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Sample records for compton scattering gamma

  1. Compton scatter attenuation gamma ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, W. E. (inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A gamma ray spectrometer is described for use in intense radiation fields such as those in the vicinity of a rocket engine exhaust. A collimated radiation beam is Compton scattered toward shielded spectrometers to reduce the energy and intensity of the radiation and is energy selective among the spectrometers. The scattering targets are changeable to control the percentage of the radiation scattered. Sum-Compton coincidence techniques are employed for data selection.

  2. Resonant Compton scattering and gamma-ray burst continuum spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, M. G.

    1995-01-01

    The Thomson limit of resonant inverse Compton scattering in the strong magnetic fields of neutron stars is considered as a mechanism for producing gamma-ray burst continuum spectra. Photon production spectra and electron cooling rates are presented using the full magnetic Thomson cross-section. Model emission spectra are obtained as self-consistent solutions of a set of photon and electron kinetic equations, displaying spectral breaks and other structure at gamma-ray energies.

  3. COMPACT, TUNABLE COMPTON SCATTERING GAMMA-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, G G; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Betts, S M; Chu, T S; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Fisher, S E; Gibson, D J; Ladran, A S; Marsh, R A; Messerly, M J; O'Neill, K L; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J; Vlieks, A E; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G; Raubenheimer, T O

    2009-08-20

    Recent progress in accelerator physics and laser technology have enabled the development of a new class of gamma-ray light sources based on Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam and a high intensity laser pulse produced via chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). A precision, tunable gamma-ray source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by the linac interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. The source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence lines in various isotopes; applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source design, key parameters, and current status are presented.

  4. Gamma-ray burst polarization via Compton scattering process

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Zhe; Lin, Hai-Nan; Jiang, Yunguo

    2014-03-01

    Synchrotron radiation and Compton scattering are widely accepted as the most likely emission mechanisms of some astrophysical phenomena, such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and active galactic nuclei. The measurement of the polarization of photons provides a useful tool to distinguish different emission mechanisms and structures of the emission region. Based on the differential cross section of a polarized photon scattered by an unpolarized electron of any initial momentum, we derive an analytical formula of polarization for beamed photons scattered by isotropic electrons with a power-law distribution. Numerical calculations are carried out in four special cases: electrons at rest, Thomson limit, head-on collision, and monochromatic electrons. It is found that the maximum polarization can be as high as 100% for low energy photons, if the electrons are at rest. Although polarization is highly suppressed due to the isotropic electrons, a maximum value of ?10%-20% can still be achieved. The Compton scattering process can be used to explain the polarization of GRB 041219A and GRB 100826A.

  5. High-Power Laser Pulse Recirculation for Inverse Compton Scattering-Produced Gamma-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Jovanovic, I; Shverdin, M; Gibson, D; Brown, C

    2007-04-17

    Inverse Compton scattering of high-power laser pulses on relativistic electron bunches represents an attractive method for high-brightness, quasi-monoenergetic {gamma}-ray production. The efficiency of {gamma}-ray generation via inverse Compton scattering is severely constrained by the small Thomson scattering cross section. Furthermore, repetition rates of high-energy short-pulse lasers are poorly matched with those available from electron accelerators, resulting in low repetition rates for generated {gamma}-rays. Laser recirculation has been proposed as a method to address those limitations, but has been limited to only small pulse energies and peak powers. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate an alternative method for laser pulse recirculation that is uniquely capable of recirculating short pulses with energies exceeding 1 J. Inverse Compton scattering of recirculated Joule-level laser pulses has a potential to produce unprecedented peak and average {gamma}-ray brightness in the next generation of sources.

  6. Quality Control of Pavements and Tarmacs Using ({sup 137}Cs){gamma} Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Pino, F.; Barros, H.; Bernal, M.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Palacios, D.; Greaves, E. D.; Viesti, G.

    2010-08-04

    The {gamma} Compton scattering over a volume of concrete has been studied in order to design an instrument for density measurements. It will be used for the quality control in road construction, where large surfaces must be monitored. The experimental results and Monte Carlo simulations of the {gamma} Compton scattering over homogeneous and inhomogeneous volumes of concrete are shown. MC simulations have been useful to optimize the values of several parameters to improve the experimental set up and to estimate the extension of the explored volume.

  7. Laser Compton Scattering Gamma-Ray Beam Source at NewSUBARU Storage Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, S.; Amano, S.; Hashimoto, S.; Sakai, N.; Koizumi, A.; Hashimoto, T.; Shizuma, T.; Utsunomiya, H.; Yamagata, T.; Akimune, H.; Shima, T.; Li, D.; Asano, Y.; Ohkuma, H.

    2015-10-01

    Laser Compton scattering gamma-ray beam source has been developed at the NewSUBARU synchrotron light facility. The available maximum Gamma-ray photon energy is 76 MeV. The flux of quasi-monochromatic gamma-ray photons (for example: 16.7 MeV, ?E/E ~ 5%) is more than 106photons/sec using a 35 W Nd:YVO4 laser combined with the 1 GeV storage electron beam with an intensity of 300 mA. We used the electron beams at Ee = 0.55 ~ 1.47 GeV for changing the energy of quasi-monochromatic gamma-ray beam. Gamma-ray beams were used for application experiments, a nuclear physics research, a nondestructive inspection of thick material, a generation of positron by pair creation, a magnetic Compton scattering measurements, and a nuclear transmutation.

  8. GAMMA RAYS FROM COMPTON SCATTERING IN THE JETS OF MICROQUASARS: APPLICATION TO LS 5039

    E-print Network

    Boettcher, Markus

    GAMMA RAYS FROM COMPTON SCATTERING IN THE JETS OF MICROQUASARS: APPLICATION TO LS 5039 Charles D in the comoving jet frame and applied to -ray observations of LS 5039. We conclude that (1) the Te and the EGRET data claimed to be associated with LS 5039 requires a very improbable leptonic model with a very

  9. GAMMA RAYS FROM COMPTON SCATTERING IN THE JETS OF MICROQUASARS: APPLICATION TO LS 5039

    E-print Network

    Boettcher, Markus

    GAMMA RAYS FROM COMPTON SCATTERING IN THE JETS OF MICROQUASARS: APPLICATION TO LS 5039 Charles D in the comoving jet frame and applied to #­ray observations of LS 5039. We conclude that (1) the Te and the EGRET data claimed to be associated with LS 5039 requires a very improbable leptonic model with a very

  10. Gamma Rays from Compton Scattering in the Jets of Microquasars: Application to LS 5039

    E-print Network

    Charles D. Dermer; Markus Boettcher

    2006-05-16

    Recent HESS observations show that microquasars in high-mass systems are sources of VHE gamma-rays. A leptonic jet model for microquasar gamma-ray emission is developed. Using the head-on approximation for the Compton cross section and taking into account angular effects from the star's orbital motion, we derive expressions to calculate the spectrum of gamma rays when nonthermal jet electrons Compton-scatter photons of the stellar radiation field. Calculations are presented for power-law distributions of nonthermal electrons that are assumed to be isotropically distributed in the comoving jet frame, and applied to $\\gamma$-ray observations of LS 5039. We conclude that (1) the TeV emission measured with HESS cannot result only from Compton-scattered stellar radiation (CSSR), but could be synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) emission or a combination of CSSR and SSC; (2) fitting both the HESS data and the EGRET data associated with LS 5039 requires a very improbable leptonic model with a very hard electron spectrum. Because the gamma rays would be variable in a leptonic jet model, the data sets are unlikely to be representative of a simultaneously measured gamma-ray spectrum. We therefore attribute EGRET gamma rays primarily to CSSR emission, and HESS gamma rays to SSC emission. Detection of periodic modulation of the TeV emission from LS 5039 would favor a leptonic SSC or cascade hadron origin of the emission in the inner jet, whereas stochastic variability alone would support a more extended leptonic model. The puzzle of the EGRET gamma rays from LS 5039 will be quickly solved with GLAST. (Abridged)

  11. Attosecond gamma-ray pulses via nonlinear Compton scattering in the radiation dominated regime

    E-print Network

    Li, Jian-Xing; Galow, Benjamin J; Keitel, Christoph H

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of a relativistic electron bunch with a counter-propagating tightly-focused laser beam is investigated for intensities when the dynamics is strongly affected by its own radiation. The Compton scattering spectra of gamma-radiation are evaluated employing a semiclassical description for the laser-driven electron dynamics and a quantum electrodynamical description for the photon emissions. We show for laser facilities under construction that gamma-ray bursts of few hundred attoseconds and dozens of megaelectronvolt photon energies may be detected in the near-backwards direction of the initial electron motion. Tight focussing of the laser beam and radiation reaction are demonstrated to be jointly responsible for such short gamma-ray bursts which are independent of both duration of electron bunch and laser pulse. Furthermore, the stochastic nature of the gamma-photon emission features signatures in the resulting gamma-ray comb in the case of the application of a multi-cycle laser pulse.

  12. Attosecond Gamma-Ray Pulses via Nonlinear Compton Scattering in the Radiation-Dominated Regime.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Xing; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z; Galow, Benjamin J; Keitel, Christoph H

    2015-11-13

    The feasibility of the generation of bright ultrashort gamma-ray pulses is demonstrated in the interaction of a relativistic electron bunch with a counterpropagating tightly focused superstrong laser beam in the radiation-dominated regime. The Compton scattering spectra of gamma radiation are investigated using a semiclassical description for the electron dynamics in the laser field and a quantum electrodynamical description for the photon emission. We demonstrate the feasibility of ultrashort gamma-ray bursts of hundreds of attoseconds and of dozens of megaelectronvolt photon energies in the near-backwards direction of the initial electron motion. The tightly focused laser field structure and the radiation reaction are shown to be responsible for such short gamma-ray bursts, which are independent of the durations of the electron bunch and of the laser pulse. The results are measurable with the laser technology available in the near future. PMID:26613446

  13. Attosecond Gamma-Ray Pulses via Nonlinear Compton Scattering in the Radiation-Dominated Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Xing; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z.; Galow, Benjamin J.; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2015-11-01

    The feasibility of the generation of bright ultrashort gamma-ray pulses is demonstrated in the interaction of a relativistic electron bunch with a counterpropagating tightly focused superstrong laser beam in the radiation-dominated regime. The Compton scattering spectra of gamma radiation are investigated using a semiclassical description for the electron dynamics in the laser field and a quantum electrodynamical description for the photon emission. We demonstrate the feasibility of ultrashort gamma-ray bursts of hundreds of attoseconds and of dozens of megaelectronvolt photon energies in the near-backwards direction of the initial electron motion. The tightly focused laser field structure and the radiation reaction are shown to be responsible for such short gamma-ray bursts, which are independent of the durations of the electron bunch and of the laser pulse. The results are measurable with the laser technology available in the near future.

  14. Contribution of inverse Compton scattering to the diffuse extragalactic gamma-ray background from annihilating dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Belikov, Alexander V.; Hooper, Dan

    2010-02-15

    In addition to gamma rays, dark matter annihilation products can include energetic electrons which inverse Compton scatter with the cosmic microwave background to produce a diffuse extragalactic background of gamma rays and x rays. In models in which the dark matter particles annihilate primarily to electrons or muons, the measurements of EGRET and COMPTEL can provide significant constraints on the annihilation cross section. The Fermi gamma-ray space telescope will likely provide an even more stringent test of such scenarios.

  15. Pulse width measurement of laser Compton scattered gamma rays in picosecond range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, Y.; Adachi, M.; Zen, H.; Yamamoto, N.; Hosaka, M.; Soda, K.; Katoh, M.

    2012-12-01

    Ultra-short gamma ray pulses of the picosecond and femtosecond ranges can be generated using laser Compton scattering with 90° collisions at the UVSOR-II electron storage ring. Measurement techniques for a gamma ray pulse width in the femtosecond range are being developed. As the first stage of pulse width measurement, we tested a pulse width measuring method for the gamma rays with pulse width of 4.8 ps (FWHM) consisted of a multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) and a digital oscilloscope. The time resolution of the MPPC was measured as 477 ps (FWHM) by using a single photon counting technique. The results indicated that the shortest pulse width that an MPPC can evaluate is 82 ps under ideal conditions. However, the experimental data were affected by a time jitter. The measured gamma ray pulse width including time jitter was 540 ps. The main reason for the large discrepancy was considered to be the noise of the trigger signal. We successfully reduced the time jitter to 77 ps after an improvement. As the next stage, we will develop a pulse width measurement technique in the femtosecond range by using a pump-probe technique with a femtosecond laser and ultra-short gamma ray pulses.

  16. Laser Compton Scattering Photon Beams and Other Gamma-Ray Sources: Project for Coherent Gamma-Ray Source on Basis of Femtosecond Laser At ILC MSU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedorezov, V. G.; Savel'Ev, A. B.

    2015-10-01

    Laser Compton back scattering photon beams and other gamma-ray sources are discussed in frame of the nuclear nonproliferation problem. New facility of ILC MSU (International Laser Center of Lomonosov Moscow State University) is described. Measured characteristics of the electron and gamma radiation in dependence on the laser parameters including the peak power, pulse duration and others are presented.

  17. Polarization of x-gamma radiation produced by a Thomson and Compton inverse scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrillo, V.; Bacci, A.; Curatolo, C.; Drebot, I.; Giribono, A.; Maroli, C.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.; Tomassini, P.; Vaccarezza, C.; Variola, A.

    2015-11-01

    A systematic study of the polarization of x-gamma rays produced in Thomson and Compton scattering is presented, in both classical and quantum schemes. Numerical results and analytical considerations let us to establish the polarization level as a function of acceptance, bandwidth and energy. Few sources have been considered: the SPARC_LAB Thomson device, as an example of a x-ray Thomson source, ELI-NP, operating in the gamma range. Then, the typical parameters of a beam produced by a plasma accelerator has been analyzed. In the first case, with bandwidths up to 10%, a contained reduction (<10 % ) in the average polarization occurs. In the last case, for the nominal ELI-NP relative bandwidth of 5 ×1 0-3 , the polarization is always close to 1. For applications requiring larger bandwidth, however, a degradation of the polarization up to 30% must be taken into account. In addition, an all optical gamma source based on a plasma accelerated electron beam cannot guarantee narrow bandwidth and high polarization operational conditions required in nuclear photonics experiments.

  18. Compton scattering and the gamma-ray power-law spectrum in Markarian 421

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Krolik, Julian H.

    1993-01-01

    The nearest BL Lac object, Mrk 421, has a gamma-ray spectrum which is approximately flat in EF-sub E from E less than about 50 MeV to E greater than about 1 TeV. Inverse Compton scattering can explain this smooth spectrum, despite the structure in the Klein-Nishina cross section, if the injected electron distribution function is proportional to gamma exp -2, where gamma is the electron Lorentz factor. When this is the case, the structure imprinted on the steady state electron distribution function by the structure in the Klein-Nishina cross section is almost exactly compensated in the radiated spectrum. Because particle acceleration in strong shocks injects particles with this distribution function, this shape injection function is in fact quite plausible. Other blazars may be explained by the same model if the cutoff below TeV energies observed in other objects is due to pair production on the cosmological IR background, as suggested by Stecker et al. (1992).

  19. Design and Operation of a tunable MeV-level Compton-scattering-based (gamma-ray) source

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, D J; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Betts, S M; Messerly, M J; Phan, H H; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Tremaine, A M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C P

    2009-07-07

    A mono-energetic gamma-ray (MEGa-ray) source based on Compton-scattering, targeting nuclear physics applications such as nuclear resonance fluorescence, has been constructed and commissioned at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In this paper, the overall architecture of the system, as well as some of the critical design decisions made in the development of the source, are discussed. The performances of the two laser systems (one for electron production, one for scattering), the electron photoinjector, and the linear accelerator are also detailed, and initial {gamma}-ray results are presented.

  20. Compton scattering overview

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V

    2008-12-01

    An overview of linear and nonlinear Compton scattering is presented, along with a comparison with Thomson scattering. Two distinct processes play important roles in the nonlinear regime: multi-photon interactions, leading to the generation of harmonics, and radiation pressure, yielding a downshift of the radiated spectral features. These mechanisms, their influence on the source brightness, and different modeling strategies are also briefly discussed.

  1. Virtual Compton scattering measurements in the {gamma}*N{yields}{delta} transition

    SciTech Connect

    Sparveris, N. F.; Christopoulou, A.; Karabarbounis, A.; Papanicolas, C. N.; Stiliaris, S.; Achenbach, P.; Gayoso, C. Ayerbe; Baumann, D.; Bernauer, J.; Boehm, R.; Ding, M.; Distler, M. O.; Doria, L.; Friedrich, J.; Merkel, H.; Mueller, U.; Neuhausen, R.; Nungesser, L.; Piegsa, A.; Pochodzalla, J.

    2008-07-15

    We report on new H(e,e{sup '}p){gamma} measurements in the {delta}(1232) resonance at Q{sup 2}=0.06 (GeV/c){sup 2} carried out simultaneously with H(e,e{sup '}p){pi}{sup 0}. It is the lowest Q{sup 2} for which the virtual Compton scattering (VCS) reaction has been studied in the first resonance region. The VCS measured cross sections are well described by dispersion-relation calculations in which the multipole amplitudes derived from H(e,e{sup '}p){pi}{sup 0} data are used as input, thus confirming the compatibility of the results. The derived resonant magnetic dipole amplitude M{sub 1+}{sup 3/2}=(40.60{+-}0.70{sub stat+sys})(10{sup -3}/m{sub {pi}{sup +}}) at W=1232 MeV is in excellent agreement with the value extracted from H(e,e{sup '}p){pi}{sup 0} measurements.

  2. General introduction to Compton scattering

    E-print Network

    D. Drechsel

    1996-07-12

    Real and virtual Compton scattering has been and will be an important tool to study the structure of hadronic systems. We summarize the status of real Compton scattering and give an outlook at the new theoretical and experimental developments in the field of virtual Compton scattering.

  3. Spectral evolution of active galactic nuclei Penrose Compton scattering processes and gamma ray emission from Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiter, Darryl; Boldt, Elihu

    1990-01-01

    In black hole spectral evolution models for active galactic nuclei (AGN), present epoch Seyfert galaxies evolve from an earlier precursor active galaxy (PAG) stage at redshift z is approximately 7 where they acted as the thermal sources responsible for the residual cosmic x ray background (RCXB). The Seyfert galaxies which emerge in this context emit Penrose Compton Scattering (PCS) gamma ray transients on the order of hours with a kinematic cutoff in the spectrum less than or equal to 3 MeV. The EGRET (Energetic Gamma-Ray Experimental Telescope/ OSSE (Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment/ COMPTEL (Compton Telescope)/ BATSE (Burst and Transient Source Experiment) instruments on the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) are appropriate instruments to carry out further tests of this model by studying: PCS gamma ray transient emission from individual galaxies and, the possibility that present epoch PCS gamma ray emitting Seyfert galaxies contribute observable temporal variability to the excess diffuse gamma ray background component less than or equal to 3 MeV.

  4. Effective atomic numbers of blue topaz at different gamma-rays energies obtained from Compton scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuschareon, S.; Limkitjaroenporn, P.; Kaewkhao, J.

    2014-03-01

    Topaz occurs in a wide range of colors, including yellow, orange, brown, pink-to-violet and blue. All of these color differences are due to color centers. In order to improve the color of natural colorless topaz, the most commonly used is irradiated with x- or gamma-rays, indicated that attenuation parameters is important to enhancements by irradiation. In this work, the mass attenuation coefficients of blue topaz were measured at the different energy of ?-rays using the Compton scattering technique. The results show that, the experimental values of mass attenuation coefficient are in good agreement with the theoretical values. The mass attenuation coefficients increase with the decrease in gamma rays energies. This may be attributed to the higher photon interaction probability of blue topaz at lower energy. This result is a first report of mass attenuation coefficient of blue topaz at different gamma rays energies.

  5. Effective atomic numbers of blue topaz at different gamma-rays energies obtained from Compton scattering technique

    SciTech Connect

    Tuschareon, S. Limkitjaroenporn, P. Kaewkhao, J.

    2014-03-24

    Topaz occurs in a wide range of colors, including yellow, orange, brown, pink-to-violet and blue. All of these color differences are due to color centers. In order to improve the color of natural colorless topaz, the most commonly used is irradiated with x- or gamma-rays, indicated that attenuation parameters is important to enhancements by irradiation. In this work, the mass attenuation coefficients of blue topaz were measured at the different energy of ?-rays using the Compton scattering technique. The results show that, the experimental values of mass attenuation coefficient are in good agreement with the theoretical values. The mass attenuation coefficients increase with the decrease in gamma rays energies. This may be attributed to the higher photon interaction probability of blue topaz at lower energy. This result is a first report of mass attenuation coefficient of blue topaz at different gamma rays energies.

  6. Photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using ultrashort laser-Compton-scattered gamma-ray pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, Y.; Toyokawa, H.; Kuroda, R.; Yamamoto, N.; Adachi, M.; Tanaka, S.; Katoh, M.

    2013-05-01

    High-energy ultrashort gamma-ray pulses can be generated via laser Compton scattering with 90° collisions at the UVSOR-II electron storage ring. As an applied study of ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, a new photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy approach has been developed. Ultrashort gamma-ray pulses with a maximum energy of 6.6 MeV and pulse width of 2.2 ps created positrons throughout bulk lead via pair production. Annihilation gamma rays were detected by a BaF2 scintillator mounted on a photomultiplier tube. A positron lifetime spectrum was obtained by measuring the time difference between the RF frequency of the electron storage ring and the detection time of the annihilation gamma rays. We calculated the response of the BaF2 scintillator and the time jitter caused by the variation in the total path length of the ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, annihilation gamma rays, and scintillation light using a Monte Carlo simulation code. The positron lifetime for bulk lead was successfully measured.

  7. Photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using ultrashort laser-Compton-scattered gamma-ray pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Y.; Toyokawa, H.; Kuroda, R.; Yamamoto, N.; Adachi, M.; Tanaka, S.; Katoh, M.

    2013-05-15

    High-energy ultrashort gamma-ray pulses can be generated via laser Compton scattering with 90 Degree-Sign collisions at the UVSOR-II electron storage ring. As an applied study of ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, a new photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy approach has been developed. Ultrashort gamma-ray pulses with a maximum energy of 6.6 MeV and pulse width of 2.2 ps created positrons throughout bulk lead via pair production. Annihilation gamma rays were detected by a BaF{sub 2} scintillator mounted on a photomultiplier tube. A positron lifetime spectrum was obtained by measuring the time difference between the RF frequency of the electron storage ring and the detection time of the annihilation gamma rays. We calculated the response of the BaF{sub 2} scintillator and the time jitter caused by the variation in the total path length of the ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, annihilation gamma rays, and scintillation light using a Monte Carlo simulation code. The positron lifetime for bulk lead was successfully measured.

  8. Electron Linac design to drive bright Compton back-scattering gamma-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bacci, A.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.; Alesini, D.; Bellaveglia, M.; Boni, R.; Chiadroni, E.; Di Pirro, G.; Esposito, A.; Ferrario, M.; Gallo, A.; Gatti, G.; Ghigo, A.; Spataro, B.; Vaccarezza, C.; Antici, P.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Cianchi, A.; and others

    2013-05-21

    The technological development in the field of high brightness linear accelerators and high energy/high quality lasers enables today designing high brilliance Compton-X and Gamma-photon beams suitable for a wide range of applications in the innovative field of nuclear photonics. The challenging requirements of this kind of source comprise: tunable energy (1-20 MeV), very narrow bandwidth (0.3%), and high spectral density (10{sup 4} photons/s/eV). We present here a study focused on the design and the optimization of an electron Linac aimed to meet the source specifications of the European Extreme Light Infrastructure-Nuclear Physics project, currently funded and seeking for an innovative machine design in order to outperform state-of-the-art facilities. We show that the phase space density of the electron beam, at the collision point against the laser pulse, is the main quality factor characterizing the Linac.

  9. Weak Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ales Psaker; Wolodymyr Melnitchouk; Anatoly Radyushkin

    2007-03-01

    We extend the analysis of the deeply virtual Compton scattering process to the weak interaction sector in the generalized Bjorken limit. The virtual Compton scattering amplitudes for the weak neutral and charged currents are calculated at the leading twist within the framework of the nonlocal light-cone expansion via coordinate space QCD string operators. Using a simple model, we estimate cross sections for neutrino scattering off the nucleon, relevant for future high intensity neutrino beam facilities.

  10. THE ROLE OF INVERSE COMPTON SCATTERING IN SOLAR CORONAL HARD X-RAY AND {gamma}-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Bin; Bastian, T. S.

    2012-05-01

    Coronal hard X-ray (HXR) and continuum {gamma}-ray sources associated with the impulsive phase of solar flares have been the subject of renewed interest in recent years. They have been interpreted in terms of thin-target, non-thermal bremsstrahlung emission. This interpretation has led to rather extreme physical requirements in some cases. For example, in one case, essentially all of the electrons in the source must be accelerated to non-thermal energies to account for the coronal HXR source. In other cases, the extremely hard photon spectra of the coronal continuum {gamma}-ray emission suggest that the low-energy cutoff of the electron energy distribution lies in the MeV energy range. Here, we consider the role of inverse Compton scattering (ICS) as an alternate emission mechanism in both the ultra- and mildly relativistic regimes. It is known that relativistic electrons are produced during powerful flares; these are capable of upscattering soft photospheric photons to HXR and {gamma}-ray energies. Previously overlooked is the fact that mildly relativistic electrons, generally produced in much greater numbers in flares of all sizes, can upscatter extreme-ultraviolet/soft X-ray photons to HXR energies. We also explore ICS on anisotropic electron distributions and show that the resulting emission can be significantly enhanced over an isotropic electron distribution for favorable viewing geometries. We briefly review results from bremsstrahlung emission and reconsider circumstances under which non-thermal bremsstrahlung or ICS would be favored. Finally, we consider a selection of coronal HXR and {gamma}-ray events and find that in some cases the ICS is a viable alternative emission mechanism.

  11. Compton Gamma Ray Observatory/BATSE observations of energetic electrons scattered by cyclotron resonance with waves from powerful VLF transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datlowe, Dayton W.; Imhof, William L.

    1994-01-01

    To obtain a better understanding of the wave-particle mechanisms responsible for the loss of electrons from the radiation belts, energetic electron data from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the NASA's Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) was studied. Powerful ground-based VLF transmitters resonantly scatter electrons from the inner radiation belt onto trajectories from which they precipitate into the atmosphere as they drift eastward. 563 instances in which the satellite traversed a cloud of energetic electrons which had been scattered into quasi-trapped trajectories were identified. From the longitude distribution, it was concluded that waves from the VLF transmitter NWC at 114 deg E are the origin of 257 of the events, and waves from UMSat 44 deg E related to 45 more. In another 177 cases the electrons had drifted from the longitude of these transmitters to a location in the western hemisphere. The previously reported seasonal variation in the frequency of occurrence of cyclotron resonance interaction is confirmed with the continuous coverage provided by GRO. The frequency of occurrence of the cyclotron resonance interactions is largest before sunrise, which we attribute to the diurnal variations in the transmission VLF waves through the ionosphere. For the first time, unique very narrow sheets of electrons occurring in the aftermath of a large geomagnetic storm are reported.

  12. Timelike Compton Scattering at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Paremuzyan, Rafayel G.

    2014-01-01

    It is demonstrated, that with exclusive final state, data from electron scattering experiments that are recorded with loose trigger requirements can be used to analyze photoproduction reactions. A preliminary results on Timelike Compton Scattering using the electroproduction data from the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab are presented. In particular, using final state (pe{sup -}e{sup +}) photoproduction of vector mesons and timelike photon is studied. Angular asymmetries in Timelike Compton Scattering region is compared with model predictions in the framework of Generalized Parton Distribution.

  13. The Penrose photoproduction scenario for NGC 4151: A black hole gamma-ray emission mechanism for active galactic nuclei and Seyfert galaxies. [Compton scattering and pair production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiter, D.

    1979-01-01

    A consistent theoretical interpretation is given for the suggestion that a steepening of the spectrum between X-ray and gamma ray energies may be a general, gamma-ray characteristic of Seyfert galaxies, if the diffuse gamma ray spectrum is considered to be a superposition of unresolved contributions, from one or more classes of extragalactic objects. In the case of NGC 4151, the dominant process is shown to be Penrose Compton scattering in the ergosphere of a Kerr black hole, assumed to exist in the Seyfert's active galactic nucleus.

  14. Half-life of {sup 184}Re populated by the ({gamma},n) reaction from laser Compton scattering {gamma} rays at the electron storage ring NewSUBARU

    SciTech Connect

    Hayakawa, T.; Miyamoto, S.; Horikawa, K.; Mochizuki, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Kando, M.; Kawase, K.; Nakanishi, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Ohta, T.; Chiba, S.; Kajino, T.; Fujiwara, M.

    2006-12-15

    We report a half-life of the ground state of {sup 184}Re populated by the {sup 185}Re({gamma},n){sup 184}Re reaction from laser Compton scattering {gamma} rays generated through relativistic engineering. The {gamma} rays are provided at the electron storage ring NewSUBARU. The previous experiment using deuteron-induced reactions has yielded a recommended half-life of the 3{sup -} ground state of {sup 184}Re of 38.0{+-}0.5 d, including a possible contribution from the 8{sup +} isomer (T{sub 1/2}=169{+-}8 d) of {sup 184}Re since the presence of the isomer was not known at that time. In contrast, the ({gamma},n) reaction has an advantage to selectively populate the ground state because this reaction does not bring large angular momentum. The measured half-life of 35.4{+-}0.7 d is shorter than the previous half-life by about 7%. This difference is crucial for applications using the activation method.

  15. Can the cosmic x ray and gamma ray background be due to reflection of a steep power law spectrum and Compton scattering by relativistic electrons?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zycki, Piotr T.; Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Svensson, Roland

    1991-01-01

    We reconsider the recent model for the origin in the cosmic X-ray and gamma-ray background by Rogers and Field. The background in the model is due to an unresolved population of AGNs. An individual AGN spectrum contains three components: a power law with the energy index of alpha = 1.1, an enhanced reflection component, and a component from Compton scattering by relativistic electrons with a low energy cutoff at some minimum Lorentz factor, gamma(sub min) much greater than 1. The MeV bump seen in the gamma-ray background is then explained by inverse Compton emission by the electrons. We show that the model does not reproduce the shape of the observed X-ray and gamma-ray background below 10 MeV and that it overproduces the background at larger energies. Furthermore, we find the assumptions made for the Compton component to be physically inconsistent. Relaxing the inconsistent assumptions leads to model spectra even more different from that of the observed cosmic background. Thus, we can reject the hypothesis that the high-energy cosmic background is due to the described model.

  16. Radiative corrections to pion Compton scattering

    E-print Network

    N. Kaiser; J. M. Friedrich

    2008-08-07

    We calculate the one-photon loop radiative corrections to charged pion Compton scattering, $\\pi^- \\gamma \\to \\pi^- \\gamma $. Ultraviolet and infrared divergencies are both treated in dimensional regularization. Analytical expressions for the ${\\cal O}(\\alpha)$ corrections to the invariant Compton scattering amplitudes, $A(s,u)$ and $B(s,u)$, are presented for 11 classes of contributing one-loop diagrams. Infrared finiteness of the virtual radiative corrections is achieved (in the standard way) by including soft photon radiation below an energy threshold $\\lambda$, and its relation to the experimental detection threshold is discussed. We find that the radiative corrections are maximal in backward directions, reaching e.g. -2.4% for a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=4m_\\pi$ and $\\lambda=5 $MeV. Furthermore, we extend our calculation of the radiative corrections by including the leading pion structure effect (at low energies) in form of its electric and magnetic polarizability difference, $\\alpha_\\pi - \\beta_\\pi \\simeq 6\\cdot 10^{-4} $fm$^3$. We find that this structure effect does not change the relative size and angular dependence of the radiative corrections to pion Compton scattering. Our results are particularly relevant for analyzing the COMPASS experiment at CERN which aims at measuring the pion electric and magnetic polarizabilities with high statistics using the Primakoff effect.

  17. Design of a 2 MeV Compton scattering gamma-ray source for DNDO missions

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F

    2009-08-24

    Nuclear resonance fluorescence-based isotope-specific detection and imaging is a powerful new technology that can enable access to new mission spaces for DNDO. Within this context, the development of advanced mono-energetic gamma ray sources plays an important role in the DNDO R&D portfolio, as it offers a faster, more precise, and safer alternative to conventional Bremsstrahlung sources. In this report, a specific design strategy is presented, along with a series of theoretical and computational tools, with the goal of optimizing source parameters for DNDO applications. In parallel, key technologies are outlined, along with discussions justifying specific choices and contrasting those with other alternatives. Finally, a complete conceptual design is described, and machine parameters are presented in detail.

  18. Compton scattering in terrestrial gamma-ray flashes detected with the Fermi gamma-ray burst monitor

    E-print Network

    Fitzpatrick, Gerard; McBreen, Sheila; Briggs, Michael S; Foley, Suzanne; Tierney, David; Chaplin, Vandiver L; Connaughton, Valerie; Stanbro, Matthew; Xiong, Shaolin; Dwyer, Joseph; Fishman, Gerald J; Roberts, Oliver J; von Kienlin, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are short intense flashes of gamma rays associated with lightning activity in thunderstorms. Using Monte Carlo simulations of the relativistic runaway electron avalanche (RREA) process, theoretical predictions for the temporal and spectral evolution of TGFs are compared to observations made with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Assuming a single source altitude of 15 km, a comparison of simulations to data is performed for a range of empirically chosen source electron variation time scales. The data exhibit a clear softening with increased source distance, in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions. The simulated spectra follow this trend in the data, but tend to underestimate the observed hardness. Such a discrepancy may imply that the basic RREA model is not sufficient. Alternatively, a TGF beam that is tilted with respect to the zenith could produce an evolution with source distance that is compatible with the da...

  19. DESIGN OF A 250 MeV, X-BAND PHOTOINJECTOR LINAC FOR A PRECISION COMPTON-SCATTERING BASED GAMMA-RAY SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S G; Albert, F; Gibson, D J; McNabb, D; Messerly, M; Rusnak, B; Shverdin, M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C J; Tantawi, S; Vlieks, A

    2009-05-07

    We present a compact, X-band, high-brightness accelerator design suitable for driving a precision gamma-ray source. Future applications of gamma-rays generated by Compton-scattering of laser and relativistic electron beams place stringent demands on the brightness and stability of the incident electron beam. This design identifies the beam parameters required for gamma-ray production, including position, and pointing stability. The design uses an emittance compensated, 11.4 GHz photo-gun and linac to generate 400 pC, 1-2 mm-mrad electron bunches at up to 250 MeV and 120 Hz repetition rate. The effects of jitter in the RF power system are analyzed as well as structure and optic misalignments. Finally, strategies for the mitigation of on-axis Bremsstrahlung noise are discussed.

  20. Elastic Compton Scattering from Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capone, John; Feldman, Gerald

    2009-10-01

    A Compton scattering experiment was conducted at MAX-Lab in Lund, Sweden, in which tagged photons of energy E? = 81.5 -- 115.7 MeV were incident on a carbon target. Photons were produced via bremsstrahlung by an electron beam's interaction with an aluminum radiator. The electrons were then deflected by a magnetic field into plastic scintillator paddles along the focal plane, allowing the energies of the corresponding photons to be tagged. Photons scattered from the carbon target were then detected by three large-volume (50 cm x 50 cm) NaI scintillator detectors located at 60 , 120 and 150 from the photon beam axis. The elastic Compton scattering peak was identified by setting a time window on ``true'' coincidences between the NaI detectors and the tagger focal plane array. The data required a background subtraction to remove unwanted contributions to the energy spectra from ``random'' events such as cosmic rays and untagged photons. After this subtraction, the residual background was fit in order to determine the integral of the elastic scattering peak. With this experimental yield, normalization factors such as the target thickness, photon flux and NaI detector solid angles were applied to determine the absolute cross section. The results for the differential cross section will be presented as a function of angle and energy and will be compared to published values from the literature.

  1. INVERSE COMPTON SCATTERING MODEL FOR X-RAY EMISSION OF THE GAMMA-RAY BINARY LS 5039

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, M. S.; Takahara, F.

    2012-12-20

    We propose a model for the gamma-ray binary LS 5039 in which the X-ray emission is due to the inverse Compton (IC) process instead of the synchrotron radiation. Although the synchrotron model has been discussed in previous studies, it requires a strong magnetic field which leads to a severe suppression of the TeV gamma-ray flux in conflict with H.E.S.S. observations. In this paper, we calculate the IC emission by low energy electrons ({gamma}{sub e} {approx}< 10{sup 3}) in the Thomson regime. We find that IC emission of the low energy electrons can explain the X-ray flux and spectrum observed with Suzaku if the minimum Lorentz factor of injected electrons {gamma}{sub min} is around 10{sup 3}. In addition, we show that the Suzaku light curve is well reproduced if {gamma}{sub min} varies in proportion to the Fermi flux when the distribution function of injected electrons at higher energies is fixed. We conclude that the emission from LS 5039 is well explained by the model with the IC emission from electrons whose injection properties are dependent on the orbital phase. Since the X-ray flux is primarily determined by the total number of cooling electrons, this conclusion is rather robust, although some mismatches between the model and observations at the GeV band remain in the present formulation.

  2. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering off the neutron

    SciTech Connect

    M. Mazouz; A. Camsonne; C. Munoz Camacho; C. Ferdi; G. Gavalian; E. Kuchina; M. Amarian; K. A. Aniol; M. Beaumel; H. Benaoum; P. Bertin; M. Brossard; J.-P. Chen; E. Chudakov; B. Craver; F. Cusanno; C.W. de Jager; A. Deur; R. Feuerbach; J.-M. Fieschi; S. Frullani; M. Garcon; F. Garibaldi; O. Gayou; R. Gilman; J. Gomez; P. Gueye; P.A.M. Guichon; B. Guillon; O. Hansen; D. Hayes; D. Higinbotham; T. Holmstrom; C.E. Hyde; H. Ibrahim; R. Igarashi; X. Jiang; H.S. Jo; L.J. Kaufman; A. Kelleher; A. Kolarkar; G. Kumbartzki; G. Laveissiere; J.J. LeRose; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; H.-J. Lu; D.J. Margaziotis; Z.-E. Meziani; K. McCormick; R. Michaels; B. Michel; B. Moffit; P. Monaghan; S. Nanda; V. Nelyubin; M. Potokar; Y. Qiang; R.D. Ransome; J.-S. Real; B. Reitz; Y. Roblin; J. Roche; F. Sabatie; A. Saha; S. Sirca; K. Slifer; P. Solvignon; R. Subedi; V. Sulkosky; P.E. Ulmer; E. Voutier; K. Wang; L.B. Weinstein; B. Wojtsekhowski; X. Zheng; L. Zhu

    2007-12-01

    The present experiment exploits the interference between the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) and the Bethe-Heitler processes to extract the imaginary part of DVCS amplitudes on the neutron and on the deuteron from the helicity-dependent D$({\\vec e},e'\\gamma)X$ cross section measured at $Q^2$=1.9 GeV$^2$ and $x_B$=0.36. We extract a linear combination of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) particularly sensitive to $E_q$, the least constrained GPD. A model dependent constraint on the contribution of the up and down quarks to the nucleon spin is deduced.

  3. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering off the Neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Mazouz, M.; Guillon, B.; Real, J.-S.; Voutier, E.

    2007-12-14

    The present experiment exploits the interference between the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) and the Bethe-Heitler processes to extract the imaginary part of DVCS amplitudes on the neutron and on the deuteron from the helicity-dependent D(e-vector,e{sup '}{gamma})X cross section measured at Q{sup 2}=1.9 GeV{sup 2} and x{sub B}=0.36. We extract a linear combination of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) particularly sensitive to E{sub q}, the least constrained GPD. A model dependent constraint on the contribution of the up and down quarks to the nucleon spin is deduced.

  4. Determination of Rest Mass Energy of the Electron by a Compton Scattering Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasannakumar, S.; Krishnaveni, S.; Umesh, T. K.

    2012-01-01

    We report here a simple Compton scattering experiment which may be carried out in graduate and undergraduate laboratories to determine the rest mass energy of the electron. In the present experiment, we have measured the energies of the Compton scattered gamma rays with a NaI(Tl) gamma ray spectrometer coupled to a 1 K multichannel analyzer at…

  5. Multiple scattering Compton camera with neutron activation for material inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taewoong; Lee, Wonho

    2015-06-01

    We designed a multiple scattering Compton camera (MSCC) based on a lanthanum bromide (LaBr3:Ce) scintillator to detect neutron-activated prompt gamma-rays for material inspection. The system parameters such as detector thickness and inter-detector distances were optimized on the basis of figure of merit (FOM). The FOM was maximized when the inter-detector distance and detector thickness were 18 cm and 1.5 cm, respectively. Under the optimized conditions, energy spectra and spatial images were obtained to identify various substances, and the results matched well with theoretical data. The probability of multiple Compton scattering was higher than that of conventional Compton scattering at high energies (~MeV), which proved the effectiveness of MSCC to detect prompt gamma-rays. Simulations with realistic conditions showed the feasibility of using the MSCC investigate of materials in field applications.

  6. Deeply virtual Compton scattering at Jefferson Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Angela Biselli

    2015-10-15

    The generalized parton distributions (GPDs) have emerged as a universal tool to describe hadrons in terms of their elementary constituents, the quarks and the gluons. Deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) on a proton or neutron ($N$), $e N \\rightarrow e' N' \\gamma$, is the process more directly interpretable in terms of GPDs. The amplitudes of DVCS and Bethe-Heitler, the process where a photon is emitted by either the incident or scattered electron, can be accessed via cross-section measurements or exploiting their interference which gives rise to spin asymmetries. Spin asymmetries, cross sections and cross-section differences can be connected to different combinations of the four leading-twist GPDs (${H}$, ${E}$, ${\\tilde{H}}$, ${\\tilde{E}}$) for each quark flavors, depending on the observable and on the type of target. This paper gives an overview of recent experimental results obtained for DVCS at Jefferson Laboratory in the halls A and B. Several experiments have been done extracting DVCS observables over large kinematics regions. Multiple measurements with overlapping kinematic regions allow to perform a quasi-model independent extraction of the Compton form factors, which are GPDs integrals, revealing a 3D image of the nucleon.

  7. Half-life of the {sup 164}Ho by the ({gamma},n) reaction from laser Compton scattering {gamma} rays at the electron storage ring NewSUBARU

    SciTech Connect

    Hayakawa, T.; Shizuma, T.; Mori, M.; Kawase, K.; Kando, M.; Kikuzawa, N.; Miyamoto, S.; Amano, S.; Horikawa, K.; Ishihara, K.; Mochizuki, T.; Chiba, S.; Kajino, T.; Fujiwara, M.

    2008-06-15

    The half-life of an isomer in {sup 164}Ho was measured by using photodisintegration reactions. The photons were generated by Compton scattering of laser photons and relativistic electrons at the electron storage ring NewSUBARU in the super photon ring 8-GeV (SPring-8) facility. The half-life is 36.4{+-}0.3 min. This value is about 3% shorter than the previous value 37.5{sub -0.5}{sup +1.5} min reported in 1966.

  8. Magnetic Compton Scattering in Pulsar Magnetospheres.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturner, Steven John

    In the large magnetic fields associated with highly magnetized neutron stars, the Compton cross section exhibits a resonance at the local cyclotron energy. In this work I describe applications of magnetic Compton scattering to models of both rotation powered and accretion powered pulsars. Radio pulsars are generally considered to be rapidly rotating, highly magnetized neutron stars. The rapid rotation coupled with the large magnetic field induces large electric fields that can accelerate electrons in the neutron star magnetosphere to large energies. I have produced a Monte Carlo code to model gamma -ray emission from rotation powered pulsars utilizing pair cascades initiated by Comptonized photons. Previous polar cap gamma-ray emission models have relied on pair cascades initiated by curvature radiation photons. This Monte Carlo model can reproduce the double peak pulse profiles often observed from rotation powered pulsars and explain the trend for harder spectra from slower pulsars. X-ray Pulsars are thought to be highly magnetized neutron stars accreting matter from an ordinary stellar companion. The accreting matter is channeled onto the neutron star polar cap by the magnetic field. This material produces a hot spot on the neutron star surface that emits X-rays. I have investigated the effects of radiation pressure due to these X-rays on the accreting material. The radiation pressure is greatly enhanced by the resonance in the magnetic Compton cross section. Because the electron cyclotron energy varies with distance from the neutron star, the energy dependent X-ray spectrum maps to a spatially varying radiation force. This force can exceed the force of gravity over a limited region of the X-ray pulsar magnetosphere. I postulate that when this occurs matter can be elevated above the neutron star surface outside the accretion column. This material will act as an energy dependent "lamp shade" that will produce pulse profiles that vary with photon energy. This model is capable of reproducing the energy dependent pulse profiles observed from the X-ray pulsars 4U 1626-67, 4U 1538-52, 4U 1907+09, and Vela X-1.

  9. The electromagnetic calorimeter in JLab Real Compton Scattering Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Shahinyan; Eugene Chudakov; A. Danagoulian; P. Degtyarenko; K. Egiyan; V. Gorbenko; J. Hines; E. Hovhannisyan; Ch. Hyde; C.W. de Jager; A. Ketikyan; V. Mamyan; R. Michaels; A.M. Nathan; V. Nelyubin; I. Rachek; M. Roedelbrom; A. Petrosyan; R. Pomatsalyuk; V. Popov; J. Segal; Yu. Shestakov; J. Templon; H. Voskanyan; B. Wojtsekhowski

    2007-04-16

    A hodoscope calorimeter comprising of 704 lead-glass blocks is described. The calorimeter was constructed for use in the JLab Real Compton Scattering experiment. The detector provides a measurement of the coordinates and the energy of scattered photons in the GeV energy range with resolutions of 5 mm and 6\\%/$\\sqrt{E_\\gamma \\, [GeV]}$, respectively. Design features and performance parameters during the experiment are presented.

  10. The nonlinear effect in relativistic Compton scattering for an intense circularly polarized laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, W.; Zhuo, H. B.; Ma, Y. Y.; Zhu, Z. C.; Fan, G. T.; Xu, W.; Song, Y. M.

    2014-07-01

    Compton scattering between an intense laser pulse and a relativistic electron beam offers a promising development path toward high-energy, high-brightness x- and gamma-ray sources. Increasing laser peak power to obtain intense x- and gamma rays causes nonlinear Compton scattering to occur. To predict high-order harmonic radiation properties, we upgrade a Monte Carlo laser-Compton scattering simulation code (MCLCSS) by taking into account the nonlinear effect for the relativistic Compton scattering process. The energy spectra and angular and harmonic intensity distributions of the scattered photons are investigated using nonlinear Compton scattering of an intense circularly polarized laser. It is found that the laser parameter {{a}_{0}}\\equiv e{\\rm{A}}\\;{{m}_{e}}{{c}^{-2}} plays an important role in the generation of high-order harmonic radiation. Our study also suggests that the high-energy tails of the second and higher harmonics will stray from the backscattering region.

  11. Monitoring the distribution of prompt gamma rays in boron neutron capture therapy using a multiple-scattering Compton camera: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taewoong; Lee, Hyounggun; Lee, Wonho

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluated the use of Compton imaging technology to monitor prompt gamma rays emitted by 10B in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) applied to a computerized human phantom. The Monte Carlo method, including particle-tracking techniques, was used for simulation. The distribution of prompt gamma rays emitted by the phantom during irradiation with neutron beams is closely associated with the distribution of the boron in the phantom. Maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) method was applied to the information obtained from the detected prompt gamma rays to reconstruct the distribution of the tumor including the boron uptake regions (BURs). The reconstructed Compton images of the prompt gamma rays were combined with the cross-sectional images of the human phantom. Quantitative analysis of the intensity curves showed that all combined images matched the predetermined conditions of the simulation. The tumors including the BURs were distinguishable if they were more than 2 cm apart.

  12. CLIC Polarized Positron Source Based on Laser Compton Scattering

    E-print Network

    Zimmermann, Frank; Artru, X; Braun, H; Bulyak, E; Chehab, R; Chevallier, M; Fukuda, M; Gao, J; Gladkikh, P; Guiducci, S; Higashi, Y; Hirano, K; Hirose, T; Honda, Y; Korostelev, M S; Kurihara, Y; Kuriki, M; Mönig, K; Okugi, T; Omori, T; Raimondi, P; Rinolfi, Louis; Sato, H; Sakaue, K; Schulte, Daniel; Soskov, V; Strakhovenko, V M; Takano, M; Takahashi, T; Taniguchi, T; Terunuma, N; Tsunemi, A; Urakawa, J; Variola, A; Washio, M; Zomer, F; CERN. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    We describe a possible layout and parameters of a polarized positron source for CLIC, where the positrons are produced from polarized gamma rays created by Compton scattering of a 1.3-GeV electron beam off a YAG laser. This scheme is very energy effective using high finesse laser cavities in conjunction with an electron storage ring. We point out the differences with respect to a similar system proposed for the ILC.

  13. Signatures of High-Intensity Compton Scattering

    E-print Network

    Harvey, Chris; Ilderton, Anton

    2009-01-01

    We review known and discuss new signatures of high-intensity Compton scattering assuming a scenario where a high-power laser is brought into collision with an electron beam. At high intensities one expects to see a substantial red-shift of the usual kinematic Compton edge of the photon spectrum caused by the large, intensity dependent, effective mass of the electrons within the laser beam. Emission rates acquire their global maximum at this edge while neighbouring smaller peaks signal higher harmonics. In addition, we find that the notion of the centre-of-mass frame for a given harmonic becomes intensity dependent. Tuning the intensity then effectively amounts to changing the frame of reference, going continuously from inverse to ordinary Compton scattering with the centre-of-mass kinematics defining the transition point between the two.

  14. Production of gamma rays by pulsed laser beam Compton scattering off GeV-electrons using a non-planar four-mirror optical cavity

    E-print Network

    Akagi, T; Bonis, J; Chaikovska, I; Chiche, R; Cizeron, R; Cohen, M; Cormier, E; Cornebise, P; Delerue, N; Flaminio, R; Funahashi, S; Jehanno, D; Honda, Y; Labaye, F; Lacroix, M; Marie, R; Miyoshi, S; Nagata, S; Omori, T; Peinaud, Y; Pinard, L; Shimizu, H; Soskov, V; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, R; Terunuma, T; Urakawa, J; Variola, A; Zomer, F

    2011-01-01

    As part of the positron source R&D for future $e^+-e^-$ colliders and Compton based compact light sources, a high finesse non-planar four-mirror Fabry-Perot cavity has recently been installed at the ATF (KEK, Tsukuba, Japan). The first measurements of the gamma ray flux produced with a such cavity using a pulsed laser is presented here. We demonstrate the production of a flux of 2.7 $\\pm$ 0.2 gamma rays per bunch crossing ($\\sim3\\times10^6$ gammas per second) during the commissioning.

  15. Novel approach to stationary transmission scanning using Compton scattered radiation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, M K; Truong, T T; Delarbre, J L; Roux, Ch; Zaidi, H

    2007-08-01

    Transmission scanning-based estimation of the attenuation map plays a crucial role in quantitative radionuclide imaging. X-ray computed tomography (CT) reconstructs directly the attenuation coefficients map from data transmitted through the object. This paper proposes an alternative route for reconstructing the object attenuation map by exploiting Compton scatter of transmitted radiation from an externally placed radionuclide source. In contrast to conventional procedures, data acquisition is realized as a series of images parameterized by the Compton scattering angle and registered on a stationary gamma camera operating without spatial displacement. Numerical simulation results using realistic voxel-based phantoms are presented to illustrate the efficiency of this new transmission scanning approach for attenuation map reconstruction. The encouraging results presented in this paper may suggest the possibility of proposing a new concept for emission/transmission imaging using scattered radiation, which has many advantages compared to conventional technologies. PMID:17634654

  16. Virtual Compton scattering off nuclei in the $?$-resonance region

    E-print Network

    B. Pasquini; S. Boffi

    1996-05-03

    Virtual Compton scattering in the $\\Delta$-resonance region is considered in the case of a target nucleus. The discussion involves generalized polarizabilities and is developed for zero-spin nuclei, focusing on the new information coming from virtual Compton scattering in comparison with real Compton scattering.

  17. Experimental confirmation of neoclassical Compton scattering theory

    SciTech Connect

    Aristov, V. V.; Yakunin, S. N.; Despotuli, A. A.

    2013-12-15

    Incoherent X-ray scattering spectra of diamond and silicon crystals recorded on the BESSY-2 electron storage ring have been analyzed. All spectral features are described well in terms of the neoclassical scattering theory without consideration for the hypotheses accepted in quantum electrodynamics. It is noted that the accepted tabular data on the intensity ratio between the Compton and Rayleigh spectral components may significantly differ from the experimental values. It is concluded that the development of the general theory (considering coherent scattering, incoherent scattering, and Bragg diffraction) must be continued.

  18. A note on Compton scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbosa, D. D.

    1982-01-01

    Calculations are presented on the energy exchange between free electrons and electromagnetic radiation. The full Klein-Nishina cross section is used in evaluating average scattering coefficients for an electron moving with arbitrary velocity. A number of useful series expansions for the mean energy and mean square energy transfer rates are presented. A Fokker-Planck equation that includes induced scattering is used in deriving a generalized diffusion equation in frequency for multiple scattering of photons of nonrelativistic electrons. The relationship of the Klein-Nishina cross section to that of classical electromagnetic radiation theory is elucidated.

  19. Inverse-Compton gamma rays in the galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemen, J. B. G. M.

    1985-01-01

    Compton gamma rays with energies 1 MeV largely results from scattering between electrons, with energies 100 MeV, and photons in the optical and infrared range and the 2.7 K universal blackbody radiation. An empirical model of the inverse Compton (IC) gamma ray production in the Galaxy is presented, using the most recent estimate of the interstellar electron spectrum given by Webber and a combination of optical and infrared observations to determine the galactic distribution of the various components of the interstellar photon field. The present analysis has an improved precision since the spectral distribution of the IC source function as well as that of the interstellar photon field are more accurately taken into account. The exact evaluation of the IC process is applied and different electron distribution models are considered.

  20. Unitary constraints on Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Laget

    2007-11-01

    At moderately low momentum transfer ($-t$ up to 1 GeV$^2$) the coupling to the vector meson production channels gives the dominant contribution to real Compton and deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS). Starting from a Regge Pole approach that successfully describes vector meson production, the singular part of the corresponding box diagrams (where the intermediate vector meson-baryon pair propagates on-shell) is evaluated without any further assumptions (unitarity). Such a treatment explains not only the unexpectedly large DVCS unpolarized cross section that has been recently measured at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab), but also all the beam spin and charge asymmetries that has been measured at JLab and Hermes, without explicit need of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPD). The issue of the relationship between the two approaches is addressed.

  1. Beam dynamics in Compton ring gamma sources

    E-print Network

    Bulyak, E; Skomorokhov, Vladislav; Omori, Tsunehiko; Urakawa, Junji; Moenig, Klaus; Zimmermann, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Electron storage rings of GeVenergy with laser pulse stacking cavities are promising intense sources of polarized hard photons which, via pair production, can be used to generate polarized positron beams. In this paper, the dynamics of electron bunches circulating in a storage ring and interacting with high-power laser pulses is studied both analytically and by simulation. Both the common features and the differences in the behavior of bunches interacting with an extremely high power laser pulse and with a moderate pulse are discussed. Also considerations on particular lattice designs for Compton gamma rings are presented.

  2. The Mathematical Foundations of 3D Compton Scatter Emission Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Truong, T. T.; Nguyen, M. K.; Zaidi, H.

    2007-01-01

    The mathematical principles of tomographic imaging using detected (unscattered) X- or gamma-rays are based on the two-dimensional Radon transform and many of its variants. In this paper, we show that two new generalizations, called conical Radon transforms, are related to three-dimensional imaging processes based on detected Compton scattered radiation. The first class of conical Radon transform has been introduced recently to support imaging principles of collimated detector systems. The second class is new and is closely related to the Compton camera imaging principles and invertible under special conditions. As they are poised to play a major role in future designs of biomedical imaging systems, we present an account of their most important properties which may be relevant for active researchers in the field. PMID:18382608

  3. Small-angle Compton Scattering to Determine the Depth of a Radioactive Source in Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Oberer, R. B.; Gunn, C. A.; Chiang, L. G.; Valiga, R. E.; Cantrell, J. A.

    2011-04-01

    A gamma-ray peak in a spectrum is often accompanied by a discontinuity in the Compton continuum at the peak. The Compton continuum results from Compton scattering in the detector. The discontinuity at a peak results from small-angle Compton scattering by the gamma rays in matter situated directly between the gamma-ray source and the detector. The magnitude of this discontinuity with respect to the gamma-ray peak is therefore an indicator of the amount of material or shielding between the gamma-ray source and the detector. This small-angle scattering was used to determine the depth of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) solution standards in a concrete floor mockup. The empirical results of the use of this small-angle scattering discontinuity in a concrete floor experiment will be described. A Monte Carlo calculation of the experiment will also be described. In addition, the depth determined from small-angle scattering was used in conjunction with differential attenuation to more accurately measure the uranium content of the mockup. Following these empirical results, the theory of small-angle scattering will be discussed. The magnitude of the discontinuity compared to the peak count rate is directly related to the depth of the gamma-ray source in matter. This relation can be described by relatively simple mathematical expressions. This is the first instance that we are aware of in which the small-angle Compton scattering has been used to determine the depth of a radioactive source. Furthermore this is the first development of the theoretical expressions for the magnitude of the small-angle scattering discontinuity.

  4. Anomalous nonlinear X-ray Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Matthias; Trigo, Mariano; Chen, Jian; Ghimire, Shambhu; Shwartz, Sharon; Kozina, Michael; Jiang, Mason; Henighan, Thomas; Bray, Crystal; Ndabashimiye, Georges; Bucksbaum, Philip H.; Feng, Yiping; Herrmann, Sven; Carini, Gabriella A.; Pines, Jack; Hart, Philip; Kenney, Christopher; Guillet, Serge; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M. Marvin; Moeller, Stefan; Hastings, Jerome B.; Reis, David A.

    2015-11-01

    X-ray scattering is typically used as a weak linear atomic-scale probe of matter. At high intensities, such as produced at free-electron lasers, nonlinearities can become important, and the probe may no longer be considered weak. Here we report the observation of one of the most fundamental nonlinear X-ray-matter interactions: the concerted nonlinear Compton scattering of two identical hard X-ray photons producing a single higher-energy photon. The X-ray intensity reached 4 × 1020 W cm-2, corresponding to an electric field well above the atomic unit of strength and within almost four orders of magnitude of the quantum-electrodynamic critical field. We measure a signal from solid beryllium that scales quadratically in intensity, consistent with simultaneous non-resonant two-photon scattering from nearly-free electrons. The high-energy photons show an anomalously large redshift that is incompatible with a free-electron approximation for the ground-state electron distribution, suggesting an enhanced nonlinearity for scattering at large momentum transfer.

  5. Energy measurement of electron beams by Compton scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keppel, Cynthia

    1995-01-01

    A method has been proposed to utilize the well-known Compton scattering process as a tool to measure the centroid energy of a high energy electron beam at the 0.01% level. It is suggested to use the Compton scattering of an infrared laser off the electron beam, and then to measure the energy of the scattered gamma-rays very precisely using solid-state detectors. The technique proposed is applicable for electron beams with energies from 200 MeV to 16 GeV using presently available lasers. This technique was judged to be the most viable of all those proposed for beam energy measurements at the nearby Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). Plans for a prototype test of the technique are underway, where the main issues are the possible photon backgrounds associated with an electron accelerator and the electron and laser beam stabilities and diagnostics. The bulk of my ASEE summer research has been spent utilizing the expertise of the staff at the Aerospace Electronics Systems Division at LaRC to assist in the design of the test. Investigations were made regarding window and mirror transmission and radiation damage issues, remote movement of elements in ultra-high vacuum conditions, etc. The prototype test of the proposed laser backscattering method is planned for this December.

  6. A Compton scattering technique to determine wood density and locating defects in it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tondon, Akash; Singh, Mohinder; Sandhu, B. S.; Singh, Bhajan

    2015-08-01

    A Compton scattering technique is presented to determine density and void location in the given wooden samples. The technique uses a well collimated gamma ray beam from 137Cs along with the NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. First, a linear relationship is established between Compton scattered intensity and known density of chemical compounds, and then density of the wood is determined from this linear relation. In another experiment, the ability of penetration of gamma rays is explored to detect voids in wooden (low Z) sample. The sudden reduction in the Compton scattered intensities agrees well with the position and size of voids in the wooden sample. It is concluded that wood density and the voids of size ˜ 4 mm and more can be detected easily by this method.

  7. Effect of Compton Scattering on the Electron Beam Dynamics at the ATF Damping Ring

    E-print Network

    Chaikovska, I; Delerue, N; Variola, A; Zomer, F; Kubo, K; Naito, T; Omori, T; Terunuma, N; Urakawa, J

    2011-01-01

    Compton scattering provides one of the most promising scheme to obtain polarized positrons for the next generation of $e^-$ -- $e^+$ colliders. Moreover it is an attractive method to produce monochromatic high energy polarized gammas for nuclear applications and X-rays for compact light sources. In this framework a four-mirror Fabry-P\\'erot cavity has been installed at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF - KEK, Tsukuba, Japan) and is used to produce an intense flux of polarized gamma rays by Compton scattering \\cite{ipac-mightylaser}. For electrons at the ATF energy (1.28 GeV) Compton scattering may result in a shorter lifetime due to the limited bucket acceptance. We have implemented the effect of Compton scattering on a 2D tracking code with a Monte-Carlo method. This code has been used to study the longitudinal dynamics of the electron beam at the ATF damping ring, in particular the evolution of the energy spread and the bunch length under Compton scattering. The results obtained are presented and discussed...

  8. High-energy Picosecond Laser Pulse Recirculation for Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Jovanovic, I; Anderson, S G; Betts, S M; Brown, C; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Hernandez, J E; Johnson, M; McNabb, D P; Messerly, M; Pruet, J; Shverdin, M Y; Siders, C W; Tremaine, A M; Barty, C J

    2007-06-12

    Frequency upconversion of laser-generated photons by inverse Compton scattering for applications such as nuclear spectroscopy and gamma-gamma collider concepts on the future ILC would benefit from an increase of average source brightness. The primary obstacle to higher average brightness is the relatively small Thomson scattering cross section. It has been proposed that this limitation can be partially overcome by use of laser pulse recirculation. The traditional approach to laser recirculation entails resonant coupling of low-energy pulse train to a cavity through a partially reflective mirror. Here we present an alternative, passive approach that is akin to 'burst-mode' operation and does not require interferometric alignment accuracy. Injection of a short and energetic laser pulse is achieved by placing a thin frequency converter, such as a nonlinear optical crystal, into the cavity in the path of the incident laser pulse. This method leads to the increase of x-ray/gamma-ray energy proportional to the increase in photon energy in frequency conversion. Furthermore, frequency tunability can be achieved by utilizing parametric amplifier in place of the frequency converter.

  9. Optimal geometrical configuration of a double-scattering compton camera for maximum imaging resolution and sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Hee; Lee, Se Hyung; Kim, Chan Hyeong; An, So Hyun; Lee, Ju Hahn; Lee, Chun Sik

    2008-06-01

    A novel type of Compton camera, called a double-scattering Compton imager (DOCI), is under development for nuclear medicine and molecular imaging applications. Two plane-type position-sensitive semiconductor detectors are employed as the scatterer detectors, and a 3?×3? cylindrical NaI(Tl) scintillation detector is employed as the absorber detector. This study determined the optimal geometrical configuration of these component detectors to maximize the performance of the Compton camera in imaging resolution and sensitivity. To that end, the Compton camera was simulated very realistically, with the GEANT4 detector simulation toolkit, including various detector characteristics such as energy resolution, spatial resolution, energy discrimination, and Doppler energy broadening. According to our simulation results, the Compton camera is expected to show its maximum performance when the two scatterer detectors are positioned in parallel, with ˜8 cm of separation. The Compton camera will show the maximum performance also when the gamma-ray energy is about 500 keV, which suggests that the Compton camera is a suitable device to image the distribution of the positron emission tomography (PET) isotopes in the human body.

  10. Nonforward Compton scattering in AdS/CFT correspondence

    E-print Network

    Jian-Hua Gao; Bo-Wen Xiao

    2010-05-20

    We study the nonforward Compton scattering in particular the deeply virtual Compton scattering from AdS/CFT. We first calculate the contributions from the s-channel and u-channel supergravity diagrams as well as the four point interaction diagram which correspond to the Compton scatterings on a dilaton target in CFT. Furthermore, we study the Compton scattering on a dilatino target. Assuming that protons can be identified as supergravity modes of dilatino, we compare the calculated DVCS cross section to the low-energy experimental data from the H1 and ZEUS collaborations and find good agreement. We also discuss the t-channel graviton exchange contribution and show that it should be dominant in the high-energy limit.

  11. Inverse Compton Scattering in Mildly Relativistic Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, S. M.; Birkinshaw, M.

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the effect of inverse Compton scattering in mildly relativistic static and moving plasmas with low optical depth using Monte Carlo simulations, and calculated the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in the cosmic background radiation. Our semi-analytic method is based on a separation of photon diffusion in frequency and real space. We use Monte Carlo simulation to derive the intensity and frequency of the scattered photons for a monochromatic incoming radiation. The outgoing spectrum is determined by integrating over the spectrum of the incoming radiation using the intensity to determine the correct weight. This method makes it possible to study the emerging radiation as a function of frequency and direction. As a first application we have studied the effects of finite optical depth and gas infall on the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (not possible with the extended Kompaneets equation) and discuss the parameter range in which the Boltzmann equation and its expansions can be used. For high temperature clusters (k(sub B)T(sub e) greater than or approximately equal to 15 keV) relativistic corrections based on a fifth order expansion of the extended Kompaneets equation seriously underestimate the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect at high frequencies. The contribution from plasma infall is less important for reasonable velocities. We give a convenient analytical expression for the dependence of the cross-over frequency on temperature, optical depth, and gas infall speed. Optical depth effects are often more important than relativistic corrections, and should be taken into account for high-precision work, but are smaller than the typical kinematic effect from cluster radial velocities.

  12. Next Generation Laser-Compton Gamma-ray Beam Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ying

    2014-09-01

    Since late 1970s, laser driven Compton gamma-ray beam facilities have been developed, contradicted and operated around the world for basic science research in nuclear physics and astrophysics, and for applied research in the areas of national security and industrial applications. Currently, TUNL's High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIGS) located at Duke University campus is the most intense Compton gamma-ray beam facility dedicated for scientific research. Driven by a high power storage ring Free-Electron Laser (FEL), HIGS produces nearly monochromatic, highly polarized gamma-ray beams from 1 to 100 MeV, with its peak performance of total flux up to few 1E10 g/s and a spectral flux of more than 1E3 g/s/eV in the few MeV to 10 MeV region. The next generation Compton gamma-ray sources will be developed using advanced laser technologies. This talk will provide an overview of new Compton gamma-beam projects, including the ELI-NP (Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics) project in Romania and the HIGS upgrade project - HIGS2. Since late 1970s, laser driven Compton gamma-ray beam facilities have been developed, contradicted and operated around the world for basic science research in nuclear physics and astrophysics, and for applied research in the areas of national security and industrial applications. Currently, TUNL's High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIGS) located at Duke University campus is the most intense Compton gamma-ray beam facility dedicated for scientific research. Driven by a high power storage ring Free-Electron Laser (FEL), HIGS produces nearly monochromatic, highly polarized gamma-ray beams from 1 to 100 MeV, with its peak performance of total flux up to few 1E10 g/s and a spectral flux of more than 1E3 g/s/eV in the few MeV to 10 MeV region. The next generation Compton gamma-ray sources will be developed using advanced laser technologies. This talk will provide an overview of new Compton gamma-beam projects, including the ELI-NP (Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics) project in Romania and the HIGS upgrade project - HIGS2. Work supported by U.S. Grant: DE-FG02-97ER41033.

  13. Coded-aperture Compton camera for gamma-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farber, Aaron M.

    This dissertation describes the development of a novel gamma-ray imaging system concept and presents results from Monte Carlo simulations of the new design. Current designs for large field-of-view gamma cameras suitable for homeland security applications implement either a coded aperture or a Compton scattering geometry to image a gamma-ray source. Both of these systems require large, expensive position-sensitive detectors in order to work effectively. By combining characteristics of both of these systems, a new design can be implemented that does not require such expensive detectors and that can be scaled down to a portable size. This new system has significant promise in homeland security, astronomy, botany and other fields, while future iterations may prove useful in medical imaging, other biological sciences and other areas, such as non-destructive testing. A proof-of-principle study of the new gamma-ray imaging system has been performed by Monte Carlo simulation. Various reconstruction methods have been explored and compared. General-Purpose Graphics-Processor-Unit (GPGPU) computation has also been incorporated. The resulting code is a primary design tool for exploring variables such as detector spacing, material selection and thickness and pixel geometry. The advancement of the system from a simple 1-dimensional simulation to a full 3-dimensional model is described. Methods of image reconstruction are discussed and results of simulations consisting of both a 4 x 4 and a 16 x 16 object space mesh have been presented. A discussion of the limitations and potential areas of further study is also presented.

  14. Imaging through Compton scattering and pair creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schonfelder, Volker; Kanbach, Gottfried

    Compton telescopes and pair-creation telescopes are the most successful instruments used in space-based ?-ray astronomy in the energy range from ? 0.3 MeV to u8776 30 GeV. The principles of measurement of both kinds of telescopes are explained and an overview of early Compton and pair telescopes is given. The properties and capabilities of COMPTEL and EGRET aboard NASA"s CGRO are described. These two instruments have performed the first-ever all-sky survey in ?-ray astronomy above 1 MeV. The other two CGRO instruments OSSE and BATSE have complemented these surveys towards lower energies (for this purpose, the omnidirectionally sensitive BATSE instrument used its capability to monitor hard X-ray sources >20 keV by means of Earth occultation). Finally, the outlook for future Compton and pair creation telescopes is given.

  15. Generation of 9 MeV -rays by all-laser-driven Compton scattering with second-harmonic laser light

    E-print Network

    Umstadter, Donald

    Generation of 9 MeV -rays by all-laser-driven Compton scattering with second-harmonic laser light); published July 7, 2014 Gamma-ray photons with energy >9 MeV were produced when second to scatter. Since the two pulses play very different roles in the -ray generation process, and thus have

  16. Narrowband inverse Compton scattering x-ray sources at high laser intensities

    E-print Network

    D. Seipt; S. G. Rykovanov; A. Surzhykov; S. Fritzsche

    2015-03-02

    Narrowband x- and gamma-ray sources based on the inverse Compton scattering of laser pulses suffer from a limitation of the allowed laser intensity due to the onset of nonlinear effects that increase their bandwidth. It has been suggested that laser pulses with a suitable frequency modulation could compensate this ponderomotive broadening and reduce the bandwidth of the spectral lines, which would allow to operate narrowband Compton sources in the high-intensity regime. In this paper we, therefore, present the theory of nonlinear Compton scattering in a frequency modulated intense laser pulse. We systematically derive the optimal frequency modulation of the laser pulse from the scattering matrix element of nonlinear Compton scattering, taking into account the electron spin and recoil. We show that, for some particular scattering angle, an optimized frequency modulation completely cancels the ponderomotive broadening for all harmonics of the backscattered light. We also explore how sensitive this compensation depends on the electron beam energy spread and emittance, as well as the laser focusing.

  17. Astrophysical gamma-ray production by inverse Compton interactions of relativistic electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlickeiser, R.

    1979-01-01

    The inverse Compton scattering of background photon gases by relativistic electrons is a good candidate for the production of high-energy gamma rays in the diffuse interstellar medium as well as in discrete sources. By discussing the special case of the scattering of the diffuse starlight in the interstellar medium by cosmic ray electrons, we demonstrate that previous derivations of the gamma ray source function for this process on the basis of the Thomson limit of the Klein-Nishina cross section lead to incorrect values for gamma-ray energies above 100 MeV. It is shown that the Thomson limit is not applicable for the calculation of gamma-ray source functions in astrophysical circumstances in which target photons with energies greater than 1 eV are scattered by relativistic electrons.

  18. Spin and orbital magnetization loops obtained using magnetic Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y.; Koizumi, A.

    2013-02-25

    We present an application of magnetic Compton scattering (MCS) to decompose a total magnetization loop into spin and orbital magnetization contributions. A spin magnetization loop of SmAl{sub 2} was measured by recording the intensity of magnetic Compton scattering as a function of applied magnetic field. Comparing the spin magnetization loop with the total magnetization one measured by a vibrating sample magnetometer, the orbital magnetization loop was obtained. The data display an anti-coupled behavior between the spin and orbital magnetizations and confirm that the orbital part dominates the magnetization.

  19. Directional gamma sensing from covariance processing of inter-detector Compton crosstalk energy asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trainham, R.; Tinsley, J.

    2014-06-01

    Energy asymmetry of inter-detector crosstalk from Compton scattering can be exploited to infer the direction to a gamma source. A covariance approach extracts the correlated crosstalk from data streams to estimate matched signals from Compton gammas split over two detectors. On a covariance map the signal appears as an asymmetric cross diagonal band with axes intercepts at the full photo-peak energy of the original gamma. The asymmetry of the crosstalk band can be processed to determine the direction to the radiation source. The technique does not require detector shadowing, masking, or coded apertures, thus sensitivity is not sacrificed to obtain the directional information. An angular precision of better than 1° of arc is possible, and processing of data streams can be done in real time with very modest computing hardware.

  20. Using Polarized Compton Scattering to Extract Proton Spin Polarizabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Philippe; MAMI A2 Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The MAMI A2 collaboration has recently taken data on the Compton scattering beam-target asymmetry ?2 z using a circularly polarized photon beam with a longitudinally polarized target. These data accompany previous A2 data using a transversely polarized target to obtain ?2 x and a linearly polarized photon beam on an unpolarized target to obtain ?3. The goal of this Compton scattering program at A2 is the extraction of the proton spin polarizabilities, parameters which describe the response of the proton spin to a scattering photon. Third order terms in the energy expansion of the Compton scattering amplitude, the spin polarizabilities provide a valuable test of nucleon structure, dispersion and effective field theories, and lattice calculations. While values have been determined for two linear combinations of the spin polarizabilities, their independent extraction requires the use of such complimentary data sets on different Compton scattering observables. These data were taken with the MAMI A2 Bremsstrahlung beam, either a frozen-spin butanol or an unpolarized hydrogen target, and the Crystal Ball and TAPS detectors. We will report on the ?2 x measurements, supplemented by preliminary ?3 and ?2 z measurements.

  1. Gamma-ray momentum reconstruction from Compton electron trajectories by filtered back-projection

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Haefner, A.; Gunter, D.; Plimley, B.; Pavlovsky, R.; Vetter, K.

    2014-11-03

    Gamma-ray imaging utilizing Compton scattering has traditionally relied on measuring coincident gamma-ray interactions to map directional information of the source distribution. This coincidence requirement makes it an inherently inefficient process. We present an approach to gamma-ray reconstruction from Compton scattering that requires only a single electron tracking detector, thus removing the coincidence requirement. From the Compton scattered electron momentum distribution, our algorithm analytically computes the incident photon's correlated direction and energy distributions. Because this method maps the source energy and location, it is useful in applications, where prior information about the source distribution is unknown. We demonstrate this method withmore »electron tracks measured in a scientific Si charge coupled device. While this method was demonstrated with electron tracks in a Si-based detector, it is applicable to any detector that can measure electron direction and energy, or equivalently the electron momentum. For example, it can increase the sensitivity to obtain energy and direction in gas-based systems that suffer from limited efficiency.« less

  2. Gamma-ray momentum reconstruction from Compton electron trajectories by filtered back-projection

    SciTech Connect

    Haefner, A.; Gunter, D.; Plimley, B.; Pavlovsky, R.; Vetter, K.

    2014-11-03

    Gamma-ray imaging utilizing Compton scattering has traditionally relied on measuring coincident gamma-ray interactions to map directional information of the source distribution. This coincidence requirement makes it an inherently inefficient process. We present an approach to gamma-ray reconstruction from Compton scattering that requires only a single electron tracking detector, thus removing the coincidence requirement. From the Compton scattered electron momentum distribution, our algorithm analytically computes the incident photon's correlated direction and energy distributions. Because this method maps the source energy and location, it is useful in applications, where prior information about the source distribution is unknown. We demonstrate this method with electron tracks measured in a scientific Si charge coupled device. While this method was demonstrated with electron tracks in a Si-based detector, it is applicable to any detector that can measure electron direction and energy, or equivalently the electron momentum. For example, it can increase the sensitivity to obtain energy and direction in gas-based systems that suffer from limited efficiency.

  3. Nuclear Compton scattering in the $?$-resonance region with polarized photons

    E-print Network

    B. Pasquini; S. Boffi

    1995-11-17

    Nuclear Compton scattering in the $\\Delta$-resonance region is reconsidered within the framework of the $\\Delta$-hole model. The different role of the resonant and non-resonant contributions to the transition amplitudes is discussed and their effect is investigated by comparing the results of calculation with recent data also taken with polarized photons.

  4. New JLab/Hall A Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering results

    SciTech Connect

    Defurne, Maxime [CEA, Centre de Saclay, IRFU et. al.,

    2015-08-01

    New data points for unpolarized Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering cross sections have been extracted from the E00-110 experiment at Q^2=1.9 GeV^2 effectively doubling the statistics available in the valence region. A careful study of systematic uncertainties has been performed

  5. Unification of synchrotron radiation and inverse Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin, W.H.G.; Barber, D.P.; Chen, P.

    1995-03-24

    This article describes a new approach to radiation theory. This theory, expounded by Lieu and Axford, uses the concept of inverse Compton scattering to explain with unprecedented simplicity all the classical and quantum electrodynamic properties of synchrotron radiation, unifying two fundamental processes in physics. Ramifications of this theory are also discussed. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  6. GAMMA-RAY COMPTON LIGHT SOURCE DEVELOPMENT AT LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Hagmann, C A; Johnson, M S; Jovanovic, I; Messerly, M J; Pruet, J A; Shverdin, M Y; Tremaine, A M; McNabb, D P; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2007-08-15

    A new class of tunable, monochromatic {gamma}-ray sources capable of operating at high peak and average brightness is currently being developed at LLNL for nuclear photoscience and applications. These novel systems are based on Compton scattering of laser photons by a high brightness relativistic electron beam produced by an rf photoinjector. A prototype, capable of producing > 10{sup 8} 0.7 MeV photons in a single shot, with a fractional bandwidth of 1%, and a repetition rate of 10 Hz, is currently under construction at LLNL; this system will be used to perform nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments. A new symmetrized S-band rf gun, using a Mg photocathode, will produce up to 1 nC of charge in an 8 ps bunch, with a normalized emittance modeled at 0.8 mm.mrad; electrons are subsequently accelerated up to 120 MeV to interact with a 500 mJ, 10 ps, 355 nm laser pulse and generate {gamma}-rays. The laser front end is a fiber-based system, using corrugated-fiber Bragg gratings for stretching, and drives both the frequency-quadrupled photocathode illumination laser and the Nd:YAG interaction laser. Two new technologies are used in the laser: a hyper-Michelson temporal pulse stacker capable of producing 8 ps square UV pulses, and a hyper-dispersion compressor for the interaction laser. Other key technologies, basic scaling laws, and recent experimental results will also be presented, along with an overview of future research and development directions.

  7. A low energy bound atomic electron Compton scattering model for Geant4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. M. C.; Dimmock, M. R.; Gillam, J. E.; Paganin, D. M.

    2014-11-01

    A two-body fully relativistic three-dimensional scattering framework has been utilised to develop an alternative Compton scattering computational model to those adapted from Ribberfors' work for Monte Carlo modelling of Compton scattering. Using a theoretical foundation that ensures the conservation of energy and momentum in the relativistic impulse approximation, this new model, the Monash University Compton scattering model, develops energy and directional algorithms for both the scattered photon and ejected Compton electron from first principles. The Monash University Compton scattering model was developed to address the limitation of the Compton electron directionality algorithms of other computational models adapted from Ribberfors' work. Here the development of the Monash University Compton scattering model, including its implementation in a Geant4 low energy electromagnetic physics class, G4LowEPComptonModel, is outlined. Assessment of the performance of G4LowEPComptonModel was undertaken in two steps: (1) comparison with respect to the two standard Compton scattering classes of Geant4 version 9.5, G4LivermoreComptonModel and G4PenelopeComptonModel, and (2) experimental comparison with respect to Compton electron kinetic energy spectra obtained from the Compton scattering of 662 keV photons off the K-shell of gold. Both studies illustrate that the Monash University Compton scattering model, and in turn G4LowEPComptonModel, is a viable replacement for the majority of computational models that have been adapted from Ribberfors' work. It was also shown that the Monash University Compton scattering model is able to reproduce the Compton scattering triply differential cross-section Compton electron kinetic energy spectra of 662 keV photons K-shell scattering off of gold to within experimental uncertainty.

  8. Measurements of Double-Polarized Compton Scattering Asymmetries and Extraction of the Proton Spin Polarizabilities

    E-print Network

    P. P. Martel; R. Miskimen; P. Aguar-Bartolome; J. Ahrens; C. S. Akondi; J. R. M. Annand; H. J. Arends; W. Barnes; R. Beck; A. Bernstein; N. Borisov; A. Braghieri; W. J. Briscoe; S. Cherepnya; C. Collicott; S. Costanza; A. Denig; M. Dieterle; E. J. Downie; L. V. Fil'kov; S. Garni; D. I. Glazier; W. Gradl; G. Gurevich; P. Hall Barrientos; D. Hamilton; D. Hornidge; D. Howdle; G. M. Huber; T. C. Jude; A. Kaeser; V. L. Kashevarov; I. Keshelashvili; R. Kondratiev; M. Korolija; B. Krusche; A. Lazarev; V. Lisin; K. Livingston; I. J. D. MacGregor; J. Mancell; D. M. Manley; W. Meyer; D. G. Middleton; A. Mushkarenkov; B. M. K. Nefkens; A. Neganov; A. Nikolaev; M. Oberle; H. Ortega Spina; M. Ostrick; P. Ott; P. B. Otte; B. Oussena; P. Pedroni; A. Polonski; V. Polyansky; S. Prakhov; A. Rajabi; G. Reicherz; T. Rostomyan; A. Sarty; S. Schrauf; S. Schumann; M. H. Sikora; A. Starostin; O. Steffen; I. I. Strakovsky; T. Strub; I. Supek; M. Thiel; L. Tiator; A. Thomas; M. Unverzagt; Y. Usov; D. P. Watts; L. Witthauer; D. Werthmüller; M. Wolfes

    2015-03-20

    The spin polarizabilities of the nucleon describe how the spin of the nucleon responds to an incident polarized photon. The most model-independent way to measure the nucleon spin polarizabilities is through polarized Compton scattering. Double-polarized Compton scattering asymmetries on the proton were measured in the $\\Delta(1232)$ region using circularly polarized incident photons and a transversely polarized proton target at the Mainz Microtron. Fits to asymmetry data were performed using a dispersion model calculation and a baryon chiral perturbation theory calculation, and a separation of all four proton spin polarizabilities in the multipole basis was achieved. The analysis based on a dispersion model calculation yields $\\gamma_{E1E1} = -3.5 \\pm 1.2$, $\\gamma_{M1M1}= 3.16 \\pm 0.85$, $\\gamma_{E1M2} = -0.7 \\pm 1.2$, and $\\gamma_{M1E2} = 1.99 \\pm 0.29$, in units of $10^{-4}$ fm$^4$.

  9. Polarization of GRB by scattering off relativistically moving material: Compton sailing and high polarization

    E-print Network

    Amir Levinson; David Eichler

    2004-02-19

    The polarization of gamma ray emission scattered off the baryon rich material that collimates a GRB fireball and the coasting speed of the irradiated matter are calculated numerically for different geometries of the radiation source and the collimating wall. It is shown that when the scattering material is Compton sailing, the direction of maximum polarization is quite generally well within the beaming cone of scattered radiation. As a result, the probability for observing bright highly polarized GRB's increases considerably, provided the Lorentz factor of the coasting matter is not well below 30, and the scattered radiation is highly polarized even when the beam thickness is large compared to $1/\\Gamma$. It is suggested that correlation between polarization and intensity could provide clues as to whether energy flows from matter to photons or the reverse.

  10. Is Compton scattering in strong magnetic fields really infrared divergent?

    E-print Network

    M. Kachelriess; D. Berg; G. Wunner

    1994-12-05

    The infrared behavior of QED changes drastically in the presence of a strong magnetic field: the electron self-energy and the vertex function are infrared {\\em finite}, in contrast with field-free QED, while new infrared divergences appear that are absent in free space. One famous example of the latter is the infrared catastrophe of magnetic Compton scattering, where the cross section for scattering of photons from electrons which undergo a transition to the Landau ground state {\\em diverges} as the frequency of the incoming photon goes to zero. We examine this divergence in more detail and prove that the singularity of the cross section is {\\em removed} as soon as proper account is taken of all quantum electrodynamical processes that become indistinguishable from Compton scattering in the limit of vanishing frequency of the incident photon.

  11. Attosecond neutron Compton scattering from protons

    E-print Network

    C. Aris Chatzidimitriou-Dreismann

    2007-02-01

    The effect of "anomalous" scattering of neutrons and electrons from protons in the electron-volt energy-transfer range is considered, and related experimental results are mentioned. A recent independent confirmation of this effect with a new data analysis procedure is presented. Due to the very short characteristic scattering time, there is no well defined separation of time scales of electronic and protonic motions. An outline of a proposed theoretical interpretation is presented, which is based on the fact that scattering protons represent \\textit{open} quantum systems, thus being subject to decoherence.

  12. Advanced Laser-Compton Gamma-Ray Sources for Nuclear Materials Detection, Assay and Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barty, C. P. J.

    2015-10-01

    Highly-collimated, polarized, mono-energetic beams of tunable gamma-rays may be created via the optimized Compton scattering of pulsed lasers off of ultra-bright, relativistic electron beams. Above 2 MeV, the peak brilliance of such sources can exceed that of the world's largest synchrotrons by more than 15 orders of magnitude and can enable for the first time the efficient pursuit of nuclear science and applications with photon beams, i.e. Nuclear Photonics. Potential applications are numerous and include isotope-specific nuclear materials management, element-specific medical radiography and radiology, non-destructive, isotope-specific, material assay and imaging, precision spectroscopy of nuclear resonances and photon-induced fission. This review covers activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory related to the design and optimization of mono-energetic, laser-Compton gamma-ray systems and introduces isotope-specific nuclear materials detection and assay applications enabled by them.

  13. Inverse Comptonization and the nature of the March 1979 gamma-ray burst event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, E. P. T.

    1981-01-01

    A discussion is presented concerning whether the March 5, 1979 gamma-ray burst has as its source the supernova remnant N 49 of the Large Magellanic Cloud, whose extragalactic distance implies super-Eddington luminosity. It is pointed out that the observed burst spectrum is best interpreted as that of a synchrotron spectrum modified by inverse Compton scattering from MeV e + or - pairs. Inverse Comptonization describes the energy gain of photons as a result of scattering with electrons of much higher energy. This model allows the derivation from first principles of the burst source's intrinsic synchrotron luminosity; which is found to be in basic agreement with that expected from N 49, with its distance of about 55 kpc.

  14. Scheme of Laser-Compton Gamma-ray Beamline in SAGA-LS

    SciTech Connect

    Ohgaki, H.; Koda, S.; Iwasaki, Y.; Takabayashi, Y.; Yoshida, K.; Tomimasu, T.; Uozumi, Y.; Ishibashi, K.

    2007-01-19

    A Laser-Compton Gamma-ray beamline in SAGA-LS has been planned to investigate the nuclear science and technology. The electron beam energy of 1.4 GeV and a small emittance are attractive to generate an intense and narrow energy bandwidth of Laser-Compton gamma-ray beam in MeV-region. Thus a design work for a gamma-ray beamline has been performed. Since the electron energy will be fixed, 1.4 GeV, for SR users, the laser wavelength should be variable to tune the energy of the gamma-ray beam. An OPO-DFG laser is one of candidate for this purpose. However, the laser power is not high enough to obtain the gamma-ray yield of -106 photons/s/100mA. The other method to tune the energy of gamma-ray beam is selecting the scattering angle by using a collimator and an absorber. However, simulation shows that the collimator-absorber scheme produce a poor bandwidth of the gamma-ray beam. An acceptable performance beam can be obtained by controlling the energy of electron beam at present stage.

  15. Non-planar four-mirror optical cavity for high intensity gamma ray flux production by pulsed laser beam Compton scattering off GeV-electrons

    E-print Network

    Bonis, J; Cizeron, R; Cohen, M; Cormier, E; Cornebise, P; Delerue, N; Flaminio, R; Jehanno, D; Labaye, F; Lacroix, M; Marie, R; Mercier, B; Peinaud, Y; Pinard, L; Prevost, C; Soskov, V; Variola, A; Zomer, F

    2011-01-01

    As part of the R&D toward the production of high flux of polarised Gamma-rays we have designed and built a non-planar four-mirror optical cavity with a high finesse and operated it at a particle accelerator. We report on the main challenges of such cavity, such as the design of a suitable laser based on fiber technology, the mechanical difficulties of having a high tunability and a high mechanical stability in an accelerator environment and the active stabilization of such cavity by implementing a double feedback loop in a FPGA.

  16. MULTIPLE INVERSE COMPTON SCATTERINGS AND THE BLAZAR SEQUENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Bjoernsson, C.-I.

    2010-11-01

    The high frequency component in blazars is thought to be due to inverse Compton scattered radiation. Recent observations by Fermi-LAT are used to evaluate the details of the scattering process. A comparison is made between the usually assumed single scattering scenario and one in which multiple scatterings are energetically important. In the latter case, most of the radiation is emitted in the Klein-Nishina limit. It is argued that several of the observed correlations defining the blazar sequence are most easily understood in a multiple scattering scenario. Observations indicate also that, in such a scenario, the blazar sequence is primarily governed by the energy density of relativistic electrons rather than that of the seed photons. The pronounced X-ray minimum in the spectral energy distribution often observed in the most luminous blazars is discussed. It is shown how this feature can be accounted for in a multiple scattering scenario by an extension of standard one-zone models.

  17. GAMMA-RAY POLARIZATION INDUCED BY COLD ELECTRONS VIA COMPTON PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Zhe; Jiang Yunguo; Lin Hainan E-mail: jiangyg@ihep.ac.cn

    2013-05-20

    The polarization measurement is an important tool to probe the prompt emission mechanism in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The synchrotron photons can be scattered by cold electrons in the outflow via Compton scattering (CS) processes. The observed polarization depends on both the photon energy and the viewing angle. With the typical bulk Lorentz factor {Gamma} {approx} 200, photons with energy E > 10 MeV tend to have smaller polarization than photons with energy E < 1 MeV. At the right viewing angle, i.e., {theta} {approx} {Gamma}{sup -1}, the polarization achieves its maximal value, and the polarization angle changes 90 Degree-Sign relative to the initial polarization direction. Thus, the synchrotron radiation plus CS model can naturally explain the 90 Degree-Sign change of the polarization angle in GRB 100826A.

  18. Compton suppression gamma-counting: The effect of count rate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Millard, H.T., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Past research has shown that anti-coincidence shielded Ge(Li) spectrometers enhanced the signal-to-background ratios for gamma-photopeaks, which are situated on high Compton backgrounds. Ordinarily, an anti- or non-coincidence spectrum (A) and a coincidence spectrum (C) are collected simultaneously with these systems. To be useful in neutron activation analysis (NAA), the fractions of the photopeak counts routed to the two spectra must be constant from sample to sample to variations must be corrected quantitatively. Most Compton suppression counting has been done at low count rate, but in NAA applications, count rates may be much higher. To operate over the wider dynamic range, the effect of count rate on the ratio of the photopeak counts in the two spectra (A/C) was studied. It was found that as the count rate increases, A/C decreases for gammas not coincident with other gammas from the same decay. For gammas coincident with other gammas, A/C increases to a maximum and then decreases. These results suggest that calibration curves are required to correct photopeak areas so quantitative data can be obtained at higher count rates. ?? 1984.

  19. Comparison between electron and neutron Compton scattering studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreh, Raymond; Finkelstein, Yacov; Vos, Maarten

    2015-05-01

    We compare two techniques: Electron Compton Scattering (ECS) and neutron Compton scattering (NCS) and show that using certain incident energies, both can measure the atomic kinetic energy of atoms in molecules and solids. The information obtained is related to the Doppler broadening of nuclear levels and is very useful for deducing the widths of excited levels in many nuclei in self absorption measurements. A comparison between the atomic kinetic energies measured by the two methods on the same samples is made. Some results are also compared with calculated atomic kinetic energies obtained using the harmonic approximation where the vibrational frequencies were taken from IR/Raman optical measurements. The advantages of the ECS method are emphasized.

  20. Nucleon Polarizabilities: from Compton Scattering to Hydrogen Atom

    E-print Network

    Hagelstein, Franziska; Pascalutsa, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    We review the current state of knowledge of the nucleon polarizabilities and of their role in nucleon Compton scattering and in hydrogen spectrum. We discuss the basic concepts, the recent lattice QCD calculations and advances in chiral effective-field theory. On the experimental side, we review the ongoing programs aimed to measure the nucleon (scalar and spin) polarizabilities via the Compton scattering processes, with real and virtual photons. A great part of the review is devoted to the general constraints based on unitarity, causality, discrete and continuous symmetries, which result in model-independent relations involving nucleon polarizabilities. We (re-)derive a variety of such relations and discuss their empirical value. The proton polarizability effects are presently the major sources of uncertainty in the assessment of the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift and hyperfine structure. Recent calculations of these effects are reviewed here in the context of the "proton-radius puzzle". We conclude with summary...

  1. A Practical Review of the Kompaneets Equation and its Application to Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    D.G. Shirk

    2006-05-15

    In this study, we explore both inverse Compton and Compton scattering processes using the Chang and Cooper scheme to form a deterministic solution of the Kompaneets equation. We examine the individual terms of the Kompaneets equation and illustrate their effect on the equilibrium solution. We use two examples (a Gaussian line profile and a Planck profile) to illustrate the advective and diffusive properties of the Kompaneets operator. We also explore both inverse Compton scattering and Compton scattering, and discuss and illustrate the Bose-Einstein condensation feature of the Compton scattering spectrum.

  2. An Electron-Tracking Compton Telescope for a Survey of the Deep Universe by MeV Gamma-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimori, T.; Kubo, H.; Takada, A.; Iwaki, S.; Komura, S.; Kurosawa, S.; Matsuoka, Y.; Miuchi, K.; Miyamoto, S.; Mizumoto, T.; Mizumura, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, S.; Oda, M.; Parker, J. D.; Sawano, T.; Sonoda, S.; Takemura, T.; Tomono, D.; Ueno, K.

    2015-09-01

    Photon imaging for MeV gammas has serious difficulties due to huge backgrounds and unclearness in images, which originate from incompleteness in determining the physical parameters of Compton scattering in detection, e.g., lack of the directional information of the recoil electrons. The recent major mission/instrument in the MeV band, Compton Gamma Ray Observatory/COMPTEL, which was Compton Camera (CC), detected a mere ˜30 persistent sources. It is in stark contrast with the ˜2000 sources in the GeV band. Here we report the performance of an Electron-Tracking Compton Camera (ETCC), and prove that it has a good potential to break through this stagnation in MeV gamma-ray astronomy. The ETCC provides all the parameters of Compton-scattering by measuring 3D recoil electron tracks; then the Scatter Plane Deviation (SPD) lost in CCs is recovered. The energy loss rate (dE/dx), which CCs cannot measure, is also obtained, and is found to be helpful to reduce the background under conditions similar to those in space. Accordingly, the significance in gamma detection is improved severalfold. On the other hand, SPD is essential to determine the point-spread function (PSF) quantitatively. The SPD resolution is improved close to the theoretical limit for multiple scattering of recoil electrons. With such a well-determined PSF, we demonstrate for the first time that it is possible to provide reliable sensitivity in Compton imaging without utilizing an optimization algorithm. As such, this study highlights the fundamental weak-points of CCs. In contrast we demonstrate the possibility of ETCC reaching the sensitivity below 1 × 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 at 1 MeV.

  3. An Electron-Tracking Compton Telescope for a Survey of the Deep Universe by MeV gamma-rays

    E-print Network

    T. Tanimori; H. Kubo; A. Takada; S. Iwaki; S. Komura; S. Kurosawa; Y. Matsuoka; K. Miuchi; S. Miyamoto; T. Mizumoto; Y. Mizumura; K. Nakamura; S. Nakamura; M. Oda; J. D. Parker; T. Sawano; S. Sonoda; T. Takemura; D. Tomono; K. Ueno

    2015-08-04

    Photon imaging for MeV gammas has serious difficulties due to huge backgrounds and unclearness in images, which are originated from incompleteness in determining the physical parameters of Compton scattering in detection, e.g., lack of the directional information of the recoil electrons. The recent major mission/instrument in the MeV band, Compton Gamma Ray Observatory/COMPTEL, which was Compton Camera (CC), detected mere $\\sim30$ persistent sources. It is in stark contrast with $\\sim$2000 sources in the GeV band. Here we report the performance of an Electron-Tracking Compton Camera (ETCC), and prove that it has a good potential to break through this stagnation in MeV gamma-ray astronomy. The ETCC provides all the parameters of Compton-scattering by measuring 3-D recoil electron tracks; then the Scatter Plane Deviation (SPD) lost in CCs is recovered. The energy loss rate (dE/dx), which CCs cannot measure, is also obtained, and is found to be indeed helpful to reduce the background under conditions similar to space. Accordingly the significance in gamma detection is improved severalfold. On the other hand, SPD is essential to determine the point-spread function (PSF) quantitatively. The SPD resolution is improved close to the theoretical limit for multiple scattering of recoil electrons. With such a well-determined PSF, we demonstrate for the first time that it is possible to provide reliable sensitivity in Compton imaging without utilizing an optimization algorithm. As such, this study highlights the fundamental weak-points of CCs. In contrast we demonstrate the possibility of ETCC reaching the sensitivity below $1\\times10^{-12}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ at 1 MeV.

  4. Polarisation Transfer in Proton Compton Scattering at High Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    David Hamilton

    2004-12-31

    The Jefferson Lab Hall A experiment E99-114 comprised a series of measurements to explore proton Compton scattering at high momentum transfer. For the first time, the polarisation transfer observables in the p (~ 0 ~ p) reaction were measured in the GeV energy range, where it is believed that quark-gluon degrees of freedom begin to dominate. The experiment utilised a circularly polarised photon beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target, with the scattered photon and recoil proton detected in a lead-glass calorimeter and a magnetic spectrometer, respectively.

  5. POSSIBLE EXPERIMENTS ON WAVE FUNCTION LOCALIZATION DUE TO COMPTON SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Danilov, Viatcheslav V; Gorlov, Timofey V; Liu, Yun; Shishlo, Andrei P; Nagaitsev,

    2013-01-01

    The reduction of a particle s wave function in the process of radiation or light scattering is a longstanding problem. Its solution will give a clue on processes that form, for example, wave functions of electrons constantly emitting synchrotron radiation quanta in storage rings. On a more global scale, it may shed light on wave function collapse due to the process of measurement. In this paper we consider various experimental options using Fermilab electron beams and a possible electron beam from the SNS linac and lasers to detect electron wave function change due to Compton scattering.

  6. Test of pulse shape analysis using single Compton scattering events

    E-print Network

    I. Abt; A. Caldwell; K. Kröninger; J. Liu; X. Liu; B. Majorovits

    2007-08-13

    Compton scattering is one of the dominant interaction processes in germanium for photons with an energy of around two MeV. If a photon scatters only once inside a germanium detector, the resulting event contains only one electron which normally deposits its energy within a mm range. Such events are similar to Ge-76 neutrinoless double beta-decay events with just two electrons in the final state. Other photon interactions like pair production or multiple scattering can result in events composed of separated energy deposits. One method to identify the multiple energy deposits is the use of timing information contained in the electrical response of a detector or a segment of a detector. The procedures developed to separate single- and multiple-site events are tested with specially selected event samples provided by an 18-fold segmented prototype germanium detector for Phase II of the GERmanium Detector Array, GERDA. The single Compton scattering, i.e. single-site, events are tagged by coincidently detecting the scattered photon with a second detector positioned at a defined angle. A neural network is trained to separate such events from events which come from multi-site dominated samples. Identification efficiencies of ~80% are achieved for both single- and multi-site events.

  7. Energy Calibration of Gamma Spectra in Plastic Scintillators using Compton Kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Siciliano, Edward R.; Ely, James H.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Schweppe, John E.; Strachan, Denis M.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes a simple and practicable method for assigning energy values to gamma-ray pulse-height distributions measured with polyvinyl toluene based detectors. It is based upon the characteristic shape of the spectrum in the region of maximum energy deposition resulting from a single Compton scattering. The validity of this method is first demonstrated by applying it to a set of NaI(Tl) spectra, and comparing those results to the standard photo-peak method of calibrating the same spectra. The method is then applied to a set of polyvinyl toluene derived spectra.

  8. Polaritonic pulse and coherent X- and gamma rays from Compton (Thomson) backscattering

    SciTech Connect

    Apostol, M.; Ganciu, M.

    2011-01-01

    The formation of polariton wave-packets created by high-intensity laser beams focused in plasmas is analyzed, and the velocity, energy, size, structure, stability, and electron content of such polaritonic pulses are characterized. It is shown that polaritonic pulses may transport trapped electrons with appreciable energies, provided the medium behaves as a rarefied classical plasma. The relativistic electron energy is related to the polariton group velocity, which is close to the velocity of light in this case. The plasma pulse is polarized, and the electron number in the pulse is estimated as being proportional to the square root of the laser intensity and the 3/2-power of the pulse size. It is shown that Compton (Thomson) backscattering by such polaritonic pulses of electrons may produce coherent X- and gamma rays, as a consequence of the quasirigidity of the electrons inside the polaritonic pulses and their relatively large number. The classical results of the Compton scattering are re-examined in this context, the energy of the scattered photons and their cross-section are analyzed, especially for backscattering, the great enhancement of the scattered flux of X- or gamma rays due to the coherence effect is highlighted and numerical estimates are given for some typical situations.

  9. THE VERY HIGH ENERGY EMISSION FROM PULSARS: A CASE FOR INVERSE COMPTON SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    Lyutikov, Maxim; Otte, Nepomuk; McCann, Andrew

    2012-07-20

    The observations of gamma-ray emission from pulsars with the Fermi-LAT detector and the detection of the Crab pulsar with the VERITAS array of Cherenkov telescopes at energies above 100 GeV make it unlikely that curvature radiation is the main source of photons above GeV energies in the Crab and many other pulsars. We outline a model in which the broad UV-X-ray component and the very high energy {gamma}-ray emission of pulsars are explained within the synchrotron self-Compton framework. We argue that the bulk of the observed radiation is generated by the secondary plasma, which is produced in cascades in the outer gaps of the magnetosphere. We find that the inverse Compton (IC) scattering occurs in the Klein-Nishina regime, which favors synchrotron photons in the UV band as target field for the scattering process. The primary beam is accelerated in a modest electric field, with a field strength that is of the order of a few percent of the magnetic field near the light cylinder. Overall, for IC scattering occurring in the Klein-Nishina regime, the particle distribution in the gap does not evolve toward a stationary distribution and thus is intrinsically time-dependent. We point out that in a radiation reaction-limited regime of particle acceleration the gamma-ray luminosity L{sub {gamma}} scales linearly with the pulsar spin-down power E-dot , L{sub {gamma}}{proportional_to} E-dot , and not proportional to {radical}( E-dot ) as expected from potential-limited acceleration.

  10. Experimental Study of a Si/CdTe Semiconductor Compton Camera for the Next Generation of Gamma-ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Shinichiro

    A Compton camera is the most promising detector for gamma-ray astronomy in the energy band from a few tens of keV to MeV. Its detection method, based on Compton scattering kinematics, allows us to determine the direction of incident gamma-rays and significantly reduce background events caused by cosmic charged particle or detector activation in orbit. In this thesis, we describe a new Compton camera, named the Si/CdTe semiconductor Compton camera, which consists of many layers of position-sensitive Silicon and CdTe detectors. In order to verify the performance and to understand the detector response, we construct prototype Si/CdTe Compton cameras. The spectral response is studied by taking charge sharing, charge collection efficiency and thermal diffusion inside the Si and CdTe semiconductor devices used in the detectors. The imaging capability with various kinds of gamma-ray targets, such as a point source, arranged point sources and extended sources, is examined. Utilizing the maximum-likelihood iteration algorithm, the extended source and adjacent sources were successfully deconvolved with its internal structure. The ability of polarization measurements, which is one of key features of the Compton camera, are demonstrated through the experiment at synchrotron beam facility. The direction of the polarization vector is determined to within an accuracy of 1o. For the 92.5 % polarized 170 keV gamma-rays, the modulation factor of 0.82 is obtained. Based on the Monte Carlo simulator verified by the results from various experiments in this thesis, in-orbit performances for all-sky survey is studied. We confirmed that the Si/CdTe Compton camera can achieve one order of magnitude higher sensitivity in comparison with the COMPTEL onboard CGRO in the energy band from 500 keV to a few MeV

  11. Flow shear induced Compton scattering of electron drift instability

    SciTech Connect

    Hahm, T.S.

    1992-02-01

    Plasma flow shear effects on nonlinear saturation of electron drift waves are analyzed in the weak turbulence regime. Flow shear can enhance ion Compton scattering of long wavelength electron drift waves not only by modifying the beat wave-ion resonance condition, but also via the radial dependence of linear susceptibility. A nonlinear dispersion relation is obtained as a solution of the radially nonlocal nonlinear eigenmode equation. At nonlinear saturation, the spectral intensity of the fluctuations scales with flow shear as ({partial_derivative}V{var_phi}/{partial_derivative}r){sup {minus}2} in addition to the linear dependence on the linear growth rate.

  12. The equivalence of inverse Compton scattering and the undulator concept

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y,; /Fermilab

    2009-08-01

    Inverse Compton scattering is a method to produce very high frequency photon beam. However, the production mechanism can also be viewed as a undulator emission. This is because the electron sees electric and magnetic fields of the incident laser beam and is driven into transverse oscillatory motion in exactly the same way when the electron passes through a undulator consisting of alternating magnetic field. This note gives a detailed examination of the similarity about the two views. Equivalent undulator parameters are derived for the incident laser beam, as well as the differential cross section of photon emission.

  13. Polarization Transfer in Proton Compton Scattering at High Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, D.J.; Annand, J.R.M.; Mamyan, V.H.; Aniol, K.A.; Margaziotis, D.J.; Bertin, P.Y.; Camsonne, A.; Laveissiere, G.; Bosted, P.; Paschke, K.; Calarco, J.R.; Chang, G.C.; Horn, T.; Savvinov, N.; Chang, T.-H.; Danagoulian, A.; Nathan, A.M.; Roedelbronn, M.; Chen, J.-P.

    2005-06-24

    Compton scattering from the proton was investigated at s=6.9 GeV{sup 2} and t=-4.0 GeV{sup 2} via polarization transfer from circularly polarized incident photons. The longitudinal and transverse components of the recoil proton polarization were measured. The results are in disagreement with a prediction of perturbative QCD based on a two-gluon exchange mechanism, but agree well with a prediction based on a reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton.

  14. Magnetic properties of Ga doped cobalt ferrite: Compton scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Arvind Mund, H. S.; Ahuja, B. L.; Sahariya, Jagrati; Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y.

    2014-04-24

    We present the spin momentum density of Ga doped CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} at 100 K using magnetic Compton scattering. The measurement has been performed using circularly polarized synchrotron radiations of 182.65 keV at SPring8, Japan. The experimental profile is decomposed into its constituent profile to determine the spin moment at individual sites. Co atom has the maximum contribution (about 58%) in the total spin moment of the doped CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}.

  15. X-Ray Spectrometer for Observation of Nonlinear Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, Y.; Kumita, T.; Siddons, D. P.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Liu, C.; Macrander, A. T.; Hirose, T.; Washio, M.; Omori, T.; Urakawa, J.; Yokoya, K.

    2004-10-01

    An x-ray spectrometer, which consists of a multilayer device and a two-dimensional position sensitive detector, is designed for measurement of the x-ray energy spectrum and angular distribution from the nonlinear Compton scattering of 60 MeV electron and high power CO2 laser beams provided by a user facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A Prototype of the spectrometer has constructed and tested using isotropic 8 keV (Cu K?) x-rays from a sealed x-ray tube.

  16. An Electron-Tracking Compton Telescope for a Survey of the Deep Universe by MeV gamma-rays

    E-print Network

    Tanimori, T; Takada, A; Iwaki, S; Komura, S; Kurosawa, S; Matsuoka, Y; Miuchi, K; Miyamoto, S; Mizumoto, T; Mizumura, Y; Nakamura, K; Nakamura, S; Oda, M; Parker, J D; Sawano, T; Sonoda, S; Takemura, T; Tomono, D; Ueno, K

    2015-01-01

    Photon imaging for MeV gammas has serious difficulties due to huge backgrounds and unclearness in images, which are originated from incompleteness in determining the physical parameters of Compton scattering in detection, e.g., lack of the directional information of the recoil electrons. The recent major mission/instrument in the MeV band, CGRO/COMPTEL, which was Compton Camera (CC), detected mere $\\sim30$ persistent sources. It is in stark contrast with $\\sim$2000 sources in the GeV band. Here we report the performance of an Electron-Tracking Compton Camera (ETCC), and prove that it has a good potential to break through this stagnation in MeV gamma-ray astronomy. The ETCC provides all the parameters of Compton-scattering by measuring 3-D recoil electron tracks; then the SPD (Scatter Plane Deviation) lost in CCs is recovered. The energy loss rate (dE/dx), which CCs cannot measure, is also obtained, and is found to be indeed helpful to reduce the background under conditions similar to space. Accordingly the si...

  17. Nucleon Polarizabilities: from Compton Scattering to Hydrogen Atom

    E-print Network

    Franziska Hagelstein; Rory Miskimen; Vladimir Pascalutsa

    2015-12-15

    We review the current state of knowledge of the nucleon polarizabilities and of their role in nucleon Compton scattering and in hydrogen spectrum. We discuss the basic concepts, the recent lattice QCD calculations and advances in chiral effective-field theory. On the experimental side, we review the ongoing programs aimed to measure the nucleon (scalar and spin) polarizabilities via the Compton scattering processes, with real and virtual photons. A great part of the review is devoted to the general constraints based on unitarity, causality, discrete and continuous symmetries, which result in model-independent relations involving nucleon polarizabilities. We (re-)derive a variety of such relations and discuss their empirical value. The proton polarizability effects are presently the major sources of uncertainty in the assessment of the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift and hyperfine structure. Recent calculations of these effects are reviewed here in the context of the "proton-radius puzzle". We conclude with summary plots of the recent results and prospects for the near-future work.

  18. Laser pulse-shape dependence of Compton scattering

    E-print Network

    Alexander I. Titov; Burkhard Kampfer; Takuya Shibata; Atsushi Hosaka; Hideaki Takabe

    2014-08-05

    Compton scattering of short and ultra short (sub-cycle) laser pulses off mildly relativistic electrons is considered within a QED framework. The temporal shape of the pulse is essential for the differential cross section as a function of the energy of the scattered photon at fixed observation angle. The partly integrated cross section is sensitive to the non-linear dynamics resulting in a large enhancement of the cross section for short and, in particular, for ultra-short flat-top pulse envelopes which can reach several orders of magnitude, as compared with the case of a long pulse. Such effects can be studied experimentally and must be taken into account in Monte-Carlo/transport simulations of %$e^+e^-$ pair production in the interaction of electrons and photons in a strong laser field.

  19. Beam-Shape Effects in Nonlinear Compton and Thomson Scattering

    E-print Network

    Heinzl, T; Kämpfer, B

    2009-01-01

    We discuss intensity effects in collisions between beams of optical photons from a high-power laser and relativistic electrons. Our main focus are the modifications of the emission spectra due to realistic finite-beam geometries. By carefully analyzing the classical limit we precisely quantify the distinction between strong-field QED Compton scattering and classical Thomson scattering. A purely classical, but fully covariant, calculation of the bremsstrahlung emitted by an electron in a plane wave laser field yields radiation into harmonics, as expected. This result is generalized to pulses of finite duration and explains the appearance of line broadening and harmonic substructure as an interference phenomenon. The ensuing numerical treatment confirms that strong focussing of the laser leads to a broad continuum while higher harmonics become visible only at moderate focussing, hence lower intensity. We present a scaling law for the backscattered photon spectral density which facilitates averaging over electro...

  20. Resonant Cyclotron Scattering and Comptonization in Neutron Star Magnetospheres

    E-print Network

    Maxim Lyutikov; Fotis P. Gavriil

    2006-02-10

    Resonant cyclotron scattering of the surface radiation in the magnetospheres of neutron stars may considerably modify the emergent spectra and impede efforts to constraint neutron star properties. Resonant cyclotron scattering by a non-relativistic warm plasma in an inhomogeneous magnetic field has a number of unusual characteristics: (i) in the limit of high resonant optical depth, the cyclotron resonant layer is half opaque, in sharp contrast to the case of non-resonant scattering. (ii) The transmitted flux is on average Compton up-scattered by ~ $1+ 2 beta_T$, where $\\beta_T$ is the typical thermal velocity in units of the velocity of light; the reflected flux has on average the initial frequency. (iii) For both the transmitted and reflected fluxes the dispersion of intensity decreases with increasing optical depth. (iv) The emergent spectrum is appreciably non-Plankian while narrow spectral features produced at the surface may be erased. We derive semi-analytically modification of the surface Plankian emission due to multiple scattering between the resonant layers and apply the model to anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 1048.1--5937. Our simple model fits just as well as the ``canonical'' magnetar spectra model of a blackbody plus power-law.

  1. Compton Gamma Ray Observatory: Lessons Learned in Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dressler, G. A.; Joseph, G. W.; Behrens, H. W.; Asato, D. I.; Carlson, R. A.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory was the second of NASA's Great Observatories. At 17 1/2 tons. it was the heaviest astrophysical payload ever flown at the time of its launch on April 5, 1991 aboard the Space Shuttle. During initial, on-orbit priming of the spacecraft's monopropellant hydrazine propulsion system, a severe waterhammer transient was experienced. At that time, anomalous telemetry readings were received from on-board propulsion system instrumentation. This led to ground analyses and laboratory investigations as to the root cause of the waterhammer, potential damage to system integrity and functionality, and risks for switching from the primary (A-side) propulsion system to the redundant (B-side) system. The switchover to B-side was ultimately performed successfully and the spacecraft completed its basic and extended missions in this configuration. Nine years later, following a critical control gyroscope failure, Compton was safely deorbited and re-entered the Earth's atmosphere on June 4, 2000. Additional risk assessments concerning viability of A- and B-sides were necessary to provide confidence in attitude and delta-V authority and reliability to manage the precisely controlled reentry. This paper summarizes the design and operation of the propulsion system used on the spacecraft and provides "lessons learned" from the system engineering investigations into the propellant loading procedures, the initial priming anomaly, mission operations, and the commanded re-entry following the gyro failure.

  2. Energy calibration of gamma spectra in plastic scintillators using Compton kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siciliano, E. R.; Ely, J. H.; Kouzes, R. T.; Schweppe, J. E.; Strachan, D. M.; Yokuda, S. T.

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes a simple and practicable method for assigning energy values to gamma-ray pulse-height distributions measured with polyvinyl toluene (PVT) based detectors. It is based upon the characteristic shape of simulated spectra in the region of maximum energy deposition resulting from a single Compton scattering. The validity of this method is demonstrated by applying it to a set of measured NaI(Tl) spectra, and comparing those results to the standard photopeak method of calibrating the same spectra. The method is then applied to a set of measured PVT spectra. It can now be applied to calibration of fielded PVT detectors using two selected gamma-ray sources, which was the initial motivation for this study.

  3. Evidence for a narrow N{sup *}(1685) resonance in quasifree Compton scattering on the neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, V.; Polyakov, M. V.; Bellini, V.; Giusa, A.; Mammoliti, F.; Randieri, C.; Russo, G.; Sperduto, M. L.; Boiko, T.; Chebotaryov, S.; Dho, H.-S.; Kim, W.; Milman, E.; Ni, A.; Gervino, G.; Ghio, F.; Kim, A.; Perevalova, I. A.; Vall, A. N.; Sutera, C. M.

    2011-02-15

    The study of quasifree Compton scattering on the neutron in the energy range of E{sub {gamma}}=0.75-1.5 GeV is presented. The data reveal a narrow peak at W{approx}1.685 GeV. This result, being considered in conjunction with the recent evidence for a narrow structure at W{approx}1.68 GeV in {eta} photoproduction on the neutron, suggests the existence of a nucleon resonance with unusual properties: a mass M{approx}1.685 GeV, a narrow width {Gamma}{<=}30 MeV, and the much stronger photoexcitation on the neutron than on the proton.

  4. Correction of radiation absorption on biological samples using Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Marcelo O.; Conti, Claudio de Carvalho; dos Anjos, Marcelino J.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a method to correct the absorbed radiation (the mass attenuation coefficient curve) in low energy (E < 30 keV) applied to a biological matrix based on the Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio and the effective atomic number. For calibration, scattering measurements were performed on standard samples of radiation produced by a gamma-ray source of 241Am (59.54 keV) also applied to certified biological samples of milk powder, hay powder and bovine liver (NIST 1557B). In addition, six methods of effective atomic number determination were used as described in literature to determinate the Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio (R/C), in order to calculate the mass attenuation coefficient. The results obtained by the proposed method were compared with those obtained using the transmission method. The experimental results were in good agreement with transmission values suggesting that the method to correct radiation absorption presented in this paper is adequate for biological samples.

  5. A performance study of an electron-tracking Compton camera with a compact system for environmental gamma-ray observation

    E-print Network

    Mizumoto, Tetsuya; Takada, Atsushi; Tanimori, Toru; Komura, Shotaro; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Mizumura, Yoshitaka; Nakamura, Kiseki; Nakamura, Shogo; Oda, Makoto; Parker, Joseph D; Sawano, Tatsuya; Bando, Naoto; Nabetani, Akira

    2015-01-01

    An electron-tracking Compton camera (ETCC) is a detector that can determine the arrival direction and energy of incident sub-MeV/MeV gamma-ray events on an event-by-event basis. It is a hybrid detector consisting of a gaseous time projection chamber (TPC), that is the Compton-scattering target and the tracker of recoil electrons, and a position-sensitive scintillation camera that absorbs of the scattered gamma rays, to measure gamma rays in the environment from contaminated soil. To measure of environmental gamma rays from soil contaminated with radioactive cesium (Cs), we developed a portable battery-powered ETCC system with a compact readout circuit and data-acquisition system for the SMILE-II experiment. We checked the gamma-ray imaging ability and ETCC performance in the laboratory by using several gamma-ray point sources. The performance test indicates that the field of view (FoV) of the detector is about 1$\\;$sr and that the detection efficiency and angular resolution for 662$\\;$keV gamma rays from the ...

  6. A GENERAL RELATIVISTIC EXTERNAL COMPTON-SCATTERING MODEL FOR TeV EMISSION FROM M87

    SciTech Connect

    Cui Yudong; Yuan Yefei; Li Yanrong; Wang Jianmin

    2012-02-20

    M87 is the first detected non-blazar extragalactic tera-electron-volt (TeV) source with rapid variation and a very flat spectrum in the TeV band. To explain the two peaks in the spectral energy distribution of the nucleus of M87, which is similar to that of blazars, the most commonly adopted models are the synchrotron self-Compton-scattering models and the external inverse Compton (EIC) scattering models. Considering that there is no correlated variation in the soft band (from radio to X-ray) matching the TeV variation and that the TeV sources should not suffer from {gamma}{gamma} absorption due to the flat TeV spectrum, the EIC models are advantageous in modeling the TeV emission from M87. In this paper, we propose a self-consistent EIC model to explain the flat TeV spectrum of M87 within the framework of fully general relativity, where the background soft photons are from the advection-dominated accretion flow around the central black hole, and the high-energy electrons are from the mini-jets that are powered by the magnetic reconnection in the main jet. In our model, both the TeV flares observed in the years 2005 and 2008 could be well explained: the {gamma}{gamma} absorption for TeV photons is very low, even inside the region very close to the black hole 20R{sub g} {approx} 50R{sub g} ; at the same region, the average EIC cooling time ({approx}10{sup 2} {approx} 10{sup 3} s) is short, which is consistent with the observed timescale of the TeV variation. Furthermore, we also discuss the possibility that the accompanying X-ray flare in 2008 is due to the direct synchrotron radiation of the mini-jets.

  7. Exclusive Measurement of Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering off 4 He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltzell, Nathan; CLAS Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Deeply virtual Compton scattering and meson production are proven prime reactions to progress our understanding of partonic structure via Generalized Parton and Transverse Momentum Distribution frameworks. Their extension to nuclei is of particular interest, with the possibility of revealing new information on the modification of partonic structure in nuclear media. An ideal candidate is 4 He due to its simplicity and high density, with spin=0 and isospin=0 resulting in only one contributing GPD at leading twist. We performed an experiment in Hall-B at Jefferson Lab with longitudinally polarized 6 GeV electrons incident on a 6 atm, long, gaseous 4 He target in a 4 T solenoid field. The large acceptance CLAS detector system was augmented by a lead tungstate calorimeter for forward photons. A new radial time projection chamber with cylindrical GEM amplification provided nuclear recoil detection. The first exclusive measurement of DVCS off 4 He will be presented, with Q2 and xB in the ranges 1.0-2.3 GeV2 and 0.1-0.25. Extractions of beam spin asymmetries and the Compton form factor will be discussed, as well as a simultaneous measurement of ?0 production. and Argonne National Laboratory.

  8. Compton-Pair Production Space Telescope: Extending Fermi-LAT Discoveries into MeV Gamma-ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, Regina; ComPair Team

    2016-01-01

    The gamma-ray energy range from several hundred keV to a hundred MeV has remained largely unexplored, since the observations by instruments on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (1991- 2000) and on INTEGRAL (since 2002). Accurate measurements in this energy range are critical for answering a broad range of astrophysical questions, but they are particularly challenging because this range encompasses the Compton scattering/pairproduction transition zone (~10 MeV) where the interaction cross section is minimized. These interaction processes require different optimizations in both detection and event reconstruction. We are developing a MIDEX-scale wide-aperture discovery mission, Compton-Pair Production Space Telescope (ComPair), to investigate the energy range from 200 keV to >500 MeV with high energy and angular resolution and with sensitivity approaching a factor of 20-50 better than COMPTEL. This instrument will be capable of measuring both Compton-scattering events at lower energy and pair-production events at higher energy. ComPair will build on the heritage of successful space missions including Fermi-LAT, CGRO, INTEGRAL, AGILE, AMS and PAMELA, and will utilize well-developed space-qualified detector technologies including Si-strip and CdZnTe-strip detectors, heavy inorganic scintillators, and plastic scintillators.

  9. Measurement of deeply virtual compton scattering beam-spin asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Girod, F X; Niyazov, R A; Avakian, H; Ball, J; Bedlinskiy, I; Burkert, V D; De Masi, R; Elouadrhiri, L; Garçon, M; Guidal, M; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Kubarovsky, V; Kuleshov, S V; MacCormick, M; Niccolai, S; Pogorelko, O; Sabatié, F; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Ungaro, M; Zhao, B; Amaryan, M J; Ambrozewicz, P; Anghinolfi, M; Asryan, G; Bagdasaryan, H; Baillie, N; Ball, J P; Baltzell, N A; Batourine, V; Battaglieri, M; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Biselli, A S; Blaszczyk, L; Bouchigny, S; Boiarinov, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Bültmann, S; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Careccia, S L; Carman, D S; Casey, L; Chen, S; Cheng, L; Cole, P L; Collins, P; Coltharp, P; Crabb, D; Crede, V; Dashyan, N; De Sanctis, E; De Vita, R; Degtyarenko, P V; Deur, A; Dharmawardane, K V; Dickson, R; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Donnelly, J; Doughty, D; Dugger, M; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; El Fassi, L; Eugenio, P; Fedotov, G; Feldman, G; Funsten, H; Gavalian, G; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Goetz, J T; Gonenc, A; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guler, N; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hleiqawi, I; Holtrop, M; Hyde, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Johnstone, J R; Juengst, H G; Kalantarians, N; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klimenko, A V; Kossov, M; Krahn, Z; Kramer, L H; Kuhn, J; Kuhn, S E; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Langheinrich, J; Lawrence, D; Lee, T; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; Markov, N; Mattione, P; Mazouz, M; McKinnon, B; Mecking, B A; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mibe, T; Michel, B; Mikhailov, K; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Moriya, K; Morrow, S A; Moteabbed, M; Munevar, E; Mutchler, G S; Nadel-Turonski, P; Nasseripour, R; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niroula, M R; Nozar, M; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Paterson, C; Anefalos Pereira, S; Pierce, J; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pozdniakov, S; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Raue, B A; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Salamanca, J; Salgado, C; Santoro, J P; Sapunenko, V; Schumacher, R A; Serov, V S; Sharabian, Y G; Sharov, D; Shvedunov, N V; Smith, E S; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stavinsky, A; Stepanyan, S S; Stokes, B E; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Tedeschi, D J; Tkabladze, A; Tkachenko, S; Tur, C; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Voutier, E; Watts, D P; Weinstein, L B; Weygand, D P; Williams, M; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zhao, Z W

    2008-04-25

    The beam-spin asymmetries in the hard exclusive electroproduction of photons on the proton (e p-->epgamma) were measured over a wide kinematic range and with high statistical accuracy. These asymmetries result from the interference of the Bethe-Heitler process and of deeply virtual Compton scattering. Over the whole kinematic range (x(B) from 0.11 to 0.58, Q2 from 1 to 4.8 GeV2, -t from 0.09 to 1.8 GeV2), the azimuthal dependence of the asymmetries is compatible with expectations from leading-twist dominance, A approximately a sinphi/(1+c cosphi). This extensive set of data can thus be used to constrain significantly the generalized parton distributions of the nucleon in the valence quark sector. PMID:18518188

  10. Deeply virtual Compton scattering from gauge/gravity duality

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Miguel S.; Djuric, Marko

    2013-04-15

    We use gauge/gravity duality to study deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) in the limit of high center of mass energy at fixed momentum transfer, corresponding to the limit of low Bjorken x, where the process is dominated by the exchange of the pomeron. At strong coupling, the pomeron is described as the graviton Regge trajectory in AdS space, with a hard wall to mimic confinement effects. This model agrees with HERA data in a large kinematical range. The behavior of the DVCS cross section for very high energies, inside saturation, can be explained by a simple AdS black disk model. In a restricted kinematical window, this model agrees with HERA data as well.

  11. Longitudinal Target-Spin Asymmetries for Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seder, E.; Biselli, A.; Pisano, S.; Niccolai, S.; Smith, G. D.; Joo, K.; Adhikari, K.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Bosted, P.; Briscoe, W.; Brock, J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Carlin, C.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crabb, D.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garillon, B.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hirlinger Saylor, N.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jo, H. S.; Joosten, S.; Keith, C. D.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meekins, D. G.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R.; Moody, C. I.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Senderovich, I.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, I.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Tian, Y.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    A measurement of the electroproduction of photons off protons in the deeply inelastic regime was performed at Jefferson Lab using a nearly 6 GeV electron beam, a longitudinally polarized proton target, and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Target-spin asymmetries for e p ?e'p'? events, which arise from the interference of the deeply virtual Compton scattering and the Bethe-Heitler processes, were extracted over the widest kinematics in Q2 , xB, t , and ? , for 166 four-dimensional bins. In the framework of generalized parton distributions, at leading twist the t dependence of these asymmetries provides insight into the spatial distribution of the axial charge of the proton, which appears to be concentrated in its center. These results also bring important and necessary constraints for the existing parametrizations of chiral-even generalized parton distributions.

  12. Longitudinal target-spin asymmetries for deeply virtual Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Seder, E.; Biselli, A.; Pisano, S.; Niccolai, S.; Smith, G. D.; Joo, K.; Adhikari, K.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Bosted, P.; Briscoe, W.; Brock, J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Carlin, C.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crabb, D.; Crede, V.; D’Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garillon, B.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hirlinger Saylor, N.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jo, H. S.; Joosten, S.; Keith, C. D.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meekins, D. G.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R.; Moody, C. I.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Senderovich, I.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, I.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Tian, Y.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zonta, I.

    2015-01-22

    A measurement of the electroproduction of photons off protons in the deeply inelastic regime was performed at Jefferson Lab using a nearly 6-GeV electron beam, a longitudinally polarized proton target and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Target-spin asymmetries for ep ? e'p'y events, which arise from the interference of the deeply virtual Compton scattering and the Bethe-Heitler processes, were extracted over the widest kinematics in Q2, xB, t and ?, for 166 four-dimensional bins. In the framework of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs), at leading twist the t dependence of these asymmetries provides insight on the spatial distribution of the axial charge of the proton, which appears to be concentrated in its center. In conclusion, these results bring important and necessary constraints for the existing parametrizations of chiral-even GPDs.

  13. Longitudinal target-spin asymmetries for deeply virtual Compton scattering

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Seder, E.; Biselli, A.; Pisano, S.; Niccolai, S.; Smith, G. D.; Joo, K.; Adhikari, K.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; et al

    2015-01-22

    A measurement of the electroproduction of photons off protons in the deeply inelastic regime was performed at Jefferson Lab using a nearly 6-GeV electron beam, a longitudinally polarized proton target and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Target-spin asymmetries for ep ? e'p'y events, which arise from the interference of the deeply virtual Compton scattering and the Bethe-Heitler processes, were extracted over the widest kinematics in Q2, xB, t and ?, for 166 four-dimensional bins. In the framework of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs), at leading twist the t dependence of these asymmetries provides insight on the spatial distribution of the axialmore »charge of the proton, which appears to be concentrated in its center. In conclusion, these results bring important and necessary constraints for the existing parametrizations of chiral-even GPDs.« less

  14. Longitudinal target-spin asymmetries for deeply virtual compton scattering.

    PubMed

    Seder, E; Biselli, A; Pisano, S; Niccolai, S; Smith, G D; Joo, K; Adhikari, K; Amaryan, M J; Anderson, M D; Anefalos Pereira, S; Avakian, H; Battaglieri, M; Bedlinskiy, I; Bono, J; Boiarinov, S; Bosted, P; Briscoe, W; Brock, J; Brooks, W K; Bültmann, S; Burkert, V D; Carman, D S; Carlin, C; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Charles, G; Colaneri, L; Cole, P L; Contalbrigo, M; Crabb, D; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; Dashyan, N; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Deur, A; Djalali, C; Doughty, D; Dupre, R; El Fassi, L; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fedotov, G; Fegan, S; Filippi, A; Fleming, J A; Fradi, A; Garillon, B; Garçon, M; Gevorgyan, N; Ghandilyan, Y; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Gohn, W; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guegan, B; Guidal, M; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Harrison, N; Hattawy, M; Hirlinger Saylor, N; Holtrop, M; Hughes, S M; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Jo, H S; Joosten, S; Keith, C D; Keller, D; Khachatryan, G; Khandaker, M; Kim, A; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Koirala, S; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, S E; Lenisa, P; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I J D; Markov, N; Mayer, M; McKinnon, B; Meekins, D G; Mineeva, T; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Montgomery, R; Moody, C I; Moutarde, H; Movsisyan, A; Munoz Camacho, C; Nadel-Turonski, P; Niculescu, I; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Paolone, M; Pappalardo, L L; Park, K; Park, S; Pasyuk, E; Peng, P; Phelps, W; Pogorelko, O; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Puckett, A J R; Ripani, M; Rizzo, A; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Roy, P; Sabatié, F; Salgado, C; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Senderovich, I; Simonyan, A; Skorodumina, I; Sokhan, D; Sparveris, N; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Sytnik, V; Taiuti, M; Tang, W; Tian, Y; Ungaro, M; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Walford, N K; Watts, D P; Wei, X; Weinstein, L B; Wood, M H; Zachariou, N; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zonta, I

    2015-01-23

    A measurement of the electroproduction of photons off protons in the deeply inelastic regime was performed at Jefferson Lab using a nearly 6 GeV electron beam, a longitudinally polarized proton target, and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Target-spin asymmetries for ep?e^{'}p^{'}? events, which arise from the interference of the deeply virtual Compton scattering and the Bethe-Heitler processes, were extracted over the widest kinematics in Q^{2}, x_{B}, t, and ?, for 166 four-dimensional bins. In the framework of generalized parton distributions, at leading twist the t dependence of these asymmetries provides insight into the spatial distribution of the axial charge of the proton, which appears to be concentrated in its center. These results also bring important and necessary constraints for the existing parametrizations of chiral-even generalized parton distributions. PMID:25658994

  15. Observation of redshifting and harmonic radiation in inverse Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Y.; Pogorelsky, I.; Williams, O.; O'Shea, F.; Barber, S.; Gadjev, I.; Duris, J.; Musumeci, P.; Fedurin, M.; Korostyshevsky, A.; Malone, B.; Swinson, C.; Stenby, G.; Kusche, K.; Babzien, M.; Montemagno, M.; Jacob, P.; Zhong, Z.; Polyanskiy, M.; Yakimenko, V.; Rosenzweig, J.

    2015-06-01

    Inverse Compton scattering of laser photons by ultrarelativistic electron beam provides polarized x- to ? -ray pulses due to the Doppler blueshifting. Nonlinear electrodynamics in the relativistically intense linearly polarized laser field changes the radiation kinetics established during the Compton interaction. These are due to the induced figure-8 motion, which introduces an overall redshift in the radiation spectrum, with the concomitant emission of higher order harmonics. To experimentally analyze the strong field physics associated with the nonlinear electron-laser interaction, clear modifications to the angular and wavelength distributions of x rays are observed. The relativistic photon wave field is provided by the ps CO2 laser of peak normalized vector potential of 0.5 scattered by 65 MeV electron beam of 0.3 nC, at the interaction point is measured to be approximately 109 .

  16. Hadron Optics: Diffraction Patterns in Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering

    E-print Network

    S. J. Brodsky; D. Chakrabarti; A. Harindranath; A. Mukherjee; J. P. Vary

    2006-08-10

    We show that the Fourier transform of the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) amplitude with respect to the skewness variable $\\zeta$ at fixed invariant momentum transfer squared $t$ provides a unique way to visualize the structure of the target hadron in the boost-invariant longitudinal coordinate space. The results are analogous to the diffractive scattering of a wave in optics. As a specific example, we utilize the quantum fluctuations of a fermion state at one loop in QED to obtain the behavior of the DVCS amplitude for electron-photon scattering. We then simulate the wavefunctions for a hadron by differentiating the above LFWFs with respect to $M^2$ and study the corresponding DVCS amplitudes in light-front longitudinal space. In both cases we observe that the diffractive patterns in the longitudinal variable conjugate to $\\zeta$ sharpen and the positions of the first minima move in with increasing momentum transfer. For fixed $t$, higher minima appear at positions which are integral multiples of the lowest minimum. Both these observations strongly support the analogy with diffraction in optics.

  17. The inverse Compton gamma-ray spectrum of the Crab nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Jager, O. C.; Harding, A. K.

    1991-01-01

    The observed TeV flux from the Crab can be explained by inverse Compton scattering in the nebula if the average nebular field is indeed approximately equal to 0.0003 G as is predicted by the spectral break between radio and optical. The estimated spectral index at TeV energies also agrees with the observed value. The unpulsed high energy gamma-rays seen by COS-B are not explained by this inverse Compton component but can be explained by synchrotron radiation requiring electrons up to at least 10 exp 16 eV, most likely accelerated at the shock in the pulsar wind. The detection of a spectral depression at about 1 GeV would allow an estimate of the maximum electron energy. The flux estimates also predict the detection of a steady flux of unpulsed UHE gamma-rays from near the shock with sensitive detectors if the field strength increases downstream with increasing radius as is predicted by MHD theory.

  18. Verification of Compton scattering spectrum of a 662keV photon beam scattered on a cylindrical steel target using MCNP5 code.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Tran Thien; Nguyen, Vo Hoang; Chuong, Huynh Dinh; Tran, Le Bao; Tam, Hoang Duc; Binh, Nguyen Thi; Tao, Chau Van

    2015-11-01

    This article focuses on the possible application of a (137)Cs low-radioactive source (5mCi) and a NaI(Tl) detector for measuring the saturation thickness of solid cylindrical steel targets. In order to increase the reliability of the obtained experimental results and to verify the detector response function of Compton scattering spectrum, simulation using Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP5) code is performed. The obtained results are in good agreement with the response functions of the simulation scattering and experimental scattering spectra. On the basis of such spectra, the saturation depth of a steel cylinder is determined by experiment and simulation at about 27mm using gamma energy of 662keV ((137)Cs) at a scattering angle of 120°. This study aims at measuring the diameter of solid cylindrical objects by gamma-scattering technique. PMID:26363240

  19. Development of Gamma-Ray Compton Imager Using Room-Temperature 3-D Position Sensitive Semiconductor Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong He; David Whe; Glenn Knoll

    2003-05-14

    During the three years of this project, two 3-dimensional position sensitive CdZnTe spectrometers were upgraded in collaboration with Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. A prototype Compton-scattering gamma-ray imager was assembled using the two upgraded CdZnTe detectors. The performance of both gamma-ray spectrometers were individually tested. The angular resolution and detection sensitivity of the imaging system were measured using both a point and a line-shaped 137 Cs radiation source. The measurement results are consistent with that obtained from Monte-Carlo simulations performed during the early phase of the project.

  20. Predictor-corrector with cubic spline method for spectrum estimation in Compton scatter correction of SPECT.

    PubMed

    Chen, E Q; Lam, C F

    1994-05-01

    In single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), Compton scattered photons degrade image contrast and cause erroneous regional activity quantification. A predictor-corrector and cubic spline (PCCS) method for the compensation of Compton scatter in SPECT is proposed. Using spectral information recorded at four energy windows, the PCCS method estimates scatter counts at each window and constructs the scatter spectrum with cubic spline interpolation. We have shown in simulated noise-free situations that this method provides accurate estimation of scatter fractions. A scatter correction employing PCCS method can be implemented on many existing SPECT systems without hardware modification and complicated calibration. PMID:7924268

  1. Simplified Formulae System for Resonant Inverse Compton Scattering of a Fast Electron in an Intense Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    You, J. H.; Chen, W. P.; Zhang, S. N.; Chen, L.; Liu, D.; Chou, C. K.

    2003-01-01

    We present simple analytical formulae for the emission spectrum and total power of a special kind of resonant inverse Compton scattering (RICS) of a relativistic electron in an intense magnetic field. In contrast with the available formulae system, we obtain a markedly simplified one based on the semiclassical quantum theory, which is more understandable for people who are unfamiliar with quantum electrodynamics. We show that the RICS process, under an appropriate 'accommodation condition' derived in this paper, is predominantly much more efficient than the coexistent ordinary inverse Compton scattering, and produces highly beamed high-frequency radiation with moderately good monochromaticity. Our formulae are simple to use - thus offering a lucid physical intuition for the theory - and may find wide applications in hard X-ray and gamma-ray astrophysics.

  2. X-band RF Photoinjector for Laser Compton X-ray and Gamma-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, R. A.; Anderson, G. G.; Anderson, S. G.; Gibson, D. J.; Barty, C. J.

    2015-05-06

    Extremely bright narrow bandwidth gamma-ray sources are expanding the application of accelerator technology and light sources in new directions. An X-band test station has been commissioned at LLNL to develop multi-bunch electron beams. This multi-bunch mode will have stringent requirements for the electron bunch properties including low emittance and energy spread, but across multiple bunches. The test station is a unique facility featuring a 200 MV/m 5.59 cell X-band photogun powered by a SLAC XL4 klystron driven by a Scandinova solid-state modulator. This paper focuses on its current status including the generation and initial characterization of first electron beam. Design and installation of the inverse-Compton scattering interaction region and upgrade paths will be discussed along with future applications.

  3. Compton scattering in strong magnetic fields: Spin-dependent influences at the cyclotron resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonthier, Peter L.; Baring, Matthew G.; Eiles, Matthew T.; Wadiasingh, Zorawar; Taylor, Caitlin A.; Fitch, Catherine J.

    2014-08-01

    The quantum electrodynamical (QED) process of Compton scattering in strong magnetic fields is commonly invoked in atmospheric and inner magnetospheric models of x-ray and soft gamma-ray emission in high-field pulsars and magnetars. A major influence of the field is to introduce resonances at the cyclotron frequency and its harmonics, where the incoming photon accesses thresholds for the creation of virtual electrons or positrons in intermediate states with excited Landau levels. At these resonances, the effective cross section typically exceeds the classical Thomson value by over 2 orders of magnitude. Near and above the quantum critical magnetic field of 44.13 TeraGauss, relativistic corrections must be incorporated when computing this cross section. This profound enhancement underpins the anticipation that resonant Compton scattering is a very efficient process in the environs of highly magnetized neutron stars. This paper presents formalism for the QED magnetic Compton differential cross section valid for both subcritical and supercritical fields, yet restricted to scattered photons that are below pair creation threshold. Calculations are developed for the particular case of photons initially propagating along the field, and in the limit of zero vacuum dispersion, mathematically simple specializations that are germane to interactions involving relativistic electrons frequently found in neutron star magnetospheres. This exposition of relativistic, quantum, magnetic Compton cross sections treats electron spin dependence fully, since this is a critical feature for describing the finite decay lifetimes of the intermediate states. Such lifetimes are introduced to truncate the resonant cyclotronic divergences via standard Lorentz profiles. The formalism employs both the traditional Johnson and Lippmann (JL) wave functions and the Sokolov and Ternov (ST) electron eigenfunctions of the magnetic Dirac equation. The ST states are formally correct for self-consistently treating spin-dependent effects that are so important in the resonances. It is found that the values of the polarization-dependent differential cross section depend significantly on the choice of ST or JL eigenstates when in the fundamental resonance but not outside of it, a characteristic that is naturally expected. Relatively compact analytic forms for the cross sections are presented that will prove useful for astrophysical modelers.

  4. Inverse Compton Scattering on Solar Photons, Heliospheric Modulation, and Neutrino Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Porter, Troy A.; Digel, Seth W.; /SLAC

    2006-08-01

    We study the inverse Compton scattering of solar photons by Galactic cosmic-ray electrons. We show that the {gamma}-ray emission from this process is significant with the maximum flux in the direction of the Sun; the angular distribution of the emission is broad. This previously neglected foreground should be taken into account in studies of the diffuse Galactic and extragalactic {gamma}-ray emission. Furthermore, observations by GLAST can be used to monitor the heliosphere and determine the electron spectrum as a function of position from distances as large as Saturn's orbit down to close proximity of the Sun, thus enabling studies of solar modulation in the most extreme case. This paves the way for the determination of other Galactic cosmic-ray species, primarily protons, near the solar surface leading to accurate predictions of {gamma}-rays from pp-interactions in the solar atmosphere. These albedo {gamma}-rays will be observable by GLAST, allowing the study of deep atmospheric layers, magnetic field(s), and cosmic-ray cascade development. The latter is necessary to calculate the neutrino flux from pp-interactions at higher energies (>1 TeV). The corresponding neutrino flux from the Sun can be used as a ''standard candle'' for upcoming km{sup 3} neutrino detectors, such as IceCube. Since the solar core is opaque for very high-energy neutrinos, it may be possible to directly study the mass distribution of the Sun.

  5. Measurement of Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering with a Polarized Proton Target

    SciTech Connect

    S. Chen; H. Avakian; V. Burkert; P. Eugenio

    2006-05-05

    The longitudinal target-spin asymmetry A{sub UL} for the exclusive electroproduction of high energy photons was measured for the first time in p(e,e'p/gamma). The data have been accumulated at Jefferson Lab with the CLAS spectrometer using 5.7 GeV electrons and a longitudinally polarized NH{sub 3} target. A significant azimuthal angular dependence was observed, resulting from the interference of the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering and Bethe-Heitler processes. The amplitude of the sin(phi) moment is 0.252 +/- 0.042(stat) +/- 0.020(sys). Theoretical calculations are in good agreement with the magnitude and the kinematic dependence of the target-spin asymmetry, which is sensitive to the generalized parton distributions H and H-tilde.

  6. Scaling Tests of the Cross Section for Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Camacho, C. Munoz; Beaumel, M.; Garcon, M.; Guichon, P. A. M.; Sabatie, F.; Gavalian, G.; Amarian, M.; Hayes, D.; Hyde-Wright, C. E.; Ibrahim, H.

    2006-12-31

    We present the first measurements of the e(vector sign)p{yields}ep{gamma} cross section in the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) regime and the valence quark region. The Q{sup 2} dependence (from 1.5 to 2.3 GeV{sup 2}) of the helicity-dependent cross section indicates the twist-2 dominance of DVCS, proving that generalized parton distributions (GPDs) are accessible to experiment at moderate Q{sup 2}. The helicity-independent cross section is also measured at Q{sup 2}=2.3 GeV{sup 2}. We present the first model-independent measurement of linear combinations of GPDs and GPD integrals up to the twist-3 approximation.

  7. Effective atomic numbers for materials of medical interest at low photon energy using the Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Lama, L. S.; Soares, L. D. H.; Antoniassi, M.; Poletti, M. E.

    2015-06-01

    The Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio (R/C) has been used as a reliable quantitative method for materials analysis, especially biological ones Unlike the conventional transmission method, which is sensitive to linear attenuation coefficients, the R/C ratio is more useful for situations where the ? variations are small and the atomic number variations become more significant. In the present study, gamma rays from an 241Am source with an energy of 59.54 keV were used to determine the effective atomic numbers for several materials considering the conventional total cross-section based method (ZeffATTEN) and also the intensity ratio between elastic (Rayleigh) and inelastic (Compton) scattered photons (ZeffR/C). Common liquid and solid compounds used as phantoms for investigation of radiation interaction effects on biological tissues were analyzed. This work aimed to use the R/C method in choosing the most suitable phantom to simulate biological tissues, considering two different experimental conditions: attenuation and scattering. The Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio was shown to be a complementary approach to assist in the selection of appropriate tissue substitute materials.

  8. Relativistic electron beam acceleration by Compton scattering of lower-hybrid waves

    E-print Network

    Sugaya, R; Sugawa, M; Sugaya, Reiji; Maehara, Tsunehiro; Sugawa, Masao

    2004-01-01

    It has been proved theoetically and numerically that the highly relativistic electron beam can be accelerated efficiently via the Compton scattering induced by nonlinear Landau and cyclotron damping of the lower-hybrid waves.

  9. Polarization Transfer in Wide-Angle Compton Scattering and Single-Pion Photoproduction from the Proton

    E-print Network

    Fanelli, C.

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The ...

  10. Computation of angle averaged cross sections in a degenerate Compton scattering medium

    SciTech Connect

    Nickel, G.H.; Pochkowski, M.; Bailey, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    An accurate yet simple analytic method is developed for calculating Compton scattering cross sections for monoenergetic photons interacting with an isotropic and degenerate distribution of relativistic electrons. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  11. A performance study of an electron-tracking Compton camera with a compact system for environmental gamma-ray observation

    E-print Network

    Tetsuya Mizumoto; Dai Tomono; Atsushi Takada; Toru Tanimori; Shotaro Komura; Hidetoshi Kubo; Yoshihiro Matsuoka; Yoshitaka Mizumura; Kiseki Nakamura; Shogo Nakamura; Makoto Oda; Joseph D. Parker; Tatsuya Sawano; Naoto Bando; Akira Nabetani

    2015-08-06

    An electron-tracking Compton camera (ETCC) is a detector that can determine the arrival direction and energy of incident sub-MeV/MeV gamma-ray events on an event-by-event basis. It is a hybrid detector consisting of a gaseous time projection chamber (TPC), that is the Compton-scattering target and the tracker of recoil electrons, and a position-sensitive scintillation camera that absorbs of the scattered gamma rays, to measure gamma rays in the environment from contaminated soil. To measure of environmental gamma rays from soil contaminated with radioactive cesium (Cs), we developed a portable battery-powered ETCC system with a compact readout circuit and data-acquisition system for the SMILE-II experiment. We checked the gamma-ray imaging ability and ETCC performance in the laboratory by using several gamma-ray point sources. The performance test indicates that the field of view (FoV) of the detector is about 1$\\;$sr and that the detection efficiency and angular resolution for 662$\\;$keV gamma rays from the center of the FoV is $(9.31 \\pm 0.95) \\times 10^{^-5}$ and $5.9^{\\circ} \\pm 0.6^{\\circ}$, respectively. Furthermore, the ETCC can detect 0.15$\\;\\mu\\rm{Sv/h}$ from a $^{137}$Cs gamma-ray source with a significance of 5$\\sigma$ in 13 min in the laboratory. In this paper, we report the specifications of the ETCC and the results of the performance tests. Furthermore, we discuss its potential use for environmental gamma-ray measurements.

  12. A performance study of an electron-tracking Compton camera with a compact system for environmental gamma-ray observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizumoto, T.; Tomono, D.; Takada, A.; Tanimori, T.; Komura, S.; Kubo, H.; Matsuoka, Y.; Mizumura, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, S.; Oda, M.; Parker, J. D.; Sawano, T.; Bando, N.; Nabetani, A.

    2015-06-01

    An electron-tracking Compton camera (ETCC) is a detector that can determine the arrival direction and energy of incident sub-MeV/MeV gamma-ray events on an event-by-event basis. It is a hybrid detector consisting of a gaseous time projection chamber (TPC), that is the Compton-scattering target and the tracker of recoil electrons, and a position-sensitive scintillation camera that absorbs of the scattered gamma rays, to measure gamma rays in the environment from contaminated soil. To measure of environmental gamma rays from soil contaminated with radioactive cesium (Cs), we developed a portable battery-powered ETCC system with a compact readout circuit and data-acquisition system for the SMILE-II experiment [1,2]. We checked the gamma-ray imaging ability and ETCC performance in the laboratory by using several gamma-ray point sources. The performance test indicates that the field of view (FoV) of the detector is about 1 sr and that the detection efficiency and angular resolution for 662 keV gamma rays from the center of the FoV is (9.31 ± 0.95) × 10-5 and 5.9° ± 0.6°, respectively. Furthermore, the ETCC can detect 0.15 ?Sv/h from a 137Cs gamma-ray source with a significance of 5? in 13 min in the laboratory. In this paper, we report the specifications of the ETCC and the results of the performance tests. Furthermore, we discuss its potential use for environmental gamma-ray measurements.

  13. Deeply virtual Compton Scattering cross section measured with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Guegan, Baptistse

    2014-09-01

    The Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) provide a new description of nucleon structure in terms of its elementary constituents, the quarks and the gluons. Including and extending the information provided by the form factors and the parton distribution functions, they describe the correlation between the transverse position and the longitudinal momentum fraction of the partons in the nucleon. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS), the electroproduction of a real photon on a single quark in the nucleon eN --> e'N'g, is the exclusive process most directly interpretable in terms of GPDs. A dedicated experiment to study DVCS with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab has been carried out using a 5.9-GeV polarized electron beam and an unpolarized hydrogen target, allowing us to collect DVCS events in the widest kinematic range ever explored in the valence region : 1.0 < Q2 < 4.6 GeV2, 0.1 < xB < 0.58 and 0.09 < -t < 2.0 GeV2. In this paper, we show preliminary results of unpolarized cross sections and of polarized cross section differences for the DVCS channel.

  14. Neutron Polarizabilities From Compton Scattering on the Deuteron?

    E-print Network

    Jonathan J. Karakowski; Gerald A. Miller

    1999-01-08

    A calculation of deuteron Compton scattering using non-relativistic perturbation theory is presented,with the primary motivation of investigating the feasibility of determining the neutron polarizabilities from this type of experiment. This calculation is expected to be valid for energies below 100 MeV. Pion-exchange, relativistic, and recoil corrections are also included. The low-energy theorem for gauge invariance is shown to be satisfied. The relative effects of the different terms and their effects on the determinations of the polarizabilities are discussed at energies of 49, 69, and 95 MeV. The cross-section is dominated by the seagull, polarizability, and electromagnetic multipole interactions. Relativistic and pion-exchange terms are also important, while recoil corrections and multipoles of $L$=2 and greater are negligible. The calculation provides a reasonable description of the experimental data points at 49 and 69 MeV. The polarizabilities are difficult to determine at these energies. A more accurate determination of the polarizabilities may be possible at 95 MeV.

  15. Global phase and frequency comb structures in nonlinear Compton and Thomson scattering

    E-print Network

    Krajewska, K; Kami?ski, J Z

    2014-01-01

    The Compton and Thomson radiation spectra, generated in collisions of an electron beam with a powerful laser beam, are studied in the framework of quantum and classical electrodynamics, respectively. We show that there are frequency regimes where both radiation spectra are nearly identical, which for Compton scattering relates to the process which preserves the electron spin. Although the radiation spectra are nearly identical, the corresponding probability amplitudes exhibit different global phases. This has pronounced consequences, which we demonstrate by investigating temporal power distributions in both cases. We show that, contrary to Thomson scattering, it is not always possible to synthesize short laser pulses from Compton radiation. This happens when the global phase of the Compton amplitude varies in a nonlinear way with the frequency of emitted photons. We also demonstrate that while the Compton process driven by a non-chirped laser pulse can generate chirped bursts of radiation, this is not the cas...

  16. Gamma-ray polarization of the synchrotron self-compton process from a highly relativistic jet

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Zhe; Lin, Hai-Nan

    2014-11-01

    The high polarization observed in the prompt phase of some gamma-ray bursts invites extensive study of the emission mechanism. In this paper, we investigate the polarization properties of the synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) process from a highly relativistic jet. A magnetic-dominated, baryon-loaded jet ejected from the central engine travels with a large Lorentz factor. Shells with slightly different velocities collide with each other and produce shocks. The shocks accelerate electrons to a power-law distribution and, at the same time, magnify the magnetic field. Electrons move in the magnetic field and produce synchrotron photons. Synchrotron photons suffer from the Compton scattering (CS) process and then are detected by an observer located slightly off-axis. We analytically derive the formulae of photon polarization in the SSC process in two magnetic configurations: a magnetic field in the shock plane and perpendicular to the shock plane. We show that photons induced by the SSC process can be highly polarized, with the maximum polarization ? ? 24% in the energy band [0.5, 5] MeV. The polarization depends on the viewing angles, peaking in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. In the energy band [0.05, 0.5] MeV, in which most ?-ray polarimeters are active, the polarization is about twice that in the Thomson limit, reaching ? ? 20%. This implies that the Klein-Nishina effect, which is often neglected in the literature, should be carefully considered.

  17. Rutherford and Compton scattering in QCD Substructure dependence of jet cross sections at HERA

    E-print Network

    Rutherford and Compton scattering in QCD Substructure dependence of jet cross sections at HERA in the scattering of # particles by metal sheets led to the discovery of the atomic nucleus. The model of Rutherford as 1/(1 ± cos # # ) 2 when # # # 0 or #, similar to Rutherford scattering. In contrast, the angular

  18. Guest Investigator Studies with the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestrand, W. T.

    1998-09-01

    The cumulative all-sky survey by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), composed of data acquired during the first three years of the mission, included a number of regions of very limited exposure. The most glaring deficiency in coverage was toward the region of the South Galactic Pole (SGP), which received significantly less exposure than other directions- by a factor of at least 2 to 3. Furthermore, nearly all of the SGP exposure was accumulated during the first year of the mission. Since blazars are known to be time-variable, and of unknown duty cycle, a pointing of the CCRO in that direction was considered highly desirable, and long overdue. In addition, data gathered from a pointing toward the SGP and its comparison with comprehensive data available for the North Galactic Pole would be extremely valuable to investigators studying the extragalactic diffuse emission. The reasons outlined above prompted our initiation of a Cycle 4 campaign to systematically search with EGRET and COMPTEL for gamma-ray emission from sources near the South Galactic Pole. The Cycle 4 SGP campaign consisted of tnvo 14-day observations separated in in time by approximately 10 months. The temporal separation of the observations was requested to allow a test for possible variations in the detected sources. Our primary targets were 38 FSRQs which lie within 30 degrees of the SGP, and which satisfy the basic criteria for candidate gamma-ray AGNs,flat-spectrum radio sources, many of which exhibit blazar-type properties). These targets were selected from the standard references, and from the available on-line databases (e.g., the NASA Extragalactic Database, NED), as the most promising AGN targets in the vicinity of the SGP. A 30 radius from the SGP was chosen as the boundary of our survey, since the selected targets would then fall within the most sensitive portion of the fields of view of EGRET and COMPTEL (i.e., within a 30 zenith angle), for a CGRO pointing directed exactly at the SGP. Our South Galactic Pole Survey yielded a number of exciting results. The EGRET data were analyzed using the maximum likelihood techniques to estimate the intensity, spectrum, and position of gamma-ray sources in the field of view. Our analysis revealed four sources at energies greater than 100 MeV with likelihood ratios corresponding to greater than 30 detections (Vestrand et al. 1996). One of the sources is associated with the well known gamma-ray blazar PKS 0208-512, but the other three were previously unknown. Among the new detections was PKS 2155-304 which is often considered a prototype of the x-ray selected BL Lacs. PKS 2155-304, which was also detected at hard x-ray energies by CGRO/OSSE, is one of the brightest BL Lac objects in the sky at optical through x-ray energies and has a history of rapid, strong multiwavelength variability. As such, it has been the subject of intensive, contemporaneous, multiwavelength monitoring covering radio frequencies to x-ray energies.

  19. Tomographic images of breast tissues obtained by Compton scattering: An analytical computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniassi, M.; Poletti, M. E.; Brunetti, A.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we studied by analytical simulation the potential of a Compton scatter technique for breast imaging application. A Compton scattering tomography system was computationally simulated in order to provide the projection data (scattering signal) for the image reconstructions. The simulated projections generated by the analytical proposed method were validated through comparison with those obtained by Monte Carlo simulation. Electron density images were obtained from the scattering signal using a reconstruction algorithm implemented for the system geometry. Finally, the quality of the reconstructed images was evaluated for different sample sizes, beam energies, and tissue compositions (glandularities).

  20. Model-Based Detection of Radioactive Contraband for Harbor Defense Incorporating Compton Scattering Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V; Chambers, D H; Breitfeller, E F; Guidry, B L; Verbeke, J M; Axelrod, M A; Sale, K E; Meyer, A M

    2010-03-02

    The detection of radioactive contraband is a critical problem is maintaining national security for any country. Photon emissions from threat materials challenge both detection and measurement technologies especially when concealed by various types of shielding complicating the transport physics significantly. This problem becomes especially important when ships are intercepted by U.S. Coast Guard harbor patrols searching for contraband. The development of a sequential model-based processor that captures both the underlying transport physics of gamma-ray emissions including Compton scattering and the measurement of photon energies offers a physics-based approach to attack this challenging problem. The inclusion of a basic radionuclide representation of absorbed/scattered photons at a given energy along with interarrival times is used to extract the physics information available from the noisy measurements portable radiation detection systems used to interdict contraband. It is shown that this physics representation can incorporated scattering physics leading to an 'extended' model-based structure that can be used to develop an effective sequential detection technique. The resulting model-based processor is shown to perform quite well based on data obtained from a controlled experiment.

  1. Measurement of an inverse Compton scattering source local spectrum using k-edge filters

    SciTech Connect

    Golosio, Bruno; Oliva, Piernicola; Carpinelli, Massimo; Endrizzi, Marco; Delogu, Pasquale; Pogorelsky, Igor; Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2012-04-16

    X-ray sources based on the inverse Compton scattering process are attracting a growing interest among scientists, due to their extremely fast pulse, quasi-monochromatic spectrum, and relatively high intensity. The energy spectrum of the x-ray beam produced by inverse Compton scattering sources in a fixed observation direction is a quasi-monochromatic approximately Gaussian distribution. The mean value of this distribution varies with the scattering polar angle between the electron beam direction and the x-ray beam observation direction. Previous works reported experimental measurements of the mean energy as a function of the polar angle. This work introduces a method for the measurement of the whole local energy spectrum (i.e., the spectrum in a fixed observation direction) of the x-ray beam yielded by inverse Compton scattering sources, based on a k-edge filtering technique.

  2. Virtual Compton scattering and neutral pion electroproduction in the resonance region up to the deep inelastic region at backward angles

    SciTech Connect

    Laveissiere, G.; Jaminion, S.; Salvo, R. Di; Berthot, J.; Bertin, P. Y.; Breton, V.; Fonvieille, H.; Grenier, P.; Ravel, O.; Roblin, Y.; Smirnov, G.; Jutier, C.; Hyde, C. E.; Todor, L.; Dodge, G. E.; McCormick, K.; Ulmer, P. E.

    2009-01-15

    We have made the first measurements of the virtual Compton scattering (VCS) process via the H(e, e{sup '}p){gamma} exclusive reaction in the nucleon resonance region, at backward angles. Results are presented for the W-dependence at fixed Q{sup 2}=1 GeV{sup 2} and for the Q{sup 2} dependence at fixed W near 1.5 GeV. The VCS data show resonant structures in the first and second resonance regions. The observed Q{sup 2} dependence is smooth. The measured ratio of H(e, e{sup '}p){gamma} to H(e, e{sup '}p){pi}{sup 0} cross sections emphasizes the different sensitivity of these two reactions to the various nucleon resonances. Finally, when compared to real Compton scattering (RCS) at high energy and large angles, our VCS data at the highest W (1.8-1.9 GeV) show a striking Q{sup 2} independence, which may suggest a transition to a perturbative scattering mechanism at the quark level.

  3. Exclusive Vector Meson Production and Deep Virtual Compton Scattering in Electron-Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cazaroto, E. R.; Navarra, F. S.; Carvalho, F.; Kugeratski, M. S.; Goncalves, V. P.

    2010-11-12

    We calculate the nuclear cross section for coherent and incoherent deep virtual Compton scattering as well as for coherent and incoherent vector meson production for the mesons J/{Psi}, {phi} and {rho} within the QCD color dipole picture, including saturation effects. Theoretical estimates for scattering on both light and heavy nuclei are given over a wide range of energy.

  4. Test of Compton camera components for prompt gamma imaging at the ELBE bremsstrahlung beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso-González, F.; Golnik, C.; Berthel, M.; Dreyer, A.; Enghardt, W.; Fiedler, F.; Heidel, K.; Kormoll, T.; Rohling, H.; Schöne, S.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.; Pausch, G.

    2014-05-01

    In the context of ion beam therapy, particle range verification is a major challenge for the quality assurance of the treatment. One approach is the measurement of the prompt gamma rays resulting from the tissue irradiation. A Compton camera based on several position sensitive gamma ray detectors, together with an imaging algorithm, is expected to reconstruct the prompt gamma ray emission density map, which is correlated with the dose distribution. At OncoRay and Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), a Compton camera setup is being developed consisting of two scatter planes: two CdZnTe (CZT) cross strip detectors, and an absorber consisting of one Lu2SiO5 (LSO) block detector. The data acquisition is based on VME electronics and handled by software developed on the ROOT framework. The setup has been tested at the linear electron accelerator ELBE at HZDR, which is used in this experiment to produce bunched bremsstrahlung photons with up to 12.5 MeV energy and a repetition rate of 13 MHz. Their spectrum has similarities with the shape expected from prompt gamma rays in the clinical environment, and the flux is also bunched with the accelerator frequency. The charge sharing effect of the CZT detector is studied qualitatively for different energy ranges. The LSO detector pixel discrimination resolution is analyzed and it shows a trend to improve for high energy depositions. The time correlation between the pulsed prompt photons and the measured detector signals, to be used for background suppression, exhibits a time resolution of 3 ns FWHM for the CZT detector and of 2 ns for the LSO detector. A time walk correction and pixel-wise calibration is applied for the LSO detector, whose resolution improves up to 630 ps. In conclusion, the detector setup is suitable for time-resolved background suppression in pulsed clinical particle accelerators. Ongoing tasks are the quantitative comparison with simulations and the test of imaging algorithms. Experiments at proton accelerators have also been performed and are currently under analysis.

  5. Compton DIV: Using a Compton-Based Gamma-Ray Imager for Design Information Verification of Uranium Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Burks, M; Verbeke, J; Dougan, A; Wang, T; Decman, D

    2009-07-04

    A feasibility study has been performed to determine the potential usefulness of Compton imaging as a tool for design information verification (DIV) of uranium enrichment plants. Compton imaging is a method of gamma-ray imaging capable of imaging with a 360-degree field of view over a broad range of energies. These systems can image a room (with a time span on the order of one hour) and return a picture of the distribution and composition of radioactive material in that room. The effectiveness of Compton imaging depends on the sensitivity and resolution of the instrument as well the strength and energy of the radioactive material to be imaged. This study combined measurements and simulations to examine the specific issue of UF{sub 6} gas flow in pipes, at various enrichment levels, as well as hold-up resulting from the accumulation of enriched material in those pipes. It was found that current generation imagers could image pipes carrying UF{sub 6} in less than one hour at moderate to high enrichment. Pipes with low enriched gas would require more time. It was also found that hold-up was more amenable to this technique and could be imaged in gram quantities in a fraction of an hour. another questions arises regarding the ability to separately image two pipes spaced closely together. This depends on the capabilities of the instrument in question. These results are described in detail. In addition, suggestions are given as to how to develop Compton imaging as a tool for DIV.

  6. New approach to low energy virtual Compton scattering and generalized polarizabilities of the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Gorchtein, M.

    2010-01-15

    Virtual Compton scattering off the nucleon (VCS) is studied in the regime of low energy of the outgoing real photon. This regime allows one to directly access the generalized polarizabilities of the nucleon in a VCS experiment. In the derivation of the low energy theorem for VCS that exists in the literature, the low energy limit taken for virtual initial photons does not match on that for real photons, when one approaches the initial photon's mass shell. While this problem has for a long time been attributed to the nonanalyticity of the Compton amplitude with respect to the photon virtuality, I demonstrate that it is merely due to an ill-defined low energy limit for VCS, on one hand, and to a particular way of constructing the VCS amplitude, used in the literature, on the other. I provide a uniform description of low energy Compton scattering with real and virtual photons by defining a Lorentz-covariant operator sub-basis for Compton scattering in that regime, which has six independent structures. Correspondingly, six new generalized polarizabilities are introduced in the Breit frame. These polarizabilities are defined as continuous functions of the photon virtuality and at the real photon point match onto the nucleon polarizabilities known from real Compton scattering.

  7. Photon Plasma-Wave Interaction via Compton Scattering

    E-print Network

    Galina Erochenkova; Cristel Chandre

    2012-08-16

    The Kompaneets theory of photon kinetic evolution due to the Compton effect is extended to the case of the Vlasov plasma wave oscillations. Taking into account Zel'dovich-Levich's approximation we study interaction of accumulating photons with plasma in the long wavelength limit.

  8. OBSERVATION OF DIFFUSE COSMIC AND ATMOSPHERIC GAMMA RAYS AT BALLOON ALTITUDES WITH AN ELECTRON-TRACKING COMPTON CAMERA

    SciTech Connect

    Takada, Atsushi; Nonaka, Naoki; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Nishimura, Hironobu; Ueno, Kazuki; Hattori, Kaori; Kabuki, Shigeto; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Miuchi, Kentaro; Nagayoshi, Tsutomu; Okada, Yoko; Orito, Reiko; Sekiya, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Atsushi; Tanimori, Toru; Mizuta, Eiichi

    2011-05-20

    We observed diffuse cosmic and atmospheric gamma rays at balloon altitudes with the Sub-MeV gamma-ray Imaging Loaded-on-balloon Experiment I (SMILE-I) as the first step toward a future all-sky survey with a high sensitivity. SMILE-I employed an electron-tracking Compton camera comprised of a gaseous electron tracker as a Compton-scattering target and a scintillation camera as an absorber. The balloon carrying the SMILE-I detector was launched from the Sanriku Balloon Center of the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science/Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency on 2006 September 1, and the flight lasted for 6.8 hr, including level flight for 4.1 hr at an altitude of 32-35 km. During the level flight, we successfully detected 420 downward gamma rays between 100 keV and 1 MeV at zenith angles below 60 deg. To obtain the flux of diffuse cosmic gamma rays, we first simulated their scattering in the atmosphere using Geant4, and for gamma rays detected at an atmospheric depth of 7.0 g cm{sup -2} we found that 50% and 21% of the gamma rays at energies of 150 keV and 1 MeV, respectively, were scattered in the atmosphere prior to reaching the detector. Moreover, by using Geant4 simulations and the QinetiQ atmospheric radiation model, we estimated that the detected events consisted of diffuse cosmic and atmospheric gamma rays (79%), secondary photons produced in the instrument through the interaction between cosmic rays and materials surrounding the detector (19%), and other particles (2%). The obtained growth curve was comparable to Ling's model, and the fluxes of diffuse cosmic and atmospheric gamma rays were consistent with the results of previous experiments. The expected detection sensitivity of a future SMILE experiment measuring gamma rays between 150 keV and 20 MeV was estimated from our SMILE-I results and was found to be 10 times better than that of other experiments at around 1 MeV.

  9. Differential hard x-ray imaging of HED/ICF plasmas using Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartemann, Frederic

    2014-10-01

    Tunable, narrow-bandwidth, picosecond x-ray pulses can be produced via Compton scattering. Such pulses can be used for high-contrast K-edge imaging of specific ions in a plasma. In addition, the K-edge shift due to ionization and screening could also be studied using such x-rays. Details of a Compton scattering x-ray source will be presented, along with methods for spectral resolution and imaging, and information retrieval of the ion states and plasma conditions. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. Techniques and use of a tunable, laser-based, MeV-Class Compton scattering light source

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Hagmann, C A; Johnson, M S; Messerly, M; Semenov, V; Shverdin, M Y; Rusnak, B; Tremaine, A M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C P

    2009-06-30

    A Compton scattering {gamma}-ray source, capable of producing photons with energies ranging from 0.1 MeV to 0.9 MeV has been commissioned and characterized, and then used to perform nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) experiments. The key source parameters are the size (0.01 mm{sup 2}), horizontal and vertical divergence (6 x 10 mrad{sup 2}), duration (10 ps), spectrum and intensity (10{sup 5} photons/shot). These parameters are summarized by the peak brightness, 1.5 x 10{sup 15} photons/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/s/0.1%bandwidth, measured at 478 keV. Additional measurements of the flux as a function of the timing difference between the drive laser pulse and the relativistic photoelectron bunch, {gamma}-ray beam profile, and background evaluations are presented. These results are systematically compared to theoretical models and computer simulations. NRF measurements performed on {sup 7}Li in LiH demonstrate the potential of Compton scattering photon sources to accurately detect isotopes in situ.

  11. Evaluation of geometrical contributions to the spread of the Compton-scatter energy distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, A. L.; Gigante, G. E.

    1989-07-01

    The spectrum from Compton-scattered x rays is an inherently broad distribution. This distribution is the sum of several Gaussian-like distributions, which gives the sum its unique shape. The Gaussian-like distributions are the result of convoluting the so-called Compton profile, the spread in the scattered-x-ray energies due to the momentum distributions of the target electrons, with the detector response and the geometrical effects. The distribution is then further modified by the absorption within the sample. A formulation for both qualitatively and quantitatively determining the magnitude of the geometrical contributions is presented. This formulation is based on a recently devised approach to the scattering geometry [Hanson, Gigante, Meron, Phys. Rev. Lett. 61, 135 (1988)]. A methodology for determining the geometrical spread in the energy of the scattered x rays is presented. The results can be conveniently used to optimize scattering geometries for the reduction of the geometry-caused spread.

  12. Gamma-Ray Bursts from Up-Scattered Self-Absorbed Synchrotron Emission

    E-print Network

    A. Panaitescu; P. Meszaros

    2000-09-19

    We calculate the synchrotron self-Compton emission from internal shocks occurring in relativistic winds as a source of gamma-ray bursts, with allowance for self-absorption. For plausible model parameters most pulses within a Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) are optically thick to synchrotron self-absorption at the frequency at which most electrons radiate. Up-scattering of photon number spectra harder than $\

  13. Gamma-Ray Bursts from Up-Scattered Self-Absorbed Synchrotron Emission

    E-print Network

    Panaitescu, A

    2000-01-01

    We calculate the synchrotron self-Compton emission from internal shocks occurring in relativistic winds as a source of gamma-ray bursts, with allowance for self-absorption. For plausible model parameters most pulses within a Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) are optically thick to synchrotron self-absorption at the frequency at which most electrons radiate. Up-scattering of photon number spectra harder than $\

  14. Photon plasma–wave interaction via Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erochenkova, G.; Chandre, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Kompaneets theory of photon kinetic evolution due to the Compton effect in the absence of absorption and emission is extended to the case of the Vlasov plasma wave oscillations. Under the assumption that the electron distribution function at equilibrium is perturbed by a solution of the linearized Vlasov equation in the long-wavelength limit, a solution of the Kompaneets kinetic equation for the photon distribution function is found and discussed.

  15. Photon plasma--wave interaction via Compton scattering

    E-print Network

    G Erochenkova; Cristel Chandre

    2015-11-25

    The Kompaneets theory of photon kinetic evolution due to the Compton effect in the absence of absorption and emission is extended to the case of the Vlasov plasma wave oscillations. Under the assumption that the electron distribution function at equilibrium is perturbed by a solution of the linearised Vlasov equation in the long-wavelength limit, a solution of the Kompaneets kinetic equation for the photon distribution function is found and discussed.

  16. Photon plasma--wave interaction via Compton scattering

    E-print Network

    Erochenkova, G

    2015-01-01

    The Kompaneets theory of photon kinetic evolution due to the Compton effect in the absence of absorption and emission is extended to the case of the Vlasov plasma wave oscillations. Under the assumption that the electron distribution function at equilibrium is perturbed by a solution of the linearised Vlasov equation in the long-wavelength limit, a solution of the Kompaneets kinetic equation for the photon distribution function is found and discussed.

  17. Modeling and simulation results on a new Compton scattering tomography modality

    E-print Network

    Nguyen-Verger, Maï K.

    (X-ray scanner, Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography, Positron Emission Tomography, etc to the X-ray scanning tomography, in the sense that it works in transmission modality but uses Compton For more than fifty years, transmitted penetrating radiation such as X- or gamma-rays have been routinely

  18. Development of a High-Average-Power Compton Gamma Source for Lepton Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, Igor; Polyanskiy, Mikhail N.; Yakimenko, Vitaliy; Platonenko, Viktor T.

    2009-01-22

    Gamma-({gamma}{sup -}) ray beams of high average power and peak brightness are of demand for a number of applications in high-energy physics, material processing, medicine, etc. One of such examples is gamma conversion into polarized positrons and muons that is under consideration for projected lepton colliders. A {gamma}-source based on the Compton backscattering from the relativistic electron beam is a promising candidate for this application. Our approach to the high-repetition {gamma}-source assumes placing the Compton interaction point inside a CO{sub 2} laser cavity. A laser pulse interacts with periodical electron bunches on each round-trip inside the laser cavity producing the corresponding train of {gamma}-pulses. The round-trip optical losses can be compensated by amplification in the active laser medium. The major challenge for this approach is in maintaining stable amplification rate for a picosecond CO{sub 2}-laser pulse during multiple resonator round-trips without significant deterioration of its temporal and transverse profiles. Addressing this task, we elaborated on a computer code that allows identifying the directions and priorities in the development of such a multi-pass picosecond CO{sub 2} laser. Proof-of-principle experiments help to verify the model and show the viability of the concept. In these tests we demonstrated extended trains of picosecond CO{sub 2} laser pulses circulating inside the cavity that incorporates the Compton interaction point.

  19. Evaluation of the forward Compton scattering off protons: Spin-independent amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryniuk, Oleksii; Hagelstein, Franziska; Pascalutsa, Vladimir

    2015-10-01

    We evaluate the forward Compton scattering off the proton, based on Kramers-Kronig kind of relations which express the Compton amplitudes in terms of integrals of total photoabsorption cross sections. We obtain two distinct fits to the world data on the unpolarized total photoabsorption cross section and evaluate the various spin-independent sum rules using these fits. For the sum of proton electric and magnetic dipole polarizabilities governed by the Baldin sum rule, we obtain the following average (between the two fits): ?E 1+?M 1=14.0 (2 )×1 0-4 fm3 . An analogous sum rule involving the quadrupole polarizabilities of the proton is evaluated too. The spin-independent forward amplitude of proton Compton scattering is evaluated in a broad energy range. The results are compared with previous evaluations and the only experimental data point for this amplitude (at 2.2 GeV). We remark on sum rules for the elastic component of polarizabilities.

  20. Spatially resolved hard X-ray polarization in solar flares: effects of Compton scattering and bremsstrahlung

    E-print Network

    Jeffrey, Natasha

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to study the polarization of hard X-ray (HXR) sources in the solar atmosphere, including Compton backscattering of photons in the photosphere (the albedo effect) and the spatial distribution of polarization across the source. HXR photon polarization and spectra produced via electron-ion bremsstrahlung are calculated from electron distributions typical for solar flares. Compton scattering and photoelectric absorption are then modelled using Monte Carlo simulations of photon transport in the photosphere. Polarization maps across HXR sources (primary and albedo components) for each of the modelled electron distributions are calculated at various source locations from the solar centre to the limb. We show that Compton scattering produces a distinct polarization variation across the albedo patch at peak albedo energies of 20-50 keV for all anisotropies modelled. The results show that there are distinct spatial polarization changes in both the radial and perpendicular to radial directions across the...

  1. Sensitivity booster for DOI-PET scanner by utilizing Compton scattering events between detector blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Eiji; Tashima, Hideaki; Yamaya, Taiga

    2014-11-01

    In a conventional PET scanner, coincidence events are measured with a limited energy window for detection of photoelectric events in order to reject Compton scatter events that occur in a patient, but Compton scatter events caused in detector crystals are also rejected. Scatter events within the patient causes scatter coincidences, but inter crystal scattering (ICS) events have useful information for determining an activity distribution. Some researchers have reported the feasibility of PET scanners based on a Compton camera for tracing ICS into the detector. However, these scanners require expensive semiconductor detectors for high-energy resolution. In the Anger-type block detector, single photons interacting with multiple detectors can be obtained for each interacting position and complete information can be gotten just as for photoelectric events in the single detector. ICS events in the single detector have been used to get coincidence, but single photons interacting with multiple detectors have not been used to get coincidence. In this work, we evaluated effect of sensitivity improvement using Compton kinetics in several types of DOI-PET scanners. The proposed method promises to improve the sensitivity using coincidence events of single photons interacting with multiple detectors, which are identified as the first interaction (FI). FI estimation accuracy can be improved to determine FI validity from the correlation between Compton scatter angles calculated on the coincidence line-of-response. We simulated an animal PET scanner consisting of 42 detectors. Each detector block consists of three types of scintillator crystals (LSO, GSO and GAGG). After the simulation, coincidence events are added as information for several depth-of-interaction (DOI) resolutions. From the simulation results, we concluded the proposed method promises to improve the sensitivity considerably when effective atomic number of a scintillator is low. Also, we showed that FI estimate accuracy is improved, as DOI resolution is high.

  2. Compton Scattering from Deuterium and the Electromagnetic Polarizabilities of the Neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Gerald; Compton@MAX-Lab Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The electric and magnetic polarizabilities of the neutron are still relatively uncertain, as compared to those values for the proton. To address this problem, a multi-institutional collaboration has conducted a program of elastic Compton scattering experiments on deuterium at the MAX IV Laboratory in Lund, Sweden using tagged photons spanning the energy range E? = 65-115 MeV. We assembled at one laboratory, for the first time, three of the world's largest NaI detectors (each with ?E / E ~ 2%) and measured elastic Compton scattering cross sections at lab angles of ?? = 60º, 120º and 150º. This effectively doubles the world's set of elastic Compton scattering data from deuterium and provides valuable input for chiral effective field theory (?EFT) calculations. The absolute normalization of the current data was rigorously checked via separate measurements of elastic Compton scattering on carbon, which can be compared with precise values in the literature. These new deuterium data overlap previous measurements and extend them by 20 MeV to higher energies. Based on ?EFT fits to the expanded world data set, new values for the neutron electric and magnetic polarizabilities have been obtained with greater accuracy than previously achieved, decreasing the statistical error by more than 30%.

  3. Design of a Polarised Positron Source Based on Laser Compton Scattering

    E-print Network

    Araki, S; Honda, Y; Kurihara, Y; Kuriki, M; Okugi, T; Omori, T; Taniguchi, T; Terunuma, N; Urakawa, J; Artru, X; Chevallier, M; Strakhovenko, V M; Bulyak, E; Gladkikh, P; Mönig, K; Chehab, R; Variola, A; Zomer, F; Guiducci, S; Raimondi, Pantaleo; Zimmermann, Frank; Sakaue, K; Hirose, T; Washio, M; Sasao, N; Yokoyama, H; Fukuda, M; Hirano, K; Takano, M; Takahashi, T; Sato, H; Tsunemi, A; Gao, J; Soskov, V

    2005-01-01

    We describe a scheme for producing polarised positrons at the ILC from polarised X-rays created by Compton scattering of a few-GeV electron beam off a CO2 or YAG laser. This scheme is very energy effective using high finesse laser cavities in conjunction with an electron storage ring.

  4. Polarization Transfer in Wide-Angle Compton Scattering and Single-Pion Photoproduction from the Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanelli, C.; Cisbani, E.; Hamilton, D. J.; Salmé, G.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Ahmidouch, A.; Annand, J. R. M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Beaufait, J.; Bosted, P.; Brash, E. J.; Butuceanu, C.; Carter, P.; Christy, E.; Chudakov, E.; Danagoulian, S.; Day, D.; Degtyarenko, P.; Ent, R.; Fenker, H.; Fowler, M.; Frlez, E.; Gaskell, D.; Gilman, R.; Horn, T.; Huber, G. M.; de Jager, C. W.; Jensen, E.; Jones, M. K.; Kelleher, A.; Keppel, C.; Khandaker, M.; Kohl, M.; Kumbartzki, G.; Lassiter, S.; Li, Y.; Lindgren, R.; Lovelace, H.; Luo, W.; Mack, D.; Mamyan, V.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Maxwell, J.; Mbianda, G.; Meekins, D.; Meziane, M.; Miller, J.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Mulholland, J.; Nelyubin, V.; Pentchev, L.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Piasetzky, E.; Prok, Y.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Punjabi, V.; Shabestari, M.; Shahinyan, A.; Slifer, K.; Smith, G.; Solvignon, P.; Subedi, R.; Wesselmann, F. R.; Wood, S.; Ye, Z.; Zheng, X.

    2015-10-01

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The wide-angle Compton scattering polarization transfer was analyzed at an incident photon energy of 3.7 GeV at a proton scattering angle of ?cmp=70 ° . The longitudinal transfer KLL, measured to be 0.645 ±0.059 ±0.048 , where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, has the same sign as predicted for the reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton. However, the observed value is ˜3 times larger than predicted by the generalized-parton-distribution-based calculations, which indicates a significant unknown contribution to the scattering amplitude.

  5. Precise tests of x-ray scattering theories in the Compton regime.

    SciTech Connect

    Dunford, R. W.; Gemmell, D. S.; Kanter, E. P.; Krassig, B.; Southworth, S. H.; Young, L.

    1999-01-15

    The authors report two experiments intended to test the accuracy of state-of-the-art theoretical predictions for x-ray scattering from low-Z atoms. The first one deals with the differential x-ray scattering cross sections in Ne and He from 11-22 keV and the Ne Compton-to-Rayleigh scattering ratio in this energy range. It was found that, in order to be consistent with the experimental results, an accurate description at low Z must include nonlocal exchange, electron correlation, and dynamic effects. The second experiment concerns the ratio of helium double-to-single ionization for Compton scattering in the 8-28 keV energy range where published experimental and theoretical results so far fail to give a consistent picture. The progress of the experiment and the data analysis is reported.

  6. Polarization Transfer in Wide-Angle Compton Scattering and Single-Pion Photoproduction from the Proton

    E-print Network

    C. Fanelli; E. Cisbani; D. J. Hamilton; G. Salme; B. Wojtsekhowski; A. Ahmidouch; J. R. M. Annand; H. Baghdasaryan; J. Beaufait; P. Bosted; E. J. Brash; C. Butuceanu; P. Carter; E. Christy; E. Chudakov; S. Danagoulian; D. Day; P. Degtyarenko; R. Ent; H. Fenker; M. Fowler; E. Frlez; D. Gaskell; R. Gilman; T. Horn; G. M. Huber; C. W. de Jager; E. Jensen; M. K. Jones; A. Kelleher; C. Keppel; M. Khandaker; M. Kohl; G. Kumbartzki; S. Lassiter; Y. Li; R. Lindgren; H. Lovelace; W. Luo; D. Mack; V. Mamyan; D. J. Margaziotis; P. Markowitz; J. Maxwell; G. Mbianda; D. Meekins; M. Meziane; J. Miller; A. Mkrtchyan; H. Mkrtchyan; J. Mulholland; V. Nelyubin; L. Pentchev; C. F. Perdrisat; E. Piasetzky; Y. Prok; A. J. R. Puckett; V. Punjabi; M. Shabestari; A. Shahinyan; K. Slifer; G. Smith; P. Solvignon; R. Subedi; F. R. Wesselmann; S. Wood; Z. Ye; X. Zheng

    2015-10-07

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The wide-angle Compton scattering polarization transfer was analyzed at an incident photon energy of 3.7~GeV at a proton scattering angle of \\cma$= 70^\\circ$. The longitudinal transfer \\KLL, measured to be $0.645 \\pm 0.059 \\pm 0.048$, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, has the same sign as predicted for the reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton. However, the observed value is $\\sim$3~times larger than predicted by the generalized-parton-distribution-based calculations, which indicates a significant unknown contribution to the scattering amplitude.

  7. Compton-suppression gamma counting in the neutron activation analysis measurement of noble metals

    SciTech Connect

    Millard, H.T. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Recent interest in studying elemental abundance anomalies associated with the Cretaceous and Tertiary (K-T) boundary in geologic strata has increased the importance of analytical methods for the determination of low levels of iridium and other noble metals. The determination of iridium anomalies that are in the range from 1 to 100 {mu}g/kg (ppb) requires radiochemical separation procedures following neutron activation. Faster and less laborious instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA) techniques using elaborate Compton-suppression gamma counters are under development. Compton-suppression gamma counting (CSGC) uses anticoincidence shielded Ge(Li) detectors that enhance the signal-to-background ratios for gamma photopeaks situated on high Compton backgrounds. In this method, an anti- or noncoincidence spectrum and a coincidence spectrum are collected simultaneously. Most Compton-suppression counting has been done at low count rates, but neutron-activated samples ordinarily produce much higher count rates. In the work reported in this paper, K-T boundary and adjacent samples were neutron irradiated, the noble metals separated as a group, and the noble metal group separately counted using CSGC. Iridium, gold, platinum, and silver were determined. The counting data from these analyses were available for a thorough evaluation of the value of CSGC to the determination of this particular suite of noble metals in geologic samples.

  8. Inverse-Compton Contribution to the Star-forming Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Nachiketa; Fields, Brian D.

    2013-08-01

    Fermi has resolved several star-forming galaxies, but the vast majority of the star-forming universe is unresolved, and thus contributes to the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGB). Here, we calculate the contribution of star-forming galaxies to the EGB in the Fermi range from 100 MeV to 100 GeV due to inverse-Compton (IC) scattering of the interstellar photon field by cosmic-ray electrons. We first construct one-zone models for individual star-forming galaxies assuming that supernovae power the acceleration of cosmic rays. We develop templates for both normal and starburst galaxies, accounting for differences in the cosmic-ray electron propagation and in the interstellar radiation fields. For both types of star-forming galaxies, the same IC interactions leading to gamma rays also substantially contribute to the energy loss of the high-energy cosmic-ray electrons. Consequently, a galaxy's IC emission is determined by the relative importance of IC losses in the cosmic-ray electron energy budget ("partial calorimetry"). We calculate the cosmological contribution of star-forming galaxies to the EGB using our templates and the cosmic star formation rate distribution. For all of our models, we find that the IC EGB contribution is almost an order of magnitude less than the peak of the emission due to cosmic-ray ion interactions (mostly pionic p cr p ism ? ?0 ? ??) even at the highest Fermi energies, IC is subdominant. The flatter IC spectrum increases the high-energy signal of the pionic+IC sum, bringing it closer to the EGB spectral index observed by Fermi. Partial calorimetry ensures that the overall IC signal is relatively well constrained, with only uncertainties in the amplitude and spectral shape for plausible model choices. We conclude with a brief discussion on how the pionic spectral feature and other methods can be used to measure the star-forming component of the EGB.

  9. Intershell correlations in nonresonant Compton scattering of an X-ray photon by an atom

    SciTech Connect

    Hopersky, A. N. Nadolinsky, A. M.; Ikoeva, K. Kh.; Khoroshavina, O. A.

    2011-11-15

    The role of intershell correlations in nonresonant Compton scattering of an X-ray photon by a free multielectron atom is studied theoretically for the Ar atom. The results of calculation are of a predictive nature. The developed mathematical formalism is general in nature and can be applied to a wide set of elements from the Periodic Table, for which the description of the wavefunctions of scattering states in the nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock approximation remains correct.

  10. Global phase and frequency comb structures in nonlinear Compton and Thomson scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajewska, K.; Twardy, M.; Kami?ski, J. Z.

    2014-05-01

    The Compton and Thomson radiation spectra generated in collisions of an electron beam with a powerful laser beam are studied in the framework of quantum and classical electrodynamics, respectively. We show that there are frequency regimes where both radiation spectra are nearly identical, which for Compton scattering relates to the process which preserves the electron spin. Although the radiation spectra are nearly identical, the corresponding probability amplitudes exhibit different global phases. This has pronounced consequences, which we demonstrate by investigating temporal power distributions in both cases. We show that, contrary to Thomson scattering, it is not always possible to synthesize short laser pulses from Compton radiation. This happens when the global phase of the Compton amplitude varies in a nonlinear way with the frequency of emitted photons. We also demonstrate that, while the Compton process driven by a nonchirped laser pulse can generate chirped bursts of radiation, this is not the case for the Thomson process. In principle, both processes can lead to a generation of coherent frequency combs when single or multiple driving laser pulse collide with electrons. Once we synthesize these combs into short bursts of radiation, we can control them, for instance, by changing the time delay between the driving pulses.

  11. Global phase and frequency comb structures in nonlinear Compton and Thomson scattering

    E-print Network

    K. Krajewska; M. Twardy; J. Z. Kami?ski

    2014-03-17

    The Compton and Thomson radiation spectra, generated in collisions of an electron beam with a powerful laser beam, are studied in the framework of quantum and classical electrodynamics, respectively. We show that there are frequency regimes where both radiation spectra are nearly identical, which for Compton scattering relates to the process which preserves the electron spin. Although the radiation spectra are nearly identical, the corresponding probability amplitudes exhibit different global phases. This has pronounced consequences, which we demonstrate by investigating temporal power distributions in both cases. We show that, contrary to Thomson scattering, it is not always possible to synthesize short laser pulses from Compton radiation. This happens when the global phase of the Compton amplitude varies in a nonlinear way with the frequency of emitted photons. We also demonstrate that while the Compton process driven by a non-chirped laser pulse can generate chirped bursts of radiation, this is not the case for the Thomson process. In principle, both processes can lead to a generation of coherent frequency combs when single or multiple driving laser pulses collide with electrons. Once we synthesize these combs into short bursts of radiation, we can control them, for instance, by changing the time delay between the driving pulses.

  12. INVERSE-COMPTON CONTRIBUTION TO THE STAR-FORMING EXTRAGALACTIC GAMMA-RAY BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Nachiketa; Fields, Brian D.

    2013-08-20

    Fermi has resolved several star-forming galaxies, but the vast majority of the star-forming universe is unresolved, and thus contributes to the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGB). Here, we calculate the contribution of star-forming galaxies to the EGB in the Fermi range from 100 MeV to 100 GeV due to inverse-Compton (IC) scattering of the interstellar photon field by cosmic-ray electrons. We first construct one-zone models for individual star-forming galaxies assuming that supernovae power the acceleration of cosmic rays. We develop templates for both normal and starburst galaxies, accounting for differences in the cosmic-ray electron propagation and in the interstellar radiation fields. For both types of star-forming galaxies, the same IC interactions leading to gamma rays also substantially contribute to the energy loss of the high-energy cosmic-ray electrons. Consequently, a galaxy's IC emission is determined by the relative importance of IC losses in the cosmic-ray electron energy budget ({sup p}artial calorimetry{sup )}. We calculate the cosmological contribution of star-forming galaxies to the EGB using our templates and the cosmic star formation rate distribution. For all of our models, we find that the IC EGB contribution is almost an order of magnitude less than the peak of the emission due to cosmic-ray ion interactions (mostly pionic p{sub cr} p{sub ism} {yields} {pi}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}); even at the highest Fermi energies, IC is subdominant. The flatter IC spectrum increases the high-energy signal of the pionic+IC sum, bringing it closer to the EGB spectral index observed by Fermi. Partial calorimetry ensures that the overall IC signal is relatively well constrained, with only uncertainties in the amplitude and spectral shape for plausible model choices. We conclude with a brief discussion on how the pionic spectral feature and other methods can be used to measure the star-forming component of the EGB.

  13. New approach to low energy Virtual Compton Scattering and generalized polarizabilities of the nucleon

    E-print Network

    Gorchtein, Mikhail

    2009-01-01

    Virtual Compton scattering off the nucleon (VCS) is studied in the regime of low energy of the outgoing real photon. This regime allows one to directly access the generalized polarizabilities of the nucleon in a VCS experiment. In the derivation of the low energy theorem for VCS that exists in the literature, the low energy limit taken for virtual initial photons does not match on that for real photons, when one approaches the initial photon's mass shell. While this problem has for a long time been attributed to the non-analyticity of the Compton amplitude with respect to the photon virtuality, I demonstrate that it is merely due to an ill-defined low energy limit for VCS, on one hand, and to a particular way of constructing the VCS amplitude, use in the literature, on the other. I provide a uniform description of low energy Compton scattering with real and virtual photons by defining a Lorentz-covariant operator sub-basis for Compton scattering in that regime, that has six independent structures. Correspondi...

  14. J =0 fixed pole and D -term form factor in deeply virtual Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, D.; Semenov-Tian-Shansky, K. M.

    2015-10-01

    Brodsky, Llanes-Estrada, and Szczepaniak emphasized the importance of the J =0 fixed-pole manifestation in real and (deeply) virtual Compton scattering measurements and argued that the J =0 fixed pole is universal, i.e., independent on the photon virtualities [Phys. Rev. D 79, 033012 (2009)]. In this paper we review the J =0 fixed-pole issue in deeply virtual Compton scattering. We employ the dispersive approach to derive the sum rule that connects the J =0 fixed-pole contribution and the subtraction constant, called the D -term form factor for deeply virtual Compton scattering. We show that in the Bjorken limit the J =0 fixed-pole universality hypothesis is equivalent to the conjecture that the D -term form factor is given by the inverse moment sum rule for the Compton form factor. This implies that the D -term is an inherent part of the corresponding generalized parton distribution (GPD). Any supplementary D -term added to a GPD results in an additional J =0 fixed-pole contribution and implies the violation of the universality hypothesis. We argue that there exists no theoretical proof for the J =0 fixed-pole universality conjecture.

  15. $J=0$ fixed pole and $D$-term form factor in deeply virtual Compton scattering

    E-print Network

    Dieter Müller; Kirill M. Semenov-Tian-Shansky

    2015-07-08

    S.~Brodsky, F.~J.~Llanes-Estrada, and A.~Szczepaniak emphasized the importance of the $J=0$ fixed pole manifestation in real and (deeply) virtual Compton scattering measurements and argued that the $J=0$ fixed pole is universal, {\\it i.e.}, independent on the photon virtualities \\cite{Brodsky:2008qu}. In this paper we review the $J=0$ fixed pole issue in deeply virtual Compton scattering. We employ the dispersive approach to derive the sum rule that connects the $J=0$ fixed pole contribution and the subtraction constant, called the $D$-term form factor for deeply virtual Compton scattering. We show that in the Bjorken limit the $J=0$ fixed pole universality hypothesis is equivalent to the conjecture that the $D$-term form factor is given by the inverse moment sum rule for the Compton form factor. This implies that the $D$-term is an inherent part of corresponding generalized parton distribution (GPD). Any supplementary $D$-term added to a GPD results in an additional $J=0$ fixed pole contribution and implies the violation of the universality hypothesis. We argue that there exists no theoretical proof for the $J=0$ fixed pole universality conjecture.

  16. Atomic and molecular diamagnetic susceptibilities from Compton scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadre, Shridhar R.; Pathak, Rajeev K.

    1990-04-01

    A procedure is proposed for the extraction of molar Larmor diamagnetic susceptibilities ?L=-N0e2/(6mc2) (N0 is the Avogadro number) for closed-shell atomic and molecular systems, starting exclusively from their electron momentum densities derived from experimental or theoretical Compton profile data. This procedure is essentially founded on a transcription of the coordinate-space nonlocal-density approximation (NLDA) of Gadre and Chakravorty [J. Chem. Phys. 86, 2224 (1987)] to momentum space. Numerical tests of this scheme to a variety of closed-shell systems yield decent estimates of their values which compare well with their experimental or theoretical counterparts.

  17. First refraction contrast imaging via Laser-Compton Scattering X-ray at KEK

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaue, Kazuyuki; Aoki, Tatsuro; Washio, Masakazu; Araki, Sakae; Fukuda, Masafumi; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Urakawa, Junji

    2012-07-31

    Laser-Compton Scattering (LCS) is one of the most feasible techniques for high quality, high brightness, and compact X-ray source. High energy electron beam produced by accelerators scatters off the laser photon at a small spot. As a laser target, we have been developing a pulsedlaser storage cavity for increasing an X-ray flux. The X-ray flux was still inadequate that was 2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5}/sec, however, we performed first refraction contrast imaging in order to evaluate the quality of LCS X-ray. Edge enhanced contrast imaging was achieved by changing the distance from sample to detector. The edge enhancement indicates that the LCS X-ray has small source size, i.e. high brightness. We believe that the result has demonstrated good feasibility of linac-based high brightness X-ray sources via laser-electron Compton scatterings.

  18. The integration of improved Monte Carlo compton scattering algorithms into the Integrated TIGER Series.

    SciTech Connect

    Quirk, Thomas, J., IV

    2004-08-01

    The Integrated TIGER Series (ITS) is a software package that solves coupled electron-photon transport problems. ITS performs analog photon tracking for energies between 1 keV and 1 GeV. Unlike its deterministic counterpart, the Monte Carlo calculations of ITS do not require a memory-intensive meshing of phase space; however, its solutions carry statistical variations. Reducing these variations is heavily dependent on runtime. Monte Carlo simulations must therefore be both physically accurate and computationally efficient. Compton scattering is the dominant photon interaction above 100 keV and below 5-10 MeV, with higher cutoffs occurring in lighter atoms. In its current model of Compton scattering, ITS corrects the differential Klein-Nishina cross sections (which assumes a stationary, free electron) with the incoherent scattering function, a function dependent on both the momentum transfer and the atomic number of the scattering medium. While this technique accounts for binding effects on the scattering angle, it excludes the Doppler broadening the Compton line undergoes because of the momentum distribution in each bound state. To correct for these effects, Ribbefor's relativistic impulse approximation (IA) will be employed to create scattering cross section differential in both energy and angle for each element. Using the parameterizations suggested by Brusa et al., scattered photon energies and angle can be accurately sampled at a high efficiency with minimal physical data. Two-body kinematics then dictates the electron's scattered direction and energy. Finally, the atomic ionization is relaxed via Auger emission or fluorescence. Future work will extend these improvements in incoherent scattering to compounds and to adjoint calculations.

  19. A K edge filter technique for optimization of the coherent-to-Compton scatter ratio method.

    PubMed

    Harding, G; Armstrong, R; McDaid, S; Cooper, M J

    1995-12-01

    The ratio method involves forming the ratio of the elastic to inelastic x-ray scatter signals from a localized region of a scattering medium to determine its mean atomic number. An analysis is presented of two major error sources influencing the ratio method: firstly statistical (photon) noise and secondly multiple scattering and self-attenuation of the primary and scatter radiations in the medium. It is shown that a forward scattering geometry minimizes errors of both types for substances composed of elements with low and medium atomic number. However, owing to the small energy separation (approximately 100 eV) of coherent and Compton scatter for this geometry, they cannot be distinguished directly with semiconductor (e.g., Ge) detectors. A novel K edge filter technique is described which permits separation of the elastic and Compton signals in the forward-scatter geometry. The feasibility of this method is demonstrated by experimental results obtained with Ta fluorescence radiation provided by a fluorescent x-ray source filtered with an Er foil. The extension of this technique to the "in vivo" measurement of low momentum transfer inelastic scattering from biological tissues, possibly providing useful diagnostic information, is briefly discussed. PMID:8746705

  20. Compton scattering of two x-ray photons by an atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopersky, Alexey N.; Nadolinsky, Alexey M.; Novikov, Sergey A.

    2015-11-01

    The process of inelastic nonresonant two x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) photon Compton scattering by a free atom is theoretically investigated. The object of the study is the He atom. We obtain the absolute values and the shape of the double differential scattering cross section. The quantum effect of creation of "hot" scattered photons with maximum energy 2 ? ? -I1 s is predicted (? ? is the energy of the incident XFEL photon on the atom, and I1 s is the energy of the ionization threshold of an atomic 1 s2 shell).

  1. In-Flight Calibration of the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, J. A.; Bertsch, D. L.; Chen, A. W.; Dingus, B. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kanbach, G.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lin, Y. C.; Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.; McDonald, L. M.; Michelson, P. F.; vonMontigny, C.; Mukherjee, R.; Nolan, P. L.; Schneid, E.; Sreekumar, P.; Thompson, D. J.; Tompkins, W. F.

    1998-01-01

    The Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory has been operating for over seven years since its launch in 1991 April. This span of time far exceeds the design lifetime of two years. As the instrument has aged, several changes have occurred due to spark chamber gas exchanges as well as some hardware degradation and failures, all of which have an influence on the instrument sensitivity. This paper describes post-launch measurements and analysis that are done to calibrate the instrument response functions. The updated instrument characteristics are incorporated into the analysis software.

  2. Study of the proton structure by measurements of polarization transfers in real Compton scattering at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Fanelli, Cristiano Fanelli; Cisbani, Evarostp; Hamilton, David; Salme, G.; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B.

    2014-03-01

    A preliminary analysis of polarization-transfer data at large scattering angle (70°), obtained in an experiment of real Compton scattering on proton, performed in Hall-C of Jefferson Lab, is presented. It is also discussed the relevance of this kind of experiments for shedding light on the non-perturbative structure of the proton, at low energy, and on the transition from the non-perturbative regime to the perturbative one, that occurs at high energy. Moreover, the possibility to extract Compton form factors and the Generalized Parton Distributions, one of the most promising theoretical tool to determine the total angular momentum contribution of quarks and gluons to nucleon spin, is emphasized.

  3. Quantitative phase retrieval with picosecond X-ray pulses from the ATF Inverse Compton Scattering source

    SciTech Connect

    Endrizzi, M.; Pogorelsky, I.; Gureyev, T.E.; Delogu, P.; Oliva, P.; Golosio, B.; Carpinelli, M.; Yakimenko, Y.; Bottigli, U.

    2011-01-28

    Quantitative phase retrieval is experimentally demonstrated using the Inverse Compton Scattering X-ray source available at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) in the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Phase-contrast images are collected using in-line geometry, with a single X-ray pulse of approximate duration of one picosecond. The projected thickness of homogeneous samples of various polymers is recovered quantitatively from the time-averaged intensity of transmitted X-rays. The data are in good agreement with the expectations showing that ATF Inverse Compton Scattering source is suitable for performing phase-sensitive quantitative X-ray imaging on the picosecond scale. The method shows promise for quantitative imaging of fast dynamic phenomena.

  4. Beam spin asymmetries in deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) with CLAS at 4.8 GeV

    E-print Network

    Prok, Yelena

    We report measurements of the beam spin asymmetry in deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) at an electron beam energy of 4.8 GeV using the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The DVCS ...

  5. Compact x-ray source based on burst-mode inverse Compton scattering at 100 kHz

    E-print Network

    Bessuille, J.

    A design for a compact x-ray light source (CXLS) with flux and brilliance orders of magnitude beyond existing laboratory scale sources is presented. The source is based on inverse Compton scattering of a high brightness ...

  6. Virtual Compton scattering and neutral pion electroproduction in the resonance region up to the deep inelastic region at backward angles

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Z. -L.

    We have made the first measurements of the virtual Compton scattering (VCS) process via the H(e, e'p)? exclusive reaction in the nucleon resonance region, at backward angles. Results are presented for the W-dependence at ...

  7. ON THE SPECTRAL SHAPE OF RADIATION DUE TO INVERSE COMPTON SCATTERING CLOSE TO THE MAXIMUM CUTOFF

    SciTech Connect

    Lefa, E.; Kelner, S. R.; Aharonian, F. A.

    2012-07-10

    The spectral shape of radiation due to inverse Compton scattering is analyzed in the Thomson and the Klein-Nishina regime for electron distributions with exponential cutoff. We derive analytical, asymptotic expressions for the spectrum close to the maximum cutoff region. We consider monoenergetic, Planckian, and synchrotron photons as target photon fields. These approximations provide a direct link between the distribution of parent electrons and the upscattered spectrum at the cutoff region.

  8. Time-step limits for a Monte Carlo Compton-scattering method

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffery D; Warsa, James S; Lowrie, Robert B

    2009-01-01

    We perform a stability analysis of a Monte Carlo method for simulating the Compton scattering of photons by free electron in high energy density applications and develop time-step limits that avoid unstable and oscillatory solutions. Implementing this Monte Carlo technique in multi physics problems typically requires evaluating the material temperature at its beginning-of-time-step value, which can lead to this undesirable behavior. With a set of numerical examples, we demonstrate the efficacy of our time-step limits.

  9. The BATSE experiment on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory: Status and some early results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Wilson, R. B.; Paciesas, W. S.; Pendleton, G. N.

    1992-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) is a sensitive all-sky detector system. It consists of eight uncollimated detectors at the corners of the spacecraft which have a total energy range of 15 keV to 100 MeV. The primary objective of BATSE is the detection, location, and study of gamma ray bursts and other transient sources. The instrement also has considerable capability for the study of pulsars, solar flares, and other discrete high energy sources. The experiment is now in full operation, detecting about one gamma ray burst per day. A brief description of the on-orbit performance of BATSE is presented, along with examples of early results from some of the gamma ray bursts.

  10. A study on electron density imaging using the Compton scattered X-ray CT technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuji, Ryota; Watanabe, Kenichi; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Uritani, Akira

    2011-10-01

    We propose a novel electron density imaging technique based on a Compton scattered X-ray CT (CSX-CT) technique. We design fundamental configuration of the CSX-CT system, which consists of a fan-shaped X-ray beam, two-dimensional sensors for scattered X-ray detection, parallel plate collimators for limitation of the direction of scattered X-rays and a line sensor for the transmission of X-ray CT (TX-CT). An image obtained by the TX-CT can be used to correct the attenuation effect of scattered X-rays. Through Monte Carlo simulation modeling studies of the CSX-CT system, we demonstrate that the utilization of the information of scattered X-rays is useful to obtain the electron density image. We additionally confirm that the medical exposure irradiated in the CSX-CT is estimated to be lower than the maximum dose recommended in the guideline of some committees.

  11. Development of a High-Average-Power Compton Gamma Source for Lepton Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelsky, Igor; Polyanskiy, Mikhail N.; Yakimenko, Vitaliy; Platonenko, Viktor T.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma- (?-) ray beams of high average power and peak brightness are of demand for a number of applications in high-energy physics, material processing, medicine, etc. One of such examples is gamma conversion into polarized positrons and muons that is under consideration for projected lepton colliders. A ?-source based on the Compton backscattering from the relativistic electron beam is a promising candidate for this application. Our approach to the high-repetition ?-source assumes placing the Compton interaction point inside a CO2 laser cavity. A laser pulse interacts with periodical electron bunches on each round-trip inside the laser cavity producing the corresponding train of ?-pulses. The round-trip optical losses can be compensated by amplification in the active laser medium. The major challenge for this approach is in maintaining stable amplification rate for a picosecond CO2-laser pulse during multiple resonator round-trips without significant deterioration of its temporal and transverse profiles. Addressing this task, we elaborated on a computer code that allows identifying the directions and priorities in the development of such a multi-pass picosecond CO2 laser. Proof-of-principle experiments help to verify the model and show the viability of the concept. In these tests we demonstrated extended trains of picosecond CO2 laser pulses circulating inside the cavity that incorporates the Compton interaction point.

  12. Comptonization signatures in the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Frontera, F.; Farinelli, R.; Dichiara, S.; Guidorzi, C.; Titarchuk, L.; Amati, L.; Landi, R.

    2013-12-20

    We report results of a systematic study of the broadband (2-2000 keV) time-resolved prompt emission spectra of a sample of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected with both Wide Field Cameras (WFCs) on board the BeppoSAX satellite and the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. The main goal of this paper is to test spectral models of the GRB prompt emission that have recently been proposed. In particular, we test a recent photospheric model proposed, i.e., blackbody plus power law, the addition of a blackbody emission to the Band function in the cases in which this function does not fit the data, and a recent Comptonization model. By considering the few spectra for which the simple Band function does not provide a fully acceptable fit to the data, we find a statistically significant better fit by adding a blackbody to this function only in one case. We confirm earlier results found fitting the BATSE spectra alone with a blackbody plus power law. Instead, when the BATSE GRB spectra are joined to those obtained with WFCs (2-28 keV), this model becomes unacceptable in most time intervals in which we subdivide the GRB light curves. We find instead that the Comptonization model is always acceptable, even in the few cases in which the Band function is inconsistent with the data. We discuss the implications of these results.

  13. Deeply-Virtual Compton Scattering on Deuterium and Neon at HERMES

    E-print Network

    F. Ellinghaus; R. Shanidze; J. Volmer; for the HERMES collaboration

    2002-12-09

    We report the first observation of azimuthal beam-spin asymmetries in hard electroproduction of real photons off nuclei. Attributed to the interference between the Bethe-Heitler process and the deeply-virtual Compton scattering process, the asymmetry gives access to the latter at the amplitude level. This process appears to be the theoretically cleanest way to access generalized parton distributions. The data presented here have been accumulated by the HERMES experiment at DESY, scattering the HERA 27.6 GeV positron beam off deuterium and neon gas targets.

  14. Characterization of tissue via coherent-to-Compton scattering ratio: sensitivity considerations.

    PubMed

    Karellas, A; Leichter, I; Craven, J D; Greenfield, M A

    1983-01-01

    It is known that the ratio (R) of the detected coherent and Compton scattered photons from bone can be used in order to determine its mineral density. This technique utilizes the dependence of the coherent scattering on the effective atomic number (Z) of the scattering medium. It is generally accepted that a small scatter angle is preferred in order to ensure adequate counting statistics by favoring the detection of more coherent photons. Moreover, it has been assumed that a change in the scatter angle does not affect the sensitivity of the measurement. Our theoretical calculations for 60-keV photons and for the range of Z that corresponds to trabecular bone, indicate that increasing the scatter angle results in a stronger power dependence of the measured ratio on Z. This implies that by increasing the scatter angle, smaller changes in the mineral density can be detected, thus improving the sensitivity of the measurement. This effect was investigated experimentally by using a collimated beam of 59.54-keV photons from Am-241 (44.4 GBq) and a collimated intrinsic germanium detector. Solutions of K2HPO4 with different concentrations were used in order to simulate trabecular bone. The scatter spectra were recorded for all solutions at six scatter angles between 37 degrees and 98 degrees and the value of R was computed for each spectrum. The sensitivity of the measurement, evaluated from these experiments increased, with the increase of the scatter angle. PMID:6646064

  15. INVERSE COMPTON EMISSION FROM THE PROMPT OPTICAL EMISSION REGION IN GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, X. H.; Dai, Z. G.; Liu, T.; Bai, J. M.

    2010-01-10

    Prompt optical emission accompanying gamma-ray emission has been detected in several gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), and its origin is still under debate. A plausible interpretation is that the prompt optical emission is generated by internal shocks but from regions different from the prompt gamma-ray one. Based on this model, we investigate in detail the inverse Compton (IC) emission including the synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) and second inverse Compton (2IC) ones from the optical emission region. We expect that this study could provide a clue to the origin of prompt optical emission. We first explore the dependence of IC Y factor on some uncertain parameters such as the magnetic field equipartition factor and the Lorentz factor of GRB ejecta. The results indicate that the 2IC emission associated with strong optical flashes (such as GRB 080319b) may be easily detected by Fermi for general parameters. If the SSC peak energy is in the range of tens-to-hundreds keV but generally much weaker than the prompt gamma-ray emission, the component may be detectable by Swift (BAT). For moderately bright optical flashes, the 2IC emission is marginally detectable while the SSC is not. For weak optical flashes, both the 2IC and SSC components are undetectable. We then carry out a numerical calculation of the expected spectrum including synchrotron, SSC, and the 2IC emission for various parameters, which verifies the analytical results. Finally, taking GRB 080319b as an example, we make a simple case study. We find that the detection of the 2IC emission optical region by Fermi is promising. The future simultaneous detection of optical and high energy (MeV-GeV) from the emissions will possibly reveal the nature of the prompt optical emission and allow us to measure the quantities presently unknown such as the bulk Lorentz factor, radiative electrons energy, and magnetic field.

  16. Compton Scattering from the Deuteron below Pion-Production Threshold

    E-print Network

    Luke Myers; John Annand; Jason Brudvik; Gerald Feldman; Kevin Fissum; Harald Grießhammer; Kurt Hansen; Seth Henshaw; Lennart Isaksson; Ramsey Jebali; Michael Kovash; Magnus Lundin; Duncan Middleton; Alan Nathan; Bent Schröder; Sean Stave

    2015-03-27

    Differential cross sections for elastic scattering of photons from the deuteron have recently been measured at the Tagged-Photon Facility at the MAX IV Laboratory in Lund, Sweden. These first new measurements in more than a decade further constrain the isoscalar electromagnetic polarizabilities of the nucleon and provide the first-ever results above 100 MeV, where the sensitivity to the polarizabilities is increased. We add 23 points between 70 and 112 MeV, at angles 60deg, 120deg and 150deg. Analysis of these data using a Chiral Effective Field Theory indicates that the cross sections are both self-consistent and consistent with previous measurements. Extracted values of \\alpha_s = [12.1 +/- 0.8(stat) +/- 0.2(BSR) +/- 0.8(th)] X 10^{-4} fm^3 and \\beta_s = [2.4 +/- 0.8(stat) +/- 0.2(BSR) +/- 0.8(th)] X 10^{-4} fm^3 are obtained from a fit to these 23 new data points. This paper presents in detail the experimental conditions and the data analysis used to extract the cross sections.

  17. Evaluation of the forward Compton scattering off protons: I. Spin-independent amplitude

    E-print Network

    Gryniuk, Oleksii; Pascalutsa, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    We evaluate the forward Compton scattering off the proton, based on Kramers-Kronig kind of relations which express the Compton amplitudes in terms of integrals of total photoabsorption cross sections. We obtain two distinct fits to the world data on the unpolarized total photoabsorption cross section, and evaluate the various spin-independent sum rules using these fits. For the sum of proton electric and magnetic dipole polarizabilities, governed by the Baldin sum rule, we obtain the following average (between the two fits): $\\alpha_{E1}+\\beta_{M1}=(14.0\\pm 0.20)\\times 10^{-4}\\,\\mathrm{fm}^3$. An analogous sum rule involving the quadrupole polarizabilities is evaluated here too. The spin-independent forward amplitude of proton Compton scattering is evaluated in a broad energy range. The results are compared with previous evaluations and the only experimental data point for this amplitude (at 2.2 GeV). We also remark on sum rules for the elastic component of polarizabilities.

  18. Evaluation of the forward Compton scattering off protons: I. Spin-independent amplitude

    E-print Network

    Oleksii Gryniuk; Franziska Hagelstein; Vladimir Pascalutsa

    2015-09-13

    We evaluate the forward Compton scattering off the proton, based on Kramers-Kronig kind of relations which express the Compton amplitudes in terms of integrals of total photoabsorption cross sections. We obtain two distinct fits to the world data on the unpolarized total photoabsorption cross section, and evaluate the various spin-independent sum rules using these fits. For the sum of proton electric and magnetic dipole polarizabilities, governed by the Baldin sum rule, we obtain the following average (between the two fits): $\\alpha_{E1}+\\beta_{M1}=14.0(2)\\times 10^{-4}\\,\\mathrm{fm}^3$. An analogous sum rule involving the quadrupole polarizabilities of the proton is evaluated too. The spin-independent forward amplitude of proton Compton scattering is evaluated in a broad energy range. The results are compared with previous evaluations and the only experimental data point for this amplitude (at 2.2 GeV). We remark on sum rules for the elastic component of polarizabilities.

  19. Coherent to incoherent cross section ratio for 59.54 keV gamma rays at scattering angle of 110°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, M. P.; Sharma, Amandeep; Singh, Bhajan; Sandhu, B. S.

    2015-08-01

    The coherent (Rayleigh) to incoherent (Compton) scattering cross-section ratio of elements, in the range 13 ? Z ? 82, are determined experimentally for 59.54 keV incident gamma photons. An HPGe (High purity germanium) semiconductor detector is employed, at scattering angle of 110°, to record the spectra originating from interactions of incident gamma photons with the target under investigation. The intensity ratio of Rayleigh to Compton scattered peaks observed in the recorded spectra, and corrected for photo-peak efficiency of gamma detector and absorption of photons in the target and air, along with the other required parameters provides the differential cross-section ratio. The measured values of cross-section ratio are found to agree with theoretical predictions based upon non-relativistic form factor, relativistic form factor, modified form factor and S-matrix theory.

  20. X-ray Compton scattering experiments for fluid alkali metals at high temperatures and pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, K.; Fukumaru, T.; Kimura, K.; Tamura, K.; Katoh, M.; Kajihara, Y.; Inui, M.; Yao, M.; Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y.

    2015-08-01

    We have developed a high-pressure vessel and a cell for x-ray Compton scattering measurements of fluid alkali metals. Measurements have been successfully carried out for alkali metal rubidium at elevated temperatures and pressures using synchrotron radiation at SPring-8. The width of Compton profiles (CPs) of fluid rubidium becomes narrow with decreasing fluid density, which indicates that the CPs sensitively detect the effect of reduction in the valence electron density. At the request of all authors of the paper, and with the agreement of the Proceedings Editor, an updated version of this article was published on 10 September 2015. The original article supplied to AIP Publishing was not the final version and contained PDF conversion errors in Formulas (1) and (2). The errors have been corrected in the updated and re-published article.

  1. A fitter code for Deep Virtual Compton Scattering and Generalized Parton Distributions

    E-print Network

    M. Guidal

    2008-09-17

    We have developped a fitting code based on the leading-twist handbag Deep Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) amplitude in order to extract the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPD) information from DVCS observables in the valence region. In a first stage, with simulations and pseudo-data, we show that the full GPD information can be recovered from experimental data if enough observables are measured. If only part of these observables are measured, valuable information can still be extracted, certain observables being particularly sensitive to certain GPDs. In a second stage, we make a practical application of this code to the recent DVCS Jefferson Lab Hall A data from which we can extract numerical constraints for the two $H$ GPD Compton Form Factors.

  2. The diffuse galactic gamma radiation: The Compton contribution and component separation by energy interval and galactic coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kniffen, D. A.; Fichtel, C.

    1981-01-01

    The radiation to be expected from cosmic ray interactions with matter and photons was examined. Particular emphasis is placed on the Compton emission. Both the photon density in and near the visible region and that in the region are deduced from the estimates of the emission functions throughout the Galaxy. The blackbody radiation is also included in the estimate of the total Compton emission. The result suggests that the gamma ray Compton radiation from cosmic ray ineractions with galactic visible and infrared photons is substantially larger than previously believed.

  3. Compton Scattering by Static and Moving Media. Part 1; The Transfer Equation and its Moments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Psaltis, Dimitrios; Lamb, Frederick K.

    1997-01-01

    Compton scattering of photons by nonrelativistic particles is thought to play an important role in forming the radiation spectrum of many astrophysical systems. Here we derive the time-dependent photon kinetic equation that describes spontaneous and induced Compton scattering, as well as absorption and emission by static and moving media, the corresponding radiative transfer equation, and their zeroth and first angular moments, both in the system frame and in the frame comoving with the medium. We show that it is necessary to use the correct relativistic differential scattering cross section in order to obtain a photon kinetic equation that is correct to first order in Epsilon/m(sub e), T(sub e)/m(sub e), and V, where Epsilon is the photon energy, T(sub e) and m(sub e) are the electron temperature and rest mass, and V is the electron bulk velocity in units of the speed of light. We also demonstrate that the terms in the radiative transfer equation that are second order in V should usually be retained, because if the radiation energy density is sufficiently large, compared to the radiation flux, the effects of bulk Comptonization described by the terms that are second order in V can be as important as the effects described by the terms that are first order in V, even when V is small. The system- and fluid-frame equations that we derive are correct to first order in Epsilon/m(sub e). Our system-frame equations, which are correct to second order in V, may be used when V is not too large. Our fluid-frame equations, which are exact in V, may be used when V approaches 1. Both sets of equations are valid for systems of arbitrary optical depth and can therefore be used in both the free-streaming and diffusion regimes. We demonstrate that Comptonization by the electron bulk motion occurs whether or not the radiation field is isotropic or the bulk flow converges and that it is more important than thermal Comptonization if V(sup 2) is greater than 3T(sub e)/m(sub e).

  4. Experiments in Special Relativity Using Compton Scattering of Gamma Rays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egelstaff, P. A.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Some simple undergraduate laboratory experiments are described, which verify the energy-momentum relationship of special relativity. These experiments have been designed either to be used as classroom demonstrations or to be carried out by second-year students. (Author/JN)

  5. Study of Generalized Parton Distributions and Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering on the nucleon with the CLAS and CLAS12 detectors at the Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Baptiste Guegan

    2012-11-01

    The exclusive leptoproduction of a real photon is considered to be the "cleanest" way to access the Generalized Parton Distribution (GPD). This process is called Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) lN {yields} lN{gamma} , and is sensitive to all the four GPDs. Measuring the DVCS cross section is one of the main goals of this thesis. In this thesis, we present the work performed to extract on a wide phase-space the DVCS cross-section from the JLab data at a beam energy of 6 GeV.

  6. Time-resolved Compton scattering for a model fermion-boson system

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, R. E.; Su, Q.; Grobe, R.

    2010-08-15

    We study the scattering of a boson with a fermion with full spatial and temporal resolution based on the one-dimensional Yukawa Hamiltonian. In quantum field theory this interaction is described by the annihilation and creation of bosons with intermediate virtual particle states. We show that this process can be modeled in the center-of-mass frame by a scattering potential, permitting us to interpret the absorption and re-emission processes in quantum mechanical terms of a characteristic force. This Compton force between the fermion and boson is repulsive for large distances and attractive for shorter spacings. We also examine the periodic dynamics of a fermion and a boson that are spatially confined to a ring cavity in which they counterpropagate, enabling us to study interactions independent of the transients that characterize the (one-time) scattering event of two wave packets.

  7. Polarization transfer in wide-angle Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton

    SciTech Connect

    Fanelli, Cristiano V.

    2015-10-06

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The WACS polarization transfer was analyzed at an incident photon energy of 3.7 GeV at a proton scattering angle of ?Pcm = 70°. The longitudinal transfer KLL, measured to be 0.645 ± 0.059 ± 0.048, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, has the same sign as predicted for the reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton. However, the observed value is ~3 times larger than predicted by the GPD-based calculations, which indicates a significant unknown contribution to the scattering amplitude.

  8. Polarization transfer in wide-angle Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fanelli, Cristiano V.

    2015-10-06

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The WACS polarization transfer was analyzed at an incident photon energy of 3.7 GeV at a proton scattering angle of ?Pcm = 70°. The longitudinal transfer KLL, measured to be 0.645 ± 0.059 ± 0.048, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, has the same sign as predicted for the reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton.more »However, the observed value is ~3 times larger than predicted by the GPD-based calculations, which indicates a significant unknown contribution to the scattering amplitude.« less

  9. Dissecting deuteron Compton scattering I: The observables with polarised initial states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grießhammer, Harald W.

    2013-08-01

    A complete set of linearly independent observables in Compton scattering with arbitrarily polarised real photons off an arbitrarily polarised spin-1 target is introduced, for the case that the final-state polarisations are not measured. Adopted from the one widely used, e.g., in deuteron photo-dissociation, it consists of 18 terms: the unpolarised cross section, the beam asymmetry, 4 target asymmetries and 12 asymmetries in which both beam and target are polarised. They are expressed by the helicity amplitudes and —where available— related to observables discussed by other authors. As application to deuteron Compton scattering, their dependence on the (isoscalar) scalar and spin dipole polarisabilities of the nucleon is explored in Chiral Effective Field Theory with dynamical ?(1232) degrees of freedom at order e 2 ? 3. Some asymmetries are sensitive to only one or two dipole polarisabilities, making them particularly attractive for experimental studies. At a photon energy of 100 MeV, a set of 5 observables is identified from which one may be able to extract the spin polarisabilities of the nucleon. These are experimentally realistic but challenging and mostly involve tensor-polarised deuterons. Relative to Compton scattering from a nucleon, sensitivity to the "mixed" spin polarisabilities ? E1 M2 and ? M1 E2 is increased because of the interference with the D wave component of the deuteron and with its pion-exchange current. An interactive Mathematica 9.0 notebook with results for all observables at photon energies up to 120 MeV is available from hgrie@gwu.edu.

  10. Spatially resolved hard X-ray polarization in solar flares: effects of Compton scattering and bremsstrahlung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffrey, N. L. S.; Kontar, E. P.

    2011-12-01

    Aims: We study the polarization of hard X-ray (HXR) sources in the solar atmosphere, including Compton backscattering of photons in the photosphere (the albedo effect) and the spatial distribution of polarization across the source. Methods: HXR photon polarization and spectra produced via electron-ion bremsstrahlung emission are calculated from various electron distributions typical for solar flares. Compton scattering and photoelectric absorption are then modelled using Monte Carlo simulations of photon transport in the photosphere to study the observed (primary and albedo) sources. Polarization maps across HXR sources (primary and albedo components) for each of the modelled electron distributions are calculated at various source locations from the solar centre to the limb. Results: We show that Compton scattering produces a distinct polarization variation across the albedo patch at peak albedo energies of 20-50 keV for all anisotropies modelled. The results show that there are distinct spatial polarization changes in both the radial and perpendicular to radial directions across the extent of the HXR source at a given disk location. In the radial direction, the polarization magnitude and direction at specific positions along the HXR source will either increase or decrease with increased photon distribution directivity towards the photosphere. We also show how high electron cutoff energies influence the direction of polarization at above ~100 keV. Conclusions: Spatially resolved HXR polarization measurements can provide important information about the directivity and energetics of the electron distribution. Our results indicate the preferred angular resolution of polarization measurements required to distinguish between the scattered and primary components. We also show how spatially resolved polarization measurements could be used to probe the emission pattern of an HXR source, using both the magnitude and the direction of the polarization.

  11. Wide angle Compton scattering on the proton: study of power suppressed corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivel, N.; Vanderhaeghen, M.

    2015-10-01

    We study the wide angle Compton scattering process on a proton within the soft-collinear factorization (SCET) framework. The main purpose of this work is to estimate the effect due to certain power suppressed corrections. We consider all possible kinematical power corrections and also include the subleading amplitudes describing the scattering with nucleon helicity flip. Under certain assumptions we present a leading-order factorization formula for these amplitudes which includes the hard- and soft-spectator contributions. We apply the formalism and perform a phenomenological analysis of the cross section and asymmetries in the wide angle Compton scattering on a proton. We assume that in the relevant kinematical region where -t,-u>2.5 GeV2 the dominant contribution is provided by the soft-spectator mechanism. The hard coefficient functions of the corresponding SCET operators are taken in the leading-order approximation. The analysis of existing cross section data shows that the contribution of the helicity-flip amplitudes to this observable is quite small and comparable with other expected theoretical uncertainties. We also show predictions for double polarization observables for which experimental information exists.

  12. Wide angle Compton scattering on the proton: study of power suppressed corrections

    E-print Network

    N. Kivel; M. Vanderhaeghen

    2015-04-04

    We study the wide angle Compton scattering process on a proton within the soft collinear factorization (SCET) framework. The main purpose of this work is to estimate the effect due to certain power suppressed corrections. We consider all possible kinematical power corrections and also include the subleading amplitudes describing the scattering with nucleon helicity flip. Under certain assumptions we present a leading-order factorization formula for these amplitudes which includes the hard- and soft-spectator contributions. We apply the formalism and perform a phenomenological analysis of the cross section and asymmetries in the wide angle Compton scattering on a proton. We assume that in the relevant kinematical region where $-t,-u>2.5$~GeV$^{2}$ the dominant contribution is provided by the soft-spectator mechanism. The hard coefficient functions of the corresponding SCET operators are taken in the leading-order approximation. The analysis of existing cross section data shows that the contribution of the helicity flip amplitudes to this observable is quite small and comparable with other expected theoretical uncertainties. We also show predictions for double polarization observables for which experimental information exists.

  13. Study of electron densities of normal and neoplastic human breast tissues by Compton scattering using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Antoniassi, M; Conceição, A L C; Poletti, M E

    2012-07-01

    Electron densities of 33 samples of normal (adipose and fibroglangular) and neoplastic (benign and malignant) human breast tissues were determined through Compton scattering data using a monochromatic synchrotron radiation source and an energy dispersive detector. The area of Compton peaks was used to determine the electron densities of the samples. Adipose tissue exhibits the lowest values of electron density whereas malignant tissue the highest. The relationship with their histology was discussed. Comparison with previous results showed differences smaller than 4%. PMID:22264794

  14. POST-PERIASTRON GAMMA-RAY FLARE FROM PSR B1259-63/LS 2883 AS A RESULT OF COMPTONIZATION OF THE COLD PULSAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Khangulyan, Dmitry; Bogovalov, Sergey V.; Ribo, Marc E-mail: felix.aharonian@dias.ie E-mail: mribo@am.ub.es

    2012-06-10

    We argue that the bright flare of the binary pulsar PSR B1259-63/LS2883 detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope is due to the inverse Compton scattering of the unshocked electron-positron pulsar wind with a Lorentz factor {Gamma}{sub 0} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 4}. The combination of two effects both linked to the circumstellar disk (CD) is a key element in the proposed model. The first effect is related to the impact of the surrounding medium on the termination of the pulsar wind. Inside the disk, the 'early' termination of the wind results in suppression of its gamma-ray luminosity. When the pulsar escapes the disk, the conditions for termination of the wind undergo significant changes. This would lead to a dramatic increase of the pulsar wind zone, and thus to the proportional increase of the gamma-ray flux. On the other hand, if the parts of the CD disturbed by the pulsar can supply infrared photons of density high enough for efficient Comptonization of the wind, almost the entire kinetic energy of the pulsar wind would be converted to radiation, thus the gamma-ray luminosity of the wind could approach the level of the pulsar's spin-down luminosity as reported by the Fermi Collaboration.

  15. AN INVERSE COMPTON SCATTERING ORIGIN OF X-RAY FLARES FROM Sgr A*

    SciTech Connect

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Wardle, M.; Dodds-Eden, K.; Gillessen, S.; Genzel, R.; Heinke, C. O.; Bushouse, H.; Grosso, N.; Porquet, D.

    2012-07-15

    The X-ray and near-IR emission from Sgr A* is dominated by flaring, while a quiescent component dominates the emission at radio and submillimeter (sub-mm) wavelengths. The spectral energy distribution of the quiescent emission from Sgr A* peaks at sub-mm wavelengths and is modeled as synchrotron radiation from a thermal population of electrons in the accretion flow, with electron temperatures ranging up to {approx}5-20 MeV. Here, we investigate the mechanism by which X-ray flare emission is produced through the interaction of the quiescent and flaring components of Sgr A*. The X-ray flare emission has been interpreted as inverse Compton, self-synchrotron Compton, or synchrotron emission. We present results of simultaneous X-ray and near-IR observations and show evidence that X-ray peak flare emission lags behind near-IR flare emission with a time delay ranging from a few to tens of minutes. Our inverse Compton scattering modeling places constraints on the electron density and temperature distributions of the accretion flow and on the locations where flares are produced. In the context of this model, the strong X-ray counterparts to near-IR flares arising from the inner disk should show no significant time delay, whereas near-IR flares in the outer disk should show a broadened and delayed X-ray flare.

  16. Scaling Tests of the Cross Section for Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, C. Muñoz; Camsonne, A.; Mazouz, M.; Ferdi, C.; Gavalian, G.; Kuchina, E.; Amarian, M.; Aniol, K. A.; Beaumel, M.; Benaoum, H.; Bertin, P.; Brossard, M.; Chen, J.-P.; Chudakov, E.; Craver, B.; Cusanno, F.; de Jager, C. W.; Deur, A.; Feuerbach, R.; Fieschi, J.-M.; Frullani, S.; Garçon, M.; Garibaldi, F.; Gayou, O.; Gilman, R.; Gomez, J.; Gueye, P.; Guichon, P. A. M.; Guillon, B.; Hansen, O.; Hayes, D.; Higinbotham, D.; Holmstrom, T.; Hyde-Wright, C. E.; Ibrahim, H.; Igarashi, R.; Jiang, X.; Jo, H. S.; Kaufman, L. J.; Kelleher, A.; Kolarkar, A.; Kumbartzki, G.; Laveissière, G.; Lerose, J. J.; Lindgren, R.; Liyanage, N.; Lu, H.-J.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Meziani, Z.-E.; McCormick, K.; Michaels, R.; Michel, B.; Moffit, B.; Monaghan, P.; Nanda, S.; Nelyubin, V.; Potokar, M.; Qiang, Y.; Ransome, R. D.; Réal, J.-S.; Reitz, B.; Roblin, Y.; Roche, J.; Sabatié, F.; Saha, A.; Sirca, S.; Slifer, K.; Solvignon, P.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Ulmer, P. E.; Voutier, E.; Wang, K.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.

    2006-12-01

    We present the first measurements of the e?p?ep? cross section in the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) regime and the valence quark region. The Q2 dependence (from 1.5 to 2.3GeV2) of the helicity-dependent cross section indicates the twist-2 dominance of DVCS, proving that generalized parton distributions (GPDs) are accessible to experiment at moderate Q2. The helicity-independent cross section is also measured at Q2=2.3GeV2. We present the first model-independent measurement of linear combinations of GPDs and GPD integrals up to the twist-3 approximation.

  17. Overview of Laser Compton-Scattered Photon Source at the cERL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, R.; Hajima, R.; Kosuge, A.; Mori, M.; Shizuma, T.; Nishimori, N.; Akagi, T.; Honda, Y.; Urakawa, J.

    2015-10-01

    A high intensity ?-ray source from the laser Compton scattering (LCS) by an electron beam in the energy recovery linac (ERL) is a very useful prove for a nondestructive assay to identify nuclear species. In order to demonstrate a high performance of the accelerator and laser required for the ?-ray source, an LCS experiment is planned at the Compact ERL (cERL) at High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). A mode-locked fiber laser, laser enhancement cavity, beamline, and experimental hatch are under construction for the LCS experiment.

  18. Compton-Scattering Cross Section on the Proton at High Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Danagoulian, A.; Roedelbronn, M.; Chang, T.-H.; Nathan, A. M.; Mamyan, V. H.; Aniol, K. A.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Annand, J. R. M.; Hamilton, D. J.; Bertin, P. Y.; Camsonne, A.; Laveissiere, G.; Bosted, P.; Paschke, K.; Calarco, J. R.; Chang, C. C.; Horn, T.; Savvinov, N.; Chen, J.-P.

    2007-04-13

    Cross-section values for Compton scattering on the proton were measured at 25 kinematic settings over the range s=5-11 and -t=2-7 GeV{sup 2} with a statistical accuracy of a few percent. The scaling power for the s dependence of the cross section at fixed center-of-mass angle was found to be 8.0{+-}0.2, strongly inconsistent with the prediction of perturbative QCD. The observed cross-section values are in fair agreement with the calculations using the handbag mechanism, in which the external photons couple to a single quark.

  19. Forward virtual Compton scattering and the Lamb shift in chiral perturbation theory

    E-print Network

    David Nevado; Antonio Pineda

    2008-03-08

    We compute the spin-independent structure functions of the forward virtual-photon Compton tensor of the proton at one loop using heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory and dispersion relations. We study the relation between both approaches. We use these results to generalize some sum rules to virtual photon transfer momentum and relate them with sum rules in deep inelastic scattering. We then compute the leading chiral term of the polarizability correction to the Lamb shift of the hydrogen and muonic hydrogen. We obtain -87.05/n^3 Hz and -0.148/n^3 meV for the correction to the hydrogen and muonic hydrogen Lamb shift respectively.

  20. Time evolution analysis of the electron distribution in Thomson/Compton back-scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Petrillo, V.; Bacci, A.; Curatolo, C.; Maroli, C.; Serafini, L.; Rossi, A. R.

    2013-07-28

    We present the time evolution of the energy distribution of a relativistic electron beam after the Compton back-scattering with a counter-propagating laser field, performed in the framework of the Quantum Electrodynamics, by means of the code CAIN. As the correct angular distribution of the spontaneous emission is accounted, the main effect is the formation of few stripes, followed by the diffusion of the more energetic particles toward lower values in the longitudinal phase space. The Chapman-Kolmogorov master equation gives results in striking agreement with the numerical ones. An experiment on the Thomson source at SPARC-LAB is proposed.

  1. Deeply virtual Compton scattering on longitudinally polarized protons and neutrons at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Silvia Niccolai

    2012-04-01

    This paper focuses on a measurement of deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) performed at Jefferson Lab using a nearly-6-GeV polarized electron beam, two longitudinally polarized (via DNP) solid targets of protons (NH{sub 3}) and deuterons (ND{sub 3}) and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Here, preliminary results for target-spin asymmetries and double (beam-target) asymmetries for proton DVCS, as well as a very preliminary extraction of beam-spin asymmetry for neutron DVCS, are presented and linked to Generalized Parton Distributions.

  2. Timelike and spacelike deeply virtual Compton scattering at next-to-leading order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutarde, H.; Pire, B.; Sabatié, F.; Szymanowski, L.; Wagner, J.

    2013-03-01

    We study timelike and spacelike virtual Compton scattering in the generalized Bjorken scaling regime at next-to-leading order in the strong coupling constant, in the medium energy range which will be studied intensely at JLab12 and in the COMPASS-II experiment at CERN. We show that the Born amplitudes get sizeable O(?s) corrections and, even at moderate energies, the gluonic contributions are by no means negligible. We stress that the timelike and spacelike cases are complementary and that their difference deserves much special attention.

  3. Simple analytical approximations for treatment of inverse Compton scattering of relativistic electrons in the blackbody radiation field

    SciTech Connect

    Khangulyan, D.; Kelner, S. R. E-mail: Felix.Aharonian@mpi-hd.mpg.de

    2014-03-10

    The inverse Compton (IC) scattering of relativistic electrons is one of the major gamma-ray production mechanisms in different environments. Often, the target photons for IC scattering are dominated by blackbody (or graybody) radiation. In this case, the precise treatment of the characteristics of IC radiation requires numerical integrations over the Planckian distribution. Formally, analytical integrations are also possible but they result in series of several special functions; this limits the efficiency of usage of these expressions. The aim of this work is the derivation of approximate analytical presentations that would provide adequate accuracy for the calculations of the energy spectra of upscattered radiation, the rate of electron energy losses, and the mean energy of emitted photons. Such formulae have been obtained by merging the analytical asymptotic limits. The coefficients in these expressions are calculated via the least-squares fitting of the results of numerical integrations. The simple analytical presentations, obtained for both the isotropic and anisotropic target radiation fields, provide adequate (as good as 1%) accuracy for broad astrophysical applications.

  4. Measurements of Compton Scattering on the Proton at 2 - 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Areg Danagoulian

    2006-05-01

    Similar to elastic electron scattering, Compton Scattering on the proton at high momentum transfers(and high p?) can be an effective method to study its short-distance structure. An experiment has been carried out to measure the cross sections for Real Compton Scattering (RCS) on the proton for 2.3-5.7 GeV electron beam energies and a wide distribution of large scattering angles. The 25 kinematic settings sampled a domain of s = 5?11(GeV/c)2,?t = ?7(GeV/c)2 and ?u = 0.5?6.5(GeV/c)2. In addition, a measurement of longitudinal and transverse polarization transfer asymmetries was made at a 3.48 GeV beam energy and a scattering angle of ?cm = 120o. These measurements were performed to test the existing theoretical mechanisms for this process as well as to determine RCS form factors. At the heart of the scientific motivation is the desire to understand the manner in which a nucleon interacts with external excitations at the above listed energies, by comparing and contrasting the two existing models – Leading Twist Mechanism and Soft Overlap “Handbag” Mechanism – and identify the dominant mechanism. Furthermore, the Handbag Mechanism allows one to calculate reaction observables in the framework of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPD), which have the function of bridging the wide gap between the exclusive(form factors) and inclusive(parton distribution functions) description of the proton. The experiment was conducted in Hall A of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility(Jefferson Lab). It used a polarized and unpolarized electron beam, a 6% copper radiator with the thickness of 6.1% radiation lengths (to produce a bremsstrahlung photon beam), the Hall A liquid hydrogen target, a high resolution spectrometer with a focal plane polarimeter, and a photon hodoscope calorimeter. Results of the differential cross sections are presented, and discussed in the general context of the scientific motivation.

  5. Directional Stand-off Detection of Fast Neutrons and Gammas Using Angular Scattering Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Vanier P. e.; Dioszegi, I.; Salwen, C.; Forman, L.

    2009-10-25

    We have investigated the response of a DoubleScatter Neutron Spectrometer (DSNS) for sources at long distances (gr than 200 meters). We find that an alternative method for analyzing double scatter data avoids some uncertainties introduced by amplitude measurements in plastic scintillators.Time of flight is used to discriminate between gamma and neutron events, and the kinematic distributions of scattering angles are assumed to apply. Non-relativistic neutrons are most likely to scatter at 45°, while gammas with energies greater than 2 MeV are most likely to be forward scattered. The distribution of scattering angles of fission neutrons arriving from a distant point source generates a 45° cone, which can be back-projected to give the source direction. At the same time, the distribution of Compton-scattered gammas has a maximum in the forward direction, and can be made narrower by selecting events that deposit minimal energy in the first scattering event. We have further determined that the shape of spontaneous fission neutron spectra at ranges gr than 110 m is still significantly different from thecosmic ray background.

  6. Local Two-Photon Couplings and the J=0 Fixed Pole in Real and Virtual Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2008-12-05

    The local coupling of two photons to the fundamental quark currents of a hadron gives an energy-independent contribution to the Compton amplitude proportional to the charge squared of the struck quark, a contribution which has no analog in hadron scattering reactions. We show that this local contribution has a real phase and is universal, giving the same contribution for real or virtual Compton scattering for any photon virtuality and skewness at fixed momentum transfer squared t. The t-dependence of this J = 0 fixed Regge pole is parameterized by a yet unmeasured even charge-conjugation form factor of the target nucleon. The t = 0 limit gives an important constraint on the dependence of the nucleon mass on the quark mass through the Weisberger relation. We discuss how this 1=x form factor can be extracted from high energy deeply virtual Compton scattering and examine predictions given by models of the H generalized parton distribution.

  7. Stability analysis of implicit time discretizations for the Compton-scattering Fokker-Planck equation

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffery D; Warsa, James S; Lowrie, Robert B; Morel, Jim E

    2008-01-01

    The Fokker-Planck equation is a widely used approximation for modeling the Compton scattering of photons in high energy density applications. In this paper, we perform a stability analysis of three implicit time discretizations for the Compton-Scattering Fokker-Planck equation. Specifically, we examine (i) a Semi-Implicit (SI) scheme that employs backward-Euler differencing but evaluates temperature-dependent coefficients at their beginning-of-time-step values, (ii) a Fully Implicit (FI) discretization that instead evaluates temperature-dependent coefficients at their end-of-time-step values, and (iii) a Linearized Implicit (LI) scheme, which is developed by linearizing the temperature dependence of the FI discretization within each time step. Our stability analysis shows that the FI and LI schemes are unconditionally stable and cannot generate oscillatory solutions regardless of time-step size, whereas the SI discretization can suffer from instabilities and nonphysical oscillations for sufficiently large time steps. With the results of this analysis, we present time-step limits for the SI scheme that prevent undesirable behavior. We test the validity of our stability analysis and time-step limits with a set of numerical examples.

  8. Scintillation response of Xe gas studied by gamma-ray absorption and Compton electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiderski, L.; Chandra, R.; Curioni, A.; Davatz, G.; Friederich, H.; Gendotti, A.; Gendotti, U.; Goeltl, L.; Iwanowska-Hanke, J.; Moszy?ski, M.; Murer, D.; Resnati, F.; Rubbia, A.; Szawlowski, M.

    2015-07-01

    In this study we report on the scintillation response of Xe gas under irradiation of gamma-rays in the energy range between 50 keV and 1.5 MeV. Xe gas was pressurized to 50 bar and tested as a detector for gamma spectroscopy. The gas was confined in a titanium vessel of 200 mm length and 101 mm diameter with 2.5 mm thick walls. The vessel was sealed with two 3 inch diameter UV transparent windows. The inner surface of the vessel was covered with a reflecting wavelength shifter. Two photomultipliers coupled to both windows at the end of the vessel allowed for registration of 3700 photoelectrons/MeV, which resulted in 7.0% energy resolution registered for 662 keV ?-rays from a 137Cs source. The non-proportionality of the photoelectron yield and intrinsic resolution was studied with gamma photoabsorption peaks. Due to the thickness of the detector vessel, the response of the Xe gas as a scintillator in the low energy range was performed by means of a Compton Coincidence Technique and compared with the gamma absorption results. The shape of the non-proportionality characteristics of Xe gaseous scintillator was compared to the results obtained for NaI:Tl, LaBr3:Ce and LYSO:Ce. A correlation between non-proportionality and intrinsic resolution of Xe gaseous scintillator was pointed out.

  9. NRF Based Nondestructive Inspection System for SNM by Using Laser-Compton-Backscattering Gamma-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohgaki, H.; Omer, M.; Negm, H.; Daito, I.; Zen, H.; Kii, T.; Masuda, K.; Hori, T.; Hajima, R.; Hayakawa, T.; Shizuma, T.; Kando, M.

    2015-10-01

    A non-destructive inspection system for special nuclear materials (SNMs) hidden in a sea cargo has been developed. The system consists of a fast screening system using neutron generated by inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) device and an isotope identification system using nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements with laser Compton backscattering (LCS) gamma-rays has been developed. The neutron flux of 108 n/sec has been achieved by the IEC in static mode. We have developed a modified neutron reactor noise analysis method to detect fission neutron in a short time. The LCS gamma-rays has been generated by using a small racetrack microtoron accelerator and an intense sub-nano second laser colliding head-on to the electron beam. The gamma-ray flux has been achieved more than 105 photons/s. The NRF gamma-rays will be measured using LaBr3(Ce) scintillation detector array whose performance has been measured by NRF experiment of U-235 in HIGS facility. The whole inspection system has been designed to satisfy a demand from the sea port.

  10. Results from the energetic gamma-ray experiment telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Bertsch, D. L.; Dingus, B.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kanbach, G.; Kniffen, D. A.; Kwok, P. W.; Lin, Y. C.; Mattox, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    The Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) covers the high energy gamma ray energy range, approximately 30 MeV to 30 GeV, with a sensitivity considerably greater than earlier high energy gamma-ray satellites. Thus far, 4 pulsars have been detected and their properties measured, including in 3 cases the energy spectrum as a function of phase. The details of the galactic plane are being mapped and a spectra of the center region has been obtained in good agreement with that expected from cosmic ray interactions. The Magellanic clouds have been examined with the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) having been detected at a level consistent with it having a cosmic ray density compatible with quasi-stable equilibrium. Sixteen Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN's) have been seen thus far with a high degree of certainty including 12 quasars and 4 BL Lac objects, but no Seyferts. Time variation has been detected in some of these AGN's

  11. Development of a Compton Camera for Online Range Monitoring of Laser-Accelerated Proton Beams via Prompt-Gamma Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirolf, P. G.; Lang, C.; Aldawood, S.; Kolff, H. G. v. d.; Maier, L.; Schaart, D. R.; Parodi, K.

    2014-03-01

    Presently large efforts are conducted in Munich towards the development of proton beams for bio-medical applications, generated via the technique of particle acceleration from high-power, short-pulse lasers. While so far mostly offline diagnostics tools are used in this context, we aim at developing a reliable and accurate online range monitoring technique, based on the position-sensitive detection of prompt ? rays emitted from nuclear reactions between the proton beam and the biological sample. For this purpose, we develop a Compton camera, designed to be able to track not only the Compton scattering of the primary photon, but also to detect the secondary Compton electron, thus reducing the Compton cone to an arc segment and by this increasing the source reconstruction efficiency. Design specifications and the status of the protype system are discussed.

  12. Compton scattering of an X-ray photon by an open-shell atom

    SciTech Connect

    Hopersky, A. N. Nadolinsky, A. M.

    2012-09-15

    A nonrelativistic quantum theory for the nonresonant Compton scattering of an X-ray photon by a free many-electron atom with an open shell in the ground state has been constructed in the single-configuration Hartree-Fock approximation outside the impulse approximation widely used in the literature. The transition to an atom with closed shells reproduces the results obtained previously in [6, 7]. The results of a test calculation for atoms with open (Ti, Fe) and closed (Zn) 3d core shells are presented. The effects of the radial relaxation of one-electron states in the field of core vacancies have been taken into account. The results of the calculation agree well with the experimental results [15, 16]. It has been established that the results of the impulse approximation in the investigated X-ray photon energy ranges disagree with those of our theory not only quantitatively but also qualitatively. In particular, the impulse approximation near the elastic (Thomson and Rayleigh) scattering line leads to a gross overestimation of the contributions from the deep atomic shells involved in the inelastic photon scattering only virtually to the scattering probability. The presented theory is general in character and its applicability to a particular element of the Mendeleev table with an open core shell or to a many-electron atomic ion is limited only by the requirement that the nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock approximation be properly used in describing the scattering-state wave functions.

  13. Compton scattering for spectroscopic detection of ultra-fast, high flux, broad energy range X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Cipiccia, S.; Wiggins, S. M.; Brunetti, E.; Vieux, G.; Yang, X.; Welsh, G. H.; Anania, M.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Maneuski, D.; Montgomery, R.; Smith, G.; Hoek, M.; Hamilton, D. J.; Shea, V. O.; Issac, R. C.; Research Department of Physics, Mar Athanasius College, Kothamangalam 686666, Kerala ; Lemos, N. R. C.; Dias, J. M.; and others

    2013-11-15

    Compton side-scattering has been used to simultaneously downshift the energy of keV to MeV energy range photons while attenuating their flux to enable single-shot, spectrally resolved, measurements of high flux X-ray sources to be undertaken. To demonstrate the technique a 1 mm thick pixelated cadmium telluride detector has been used to measure spectra of Compton side-scattered radiation from a Cobalt-60 laboratory source and a high flux, high peak brilliance X-ray source of betatron radiation from a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator.

  14. New readout and data-acquisition system in an Electron-Tracking Compton Camera for MeV Gamma-Ray Astronomy (SMILE-II)

    E-print Network

    Mizumoto, Tetsuya; Mizumura, Yoshitaka; Tanimori, Toru; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Takada, Atsushi; Iwaki, Satoru; Sawano, Tatsuya; Nakamura, Kiseki; Komura, Shotaro; Nakamura, Shogo; Kishimoto, Tetsuro; Oda, Makoto; Miyamoto, Shohei; Takemura, Taito; Parker, Joseph D; Tomono, Dai; Sonoda, Shinya; Miuchi, Kentaro; Kurosawa, Shunsuke

    2015-01-01

    For MeV gamma-ray astronomy, we have developed an electron-tracking Compton camera (ETCC) as a MeV gamma-ray telescope capable of rejecting the radiation background and attaining the high sensitivity of near 1 mCrab in space. Our ETCC comprises a gaseous time-projection chamber (TPC) with a micro pattern gas detector for tracking recoil electrons and a position-sensitive scintillation camera for detecting scattered gamma rays. After the success of a first balloon experiment in 2006 with a small ETCC (using a 10$\\times$10$\\times$15 cm$^3$ TPC) for measuring diffuse cosmic and atmospheric sub-MeV gamma rays (Sub-MeV gamma-ray Imaging Loaded-on-balloon Experiment I; SMILE-I), a (30 cm)$^{3}$ medium-sized ETCC was developed to measure MeV gamma-ray spectra from celestial sources, such as the Crab Nebula, with single-day balloon flights (SMILE-II). To achieve this goal, a 100-times-larger detection area compared with that of SMILE-I is required without changing the weight or power consumption of the detector syste...

  15. The Si/CdTe semiconductor Compton camera of the ASTRO-H Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD)

    E-print Network

    Watanabe, Shin; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Ichinohe, Yuto; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Enoto, Teruaki; Fukuyama, Taro; Furui, Shunya; Genba, Kei; Hagino, Kouichi; Harayama, Astushi; Kuroda, Yoshikatsu; Matsuura, Daisuke; Nakamura, Ryo; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Noda, Hirofumi; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ohta, Masayuki; Onishi, Mitsunobu; Saito, Shinya; Sato, Goro; Sato, Tamotsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tanaka, Takaaki; Togo, Atsushi; Tomizuka, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    The Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD) is one of the instrument payloads onboard ASTRO-H, and will cover a wide energy band (60--600 keV) at a background level 10 times better than instruments currently in orbit. The SGD achieves low background by combining a Compton camera scheme with a narrow field-of-view active shield. The Compton camera in the SGD is realized as a hybrid semiconductor detector system which consists of silicon and cadmium telluride (CdTe) sensors. The design of the SGD Compton camera has been finalized and the final prototype, which has the same configuration as the flight model, has been fabricated for performance evaluation. The Compton camera has overall dimensions of 12 cm x 12 cm x 12 cm, consisting of 32 layers of Si pixel sensors and 8 layers of CdTe pixel sensors surrounded by 2 layers of CdTe pixel sensors. The detection efficiency of the Compton camera reaches about 15% and 3% for 100 keV and 511 keV gamma rays, respectively. The pixel pitch of the Si and CdTe sensors is 3.2 mm, and ...

  16. Caustic structures in the spectrum of x-ray Compton scattering off electrons driven by a short intense laser pulse

    E-print Network

    D. Seipt; A. Surzhykov; S. Fritzsche; B. Kampfer

    2015-07-31

    We study the Compton scattering of x-rays off electrons that are driven by a relativistically intense short optical laser pulse. The frequency spectrum of the laser-assisted Compton radiation shows a broad plateau in the vicinity of the laser-free Compton line due to a nonlinear mixing between x-ray and laser photons. Special emphasis is placed on how the shape of the short assisting laser pulse affects the spectrum of the scattered x-rays. In particular, we observe sharp peak structures in the plateau region, whose number and locations are highly sensitive to the laser pulse shape. These structures are interpreted as spectral caustics by using a semiclassical analysis of the laser-assisted QED matrix element.

  17. Caustic structures in the spectrum of x-ray Compton scattering off electrons driven by a short intense laser pulse

    E-print Network

    Seipt, D; Fritzsche, S; Kampfer, B

    2015-01-01

    We study the Compton scattering of x-rays off electrons that are driven by a relativistically intense short optical laser pulse. The frequency spectrum of the laser-assisted Compton radiation shows a broad plateau in the vicinity of the laser-free Compton line due to a nonlinear mixing between x-ray and laser photons. Special emphasis is placed on how the shape of the short assisting laser pulse affects the spectrum of the scattered x-rays. In particular, we observe sharp peak structures in the plateau region, whose number and locations are highly sensitive to the laser pulse shape. These structures are interpreted as spectral caustics by using a semiclassical analysis of the laser-assisted QED matrix element.

  18. Influence of electron-neutral collisions on the Compton scattering cross section and the Salpeter structure factor in warm collisional plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Mi-Young; Yoon, Jung-Sik; Jung, Young-Dae

    2015-03-15

    The electron-neutral collision effects on the Compton scattering process are investigated in warm collisional plasmas. The Compton scattering cross section in warm collisional plasmas is obtained by the Salpeter structure factor with the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and the plasma dielectric function as a function of the electron-neutral collision frequency, Debye length, and wave number. It is shown that the influence of electron-neutral collision strongly suppresses the Compton scattering cross section in warm collisional plasmas. It is also found that the electron-neutral collision effect on the differential Compton scattering cross section is more significant in forward scattering directions. We show that the differential Compton scattering cross section has a maximum at the scattering angle ?=?/2. In addition, we find that the electron-neutral collision effect on the total Compton scattering cross section increases with increasing Debye length and wave number. The variation of the Compton scattering cross section due to the change of collision frequency and plasma parameters is also discussed.

  19. Influence of electron-neutral collisions on the Compton scattering cross section and the Salpeter structure factor in warm collisional plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mi-Young; Yoon, Jung-Sik; Jung, Young-Dae

    2015-03-01

    The electron-neutral collision effects on the Compton scattering process are investigated in warm collisional plasmas. The Compton scattering cross section in warm collisional plasmas is obtained by the Salpeter structure factor with the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and the plasma dielectric function as a function of the electron-neutral collision frequency, Debye length, and wave number. It is shown that the influence of electron-neutral collision strongly suppresses the Compton scattering cross section in warm collisional plasmas. It is also found that the electron-neutral collision effect on the differential Compton scattering cross section is more significant in forward scattering directions. We show that the differential Compton scattering cross section has a maximum at the scattering angle ? = ? / 2 . In addition, we find that the electron-neutral collision effect on the total Compton scattering cross section increases with increasing Debye length and wave number. The variation of the Compton scattering cross section due to the change of collision frequency and plasma parameters is also discussed.

  20. Avalanche Photon Cooling by Induced Compton Scattering: Higher-Order Kompaneets Equation

    E-print Network

    Tanaka, Shuta J; Terasawa, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Induced Compton scattering (ICS) is an interaction between intense electro-magnetic radiations and plasmas, where ICS transfers the energy from photons to plasmas. Although ICS is important for laser plasma interactions in laboratory experiments and for radio emission from pulsars propagating in pulsar wind plasmas, the detail of photon cooling process has not been understood. The problem is that, when ICS dominates, evolution of photon spectra is described as a nonlinear convection equation, which makes photon spectra to be multi-valued. Here, we propose a new approach to treat evolution of photon spectra affected by ICS. Starting from the higher-order Kompaneets equation, we find a new equation that resolves the unphysical behavior of photon spectra. In addition, we find the steady-state analytic solution, which is linearly stable. We also successfully simulate the evolution of photon spectra without artificial viscosity. We find that photons rapidly lose their energy by ICS with continuously forming solita...

  1. Scaling tests of the cross section for deeply virtual Compton scattering.

    PubMed

    Camacho, C Muñoz; Camsonne, A; Mazouz, M; Ferdi, C; Gavalian, G; Kuchina, E; Amarian, M; Aniol, K A; Beaumel, M; Benaoum, H; Bertin, P; Brossard, M; Chen, J-P; Chudakov, E; Craver, B; Cusanno, F; de Jager, C W; Deur, A; Feuerbach, R; Fieschi, J-M; Frullani, S; Garçon, M; Garibaldi, F; Gayou, O; Gilman, R; Gomez, J; Gueye, P; Guichon, P A M; Guillon, B; Hansen, O; Hayes, D; Higinbotham, D; Holmstrom, T; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ibrahim, H; Igarashi, R; Jiang, X; Jo, H S; Kaufman, L J; Kelleher, A; Kolarkar, A; Kumbartzki, G; Laveissière, G; Lerose, J J; Lindgren, R; Liyanage, N; Lu, H-J; Margaziotis, D J; Meziani, Z-E; McCormick, K; Michaels, R; Michel, B; Moffit, B; Monaghan, P; Nanda, S; Nelyubin, V; Potokar, M; Qiang, Y; Ransome, R D; Réal, J-S; Reitz, B; Roblin, Y; Roche, J; Sabatié, F; Saha, A; Sirca, S; Slifer, K; Solvignon, P; Subedi, R; Sulkosky, V; Ulmer, P E; Voutier, E; Wang, K; Weinstein, L B; Wojtsekhowski, B; Zheng, X; Zhu, L

    2006-12-31

    We present the first measurements of the e[over -->]p-->epgamma cross section in the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) regime and the valence quark region. The Q(2) dependence (from 1.5 to 2.3 GeV(2)) of the helicity-dependent cross section indicates the twist-2 dominance of DVCS, proving that generalized parton distributions (GPDs) are accessible to experiment at moderate Q(2). The helicity-independent cross section is also measured at Q(2)=2.3 GeV(2). We present the first model-independent measurement of linear combinations of GPDs and GPD integrals up to the twist-3 approximation. PMID:17280421

  2. Exploration of deeply virtual Compton scattering on the neutron in the Hall A of Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Malek Mazouz

    2006-12-08

    Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) are universal functions which provide a comprehensive description of hadron properties in terms of quarks and gluons. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) is the simplest hard exclusive process involving GPDs. In particular, the DVCS on the neutron is mostly sensitive to E, the less constrained GPD, wich allows to access to the quark angular momentum. The first dedicated DVCS experiment on the neutron ran in the Hall A of Jefferson Lab in fall 2004. The high luminosity of the experiment and the resulting background rate recquired specific devices which are decribed in this document. The analysis methods and the experiment results, leading to preliminary constraints on the GPD E, are presented.

  3. X-ray phase-contrast imaging with an Inverse Compton Scattering source

    SciTech Connect

    Endrizzi, M.; Carpinelli, M.; Oliva, P.; Golosio, B.; Delogu, P.; Stefanini, A.; Gureyev, T. E.; Bottigli, U.

    2010-07-23

    Single-shot in-line phase-contrast imaging with the Inverse Compton Scattering X-ray source available at ATF (Accelerator Test Facility) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is experimentally demonstrated. Phase-contrast images of polymer wires are obtained with a single X-ray pulse whose time length is about 1 picosecond. The edge-enhancement effect is clearly visible in the images and simulations show a quantitative agreement with experimental data. A phase-retrieval step in the image processing leads to a accurate estimation of the projected thickness of our samples. Finally, a single-shot image of a wasp is presented as an example of a biological sample.

  4. Forward virtual Compton scattering and the Lamb shift in chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nevado, David; Pineda, Antonio

    2008-03-15

    We compute the spin-independent structure functions of the forward virtual-photon Compton tensor of the proton at one loop using heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory and dispersion relations. We study the relation between both approaches. We use these results to generalize some sum rules to virtual photon transfer momentum and relate them with sum rules in deep inelastic scattering. We then compute the leading chiral term of the polarizability correction to the Lamb shift of hydrogen and muonic hydrogen. We obtain -87.05/n{sup 3}Hz and -0.148/n{sup 3}meV for the correction to the hydrogen and muonic hydrogen Lamb shift, respectively.

  5. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering and Meson Production at Jlab/CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Hyon-Suk Jo

    2012-04-01

    This report reviews the recent experimental results from the CLAS collaboration (Hall B of Jefferson Lab, or JLab) on Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) and Deeply Virtual Meson Production (DVMP) and discusses their interpretation in the framework of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs). The impact of the experimental data on the applicability of the GPD mechanism to these exclusive reactions is discussed. Initial results obtained from JLab 6 GeV data indicate that DVCS might already be interpretable in this framework while GPD models fail to describe the exclusive meson production (DVMP) data with the GPD parameterizations presently used. An exception is the {phi} meson production for which the GPD mechanism appears to apply. The recent global analyses aiming to extract GPDs from fitting DVCS CLAS and world data are discussed. The GPD experimental program at CLAS12, planned with the upcoming 12 GeV upgrade of JLab, is briefly presented.

  6. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering on nucleons and nuclei in generalized vector meson dominance model

    SciTech Connect

    Vadim Guzey; Klaus Goeke; Marat Siddikov

    2008-02-01

    We consider Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) on nucleons and nuclei in the framework of generalized vector meson dominance (GVMD) model. We demonstrate that the GVMD model provides a good description of the HERA data on the dependence of the proton DVCS cross section on $Q^2$, $W$ (at $Q^2=4$ GeV$^2$) and $t$. At $Q^2 = 8$ GeV$^2$, the soft $W$-behavior of the GVMD model somewhat underestimates the $W$-dependence of the DVCS cross section due to the hard contribution not present in the GVMD model. We estimate $1/Q^2$ power-suppressed corrections to the DVCS amplitude and the DVCS cross section and find them large. We also make predictions for the nuclear DVCS amplitude and cross section in the kinematics of the future Electron-Ion Collider. We predict significant nuclear shadowing, which matches well predictions of the leading-twist nuclear shadowing in DIS on nuclei.

  7. A General Relativistic External Compton-Scattering Model for TeV Emission from M87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yu-Dong; Yuan, Ye-Fei; Li, Yan-Rong; Wang, Jian-Min

    2012-02-01

    M87 is the first detected non-blazar extragalactic tera-electron-volt (TeV) source with rapid variation and a very flat spectrum in the TeV band. To explain the two peaks in the spectral energy distribution of the nucleus of M87, which is similar to that of blazars, the most commonly adopted models are the synchrotron self-Compton-scattering models and the external inverse Compton (EIC) scattering models. Considering that there is no correlated variation in the soft band (from radio to X-ray) matching the TeV variation and that the TeV sources should not suffer from ?? absorption due to the flat TeV spectrum, the EIC models are advantageous in modeling the TeV emission from M87. In this paper, we propose a self-consistent EIC model to explain the flat TeV spectrum of M87 within the framework of fully general relativity, where the background soft photons are from the advection-dominated accretion flow around the central black hole, and the high-energy electrons are from the mini-jets that are powered by the magnetic reconnection in the main jet. In our model, both the TeV flares observed in the years 2005 and 2008 could be well explained: the ?? absorption for TeV photons is very low, even inside the region very close to the black hole 20Rg ~ 50Rg ; at the same region, the average EIC cooling time (~102 ~ 103 s) is short, which is consistent with the observed timescale of the TeV variation. Furthermore, we also discuss the possibility that the accompanying X-ray flare in 2008 is due to the direct synchrotron radiation of the mini-jets.

  8. Measurement of effective atomic number of gunshot residues using scattering of gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y?lmaz, Demet; Tur?ucu, Ahmet; Uzuno?lu, Zeynep; Korucu, Demet

    2014-09-01

    Better understanding of gunshot residues and the major elemental composition would be valuable to forensic scientists for their analysis work and interpretation of results. In the present work, the effective atomic numbers of gunshot residues (cartridge case, bullet core, bullet jacket and gunpowder) were analyzed using energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The scattering of 59.54 keV gamma rays is studied using a high-resolution HPGe detector. The experiment is performed on various elements with atomic number in the 4?Z?82. The intensity ratio of coherent to Compton scattered peaks, corrected for photo-peak efficiency of gamma detector and absorption of photons in the sample and air, is plotted as a function of atomic number and constituted a best-fit-curve. From this fit-curve, the respective effective atomic numbers of gunshot residues are determined.

  9. Gamma-Ray Burst Arrival Time Localizations: Simultaneous Observations by Mars Observer, Compton Gamma Ray Observatory and Ulysses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laros, J. G.; Boynton, W. V.; Hurley, K.; Kouveliotou, C.; McCollough, M. L.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.

    1997-01-01

    Between 1992 October 4 and 1993 August 1, concurrent coverage by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), Mars Observer (MO), and Ulysses spacecraft was obtained for 78 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Although most of these were below the MO and Ulysses thresholds, nine were positively detected by all three spacecraft, with data quality adequate for quantitative localization analysis. All were localized independently to approximately 2 deg accuracy by the CGRO Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE). We computed arrival-time error boxes with larger dimensions ranging from a few arcminutes to the diameters of the BATSE-only boxes and with smaller dimensions in the arcminute range. Three events are of particular interest: GB 930704 (BATSE 2428) has been described as a possible repeater. The arrival-time information is consistent with that hypothesis, but only just so. The GB 930706 (2431) box, at approximately 1 min x 4 min, is the only one this small obtained since Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) entered the Venusian atmosphere in 1992 October. Sensitive radio and optical observations of this location were made within 8 and 9 days of the burst, but no counterpart candidates were identified. GB 930801 (2477) is the first GRB that had its localization improved by taking into account BATSE Earth occultation.

  10. 500 MW X-BAND RF SYSTEM OF A 0.25 GEV ELECTRON LINAC FOR ADVANCED COMPTON SCATTERING SOURCE APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T S; Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Marsh, R A; Siders, C; Barty, C P; Adolphsen, C; Jongewaard, E; Tantawi, S; Vlieks, A; Wang, J W; Raubenheimer, T

    2010-05-12

    A Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray (MEGa-Ray) Compton scattering light source is being developed at LLNL in collaboration with SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The electron beam for the Compton scattering interaction will be generated by a X-band RF gun and a X-band LINAC at the frequency of 11.424 GHz. High power RF in excess of 500 MW is needed to accelerate the electrons to energy of 250 MeV or greater for the interaction. Two high power klystron amplifiers, each capable of generating 50 MW, 1.5 msec pulses, will be the main high power RF sources for the system. These klystrons will be powered by state of the art solid-state high voltage modulators. A RF pulse compressor, similar to the SLED II pulse compressor, will compress the klystron output pulse with a power gain factor of five. For compactness consideration, we are looking at a folded waveguide setup. This will give us 500 MW at output of the compressor. The compressed pulse will then be distributed to the RF gun and to six traveling wave accelerator sections. Phase and amplitude control are located at the RF gun input and additional control points along the LINAC to allow for parameter control during operation. This high power RF system is being designed and constructed. In this paper, we will present the design, layout, and status of this RF system.

  11. 500 MW X-Band RF System of a 0.25 GeV Electron LINAC for Advanced Compton Scattering Source Application

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Tak Sum; Anderson, Scott; Barty, Christopher; Gibson, David; Hartemann, Fred; Marsh, Roark; Siders, Craig; Adolphsen, Chris; Jongewaard, Erik; Raubenheimer, Tor; Tantawi, Sami; Vlieks, Arnold; Wang, Juwen; /SLAC

    2012-07-03

    A Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray (MEGa-Ray) Compton scattering light source is being developed at LLNL in collaboration with the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The electron beam for the Compton scattering interaction will be generated by a X-band RF gun and a X-band LINAC at the frequency of 11.424 GHz. High power RF in excess of 500 MW is needed to accelerate the electrons to energy of 250 MeV or greater for the interaction. Two high power klystron amplifiers, each capable of generating 50 MW, 1.5 msec pulses, will be the main high power RF sources for the system. These klystrons will be powered by state of the art solid-state high voltage modulators. A RF pulse compressor, similar to the SLED II pulse compressor, will compress the klystron output pulse with a power gain factor of five. For compactness consideration, we are looking at a folded waveguide setup. This will give us 500 MW at output of the compressor. The compressed pulse will then be distributed to the RF gun and to six traveling wave accelerator sections. Phase and amplitude control are located at the RF gun input and additional control points along the LINAC to allow for parameter control during operation. This high power RF system is being designed and constructed. In this paper, we will present the design, layout, and status of this RF system.

  12. (Gamma scattering in condensed matter with high intensity Moessbauer radiation)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses: quasielastic scattering studies on glycerol; gamma-ray scattering from alkali halides; lattice dynamics in metals; Moessbauer neutron scattering, x-ray diffraction, and macroscopic studies of high {Tc} superconductors containing tungsten; NiAl scattering studies; and atomic interference factors and nuclear Casimir effect.

  13. The Si/CdTe semiconductor Compton camera of the ASTRO-H Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Shin; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Ichinohe, Yuto; Takeda, Shin`ichiro; Enoto, Teruaki; Fukuyama, Taro; Furui, Shunya; Genba, Kei; Hagino, Kouichi; Harayama, Atsushi; Kuroda, Yoshikatsu; Matsuura, Daisuke; Nakamura, Ryo; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Noda, Hirofumi; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ohta, Masayuki; Onishi, Mitsunobu; Saito, Shinya; Sato, Goro; Sato, Tamotsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tanaka, Takaaki; Togo, Atsushi; Tomizuka, Shinji

    2014-11-01

    The Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD) is one of the instrument payloads onboard ASTRO-H, and will cover a wide energy band (60-600 keV) at a background level 10 times better than instruments currently in orbit. The SGD achieves low background by combining a Compton camera scheme with a narrow field-of-view active shield. The Compton camera in the SGD is realized as a hybrid semiconductor detector system which consists of silicon and cadmium telluride (CdTe) sensors. The design of the SGD Compton camera has been finalized and the final prototype, which has the same configuration as the flight model, has been fabricated for performance evaluation. The Compton camera has overall dimensions of 12 cm×12 cm×12 cm, consisting of 32 layers of Si pixel sensors and 8 layers of CdTe pixel sensors surrounded by 2 layers of CdTe pixel sensors. The detection efficiency of the Compton camera reaches about 15% and 3% for 100 keV and 511 keV gamma rays, respectively. The pixel pitch of the Si and CdTe sensors is 3.2 mm, and the signals from all 13,312 pixels are processed by 208 ASICs developed for the SGD. Good energy resolution is afforded by semiconductor sensors and low noise ASICs, and the obtained energy resolutions with the prototype Si and CdTe pixel sensors are 1.0-2.0 keV (FWHM) at 60 keV and 1.6-2.5 keV (FWHM) at 122 keV, respectively. This results in good background rejection capability due to better constraints on Compton kinematics. Compton camera energy resolutions achieved with the final prototype are 6.3 keV (FWHM) at 356 keV and 10.5 keV (FWHM) at 662 keV, which satisfy the instrument requirements for the SGD Compton camera (better than 2%). Moreover, a low intrinsic background has been confirmed by the background measurement with the final prototype.

  14. Radon transforms on generalized Cormack's curves and a new Compton scatter tomography This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-print Network

    Nguyen-Verger, Maï K.

    Radon transforms on generalized Cormack's curves and a new Compton scatter tomography modality:10.1088/0266-5611/27/12/125001 Radon transforms on generalized Cormack's curves and a new Compton/125001 Abstract In his seminal work of 1981, Cormack established that Radon transforms defined on two remarkable

  15. Observations of gamma radiation between 0. 4 MeV and 7 MeV at balloon altitudes using a Compton telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwood, J.A.; Webber, W.R.; Friling, L.A.; Macri, J.; Hsieh, L.

    1981-09-15

    Results are presented from a balloon flight at Palestine, Texas, in 1978 to measure the atmospheric and diffuse ..gamma..-ray flux in the energy range 0.4--7.0 MeV. The observations were made with a Compton telescope which included pulse-shape discrimination of the first scattering detector and a time-of-flight system between the first and second detector elements. The total downward ..gamma..-ray flux at 3.7 g cm/sup -2/ is given by the spectrum 3.1 x 10/sup -2/ x E/sup -1.74/ (photons cm/sup -2/ s/sup -1/ MeV/sup -1/ sr/sup -1/) for 0.5gamma..-ray flux to the atmospheric ..gamma..-rays indicate that 0.2 MeV

  16. Hadron Optics in Three-Dimensional Invariant Coordinate Space from Deeply VirtualCompton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.; Chakrabarti, D.; Harindranath, A.; Mukherjee, A.; Vary, J.P.

    2006-11-30

    The Fourier transform of the deeply virtual Compton scattering amplitude (DVCS) with respect to the skewness parameter {zeta} = Q{sup 2}/2p {center_dot} q can be used to provide an image of the target hadron in the boost-invariant variable {sigma}, the coordinate conjugate to light-front time {tau} = t + z/c. As an illustration, we construct a consistent covariant model of the DVCS amplitude and its associated generalized parton distributions using the quantum fluctuations of a fermion state at one loop in QED, thus providing a representation of the light-front wave functions of a lepton in {sigma} space. A consistent model for hadronic amplitudes can then be obtained by differentiating the light-front wave functions with respect to the bound-state mass. The resulting DVCS helicity amplitudes are evaluated as a function of {sigma} and the impact parameter {rvec b}{sub {perpendicular}}, thus providing a light-front image of the target hadron in a frame-independent three-dimensional light-front coordinate space. Models for the LFWFs of hadrons in (3 + 1) dimensions displaying confinement at large distances and conformal symmetry at short distances have been obtained using the AdS/CFT method. We also compute the LFWFs in this model in invariant three dimensional coordinate space. We find that in the models studied, the Fourier transform of the DVCS amplitudes exhibit diffraction patterns. The results are analogous to the diffractive scattering of a wave in optics where the distribution in ? measures the physical size of the scattering center in a one-dimensional system.

  17. Hadron Optics in Three-Dimensional Invariant Coordinate Space from Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering

    E-print Network

    S. J. Brodsky; D. Chakrabarti; A. Harindranath; A. Mukherjee; J. P. Vary

    2006-11-28

    The Fourier transform of the deeply virtual Compton scattering amplitude (DVCS) with respect to the skewness parameter \\zeta= Q^2/ 2 p.q can be used to provide an image of the target hadron in the boost-invariant variable \\sigma, the coordinate conjugate to light-front time \\tau=t+ z/ c. As an illustration, we construct a consistent covariant model of the DVCS amplitude and its associated generalized parton distributions using the quantum fluctuations of a fermion state at one loop in QED, thus providing a representation of the light-front wavefunctions of a lepton in \\sigma space. A consistent model for hadronic amplitudes can then be obtained by differentiating the light-front wavefunctions with respect to the bound-state mass. The resulting DVCS helicity amplitudes are evaluated as a function of \\sigma and the impact parameter \\vec b_\\perp, thus providing a light-front image of the target hadron in a frame-independent three-dimensional light-front coordinate space. Models for the LFWFs of hadrons in (3+1) dimensions displaying confinement at large distances and conformal symmetry at short distances have been obtained using the AdS/CFT method. We also compute the LFWFs in this model in invariant three dimensional coordinate space. We find that in the models studied, the Fourier transform of the DVCS amplitudes exhibit diffraction patterns. The results are analogous to the diffractive scattering of a wave in optics where the distribution in \\sigma measures the physical size of the scattering center in a one-dimensional system.

  18. An all-optical table-top collider for testing $\\gamma\\gamma\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$ scattering in the region of MeV

    E-print Network

    Homma, Kensuke; Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Photon-photon scatterings contain rich information on the two-photon coupling to a virtual $e^+e^-$ pair in QED and also the coupling to known resonance states in the context of QCD and the electroweak interaction. Moreover, discovering weakly-coupling resonance states over many orders of magnitude on the mass scale can provide us hints on something dark in the Universe. The perturbative QED calculations manifestly predict the maximized cross section at the MeV scale, however, any examples of real-photon - real-photon scattering have not been observed in that energy scale hitherto. Hence, we propose the direct measurement with the maximized cross-section at the center-of-mass energy of 1-2 MeV to establish the firm footing at the MeV scale. Given currently state-of-the-art high power lasers, the QED-based elastic scattering may be observed at a reasonable rate, if a photon-photon collider exploiting $\\gamma$-rays generated by the inverse Compton process with electrons delivered from laser-plasma accelerators ...

  19. Trajectory Design and Control for the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Re-Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, Susan; Vaughn, Frank; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) controlled re-entry operation was successfully conducted in June of 2000. The surviving parts of the spacecraft landed in the Pacific Ocean within the predicted footprint. The design of the maneuvers to control the trajectory to accomplish this re-entry presented several challenges. These challenges included timing and duration of the maneuvers, fuel management, post maneuver position knowledge, collision avoidance with other spacecraft, accounting for the break-up of the spacecraft into several pieces with a wide range of ballistic coefficients, and ensuring that the impact footprint would remain within the desired landing area in the event of contingencies. This paper presents the initial re-entry trajectory design and the evolution of the design into the maneuver sequence used for the re-entry. The paper discusses the constraints on the trajectory design, the modifications made to the initial design and the reasons behind these modifications. Data from the re-entry operation are presented.

  20. Trajectory Design and Control for the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Re-Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, Susan; Vaughn, Frank J., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) controlled re-entry operation was successfully conducted in June of 2000. The surviving parts of the spacecraft landed in the Pacific Ocean within the nominal impact target zone. The design of the maneuvers to control the trajectory to accomplish this re-entry presented several challenges. These challenges included the timing and duration of the maneuvers, propellant management, post-maneuver state determination, collision avoidance with other spacecraft, accounting for the break-up of the spacecraft into several pieces with a wide range of ballistic coefficients, and ensuring that the impact footprint would remain within the desired impact target zone in the event of contingencies. This paper presents the initial re-entry trajectory design and traces the evolution of that design into the maneuver sequence used for the re-entry. The paper also discusses the spacecraft systems and operational constraints imposed on the trajectory design and the required modifications to the initial design based on those constraints. Data from the reentry operation are also presented.

  1. Inversion of a new circular-arc Radon transform for Compton scattering tomography This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-print Network

    Nguyen-Verger, Maï K.

    Inversion of a new circular-arc Radon transform for Compton scattering tomography This article has:10.1088/0266-5611/26/6/065005 Inversion of a new circular-arc Radon transform for Compton scattering-arc Radon transform arising from the mathematical modeling of image formation in a new modality of Compton

  2. Inverse Compton Origin of the Hard X-ray and Soft gamma-ray Emission from the Galactic Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Troy A.; Moskalenko, Igor V.; Strong, Andrew W.; Orlando, Elena; Bouchet, Laurent

    2008-09-30

    A recent re-determination of the non-thermal component of the hard X-ray to soft {gamma}-ray emission from the Galactic ridge, using the SPI instrument on the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) Observatory, is shown to be well reproduced as inverse-Compton emission from the interstellar medium. Both cosmic-ray primary electrons and secondary electrons and positrons contribute to the emission. The prediction uses the GALPROP model and includes a new calculation of the interstellar radiation field. This may solve a long-standing mystery of the origin of this emission, and potentially opens a new window on Galactic cosmic rays.

  3. The detector response matrices of the burst and transient source experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Paciesas, William S.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Koshut, Tom M.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles A.; Wilson, Robert B.; Horack, John M.; Lestrade, John Patrick

    1995-01-01

    The detector response matrices for the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) are described, including their creation and operation in data analysis. These response matrices are a detailed abstract representation of the gamma-ray detectors' operating characteristics that are needed for data analysis. They are constructed from an extensive set of calibration data coupled with a complex geometry electromagnetic cascade Monte Carlo simulation code. The calibration tests and simulation algorithm optimization are described. The characteristics of the BATSE detectors in the spacecraft environment are also described.

  4. Virtual Compton Scattering and the Generalized Polarizabilities of the Proton at Q^2=0.92 and 1.76 GeV^2

    SciTech Connect

    Helene Fonvieille, Geraud Laveissiere, Natalie Degrande, Stephanie Jaminion, Christophe Jutier, Luminita Todor, L. Van Hoorebeke, Bryon Anderson, Konrad Aniol, Kathleen Arundell, Gerard Audit, Leonard Auerbach, F. Baker, Maud Baylac, J. Berthot, Pierre Bertin, William Bertozzi, Louis Bimbot, Werner Boeglin, Edward Brash, Vincent Breton, Herbert Breuer, Etienne Burtin, John Calarco, Lawrence Cardman, Christian Cavata, Jian-Ping Chen, Eugene Chudakov, Evaristo Cisbani, Daniel Dale, Cornelis De Jager, Raffaele De Leo, Alexandre Deur, Nicole D'Hose, Gail Dodge, John Domingo, Latifa Elouadrhiri, Martin Epstein, Lars Ewell, John Finn, Kevin Fissum, Guy Fournier, Bernhard Frois, Salvatore Frullani, Christophe Furget, Haiyan Gao, Juncai Gao, Franco Garibaldi, Ashot Gasparian, Shalev Gilad, Ronald Gilman, Oleksandr Glamazdin, Charles Glashausser, Javier Gomez, Viktor Gorbenko, Pierre Guichon, Jens-Ole Hansen, Richard Holmes, Maurik Holtrop, Calvin Howell, Garth Huber, Charles Hyde, Sebastien Incerti, Mauro Iodice, Johann Jardillier, Mark Jones, Seigo Kato, James Kelly, Armen Ketikyan, Mohammad Khayat, Kouichi Kino, Serge Kox, Laird Kramer, Krishna Kumar, Gerfried Kumbartzki, Michael Kuss, Antonio Leone, John LeRose, Richard Lindgren, Nilanga Liyanage, George Lolos, Kazushige Maeda, Sergey Malov, D. Manley, Claude Marchand, Dominique Marchand, Demetrius Margaziotis, Pete Markowitz, Jacques Marroncle, Jacques Martino, Kathy McCormick, James McIntyre, Surik Mehrabyan, Fernand Merchez, Zein-Eddine Meziani, Robert Michaels, Jean Mougey, Sirish Nanda, Amra Offermann, Zisis Papandreou, Charles Perdrisat, R. Perrino, Gerassimos Petratos, Stephane Platchkov, Roman Pomatsalyuk, David Prout, Vina Punjabi, Thierry Pussieux, Gilles Quemener, Ronald Ransome, Oliver Ravel, Jean-Sebastien Real, Yves Roblin, David Rowntree, Gary Rutledge, Paul Rutt, Arunava Saha, Teijiro Saito, Adam Sarty, Tim Smith, Paul Souder, Riad Suleiman, Jeffrey Templon, Tatsuo Terasawa, Raphael Tieulent, Egle Tomasi, Hiroaki Tsubota, Hiroaki Ueno, Paul Ulmer, Guido Urciuoli, Marc Vanderhaeghen, Rob van der Meer, R.Van De Vyver, Pascal Vernin, Branislav Vlahovic, Hakob Voskanyan, Eric Voutier, John Watson, Lawrence Weinstein, Krishni Wijesooriya, Richard Wilson, Bogdan Wojtsekhowski, Dan Zainea, Zilu Zhou, Rachele Di Salvo

    2012-07-01

    Virtual Compton Scattering (VCS) on the proton has been studied at Jefferson Lab using the exclusive photon electroproduction reaction (e p --> e p gamma). This paper gives a detailed account of the analysis which has led to the determination of the structure functions P{sub LL}-P{sub TT}/epsilon and P{sub LT}, and the electric and magnetic generalized polarizabilities (GPs) alpha{sub E}(Q{sup 2}) and beta{sub M}(Q{sup 2}) at values of the four-momentum transfer squared Q{sup 2} = 0.92 and 1.76 GeV{sup 2}. These data, together with the results of VCS experiments at lower momenta, help building a coherent picture of the electric and magnetic GPs of the proton over the full measured Q{sup 2}-range, and point to their non-trivial behavior.

  5. A measurement of unpolarized cross sections and polarized cross section differences of deeply virtual compton scattering on the proton at Jefferson laboratory using CLAS (e1-dvcs2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirlinger Saylor, Nicholas A. N.

    This thesis focuses on the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) reaction e + p ? e' + p' + gamma (DVCS). The reaction is measured using the e1-dvcs2 experiment run at Jefferson Laboratory in Hall B using CLAS. The experiment took place from 22 October, 2008 to 23 January, 2009, and experiment run time of 90 days. This analysis focuses on the determination of the DVCS cross section in bins of xB, Q 2, t and ?, and makes a comparison with already existing and parallel analyses of DVCS. By factorizing the cross section of the reaction into perturbative and non-perturbative parts, we may relate the cross section of this reaction to Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) for the proton, and in doing so, provide better insight as to the distributions of quarks and gluons within it, including spacial distribution and contributions of angular momentum.

  6. Electronic structure of CdMoO{sub 4} using Compton scattering technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Khushboo Ahuja, B. L.; Sahariya, Jagrati

    2014-04-24

    The first ever Compton profile of polycrystalline CdMoO{sub 4} has been measured using {sup 137}Cs spectrometer. The results are compared with theoretical Compton profiles deduced from free atom and linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) methods. We have also computed the energy bands using density functional theory (DFT) within LCAO. The computed bands confirm the semiconducting behaviour of this compound. It is seen that the DFT theoretical profile (with local density approximation) gives a better agreement with the experimental Compton data than free atom Compton profile.

  7. Evaluation of Compton gamma camera prototype based on pixelated CdTe detectors

    PubMed Central

    Calderón, Y.; Chmeissani, M.; Kolstein, M.; De Lorenzo, G.

    2014-01-01

    A proposed Compton camera prototype based on pixelated CdTe is simulated and evaluated in order to establish its feasibility and expected performance in real laboratory tests. The system is based on module units containing a 2×4 array of square CdTe detectors of 10×10 mm2 area and 2 mm thickness. The detectors are pixelated and stacked forming a 3D detector with voxel sizes of 2 × 1 × 2 mm3. The camera performance is simulated with Geant4-based Architecture for Medicine-Oriented Simulations(GAMOS) and the Origin Ensemble(OE) algorithm is used for the image reconstruction. The simulation shows that the camera can operate with up to 104 Bq source activities with equal efficiency and is completely saturated at 109 Bq. The efficiency of the system is evaluated using a simulated 18F point source phantom in the center of the Field-of-View (FOV) achieving an intrinsic efficiency of 0.4 counts per second per kilobecquerel. The spatial resolution measured from the point spread function (PSF) shows a FWHM of 1.5 mm along the direction perpendicular to the scatterer, making it possible to distinguish two points at 3 mm separation with a peak-to-valley ratio of 8. PMID:24932209

  8. Visualizing the Mixed Bonding Properties of Liquid Boron with High-Resolution X-Ray Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, J. T.; Sit, P. H.-L.; Watanabe, Y.; Barbiellini, B.; Ishikawa, T.; Wang, Y. J.; Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y.; Bansil, A.; Ishikawa, R.; Hamaishi, M.; Paradis, P.-F.; Kimura, K.; Ishikawa, T.; Nanao, S.

    2015-05-01

    Bonding characteristics of liquid boron at 2500 K are studied by using high-resolution Compton scattering. An excellent agreement is found between the measurements and the corresponding Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. Covalent bond pairs are clearly shown to dominate in liquid boron along with the coexistence of diffuse pairs. Our study reveals the complex bonding pattern of liquid boron and gives insight into the unusual properties of this high-temperature liquid.

  9. CONSTRAINT ON THE PARAMETERS OF THE INVERSE COMPTON SCATTERING MODEL FOR RADIO PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, M.; Wang, H. G.; Lee, K. J.; Qiao, G. J.; Xu, R. X.

    2011-11-01

    The inverse Compton scattering (ICS) model can explain various pulse profile shapes and the diversity of the pulse profile evolution based on the mechanism where the radio emission is generated through ICS between secondary relativistic particles and radio waves from polar gap avalanches. In this paper, we study the parameter space of the ICS model for 15 pulsars that share the common pulse profile evolution phenomenon, where the pulse profiles are narrower at higher observing frequencies. Two key parameters, the initial Lorentz factor and the energy loss factor of secondary particles, are constrained using the least-squares fitting method, where we fit the theoretical curve of the 'beam-frequency mapping' of the ICS model to the observed pulse widths at multiple frequencies. The uncertainty of the inclination and viewing angles are taken into account in the fitting process. It is found that the initial Lorentz factor is larger than 4000, and the energy loss factor is between 20 and 560. The Lorentz factor is consistent with the prediction of the inner vacuum gap model. Such high-energy loss factors suggest significant energy loss for secondary particles at altitudes of a few tens to hundreds of kilometers.

  10. Coherent deeply virtual Compton scattering off 3He and neutron generalized parton distributions

    E-print Network

    Matteo Rinaldi; Sergio Scopetta

    2014-06-18

    It has been recently proposed to study coherent deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) off 3He nuclei to access neutron generalized parton distributions (GPDs). In particular, it has been shown that, in Impulse Approximation (IA) and at low momentum transfer, the sum of the quark helicity conserving GPDs of 3He, H and E, is dominated by the neutron contribution. This peculiar result makes the 3He target very promising to access the neutron information. We present here the IA calculation of the spin dependent GPD tilde-H of 3He. Also for this quantity the neutron contribution is found to be the dominant one, at low momentum transfer. The known forward limit of the IA calculation of tilde-H, yielding the polarized parton distributions of 3He, is correctly recovered. The extraction of the neutron information could be anyway non trivial, so that a procedure, able to take into account the nuclear effects encoded in the IA analysis, is proposed. These calculations, essential for the evaluation of the coherent DVCS cross section asymmetries, which depend on the GPDs H, E and tilde-H, represent a crucial step for planning possible experiments at Jefferson Lab.

  11. Fermi-Compton scattering due to magnetopause surface fluctuations in Jupiter's magnetospheric cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbosa, D. D.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of boundary surface fluctuations on a spectrum of electromagnetic radiation trapped in a high Q (quality) cavity are considered. Undulating walls introduce small frequency shifts at reflection to the radiation, and it is argued that the process is entirely analogous to both Fermi (particle) acceleration and inverse Compton scattering. A Fokker-Planck formalism is pursued; it yields a diffusion equation in frequency for which the Green's function and steady-state solutions are found. Applying this analysis to the Jovian continuum radiation discovered by Voyager spacecraft, it is suggested that characteristic diffusion times are greater than 1 year, and that in order to account for the steep frequency spectra observed, an unidentified loss mechanism must operate in the cavity with a decay time constant approximately equal to the characteristic diffusion time divided by 28. A radiator-reactor model of the cavity is investigated to provide an estimate for the intrinsic luminosity of the low frequency (approximately 100 Hz) continuum source whose power is approximately 7 x 10 to the 6th W.

  12. The Operation Modes of Kharkov X-Ray Generator Based on Compton Scattering NESTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Bulyak, E.V.; Gladkikh, P.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Mytsykov, A.; Shcherbakov, A.A.; Zelinsky, A.Y.; Tatchyn, R.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2005-05-09

    The results of theoretical and numerical considerations of linear Compton scattering are used to evaluate characteristics of X-rays produced by collision between a low emittance electron beam and intensive laser light in an X-ray generator NESTOR of NSC KIPT. Two main generation modes have been under consideration at preliminary NESTOR design. There are the operation mode for medicine 33.4 keV X-rays production using 43 Mev electron beam and Nd:YAG laser beam and higher energy X-rays production mode providing X-rays with energy up to 900 keV with 225 MeV electron beam and Nd:YAG laser beam. It was supposed to use an optical cavity for laser beam accumulation of about 2.6 m long and an interaction angle of about 3{sup o} in both operation modes. A few more operation modes provide possibility to expand operation range of NESTOR. Using interaction angle 10{sup o} and 150{sup o} along with optical resonator of 42 cm long and the second mode of laser light it is possible to produce X-rays in energy range from a few keV till 1.5 MeV. The intensity and spectral brightness of the X-rays is expected to be {approx} 10{sup 13} phot/s and {approx}10{sup 13} phot/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1%BW respectively.

  13. Can the Neutron Polarizabilities Be Determined from a Deuteron Compton Scattering Experiment?

    E-print Network

    Jonathan Karakowski; Gerald A. Miller

    1999-01-06

    A calculation of deuteron Compton scattering using non-relativistic diagrammatic perturbation theory is presented, with the primary motivation of investigating the feasibility of determining the neutron polarizabilities from this type of experiment. This calculation is expected to be valid for energies below 100 MeV. Previous theoretical and experimental estimates for the polarizabilities are given. All diagrams are calculated by expanding the photon wavefunctions into partial waves and using realistic deuteron wavefunctions. The Green's function for the intermediate state in the dispersive states is determined numerically. Pion-exchange, relativistic, and recoil corrections are also included. The low-energy theorem is shown to be satisfied. The relative effects of the different terms as well as their effects on the determinations of the polarizabilities are discussed at energies of 49, 69, and 95 MeV. The cross-section is dominated by the seagull, polarizability, and electromagnetic multipole interactions. Relativistic and pion-exchange terms are also important, while recoil corrections and multipoles of L=2 and greater are negligible. The calculation provides a reasonable description of the experimental data points at 49 and 69 MeV, except for the point at the greatest angle. The polarizabilities are difficult to determine at these energies due to the size of the experimental error bars. No data has been published at 95 MeV but a more accurate determination of the polarizabilities is likely at this higher energy. Detailed calculations for all terms can be found in the appendices.

  14. Avalanche photon cooling by induced Compton scattering: Higher-order Kompaneets equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shuta J.; Asano, Katsuaki; Terasawa, Toshio

    2015-07-01

    Induced Compton scattering (ICS) is an interaction between intense electromagnetic radiation and plasmas, where ICS transfers the energy from photons to plasma. Although ICS is important for laser plasma interactions in laboratory experiments and for radio emission from pulsars propagating in pulsar wind plasmas, the detail of the photon cooling process has not been understood. The problem is that, when ICS dominates, the evolution of photon spectra is described as a nonlinear convection equation, which makes the photon spectra multi-valued. Here, we propose a new approach to treat the evolution of photon spectra affected by ICS. Starting from the higher-order Kompaneets equation, we find a new equation that resolves the unphysical behavior of photon spectra. In addition, we find the steady-state analytic solution, which is linearly stable. We also successfully simulate the evolution of photon spectra without artificial viscosity. We find that photons rapidly lose their energy by ICS with continuously forming solitary structures in frequency space. The solitary structures have the same logarithmic width characterized by an electron temperature. The energy transfer from photons to plasma is more effective for a broader spectrum of photons such as that expected in astrophysical situations.

  15. A New High-Accuracy Analysis of Compton Scattering in Chiral EFT: Neutron Polarisabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griesshammer, Harald W.; McGovern, Judith A.; Phillips, Daniel R.

    2015-04-01

    Low-energy Compton scattering tests the symmetries and interaction strengths of a target's internal degrees of freedom in the electric and magnetic fields of a real, external photon. In the single-nucleon sector, information is often compressed into the static scalar dipole polarisabilities which are experimentally not directly accessible but encode information on the pion cloud and the ?(1232) excitation. The interaction of the photon with the charged pion-exchange also provides a conceptually clean probe of few-nucleon binding. After demonstrating the statistical consistency of the world's ?d dataset including the new data from the MAX-IV collaboration described in the preceding talk, we present a new extraction of the neutron polarisabilities in Chiral Effective Field Theory: ?n = [ 11 . 55 +/- 1 . 25(stat) +/- 0 . 2(BSR) +/- 0 . 8(th) ] and ?n = [ 3 . 65 -/+ 1 . 25(stat) +/- 0 . 2(BSR) -/+ 0 . 8(th) ] , in 10-4 fm3, with ?2 = 45 . 2 for 44 degrees of freedom. The new data reduced the statistical uncertainties by 30%. We discuss data accuracy and consistency, the role of the ?(1232) , and an estimate of residual theoretical uncertainties. Within statistical and systematic errors, proton and neutron polarisabilities remain identical. Supported in part by UK STFC and US DOE.

  16. Material efficiency studies for a Compton camera designed to measure characteristic prompt gamma rays emitted during proton beam radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Daniel; Polf, Jerimy C.; Peterson, Steve W.; Gillin, Michael T.; Beddar, Sam

    2011-05-01

    Prompt gamma rays emitted from biological tissues during proton irradiation carry dosimetric and spectroscopic information that can assist with treatment verification and provide an indication of the biological response of the irradiated tissues. Compton cameras are capable of determining the origin and energy of gamma rays. However, prompt gamma monitoring during proton therapy requires new Compton camera designs that perform well at the high gamma energies produced when tissues are bombarded with therapeutic protons. In this study we optimize the materials and geometry of a three-stage Compton camera for prompt gamma detection and calculate the theoretical efficiency of such a detector. The materials evaluated in this study include germanium, bismuth germanate (BGO), NaI, xenon, silicon and lanthanum bromide (LaBr3). For each material, the dimensions of each detector stage were optimized to produce the maximum number of relevant interactions. These results were used to predict the efficiency of various multi-material cameras. The theoretical detection efficiencies of the most promising multi-material cameras were then calculated for the photons emitted from a tissue-equivalent phantom irradiated by therapeutic proton beams ranging from 50 to 250 MeV. The optimized detector stages had a lateral extent of 10 × 10 cm2 with the thickness of the initial two stages dependent on the detector material. The thickness of the third stage was fixed at 10 cm regardless of material. The most efficient single-material cameras were composed of germanium (3 cm) and BGO (2.5 cm). These cameras exhibited efficiencies of 1.15 × 10-4 and 9.58 × 10-5 per incident proton, respectively. The most efficient multi-material camera design consisted of two initial stages of germanium (3 cm) and a final stage of BGO, resulting in a theoretical efficiency of 1.26 × 10-4 per incident proton.

  17. Imaging, Mapping and Monitoring Environmental Radionuclide Transport Using Compton-Geometry Gamma Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridge, J. W.; Dormand, J.; Cooper, J.; Judson, D.; Boston, A. J.; Bankhead, M.; Onda, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The legacy to-date of the nuclear disaster at Fukushima Dai-ichi, Japan, has emphasised the fundamental importance of high quality radiation measurements in soils and plant systems. Current-generation radiometers based on coded-aperture collimation are limited in their ability to locate sources of radiation in three dimensions, and require a relatively long measurement time due to the poor efficiency of the collimation system. The quality of data they can provide to support biogeochemical process models in such systems is therefore often compromised. In this work we report proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating the potential of an alternative approach in the measurement of environmentally-important radionuclides (in particular 137Cs) in quartz sand and soils from the Fukushima exclusion zone. Compton-geometry imaging radiometers harness the scattering of incident radiation between two detectors to yield significant improvements in detection efficiency, energy resolution and spatial location of radioactive sources in a 180° field of view. To our knowledge we are reporting its first application to environmentally-relevant systems at low activity, dispersed sources, with significant background radiation and, crucially, movement over time. We are using a simple laboratory column setup to conduct one-dimensional transport experiments for 139Ce and 137Cs in quartz sand and in homogenized repacked Fukushima soils. Polypropylene columns 15 cm length with internal diameter 1.6 cm were filled with sand or soil and saturated slowly with tracer-free aqueous solutions. Radionuclides were introduced as 2mL pulses (step-up step-down) at the column inlet. Data were collected continuously throughout the transport experiment and then binned into sequential time intervals to resolve the total activity in the column and its progressive movement through the sand/soil. The objective of this proof-of-concept work is to establish detection limits, optimise image reconstruction algorithms, and develop a novel approach to time-lapse quantification of radionuclide dynamics in the soil-plant system. The aim is to underpin the development of a new generation of Compton radiometers equipped to provide high resolution, dynamic measurements of radionuclides in terrestrial biogeochemical environments.

  18. New readout and data-acquisition system in an electron-tracking Compton camera for MeV gamma-ray astronomy (SMILE-II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizumoto, T.; Matsuoka, Y.; Mizumura, Y.; Tanimori, T.; Kubo, H.; Takada, A.; Iwaki, S.; Sawano, T.; Nakamura, K.; Komura, S.; Nakamura, S.; Kishimoto, T.; Oda, M.; Miyamoto, S.; Takemura, T.; Parker, J. D.; Tomono, D.; Sonoda, S.; Miuchi, K.; Kurosawa, S.

    2015-11-01

    For MeV gamma-ray astronomy, we have developed an electron-tracking Compton camera (ETCC) as a MeV gamma-ray telescope capable of rejecting the radiation background and attaining the high sensitivity of near 1 mCrab in space. Our ETCC comprises a gaseous time-projection chamber (TPC) with a micro pattern gas detector for tracking recoil electrons and a position-sensitive scintillation camera for detecting scattered gamma rays. After the success of a first balloon experiment in 2006 with a small ETCC (using a 10×10×15 cm3 TPC) for measuring diffuse cosmic and atmospheric sub-MeV gamma rays (Sub-MeV gamma-ray Imaging Loaded-on-balloon Experiment I; SMILE-I), a (30 cm)3 medium-sized ETCC was developed to measure MeV gamma-ray spectra from celestial sources, such as the Crab Nebula, with single-day balloon flights (SMILE-II). To achieve this goal, a 100-times-larger detection area compared with that of SMILE-I is required without changing the weight or power consumption of the detector system. In addition, the event rate is also expected to dramatically increase during observation. Here, we describe both the concept and the performance of the new data-acquisition system with this (30 cm)3 ETCC to manage 100 times more data while satisfying the severe restrictions regarding the weight and power consumption imposed by a balloon-borne observation. In particular, to improve the detection efficiency of the fine tracks in the TPC from ~10% to ~100%, we introduce a new data-handling algorithm in the TPC. Therefore, for efficient management of such large amounts of data, we developed a data-acquisition system with parallel data flow.

  19. New readout and data-acquisition system in an electron-tracking Compton camera for MeV gamma-ray astronomy (SMILE-II)

    E-print Network

    Tetsuya Mizumoto; Yoshihiro Matsuoka; Yoshitaka Mizumura; Toru Tanimori; Hidetoshi Kubo; Atsushi Takada; Satoru Iwaki; Tatsuya Sawano; Kiseki Nakamura; Shotaro Komura; Shogo Nakamura; Tetsuro Kishimoto; Makoto Oda; Shohei Miyamoto; Taito Takemura; Joseph D. Parker; Dai Tomono; Shinya Sonoda; Kentaro Miuchi; Shunsuke Kurosawa

    2015-08-30

    For MeV gamma-ray astronomy, we have developed an electron-tracking Compton camera (ETCC) as a MeV gamma-ray telescope capable of rejecting the radiation background and attaining the high sensitivity of near 1 mCrab in space. Our ETCC comprises a gaseous time-projection chamber (TPC) with a micro pattern gas detector for tracking recoil electrons and a position-sensitive scintillation camera for detecting scattered gamma rays. After the success of a first balloon experiment in 2006 with a small ETCC (using a 10$\\times$10$\\times$15 cm$^3$ TPC) for measuring diffuse cosmic and atmospheric sub-MeV gamma rays (Sub-MeV gamma-ray Imaging Loaded-on-balloon Experiment I; SMILE-I), a (30 cm)$^{3}$ medium-sized ETCC was developed to measure MeV gamma-ray spectra from celestial sources, such as the Crab Nebula, with single-day balloon flights (SMILE-II). To achieve this goal, a 100-times-larger detection area compared with that of SMILE-I is required without changing the weight or power consumption of the detector system. In addition, the event rate is also expected to dramatically increase during observation. Here, we describe both the concept and the performance of the new data-acquisition system with this (30 cm)$^{3}$ ETCC to manage 100 times more data while satisfying the severe restrictions regarding the weight and power consumption imposed by a balloon-borne observation. In particular, to improve the detection efficiency of the fine tracks in the TPC from $\\sim$10\\% to $\\sim$100\\%, we introduce a new data-handling algorithm in the TPC. Therefore, for efficient management of such large amounts of data, we developed a data-acquisition system with parallel data flow.

  20. Efficient propagation of the polarization from laser photons to positrons through Compton scattering and electron-positron pair creation

    E-print Network

    T. Omori; M. Fukuda; T. Hirose; Y. Kurihara; R. Kuroda; M. Nomura; A. Ohashi; T. Okugi; K. Sakaue; T. Saito; J. Urakawa; M. Washio; I. Yamazaki

    2006-02-21

    We demonstrated for the first time the production of highly polarized short-pulse positrons with a finite energy spread in accordance with a new scheme that consists of two-quantum processes, such as inverse Compton scatterings and electron-positron pair creations. Using a circularly polarized laser beam of 532 nm scattered off a high-quality electron beam with the energy of 1.28 GeV, we obtained polarized positrons with an intensity of 10^4 e+/bunch. Magnitude of positron polarizations was determined as 73+-15(sta) +-19(sys)% by means of a newly designed positron polarimeter.

  1. Measurements of the Electron-Helicity Dependent Cross Sections of Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering with CEBAF at 12 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    J. Roche; C. E. Hyde-Wright; B. Michel; C. Munoz Camacho; et al.

    2006-09-11

    We propose precision measurements of the helicity-dependent and helicity independent cross sections for the ep {yields} ep{gamma} reaction in Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) kinematics. DVCS scaling is obtained in the limits Q{sup 2} >> {Lambda}{sub QCD}{sup 2}, x{sub Bj} fixed, and -{Delta}{sup 2} = -(q-q{prime}){sup 2} << Q{sup 2}. We consider the specific kinematic range Q{sup 2} > 2 GeV{sup 2}, W > 2 GeV, and -{Delta}{sup 2} {le} 1 GeV{sup 2}. We will use our successful technique from the 5.75 GeV Hall A DVCS experiment (E00-110). With polarized 6.6, 8.8, and 11 GeV beams incident on the liquid hydrogen target, we will detect the scattered electron in the Hall A HRS-L spectrometer (maximum central momentum 4.3 GeV/c) and the emitted photon in a slightly expanded PbF{sub 2} calorimeter. In general, we will not detect the recoil proton. The H(e,e{prime}{gamma})X missing mass resolution is sufficient to isolate the exclusive channel with 3% systematic precision.

  2. Observations of a large flare in GX 1+4 with the Compton gamma ray observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staubert, R.; Maisack, M.; Kendziorra, E.; Draxler, T.; Finger, M. H.; Fishman, G. J.; Strickman, M. S.; Starr, C. H.

    1995-01-01

    The pulsating X-ray binary GX 1+4 (4U 1728-24) was observed by Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) from 9 to 21 September 1993 as a target of oppurtunity after Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) had detected the onset of a large flare by the greatly increased pulsed flux at the period of approximately 2 min. The total flux in the 40-100 keV range as observed by the OSSE reached its maximum of 83 mCrab on 14/15 September, after which it fell sharply to about 31 mCrab within 2 days. The spectrum is well described by thermal type spectra. The characteristic temperature of the average OSSE spectrum for a thermal Bremsstrahlung model is kT = (35.5 +/- 0.5) keV. A single power law can be ruled out. There is evidence for a hardening of the spectrum with decreasing intensity at the end of the flare. The barycentric pulse period was (120.567 +/- 0.005) s on 5 September. The average spin-down rate as taken from the standard BATSE analysis was dP/dt = 0.0105 s/day, and constant over the time of the flare. A further target of oppurtunity (TOO) observation with the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) on 18 September led to the first detection of the source with a reflecting X-ray telescope and to a signifcantly improved position: RA(2000) = 17h 32m 2.1s and DEC(2000) = -24 deg 44 min 44 sec. This position 3.5 sec from V2116 Oph, with a 90% error radius of 8 sec is the most accurate so far obtained with an X-ray instrument, thus confirming the identification with the suspected stellar counterpart.

  3. Visualization of microvessels by angiography using inverse-Compton scattering X-rays in animal models.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Toshiharu; Fukuyama, Naoto; Tanaka, Chiharu; Ikeya, Yoshimori; Shinozaki, Yoshiro; Kawai, Toshiaki; Atsumi, Takuji; Shiraishi, Takashi; Sato, Eiichi; Kuroda, Ryunosuke; Toyokawa, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Kawakatsu; Ikari, Yuji; Mori, Hidezo

    2014-11-01

    The fundamental performance of microangiography has been evaluated using the S-band linac-based inverse-Compton scattering X-ray (iCSX) method to determine how many photons would be required to apply iCSX to human microangiography. ICSX is characterized by its quasi-monochromatic nature and small focus size which are fundamental requirements for microangiography. However, the current iCSX source does not have sufficient flux for microangiography in clinical settings. It was determined whether S-band compact linac-based iCSX can visualize small vessels of excised animal organs, and the amount of X-ray photons required for real time microangiography in clinical settings was estimated. The iCSX coupled with a high-gain avalanche rushing amorphous photoconductor camera could visualize a resolution chart with only a single iCSX pulse of ?3?ps duration; the resolution was estimated to be ?500?µm. The iCSX coupled with an X-ray cooled charge-coupled device image sensor camera visualized seventh-order vascular branches (80?µm in diameter) of a rabbit ear by accumulating the images for 5 and 30?min, corresponding to irradiation of 3000 and 18000 iCSX pulses, respectively. The S-band linac-based iCSX visualized microvessels by accumulating the images. An iCSX source with a photon number of 3.6 × 10(3)-5.4 × 10(4) times greater than that used in this study may enable visualizing microvessels of human fingertips even in clinical settings. PMID:25343802

  4. Extracting the cation distributions in NiFe2-x Al x O4 solid solutions using magnetic Compton scattering.

    PubMed

    Kamali, S; Shih, K; Barbiellini, B; Wang, Y J; Kaprzyk, S; Itou, M; Bansil, A; Sakurai, Y

    2015-11-18

    We discuss the ground state electronic structure and magnetization properties of a series of NiFe2-x Al x O4 solid solutions (x??=??0.0, 0.4, 0.8, 1.2, 1.6, and 2.0) using magnetic Compton scattering measurements, together with parallel first-principles computations. In this way, we systematically extract the complicated cation distributions in this ferrite system as a function of x. The relationship between the electronic ground state, magnetism, and cation distributions is explained in terms of a model, validated by our first-principles computations, wherein the magnetic properties of the three cation distributions are assumed to be different. A good accord is found between the computed and measured magnetic Compton profiles. PMID:26471985

  5. Prompt GeV emission in the synchrotron self-Compton model for gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Panaitescu, Alin

    2008-01-01

    The detection in 10 bursts of an optical counterpart emission (i.e. during the prompt GRB phase) that is 10-10000 brighter than the extrapolation of the burst spectrum to optical frequencies suggests a synchrotron self-Compton origin for the GRB emission, synchrotron producing the optical counterpart emission. In this model, the second upscattering of the burst photons yields a prompt GeV-TeV emission, whose brightness depends strongly on an unknown quantity, the peak energy of the primary synchrotron spectrum. Measurements of the optical, gamma-ray, and GeV prompt fluxes can be used to test the synchrotron self-Compton model for GRBs and to determine directly the total radiative output of GRBs. For a set of 29 GRBs with optical counterpart detections, we find that the expected GeV photon flux should correlate with the fluence of the sub-MeV emission and should anticorrelate with the brightness of the optical counterpart, the strength of these correlations decreasing for an increasing width of the synchrotron peak energy distribution. The detection of a GeV prompt emission consistent with the extrapolation of the burst spectrum to higher energies would rule out the synchrotron self-Compton model if the sub-MeV burst emission were very bright and the (intrinsic) optical counterpart were very dim.

  6. High flux, narrow bandwidth compton light sources via extended laser-electron interactions

    DOEpatents

    Barty, V P

    2015-01-13

    New configurations of lasers and electron beams efficiently and robustly produce high flux beams of bright, tunable, polarized quasi-monoenergetic x-rays and gamma-rays via laser-Compton scattering. Specifically, the use of long-duration, pulsed lasers and closely-spaced, low-charge and low emittance bunches of electron beams increase the spectral flux of the Compton-scattered x-rays and gamma rays, increase efficiency of the laser-electron interaction and significantly reduce the overall complexity of Compton based light sources.

  7. Inverse Compton scattering of ambient radiation by a cold relativistic jet - A source of beamed, polarized continuum in blazars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.; Sikora, Marek

    1987-01-01

    A general formalism is developed for computing the intensity and polarization of unpolarized radiation scattered by a group of electrons with a specified distribution of momenta. The case of isotropic incident radiation with a power-law spectrum is addressed, and the 'head-on' approximation is developed to describe the nearly unidirectional character of the incident radiation in the electron rest frame. The formalism is implemented numerically, verifying the validity of the 'head-on' approximation and illustrating the polarization and intensity properties of radiation scattered by jets with different electron momentum distribution. The results are placed in an astrophysical setting, determining the optical depths and kinetic energies required for the scattered radiation to dominate over the isotropic component in blazars. It is argued that Comptonization of unbeamed AGN radiation by a relativistic jet can account for the polarization and the overall spectral shape of the IR-optical continuum in blazars.

  8. The non-linear Compton scattering in plasma obtained using a novel analytical solution of the strong-field Klein-Gordon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raicher, E.; Eliezer, S.; Zigler, A.

    2015-05-01

    The matrix element of the Compton scattering in the presence of strong electromagnetic field in plasma is considered. The calculation is performed employing two novel wavefunctions, numerical and analytical, describing the dynamics of the particle in the electromagnetic field. The impact of the analytical approximation on the matrix element of the scattering process is investigated.

  9. High energy afterglows and flares from Gamma-Ray Burst by Inverse Compton emission

    E-print Network

    A. Galli; L. Piro

    2007-09-28

    We perform a detailed study of inverse Compton (IC) emission for a fireball undergoing external shock (ES) in either a uniform or a wind-like interstellar medium, and assess the relative importance of IC and synchrotron emissions. We determine the primary model parameters driving the IC to synchrotron emission ratio in the case of a short duration central engine. We then investigate the case of ES by a long duration central engine, or delayed external shock (DES), a model that can account for some of the flares observed in GRB X-ray light curves. We present model predictions, in particular in terms of GeV vs X-ray behavior, and compare them with other models proposed to explain the origin of flares. We find that if most of the emission occurs when the fireball is in the fast cooling regime, then a substantial GeV emission is expected both for a short (standard ES) and a long (DES) duration central engine activity. In particular, in the context of standard ES we are able to account for the delayed emission observed in GRB940217. In the case of DES, we find that IC scattering of X-ray flare photons can produce high energy flares in the GeV band, which can be detected by GLAST. The detectability of high energy flares improves with the burst kinetic energy: about 30% of Swift GRBs showing flares in their X-ray light curve have sufficiently large kinetic energy so that the expected high flares can be detected by GLAST. One important prediction of the DES model is the simultaneity between low and high energy flares. To test this simultaneity, the peak energies of both flares need to fall below or within the observational bands. We predict that X-ray flares with peak energy of ~10 eV produce high energy flares with peak energy of around 100 MeV-GeV. Observations by Swift and GLAST then, can test the predicted simultaneity.

  10. Virtual Compton scattering and neutral pion electroproduction in the resonance region up to the deep inelastic region at backward angles

    SciTech Connect

    Laveissiere, Geraud; Degrande, Natalie; Jaminion, Stephanie; Jutier, Christophe; Todor, Luminita; Di Salvo, Rachele; Van Hoorebeke, L.; Alexa, L.C.; Anderson, Brian; Aniol, Konrad; Arundell, Kathleen; Audit, Gerard; Auerbach, Leonard; Baker, F.; Baylac, Maud; Berthot, J.; Bertin, Pierre; Bertozzi, William; Bimbot, Louis; Boeglin, Werner; Brash, Edward; Breton, Vincent; Breuer, Herbert; Burtin, Etienne; Calarco, John; Cardman, Lawrence; Cavata, Christian; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Chen, Jian-Ping; Chudakov, Eugene; Cisbani, Evaristo; Dale, Daniel; De Jager, Cornelis; De Leo, Raffaele; Deur, Alexandre; D'Hose, Nicole; Dodge, Gail; Domingo, John; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Epstein, Martin; Ewell, Lars; Finn, John; Fissum, Kevin; Fonvieille, Helene; Fournier, Guy; Frois, Bernard; Frullani, Salvatore; Furget, Christophe; Gao, Haiyan; Gao, Juncai; Garibaldi, Franco; Gasparian, Ashot; Gilad, Shalev; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Glashausser, Charles; Gomez, Javier; Gorbenko, Viktor; Grenier, Philippe; Guichon, Pierre; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Holmes, Richard; Holtrop, Maurik; Howell, Calvin; Huber, Garth; Hyde, Charles; Incerti, Sebastien; Iodice, Mauro; Jardillier, Johann; Jones, Mark; Kahl, William; Kamalov, Sabit; Kato, Seigo; Katramatou, A.T.; Kelly, James; Kerhoas, Sophie; Ketikyan, Armen; Khayat, Mohammad; Kino, Kouichi; Kox, Serge; Kramer, Laird; Kumar, Krishna; Kumbartzki, Gerfried; Kuss, Michael; Leone, Antonio; LeRose, John; Liang, Meihua; Lindgren, Richard; Liyanage, Nilanga; Lolos, George; Lourie, Robert; Madey, Richard; Maeda, Kazushige; Malov, Sergey; Manley, D.; Marchand, Claude; Marchand, Dominique; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Marroncle, Jacques; Martino, Jacques; McCormick, Kathy; McIntyre, Justin; Mehrabyan, Surik; Merchez, Fernand; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Miller, Gerald; Mougey, Jean; Nanda, Sirish; Neyret, Damien; Offermann, Edmond; Papandreou, Zisis; Perdrisat, Charles; Perrino, R.; Petratos, Gerassimos; Platchkov, Stephane; Pomatsalyuk, Roman; Prout, David; Punjabi, Vina; Pussieux, Thierry; Quemener, Gilles; Ransome, Ronald; Ravel, Oliver; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Renard, F.; Roblin, Yves; Rowntree, David; Rutledge, Gary; Rutt, Paul; Saha, Arunava; Saito, Teijiro; Sarty, Adam; Serdarevic, A.; Smith, T.; Smirnov, G.; Soldi, K.; Sorokin, Pavel; Souder, Paul; Suleiman, Riad; Templon, Jeffrey; Terasawa, Tatsuo; Tiator, Lothar; Tieulent, Raphael; Tomasi-Gustaffson, E.; Tsubota, Hiroaki; Ueno, Hiroaki; Ulmer, Paul; Urciuoli, Guido; Van De Vyver, R.; van der Meer, Rob; Vernin, Pascal; Vlahovic, B.; Voskanyan, Hakob; Voutier, Eric; Watson, J.W.; Weinstein, Lawrence; Wijesooriya, Krishni; Wilson, R.; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Zainea, Dan; Zhang, Wei-Ming; Zhao, Jie; Zhou, Z.-L.

    2009-01-01

    We have made the first measurements of the virtual Compton scattering (VCS) process via the H(e,e'p)? exclusive reaction in the nucleon resonance region, at backward angles. Results are presented for the W-dependence at fixed Q2=1 GeV2, and for the Q2-dependence at fixed W near 1.5 GeV. The VCS data show resonant structures in the first and second resonance regions. The observed Q2-dependence is smooth. The measured ratio of H(e,e'p)? to H(e,e'p)?0 cross sections emphasizes the different sensitivity of these two reactions to the various nucleon resonances. Finally, when compared to Real Compton Scattering (RCS) at high energy and large angles, our VCS data at the highest W (1.8-1.9 GeV) show a striking Q2-independence, which may suggest a transition to a perturbative scattering mechanism at the quark level.

  11. A Monte Carlo study of high-energy photon transport in matter: application for multiple scattering investigation in Compton spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brancewicz, Marek; Itou, Masayoshi; Sakurai, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    The first results of multiple scattering simulations of polarized high-energy X-rays for Compton experiments using a new Monte Carlo program, MUSCAT, are presented. The program is developed to follow the restrictions of real experimental geometries. The new simulation algorithm uses not only well known photon splitting and interaction forcing methods but it is also upgraded with the new propagation separation method and highly vectorized. In this paper, a detailed description of the new simulation algorithm is given. The code is verified by comparison with the previous experimental and simulation results by the ESRF group and new restricted geometry experiments carried out at SPring-8. PMID:26698070

  12. Gamma-ray burst observations with the [ital Compton]/[ital Ulysses]/[ital Pioneer]-[ital Venus] network

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, T.L. ); Hurley, K.C. ); Sommer, M. ); Boer, M.; Niel, M. ); Fishman, G.J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Meegan, C.A.; Paciesas, W.S.; Wilson, R.B. ); Fenimore, E.E.; Laros, J.G.; Klebesadel, R.W. )

    1993-07-05

    The third and latest interplanetary network for the precise directional analysis of gamma ray bursts consists of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment in [ital Compton] [ital Gamma] [ital Ray] [ital Observatory] and instruments on [ital Pioneer]-[ital Venus] [ital Orbiter] and the deep-space mission [ital Ulysses]. The unsurpassed resolution of the BATSE instrument, the use of refined analysis techniques, and [ital Ulysses]' distance of up to 6 AU all contribute to a potential for greater precision than had been achieved with former networks. Also, the departure of [ital Ulysses] from the ecliptic plane in 1992 avoids any positional alignment of the three instruments that would lessen the source directional accuracy.

  13. THE {gamma}-RAY SPECTRUM OF GEMINGA AND THE INVERSE COMPTON MODEL OF PULSAR HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2012-09-20

    We reanalyze the Fermi spectra of the Geminga and Vela pulsars. We find that the spectrum of Geminga above the break is well approximated by a simple power law without the exponential cutoff, making Geminga's spectrum similar to that of Crab. Vela's broadband {gamma}-ray spectrum is equally well fit with both the exponential cutoff and the double power-law shapes. In the broadband double power-law fits, for a typical Fermi spectrum of a bright {gamma}-ray pulsar, most of the errors accumulate due to the arbitrary parameterization of the spectral roll-off. In addition, a power law with an exponential cutoff gives an acceptable fit for the underlying double power-law spectrum for a very broad range of parameters, making such fitting procedures insensitive to the underlying Fermi photon spectrum. Our results have important implications for the mechanism of pulsar high-energy emission. A number of observed properties of {gamma}-ray pulsars-i.e., the broken power-law spectra without exponential cutoffs and stretching in the case of Crab beyond the maximal curvature limit, spectral breaks close to or exceeding the maximal breaks due to curvature emission, patterns of the relative intensities of the leading and trailing pulses in the Crab repeated in the X-ray and {gamma}-ray regions, presence of profile peaks at lower energies aligned with {gamma}-ray peaks-all point to the inverse Compton origin of the high-energy emission from majority of pulsars.

  14. Generation of Femtosecond X-Rays by 90 degrees Compton Scattering

    E-print Network

    Kim, K.-J.

    2008-01-01

    and bright electron beam sources. Compton backscattering, inbackscattering, the pulse length of the generated x-ray beam is given roughly by the average of electron andbackscattering in that they both produce short wavelength radiation in the direction of the electron

  15. Polarized positron source with a Compton multiple interaction point line

    E-print Network

    Chaikovska, I; Dadoun, O; Lepercq, P; Variola, A

    2014-01-01

    Positron sources are critical components of the future linear collider projects. This is essentially due to the high luminosity required, orders of magnitude higher than existing ones. In addition, polarization of the positron beam rather expands the physics research potential of the machine. In this framework, the Compton sources for polarized positron production are taken into account where the high energy gamma rays are produced by the Compton scattering and subsequently converted into the polarized electron-positron pairs in a target-converter. The Compton multiple Interaction Point (IP) line is proposed as one of the solutions to increase the number of the positrons produced. The gamma ray production with the Compton multiple IP line is simulated and used for polarized positron generation. Later, a capture section based on an adiabatic matching device (AMD) followed by a pre-injector linac is simulated to capture and accelerate the positron beam.

  16. Electron-tracking Compton gamma-ray camera for small animal and phantom imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabuki, Shigeto; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Amano, Hiroo; Nakamoto, Yuji; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Miuchi, Kentaro; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Takahashi, Michiaki; Kawashima, Hidekazu; Ueda, Masashi; Okada, Tomohisa; Kubo, Atsushi; Kunieda, Etuso; Nakahara, Tadaki; Kohara, Ryota; Miyazaki, Osamu; Nakazawa, Tetsuo; Shirahata, Takashi; Yamamoto, Etsuji; Ogawa, Koichi; Togashi, Kaori; Saji, Hideo; Tanimori, Toru

    2010-11-01

    We have developed an electron-tracking Compton camera (ETCC) for medical use. Our ETCC has a wide energy dynamic range (200-1300 keV) and wide field of view (3 sr), and thus has potential for advanced medical use. To evaluate the ETCC, we imaged the head (brain) and bladder of mice that had been administered with F-18-FDG. We also imaged the head and thyroid gland of mice using double tracers of F-18-FDG and I-131 ions.

  17. E00-110 experiment at Jefferson Lab Hall A: Deeply virtual Compton scattering off the proton at 6 GeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Defurne, M.; Amaryan, M.; Aniol, K. A.; Beaumel, M.; Benaoum, H.; Bertin, P.; Brossard, M.; Camsonne, A.; Chen, J. -P.; Chudakov, E.; et al

    2015-11-03

    We present final results on the photon electroproduction ($\\vec{e}p\\rightarrow ep\\gamma$) cross section in the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) regime and the valence quark region from Jefferson Lab experiment E00-110. Results from an analysis of a subset of these data were published before, but the analysis has been improved which is described here at length, together with details on the experimental setup. Furthermore, additional data have been analyzed resulting in photon electroproduction cross sections at new kinematic settings, for a total of 588 experimental bins. Results of the $Q^2$- and $x_B$-dependences of both the helicity-dependent and helicity-independent cross sections aremore »discussed. The $Q^2$-dependence illustrates the dominance of the twist-2 handbag amplitude in the kinematics of the experiment, as previously noted. Thanks to the excellent accuracy of this high luminosity experiment, it becomes clear that the unpolarized cross section shows a significant deviation from the Bethe-Heitler process in our kinematics, compatible with a large contribution from the leading twist-2 DVCS$^2$ term to the photon electroproduction cross section. The necessity to include higher-twist corrections in order to fully reproduce the shape of the data is also discussed. The DVCS cross sections in this study represent the final set of experimental results from E00-110, superseding the previous publication.« less

  18. E00-110 experiment at Jefferson Lab Hall A: Deeply virtual Compton scattering off the proton at 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Defurne, M.; Amaryan, M.; Aniol, K. A.; Beaumel, M.; Benaoum, H.; Bertin, P.; Brossard, M.; Camsonne, A.; Chen, J. -P.; Chudakov, E.; Craver, B.; Cusanno, F.; de Jager, C. W.; Deur, A.; Feuerbach, R.; Ferdi, C.; Fieschi, J. -M.; Frullani, S.; Fuchey, E.; Garçon, M.; Garibaldi, F.; Gayou, O.; Gavalian, G.; Gilman, R.; Gomez, J.; Gueye, P.; Guichon, P. A. M.; Guillon, B.; Hansen, O.; Hayes, D.; Higinbotham, D.; Holmstrom, T.; Hyde, C. E.; Ibrahim, H.; Igarashi, R.; Jiang, X.; Jo, H. S.; Kaufman, L. J.; Kelleher, A.; Keppel, C.; Kolarkar, A.; Kuchina, E.; Kumbartzki, G.; Laveissière, G.; LeRose, J. J.; Lindgren, R.; Liyanage, N.; Lu, H. -J.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Mazouz, M.; Meziani, Z. -E.; McCormick, K.; Michaels, R.; Michel, B.; Moffit, B.; Monaghan, P.; Muñoz Camacho, C.; Nanda, S.; Nelyubin, V.; Paremuzyan, R.; Potokar, M.; Qiang, Y.; Ransome, R. D.; Réal, J. -S.; Reitz, B.; Roblin, Y.; Roche, J.; Sabatié, F.; Saha, A.; Sirca, S.; Slifer, K.; Solvignon, P.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Ulmer, P. E.; Voutier, E.; Wang, K.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.

    2015-11-03

    We present final results on the photon electroproduction ($\\vec{e}p\\rightarrow ep\\gamma$) cross section in the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) regime and the valence quark region from Jefferson Lab experiment E00-110. Results from an analysis of a subset of these data were published before, but the analysis has been improved which is described here at length, together with details on the experimental setup. Furthermore, additional data have been analyzed resulting in photon electroproduction cross sections at new kinematic settings, for a total of 588 experimental bins. Results of the $Q^2$- and $x_B$-dependences of both the helicity-dependent and helicity-independent cross sections are discussed. The $Q^2$-dependence illustrates the dominance of the twist-2 handbag amplitude in the kinematics of the experiment, as previously noted. Thanks to the excellent accuracy of this high luminosity experiment, it becomes clear that the unpolarized cross section shows a significant deviation from the Bethe-Heitler process in our kinematics, compatible with a large contribution from the leading twist-2 DVCS$^2$ term to the photon electroproduction cross section. The necessity to include higher-twist corrections in order to fully reproduce the shape of the data is also discussed. The DVCS cross sections in this study represent the final set of experimental results from E00-110, superseding the previous publication.

  19. The E00-110 experiment in Jefferson Lab's Hall A: Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering off the Proton at 6 GeV

    E-print Network

    M. Defurne; M. Amaryan; K. A. Aniol; M. Beaumel; H. Benaoum; P. Bertin; M. Brossard; A. Camsonne; J. -P. Chen; E. Chudakov; B. Craver; F. Cusanno; C. W. de Jager; A. Deur; R. Feuerbach; C. Ferdi; J. -M. Fieschi; S. Frullani; E. Fuchey; M. Garcon; F. Garibaldi; O. Gayou; G. Gavalian; R. Gilman; J. Gomez; P. Gueye; P. A. M. Guichon; B. Guillon; O. Hansen; D. Hayes; D. Higinbotham; T. Holmstrom; C. E. Hyde; H. Ibrahim; R. Igarashi; X. Jiang; H. S. Jo; L. J. Kaufman; A. Kelleher; C. Keppel; A. Kolarkar; E. Kuchina; G. Kumbartzki; G. Laveissière; J. J. LeRose; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; H. -J. Lu; D. J. Margaziotis; M. Mazouz; Z. -E. Meziani; K. McCormick; R. Michaels; B. Michel; B. Moffit; P. Monaghan; C. Muñoz Camacho; S. Nanda; V. Nelyubin; R. Paremuzyan; M. Potokar; Y. Qiang; R. D. Ransome; J. -S. Réal; B. Reitz; Y. Roblin; J. Roche; F. Sabatié; A. Saha; S. Sirca; K. Slifer; P. Solvignon; R. Subedi; V. Sulkosky; P. E. Ulmer; E. Voutier; K. Wang; L. B. Weinstein; B. Wojtsekhowski; X. Zheng; L. Zhu

    2015-04-21

    We present final results on the photon electroproduction ($\\vec{e}p\\rightarrow ep\\gamma$) cross section in the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) regime and the valence quark region from Jefferson Lab experiment E00-110. Results from an analysis of a subset of these data were published before, but the analysis has been improved which is described here at length, together with details on the experimental setup. Furthermore, additional data have been analyzed resulting in photon electroproduction cross sections at new kinematic settings, for a total of 588 experimental bins. Results of the $Q^2$- and $x_B$-dependences of both the helicity-dependent and helicity-independent cross sections are discussed. The $Q^2$-dependence illustrates the dominance of the twist-2 handbag amplitude in the kinematics of the experiment, as previously noted. Thanks to the excellent accuracy of this high luminosity experiment, it becomes clear that the unpolarized cross section shows a significant deviation from the Bethe-Heitler process in our kinematics, compatible with a large contribution from the leading twist-2 DVCS$^2$ term to the photon electroproduction cross section. The necessity to include higher-twist corrections in order to fully reproduce the shape of the data is also discussed. The DVCS cross sections in this paper represent the final set of experimental results from E00-110, superseding the previous publication.

  20. Analysis of Data from the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kniffen, Donald A.; Elliott, William W.

    1999-01-01

    The final report consists of summaries of work proposed, work accomplished, papers and presentations published and continuing work regarding the cooperative agreement. The work under the agreement is based on high energy gamma ray source data analysis collected from the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET).

  1. Some properties of synchrotron radio and inverse-Compton gamma-ray images of supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruk, O.; Beshley, V.; Bocchino, F.; Orlando, S.

    2009-05-01

    The synchrotron radio maps of supernova remnants (SNRs) in a uniform interstellar medium and interstellar magnetic field (ISMF) are analysed, allowing for different `sensitivity' of the injection efficiency to the obliquity of the shock. The very-high-energy ?-ray maps arising from inverse Compton processes are also synthesized. The properties of images in these different wavelength bands are compared, with particular emphasis on the location of the bright limbs in bilateral SNRs. Recent High-Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) observations of SN 1006 show that the radio and inverse Compton ?-ray limbs coincide, and we found that this may happen if (i) injection is isotropic but the variation of the maximum energy of electrons is rather fast to compensate for differences in the magnetic field, or (ii) the obliquity dependence of injection (either quasi-parallel or quasi-perpendicular) and the electron maximum energy are strong enough to dominate the magnetic field variation. In the latter case, the obliquity dependences of the injection and the maximum energy should not be opposite. We argue that the position of the limbs alone, and even their coincidence in radio, X-rays and ?-rays, as discovered by HESS in SN 1006, cannot be conclusive as regards the dependence of the electron injection efficiency, the compression/amplification of the ISMF and the electron maximum energy on the obliquity angle.

  2. Diagnostics for the optimization of an 11 keV inverse Compton scattering x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Chauchat, A.-S.; Brasile, J.-P; Le Flanchec, V.; Negre, J.-P.; Binet, A.; Ortega, J.-M.

    2013-04-19

    In a scope of a collaboration between Thales Communications and Security and CEA DAM DIF, 11 keV Xrays were produced by inverse Compton scattering on the ELSA facility. In this type of experiment, X-ray observation lies in the use of accurate electron and laser beam interaction diagnostics and on fitted X-ray detectors. The low interaction probability between < 100 {mu}m width, 12 ps [rms] length electron and photon pulses requires careful optimization of pulse spatial and temporal covering. Another issue was to observe 11 keV X-rays in the ambient radioactive noise of the linear accelerator. For that, we use a very sensitive detection scheme based on radio luminescent screens.

  3. Beam Measurement of 11.424 GHz X-Band Linac for Compton Scattering X-ray Source

    SciTech Connect

    Natsui, Takuya; Mori, Azusa; Masuda, Hirotoshi; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Sakamoto, Fumito

    2010-11-04

    An inverse Compton scattering X-ray source for medical applications, consisting of an X-band (11.424 GHz) linac and Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, is currently being developed at the University of Tokyo. This system uses an X-band 3.5-cell thermionic cathode RF gun for electron beam generation. We can obtain a multi-bunch electron beam with this gun. The beam is accelerated to 30 MeV by a traveling-wave accelerating tube. So far, we have verified stable beam generation (around 2.3 MeV) by using the newly designed RF gun and we have succeeded in beam transportation to a beam dump.

  4. Diagnostics for the optimization of an 11 keV inverse Compton scattering x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauchat, A.-S.; Brasile, J.-P.; Le Flanchec, V.; Nègre, J.-P.; Binet, A.; Ortega, J.-M.

    2013-04-01

    In a scope of a collaboration between Thales Communications & Security and CEA DAM DIF, 11 keV Xrays were produced by inverse Compton scattering on the ELSA facility. In this type of experiment, X-ray observation lies in the use of accurate electron and laser beam interaction diagnostics and on fitted X-ray detectors. The low interaction probability between < 100 ?m width, 12 ps [rms] length electron and photon pulses requires careful optimization of pulse spatial and temporal covering. Another issue was to observe 11 keV X-rays in the ambient radioactive noise of the linear accelerator. For that, we use a very sensitive detection scheme based on radio luminescent screens.

  5. Microscopic magnetic properties of an oxygen-doped Tb-Fe thin film by magnetic Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Agui, Akane; Unno, Tomoya; Matsumoto, Sayaka; Suzuki, Kousuke; Sakurai, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Akihisa

    2013-11-14

    The magnetic Compton scattering of a Tb{sub 32}Fe{sub 55}O{sub 13} film was measured in order to investigate the microscopic magnetization processes (i.e., the spin moment, orbital moment, and element specific moments). The trend of the spin magnetic moment was the same as that of the total magnetic moment but opposite to the orbital magnetic moment. In the low magnetic field region, the magnetic moments were not perfectly aligned perpendicular to the film surface, and the perpendicular components were found to mainly arise from the magnetic moment of Tb. Oxygen atoms hinder long range magnetic interaction and hence also affect the magnetization process of the magnetic moments of Tb and Fe.

  6. Advances on Ultrafast Silicon Field Emitter Array Photocathodes for Coherent Radiation Sources Based on Inverse Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, C.; Swanwick, M.; Keathley, P. D.; Kärtner, F. X.; Velásquez-García, L. F.

    2014-11-01

    Low-cost, compact, and coherent X-rays sources would enable exciting applications such as biomedical imaging of soft tissue and real-time visualisation of molecules at a widespread scale. A promising approach to implement such an X-ray source is based on inverse Compton scattering of a series of nanostructured electron sheets accelerated to relativistic speeds. Photon-triggered field emission arrays can readily produce planar arrays of electron bunches with pC-level sheet charge at high repetition rates using intense laser pulses. In this article, the performance of single-crystal, ultrafast, photon-actuated silicon field emitter arrays is investigated for varying emitter height. Charge vs. incident photon pulse energy characteristics and quantum efficiency of the devices are reported.

  7. Measurement of the beam-recoil polarization in low-energy virtual Compton scattering from the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doria, L.; Janssens, P.; Achenbach, P.; Ayerbe Gayoso, C.; Baumann, D.; Bensafa, I.; Benali, M.; Beri?i?, J.; Bernauer, J. C.; Böhm, R.; Bosnar, D.; Correa, L.; D'Hose, N.; Defaÿ, X.; Ding, M.; Distler, M. O.; Fonvieille, H.; Friedrich, J.; Friedrich, J. M.; Laveissière, G.; Makek, M.; Marroncle, J.; Merkel, H.; Mihovilovi?, M.; Müller, U.; Nungesser, L.; Pasquini, B.; Pochodzalla, J.; Postavaru, O.; Potokar, M.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sánchez Majos, S.; Schlimme, B. S.; Seimetz, M.; Širca, S.; Tamas, G.; Van de Vyver, R.; Van Hoorebeke, L.; Van Overloop, A.; Walcher, Th.; Weinriefer, M.; A1 Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Double-polarization observables in the reaction e ?p ?e'p ?'? have been measured at Q2=0.33 (GeV/c ) 2 . The experiment was performed at the spectrometer setup of the A1 Collaboration using the 855 MeV polarized electron beam provided by the Mainz Microtron (MAMI) and a recoil proton polarimeter. From the double-polarization observables the structure function PLT ? is extracted for the first time, with the value (-15.4 ±3 .3(stat .)-2.4+1.5(syst.)) GeV-2 , using the low-energy theorem for virtual Compton scattering. This structure function provides a hitherto unmeasured linear combination of the generalized polarizabilities of the proton.

  8. The Quantum Mechanics of Nano-Confined Water: New Cooperative Effects Revealed with Neutron and X-Ray Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, G. F.; Deb, Aniruddha

    2014-12-01

    Neutron Compton scattering(NCS) measurements of the momentum distribution of light ions using the Vesuvio instrument at ISIS provide a sensitive local probe of the environment of those ions. NCS measurements of the proton momentum distribution in bulk water show only small deviations from the usual picture of water as a collection of molecules, with the protons covalently bonded to an oxygen and interacting weakly, primarily electrostatically, with nearby molecules. However, a series of measurements of the proton momentum distribution in carbon nanotubes, xerogel, and Nafion show that the proton delocalizes over distances of 0.2-0.3Å when water is confined on the scale of 20Å. This delocalization must be the result of changes in the Born-Oppenheimer surface for the protons, which would imply that there are large deviations in the electron distribution from that of a collection of weakly interacting molecules. This has been observed at Spring-8 using x-ray Compton scattering. The observed deviation in the valence electron momentum distribution from that of bulk water is more than an order of magnitude larger than the change observed in bulk water as the water is heated from just above melting to just below boiling. We conclude that the protons and electrons in nano-confined water are in a qualitatively different ground state from that of bulk water. Since the properties of this state persist at room temperature, and the confinement distance necessary to observe it is comparable to the distance between the elements of biological cells, this state presumably plays a role in the functioning of those cells.

  9. Bright MeV-energy x-ray beams from a compact all-laser-driven inverse-Compton-scattering source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umstadter, Donald

    2012-10-01

    Bright MeV energy x-ray beams produced by conventional inverse-Compton-scattering sources are used for nuclear physics research, but their large size (>100-m) restricts accessibility and utilization for real-world radiological applications. By developing a method to integrate a compact laser-driven accelerator with Compton scattering, we have developed a source that produces MeV energy x-rays, but with a four orders-of-magnitude increase in peak brightness, and yet has a size (< 10 m) small enough to fit in a hospital laboratory, or even on a portable platform. Our design employs two independently adjustable laser pulses---one to accelerate electrons by means of a high-gradient laser wakefield, and one to Compton scatter. The use of two separate pulses from the same high-peak-power laser system allowed us to independently optimize the electron accelerator and the Compton scattering process. It also allowed the electron bunch and scattering laser pulse to be spatially overlapped on the micron scale, and be synchronized with femtosecond timing accuracy. The resulting x-ray photon energy was peaked at 1 MeV, and reached up to 4 MeV, which is twenty times higher than from an earlier all-laser-driven Compton source with a different design [K. Ta Phuoc et al., Nature Photonics 6, 308 (2012)]. The total photon number was measured to be 2x10^7; the source size was 5 ?m; and the beam divergence angle was ˜10 mrad. The measurements were found to be consistent with a theoretical model that included realistic beams. We also discuss the results of the first application of the source, namely, the diagnosis---with micron resolution---of both the radiation source size and the emittance of a laser-wakefield-accelerated electron beam. Ultrafast nuclear science can also be enabled by MeV x-ray energy combined with ultrashort pulse duration (fs).

  10. The Highest-Energy Photons Seen by the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Bertsch, D. L.; ONeal, R. H., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    During its nine-year lifetime, the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGBET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) detected 1506 cosmic photons with measured energy E>10 GeV. Of this number, 187 are found within a 1 deg of sources that are listed in the Third EGRET Catalog and were included in determining the detection likelihood, flux, and spectra of those sources. In particular, five detected EGRET pulsars are found to have events above 10 GeV, and together they account for 37 events. A pulsar not included in the Third EGRET Catalog has 2 events, both with the same phase and in one peak of the lower-energy gamma-ray light-curve. Most of the remaining 1319 events appear to be diffuse Galactic and extragalactic radiation based on the similarity of the their spatial and energy distributions with the diffuse model and in the E>100, MeV emission. No significant time clustering which would suggest a burst was detected.

  11. Method and apparatus for elemental analysis employing combination of neutron inelastic scattering and gamma ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sowerby, B.D.

    1982-02-02

    The present invention discloses a method and apparatus of elemental analysis which finds particular application in the online analyses of the specific energy (Calorific value) of coal or coke by the determination of carbon content. Analysis is achieved by a comparison of the output of neutron inelastic scatter which produces first gamma rays and of scatter of second gamma rays. Preferably 4.43 mev carbon gamma rays are used and, in addition, one or more of moisture, ash, or hydrogen content of coal or coke can be measured using 2.2 mev hydrogen capture gamma rays. The method and apparatus have the advantage of providing a compensated count rate that is essentially independent of sample compaction.

  12. Forward Compton scattering with weak neutral current: Constraints from sum rules

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gorchtein, Mikhail; Zhang, Xilin

    2015-07-01

    We generalize forward real Compton amplitude to the case of the interference of the electromagnetic and weak neutral current, formulate a low-energy theorem, relate the new amplitudes to the interference structure functions and obtain a new set of sum rules. We address a possible new sum rule that relates the product of the axial charge and magnetic moment of the nucleon to the 0th moment of the structure function g?(?0). For the dispersive ? ?-box correction to the proton's weak charge, the application of the GDH sum rule allows us to reduce the uncertainty due to resonance contributions by amore »factor of two. The finite energy sum rule helps addressing the uncertainty in that calculation due to possible duality violations.« less

  13. Extracting d-orbital occupancy from magnetic Compton scattering in bilayer manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbiellini, B.; Mijnarends, P. E.; Kaprzyk, S.; Bansil, A.; Li, Yinwan; Mitchell, J. F.; Montano, P. A.

    2005-12-01

    We consider the shape of the magnetic Compton profile (MCP), Jmag(pz), in La1.2Sr1.8Mn2O7 for momentum transfer pz along the [110] direction and the associated reciprocal form factor B(r) defined by taking the one-dimensional Fourier transform of Jmag(pz). B(r) is shown to contain a prominent dip at r?1 Å, where the minimum value Bmin of B(r) can be related to the occupancies of the eg orbitals of d and d symmetry in the system. We illustrate our procedure in detail by analyzing the measured MCP at 5 K and the MCP computed within the framework of the local spin density approximation (LSDA) and comment on the differences between the measured and computed eg occupancies as a reflection of the limitations of the LSDA in treating electron correlation effects.

  14. Evaluation of orbital moment in Ni-Zn ferrites: A magnetic Compton scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, B. L.; Mund, H. S.; Tiwari, Shailja; Sahariya, Jagrati; Dashora, Alpa; Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y.

    2012-03-01

    Temperature dependent magnetic Compton profiles of Ni1-xZnxFe2O4 (x = 0.0, 0.1, 0.2) ferrites have been decomposed into component profiles to determine the site-specific magnetic moments. For a quantitative evaluation of orbital moment, the spin momentum density data have been combined with magnetization data. Interestingly, the orbital magnetic moment decreases from 0.25 ± 0.03 ?B/f.u. (for x = 0.0) to 0.09 ± 0.03 ?B/f.u. (for x = 0.2) which is in contrast to spin moment. A decrease in ratio of orbital to spin moments in Ni rich ferrites is explained on the basis of spin-orbit coupling and crystal field interaction.

  15. Limits on Light-Speed Anisotropies from Compton Scattering of High-Energy Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bocquet, J.-P.; Lleres, A.; Perrin, C.; Rebreyend, D.; Bellini, V.; Giusa, A.; Mammoliti, F.; Randieri, C.; Russo, G.; Sperduto, M. L.; Sutera, M. C.; Beretta, M.; Levi Sandri, P.; D'Angelo, A.; Fantini, A.; Franco, D.; Messi, R.

    2010-06-18

    The possibility of anisotropies in the speed of light relative to the limiting speed of electrons is considered. The absence of sidereal variations in the energy of Compton-edge photons at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility's GRAAL facility constrains such anisotropies representing the first nonthreshold collision-kinematics study of Lorentz violation. When interpreted within the minimal standard-model extension, this result yields the two-sided limit of 1.6x10{sup -14} at 95% confidence level on a combination of the parity-violating photon and electron coefficients ({kappa}-tilde{sub o+}){sup YZ}, ({kappa}-tilde{sub o+}){sup ZX}, c{sub TX}, and c{sub TY}. This new constraint provides an improvement over previous bounds by 1 order of magnitude.

  16. Few arc-minute and keV resolutions with the TIGRE Compton telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zych, A.; Bhattacharya, D.; Dixon, D.; ONeill, T.; Tuemer, T.; White, R. S.; Ryan, J.; McConnell, M.; Macri, J.; Oegelman, H.; Paulos, R.; Wheaton, W.; Akyuez, A.; Samimi, J.; Oezel, M.

    1997-01-01

    The tracking and imaging gamma ray experiment (TIGRE) Compton telescope concept can provide an angular resolution of a few arcmin, an energy resolution of a few keV and high sensitivity, while providing the wide field of view necessary for surveying and monitoring observations. Silicon and CdZnTe strip detectors are used to detect Compton pair events and determine their incident directions and energies. Above 400 keV, Compton recoil electrons are tracked through successive layers of thin silicon strip detectors. Compton scattered photons are detected with CdZnTe strip detectors. Pair electrons and positrons are tracked to provide high sensitivity observations in the 10 to 100 MeV range. Polarization studies are performed with large angle Compton scatter events. The TIGRE concept and development status are described.

  17. Compton Profile Study of Intermetallic Ti{sub 3}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, V.; Sharma, G.; Mishra, M. C.; Sharma, B. K.; Joshi, K. B.

    2011-10-20

    The Compton scattering measurement on intermetallic alloy Ti{sub 3}Al is reported in this work. The measurement is made using 59.54 keV gamma-rays from Am{sup 241} source. Theoretical calculation of Compton profile is also performed employing CRYSTAL code within the framework of density functional theory to compare with the measurement. The theoretical profile of the alloy is also synthesized following the superposition model taking the published Compton profiles of elemental solids from the APW method. The experimental study of charge transfer in the alloys has also been done by performing the experimental Compton profile measurements on Ti and Al following the superposition model and charge transfer from Al to Ti is clearly seen on the alloy formation.

  18. Resonant Compton Physics for Magnetar Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ickes, Jesse; Gonthier, Peter L.; Eiles, Matthew; Baring, Matthew G.

    2016-01-01

    Various telescopes including RXTE, INTEGRAL, Suzaku, and Fermi have detected steady non-thermal X-ray emission in the 10 - 200 keV band from strongly magnetic neutron stars known as magnetars. Magnetic inverse Compton scattering is believed to be the leading candidate for the production of this intense X-ray radiation. Scattering at ultra-relativistic energies leads to attractive simplifications in the analytics of the magnetic Compton cross section. We have recently addressed such a case by developing compact analytic expressions using correct spin-dependent widths acquired through the implementation of Sokolov & Ternov basis states, focusing specifically on ground-state-ground-state scattering. Compton scattering in magnetar magnetospheres can cool electrons down to mildly relativistic energies. Moreover, soft gamma-ray flaring in magnetars may involve strong Comptonization in expanding clouds of mildly relativistic pairs. Such environs necessitate the development of more general magnetic scattering cross sections, in which the incoming photons acquire substantial incident angles relative to the field in the rest frame of the electron leading to arbitrary Landau excitations of the intermediate and final states. Due to the rapid transitions of the excited-state to the ground-state, the initial electron is still assumed to be in the ground state. The cross sections treat the plethora of harmonic resonances associated with various cyclotron transitions between Landau states. Polarization and spin dependence of the cross section for the four scattering modes is compared to the cross section obtained with spin-averaged widths. We present numerical results to show the comparisons to highlight the role of the spin-dependent widths of the resonances. The findings presented here will have applications to various neutron star problems, including computation of Eddington luminosities and polarization mode-switching rates in transient magnetar fireballs.

  19. INHOMOGENEITIES IN TYPE Ib/c SUPERNOVAE: AN INVERSE COMPTON SCATTERING ORIGIN OF THE X-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Bjoernsson, C.-I.

    2013-05-20

    Inhomogeneities in a synchrotron source can severely affect the conclusions drawn from observations regarding the source properties. However, their presence is not always easy to establish, since several other effects can give rise to similar observed characteristics. It is argued that the recently observed broadening of the radio spectra and/or light curves in some Type Ib/c supernovae is a direct indication of inhomogeneities. As compared to a homogeneous source, this increases the deduced velocity of the forward shock and the observed correlation between total energy and shock velocity could in part be due to a varying covering factor. The X-ray emission from at least some Type Ib/c supernovae is unlikely to be synchrotron radiation from an electron distribution accelerated in a nonlinear shock. Instead it is shown that the observed correlation during the first few hundred days between the radio, X-ray, and bolometric luminosities indicates that the X-ray emission is inverse Compton scattering of the photospheric photons. Inhomogeneities are consistent with equipartition between electrons and magnetic fields in the optically thin synchrotron emitting regions.

  20. Compton Scattering by Internal Shields Based on Melanin-Containing Mushrooms Provides Protection of Gastrointestinal Tract from Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Revskaya, Ekaterina; Chu, Peter; Howell, Robertha C.; Schweitzer, Andrew D.; Bryan, Ruth A.; Harris, Matthew; Gerfen, Gary; Jiang, Zewei; Jandl, Thomas; Kim, Kami; Ting, Li-Min; Sellers, Rani S.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    Abstract There is a need for radioprotectors that protect normal tissues from ionizing radiation in patients receiving high doses of radiation and during nuclear emergencies. We investigated the possibility of creating an efficient oral radioprotector based on the natural pigment melanin that would act as an internal shield and protect the tissues via Compton scattering followed by free radical scavenging. CD-1 mice were fed melanin-containing black edible mushrooms Auricularia auricila-judae before 9?Gy total body irradiation. The location of the mushrooms in the body before irradiation was determined by in vivo fluorescent imaging. Black mushrooms protected 80% of mice from the lethal dose, while control mice or those given melanin-devoid mushrooms died from gastrointestinal syndrome. The crypts of mice given black mushrooms showed less apoptosis and more cell division than those in control mice, and their white blood cell and platelet counts were restored at 45 days to preradiation levels. The role of melanin in radioprotection was proven by the fact that mice given white mushrooms supplemented with melanin survived at the same rate as mice given black mushrooms. The ability of melanin-containing mushrooms to provide remarkable protection against radiation suggests that they could be developed into oral radioprotectors. PMID:23113595

  1. The first determination of Generalized Polarizabilities of the proton by a Virtual Compton Scattering experiment

    E-print Network

    Roche, J; Lhuillier, D; Bartsch, P; Baumann, D; Berthot, J; Bertin, P Y; Breton, V; Böglin, W; Böhm, R; D'Hose, N; Derber, S; Degrande, N; Ding, M; Distler, M O; Ducret, J E; Ewald, I; Fonvieille, H; Guichon, P A M; Holvoet, H; Hyde-Wright, C E; Jennewein, P; Kahrau, M; Kerhoas, S; Krygier, K W; Lannoy, B; Liesenfeld, A; Marchand, C; Marchand, D; Marroncle, J; Martino, J; Merkel, H; Merle, P; De Meyer, G; Mougey, J; Müller, U; Neuhausen, R; Pospischil, T; Quéméner, G; Ravel, O; Roblin, Y; Rohe, D; Rosner, G; Ryckbosch, D; Schmieden, H; Tamas, G; Tytgat, M; Vanderhaeghen, M; Van Hoorebeke, L; Van de Vyver, R; Van de Wiele, J; Vernin, P; Wagner, A; Walcher, T; Weiss, M

    2000-01-01

    Absolute differential cross sections for the reaction (e+p -> e+p+gamma) have been measured at a four-momentum transfer with virtuality Q^2=0.33 GeV^2 and polarization \\epsilon = 0.62 in the range 33.6 to 111.5 MeV/c for the momentum of the outgoing photon in the photon-proton center of mass frame. The experiment has been performed with the high resolution spectrometers at the Mainz Microtron MAMI. From the photon angular distributions, two structure functions which are a linear combination of the generalized polarizabilities have been determined for the first time.

  2. Precision Electron-Beam Polarimetry using Compton Scattering at 1 GeV

    E-print Network

    Narayan, A; Cornejo, J C; Dalton, M M; Deconinck, W; Dutta, D; Gaskell, D; Martin, J W; Paschke, K D; Tvaskis, V; Asaturyan, A; Benesch, J; Cates, G; Cavness, B S; Dillon-Townes, L A; Hays, G; Ihloff, E; Jones, R; Kowalski, S; Kurchaninov, L; Lee, L; McCreary, A; McDonald, M; Micherdzinska, A; Mkrtchyan, A; Mkrtchyan, H; Nelyubin, V; Page, S; Ramsay, W D; Solvignon, P; Storey, D; Tobias, A; Urban, E; Vidal, C; Wang, P; Zhamkotchyan, S

    2015-01-01

    We report on the highest precision yet achieved in the measurement of the polarization of a low energy, $\\mathcal{O}$(1 GeV), electron beam, accomplished using a new polarimeter based on electron-photon scattering, in Hall~C at Jefferson Lab. A number of technical innovations were necessary, including a novel method for precise control of the laser polarization in a cavity and a novel diamond micro-strip detector which was able to capture most of the spectrum of scattered electrons. The data analysis technique exploited track finding, the high granularity of the detector and its large acceptance. The polarization of the $180~\\mu$A, $1.16$~GeV electron beam was measured with a statistical precision of $<$~1\\% per hour and a systematic uncertainty of 0.59\\%. This exceeds the level of precision required by the \\qweak experiment, a measurement of the vector weak charge of the proton. Proposed future low-energy experiments require polarization uncertainty $<$~0.4\\%, and this result represents an important de...

  3. Polarized ? source based on Compton backscattering in a laser cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakimenko, V.; Pogorelsky, I. V.

    2006-09-01

    We propose a novel gamma source suitable for generating a polarized positron beam for the next generation of electron-positron colliders, such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). This 30-MeV polarized gamma source is based on Compton scattering inside a picosecond CO2 laser cavity generated from electron bunches produced by a 4-GeV linac. We identified and experimentally verified the optimum conditions for obtaining at least one gamma photon per electron. After multiplication at several consecutive interaction points, the circularly polarized gamma rays are stopped on a target, thereby creating copious numbers of polarized positrons. We address the practicality of having an intracavity Compton-polarized positron source as the injector for these new colliders.

  4. First Determination of Generalized Polarizabilities of the Proton by a Virtual Compton Scattering Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Roche, J.; Lhuillier, D.; Baumann, D.; Berthot, J.; Bertin, P. Y.; Breton, V.; Boeglin, W. U.; Boehm, R.

    2000-07-24

    Absolute differential cross sections for the reaction ep{yields}ep{gamma} have been measured at a four-momentum transfer with virtuality Q{sup 2}=0.33 GeV{sup 2} and polarization {epsilon}=0.62 in the range 33.6 to 111.5 MeV/c for the momentum of the outgoing photon in the photon-proton center of mass frame. The experiment has been performed with the high-resolution spectrometers at the Mainz Microtron MAMI. From the photon angular distributions, two structure functions which are a linear combination of the generalized polarizabilities have been determined for the first time. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  5. The high energy tail of gamma-ray burst 941017: Comptonization of synchrotron self absorbed photons

    E-print Network

    Asaf Pe'er; Eli Waxman

    2004-03-01

    The recent detection of an unusually hard spectral component in GRB941017 extending to $\\ge200$ MeV is hard to explain as a synchrotron emission from shock-accelerated electrons. It was argued to imply acceleration of protons to ultra-high energy. We show here that the "high energy tail" can be explained as emission from shock-accelerated electrons in the early afterglow epoch, taking into account the effect of synchrotron self-absorption. High energy observations set in this case stringent constraints on model parameters: A lower limit to the total explosion energy $E\\gsim5 \\times 10^{53}$ erg (assuming spherical symmetry); An upper limit to the density of gas surrounding the explosion, $n\\lsim10^{-2}(E/10^{54}{\\rm erg}){\\rm cm}^{-3}$; A lower limit to the expansion Lorentz factor $\\Gamma_i\\gsim 200$; and An upper limit to the fraction of thermal energy carried by the magnetic field behind the shock driven into the surrounding medium, $\\epsilon_{B,f} <= 10^{-4}$. Such constraints can not be inferred from keV--MeV data alone. The unusually low value of $\\epsilon_{B,f}$ and the unusually high ratio $E/n$ may account for the rareness of GRB941017-type high energy tails. Tighter constraints on model parameters may be obtained in the future from optical and sub-TeV observations.

  6. Compton suppressed LaBr3 detection system for use in nondestructive spent fuel assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, S.; Heidrich, B.; Ünlü, K.

    2015-06-01

    Current methods for safeguarding and accounting for spent nuclear fuel in reprocessing facilities are extremely resource and time intensive. The incorporation of autonomous passive gamma-ray detectors into the procedure could make the process significantly less burdensome. In measured gamma-ray spectra from spent nuclear fuel, the Compton continuum from dominant fission product photopeaks obscure the lower energy lines from other isotopes. The application of Compton suppression to gamma-ray measurements of spent fuel may reduce this effect and allow other less intense, lower energy peaks to be detected, potentially improving the accuracy of multivariate analysis algorithms. Compton suppressed spectroscopic measurements of spent nuclear fuel using HPGe, LaBr3, and NaI(Tl) primary detectors were performed. Irradiated fuel was measured in two configurations: as intact fuel elements viewed through a collimator and as feed solutions in a laboratory to simulate the measurement of a dissolved process stream. These two configurations allowed the direct assessment and quantification of the differences in measured gamma-ray spectra from the application of Compton suppression. In the first configuration, several irradiated fuel elements of varying cooling times from the Penn State Breazeale Reactor spent fuel inventory were measured using the three collimated Compton suppression systems. In the second geometry, Compton suppressed measurements of two samples of Approved Test Material commercial fuel elements were recorded inside the guard detector annulus to simulate the siphoning of small quantities from the main process stream for long dwell measurement periods. Compton suppression was found to improve measured gamma-ray spectra of spent fuel for multivariate analysis by notably lowering the Compton continuum from dominant photopeaks such as 137Cs and 140La, due to scattered interactions in the detector, which allowed more spectral features to be resolved. There was a significant advantage demonstrated when measurements were recorded using the beam source configuration as opposed to the standard, enclosed Compton suppression system geometry.

  7. A novel dual mode neutron-gamma imager.

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Robert Lee; Gerling, Mark; Brennan, James S.; Mascarenhas, Nicholas; Mrowka, Stanley; Marleau, Peter

    2010-05-01

    The Neutron Scatter Camera (NSC) can image fission sources and determine their energy spectra at distances of tens of meters and through significant thicknesses of intervening materials in relatively short times [1]. We recently completed a 32 element scatter camera and will present recent advances made with this instrument. A novel capability for the scatter camera is dual mode imaging. In normal neutron imaging mode we identify and image neutron events using pulse shape discrimination (PSD) and time of flight in liquid scintillator. Similarly gamma rays are identified from Compton scatter in the front and rear planes for our segmented detector. Rather than reject these events, we show it is possible to construct a gamma-ray image by running the analysis in a 'Compton mode'. Instead of calculating the scattering angle by the kinematics of elastic scatters as is appropriate for neutron events, it can be found by the kinematics of Compton scatters. Our scatter camera has not been optimized as a Compton gamma-ray imager but is found to work reasonably. We studied imaging performance using a Cs137 source. We find that we are able to image the gamma source with reasonable fidelity. We are able to determine gamma energy after some reasonable assumptions. We will detail the various algorithms we have developed for gamma image reconstruction. We will outline areas for improvement, include additional results and compare neutron and gamma mode imaging.

  8. Constraints on the synchrotron self-Compton mechanism of TeV gamma ray emission from the Milagro TeV source MGRO J2019+37 within the pulsar wind nebula scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Lab; Bhattacharjee, Pijushpani

    2015-03-01

    Origin of the TeV gamma ray emission from MGRO J2019+37 discovered by the Milagro experiment is investigated within the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) scenario using multiwavelength information on sources suggested to be associated with this object. We find that the synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) mechanism of origin of the observed TeV gamma rays within the PWN scenario is severely constrained by the upper limit on the radio flux from the region around MGRO J2019+37 given by the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) as well as by the x-ray flux upper limit from SWIFT/XRT. Specifically, for the SSC mechanism to explain the observed TeV flux from MGRO J2019+37 without violating the GMRT and/or Swift/XRT flux upper limits in the radio and x-ray regions, respectively, the emission region must be extremely compact with the characteristic size of the emission region restricted to ? O (10-4 pc) for an assumed distance of ˜ few kpc to the source. This is at least four orders of magnitude less than the characteristic size of the emission region typically invoked in explaining the TeV emission through the SSC mechanism within the PWN scenario. On the other hand, inverse Compton (IC) scattering of the nebular high energy electrons on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons can, for reasonable ranges of values of various parameters, explain the observed TeV flux without violating the GMRT and/or SWIFT/XRT flux bounds.

  9. Constraints on the synchrotron self-Compton mechanism of TeV gamma ray emission from the Milagro TeV source MGRO J2019+37 within the pulsar wind nebula scenario

    E-print Network

    Lab Saha; Pijushpani Bhattacharjee

    2015-05-22

    Origin of the TeV gamma ray emission from MGRO J2019+37 discovered by the Milagro experiment is investigated within the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) scenario using multiwavelength information on sources suggested to be associated with this object. We find that the synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) mechanism of origin of the observed TeV gamma rays within the PWN scenario is severely constrained by the upper limit on the radio flux from the region around MGRO J2019+37 given by the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) as well as by the x-ray flux upper limit from SWIFT/XRT. Specifically, for the SSC mechanism to explain the observed TeV flux from MGRO J2019+37 without violating the GMRT and/or Swift/XRT flux upper limits in the radio and x-ray regions, respectively, the emission region must be extremely compact with the characteristic size of the emission region restricted to $\\lsim{\\mathcal O}(10^{-4}\\pc)$ for an assumed distance of $\\sim$ few kpc to the source. This is at least four orders of magnitude less than the characteristic size of the emission region typically invoked in explaining the TeV emission through the SSC mechanism within the PWN scenario. On the other hand, inverse Compton (IC) scattering of the nebular high energy electrons on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons can, for reasonable ranges of values of various parameters, explain the observed TeV flux without violating the GMRT and/or SWIFT/XRT flux bounds.

  10. Measurements of Polarization Transfers in Real Compton Scattering by a proton target at JLAB: a new source of information on the 3D shape of the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Fanelli, Cristiano V.

    2015-03-01

    In this thesis work, results of the analysis of the polarization transfers measured in real Compton scattering (RCS) by the Collaboration E07-002 at the Je#11;fferson Lab Hall-C are presented. The data were collected at large scattering angle (theta_cm = 70deg) and with a polarized incident photon beam at an average energy of 3.8 GeV. Such a kind of experiments allows one to understand more deeply the reaction mechanism, that involves a real photon, by extracting both Compton form factors and Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) (also relevant for possibly shedding light on the total angular momentum of the nucleon). The obtained results for the longitudinal and transverse polarization transfers K_LL and K_LT, are of crucial importance, since they confirm unambiguously the disagreement between experimental data and pQCD prediction, as it was found in E99-114 experiment, and favor the Handbag mechanism. The E99-114 and E07-002 results can contribute to attract new interest on the great yield of the Compton scattering by a nucleon target, as demonstrated by the recent approval of an experimental proposal submitted to the Jefferson Lab PAC 42 for a Wide-angle Compton Scattering experiment, at 8 and 10 GeV Photon Energies. The new experiments approved to run with the updated 12 GeV electron beam at JLab, are characterized by much higher luminosities, and a new GEM tracker is under development to tackle the challenging backgrounds. Within this context, we present a new multistep tracking algorithm, based on (i) a Neural Network (NN) designed for a fast and efficient association of the hits measured by the GEM detector which allows the track identification, and (ii) the application of both a Kalman filter and Rauch-Tung-Striebel smoother to further improve the track reconstruction. The full procedure, i.e. NN and filtering, appears very promising, with high performances in terms of both association effciency and reconstruction accuracy, and these preliminary results will be discussed in detail in the last chapters.

  11. Study on ion-irradiation-induced ferromagnetism in FeRh intermetallic compound by means of magnetic Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kosugi, S.; Matsui, T.; Aikoh, K.; Shimizu, K.; Tahara, Y.; Hori, F.; Iwase, A.; Ishikawa, N.; Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y.

    2011-04-01

    The magnetic Compton profiles of Fe-50 at. % Rh intermetallic compound were measured to study the ferromagnetism induced by 200 MeV Xe ion irradiation. The magnetic effect at 50 K increases with increasing the ion-fluence. The analysis of the experimental result revealed that the values of spin moment induced by the irradiation were close to the values of magnetization obtained by a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer, suggesting that the ion irradiation mainly induces the spin magnetic moment. The difference in magnetic Compton profiles between the irradiation-induced ferromagnetism and the intrinsic ferromagnetism in pure Fe is also discussed.

  12. Helium Compton Form Factor Measurements at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Voutier, Eric J.-M.

    2013-07-01

    The distribution of the parton content of nuclei, as encoded via the generalized parton distributions (GPDs), can be accessed via the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) process contributing to the cross section for leptoproduction of real photons. Similarly to the scattering of light by a material, DVCS provides information about the dynamics and the spatial structure of hadrons. The sensitivity of this process to the lepton beam polarization allows to single-out the DVCS amplitude in terms of Compton form factors that contain GPDs information. The beam spin asymmetry of the $^4$He($\\vec {\\mathrm e}$,e$' \\gamma ^4$He) process was measured in the experimental Hall B of the Jefferson Laboratory to extract the real and imaginary parts of the twist-2 Compton form factor of the $^4$He nucleus. The experimental results reported here demonstrate the relevance of this method for such a goal, and suggest the dominance of the Bethe-Heitler amplitude to the unpolarized process in the kinematic range explored by the experiment.

  13. Helium Compton Form Factor Measurements at CLAS

    E-print Network

    Eric Voutier

    2013-06-30

    The distribution of the parton content of nuclei, as encoded via the generalized parton distributions (GPDs), can be accessed via the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) process contributing to the cross section for leptoproduction of real photons. Similarly to the scattering of light by a material, DVCS provides information about the dynamics and the spatial structure of hadrons. The sensitivity of this process to the lepton beam polarization allows to single-out the DVCS amplitude in terms of Compton form factors that contain GPDs information. The beam spin asymmetry of the $^4$He($\\vec {\\mathrm e}$,e$' \\gamma ^4$He) process was measured in the experimental Hall B of the Jefferson Laboratory to extract the real and imaginary parts of the twist-2 Compton form factor of the $^4$He nucleus. The experimental results reported here demonstrate the relevance of this method for such a goal, and suggest the dominance of the Bethe-Heitler amplitude to the unpolarized process in the kinematic range explored by the experiment.

  14. Noise evaluation of Compton camera imaging for proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, P. G.; Torres-Espallardo, I.; Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Gillam, J. E.; Lacasta, C.; Llosá, G.; Oliver, J. F.; Sala, P. R.; Solevi, P.; Rafecas, M.

    2015-02-01

    Compton Cameras emerged as an alternative for real-time dose monitoring techniques for Particle Therapy (PT), based on the detection of prompt-gammas. As a consequence of the Compton scattering process, the gamma origin point can be restricted onto the surface of a cone (Compton cone). Through image reconstruction techniques, the distribution of the gamma emitters can be estimated, using cone-surfaces backprojections of the Compton cones through the image space, along with more sophisticated statistical methods to improve the image quality. To calculate the Compton cone required for image reconstruction, either two interactions, the last being photoelectric absorption, or three scatter interactions are needed. Because of the high energy of the photons in PT the first option might not be adequate, as the photon is not absorbed in general. However, the second option is less efficient. That is the reason to resort to spectral reconstructions, where the incoming ? energy is considered as a variable in the reconstruction inverse problem. Jointly with prompt gamma, secondary neutrons and scattered photons, not strongly correlated with the dose map, can also reach the imaging detector and produce false events. These events deteriorate the image quality. Also, high intensity beams can produce particle accumulation in the camera, which lead to an increase of random coincidences, meaning events which gather measurements from different incoming particles. The noise scenario is expected to be different if double or triple events are used, and consequently, the reconstructed images can be affected differently by spurious data. The aim of the present work is to study the effect of false events in the reconstructed image, evaluating their impact in the determination of the beam particle ranges. A simulation study that includes misidentified events (neutrons and random coincidences) in the final image of a Compton Telescope for PT monitoring is presented. The complete chain of detection, from the beam particle entering a phantom to the event classification, is simulated using FLUKA. The range determination is later estimated from the reconstructed image obtained from a two and three-event algorithm based on Maximum Likelihood Expectation Maximization. The neutron background and random coincidences due to a therapeutic-like time structure are analyzed for mono-energetic proton beams. The time structure of the beam is included in the simulations, which will affect the rate of particles entering the detector.

  15. Noise evaluation of Compton camera imaging for proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Ortega, P G; Torres-Espallardo, I; Cerutti, F; Ferrari, A; Gillam, J E; Lacasta, C; Llosá, G; Oliver, J F; Sala, P R; Solevi, P; Rafecas, M

    2015-03-01

    Compton Cameras emerged as an alternative for real-time dose monitoring techniques for Particle Therapy (PT), based on the detection of prompt-gammas. As a consequence of the Compton scattering process, the gamma origin point can be restricted onto the surface of a cone (Compton cone). Through image reconstruction techniques, the distribution of the gamma emitters can be estimated, using cone-surfaces backprojections of the Compton cones through the image space, along with more sophisticated statistical methods to improve the image quality. To calculate the Compton cone required for image reconstruction, either two interactions, the last being photoelectric absorption, or three scatter interactions are needed. Because of the high energy of the photons in PT the first option might not be adequate, as the photon is not absorbed in general. However, the second option is less efficient. That is the reason to resort to spectral reconstructions, where the incoming ? energy is considered as a variable in the reconstruction inverse problem. Jointly with prompt gamma, secondary neutrons and scattered photons, not strongly correlated with the dose map, can also reach the imaging detector and produce false events. These events deteriorate the image quality. Also, high intensity beams can produce particle accumulation in the camera, which lead to an increase of random coincidences, meaning events which gather measurements from different incoming particles. The noise scenario is expected to be different if double or triple events are used, and consequently, the reconstructed images can be affected differently by spurious data. The aim of the present work is to study the effect of false events in the reconstructed image, evaluating their impact in the determination of the beam particle ranges. A simulation study that includes misidentified events (neutrons and random coincidences) in the final image of a Compton Telescope for PT monitoring is presented. The complete chain of detection, from the beam particle entering a phantom to the event classification, is simulated using FLUKA. The range determination is later estimated from the reconstructed image obtained from a two and three-event algorithm based on Maximum Likelihood Expectation Maximization. The neutron background and random coincidences due to a therapeutic-like time structure are analyzed for mono-energetic proton beams. The time structure of the beam is included in the simulations, which will affect the rate of particles entering the detector. PMID:25658644

  16. The Nuclear Compton Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hsiang-Kuang; Boggs, Steven

    The Nuclear Compton Telescope (NCT) is a balloon-borne soft gamma-ray (0.2-15 MeV) tele-scope designed to study astrophysical sources of nuclear line emission and gamma-ray polariza-tion. It employs a novel Compton telescope design, utilizing twelve 3D-positioning germanium semiconductor detectors with high spectral and spatial resolution for tracking gamma-ray in-teractions. The tracking serves three purposes: imaging the sky, measuring polarization, and very effectively reducing background. The array is enclosed on the sides and bottom by an active BGO well, and with an overall field-of-view (FOV) of 3.2 str. The telescope is mounted in a pointed, autonomous LDBF platform. NCT is designed as a science prototype instrument, to achieve effective areas for Compton imaging comparable to COMPTEL/CGRO, and signifi-cantly improved sensitivity over COMPTEL and INTEGRAL/SPI. We will discuss the design and performance of the instrument, as well as results from the Spring 2009 and Spring 2010 balloon campaigns.

  17. Statistical properties of the time histories of cosmic gamma-ray bursts detected by the BATSE experiment of the Compton gamma-ray observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagdeev, Roald

    1995-01-01

    The main scientific objectives of the project were: (1) Calculation of average time history for different subsets of BATSE gamma-ray bursts; (2) Comparison of averaged parameters and averaged time history for different Burst And Transient Source Experiments (BASTE) Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB's) sets; (3) Comparison of results obtained with BATSE data with those obtained with APEX experiment at PHOBOS mission; and (4) Use the results of (1)-(3) to compare current models of gamma-ray bursts sources.

  18. Single and double spin asymmetries for deeply virtual Compton scattering measured with CLAS and a longitudinally polarized proton target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisano, S.; Biselli, A.; Niccolai, S.; Seder, E.; Guidal, M.; Mirazita, M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bosted, P.; Briscoe, B.; Brock, J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carlin, C.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crabb, D. G.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garillon, B.; Garçon, M.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, X.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Keith, C. D.; Keller, D.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacCormick, M.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meekins, D. G.; Meyer, C. A.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moody, C. I.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Phelps, W.; Phillips, J. J.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Skorodumina, I.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Turisini, M.; Ungaro, M.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Single-beam, single-target, and double spin asymmetries for hard exclusive electroproduction of a photon on the proton e ?p ??e'p'? are presented. The data were taken at Jefferson Lab using the CEBAF large acceptance spectrometer and a longitudinally polarized NH3 14 target. The three asymmetries were measured in 165 four-dimensional kinematic bins, covering the widest kinematic range ever explored simultaneously for beam and target-polarization observables in the valence quark region. The kinematic dependences of the obtained asymmetries are discussed and compared to the predictions of models of generalized parton distributions. The measurement of three DVCS spin observables at the same kinematic points allows a quasi-model-independent extraction of the imaginary parts of the H and H ˜ Compton form factors, which give insight into the electric and axial charge distributions of valence quarks in the proton.

  19. Single and double spin asymmetries for deeply virtual Compton scattering measured with CLAS and a longitudinally polarized proton target

    SciTech Connect

    Pisano, S.; Biselli, A.; Niccolai, S.; Seder, E.; Guidal, M.; Mirazita, M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bosted, P.; Briscoe, B.; Brock, J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carlin, C.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crabb, D. G.; Crede, V.; D' Angelo, A.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garillon, B.; Garcon, M.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, X.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Keith, C. D.; Keller, D.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacCormick, M.; MacGregor, Ian J. D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meekins, D. G.; Meyer, C. A.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moody, C. I.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Phelps, W.; Phillips, J. J.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatie, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Skorodumina, I.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Turisini, M.; Ungaro, M.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2015-03-19

    Single-beam, single-target, and double-spin asymmetries for hard exclusive photon production on the proton e? p? ?e'p'? are presented. The data were taken at Jefferson Lab using the CLAS detector and a longitudinally polarized 14NH3 target. The three asymmetries were measured in 165 4-dimensional kinematic bins, covering the widest kinematic range ever explored simultaneously for beam and target-polarization observables in the valence quark region. The kinematic dependences of the obtained asymmetries are discussed and compared to the predictions of models of Generalized Parton Distributions. As a result, the measurement of three DVCS spin observables at the same kinematic points allows a quasi-model-independent extraction of the imaginary parts of the H and H~ Compton Form Factors, which give insight into the electric and axial charge distributions of valence quarks in the proton.

  20. Design Concept of a Gamma-gamma Higgs Factory Driven by Thin Laser Targets and Energy Recovery Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yuhong

    2013-06-01

    A gamma-gamma collider has long been considered an option for a Higgs Factory. Such photon colliders usually rely on Compton back-scattering for generating high energy gamma photons and further Higgs bosons through gamma-gamma collisions. The presently existing proposals or design concepts all have chosen a very thick laser target (i.e., high laser photon intensity) for Compton scatterings. In this paper, we present a new design concept of a gamma-gamma collider utilizing a thin laser target (i.e., relatively low photon density), thus leading to a low electron to gamma photon conversion rate. This new concept eliminates most useless and harmful low energy soft gamma photons from multiple Compton scattering so the detector background is improved. It also greatly relaxes the requirement of the high peak power of the laser, a significant technical challenge. A high luminosity for such a gamma-gamma collider can be achieved through an increase of the bunch repetition rate and current of the driven electron beam. Further, multi-pass recirculating linac could greatly reduce the linac cost and energy recovery is required to reduce the needed RF power.

  1. Beaming, Baryon-Loading, and the Synchrotron Self-Compton Component in Gamma-Ray Burst Blast Waves Energized by External Shocks

    E-print Network

    Charles D. Dermer; James Chiang; Kurt E. Mitman

    1999-10-13

    We present detailed calculations of nonthermal synchrotron and synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) spectra radiated by blast waves that are energized by interactions with a uniform surrounding medium. Radio, optical, X-ray and gamma-ray light curves and spectral indices are calculated for a standard parameter set that yields hard GRB spectra during the prompt emission phase. Because no lateral spreading of the blast-wave is assumed, the calculated temporal breaks represent the sharpest breaks possible from collimated outflows in a uniform surrounding medium. Absence of SSC hardenings in observed GRB X-ray afterglows indicates magnetic field generation toward equipartition as the blast wave evolves. EGRET detections of 100 MeV-GeV photons observed promptly and 90 minutes after GRB 940217 are attributed to nonthermal synchrotron radiation and SSC emission from a decelerating blast wave, respectively. The SSC process will produce prompt TeV emission that could be observed from GRBs with redshifts $z \\lesssim 0.1$, provided $\\gamma$-$\\gamma$ opacity in the source is small. Measurements of the time dependence of the 100 MeV-GeV spectral indices with the planned {\\it GLAST} mission will chart the evolution of the SSC component and test the external shock scenario. Transient optical and X-ray emissions from misaligned GRBs are generally much weaker than on-axis emissions produced by dirty and clean fireballs that would themselves not trigger a GRB detector; thus detection of long wavelength transients not associated with GRBs will not unambiguously demonstrate GRB beaming.

  2. SU-F-18C-05: Characterization of a Silicon Strip Photon-Counting Detector in the Presence of Compton Scatter: A Simulation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemer, B; Ding, H; Cho, H

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of Compton scatter on detection efficiency and charge-sharing for a Si strip photon-counting detector as a function of pixel pitch, slice thickness and total pixel length. Methods: A CT imaging system employing a silicon photon-counting detector was implemented using the GATE Monte Carlo package. A focal spot size of 300 µm, magnification of 1.33, and pixel pitches of 0.1 and 0.5mm were initially investigated. A 60 kVp spectrum with 3 mm Al filter was used and energy spectral degradation based on a prototype detector was simulated. To study charge-sharing, a single pixel was illuminated, and the detector response in neighboring pixels was investigated. A longitudinally semiinfinite detector was simulated to optimize the quantum detection efficiency of the imaging system as a function of pixel pitch, slice thickness and depth of interaction. A 2.5 mm thick tungsten plate with a 0.01 mm by 1.5 mm slit was implemented to calculate the modulation transfer function (MTF) from projection-based images. A threshold of 15 keV was implemented in the detector simulation. The preliminary charge sharing investigation results considered only scattering effects and the detector electronics related factors were neglected. Results: Using a 15 keV threshold, 1% of the pixel charge migrated into neighboring pixels with a pixel size of 0.1×0.1 mm{sup 2}. The quantum detection efficiency was 77%, 84%, 87% and 89% for 15 mm, 22.5 mm, 30 mm, and 45 mm length silicon detector pixels, respectively. For a pixel pitch of 0.1 mm, the spatial frequency at 10% of the maximum MTF was found to be 5.2 lp/mm. This agreed with an experimental MTF measurement of 5.3 lp/mm with a similar detector configuration. Conclusion: Using optimized design parameters, Si strip photon-counting detectors can offer high detection efficiency and spatial resolution even in the presence of Compton scatter.

  3. Recent developments in nuclear scattering of capture gamma-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahal, O.; Moreh, R.

    1985-01-01

    Recent studies at the IRR-2 reactor using monoenergetic neutron capture ?-rays fall into three categories: 1) study the low energy GDR tail using the (?, ?) and (?, n) reactions; 2) study of interference effects between nuclear resonance fluorescence, Rayleigh and Delbruck scattering at small angles; 3) testing the 2D absorption structure of simple molecules on graphite using nuclear resonance scattering technique.

  4. A library least-squares approach for scatter correction in gamma-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meric, Ilker; Anton Johansen, Geir; Valgueiro Malta Moreira, Icaro

    2015-03-01

    Scattered radiation is known to lead to distortion in reconstructed images in Computed Tomography (CT). The effects of scattered radiation are especially more pronounced in non-scanning, multiple source systems which are preferred for flow imaging where the instantaneous density distribution of the flow components is of interest. In this work, a new method based on a library least-squares (LLS) approach is proposed as a means of estimating the scatter contribution and correcting for this. The validity of the proposed method is tested using the 85-channel industrial gamma-ray tomograph previously developed at the University of Bergen (UoB). The results presented here confirm that the LLS approach can effectively estimate the amounts of transmission and scatter components in any given detector in the UoB gamma-ray tomography system.

  5. Application of the {gamma}SF method to palladium

    SciTech Connect

    Utsunomiya, H.; Akimune, H.; Yamagata, T.; Kondo, T.; Iwamoto, C.; Kamata, M.; Itoh, O.; Goriely, S.; Daoutidis, I.; Arteaga, D. P.; Harada, H.; Kitatani, F.; Goko, S.; Toyokawa, H.; Yamada, K.; Lui, Y.-W.; Hilaire, S.; Koning, A. J.

    2011-10-28

    Photoneutron cross sections were measured for {sup 108}Pd, {sup 106}Pd, and {sup 105}Pd with laser-Compton scattering {gamma}-ray beams in an application of the {gamma}SF method to a radioactive nucleus {sup 107}Pd. We present radiative neutron cross sections for {sup 107}Pd[6.5x10{sup 6} y] obtained with the {gamma}SF method.

  6. Development of Electron Tracking Compton Camera using micro pixel gas chamber for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabuki, Shigeto; Hattori, Kaori; Kohara, Ryota; Kunieda, Etsuo; Kubo, Atsushi; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Miuchi, Kentaro; Nakahara, Tadaki; Nagayoshi, Tsutomu; Nishimura, Hironobu; Okada, Yoko; Orito, Reiko; Sekiya, Hiroyuki; Shirahata, Takashi; Takada, Atsushi; Tanimori, Toru; Ueno, Kazuki

    2007-10-01

    We have developed the Electron Tracking Compton Camera (ETCC) with reconstructing the 3-D tracks of the scattered electron in Compton process for both sub-MeV and MeV gamma rays. By measuring both the directions and energies of not only the recoil gamma ray but also the scattered electron, the direction of the incident gamma ray is determined for each individual photon. Furthermore, a residual measured angle between the recoil electron and scattered gamma ray is quite powerful for the kinematical background rejection. For the 3-D tracking of the electrons, the Micro Time Projection Chamber (?-TPC) was developed using a new type of the micro pattern gas detector. The ETCC consists of this ?-TPC (10×10×8 cm 3) and the 6×6×13 mm 3 GSO crystal pixel arrays with a flat panel photo-multiplier surrounding the ?-TPC for detecting recoil gamma rays. The ETCC provided the angular resolution of 6.6° (FWHM) at 364 keV of 131I. A mobile ETCC for medical imaging, which is fabricated in a 1 m cubic box, has been operated since October 2005. Here, we present the imaging results for the line sources and the phantom of human thyroid gland using 364 keV gamma rays of 131I.

  7. On the origin of the diffuse gamma-ray background radiation

    E-print Network

    Shlomo Dado; Arnon Dar; A De Rujula

    2007-04-08

    We show that inverse Compton scattering of cosmic-microwave-background and starlight photons by cosmic-ray electrons in the interstellar and intergalactic space explains well the spectrum and intensity of the diffuse gamma-ray background radiation (GBR), which was measured by EGRET aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) in directions away from the Galactic disk and centre. The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will be able to separate the Galactic foreground from the extragalactic gamma-rays, and to provide stringent tests of the theory.

  8. On the origin of the diffuse gamma-ray background radiation

    E-print Network

    Dar, A; De Rújula, Alvaro; Dar, Arnon; Dado, Shlomo

    2007-01-01

    We show that inverse Compton scattering of cosmic-microwave-background and starlight photons by cosmic-ray electrons in the interstellar and intergalactic space explains well the spectrum and intensity of the diffuse gamma-ray background radiation (GBR), which was measured by EGRET aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) in directions away from the Galactic disk and centre. The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will be able to separate the Galactic foreground from the extragalactic gamma-rays, and to provide stringent tests of the theory.

  9. E00-110 experiment at Jefferson Lab Hall A: Deeply virtual Compton scattering off the proton at 6 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defurne, M.; Amaryan, M.; Aniol, K. A.; Beaumel, M.; Benaoum, H.; Bertin, P.; Brossard, M.; Camsonne, A.; Chen, J.-P.; Chudakov, E.; Craver, B.; Cusanno, F.; de Jager, C. W.; Deur, A.; Feuerbach, R.; Ferdi, C.; Fieschi, J.-M.; Frullani, S.; Fuchey, E.; Garçon, M.; Garibaldi, F.; Gayou, O.; Gavalian, G.; Gilman, R.; Gomez, J.; Gueye, P.; Guichon, P. A. M.; Guillon, B.; Hansen, O.; Hayes, D.; Higinbotham, D.; Holmstrom, T.; Hyde, C. E.; Ibrahim, H.; Igarashi, R.; Jiang, X.; Jo, H. S.; Kaufman, L. J.; Kelleher, A.; Keppel, C.; Kolarkar, A.; Kuchina, E.; Kumbartzki, G.; Laveissière, G.; LeRose, J. J.; Lindgren, R.; Liyanage, N.; Lu, H.-J.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Mazouz, M.; Meziani, Z.-E.; McCormick, K.; Michaels, R.; Michel, B.; Moffit, B.; Monaghan, P.; Muñoz Camacho, C.; Nanda, S.; Nelyubin, V.; Paremuzyan, R.; Potokar, M.; Qiang, Y.; Ransome, R. D.; Réal, J.-S.; Reitz, B.; Roblin, Y.; Roche, J.; Sabatié, F.; Saha, A.; Sirca, S.; Slifer, K.; Solvignon, P.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Ulmer, P. E.; Voutier, E.; Wang, K.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.; Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    We present final results on the photon electroproduction (e ?p ?e p ? ) cross section in the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) regime and the valence quark region from Jefferson Lab experiment E00-110. Results from an analysis of a subset of these data were published before, but the analysis has been improved, which is described here at length, together with details on the experimental setup. Furthermore, additional data have been analyzed, resulting in photon electroproduction cross sections at new kinematic settings for a total of 588 experimental bins. Results of the Q2 and xB dependencies of both the helicity-dependent and the helicity-independent cross sections are discussed. The Q2 dependence illustrates the dominance of the twist-2 handbag amplitude in the kinematics of the experiment, as previously noted. Thanks to the excellent accuracy of this high-luminosity experiment, it becomes clear that the unpolarized cross section shows a significant deviation from the Bethe-Heitler process in our kinematics, compatible with a large contribution from the leading twist-2 DVCS2 term to the photon electroproduction cross section. The necessity to include higher-twist corrections to fully reproduce the shape of the data is also discussed. The DVCS cross sections in this paper represent the final set of experimental results from E00-110, superseding the previous publication.

  10. Development of polarization-controlled multi-pass Thomson scattering system in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, M.; Morimoto, M.; Shima, Y.; Kohagura, J.; Sakamoto, M.; Nakashima, Y.; Imai, T.; Yasuhara, R.; Yamada, I.; Kawahata, K.; Funaba, H.; Minami, T.

    2012-10-15

    In the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror, the typical electron density is comparable to that of the peripheral plasma of torus-type fusion devices. Therefore, an effective method to increase Thomson scattering (TS) signals is required in order to improve signal quality. In GAMMA 10, the yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG)-TS system comprises a laser, incident optics, light collection optics, signal detection electronics, and a data recording system. We have been developing a multi-pass TS method for a polarization-based system based on the GAMMA 10 YAG TS. To evaluate the effectiveness of the polarization-based configuration, the multi-pass system was installed in the GAMMA 10 YAG-TS system, which is capable of double-pass scattering. We carried out a Rayleigh scattering experiment and applied this double-pass scattering system to the GAMMA 10 plasma. The integrated scattering signal was made about twice as large by the double-pass system.

  11. Gamma-Ray Burst Arrival Time Localizations: Simultaneous Observations by {ital Pioneer} {ital V}{ital enus} {ital Orbiter}, {ital Compton} {ital Gamma}-{ital Ray} {ital Observatory}, and {ital Ulysses}

    SciTech Connect

    Laros, J.G.; Hurley, K.C.; Fenimore, E.E.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Briggs, M.S.; Kouveliotou, C.; McCollough, M.L.

    1998-10-01

    Between the {ital Compton} {ital Gamma} {ital Ray} {ital Observatory} ({ital CGRO}) launch in 1991 April and the {ital Pioneer} {ital V}{ital enus} {ital Orbiter} ({ital PVO}) demise in 1992 October, concurrent coverage by {ital CGRO}, {ital PVO}, and {ital Ulysses} was obtained for several hundred gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Although most of these were below the {ital PVO} and {ital Ulysses} thresholds, 37 were positively detected by all three spacecraft, with data quality adequate for quantitative localization analysis. All were localized independently to {approximately}2{degree} accuracy by the {ital CGRO} Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), and three were also localized by COMPTEL. We computed arrival-time error boxes, whose larger dimensions range from about 2{prime} to several degrees and whose smaller dimensions are in the arcminute range. Twelve have areas less than 10 arcmin{sup 2}, and only four have areas greater than 1 deg{sup 2}. The area of the smallest box is 0.44 arcmin{sup 2}. We find that the overall BATSE localization accuracy for these events is consistent with the most recent stated uncertainties. This work indicates that the {ital ROSAT} soft X-ray source found within a preliminary IPN error box for GB920501 (Trig 1576) (Hurley et al.) is less likely to be the GRB counterpart than previously reported. {copyright} {ital {copyright} 1998.} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  12. Constrained {gamma}Z correction to parity-violating electron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Nathan Luk; Blunden, Peter Gwithian; Melnitchouk, Wally; Thomas, Anthony W.; Young, Ross D.

    2013-11-01

    We update the calculation of {gamma}Z interference corrections to the weak charge of the proton. We show how constraints from parton distributions, together with new data on parity-violating electron scattering in the resonance region, significantly reduce the uncertainties on the corrections compared to previous estimates.

  13. Analysis of the electronic structure of ZrO{sub 2} by Compton spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mahammad, F. M.; Mahammed, S. F.; Kumar, R.; Vijay, Y. K.; Sharma, B. K.; Sharma, G.

    2013-07-15

    The electronic structure of ZrO{sub 2} is studied using the Compton scattering technique. The first-ever Compton profile measurement on polycrystalline ZrO{sub 2} was obtained using 59.54 keV gamma-rays emanating from the {sup 241}Am radioisotope. To explain the experimental data, we compute theoretical Compton profile values using the method of linear combination of atomic orbitals in the framework of density functional theory. The correlation scheme proposed by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof and the exchange scheme of Becke are considered. The ionic-model-based calculations for a number of configurations, i.e., Zr{sup +x}(O{sup -x/2}){sub 2} (0 {<=} x {<=} 2), are also performed to estimate the charge transfer on compound formation, and the study supports transfer of 1.5 electrons from Zr to O atoms.

  14. MIT inverse Compton source concept

    E-print Network

    Graves, William S.

    A compact X-ray source based on inverse Compton scattering of a high-power laser on a high-brightness linac beam is described. The facility can operate in two modes: at high (MHz) repetition rate with flux and brilliance ...

  15. Constrained gamma-Z interference corrections to parity-violating electron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Nathan Luke; Blunden, Peter Gwithian; Melnitchouk, Wally; Thomas, Anthony W.; Young, Ross D.

    2013-07-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of gamma-Z interference corrections to the weak charge of the proton measured in parity-violating electron scattering, including a survey of existing models and a critical analysis of their uncertainties. Constraints from parton distributions in the deep-inelastic region, together with new data on parity-violating electron scattering in the resonance region, result in significantly smaller uncertainties on the corrections compared to previous estimates. At the kinematics of the Qweak experiment, we determine the gamma-Z box correction to be Re\\box_{gamma-Z}^V = (5.61 +- 0.36) x 10^{-3}. The new constraints also allow precise predictions to be made for parity-violating deep-inelastic asymmetries on the deuteron.

  16. The Compton Observatory Science Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrader, Chris R. (editor); Gehrels, Neil (editor); Dennis, Brian (editor)

    1992-01-01

    The Compton Observatory Science Workshop was held in Annapolis, Maryland on September 23-25, 1991. The primary purpose of the workshop was to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas and information among scientists with interests in various areas of high energy astrophysics, with emphasis on the scientific capabilities of the Compton Observatory. Early scientific results, as well as reports on in-flight instrument performance and calibrations are presented. Guest investigator data products, analysis techniques, and associated software were discussed. Scientific topics covered included active galaxies, cosmic gamma ray bursts, solar physics, pulsars, novae, supernovae, galactic binary sources, and diffuse galactic and extragalactic emission.

  17. SU-E-J-121: Measuring Prompt Gamma Emission Profiles with a Multi-Stage Compton Camera During Proton Beam Irradiation: Initial Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Polf, J; McCleskey, M; Brown, S; Mann, J; He, Z; Mackin, D; Beddar, S; Zheng, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Recent studies have suggested that the characteristics of prompt gammas (PG) emitted during proton beam irradiation are advantageous for determining beam range during treatment delivery. The purpose of this work was to determine the feasibility of determining the proton beam range from PG data measured with a prototype Compton camera (CC) during proton beam irradiation. Methods: Using a prototype multi-stage CC the PG emission from a water phantom was measured during irradiation with clinical proton therapy beams. The measured PG emission data was used to reconstruct an image of the PG emission using a backprojection reconstruction algorithm. One dimensional (1D) profiles extracted from the PG images were compared to: 1) PG emission data measured at fixed depths using collimated high purity Germanium and Lanthanum Bromide detectors, and 2) the measured depth dose profiles of the proton beams. Results: Comparisons showed that the PG emission profiles reconstructed from CC measurements agreed very well with the measurements of PG emission as a function of depth made with the collimated detectors. The distal falloff of the measured PG profile was between 1 mm to 4 mm proximal to the distal edge of the Bragg peak for proton beam ranges from 4 cm to 16 cm in water. Doses of at least 5 Gy were needed for the CC to measure sufficient data to image the PG profile and localize the distal PG falloff. Conclusion: Initial tests of a prototype CC for imaging PG emission during proton beam irradiation indicated that measurement and reconstruction of the PG profile was possible. However, due to limitations of the operational parameters (energy range and count rate) of the current CC prototype, doses of greater than a typical treatment dose (?2 Gy) were needed to measure adequate PG signal to reconstruct viable images. Funding support for this project provided by a grant from DoD.

  18. Development of Gamma-Ray Nondestructive Detection and Assay Systems for Nuclear Safeguards and Security at JAEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajima, Ryoichi

    2015-10-01

    Nondestructive detection and assay of nuclide is one of the promising applications of energy-tunable gamma-rays from laser Compton scattering. In JAEA, we are developing technologies relevant to the gamma-ray non-destructive assay, which include a high-brightness gamma-ray source based on advanced laser and accelerator technologies and gamma-ray measurement techniques optimized for highly radioactive samples. In this paper, the status of the above R&D's is reviewed.

  19. Imaging of prompt gamma rays emitted during delivery of clinical proton beams with a Compton camera: feasibility studies for range verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polf, Jerimy C.; Avery, Stephen; Mackin, Dennis S.; Beddar, Sam

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the ability of a prototype Compton camera (CC) to measure prompt gamma rays (PG) emitted during delivery of clinical proton pencil beams for prompt gamma imaging (PGI) as a means of providing in vivo verification of the delivered proton radiotherapy beams. A water phantom was irradiated with clinical 114 MeV and 150 MeV proton pencil beams. Up to 500 cGy of dose was delivered per irradiation using clinical beam currents. The prototype CC was placed 15?cm from the beam central axis and PGs from 0.2 MeV up to 6.5 MeV were measured during irradiation. From the measured data (2D) images of the PG emission were reconstructed. (1D) profiles were extracted from the PG images and compared to measured depth dose curves of the delivered proton pencil beams. The CC was able to measure PG emission during delivery of both 114 MeV and 150 MeV proton beams at clinical beam currents. 2D images of the PG emission were reconstructed for single 150 MeV proton pencil beams as well as for a 5???×???5?cm mono-energetic layer of 114 MeV pencil beams. Shifts in the Bragg peak (BP) range were detectable on the 2D images. 1D profiles extracted from the PG images show that the distal falloff of the PG emission profile lined up well with the distal BP falloff. Shifts as small as 3?mm in the beam range could be detected from the 1D PG profiles with an accuracy of 1.5?mm or better. However, with the current CC prototype, a dose of 400 cGy was required to acquire adequate PG signal for 2D PG image reconstruction. It was possible to measure PG interactions with our prototype CC during delivery of proton pencil beams at clinical dose rates. Images of the PG emission could be reconstructed and shifts in the BP range were detectable. Therefore PGI with a CC for in vivo range verification during proton treatment delivery is feasible. However, improvements in the prototype CC detection efficiency and reconstruction algorithms are necessary to make it a clinically viable PGI system.

  20. Diamond Detectors for Compton Polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J. W.; Dutta, D.; Narayan, A.; Wang, P.

    2009-12-17

    Parity-violating electron scattering experiments aim to test the standard model of particle physics through precise low-energy determinations of the weak mixing angle. These experiments require determination of the polarization of the incident electron beam to the 1% level or better. An example of this type of experiment is the Q-weak experiment, which will be conducted in Hall C at Jefferson Lab in 2010 and beyond. We are constructing a Compton polarimeter in Hall C to provide continuous monitoring of the polarization with the goal of 1% absolute polarization determination. In our Compton polarimeter, circularly polarized laser light will impinge upon the electron beam. Electrons scattered by the Compton process will be momentum-analyzed in a dipole magnet downstream of the interaction point. A diamond strip tracker will be placed further downstream of the dipole to sense the Compton-scattered electrons and determine their momenta. The design of the polarimeter, focusing on electron detection, and our progress in prototyping and constructing the diamond strip tracker, are discussed.

  1. Direct Evidence of the Symmetry Change of Co-3d Orbitals Associated with the Spin-State Transition in LaCoO3 by X-ray Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yoshihiko; Sakurai, Yoshiharu; Itou, Masayoshi; Sato, Keisuke; Asai, Kichizo

    2015-11-01

    We have investigated the electron momentum density of Co-3d electrons in LaCoO3 using X-ray Compton scattering in order to demonstrate the symmetry change of the Co(3d) electron orbital states through the spin-state transition. The electron momentum density reconstructed from the Compton profiles indicates the symmetry change in the 3d electron-orbital states between below and above 100 K, which provides the first microscopic direct evidence for the orbital symmetry change of occupied electronic state associated with the spin-state transition in LaCoO3. The reproduced electron orbital states show a covalent bond with O-2p orbitals, which is responsible for the collectiveness in the characteristics of the spin-state transition.

  2. A Germanium Detector with Optimized Compton Veto for High Sensitivity at Low Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S

    2011-11-30

    We have built a prototype germanium detector with a Compton veto that is optimized for high sensitivity in the low-energy range around {approx}100 keV. It is specifically designed to address the problem to directly detect plutonium gamma emissions in spent nuclear fuel by non-destructive assay. This is not possible with current detectors due to the large low-energy background of Compton-scattered high-energy radiation from the fission products, whose gamma flux is at least 6 to 7 orders of magnitude higher than the Pu signal. Our instrument is designed to assess the feasibility to selectively suppress the background in the low-energy region around {approx}100 keV with the strongest Pu X-ray and gamma emissions lines. It employs a thin Ge detector with a large Compton veto directly behind it to suppress the background from forward-scattered radiation by anti-coincidence vetoing. This report summarizes the design considerations and the performance of the instrument.

  3. First results of electron temperature measurements by the use of multi-pass Thomson scattering system in GAMMA 10

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, M. Nagasu, K.; Shimamura, Y.; Shima, Y.; Kohagura, J.; Sakamoto, M.; Nakashima, Y.; Imai, T.; Ichimura, M.; Yasuhara, R.; Yamada, I.; Funaba, H.; Kawahata, K.; Minami, T.

    2014-11-15

    A multi-pass Thomson scattering (TS) has the advantage of enhancing scattered signals. We constructed a multi-pass TS system for a polarisation-based system and an image relaying system modelled on the GAMMA 10 TS system. We undertook Raman scattering experiments both for the multi-pass setting and for checking the optical components. Moreover, we applied the system to the electron temperature measurements in the GAMMA 10 plasma for the first time. The integrated scattering signal was magnified by approximately three times by using the multi-pass TS system with four passes. The electron temperature measurement accuracy is improved by using this multi-pass system.

  4. Range verification of passively scattered proton beams using prompt gamma-ray detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verburg, Joost M.; Testa, Mauro; Seco, Joao

    2015-02-01

    We performed an experimental study to verify the range of passively scattered proton beams by detecting prompt gamma-rays emitted from proton-nuclear interactions. A method is proposed using a single scintillation detector positioned near the distal end of the irradiated target. Lead shielding was used to attenuate gamma-rays emitted along most of the entrance path of the beam. By synchronizing the prompt gamma-ray detector to the rotation of the range modulation wheel, the relation between the gamma emission from the distal part of the target and the range of the incident proton beam was determined. In experiments with a water phantom and an anthropomorphic head phantom, this relation was found to be sensitive to range shifts that were introduced. The wide opening angle of the detector enabled a sufficient signal-to-background ratio to be achieved in the presence of neutron-induced background from the scattering and collimating devices. Uniform range shifts were detected with a standard deviation of 0.1 mm to 0.2 mm at a dose level of 30 cGy to 50 cGy (RBE). The detectable magnitude of a range shift limited to a part of the treatment field area was approximately proportional to the ratio between the field area and the area affected by the range shift. We conclude that it is feasible to detect changes in the range of passively scattered proton beams using a relatively simple prompt gamma-ray detection system. The method can be employed for in vivo verification of the consistency of the delivered range in fractionated treatments.

  5. A double photomultiplier Compton camera and its readout system for mice imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, Cristiano Lino; Atroshchenko, Kostiantyn; Baldazzi, Giuseppe; Uzunov, Nikolay; Di Domenico, Giovanni

    2013-04-19

    We have designed a Compton Camera (CC) to image the bio-distribution of gamma-emitting radiopharmaceuticals in mice. A CC employs the 'electronic collimation', i.e. a technique that traces the gamma-rays instead of selecting them with physical lead or tungsten collimators. To perform such a task, a CC measures the parameters of the Compton interaction that occurs in the device itself. At least two detectors are required: one (tracker), where the primary gamma undergoes a Compton interaction and a second one (calorimeter), in which the scattered gamma is completely absorbed. Eventually the polar angle and hence a 'cone' of possible incident directions are obtained (event with 'incomplete geometry'). Different solutions for the two detectors are proposed in the literature: our design foresees two similar Position Sensitive Photomultipliers (PMT, Hamamatsu H8500). Each PMT has 64 output channels that are reduced to 4 using a charge multiplexed readout system, i.e. a Series Charge Multiplexing net of resistors. Triggering of the system is provided by the coincidence of fast signals extracted at the last dynode of the PMTs. Assets are the low cost and the simplicity of design and operation, having just one type of device; among drawbacks there is a lower resolution with respect to more sophisticated trackers and full 64 channels Readout. This paper does compare our design of our two-Hamamatsu CC to other solutions and shows how the spatial and energy accuracy is suitable for the inspection of radioactivity in mice.

  6. A double photomultiplier Compton camera and its readout system for mice imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Cristiano Lino; Atroshchenko, Kostiantyn; Baldazzi, Giuseppe; Bello, Michele; Uzunov, Nikolay; Di Domenico, Giovanni Di

    2013-04-01

    We have designed a Compton Camera (CC) to image the bio-distribution of gamma-emitting radiopharmaceuticals in mice. A CC employs the "electronic collimation", i.e. a technique that traces the gamma-rays instead of selecting them with physical lead or tungsten collimators. To perform such a task, a CC measures the parameters of the Compton interaction that occurs in the device itself. At least two detectors are required: one (tracker), where the primary gamma undergoes a Compton interaction and a second one (calorimeter), in which the scattered gamma is completely absorbed. Eventually the polar angle and hence a "cone" of possible incident directions are obtained (event with "incomplete geometry"). Different solutions for the two detectors are proposed in the literature: our design foresees two similar Position Sensitive Photomultipliers (PMT, Hamamatsu H8500). Each PMT has 64 output channels that are reduced to 4 using a charge multiplexed readout system, i.e. a Series Charge Multiplexing net of resistors. Triggering of the system is provided by the coincidence of fast signals extracted at the last dynode of the PMTs. Assets are the low cost and the simplicity of design and operation, having just one type of device; among drawbacks there is a lower resolution with respect to more sophisticated trackers and full 64 channels Readout. This paper does compare our design of our two-Hamamatsu CC to other solutions and shows how the spatial and energy accuracy is suitable for the inspection of radioactivity in mice.

  7. Testing the DC-electric field model in a solar flare observed by Yohkoh and the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarro, D. M.; Mariska, J. T.; Dennis, B. R.

    1995-01-01

    We apply a DC-electric field model to the analysis of soft and hard X-ray observations of a solar flare observed by Yohkoh and the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) on 6 September 1992. The flare was observed simultaneously in the soft X-ray Ca XIX line by the Yohkoh Bragg Crystal Spectrometer (BCS) and in hard X-rays (greater than 50 keV) by the CGRO Burst and Transient Spectrometer Experiment (BATSE). A strong stationary component of Ca XIX emission was present at the start of impulsive hard X-ray emission indicating an extended phase of heating prior to the production of energetic nonthermal electrons. We interpret the preflare Ca XIX emission as a signature of Joule heating by field-aligned currents. We relate the temporal variation of impulsive hard X-ray emission to the rate of runaway electron acceleration by the DC-electric field associated with the current. We find that the initial rise in hard X-ray emission is consistent with electron acceleration by a DC-electric field that increased from a preflare value of less than approximately 10(exp -5) V/cm to approximately (9 +/- 1) x 10(exp -5) V/cm at the time of the first hard X-ray peak and then remained constant during the rest of the impulsive phase. We attribute the increase in electric field strength to the formation of a current sheet at the reconnection point of two loop structures. The decrease in hard X-ray emission after flare maximum is consistent with a reduction in the number of runaway electrons due to an increase in coronal density produced by chromospheric evaporation. The increased density quenches the runaway process by enhancing collisional thermalization of electrons. To avoid the generation of an unrealistically large magnetic field, the flaring region must be highly filamented into greater than approximately 10(exp 6) oppositely directed current channels of approximately 30 cm width with an initial preflare current of approximately 3 x 10(exp 10) A per channel.

  8. Event reconstruction in high resolution Compton telescopes

    E-print Network

    S. E. Boggs; P. Jean

    2000-05-11

    The development of germanium Compton telescopes for nuclear gamma-ray astrophysics (~0.2-20 MeV) requires new event reconstruction techniques to accurately determine the initial direction and energy of photon events, as well as to consistently reject background events. This paper describes techniques for event reconstruction, accounting for realistic instrument/detector performance and uncertainties. An especially important technique is Compton Kinematic Discrimination, which allows proper interaction ordering and background rejection with high probabilities. The use of these techniques are crucial for the realistic evaluation of the performance and sensitivity of any germanium Compton telescope configuration.

  9. Investigating the Compton Effect with a Spreadsheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinderman, Jesusa Valdez

    1992-01-01

    Describes a computer simulation of the Compton effect designed to lead students to discover (1) the relationship of the electron's final kinetic energy to its angle of scattering and (2) the relationship between the scattering angles of the outgoing electron and photon. (MDH)

  10. Discrimination of gamma rays due to inelastic neutron scattering in AGATA

    E-print Network

    A. Ataç; A. Ka?ka?; S. Akkoyun; M. ?enyi?it; T. Hüyük; S. O. Kara; J. Nyberg

    2009-06-10

    Possibilities of discriminating neutrons and gamma rays in the AGATA gamma-ray tracking spectrometer have been investigated with the aim of reducing the background due to inelastic scattering of neutrons in the high-purity germanium crystals. This background may become a serious problem especially in experiments with neutron-rich radioactive ion beams. Simulations using the Geant4 toolkit and a tracking program based on the forward tracking algorithm were carried out by emitting neutrons and gamma rays from the center of AGATA. Three different methods were developed and tested in order to find 'fingerprints' of the neutron interaction points in the detectors. In a simulation with simultaneous emission of six neutrons with energies in the range 1-5 MeV and ten gamma rays with energies between 150 and 1450 keV, the peak-to-background ratio at a gamma-ray energy of 1.0 MeV was improved by a factor of 2.4 after neutron rejection with a reduction of the photopeak efficiency at 1.0 MeV of only a factor of 1.25.

  11. A confocal three-dimensional micro X-ray scattering technology based on Rayleigh to Compton ratio for identifying materials with similar density and different weight percentages of low-Z elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi; Yang, Chaolin; Sun, Xuepeng; Sun, Weiyuan; He, Jialin; Ding, Xunliang

    2015-07-01

    A point-by-point Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio (R/C) imaging for two polymer materials with similar density and different weight percentages of low-Z elements was carried out by using the confocal three-dimensional (3D) micro X-ray scatter tomographic technology based on polycapillary X-ray optics. This confocal 3D micro X-ray scatter tomographic technique was based on the confocal configuration of a polycapillary focusing X-ray lens (PFXRL) in the excitation channel and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL) in the detection channel, which let only the X-rays scattered from the confocal micro-volume overlapped by the input focal spot of the PPXRL and the output focal spot of the PFXRL be detected by the detector. The main scope of this study was using the confocal 3D micro X-ray scattering tomography based on the R/C ratio to characterize and identify materials with nearly equal low density and different weight percentages of low-Z elements, as other radiological techniques are difficult to discriminate them for their very close attenuation coefficients ? . A mapping of R/C ratios for two thermoplastic polymer materials was obtained, which provided the spatially resolved distribution of their effective atom numbers, and their differences were accordingly presented. This confocal 3D micro X-ray scatter tomographic technique has potential applications in fields such as material identification, dosimetry, medical imaging, carbonation cancer, and so on.

  12. Compton polarimetry revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, D.

    2015-11-01

    We compute the average polarisation asymmetry from the Klein-Nishina differential cross-section on free electrons at rest. As expected from the expression for the asymmetry, the average asymmetry is found to decrease like the inverse of the incident photon energy asymptotically at high energy. We then compute a simple estimator of the polarisation fraction that makes optimal use of all the kinematic information present in an event final state, by the use of "moments" method, and we compare its statistical power to that of a simple fit of the azimuthal distribution. In contrast to polarimetry with pair creation, for which we obtained an improvement by a factor of larger than two in a previous work, here for Compton scattering the improvement is only of 10-20%.

  13. Compton Sources of Electromagnetic Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffrey Krafft,Gerd Priebe

    2011-01-01

    When a relativistic electron beam interacts with a high-field laser beam, intense and highly collimated electromagnetic radiation will be generated through Compton scattering. Through relativistic upshifting and the relativistic Doppler effect, highly energetic polarized photons are radiated along the electron beam motion when the electrons interact with the laser light. For example, X-ray radiation can be obtained when optical lasers are scattered from electrons of tens-of-MeV beam energy. Because of the desirable properties of the radiation produced, many groups around the world have been designing, building, and utilizing Compton sources for a wide variety of purposes. In this review article, we discuss the generation and properties of the scattered radiation, the types of Compton source devices that have been constructed to date, and the prospects of radiation sources of this general type. Due to the possibilities of producing hard electromagnetic radiation in a device that is small compared to the alternative storage ring sources, it is foreseen that large numbers of such sources may be constructed in the future.

  14. Design of a compact spectrometer for high-flux MeV gamma-ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Corvan, D. J. Sarri, G.; Zepf, M.

    2014-06-15

    A novel design for a compact gamma-ray spectrometer is presented. The proposed system allows for spectroscopy of high-flux multi-MeV gamma-ray beams with MeV energy resolution in a compact design. In its basic configuration, the spectrometer exploits conversion of gamma-rays into electrons via Compton scattering in a low-Z material. The scattered electron population is then spectrally resolved using a magnetic spectrometer. The detector is shown to be effective for gamma-ray energies between 3 and 20 MeV. The main properties of the spectrometer are confirmed by Monte Carlo simulations.

  15. Radial Electron Temperature and Density Measurements Using Thomson Scattering System in GAMMA 10/PDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, M.; Ohta, K.; Wang, X.; Chikatsu, M.; Kohagura, J.; Shima, Y.; Sakamoto, M.; Imai, T.; Nakashima, Y.; Yasuhara, R.; Yamada, I.; Funaba, H.; Minami, T.

    2015-11-01

    A Thomson scattering (TS) system in GAMMA 10/PDX has been developed for the measurement of radial profiles of electron temperature and density in a single plasma and laser shot. The TS system has a large solid angle optical collection system and high-sensitivity signal detection system. The TS signals are obtained using four-channel high-speed digital oscilloscopes controlled by a Windows PC. We designed the acquisition program for six oscilloscopes to obtain 10-Hz TS signals in a single plasma shot, following which the time-dependent electron temperatures and densities can be determined. Moreover, in order to obtain larger TS signal intensity in the edge region, we added a second collection mirror. The radial electron temperatures and densities at six radial positions in GAMMA 10/PDX were successfully obtained.

  16. gamma-Z corrections to forward-angle parity-violating e-p scattering

    SciTech Connect

    A. Sibirtsev, P. Blunden, W. Melnitchouk, A. W. Thomas

    2010-07-01

    We use dispersion relations to evaluate the \\gamma-Z box contribution to parity-violating electron scattering in the forward limit, taking into account constraints from recent JLab data on electroproduction in the resonance region as well as high energy data from HERA. The correction to the asymmetry is found to be 1.2 +- 0.2% at the kinematics of the JLab Qweak experiment, which is well within the limits required to achieve a 4% measurement of the weak charge of the proton.

  17. Spectral properties of Compton inverse radiation: Application of Compton beams

    E-print Network

    Bulyak, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Compton inverse radiation emitted due to backscattering of laser pulses off the relativistic electrons possesses high spectral density and high energy of photons - in hard x-ray up to gamma-ray energies - because of short wavelength of laser radiation as compared with the classical electromagnetic devices such as undulators. In this report, the possibility of such radiation to monochromatization by means of collimation is studied. Two approaches have been considered for the description of the spectral-angular density of Compton radiation based on the classical field theory and on the quantum electrodynamics. As is shown, both descriptions produce similar total spectra. On the contrary, angular distribution of the radiation is different: the classical approach predicted a more narrow radiation cone. Also proposed and estimated is a method of the `electronic' monochromatization based on the electronic subtraction of the two images produced by the electron beams with slightly different energies. A `proof-of-prin...

  18. Spin momentum density of Nd using Compton spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sahariya, Jagrati; Dashora, Alpa; Mund, H. S.; Ahuja, B. L.; Tiwari, Shailja; Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y.

    2013-02-05

    Spin momentum density of Nd has been measured at 6K temperature using magnetic Compton scattering. The individual contribution of different electronic states, in the formation of total spin moment, is deduced from the analysis of magnetic Compton profile. The electron-specific spin moments deduced from the experimental Compton data are compared with the theoretical results obtained from full potential linearized augmented plane wave method and are found to be in good agreement.

  19. Modeled Performance of a Compton Telescope Based on Planar Germanium Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Bradley L.

    A Monte Carlo technique for modeling the gamma-ray background spectra in space-based gamma-ray telescopes has been developed. The background spectrum is one of the key factors to the ultimate sensitivity that gamma-ray telescopes can achieve. The major sources of background are the diffuse cosmic gamma-ray flux, the Earth's atmospheric flux, and the decay of nuclei produced by spallation of cosmic rays, trapped protons and their secondary particles, the decay of nuclei produced by neutron capture and the de-excitation of excited states produced by inelastic scattering of neutrons. All of these sources are included in the model. The method for calculating the nuclear activation and decay component of the background combines the low Earth orbit primary proton and neutron flux, the production of secondary hadrons with GEANT, the spallation cross sections from Alice91 and YieldX, nuclear decay data from National Nuclear Data Center's (NNDC) Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data Files (ENSDF) database, and three-dimensional gamma-ray and beta particle transport with Electron Gamma-ray Shower version 4 (EGS4) using MORSE-CG. The background in the High Energy Astrophysics Observatory 3 (HEAO 3) gamma-ray instrument was modeled and compared to the measured background to validate the code. HEAO 3 is a space-based germanium spectrometer surrounded by active scintillators that provide shielding. Both the active and passive components of the HEAO 3 instrument are included in the simulation. The measured background from the HEAO 3 space instrument is compared with the simulation. This Monte Carlo code handles the following decay types: electron capture, beta-, beta+, meta-stable isotopes and short lived meta-stable decay products, and isotopes that have branchings to both beta- and beta+. The code follows a cascade of photons to the ground state of the decay product, and propagates these photons and appropriate accompanying beta simultaneously. This model was applied to the design of an advanced Compton telescope (proposed as the ATHENA mission) to predict its performance capabilities. The effective area, background, and point spread function (the imaged response to a point source) were modeled for several configurations of this Compton telescope. Thus, the sensitivity of these different configurations of this Compton telescope were compared. The sensitivity of the best configurations of this advanced Compton telescope are ~3×10-7 gamma-rays s-1 cm-2 which is nearly 100 times more sensitivity than previous gamma-ray instruments.

  20. Gamma ray production cross-sections associated with multiple inelastic scattering of 14 MeV neutrons in lead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, P. C.; Cox, A. J.

    1985-11-01

    The gamma ray angular distributions and differential production cross-sections have been measured for the inelastic scattering of 14 MeV neutrons in lead, using a gamma ray spectrometer based on an associated particle time-of-flight gating technique. The variation of cross-section with sample thickness was measured and the results compared with the predictions of the Monte Carlo computer code MORSE.

  1. Erratum to: Energy calibration of gamma spectra in plastic scintillators using Compton kinematics [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 594 (2008) 232–243

    SciTech Connect

    Siciliano, Edward R.; Ely, James H.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Schweppe, John E.; Strachan, Denis M.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2009-11-01

    In recent work at our laboratory, we were re-examining our data and found an inconsistency between the values listed for 137Cs in Table 2 (Siciliano et al. 2008) and results plotted for that source in Figures 11 and 12. In the course of fitting the parabolic function (Equation 4) to the Compton maxima, two ranges of channels were used when determining the parameters for 137Cs. The parabolic fit curve shown in Figure 11 resulted from fitting channels 50 to 70. The parameters for that fit are: are: A = 0.972(12), B = 1.42(24) ? 10-3, and CNO = 60.2(5). The parameters for 137Cs listed in Table 2 (and also used to determine the calibration relations in Figure 12—the main result of this paper) came from fitting the 137Cs data in channels 40 to 80. Although the curves plotted from these two different sets of parameters would be visually distinguishable in Figure 11, when incorporated with the other isotope values shown in Figure 12 to obtain the linear energy-channel fit, the 50-70 channel parameter set plus the correction from the Compton maximum to the Compton edge gives a negligible change in the slope [6.470(41) as opposed to the reported 6.454(15) keV/channel] and a small change in the intercept [41(8) as opposed to 47(3) keV] for the dashed line. The conclusions of the article therefore do not change as a result of this inconsistency.

  2. A high-energy Compton polarimeter for the POET SMEX mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloser, Peter F.; McConnell, Mark L.; Legere, Jason S.; Ertley, Camden D.; Hill, Joanne E.; Kippen, Marc; Ryan, James M.

    2014-07-01

    The primary science goal of the Polarimeters for Energetic Transients (POET) mission is to measure the polarization of gamma-ray bursts over a wide energy range, from X rays to soft gamma rays. The higher-energy portion of this band (50 - 500 keV) will be covered by the High Energy Polarimeter (HEP) instrument, a non-imaging, wide field of view Compton polarimeter. Incident high-energy photons will Compton scatter in low-Z, plastic scintillator detector elements and be subsequently absorbed in high-Z, CsI(Tl) scintillator elements; polarization is detected by measuring an asymmetry in the azimuthal scatter angle distribution. The HEP design is based on our considerable experience with the development and flight of the Gamma-Ray Polarimeter Experiment (GRAPE) balloon payload. We present the design of the POET HEP instrument, which incorporates lessons learned from the GRAPE balloon design and previous work on Explorer proposal efforts, and its expected performance on a two-year SMEX mission.

  3. Stacking Simulations for Compton Positron sources of Future Linear Colliders

    E-print Network

    Zimmermann, F; Rinolfi, L; Vivoli, A; Yakimenko, V; Kuriki, M; Chehab, R; Omori, T; Urakawa, J; Variola, A; Antoniou, F

    2010-01-01

    The Compton positron source of a future linear collider must obtain the target bunch population by accumulating a large number of positron packets, arriving either in a number of bursts from a ‘Compton ring’, with intermediate damping of the scattering electron beam, or quasicontinually from a ‘Compton energy recovery linac’. We present simulation results for the longitudinal stacking of Compton positrons in the ILC damping ring (DR) and the CLIC pre-damping ring (PDR), discussing parameter optimization, stacking efficiency, possible further improvements, and outstanding questions.

  4. HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY AFTERGLOWS FROM LOW-LUMINOSITY GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    He Haoning; Wang Xiangyu; Yu Yunwei; Meszaros, Peter

    2009-12-01

    The observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) such as 980425, 031203 and 060218, with luminosities much lower than those of other classic bursts, lead to the definition of a new class of GRBs-LL-GRBs. The nature of the outflow responsible for them is not yet clear. Two scenarios have been suggested: one is the conventional relativistic outflow with initial Lorentz factor of order of GAMMA{sub 0} approx> 10 and the other is a trans-relativistic outflow with GAMMA{sub 0} approx = 1-2. Here, we compare the high-energy gamma-ray afterglow emission from these two different models, taking into account both synchrotron self-inverse Compton (SSC) scattering and the external inverse Compton scattering due to photons from the cooling supernova or hypernova envelope (SNIC). We find that the conventional relativistic outflow model predicts a relatively high gamma-ray flux from SSC at early times (<10{sup 4} s for typical parameters) with a rapidly decaying light curve, while in the trans-relativistic outflow model, one would expect a much flatter light curve of high-energy gamma-ray emission at early times, which could be dominated by both the SSC emission and the SNIC emission, depending on the properties of the underlying supernova and the shock parameter epsilon{sub e} and epsilon{sub B}. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope should be able to distinguish between the two models in the future.

  5. The Advanced Compton Telescope Mission

    E-print Network

    Steven E. Boggs; James Kurfess; James Ryan; Elena Aprile; Neil Gehrels; Marc Kippen; Mark Leising; Uwe Oberlack; Cornelia Wunderer; Allen Zych; Peter Bloser; Michael Harris; Andrew Hoover; Alexei Klimenk; Dan Kocevski; Mark McConnell; Peter Milne; Elena I. Novikova; Bernard Phlips; Mark Polsen; Steven Sturner; Derek Tournear; Georg Weidenspointner; Eric Wulf; Andreas Zoglauer; Matthew Baring; John Beacom; Lars Bildsten; Charles Dermer; Dieter Hartmann; Margarita Hernanz; David Smith; Sumner Starrfield; for the larger ACT collaboration

    2006-08-24

    The Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT), the next major step in gamma-ray astronomy, will probe the fires where chemical elements are formed by enabling high-resolution spectroscopy of nuclear emission from supernova explosions. During the past two years, our collaboration has been undertaking a NASA mission concept study for ACT. This study was designed to (1) transform the key scientific objectives into specific instrument requirements, (2) to identify the most promising technologies to meet those requirements, and (3) to design a viable mission concept for this instrument. We present the results of this study, including scientific goals and expected performance, mission design, and technology recommendations.

  6. A synchrotron self-Compton emission model compared with the VHE spectrum of Crab Nebula, Geminga energy spectra and hadronic gamma-rays in the Tycho SNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitsyna, V. G.; Borisov, S. S.; Musin, F. I.; Nikolsky, S. I.; Sinitsyna, V. Y.; Platonov, G. F.

    2009-12-01

    The Crab Nebula has an extraordinary broad spectrum, attributed to synchrotron radiation of electrons with energies from GeV to PeV. This continuous spectrum appears to terminate near 108 eV and photons, produced by relativistic electrons and positrons (˜1015 eV) via the Inverse Compton effect, form a new component of the spectrum in the GeV - TeV energy range. The spectrum of ?-rays from the Crab Nebula has been measured in the energy range 0.8 TeV to 11 TeV at the SHALON Alatoo Observatory by the atmospheric Cerenkov technique. The VHE spectral energy distribution of the Crab Nebula is compared with the predictions of a synchrotron self-Compton emission model in the energy range 0.8 TeV to 11 TeV (Hillas et al. 1998). Tycho's SNR has been observed by SHALON imaging Cherenkov telescope at Tien-Shan. This object, Ia SNR, has long been considered as a candidate for a CR hadron source in the Northern Hemisphere. The expected pion decay ?-flux, F˜E?-1, extends up to >30 TeV, whereas the IC ?-ray flux has a cutoff above a few TeV. So, the detection of ?-rays at energies of 10 - 40 TeV by SHALON is evidence for a hadron origin of the ?-rays.

  7. gamma-Z corrections to forward-angle parity-violating e-p scattering

    E-print Network

    A. Sibirtsev; P. G. Blunden; W. Melnitchouk; A. W. Thomas

    2010-07-07

    We use dispersion relations to evaluate the gamma-Z box contribution to parity-violating electron scattering in the forward limit arising from the axial-vector coupling at the electron vertex. The calculation makes full use of the critical constraints from recent JLab data on electroproduction in the resonance region as well as high energy data from HERA. At the kinematics of the Qweak experiment, this gives a correction of 0.0047{+0.0011}{-0.0004}$ to the Standard Model value 0.0713(8) of the proton weak charge. While the magnitude of the correction is highly significant, the uncertainty is within the anticipated experimental uncertainty of +- 0.003.

  8. A Compton-Vetoed Germanium Detector with Increased Sensitivity at Low Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S; Bates, C; Drury, O B; Burks, M; DiPrete, D

    2012-03-29

    The difficulty to directly detect plutonium in spent nuclear fuel due to the high Compton background of the fission products motivates the design of a Gamma detector with improved sensitivity at low energies. We have built such a detector by operating a thin high-purity Ge detector with a large scintillator Compton veto directly behind it. The Ge detector is thin to absorb just the low-energy Pu radiation of interest while minimizing Compton scattering of high energy radiation from the fission products. The subsequent scintillator is large so that forward scattered photons from the Ge detector interact in it at least once to provide an anti-coincidence veto for the Ge detector. For highest sensitivity, additional material in the line-of-sight is minimized, the radioactive sample is kept thin, and its radiation is collimated. We will discuss the instrument design, and demonstrate the feasibility of the approach with a prototype that employs two large CsI scintillator vetoes. Initial spectra of a thin Cs-137 calibration source show a background suppression of a factor of {approx}2.5 at {approx}100 keV, limited by an unexpectedly thick 4 mm dead layer in the Ge detector.

  9. Three-dimensional Monte-Carlo simulation of gamma-ray scattering and production in the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, D.J. )

    1989-05-15

    Monte Carlo codes have been developed to simulate gamma-ray scattering and production in the atmosphere. The scattering code simulates interactions of low-energy gamma rays (20 to several hundred keV) from an astronomical point source in the atmosphere; a modified code also simulates scattering in a spacecraft. Four incident spectra, typical of gamma-ray bursts, solar flares, and the Crab pulsar, and 511 keV line radiation have been studied. These simulations are consistent with observations of solar flare radiation scattered from the atmosphere. The production code simulates the interactions of cosmic rays which produce high-energy (above 10 MeV) photons and electrons. It has been used to calculate gamma-ray and electron albedo intensities at Palestine, Texas and at the equator; the results agree with observations in most respects. With minor modifications this code can be used to calculate intensities of other high-energy particles. Both codes are fully three-dimensional, incorporating a curved atmosphere; the production code also incorporates the variation with both zenith and azimuth of the incident cosmic-ray intensity due to geomagnetic effects. These effects are clearly reflected in the calculated albedo by intensity contrasts between the horizon and nadir, and between the east and west horizons.

  10. External Compton Radiation from Rapid Nonthermal Flares in Blazars

    E-print Network

    Andrei Sokolov; Alan P. Marscher

    2005-04-29

    In this paper we extend our approach to modeling multifrequency emission variability from blazars to include external-radiation Compton (ERC) emission and electron energy losses from inverse Compton scattering of seed photons originating outside the jet. We consider seed-photon emission from a dusty molecular torus and the broad line region (BLR) surrounding the central engine. We establish constraints on the properties of the molecular torus and BLR under which synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) emission dominates such that the results obtained in our previous paper are applicable. The focus of this study is on relative time delays between the light curves observed at different frequencies. For definiteness, we consider emission resulting from a collision between relativistic shocks, but the results apply more generally to conditions involving acceleration of relativistic electrons and/or magnetic field amplification at any type of front. Unlike SSC emission, ERC flares involving a constant field of seed photons are not delayed by light travel time of the seed photons. The main cause of delays is from radiative energy losses, which result in frequency stratification behind the front and quench the flare first at the highest frequencies, progressing to lower frequencies as time advances. However, if the spectrum of electrons injected at the shock front is characterized by a relatively high value of the minimum energy (a Lorentz factor $\\gamma_{min}\\sim100$ is sufficient), the ERC flare in the X-ray band can be delayed and may even peak after the injection has ceased. This effect is strongly frequency dependent, with a longer lag at lower frequencies and an X-ray spectral index that changes rapidly from positive (inverted spectrum) to steep values.

  11. Compton Radiation for Nuclear Waste Management and Transmutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulyak, E.; Urakawa, J.

    2015-10-01

    Compton inverse radiation is emitted in the process of backscattering of the laser pulses off the relativistic electrons. This radiation possesses high spectral density and high energy of photons--in hard x-ray up to gammaray energy range--with moderate electron energies (hundreds of MeV up to 1 GeV) due to short wavelength of the laser radiation. The Compton radiation is well collimated: emitting within a narrow cone along the electron beam. A distinct property of the Compton inverse radiation is a steep high-energy cutoff of the spectrum and the maximal intensity just below the cutoff. The Compton sources can attain: spectral density up to 1014 gammas/(s 0.1%bandwidth) in MeV range of energies, and spectral brightness up to 1020 gammas/(smm2mr2 0.1% bw). Applicability of Compton sources for nuclear waste management and detection of radioisotopes and fissionable nuclides are discussed in the report. Also application limits of Compton gamma sources for transmutation of radioactive isotopes are estimated. A recently proposed subtracting method, in which two sets of data obtained by irradiating the object by the Compton beams with slightly different maximal energies are compared, will enhance resolution of detection radioactive elements at the 'atomic' (hundreds of keV) and the 'nuclear' (a few MeV) photon energies.

  12. The Design of Diamond Compton Telescope

    E-print Network

    Kinya Hibino; Toshisuke Kashiwagi; Shoji Okuno; Kaori Yajima; Yukio Uchihori; Hisashi Kitamura; Takeshi Takashima; Mamoru Yokota; Kenji Yoshida

    2007-07-23

    We have developed radiation detectors using the new synthetic diamonds. The diamond detector has an advantage for observations of "low/medium" energy gamma rays as a Compton telescope. The primary advantage of the diamond detector can reduce the photoelectric effect in the low energy range, which is background noise for tracking of the Compton recoil electron. A concept of the Diamond Compton Telescope (DCT) consists of position sensitive layers of diamond-striped detector and calorimeter layer of CdTe detector. The key part of the DCT is diamond-striped detectors with a higher positional resolution and a wider energy range from 10 keV to 10 MeV. However, the diamond-striped detector is under development. We describe the performance of prototype diamond detector and the design of a possible DCT evaluated by Monte Carlo simulations.

  13. The Design of Diamond Compton Telescope

    E-print Network

    Hibino, Kinya; Okuno, Shoji; Yajima, Kaori; Uchihori, Yukio; Kitamura, Hisashi; Takashima, Takeshi; Yokota, Mamoru; Yoshida, Kenji

    2007-01-01

    We have developed radiation detectors using the new synthetic diamonds. The diamond detector has an advantage for observations of "low/medium" energy gamma rays as a Compton telescope. The primary advantage of the diamond detector can reduce the photoelectric effect in the low energy range, which is background noise for tracking of the Compton recoil electron. A concept of the Diamond Compton Telescope (DCT) consists of position sensitive layers of diamond-striped detector and calorimeter layer of CdTe detector. The key part of the DCT is diamond-striped detectors with a higher positional resolution and a wider energy range from 10 keV to 10 MeV. However, the diamond-striped detector is under development. We describe the performance of prototype diamond detector and the design of a possible DCT evaluated by Monte Carlo simulations.

  14. Effects of dead time losses on terrestrial gamma ray flash measurements with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment

    E-print Network

    Østgaard, Nikolai

    on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) are the only ones where characteristics of single terrestrial gamma) on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) [Fishman et al., 1994]. They were found to be short (1 ms

  15. Inverse Compton Emission from Galactic Supernova Remnants: Effect of the Interstellar Radiation Field

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Troy A.; Moskalenko, Igor V.; Strong, Andrew W.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE

    2006-08-01

    The evidence for particle acceleration in supernova shells comes from electrons whose synchrotron emission is observed in radio and X-rays. Recent observations by the HESS instrument reveal that supernova remnants also emit TeV {gamma}-rays; long awaited experimental evidence that supernova remnants can accelerate cosmic rays up to the ''knee'' energies. Still, uncertainty exists whether these {gamma}-rays are produced by electrons via inverse Compton scattering or by protons via {pi}{sup 0}-decay. The multi-wavelength spectra of supernova remnants can be fitted with both mechanisms, although a preference is often given to {pi}{sup 0}-decay due to the spectral shape at very high energies. A recent study of the interstellar radiation field indicates that its energy density, especially in the inner Galaxy, is higher than previously thought. In this paper we evaluate the effect of the interstellar radiation field on the inverse Compton emission of electrons accelerated in a supernova remnant located at different distances from the Galactic Centre. We show that contribution of optical and infra-red photons to the inverse Compton emission may exceed the contribution of cosmic microwave background and in some cases broaden the resulted {gamma}-ray spectrum. Additionally, we show that if a supernova remnant is located close to the Galactic Centre its {gamma}-ray spectrum will exhibit a ''universal'' cutoff at very high energies due to the Klein-Nishina effect and not due to the cut-off of the electron spectrum. As an example, we apply our calculations to the supernova remnants RX J1713.7-3946 and G0.9+0.1 recently observed by HESS.

  16. Cosmic ray-dark matter scattering: a new signature of (asymmetric) dark matter in the gamma ray sky

    SciTech Connect

    Profumo, Stefano; Ubaldi, Lorenzo E-mail: ubaldi@physics.ucsc.edu

    2011-08-01

    We consider the process of scattering of Galactic cosmic-ray electrons and protons off of dark matter with the radiation of a final-state photon. This process provides a novel way to search for Galactic dark matter with gamma rays. We argue that for a generic weakly interacting massive particle, barring effects such as co-annihilation or a velocity-dependent cross section, the gamma-ray emission from cosmic-ray scattering off of dark matter is typically smaller than that from dark matter pair-annihilation. However, if dark matter particles cannot pair-annihilate, as is the case for example in asymmetric dark matter scenarios, cosmic-ray scattering with final state photon emission provides a unique window to detect a signal from dark matter with gamma rays. We estimate the expected flux level and its spectral features for a generic supersymmetric setup, and we also discuss dipolar and luminous dark matter. We show that in some cases the gamma-ray emission might be large enough to be detectable with the Fermi Large Area Telescope.

  17. An experimental study of energy dependence of saturation thickness of multiply scattered gamma rays in binary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurvinderjit; Singh, Bhajan; Sandhu, B. S.

    2015-08-01

    The present measurements are carried out to investigate the multiple scattering of 662 keV gamma photons emerging from targets of binary alloys (brass and soldering material). The scattered photons are detected by 51 mm × 51 mm NaI(Tl) scintillation detector whose response unscrambling converting the observed pulse-height distribution to a true photon energy spectrum, is obtained with the help of 10 × 10 inverse response matrix. The numbers of multiply scattered events, having same energy as in the singly scattered distribution, first increases with target thickness and then saturate. The application of response function of scintillation detector does not result in any change of measured saturation thickness. Monte Carlo calculation supports the present experimental results.

  18. A nonlinear plasma retroreflector for single pulse Compton backscattering

    E-print Network

    Palastro, J P; Gordon, D; Hafizi, B; Helle, M; Penano, J; Ting, A

    2014-01-01

    Compton scattered x-rays can be generated using a configuration consisting of a single, ultra-intense laser pulse, and a shaped gas target. The gas target incorporates a hydrodynamically formed density spike, which nonlinearly scatters the incident pump radiation, to produce a counter-propagating electromagnetic wiggler. This self-generated wiggler field Compton scatters from electrons accelerated in the laser wakefield of the pump radiation. The nonlinear scattering mechanism in the density spike is examined theoretically and numerically in order to optimize the Compton scattered radiation. It is found that narrow-band x-rays are produced by moderate intensity pump radiation incident on the quarter-critical surface of the density spike, while high fluence, broadband x-rays are produced by high intensity pump radiation reflected near the critical surface.

  19. Gamma-ray astronomy: Nuclear transition region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, E. L.

    1976-01-01

    This monograph reviews the major theoretical and experimental efforts made during the past 12 years in gamma-ray astronomy over the energy range from 10 keV to about 100 MeV, where nuclear-transition lines are expected. Early attempts to detect celestial gamma rays are recounted, mechanisms of gamma-ray line and continuum production are examined, and formulas giving the various possible differential gamma-ray spectral shapes are provided. Predicted fluxes are discussed for solar gamma rays as well as for gamma emission from supernova remnants, supernovae, neutron stars, flare stars, the galactic core and disk, black holes, and diffuse sources. Gamma-ray interactions with matter are analyzed, particularly the photoelectric effect, Compton scattering from free electrons, and pair production in nuclear fields. Significant results are summarized for observations of gamma rays from the sun as well as from point and extended sources within and beyond the Galaxy, including diffuse fluxes and transient gamma-ray bursts. Factors pertaining to the design of gamma-ray astronomy experiments are considered, especially detector background limitations, gamma-ray production within instruments, and present-day detection methods.

  20. Studies on solar hard X-Rays and gamma-rays: Compton backscatter, anisotropy, polarization and evidence for two phases of acceleration. Ph.D. Thesis - Maryland Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, T.

    1977-01-01

    Observations of solar X-rays and gamma-rays from large flares show that the hard X-ray spectrum extends into the gamma ray region, where a flattening in the spectrum of the continuum emission is observed above about 1 MeV. This emission is believed to be due to bremsstrahlung. In addition to electron-proton collisions, at energies greater than approximately 500 keV, bremsstrahlung due to electron-electron collisions becomes significant. Bremsstrahlung production was calculated for a variety of electron spectra extending from the nonrelativistic region to relativistic energies and electron-electron bremsstrahlung is taken into account. By comparing these calculations with data, it is shown that the flattening in the spectrum of the continuum emission can be best explained by an electron spectrum consisting of two distinctive components. This evidence, together with information on the X-ray and gamma ray time profiles, implied the existence of two phases of acceleration. The first phase accelerates electrons mainly up to about several hundred keV; the second phase accelerates a small fraction of the electrons accelerated in the first phase to relativistic energies and accelerates protons to tens and hundreds of MeV.

  1. Fermi gamma-ray imaging of a radio galaxy.

    PubMed

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cavazzuti, E; Cecchi, C; Celik, O; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Colafrancesco, S; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Costamante, L; Cutini, S; Davis, D S; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Finke, J; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Georganopoulos, M; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hughes, R E; Jackson, M S; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Mazziotta, M N; McConville, W; McEnery, J E; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sambruna, R; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Saz Parkinson, P M; Scargle, J D; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Starck, J-L; Stawarz, ?; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Vasileiou, V; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Wallace, E; Wang, P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M; Hardcastle, M J; Kazanas, D

    2010-05-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has detected the gamma-ray glow emanating from the giant radio lobes of the radio galaxy Centaurus A. The resolved gamma-ray image shows the lobes clearly separated from the central active source. In contrast to all other active galaxies detected so far in high-energy gamma-rays, the lobe flux constitutes a considerable portion (greater than one-half) of the total source emission. The gamma-ray emission from the lobes is interpreted as inverse Compton-scattered relic radiation from the cosmic microwave background, with additional contribution at higher energies from the infrared-to-optical extragalactic background light. These measurements provide gamma-ray constraints on the magnetic field and particle energy content in radio galaxy lobes, as well as a promising method to probe the cosmic relic photon fields. PMID:20360067

  2. Spectral properties of Compton inverse radiation: Application of Compton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulyak, Eugene; Urakawa, Junji

    2014-05-01

    Compton inverse radiation emitted due to backscattering of laser pulses off the relativistic electrons possesses high spectral density and high energy of photons - in hard x-ray up to gamma-ray energies - because of short wavelength of laser radiation as compared with the classical electromagnetic devices such as undulators. In this report, the possibility of such radiation to monochromatization by means of collimation is studied. Two approaches have been considered for the description of the spectral-angular density of Compton radiation based on the classical field theory and on the quantum electrodynamics. As is shown, both descriptions produce similar total spectra. On the contrary, angular distribution of the radiation is different: the classical approach predicted a more narrow radiation cone. Also proposed and estimated is a method of the 'electronic' monochromatization based on the electronic subtraction of the two images produced by the electron beams with slightly different energies. A 'proof-of-principle' experiment of this method is proposed for the LUXC facility of KEK (Japan).

  3. Single--Spin Asymmetries in the Bethe--Heitler Process e{sup -} + p {yields} e{sup -} + {gamma} + p from QED Radiative Corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Afanasev; M.I. Konchatnij; N.P. Merenkov

    2005-06-01

    We derived analytic formulae for the polarization single--spin asymmetries (SSA) in the Bethe--Heitler process e{sup -} + p {yields} e{sup -} + {gamma} + p. The asymmetries arise due to one-loop QED radiative corrections to the leptonic part of the interaction and present a systematic correction for the studies of virtual Compton Scattering on a proton through interference with the Bethe-Heitler amplitude. Considered are SSA with either longitudinally polarized electron beam or a polarized proton target. The computed effect appears to be small, not exceeding 0.1 percent for kinematics of current virtual Compton scattering experiments.

  4. Recent progress in single sided gamma-ray tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Thoe, R.S.

    1994-04-01

    The use of scattered radiation for radiography has many potential advantages over conventional projection techniques: For high energy photons the scattering process strongly dominates all other processes. The intensity of scattered radiation is due directly to the electron density and highly insensitive to chemical composition. Finally, the use of scattered radiation allows the investigator to position the radiation source-on-the same side of the object as the detector. In this paper I will present some recent results of a set of measurements made with our uncollimated Compton backscattering tomography apparatus. This technique uses the Compton energy shift of scattered gamma rays to determine the scattering site. By measuring the spectrum of these scattered gamma rays it is then possible to determine the electron density of the object being investigated. I will give a brief description of the apparatus and present the results of numerous measurements made on a brass phantom with voids placed at various depths. These results imply that for this crude apparatus occlusions as small as one cubic millimeter may be located to an accuracy of about one millimeter at depths of about 15 millimeters in solid brass.

  5. Geant4 Model Validation of Compton Suppressed System for Process monitoring of Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, Sarah; Unlu, Kenan; Orton, Christopher R.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2013-05-01

    Nuclear material accountancy is of continuous concern for the regulatory, safeguards, and verification communities. In particular, spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities pose one of the most difficult accountancy challenges: monitoring highly radioactive, fluid sample streams in near real-time. The Multi-Isotope Process monitor will allow for near-real-time indication of process alterations using passive gamma-ray detection coupled with multivariate analysis techniques to guard against potential material diversion or to enhance domestic process monitoring. The Compton continuum from the dominant 661.7 keV 137Cs fission product peak obscures lower energy lines which could be used for spectral and multivariate analysis. Compton suppression may be able to mitigate the challenges posed by the high continuum caused by scattering. A Monte Carlo simulation using the Geant4 toolkit is being developed to predict the expected suppressed spectrum from spent fuel samples to estimate the reduction in the Compton continuum. Despite the lack of timing information between decay events in the particle management of Geant4, encouraging results were recorded utilizing only the information within individual decays without accounting for accidental coincidences. The model has been validated with single and cascade decay emitters in two steps: as an unsuppressed system and with suppression activated. Results of the Geant4 model validation will be presented.

  6. Performance of a new Electron-Tracking Compton Camera under intense radiations from a water target irradiated with a proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Y.; Tanimori, T.; Kubo, H.; Takada, A.; Parker, J. D.; Mizumoto, T.; Mizumura, Y.; Iwaki, S.; Sawano, T.; Komura, S.; Kishimoto, T.; Oda, M.; Takemura, T.; Miyamoto, S.; Sonoda, S.; Tomono, D.; Miuchi, K.; Kabuki, S.; Kurosawa, S.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an electron-tracking Compton camera (ETCC) for use in next-generation MeV gamma ray telescopes. An ETCC consists of a gaseous time projection chamber (TPC) and pixel scintillator arrays (PSAs). Since the TPC measures the three dimensional tracks of Compton-recoil electrons, the ETCC can completely reconstruct the incident gamma rays. Moreover, the ETCC demonstrates efficient background rejection power in Compton-kinematics tests, identifies particle from the energy deposit rate (dE/dX) registered in the TPC, and provides high quality imaging by completely reconstructing the Compton scattering process. We are planning the ``Sub-MeV gamma ray Imaging Loaded-on-balloon Experiment'' (SMILE) for our proposed all-sky survey satellite. Performance tests of a mid-sized (30 cm)3 ETCC, constructed for observing the Crab nebula, are ongoing. However, observations at balloon altitudes or satellite orbits are obstructed by radiation background from the atmosphere and the detector itself [1]. The background rejection power was checked using proton accelerator experiments conducted at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. To create the intense radiation fields encountered in space, which comprise gamma rays, neutrons, protons, and other energetic entities, we irradiated a water target with a 140 MeV proton beam and placed a SMILE-II ETCC near the target. In this situation, the counting rate was five times than that expected at the balloon altitude. Nonetheless, the ETCC stably operated and identified particles sufficiently to obtain a clear gamma ray image of the checking source. Here, we report the performance of our detector and demonstrate its effective background rejection based in electron tracking experiments.

  7. Performance of a new electron-tracking Compton camera under intense radiations from a water target irradiated with a proton beam

    E-print Network

    Yoshihiro Matsuoka; T. Tanimori; H. Kubo; A. Takada; J. D. Parker; T. Mizumoto; Y. Mizumura; S. Iwaki; T. Sawano; S. Komura; T. Kishimoto; M. Oda; T. Takemura; S. Miyamoto; S. Sonoda; D. Tomono; K. Miuchi; S. Kabuki; S. Kurosawa

    2015-01-22

    We have developed an electron-tracking Compton camera (ETCC) for use in next-generation MeV gamma ray telescopes. An ETCC consists of a gaseous time projection chamber (TPC) and pixel scintillator arrays (PSAs). Since the TPC measures the three dimensional tracks of Compton-recoil electrons, the ETCC can completely reconstruct the incident gamma rays. Moreover, the ETCC demonstrates efficient background rejection power in Compton-kinematics tests, identifies particle from the energy deposit rate (dE/dX) registered in the TPC, and provides high quality imaging by completely reconstructing the Compton scattering process. We are planning the "Sub-MeV gamma ray Imaging Loaded-on-balloon Experiment" (SMILE) for our proposed all-sky survey satellite. Performance tests of a mid-sized 30 cm-cubic ETCC, constructed for observing the Crab nebula, are ongoing. However, observations at balloon altitudes or satellite orbits are obstructed by radiation background from the atmosphere and the detector itself. The background rejection power was checked using proton accelerator experiments conducted at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. To create the intense radiation fields encountered in space, which comprise gamma rays, neutrons, protons, and other energetic entities, we irradiated a water target with a 140 MeV proton beam and placed a SMILE-II ETCC near the target. In this situation, the counting rate was five times than that expected at the balloon altitude. Nonetheless, the ETCC stably operated and identified particles sufficiently to obtain a clear gamma ray image of the checking source. Here, we report the performance of our detector and demonstrate its effective background rejection based in electron tracking experiments.

  8. X-Rays Compton Detectors For Biomedical Application

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Paolo; Fontana, Cristiano Lino; Moschini, Giuliano; Baldazzi, Giuseppe; Navarria, Francesco; Battistella, Andrea; Bello, Michele; Bollini, Dante; Bonvicini, Valter; Rashevsky, Alexander; Zampa, Gianluigi; Zampa, Nicola; Vacchi, Andrea; Gennaro, Gisella; Uzunov, Nikolay

    2011-06-01

    Collimators are usually needed to image sources emitting X-rays that cannot be focused. Alternately, one may employ a Compton Camera (CC) and measure the direction of the incident X-ray by letting it interact with a thin solid, liquid or gaseous material (Tracker) and determine the scattering angle. With respect to collimated cameras, CCs allow higher gamma-ray efficiency in spite of lighter geometry, and may feature comparable spatial resolution. CCs are better when the X-ray energy is high and small setups are required. We review current applications of CCs to Gamma Ray Astronomy and Biomedical systems stressing advantages and drawbacks. As an example, we focus on a particular CC we are developing, which is designed to image small animals administered with marked pharmaceuticals, and assess the bio-distribution and targeting capability of these latter. This camera has to address some requirements: relatively high activity of the imaged objects; detection of gamma-rays of different energies that may range from 140 keV (Tc99m) to 511 keV; presence of gamma and beta radiation with energies up to 2 MeV in case of 188Re. The camera consists of a thin position-sensitive Silicon Drift Detector as Tracker, and a further downstream position-sensitive system employing scintillating crystals and a multi-anode photo-multiplier (Calorimeter). The choice of crystal, pixel size, and detector geometry has been driven by measurements and simulations with the tracking code GEANT4. Spatial resolution, efficiency and scope are discussed.

  9. Diffuse Galactic low energy gamma ray continuum emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skibo, J. G.; Ramaty, R.

    1993-01-01

    We investigate the origin of diffuse low-energy Galactic gamma-ray continuum down to about 30 keV. We calculate gamma-ray emission via bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton scattering by propagating an unbroken electron power law injection spectrum and employing a Galactic emmissivity model derived from COSB observations. To maintain the low energy electron population capable of producing the observed continuum via bremsstrahlung, a total power input of 4 x 10 exp 41 erg/s is required. This exceeds the total power supplied to the nuclear cosmic rays by about an order of magnitude.

  10. Lauren Bains August 27, 2002 Differential Scattering Cross Sections of Photons Scattered

    E-print Network

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Lauren Bains August 27, 2002 Differential Scattering Cross Sections of Photons Scattered from Compton scattering of high energy photons off of oxygen nuclei (Saskatchewan Accelerator Laboratory (SAL) Experiment 056). Nuclear Compton scattering occurs when a photon with some initial momentum interacts

  11. SU-E-J-46: Development of a Compton Camera Prototype for Online Range Verification of Laser-Accelerated Proton Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Thirolf, PG; Bortfeldt, J; Lang, C; Parodi, K; Aldawood, S; Boehmer, M; Gernhaeuser, R; Maier, L; Castelhano, I; Kolff, H van der; Schaart, DR

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Development of a photon detection system designed for online range verification of laser-accelerated proton beams via prompt-gamma imaging of nuclear reactions. Methods: We develop a Compton camera for the position-sensitive detection of prompt photons emitted from nuclear reactions between the proton beam and biological samples. The detector is designed to be capable to reconstruct the photon source origin not only from the Compton scattering kinematics of the primary photon, but also to allow for tracking of the Compton-scattered electrons. Results: Simulation studies resulted in the design of the Compton camera based on a LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillation crystal acting as absorber, preceded by a stacked array of 6 double-sided silicon strip detectors as scatterers. From the design simulations, an angular resolution of ? 2° and an image reconstruction efficiency of 10{sup ?3} ?10{sup ?5} (at 2–6 MeV) can be expected. The LaBr{sub 3} crystal has been characterized with calibration sources, resulting in a time resolution of 273 ps (FWHM) and an energy resolution of about 3.8% (FWHM). Using a collimated (1 mm diameter) {sup 137}Cs calibration source, the light distribution was measured for each of 64 pixels (6×6 mm{sup 2}). Data were also taken with 0.5 mm collimation and 0.5 mm step size to generate a reference library of light distributions that allows for reconstructing the interaction position of the initial photon using a k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) algorithm developed by the Delft group. Conclusion: The Compton-camera approach for prompt-gamma detection offers promising perspectives for ion beam range verification. A Compton camera prototype is presently being developed and characterized in Garching. Furthermore, an arrangement of, e.g., 4 camera modules could even be used in a ‘gamma-PET’ mode to detect delayed annihilation radiation from positron emitters in the irradiation interrupts (with improved performance in the presence of an additional third (prompt) photon (as in 10C and 14O). This work was supported by the DFG Cluster of Excellence MAP (Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics)

  12. Graviton-Photon Scattering

    E-print Network

    N. E. J. Bjerrum-Bohr; Barry R. Holstein; Ludovic Planté; Pierre Vanhove

    2015-02-19

    We use the feature that the gravitational Compton scattering amplitude factorizes in terms of Abelian QED amplitudes to evaluate various gravitational Compton processes. We examine both the QED and gravitational Compton scattering from a massive spin-1 system by the use of helicity amplitude methods. In the case of gravitational Compton scattering we show how the massless limit can be used to evaluate the cross section for graviton-photon scattering and discuss the difference between photon interactions and the zero mass spin-1 limit. We show that the forward scattering cross section for graviton photoproduction has a very peculiar behavior, differing from the standard Thomson and Rutherford cross sections for a Coulomb-like potential.

  13. Gamma-ray transfer and energy deposition in supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, Douglas A.; Sutherland, Peter G.; Harkness, Robert P.

    1995-01-01

    Solutions to the energy-independent (gray) radiative transfer equations are compared to results of Monte Carlo simulations of the Ni-56 and Co-56 decay gamma-ray energy deposition in supernovae. The comparison shows that an effective, purely absorptive, gray opacity, kappa(sub gamma) approximately (0. 06 +/- 0.01)Y(sub e) sq cm/g, where Y is the total number of electrons per baryon, accurately describes the interaction of gamma-rays with the cool supernova gas and the local gamma-ray energy deposition within the gas. The nature of the gamma-ray interaction process (dominated by Compton scattering in the relativistic regime) creates a weak dependence of kappa(sub gamma) on the optical thickness of the (spherically symmetric) supernova atmosphere: The maximum value of kappa(sub gamma) applies during optically thick conditions when individual gamma-rays undergo multiple scattering encounters and the lower bound is reached at the phase characterized by a total Thomson optical depth to the center of the atmosphere tau(sub e) approximately less than 1. Gamma-ray deposition for Type Ia supernova models to within 10% for the epoch from maximum light to t = 1200 days. Our results quantitatively confirm that the quick and efficient solution to the gray transfer problem provides an accurate representation of gamma-ray energy deposition for a broad range of supernova conditions.

  14. Search for medium-energy gamma-ray pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, W.E. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Results are presented from a search for pulsed gamma rays from four radio pulsars, chosen for their interest to gamma-ray astronomers in previous studies. The data set used for the search consists of gamma-ray events at energies of 1-30 MeV, detected during a 40-hour balloon flight of the UCR double Compton scatter telescope launched at the National Scientific Balloon Facility in Palestine, Texas, USA on September 30, 1978. No statistically significant signals were detected from any of the pulsars. Three sigma upper limits to pulsed 1-30 MeV gamma ray flux from PSR 0950+08, PSR 1822+09, PSR 1929+10, and PSR 1953+29 are presented. Two complete exposures to PSR 0950+08 were obtained. The reported tentative detection of 1-20 MeV gamma rays from PSR 0950+08 is not confirmed.

  15. The Compton effect: Transition to quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuewer, R. H.

    2000-11-01

    The discovery of the Compton effect at the end of 1922 was a decisive event in the transition to the new quantum mechanics of 1925-1926 because it stimulated physicists to examine anew the fundamental problem of the interaction between radiation and matter. I first discuss Albert Einstein's light-quantum hypothesis of 1905 and why physicists greeted it with extreme skepticism, despite Robert A. Millikan's confirmation of Einstein's equation of the photoelectric effect in 1915. I then follow in some detail the experimental and theoretical research program that Arthur Holly Compton pursued between 1916 and 1922 at the University of Minnesota, the Westinghouse Lamp Company, the Cavendish Laboratory, and Washington University that culminated in his discovery of the Compton effect. Surprisingly, Compton was not influenced directly by Einstein's light-quantum hypothesis, in contrast to Peter Debye and H.A. Kramers, who discovered the quantum theory of scattering independently. I close by discussing the most significant response to that discovery, the Bohr-Kramers-Slater theory of 1924, its experimental refutation, and its influence on the emerging new quantum mechanics.

  16. Precision linac and laser technologies for nuclear photonics gamma-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, F.; Hartemann, F. V.; Anderson, S. G.; Cross, R. R.; Gibson, D. J.; Hall, J.; Marsh, R. A.; Messerly, M.; Wu, S. S.; Siders, C. W.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2012-05-15

    Tunable, high precision gamma-ray sources are under development to enable nuclear photonics, an emerging field of research. This paper focuses on the technological and theoretical challenges related to precision Compton scattering gamma-ray sources. In this scheme, incident laser photons are scattered and Doppler upshifted by a high brightness electron beam to generate tunable and highly collimated gamma-ray pulses. The electron and laser beam parameters can be optimized to achieve the spectral brightness and narrow bandwidth required by nuclear photonics applications. A description of the design of the next generation precision gamma-ray source currently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is presented, along with the underlying motivations. Within this context, high-gradient X-band technology, used in conjunction with fiber-based photocathode drive laser and diode pumped solid-state interaction laser technologies, will be shown to offer optimal performance for high gamma-ray spectral flux, narrow bandwidth applications.

  17. Inclusive and Exclusive Compton Processes in Quantum Chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ales Psaker

    2005-12-31

    In our work, we describe two types of Compton processes. As an example of an inclusive process, we consider the high-energy photoproduction of massive muon pairs off the nucleon. We analyze the process in the framework of the QCD parton model, in which the usual parton distributions emerge as a tool to describe the nucleon in terms of quark and gluonic degrees of freedom. To study its exclusive version, a new class of phenomenological functions is required, namely, generalized parton distributions. They can be considered as a generalization of the usual parton distributions measured in deeply inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering. Generalized parton distributions (GPDs) may be observed in hard exclusive reactions such as deeply virtual Compton scattering. We develop an extension of this particular process into the weak interaction sector. We also investigate a possible application of the GPD formalism to wide-angle real Compton scattering.

  18. Nuclear photon scattering and its application to nuclear physics investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Shizuma, Toshiyuki; Hayakawa, Takehito; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Toyokawa, Hiroyuki; Komatsubara, Tetsuro

    2012-07-11

    Electro-magnetic dipole transitions below the neutron separation energy in {sup 56}Fe have been measured by using a quasi-monochromatic, linearly polarized photon beam generated by the Compton scattering of laser light with high energy electrons. The parity of the resonant states in {sup 56}Fe was determined by the intensity asymmetry of resonant scattering {gamma} rays relative to the polarization plane of the incident photon beam. The total magnetic dipole strength of {approx}6{mu}{sup 2}{sub N} at the excitation energies between 6 and 10 MeV was obtained.

  19. Filtered backprojection reconstruction and redundancy in Compton camera imaging.

    PubMed

    Maxim, Voichi?a

    2014-01-01

    During the acquisition process with the Compton gamma-camera, integrals of the intensity distribution of the source on conical surfaces are measured. They represent the Compton projections of the intensity. The inversion of the Compton transform reposes on a particular Fourier-Slice theorem. This paper proposes a filtered backprojection algorithm for image reconstruction from planar Compton camera data. We show how different projections are related together and how they may be combined in the tomographical reconstruction step. Considering a simulated Compton imaging system, we conclude that the proposed method yields accurate reconstructed images for simple sources. An elongation of the source in the direction orthogonal to the camera may be observed and is to be related to the truncation of the projections induced by the finite extent of the device. This phenomenon was previously observed with other reconstruction methods, e.g., iterative maximum likelihood expectation maximization. The redundancy of the Compton transform is thus an important feature for the reduction of noise in Compton images, since the ideal assumptions of infinite width and observation time are never met in practice. We show that a selection operated on the set of data allows to partially get around projection truncation, at the expense of an enhancement of the noise in the images. PMID:24196864

  20. High Energy Gamma-Ray Emission From Blazars: EGRET Observations

    E-print Network

    R. Mukherjee

    1999-01-17

    We will present a summary of the observations of blazars by the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). EGRET has detected high energy gamma-ray emission at energies greater than 100 MeV from more that 50 blazars. These sources show inferred isotropic luminosities as large as $3\\times 10^{49}$ ergs s$^{-1}$. One of the most remarkable characteristics of the EGRET observations is that the gamma-ray luminosity often dominates the bolometric power of the blazar. A few of the blazars are seen to exhibit variability on very short time-scales of one day or less. The combination of high luminosities and time variations seen in the gamma-ray data indicate that gamma-rays are an important component of the relativistic jet thought to characterize blazars. Currently most models for blazars involve a beaming scenario. In leptonic models, where electrons are the primary accelerated particles, gamma-ray emission is believed to be due to inverse Compton scattering of low energy photons, although opinions differ as to the source of the soft photons. Hardronic models involve secondary production or photomeson production followed by pair cascades, and predict associated neutrino production.

  1. OVERVIEW OF MONO-ENERGETIC GAMMA-RAY SOURCES & APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, G G; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Betts, S M; Chu, T S; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Fisher, S E; Gibson, D J; Ladran, A S; Marsh, R A; Messerly, M J; O'Neill, K L; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C P; Vlieks, A E; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G; Raubenheimer, T O

    2010-05-18

    Recent progress in accelerator physics and laser technology have enabled the development of a new class of tunable gamma-ray light sources based on Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam and a high intensity laser pulse produced via chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). A precision, tunable Mono-Energetic Gamma-ray (MEGa-ray) source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development and construction at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by an X-band linac designed in collaboration with SLAC NAL will interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps, diode-pumped CPA laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. This MEGa-ray source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence in various isotopes. Applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source design, key parameters, and current status are presented, along with important applications, including nuclear resonance fluorescence. In conclusion, we have optimized the design of a high brightness Compton scattering gamma-ray source, specifically designed for NRF applications. Two different parameters sets have been considered: one where the number of photons scattered in a single shot reaches approximately 7.5 x 10{sup 8}, with a focal spot size around 8 {micro}m; in the second set, the spectral brightness is optimized by using a 20 {micro}m spot size, with 0.2% relative bandwidth.

  2. On the Possibility of Faster-Than-Light Motion of the Compton Electron

    E-print Network

    G. A. Kotel'nikov

    2007-01-10

    The kinematics of Compton-effect with violated invariance of the velocity of light has been considered. It has been shown that in this case faster-than-light motion of the Compton electron is possible. The motion (if it exists really) begins with the energy of the incident gamma-quantum above 360 keV.

  3. Correlation analysis of 1 to 30 MeV celestial gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Long, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    This paper outlines the development of a method of producing celestial sky maps from the data generated by the University of California, Riverside's double Compton scatter gamma ray telescope. The method makes use of a correlation between the telescope's data and theoretical calculated response functions. The results of applying this technique to northern hemisphere data obtained from a 1978 balloon flight from Palestine, Texas are included.

  4. The gamma-ray observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    An overview is given of the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) mission. Detection of gamma rays and gamma ray sources, operations using the Space Shuttle, and instruments aboard the GRO, including the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE), the Imaging Compton Telescope (COMPTEL), and the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) are among the topics surveyed.

  5. Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimeter (GAP) aboard the Small Solar Power Sail Demonstrator IKAROS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonetoku, Daisuke; Murakami, Toshio; Gunji, Shuichi; Mihara, Tatehiro; Sakashita, Tomonori; Morihara, Yoshiyuki; Kikuchi, Yukihiro; Takahashi, Takuya; Fujimoto, Hirofumi; Toukairin, Noriyuki; Kodama, Yoshiki; Kubo, Shin; Ikaros Demonstration Team

    2011-06-01

    The small solar-power sail demonstrator ``IKAROS'' is a Japanese engineering verification spacecraft launched by the H-IIA rocket on 2010 May 21 at Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Tanegashima Space Center. IKAROS has a 20 m diameter sail, which is made of a thin polyimide membrane. The sail converts the solar radiation-pressure into the propulsion force of IKAROS, and accelerates the spacecraft. The Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimeter (GAP) aboard IKAROS is the first polarimeter specifically designed to measure the polarization of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) from space, and will do so in the cruising phase of the IKAROS mission. GAP is a modest detector of 3.8 kg in weight and 17 cm in size with an energy range of between 50-300 keV. The GAP detector is now a member of the interplanetary network (IPN) for determining the GRB direction. The detection principle of gamma-ray polarization is the anisotropy of the Compton scattering. Coincidence between the central plastic Compton scattering medium and discrete CsI detectors distributed around the sides of the plastic defines the Compton-scattering angle, which is expected to show an angular dependence if polarization is present in a given GRB. In this paper, we present the GAP detector and its ground-based and onboard calibrations.

  6. Gamma-Ray Polarimetry of the Prompt Emission by IKAROS-GAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonetoku, D.; Murakami, T.; Sakashita, T.; Morihara, Y.; Kikuchi, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Gunji, S.; Mihara, T.; Kubo, S.

    2011-08-01

    The small solar power sail demonstrator ``IKAROS'' is a Japanese engineering verification spacecraft launched by H-IIA rocket on May 21, 2010 at JAXA Tanegashima Space Center. IKAROS has a 20 m diameter sail which is made of thin polyimide membrane. This sail converts the solar radiation-pressure into the propulsion force of IKAROS and accelerates the spacecraft. The Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimeter (GAP) aboard IKAROS is the first polarimeter specifically designed to measure the polarization of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) from space, and will do so in the cruising phase of the IKAROS mission. GAP is a modest detector of 3.8 kg in weight and 17 cm in size with an energy range between 50-300 keV. The GAP detector can be a member of the interplanetary network (IPN) for the determination of the GRB direction. The detection principle of gamma-ray polarization is the anisotropy of the Compton scattering. Coincidence between the central plastic Compton scattering medium and discrete CsI detectors distributed around the sides of the plastic defines the Compton scattering angle, which is expected to show an angular dependence if polarization is present in a given GRB. We presented the GAP detector and its ground and onboard calibrations.

  7. Picosecond Pulse Recirculation for High Average Brightness Thomson Scattering-based Gamma-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, V

    2009-05-28

    Pulse recirculation has been successfully demonstrated with the interaction laser system of LLNL's Thomson-Radiated Extreme X-ray (T-REX) source. The recirculation increased twenty-eight times the intensity of the light coming out of the laser system, demonstrating the capability of increasing the gamma-ray flux emitted by T-REX. The technical approach demonstrated could conceivably increase the average gamma-ray flux output by up to a hundred times.

  8. Least-Squares Deconvolution of Compton Telescope Data with the Positivity Constraint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheaton, William A.; Dixon, David D.; Tumer, O. Tumay; Zych, Allen D.

    1993-01-01

    We describe a Direct Linear Algebraic Deconvolution (DLAD) approach to imaging of data from Compton gamma-ray telescopes. Imposition of the additional physical constraint, that all components of the model be non-negative, has been found to have a powerful effect in stabilizing the results, giving spatial resolution at or near the instrumental limit. A companion paper (Dixon et al. 1993) presents preliminary images of the Crab Nebula region using data from COMPTEL on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory.

  9. Giant Flare in SGR 1806-20 and Its Compton Reflection from the Moon

    E-print Network

    D. D. Frederiks; S. V. Golenetskii; V. D. Palshin; R. L. Aptekar; V. N. Ilyinskii; F. P. Oleinik; E. P. Mazets; T. L. Cline

    2006-12-12

    We analyze the data obtained when the Konus-Wind gamma-ray spectrometer detected a giant flare in SGR 1806-20 on December 27, 2004. The flare is similar in appearance to the two known flares in SGR 0526-66 and SGR 1900+14 while exceeding them significantly in intensity. The enormous X-ray and gamma-ray flux in the narrow initial pulse of the flare leads to almost instantaneous deep saturation of the gamma-ray detectors, ruling out the possibility of directly measuring the intensity, time profile, and energy spectrum of the initial pulse. In this situation, the detection of an attenuated signal of Compton back-scattering of the initial pulse emission by the Moon with the Helicon gamma-ray spectrometer onboard the Coronas-F satellite was an extremely favorable circumstance. Analysis of this signal has yielded the most reliable temporal, energy, and spectral characteristics of the pulse. The temporal and spectral characteristics of the pulsating flare tail have been determined from Konus-Wind data. Its soft spectra have been found to contain also a hard power-law component extending to 10 MeV. A weak afterglow of SGR 1806-20 decaying over several hours is traceable up to 1 MeV. We also consider the overall picture of activity of SGR 1806-20 in the emission of recurrent bursts before and after the giant flare.

  10. The Penrose Photoproduction Scenario for NGC 4151 /PCS-SSC/ - A black hole gamma-ray emission mechanism for active galactic nuclei and Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiter, D.

    1980-01-01

    On the basis of general arguments, it has been suggested (Bignami et al., 1979) that a steepening of the spectrum between X-ray and gamma-ray energies may be a general, gamma-ray characteristic of Seyfert galaxies, if the diffuse gamma-ray spectrum is considered to be a superposition of unresolved contributions, from one or more classes of extragalactic objects. It is shown that the above suggestion can be given a consistent theoretical interpretation in the context of the Penrose Photoproduction Scenario (PCS-SSC). Specifically in the case of NGC 4151, the dominant process will be shown to be Penrose Compton Scattering PCS in the ergosphere of a massive, central, rapidly spinning Kerr black hole, assumed in its nucleus. It is assumed that PCS gamma-ray induced electron-position, Synchrotron-Self-Compton processes 'evolve' as the dominant source of nonthermal X-rays.

  11. Calibration of the Gamma-RAy Polarimeter Experiment (GRAPE) at a Polarized Hard X-Ray Beam

    E-print Network

    Bloser, P F; McConnell, M L; Macri, J R; Bancroft, C M; Connor, T P; Ryan, J M

    2008-01-01

    The Gamma-RAy Polarimeter Experiment (GRAPE) is a concept for an astronomical hard X-ray Compton polarimeter operating in the 50 - 500 keV energy band. The instrument has been optimized for wide-field polarization measurements of transient outbursts from energetic astrophysical objects such as gamma-ray bursts and solar flares. The GRAPE instrument is composed of identical modules, each of which consists of an array of scintillator elements read out by a multi-anode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT). Incident photons Compton scatter in plastic scintillator elements and are subsequently absorbed in inorganic scintillator elements; a net polarization signal is revealed by a characteristic asymmetry in the azimuthal scattering angles. We have constructed a prototype GRAPE module containing a single CsI(Na) calorimeter element, at the center of the MAPMT, surrounded by 60 plastic elements. The prototype has been combined with custom readout electronics and software to create a complete "engineering model" of the GRAPE...

  12. G. E. M. Jauncey and the Compton Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkin, John

    In late 1922 Arthur Holly Compton (1892-1962) discovered that an X-ray quantum of radiation undergoes a discrete change in wavelength when it experiences a billiard-ball collision with a single atomic electron, a phenomenon that became known as the Compton effect and for which he shared the Nobel Prize in Physics for 1927. But for more than five years before he made his discovery, Compton had analyzed X-ray scattering in terms of classical electrodynamics. I suggest that his colleague at Washington University in St. Louis, G. E. M. Jauncey (1888-1947), helped materially to persuade him to embrace the quantum interpretation of his X-ray scattering experiments.

  13. Angular spectrum characteristics of relativistic inverse compton harmonic X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Y.; Xiao, L.; Barber, S.; O'Shea, F. H.; Williams, O.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Pogorelsky, I.; Korostyshevsky, A.; Malone, B.; Kusche, K.; Montemagno, M.; Polyanskiy, M. N.; Babzien, M.; Fedurin, M.; Yakimenko, V.

    2012-12-21

    The X-ray spectrum emitted during relativistic non-linear inverse Compton scattering is angularly resolved, and energy analyzed through the use of K-edge and attenuation filters. A 0.5 nC electron beam of 65 MeV energy was employed, colliding with a highly intense CO{sub 2} laser of normalized vector potential a{sub L}{approx}0.5. In this experiment, 2nd harmonic radiation was clearly observed. In addition, evidence for the 3rd harmonic component of the radiation, having radiation angle of < 1/{gamma} has been found. This measurement represents a significant step forward in experimental understanding the electrodynamics of ICS in the nonlinear regime.

  14. Measurement of cross sections for inelastic cold-neutron scattering in metals and polymers by the method of (n, {gamma}) analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Arzumanov, S. S.; Bondarenko, L. N.; Geltenbort, P.; Morozov, V. I.; Panin, Yu. N.; Chernyavsky, S. M.

    2008-11-15

    The results obtained by measuring the cross sections for the inelastic scattering of very cold neutrons for a number of metals and polymers by the method of a neutron-irradiation analysis are presented. The method is based on simultaneously measuring events of inelastic scattering and neutron capture in the sample under investigation via recording gamma radiation with a semiconductor germanium detector. Neutron capture by a nucleus of the sample is accompanied by the prompt radiation of gamma rays having a known spectrum. Upon inelastic scattering, a neutron acquires thermal energy. Upon leaving the sample, this neutron is absorbed in a special converter that contains the isotope {sup 10}B. The capture of the neutron by a {sup 10}B nucleus is followed by the emission of a 477-keV gamma ray. The probabilities of capture and inelastic scattering are proportional to the respective neutron-interaction cross sections, and the ratio of the recorded detector counts corresponding to events of the two types does not depend on the spectrum of the incident flux of very cold neutrons or on the trajectory of neutron motion in the sample. The sought inelastic-scattering cross section at a fixed sample temperature is calculated by using this ratio and the known cross section for neutron capture by the sample isotope having a known gamma-radiation spectrum.

  15. Testing of a gamma ray imaging system at the High Intensity Gamma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemieux, Daniel A.; Barber, H. Bradford; Grim, Gary P.; Archuleta, Thomas; Fatherley, Valerie; Fastje, David

    2014-09-01

    Testing of the gamma ray imaging system will continue at the High Intensity Gamma Source (HIGS) at Duke University. Previous testing at OMEGA gave useful information but at much lower photon energies. Utilizing HIGS 108 gammas/s and its tight beam we will be able to characterize the system in the energy regime that it was designed for namely 4.44 MeV. HIGS offers the ability to tune the beam's energy from 1-20 MeV by way of controlling the inverse Compton scattering off of a relativistic electron beam. With this feature characterization in a range of energies will be possible. Targets were made using a ray-tracing program that replicates a 12-micron ideal pinhole and a 20 cm long 300-micron gold penumbra aperture. The latter will require reconstruction of the coded images.

  16. The CLIC positron source based on compton schemes

    E-print Network

    Rinolfi, L; Braun, H; Papaphilippou, Y; Schulte, D; Vivoli, A; Zimmermann, F; Dadoun, O; Lepercq, P; Roux, R; Variola, A; Zomer, F; Pogorelski, I; Yakimenko, V; Gai, W; Liu, W; Kamitani, T; Omori, T; Urakawa, J; Kuriki, M; Takahasi, TM; Bulyak, E; Gladkikh, P; Chehab, R; Clarke, J

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC polarized positron source is based on a positron production scheme in which polarized photons are produced by a Compton process. In one option, Compton backscattering takes place in a so-called “Compton ring”, where an electron beam of 1 GeV interacts with circularly-polarized photons in an optical resonator. The resulting circularly-polarized gamma photons are sent on to an amorphous target, producing pairs of longitudinally polarized electrons and positrons. The nominal CLIC bunch population is 4.2x109 particles per bunch at the exit of the Pre-Damping Ring (PDR). Since the photon flux coming out from a "Compton ring" is not sufficient to obtain the requested charge, a stacking process is required in the PDR. Another option is to use a Compton Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) where a quasicontinual stacking in the PDR could be achieved. A third option is to use a "Compton Linac" which would not require stacking. We describe the overall scheme as well as advantages and constraints of the three option...

  17. Initial evaluation of a modified dual-energy window scatter correction method for CZT-based gamma cameras for breast SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Steve D.; Tornai, Martin P.

    2015-03-01

    Solid state Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) gamma cameras for SPECT imaging offer significantly improved energy resolution compared to traditional scintillation detectors. However, the photopeak resolution is often asymmetric due to incomplete charge collection within the detector, resulting in many photopeak events incorrectly sorted into lower energy bins ("tailing"). These misplaced events contaminate the true scatter signal, which may negatively impact scatter correction methods that rely on estimates of scatter from the spectra. Additionally, because CZT detectors are organized into arrays, each individual detector element may exhibit different degrees of tailing. Here, we present a modified dualenergy window scatter correction method for emission detection and imaging that attempts to account for positiondependent effects of incomplete charge collection in the CZT gamma camera of our dedicated breast SPECT-CT system. Point source measurements and geometric phantoms were used to estimate the impact of tailing on the scatter signal and extract a better estimate of the ratio of scatter within two energy windows. To evaluate the method, cylindrical phantoms with and without a separate fillable chamber were scanned to determine the impact on quantification in hot, cold, and uniform background regions. Projections were reconstructed using OSEM, and the results for the traditional and modified scatter correction methods were compared. Results show that while modest reduced quantification accuracy was observed in hot and cold regions of the multi-chamber phantoms, the modified scatter correction method yields up to 8% improved quantification accuracy with 4% less added noise than the traditional DEW method within uniform background regions.

  18. Test of Lorentz Invarience from Compton Scattering

    E-print Network

    Prajwal Mohanmurthy; Dipangkar Dutta; Amrendra Narayan

    2015-10-05

    In the recent times, test of Lorentz Invariance has been used as a means to probe theories of physics beyond the standard model. We describe a simple way of utilizing the polarimeters, which are a critical beam instrument at precision and intensity frontier nuclear physics labs such as the erstwhile Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) and Jefferson Lab (JLab), to constrain the dependence of vacuum dispersion with the energy of the photons and its direction of propagation at unprecedented level of precision. We obtain a limit of minimal Standard Model extension (MSME) parameters: $\\sqrt{\\kappa_X^2 + \\kappa_Y^2} < 4.2 \\times 10^{-17}$ and $\\sqrt{\\left( 2c_{TX} - (\\tilde{\\kappa}_{0^+}^{YZ} \\right)^2 + \\left( 2c_{TY} - (\\tilde{\\kappa}_{0^+}^{ZX} \\right)^2} < 4.2 \\times 10^{-17}$. We also obtain a leading constraint for the refractive index of free space $n = 1 + (2.44\\times10^{-9} \\pm 6.82\\times 10^{-9})$.

  19. Test of Lorentz Invarience from Compton Scattering

    E-print Network

    Mohanmurthy, Prajwal; Narayan, Amrendra

    2015-01-01

    In the recent times, test of Lorentz Invariance has been used as a means to probe theories of physics beyond the standard model, especially those such as extensions to String Theory and Quantum Gravity. Tests of Lorentz invariance could go a long way in setting the stage for possible quantum gravity theories which are beyond the standard model. We describe a simple way of utilizing the polarimeters, which are a critical beam instrument at precision and intensity frontier nuclear physics labs such as Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) and Jefferson Lab (JLab), to limit the dependence of speed of light with the energy of the photons. Furthermore, we also describe a way of limiting directional dependence of speed of light at previously unprecedented levels of precision by studying the sidereal variations. We obtain a limit of MSME parameters: $\\sqrt{\\kappa_X^2 + \\kappa_Y^2} < 2.4 \\times 10^{-17}$ and $\\sqrt{\\left( 2c_{TX} - (\\tilde{\\kappa}_{0^+}^{YZ} \\right)^2 + \\left( 2c_{TY} - (\\tilde{\\kappa}_{0^+}^{...

  20. X-ray spectra transmitted through Compton-thick absorbers

    E-print Network

    Giorgio Matt; Fulvio Pompilio; Fabio La Franca

    1999-04-24

    X-ray spectra transmitted through matter which is optically thick to Compton scattering are computed by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Applications to the BeppoSAX data of the Seyfert 2 galaxy in Circinus, and to the spectral modeling of the Cosmic X-ray Background, are discussed.

  1. Spatial and Spectral Modeling of the Gamma-ray Distribution in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    E-print Network

    Foreman, Gary; Gruendl, Robert; Hughes, Annie; Fields, Brian; Ricker, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We perform spatial and spectral analyses of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) gamma-ray emission collected over 66 months by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. In our spatial analysis, we model the LMC cosmic-ray distribution and gamma-ray production using observed maps of the LMC interstellar medium, star formation history, interstellar radiation field, and synchrotron emission. We use bootstrapping of the data to quantify the robustness of spatial model performance. We model the LMC gamma-ray spectrum using fitting functions derived from the physics of $\\pi^0$ decay, bremsstrahlung, and inverse Compton scattering. We find the integrated gamma-ray flux of the LMC from 200 MeV to 20 GeV to be $1.38 \\pm 0.02 \\times 10^{-7}$ ph cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$, of which we attribute about 10% to inverse Compton scattering and 40% to bremsstrahlung. From our work, we conclude that the spectral index of the LMC cosmic-ray proton population is 2.4$\\pm$0.2, and we find that cosmic-ray energy loss through gamma-ray production is...

  2. Precision X-Band Linac Technologies for Nuclear Photonics Gamma-Ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Gibson, D J; Houck, T L; Marsh, R A; Messerly, M J; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J; Adolphsen, C E; Chu, T S; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G; Vlieks, A E; Wang, F; Wang, J W; Raubenheimer, T O; Ighigeanu, D; Toma, M; Cutoiu, D

    2011-08-31

    Nuclear photonics is an emerging field of research requiring new tools, including high spectral brightness, tunable gamma-ray sources; high photon energy, ultrahigh-resolution crystal spectrometers; and novel detectors. This presentation focuses on the precision linac technology required for Compton scattering gamma-ray light sources, and on the optimization of the laser and electron beam pulse format to achieve unprecedented spectral brightness. Within this context, high-gradient X-band technology will be shown to offer optimal performance in a compact package, when used in conjunction with the appropriate pulse format, and photocathode illumination and interaction laser technologies. The nascent field of nuclear photonics is enabled by the recent maturation of new technologies, including high-gradient X-band electron acceleration, robust fiber laser systems, and hyper-dispersion CPA. Recent work has been performed at LLNL to demonstrate isotope-specific detection of shielded materials via NRF using a tunable, quasi-monochromatic Compton scattering gamma-ray source operating between 0.2 MeV and 0.9 MeV photon energy. This technique is called Fluorescence Imaging in the Nuclear Domain with Energetic Radiation (or FINDER). This work has, among other things, demonstrated the detection of {sup 7}Li shielded by Pb, utilizing gamma rays generated by a linac-driven, laser-based Compton scattering gamma-ray source developed at LLNL. Within this context, a new facility is currently under construction at LLNL, with the goal of generating tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range, at a repetition rate of 120 Hz, and with a peak brightness in the 10{sup 20} photons/(s x mm{sup 2} x mrad{sup 2} x 0.1% bw).

  3. Method and apparatus for measuring lung density by Compton backscattering

    DOEpatents

    Loo, B.W.; Goulding, F.S.

    1988-03-11

    The density of the lung of a patient suffering from pulmonary edema is monitored by irradiating the lung by a single collimated beam of monochromatic photons and measuring the energies of photons compton back-scattered from the lung by a single high-resolution, high-purity germanium detector. A compact system geometry and a unique data extraction scheme are utilized to minimize systematic errors due to the presence of the chestwall and multiple scattering. 11 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Spectra of clinical CT scanners using a portable Compton spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Duisterwinkel, H. A.; Abbema, J. K. van; Kawachimaru, R.; Paganini, L.; Graaf, E. R. van der; Brandenburg, S.; Goethem, M. J. van

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Spectral information of the output of x-ray tubes in (dual source) computer tomography (CT) scanners can be used to improve the conversion of CT numbers to proton stopping power and can be used to advantage in CT scanner quality assurance. The purpose of this study is to design, validate, and apply a compact portable Compton spectrometer that was constructed to accurately measure x-ray spectra of CT scanners. Methods: In the design of the Compton spectrometer, the shielding materials were carefully chosen and positioned to reduce background by x-ray fluorescence from the materials used. The spectrum of Compton scattered x-rays alters from the original source spectrum due to various physical processes. Reconstruction of the original x-ray spectrum from the Compton scattered spectrum is based on Monte Carlo simulations of the processes involved. This reconstruction is validated by comparing directly and indirectly measured spectra of a mobile x-ray tube. The Compton spectrometer is assessed in a clinical setting by measuring x-ray spectra at various tube voltages of three different medical CT scanner x-ray tubes. Results: The directly and indirectly measured spectra are in good agreement (their ratio being 0.99) thereby validating the reconstruction method. The measured spectra of the medical CT scanners are consistent with theoretical spectra and spectra obtained from the x-ray tube manufacturer. Conclusions: A Compton spectrometer has been successfully designed, constructed, validated, and applied in the measurement of x-ray spectra of CT scanners. These measurements show that our compact Compton spectrometer can be rapidly set-up using the alignment lasers of the CT scanner, thereby enabling its use in commissioning, troubleshooting, and, e.g., annual performance check-ups of CT scanners.

  5. The 106Cd(alpha,alpha)106Cd elastic scattering in a wide energy range for gamma-process studies

    E-print Network

    A. Ornelas; G. G. Kiss; P. Mohr; D. Galaviz; Zs. Fülöp; Gy. Gyürky; Z. Máté; T. Rauscher; E. Somorjai; K. Sonnabend; A. Zilges

    2015-04-29

    Alpha elastic scattering angular distributions of the 106Cd(alpha,alpha)106Cd reaction were measured at three energies around the Coulomb barrier to provide a sensitive test for the alpha + nucleus optical potential parameter sets. Furthermore, the new high precision angular distributions, together with the data available from the literature were used to study the energy dependence of the locally optimized {\\alpha}+nucleus optical potential in a wide energy region ranging from E_Lab = 27.0 MeV down to 16.1 MeV. The potentials under study are a basic prerequisite for the prediction of alpha-induced reaction cross sections and thus, for the calculation of stellar reaction rates used for the astrophysical gamma process. Therefore, statistical model predictions using as input the optical potentials discussed in the present work are compared to the available 106Cd + alpha cross section data.

  6. Formation of very hard electron and gamma-ray spectra of flat spectrum radio quasar in fast-cooling regime

    E-print Network

    Yan, Dahai; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2015-01-01

    In external Compton scenario, we investigate the formation of the very hard electron spectrum in the fast-cooling regime, using a time-dependent emission model. It is shown that a very hard electron distribution $N'_{\\rm e}(\\gp)\\propto\\gp^{-p}$ with the spectral index $p\\sim1.3$ is formed below the minimum energy of injection electron when inverse Compton scattering takes place in the Klein-Nishina regime, i.e., inverse Compton scattering of relativistic electrons on broad-line region radiation in flat spectrum radio quasars. This produces a very hard gamma-ray spectrum, and can reasonably explain the very hard \\emph{Fermi}-LAT spectrum of the flat spectrum radio quasar 3C 279 during the extreme gamma-ray flare in 2013 December. We examine the impact of gamma-ray emission site on the evolution of electron distribution and their radiative output in detail. We find that such hard \\emph{Fermi}-LAT spectrum and simultaneous X-ray observations can put a stringent constraint on the gamma-ray emission site. Variabil...

  7. Performance of the Three-Dimensional Track Imager (3-DTI) for Gamma-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Son, Seunghee; Barbier, L, M.; Bloser, P. F.; Floyd, S. R,; Hunter, S. D.; Krizmanic, J. F.; Link, J. T.; McConnell, M. L.; DeNolfo, Georgia; Ryan, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    We have been developing a gas time projection chamber for the imaging of gamma-rays between 0.3 - 50 MeV, the Three-Dimensional Track Imager (3DTI). The detector is being designed for use on satellite experiments for the imaging of astrophysical gamma-ray sources. Electrons produced by pair production or Compton scattering ionize the gas and these ionization electrons are detected by the cross-strip micro-well detector at the bottom of the chamber. Discrete component of front end electronics and time digitization electronics have been developed. We will present results of prototype microwell detector and laboratory set-up in various gas mixtures.

  8. Isotope-specific detection of low density materials with mono-energetic (gamma)-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Hagmann, C A; Johnson, M S; Messerly, M J; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Tremaine, A M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J

    2009-03-16

    The first demonstration of isotope-specific detection of a low-Z, low density object, shielded by a high-Z and high density material using mono-energetic gamma-rays is reported. Isotope-specific detection of LiH shielded by Pb and Al is accomplished using the nuclear resonance fluorescence line of {sup 7}Li at 0.478 MeV. Resonant photons are produced via laser-based Compton scattering. The detection techniques are general and the confidence level obtained is shown to be superior to that yielded by conventional x-ray/{gamma}-ray techniques in these situations.

  9. Overview of the Compton Observatory instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Kurfess, J. D.; Bertsch, D. L.

    1997-05-10

    The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory and its complement of four scientific instruments has completed over six years of outstanding on-orbit operation. In this paper we summarize the capabilities of the four CGRO experiments. The enhanced capabilities that have been achieved since the beginning of the mission are discussed. Recently, the spacecraft has been re-boosted to a higher orbit that could extend the mission lifetime for another ten years. This will enable continued monitoring of the hard X-ray sky by BATSE, continued mapping of the Galaxy across the gamma ray spectrum, the capability to observe rare events such as extragalactic supernovae, and solar flare observations during the next solar maximum by all instruments. The instrumental capabilities for an extended mission are discussed.

  10. HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION OF GRB 130427A: EVIDENCE FOR INVERSE COMPTON RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Yi-Zhong; Zhang, Fu-Wen; He, Hao-Ning; Zhou, Bei; Yang, Rui-Zhi; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Wei, Da-Ming; Tam, P. H. T.; Liang, Yun-Feng E-mail: fwzhang@pmo.ac.cn

    2013-10-20

    A nearby superluminous burst GRB 130427A was simultaneously detected by six ?-ray space telescopes (Swift, the Fermi GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM)/Large Area Telescope, Konus-Wind, SPI-ACS/INTEGRAL, AGILE, and RHESSI) and by three RAPTOR full-sky persistent monitors. The isotropic ?-ray energy release is ?10{sup 54} erg, rendering it the most powerful explosion among gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with a redshift z ? 0.5. The emission above 100 MeV lasted about one day, and four photons are at energies greater than 40 GeV. We show that the count rate of 100 MeV-100 GeV emission may be mainly accounted for by the forward shock synchrotron radiation and the inverse Compton radiation likely dominates at GeV-TeV energies. In particular, an inverse Compton radiation origin is favored for the ?(95.3, 47.3, 41.4, 38.5, 32) GeV photons arriving at t ? (243, 256.3, 610.6, 3409.8, 34366.2) s after the trigger of Fermi-GBM. Interestingly, the external inverse Compton scattering of the prompt emission (the second episode, i.e., t ? 120-260 s) by the forward-shock-accelerated electrons is expected to produce a few ?-rays at energies above 10 GeV, while five were detected in the same time interval. A possible unified model for the prompt soft ?-ray, optical, and GeV emission of GRB 130427A, GRB 080319B, and GRB 090902B is outlined. Implications of the null detection of >1 TeV neutrinos from GRB 130427A by IceCube are discussed.

  11. MEMORIAL DR. OLIVER "CECIL" COMPTON

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dr. Oliver "Cecil" Compton of Corvallis, Oregon, died Wednesday 10 August 2005, at Samaritan Heart of the Valley Care Center. He was 102. Dr. Compton was an Emeritus Professor of Oregon State University. This brief article gives a brief summary of his life and some of his academic activities in pomo...

  12. Gamma-to-electron magnetic spectrometer (GEMS): An energy-resolved {gamma}-ray diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.; Herrmann, H. W.; Mack, J. M.; Young, C. S.; Barlow, D. B.; Schillig, J. B.; Sims, J. R. Jr.; Lopez, F. E.; Mares, D.; Oertel, J. A.; Hayes-Sterbenz, A. C.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Wu, W.; Moy, K.; Stoeffl, W.

    2012-10-15

    The gamma-to-electron magnetic spectrometer, having better than 5% energy resolution, is proposed to resolve {gamma}-rays in the range of E{sub o}{+-} 20% in single shot, where E{sub o} is the central energy and is tunable from 2 to 25 MeV. Gamma-rays from inertial confinement fusion implosions interact with a thin Compton converter (e.g., beryllium) located at approximately 300 cm from the target chamber center (TCC). Scattered electrons out of the Compton converter enter an electromagnet placed outside the NIF chamber (approximately 600 cm from TCC) where energy selection takes place. The electromagnet provides tunable E{sub o} over a broad range in a compact manner. Energy resolved electrons are measured by an array of quartz Cherenkov converters coupled to photomultipliers. Given 100 detectable electrons in the energy bins of interest, 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} minimum deuterium/tritium (DT) neutrons will be required to measure the 4.44 MeV {sup 12}C {gamma}-rays assuming 200 mg/cm{sup 2} plastic ablator areal density and 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} minimum DT neutrons to measure the 16.75 MeV DT {gamma}-ray line.

  13. Neural network generated parametrizations of deeply virtual Compton form factors

    E-print Network

    Kresimir Kumericki; Dieter Mueller; Andreas Schafer

    2011-06-14

    We have generated a parametrization of the Compton form factor (CFF) H based on data from deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) using neural networks. This approach offers an essentially model-independent fitting procedure, which provides realistic uncertainties. Furthermore, it facilitates propagation of uncertainties from experimental data to CFFs. We assumed dominance of the CFF H and used HERMES data on DVCS off unpolarized protons. We predict the beam charge-spin asymmetry for a proton at the kinematics of the COMPASS II experiment.

  14. REVISITING THE LIGHT CURVES OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS IN THE RELATIVISTIC TURBULENCE MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Da-Bin; Gu, Wei-Min; Hou, Shu-Jin; Liu, Tong; Sun, Mou-Yuan; Lu, Ju-Fu E-mail: lujf@xmu.edu.cn

    2013-10-10

    Rapid temporal variability has been widely observed in the light curves of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). One possible mechanism for such variability is related to the relativistic eddies in the jet. In this paper, we include the contribution of the inter-eddy medium together with the eddies to the gamma-ray emission. We show that the gamma-ray emission can either lead or lag behind the observed synchrotron emission, where the latter originates in the inter-eddy medium and provides most of the seed photons for producing gamma-ray emission through inverse Compton scattering. As a consequence, we argue that the lead/lag found in non-stationary short-lived light curves may not reveal the intrinsic lead/lag of different emission components. In addition, our results may explain the lead of gamma-ray emission with respect to optical emission observed in GRB 080319B.

  15. Gamma Rays, Electrons, Hard X-Rays, and the Central Parsec of the Milky Way

    E-print Network

    Kistler, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    The complex interplay of processes at the Galactic Center is at the heart of numerous past, present, and (likely) future mysteries. We aim at a more complete understanding of how spectra extending to >10 TeV result. We first construct a simplified model to account for the peculiar energy and angular dependence of the intense central parsec photon field. This allows for calculating anisotropic inverse Compton scattering and mapping gamma-ray extinction due to gamma gamma -> e^+ e^- attenuation. Coupling these with a method for evolving electron spectra, we examine several clear and present excesses, including the diffuse hard X-rays seen by NuSTAR and GeV gamma rays by Fermi. We address further applications to cosmic rays, dark matter, neutrinos, and gamma rays from the Center and beyond.

  16. Bulk Comptonization of the Cosmic Microwave Background by Extragalactic Jets as a Probe of their Matter Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georganopoulos, Markos; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Perlman, Eric; Stecker, Floyd W.

    2004-01-01

    We propose a method for estimating the composition, i.e. the relative amounts of leptons and protons, of extragalactic jets which exhibit Chandra - detected knots in their kpc scale jets. The method relies on measuring, or setting upper limits on, the component of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation that is bulk-Comptonized by the cold electrons in the relativistically flowing jet. These measurements, along with modeling of the broadband knot emission that constrain the bulk Lorentz factor GAMMA of the jets, can yield estimates of the jet power carried by protons and leptons. We provide an explicit calculation of the spectrum of the bulk-Comptonized (BC) CMB component and apply these results to PKS 0637 - 752 and 3C 273, two superluminal quasars with Chandra - detected large scale jets. What makes these sources particularly suited for such a procedure is the absence of significant non-thermal jet emission in the 'bridge', the region between the core and the first bright jet knot, which guarantees that most of the electrons are cold there, leaving the BC scattered CMB radiation as the only significant source of photons in this region. At lambda = 3.6 - 8.0 microns, the most likely band to observe the BC scattered CMB emission, the Spitzer angular resolution (approximately 1" - 3") is considerably smaller than the the 'bridges' of these jets (approximately 10"), making it possible to both measure and resolve this emission.

  17. TOPICAL REVIEW: Human soft tissue analysis using x-ray or gamma-ray techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorakou, C.; Farquharson, M. J.

    2008-06-01

    This topical review is intended to describe the x-ray techniques used for human soft tissue analysis. X-ray techniques have been applied to human soft tissue characterization and interesting results have been presented over the last few decades. The motivation behind such studies is to provide improved patient outcome by using the data obtained to better understand a disease process and improve diagnosis. An overview of theoretical background as well as a complete set of references is presented. For each study, a brief summary of the methodology and results is given. The x-ray techniques include x-ray diffraction, x-ray fluorescence, Compton scattering, Compton to coherent scattering ratio and attenuation measurements. The soft tissues that have been classified using x-rays or gamma rays include brain, breast, colon, fat, kidney, liver, lung, muscle, prostate, skin, thyroid and uterus.

  18. Isotopic response with small scintillator based gamma-ray spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Norman W. (Sparks, NV); Goulding, Frederick S. (Lafayette, CA); Asztalos, Stephen J. (Oakland, CA)

    2012-01-24

    The intrinsic background of a gamma ray spectrometer is significantly reduced by surrounding the scintillator with a second scintillator. This second (external) scintillator surrounds the first scintillator and has an opening of approximately the same diameter as the smaller central scintillator in the forward direction. The second scintillator is selected to have a higher atomic number, and thus has a larger probability for a Compton scattering interaction than within the inner region. Scattering events that are essentially simultaneous in coincidence to the first and second scintillators, from an electronics perspective, are precluded electronically from the data stream. Thus, only gamma-rays that are wholly contained in the smaller central scintillator are used for analytic purposes.

  19. Experimental status DVCS e p ---> e p gamma and e n ---> e n gamma at Jefferson Lab-Hall A

    SciTech Connect

    C. Ferdi

    2004-06-02

    The experiments E00-110 and E03-106 [1] propose to measure the Deep Virtual Compton Scattering process (DVCS) ep --> ep{gamma} and en --> en{gamma} in Hall A at Jefferson Lab with a 5.75 GeV longitudinally polarized electron beam. The exclusivity requires the High Resolution Spectrometer of the Hall A for the detection of the scattered electron ({Delta}p/p = 10^-4), an electromagnetic calorimeter for the detection of the real photon ({sigma}/E<5%) and a scintillator array for the detection of the third particle. A 1 GHz sampling system allows one to deal with pile-up as expected from running detectors at small angles and high luminosity L = 10^37 cm^-2 s^-1. We will describe the apparatus and will explain the method to extract GPDs and evaluate the contributions from higher twists from the measurement of the cross-section difference.

  20. Laser System for Livermore's Mono Energetic Gamma-Ray Source

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, D; Albert, F; Bayramian, A; Marsh, R; Messerly, M; Ebbers, C; Hartemann, F

    2011-03-14

    A Mono-energetic Gamma-ray (MEGa-ray) source, based on Compton scattering of a high-intensity laser beam off a highly relativistic electron beam, requires highly specialized laser systems. To minimize the bandwidth of the {gamma}-ray beam, the scattering laser must have minimal bandwidth, but also match the electron beam depth of focus in length. This requires a {approx}1 J, 10 ps, fourier-transform-limited laser system. Also required is a high-brightness electron beam, best provided by a photoinjector. This electron source requires a second laser system with stringent requirements on the beam including flat transverse and longitudinal profiles and fast rise times. Furthermore, these systems must be synchronized to each other with ps-scale accuracy. Using a novel hyper-dispersion compressor configuration and advanced fiber amplifiers and diode-pumped Nd:YAG amplifiers, we have designed laser systems that meet these challenges for the X-band photoinjector and Compton-scattering source being built at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  1. Compact Gamma-Beam Source for Nuclear Security Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkikh, P.; Urakawa, J.

    2015-10-01

    A compact gamma-beam source dedicated to the development of the nuclear security technologies by use of the nuclear resonance fluorescence is described. Besides, such source is a very promising tool for novel technologies of the express cargoes inspection to prevent nuclear terrorism. Gamma-beam with the quanta energies from 0.3MeV to 7.2MeV is generated in the Compton scattering of the "green" laser photons on the electron beam with energies from 90MeV to 430MeV. The characteristic property of the proposed gammabeam source is a narrow spectrum (less than 1%) at high average gamma-yield (of 1013?/s) due to special operation mode.

  2. Results of a Si/Cdte Compton Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Oonuki, Kousuke; Tanaka, Takaaki; Watanabe, Shin; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Mitani, Takefumi; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Nomachi, Masaharu; /Sagamihara, Inst. Space Astron. Sci. /Tokyo U. /SLAC /Hiroshima U. /Osaka U.

    2005-09-23

    We have been developing a semiconductor Compton telescope to explore the universe in the energy band from several tens of keV to a few MeV. We use a Si strip and CdTe pixel detector for the Compton telescope to cover an energy range from 60 keV. For energies above several hundred keV, the higher efficiency of CdTe semiconductor in comparison with Si is expected to play an important role as an absorber and a scatterer. In order to demonstrate the spectral and imaging capability of a CdTe-based Compton Telescope, we have developed a Compton telescope consisting of a stack of CdTe pixel detectors as a small scale prototype. With this prototype, we succeeded in reconstructing images and spectra by solving the Compton equation from 122 keV to 662 keV. The energy resolution (FWHM) of reconstructed spectra is 7.3 keV at 511 keV and 3.1 keV at 122 keV, respectively. The angular resolution obtained at 511 keV is measured to be 12.2{sup o}(FWHM).

  3. Determination of the position of a dense body in a light medium with the aid of data of scattered gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilev, M. B.; Chuvashev, N. F.; Kustova, N. D.

    1985-09-01

    Results are presented from experiments performed to assess the usefulness of gamma ray scattering data for detecting foreign particles with a mass density heavier than the medium containing them. Radiation from Cs-137 and Co-60 sources were directed through water-filled plastic cylinders in which Al, Fe, and Pb cylinders were suspended. The radiation scattering angles, exposure rates, and distance between the emitter and target were monitored. The data were consistent enough to allow formulation of a simple model for the depth of the foreign matter within the less-dense medium. It is recommended that the models be tested for more complex situations.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF A PRECISION TUNABLE GAMMA-RAY SOURCE DRIVEN BY A COMPACT X-BAND LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, G G; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Betts, S M; Chu, T S; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Fisher, S E; Gibson, D J; Ladran, A S; Messerly, M J; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J; Vlieks, A E; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G

    2009-04-30

    A precision, tunable gamma-ray source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by the linac interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. The source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence lines in various isotopes; applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source design, key parameters, and current status are presented.

  5. Beam Test of a Prototype Phoswich Detector Assembly forthe PoGOLite Astronomical Soft Gamma-ray Polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai, Y.; Ueno, M.; Kataoka, J.; Arimoto, M.; Kawai, N.; Yamamoto, K.; Mizuno, T.; Fukazawa, Y.; Kiss, M.; Ylinen, T.; Bettolo, C.Marini; Carlson, P.; P.Chen d, B.Craig d, T.Kamae d, G.Madejski d, J.S.T.Ng; Rogers, R.; Tajima, H.; Thurston, T.S.; Saito, Y.; Takahashi, T. Gunji, S.; Bjornsson, C-I.; Larsson, S.; /Stockholm U. /Ecole Polytechnique /KEK, Tsukuba

    2007-01-17

    We report about the beam test on a prototype of the balloon-based astronomical soft gamma-ray polarimeter, PoGOLite (Polarized Gamma-ray Observer--Light Version) conducted at KEK Photon Factory, a synchrotron radiation facility in Japan. The synchrotron beam was set at 30, 50, and 70 keV and its polarization was monitored by a calibrated polarimeter. The goal of the experiment was to validate the flight design of the polarimeter. PoGOLite is designed to measure polarization by detecting a Compton scattering and the subsequent photo-absorption in an array of 217 well-type phoswich detector cells (PDCs). The test setup included a first flight model PDC and a front-end electronics to select and reconstruct valid Compton scattering events. The experiment has verified that the flight PDC can detect recoil electrons and select valid Compton scattering events down to 30 keV from background. The measure azimuthal modulations (34.4 %, 35.8 % and 37.2 % at 30, 50, and 70 keV, respectively) agreed within 10% (relative) with the predictions by Geant4 implemented with dependence on the initial and final photon polarizations.

  6. Inverse Compton X-ray emission from the superluminal quasar 3C 345

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unwin, S. C.; Wehrle, A. E.; Urry, C. M.; Gilmore, D. M.; Barton, E. J.; Kjerulf, B. C.; Zensus, J. A.; Rabaca, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    In quasars with strong radio cores, the inverse-Compton process is believed to be the dominant source X-ray emission. For objects with parsec-scale radio jets, simple models have predicted that components in the jet emerging from the quasar nucleus generate the observed X-ray emission. We have tested this hypothesis in detail for the quasar 3C 345 using a ROSAT X-ray observation in 1990 July, together with quasi-simultaneous very long base interferometry (VLBI) imaging of the parsec-scale jet at five frequencies. The ROSAT spectrum is well fitted by a power law with index alpha = -0.96 +/- -0.13, consistent with models in which the X-ray emission results from inverse-Compton scattering of radio radiation from high-energy electrons in compact components. We show that the radio properties of brightest `knot' in the jet (`C5') can be fitted with a homogeneous sphere model whose parameters require bulk relativistic motion of the emitting material; otherwise the predicted model whose parameters require bulk relativistic motion of the emitting material; otherwise the predicted inverse-Compton X-ray emission exceeds the observed flux. If C5 is the origin of the X-ray emission, then it has a Doppler factor delta = 7.5((sup +3 sub -2)). If the nucleus or other components contribute to the X-ray emission, then this becomes a firm lower limit to delta. The inhomogeneous jet model of Koenigl is a good fit both to the barely resolved (less than 1 pc) flat-spectrum nucleus in the radio, and also to the ROSAT X-ray spectrum. The synchrotron and inverse-Compton emitting fluid moves down a narrow cone (opening angle 2 phi approximately 5 deg) nucleus relativistically, with delta approximately 4.6. Doppler factors for the nucleus and C5, derived from our ROSAT observation, provide evidence for bulk relativistic motion in the jet. By combining these constraints with well-known superluminal motion of jet components, we can deduce geometry. For epoch 1990.5 we infer the Lorentz factor gamma = 7.5 ((sup +1.0 sub -1.5)) and angle to the line of sight theta = 8((sup +2 deg sub -3 deg)) for H(sub 0) = 100 km/s/Mpc. These values are the most reliable yet derived using this method, because of the near-simultaneity of our X-ray and VLBI observations and the quality of the multifrequency of VLBI images and component radio spectra.

  7. Extreme Ultraviolet Emission from Clusters of Galaxies: Inverse Compton Radiation from a Relic Population of Cosmic Ray Electrons?

    E-print Network

    Craig L. Sarazin; Richard Lieu

    1997-12-03

    We suggest that the luminous extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission which has been detected recently from clusters of galaxies is Inverse Compton (IC) scattering of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation by low energy cosmic ray electrons in the intracluster medium. The cosmic ray electrons would have Lorentz factors of gamma ~ 300, and would lose energy primarily by emitting EUV radiation. These particles have lifetimes comparable to the Hubble time; thus, the electrons might represent a relic population of cosmic rays produced by nonthermal activity over the history of the cluster. The IC model naturally explains the observed increase in the ratio of EUV to X-ray emission with radius in clusters. The required energy in cosmic ray electrons is typically 1--10% of the thermal energy content of the intracluster gas. We suggest that the cosmic ray electrons might have been produced by supernovae in galaxies, by radio galaxies, or by particle acceleration in intracluster shocks.

  8. "Stereo Compton cameras" for the 3-D localization of radioisotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, K.; Kataoka, J.; Nishiyama, T.; Fujita, T.; Kishimoto, A.; Ohsuka, S.; Nakamura, S.; Adachi, S.; Hirayanagi, M.; Uchiyama, T.; Ishikawa, Y.; Kato, T.

    2014-11-01

    The Compton camera is a viable and convenient tool used to visualize the distribution of radioactive isotopes that emit gamma rays. After the nuclear disaster in Fukushima in 2011, there is a particularly urgent need to develop "gamma cameras", which can visualize the distribution of such radioisotopes. In response, we propose a portable Compton camera, which comprises 3-D position-sensitive GAGG scintillators coupled with thin monolithic MPPC arrays. The pulse-height ratio of two MPPC-arrays allocated at both ends of the scintillator block determines the depth of interaction (DOI), which dramatically improves the position resolution of the scintillation detectors. We report on the detailed optimization of the detector design, based on Geant4 simulation. The results indicate that detection efficiency reaches up to 0.54%, or more than 10 times that of other cameras being tested in Fukushima, along with a moderate angular resolution of 8.1° (FWHM). By applying the triangular surveying method, we also propose a new concept for the stereo measurement of gamma rays by using two Compton cameras, thus enabling the 3-D positional measurement of radioactive isotopes for the first time. From one point source simulation data, we ensured that the source position and the distance to the same could be determined typically to within 2 meters' accuracy and we also confirmed that more than two sources are clearly separated by the event selection from two point sources of simulation data.

  9. The modulation of the gamma-ray emission from the binary LS 5039

    E-print Network

    G. Dubus; B. Cerutti; G. Henri

    2007-10-04

    Gamma-ray binaries, composed of a massive star and compact object, have been established as a new class of sources of very high energy (VHE) photons. The gamma-rays are produced by inverse Compton scattering of the stellar light by VHE electrons accelerated in the vicinity of the compact object. The VHE emission from LS 5039 displays an orbital modulation. The inverse Compton spectrum depends on the angle between the incoming and outgoing photon in the electron rest frame. Since the angle at which an observer sees the star and electrons changes with the orbit, a phase dependence of the spectrum is expected. The phase-dependent spectrum of LS 5039 is calculated, assuming a continuous injection of electrons. The shape of the electron distribution depends on the injected power-law and on the magnetic field intensity. Anisotropic scattering produces hard emission at inferior conjunction, when attenuation due to pair production of the VHE gamma-rays on star light is minimum. The computed lightcurve and spectra provide good fits to the HESS and EGRET observations, except at phases of maximum attenuation where pair cascade emission may be significant for HESS. Detailed predictions are made for a modulation in the GLAST energy range. The magnetic field intensity at periastron is 0.8+-0.2 G. Anisotropic inverse Compton scattering plays a major role in LS 5039. The derived magnetic field intensity, injection energy and slope suggest a rotation-powered pulsar wind nebula. Gamma-ray binaries are promising sources to study the environment of pulsars on small scales.

  10. Active Detection and Imaging of Nuclear Materials with High-Brightness Gamma Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, C J; Gibson, D J; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Anderson, G G; Betts, S M; Berry, R D; Fisher, S E; Hagmann, C A; Johnson, M S; Messerly, M J; Phan, H H; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Tremaine, A M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P

    2009-02-26

    A Compton scattering {gamma}-ray source, capable of producing photons with energies ranging from 0.1 MeV to 0.9 MeV has been commissioned and characterized, and then used to perform nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) experiments. The performances of the two laser systems (one for electron production, one for scattering), the electron photoinjector, and the linear accelerator are also detailed, and {gamma}-ray results are presented. The key source parameters are the size (0.01 mm{sup 2}), horizontal and vertical divergence (6 x 10 mrad{sup 2}), duration (10 ps), spectrum and intensity (10{sup 5} photons/shot). These parameters are summarized by the peak brightness, 1.5 x 10{sup 15} photons/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/s/0.1% bandwidth, measured at 478 keV. Additional measurements of the flux as a function of the timing difference between the drive laser pulse and the relativistic photo-electron bunch, {gamma}-ray beam profile, and background evaluations are presented. These results are systematically compared to theoretical models and computer simulations. NRF measurements performed on {sup 7}Li in LiH demonstrate the potential of Compton scattering photon sources to accurately detect isotopes in situ.

  11. Development of a low-cost-high-sensitivity Compton camera using CsI (Tl) scintillators (?I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagaya, M.; Katagiri, H.; Enomoto, R.; Hanafusa, R.; Hosokawa, M.; Itoh, Y.; Muraishi, H.; Nakayama, K.; Satoh, K.; Takeda, T.; Tanaka, M. M.; Uchida, T.; Watanabe, T.; Yanagita, S.; Yoshida, T.; Umehara, K.

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a novel low-cost gamma-ray imaging Compton camera ?I that has a high detection efficiency. Our motivation for the development of this detector was to measure the arrival directions of gamma rays produced by radioactive nuclides that were released by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in 2011. The detector comprises two arrays of inorganic scintillation detectors, which act as a scatterer and an absorber. Each array has eight scintillation detectors, each comprising a large CsI (Tl) scintillator cube of side 3.5 cm, which is inexpensive and has a good energy resolution. Energies deposited by the Compton scattered electrons and subsequent photoelectric absorption, measured by each scintillation counter, are used for image reconstruction. The angular resolution was found to be 3.5° after using an image-sharpening technique. With this angular resolution, we can resolve a 1 m2 radiation hot spot that is located at a distance of 10 m from the detector with a wide field of view of 1 sr. Moreover, the detection efficiency 0.68 cps/MBq at 1 m for 662 keV (7.6 cps/?Sv/h) is sufficient for measuring low-level contamination (i.e., less than 1 ?Sv/h) corresponding to typical values in large areas of eastern Japan. In addition to the laboratory tests, the imaging capability of our detector was verified in various regions with dose rates less than 1 ?Sv/h (e.g., Fukushima city).

  12. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, R.D.; Huang, Z.

    1998-10-20

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source is disclosed for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications. 4 figs.

  13. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Huang, Zhirong (Stanford, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  14. Compton backscattered collmated X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Huang, Zhirong (Stanford, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  15. A LEPTONIC MODEL OF STEADY HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM Sgr A*

    SciTech Connect

    Kusunose, Masaaki; Takahara, Fumio E-mail: takahara@vega.ess.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2012-03-20

    Recent observations of Sgr A* by Fermi and HESS have detected steady {gamma}-ray emission in the GeV and TeV bands. We present a new model to explain the GeV {gamma}-ray emission by inverse Compton scattering by nonthermal electrons supplied by the NIR/X-ray flares of Sgr A*. The escaping electrons from the flare regions accumulate in a region with a size of {approx}10{sup 18} cm and magnetic fields of {approx}< 10{sup -4} G. Those electrons produce {gamma}-rays by inverse Compton scattering off soft photons emitted by stars and dust around the central black hole. By fitting the GeV spectrum, we find constraints on the magnetic field and the energy density of optical-UV radiation in the central 1 pc region around the supermassive black hole. While the GeV spectrum is well fitted by our model, the TeV {gamma}-rays, whose spectral index is different from that of the GeV emission, may be from different sources such as pulsar wind nebulae.

  16. Direct linear algebraic deconvolution imaging of Compton telescope data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, D. D.; Buchholz, J.; O'Neill, T. J.; Tümer, O. T.; White, R. S.; Zych, A. D.; Wheaton, W. A.

    A general direct linear algebraic deconvolution method for imaging Compton gamma-ray telescope event data is described. This method gives an image of the gamma ray source distribution that is linearly related to the binned event data. Two algorithms for imposing the positivity constraint are investigated and compared; the Non-negative Least Squares method of Lawson and Hanson (1974) and the Inequality Constrained Generalized Least Squares method of Werner (1990). The latter is applied here to CGRO COMPTEL event data for Viewing Period # 1 centered on the Crab Nebula. Preliminary flux images and their statistical significant are presented.

  17. Method and apparatus for measuring lung density by Compton backscattering

    DOEpatents

    Loo, Billy W. (Oakland, CA); Goulding, Frederick S. (Lafayette, CA)

    1991-01-01

    The density of the lung of a patient suffering from pulmonary edema is monitored by irradiating the lung by a single collimated beam of monochromatic photons and measuring the energies of photons Compton backscattered from the lung by a single high-resolution, high-purity germanium detector. A compact system geometry and a unique data extraction scheme are utilized to monimize systematic errors due to the presence of the chestwall and multiple scattering.

  18. Dual color x-rays from Thomson or Compton sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrillo, V.; Bacci, A.; Curatolo, C.; Ferrario, M.; Maroli, C.; Rau, J. V.; Ronsivalle, C.; Serafini, L.; Vaccarezza, C.; Venturelli, M.

    2015-05-01

    We analyze the possibility of producing two color X or ? radiation by Thomson/Compton back-scattering between a high intensity laser pulse and a two-energy level electron beam, constituted by a couple of beamlets separated in time and/or energy obtained by a photoinjector with comb laser techniques and linac velocity bunching. The parameters of the Thomson source at SPARC_LAB have been simulated, proposing a set of values for a realistic experiments.

  19. Extragalactic Inverse Compton Light from Dark Matter annihilation and the Pamela positron excess

    SciTech Connect

    Profumo, Stefano; Jeltema, Tesla E. E-mail: tesla@ucolick.org

    2009-07-01

    We calculate the extragalactic diffuse emission originating from the up-scattering of cosmic microwave photons by energetic electrons and positrons produced in particle dark matter annihilation events at all redshifts and in all halos. We outline the observational constraints on this emission and we study its dependence on both the particle dark matter model (including the particle mass and its dominant annihilation final state) and on assumptions on structure formation and on the density profile of halos. We find that for low-mass dark matter models, data in the X-ray band provide the most stringent constraints, while the gamma-ray energy range probes models featuring large masses and pair-annihilation rates, and a hard spectrum for the injected electrons and positrons. Specifically, we point out that the all-redshift, all-halo inverse Compton emission from many dark matter models that might provide an explanation to the anomalous positron fraction measured by the Pamela payload severely overproduces the observed extragalactic gamma-ray background.

  20. Studies of Few-Nucleon Systems and Nucleon Structure with Gamma-ray Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Haiyan

    2014-03-01

    The High Intensity Gamma Source (HI ?S) at the Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory (DFELL), an important experimental facility of the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL), is located on the campus of the Duke University. The HI ?S facility, capable of delivering the most intense mono-energetic photon beam with either circularly polarized or linearly polarized photons in the world, opens up new opportunities for studies of the few-nucleon system through photodisintegration processes, and nucleon structure through Compton scattering. These measurements either with polarized or unpolarized few nucleon target systems provide high precision tests of the state-of-the-arts few-body calculations. Single polarized and double polarized Compton scattering experiments allow for significantly improved determinations of electric and magnetic polarizabilities of the nucleon, as well as spin polarizabilities of the nucleon, which so far have never been determined separately. In this talk, I will present latest results from HI ?S on the studies of few-nucleon systems and upcoming experiments. I will also discuss new experiments on polarized and unpolarized Compton scattering at HI ?S. This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contracts No. DE-FG02- 03ER41231, No. DE-FG02-97ER41033, and No. DE- FG02-97ER41041.