Science.gov

Sample records for computational flow predictions

  1. Unsteady jet flow computation towards noise prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soh, Woo-Yung

    1994-01-01

    An attempt has been made to combine a wave solution method and an unsteady flow computation to produce an integrated aeroacoustic code to predict far-field jet noise. An axisymmetric subsonic jet is considered for this purpose. A fourth order space accurate Pade compact scheme is used for the unsteady Navier-Stokes solution. A Kirchhoff surface integral for the wave equation is employed through the use of an imaginary surface which is a circular cylinder enclosing the jet at a distance. Information such as pressure and its time and normal derivatives is provided on the surface. The sound prediction is performed side by side with the jet flow computation. Retarded time is also taken into consideration since the cylinder body is not acoustically compact. The far-field sound pressure has the directivity and spectra show that low frequency peaks shift toward higher frequency region as the observation angle increases from the jet flow axis.

  2. Computational flow predictions for hypersonic drag devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokarcik, Susan A.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    1993-01-01

    The effectiveness of two types of hypersonic decelerators is examined: mechanically deployable flares and inflatable ballutes. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is used to predict the flowfield around a solid rocket motor (SRM) with a deployed decelerator. The computations are performed with an ideal gas solver using an effective specific heat ratio of 1.15. The results from the ideal gas solver are compared to computational results from a thermochemical nonequilibrium solver. The surface pressure coefficient, the drag, and the extend of the compression corner separation zone predicted by the ideal gas solver compare well with those predicted by the nonequilibrium solver. The ideal gas solver is computationally inexpensive and is shown to be well suited for preliminary design studies. The computed solutions are used to determine the size and shape of the decelerator that are required to achieve a drag coefficient of 5. Heat transfer rates to the SRM and the decelerators are predicted to estimate the amount of thermal protection required.

  3. Special session: computational predictability of natural convection flows in enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Christon, M A; Gresho, P M; Sutton, S B

    2000-08-14

    Modern thermal design practices often rely on a ''predictive'' simulation capability--although predictability is rarely quantified and often difficult to confidently achieve in practice. The computational predictability of natural convection in enclosures is a significant issue for many industrial thermal design problems. One example of this is the design for mitigation of optical distortion due to buoyancy-driven flow in large-scale laser systems. In many instances the sensitivity of buoyancy-driven enclosure flows can be linked to the presence of multiple bifurcation points that yield laminar thermal convective processes that transition from steady to various modes of unsteady flow. This behavior is brought to light by a problem as ''simple'' as a differentially-heated tall rectangular cavity (8:1 height/width aspect ratio) filled with a Boussinesq fluid with Pr = 0.71--which defines, at least partially, the focus of this special session. For our purposes, the differentially-heated cavity provides a virtual fluid dynamics laboratory.

  4. Computer prediction of three-dimensional potential flow fields in which aircraft propellers operate: Computer program description and users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jumper, S. J.

    1979-01-01

    A method was developed for predicting the potential flow velocity field at the plane of a propeller operating under the influence of a wing-fuselage-cowl or nacelle combination. A computer program was written which predicts the three dimensional potential flow field. The contents of the program, its input data, and its output results are described.

  5. RAXJET: A computer program for predicting transonic, axisymmetric flow over nozzle afterbodies with supersonic jet exhausts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmoth, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    A viscous-inviscid interaction method to calculate the subsonic and transonic flow over nozzle afterbodies with supersonic jet exhausts was developed. The method iteratively combines a relaxation solution of the full potential equation for the inviscid external flow, a shock capturing-shock fitting inviscid jet solution, an integral boundary layer solution, a control volume method for treating separated flows, and an overlaid mixing layer solution. A computer program called RAXJET which incorporates the method, illustrates the predictive capabilities of the method by comparison with experimental data is described, a user's guide to the computer program is provided. The method accurately predicts afterbody pressures, drag, and flow field properties for attached and separated flows for which no shock induced separation occurs.

  6. A New Finite Element Approach for Prediction of Aerothermal Loads: Progress in Inviscid Flow Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bey, K. S.; Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.; Ramakrishnan, R.

    1985-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of finite element methodology for the prediction of aerothermal loads is described. Two dimensional, inviscid computations are presented, but emphasis is placed on development of an approach extendable to three dimensional viscous flows. Research progress is described for: (1) utilization of a commerically available program to construct flow solution domains and display computational results, (2) development of an explicit Taylor-Galerkin solution algorithm, (3) closed form evaluation of finite element matrices, (4) vector computer programming strategies, and (5) validation of solutions. Two test problems of interest to NASA Langley aerothermal research are studied. Comparisons of finite element solutions for Mach 6 flow with other solution methods and experimental data validate fundamental capabilities of the approach for analyzing high speed inviscid compressible flows.

  7. Boundary-layer computational model for predicting the flow and heat transfer in sudden expansions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, J. P.; Pletcher, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    Fully developed turbulent and laminar flows through symmetric planar and axisymmetric expansions with heat transfer were modeled using a finite-difference discretization of the boundary-layer equations. By using the boundary-layer equations to model separated flow in place of the Navier-Stokes equations, computational effort was reduced permitting turbulence modelling studies to be economically carried out. For laminar flow, the reattachment length was well predicted for Reynolds numbers as low as 20 and the details of the trapped eddy were well predicted for Reynolds numbers above 200. For turbulent flows, the Boussinesq assumption was used to express the Reynolds stresses in terms of a turbulent viscosity. Near-wall algebraic turbulence models based on Prandtl's-mixing-length model and the maximum Reynolds shear stress were compared.

  8. Turbulent flow computation through a model Francis turbine and its performance prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Liu, S.; Wu, X.; Dou, H.; Zhang, L.; Tao, X.

    2010-08-01

    In this paper an improved k-ω turbulence model is proposed, which brings the nonlinear term of the mean fluid flow transition to the ω equation in the original k-ω model of Wilcox. Based on the improved k-ω turbulence model, three dimensional turbulent flow computation is carried out through the whole flow passage including the spiral casing, stay vanes, guide vanes, runner and draft tube of a model Francis turbine. In calculation the direct coupling method is used to solve the RANS turbulent flow governing equations for the Francis model turbine by Ansys CFX software. Since the feasibility of the improved k-ω turbulence model to hydro-turbine performance prediction is the present main concern, its validation is conducted by the steady flow simulation. Comparisons of the computational results on energy characteristics with test data and with different turbulence models at different flow rate cases indicate that the present method has sufficient potential to simulate the turbulent flow in hydraulic turbines and to predict their performances.

  9. Predicting Flow Reversals in a Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulated Thermosyphon Using Data Assimilation.

    PubMed

    Reagan, Andrew J; Dubief, Yves; Dodds, Peter Sheridan; Danforth, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    A thermal convection loop is a annular chamber filled with water, heated on the bottom half and cooled on the top half. With sufficiently large forcing of heat, the direction of fluid flow in the loop oscillates chaotically, dynamics analogous to the Earth's weather. As is the case for state-of-the-art weather models, we only observe the statistics over a small region of state space, making prediction difficult. To overcome this challenge, data assimilation (DA) methods, and specifically ensemble methods, use the computational model itself to estimate the uncertainty of the model to optimally combine these observations into an initial condition for predicting the future state. Here, we build and verify four distinct DA methods, and then, we perform a twin model experiment with the computational fluid dynamics simulation of the loop using the Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (ETKF) to assimilate observations and predict flow reversals. We show that using adaptively shaped localized covariance outperforms static localized covariance with the ETKF, and allows for the use of less observations in predicting flow reversals. We also show that a Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) of the temperature and velocity fields recovers the low dimensional system underlying reversals, finding specific modes which together are predictive of reversal direction. PMID:26849061

  10. Predicting Flow Reversals in a Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulated Thermosyphon Using Data Assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Reagan, Andrew J.; Dubief, Yves; Dodds, Peter Sheridan; Danforth, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    A thermal convection loop is a annular chamber filled with water, heated on the bottom half and cooled on the top half. With sufficiently large forcing of heat, the direction of fluid flow in the loop oscillates chaotically, dynamics analogous to the Earth’s weather. As is the case for state-of-the-art weather models, we only observe the statistics over a small region of state space, making prediction difficult. To overcome this challenge, data assimilation (DA) methods, and specifically ensemble methods, use the computational model itself to estimate the uncertainty of the model to optimally combine these observations into an initial condition for predicting the future state. Here, we build and verify four distinct DA methods, and then, we perform a twin model experiment with the computational fluid dynamics simulation of the loop using the Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (ETKF) to assimilate observations and predict flow reversals. We show that using adaptively shaped localized covariance outperforms static localized covariance with the ETKF, and allows for the use of less observations in predicting flow reversals. We also show that a Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) of the temperature and velocity fields recovers the low dimensional system underlying reversals, finding specific modes which together are predictive of reversal direction. PMID:26849061

  11. Development of Computational Aeroacoustics Code for Jet Noise and Flow Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Hixon, Duane R.

    2002-07-01

    Accurate prediction of jet fan and exhaust plume flow and noise generation and propagation is very important in developing advanced aircraft engines that will pass current and future noise regulations. In jet fan flows as well as exhaust plumes, two major sources of noise are present: large-scale, coherent instabilities and small-scale turbulent eddies. In previous work for the NASA Glenn Research Center, three strategies have been explored in an effort to computationally predict the noise radiation from supersonic jet exhaust plumes. In order from the least expensive computationally to the most expensive computationally, these are: 1) Linearized Euler equations (LEE). 2) Very Large Eddy Simulations (VLES). 3) Large Eddy Simulations (LES). The first method solves the linearized Euler equations (LEE). These equations are obtained by linearizing about a given mean flow and the neglecting viscous effects. In this way, the noise from large-scale instabilities can be found for a given mean flow. The linearized Euler equations are computationally inexpensive, and have produced good noise results for supersonic jets where the large-scale instability noise dominates, as well as for the tone noise from a jet engine blade row. However, these linear equations do not predict the absolute magnitude of the noise; instead, only the relative magnitude is predicted. Also, the predicted disturbances do not modify the mean flow, removing a physical mechanism by which the amplitude of the disturbance may be controlled. Recent research for isolated airfoils' indicates that this may not affect the solution greatly at low frequencies. The second method addresses some of the concerns raised by the LEE method. In this approach, called Very Large Eddy Simulation (VLES), the unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved directly using a high-accuracy computational aeroacoustics numerical scheme. With the addition of a two-equation turbulence model and the use of a relatively

  12. Development of Computational Aeroacoustics Code for Jet Noise and Flow Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Hixon, Duane R.

    2002-01-01

    Accurate prediction of jet fan and exhaust plume flow and noise generation and propagation is very important in developing advanced aircraft engines that will pass current and future noise regulations. In jet fan flows as well as exhaust plumes, two major sources of noise are present: large-scale, coherent instabilities and small-scale turbulent eddies. In previous work for the NASA Glenn Research Center, three strategies have been explored in an effort to computationally predict the noise radiation from supersonic jet exhaust plumes. In order from the least expensive computationally to the most expensive computationally, these are: 1) Linearized Euler equations (LEE). 2) Very Large Eddy Simulations (VLES). 3) Large Eddy Simulations (LES). The first method solves the linearized Euler equations (LEE). These equations are obtained by linearizing about a given mean flow and the neglecting viscous effects. In this way, the noise from large-scale instabilities can be found for a given mean flow. The linearized Euler equations are computationally inexpensive, and have produced good noise results for supersonic jets where the large-scale instability noise dominates, as well as for the tone noise from a jet engine blade row. However, these linear equations do not predict the absolute magnitude of the noise; instead, only the relative magnitude is predicted. Also, the predicted disturbances do not modify the mean flow, removing a physical mechanism by which the amplitude of the disturbance may be controlled. Recent research for isolated airfoils' indicates that this may not affect the solution greatly at low frequencies. The second method addresses some of the concerns raised by the LEE method. In this approach, called Very Large Eddy Simulation (VLES), the unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved directly using a high-accuracy computational aeroacoustics numerical scheme. With the addition of a two-equation turbulence model and the use of a relatively

  13. Computer program predicts thermal and flow transients experienced in a reactor loss- of-flow accident

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, C. J.

    1967-01-01

    Program analyzes the consequences of a loss-of-flow accident in the primary cooling system of a heterogeneous light-water moderated and cooled nuclear reactor. It produces a temperature matrix 36 x 41 /x,y/ which includes fuel surface temperatures relative to the time the pump power was lost.

  14. Computer code for predicting coolant flow and heat transfer in turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, Peter L.

    1990-01-01

    A computer code was developed to analyze any turbomachinery coolant flow path geometry that consist of a single flow passage with a unique inlet and exit. Flow can be bled off for tip-cap impingement cooling, and a flow bypass can be specified in which coolant flow is taken off at one point in the flow channel and reintroduced at a point farther downstream in the same channel. The user may either choose the coolant flow rate or let the program determine the flow rate from specified inlet and exit conditions. The computer code integrates the 1-D momentum and energy equations along a defined flow path and calculates the coolant's flow rate, temperature, pressure, and velocity and the heat transfer coefficients along the passage. The equations account for area change, mass addition or subtraction, pumping, friction, and heat transfer.

  15. Computer programs for predicting supersonic and hypersonic interference flow fields and heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. J.; Keyes, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    This report describes computer codes which calculate two-dimensional shock interference patterns. These codes compute the six types of interference flows as defined by Edney (Aeronaut. Res. Inst. of Sweden FAA Rep. 115). Results include properties of the inviscid flow field and the inviscid-viscous interaction at the surface along with peak pressure and peak heating at the impingement point.

  16. Prediction of compressor stall for distorted and undistorted flow by use of a multistage compressor simulation on the digital computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniele, C. J.; Teren, F.

    1975-01-01

    A simulation technique is presented for the prediction of compressor stall for axial-flow compressors for clean and distorted inlet flow. The simulation is implemented on the digital computer and uses stage stacking and lumped-volume gas dynamics. The resulting nonlinear differential equations are linearized about a steady-state operating point, and a Routh-Hurwitz stability test is performed on the linear system matrix. Parallel compressor theory is utilized to extend the technique to the distorted inlet flow problem. The method is applied to the eight-stage J85-13 compressor. Analytical stall prediction for the undistorted stall line shows good agreement with experimental results. The predicted stall line for distorted inlet flow is in agreement with experimental results only for large distortion extents and/or low distortion levels. Results for low distortion extents and high distortion level do not agree with experimental results.

  17. Development of a computational model for predicting solar wind flows past nonmagnetic terrestrial planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahara, S. S.; Spreiter, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    A computational model for the determination of the detailed plasma and magnetic field properties of the global interaction of the solar wind with nonmagnetic terrestrial planetary obstacles is described. The theoretical method is based on an established single fluid, steady, dissipationless, magnetohydrodynamic continuum model, and is appropriate for the calculation of supersonic, super-Alfvenic solar wind flow past terrestrial ionospheres.

  18. Prediction of compressor stall for distorted and undistorted flow by use of a multistage compressor simulation on the digital computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniele, C. J.; Teren, F.

    1974-01-01

    A simulation technique is presented for the prediction of compressor stall for axial-flow compressors for clean and distorted inlet flow. The simulation is implemented on the digital computer and uses stage stacking and lumped-volume gas dynamics. The resulting nonlinear differential equations are linearized about a steady-state operating point, and a Routh-Hurwitz stability test is performed on the linear system matrix. Parallel compressor theory is utilized to extend the technique to the distorted inlet flow problem. The method is applied to the eight-stage J85-13 compressor.

  19. STGSTK: A computer code for predicting multistage axial flow compressor performance by a meanline stage stacking method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinke, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer code is presented for off-design performance prediction of axial-flow compressors. Stage and compressor performance is obtained by a stage-stacking method that uses representative velocity diagrams at rotor inlet and outlet meanline radii. The code has options for: (1) direct user input or calculation of nondimensional stage characteristics; (2) adjustment of stage characteristics for off-design speed and blade setting angle; (3) adjustment of rotor deviation angle for off-design conditions; and (4) SI or U.S. customary units. Correlations from experimental data are used to model real flow conditions. Calculations are compared with experimental data.

  20. Computational Flow Predictions for the Lower Plenum of a High-Temperature, Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-11-01

    Advanced gas-cooled reactors offer the potential advantage of higher efficiency and enhanced safety over present day nuclear reactors. Accurate simulation models of these Generation IV reactors are necessary for design and licensing. One design under consideration by the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) program is a modular, prismatic gas-cooled reactor. In this reactor, the lower plenum region may experience locally high temperatures that can adversely impact the plant's structural integrity. Since existing system analysis codes cannot capture the complex flow effects occurring in the lower plenum, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes are being employed to model these flows [1]. The goal of the present study is to validate the CFD calculations using experimental data.

  1. Computational Flow Predictions for the Lower Plenum of a High-Temperature, Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen

    2006-11-01

    Advanced gas-cooled reactors offer the potential advantage of higher efficiency and enhanced safety over present day nuclear reactors. Accurate simulation models of these Generation IV reactors are necessary for design and licensing. One design under consideration by the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) program is a modular, prismatic gas-cooled reactor. In this reactor, the lower plenum region may experience locally high temperatures that can adversely impact the plant’s structural integrity. Since existing system analysis codes cannot capture the complex flow effects occurring in the lower plenum, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes are being employed to model these flows [1]. The goal of the present study is to validate the CFD calculations using experimental data.

  2. Computations in turbulent flows and off-design performance predictions for airframe-integrated scramjets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goglia, G. L.; Spiegler, E.

    1977-01-01

    The research activity focused on two main tasks: (1) the further development of the SCRAM program and, in particular, the addition of a procedure for modeling the mechanism of the internal adjustment process of the flow, in response to the imposed thermal load across the combustor and (2) the development of a numerical code for the computation of the variation of concentrations throughout a turbulent field, where finite-rate reactions occur. The code also includes an estimation of the effect of the phenomenon called 'unmixedness'.

  3. A Bioimage Informatics Based Reconstruction of Breast Tumor Microvasculature with Computational Blood Flow Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Stamatelos, Spyros K.; Kim, Eugene; Pathak, Arvind P.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2014-01-01

    Induction of tumor angiogenesis is among the hallmarks of cancer and a driver of metastatic cascade initiation. Recent advances in high-resolution imaging enable highly detailed three-dimensional geometrical representation of the whole-tumor microvascular architecture. This enormous increase in complexity of image-based data necessitates the application of informatics methods for the analysis, mining and reconstruction of these spatial graph data structures. We present a novel methodology that combines ex-vivo high-resolution micro-computed tomography imaging data with a bioimage informatics algorithm to track and reconstruct the whole-tumor vasculature of a human breast cancer model. The reconstructed tumor vascular network is used as an input of a computational model that estimates blood flow in each segment of the tumor microvascular network. This formulation involves a well-established biophysical model and an optimization algorithm that ensures mass balance and detailed monitoring of all the vessels that feed and drain blood from the tumor microvascular network. Perfusion maps for the whole-tumor microvascular network are computed. Morphological and hemodynamic indices from different regions are compared to infer their role in overall tumor perfusion. PMID:24342178

  4. Development of a computer simulation technique for predicting heat transfer in multiphase liquid-particle flow systems

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, Kevin F.; Xu, Bao H.; Fairweather, Michael

    2007-07-01

    Many of the highly active waste liquors that result from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel contain particulate solids of various materials. Operations for safe processing, handling and intermediate storage of these wastes often pose significant technical challenges due to the need for effective cooling systems to remove the heat generated by the radioactive solids. The multi-scale complexity of liquid-particle flow systems is such that investigation and prediction of their heat transfer characteristics based on experimental studies is a difficult task. Fortunately, the increasing availability of cheap computing power means that predictive simulation tools may be able to provide a means to investigate these systems without the need for expensive pilot studies. In this work we describe the development of a Combined Continuum and Discrete Model (CCDM) for predicting the heat transfer behaviour of systems of particles suspended in liquids. (authors)

  5. Computational method to predict thermodynamic, transport, and flow properties for the modified Langley 8-foot high-temperature tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkateswaran, S.; Hunt, L. Roane; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    1992-07-01

    The Langley 8 foot high temperature tunnel (8 ft HTT) is used to test components of hypersonic vehicles for aerothermal loads definition and structural component verification. The test medium of the 8 ft HTT is obtained by burning a mixture of methane and air under high pressure; the combustion products are expanded through an axisymmetric conical contoured nozzle to simulate atmospheric flight at Mach 7. This facility was modified to raise the oxygen content of the test medium to match that of air and to include Mach 4 and Mach 5 capabilities. These modifications will facilitate the testing of hypersonic air breathing propulsion systems for a wide range of flight conditions. A computational method to predict the thermodynamic, transport, and flow properties of the equilibrium chemically reacting oxygen enriched methane-air combustion products was implemented in a computer code. This code calculates the fuel, air, and oxygen mass flow rates and test section flow properties for Mach 7, 5, and 4 nozzle configurations for given combustor and mixer conditions. Salient features of the 8 ft HTT are described, and some of the predicted tunnel operational characteristics are presented in the carpet plots to assist users in preparing test plans.

  6. Computational method to predict thermodynamic, transport, and flow properties for the modified Langley 8-foot high-temperature tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, S.; Hunt, L. Roane; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    1992-01-01

    The Langley 8 foot high temperature tunnel (8 ft HTT) is used to test components of hypersonic vehicles for aerothermal loads definition and structural component verification. The test medium of the 8 ft HTT is obtained by burning a mixture of methane and air under high pressure; the combustion products are expanded through an axisymmetric conical contoured nozzle to simulate atmospheric flight at Mach 7. This facility was modified to raise the oxygen content of the test medium to match that of air and to include Mach 4 and Mach 5 capabilities. These modifications will facilitate the testing of hypersonic air breathing propulsion systems for a wide range of flight conditions. A computational method to predict the thermodynamic, transport, and flow properties of the equilibrium chemically reacting oxygen enriched methane-air combustion products was implemented in a computer code. This code calculates the fuel, air, and oxygen mass flow rates and test section flow properties for Mach 7, 5, and 4 nozzle configurations for given combustor and mixer conditions. Salient features of the 8 ft HTT are described, and some of the predicted tunnel operational characteristics are presented in the carpet plots to assist users in preparing test plans.

  7. Computer prediction of three-dimensional potential flow fields in which aircraft propellers operate. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jumper, S. J.

    1982-01-01

    A computer program was developed to calculate the three dimensional, steady, incompressible, inviscid, irrotational flow field at the propeller plane (propeller removed) located upstream of an arbitrary airframe geometry. The program uses a horseshoe vortex of known strength to model the wing. All other airframe surfaces are modeled by a network source panels of unknown strength which is exposed to a uniform free stream and the wing-induced velocity field. By satisfying boundary conditions on each panel (the Neumann problem), relaxed boundary conditions being used on certain panels to simulate inlet inflow, the source strengths are determined. From the known source and wing vortex strengths, the resulting velocity fields on the airframe surface and at the propeller plane are obtained. All program equations are derived in detail, and a brief description of the program structure is presented. A user's manual which fully documents the program is cited. Computer predictions of the flow on the surface of a sphere and at a propeller plane upstream of the sphere are compared with the exact mathematical solutions. Agreement is good, and correct program operation is verified.

  8. Computation of Unsteady Flow in Flame Trench For Prediction of Ignition Overpressure Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan; Kris, Cetin

    2010-01-01

    Computational processes/issues for supporting mission tasks are discussed using an example from launch environment simulation. Entire CFD process has been discussed using an existing code; STS-124 conditions were revisited to support wall repair effort for STS-125 flight; when water bags were not included, computed results indicate that IOP waves with the peak values have been reflected from SRB s own exhaust hole; ARES-1X simulations show that there is a shock wave going through the unused exhaust hole, however, it plays a secondary role; all three ARES-1X cases and STS-1 simulations showed very similar IOP magnitudes and patters on the vehicle; with the addition of water bags and water injection, it will further diminish the IOP effects.

  9. Predicting Flows of Rarefied Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeBeau, Gerald J.; Wilmoth, Richard G.

    2005-01-01

    DSMC Analysis Code (DAC) is a flexible, highly automated, easy-to-use computer program for predicting flows of rarefied gases -- especially flows of upper-atmospheric, propulsion, and vented gases impinging on spacecraft surfaces. DAC implements the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, which is widely recognized as standard for simulating flows at densities so low that the continuum-based equations of computational fluid dynamics are invalid. DAC enables users to model complex surface shapes and boundary conditions quickly and easily. The discretization of a flow field into computational grids is automated, thereby relieving the user of a traditionally time-consuming task while ensuring (1) appropriate refinement of grids throughout the computational domain, (2) determination of optimal settings for temporal discretization and other simulation parameters, and (3) satisfaction of the fundamental constraints of the method. In so doing, DAC ensures an accurate and efficient simulation. In addition, DAC can utilize parallel processing to reduce computation time. The domain decomposition needed for parallel processing is completely automated, and the software employs a dynamic load-balancing mechanism to ensure optimal parallel efficiency throughout the simulation.

  10. Computed Flows In A Transonic Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rangwalla, A. A.; Madavan, N. K.; Johnson, P. D.

    1993-01-01

    Report presents computational study of flow in first stage of three alternative versions of proposed transonic turbine. Study demonstrates application of computational fluid dynamics to predict performance and analyze effects of changes in designs of these advanced machines.

  11. Computation of Flow Over a Drag Prediction Workshop Wing/Body Transport Configuration Using CFL3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.; Biedron, Robert T.

    2001-01-01

    A Drag Prediction Workshop was held in conjunction with the 19th AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Conference in June 2001. The purpose of the workshop was to assess the prediction of drag by computational methods for a wing/body configuration (DLR-F4) representative of subsonic transport aircraft. This report details computed results submitted to this workshop using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes code CFL3D. Two supplied grids were used: a point-matched 1-to-1 multi-block grid, and an overset multi-block grid. The 1-to-1 grid, generally of much poorer quality and with less streamwise resolution than the overset grid, is found to be too coarse to adequately resolve the surface pressures. However, the global forces and moments are nonetheless similar to those computed using the overset grid. The effect of three different turbulence models is assessed using the 1-to-1 grid. Surface pressures are very similar overall, and the drag variation due to turbulence model is 18 drag counts. Most of this drag variation is in the friction component, and is attributed in part to insufficient grid resolution of the 1-to-1 grid. The misnomer of 'fully turbulent' computations is discussed; comparisons are made using different transition locations and their effects on the global forces and moments are quantified. Finally, the effect of two different versions of a widely used one-equation turbulence model is explored.

  12. Predicting fish population response to instream flows

    SciTech Connect

    Studley, T.K.; Baldridge, J.E.; Railsback, S.F.

    1996-10-01

    A cooperative research program initiated by Pacific Gas and Electric is described. The goals of the project are to determine if trout populations respond to changes in base streamflows in a predictible manner, and to evaluate and improve the methods used to predict rainbow and brown trout population responses under altered flow regimes. Predictive methods based on computer models of the Physical Habitat Simulation System are described, and predictions generated for four diversions and creeks are tabulated. Baseline data indicates that instream flow assessments can be improved by using guild criteria in streams with competing species and including additional limiting factors (low recruitment, high winter flow, and high stream temperatures) in the analyses.

  13. On the prediction of turbulent secondary flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, C. G.; So, R. M. C.; Younis, B. A.

    1992-01-01

    The prediction of turbulent secondary flows, with Reynolds stress models, in circular pipes and non-circular ducts is reviewed. Turbulence-driven secondary flows in straight non-circular ducts are considered along with turbulent secondary flows in pipes and ducts that arise from curvature or a system rotation. The physical mechanisms that generate these different kinds of secondary flows are outlined and the level of turbulence closure required to properly compute each type is discussed in detail. Illustrative computations of a variety of different secondary flows obtained from two-equation turbulence models and second-order closures are provided to amplify these points.

  14. Computational methods for unsteady transonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, John W.; Thomas, James L.

    1987-01-01

    Computational methods for unsteady transonic flows are surveyed with emphasis upon applications to aeroelastic analysis and flutter prediction. Computational difficulty is discussed with respect to type of unsteady flow; attached, mixed (attached/separated) and separated. Significant early computations of shock motions, aileron buzz and periodic oscillations are discussed. The maturation of computational methods towards the capability of treating complete vehicles with reasonable computational resources is noted and a survey of recent comparisons with experimental results is compiled. The importance of mixed attached and separated flow modeling for aeroelastic analysis is discussed and recent calculations of periodic aerodynamic oscillations for an 18 percent thick circular arc airfoil are given.

  15. Computational methods for unsteady transonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, John W.; Thomas, J. L.

    1987-01-01

    Computational methods for unsteady transonic flows are surveyed with emphasis on prediction. Computational difficulty is discussed with respect to type of unsteady flow; attached, mixed (attached/separated) and separated. Significant early computations of shock motions, aileron buzz and periodic oscillations are discussed. The maturation of computational methods towards the capability of treating complete vehicles with reasonable computational resources is noted and a survey of recent comparisons with experimental results is compiled. The importance of mixed attached and separated flow modeling for aeroelastic analysis is discussed, and recent calculations of periodic aerodynamic oscillations for an 18 percent thick circular arc airfoil are given.

  16. Prediction of axial-flow instabilities in a turbojet engine by use of a multistage compressor simulation on the digital computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniele, C. J.; Blaha, R. J.; Seldner, K.

    1975-01-01

    A method of estimating the undistorted stall line for an axial-flow compressor by using the digital computer is presented. The method involves linearization of nonlinear dynamic equations about an operating point on a speed line, and then application of the first method of Lyapunov to determine the stability of the nonlinear system from the stability of the linear system. The method is applied to a simulation of the J85 compressor, which utilizes stage stacking and lumped volume techniques for the interstage regions to simulate steady-state and dynamic compressor performance. The stability boundary predicted by the digital simulation compares quite well with the stall line predicted by a dynamic simulation of the J85 compressor programmed on the analog computer. Since previous studies have shown that the analog-predicted stall line agrees well with the stall line of the compressor, the digital method presented is also a good means of estimating the stall line.

  17. Computational Challenges of Viscous Incompressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin; Kim, Chang Sung

    2004-01-01

    Over the past thirty years, numerical methods and simulation tools for incompressible flows have been advanced as a subset of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) discipline. Although incompressible flows are encountered in many areas of engineering, simulation of compressible flow has been the major driver for developing computational algorithms and tools. This is probably due to the rather stringent requirements for predicting aerodynamic performance characteristics of flight vehicles, while flow devices involving low-speed or incompressible flow could be reasonably well designed without resorting to accurate numerical simulations. As flow devices are required to be more sophisticated and highly efficient CFD took become increasingly important in fluid engineering for incompressible and low-speed flow. This paper reviews some of the successes made possible by advances in computational technologies during the same period, and discusses some of the current challenges faced in computing incompressible flows.

  18. SANDRAG: a computer code for predicting drag of bodies of revolution at zero angle of attack in incompressible flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, W.P.; Oberkampf, W.L.

    1985-04-01

    A design method is presented for calculating the flow field and drag of bodies of revolution at zero angle of attack in compressible flow. The body pressure distribution, viscous shear stress, and boundary layer separation point are calculated by a combination of a potential flow method and boundary layer techniques. The potential solution is obtained by modeling the body with an axial distribution of source/sink elements whose strengths vary linearly along their length. Both the laminar and turbulent boundary layer solutions use momentum integral techniques which have been modified to account for the effects of surface roughness. An existing technique for estimating the location of transition was also modified to include surface roughness. Empirical correlations are developed to estimate the base pressure coefficient on a wide variety of geometries. Body surface pressure distributions and drag predictions are compared with experimental data for artillery projectiles, conical, and flared bodies. Very good agreement between the present method and experiment is obtained. 30 refs., 31 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Computing Flows Of Coolants In Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, P. L.

    1994-01-01

    Coolant Passage Flow (CPF) computer code developed to predict accurately coolant flow and heat transfer inside turbomachinery cooling passages (either radial or axial blading). Computes flow in one-inlet/one-outlet passage of any shape. Calculates rate of flow of coolant, temperature, pressure, velocity, and heat-transfer coefficients along passage. Integrates one-dimensional momentum and energy equations along defined flow path, taking into account change in area, addition or subtraction of mass, pumping, friction, and transfer of heat. Written in FORTRAN IV.

  20. Development of an efficient computer code to solve the time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations. [for predicting viscous flow fields about lifting bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harp, J. L., Jr.; Oatway, T. P.

    1975-01-01

    A research effort was conducted with the goal of reducing computer time of a Navier Stokes Computer Code for prediction of viscous flow fields about lifting bodies. A two-dimensional, time-dependent, laminar, transonic computer code (STOKES) was modified to incorporate a non-uniform timestep procedure. The non-uniform time-step requires updating of a zone only as often as required by its own stability criteria or that of its immediate neighbors. In the uniform timestep scheme each zone is updated as often as required by the least stable zone of the finite difference mesh. Because of less frequent update of program variables it was expected that the nonuniform timestep would result in a reduction of execution time by a factor of five to ten. Available funding was exhausted prior to successful demonstration of the benefits to be derived from the non-uniform time-step method.

  1. Boundary Conditions for Jet Flow Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayder, M. E.; Turkel, E.

    1994-01-01

    Ongoing activities are focused on capturing the sound source in a supersonic jet through careful large eddy simulation (LES). One issue that is addressed is the effect of the boundary conditions, both inflow and outflow, on the predicted flow fluctuations, which represent the sound source. In this study, we examine the accuracy of several boundary conditions to determine their suitability for computations of time-dependent flows. Various boundary conditions are used to compute the flow field of a laminar axisymmetric jet excited at the inflow by a disturbance given by the corresponding eigenfunction of the linearized stability equations. We solve the full time dependent Navier-Stokes equations by a high order numerical scheme. For very small excitations, the computed growth of the modes closely corresponds to that predicted by the linear theory. We then vary the excitation level to see the effect of the boundary conditions in the nonlinear flow regime.

  2. Confined Turbulent Swirling Recirculating Flow Predictions. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abujelala, M. T.

    1984-01-01

    Turbulent swirling flow, the STARPIC computer code, turbulence modeling of turbulent flows, the k-xi turbulence model and extensions, turbulence parameters deduction from swirling confined flow measurements, extension of the k-xi to confined swirling recirculating flows, and general predictions for confined turbulent swirling flow are discussed.

  3. Prediction of Geophysical Flow Mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagnoli, B.; Piersanti, A.

    2014-12-01

    The prediction of the mobility of geophysical flows to assess their hazards is one of the main research goals in the earth sciences. Our laboratory experiments and numerical simulations are carried out to understand the effects of grain size and flow volume on the mobility of the centre of mass of dry granular flows of angular rock fragments that have pyroclastic flows and rock avalanches as counterpart in nature. We focus on the centre of mass because it provides information about the intrinsic ability of a flow to dissipate more or less energy as a function of its own features. We show that the grain size and flow volume effects can be expressed by a linear relationship between scaling parameters where the finer the grain size or the smaller the flow volume, the more mobile the centre of mass of the granular flow. The grain size effect is the result of the decrease of particle agitation per unit of flow mass, and thus, the decrease of energy dissipation per unit of travel distance, as grain size decreases. In this sense, flows with different grain sizes are like cars with engines with different fuel efficiencies. The volume effect is the result of the fact that the deposit accretes backward during its formation on a slope change (either gradual or abrupt). We adopt for the numerical simulations a 3D discrete element modeling which confirms the grain size and flow volume effects shown by the laboratory experiments. This confirmation is obtained without prior fine tuning of the parameter values to get the desired output. The numerical simulations reveal also that the larger the initial compaction of the granular mass before release, the more mobile the flow. This behaviour must be taken into account to prevent misinterpretation of laboratory and field data. Discrete element modeling predicts the correct effects of grain size and flow volume because it takes into consideration particle interactions that are responsible for the energy dissipated by the flows.

  4. Predicting performance of parallel computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mak, Victor W.; Lundstrom, Stephen F.

    1990-01-01

    An accurate and computationally efficient method for predicting the performance of a class of parallel computations running on concurrent systems is described. A parallel computation is modeled as a task system with precedence relationships expressed as a series-parallel directed acyclic graph. Resources in a concurrent system are modeled as service centers in a queuing network model. Using these two models as inputs, the method outputs predictions of expected execution time of the parallel computation and the concurrent system utilization. The method is validated against both detailed simulation and actual execution on a commercial multiprocessor. Using 100 test cases, the average error of the prediction when compared to simulation statistics is 1.7 percent, with a standard deviation of 1.5 percent; the maximum error is about 10 percent.

  5. Computation of viscous incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan

    1989-01-01

    Incompressible Navier-Stokes solution methods and their applications to three-dimensional flows are discussed. A brief review of existing methods is given followed by a detailed description of recent progress on development of three-dimensional generalized flow solvers. Emphasis is placed on primitive variable formulations which are most promising and flexible for general three-dimensional computations of viscous incompressible flows. Both steady- and unsteady-solution algorithms and their salient features are discussed. Finally, examples of real world applications of these flow solvers are given.

  6. Computational Aeroheating Predictions for Mars Lander Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edquist, Karl T.; Alter, Stephen J.

    2003-01-01

    The proposed Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission is intended to deliver a large rover to the Martian surface within 10 km of the target site. This paper presents computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions of forebody heating rates for two MSL entry configurations with fixed aerodynamic trim tabs. Results are compared to heating on a 70-deg sphere-cone reference geometry. All three heatshield geometries are designed to trim hypersonically at a 16 deg angle of attack in order to generate the lift-to-drag ratio (LID) required for precision landing. Comparisons between CFD and tunnel data are generally in good agreement for each configuration, but the computations predict more flow separation and higher heating on a trim tab inclined 10 deg relative to the surface. CFD solutions at flight conditions were obtained using an 8-species Mars gas in chemical and thermal non-equilibrium. Laminar and Baldwin-Lomax solutions were used to estimate the effects of the trim tabs and turbulence on heating. A tab extending smoothly from the heatshield flank is not predicted to increase laminar or turbulent heating rates above the reference levels. Laminar heating on a tab deflected 10 deg from the conical heatshield is influenced by flow separation and is up to 35% above the baseline heating rate. The turbulent solution on the inclined tab configuration predicts attached flow and a 43% heating increase above the reference level.

  7. Computational Aeroheating Predictions for Mars Lander Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edquist, Karl T.; Alter, Stephen J.

    2003-01-01

    The proposed Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission is intended to deliver a large rover to the Martian surface within 10 km of the target site. This paper presents computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions of forebody heating rates for two MSL entry configurations with fixed aerodynamic trim tabs. Results are compared to heating on a 70-deg sphere-cone reference geometry. All three heatshield geometries are designed to trim hypersonically at a 16 deg angle of attack in order to generate the lift-to-drag ratio (L/D) required for precision landing. Comparisons between CFD and tunnel data are generally in good agreement for each configuration, but the computations predict more flow separation and higher heating on a trim tab inclined 10 deg relative to the surface. CFD solutions at flight conditions were obtained using an 8-species Mars gas in chemical and thermal nonequilibrium. Laminar and Baldwin-Lomax solutions were used to estimate the effects of the trim tabs and turbulence on heating. A tab extending smoothly from the heatshield flank is not predicted to increase laminar or turbulent heating rates above the reference levels. Laminar heating on a tab deflected 10 deg from the conical heatshield is influenced by flow separation and is up to 35% above the baseline heating rate. The turbulent solution on the inclined tab configuration predicts attached flow and a 43% heating increase above the reference level.

  8. Computer loss experience and predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Donn B.

    1996-03-01

    The types of losses organizations must anticipate have become more difficult to predict because of the eclectic nature of computers and the data communications and the decrease in news media reporting of computer-related losses as they become commonplace. Total business crime is conjectured to be decreasing in frequency and increasing in loss per case as a result of increasing computer use. Computer crimes are probably increasing, however, as their share of the decreasing business crime rate grows. Ultimately all business crime will involve computers in some way, and we could see a decline of both together. The important information security measures in high-loss business crime generally concern controls over authorized people engaged in unauthorized activities. Such controls include authentication of users, analysis of detailed audit records, unannounced audits, segregation of development and production systems and duties, shielding the viewing of screens, and security awareness and motivation controls in high-value transaction areas. Computer crimes that involve highly publicized intriguing computer misuse methods, such as privacy violations, radio frequency emanations eavesdropping, and computer viruses, have been reported in waves that periodically have saturated the news media during the past 20 years. We must be able to anticipate such highly publicized crimes and reduce the impact and embarrassment they cause. On the basis of our most recent experience, I propose nine new types of computer crime to be aware of: computer larceny (theft and burglary of small computers), automated hacking (use of computer programs to intrude), electronic data interchange fraud (business transaction fraud), Trojan bomb extortion and sabotage (code security inserted into others' systems that can be triggered to cause damage), LANarchy (unknown equipment in use), desktop forgery (computerized forgery and counterfeiting of documents), information anarchy (indiscriminate use of

  9. Turbulent Flow Computations in Ejectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, A.; Siddesha, H.

    2010-09-01

    The paper presents computations in ejectors using in-house code NUMBERS. Computations are carried out in a 2D ejector and in a cylindrical ejector. Computations on the cylindrical ejector are done for various nozzle pressure ratios. The ejector flow is dominated by complex mixing of primary and secondary jets. The Spalart-Allmaras and Menter SST turbulence models are used. The results with the Menter SST model are superior to Spalart-Allmaras model at higher nozzle pressure ratios for the cylindrical ejector.

  10. Semidirect computations for transonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swisshelm, J. M.; Adamczyk, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    A semidirect method, driven by a Poisson solver, was developed for inviscid transonic flow computations. It is an extension of a recently introduced algorithm for solving subsonic rotational flows. Shocks are captured by implementing a form of artificial compressibility. Nonisentropic cases are computed using a shock tracking procedure coupled with the Rankine-Hugoniot relationships. Results are presented for both subsonic and transonic flows. For the test geometry, an unstaggered cascade of 20 percent thick circular arc airfoils at zero angle of attack, shocks are crisply resolved in supercritical situations and the algorithm converges rapidly. In addition, the convergence rate appears to be nearly independent of the entropy and vorticity production at the shock.

  11. Assessment of computational prediction of tail buffeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, John W.

    1990-01-01

    Assessments of the viability of computational methods and the computer resource requirements for the prediction of tail buffeting are made. Issues involved in the use of Euler and Navier-Stokes equations in modeling vortex-dominated and buffet flows are discussed and the requirement for sufficient grid density to allow accurate, converged calculations is stressed. Areas in need of basic fluid dynamics research are highlighted: vorticity convection, vortex breakdown, dynamic turbulence modeling for free shear layers, unsteady flow separation for moderately swept, rounded leading-edge wings, vortex flows about wings at high subsonic speeds. An estimate of the computer run time for a buffeting response calculation for a full span F-15 aircraft indicates that an improvement in computer and/or algorithm efficiency of three orders of magnitude is needed to enable routine use of such methods. Attention is also drawn to significant uncertainties in the estimates, in particular with regard to nonlinearities contained within the modeling and the question of the repeatability or randomness of buffeting response.

  12. Prediction of the decay process in turbulent swirl flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algifri, A. H.; Bhardwaj, R. K.; Rao, Y. V. N.

    The paper describes a numerical procedure for predicting the decay of a swirl flow by computing the swirl intensity and tangential and axial velocity distributions at any downstream section of the pipe from the flow parameters at the inlet of the test pipe. The predictions were compared with experimental results obtained on a flow in a test pipe of 74-mm-diameter and 7400-mm-length. Air was used as the working fluid; its stream was given a swirling motion by means of a radial cascade with adjustable blades installed at the inlet. The flow in this set-up was created by a blower, and the rate of flow was regulated by means of a throttling disk. Data obtained on four different flows on the variation of the swirl number along the axis of the test pipe agreed with theoretical predictions within the range of experimental errors. A flow chart for the computational procedure is included.

  13. Prediction of High-Lift Flows using Turbulent Closure Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.; Gatski, Thomas B.; Ying, Susan X.; Bertelrud, Arild

    1997-01-01

    The flow over two different multi-element airfoil configurations is computed using linear eddy viscosity turbulence models and a nonlinear explicit algebraic stress model. A subset of recently-measured transition locations using hot film on a McDonnell Douglas configuration is presented, and the effect of transition location on the computed solutions is explored. Deficiencies in wake profile computations are found to be attributable in large part to poor boundary layer prediction on the generating element, and not necessarily inadequate turbulence modeling in the wake. Using measured transition locations for the main element improves the prediction of its boundary layer thickness, skin friction, and wake profile shape. However, using measured transition locations on the slat still yields poor slat wake predictions. The computation of the slat flow field represents a key roadblock to successful predictions of multi-element flows. In general, the nonlinear explicit algebraic stress turbulence model gives very similar results to the linear eddy viscosity models.

  14. The CMC/3DPNS computer program for prediction of three-dimensional, subsonic, turbulent aerodynamic juncture region flow. Volume 3: Programmers' manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orzechowski, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    The CMC fluid mechanics program system was developed to transmit the theoretical evolution of finite element numerical solution methodology, applied to nonlinear field problems into a versatile computer code for comprehensive flow field analysis. A detailed view of the code from the standpoint of a computer programmer's use is presented. A system macroflow chart and detailed flow charts of several routines necessary to interact with a theoretican/user to modify the operation of this program are presented. All subroutines and details of usage, primarily for input and output routines are described. Integer and real scalars and a cross reference list denoting subroutine usage for these scalars are outlined. Entry points in dynamic storage vector IZ; the lengths of each vector accompanying the scalar definitions are described. A listing of the routines peculiar to the standard test case and a listing of the input deck and printout for this case are included.

  15. Microgravity Geyser and Flow Field Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, J. I.; Marchetta, J. G.; Thornton, R. J.

    2006-01-01

    Modeling and prediction of flow fields and geyser formation in microgravity cryogenic propellant tanks was investigated. A computational simulation was used to reproduce the test matrix of experimental results performed by other investigators, as well as to model the flows in a larger tank. An underprediction of geyser height by the model led to a sensitivity study to determine if variations in surface tension coefficient, contact angle, or jet pipe turbulence significantly influence the simulations. It was determined that computational geyser height is not sensitive to slight variations in any of these items. An existing empirical correlation based on dimensionless parameters was re-examined in an effort to improve the accuracy of geyser prediction. This resulted in the proposal for a re-formulation of two dimensionless parameters used in the correlation; the non-dimensional geyser height and the Bond number. It was concluded that the new non-dimensional geyser height shows little promise. Although further data will be required to make a definite judgement, the reformulation of the Bond number provided correlations that are more accurate and appear to be more general than the previously established correlation.

  16. Computation of high-speed reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clutter, James Keith

    A computational study has been conducted for high-speed reacting flows relevant to munition problems, including shock-induced combustion and gun muzzle blast. The theoretical model considers inviscid and viscous flows, multi-species, finite rate chemical reaction schemes, and turbulence. Both the physical and numerical aspects are investigated to determine their impact on simulation accuracy. A range of hydrogen and oxygen reaction mechanisms are evaluated for the shock-induced combustion flow scenario. Characteristics of the mechanisms such as the induction time, heat release rate, and second explosion limit are found to impact the accuracy of the computation. On the numerical side, reaction source term treatments, including logarithmic weighting and scaling modifications, are investigated to determine their effectiveness in addressing numerical errors caused by disparate length scales between chemical reactions and fluid dynamics. It is demonstrated that these techniques can enhance solution accuracy. Computations of shock-induced combustion have also been performed using a κ-ɛ model to account for the turbulent transport of species and heat. An algebraic model of the temperature fluctuations has been used to estimate the impact of the turbulent effect on the chemical reaction source terms. The turbulence effects when represented with the current models are found to be minimal in the shock-induced combustion flow investigated in the present work. For the gun system simulations, computations for both a large caliber howitzer and small caliber firearms are carried out. A reduced kinetic scheme and an algebraic turbulence model are employed. The present approach, which accounts for the chemical reaction aspects of the gun muzzle blast problem, is found to improve the prediction of peak overpressures and can capture the effects produced by small caliber firearm sound suppressors. The present study has established the numerical and physical requirements for

  17. Predictive models and computational toxicology.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Thomas; Martin, Matthew; Chandler, Kelly; Kleinstreuer, Nicole; Judson, Richard; Sipes, Nisha

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the potential health risks posed by environmental chemicals is a significant challenge elevated by the large number of diverse chemicals with generally uncharacterized exposures, mechanisms, and toxicities. The ToxCast computational toxicology research program was launched by EPA in 2007 and is part of the federal Tox21 consortium to develop a cost-effective approach for efficiently prioritizing the toxicity testing of thousands of chemicals and the application of this information to assessing human toxicology. ToxCast addresses this problem through an integrated workflow using high-throughput screening (HTS) of chemical libraries across more than 650 in vitro assays including biochemical assays, human cells and cell lines, and alternative models such as mouse embryonic stem cells and zebrafish embryo development. The initial phase of ToxCast profiled a library of 309 environmental chemicals, mostly pesticidal actives having rich in vivo data from guideline studies that include chronic/cancer bioassays in mice and rats, multigenerational reproductive studies in rats, and prenatal developmental toxicity endpoints in rats and rabbits. The first phase of ToxCast was used to build models that aim to determine how well in vivo animal effects can be predicted solely from the in vitro data. Phase I is now complete and both the in vitro data (ToxCast) and anchoring in vivo database (ToxRefDB) have been made available to the public (http://actor.epa.gov/). As Phase II of ToxCast is now underway, the purpose of this chapter is to review progress to date with ToxCast predictive modeling, using specific examples on developmental and reproductive effects in rats and rabbits with lessons learned during Phase I. PMID:23138916

  18. Viscous transonic flow computation over Space Shuttle configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujii, K.; Kutler, P.

    1984-01-01

    A thin-layer Navier-Stokes code capable of predicting steady-state viscous flows is applied to the transonic flow over a Space Shuttle configuration. The code is written in the generalized coordinate system, and the grid-generation code of Fujii (1983) is used for the discretization of the flow field. The flow-field computation is done using the CRAY 1S computer at NASA Ames. The computed result is physically reasonable, even though no experimental data is available for the comparison purpose.

  19. Computer Program Predicts Turbine-Stage Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Robert J.; Haas, Jeffrey E.; Katsanis, Theodore

    1988-01-01

    MTSBL updated version of flow-analysis programs MERIDL and TSONIC coupled to boundary-layer program BLAYER. Method uses quasi-three-dimensional, inviscid, stream-function flow analysis iteratively coupled to calculated losses so changes in losses result in changes in flow distribution. Manner effects both configuration on flow distribution and flow distribution on losses taken into account in prediction of performance of stage. Written in FORTRAN IV.

  20. Universal Formulation For Symmetries In Computed Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. Paul; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.

    1995-01-01

    Universal formulation for high-order symmetries in boundary conditions on flows devised. Eliminates need for special procedures to incorporate symmetries and corresponding boundary conditions into computer codes solving Navier-Stokes and Euler equations of flow.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF COMPUTER PROGRAM FOR FIRE SUPPRESSANT FLUID FLOW.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the project is to develop a computer code capable of predicting single and two phase hydrodynamic behavior of fire suppressant fluids during transport through piping systems. This new code will be able to predict pressure losses and flow rates for a wide variety ...

  2. Computed Flow Through An Artificial Heart Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stewart E.; Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin; Chang, I-Dee

    1994-01-01

    Report discusses computations of blood flow through prosthetic tilting disk valve. Computational procedure developed in simulation used to design better artificial hearts and valves by reducing or eliminating following adverse flow characteristics: large pressure losses, which prevent hearts from working efficiently; separated and secondary flows, which causes clotting; and high turbulent shear stresses, which damages red blood cells. Report reiterates and expands upon part of NASA technical memorandum "Computed Flow Through an Artificial Heart and Valve" (ARC-12983). Also based partly on research described in "Numerical Simulation of Flow Through an Artificial Heart" (ARC-12478).

  3. Computations of flows over a turbine blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, R. S.; Xu, C.

    2009-09-01

    To meet the needs of efficient turbine blade designs, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions of a complex three-dimensional (3D) flow field in turbine blade passages have been incorporated in the design process during the last decade. Owing to the numerous advantages possessed by a 3D CFD technology, many industries already use a 3D blading technique in the design process of turbomachines. In addition, blade lean and sweep have been implemented to increase the blade row efficiency. Experimental studies have shown some advantages of these features. However, most of the experimental results were combined with other features together as well, thus making it difficult to determine the effects of individual superior features. The development of CFD techniques has made it possible to do 3D turbulent flow analyses in a very short time. In this study, numerical studies are presented to demonstrate the sweep effects on a transonic compressor airfoil. The purpose of this study is to investigate the sweep effects without changing other compressor blade features, i.e., keeping the blade outflow angles and section shapes to be the same at design sections for all cases. Through this study, the sweep effect in a transonic compressor rotor blade was tested. The results showed that the sweeps redistribute the flow reducing the secondary flow loss, depending on the baseline. It was shown that the forward sweep reduces the tip loading in terms of the static pressure coefficient.

  4. A survey of aftbody flow prediction methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, L. E.; Mace, J.

    1981-01-01

    A survey of computational methods used in the calculation of nozzle aftbody flows is presented. One class of methods reviewed are those which patch together solutions for the inviscid, boundary layer, and plume flow regions. The second class of methods reviewed are those which computationally solve the Navier Stokes equations over nozzle aftbodies with jet exhaust flow. Computed results from the methods are compared with experiment. Advantages and disadvantages of the various methods are discussed along with opportunities for further development of these methods.

  5. Predictive Models and Computational Toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the potential health risks posed by environmental chemicals is a significant challenge elevated by the large number of diverse chemicals with generally uncharacterized exposures, mechanisms, and toxicities. The ToxCast computational toxicology research program was l...

  6. PREDICTING CHEMICAL REACTIVITY BY COMPUTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mathematical models for predicting the fate of pollutants in the environment require reactivity parameter values--that it, the physical and chemical constants that govern reactivity. lthough empirical structure-activity relationships have been developed that allow estimation of s...

  7. Predictive Models and Computational Embryology

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA’s ‘virtual embryo’ project is building an integrative systems biology framework for predictive models of developmental toxicity. One schema involves a knowledge-driven adverse outcome pathway (AOP) framework utilizing information from public databases, standardized ontologies...

  8. Predictive models for moving contact line flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rame, Enrique; Garoff, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Modeling flows with moving contact lines poses the formidable challenge that the usual assumptions of Newtonian fluid and no-slip condition give rise to a well-known singularity. This singularity prevents one from satisfying the contact angle condition to compute the shape of the fluid-fluid interface, a crucial calculation without which design parameters such as the pressure drop needed to move an immiscible 2-fluid system through a solid matrix cannot be evaluated. Some progress has been made for low Capillary number spreading flows. Combining experimental measurements of fluid-fluid interfaces very near the moving contact line with an analytical expression for the interface shape, we can determine a parameter that forms a boundary condition for the macroscopic interface shape when Ca much les than l. This parameter, which plays the role of an "apparent" or macroscopic dynamic contact angle, is shown by the theory to depend on the system geometry through the macroscopic length scale. This theoretically established dependence on geometry allows this parameter to be "transferable" from the geometry of the measurement to any other geometry involving the same material system. Unfortunately this prediction of the theory cannot be tested on Earth.

  9. Predictive Dynamic Security Assessment through Advanced Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhenyu; Diao, Ruisheng; Jin, Shuangshuang; Chen, Yousu

    2014-11-30

    Abstract— Traditional dynamic security assessment is limited by several factors and thus falls short in providing real-time information to be predictive for power system operation. These factors include the steady-state assumption of current operating points, static transfer limits, and low computational speed. This addresses these factors and frames predictive dynamic security assessment. The primary objective of predictive dynamic security assessment is to enhance the functionality and computational process of dynamic security assessment through the use of high-speed phasor measurements and the application of advanced computing technologies for faster-than-real-time simulation. This paper presents algorithms, computing platforms, and simulation frameworks that constitute the predictive dynamic security assessment capability. Examples of phasor application and fast computation for dynamic security assessment are included to demonstrate the feasibility and speed enhancement for real-time applications.

  10. ANFIS modeling for prediction of particle motions in fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safdari, Arman; Kim, Kyung Chun

    2015-11-01

    Accurate dynamic analysis of parcel of solid particles driven in fluid flow system is of interest for many natural and industrial applications such as sedimentation process, study of cloud particles in atmosphere, etc. In this paper, numerical modeling of solid particles in incompressible flow using Eulerian-Lagrangian approach is carried out to investigate the dynamic behavior of particles in different flow conditions; channel and cavity flow. Although modern computers have been well developed, the high computational time and costs for this kind of problems are still demanded. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) is used to simulate fluid flows and combined with the Lagrangian approach to predict the motion of particles in the range of masses. Some particles are selected, and subjected to Adaptive-network-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) to predict the trajectory of moving solid particles. Using a hybrid learning procedure from computational particle movement, the ANFIS can construct an input-output mapping based on fuzzy if-then rules and stipulated computational fluid dynamics prediction pairs. The obtained results from ANFIS algorithm is validated and compared with the set of benchmark data provided based on point-like approach coupled with the LBM method.

  11. Predicting Information Flows in Network Traffic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinich, Melvin J.; Molyneux, Robert E.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses information flow in networks and predicting network traffic and describes a study that uses time series analysis on a day's worth of Internet log data. Examines nonlinearity and traffic invariants, and suggests that prediction of network traffic may not be possible with current techniques. (Author/LRW)

  12. Predicting Transition from Laminar to Turbulent Flow over a Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajnarayan, Dev (Inventor); Sturdza, Peter (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A prediction of whether a point on a computer-generated surface is adjacent to laminar or turbulent flow is made using a transition prediction technique. A plurality of instability modes are obtained, each defined by one or more mode parameters. A vector of regressor weights is obtained for the known instability growth rates in a training dataset. For an instability mode in the plurality of instability modes, a covariance vector is determined. A predicted local instability growth rate at the point is determined using the covariance vector and the vector of regressor weights. Based on the predicted local instability growth rate, an n-factor envelope at the point is determined.

  13. Computing Cooling Flows in Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauntner, J.

    1986-01-01

    Algorithm developed for calculating both quantity of compressor bleed flow required to cool turbine and resulting decrease in efficiency due to cooling air injected into gas stream. Program intended for use with axial-flow, air-breathing, jet-propulsion engines with variety of airfoil-cooling configurations. Algorithm results compared extremely well with figures given by major engine manufacturers for given bulk-metal temperatures and cooling configurations. Program written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution.

  14. High-End Computing for Incompressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the First MIT Conference on Computational Fluid and Solid Mechanics (June 12-14, 2001) is to bring together industry and academia (and government) to nurture the next generation in computational mechanics. The objective of the current talk, 'High-End Computing for Incompressible Flows', is to discuss some of the current issues in large scale computing for mission-oriented tasks.

  15. Software Aids Visualization of Computed Unsteady Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Kenwright, David

    2003-01-01

    Unsteady Flow Analysis Toolkit (UFAT) is a computer program that synthesizes motions of time-dependent flows represented by very large sets of data generated in computational fluid dynamics simulations. Prior to the development of UFAT, it was necessary to rely on static, single-snapshot depictions of time-dependent flows generated by flow-visualization software designed for steady flows. Whereas it typically takes weeks to analyze the results of a largescale unsteady-flow simulation by use of steady-flow visualization software, the analysis time is reduced to hours when UFAT is used. UFAT can be used to generate graphical objects of flow visualization results using multi-block curvilinear grids in the format of a previously developed NASA data-visualization program, PLOT3D. These graphical objects can be rendered using FAST, another popular flow visualization software developed at NASA. Flow-visualization techniques that can be exploited by use of UFAT include time-dependent tracking of particles, detection of vortex cores, extractions of stream ribbons and surfaces, and tetrahedral decomposition for optimal particle tracking. Unique computational features of UFAT include capabilities for automatic (batch) processing, restart, memory mapping, and parallel processing. These capabilities significantly reduce analysis time and storage requirements, relative to those of prior flow-visualization software. UFAT can be executed on a variety of supercomputers.

  16. Predicting Transition from Laminar to Turbulent Flow over a Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajnarayan, Dev (Inventor); Sturdza, Peter (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A prediction of whether a point on a computer-generated surface is adjacent to laminar or turbulent flow is made using a transition prediction technique. A plurality of boundary-layer properties at the point are obtained from a steady-state solution of a fluid flow in a region adjacent to the point. A plurality of instability modes are obtained, each defined by one or more mode parameters. A vector of regressor weights is obtained for the known instability growth rates in a training dataset. For each instability mode in the plurality of instability modes, a covariance vector is determined, which is the covariance of a predicted local growth rate with the known instability growth rates. Each covariance vector is used with the vector of regressor weights to determine a predicted local growth rate at the point. Based on the predicted local growth rates, an n-factor envelope at the point is determined.

  17. Computational interferometric description of nested flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havener, A. George; Obergefell, L. A.

    1987-01-01

    Computer graphics and theoretical descriptions of density are used to obtain computer generated flow visualizations called computational interferograms. Computational interferograms are pictorially analogous to optical interferograms, and examples showing the fringe pattern for the flow about a sharp tip cone in a supersonic air stream are presented. To ascertain the effect of unsteady behavior, local density disturbances are added to the steady state flow field. This introduces irregularities to the computational interferogram like those seen in the optical interferograms. These theoretical disturbances can be varied in geometry, density description, translated with time, and strengthened or dissipated. The accuracy of computational interferometry relies on the accuracy of the theoretical density descriptions and therefore, it provides a way of verifying existing models of flow fields, especially those containing unsteady or turbulent behavior. In addition to being a unique method of flow visualization, computational interferometry can be used to develop and modify theories or numerical solutions to both simple and complex flow fields. The presented research is a general description of this process.

  18. Predicting Peak Flows following Forest Fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliot, William J.; Miller, Mary Ellen; Dobre, Mariana

    2016-04-01

    Following forest fires, peak flows in perennial and ephemeral streams often increase by a factor of 10 or more. This increase in peak flow rate may overwhelm existing downstream structures, such as road culverts, causing serious damage to road fills at stream crossings. In order to predict peak flow rates following wildfires, we have applied two different tools. One is based on the U.S.D.A Natural Resource Conservation Service Curve Number Method (CN), and the other is by applying the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) to the watershed. In our presentation, we will describe the science behind the two methods, and present the main variables for each model. We will then provide an example of a comparison of the two methods to a fire-prone watershed upstream of the City of Flagstaff, Arizona, USA, where a fire spread model was applied for current fuel loads, and for likely fuel loads following a fuel reduction treatment. When applying the curve number method, determining the time to peak flow can be problematic for low severity fires because the runoff flow paths are both surface and through shallow lateral flow. The WEPP watershed version incorporates shallow lateral flow into stream channels. However, the version of the WEPP model that was used for this study did not have channel routing capabilities, but rather relied on regression relationships to estimate peak flows from individual hillslope polygon peak runoff rates. We found that the two methods gave similar results if applied correctly, with the WEPP predictions somewhat greater than the CN predictions. Later releases of the WEPP model have incorporated alternative methods for routing peak flows that need to be evaluated.

  19. Low thrust viscous nozzle flow fields prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liaw, Goang-Shin

    1987-01-01

    An existing Navier-Stokes code (PARC2D) was used to compute the nozzle flow field. Grids were generated by the interactive grid generator codes TBGG and GENIE. All computations were made on the NASA/MSFC CRAY X-MP computer. Comparisons were made between the computations and MSFC in-house wall pressure measurements for CO2 flow through a conical nozzle having an area ratio of 40. Satisfactory agreements exist between the computations and measurements for different stagnation pressures of 29.4, 14.7, and 7.4 psia, at stagnation temperature of 1060 R. However, agreements did not match precisely near the nozzle exit. Several reasons for the lack of agreement are possible. The computational code assumes a constant gas gamma, whereas the gamma i.e. the specific heat ratio for CO2 varied from 1.22 in the plenum chamber to 1.38 at the nozzle exit. The computations also assumes adiabatic and no-slip walls. Both assumptions may not be correct. Finally, it is possible that condensation occurs during the nozzle expansion at the low stagnation pressure. The next phase of the work will incorporate variable gamma and slip wall boundary conditions in the computational code and develop a more accurate computer code.

  20. Reliability of computer-generated prediction tracing.

    PubMed

    Cangialosi, T J; Chung, J M; Elliott, D F; Meistrell, M E

    1995-01-01

    The reliability of a commercially available computer prediction program (Quick Ceph II) was evaluated using pretreatment and posttreatment cephalograms of 30 patients who were treated during an active period of growth. The computer prediction was compared with the actual treatment result, and the growth forecast with the computer program was compared with the growth forecast using a manual method. Using paired student's t-tests, predictions for 5 of the 10 variables measured were found to be statistically reliable. Comparing the relative accuracy of growth prediction in terms of absolute values, the computer came closer to the actual result in four of the nine variables, while the manual method came closer in three variables. Predictions for the other two variables were virtually the same using both methods. The manual method of prediction was sufficient to give a reasonably good graphic representation of growth changes to create a VTO. However, the computer offers the added advantages of quicker access to information and somewhat greater accuracy in producing the tracing, as well as its use in patient education. PMID:7486242

  1. Graphics and Flow Visualization of Computer Generated Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kathong, M.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1987-01-01

    Flow field variables are visualized using color representations described on surfaces that are interpolated from computational grids and transformed to digital images. Techniques for displaying two and three dimensional flow field solutions are addressed. The transformations and the use of an interactive graphics program for CFD flow field solutions, called PLOT3D, which runs on the color graphics IRIS workstation are described. An overview of the IRIS workstation is also described.

  2. Vortical Flow Prediction Using an Adaptive Unstructured Grid Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.

    2003-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method has been employed to compute vortical flows around slender wing/body configurations. The emphasis of the paper is on the effectiveness of an adaptive grid procedure in "capturing" concentrated vortices generated at sharp edges or flow separation lines of lifting surfaces flying at high angles of attack. The method is based on a tetrahedral unstructured grid technology developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Two steady-state, subsonic, inviscid and Navier-Stokes flow test cases are presented to demonstrate the applicability of the method for solving practical vortical flow problems. The first test case concerns vortex flow over a simple 65 delta wing with different values of leading-edge radius. Although the geometry is quite simple, it poses a challenging problem for computing vortices originating from blunt leading edges. The second case is that of a more complex fighter configuration. The superiority of the adapted solutions in capturing the vortex flow structure over the conventional unadapted results is demonstrated by comparisons with the wind-tunnel experimental data. The study shows that numerical prediction of vortical flows is highly sensitive to the local grid resolution and that the implementation of grid adaptation is essential when applying CFD methods to such complicated flow problems.

  3. Review and evaluation of recent developments in melic inlet dynamic flow distortion prediction and computer program documentation and user's manual estimating maximum instantaneous inlet flow distortion from steady-state total pressure measurements with full, limited, or no dynamic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweikhard, W. G.; Dennon, S. R.

    1986-01-01

    A review of the Melick method of inlet flow dynamic distortion prediction by statistical means is provided. These developments include the general Melick approach with full dynamic measurements, a limited dynamic measurement approach, and a turbulence modelling approach which requires no dynamic rms pressure fluctuation measurements. These modifications are evaluated by comparing predicted and measured peak instantaneous distortion levels from provisional inlet data sets. A nonlinear mean-line following vortex model is proposed and evaluated as a potential criterion for improving the peak instantaneous distortion map generated from the conventional linear vortex of the Melick method. The model is simplified to a series of linear vortex segments which lay along the mean line. Maps generated with this new approach are compared with conventionally generated maps, as well as measured peak instantaneous maps. Inlet data sets include subsonic, transonic, and supersonic inlets under various flight conditions.

  4. Computation of unsteady flows over airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekaterinaris, J. A.; Platzer, M. F.

    1992-01-01

    Two methods are described for calculating unsteady flows over rapidly pitching airfoils. The first method is based on an interactive scheme in which the inviscid flow is obtained by a panel method. The boundary layer flow is computed by an interactive method that makes use of the Hilbert integral to couple the solutions of the inviscid and viscous flow equations. The second method is based on the solution of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The solution of these equations is obtained with an approximately factorized numerical algorithm, and with single block or multiple grids which enable grid embedding to enhance the resolution at isolated flow regions. In addition, the attached flow region can be computed by the numerical solution of compressible boundary layer equations. Unsteady pressure distributions obtained with both methods are compared with available experimental data.

  5. Mean Flow Boundary Conditions for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, R.; Nallasamy, M.; Sawyer, S.; Dyson, R.

    2003-01-01

    In this work, a new type of boundary condition for time-accurate Computational Aeroacoustics solvers is described. This boundary condition is designed to complement the existing nonreflective boundary conditions while ensuring that the correct mean flow conditions are maintained throughout the flow calculation. Results are shown for a loaded 2D cascade, started with various initial conditions.

  6. Computational methods for ideal compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanleer, B.

    1983-01-01

    Conservative dissipative difference schemes for computing one dimensional flow are introduced, and the recognition and representation of flow discontinuities are discussed. Multidimensional methods are outlined. Second order finite volume schemes are introduced. Conversion of difference schemes for a single linear convection equation into schemes for the hyperbolic system of the nonlinear conservation laws of ideal compressible flow is explained. Approximate Riemann solvers are presented. Monotone initial value interpolation; and limiters, switches, and artificial dissipation are considered.

  7. Computation of Flow in Screw Compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalitzin, Georgi; Cai, Xiaodan; Reba, Ramons; Medic, Gorazd

    2015-08-01

    A CFD model enabling accurate and computationally affordable simulation of unsteady flow in screw compressors has been developed. This paper focuses on computational aspects, including real-gas CFD using hybrid structured/unstructured moving grids, and specifics of grid generation for moving rotors and their communication with the discharge plenum.

  8. Computation of Reacting Flows in Combustion Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Chen, Kuo-Huey

    1997-01-01

    The main objective of this research was to develop an efficient three-dimensional computer code for chemically reacting flows. The main computer code developed is ALLSPD-3D. The ALLSPD-3D computer program is developed for the calculation of three-dimensional, chemically reacting flows with sprays. The ALL-SPD code employs a coupled, strongly implicit solution procedure for turbulent spray combustion flows. A stochastic droplet model and an efficient method for treatment of the spray source terms in the gas-phase equations are used to calculate the evaporating liquid sprays. The chemistry treatment in the code is general enough that an arbitrary number of reaction and species can be defined by the users. Also, it is written in generalized curvilinear coordinates with both multi-block and flexible internal blockage capabilities to handle complex geometries. In addition, for general industrial combustion applications, the code provides both dilution and transpiration cooling capabilities. The ALLSPD algorithm, which employs the preconditioning and eigenvalue rescaling techniques, is capable of providing efficient solution for flows with a wide range of Mach numbers. Although written for three-dimensional flows in general, the code can be used for two-dimensional and axisymmetric flow computations as well. The code is written in such a way that it can be run in various computer platforms (supercomputers, workstations and parallel processors) and the GUI (Graphical User Interface) should provide a user-friendly tool in setting up and running the code.

  9. Images constructed from computed flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, Leslie A.

    1992-01-01

    A method for constructing interferograms, schlieren, and shadowgraphs from ideal- and real-gas, two- and three-dimensional computed flow fields is described. The computational grids can be structured or unstructured, and multiple grids are an option. The constructed images are compared to experimental images for several types of flow, including a ramp, a blunt-body, a nozzle, and a reacting flow. The constructed images simulate the features observed in the experimental images. They are sensitive to errors in the flow-field solutions and can be used to identify solution errors. In addition, techniques for obtaining phase shifts from experimental finite-fringe interferograms and for removing experimentally induced phase-shift errors are discussed. Both the constructed images and calculated phase shifts can be used for validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes.

  10. Predictability of Turbulent Flow in Street Canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, K. W.; Ngan, K.

    2015-08-01

    Although predictability is a subject of great importance in atmospheric modelling, there has been little research on urban boundary-layer flows. Here the predictability of street-canyon flow is examined numerically via large-eddy simulation of a unit-aspect-ratio canyon and neutrally stratified atmosphere. In spectral space there is indication of cascade-like behaviour away from the canyon at early times, but the error growth is essentially independent of scale inside the canyon; in physical space the error field is rather inhomogeneous and shows clear differences among the canyon, shear layer and inertial sublayer. The error growth is largely driven by the shear layer: errors generated above roof level are advected into the canyon while contributions from intermittent bursting and in situ development within the canyon play a relatively minor role. This work highlights differences between the predictability of urban flows and canonical turbulent flows and should be useful in developing modelling strategies for more realistic time-dependent urban flows.

  11. Geostatistical prediction of flow-duration curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugliese, A.; Castellarin, A.; Brath, A.

    2013-11-01

    We present in this study an adaptation of Topological kriging (or Top-kriging), which makes the geostatistical procedure capable of predicting flow-duration curves (FDCs) in ungauged catchments. Previous applications of Top-kriging mainly focused on the prediction of point streamflow indices (e.g. flood quantiles, low-flow indices, etc.). In this study Top-kriging is used to predict FDCs in ungauged sites as a weighted average of standardised empirical FDCs through the traditional linear-weighting scheme of kriging methods. Our study focuses on the prediction of period-of-record FDCs for 18 unregulated catchments located in Central Italy, for which daily streamflow series with length from 5 to 40 yr are available, together with information on climate referring to the same time-span of each daily streamflow sequence. Empirical FDCs are standardised by a reference streamflow value (i.e. mean annual flow, or mean annual precipitation times the catchment drainage area) and the overall deviation of the curves from this reference value is then used for expressing the hydrological similarity between catchments and for deriving the geostatistical weights. We performed an extensive leave-one-out cross-validation to quantify the accuracy of the proposed technique, and to compare it to traditional regionalisation models that were recently developed for the same study region. The cross-validation points out that Top-kriging is a reliable approach for predicting FDCs, which can significantly outperform traditional regional models in ungauged basins.

  12. Mathematical and computational models of plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brushlinsky, K. V.

    Investigations of plasma flows are of interest, firstly, due to numerous applications, and secondly, because of their general principles, which form a special branch of physics: the plasma dynamics. Numerical simulation and computation, together with theoretic and experimental methods, play an important part in these investigations. Speaking on flows, a relatively dense plasma is mentioned, so its mathematical models appertain to the fluid mechanics, i.e., they are based on the magnetohydrodynamic description of plasma. Time dependent two dimensional models of plasma flows of two wide-spread types are considered: the flows across the magnetic field and those in the magnetic field plane.

  13. Vortical Flow Prediction Using an Adaptive Unstructured Grid Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.

    2001-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method has been employed to compute vortical flows around slender wing/body configurations. The emphasis of the paper is on the effectiveness of an adaptive grid procedure in "capturing" concentrated vortices generated at sharp edges or flow separation lines of lifting surfaces flying at high angles of attack. The method is based on a tetrahedral unstructured grid technology developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Two steady-state, subsonic, inviscid and Navier-Stokes flow test cases are presented to demonstrate the applicability of the method for solving practical vortical flow problems. The first test case concerns vortex flow over a simple 65deg delta wing with different values of leading-edge bluntness, and the second case is that of a more complex fighter configuration. The superiority of the adapted solutions in capturing the vortex flow structure over the conventional unadapted results is demonstrated by comparisons with the windtunnel experimental data. The study shows that numerical prediction of vortical flows is highly sensitive to the local grid resolution and that the implementation of grid adaptation is essential when applying CFD methods to such complicated flow problems.

  14. Hypersonic Flow Computations on Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibb, K. L.; Riley, C. J.; Peraire, J.

    1997-01-01

    A method for computing inviscid hypersonic flow over complex configurations using unstructured meshes is presented. The unstructured grid solver uses an edge{based finite{volume formulation. Fluxes are computed using a flux vector splitting scheme that is capable of representing constant enthalpy solutions. Second{order accuracy in smooth flow regions is obtained by linearly reconstructing the solution, and stability near discontinuities is maintained by locally forcing the scheme to reduce to first-order accuracy. The implementation of the algorithm to parallel computers is described. Computations using the proposed method are presented for a sphere-cone configuration at Mach numbers of 5.25 and 10.6, and a complex hypersonic re-entry vehicle at Mach numbers of 4.5 and 9.8. Results are compared to experimental data and computations made with established structured grid methods. The use of the solver as a screening tool for rapid aerodynamic assessment of proposed vehicles is described.

  15. Prediction of unsteady transonic flow around missile configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, D.; Reisenthel, P. H.; Torres, T. O.; Klopfer, G. H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the preliminary development of a method for predicting the unsteady transonic flow around missiles at transonic and supersonic speeds, with the final goal of developing a computer code for use in aeroelastic calculations or during maneuvers. The basic equations derived for this method are an extension of those derived by Klopfer and Nixon (1989) for steady flow and are a subset of the Euler equations. In this approach, the five Euler equations are reduced to an equation similar to the three-dimensional unsteady potential equation, and a two-dimensional Poisson equation. In addition, one of the equations in this method is almost identical to the potential equation for which there are well tested computer codes, allowing the development of a prediction method based in part on proved technology.

  16. Assessment of nonequilibrium radiation computation methods for hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Surendra

    1993-01-01

    The present understanding of shock-layer radiation in the low density regime, as appropriate to hypersonic vehicles, is surveyed. Based on the relative importance of electron excitation and radiation transport, the hypersonic flows are divided into three groups: weakly ionized, moderately ionized, and highly ionized flows. In the light of this division, the existing laboratory and flight data are scrutinized. Finally, an assessment of the nonequilibrium radiation computation methods for the three regimes in hypersonic flows is presented. The assessment is conducted by comparing experimental data against the values predicted by the physical model.

  17. Computational Modeling of Flow-Altering Surgeries in Basilar Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Rayz, V. L.; Abla, A.; Boussel, L.; Leach, J. R.; Acevedo-Bolton, G.; Saloner, D.; Lawton, M. T.

    2014-01-01

    In cases where surgeons consider different interventional options for flow alterations in the setting of pathological basilar artery hemodynamics, a virtual model demonstrating the flow fields resulting from each of these options can assist in making clinical decisions. In this study, image-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were used to simulate the flow in four basilar artery aneurysms in order to evaluate postoperative hemodynamics that would result from flow-altering interventions. Patient-specific geometries were constructed using MR angiography and velocimetry data. CFD simulations carried out for the preoperative flow conditions were compared to in vivo phase-contrast MRI measurements (4DFlowMRI) acquired prior to the interventions. The models were then modified according to the procedures considered for each patient. Numerical simulations of the flow and virtual contrast transport were carried out in each case in order to assess postoperative flow fields and estimate the likelihood of intra-aneurysmal thrombus deposition following the procedures. Postoperative imaging data, when available, were used to validate computational predictions. In two cases, where the aneurysms involved vital pontine perforator arteries branching from the basilar artery, idealized geometries of these vessels were incorporated into the CFD models. The effect of interventions on the flow through the perforators was evaluated by simulating the transport of contrast in these vessels. The computational results were in close agreement with the MR imaging data. In some cases, CFD simulations could help determine which of the surgical options was likely to reduce the flow into the aneurysm while preserving the flow through the basilar trunk. The study demonstrated that image-based computational modeling can provide guidance to clinicians by indicating possible outcome complications and indicating expected success potential for ameliorating pathological aneurysmal flow, prior

  18. Prediction of swirling reacting flow in ramjet combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilley, D. G.; Samples, J. W.; Rhode, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    Numerical computations have been undertaken for a basic two-dimensional axisymmetric flowfield which is similar to that found in conventional gas turbine and ramjet combustors. A swirling flow enters a larger chamber via a sudden or gradual expansion. The calculation method involves a staggered grid system for axial and radial velocities, a line relaxation procedure for efficient solution of the equations, a two-equation turbulence energy-turbulence dissipation rate turbulence model, a stairstep boundary representation of the expansion flow, and realistic accommodation of swirl effects. The results include recirculation zone characterization and predicted mean streamline patterns. Predictions with and without chemical reaction are obtained. An associated isothermal experimental flow study is providing a useful data base. Successful outcomes of the work can be incorporated into the more combustion- and hardware-oriented activities of industrial concerns.

  19. Energy measurement using flow computers and chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Beeson, J.

    1995-12-01

    Arkla Pipeline Group (APG), along with most transmission companies, went to electronic flow measurement (EFM) to: (1) Increase resolution and accuracy; (2) Real time correction of flow variables; (3) Increase speed in data retrieval; (4) Reduce capital expenditures; and (5) Reduce operation and maintenance expenditures Prior to EFM, mechanical seven day charts were used which yielded 800 pressure and differential pressure readings. EFM yields 1.2-million readings, a 1500 time improvement in resolution and additional flow representation. The total system accuracy of the EFM system is 0.25 % compared with 2 % for the chart system which gives APG improved accuracy. A typical APG electronic measurement system includes a microprocessor-based flow computer, a telemetry communications package, and a gas chromatograph. Live relative density (specific gravity), BTU, CO{sub 2}, and N{sub 2} are updated from the chromatograph to the flow computer every six minutes which provides accurate MMBTU computations. Because the gas contract length has changed from years to monthly and from a majority of direct sales to transports both Arkla and its customers wanted access to actual volumes on a much more timely basis than is allowed with charts. The new electronic system allows volumes and other system data to be retrieved continuously, if EFM is on Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) or daily if on dial up telephone. Previously because of chart integration, information was not available for four to six weeks. EFM costs much less than the combined costs of telemetry transmitters, pressure and differential pressure chart recorders, and temperature chart recorder which it replaces. APG will install this equipment on smaller volume stations at a customers expense. APG requires backup measurement on metering facilities this size. It could be another APG flow computer or chart recorder, or the other companies flow computer or chart recorder.

  20. Predicting multidimensional annular flow with a locally based two-fluid model

    SciTech Connect

    Antal, S.P.; Edwards, D.P.; Strayer, T.D.

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to: develop a methodology to predict annular flows using a multidimensional four-field, two-fluid Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) computer code; develop closure models which use the CFD predicted local velocities, phasic volume fractions, etc...; implement a numerical method which allows the discretized equations to have the same characteristics as the differential form; and compare predicted results to local flow field data taken in a R-134a working fluid test section.

  1. Computation of leading-edge vortex flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsome, R. W.; Thomas, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    The simulation of the leading edge vortex flow about a series of conical delta wings through solution of the Navier-Stokes and Euler equations is studied. The occurrence, the validity, and the usefulness of separated flow solutions to the Euler equations of particular interest. Central and upwind difference solutions to the governing equations are compared for a series of cross sectional shapes, including both rounded and sharp tip geometries. For the rounded leading edge and the flight condition considered, viscous solutions obtained with either central or upwind difference methods predict the classic structure of vortical flow over a highly swept delta wing. Predicted features include the primary vortex due to leading edge separation and the secondary vortex due to crossflow separation. Central difference solutions to the Euler equations show a marked sensitivity to grid refinement. On a coarse grid, the flow separates due to numerical error and a primary vortex which resembles that of the viscous solution is predicted. In contrast, the upwind difference solutions to the Euler equations predict attached flow even for first-order solutions on coarse grids. On a sufficiently fine grid, both methods agree closely and correctly predict a shock-curvature-induced inviscid separation near the leeward plane of symmetry. Upwind difference solutions to the Navier-Stokes and Euler equations are presented for two sharp leading edge geometries. The viscous solutions are quite similar to the rounded leading edge results with vortices of similar shape and size. The upwind Euler solutions predict attached flow with no separation for both geometries. However, with sufficient grid refinement near the tip or through the use of more accurate spatial differencing, leading edge separation results. Once the leading edge separation is established, the upwind solution agrees with recently published central difference solutions to the Euler equations.

  2. Semiempirical methods for computing turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belov, I. A.; Ginzburg, I. P.

    1986-01-01

    Two semiempirical theories which provide a basis for determining the turbulent friction and heat exchange near a wall are presented: (1) the Prandtl-Karman theory, and (2) the theory utilizing an equation for the energy of turbulent pulsations. A comparison is made between exact numerical methods and approximate integral methods for computing the turbulent boundary layers in the presence of pressure, blowing, or suction gradients. Using the turbulent flow around a plate as an example, it is shown that, when computing turbulent flows with external turbulence, it is preferable to construct a turbulence model based on the equation for energy of turbulent pulsations.

  3. PAN AIR: A computer program for predicting subsonic or supersonic linear potential flows about arbitrary configurations using a higher order panel method. Volume 3: Case manual (version 1.0)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medan, R. T. (Editor); Magnus, A. E.; Sidwell, K. W.; Epton, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    Numerous applications of the PAN AIR computer program system are presented. PAN AIR is user-oriented tool for analyzing and/or designing aerodynamic configurations in subsonic or supersonic flow using a technique generally referred to as a higher order panel method. Problems solved include simple wings in subsonic and supersonic flow, a wing-body in supersonic flow, wing with deflected flap in subsonic flow, design of two-dimensional and three-dimensional wings, axisymmetric nacelle in supersonic flow, and wing-canard-tail-nacelle-fuselage combination in supersonic flow.

  4. Numerical computation of transonic flow about wing-fuselage configurations on a vector computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, S. D.; Holst, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    The transonic wing analysis code TWING, which uses the AF2 relaxation algorithm, has been vectorized to run on the Cray-1S computer. Vectorization of this code improved computational efficiency over that of the CDC 7600 computer by factors of 11 to 13. The improvement compares favorably with the prediction of a theoretical performance model. A convenient generalization now permits the treatment of rudimentary wing-fuselage combinations. Flow predictions for a transport configuration in both isolated-wing and wing-fuselage modes show the expected trends in shock strength and position when compared with wind-tunnel results. An isolated fighter wing is examined in terms of execution time on three different computers and in comparison with experimental data. The computational fluid dynamics code produced during this study is a careful union of an efficient three-dimensional, transonic, numerical algorithm and the vector features presently available on modern computers.

  5. Computation of transonic potential flow on helicopter rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costes, M.; Jones, H. E.

    1987-01-01

    Two computer codes, the full-potential three-dimensional (FP3D) code and the full-potential rotor (FPR) code have recently been developed. Both of these codes solve the three-dimensional conservative formulation of the full potential equation. The FPR code was developed at the U.S. Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate (AFDD) while the FP3D code was a joint development by ONERA and AFDD. Both of these codes were used to predict the nonlifting, unsteady flow over a rotor operating at high advance ratio and tip speed. Three different rotor tip planform shapes were studied: a rectangular tip, a 30 deg aft swept tip and a 30 deg forward swept tip. Results of these computations are compared to results obtained using an earlier small-disturbances code. Also, the lifting flow over a rectangular tip operating at a slightly different condition was computed. These results are also compared with the small disturbances computations and with experimental results.

  6. Prediction of unsteady aerodynamic loadings caused by leading edge and trailing edge control surface motions in subsonic compressible flow: Computer program description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redman, M. C.; Rowe, W. S.

    1975-01-01

    A digital computer program has been developed to calculate unsteady loadings caused by motions of lifting surfaces with leading edge or trailing edge controls based on the subsonic kernel function approach. The pressure singularities at hinge line and side edges have been extracted analytically as a preliminary step to solving the integral equation by collocation. The program calculates generalized aerodynamic forces for user supplied deflection modes. Optional intermediate output includes pressure at an array of points, and sectional generalized forces. From one to six controls on the half span can be accommodated.

  7. Efficient Computation of Atmospheric Flows with Tempest: Validation of Next-Generation Climate and Weather Prediction Algorithms at Non-Hydrostatic Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Jorge; Ullrich, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Tempest is a next-generation global climate and weather simulation platform designed to allow experimentation with numerical methods for a wide range of spatial resolutions. The atmospheric fluid equations are discretized by continuous / discontinuous finite elements in the horizontal and by a staggered nodal finite element method (SNFEM) in the vertical, coupled with implicit/explicit time integration. At horizontal resolutions below 10km, many important questions remain on optimal techniques for solving the fluid equations. We present results from a suite of idealized test cases to validate the performance of the SNFEM applied in the vertical with an emphasis on flow features and dynamic behavior. Internal gravity wave, mountain wave, convective bubble, and Cartesian baroclinic instability tests will be shown at various vertical orders of accuracy and compared with known results.

  8. Computational prediction of microRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Hertel, Jana; Langenberger, David; Stadler, Peter F

    2014-01-01

    The computational identification of novel microRNA (miRNA) genes is a challenging task in bioinformatics. Massive amounts of data describing unknown functional RNA transcripts have to be analyzed for putative miRNA candidates with automated computational pipelines. Beyond those miRNAs that meet the classical definition, high-throughput sequencing techniques have revealed additional miRNA-like molecules that are derived by alternative biogenesis pathways. Exhaustive bioinformatics analyses on such data involve statistical issues as well as precise sequence and structure inspection not only of the functional mature part but also of the whole precursor sequence of the putative miRNA. Apart from a considerable amount of species-specific miRNAs, the majority of all those genes are conserved at least among closely related organisms. Some miRNAs, however, can be traced back to very early points in the evolution of eukaryotic species. Thus, the investigation of the conservation of newly found miRNA candidates comprises an important step in the computational annotation of miRNAs.Topics covered in this chapter include a review on the obvious problem of miRNA annotation and family definition, recommended pipelines of computational miRNA annotation or detection, and an overview of current computer tools for the prediction of miRNAs and their limitations. The chapter closes discussing how those bioinformatic approaches address the problem of faithful miRNA prediction and correct annotation. PMID:24639171

  9. Computationally efficient prediction of area per lipid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaban, Vitaly

    2014-11-01

    Area per lipid (APL) is an important property of biological and artificial membranes. Newly constructed bilayers are characterized by their APL and newly elaborated force fields must reproduce APL. Computer simulations of APL are very expensive due to slow conformational dynamics. The simulated dynamics increases exponentially with respect to temperature. APL dependence on temperature is linear over an entire temperature range. I provide numerical evidence that thermal expansion coefficient of a lipid bilayer can be computed at elevated temperatures and extrapolated to the temperature of interest. Thus, sampling times to predict accurate APL are reduced by a factor of ∼10.

  10. Computing Incompressible Flows With Free Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kothe, D.

    1994-01-01

    RIPPLE computer program models transient, two-dimensional flows of incompressible fluids with surface tension on free surfaces of general shape. Surface tension modeled as volume force derived from continuum-surface-force model, giving RIPPLE both robustness and accuracy in modeling surface-tension effects at free surface. Also models wall adhesion effects. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  11. Computation of Reacting Flows in Combustion Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Chen, K.-H.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop an efficient numerical algorithm with unstructured grids for the computation of three-dimensional chemical reacting flows that are known to occur in combustion components of propulsion systems. During the grant period (1996 to 1999), two companion codes have been developed and various numerical and physical models were implemented into the two codes.

  12. CFD Validation Studies for Hypersonic Flow Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2001-01-01

    A series of experiments to measure pressure and heating for code validation involving hypersonic, laminar, separated flows was conducted at the Calspan-University at Buffalo Research Center (CUBRC) in the Large Energy National Shock (LENS) tunnel. The experimental data serves as a focus for a code validation session but are not available to the authors until the conclusion of this session. The first set of experiments considered here involve Mach 9.5 and Mach 11.3 N, flow over a hollow cylinder-flare with 30 deg flare angle at several Reynolds numbers sustaining laminar, separated flow. Truncated and extended flare configurations are considered. The second set of experiments, at similar conditions, involves flow over a sharp, double cone with fore-cone angle of 25 deg and aft-cone angle of 55 deg. Both sets of experiments involve 30 deg compressions. Location of the separation point in the numerical simulation is extremely sensitive to the level of grid refinement in the numerical predictions. The numerical simulations also show a significant influence of Reynolds number on extent of separation. Flow unsteadiness was easily introduced into the double cone simulations using aggressive relaxation parameters that normally promote convergence.

  13. CFD Validation Studies for Hypersonic Flow Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2001-01-01

    A series of experiments to measure pressure and heating for code validation involving hypersonic, laminar, separated flows was conducted at the Calspan-University at Buffalo Research Center (CUBRC) in the Large Energy National Shock (LENS) tunnel. The experimental data serves as a focus for a code validation session but are not available to the authors until the conclusion of this session. The first set of experiments considered here involve Mach 9.5 and Mach 11.3 N2 flow over a hollow cylinder-flare with 30 degree flare angle at several Reynolds numbers sustaining laminar, separated flow. Truncated and extended flare configurations are considered. The second set of experiments, at similar conditions, involves flow over a sharp, double cone with fore-cone angle of 25 degrees and aft-cone angle of 55 degrees. Both sets of experiments involve 30 degree compressions. Location of the separation point in the numerical simulation is extremely sensitive to the level of grid refinement in the numerical predictions. The numerical simulations also show a significant influence of Reynolds number on extent of separation. Flow unsteadiness was easily introduced into the double cone simulations using aggressive relaxation parameters that normally promote convergence.

  14. Predicting microbial interactions through computational approaches.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenhao; Lim, Kun Ming Kenneth; Chng, Kern Rei; Nagarajan, Niranjan

    2016-06-01

    Microorganisms play a vital role in various ecosystems and characterizing interactions between them is an essential step towards understanding the organization and function of microbial communities. Computational prediction has recently become a widely used approach to investigate microbial interactions. We provide a thorough review of emerging computational methods organized by the type of data they employ. We highlight three major challenges in inferring interactions using metagenomic survey data and discuss the underlying assumptions and mathematics of interaction inference algorithms. In addition, we review interaction prediction methods relying on metabolic pathways, which are increasingly used to reveal mechanisms of interactions. Furthermore, we also emphasize the importance of mining the scientific literature for microbial interactions - a largely overlooked data source for experimentally validated interactions. PMID:27025964

  15. Data flow machine for data driven computing

    DOEpatents

    Davidson, George S.; Grafe, Victor G.

    1995-01-01

    A data flow computer which of computing is disclosed which utilizes a data driven processor node architecture. The apparatus in a preferred embodiment includes a plurality of First-In-First-Out (FIFO) registers, a plurality of related data flow memories, and a processor. The processor makes the necessary calculations and includes a control unit to generate signals to enable the appropriate FIFO register receiving the result. In a particular embodiment, there are three FIFO registers per node: an input FIFO register to receive input information form an outside source and provide it to the data flow memories; an output FIFO register to provide output information from the processor to an outside recipient; and an internal FIFO register to provide information from the processor back to the data flow memories. The data flow memories are comprised of four commonly addressed memories. A parameter memory holds the A and B parameters used in the calculations; an opcode memory holds the instruction; a target memory holds the output address; and a tag memory contains status bits for each parameter. One status bit indicates whether the corresponding parameter is in the parameter memory and one status but to indicate whether the stored information in the corresponding data parameter is to be reused. The tag memory outputs a "fire" signal (signal R VALID) when all of the necessary information has been stored in the data flow memories, and thus when the instruction is ready to be fired to the processor.

  16. Data flow machine for data driven computing

    DOEpatents

    Davidson, G.S.; Grafe, V.G.

    1988-07-22

    A data flow computer and method of computing is disclosed which utilizes a data driven processor node architecture. The apparatus in a preferred embodiment includes a plurality of First-In-First-Out (FIFO) registers, a plurality of related data flow memories, and a processor. The processor makes the necessary calculations and includes a control unit to generate signals to enable the appropriate FIFO register receiving the result. In a particular embodiment, there are three FIFO registers per node: an input FIFO register to receive input information from an outside source and provide it to the data flow memories; an output FIFO register to provide output information from the processor to an outside recipient; and an internal FIFO register to provide information from the processor back to the data flow memories. The data flow memories are comprised of four commonly addressed memories. A parameter memory holds the A and B parameters used in the calculations; an opcode memory holds the instruction; a target memory holds the output address; and a tag memory contains status bits for each parameter. One status bit indicates whether the corresponding parameter is in the parameter memory and one status bit to indicate whether the stored information in the corresponding data parameter is to be reused. The tag memory outputs a ''fire'' signal (signal R VALID) when all of the necessary information has been stored in the data flow memories, and thus when the instruction is ready to be fired to the processor. 11 figs.

  17. Turbulent Flow Past Projectiles: A Computational Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmedagic, Igbal; Carlucci, Donald; Buckley, Liam; Carlucci, Pasquale; Thangam, Siva

    2010-11-01

    Projectiles with free spinning bases are often used for smart munitions to provide effective control, stability and terminal guidance. Computational investigations are performed for flow past cylinders aligned along their axis where a base freely spins while attached to and separated at various distances from a non-spinning fore-body. The energy spectrum is modified to incorporate the effects of swirl and rotation using a parametric characterization of the model coefficients. An efficient finite-volume algorithm is used to solve the time-averaged equations of motion and energy along with the modeled form of transport equations for the turbulence kinetic energy and the scalar form of turbulence dissipation. Computations are performed for both rigid cylinders as well as cylinders with free-spinning bases. Experimental data for a range of spin rates and free stream flow conditions obtained from subsonic wind tunnel with sting-mounted spinning cylinders is used for validating the computational findings.

  18. Spatial statistics for predicting flow through a rock fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Coakley, K.J.

    1989-03-01

    Fluid flow through a single rock fracture depends on the shape of the space between the upper and lower pieces of rock which define the fracture. In this thesis, the normalized flow through a fracture, i.e. the equivalent permeability of a fracture, is predicted in terms of spatial statistics computed from the arrangement of voids, i.e. open spaces, and contact areas within the fracture. Patterns of voids and contact areas, with complexity typical of experimental data, are simulated by clipping a correlated Gaussian process defined on a N by N pixel square region. The voids have constant aperture; the distance between the upper and lower surfaces which define the fracture is either zero or a constant. Local flow is assumed to be proportional to local aperture cubed times local pressure gradient. The flow through a pattern of voids and contact areas is solved using a finite-difference method. After solving for the flow through simulated 10 by 10 by 30 pixel patterns of voids and contact areas, a model to predict equivalent permeability is developed. The first model is for patterns with 80% voids where all voids have the same aperture. The equivalent permeability of a pattern is predicted in terms of spatial statistics computed from the arrangement of voids and contact areas within the pattern. Four spatial statistics are examined. The change point statistic measures how often adjacent pixel alternate from void to contact area (or vice versa ) in the rows of the patterns which are parallel to the overall flow direction. 37 refs., 66 figs., 41 tabs.

  19. Systematic computational prediction of protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Lees, J G; Heriche, J K; Morilla, I; Ranea, J A; Orengo, C A

    2011-06-01

    Determining the network of physical protein associations is an important first step in developing mechanistic evidence for elucidating biological pathways. Despite rapid advances in the field of high throughput experiments to determine protein interactions, the majority of associations remain unknown. Here we describe computational methods for significantly expanding protein association networks. We describe methods for integrating multiple independent sources of evidence to obtain higher quality predictions and we compare the major publicly available resources available for experimentalists to use. PMID:21572181

  20. Predicting aerially applied particle deposition by computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilanin, A. J.; Teske, M. E.; Morris, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    This paper is a status report on a NASA effort to develop a computer code capable of simulating the deposition of materials in the wake of fixed or rotary wing aircraft operating under realistic atmospheric conditions. The deposition code 'Ag Disp' is novel in that the mean particle trajectory, as well as the variance from the mean resulting from fluid fluctuations are simultaneously predicted. Sample calculations are undertaken to demonstrate the versatility of this code.

  1. Development of advanced stability theory suction prediction techniques for laminar flow control. [on swept wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srokowski, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of obtaining accurate estimates of suction requirements on swept laminar flow control wings was discussed. A fast accurate computer code developed to predict suction requirements by integrating disturbance amplification rates was described. Assumptions and approximations used in the present computer code are examined in light of flow conditions on the swept wing which may limit their validity.

  2. Is ""predictability"" in computational sciences a myth?

    SciTech Connect

    Hemez, Francois M

    2011-01-31

    Within the last two decades, Modeling and Simulation (M&S) has become the tool of choice to investigate the behavior of complex phenomena. Successes encountered in 'hard' sciences are prompting interest to apply a similar approach to Computational Social Sciences in support, for example, of national security applications faced by the Intelligence Community (IC). This manuscript attempts to contribute to the debate on the relevance of M&S to IC problems by offering an overview of what it takes to reach 'predictability' in computational sciences. Even though models developed in 'soft' and 'hard' sciences are different, useful analogies can be drawn. The starting point is to view numerical simulations as 'filters' capable to represent information only within specific length, time or energy bandwidths. This simplified view leads to the discussion of resolving versus modeling which motivates the need for sub-scale modeling. The role that modeling assumptions play in 'hiding' our lack-of-knowledge about sub-scale phenomena is explained which leads to discussing uncertainty in simulations. It is argued that the uncertainty caused by resolution and modeling assumptions should be dealt with differently than uncertainty due to randomness or variability. The corollary is that a predictive capability cannot be defined solely as accuracy, or ability of predictions to match the available physical observations. We propose that 'predictability' is the demonstration that predictions from a class of 'equivalent' models are as consistent as possible. Equivalency stems from defining models that share a minimum requirement of accuracy, while being equally robust to the sources of lack-of-knowledge in the problem. Examples in computational physics and engineering are given to illustrate the discussion.

  3. RNA secondary structure prediction using soft computing.

    PubMed

    Ray, Shubhra Sankar; Pal, Sankar K

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of RNA structure is invaluable in creating new drugs and understanding genetic diseases. Several deterministic algorithms and soft computing-based techniques have been developed for more than a decade to determine the structure from a known RNA sequence. Soft computing gained importance with the need to get approximate solutions for RNA sequences by considering the issues related with kinetic effects, cotranscriptional folding, and estimation of certain energy parameters. A brief description of some of the soft computing-based techniques, developed for RNA secondary structure prediction, is presented along with their relevance. The basic concepts of RNA and its different structural elements like helix, bulge, hairpin loop, internal loop, and multiloop are described. These are followed by different methodologies, employing genetic algorithms, artificial neural networks, and fuzzy logic. The role of various metaheuristics, like simulated annealing, particle swarm optimization, ant colony optimization, and tabu search is also discussed. A relative comparison among different techniques, in predicting 12 known RNA secondary structures, is presented, as an example. Future challenging issues are then mentioned. PMID:23702539

  4. Smoothness monitors for compressible flow computation

    SciTech Connect

    Sjogreen, B; Yee, H C

    2008-09-02

    In [SY04, YS07] and references cited therein, the authors introduced the concept of employing multiresolution wavelet decomposition of computed flow data as smoothness monitors (flow sensors) to indicate the amount and location of built-in numerical dissipation that can be eliminated or further reduced in shock-capturing schemes. Studies indicated that this approach is able to limit the use of numerical dissipation with improved accuracy compared with standard shock-capturing methods. The studies in [SY04, YS07] were limited to low order multiresolution redundant wavelets with low level supports and low order vanishing moments. The objective of this paper is to expand the previous investigation to include higher order redundant wavelets with larger support and higher order vanishing moments for a wider spectrum of flow type and flow speed applications.

  5. Computational Approaches for Predicting Biomedical Research Collaborations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing; Yu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical research is increasingly collaborative, and successful collaborations often produce high impact work. Computational approaches can be developed for automatically predicting biomedical research collaborations. Previous works of collaboration prediction mainly explored the topological structures of research collaboration networks, leaving out rich semantic information from the publications themselves. In this paper, we propose supervised machine learning approaches to predict research collaborations in the biomedical field. We explored both the semantic features extracted from author research interest profile and the author network topological features. We found that the most informative semantic features for author collaborations are related to research interest, including similarity of out-citing citations, similarity of abstracts. Of the four supervised machine learning models (naïve Bayes, naïve Bayes multinomial, SVMs, and logistic regression), the best performing model is logistic regression with an ROC ranging from 0.766 to 0.980 on different datasets. To our knowledge we are the first to study in depth how research interest and productivities can be used for collaboration prediction. Our approach is computationally efficient, scalable and yet simple to implement. The datasets of this study are available at https://github.com/qingzhanggithub/medline-collaboration-datasets. PMID:25375164

  6. A comparison of predicted and measured inlet distortion flows in a subsonic axial inlet flow compressor rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Albert K.

    1992-01-01

    Detailed flow measurements were taken inside an isolated axial compressor rotor operating subsonically near peak efficiency. These Laser Anemometer measurements were made with two inlet velocity profiles. One profile consisted of an unmodified baseline flow, and the second profile was distorted by placing axisymmetric screens on the hub and shroud well upstream of the rotor. A detailed comparison in the rotor relative reference frame between a Navier-Stokes solver and the measured experimental results showed good agreement between the predicted and measured flows. A primary flow is defined in the rotor and deviations and the computed predictions is made to assess the development of a passage vortex due to the distortion of the inlet flow. Computer predictions indicate that a distorted inlet profile has a minimal effect on the development of the flow in the rotor passage and the resulting passage vortex.

  7. Computational approaches for predicting mutant protein stability.

    PubMed

    Kulshreshtha, Shweta; Chaudhary, Vigi; Goswami, Girish K; Mathur, Nidhi

    2016-05-01

    Mutations in the protein affect not only the structure of protein, but also its function and stability. Prediction of mutant protein stability with accuracy is desired for uncovering the molecular aspects of diseases and design of novel proteins. Many advanced computational approaches have been developed over the years, to predict the stability and function of a mutated protein. These approaches based on structure, sequence features and combined features (both structure and sequence features) provide reasonably accurate estimation of the impact of amino acid substitution on stability and function of protein. Recently, consensus tools have been developed by incorporating many tools together, which provide single window results for comparison purpose. In this review, a useful guide for the selection of tools that can be employed in predicting mutated proteins' stability and disease causing capability is provided. PMID:27160393

  8. Flood and Debris Flow Hazard Predictions in Steep, Burned Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rengers, Francis; McGuire, Luke; Kean, Jason; Staley, Dennis

    2016-04-01

    scale. The calibrated effective watershed hydraulic conductivity was low for both models, even for storms occurring several months after the fire, consistent with wildfire-induced water-repellency being retained throughout that time. Both models captured the timing of flow peaks, although neither model correctly simulated the flow depth. This study suggests that a kinematic wave model, which is simpler and more computationally efficient, is a justifiable approach for predicting flood and debris flow timing in steep, burned watersheds. By demonstrating the applicability of these models, this study takes an important step towards the development of process-based methods to assess post-wildfire flood and debris flow hazards.

  9. Modeling Tools Predict Flow in Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    "Because rocket engines operate under extreme temperature and pressure, they present a unique challenge to designers who must test and simulate the technology. To this end, CRAFT Tech Inc., of Pipersville, Pennsylvania, won Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from Marshall Space Flight Center to develop software to simulate cryogenic fluid flows and related phenomena. CRAFT Tech enhanced its CRUNCH CFD (computational fluid dynamics) software to simulate phenomena in various liquid propulsion components and systems. Today, both government and industry clients in the aerospace, utilities, and petrochemical industries use the software for analyzing existing systems as well as designing new ones."

  10. A comparison of computational methods for three-dimensional, turbulent turbomachinery flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirtley, K. R.; Warfield, M.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1986-01-01

    A space-marching method and a time-marching method have been used to compute the three-dimensional turbulent flow in an end wall cascade of airfoils. Using an identical grid and turbulence model, the two codes were used to predict a variety of flow quantities. Predictions by the two methods are compared to each other and to experimental data. In general both methods predict measured quantities well, with a small edge in prediction accuracy going to the space-marching method. Secondary flow comparisons show the time-marching solution more accurately predicting the underturning of the flow in the outer portion of the end wall boundary layer while the space-marching method more accurately predicted the overturning of the flow very near the end wall. The prediction comparisons are discussed along with computational details and other attributes of the two methods.

  11. Comparison of two computer programs by predicting turbulent mixing of helium in a ducted supersonic airstream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Y. S.; Drummond, J. P.; Mcclinton, C. R.

    1978-01-01

    Two parabolic flow computer programs, SHIP (a finite-difference program) and COMOC (a finite-element program), are used for predicting three-dimensional turbulent reacting flow fields in supersonic combustors. The theoretical foundation of the two computer programs are described, and then the programs are applied to a three-dimensional turbulent mixing experiment. The cold (nonreacting) flow experiment was performed to study the mixing of helium jets with a supersonic airstream in a rectangular duct. Surveys of the flow field at an upstream were used as the initial data by programs; surveys at a downstream station provided comparison to assess program accuracy. Both computer programs predicted the experimental results and data trends reasonably well. However, the comparison between the computations from the two programs indicated that SHIP was more accurate in computation and more efficient in both computer storage and computing time than COMOC.

  12. Computing Flow In A Labyrinth Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Tyn S.

    1991-01-01

    Mathematical model and computer program developed to simulate flow in labyrinth seal. Primary purpose to determine drop in pressure across primary labyrinth seal of high-pressure-oxygen turbopump of Space Shuttle main engine, including portion of drop caused by resistance to flow in gaseous-oxygen drain. Variety of geometries, including multiple chokes, accommodated. Provides for improved study of various types of seal failures and for reviews of mechanics of seal regions. Flexibility of program makes it applicable to other machinery. Further development of program includes providing for lands of various area (variable radius) and improving mathematical model of drain system.

  13. Using artificial intelligence to control fluid flow computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelsey, Andrew

    1992-01-01

    Computational simulation is an essential tool for the prediction of fluid flow. Many powerful simulation programs exist today. However, using these programs to reliably analyze fluid flow and other physical situations requires considerable human effort and expertise to set up a simulation, determine whether the output makes sense, and repeatedly run the simulation with different inputs until a satisfactory result is achieved. Automating this process is not only of considerable practical importance but will also significantly advance basic artificial intelligence (AI) research in reasoning about the physical world.

  14. Computational techniques for solar wind flows past terrestrial planets: Theory and computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahara, S. S.; Chaussee, D. S.; Trudinger, B. C.; Spreiter, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The interaction of the solar wind with terrestrial planets can be predicted using a computer program based on a single fluid, steady, dissipationless, magnetohydrodynamic model to calculate the axisymmetric, supersonic, super-Alfvenic solar wind flow past both magnetic and nonmagnetic planets. The actual calculations are implemented by an assemblage of computer codes organized into one program. These include finite difference codes which determine the gas-dynamic solution, together with a variety of special purpose output codes for determining and automatically plotting both flow field and magnetic field results. Comparisons are made with previous results, and results are presented for a number of solar wind flows. The computational programs developed are documented and are presented in a general user's manual which is included.

  15. Computational Aeroheating Predictions for X-34

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelb, William L.; Wood, William A.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Alter, Stephen J.

    1998-01-01

    Radiative equilibrium surface temperatures, heating rates, streamlines, surface pressures, and flow-field features as predicted by the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (Laura) are presented for the X-34 Technology Demonstrator. Results for two trajectory points corresponding to entry peak heating and two control surface deflections are discussed. This data is also discussed in context of Thermal Protection System (TPS) design issues. The work presented in this report is part of a larger effort to define the X-34 aerothermal environment, including the application of engineering codes and wind-tunnel studies.

  16. Computational Aeroheating Predictions for X-34

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb,William H.; Wood, William A.; Gnoffo, Peter A.

    1998-01-01

    Radiative equilibrium surface temperatures, heating rates, streamlines, surface pressures, and flow-field features as predicted by the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) are presented for the X-34 Technology Demonstrator. Results for two trajectory points corresponding to entry peak heating and two control surface deflections are discussed. This data is also discussed in the context of Thermal Protection System (TPS) design issues. The work presented in this report is part of a larger effort to define the X-34 aerothermal environment, including the application of engineering codes and wind-tunnel studies.

  17. Advances in Computational Capabilities for Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ajay; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Moss, James N.; Drummond, J. Philip

    1997-01-01

    The paper reviews the growth and advances in computational capabilities for hypersonic applications over the period from the mid-1980's to the present day. The current status of the code development issues such as surface and field grid generation, algorithms, physical and chemical modeling, and validation is provided. A brief description of some of the major codes being used at NASA Langley Research Center for hypersonic continuum and rarefied flows is provided, along with their capabilities and deficiencies. A number of application examples are presented, and future areas of research to enhance accuracy, reliability, efficiency, and robustness of computational codes are discussed.

  18. Computer Model Predicts the Movement of Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A new computer model of the atmosphere can now actually pinpoint where global dust events come from, and can project where they're going. The model may help scientists better evaluate the impact of dust on human health, climate, ocean carbon cycles, ecosystems, and atmospheric chemistry. Also, by seeing where dust originates and where it blows people with respiratory problems can get advanced warning of approaching dust clouds. 'The model is physically more realistic than previous ones,' said Mian Chin, a co-author of the study and an Earth and atmospheric scientist at Georgia Tech and the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Md. 'It is able to reproduce the short term day-to-day variations and long term inter-annual variations of dust concentrations and distributions that are measured from field experiments and observed from satellites.' The above images show both aerosols measured from space (left) and the movement of aerosols predicted by computer model for the same date (right). For more information, read New Computer Model Tracks and Predicts Paths Of Earth's Dust Images courtesy Paul Giroux, Georgia Tech/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

  19. Computer-Aided Light Sheet Flow Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacy, Kathryn; Severance, Kurt; Childers, Brooks A.

    1993-01-01

    A computer-aided flow visualization process has been developed to analyze video images acquired from rotating and translating light sheet visualization systems. The computer process integrates a mathematical model for image reconstruction, advanced computer graphics concepts, and digital image processing to provide a quantitative and visual analysis capability. The image reconstruction model, based on photogrammetry, uses knowledge of the camera and light sheet locations and orientations to project two-dimensional light sheet video images into three-dimensional space. A sophisticated computer visualization package, commonly used to analyze computational fluid dynamics (CFD) data sets, was chosen to interactively display the reconstructed light sheet images, along with the numerical surface geometry for the model or aircraft under study. A description is provided of the photogrammetric reconstruction technique, and the image processing and computer graphics techniques and equipment. Results of the computer aided process applied to both a wind tunnel translating light sheet experiment and an in-flight rotating light sheet experiment are presented. The capability to compare reconstructed experimental light sheet images and CFD solutions in the same graphics environment is also demonstrated.

  20. Experimental and Computational Investigations of Flow past Spinning Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlucci, Pasquale; Mehmedagic, Igbal; Buckley, Liam; Carlucci, Donald; Thangam, Siva

    2011-11-01

    Experiments are performed in a low speed subsonic wind tunnel to analyze flow past spinning cylinders. The sting-mounted cylinders are oriented such that their axis of rotation is aligned with the mean flow. Data from spinning cylinders with both rear-mounted and fore-mounted stings are presented for a Reynolds numbers of up to 260000 and rotation numbers of up to 1.2 (based on cylinder diameter). Computations are performed using a two-equation turbulence model that is capable of capturing the effects of swirl and curvature. The model performance was validated with benchmark experimental flows and implemented for analyzing the flow configuration used in the experimental study. The results are analyzed and the predictive capability of the model is discussed. Funded in part by U. S. Army, ARDEC.

  1. Assessment and prediction of debris-flow hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Gerald F.

    1993-01-01

    Study of debris-flow geomorphology and initiation mechanism has led to better understanding of debris-flow processes. This paper reviews how this understanding is used in current techniques for assessment and prediction of debris-flow hazards.

  2. Experimental, Theoretical, and Computational Investigation of Separated Nozzle Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Craig A.

    2004-01-01

    A detailed experimental, theoretical, and computational study of separated nozzle flows has been conducted. Experimental testing was performed at the NASA Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel Complex. As part of a comprehensive static performance investigation, force, moment, and pressure measurements were made and schlieren flow visualization was obtained for a sub-scale, non-axisymmetric, two-dimensional, convergent- divergent nozzle. In addition, two-dimensional numerical simulations were run using the computational fluid dynamics code PAB3D with two-equation turbulence closure and algebraic Reynolds stress modeling. For reference, experimental and computational results were compared with theoretical predictions based on one-dimensional gas dynamics and an approximate integral momentum boundary layer method. Experimental results from this study indicate that off-design overexpanded nozzle flow was dominated by shock induced boundary layer separation, which was divided into two distinct flow regimes; three- dimensional separation with partial reattachment, and fully detached two-dimensional separation. The test nozzle was observed to go through a marked transition in passing from one regime to the other. In all cases, separation provided a significant increase in static thrust efficiency compared to the ideal prediction. Results indicate that with controlled separation, the entire overexpanded range of nozzle performance would be within 10% of the peak thrust efficiency. By offering savings in weight and complexity over a conventional mechanical exhaust system, this may allow a fixed geometry nozzle to cover an entire flight envelope. The computational simulation was in excellent agreement with experimental data over most of the test range, and did a good job of modeling internal flow and thrust performance. An exception occurred at low nozzle pressure ratios, where the two-dimensional computational model was inconsistent with the three-dimensional separation

  3. Convergence acceleration of viscous flow computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, G. M.

    1982-01-01

    A multiple-grid convergence acceleration technique introduced for application to the solution of the Euler equations by means of Lax-Wendroff algorithms is extended to treat compressible viscous flow. Computational results are presented for the solution of the thin-layer version of the Navier-Stokes equations using the explicit MacCormack algorithm, accelerated by a convective coarse-grid scheme. Extensions and generalizations are mentioned.

  4. Courant number and unsteady flow computation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lai, Chintu

    1993-01-01

    The Courant number C, the key to unsteady flow computation, is a ratio of physical wave velocity, ??, to computational signal-transmission velocity, ??, i.e., C = ??/??. In this way, it uniquely relates a physical quantity to a mathematical quantity. Because most unsteady open-channel flows are describable by a set of n characteristic equations along n characteristic paths, each represented by velocity ??i, i = 1,2,....,n, there exist as many as n components for the numerator of C. To develop a numerical model, a numerical integration must be made on each characteristic curve from an earlier point to a later point on the curve. Different numerical methods are available in unsteady flow computation due to the different paths along which the numerical integration is actually performed. For the denominator of C, the ?? defined as ?? = ?? 0 = ??x/??t has been customarily used; thus, the Courant number has the familiar form of C?? = ??/??0. This form will be referred to as ???common Courant number??? in this paper. The commonly used numerical criteria C?? for stability, neutral stability and instability, are imprecise or not universal in the sense that r0 does not always reflect the true maximum computational data-transmission speed of the scheme at hand, i.e., Ctau is no indication for the Courant constraint. In view of this , a new Courant number, called the ???natural Courant number???, Cn, that truly reflects the Courant constraint, has been defined. However, considering the numerous advantages inherent in the traditional C??, a useful and meaningful composite Courant number, denoted by C??* has been formulated from C??. It is hoped that the new aspects of the Courant number discussed herein afford the hydraulician a broader perspective, consistent criteria, and unified guidelines, with which to model various unsteady flows.

  5. Computed Flow About The Integrated Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P. G.; Chiu, I. T.; Obayashi, S.; Rizk, Y. M.; Steger, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    Report discusses numerical simulations of flow of air about integrated Space Shuttle in ascent. Goal: to improve understanding of, and ability to predict, how integrated Space Shuttle will perform during both nominal and aborted ascent under various conditions. These and other numerical simulations intended both to supplement wind-tunnel data, corrupted to some extent by scaling and wall-interference effects, and to compensate for scarcity of valid flight data.

  6. Modeling groundwater flow on massively parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, S.F.; Falgout, R.D.; Fogwell, T.W.; Tompson, A.F.B.

    1994-12-31

    The authors will explore the numerical simulation of groundwater flow in three-dimensional heterogeneous porous media. An interdisciplinary team of mathematicians, computer scientists, hydrologists, and environmental engineers is developing a sophisticated simulation code for use on workstation clusters and MPPs. To date, they have concentrated on modeling flow in the saturated zone (single phase), which requires the solution of a large linear system. they will discuss their implementation of preconditioned conjugate gradient solvers. The preconditioners under consideration include simple diagonal scaling, s-step Jacobi, adaptive Chebyshev polynomial preconditioning, and multigrid. They will present some preliminary numerical results, including simulations of groundwater flow at the LLNL site. They also will demonstrate the code`s scalability.

  7. Computational Study of Separating Flow in a Planar Subsonic Diffuser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DalBello, Teryn; Dippold, Vance, III; Georgiadis, Nicholas J.

    2005-01-01

    A computational study of the separated flow through a 2-D asymmetric subsonic diffuser has been performed. The Wind Computational Fluid Dynamics code is used to predict the separation and reattachment behavior for an incompressible diffuser flow. The diffuser inlet flow is a two-dimensional, turbulent, and fully-developed channel flow with a Reynolds number of 20,000 based on the centerline velocity and the channel height. Wind solutions computed with the Menter SST, Chien k-epsilon, Spalart-Allmaras and Explicit Algebraic Reynolds Stress turbulence models are compared with experimentally measured velocity profiles and skin friction along the upper and lower walls. In addition to the turbulence model study, the effects of grid resolution and use of wall functions were investigated. The grid studies varied the number of grid points across the diffuser and varied the initial wall spacing from y(sup +) = 0.2 to 60. The wall function study assessed the applicability of wall functions for analysis of separated flow. The SST and Explicit Algebraic Stress models provide the best agreement with experimental data, and it is recommended wall functions should only be used with a high level of caution.

  8. Turbofan forced mixer-nozzle internal flowfield. Volume 2: Computational fluid dynamic predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werle, M. J.; Vasta, V. N.

    1982-01-01

    A general program was conducted to develop and assess a computational method for predicting the flow properties in a turbofan forced mixed duct. The detail assessment of the resulting computer code is presented. It was found that the code provided excellent predictions of the kinematics of the mixing process throughout the entire length of the mixer nozzle. The thermal mixing process between the hot core and cold fan flows was found to be well represented in the low speed portion of the flowfield.

  9. The NCOREL computer program for 3D nonlinear supersonic potential flow computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siclari, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    An innovative computational technique (NCOREL) was established for the treatment of three dimensional supersonic flows. The method is nonlinear in that it solves the nonconservative finite difference analog of the full potential equation and can predict the formation of supercritical cross flow regions, embedded and bow shocks. The method implicitly computes a conical flow at the apex (R = 0) of a spherical coordinate system and uses a fully implicit marching technique to obtain three dimensional cross flow solutions. This implies that the radial Mach number must remain supersonic. The cross flow solutions are obtained by using type dependent transonic relaxation techniques with the type dependency linked to the character of the cross flow velocity (i.e., subsonic/supersonic). The spherical coordinate system and marching on spherical surfaces is ideally suited to the computation of wing flows at low supersonic Mach numbers due to the elimination of the subsonic axial Mach number problems that exist in other marching codes that utilize Cartesian transverse marching planes.

  10. Computational and experimental study of spin coater air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaoguang; Liang, Faqiu; Haji-Sheikh, A.; Ghariban, N.

    1998-06-01

    An extensive 2- and 3-D analysis of air flow in a POLARISTM 2200 Microlithography Cluster spin coater was conducted using FLUENTTM Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software. To supplement this analysis, direct measurement of air flow velocity was also performed using a DantecTM Hot Wire Anemometer. Velocity measurements were made along two major planes across the entire flow field in the spin coater at various operating conditions. It was found that the flow velocity at the spin coater inlet is much lower than previously assumed and quite nonuniform. Based on this observation, a pressure boundary condition rather than a velocity boundary condition was used for subsequent CFD analysis. A comparison between calculated results and experimental data shows that the 3D model accurately predicts the air flow field in the spin coater. An added advantage of this approach is that the CFD model can be easily generated from the mechanical design database and used to analyze the effect of design changes. The modeled and measured results show that the flow pattern in the spin bowl is affected by interactions between the spinning wafer, exhaust flow, and the gap between the spin head and surrounding baffle. Different operating conditions such as spin speed, inlet pressure, and exhaust pressure were found to generate substantially different flow patterns. It was also found that backflow of air could be generated under certain conditions.

  11. Computer Simulation of Flow Dynamics in Paraclinoidal Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, N.; Miyachi, S.; Okamoto, T.; Kojima, T.; Hattori, K.; Qian, S.; Takeda, H.; Yoshida, J.

    2005-01-01

    Summary Endovascular treatment, which is very useful method especially for paraclinoidal aneurysms, has the limitations of coil compaction and recanalization, which are difficult to predict. We tried to understand flow dynamic features, one of the important factors of such problems, using computer flow dynamics (CFD) simulations. CFD simulations were made in paraclinoidal aneurysm model of different size and protruded directions. Flow patterns, flow velocities and pressure are analyzed. Although the pressure on the aneurismal orifice is highest in the aneurysm protruding vertically upward, the flow velocity is highest in the superior-medial protruding one. Significant difference is not observed in either flow patterns, flow velocities or pressures on the aneurismal orifices between the sizes of aneurismal sac. Among paraclinoidal aneurysms, an aneurysm protruding to superior-medially receives the most severe haemodynamic stresses at the orifice and the aneurysm size does not cause significant differences in the aspect of flow dynamics. It should be considered in the treatment of such aneurysms. PMID:20584475

  12. Combined CFD/Population Balance Model for Gas Hydrate Particle Size Prediction in Turbulent Pipeline Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakin, Boris V.; Hoffmann, Alex C.; Kosinski, Pawel; Istomin, Vladimir A.; Chuvilin, Evgeny M.

    2010-09-01

    A combined computational fluid dynamics/population balance model (CFD-PBM) is developed for gas hydrate particle size prediction in turbulent pipeline flow. The model is based on a one-moment population balance technique, which is coupled with flow field parameters computed using commercial CFD software. The model is calibrated with a five-moment, off-line population balance model and validated with experimental data produced in a low-pressure multiphase flow loop.

  13. Turbulent flow in a 180 deg bend: Modeling and computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Upender K.

    1989-01-01

    A low Reynolds number k-epsilon turbulence model was presented which yields accurate predictions of the kinetic energy near the wall. The model is validated with the experimental channel flow data of Kreplin and Eckelmann. The predictions are also compared with earlier results from direct simulation of turbulent channel flow. The model is especially useful for internal flows where the inflow boundary condition of epsilon is not easily prescribed. The model partly derives from some observations based on earlier direct simulation results of near-wall turbulence. The low Reynolds number turbulence model together with an existing curvature correction appropriate to spinning cylinder flows was used to simulate the flow in a U-bend with the same radius of curvature as the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Turn-Around Duct (TAD). The present computations indicate a space varying curvature correction parameter as opposed to a constant parameter as used in the spinning cylinder flows. Comparison with limited available experimental data is made. The comparison is favorable, but detailed experimental data is needed to further improve the curvature model.

  14. Prediction of overall and blade-element performance for axial-flow pump configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serovy, G. K.; Kavanagh, P.; Okiishi, T. H.; Miller, M. J.

    1973-01-01

    A method and a digital computer program for prediction of the distributions of fluid velocity and properties in axial flow pump configurations are described and evaluated. The method uses the blade-element flow model and an iterative numerical solution of the radial equilbrium and continuity conditions. Correlated experimental results are used to generate alternative methods for estimating blade-element turning and loss characteristics. Detailed descriptions of the computer program are included, with example input and typical computed results.

  15. LES with wall models for trailing-edge flow prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meng; Cabot, William; Moin, Parviz

    1999-11-01

    Large-eddy simulation of wall-bounded turbulent flows becomes formidably expensive at high Reynolds numbers, unless the severe near-wall resolution requirement is removed though the use of a suitable wall model. The applicability of this approach to complex turbulent flows with separation is assessed by considering turbulent boundary layer flows past an asymmetric trailing-edge and the associated aeroacoustics. A simple stress balance model coupled with a mixing-length eddy viscosity, with or without pressure gradient imposed from the outer LES solution, is found to predict velocity statistics fairly well compared with those from the resolved LES, at less than 10 % of the original computational cost. In particular, the separation point near the trailing-edge is predicted correctly. The pressure gradient term is found necessary for the model to capture the correct behavior of the wall shear-stress in the favorable pressure gradient region. Numerical experiments using more elaborate wall models based on approximate boundary layer equations are underway. The effect of wall-modeling on the prediction of surface pressure fluctuations and noise radiation is investigated, and the results will be discussed.

  16. Error estimation for CFD aeroheating prediction under rarefied flow condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yazhong; Gao, Zhenxun; Jiang, Chongwen; Lee, Chunhian

    2014-12-01

    Both direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods have become widely used for aerodynamic prediction when reentry vehicles experience different flow regimes during flight. The implementation of slip boundary conditions in the traditional CFD method under Navier-Stokes-Fourier (NSF) framework can extend the validity of this approach further into transitional regime, with the benefit that much less computational cost is demanded compared to DSMC simulation. Correspondingly, an increasing error arises in aeroheating calculation as the flow becomes more rarefied. To estimate the relative error of heat flux when applying this method for a rarefied flow in transitional regime, theoretical derivation is conducted and a dimensionless parameter ɛ is proposed by approximately analyzing the ratio of the second order term to first order term in the heat flux expression in Burnett equation. DSMC simulation for hypersonic flow over a cylinder in transitional regime is performed to test the performance of parameter ɛ, compared with two other parameters, Knρ and MaṡKnρ.

  17. PAN AIR: A computer program for predicting subsonic or supersonic linear potential flows about arbitrary configurations using a higher order panel method. Volume 1: Theory document (version 1.1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnus, A. E.; Epton, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    Panel aerodynamics (PAN AIR) is a system of computer programs designed to analyze subsonic and supersonic inviscid flows about arbitrary configurations. A panel method is a program which solves a linear partial differential equation by approximating the configuration surface by a set of panels. An overview of the theory of potential flow in general and PAN AIR in particular is given along with detailed mathematical formulations. Fluid dynamics, the Navier-Stokes equation, and the theory of panel methods were also discussed.

  18. Computational algorithms to predict Gene Ontology annotations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Gene function annotations, which are associations between a gene and a term of a controlled vocabulary describing gene functional features, are of paramount importance in modern biology. Datasets of these annotations, such as the ones provided by the Gene Ontology Consortium, are used to design novel biological experiments and interpret their results. Despite their importance, these sources of information have some known issues. They are incomplete, since biological knowledge is far from being definitive and it rapidly evolves, and some erroneous annotations may be present. Since the curation process of novel annotations is a costly procedure, both in economical and time terms, computational tools that can reliably predict likely annotations, and thus quicken the discovery of new gene annotations, are very useful. Methods We used a set of computational algorithms and weighting schemes to infer novel gene annotations from a set of known ones. We used the latent semantic analysis approach, implementing two popular algorithms (Latent Semantic Indexing and Probabilistic Latent Semantic Analysis) and propose a novel method, the Semantic IMproved Latent Semantic Analysis, which adds a clustering step on the set of considered genes. Furthermore, we propose the improvement of these algorithms by weighting the annotations in the input set. Results We tested our methods and their weighted variants on the Gene Ontology annotation sets of three model organism genes (Bos taurus, Danio rerio and Drosophila melanogaster ). The methods showed their ability in predicting novel gene annotations and the weighting procedures demonstrated to lead to a valuable improvement, although the obtained results vary according to the dimension of the input annotation set and the considered algorithm. Conclusions Out of the three considered methods, the Semantic IMproved Latent Semantic Analysis is the one that provides better results. In particular, when coupled with a proper

  19. On predicting debris flows in arid mountain belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolle, Amelie; Langer, Maria; Blöthe, Jan Henrik; Korup, Oliver

    2015-03-01

    The use of topographic metrics for estimating the susceptibility to, and reconstructing the characteristics of, debris flows has a long research tradition, although largely devoted to humid mountainous terrain. The exceptional 2010 monsoonal rainstorms in the high-altitude mountain desert of Ladakh and Zanskar, NW India, were a painful reminder of how susceptible arid regions are to rainfall-triggered flash floods, landslides, and debris flows. The rainstorms of August 4-6 triggered numerous debris flows, killing 182 people, devastating 607 houses, and more than 10 bridges around Ladakh's capital of Leh. The lessons from this disaster motivated us to revisit methods of predicting (a) flow parameters such as peak discharge and maximum velocity from field and remote sensing data, and (b) the susceptibility to debris flows from catchment morphometry. We focus on quantifying uncertainties tied to these approaches. Comparison of high-resolution satellite images pre- and post-dating the 2010 rainstorm reveals the extent of damage and catastrophic channel widening. Computations based on these geomorphic markers indicate maximum flow velocities of 1.6-6.7 m s- 1 with runout of up to ~ 10 km on several alluvial fans that sustain most of the region's settlements. We estimate median peak discharges of 310-610 m3 s- 1, which are largely consistent with previous estimates. Monte Carlo-based error propagation for a single given flow-reconstruction method returns a variance in discharge similar to one derived from juxtaposing several different flow reconstruction methods. We further compare discriminant analysis, classification tree modelling, and Bayesian logistic regression to predict debris-flow susceptibility from morphometric variables of 171 catchments in the Ladakh Range. These methods distinguish between fluvial and debris flow-prone catchments at similar success rates, but Bayesian logistic regression allows quantifying uncertainties and relationships between potential

  20. Euler Flow Computations on Non-Matching Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumaste, Udayan

    1999-01-01

    Advanced fluid solvers to predict aerodynamic performance-coupled treatment of multiple fields are described. The interaction between the fluid and structural components in the bladed regions of the engine is investigated with respect to known blade failures caused by either flutter or forced vibrations. Methods are developed to describe aeroelastic phenomena for internal flows in turbomachinery by accounting for the increased geometric complexity, mutual interaction between adjacent structural components and presence of thermal and geometric loading. The computer code developed solves the full three dimensional aeroelastic problem of-stage. The results obtained show that flow computations can be performed on non-matching finite-volume unstructured meshes with second order spatial accuracy.

  1. Chemical nonequilibrium and viscous flow computation for conic aerobrake bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C. P.

    1988-01-01

    Three-dimensional analyses are presented for the viscous, reactive flow over a complete entry-body configuration with a wide-angle conic surface. The predictive method uses a split approach that solves iteratively the Navier-Stokes and the continuity equations of chemical species. The finite-difference formulation and the computational grid are adapted to the bow shock and the conformally mapped body such that the velocity components are in the computational spherical-polar space. Combinations of several conic forebody and afterbody configurations have been studied using wind-tunnel, Space Shuttle, and aerobraking orbital transfer vehicle (AOTV) entry conditions. The effects of the borebody bluntness and of finite-rate chemical reactions on the shock layer, the wall catalycity on the boundary layer, the shear-layer impingement on the afterbody, and the base-flow environment are discussed.

  2. Computational Analysis of Cryogenic Flow Through a Control Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danes, Russell; Woods, Jody; Sulyma, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The initial efforts to develop the capability to model valves used in rocket engine component testing at Stennis Space Center are documented. An axisymmetric model of a control valve with LN2 as the working fluid was developed. The goal was to predict the effect of change in the plug/sear region of the valve prior to testing. The valve flow coefficient was predicted for a range of plug positions. Verification of the calculations was carried out to quantify the uncertainty in the numerical answer. The modeled results compared well qualitatively to experimental trends. Additionally, insights into the flow processes in the valve were obtained. Benefits from the verification process included the ability to use coarser grids and insight into ways to reduce computational time by using double precision accuracy and non-integer grid ratios. Future valve modeling activities will include shape optimization of the valve/seat region and dynamic grid modeling.

  3. Prediction of vortex shedding from circular and noncircular bodies in supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendenhall, M. R.; Perkins, S. C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An engineering prediction method and associated computer code NOZVTX to predict nose vortex shedding from circular and noncircular bodies in supersonic flow at angles of attack and roll are presented. The body is represented by either a supersonic panel method for noncircular cross sections or line sources and doublets for circular cross sections, and the lee side vortex wake is modeled by discrete vortices in crossflow planes. The three-dimensional steady flow problem is reduced to a two-dimensional, unsteady, separated flow problem for solution. Comparison of measured and predicted surface pressure distributions, flow field surveys, and aerodynamic characteristics is presented for bodies with circular and noncircular cross-sectional shapes.

  4. Computational Flow Modeling of Human Upper Airway Breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mylavarapu, Goutham

    Computational modeling of biological systems have gained a lot of interest in biomedical research, in the recent past. This thesis focuses on the application of computational simulations to study airflow dynamics in human upper respiratory tract. With advancements in medical imaging, patient specific geometries of anatomically accurate respiratory tracts can now be reconstructed from Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) or Computed Tomography (CT) scans, with better and accurate details than traditional cadaver cast models. Computational studies using these individualized geometrical models have advantages of non-invasiveness, ease, minimum patient interaction, improved accuracy over experimental and clinical studies. Numerical simulations can provide detailed flow fields including velocities, flow rates, airway wall pressure, shear stresses, turbulence in an airway. Interpretation of these physical quantities will enable to develop efficient treatment procedures, medical devices, targeted drug delivery etc. The hypothesis for this research is that computational modeling can predict the outcomes of a surgical intervention or a treatment plan prior to its application and will guide the physician in providing better treatment to the patients. In the current work, three different computational approaches Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Flow-Structure Interaction (FSI) and Particle Flow simulations were used to investigate flow in airway geometries. CFD approach assumes airway wall as rigid, and relatively easy to simulate, compared to the more challenging FSI approach, where interactions of airway wall deformations with flow are also accounted. The CFD methodology using different turbulence models is validated against experimental measurements in an airway phantom. Two case-studies using CFD, to quantify a pre and post-operative airway and another, to perform virtual surgery to determine the best possible surgery in a constricted airway is demonstrated. The unsteady

  5. Computation of Hypersonic Flow about Maneuvering Vehicles with Changing Shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Ferencz, R M; Felker, F F; Castillo, V M

    2004-02-23

    Vehicles moving at hypersonic speeds have great importance to the National Security. Ballistic missile re-entry vehicles (RV's) travel at hypersonic speeds, as do missile defense intercept vehicles. Despite the importance of the problem, no computational analysis method is available to predict the aerodynamic environment of maneuvering hypersonic vehicles, and no analysis is available to predict the transient effects of their shape changes. The present state-of-the-art for hypersonic flow calculations typically still considers steady flow about fixed shapes. Additionally, with present computational methods, it is not possible to compute the entire transient structural and thermal loads for a re-entry vehicle. The objective of this research is to provide the required theoretical development and a computational analysis tool for calculating the hypersonic flow about maneuvering, deforming RV's. This key enabling technology will allow the development of a complete multi-mechanics simulation of the entire RV flight sequence, including important transient effects such as complex flight dynamics. This will allow the computation of the as-delivered state of the payload in both normal and unusual operational environments. This new analysis capability could also provide the ability to predict the nonlinear, transient behavior of endo-atmospheric missile interceptor vehicles to the input of advanced control systems. Due to the computational intensity of fluid dynamics for hypersonics, the usual approach for calculating the flow about a vehicle that is changing shape is to complete a series of steady calculations, each with a fixed shape. However, this quasi-steady approach is not adequate to resolve the frequencies characteristic of a vehicle's structural dynamics. Our approach is to include the effects of the unsteady body shape changes in the finite-volume method by allowing for arbitrary translation and deformation of the control volumes. Furthermore, because the Eulerian

  6. Noise produced by turbulent flow into a rotor: Users manual for atmospheric turbulence prediction and mean flow and turbulence contraction prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Caplin, B.

    1989-01-01

    A users manual for a computer program for predicting atmospheric turbulence and mean flow and turbulence contraction as part of a noise prediction scheme for nonisotropic turbulence ingestion noise in helicopters is described. Included are descriptions of the various program modules and subroutines, their function, programming structure, and the required input and output variables. This routine is incorporated as one module of NASA's ROTONET helicopter noise prediction program.

  7. Computational AeroAcoustics for Fan Noise Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Ed; Hixon, Ray; Dyson, Rodger; Huff, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An overview of the current state-of-the-art in computational aeroacoustics as applied to fan noise prediction at NASA Glenn is presented. Results from recent modeling efforts using three dimensional inviscid formulations in both frequency and time domains are summarized. In particular, the application of a frequency domain method, called LINFLUX, to the computation of rotor-stator interaction tone noise is reviewed and the influence of the background inviscid flow on the acoustic results is analyzed. It has been shown that the noise levels are very sensitive to the gradients of the mean flow near the surface and that the correct computation of these gradients for highly loaded airfoils is especially problematic using an inviscid formulation. The ongoing development of a finite difference time marching code that is based on a sixth order compact scheme is also reviewed. Preliminary results from the nonlinear computation of a gust-airfoil interaction model problem demonstrate the fidelity and accuracy of this approach. Spatial and temporal features of the code as well as its multi-block nature are discussed. Finally, latest results from an ongoing effort in the area of arbitrarily high order methods are reviewed and technical challenges associated with implementing correct high order boundary conditions are discussed and possible strategies for addressing these challenges ore outlined.

  8. Computations of Axisymmetric Flows in Hypersonic Shock Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Surendra P.; Wilson, Gregory J.

    1995-01-01

    A time-accurate two-dimensional fluid code is used to compute test times in shock tubes operated at supersonic speeds. Unlike previous studies, this investigation resolves the finer temporal details of the shock-tube flow by making use of modern supercomputers and state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamic solution techniques. The code, besides solving the time-dependent fluid equations, also accounts for the finite rate chemistry in the hypersonic environment. The flowfield solutions are used to estimate relevant shock-tube parameters for laminar flow, such as test times, and to predict density and velocity profiles. Boundary-layer parameters such as bar-delta(sub u), bar-delta(sup *), and bar-tau(sub w), and test time parameters such as bar-tau and particle time of flight t(sub f), are computed and compared with those evaluated by using Mirels' correlations. This article then discusses in detail the effects of flow nonuniformities on particle time-of-flight behind the normal shock and, consequently, on the interpretation of shock-tube data. This article concludes that for accurate interpretation of shock-tube data, a detailed analysis of flowfield parameters, using a computer code such as used in this study, must be performed.

  9. Selected computations of transonic cavity flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwood, Christopher A.

    1993-01-01

    An efficient diagonal scheme implemented in an overset mesh framework has permitted the analysis of geometrically complex cavity flows via the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Use of rapid hyperbolic and algebraic grid methods has allowed simple specification of critical turbulent regions with an algebraic turbulence model. Comparisons between numerical and experimental results are made in two dimensions for the following problems: a backward-facing step; a resonating cavity; and two quieted cavity configurations. In three-dimensions the flow about three early concepts of the stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) are compared to wind-tunnel data. Shedding frequencies of resolved shear layer structures are compared against experiment for the quieted cavities. The results demonstrate the progress of computational assessment of configuration safety and performance.

  10. Lagrangian computation of inviscid compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klopfer, G. H.

    1978-01-01

    A Lagrangian method is developed to solve the Euler equations of gas dynamics. The solution of the equations is obtained by a numerical computation with the well-known Flux-Corrected-Transport (FCT) numerical method. This procedure is modified so that the boundary treatment is accurate and relatively simple. Shock waves and other flow discontinuities are captured monotonically without any type of fitting procedures. The Lagrangian method is employed so that the problem of mesh generation is completely avoided. The method is applicable to all Mach numbers except the low subsonic range where compressibility effects are small. The method is applied to a one-dimensional Riemann problem (shock tube) and to a two-dimensional supersonic channel flow with reflecting shock waves.

  11. Computational studies of lobed forced mixer flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, H.; Wu, S. S.; Yu, S. C. M.

    1998-03-01

    Full Navier-Stokes Analyses have been conducted for the flows behind the trailing edge of a lobed forced mixer. The governing equations are derived from the time-dependent compressible Navier-Stokes equations and discretized in the finite-difference form. A simple two-layer eddy viscosity model has also been used to account for the turbulence. Computed results are compared with some of the velocity measurements using a laser-Doppler anemometer (Yu and Yip (1997)). In general, good agreement can be obtained in the streamwise mean velocity distribution but the decay of the streamwise circulation is underpredicted. Some suggestions to the discrepancy are proposed.

  12. Computational methods for vortex dominated compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, Earll M.

    1987-01-01

    The principal objectives were to: understand the mechanisms by which Euler equation computations model leading edge vortex flows; understand the vortical and shock wave structures that may exist for different wing shapes, angles of incidence, and Mach numbers; and compare calculations with experiments in order to ascertain the limitations and advantages of Euler equation models. The initial approach utilized the cell centered finite volume Jameson scheme. The final calculation utilized a cell vertex finite volume method on an unstructured grid. Both methods used Runge-Kutta four stage schemes for integrating the equations. The principal findings are briefly summarized.

  13. Assessment of RANS to predict flows with large streamline curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, J. L.; Wang, D. Z.; Cheng, H.; Gu, W. G.

    2013-12-01

    In order to provide a guideline for choosing turbulence models in computation of complex flows with large streamline curvature, this paper presents a comprehensive comparison investigation of different RANS models widely used in engineering to check each model's sensibility on the streamline curvature. First, different models including standard k-ε, Realizable k-ε, Renormalization-group (RNG) k-ε model, Shear-stress transport k-ω model and non-linear eddy-viscosity model v2-f model are tested to simulated the flow in a 2D U-bend which has the standard bench mark available. The comparisons in terms of non-dimensional velocity and turbulent kinetic energy show that large differences exist among the results calculated by various models. To further validate the capability to predict flows with secondary flows, the involved models are tested in a 3D 90° bend flow. Also, the velocities are compared. As a summary, the advantages and disadvantages of each model are analysed and guidelines for choice of turbulence model are presented.

  14. Computational flow study of the continuous flow ventricular assist device, prototype number 3 blood pump.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J B; Wood, H G; Allaire, P E; Bearnson, G; Khanwilkar, P

    2000-05-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of blood flow in the continuous flow ventricular assist device, Prototype No. 3 (CFVAD3), which consists of a 4 blade shrouded impeller fully supported in magnetic bearings, was performed. This study focused on the regions within the pump where return flow occurs to the pump inlet, and where potentially damaging shear stresses and flow stagnation might occur: the impeller blade passages and the narrow gap clearance regions between the impeller-rotor and pump housing. Two separate geometry models define the spacing between the pump housing and the impeller's hub and shroud, and a third geometry model defines the pump's impeller and curved blades. The flow fields in these regions were calculated for various operating conditions of the pump. Pump performance curves were calculated, which compare well with experimentally obtained data. For all pump operating conditions, the flow rates within the gap regions were predicted to be toward the inlet of the pump, thus recirculating a portion of the impeller flow. Two smaller gap clearance regions were numerically examined to reduce the recirculation and to improve pump efficiency. The computational and geometry models will be used in future studies of a smaller pump to determine increased pump efficiency and the risk of hemolysis due to shear stress, and to insure the washing of blood through the clearance regions to prevent thrombosis. PMID:10848679

  15. PAN AIR: A Computer Program for Predicting Subsonic or Supersonic Linear Potential Flows About Arbitrary Configurations Using a Higher Order Panel Method. Volume 1; Theory Document (Version 1.1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnus, Alfred E.; Epton, Michael A.

    1981-01-01

    An outline of the derivation of the differential equation governing linear subsonic and supersonic potential flow is given. The use of Green's Theorem to obtain an integral equation over the boundary surface is discussed. The engineering techniques incorporated in the PAN AIR (Panel Aerodynamics) program (a discretization method which solves the integral equation for arbitrary first order boundary conditions) are then discussed in detail. Items discussed include the construction of the compressibility transformations, splining techniques, imposition of the boundary conditions, influence coefficient computation (including the concept of the finite part of an integral), computation of pressure coefficients, and computation of forces and moments.

  16. Predictive medicine: computational techniques in therapeutic decision-making.

    PubMed

    Taylor, C A; Draney, M T; Ku, J P; Parker, D; Steele, B N; Wang, K; Zarins, C K

    1999-01-01

    The current paradigm for surgery planning for the treatment of cardiovascular disease relies exclusively on diagnostic imaging data to define the present state of the patient, empirical data to evaluate the efficacy of prior treatments for similar patients, and the judgement of the surgeon to decide on a preferred treatment. The individual variability and inherent complexity of human biological systems is such that diagnostic imaging and empirical data alone are insufficient to predict the outcome of a given treatment for an individual patient. We propose a new paradigm of predictive medicine in which the physician utilizes computational tools to construct and evaluate a combined anatomic/physiologic model to predict the outcome of alternative treatment plans for an individual patient. The predictive medicine paradigm is implemented in a software system developed for Simulation-Based Medical Planning. This system provides an integrated set of tools to test hypotheses regarding the effect of alternate treatment plans on blood flow in the cardiovascular system of an individual patient. It combines an Internet-based user interface developed using Java and VRML, image segmentation, geometric solid modeling, automatic finite element mesh generation, computational fluid dynamics, and scientific visualization techniques. This system is applied to the evaluation of alternate, patient-specific treatments for a case of lower extremity occlusive cardiovascular disease. PMID:10581521

  17. A Regression Model for Computing Index Flows Describing the Median Flow for the Summer Month of Lowest Flow in Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, David A.; Sorrell, Richard C.; Holtschlag, David J.

    2008-01-01

    regression model developed in this report can be used to produce unbiased estimates of index water yield and flow statewide. In addition, a technique is presented for computing prediction intervals about the index flow estimates.

  18. TAS: A Transonic Aircraft/Store flow field prediction code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical procedure has been developed that has the capability to predict the transonic flow field around an aircraft with an arbitrarily located, separated store. The TAS code, the product of a joint General Dynamics/NASA ARC/AFWAL research and development program, will serve as the basis for a comprehensive predictive method for aircraft with arbitrary store loadings. This report described the numerical procedures employed to simulate the flow field around a configuration of this type. The validity of TAS code predictions is established by comparison with existing experimental data. In addition, future areas of development of the code are outlined. A brief description of code utilization is also given in the Appendix. The aircraft/store configuration is simulated using a mesh embedding approach. The computational domain is discretized by three meshes: (1) a planform-oriented wing/body fine mesh, (2) a cylindrical store mesh, and (3) a global Cartesian crude mesh. This embedded mesh scheme enables simulation of stores with fins of arbitrary angular orientation.

  19. Scalable High Performance Computing: Direct and Large-Eddy Turbulent Flow Simulations Using Massively Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Philip E.

    2004-01-01

    This final report contains reports of research related to the tasks "Scalable High Performance Computing: Direct and Lark-Eddy Turbulent FLow Simulations Using Massively Parallel Computers" and "Devleop High-Performance Time-Domain Computational Electromagnetics Capability for RCS Prediction, Wave Propagation in Dispersive Media, and Dual-Use Applications. The discussion of Scalable High Performance Computing reports on three objectives: validate, access scalability, and apply two parallel flow solvers for three-dimensional Navier-Stokes flows; develop and validate a high-order parallel solver for Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) problems; and Investigate and develop a high-order Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes turbulence model. The discussion of High-Performance Time-Domain Computational Electromagnetics reports on five objectives: enhancement of an electromagnetics code (CHARGE) to be able to effectively model antenna problems; utilize lessons learned in high-order/spectral solution of swirling 3D jets to apply to solving electromagnetics project; transition a high-order fluids code, FDL3DI, to be able to solve Maxwell's Equations using compact-differencing; develop and demonstrate improved radiation absorbing boundary conditions for high-order CEM; and extend high-order CEM solver to address variable material properties. The report also contains a review of work done by the systems engineer.

  20. Aircraft T-tail flutter predictions using computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attorni, A.; Cavagna, L.; Quaranta, G.

    2011-02-01

    The paper presents the application of computational aeroelasticity (CA) methods to the analysis of a T-tail stability in transonic regime. For this flow condition unsteady aerodynamics show a significant dependency from the aircraft equilibrium flight configuration, which rules both the position of shock waves in the flow field and the load distribution on the horizontal tail plane. Both these elements have an influence on the aerodynamic forces, and so on the aeroelastic stability of the system. The numerical procedure proposed allows to investigate flutter stability for a free-flying aircraft, iterating until convergence the following sequence of sub-problems: search for the trimmed condition for the deformable aircraft; linearize the system about the stated equilibrium point; predict the aeroelastic stability boundaries using the inferred linear model. An innovative approach based on sliding meshes allows to represent the changes of the computational fluid domain due to the motion of control surfaces used to trim the aircraft. To highlight the importance of keeping the linear model always aligned to the trim condition, and at the same time the capabilities of the computational fluid dynamics approach, the method is applied to a real aircraft with a T-tail configuration: the P180.

  1. Two-Phase Flow within Geological Flow Analogies--A Computational Study

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, D.M.; Ahmadi, G.; Smith, D.H.; Ferer, M.V.; Richards, M.; Bromhal, G.S.

    2006-10-01

    Displacement of a viscous fluid in heterogeneous geological media by a less viscous one does not evacuate 100% of the defending fluid due to capillary and viscous fingering. This is of importance in geological flows that are encountered in secondary oil recovery and carbon dioxide sequestration in saturated brine fields. Hele-Shaw and pore/throat cells are commonly used to study this in the labratory. Numerical simulations of this flow phenomenon with pore-throat models have been prevalent for over two decades. This current work solves the full Navier-Stokes equations of conservation within random pore-throat geometries with varying properties to study the resulting flow properties. Verification of the solution method is performed by comparison of the model predictions with the available experimental data in the literature. Experimental flows in a pore-throat cell with a known geometrical structure are shown to be in good agreement with the model. Dynamic comparisons to a computational pore-throat model have been shown to be in good agreement as well. There are also additional two-phase immiscible flow patterns that can be identified from the current solutions for which the corresponding laboratory counter part or the pore-throat model predictions are not available. The identification of these flow patterns may allow more accurate modeling of fluid displacement on the reservoir scale.

  2. The free-wake computation of rotor-body flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, K.; Steinhoff, J.; Caradonna, F. X.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper a method is described for predicting the compressible, free-wake, flow about a lifting rotor-body configuration. The method is an extension of a unique vorticity embedded full-potential method used to calculate free-wake rotor hover performance. An unusual feature of this method is that it obviates the requirement for multiple grids to treat the rotor-body problem. The approach used to treat the body is similar to that used to include the rotor wake in the full potential calculation. The body is modeled as a structured circulation sheet and the strength of this sheet is determined in an iterative manner. Initially the method is tested to compute the flow past simple isolated bodies like cylinders and spheres. After a comparison of these simple computations with exact solutions this procedure is included into the HELIX-I, free-wake rotor code, to compute the flow around a rotor mounted on a large whirl tower. The effects of the tower on rotor wake geometry and load distribution are presented.

  3. Computational predictive methods for fracture and fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, J.; Chang, A. T.; Nelson, N.; Kim, Y.

    1994-09-01

    The damage-tolerant design philosophy as used by aircraft industries enables aircraft components and aircraft structures to operate safely with minor damage, small cracks, and flaws. Maintenance and inspection procedures insure that damages developed during service remain below design values. When damage is found, repairs or design modifications are implemented and flight is resumed. Design and redesign guidelines, such as military specifications MIL-A-83444, have successfully reduced the incidence of damage and cracks. However, fatigue cracks continue to appear in aircraft well before the design life has expired. The F16 airplane, for instance, developed small cracks in the engine mount, wing support, bulk heads, the fuselage upper skin, the fuel shelf joints, and along the upper wings. Some cracks were found after 600 hours of the 8000 hour design service life and design modifications were required. Tests on the F16 plane showed that the design loading conditions were close to the predicted loading conditions. Improvements to analytic methods for predicting fatigue crack growth adjacent to holes, when multiple damage sites are present, and in corrosive environments would result in more cost-effective designs, fewer repairs, and fewer redesigns. The overall objective of the research described in this paper is to develop, verify, and extend the computational efficiency of analysis procedures necessary for damage tolerant design. This paper describes an elastic/plastic fracture method and an associated fatigue analysis method for damage tolerant design. Both methods are unique in that material parameters such as fracture toughness, R-curve data, and fatigue constants are not required. The methods are implemented with a general-purpose finite element package. Several proof-of-concept examples are given. With further development, the methods could be extended for analysis of multi-site damage, creep-fatigue, and corrosion fatigue problems.

  4. Computational predictive methods for fracture and fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordes, J.; Chang, A. T.; Nelson, N.; Kim, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The damage-tolerant design philosophy as used by aircraft industries enables aircraft components and aircraft structures to operate safely with minor damage, small cracks, and flaws. Maintenance and inspection procedures insure that damages developed during service remain below design values. When damage is found, repairs or design modifications are implemented and flight is resumed. Design and redesign guidelines, such as military specifications MIL-A-83444, have successfully reduced the incidence of damage and cracks. However, fatigue cracks continue to appear in aircraft well before the design life has expired. The F16 airplane, for instance, developed small cracks in the engine mount, wing support, bulk heads, the fuselage upper skin, the fuel shelf joints, and along the upper wings. Some cracks were found after 600 hours of the 8000 hour design service life and design modifications were required. Tests on the F16 plane showed that the design loading conditions were close to the predicted loading conditions. Improvements to analytic methods for predicting fatigue crack growth adjacent to holes, when multiple damage sites are present, and in corrosive environments would result in more cost-effective designs, fewer repairs, and fewer redesigns. The overall objective of the research described in this paper is to develop, verify, and extend the computational efficiency of analysis procedures necessary for damage tolerant design. This paper describes an elastic/plastic fracture method and an associated fatigue analysis method for damage tolerant design. Both methods are unique in that material parameters such as fracture toughness, R-curve data, and fatigue constants are not required. The methods are implemented with a general-purpose finite element package. Several proof-of-concept examples are given. With further development, the methods could be extended for analysis of multi-site damage, creep-fatigue, and corrosion fatigue problems.

  5. Conveying Lava Flow Hazards Through Interactive Computer Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D.; Edwards, H. K.; Harnish, E. P.

    2007-12-01

    As part of an Information Sciences senior class project, a software package of an interactive version of the FLOWGO model was developed for the Island of Hawaii. The software is intended for use in an ongoing public outreach and hazards awareness program that educates the public about lava flow hazards on the island. The design parameters for the model allow an unsophisticated user to initiate a lava flow anywhere on the island and allow it to flow down-slope to the shoreline while displaying a timer to show the rate of advance of the flow. The user is also able to modify a range of input parameters including eruption rate, the temperature of the lava at the vent, and crystal fraction present in the lava at the source. The flow trajectories are computed using a 30 m digital elevation model for the island and the rate of advance of the flow is estimated using the average slope angle and the computed viscosity of the lava as it cools in either a channel (high heat loss) or lava tube (low heat loss). Even though the FLOWGO model is not intended to, and cannot, accurately predict the rate of advance of a tube- fed or channel-fed flow, the relative rates of flow advance for steep or flat-lying terrain convey critically important hazard information to the public: communities located on the steeply sloping western flanks of Mauna Loa may have no more than a few hours to evacuate in the face of a threatened flow from Mauna Loa's southwest rift whereas communities on the more gently sloping eastern flanks of Mauna Loa and Kilauea may have weeks to months to prepare for evacuation. Further, the model also can show the effects of loss of critical infrastructure with consequent impacts on access into and out of communities, loss of electrical supply, and communications as a result of lava flow implacement. The interactive model has been well received in an outreach setting and typically generates greater involvement by the participants than has been the case with static maps

  6. Applying uncertainty quantification to multiphase flow computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Gel, A; Garg, R; Tong, C; Shahnam, M; Guenther, C

    2013-07-01

    Multiphase computational fluid dynamics plays a major role in design and optimization of fossil fuel based reactors. There is a growing interest in accounting for the influence of uncertainties associated with physical systems to increase the reliability of computational simulation based engineering analysis. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has recently undertaken an initiative to characterize uncertainties associated with computer simulation of reacting multiphase flows encountered in energy producing systems such as a coal gasifier. The current work presents the preliminary results in applying non-intrusive parametric uncertainty quantification and propagation techniques with NETL's open-source multiphase computational fluid dynamics software MFIX. For this purpose an open-source uncertainty quantification toolkit, PSUADE developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been interfaced with MFIX software. In this study, the sources of uncertainty associated with numerical approximation and model form have been neglected, and only the model input parametric uncertainty with forward propagation has been investigated by constructing a surrogate model based on data-fitted response surface for a multiphase flow demonstration problem. Monte Carlo simulation was employed for forward propagation of the aleatory type input uncertainties. Several insights gained based on the outcome of these simulations are presented such as how inadequate characterization of uncertainties can affect the reliability of the prediction results. Also a global sensitivity study using Sobol' indices was performed to better understand the contribution of input parameters to the variability observed in response variable.

  7. Computation of turbulent flows over backward-facing step

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, N. N.; Kim, J.; Moin, P.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical method for computing incompressible turbulent flows is presented. The method is tested by calculating laminar recirculating flows and is applied in conjunction with a modified Kappa-epsilon model to compute the flow over a backward-facing step. In the laminar regime, the computational results are in good agreement with the experimental data. The turbulent flow study shows that the reattachment length is underpredicted by the standard Kappa-epsilon model. The addition of a term to the standard model that accounts for the effects of rotation on turbulent flow improves the results in the recirculation region and increases the computed reattachment length.

  8. Computational analysis of swirling flows in a pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, Obdulio

    The vortex breakdown of a swirling jet flow entering a finite-length pipe is studied in this thesis. The theories of Rusak and co-authors which provide fundamental tools to predict the first occurrence of breakdown and simulate the flow behavior are applied. To demonstrate the ideas, the detailed experimental data of Novak and Sarpkaya (2000) are used, specifically, the upstream (inlet) axial and circumferential velocity profiles ahead of the breakdown (stagnation) point. The critical swirl ratios, o0 and o1, that respectively form the necessary and sufficient conditions for the occurrence of breakdown in a swirling jet flow, are computed from the ordinary differential equations of the problem. It is found that for the upstream velocity profiles o0 = 0.5607 and o 1 = 1.35196. The swirl level in the experiment of Novak and Sarpkaya (2000) was o = 1, and it shows that vortex breakdown may occur downstream of the inlet in the vortex flow field, as indeed is found in the experiments. Moreover, the experiments provide flow profiles along the whole pipe which are compared with simulation results based on Granata (2014) for a swirling flow in a pipe that has the same inlet conditions. An agreement is found between the simulated results and the experimental data all along the pipe from the upstream inlet state up to the breakdown point. Behind the breakdown point, no concise agreement is found which may be due to the high turbulence in the high-Re experimental flow or a result of non-full convergence of simulated results. The present theoretical analysis and simulations shed light on the breakdown process of swirling jet flows in pipes.

  9. Prediction of the vortex wake for noncircular missiles in supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendenhall, M. R.; Perkins, S. C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Engineering prediction methods with the capability to calculate induced effects of lee-side separation vorticity associated with circular and noncircular missiles at high angles of attack in supersonic flow are compared. Methods of interest include a discrete vortex cloud technique, concentrated vortex models, and solutions of Euler's equations with specified separation. Comparison of measured and predicted surface pressure distributions and flow field surveys are presented for bodies with circular and elliptic cross sections. Two flow models for computing lee-side vortex-induced effects on control fins in the vicinity of the vortex field are examined, and suggestions regarding the appropriate flow model for specific situations are included.

  10. Computation of Thermally Perfect Compressible Flow Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, David W.; Tatum, Kenneth E.; Williams, S. Blake

    1996-01-01

    A set of compressible flow relations for a thermally perfect, calorically imperfect gas are derived for a value of c(sub p) (specific heat at constant pressure) expressed as a polynomial function of temperature and developed into a computer program, referred to as the Thermally Perfect Gas (TPG) code. The code is available free from the NASA Langley Software Server at URL http://www.larc.nasa.gov/LSS. The code produces tables of compressible flow properties similar to those found in NACA Report 1135. Unlike the NACA Report 1135 tables which are valid only in the calorically perfect temperature regime the TPG code results are also valid in the thermally perfect, calorically imperfect temperature regime, giving the TPG code a considerably larger range of temperature application. Accuracy of the TPG code in the calorically perfect and in the thermally perfect, calorically imperfect temperature regimes are verified by comparisons with the methods of NACA Report 1135. The advantages of the TPG code compared to the thermally perfect, calorically imperfect method of NACA Report 1135 are its applicability to any type of gas (monatomic, diatomic, triatomic, or polyatomic) or any specified mixture of gases, ease-of-use, and tabulated results.

  11. Computing Flows Using Chimera and Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Zheng, Yao

    2006-01-01

    DRAGONFLOW is a computer program that solves the Navier-Stokes equations of flows in complexly shaped three-dimensional regions discretized by use of a direct replacement of arbitrary grid overlapping by nonstructured (DRAGON) grid. A DRAGON grid (see figure) is a combination of a chimera grid (a composite of structured subgrids) and a collection of unstructured subgrids. DRAGONFLOW incorporates modified versions of two prior Navier-Stokes-equation-solving programs: OVERFLOW, which is designed to solve on chimera grids; and USM3D, which is used to solve on unstructured grids. A master module controls the invocation of individual modules in the libraries. At each time step of a simulated flow, DRAGONFLOW is invoked on the chimera portion of the DRAGON grid in alternation with USM3D, which is invoked on the unstructured subgrids of the DRAGON grid. The USM3D and OVERFLOW modules then immediately exchange their solutions and other data. As a result, USM3D and OVERFLOW are coupled seamlessly.

  12. Computation of Transonic Flows Using Potential Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoist, Terry L.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The proposed paper will describe the state of the art associated with numerical solution of the full or exact velocity potential equation for solving transonic, external-aerodynamic flows. The presentation will begin with a review of the literature emphasizing research activities of the past decade. Next, the various forms of the full or exact velocity potential equation, the equation's corresponding mathematical characteristics, and the derivation assumptions will be presented and described in detail. Impact of the derivation assumptions on simulation accuracy, especially with respect to shock wave capture, will be presented and discussed relative to the more complete Euler or Navier-Stokes formulations. The technical presentation will continue with a description of recently developed full potential numerical approach characteristics. This description will include governing equation nondimensionalization, physical-to-computational-domain mapping procedures, a limited description of grid generation requirements, the spatial discretization scheme, numerical implementation of boundary conditions, and the iteration scheme. The next portion of the presentation will present and discuss numerical results for several two- and three-dimensional aerodynamic applications. Included in the results section will be a discussion and demonstration of a typical grid refinement analysis for determining spatial convergence of the numerical solution and level of solution accuracy. Computer timings for a variety of full potential applications will be compared and contrasted with similar results for the Euler equation formulation. Finally. the presentation will end with concluding remarks and recommendations for future work.

  13. Two-Dimensional Computational Model for Wave Rotor Flow Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.

    1996-01-01

    A two-dimensional (theta,z) Navier-Stokes solver for multi-port wave rotor flow simulation is described. The finite-volume form of the unsteady thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations are integrated in time on multi-block grids that represent the stationary inlet and outlet ports and the moving rotor passages of the wave rotor. Computed results are compared with three-port wave rotor experimental data. The model is applied to predict the performance of a planned four-port wave rotor experiment. Two-dimensional flow features that reduce machine performance and influence rotor blade and duct wall thermal loads are identified. The performance impact of rounding the inlet port wall, to inhibit separation during passage gradual opening, is assessed.

  14. Computational and Experimental Flow Field Analyses of Separate Flow Chevron Nozzles and Pylon Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, Steven J.; Thomas, Russell H.; AbdolHamid, Khaled S.; Elmiligui, Alaa A.

    2003-01-01

    A computational and experimental flow field analyses of separate flow chevron nozzles is presented. The goal of this study is to identify important flow physics and modeling issues required to provide highly accurate flow field data which will later serve as input to the Jet3D acoustic prediction code. Four configurations are considered: a baseline round nozzle with and without a pylon, and a chevron core nozzle with and without a pylon. The flow is simulated by solving the asymptotically steady, compressible, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations using an implicit, up-wind, flux-difference splitting finite volume scheme and standard two-equation kappa-epsilon turbulence model with a linear stress representation and the addition of a eddy viscosity dependence on total temperature gradient normalized by local turbulence length scale. The current CFD results are seen to be in excellent agreement with Jet Noise Lab data and show great improvement over previous computations which did not compensate for enhanced mixing due to high temperature gradients.

  15. Computation of three-dimensional flow about aerobrake configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C. P.

    1986-01-01

    Ellipsoid, cone and cylinder aerobrake configurations are analyzed to provide comparison data between experimental and model predictions. An analytical model was devised to account for the shock layer ahead of the body and in the near-wake region in terms of the Navier-Stokes equations expressed in conformal polar and azimuthal-angle coordinates. Using polar coordinates simplified the equations by mapping the body onto a sphere, a procedure which also reduced the magnitude of the discretization errors. The equations are then solved using an alternating direction implicit (ADI) factorization technique. Computations were carried out for Mach 3-10 at various grid resolutions and compared with available wind tunnel data. The model generated pressure distributions, heat transfer coefficients and velocity profile data that agreed relatively well with experimental data at a reduced computational cost. Further work is necessary to identify the location of shocks and to model flows about asymmetric configurations.

  16. Computational investigation of slot blowing for fuselage forebody flow control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, Scott M.; Rizk, Yehia M.; Schiff, Lewis B.; Cummings, Russell M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a computational investigation of a tangential slot blowing concept for generating lateral control forces on an aircraft fuselage forebody. The effects of varying both the jet width and jet exit velocity for a fixed location slot are analyzed. This work is aimed at aiding researchers in designing future experimental and computational models of tangential slot blowing. The primary influence on the resulting side force of the forebody is seen to be the jet mass flow rate. This influence is sensitive to different combinations of slot widths and jet velocities over the range of variables considered. Both an actuator plane and an overset grid technique are used to model the tangential slot. The overset method successfully resolves the details of the actual slot geometry, extending the generality of the numerical method. The actuator plane concept predicts side forces similar to those produced by resolving the actual slot geometry.

  17. Physical aspects of computing the flow of a viscous fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, U. B.

    1984-01-01

    One of the main themes in fluid dynamics at present and in the future is going to be computational fluid dynamics with the primary focus on the determination of drag, flow separation, vortex flows, and unsteady flows. A computation of the flow of a viscous fluid requires an understanding and consideration of the physical aspects of the flow. This is done by identifying the flow regimes and the scales of fluid motion, and the sources of vorticity. Discussions of flow regimes deal with conditions of incompressibility, transitional and turbulent flows, Navier-Stokes and non-Navier-Stokes regimes, shock waves, and strain fields. Discussions of the scales of fluid motion consider transitional and turbulent flows, thin- and slender-shear layers, triple- and four-deck regions, viscous-inviscid interactions, shock waves, strain rates, and temporal scales. In addition, the significance and generation of vorticity are discussed. These physical aspects mainly guide computations of the flow of a viscous fluid.

  18. A machine-learning approach for computation of fractional flow reserve from coronary computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Itu, Lucian; Rapaka, Saikiran; Passerini, Tiziano; Georgescu, Bogdan; Schwemmer, Chris; Schoebinger, Max; Flohr, Thomas; Sharma, Puneet; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2016-07-01

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR) is a functional index quantifying the severity of coronary artery lesions and is clinically obtained using an invasive, catheter-based measurement. Recently, physics-based models have shown great promise in being able to noninvasively estimate FFR from patient-specific anatomical information, e.g., obtained from computed tomography scans of the heart and the coronary arteries. However, these models have high computational demand, limiting their clinical adoption. In this paper, we present a machine-learning-based model for predicting FFR as an alternative to physics-based approaches. The model is trained on a large database of synthetically generated coronary anatomies, where the target values are computed using the physics-based model. The trained model predicts FFR at each point along the centerline of the coronary tree, and its performance was assessed by comparing the predictions against physics-based computations and against invasively measured FFR for 87 patients and 125 lesions in total. Correlation between machine-learning and physics-based predictions was excellent (0.9994, P < 0.001), and no systematic bias was found in Bland-Altman analysis: mean difference was -0.00081 ± 0.0039. Invasive FFR ≤ 0.80 was found in 38 lesions out of 125 and was predicted by the machine-learning algorithm with a sensitivity of 81.6%, a specificity of 83.9%, and an accuracy of 83.2%. The correlation was 0.729 (P < 0.001). Compared with the physics-based computation, average execution time was reduced by more than 80 times, leading to near real-time assessment of FFR. Average execution time went down from 196.3 ± 78.5 s for the CFD model to ∼2.4 ± 0.44 s for the machine-learning model on a workstation with 3.4-GHz Intel i7 8-core processor. PMID:27079692

  19. Turbulence Models for Accurate Aerothermal Prediction in Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang-Hong; Wu, Yi-Zao; Wang, Jiang-Feng

    Accurate description of the aerodynamic and aerothermal environment is crucial to the integrated design and optimization for high performance hypersonic vehicles. In the simulation of aerothermal environment, the effect of viscosity is crucial. The turbulence modeling remains a major source of uncertainty in the computational prediction of aerodynamic forces and heating. In this paper, three turbulent models were studied: the one-equation eddy viscosity transport model of Spalart-Allmaras, the Wilcox k-ω model and the Menter SST model. For the k-ω model and SST model, the compressibility correction, press dilatation and low Reynolds number correction were considered. The influence of these corrections for flow properties were discussed by comparing with the results without corrections. In this paper the emphasis is on the assessment and evaluation of the turbulence models in prediction of heat transfer as applied to a range of hypersonic flows with comparison to experimental data. This will enable establishing factor of safety for the design of thermal protection systems of hypersonic vehicle.

  20. Computer-Generated, Three-Dimensional Models of Student Flow Characteristics in Kentucky: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Alan D.

    The use of computer graphic techniques with basic student enrollment statistics is examined to promote understanding of changes in student flow as a function of spatial distribution. Basic initial student enrollment data that serve as input into predictive flow models were modeled at Eastern Kentucky University. The following commercially…

  1. Does Preoperative Measurement of Cerebral Blood Flow with Acetazolamide Challenge in Addition to Preoperative Measurement of Cerebral Blood Flow at the Resting State Increase the Predictive Accuracy of Development of Cerebral Hyperperfusion after Carotid Endarterectomy? Results from 500 Cases with Brain Perfusion Single-photon Emission Computed Tomography Study

    PubMed Central

    OSHIDA, Sotaro; OGASAWARA, Kuniaki; SAURA, Hiroaki; YOSHIDA, Koji; FUJIWARA, Shunro; KOJIMA, Daigo; KOBAYASHI, Masakazu; YOSHIDA, Kenji; KUBO, Yoshitaka; OGAWA, Akira

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether preoperative measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) with acetazolamide in addition to preoperative measurement of CBF at the resting state increases the predictive accuracy of development of cerebral hyperperfusion after carotid endarterectomy (CEA). CBF at the resting state and cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) to acetazolamide were quantitatively assessed using N-isopropyl-p-[123I]-iodoamphetamine (IMP)-autoradiography method with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) before CEA in 500 patients with ipsilateral internal carotid artery stenosis (≥ 70%). CBF measurement using 123I-IMP SPECT was also performed immediately and 3 days after CEA. A region of interest (ROI) was automatically placed in the middle cerebral artery territory in the affected cerebral hemisphere using a three-dimensional stereotactic ROI template. Preoperative decreases in CBF at the resting state [95% confidence intervals (CIs), 0.855 to 0.967; P = 0.0023] and preoperative decreases in CVR to acetazolamide (95% CIs, 0.844 to 0.912; P < 0.0001) were significant independent predictors of post-CEA hyperperfusion. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for prediction of the development of post-CEA hyperperfusion was significantly greater for CVR to acetazolamide than for CBF at the resting state (difference between areas, 0.173; P < 0.0001). Sensitivity, specificity, and positive- and negative-predictive values for the prediction of the development of post-CEA hyperperfusion were significantly greater for CVR to acetazolamide than for CBF at the resting state (P < 0.05, respectively). The present study demonstrated that preoperative measurement of CBF with acetazolamide in addition to preoperative measurement of CBF at the resting state increases the predictive accuracy of the development of post-CEA hyperperfusion. PMID:25746308

  2. Computational biorheology of human blood flow in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Fedosov, Dmitry A; Dao, Ming; Karniadakis, George Em; Suresh, Subra

    2014-02-01

    Hematologic disorders arising from infectious diseases, hereditary factors and environmental influences can lead to, and can be influenced by, significant changes in the shape, mechanical and physical properties of red blood cells (RBCs), and the biorheology of blood flow. Hence, modeling of hematologic disorders should take into account the multiphase nature of blood flow, especially in arterioles and capillaries. We present here an overview of a general computational framework based on dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) which has broad applicability in cell biophysics with implications for diagnostics, therapeutics and drug efficacy assessments for a wide variety of human diseases. This computational approach, validated by independent experimental results, is capable of modeling the biorheology of whole blood and its individual components during blood flow so as to investigate cell mechanistic processes in health and disease. DPD is a Lagrangian method that can be derived from systematic coarse-graining of molecular dynamics but can scale efficiently up to arterioles and can also be used to model RBCs down to the spectrin level. We start from experimental measurements of a single RBC to extract the relevant biophysical parameters, using single-cell measurements involving such methods as optical tweezers, atomic force microscopy and micropipette aspiration, and cell-population experiments involving microfluidic devices. We then use these validated RBC models to predict the biorheological behavior of whole blood in healthy or pathological states, and compare the simulations with experimental results involving apparent viscosity and other relevant parameters. While the approach discussed here is sufficiently general to address a broad spectrum of hematologic disorders including certain types of cancer, this paper specifically deals with results obtained using this computational framework for blood flow in malaria and sickle cell anemia. PMID:24419829

  3. Prediction of flow rates through an orifice at pressures corresponding to the transition between molecular and isentropic flow

    SciTech Connect

    DeMuth, S.F.; Watson, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    A model of compressible flow through an orifice, in the region of transition from free molecular to isentropic expansion flow, has been developed and tested for accuracy. The transitional or slip regime is defined as the conditions where molecular interactions are too many for free molecular flow modeling, yet not great enough for isentropic expansion flow modeling. Due to a lack of literature establishing a well-accepted model for predicting transitional flow, it was felt such work would be beneficial. The model is nonlinear and cannot be satisfactorily linearized for a linear regression analysis. Consequently, a computer routine was developed which minimized the sum of the squares of the residual flow for the nonlinear model. The results indicate an average accuracy within 15% of the measured flow throughout the range of test conditions. Furthermore, the results of the regression analysis indicate that the transitional regime lies between Knudsen numbers of approximately 2 and 45. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Compressible flow computer program for gas film seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.; Smith, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    Computer program, AREAX, calculates properties of compressible fluid flow with friction and area change. Program carries out quasi-one-dimensional flow analysis which is valid for laminar and turbulent flows under both subsonic and choked flow conditions. Program was written to be applied to gas film seals.

  5. Computer program for compressible flow network analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilton, M. E.; Murtaugh, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    Program solves problem of an arbitrarily connected one dimensional compressible flow network with pumping in the channels and momentum balancing at flow junctions. Program includes pressure drop calculations for impingement flow and flow through pin fin arrangements, as currently found in many air cooled turbine bucket and vane cooling configurations.

  6. Refinement Of Hexahedral Cells In Euler Flow Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, John E.; Cappuccio, Gelsomina; Thomas, Scott D.

    1996-01-01

    Topologically Independent Grid, Euler Refinement (TIGER) computer program solves Euler equations of three-dimensional, unsteady flow of inviscid, compressible fluid by numerical integration on unstructured hexahedral coordinate grid refined where necessary to resolve shocks and other details. Hexahedral cells subdivided, each into eight smaller cells, as needed to refine computational grid in regions of high flow gradients. Grid Interactive Refinement and Flow-Field Examination (GIRAFFE) computer program written in conjunction with TIGER program to display computed flow-field data and to assist researcher in verifying specified boundary conditions and refining grid.

  7. Computational analysis of turbine engine test cell flow phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prufert, Matthew Brian

    1998-11-01

    Turbine engine altitude test cells must incorporate an exhaust system collector to remove hot exhaust gases from the vicinity of the jet engine and to provide additional pumping to simulate the reduced pressure which would be encountered in flight. For economic reasons, it is desirable to utilize the same test configuration to simulate as much of the engine operating envelope as possible. To extend the test envelope, a cut-and-try approach is usually taken using available test data, one-dimensional analyses, and past experience. In this study, a computational approach was used to model some of the recognized operational problems which are commonly encountered. Specifically, computational models were used to evaluate the performance of an altitude test cell at low altitude conditions. Particular emphasis was placed on potential test section over-heating and the reduction of diffuser pumping to achieve near sea-level test conditions. A computational model which utilizes the NPARC Navier-Stokes code was applied to several test configurations operating at steady-state and to a single diffuser configuration in the presence of unsteady pressure fluctuations. During 1997/1998, the author developed two-dimensional and three-dimensional NPARC Navier-Stokes flow models and procedures for use in predicting test cell and engine surface cooling effectiveness for a military engine installation in an altitude test chamber. The predicted model flowfields for both steady-state and time variant flows were used to qualitatively verify limited infrared imaging camera data and quantitatively compare numerical results with test cell and diffuser pressure and temperature data. Prediction of surface convention heat transfer rates are currently beyond the capabilities of the NPARC CFD code. To quantify localized wall heat transfer rates, the BLAYER boundary layer code also was utilized. The BLAYER code is capable of quantifying boundary layer convection heat transfer rates based on near

  8. Heat Transfer Computations of Internal Duct Flows With Combined Hydraulic and Thermal Developing Length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, C. R.; Towne, C. E.; Hippensteele, S. A.; Poinsatte, P. E.

    1997-01-01

    This study investigated the Navier-Stokes computations of the surface heat transfer coefficients of a transition duct flow. A transition duct from an axisymmetric cross section to a non-axisymmetric cross section, is usually used to connect the turbine exit to the nozzle. As the gas turbine inlet temperature increases, the transition duct is subjected to the high temperature at the gas turbine exit. The transition duct flow has combined development of hydraulic and thermal entry length. The design of the transition duct required accurate surface heat transfer coefficients. The Navier-Stokes computational method could be used to predict the surface heat transfer coefficients of a transition duct flow. The Proteus three-dimensional Navier-Stokes numerical computational code was used in this study. The code was first studied for the computations of the turbulent developing flow properties within a circular duct and a square duct. The code was then used to compute the turbulent flow properties of a transition duct flow. The computational results of the surface pressure, the skin friction factor, and the surface heat transfer coefficient were described and compared with their values obtained from theoretical analyses or experiments. The comparison showed that the Navier-Stokes computation could predict approximately the surface heat transfer coefficients of a transition duct flow.

  9. PEBBLES: A COMPUTER CODE FOR MODELING PACKING, FLOW AND RECIRCULATIONOF PEBBLES IN A PEBBLE BED REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Joshua J. Cogliati; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2006-10-01

    A comprehensive, high fidelity model for pebble flow has been developed and embodied in the PEBBLES computer code. In this paper, a description of the physical artifacts included in the model is presented and some results from using the computer code for predicting the features of pebble flow and packing in a realistic pebble bed reactor design are shown. The sensitivity of models to various physical parameters is also discussed.

  10. Shaded computer graphic techniques for visualizing and interpreting analytic fluid flow models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parke, F. I.

    1981-01-01

    Mathematical models which predict the behavior of fluid flow in different experiments are simulated using digital computers. The simulations predict values of parameters of the fluid flow (pressure, temperature and velocity vector) at many points in the fluid. Visualization of the spatial variation in the value of these parameters is important to comprehend and check the data generated, to identify the regions of interest in the flow, and for effectively communicating information about the flow to others. The state of the art imaging techniques developed in the field of three dimensional shaded computer graphics is applied to visualization of fluid flow. Use of an imaging technique known as 'SCAN' for visualizing fluid flow, is studied and the results are presented.

  11. Development of Next Generation Multiphase Pipe Flow Prediction Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Tulsa Fluid Flow

    2008-08-31

    The developments of fields in deep waters (5000 ft and more) is a common occurrence. It is inevitable that production systems will operate under multiphase flow conditions (simultaneous flow of gas-oil-and water possibly along with sand, hydrates, and waxes). Multiphase flow prediction tools are essential for every phase of the hydrocarbon recovery from design to operation. The recovery from deep-waters poses special challenges and requires accurate multiphase flow predictive tools for several applications including the design and diagnostics of the production systems, separation of phases in horizontal wells, and multiphase separation (topside, seabed or bottom-hole). It is very crucial to any multiphase separation technique that is employed either at topside, seabed or bottom-hole to know inlet conditions such as the flow rates, flow patterns, and volume fractions of gas, oil and water coming into the separation devices. The overall objective was to develop a unified model for gas-oil-water three-phase flow in wells, flow lines, and pipelines to predict the flow characteristics such as flow patterns, phase distributions, and pressure gradient encountered during petroleum production at different flow conditions (pipe diameter and inclination, fluid properties and flow rates). The project was conducted in two periods. In Period 1 (four years), gas-oil-water flow in pipes were investigated to understand the fundamental physical mechanisms describing the interaction between the gas-oil-water phases under flowing conditions, and a unified model was developed utilizing a novel modeling approach. A gas-oil-water pipe flow database including field and laboratory data was formed in Period 2 (one year). The database was utilized in model performance demonstration. Period 1 primarily consisted of the development of a unified model and software to predict the gas-oil-water flow, and experimental studies of the gas-oil-water project, including flow behavior description and

  12. Development of Next Generation Multiphase Pipe Flow Prediction Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Cem Sarica; Holden Zhang

    2006-05-31

    The developments of oil and gas fields in deep waters (5000 ft and more) will become more common in the future. It is inevitable that production systems will operate under multiphase flow conditions (simultaneous flow of gas, oil and water possibly along with sand, hydrates, and waxes). Multiphase flow prediction tools are essential for every phase of hydrocarbon recovery from design to operation. Recovery from deep-waters poses special challenges and requires accurate multiphase flow predictive tools for several applications, including the design and diagnostics of the production systems, separation of phases in horizontal wells, and multiphase separation (topside, seabed or bottom-hole). It is crucial for any multiphase separation technique, either at topside, seabed or bottom-hole, to know inlet conditions such as flow rates, flow patterns, and volume fractions of gas, oil and water coming into the separation devices. Therefore, the development of a new generation of multiphase flow predictive tools is needed. The overall objective of the proposed study is to develop a unified model for gas-oil-water three-phase flow in wells, flow lines, and pipelines to predict flow characteristics such as flow patterns, phase distributions, and pressure gradient encountered during petroleum production at different flow conditions (pipe diameter and inclination, fluid properties and flow rates). In the current multiphase modeling approach, flow pattern and flow behavior (pressure gradient and phase fractions) prediction modeling are separated. Thus, different models based on different physics are employed, causing inaccuracies and discontinuities. Moreover, oil and water are treated as a pseudo single phase, ignoring the distinct characteristics of both oil and water, and often resulting in inaccurate design that leads to operational problems. In this study, a new model is being developed through a theoretical and experimental study employing a revolutionary approach. The

  13. Computational nanotoxicology: Predicting toxicity of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burello, Enrico; Worth, Andrew

    2011-03-01

    A statistical model based on a quantitative structure-activity relationship accurately predicts the cytotoxicity of various metal oxide nanoparticles, thus offering a way to rapidly screen nanomaterials and prioritize testing.

  14. Computational materials science: Predictions of pinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paruch, Patrycja; Ghosez, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    A multiscale model has been implemented that provides accurate predictions of the behaviour of ferroelectric materials in electric fields, and might aid efforts to design devices such as sensors and digital memory. See Letter p.360

  15. Predictive Models and Computational Toxicology (II IBAMTOX)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA’s ‘virtual embryo’ project is building an integrative systems biology framework for predictive models of developmental toxicity. One schema involves a knowledge-driven adverse outcome pathway (AOP) framework utilizing information from public databases, standardized ontologies...

  16. Benchmarking computational fluid dynamics models for lava flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietterich, Hannah; Lev, Einat; Chen, Jiangzhi

    2016-04-01

    Numerical simulations of lava flow emplacement are valuable for assessing lava flow hazards, forecasting active flows, interpreting past eruptions, and understanding the controls on lava flow behavior. Existing lava flow models vary in simplifying assumptions, physics, dimensionality, and the degree to which they have been validated against analytical solutions, experiments, and natural observations. In order to assess existing models and guide the development of new codes, we conduct a benchmarking study of computational fluid dynamics models for lava flow emplacement, including VolcFlow, OpenFOAM, FLOW-3D, and COMSOL. Using the new benchmark scenarios defined in Cordonnier et al. (Geol Soc SP, 2015) as a guide, we model viscous, cooling, and solidifying flows over horizontal and sloping surfaces, topographic obstacles, and digital elevation models of natural topography. We compare model results to analytical theory, analogue and molten basalt experiments, and measurements from natural lava flows. Overall, the models accurately simulate viscous flow with some variability in flow thickness where flows intersect obstacles. OpenFOAM, COMSOL, and FLOW-3D can each reproduce experimental measurements of cooling viscous flows, and FLOW-3D simulations with temperature-dependent rheology match results from molten basalt experiments. We can apply these models to reconstruct past lava flows in Hawai'i and Saudi Arabia using parameters assembled from morphology, textural analysis, and eruption observations as natural test cases. Our study highlights the strengths and weaknesses of each code, including accuracy and computational costs, and provides insights regarding code selection.

  17. Survey of Turbulence Models for the Computation of Turbulent Jet Flow and Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallasamy, N.

    1999-01-01

    The report presents an overview of jet noise computation utilizing the computational fluid dynamic solution of the turbulent jet flow field. The jet flow solution obtained with an appropriate turbulence model provides the turbulence characteristics needed for the computation of jet mixing noise. A brief account of turbulence models that are relevant for the jet noise computation is presented. The jet flow solutions that have been directly used to calculate jet noise are first reviewed. Then, the turbulent jet flow studies that compute the turbulence characteristics that may be used for noise calculations are summarized. In particular, flow solutions obtained with the k-e model, algebraic Reynolds stress model, and Reynolds stress transport equation model are reviewed. Since, the small scale jet mixing noise predictions can be improved by utilizing anisotropic turbulence characteristics, turbulence models that can provide the Reynolds stress components must now be considered for jet flow computations. In this regard, algebraic stress models and Reynolds stress transport models are good candidates. Reynolds stress transport models involve more modeling and computational effort and time compared to algebraic stress models. Hence, it is recommended that an algebraic Reynolds stress model (ASM) be implemented in flow solvers to compute the Reynolds stress components.

  18. Isolating Curvature Effects in Computing Wall-Bounded Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.; Gatski, Thomas B.

    2001-01-01

    The flow over the zero-pressure-gradient So-Mellor convex curved wall is simulated using the Navier-Stokes equations. An inviscid effective outer wall shape, undocumented in the experiment, is obtained by using an adjoint optimization method with the desired pressure distribution on the inner wall as the cost function. Using this wall shape with a Navier-Stokes method, the abilities of various turbulence models to simulate the effects of curvature without the complicating factor of streamwise pressure gradient can be evaluated. The one-equation Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model overpredicts eddy viscosity, and its boundary layer profiles are too full. A curvature-corrected version of this model improves results, which are sensitive to the choice of a particular constant. An explicit algebraic stress model does a reasonable job predicting this flow field. However, results can be slightly improved by modifying the assumption on anisotropy equilibrium in the model's derivation. The resulting curvature-corrected explicit algebraic stress model possesses no heuristic functions or additional constants. It lowers slightly the computed skin friction coefficient and the turbulent stress levels for this case (in better agreement with experiment), but the effect on computed velocity profiles is very small.

  19. The flow of a thin liquid film on a stationary and rotating disk. II - Theoretical prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, M. M.; Faghri, A.; Hankey, W. L.

    1990-01-01

    The existing theoretical models are improved and a systematic procedure to compute the free surface flow of a thin liquid film is suggested. The solutions for axisymmetric radial flow on a stationary horizontal disk and for the disk rotating around its axis are presented. The theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental data presented in Part I of this report. The analysis shows results for both supercritical and subcritical flows and the flow structure in the vicinity of a hydraulic jump which isolates these two flow types. The detailed flow structure in a hydraulic jump was computed and shown to contain regions of separation including a 'surface roller'. The effects of surface tension are found to be important near the outer edge of the disk where the fluid experiences a free fall. At other locations, the surface tension is negligible. For a rotating disk, the frictional resistance in the angular direction is found to be as important as that in the radial direction.

  20. Research On Rainfall and The Prediction of Debris Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, B.

    Accurate prediction of debris flow so that economic losses and human ca- sualties can be reduced or prevented is currently the most focused and difficult point of studying debris flows. Most predictive methods have relied on rainfall as the basic parameter to make predictions, with the result that there is only the prediction of the actual occurrence without that of its arrival time and scale. This article takes Jiangjia Gully in Dongchuan of Yunnan Province as an example, and considers, on the basis of the already possessed essential condition U solid material, the abundant conditions for ° the formation of debris flow. Based on the mechanism of the occurrence of debris flow and the volume of rainfall in the basin, this paper also gives a systematic analysis on the arrival time and scale of debris flow, and suggests that the hydrological condition for forming debris flow is the unit discharge of the flood 8805; 0.35m2/s.m. It uses the ten-minute rainfall intensity to calculate both the runoffs of the rainfall and the unit discharge from the runoff, thus predicting the occurrence of debris flow. The velocity and the arrival time of a debris flow can be figured out by using the unit discharge of the runoffs. The total amount of debris flow can be calculated out and the scale of a debris flow can be predicted by using the ten-minute intensity of rainfall and the total volume of the runoffs, together with the volume concentration of sediment in a debris flow and the basin block up coefficient.

  1. Transition length prediction for flows with rapidly changing pressure gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, W.J.; Walker, G.J.; Gostelow, J.P.

    1996-10-01

    A new method for calculating intermittency in transitional boundary layers with changing pressure gradients is proposed and tested against standard turbomachinery flow cases. It is based on recent experimental studies, which show the local pressure gradient parameter to have a significant effect on turbulent spot spreading angles and propagation velocities (and hence transition length). This can be very important for some turbomachinery flows. On a turbine blade suction surface, for example, it is possible for transition to start in a region of favorable pressure gradient and finish in a region of adverse pressure gradient. Calculation methods that estimate the transition length from the local pressure gradient parameter at the start of transition will seriously overestimate the transition length under these conditions. Conventional methods based on correlations of zero pressure gradient transition date are similarly inaccurate. The new calculation method continuously adjusts the spot growth parameters in response to changes in the local pressure gradient through transition using correlations based on data given in the companion paper by Gostelow et al. (1996). Recent experiment correlations of Gostelow et al. (1994a) are used to estimate the turbulent spot generation rate at the start of transition. The method has been incorporated in a linear combination integral computation and tested with good results on cases that report both the intermittency and surface pressure distribution data. It has resulted in a much reduced sensitivity to errors in predicting the start of the transition zone, and can be recommended for engineering use in calculating boundary layer development on axial turbomachine blades.

  2. Peak power prediction of a vanadium redox flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, V. K.; Chen, D.

    2014-12-01

    The vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) is a promising grid-scale energy storage technology, but future widespread commercialization requires a considerable reduction in capital costs. Determining the appropriate battery size for the intended power range can help minimize the amount of materials needed, thereby reducing capital costs. A physics-based model is an essential tool for predicting the power range of large scale VRFB systems to aid in the design optimization process. This paper presents a modeling framework that accounts for the effects of flow rate on the pumping losses, local mass transfer rate, and nonuniform vanadium concentration in the cell. The resulting low-order model captures battery performance accurately even at high power densities and remains computationally practical for stack-level optimization and control purposes. We first use the model to devise an optimal control strategy that maximizes battery life during discharge. Assuming optimal control is implemented, we then determine the upper efficiency limits of a given VRFB system and compare the net power and associated overpotential and pumping losses at different operating points. We also investigate the effects of varying the electrode porosity, stack temperature, and total vanadium concentration on the peak power.

  3. Performance of Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes Models in Predicting Separated Flows: Study of the Hump Flow Model Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cappelli, Daniele; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2012-01-01

    Separation can be seen in most aerodynamic flows, but accurate prediction of separated flows is still a challenging problem for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools. The behavior of several Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models in predicting the separated ow over a wall-mounted hump is studied. The strengths and weaknesses of the most popular RANS models (Spalart-Allmaras, k-epsilon, k-omega, k-omega-SST) are evaluated using the open source software OpenFOAM. The hump ow modeled in this work has been documented in the 2004 CFD Validation Workshop on Synthetic Jets and Turbulent Separation Control. Only the baseline case is treated; the slot flow control cases are not considered in this paper. Particular attention is given to predicting the size of the recirculation bubble, the position of the reattachment point, and the velocity profiles downstream of the hump.

  4. Flow Field and Acoustic Predictions for Three-Stream Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, Shaun Patrick; Henderson, Brenda S.; Khavaran, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics was used to analyze a three-stream nozzle parametric design space. The study varied bypass-to-core area ratio, tertiary-to-core area ratio and jet operating conditions. The flowfield solutions from the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) code Overflow 2.2e were used to pre-screen experimental models for a future test in the Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory (AAPL) at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). Flowfield solutions were considered in conjunction with the jet-noise-prediction code JeNo to screen the design concepts. A two-stream versus three-stream computation based on equal mass flow rates showed a reduction in peak turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) for the three-stream jet relative to that for the two-stream jet which resulted in reduced acoustic emission. Additional three-stream solutions were analyzed for salient flowfield features expected to impact farfield noise. As tertiary power settings were increased there was a corresponding near nozzle increase in shear rate that resulted in an increase in high frequency noise and a reduction in peak TKE. As tertiary-to-core area ratio was increased the tertiary potential core elongated and the peak TKE was reduced. The most noticeable change occurred as secondary-to-core area ratio was increased thickening the secondary potential core, elongating the primary potential core and reducing peak TKE. As forward flight Mach number was increased the jet plume region decreased and reduced peak TKE.

  5. PAN AIR: A computer program for predicting subsonic or supersonic linear potential flows about arbitrary configurations using a higher order panel method. Volume 1: Theory document (version 3.0)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epton, Michael A.; Magnus, Alfred E.

    1990-01-01

    An outline of the derivation of the differential equation governing linear subsonic and supersonic potential flow is given. The use of Green's Theorem to obtain an integral equation over the boundary surface is discussed. The engineering techniques incorporated in the Panel Aerodynamics (PAN AIR) program (a discretization method which solves the integral equation for arbitrary first order boundary conditions) are then discussed in detail. Items discussed include the construction of the compressibility transformation, splining techniques, imposition of the boundary conditions, influence coefficient computation (including the concept of the finite part of an integral), computation of pressure coefficients, and computation of forces and moments. Principal revisions to version 3.0 are the following: (1) appendices H and K more fully describe the Aerodynamic Influence Coefficient (AIC) construction; (2) appendix L now provides a complete description of the AIC solution process; (3) appendix P is new and discusses the theory for the new FDP module (which calculates streamlines and offbody points); and (4) numerous small corrections and revisions reflecting the MAG module rewrite.

  6. Computation of three-dimensional, rotational flow through turbomachinery blade rows for improved aerodynamic design studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanian, S. V.; Bozzola, R.; Povinelli, L. A.

    1986-01-01

    The performance of a three dimensional computer code developed for predicting the flowfield in stationary and rotating turbomachinery blade rows is described in this study. The four stage Runge-Kutta numerical integration scheme is used for solving the governing flow equations and yields solution to the full, three dimensional, unsteady Euler equations in cylindrical coordinates. This method is fully explicit and uses the finite volume, time marching procedure. In order to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the code, steady solutions were obtained for several cascade geometries under widely varying flow conditions. Computed flowfield results are presented for a fully subsonic turbine stator and a low aspect ratio, transonic compressor rotor blade under maximum flow and peak efficiency design conditions. Comparisons with Laser Anemometer measurements and other numerical predictions are also provided to illustrate that the present method predicts important flow features with good accuracy and can be used for cost effective aerodynamic design studies.

  7. Computed Flow Through An Artificial Heart And Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stuart E.; Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin; Chang, I-Dee

    1994-01-01

    NASA technical memorandum discusses computations of flow of blood through artificial heart and through tilting-disk artificial heart valve. Represents further progress in research described in "Numerical Simulation of Flow Through an Artificial Heart" (ARC-12478). One purpose of research to exploit advanced techniques of computational fluid dynamics and capabilities of supercomputers to gain understanding of complicated internal flows of viscous, essentially incompressible fluids like blood. Another to use understanding to design better artificial hearts and valves.

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamic simulations of pipe elbow flow.

    SciTech Connect

    Homicz, Gregory Francis

    2004-08-01

    One problem facing today's nuclear power industry is flow-accelerated corrosion and erosion in pipe elbows. The Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is performing experiments in their Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) test loop to better characterize these phenomena, and develop advanced sensor technologies for the condition monitoring of critical elbows on a continuous basis. In parallel with these experiments, Sandia National Laboratories is performing Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations of the flow in one elbow of the FAC test loop. The simulations are being performed using the FLUENT commercial software developed and marketed by Fluent, Inc. The model geometry and mesh were created using the GAMBIT software, also from Fluent, Inc. This report documents the results of the simulations that have been made to date; baseline results employing the RNG k-e turbulence model are presented. The predicted value for the diametrical pressure coefficient is in reasonably good agreement with published correlations. Plots of the velocities, pressure field, wall shear stress, and turbulent kinetic energy adjacent to the wall are shown within the elbow section. Somewhat to our surprise, these indicate that the maximum values of both wall shear stress and turbulent kinetic energy occur near the elbow entrance, on the inner radius of the bend. Additional simulations were performed for the same conditions, but with the RNG k-e model replaced by either the standard k-{var_epsilon}, or the realizable k-{var_epsilon} turbulence model. The predictions using the standard k-{var_epsilon} model are quite similar to those obtained in the baseline simulation. However, with the realizable k-{var_epsilon} model, more significant differences are evident. The maximums in both wall shear stress and turbulent kinetic energy now appear on the outer radius, near the elbow exit, and are {approx}11% and 14% greater, respectively, than those predicted in the baseline calculation

  9. Ensemble stream flow predictions, a way towards better hydrological forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edlund, C.

    2009-04-01

    The hydrological forecasting division at SMHI has been using hydrological EPS and hydrological probabilities forecasts operationally since some years ago. The inputs to the hydrological model HBV are the EPS forecasts from ECMWF. From the ensemble, non-exceedance probabilities are estimated and final correction of the ensemble spread, based on evaluation is done. Ensemble stream flow predictions are done for about 80 indicator basins in Sweden, where there is a real-time discharge gauge. The EPS runs are updated daily against the latest observed discharge. Flood probability maps for exceeding a certain threshold, i.e. a certain warning level, are produced automatically once a day. The flood probabilistic forecasts are based on a HBV- model application, (called HBV-Sv, HBV Sweden) that covers the whole country and consist of 1001 subbasins with an average size between 200 and 700 km2. Probabilities computations for exceeding a certain warning level are made for each one of these 1001 subbasins. Statistical flood levels have been calculated for each river sub-basin. Hydrological probability forecasts should be seen as an early warning product that can give better support in decision making to end-users communities, for instance Civil Protections Offices and County Administrative Boards, within flood risk management. The main limitations with probability forecasts are: on one hand, difficulties to catch small-scale rain (mainly due to resolution of meteorological models); on the other hand, the hydrological model can't be updated against observations in all subbasins. The benefits of working with probabilities consist, first of all, of a new approach when working with flood risk management and scenarios. A probability forecast can give an early indication for Civil Protection that "something is going to happen" and to gain time in preparing aid operations. The ensemble stream flow prediction at SMHI is integrated with the national forecasting system and the products

  10. Efficient Methods to Compute Genomic Predictions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Efficient methods for processing genomic data were developed to increase reliability of estimated breeding values and simultaneously estimate thousands of marker effects. Algorithms were derived and computer programs tested on simulated data for 50,000 markers and 2,967 bulls. Accurate estimates of ...

  11. Prediction of Complex Aerodynamic Flows with Explicit Algebraic Stress Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abid, Ridha; Morrison, Joseph H.; Gatski, Thomas B.; Speziale, Charles G.

    1996-01-01

    An explicit algebraic stress equation, developed by Gatski and Speziale, is used in the framework of K-epsilon formulation to predict complex aerodynamic turbulent flows. The nonequilibrium effects are modeled through coefficients that depend nonlinearly on both rotational and irrotational strains. The proposed model was implemented in the ISAAC Navier-Stokes code. Comparisons with the experimental data are presented which clearly demonstrate that explicit algebraic stress models can predict the correct response to nonequilibrium flow.

  12. PAN AIR: A computer program for predicting subsonic or supersonic linear potential flows about arbitrary configurations using a higher order panel method. Volume 4: Maintenance document (version 3.0)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purdon, David J.; Baruah, Pranab K.; Bussoletti, John E.; Epton, Michael A.; Massena, William A.; Nelson, Franklin D.; Tsurusaki, Kiyoharu

    1990-01-01

    The Maintenance Document Version 3.0 is a guide to the PAN AIR software system, a system which computes the subsonic or supersonic linear potential flow about a body of nearly arbitrary shape, using a higher order panel method. The document describes the overall system and each program module of the system. Sufficient detail is given for program maintenance, updating, and modification. It is assumed that the reader is familiar with programming and CRAY computer systems. The PAN AIR system was written in FORTRAN 4 language except for a few CAL language subroutines which exist in the PAN AIR library. Structured programming techniques were used to provide code documentation and maintainability. The operating systems accommodated are COS 1.11, COS 1.12, COS 1.13, and COS 1.14 on the CRAY 1S, 1M, and X-MP computing systems. The system is comprised of a data base management system, a program library, an execution control module, and nine separate FORTRAN technical modules. Each module calculates part of the posed PAN AIR problem. The data base manager is used to communicate between modules and within modules. The technical modules must be run in a prescribed fashion for each PAN AIR problem. In order to ease the problem of supplying the many JCL cards required to execute the modules, a set of CRAY procedures (PAPROCS) was created to automatically supply most of the JCL cards. Most of this document has not changed for Version 3.0. It now, however, strictly applies only to PAN AIR version 3.0. The major changes are: (1) additional sections covering the new FDP module (which calculates streamlines and offbody points); (2) a complete rewrite of the section on the MAG module; and (3) strict applicability to CRAY computing systems.

  13. Radial and elliptic flow at RHIC: Further predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Huovinen, Pasi; Kolb, Peter F.; Heinz, Ulrich; Ruuskanen, P.V.; Voloshin, Sergei A.

    2001-01-30

    Using a hydrodynamic model, we predict the transverse momentum dependence of the spectra and the elliptic flow for different hadrons in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s)=130 AGeV. The dependence of the differential and p{_}t-integrated elliptic flow on the hadron mass, equation of state and freeze-out temperature is studied both numerically and analytically.

  14. Computational Methods for Analyzing Fluid Flow Dynamics from Digital Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Luttman, A.

    2012-03-30

    The main goal (long term) of this work is to perform computational dynamics analysis and quantify uncertainty from vector fields computed directly from measured data. Global analysis based on observed spatiotemporal evolution is performed by objective function based on expected physics and informed scientific priors, variational optimization to compute vector fields from measured data, and transport analysis proceeding with observations and priors. A mathematical formulation for computing flow fields is set up for computing the minimizer for the problem. An application to oceanic flow based on sea surface temperature is presented.

  15. Computational Methods to Predict Protein Interaction Partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valencia, Alfonso; Pazos, Florencio

    In the new paradigm for studying biological phenomena represented by Systems Biology, cellular components are not considered in isolation but as forming complex networks of relationships. Protein interaction networks are among the first objects studied from this new point of view. Deciphering the interactome (the whole network of interactions for a given proteome) has been shown to be a very complex task. Computational techniques for detecting protein interactions have become standard tools for dealing with this problem, helping and complementing their experimental counterparts. Most of these techniques use genomic or sequence features intuitively related with protein interactions and are based on "first principles" in the sense that they do not involve training with examples. There are also other computational techniques that use other sources of information (i.e. structural information or even experimental data) or are based on training with examples.

  16. Computer program to predict aircraft noise levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    Methods developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center for predicting the noise contributions from various aircraft noise sources were programmed to predict aircraft noise levels either in flight or in ground tests. The noise sources include fan inlet and exhaust, jet, flap (for powered lift), core (combustor), turbine, and airframe. Noise propagation corrections are available for atmospheric attenuation, ground reflections, extra ground attenuation, and shielding. Outputs can include spectra, overall sound pressure level, perceived noise level, tone-weighted perceived noise level, and effective perceived noise level at locations specified by the user. Footprint contour coordinates and approximate footprint areas can also be calculated. Inputs and outputs can be in either System International or U.S. customary units. The subroutines for each noise source and propagation correction are described. A complete listing is given.

  17. Numerical computation of pulsatile flow through a locally constricted channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, S.; Layek, G. C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the numerical solution of a pulsatile laminar flow through a locally constricted channel. A finite difference technique has been employed to solve the governing equations. The effects of the flow parameters such as Reynolds number, flow pulsation in terms of Strouhal number, constriction height and length on the flow behaviour have been studied. It is found that the peak value of the wall shear stress has significantly changed with the variation of Reynolds numbers and constriction heights. It is also noted that the Strouhal number and constriction length have little effect on the peak value of the wall shear stress. The flow computation reveals that the peak value of the wall shear stress at maximum flow rate time in pulsatile flow situation is much larger than that due to steady flow. The constriction and the flow pulsation produce flow disturbances at the vicinity of the constriction of the channel in the downstream direction.

  18. COMPUTATION OF UNSTEADY FLOWS IN THE ALABAMA RIVER.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jeffcoat, Hillary H.; Jennings, Marshall E.

    1987-01-01

    An application is described of the branch-network flow model, BRANCH, to the upper Alabama River system in central Alabama. The model is used to simulate one-dimensional unsteady flows and water surface elevations in approximately 60 river miles of the Alabama River system. Preliminary calibration was made using 72 hours of observed data. Simulated discharges are about 10 percent lower than observed discharges at higher discharge rates and computer flows lag observed flows by about 30 minutes.

  19. Computation of flow and heat transfer in rotating cavities with peripheral flow of cooling air.

    PubMed

    Kiliç, M

    2001-05-01

    Numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations have been used to model the flow and the heat transfer that occurs in the internal cooling-air systems of gas turbines. Computations are performed to study the effect of gap ratio, Reynolds number and the mass flow rate on the flow and the heat transfer structure inside isothermal and heated rotating cavities with peripheral flow of cooling air. Computations are compared with some of the recent experimental work on flow and heat transfer in rotating-cavities. The agreement between the computed and the available experimental data is reasonably good. PMID:11460668

  20. Drag Prediction and Transition in Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Helen L.; Kimmel, Roger; Schneider, Steven; Arnal, Daniel

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses progress on issues such as instability studies, nose-bluntness and angle-of-attack effects, and leading-edge-contamination problems from theoretical, computational, and experimental points of view. Also included is a review of wind-tunnel and flight data, including high-Re flight transition data, the levels of noise in flight and in wind tunnels, and how noise levels can affect parametric trends. A review of work done on drag accounting and the role of viscous drag for hypersonic vehicles is also provided.

  1. Investigation on RANS Computation for an Unsteady Turbulent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Kazuya; Toda, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Makoto

    With improvements in a computer hardware and CFD software, the problems treated in industry are becoming more complex, both physically and geometrically. Turbulent flow with strong unsteadiness is one such physically complex example. Since Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is still too time-consuming, a great number of unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computations have been employed in such engineering applications. However, the applicability of RANS to unsteady flows remains unclear. In the present study, RANS computations for two-dimensional turbulent flow with periodic perturbation over a backward-facing step are performed in order to verify the performance of a low-Reynolds-number type κ-ɛ turbulence model. Visualization and investigation of the temporal change of the flow pattern and the instantaneous term-by-term budget of the governing equations reveals that the RANS computation can reproduce the unsteady nature satisfactorily, and clarifies why the RANS model captures the unsteady turbulent flow reasonably.

  2. The development of a three-dimensional partially elliptic flow computer program for combustor research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Y. S.

    1978-01-01

    A three dimensional, partially elliptic, computer program was developed. Without requiring three dimensional computer storage locations for all flow variables, the partially elliptic program is capable of predicting three dimensional combustor flow fields with large downstream effects. The program requires only slight increase of computer storage over the parabolic flow program from which it was developed. A finite difference formulation for a three dimensional, fully elliptic, turbulent, reacting, flow field was derived. Because of the negligible diffusion effects in the main flow direction in a supersonic combustor, the set of finite-difference equations can be reduced to a partially elliptic form. Only the pressure field was governed by an elliptic equation and requires three dimensional storage; all other dependent variables are governed by parabolic equations. A numerical procedure which combines a marching integration scheme with an iterative scheme for solving the elliptic pressure was adopted.

  3. A cavitation model for computations of unsteady cavitating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yu; Wang, Guoyu; Huang, Biao

    2016-04-01

    A local vortical cavitation (LVC) model for the computation of unsteady cavitation is proposed. The model is derived from the Rayleigh-Plesset equations, and takes into account the relations between the cavitation bubble radius and local vortical effects. Calculations of unsteady cloud cavitating flows around a Clark-Y hydrofoil are performed to assess the predictive capability of the LVC model using well-documented experimental data. Compared with the conventional Zwart's model, better agreement is observed between the predictions of the LVC model and experimental data, including measurements of time-averaged flow structures, instantaneous cavity shapes and the frequency of the cloud cavity shedding process. Based on the predictions of the LVC model, it is demonstrated that the evaporation process largely concentrates in the core region of the leading edge vorticity in accordance with the growth in the attached cavity, and the condensation process concentrates in the core region of the trailing edge vorticity, which corresponds to the spread of the rear component of the attached cavity. When the attached cavity breaks up and moves downstream, the condensation area fully transports to the wake region, which is in accordance with the dissipation of the detached cavity. Furthermore, using vorticity transport equations, we also find that the periodic formation, breakup, and shedding of the sheet/cloud cavities, along with the associated baroclinic torque, are important mechanisms for vorticity production and modification. When the attached cavity grows, the liquid-vapour interface that moves towards the trailing edge enhances the vorticity in the attached cavity closure region. As the re-entrant jet moves upstream, the wavy/bubbly cavity interface enhances the vorticity near the trailing edge. At the end of the cycle, the break-up of the stable attached cavity is the main reason for the vorticity enhancement near the suction surface.

  4. Debris flow hazards mitigation--Mechanics, prediction, and assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2007-01-01

    These proceedings contain papers presented at the Fourth International Conference on Debris-Flow Hazards Mitigation: Mechanics, Prediction, and Assessment held in Chengdu, China, September 10-13, 2007. The papers cover a wide range of topics on debris-flow science and engineering, including the factors triggering debris flows, geomorphic effects, mechanics of debris flows (e.g., rheology, fluvial mechanisms, erosion and deposition processes), numerical modeling, various debris-flow experiments, landslide-induced debris flows, assessment of debris-flow hazards and risk, field observations and measurements, monitoring and alert systems, structural and non-structural countermeasures against debris-flow hazards and case studies. The papers reflect the latest devel-opments and advances in debris-flow research. Several studies discuss the development and appli-cation of Geographic Information System (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) technologies in debris-flow hazard/risk assessment. Timely topics presented in a few papers also include the development of new or innovative techniques for debris-flow monitoring and alert systems, especially an infra-sound acoustic sensor for detecting debris flows. Many case studies illustrate a wide variety of debris-flow hazards and related phenomena as well as their hazardous effects on human activities and settlements.

  5. Performance Of Bathymetric Lidar On Flow Properties Predicted With A 2-Dimensional Hydraulic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonina, D.; McKean, J. A.; Wright, C. W.

    2014-12-01

    Increased computer processing speeds and new computational fluid dynamics codes have significantly improved numerical modeling of flow and sediment transport over large domains of streams, up to several kilometers in length. Recent developments in remote sensing technologies have also greatly improved our ability to map the morphology of streams over similar spatial extents. However, limited information is available on whether the remote sensing methods can map channel topography with sufficient accuracy to define the flow boundary necessary for a fluid dynamics model. We assessed the ability of a second generation airborne bathymetric sensor, the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL-B), to support a two dimensional fluid dynamics model of a small morphologically-complex mountain stream. We compared flow model predictions using the lidar bathymetry with those made using a total station field survey of the channel. In this riverscape, results suggest EAARL bathymetric lidar can map channel topography with sufficient accuracy to support a two dimensional computational flow model.

  6. Computational investigations of axial and radial flow compressor aeromechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, Kishore

    The focus of this research is aeromechanics issues in advanced compressors of the type used in modern day high thrust-to-weight ratio aircraft gas turbine engines. The driving factor for the studies undertaken is the High Cycle Fatigue (HCF) failure of gas turbine blades. HCF is a key technology issue in the development and endurance of gas turbine engines that arises primarily due to resonant response of turbomachine blading to unsteady aerodynamic excitation. Because it is a truly coupled nonlinear fluid-structure problem, predicting HCF requires a unified approach to modeling both the fluid and the structure. Considering the serious nature of HCF and the inadequacy of lower order design systems to accurately predict blade vibratory stress, the need to develop advanced predictive tools is pressing. The first aspect of this research therefore addresses the development of a turbomachinery coupled fluid-structure interaction tool to predict flow-induced blade vibration. To this end, the TAM-ALE3D solver is further developed as a derivative of the ALE3D code of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In the second aspect of this research, TAM-ALE3D is validated by predicting viscous blade row unsteady aerodynamics and the modal properties of the stator vane in the baseline configuration of the Purdue Transonic Compressor. It is then used to predict the vane vibratory response excited by rotor wakes at resonance, with the resulting stresses in the range expected. For radial flow compressors, a very limited knowledge base exists on the unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic mechanisms that result in HCF. The bulk of this research is thus directed at the understanding of these fundamental unsteady phenomena using TAM-ALE3D as an investigative tool. The energy transfer from the downstream diffuser generated forcing function to the impeller blading is addressed by means of unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analyses. From these computational investigations, the details of

  7. Prediction of pressure drop in fluid tuned mounts using analytical and computational techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasher, William C.; Khalilollahi, Amir; Mischler, John; Uhric, Tom

    1993-01-01

    A simplified model for predicting pressure drop in fluid tuned isolator mounts was developed. The model is based on an exact solution to the Navier-Stokes equations and was made more general through the use of empirical coefficients. The values of these coefficients were determined by numerical simulation of the flow using the commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) package FIDAP.

  8. Unsteady flow computation of oscillating flexible wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Chuang, H. Andrew; Salman, Ahmed A.

    1990-01-01

    The problem of unsteady flow around flexible wings is solved using the unsteady, compressible, thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations in conjunction with the unsteady, linearized, Navier-displacement equations. Starting with the initial shape of the wing, the Navier-Stokes equations are solved on an initial structured grid to obtain the steady-flow solution which is used for the initial conditions. The forced deformation motion of the wing boundaries is then applied, and the problem is solved accurately in time. During the time-accurate stepping, the Navier-displacement equations are used to solve for the grid deformation and sequently, the Navier-Stokes equations are used to solve for the flowfield. Two applications are presented; the first is for a pulsating oscillation of a bending-mode airfoil in transonic flow, and the second is for a bending-mode oscillation of a sharp-edged delta wing in supersonic flow.

  9. Inviscid transonic flow computations with shock fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, N. J.; Seebass, A. R.

    1975-01-01

    First-and second-order numerical procedures are presented for calculating two-dimensional transonic flows that treat shock waves as discontinuities. Their application to a simple but nontrivial problem for which there are limited theoretical results is discussed.

  10. PAN AIR: A computer program for predicting subsonic or supersonic linear potential flows about arbitrary configurations using a higher order panel method. Volume 4: Maintenance document (version 1.1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baruah, P. K.; Bussoletti, J. E.; Chiang, D. T.; Massena, W. A.; Nelson, F. D.; Furdon, D. J.; Tsurusaki, K.

    1981-01-01

    The Maintenance Document is a guide to the PAN AIR software system, a system which computes the subsonic or supersonic linear potential flow about a body of nearly arbitrary shape, using a higher order panel method. The document describes the over-all system and each program module of the system. Sufficient detail is given for program maintenance, updating and modification. It is assumed that the reader is familiar with programming and CDC (Control Data Corporation) computer systems. The PAN AIR system was written in FORTRAN 4 language except for a few COMPASS language subroutines which exist in the PAN AIR library. Structured programming techniques were used to provide code documentation and maintainability. The operating systems accommodated are NOS 1.2, NOS/BE and SCOPE 2.1.3 on the CDC 6600, 7600 and Cyber 175 computing systems. The system is comprised of a data management system, a program library, an execution control module and nine separate FORTRAN technical modules. Each module calculates part of the posed PAN AIR problem. The data base manager is used to communicate between modules and within modules. The technical modules must be run in a prescribed fashion for each PAN AIR problem. In order to ease the problem of supplying the many JCL cards required to execute the modules, a separate module called MEC (Module Execution Control) was created to automatically supply most of the JCL cards. In addition to the MEC generated JCL, there is an additional set of user supplied JCL cards to initiate the JCL sequence stored on the system.

  11. Computations of the Magnus effect for slender bodies in supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturek, W. B.; Schiff, L. B.

    1980-01-01

    A recently reported Parabolized Navier-Stokes code has been employed to compute the supersonic flow field about spinning cone, ogive-cylinder, and boattailed bodies of revolution at moderate incidence. The computations were performed for flow conditions where extensive measurements for wall pressure, boundary layer velocity profiles and Magnus force had been obtained. Comparisons between the computational results and experiment indicate excellent agreement for angles of attack up to six degrees. The comparisons for Magnus effects show that the code accurately predicts the effects of body shape and Mach number for the selected models for Mach numbers in the range of 2-4.

  12. MODFLOW 2. 0: A program for predicting moderator flow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, P.F. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Paik, I.K. )

    1991-07-01

    Sudden changes in the temperature of flowing liquids can result in transient buoyancy forces which strongly impact the flow hydrodynamics via flow stratification. These effects have been studied for the case of potential flow of stratified liquids to line sinks, but not for moderator flow in SRS reactors. Standard codes, such as TRAC and COMMIX, do not have the capability to capture the stratification effect, due to strong numerical diffusion which smears away the hot/cold fluid interface. A related problem with standard codes is the inability to track plumes injected into the liquid flow, again due to numerical diffusion. The combined effects of buoyant stratification and plume dispersion have been identified as being important in operation the Supplementary Safety System which injects neutron-poison ink into SRS reactors to provide safe shutdown in the event of safety rod failure. The MODFLOW code discussed here provides transient moderator flow pattern information with stratification effects, and tracks the location of ink plumes in the reactor. The code, written in Fortran, is compiled for Macintosh II computers, and includes subroutines for interactive control and graphical output. Removing the graphics capabilities, the code can also be compiled on other computers. With graphics, in addition to the capability to perform safety related computations, MODFLOW also provides an easy tool for becoming familiar with flow distributions in SRS reactors.

  13. Numerical simulation of supersonic wake flow with parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.C.; Soetrisno, M.

    1995-07-01

    Simulating a supersonic wake flow field behind a conical body is a computing intensive task. It requires a large number of computational cells to capture the dominant flow physics and a robust numerical algorithm to obtain a reliable solution. High performance parallel computers with unique distributed processing and data storage capability can provide this need. They have larger computational memory and faster computing time than conventional vector computers. We apply the PINCA Navier-Stokes code to simulate a wind-tunnel supersonic wake experiment on Intel Gamma, Intel Paragon, and IBM SP2 parallel computers. These simulations are performed to study the mean flow in the near wake region of a sharp, 7-degree half-angle, adiabatic cone at Mach number 4.3 and freestream Reynolds number of 40,600. Overall the numerical solutions capture the general features of the hypersonic laminar wake flow and compare favorably with the wind tunnel data. With a refined and clustering grid distribution in the recirculation zone, the calculated location of the rear stagnation point is consistent with the 2D axisymmetric and 3D experiments. In this study, we also demonstrate the importance of having a large local memory capacity within a computer node and the effective utilization of the number of computer nodes to achieve good parallel performance when simulating a complex, large-scale wake flow problem.

  14. Theoretical and computational dynamics of a compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, Shih-I; Luo, Shijun

    1991-01-01

    An introduction to the theoretical and computational fluid dynamics of a compressible fluid is presented. The general topics addressed include: thermodynamics and physical properties of compressible fluids; 1D flow of an inviscid compressible fluid; shock waves; fundamental equations of the dynamics of a compressible inviscid non-heat-conducting and radiating fluid, method of small perturbations, linearized theory; 2D subsonic steady potential flow; hodograph and rheograph methods, exact solutions of 2D insentropic steady flow equations, 2D steady transonic and hypersonic flows, method of characteristics, linearized theory of 3D potential flow, nonlinear theory of 3D compressibe flow, anisentropic (rotational) flow of inviscid compressible fluid, electromagnetogasdynamics, multiphase flows, flows of a compressible fluid with transport phenomena.

  15. Predictive Computational Modeling of Chromatin Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Pierro, Miichele; Zhang, Bin; Wolynes, Peter J.; Onuchic, Jose N.

    In vivo, the human genome folds into well-determined and conserved three-dimensional structures. The mechanism driving the folding process remains unknown. We report a theoretical model (MiChroM) for chromatin derived by using the maximum entropy principle. The proposed model allows Molecular Dynamics simulations of the genome using as input the classification of loci into chromatin types and the presence of binding sites of loop forming protein CTCF. The model was trained to reproduce the Hi-C map of chromosome 10 of human lymphoblastoid cells. With no additional tuning the model was able to predict accurately the Hi-C maps of chromosomes 1-22 for the same cell line. Simulations show unknotted chromosomes, phase separation of chromatin types and a preference of chromatin of type A to sit at the periphery of the chromosomes.

  16. A generalized one-dimensional computer code for turbomachinery cooling passage flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ganesh N.; Roelke, Richard J.; Meitner, Peter L.

    1989-01-01

    A generalized one-dimensional computer code for analyzing the flow and heat transfer in the turbomachinery cooling passages was developed. This code is capable of handling rotating cooling passages with turbulators, 180 degree turns, pin fins, finned passages, by-pass flows, tip cap impingement flows, and flow branching. The code is an extension of a one-dimensional code developed by P. Meitner. In the subject code, correlations for both heat transfer coefficient and pressure loss computations were developed to model each of the above mentioned type of coolant passages. The code has the capability of independently computing the friction factor and heat transfer coefficient on each side of a rectangular passage. Either the mass flow at the inlet to the channel or the exit plane pressure can be specified. For a specified inlet total temperature, inlet total pressure, and exit static pressure, the code computers the flow rates through the main branch and the subbranches, flow through tip cap for impingement cooling, in addition to computing the coolant pressure, temperature, and heat transfer coefficient distribution in each coolant flow branch. Predictions from the subject code for both nonrotating and rotating passages agree well with experimental data. The code was used to analyze the cooling passage of a research cooled radial rotor.

  17. A generalized one dimensional computer code for turbomachinery cooling passage flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ganesh N.; Roelke, Richard J.; Meitner, Peter L.

    1989-01-01

    A generalized one-dimensional computer code for analyzing the flow and heat transfer in the turbomachinery cooling passages was developed. This code is capable of handling rotating cooling passages with turbulators, 180 degree turns, pin fins, finned passages, by-pass flows, tip cap impingement flows, and flow branching. The code is an extension of a one-dimensional code developed by P. Meitner. In the subject code, correlations for both heat transfer coefficient and pressure loss computations were developed to model each of the above mentioned type of coolant passages. The code has the capability of independently computing the friction factor and heat transfer coefficient on each side of a rectangular passage. Either the mass flow at the inlet to the channel or the exit plane pressure can be specified. For a specified inlet total temperature, inlet total pressure, and exit static pressure, the code computers the flow rates through the main branch and the subbranches, flow through tip cap for impingement cooling, in addition to computing the coolant pressure, temperature, and heat transfer coefficient distribution in each coolant flow branch. Predictions from the subject code for both nonrotating and rotating passages agree well with experimental data. The code was used to analyze the cooling passage of a research cooled radial rotor.

  18. Predicting Computer Science Ph.D. Completion: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, G. W.; Hughes, W. E., Jr.; Etzkorn, L. H.; Weisskopf, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an analysis of indicators that can be used to predict whether a student will succeed in a Computer Science Ph.D. program. The analysis was conducted by studying the records of 75 students who have been in the Computer Science Ph.D. program of the University of Alabama in Huntsville. Seventy-seven variables were…

  19. Navier-Stokes, dynamics and aeroelastic computations for vortical flows, buffet and flutter applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.

    1993-01-01

    Research on Navier-Stokes, dynamics, and aeroelastic computations for vortical flows, buffet, and flutter applications was performed. Progress during the period from 1 Oct. 1992 to 30 Sep. 1993 is included. Papers on the following topics are included: vertical tail buffet in vortex breakdown flows; simulation of tail buffet using delta wing-vertical tail configuration; shock-vortex interaction over a 65-degree delta wing in transonic flow; supersonic vortex breakdown over a delta wing in transonic flow; and prediction and control of slender wing rock.

  20. Computational Flow Modeling of a Simplified Integrated Tractor-Trailer Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Salari, K; McWherter-Payne, M

    2003-09-15

    For several years, Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have been part of a consortium funded by the Department of Energy to improve fuel efficiency of heavy vehicles such as Class 8 trucks through aerodynamic drag reduction. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of using the steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach to predict the flow field around heavy vehicles, with special emphasis on the base region of the trailer, and to compute the aerodynamic forces. In particular, Sandia's computational fluid dynamics code, SACCARA, was used to simulate the flow on a simplified model of a tractor-trailer vehicle. The results are presented and compared with NASA Ames experimental data to assess the predictive capability of RANS to model the flow field and predict the aerodynamic forces.

  1. Computational flow modeling of a simplified integrated tractor-trailer geometry.

    SciTech Connect

    McWherter-Payne, Mary Anna; Salari, Kambiz

    2003-09-01

    For several years, Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have been part of a consortium funded by the Department of Energy to improve fuel efficiency of heavy vehicles such as Class 8 trucks through aerodynamic drag reduction. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of using the steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach to predict the flow field around heavy vehicles, with special emphasis on the base region of the trailer, and to compute the aerodynamic forces. In particular, Sandia's computational fluid dynamics code, SACCARA, was used to simulate the flow on a simplified model of a tractor-trailer vehicle. The results are presented and compared with NASA Ames experimental data to assess the predictive capability of RANS to model the flow field and predict the aerodynamic forces.

  2. Modeling and Prediction of Hot Deformation Flow Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzadeh, Hamed; Cabrera, Jose Maria; Najafizadeh, Abbas

    2012-01-01

    The modeling of hot flow stress and prediction of flow curves for unseen deformation conditions are important in metal-forming processes because any feasible mathematical simulation needs accurate flow description. In the current work, in an attempt to summarize, generalize, and introduce efficient methods, the dynamic recrystallization (DRX) flow curves of a 17-4 PH martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steel, a medium carbon microalloyed steel, and a 304 H austenitic stainless steel were modeled and predicted using (1) a hyperbolic sine equation with strain dependent constants, (2) a developed constitutive equation in a simple normalized stress-normalized strain form and its modified version, and (3) a feed-forward artificial neural network (ANN). These methods were critically discussed, and the ANN technique was found to be the best for the modeling available flow curves; however, the developed constitutive equation showed slightly better performance than that of ANN and significantly better predicted values than those of the hyperbolic sine equation in prediction of flow curves for unseen deformation conditions.

  3. Simulating Subsurface Reactive Flows on Ultrascale Computers with PFLOTRAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, R. T.; Hammond, G. E.; Lichtner, P. C.; Lu, C.; Smith, B. F.; Philip, B.

    2009-12-01

    To provide true predictive utility, subsurface simulations often must accurately resolve--in three dimensions--complicated, multi-phase flow fields in highly heterogeneous geology with numerous chemical species and complex chemistry. This task is especially daunting because of the wide range of spatial scales involved--from the pore scale to the field scale--ranging over six orders of magnitude, and the wide range of time scales ranging from seconds or less to millions of years. This represents a true "Grand Challenge" computational problem, requiring not only the largest-scale ("ultrascale") supercomputers, but accompanying advances in algorithms for the efficient numerical solution of systems of PDEs using these machines, and in mathematical modeling techniques that can adequately capture the truly multi-scale nature of these problems. We describe some of the specific challenges involved and present the software and algorithmic approaches that are being using in the computer code PFLOTRAN to provide scalable performance for such simulations on tens of thousands of processors. We focus particularly on scalable techniques for solving the large (up to billions of total degrees of freedom), sparse algebraic systems that arise. We also describe ongoing work to address disparate time and spatial scales by both the development of adaptive mesh refinement methods and the use of multiple continuum formulations. Finally, we present some examples from recent simulations conducted on Jaguar, the 150152 processor core Cray XT5 system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that is currently one of the most powerful supercomputers in the world.

  4. Prediction of forces and moments on finned bodies at high angle of attack in transonic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W. L.

    1981-04-01

    This report describes a theoretical method for the prediction of fin forces and moments on bodies at high angle of attack in subsonic and transonic flow. The body is assumed to be a circular cylinder with cruciform fins (or wings) of arbitrary planform. The body can have an arbitrary roll (or bank) angle, and each fin can have individual control deflection. The method combines a body vortex flow model and lifting surface theory to predict the normal force distribution over each fin surface. Extensive comparisons are made between theory and experiment for various planform fins. A description of the use of the computer program that implements the method is given.

  5. Predicting the impact of chromium on flow-accelerated corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Chexal, B.; Goyette, L.F.; Horowitz, J.S.; Ruscak, M.

    1996-12-01

    Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) continues to cause problems in nuclear and fossil power plants. Many experiments have been performed to understand the mechanism of FAC. For approximately twenty years, it has ben widely recognized that the presence of small amounts of chromium will reduce the rate of FAC. This effect was quantified in the eighties by research performed in France, Germany and the Netherlands. The results of this research has been incorporated into the computer-based tools used by utility engineers to deal with this issue. For some time, plant data from Diablo Canyon has suggested that the existing correlations relating the concentration of chromium to the rate of FAC are conservative. Laboratory examinations have supported this observation. It appears that the existing correlations fail to capture a change in mechanism from a FAC process with linear kinetics to a general corrosion process with parabolic kinetics. This change in mechanism occurs at a chromium level of approximately 0.1%, within the allowable alloy range of typical carbon steel (ASTM/ASME A106 Grade B) used in power piping in most domestic plants. It has been difficult to obtain plant data that has sufficient chromium to develop a new correlation. Data from Diablo Canyon and the Dukovany Power Plant in the Czech Republic will be used to develop a new chromium correlation for predicting FAC rate.

  6. Predicting cancer risks from dental computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Wu, T-H; Lin, W-C; Chen, W-K; Chang, Y-C; Hwang, J-J

    2015-01-01

    Dental computed tomography (CT) has become a common tool when carrying out dental implants, yet there is little information available on its associated cancer risk. The objective of this study was to estimate the lifetime-attributable risk (LAR) of cancer incidence that is associated with the radiation dose from dental CT scans and to evaluate the effect of scan position, sex, and age on the cancer risk. This retrospective cohort study involved 505 participants who underwent CT scans. The mean effective doses for male and female patients in the maxilla group were 408 and 389 µSv (P = 0.055), respectively, whereas the mean effective doses for male and female patients in the mandible groups were 475 and 450 µSv (P < 0.001), respectively. The LAR for cancer incidence after mandible CT scanning varied from 1 in 16,196 for a 30-y-old woman to 1 in 114,680 for a 70-y-old man. The organ-specific cancer risks for thyroid cancer, other cancers, leukemia, and lung cancer account for 99% of the LAR. Among patients of all ages, the estimated LAR of a mandible scan was higher than that of a maxilla scan. Furthermore, the LAR for female thyroid cancer had a peak before age 45 y. The risk for a woman aged 30 y is roughly 8 times higher than that of a woman aged 50 y. After undergoing a dental CT scan, the possible cancer risks related to sex and age across various different anatomical regions are not similar. The greatest risk due to a dental CT scan is for a mandible scan when the woman is younger than 45 y. Given the limits of the sample size, machine parameters, and the retrospective nature of this study, the results need to be interpreted within the context of this patient population. Future studies will be of value to corroborate these findings. PMID:25359782

  7. Computer modelling of turbulent recirculating flows in engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, E. E.; Assaf, H. M. W.

    A numerical computation procedure for solving the partial differential equations governing turbulent flows is presented, with an emphasis on swirling flows. The conservation equations for mass and momentum are defined, noting the inclusion of turbulence characteristics in Reynolds stress terms. A two-dimensional turbulence model is used, based on an eddy viscosity concept, with the Reynolds stress described in terms of the mean velocity gradient and the eddy viscosity. The model is used for the flow in a rotary air garbage classifier and the flow in a vortex tube. The flexibility of the technique is demonstrated through variations of the initial flow parameters.

  8. Panel-Method Computer Code For Potential Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, Dale L.; Dudley, Michael R.; Iguchi, Steven K.

    1992-01-01

    Low-order panel method used to reduce computation time. Panel code PMARC (Panel Method Ames Research Center) numerically simulates flow field around or through complex three-dimensional bodies such as complete aircraft models or wind tunnel. Based on potential-flow theory. Facilitates addition of new features to code and tailoring of code to specific problems and computer-hardware constraints. Written in standard FORTRAN 77.

  9. Dynamic Inlet Distortion Prediction with a Combined Computational Fluid Dynamics and Distortion Synthesis Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norby, W. P.; Ladd, J. A.; Yuhas, A. J.

    1996-01-01

    A procedure has been developed for predicting peak dynamic inlet distortion. This procedure combines Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and distortion synthesis analysis to obtain a prediction of peak dynamic distortion intensity and the associated instantaneous total pressure pattern. A prediction of the steady state total pressure pattern at the Aerodynamic Interface Plane is first obtained using an appropriate CFD flow solver. A corresponding inlet turbulence pattern is obtained from the CFD solution via a correlation linking root mean square (RMS) inlet turbulence to a formulation of several CFD parameters representative of flow turbulence intensity. This correlation was derived using flight data obtained from the NASA High Alpha Research Vehicle flight test program and several CFD solutions at conditions matching the flight test data. A distortion synthesis analysis is then performed on the predicted steady state total pressure and RMS turbulence patterns to yield a predicted value of dynamic distortion intensity and the associated instantaneous total pressure pattern.

  10. Cerebral aneurysms treated with flow-diverting stents: Computational models using intravascular blood flow measurements

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, Michael R; McGah, Patrick M; Aliseda, Alberto; Mourad, Pierre D; Nerva, John D; Vaidya, Sandeep S; Morton, Ryan P; Ghodke, Basavaraj V; Kim, Louis J

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Computational fluid dynamics modeling is useful in the study of the hemodynamic environment of cerebral aneurysms, but patient-specific measurements of boundary conditions, such as blood flow velocity and pressure, have not been previously applied to the study of flow-diverting stents. We integrated patient-specific intravascular blood flow velocity and pressure measurements into computational models of aneurysms before and after treatment with flow-diverting stents to determine stent effects on aneurysm hemodynamics. Methods Blood flow velocity and pressure were measured in peri-aneurysmal locations using an intravascular dual-sensor pressure and Doppler velocity guidewire before and after flow-diverting stent treatment of four unruptured cerebral aneurysms. These measurements defined inflow and outflow boundary conditions for computational models. Intra-aneurysmal flow rates, wall shear stress and wall shear stress gradient were calculated. Results Measurements of inflow velocity and outflow pressure were successful in all four patients. Computational models incorporating these measurements demonstrated significant reductions in intra-aneurysmal wall shear stress and wall shear stress gradient, and a trend in reduced intra-aneurysmal blood flow. Conclusions Integration of intravascular dual-sensor guidewire measurements of blood flow velocity and blood pressure provided patient-specific computational models of cerebral aneurysms. Aneurysm treatment with flow-diverting stents reduces blood flow and hemodynamic shear stress in the aneurysm dome. PMID:23868162

  11. Outer packet sets and feature prediction of computer virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ling

    2014-10-01

    The packet sets model was proposed by Prof. Shi in 2008. A packet sets is a set pair composed of internal and outer packet sets, and it has dynamic characteristic. Using packet sets theory, this paper gives the feature prediction of computer virus based on outer packet sets. The concept of virus screening-filtering is given, furthermore, the virus screening-filtering order theorem, composite virus screening-filtering theorem and virus screening-filtering rule are presented. A prediction method of computer virus feature is given based on the results. The outer packet sets is a new tool in the research of the prediction of dynamic virus feature.

  12. On the Vortical-Flow Prediction Capability of an Unstructured-Grid Euler Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffari, Farhad

    1994-01-01

    The results from a concentrated computational effort are presented with the primary objective being directed at evaluating the vortical-flow-prediction capability of an unstructured-grid Euler solver. Both viscous and inviscid solutions, obtained from an established structured-grid method, along with an experimental wind-tunnel data are used as bench-mark measures to assess the validity of the unstructured-grid Euler results. Viscous effects on vortical flows are first identified by comparing the viscous and inviscid solutions obtained form the structured-grid method. Computational data analysis are then presented which reveal excellent correlations between the inviscid structured and unstructured-grid results in terms of off-surface flow structures, surface pressure distribution and the predicted longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics. The sensitivity of the unstructured-grid inviscid solutions to grid refinement is also discussed along with an analysis of the convergence and performance characteristics for each method.

  13. Interfacial shear modeling and flow predictions for internal film condesation flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narain, A.

    1992-01-01

    Internal flow of pure vapor experiencing film condesation on the walls of a straight duct is studied. The commonly occuring case of turbulent (or laminar) vapor flow in the core and laminar flow of the liquid condensate-with or without waves on the interface-is emphasized. We propose and implement a new first principle methodolgy which model interfacial shear with the help of reliable experimental data on heat transfer rates. Other details of the flow are predicted with the help of this model. These predictions are shown to be in agreement with relevant experimental data. Correlations for film thickness and heat transfer rates are also given.

  14. Hybrid soft computing systems for reservoir PVT properties prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoukhi, Amar

    2012-07-01

    In reservoir engineering, the knowledge of Pressure-Volume-Temperature (PVT) properties is of great importance for many uses, such as well test analyses, reserve estimation, material balance calculations, inflow performance calculations, fluid flow in porous media and the evaluation of new formations for the potential development and enhancement oil recovery projects. The determination of these properties is a complex problem because laboratory-measured properties of rock samples ("cores") are only available from limited and isolated well locations and/or intervals. Several correlation models have been developed to relate these properties to other measures which are relatively abundant. These models include empirical correlations, statistical regression and artificial neural networks (ANNs). In this paper, a comprehensive study is conducted on the prediction of the bubble point pressure and oil formation volume factor using two hybrid of soft computing techniques; a genetically optimised neural network and a genetically enhanced subtractive clustering for the parameter identification of an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system. Simulation experiments are provided, showing the performance of the proposed techniques as compared with commonly used regression correlations, including standard artificial neural networks.

  15. Computation of multi-dimensional viscous supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buggeln, R. C.; Kim, Y. N.; Mcdonald, H.

    1986-01-01

    A method has been developed for two- and three-dimensional computations of viscous supersonic jet flows interacting with an external flow. The approach employs a reduced form of the Navier-Stokes equations which allows solution as an initial-boundary value problem in space, using an efficient noniterative forward marching algorithm. Numerical instability associated with forward marching algorithms for flows with embedded subsonic regions is avoided by approximation of the reduced form of the Navier-Stokes equations in the subsonic regions of the boundary layers. Supersonic and subsonic portions of the flow field are simultaneously calculated by a consistently split linearized block implicit computational algorithm. The results of computations for a series of test cases associated with supersonic jet flow is presented and compared with other calculations for axisymmetric cases. Demonstration calculations indicate that the computational technique has great promise as a tool for calculating a wide range of supersonic flow problems including jet flow. Finally, a User's Manual is presented for the computer code used to perform the calculations.

  16. Use of computer graphics for visualization of flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Val; Buning, Pieter; Choi, Diana; Bancroft, Gordon; Merritt, Fergus; Rogers, Stuart

    1987-01-01

    A high-performance graphics workstation has been combined with software developed for flow-field visualization to yield a highly effective tool for analysis of fluid-flow dynamics. After the flow fields are obtained from experimental measurements or computer simulations, the workstation permits one to interactively view the dynamics of the flow fields; e.g., the viewer can zoom into a region or rotate his viewing position about the region to study it in more detail. Several techniques for visualization of flow fields with this workstation are described in this paper and illustrated with a videotape available from the authors. The computer hardware and software required to create effective flow visualization displays are discussed. Additional software and hardware required to create videotapes or 16mm movies are also described. Limitations imposed by current workstation performance is addressed and future workstation performance is forecast.

  17. Asymmetric energy flow in liquid alkylbenzenes: A computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, David M.; Pandey, Hari Datt

    2015-10-14

    Ultrafast IR-Raman experiments on substituted benzenes [B. C. Pein et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 117, 10898–10904 (2013)] reveal that energy can flow more efficiently in one direction along a molecule than in others. We carry out a computational study of energy flow in the three alkyl benzenes, toluene, isopropylbenzene, and t-butylbenzene, studied in these experiments, and find an asymmetry in the flow of vibrational energy between the two chemical groups of the molecule due to quantum mechanical vibrational relaxation bottlenecks, which give rise to a preferred direction of energy flow. We compare energy flow computed for all modes of the three alkylbenzenes over the relaxation time into the liquid with energy flow through the subset of modes monitored in the time-resolved Raman experiments and find qualitatively similar results when using the subset compared to all the modes.

  18. Computational methods in sequence and structure prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Caiyi

    This dissertation is organized into two parts. In the first part, we will discuss three computational methods for cis-regulatory element recognition in three different gene regulatory networks as the following: (a) Using a comprehensive "Phylogenetic Footprinting Comparison" method, we will investigate the promoter sequence structures of three enzymes (PAL, CHS and DFR) that catalyze sequential steps in the pathway from phenylalanine to anthocyanins in plants. Our result shows there exists a putative cis-regulatory element "AC(C/G)TAC(C)" in the upstream of these enzyme genes. We propose this cis-regulatory element to be responsible for the genetic regulation of these three enzymes and this element, might also be the binding site for MYB class transcription factor PAP1. (b) We will investigate the role of the Arabidopsis gene glutamate receptor 1.1 (AtGLR1.1) in C and N metabolism by utilizing the microarray data we obtained from AtGLR1.1 deficient lines (antiAtGLR1.1). We focus our investigation on the putatively co-regulated transcript profile of 876 genes we have collected in antiAtGLR1.1 lines. By (a) scanning the occurrence of several groups of known abscisic acid (ABA) related cisregulatory elements in the upstream regions of 876 Arabidopsis genes; and (b) exhaustive scanning of all possible 6-10 bps motif occurrence in the upstream regions of the same set of genes, we are able to make a quantative estimation on the enrichment level of each of the cis-regulatory element candidates. We finally conclude that one specific cis-regulatory element group, called "ABRE" elements, are statistically highly enriched within the 876-gene group as compared to their occurrence within the genome. (c) We will introduce a new general purpose algorithm, called "fuzzy REDUCE1", which we have developed recently for automated cis-regulatory element identification. In the second part, we will discuss our newly devised protein design framework. With this framework we have developed

  19. PNS predictions for supersonic/hypersonic flows over finned missile configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhutta, Bilal A.; Lewis, Clark H.

    1992-01-01

    Finned missile design entails accurate and computationally fast numerical techniques for predicting viscous flows over complex lifting configurations at small to moderate angles of attack and over Mach 3 to 15; these flows are often characterized by strong embedded shocks, so that numerical algorithms are also required to capture embedded shocks. The recent real-gas Flux Vector Splitting technique is here extended to investigate the Mach 3 flow over a typical finned missile configuration with/without side fin deflections. Elliptic grid-generation techniques for Mach 15 flows are shown to be inadequate for Mach 3 flows over finned configurations and need to be modified. Fin-deflection studies indicate that even small amounts of missile fin deflection can substantially modify vehicle aerodynamics. This 3D parabolized Navier-Stokes scheme is also extended into an efficient embedded algorithm for studying small axially separated flow regions due to strong fin and control surface deflections.

  20. Computed Aeroelastic Motions Of Wings In Transonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.; Obayashi, Shigeru

    1995-01-01

    Report describes computational simulations of aeroelastic motions of delta and swept wings in transonic flows. Study directed toward understanding aerodynamic behavior and enhancing maneuverability of fighter airplanes equipped with such wings. Also has implications for gas pumps and turbines, in which flows near tips of vanes and blades reach supersonic speeds.

  1. Computation techniques for the simulation of turbomachinery compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veuillot, J. P.; Cambier, L.

    Computation techniques for the simulation of turbomachinery compressible flows via the numerical solution of Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are described. In a discussion of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations for turbomachinery flow calculations, attention is given to equations for a rotating system, quasi-three-dimensional formulation, and turbulence modeling. Examples of Navier-Stokes calculations are presented.

  2. Predicting Computer System Failures Using Support Vector Machines

    SciTech Connect

    Fulp, Errin W.; Fink, Glenn A.; Haack, Jereme N.

    2008-12-07

    Mitigating the impact of computer failure is possible if accurate failure predictions are provided. Resources, applications, and services can be scheduled around predicted failure and limit the impact. Such strategies are especially important for multi-computer systems, such as compute clusters, that experience a higher rate failure due to the large number of components. However providing accurate predictions with sufficient lead time remains a challenging problem. This paper describes a new spectrum-kernel Support Vector Machine (SVM) approach to predict failure events based on system log files. These files contain messages that represent a change of system state. While a single message in the file may not be sufficient for predicting failure, a sequence or pattern of messages may be. The approach described in this paper will use a sliding window (sub-sequence) of messages to predict the likelihood of failure. The frequency representation of the message sub-sequences observed are then used as input to the SVM that associates the messages to a class of failed or non-failed system. Experimental results using actual system log files from a Linux-based compute cluster indicate the proposed SVM approach can predict hard disk failure with an accuracy of 76% one day in advance.

  3. The morphology of lava flows in planetary environments - Predictions from analog experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffiths, Ross W.; Fink, Jonathan H.

    1992-01-01

    Computations are carried out of the rates of surface cooling and lateral flow of lavas extruded onto the surfaces of terrestrial planets and the outer planet satellites, and the likely flow morphologies predicted by extrapolation of the laboratory analog results are determined. Results of this approach are presented for the earth, Venus, Mars, the moon, and the silicate flows on Io. The experiments, which involved the spreading of a viscous liquid under gravity in the presence of a solidifying surface crust, revealed a set of four distinct surface morphologies.

  4. Vortical Flow Prediction using an Adaptive Unstructured Grid Method. Chapter 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.

    2009-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method has been employed to compute vortical flows around slender wing/body configurations. The emphasis of the paper is on the effectiveness of an adaptive grid procedure in "capturing" concentrated vortices generated at sharp edges or flow separation lines of lifting surfaces flying at high angles of attack. The method is based on a tetrahedral unstructured grid technology developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Two steady-state, subsonic, inviscid and Navier-Stokes flow test cases are presented to demonstrate the applicability of the method for solving vortical flow problems. The first test case concerns vortex flow over a simple 65 delta wing with different values of leading-edge radius. Although the geometry is quite simple, it poses a challenging problem for computing vortices originating from blunt leading edges. The second case is that of a more complex fighter configuration. The superiority of the adapted solutions in capturing the vortex flow structure over the conventional unadapted results is demonstrated by comparisons with the wind-tunnel experimental data. The study shows that numerical prediction of vortical flows is highly sensitive to the local grid resolution and that the implementation of grid adaptation is essential when applying CFD methods to such complicated flow problems.

  5. Computational Analysis of Multi-Rotor Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Seokkwan; Lee, Henry C.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    Interactional aerodynamics of multi-rotor flows has been studied for a quadcopter representing a generic quad tilt-rotor aircraft in hover. The objective of the present study is to investigate the effects of the separation distances between rotors, and also fuselage and wings on the performance and efficiency of multirotor systems. Three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a spatially 5th order accurate scheme, dual-time stepping, and the Detached Eddy Simulation turbulence model. The results show that the separation distances as well as the wings have significant effects on the vertical forces of quadroror systems in hover. Understanding interactions in multi-rotor flows would help improve the design of next generation multi-rotor drones.

  6. Review - Computational methods for internal flows with emphasis on turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnally, W. D.; Sockol, P. M.

    1985-01-01

    Current computational methods for analyzing flows in turbomachinery and other related internal propulsion components are presented. The methods are divided into two classes. The inviscid methods deal specifically with turbomachinery applications. Viscous methods, deal with generalized duct flows as well as flows in turbomachinery passages. Inviscid methods are categorized into the potential, stream function, and Euler approaches. Viscous methods are treated in terms of parabolic, partially parabolic, and elliptic procedures. Various grids used in association with these procedures are also discussed.

  7. Computation of subsonic flow around airfoil systems with multiple separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, K.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical method for computing the subsonic flow around multi-element airfoil systems was developed, allowing for flow separation at one or more elements. Besides multiple rear separation also sort bubbles on the upper surface and cove bubbles can approximately be taken into account. Also, compressibility effects for pure subsonic flow are approximately accounted for. After presentation the method is applied to several examples and improved in some details. Finally, the present limitations and desirable extensions are discussed.

  8. Computational methods for internal flows with emphasis on turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnally, W. D.; Sockol, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    Current computational methods for analyzing flows in turbomachinery and other related internal propulsion components are presented. The methods are divided into two classes. The inviscid methods deal specifically with turbomachinery applications. Viscous methods, deal with generalized duct flows as well as flows in turbomachinery passages. Inviscid methods are categorized into the potential, stream function, and Euler aproaches. Viscous methods are treated in terms of parabolic, partially parabolic, and elliptic procedures. Various grids used in association with these procedures are also discussed.

  9. Prediction of flow profiles in arteries from local measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, S. C.; Atabek, H. B.

    1971-01-01

    This paper develops an approximate numerical method for calculating flow profiles in arteries. The theory takes into account the nonlinear terms of the Navier-Stokes equations as well as the large deformations of the arterial wall. The method, assuming axially symmetric flow, determines velocity distribution and wall shear at a given location from the locally measured values of the pressure, pressure gradient, and pressure-radius relation. The computed results agree well with the corresponding experimental data.

  10. Bypass flow computations on the LOFA transient in a VHTR

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, Yu-Hsin; Johnson, Richard W.; Ferng, Yuh-Ming; Chieng, Ching-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Bypass flow in the prismatic gas-cooled very high temperature reactor (VHTR) is not intentionally designed to occur, but is present in the gaps between graphite blocks. Previous studies of the bypass flow in the core indicated that the cooling provided by flow in the bypass gaps had a significant effect on temperature and flow distributions for normal operating conditions. However, the flow and heat transports in the core are changed significantly after a Loss of Flow Accident (LOFA). This study aims to study the effect and role of the bypass flow after a LOFA in terms of the temperature and flow distributions and for the heat transport out of the core by natural convection of the coolant for a 1/12 symmetric section of the active core which is composed of images and mirror images of two sub-region models. The two sub-region models, 9 x 1/12 and 15 x 1/12 symmetric sectors of the active core, are employed as the CFD flow models using computational grid systems of 70.2 million and 117 million nodes, respectively. It is concluded that the effect of bypass flow is significant for the initial conditions and the beginning of LOFA, but the bypass flow has little effect after a long period of time in the transient computation of natural circulation.

  11. Computer modeling of electromagnetic fields and fluid flows for edge containment in continuous casting

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, F.C.; Hull, J.R.; Wang, Y.H.; Blazek, K.E.

    1996-02-01

    A computer model was developed to predict eddy currents and fluid flows in molten steel. The model was verified by comparing predictions with experimental results of liquid-metal containment and fluid flow in electromagnetic (EM) edge dams (EMDs) designed at Inland Steel for twin-roll casting. The model can optimize the EMD design so it is suitable for application, and minimize expensive, time-consuming full-scale testing. Numerical simulation was performed by coupling a three-dimensional (3-D) finite-element EM code (ELEKTRA) and a 3-D finite-difference fluids code (CaPS-EM) to solve heat transfer, fluid flow, and turbulence transport in a casting process that involves EM fields. ELEKTRA is able to predict the eddy- current distribution and the electromagnetic forces in complex geometries. CaPS-EM is capable of modeling fluid flows with free surfaces. Results of the numerical simulation compared well with measurements obtained from a static test.

  12. A Computer Code for Swirling Turbulent Axisymmetric Recirculating Flows in Practical Isothermal Combustor Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilley, D. G.; Rhode, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    A primitive pressure-velocity variable finite difference computer code was developed to predict swirling recirculating inert turbulent flows in axisymmetric combustors in general, and for application to a specific idealized combustion chamber with sudden or gradual expansion. The technique involves a staggered grid system for axial and radial velocities, a line relaxation procedure for efficient solution of the equations, a two-equation k-epsilon turbulence model, a stairstep boundary representation of the expansion flow, and realistic accommodation of swirl effects. A user's manual, dealing with the computational problem, showing how the mathematical basis and computational scheme may be translated into a computer program is presented. A flow chart, FORTRAN IV listing, notes about various subroutines and a user's guide are supplied as an aid to prospective users of the code.

  13. DONBOL: A computer program for predicting axisymmetric nozzle afterbody pressure distributions and drag at subsonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, L. E.

    1979-01-01

    A Neumann solution for inviscid external flow was coupled to a modified Reshotko-Tucker integral boundary-layer technique, the control volume method of Presz for calculating flow in the separated region, and an inviscid one-dimensional solution for the jet exhaust flow in order to predict axisymmetric nozzle afterbody pressure distributions and drag. The viscous and inviscid flows are solved iteratively until convergence is obtained. A computer algorithm of this procedure was written and is called DONBOL. A description of the computer program and a guide to its use is given. Comparisons of the predictions of this method with experiments show that the method accurately predicts the pressure distributions of boattail afterbodies which have the jet exhaust flow simulated by solid bodies. For nozzle configurations which have the jet exhaust simulated by high-pressure air, the present method significantly underpredicts the magnitude of nozzle pressure drag. This deficiency results because the method neglects the effects of jet plume entrainment. This method is limited to subsonic free-stream Mach numbers below that for which the flow over the body of revolution becomes sonic.

  14. Wing analysis using a transonic potential flow computational method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henne, P. A.; Hicks, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    The ability of the method to compute wing transonic performance was determined by comparing computed results with both experimental data and results computed by other theoretical procedures. Both pressure distributions and aerodynamic forces were evaluated. Comparisons indicated that the method is a significant improvement in transonic wing analysis capability. In particular, the computational method generally calculated the correct development of three-dimensional pressure distributions from subcritical to transonic conditions. Complicated, multiple shocked flows observed experimentally were reproduced computationally. The ability to identify the effects of design modifications was demonstrated both in terms of pressure distributions and shock drag characteristics.

  15. Prediction of vortex shedding from circular and noncircular bodies in subsonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendenhall, Michael R.; Lesieutre, Daniel J.

    1987-01-01

    An engineering prediction method and associated computer code VTXCLD are presented which predict nose vortex shedding from circular and noncircular bodies in subsonic flow at angles of attack and roll. The axisymmetric body is represented by point sources and doublets, and noncircular cross sections are transformed to a circle by either analytical or numerical conformal transformations. The leeward vortices are modeled by discrete vortices in crossflow planes along the body; thus, the three-dimensional steady flow problem is reduced to a two-dimensional, unsteady, separated flow problem for solution. Comparison of measured and predicted surface pressure distributions, flowfield surveys, and aerodynamic characteristics are presented for bodies with circular and noncircular cross sectional shapes.

  16. A comparative study of computational solutions to flow over a backward-facing step

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizukami, M.; Georgiadis, N. J.; Cannon, M. R.

    1993-01-01

    A comparative study was conducted for computational fluid dynamic solutions to flow over a backward-facing step. This flow is a benchmark problem, with a simple geometry, but involves complicated flow physics such as free shear layers, reattaching flow, recirculation, and high turbulence intensities. Three Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solvers with k-epsilon turbulence models were used, each using a different solution algorithm: finite difference, finite element, and hybrid finite element - finite difference. Comparisons were made with existing experimental data. Results showed that velocity profiles and reattachment lengths were predicted reasonably well by all three methods, while the skin friction coefficients were more difficult to predict accurately. It was noted that, in general, selecting an appropriate solver for each problem to be considered is important.

  17. Computation of layers in Eulerian gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemker, P. W.

    A mixed defect-correction iteration process (MDCP) is applied for the implicit numerical solution of steady Euler flows. Without stability problems, MDCP can be applied with a straightforward 2nd order scheme such as central differences. A nearly monotonous representation of the thin layers is obtained by application of a 2nd order scheme with a proper flux-limiter. When combined with nonlinear multigrid (FAS) cycles, a few FAS-MDCP iteration steps are sufficient to determine the two solutions up to truncation-error accuracy.

  18. Recent developments in multiphysics computational models of physiological flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldredge, Jeff D.; Mittal, Rajat

    2016-04-01

    A mini-symposium on computational modeling of fluid-structure interactions and other multiphysics in physiological flows was held at the 11th World Congress on Computational Mechanics in July 2014 in Barcelona, Spain. This special issue of Theoretical and Computational Fluid Dynamics contains papers from among the participants of the mini-symposium. The present paper provides an overview of the mini-symposium and the special issue.

  19. Computational and Experimental Investigations of Turbulent Flow Past Projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmedagic, Igbal; Carlucci, Pasquale; Carlucci, Donald; Thangam, Siva

    2008-11-01

    Experimental and computational investigations of turbulent flow past projectiles is modeled as axial flow past a cylinder with a free-spinning base. A subsonic wind tunnel with a forward-sting mounted spinning cylinder is used for experiments. In addition, a free-jet facility is used for benchmarking the experimental set up. Experiments are performed for a range of spin rates and free stream flow conditions. An anisotropic two-equation Reynolds-stress model that incorporates the effect of rotation-modified energy spectrum and swirl is used to perform computations for the flow past axially rotating cylinders. Both rigid cylinders as well as that of cylinders with free-spinning base are considered from a computational point of view. Applications involving the design of projectiles are discussed.

  20. Computation of three-dimensional flows using two stream functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greywall, Mahesh S.

    1991-01-01

    An approach to compute 3-D flows using two stream functions is presented. The method generates a boundary fitted grid as part of its solution. Commonly used two steps for computing the flow fields are combined into a single step in the present approach: (1) boundary fitted grid generation; and (2) solution of Navier-Stokes equations on the generated grid. The presented method can be used to directly compute 3-D viscous flows, or the potential flow approximation of this method can be used to generate grids for other algorithms to compute 3-D viscous flows. The independent variables used are chi, a spatial coordinate, and xi and eta, values of stream functions along two sets of suitably chosen intersecting stream surfaces. The dependent variables used are the streamwise velocity, and two functions that describe the stream surfaces. Since for a 3-D flow there is no unique way to define two sets of intersecting stream surfaces to cover the given flow, different types of two sets of intersecting stream surfaces are considered. First, the metric of the (chi, xi, eta) curvilinear coordinate system associated with each type is presented. Next, equations for the steady state transport of mass, momentum, and energy are presented in terms of the metric of the (chi, xi, eta) coordinate system. Also included are the inviscid and the parabolized approximations to the general transport equations.

  1. Numerical computation of transient coaxial entry tube flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieber, P. R.; Dewitt, K. J.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical program was developed to compute transient laminar flows in two dimensions including multicomponent mixing and chemical reaction. The program can compute both incompressible flows and compressible flows at all speeds, and it is applied to describe transient and steady state solutions for low subsonic, coaxial entry, tue flows. Single component, nonreacting flows comprise most of the solutions, but one steady state solution is presented for trace concentration constituents engaging in a second order reaction. Numerical stability was obtained by adding at each calculation point a correction for numerical diffusion errors caused by truncation of the Taylor series used to finite difference the conservation equations. Transient computations were made for fluids initially at rest, then subjected to step velocity inputs that were uniform across each region of the entry plane and were held constant throughout the computation period. For center tube to annulus velocity ratios of 0.5 and 2.0, the bulk fluid in the tube initially moved in plug flow, but strong radial flows developed near the injection plane which moved the fluid into the high shear region between the jets and away from the tube wall.

  2. Computation of multi-dimensional viscous supersonic jet flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y. N.; Buggeln, R. C.; Mcdonald, H.

    1986-01-01

    A new method has been developed for two- and three-dimensional computations of viscous supersonic flows with embedded subsonic regions adjacent to solid boundaries. The approach employs a reduced form of the Navier-Stokes equations which allows solution as an initial-boundary value problem in space, using an efficient noniterative forward marching algorithm. Numerical instability associated with forward marching algorithms for flows with embedded subsonic regions is avoided by approximation of the reduced form of the Navier-Stokes equations in the subsonic regions of the boundary layers. Supersonic and subsonic portions of the flow field are simultaneously calculated by a consistently split linearized block implicit computational algorithm. The results of computations for a series of test cases relevant to internal supersonic flow is presented and compared with data. Comparison between data and computation are in general excellent thus indicating that the computational technique has great promise as a tool for calculating supersonic flow with embedded subsonic regions. Finally, a User's Manual is presented for the computer code used to perform the calculations.

  3. Long time behavior of unsteady flow computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.

    1992-01-01

    This paper addresses a specific issue of time accuracy in the calculation of external aerodynamic problems. The class of problems discussed consists of inviscid compressible subsonic flows. These problems are governed by a convective equation. A key issue that is not understood is the long time behavior of the solution. This is important if one desires transient calculations of problems governed by the Euler equations or its derivatives such as the small disturbance equations or the potential formulations for the gust problem. Difficulties arise for two dimensional problems where the time rate decay solutions of the wave equation is slow. In concert with the above mentioned problem, exterior flows require proper modeling of the boundary conditions. In particular, this requires the truncation of infinite regions into finite regions with the aid of artificial boundaries. These boundary conditions must be consistent with the physics of the unbounded problem as well as consistent in time and space. Our treatment of the problem is discussed in detail and examples are given to verify the results.

  4. MEASUREMENTS AND COMPUTATIONS OF FUEL DROPLET TRANSPORT IN TURBULENT FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Katz and Omar Knio

    2007-01-10

    The objective of this project is to study the dynamics of fuel droplets in turbulent water flows. The results are essential for development of models capable of predicting the dispersion of slightly light/heavy droplets in isotropic turbulence. Since we presently do not have any experimental data on turbulent diffusion of droplets, existing mixing models have no physical foundations. Such fundamental knowledge is essential for understanding/modeling the environmental problems associated with water-fuel mixing, and/or industrial processes involving mixing of immiscible fluids. The project has had experimental and numerical components: 1. The experimental part of the project has had two components. The first involves measurements of the lift and drag forces acting on a droplet being entrained by a vortex. The experiments and data analysis associated with this phase are still in progress, and the facility, constructed specifically for this project is described in Section 3. In the second and main part, measurements of fuel droplet dispersion rates have been performed in a special facility with controlled isotropic turbulence. As discussed in detail in Section 2, quantifying and modeling the of droplet dispersion rate requires measurements of their three dimensional trajectories in turbulent flows. To obtain the required data, we have introduced a new technique - high-speed, digital Holographic Particle Image Velocimetry (HPIV). The technique, experimental setup and results are presented in Section 2. Further information is available in Gopalan et al. (2005, 2006). 2. The objectives of the numerical part are: (1) to develop a computational code that combines DNS of isotropic turbulence with Lagrangian tracking of particles based on integration of a dynamical equation of motion that accounts for pressure, added mass, lift and drag forces, (2) to perform extensive computations of both buoyant (bubbles) and slightly buoyant (droplets) particles in turbulence conditions

  5. Use of advanced computers for aerodynamic flow simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, F. R.; Ballhaus, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    The current and projected use of advanced computers for large-scale aerodynamic flow simulation applied to engineering design and research is discussed. The design use of mature codes run on conventional, serial computers is compared with the fluid research use of new codes run on parallel and vector computers. The role of flow simulations in design is illustrated by the application of a three dimensional, inviscid, transonic code to the Sabreliner 60 wing redesign. Research computations that include a more complete description of the fluid physics by use of Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes and large-eddy simulation formulations are also presented. Results of studies for a numerical aerodynamic simulation facility are used to project the feasibility of design applications employing these more advanced three dimensional viscous flow simulations.

  6. Numerical computation of space shuttle orbiter flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannehill, John C.

    1988-01-01

    A new parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) code has been developed to compute the hypersonic, viscous chemically reacting flow fields around 3-D bodies. The flow medium is assumed to be a multicomponent mixture of thermally perfect but calorically imperfect gases. The new PNS code solves the gas dynamic and species conservation equations in a coupled manner using a noniterative, implicit, approximately factored, finite difference algorithm. The space-marching method is made well-posed by special treatment of the streamwise pressure gradient term. The code has been used to compute hypersonic laminar flow of chemically reacting air over cones at angle of attack. The results of the computations are compared with the results of reacting boundary-layer computations and show excellent agreement.

  7. Predictive mapping of the natural flow regimes of France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snelder, Ton H.; Lamouroux, Nicolas; Leathwick, John R.; Pella, Hervé; Sauquet, Eric; Shankar, Ude

    2009-06-01

    SummaryHydrologic variability is important in sustaining a variety of ecological processes in streams and rivers. Natural flow regime classifications group streams and rivers that are relatively homogeneous with respect to flow variability and have been promoted as a method of defining units for management of river flows. Although there has been considerable interest in classifying natural flow regimes, there has been less emphasis given to developing accurate methods of extrapolating these classifications to locations without flow data. We developed a method of mapping flow regime classes using boosted regression trees (BRT) that automatically fits non-linear functions and interactions between explanatory variables of flow regimes, both of which can be expected when comparing responses between complex systems such as watersheds. A natural flow regimes classification of continental France was developed from cluster analysis of 157 hydrological indices derived from 763 gauging stations representing unmodified flows. BRT models were used to predict the likelihood of gauging stations belonging to each class based on the watershed characteristics. These models were used to extrapolate the natural flow regime classification to all segments of a national river network. The performance of the BRT models were compared with other methods of assigning locations to flow regime classes, including the use of geographically contiguous regions, linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and classification and regression trees (CART). The "fitted" misclassification rate (associated with model fits) for assignment based on the BRT models was 13% whereas the fitted misclassification rates for geographically contiguous regions, LDA and CART were 52%, 44% and 39% respectively. A "predictive" misclassification rate (calculated for new cases) was estimated for assignments based on the BRT, LDA and CART models using cross validation analysis. For assignment based on the BRT models, the mean

  8. Navier-Stokes Computations With One-Equation Turbulence Model for Flows Along Concave Wall Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Chi R.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the use of a time-marching three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equation numerical solver with a one-equation turbulence model to simulate the flow fields developed along concave wall surfaces without and with a downstream extension flat wall surface. The 3-D Navier- Stokes numerical solver came from the NASA Glenn-HT code. The one-equation turbulence model was derived from the Spalart and Allmaras model. The computational approach was first calibrated with the computations of the velocity and Reynolds shear stress profiles of a steady flat plate boundary layer flow. The computational approach was then used to simulate developing boundary layer flows along concave wall surfaces without and with a downstream extension wall. The author investigated the computational results of surface friction factors, near surface velocity components, near wall temperatures, and a turbulent shear stress component in terms of turbulence modeling, computational mesh configurations, inlet turbulence level, and time iteration step. The computational results were compared with existing measurements of skin friction factors, velocity components, and shear stresses of the developing boundary layer flows. With a fine computational mesh and a one-equation model, the computational approach could predict accurately the skin friction factors, near surface velocity and temperature, and shear stress within the flows. The computed velocity components and shear stresses also showed the vortices effect on the velocity variations over a concave wall. The computed eddy viscosities at the near wall locations were also compared with the results from a two equation turbulence modeling technique. The inlet turbulence length scale was found to have little effect on the eddy viscosities at locations near the concave wall surface. The eddy viscosities, from the one-equation and two-equation modeling, were comparable at most stream-wise stations. The present one

  9. Transonic Flow Computations Using Nonlinear Potential Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This presentation describes the state of transonic flow simulation using nonlinear potential methods for external aerodynamic applications. The presentation begins with a review of the various potential equation forms (with emphasis on the full potential equation) and includes a discussion of pertinent mathematical characteristics and all derivation assumptions. Impact of the derivation assumptions on simulation accuracy, especially with respect to shock wave capture, is discussed. Key characteristics of all numerical algorithm types used for solving nonlinear potential equations, including steady, unsteady, space marching, and design methods, are described. Both spatial discretization and iteration scheme characteristics are examined. Numerical results for various aerodynamic applications are included throughout the presentation to highlight key discussion points. The presentation ends with concluding remarks and recommendations for future work. Overall. nonlinear potential solvers are efficient, highly developed and routinely used in the aerodynamic design environment for cruise conditions. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Computation of flow pressure fields from magnetic resonance velocity mapping.

    PubMed

    Yang, G Z; Kilner, P J; Wood, N B; Underwood, S R; Firmin, D N

    1996-10-01

    Magnetic resonance phase velocity mapping has unrivalled capacities for acquiring in vivo multi-directional blood flow information. In this study, the authors set out to derive both spatial and temporal components of acceleration, and hence differences of pressure in a flow field using cine magnetic resonance velocity data. An efficient numerical algorithm based on the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible Newtonian fluid was used. The computational approach was validated with in vitro flow phantoms. This work aims to contribute to a better understanding of cardiovascular dynamics and to serve as a basis for investigating pulsatile pressure/flow relationships associated with normal and impaired cardiovascular function. PMID:8892202

  11. The very local Hubble flow: Computer simulations of dynamical history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Valtonen, M. J.; Dolgachev, V. P.; Domozhilova, L. M.; Makarov, D. I.

    2004-02-01

    The phenomenon of the very local (≤3 Mpc) Hubble flow is studied on the basis of the data of recent precision observations. A set of computer simulations is performed to trace the trajectories of the flow galaxies back in time to the epoch of the formation of the Local Group. It is found that the ``initial conditions'' of the flow are drastically different from the linear velocity-distance relation. The simulations enable one also to recognize the major trends of the flow evolution and identify the dynamical role of universal antigravity produced by the cosmic vacuum.

  12. Computation of transonic potential flow about 3 dimensional inlets, ducts, and bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reyhner, T. A.

    1982-01-01

    An analysis was developed and a computer code, P465 Version A, written for the prediction of transonic potential flow about three dimensional objects including inlet, duct, and body geometries. Finite differences and line relaxation are used to solve the complete potential flow equation. The coordinate system used for the calculations is independent of body geometry. Cylindrical coordinates are used for the computer code. The analysis is programmed in extended FORTRAN 4 for the CYBER 203 vector computer. The programming of the analysis is oriented toward taking advantage of the vector processing capabilities of this computer. Comparisons of computed results with experimental measurements are presented to verify the analysis. Descriptions of program input and output formats are also presented.

  13. Compressible, turbulent flow computation and drag optimization for axisymmetric afterbodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, Russell Mark

    A new parallel implicit adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm is developed for the prediction of unsteady behaviour of laminar flames. The scheme is applied to the solution of the system of partial-differential equations governing time-dependent, two- and three-dimensional, compressible laminar flows for reactive thermally perfect gaseous mixtures. A high-resolution finite-volume spatial discretization procedure is used to solve the conservation form of these equations on body-fitted multi-block hexahedral meshes. A local preconditioning technique is used to remove numerical stiffness and maintain solution accuracy for low-Mach-number, nearly incompressible flows. A flexible block-based octree data structure has been developed and is used to facilitate automatic solution-directed mesh adaptation according to physics-based refinement criteria. The data structure also enables an efficient and scalable parallel implementation via domain decomposition. The parallel implicit formulation makes use of a dual-time-stepping like approach with an implicit second-order backward discretization of the physical time, in which a Jacobian-free inexact Newton method with a preconditioned generalized minimal residual (GMRES) algorithm is used to solve the system of nonlinear algebraic equations arising from the temporal and spatial discretization procedures. An additive Schwarz global preconditioner is used in conjunction with block incomplete LU type local preconditioners for each sub-domain. The Schwarz preconditioning and block-based data structure readily allow efficient and scalable parallel implementations of the implicit AMR approach on distributed-memory multi-processor architectures. The scheme was applied to solutions of steady and unsteady laminar diffusion and premixed methane-air combustion and was found to accurately predict key flame characteristics. For a premixed flame under terrestrial gravity, the scheme accurately predicted the frequency of the natural

  14. Does computed tomography permeability predict hemorrhagic transformation after ischemic stroke?

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Peggy; Cobb, Allison; Shankar, Jai Jai Shiva

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To use perfusion-derived permeability-surface area product maps to predict hemorrhagic transformation following thrombolytic treatment for acute ischemic stroke. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed our prospectively kept acute stroke database over five consecutive months for patients with symptoms of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) who had computed tomography (CT) perfusion (CTP) done at arrival. Patients included in the analyses also had to have a follow-up CT. The permeability-surface area product maps (PS) was calculated for the side of the ischemia and/or infarction and for the contralateral unaffected side at the same level. The cerebral blood flow map was used to delineate the ischemic territory. Next, a region of interest was drawn at the centre of this territory on the PS parametric map. Finally, a mirror region of interest was created on the contralateral side at the same level. The relative permeability-surface area product maps (rPS) provided an internal control and was calculated as the ratio of the PS on the side of the AIS to the PS on the contralateral side. A student t-test was performed after log conversion of rPS between patients with and without hemorrhagic transformation. Log conversion was used to convert the data into normal distribution to use t-test. For the group of patients who experienced intracranial bleed, a student t-test was performed between those with only petechial hemorrhage and those with more severe parenchymal hematoma with subarachnoid haemorrhage. RESULTS: Of 84 patients with AIS and CTP at admission, only 42 patients had a follow-up CT. The rPS derived using the normal side as the internal control was significantly higher (P = 0.003) for the 15 cases of hemorrhagic transformation (1.71 + 1.64) compared to 27 cases that did not have any (1.07 + 1.30). Patients with values above the overall mean rPS of 1.3 had an increased likelihood of subsequent hemorrhagic transformation. The sensitivity of using this score to predict

  15. A novel potential/viscous flow coupling technique for computing helicopter flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summa, J. Michael; Strash, Daniel J.; Yoo, Sungyul

    1990-01-01

    Because of the complexity of helicopter flow field, a zonal method of analysis of computational aerodynamics is required. Here, a new procedure for coupling potential and viscous flow is proposed. An overlapping, velocity coupling technique is to be developed with the unique feature that the potential flow surface singularity strengths are obtained directly from the Navier-Stokes at a smoother inner fluid boundary. The closed-loop iteration method proceeds until the velocity field is converged. This coupling should provide the means of more accurate viscous computations of the near-body and rotor flow fields with resultant improved analysis of such important performance parameters as helicopter fuselage drag and rotor airloads.

  16. Ensemble stream flow predictions using the ECMWF forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiczko, Adam; Romanowicz, Renata; Osuch, Marzena; Pappenberger, Florian; Karamuz, Emilia

    2015-04-01

    Floods and low flows in rivers are seasonal phenomena that can cause several problems to society. To anticipate high and low flow events, flow forecasts are crucial. They are of particular importance in mountainous catchments, where the lead time of forecasts is usually short. In order to prolong the forecast lead-time, numerical weather predictions (NWPs) are used as a hydrological model driving force. The forecasted flow is commonly given as one value, even though it is uncertain. There is an increasing interest in accounting for the uncertainty in flood early warning and decision support systems. When NWP are given in the form of ensembles, such as the ECMWF forecasts, the uncertainty of these forecasts can be accounted for. Apart from the forecast uncertainty the uncertainty related to the hydrological model used also plays an important role in the uncertainty of the final flow prediction. The aim of this study is the development of a stream flow prediction system for the Biała Tarnowska, a mountainous catchment in the south of Poland. We apply two different hydrological models. One is a conceptual HBV model for rainfall-flow predictions, applied within a Generalised Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE) framework, the second is a data-based DBM model, adjusted for Polish conditions by adding the Soil Moisture Accounting (SMA) and snow-melt modules. Both models provide the uncertainty of the predictions, but the DBM approach is much more numerically efficient, therefore more suitable for the real-time forecasting.. The ECMWF forecasts require bias reduction in order to correspond to observations. Therefore we applied Quantile Mapping with and without seasonal adjustment for bias correction. Up to seven-days ahead forecast skills are compared using the Relative Operation Characteristic (ROC) graphs, for the flood warning and flood alarm flow value thresholds. The ECMWF forecasts are obtained from the project TIGGE (http

  17. Predictive modeling of particle-laden turbulent flows. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, F.; Bolio, E.J.; Hrenya, C.M.

    1993-12-31

    Earlier work of Sinclair and Jackson which treats the laminar flow of gas-solid suspensions is extended to model dilute turbulent flow. The random particle motion, often exceeding the turbulent fluctuations in the gas, is obtained using a model based on kinetic theory of granular materials. A two-equation low Reynolds number turbulence model is, modified to account for the presence of the dilute particle phase. Comparisons of the model predictions with available experimental data for the mean and fluctuating velocity profiles for both phases indicate that the resulting theory captures many of the flow features observed in the pneumatic transport of large particles. The model predictions did not manifest an extreme sensitivity to the degree of inelasticity in the particle-particle collisions for the range of solid loading ratios investigated.

  18. Numerical prediction of turbulent oscillating flow and associated heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, W. J.; Patankar, S. V.; Ibele, W. E.

    1991-08-01

    A crucial point for further development of engines is the optimization of its heat exchangers which operate under oscillatory flow conditions. It has been found that the most important thermodynamic uncertainties in the Stirling engine designs for space power are in the heat transfer between gas and metal in all engine components and in the pressure drop across the heat exchanger components. So far, performance codes cannot predict the power output of a Stirling engine reasonably enough if used for a wide variety of engines. Thus, there is a strong need for better performance codes. However, a performance code is not concerned with the details of the flow. This information must be provided externally. While analytical relationships exist for laminar oscillating flow, there has been hardly any information about transitional and turbulent oscillating flow, which could be introduced into the performance codes. In 1986, a survey by Seume and Simon revealed that most Stirling engine heat exchangers operate in the transitional and turbulent regime. Consequently, research has since focused on the unresolved issue of transitional and turbulent oscillating flow and heat transfer. Since 1988, the University of Minnesota oscillating flow facility has obtained experimental data about transitional and turbulent oscillating flow. However, since the experiments in this field are extremely difficult, lengthy, and expensive, it is advantageous to numerically simulate the flow and heat transfer accurately from first principles. Work done at the University of Minnesota on the development of such a numerical simulation is summarized.

  19. Numerical prediction of turbulent oscillating flow and associated heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehler, W. J.; Patankar, S. V.; Ibele, W. E.

    1991-01-01

    A crucial point for further development of engines is the optimization of its heat exchangers which operate under oscillatory flow conditions. It has been found that the most important thermodynamic uncertainties in the Stirling engine designs for space power are in the heat transfer between gas and metal in all engine components and in the pressure drop across the heat exchanger components. So far, performance codes cannot predict the power output of a Stirling engine reasonably enough if used for a wide variety of engines. Thus, there is a strong need for better performance codes. However, a performance code is not concerned with the details of the flow. This information must be provided externally. While analytical relationships exist for laminar oscillating flow, there has been hardly any information about transitional and turbulent oscillating flow, which could be introduced into the performance codes. In 1986, a survey by Seume and Simon revealed that most Stirling engine heat exchangers operate in the transitional and turbulent regime. Consequently, research has since focused on the unresolved issue of transitional and turbulent oscillating flow and heat transfer. Since 1988, the University of Minnesota oscillating flow facility has obtained experimental data about transitional and turbulent oscillating flow. However, since the experiments in this field are extremely difficult, lengthy, and expensive, it is advantageous to numerically simulate the flow and heat transfer accurately from first principles. Work done at the University of Minnesota on the development of such a numerical simulation is summarized.

  20. Numerical Prediction of Transient Axial Thrust and Internal Flows in a Rocket Engine Turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanHooser, Katherine; Bailey, John W.; Majumdar, Alok

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the application of the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) to model the time-dependent flow in a complex secondary flow circuit of the turbopump of the Fastrac engine currently under development at Marshall Space Flight Center. GFSSP is a general purpose computer program for analyzing steady-state and time-dependant flowrates, pressures, temperatures, and concentrations in a complex flow network. The program employs a finite volume formulation of mass, momentum and energy conservation equations in conjunction with the thermodynamic equation of state of real fluids. GFSSP was used to calculate the axial thrust and internal flow distribution of the Fastrac engine turbopump during the start and shut down transients. The models discussed in this paper use boundary conditions that were extracted from turbopump test data. The GFSSP predicted turbopump secondary flow passage pressures and temperatures were compared with actual measured values.

  1. Computational Methods for Failure Analysis and Life Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler); Harris, Charles E. (Compiler); Housner, Jerrold M. (Compiler); Hopkins, Dale A. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    This conference publication contains the presentations and discussions from the joint UVA/NASA Workshop on Computational Methods for Failure Analysis and Life Prediction held at NASA Langley Research Center 14-15 Oct. 1992. The presentations focused on damage failure and life predictions of polymer-matrix composite structures. They covered some of the research activities at NASA Langley, NASA Lewis, Southwest Research Institute, industry, and universities. Both airframes and propulsion systems were considered.

  2. Computational prediction of isolated performance of an axisymmetric nozzle at Mach number 0.90

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, John R.

    1994-01-01

    An improved ability to predict external propulsive performance was incorporated into the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code PAB3D. The improvements are the ability to account for skin friction and external pressure forces. Performance parameters for two axisymmetric supersonic cruise nozzle configurations were calculated to test the improved methodology. Internal and external flow-field regions were computed using a two-equation kappa-epsilon turbulent viscous-stress model. The computed thrust-minus-drag ratios were within 1 percent of the absolute level of experimental data and the trends of data were predicted accurately. The predicted trend of integrated nozzle pressure drag matched the trend of the integrated experimental pressure drag over a range of nozzle pressure ratios, but absolute drag levels were not accurately predicted.

  3. Global Crustal Heat Flow Using Random Decision Forest Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J. J.; Wood, W. T.; Martin, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    We have applied supervised learning with random decision forests (RDF) to estimate, or predict, a global, densely spaced grid of crustal heat flow. The results are similar to global heat flow predictions that have been previously published but are more accurate and offer higher resolution. The training inputs are measurement values and uncertainties of existing sparsely sampled, (~8,000 locations), geographically biased, yet globally extensive, datasets of crustal heat flow. The RDF estimate is a highly non-linear empirical relationship between crustal heat flow and dozens of other parameters (attributes) that we have densely sampled, global, estimates of (e.g., crustal age, water depth, crustal thickness, seismic sound speed, seafloor temperature, sediment thickness, and sediment grain type). Synthetic attributes were key to obtaining good results using the RDF method. We created synthetic attributes by applying physical intuition and statistical analyses to the fundamental attributes. Statistics include median, kurtosis, and dozens of other functions, all calculated at every node and averaged over a variety of ranges from 5 to 500km. Other synthetic attributes are simply plausible, (e.g., distance from volcanoes, seafloor porosity, mean grain size). More than 600 densely sampled attributes are used in our prediction, and for each we estimated their relative importance. The important attributes included all those expected from geophysics, (e.g., inverse square root of age, gradient of depth, crustal thickness, crustal density, sediment thickness, distance from trenches), and some unexpected but plausible attributes, (e.g., seafloor temperature), but none that were unphysical. The simplicity of the RDF technique may also be of great interest beyond the discipline of crustal heat flow as it allows for more geologically intelligent predictions, decreasing the effect of sampling bias, and improving predictions in regions with little or no data, while rigorously

  4. Flow-based model of computer hackers' motivation.

    PubMed

    Voiskounsky, Alexander E; Smyslova, Olga V

    2003-04-01

    Hackers' psychology, widely discussed in the media, is almost entirely unexplored by psychologists. In this study, hackers' motivation is investigated, using the flow paradigm. Flow is likely to motivate hackers, according to views expressed by researchers and by hackers themselves. Taken as granted that hackers experience flow, it was hypothesized that flow increases with the increase of hackers' competence in IT use. Self-selected subjects were recruited on specialized web sources; 457 hackers filled out a web questionnaire. Competence in IT use, specific flow experience, and demographic data were questioned. An on-line research was administered within the Russian-speaking community (though one third of Ss are non-residents of Russian Federation); since hacking seems to be international, the belief is expressed that the results are universal. The hypothesis is not confirmed: flow motivation characterizes the least and the most competent hackers, and the members of an intermediate group, that is, averagely competent Ss report the "flow crisis"-no (or less) flow experience. Two differing strategies of task choice were self-reported by Ss: a step-by-step increase of the difficulty of choices leads to a match of challenges and skills (and to preserving the flow experience); putting choices irrespective of the likelihood of solution leads to a "flow crisis." The findings give productive hints on processes of hackers' motivational development. The flow-based model of computer hackers' motivation was developed. It combines both empirically confirmed and theoretically possible ways of hackers' "professional" growth. PMID:12804029

  5. Computation of steady axisymmetric flow using a one-dimensional time-dependent method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walitt, L.

    1974-01-01

    An iterative numerical method for computing steady, three dimensional, viscous, compressible flow fields, about aerodynamic bodies was studied. In order to develop the iterative method economically, the primary emphasis was directed towards supersonic, axisymmetric flow. However, the technique readily extends to three spatial dimensions. The viscous flow field about a cone-cylinder-flare body was calculated and compared to existing experimental data. Numerical predictions of the cone boundary layer and the flow field shock wave structure agreed with corresponding measurements. A separation was calculated at the cylinder-flare junction in six iterations; however, the size of the vortex did not correspond to the measured size. It was estimated that fifty iterations would be required to properly define the vortex. It was concluded that the iteration technique is of limited value for plane two dimensional and axisymmetrix flows, but of great value for three-dimensional flows.

  6. A Survey of Computational Intelligence Techniques in Protein Function Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Arvind Kumar; Srivastava, Rajeev

    2014-01-01

    During the past, there was a massive growth of knowledge of unknown proteins with the advancement of high throughput microarray technologies. Protein function prediction is the most challenging problem in bioinformatics. In the past, the homology based approaches were used to predict the protein function, but they failed when a new protein was different from the previous one. Therefore, to alleviate the problems associated with homology based traditional approaches, numerous computational intelligence techniques have been proposed in the recent past. This paper presents a state-of-the-art comprehensive review of various computational intelligence techniques for protein function predictions using sequence, structure, protein-protein interaction network, and gene expression data used in wide areas of applications such as prediction of DNA and RNA binding sites, subcellular localization, enzyme functions, signal peptides, catalytic residues, nuclear/G-protein coupled receptors, membrane proteins, and pathway analysis from gene expression datasets. This paper also summarizes the result obtained by many researchers to solve these problems by using computational intelligence techniques with appropriate datasets to improve the prediction performance. The summary shows that ensemble classifiers and integration of multiple heterogeneous data are useful for protein function prediction. PMID:25574395

  7. Numerical simulation of polymer flows: A parallel computing approach

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, R.; Keunings, R.; Roux, F.X.

    1993-12-31

    We present a parallel algorithm for the numerical simulation of viscoelastic fluids on distributed memory computers. The algorithm has been implemented within a general-purpose commercial finite element package used in polymer processing applications. Results obtained on the Intel iPSC/860 computer demonstrate high parallel efficiency in complex flow problems. However, since the computational load is unknown a priori, load balancing is a challenging issue. We have developed an adaptive allocation strategy which dynamically reallocates the work load to the processors based upon the history of the computational procedure. We compare the results obtained with the adaptive and static scheduling schemes.

  8. The computation of thermo-chemical nonequilibrium hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Candler, Graham

    1989-01-01

    Several conceptual designs for vehicles that would fly in the atmosphere at hypersonic speeds have been developed recently. For the proposed flight conditions the air in the shock layer that envelops the body is at a sufficiently high temperature to cause chemical reaction, vibrational excitation, and ionization. However, these processes occur at finite rates which, when coupled with large convection speeds, cause the gas to be removed from thermo-chemical equilibrium. This non-ideal behavior affects the aerothermal loading on the vehicle and has ramifications in its design. A numerical method to solve the equations that describe these types of flows in 2-D was developed. The state of the gas is represented with seven chemical species, a separate vibrational temperature for each diatomic species, an electron translational temperature, and a mass-average translational-rotational temperature for the heavy particles. The equations for this gas model are solved numerically in a fully coupled fashion using an implicit finite volume time-marching technique. Gauss-Seidel line-relaxation is used to reduce the cost of the solution and flux-dependent differencing is employed to maintain stability. The numerical method was tested against several experiments. The calculated bow shock wave detachment on a sphere and two cones was compared to those measured in ground testing facilities. The computed peak electron number density on a sphere-cone was compared to that measured in a flight test. In each case the results from the numerical method were in excellent agreement with experiment. The technique was used to predict the aerothermal loads on an Aeroassisted Orbital Transfer Vehicle including radiative heating. These results indicate that the current physical model of high temperature air is appropriate and that the numerical algorithm is capable of treating this class of flows.

  9. Comparison of Mars Science Laboratory Reaction Control System Jet Computations With Flow Visualization and Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Danehy, Paul M.; Johansen, Craig T.; Ashcraft, Scott W.; Novak, Luke A.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical predictions of the Mars Science Laboratory reaction control system jets interacting with a Mach 10 hypersonic flow are compared to experimental nitric oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence data. The steady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equations using the Baldwin-Barth one-equation turbulence model were solved using the OVERFLOW code. The experimental fluorescence data used for comparison consists of qualitative two-dimensional visualization images, qualitative reconstructed three-dimensional flow structures, and quantitative two-dimensional distributions of streamwise velocity. Through modeling of the fluorescence signal equation, computational flow images were produced and directly compared to the qualitative fluorescence data.

  10. Development of predictive simulation capability for reactive multiphase flow

    SciTech Connect

    VanderHeyden, W.B.; Kendrick, B.K.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of the project was to develop a self-sustained research program for advanced computer simulation of industrial reactive multiphase flows. The prototype research problem was a three-phase alumina precipitator used in the Bayer process, a key step in aluminum refining. Accomplishments included the development of an improved reaction mechanism of the alumina precipitation growth process, the development of an efficient methods for handling particle size distribution in multiphase flow simulation codes, the incorporation of precipitation growth and agglomeration kinetics in LANL's CFDLIB multiphase flow code library and the evaluation of multiphase turbulence closure models for bubbly flow simulations.

  11. Validation of a flow-structure-interaction computation model of phonation

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Pinaki; Siegmund, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Computational models of vocal fold (VF) vibration are becoming increasingly sophisticated, their utility currently transiting from exploratory research to predictive research. However, validation of such models has remained largely qualitative, raising questions over their applicability to interpret clinical situations. In this paper, a computational model with a segregated implementation is detailed. The model is used to predict the fluid–structure interaction (FSI) observed in a physical replica of the VFs when it is excited by airflow. Detailed quantitative comparisons are provided between the computational model and the corresponding experiment. First, the flow model is separately validated in the absence of VF motion. Then, in the presence of flow-induced VF motion, comparisons are made of the flow pressure on the VF walls and of the resulting VF displacements. Self-similarity of spatial distributions of flow pressure and VF displacements is highlighted. The self-similarity leads to normalized pressure and displacement profiles. It is shown that by using linear superposition of average and fluctuation components of normalized computed displacements, it is possible to determine displacements in the physical VF replica over a range of VF vibration conditions. Mechanical stresses in the VF interior are related to the VF displacements, thereby the computational model can also determine VF stresses over a range of phonation conditions. PMID:25125796

  12. Validation of a flow-structure-interaction computation model of phonation.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Pinaki; Siegmund, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Computational models of vocal fold (VF) vibration are becoming increasingly sophisticated, their utility currently transiting from exploratory research to predictive research. However, validation of such models has remained largely qualitative, raising questions over their applicability to interpret clinical situations. In this paper, a computational model with a segregated implementation is detailed. The model is used to predict the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) observed in a physical replica of the VFs when it is excited by airflow. Detailed quantitative comparisons are provided between the computational model and the corresponding experiment. First, the flow model is separately validated in the absence of VF motion. Then, in the presence of flow-induced VF motion, comparisons are made of the flow pressure on the VF walls and of the resulting VF displacements. Self-similarity of spatial distributions of flow pressure and VF displacements is highlighted. The self-similarity leads to normalized pressure and displacement profiles. It is shown that by using linear superposition of average and fluctuation components of normalized computed displacements, it is possible to determine displacements in the physical VF replica over a range of VF vibration conditions. Mechanical stresses in the VF interior are related to the VF displacements, thereby the computational model can also determine VF stresses over a range of phonation conditions. PMID:25125796

  13. Special Issue: Big data and predictive computational modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutsourelakis, P. S.; Zabaras, N.; Girolami, M.

    2016-09-01

    The motivation for this special issue stems from the symposium on "Big Data and Predictive Computational Modeling" that took place at the Institute for Advanced Study, Technical University of Munich, during May 18-21, 2015. With a mindset firmly grounded in computational discovery, but a polychromatic set of viewpoints, several leading scientists, from physics and chemistry, biology, engineering, applied mathematics, scientific computing, neuroscience, statistics and machine learning, engaged in discussions and exchanged ideas for four days. This special issue contains a subset of the presentations. Video and slides of all the presentations are available on the TUM-IAS website http://www.tum-ias.de/bigdata2015/.

  14. Computation of supersonic turbulent flow past a spinning cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agarwal, R. K.

    1982-01-01

    Computational results are presented for supersonic laminar and turbulent flow past a pointed cone at angle of attack obtained with a parabolic Navier-Stokes marching code. The code takes into account the asymmetries in the flowfield resulting from spinning motion and computes the asymmetric shock shape, crossflow and streamwise shear, heat transfer, crossflow separation, and vortex structure. The Magnus force and moments are also computed. Comparisons are made with other analyses based on boundary-layer equations. For certain laminar flow conditions, an anomaly is discovered in the displacement thickness contribution to the Magnus force when compared with boundary-layer results. For turbulent flow, at small angles of attack, good agreement is obtained with the experimental data and other theoretical results.

  15. A low computation cost method for seizure prediction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanli; Zhou, Weidong; Yuan, Qi; Wu, Qi

    2014-10-01

    The dynamic changes of electroencephalograph (EEG) signals in the period prior to epileptic seizures play a major role in the seizure prediction. This paper proposes a low computation seizure prediction algorithm that combines a fractal dimension with a machine learning algorithm. The presented seizure prediction algorithm extracts the Higuchi fractal dimension (HFD) of EEG signals as features to classify the patient's preictal or interictal state with Bayesian linear discriminant analysis (BLDA) as a classifier. The outputs of BLDA are smoothed by a Kalman filter for reducing possible sporadic and isolated false alarms and then the final prediction results are produced using a thresholding procedure. The algorithm was evaluated on the intracranial EEG recordings of 21 patients in the Freiburg EEG database. For seizure occurrence period of 30 min and 50 min, our algorithm obtained an average sensitivity of 86.95% and 89.33%, an average false prediction rate of 0.20/h, and an average prediction time of 24.47 min and 39.39 min, respectively. The results confirm that the changes of HFD can serve as a precursor of ictal activities and be used for distinguishing between interictal and preictal epochs. Both HFD and BLDA classifier have a low computational complexity. All of these make the proposed algorithm suitable for real-time seizure prediction. PMID:25062892

  16. Incompressible Navier-Stokes computations of rotating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Chang, Leon; Kwak, Dochan; Rogers, Stuart

    1993-01-01

    Flow through pump components, such as an inducer and an impeller, is efficiently simulated by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The solution method is based on the pseudocompressibility approach and uses an implicit-upwind differencing scheme together with the Gauss-Seidel line relaxation method. Current computations use one-equation Baldwin-Barth turbulence model which is derived from a simplified form of the standard k-epsilon model equations. The resulting computer code is applied to the flow analysis inside a generic rocket engine pump inducer, a fuel pump impeller, and SSME high-pressure fuel turbopump impeller. Numerical results of inducer flow are compared with experimental measurements. Flow analyses at 80-, 100-, and 120-percent of design conditions are presented.

  17. Prediction of Undsteady Flows in Turbomachinery Using the Linearized Euler Equations on Deforming Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, William S.; Hall, Kenneth C.

    1994-01-01

    A linearized Euler solver for calculating unsteady flows in turbomachinery blade rows due to both incident gusts and blade motion is presented. The model accounts for blade loading, blade geometry, shock motion, and wake motion. Assuming that the unsteadiness in the flow is small relative to the nonlinear mean solution, the unsteady Euler equations can be linearized about the mean flow. This yields a set of linear variable coefficient equations that describe the small amplitude harmonic motion of the fluid. These linear equations are then discretized on a computational grid and solved using standard numerical techniques. For transonic flows, however, one must use a linear discretization which is a conservative linearization of the non-linear discretized Euler equations to ensure that shock impulse loads are accurately captured. Other important features of this analysis include a continuously deforming grid which eliminates extrapolation errors and hence, increases accuracy, and a new numerically exact, nonreflecting far-field boundary condition treatment based on an eigenanalysis of the discretized equations. Computational results are presented which demonstrate the computational accuracy and efficiency of the method and demonstrate the effectiveness of the deforming grid, far-field nonreflecting boundary conditions, and shock capturing techniques. A comparison of the present unsteady flow predictions to other numerical, semi-analytical, and experimental methods shows excellent agreement. In addition, the linearized Euler method presented requires one or two orders-of-magnitude less computational time than traditional time marching techniques making the present method a viable design tool for aeroelastic analyses.

  18. Real-time Tsunami Inundation Prediction Using High Performance Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Y.; Imamura, F.; Sugawara, D.

    2014-12-01

    Recently off-shore tsunami observation stations based on cabled ocean bottom pressure gauges are actively being deployed especially in Japan. These cabled systems are designed to provide real-time tsunami data before tsunamis reach coastlines for disaster mitigation purposes. To receive real benefits of these observations, real-time analysis techniques to make an effective use of these data are necessary. A representative study was made by Tsushima et al. (2009) that proposed a method to provide instant tsunami source prediction based on achieving tsunami waveform data. As time passes, the prediction is improved by using updated waveform data. After a tsunami source is predicted, tsunami waveforms are synthesized from pre-computed tsunami Green functions of linear long wave equations. Tsushima et al. (2014) updated the method by combining the tsunami waveform inversion with an instant inversion of coseismic crustal deformation and improved the prediction accuracy and speed in the early stages. For disaster mitigation purposes, real-time predictions of tsunami inundation are also important. In this study, we discuss the possibility of real-time tsunami inundation predictions, which require faster-than-real-time tsunami inundation simulation in addition to instant tsunami source analysis. Although the computational amount is large to solve non-linear shallow water equations for inundation predictions, it has become executable through the recent developments of high performance computing technologies. We conducted parallel computations of tsunami inundation and achieved 6.0 TFLOPS by using 19,000 CPU cores. We employed a leap-frog finite difference method with nested staggered grids of which resolution range from 405 m to 5 m. The resolution ratio of each nested domain was 1/3. Total number of grid points were 13 million, and the time step was 0.1 seconds. Tsunami sources of 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake were tested. The inundation prediction up to 2 hours after the

  19. Numerical method for predicting flow characteristics and performance of nonaxisymmetric nozzles. Part 2: Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P. D.

    1980-01-01

    A computer implemented numerical method for predicting the flow in and about an isolated three dimensional jet exhaust nozzle is summarized. The approach is based on an implicit numerical method to solve the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations in a boundary conforming curvilinear coordinate system. Recent improvements to the original numerical algorithm are summarized. Equations are given for evaluating nozzle thrust and discharge coefficient in terms of computed flowfield data. The final formulation of models that are used to simulate flow turbulence effect is presented. Results are presented from numerical experiments to explore the effect of various quantities on the rate of convergence to steady state and on the final flowfield solution. Detailed flowfield predictions for several two and three dimensional nozzle configurations are presented and compared with wind tunnel experimental data.

  20. Evaluation of prediction intervals for expressing uncertainties in groundwater flow model predictions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, S.; Cooley, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    We tested the accuracy of 95% individual prediction intervals for hydraulic heads, streamflow gains, and effective transmissivities computed by groundwater models of two Danish aquifers. To compute the intervals, we assumed that each predicted value can be written as the sum of a computed dependent variable and a random error. Testing was accomplished by using a cross-validation method and by using new field measurements of hydraulic heads and transmissivities that were not used to develop or calibrate the models. The tested null hypotheses are that the coverage probability of the prediction intervals is not significantly smaller than the assumed probability (95%) and that each tail probability is not significantly different from the assumed probability (2.5%). In all cases tested, these hypotheses were accepted at the 5% level of significance. We therefore conclude that for the groundwater models of two real aquifers the individual prediction intervals appear to be accurate.We tested the accuracy of 95% individual prediction intervals for hydraulic heads, streamflow gains, and effective transmissivities computed by groundwater models of two Danish aquifers. To compute the intervals, we assumed that each predicted value can be written as the sum of a computed dependent variable and a random error. Testing was accomplished by using a cross-validation method and by using new field measurements of hydraulic heads and transmissivities that were not used to develop or calibrate the models. The tested null hypotheses are that the coverage probability of the prediction intervals is not significantly smaller than the assumed probability (95%) and that each tail probability is not significantly different from the assumed probability (2.5%). In all cases tested, these hypotheses were accepted at the 5% level of significance. We therefore conclude that for the groundwater models of two real aquifers the individual prediction intervals appear to be accurate.

  1. Perspective - Systematic study of Reynolds stress closure models in the computations of plane channel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.; Sarkar, S.

    1993-01-01

    The roles of pressure-strain and turbulent diffusion models in the numerical calculation of turbulent plane channel flows with second-moment closure models are investigated. Three turbulent diffusion and five pressure-strain models are utilized in the computations. The main characteristics of the mean flow and the turbulent fields are compared against experimental data. All the features of the mean flow are correctly predicted by all but one of the Reynolds stress closure models. The Reynolds stress anisotropies in the log layer are predicted to varying degrees of accuracy (good to fair) by the models. None of the models could predict correctly the extent of relaxation towards isotropy in the wake region near the center of the channel. Results from the directional numerical simulation are used to further clarify this behavior of the models.

  2. Systematic study of Reynolds stress closure models in the computations of plane channel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.; Sarkar, S.

    1992-01-01

    The roles of pressure-strain and turbulent diffusion models in the numerical calculation of turbulent plane channel flows with second-moment closure models are investigated. Three turbulent diffusion and five pressure-strain models are utilized in the computations. The main characteristics of the mean flow and the turbulent fields are compared against experimental data. All the features of the mean flow are correctly predicted by all but one of the Reynolds stress closure models. The Reynolds stress anisotropies in the log layer are predicted to varying degrees of accuracy (good to fair) by the models. None of the models could predict correctly the extent of relaxation towards isotropy in the wake region near the center of the channel. Results from the directional numerical simulation are used to further clarify this behavior of the models.

  3. Viscous Incompressible Flow Computations for 3-D Steady and Unsteady Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of viscous incompressible flow computations for three-dimensional steady and unsteady flows. Details are given on the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) as an engineering tool, solution methods for incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, numerical and physical characteristics of the primitive variable approach, and the role of CFD in the past and in current engineering and research applications.

  4. Experimental and computational investigation of the NASA Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, M. D.; Chriss, R. M.; Wood, J. R.; Strazisar, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental and computational investigation of the NASA Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor (LSCC) flow field has been conducted using laser anemometry and Dawes' 3D viscous code. The experimental configuration consists of a backswept impeller followed by a vaneless diffuser. Measurements of the three-dimensional velocity field were acquired at several measurement planes through the compressor. The measurements describe both the throughflow and secondary velocity field along each measurement plane. In several cases the measurements provide details of the flow within the blade boundary layers. Insight into the complex flow physics within centrifugal compressors is provided by the computational analysis, and assessment of the CFD predictions is provided by comparison with the measurements. Five-hole probe and hot-wire surveys at the inlet and exit to the rotor as well as surface flow visualization along the impeller blade surfaces provide independent confirmation of the laser measurement technique.

  5. Elliptic flow computation by low Reynolds number two-equation turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michelassi, V.; Shih, T.-H.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed comparison of ten low-Reynolds-number k-epsilon models is carried out. The flow solver, based on an implicit approximate factorization method, is designed for incompressible, steady two-dimensional flows. The conservation of mass is enforced by the artificial compressibility approach and the computational domain is discretized using centered finite differences. The turbulence model predictions of the flow past a hill are compared with experiments at Re = 10 exp 6. The effects of the grid spacing together with the numerical efficiency of the various formulations are investigated. The results show that the models provide a satisfactory prediction of the flow field in the presence of a favorable pressure gradient, while the accuracy rapidly deteriorates when a strong adverse pressure gradient is encountered. A newly proposed model form that does not explicitly depend on the wall distance seems promising for application to complex geometries.

  6. A numerical method for computing unsteady 2-D boundary layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainer, Andreas

    1988-01-01

    A numerical method for computing unsteady two-dimensional boundary layers in incompressible laminar and turbulent flows is described and applied to a single airfoil changing its incidence angle in time. The solution procedure adopts a first order panel method with a simple wake model to solve for the inviscid part of the flow, and an implicit finite difference method for the viscous part of the flow. Both procedures integrate in time in a step-by-step fashion, in the course of which each step involves the solution of the elliptic Laplace equation and the solution of the parabolic boundary layer equations. The Reynolds shear stress term of the boundary layer equations is modeled by an algebraic eddy viscosity closure. The location of transition is predicted by an empirical data correlation originating from Michel. Since transition and turbulence modeling are key factors in the prediction of viscous flows, their accuracy will be of dominant influence to the overall results.

  7. Computational predictions of substituted benzyne and indolyne regioselectivities

    PubMed Central

    Picazo, Elias; Houk, K. N.; Garg, Neil K.

    2015-01-01

    A computational study using DFT methods was performed for an array of mono and disubstituted benzynes and indolynes. The inherent distortion present in the geometry-optimized structures predicts the regioselectivity of aryne trapping by nucleophiles or cycloaddition partners. These studies will serve to enable the further use of unsymmetrical arynes in organic synthesis. PMID:26034336

  8. Computer program for predicting creep behavior of bodies of revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, R.; Greenbaum, G.

    1971-01-01

    Computer program, CRAB, uses finite-element method to calculate creep behavior and predict steady-state stresses in an arbitrary body of revolution subjected to a time-dependent axisymmetric load. Creep strains follow a time hardening law and a Prandtl-Reuss stress-strain relationship.

  9. Simulator predicts transient flow for Malaysian subsea pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Inayat-Hussain, A.A.; Ayob, M.S.; Zain, A.B.M.

    1996-04-15

    In a step towards acquiring in-house capability in multiphase flow technology, Petronas Research and Scientific Services Sdn. Bhd., Kuala Lumpur, has developed two-phase flow simulation software for analyzing slow gas-condensate transient flow. Unlike its general-purpose contemporaries -- TACITE, OLGA, Traflow (OGJ, Jan. 3, 1994, p. 42; OGJ, Jan. 10, 1994, p. 52), and PLAC (AEA Technology, U.K.) -- ABASs is a dedicated software for slow transient flows generated during pigging operations in the Duyong network, offshore Malaysia. This network links the Duyong and Bekok fields to the onshore gas terminal (OGT) on the east coast of peninsular Malaysia. It predicts the steady-state pressure drop vs. flow rates, condensate volume in the network, pigging dynamics including volume of produced slug, and the condensate build-up following pigging. The predictions of ABASs have been verified against field data obtained from the Duyong network. Presented here is an overview of the development, verification, and application of the ABASs software. Field data are presented for verification of the software, and several operational scenarios are simulated using the software. The field data and simulation study documented here will provide software users and developers with a further set of results on which to benchmark their own software and two-phase pipeline operating guidelines.

  10. Confined turbulent swirling recirculating flow predictions. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abujelala, M. T.; Lilley, D. G.

    1985-01-01

    The capability and the accuracy of the STARPIC computer code in predicting confined turbulent swirling recirculating flows is presented. Inlet flow boundary conditions were demonstrated to be extremely important in simulating a flowfield via numerical calculations. The degree of swirl strength and expansion ratio have strong effects on the characteristics of swirling flow. In a nonswirling flow, a large corner recirculation zone exists in the flowfield with an expansion ratio greater than one. However, as the degree of inlet swirl increases, the size of this zone decreases and a central recirculation zone appears near the inlet. Generally, the size of the central zone increased with swirl strength and expansion ratio. Neither the standard k-epsilon turbulence mode nor its previous extensions show effective capability for predicting confined turbulent swirling recirculating flows. However, either reduced optimum values of three parameters in the mode or the empirical C sub mu formulation obtained via careful analysis of available turbulence measurements, can provide more acceptable accuracy in the prediction of these swirling flows.

  11. Evolutionary computational methods to predict oral bioavailability QSPRs.

    PubMed

    Bains, William; Gilbert, Richard; Sviridenko, Lilya; Gascon, Jose-Miguel; Scoffin, Robert; Birchall, Kris; Harvey, Inman; Caldwell, John

    2002-01-01

    This review discusses evolutionary and adaptive methods for predicting oral bioavailability (OB) from chemical structure. Genetic Programming (GP), a specific form of evolutionary computing, is compared with some other advanced computational methods for OB prediction. The results show that classifying drugs into 'high' and 'low' OB classes on the basis of their structure alone is solvable, and initial models are already producing output that would be useful for pharmaceutical research. The results also suggest that quantitative prediction of OB will be tractable. Critical aspects of the solution will involve the use of techniques that can: (i) handle problems with a very large number of variables (high dimensionality); (ii) cope with 'noisy' data; and (iii) implement binary choices to sub-classify molecules with behavior that are qualitatively different. Detailed quantitative predictions will emerge from more refined models that are hybrids derived from mechanistic models of the biology of oral absorption and the power of advanced computing techniques to predict the behavior of the components of those models in silico. PMID:11865672

  12. Numerical computation of viscous flow about unconventional airfoil shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, S.; Tannehill, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    A new two-dimensional computer code was developed to analyze the viscous flow around unconventional airfoils at various Mach numbers and angles of attack. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved using an implicit, upwind, finite-volume scheme. Both laminar and turbulent flows can be computed. A new nonequilibrium turbulence closure model was developed for computing turbulent flows. This two-layer eddy viscosity model was motivated by the success of the Johnson-King model in separated flow regions. The influence of history effects are described by an ordinary differential equation developed from the turbulent kinetic energy equation. The performance of the present code was evaluated by solving the flow around three airfoils using the Reynolds time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Excellent results were obtained for both attached and separated flows about the NACA 0012 airfoil, the RAE 2822 airfoil, and the Integrated Technology A 153W airfoil. Based on the comparison of the numerical solutions with the available experimental data, it is concluded that the present code in conjunction with the new nonequilibrium turbulence model gives excellent results.

  13. Computers vs. wind tunnels for aerodynamic flow simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, D. R.; Mark, H.; Pirtle, M. W.

    1975-01-01

    It is pointed out that in other fields of computational physics, such as ballistics, celestial mechanics, and neutronics, computations have already displaced experiments as the principal means of obtaining dynamic simulations. In the case of aerodynamic investigations, the complexity of the computational work involved in solving the Navier-Stokes equations is the reason that such investigations rely currently mainly on wind-tunnel testing. However, because of inherent limitations of the wind-tunnel approach and economic considerations, it appears that at some time in the future aerodynamic studies will chiefly rely on computational flow data provided by the computer. Taking into account projected development trends, it is estimated that computers with the required capabilities for a solution of the complete viscous, time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations will be available in the mid-1980s.

  14. CFD prediction of flow and phase distribution in fuel assemblies with spacers

    SciTech Connect

    Anglart, H.; Nylund, O.; Kurul, N.

    1995-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the modeling and computation of multi-dimensional two-phase flows in BWR fuel assemblies. The modeling principles are presented based on using a two-fluid model in which lateral interfacial effects are accounted for. This model has been used to evaluate the velocity fields of both vapor and liquid phases, as well as phase distribution, between fuel elements in geometries similar to BWR fuel bundles. Furthermore, this model has been used to predict, in a detailed mechanistic manner, the effects of spacers on flow and phase distribution between, and pressure drop along, fuel elements. The related numerical simulations have been performed using a CFD computer code, CFDS-FLOW3D.

  15. Prediction of strongly-heated internal gas flows

    SciTech Connect

    McEligot, D.M. ||; Shehata, A.M.; Kunugi, Tomoaki |

    1997-12-31

    The purposes of the present article are to remind practitioners why the usual textbook approaches may not be appropriate for treating gas flows heated from the surface with large heat fluxes and to review the successes of some recent applications of turbulence models to this case. Simulations from various turbulence models have been assessed by comparison to the measurements of internal mean velocity and temperature distributions by Shehata for turbulent, laminarizing and intermediate flows with significant gas property variation. Of about fifteen models considered, five were judged to provide adequate predictions.

  16. A large-scale evaluation of computational protein function prediction

    PubMed Central

    Radivojac, Predrag; Clark, Wyatt T; Ronnen Oron, Tal; Schnoes, Alexandra M; Wittkop, Tobias; Sokolov, Artem; Graim, Kiley; Funk, Christopher; Verspoor, Karin; Ben-Hur, Asa; Pandey, Gaurav; Yunes, Jeffrey M; Talwalkar, Ameet S; Repo, Susanna; Souza, Michael L; Piovesan, Damiano; Casadio, Rita; Wang, Zheng; Cheng, Jianlin; Fang, Hai; Gough, Julian; Koskinen, Patrik; Törönen, Petri; Nokso-Koivisto, Jussi; Holm, Liisa; Cozzetto, Domenico; Buchan, Daniel W A; Bryson, Kevin; Jones, David T; Limaye, Bhakti; Inamdar, Harshal; Datta, Avik; Manjari, Sunitha K; Joshi, Rajendra; Chitale, Meghana; Kihara, Daisuke; Lisewski, Andreas M; Erdin, Serkan; Venner, Eric; Lichtarge, Olivier; Rentzsch, Robert; Yang, Haixuan; Romero, Alfonso E; Bhat, Prajwal; Paccanaro, Alberto; Hamp, Tobias; Kassner, Rebecca; Seemayer, Stefan; Vicedo, Esmeralda; Schaefer, Christian; Achten, Dominik; Auer, Florian; Böhm, Ariane; Braun, Tatjana; Hecht, Maximilian; Heron, Mark; Hönigschmid, Peter; Hopf, Thomas; Kaufmann, Stefanie; Kiening, Michael; Krompass, Denis; Landerer, Cedric; Mahlich, Yannick; Roos, Manfred; Björne, Jari; Salakoski, Tapio; Wong, Andrew; Shatkay, Hagit; Gatzmann, Fanny; Sommer, Ingolf; Wass, Mark N; Sternberg, Michael J E; Škunca, Nives; Supek, Fran; Bošnjak, Matko; Panov, Panče; Džeroski, Sašo; Šmuc, Tomislav; Kourmpetis, Yiannis A I; van Dijk, Aalt D J; ter Braak, Cajo J F; Zhou, Yuanpeng; Gong, Qingtian; Dong, Xinran; Tian, Weidong; Falda, Marco; Fontana, Paolo; Lavezzo, Enrico; Di Camillo, Barbara; Toppo, Stefano; Lan, Liang; Djuric, Nemanja; Guo, Yuhong; Vucetic, Slobodan; Bairoch, Amos; Linial, Michal; Babbitt, Patricia C; Brenner, Steven E; Orengo, Christine; Rost, Burkhard; Mooney, Sean D; Friedberg, Iddo

    2013-01-01

    Automated annotation of protein function is challenging. As the number of sequenced genomes rapidly grows, the overwhelming majority of protein products can only be annotated computationally. If computational predictions are to be relied upon, it is crucial that the accuracy of these methods be high. Here we report the results from the first large-scale community-based Critical Assessment of protein Function Annotation (CAFA) experiment. Fifty-four methods representing the state-of-the-art for protein function prediction were evaluated on a target set of 866 proteins from eleven organisms. Two findings stand out: (i) today’s best protein function prediction algorithms significantly outperformed widely-used first-generation methods, with large gains on all types of targets; and (ii) although the top methods perform well enough to guide experiments, there is significant need for improvement of currently available tools. PMID:23353650

  17. Algorithms for Target Prediction for Computer Users with Athetosis

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Sergio Peral; Ding, Dan; Riviere, Cameron N.

    2012-01-01

    Athetosis is a movement disorder that afflicts numerous persons with cerebral palsy, resulting in significant problems in their control of computer interfaces. As a step toward increasing the efficiency of icon selection by computer users with athetosis, we have implemented three techniques to reduce the time of target acquisition: transition assistance via directional gain variation based on target prediction during initial movement toward the target, settling assistance via gain reduction when in the vicinity of a predicted target, and expansion of the predicted target as the cursor approaches it. The paper describes each method, and presents results from evaluation of each method using a closed-loop model of a human subject with athetosis, trained using recorded data, at three different severity levels. PMID:21096307

  18. A large-scale evaluation of computational protein function prediction.

    PubMed

    Radivojac, Predrag; Clark, Wyatt T; Oron, Tal Ronnen; Schnoes, Alexandra M; Wittkop, Tobias; Sokolov, Artem; Graim, Kiley; Funk, Christopher; Verspoor, Karin; Ben-Hur, Asa; Pandey, Gaurav; Yunes, Jeffrey M; Talwalkar, Ameet S; Repo, Susanna; Souza, Michael L; Piovesan, Damiano; Casadio, Rita; Wang, Zheng; Cheng, Jianlin; Fang, Hai; Gough, Julian; Koskinen, Patrik; Törönen, Petri; Nokso-Koivisto, Jussi; Holm, Liisa; Cozzetto, Domenico; Buchan, Daniel W A; Bryson, Kevin; Jones, David T; Limaye, Bhakti; Inamdar, Harshal; Datta, Avik; Manjari, Sunitha K; Joshi, Rajendra; Chitale, Meghana; Kihara, Daisuke; Lisewski, Andreas M; Erdin, Serkan; Venner, Eric; Lichtarge, Olivier; Rentzsch, Robert; Yang, Haixuan; Romero, Alfonso E; Bhat, Prajwal; Paccanaro, Alberto; Hamp, Tobias; Kaßner, Rebecca; Seemayer, Stefan; Vicedo, Esmeralda; Schaefer, Christian; Achten, Dominik; Auer, Florian; Boehm, Ariane; Braun, Tatjana; Hecht, Maximilian; Heron, Mark; Hönigschmid, Peter; Hopf, Thomas A; Kaufmann, Stefanie; Kiening, Michael; Krompass, Denis; Landerer, Cedric; Mahlich, Yannick; Roos, Manfred; Björne, Jari; Salakoski, Tapio; Wong, Andrew; Shatkay, Hagit; Gatzmann, Fanny; Sommer, Ingolf; Wass, Mark N; Sternberg, Michael J E; Škunca, Nives; Supek, Fran; Bošnjak, Matko; Panov, Panče; Džeroski, Sašo; Šmuc, Tomislav; Kourmpetis, Yiannis A I; van Dijk, Aalt D J; ter Braak, Cajo J F; Zhou, Yuanpeng; Gong, Qingtian; Dong, Xinran; Tian, Weidong; Falda, Marco; Fontana, Paolo; Lavezzo, Enrico; Di Camillo, Barbara; Toppo, Stefano; Lan, Liang; Djuric, Nemanja; Guo, Yuhong; Vucetic, Slobodan; Bairoch, Amos; Linial, Michal; Babbitt, Patricia C; Brenner, Steven E; Orengo, Christine; Rost, Burkhard; Mooney, Sean D; Friedberg, Iddo

    2013-03-01

    Automated annotation of protein function is challenging. As the number of sequenced genomes rapidly grows, the overwhelming majority of protein products can only be annotated computationally. If computational predictions are to be relied upon, it is crucial that the accuracy of these methods be high. Here we report the results from the first large-scale community-based critical assessment of protein function annotation (CAFA) experiment. Fifty-four methods representing the state of the art for protein function prediction were evaluated on a target set of 866 proteins from 11 organisms. Two findings stand out: (i) today's best protein function prediction algorithms substantially outperform widely used first-generation methods, with large gains on all types of targets; and (ii) although the top methods perform well enough to guide experiments, there is considerable need for improvement of currently available tools. PMID:23353650

  19. Predictive Capabilities of a Relaxation Model for Parcel-Based Granular Flow Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radl, Stefan; Sundaresan, Sankaran

    2011-11-01

    Parcel-based methods have a great potential to reduce the computational cost of particle simulations for dense flows. Here we investigate a relaxation model, similar to that of Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK), when applied to such a parcel-based simulation method. Specifically, we have chosen the simulation methodology initially proposed by Patankar and Joseph, and combined it with the relaxation model published by O'Rourke and Snider. We show that a relaxation model is key to correctly predicting macroscopic flow features, e.g., the scattering pattern of a granular jet impinging on a flat surface, studied experimentally by Cheng et al.. Simple shear flow simulations reveal that calculation of the locally-averaged velocity is a critical ingredient to correctly predict streaming and collisional stresses. SR acknowledges the support of the Austrian Science Foundation through the Erwin-Schroedinger fellowship J-3072.

  20. A computer program to perform flow and thermal analysis during pressurization of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor field joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, J. Louie; Colbert, R. F.; Ghaffarian, B.; Majumdar, Alok

    1991-01-01

    A computational technique for prediction of the flow and thermal environment in the SRM field joint cavities is described. The SRM field joint hardware was tested with a defect in the insulation, and due to this defect, the O-ring gland cavities are pressurized during the early part of the ignition. A computer model is developed to predict the thermal environment and flow through the simulated flaw, during the pressurization of the field joint. The transient mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations in the flow passage together with the thermodynamic equation of state are solved by a fully implicit iterative numerical procedure.

  1. Computer simulation of hypersonic flow over the Space Shuttle Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inouye, M.

    1977-01-01

    Computer simulations of the flow field around the Space Shuttle Orbiter are described. Results of inviscid calculations are presented for the shock wave pattern and bottom centerline pressure distribution at 30 deg angle of attack. Results of viscous calculations are presented for wall pressure and heat transfer distributions for simple configurations representative of regions where shock wave-boundary layer interactions occur. The computer codes are verified by comparisons with wind-tunnel data and can be applied to flight conditions.

  2. Predicting sediment delivery from debris flows after wildfire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyman, Petter; Smith, Hugh G.; Sherwin, Christopher B.; Langhans, Christoph; Lane, Patrick N. J.; Sheridan, Gary J.

    2015-12-01

    Debris flows are an important erosion process in wildfire-prone landscapes. Predicting their frequency and magnitude can therefore be critical for quantifying risk to infrastructure, people and water resources. However, the factors contributing to the frequency and magnitude of events remain poorly understood, particularly in regions outside western USA. Against this background, the objectives of this study were to i) quantify sediment yields from post-fire debris flows in southeast Australian highlands and ii) model the effects of landscape attributes on debris flow susceptibility. Sediment yields from post-fire debris flows (113-294 t ha- 1) are 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than annual background erosion rates from undisturbed forests. Debris flow volumes ranged from 539 to 33,040 m3 with hillslope contributions of 18-62%. The distribution of erosion and deposition above the fan were related to a stream power index, which could be used to model changes in yield along the drainage network. Debris flow susceptibility was quantified with a logistic regression and an inventory of 315 debris flow fans deposited in the first year after two large wildfires (total burned area = 2919 km2). The differenced normalised burn ratio (dNBR or burn severity), local slope, radiative index of dryness (AI) and rainfall intensity (from rainfall radar) were significant predictors in a susceptibility model, which produced excellent results in terms identifying channels that were eroded by debris flows (Area Under Curve, AUC = 0.91). Burn severity was the strongest predictor in the model (AUC = 0.87 when dNBR is used as single predictor) suggesting that fire regimes are an important control on sediment delivery from these forests. The analysis showed a positive effect of AI on debris flow probability in landscapes where differences in moisture regimes due to climate are associated with large variation in soil hydraulic properties. Overall, the results from this study based in the

  3. Predictive modeling of particle-laden, turbulent flows

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    The successful prediction of particle-laden, turbulent flows relies heavily on the representation of turbulence in the gas phase. Several types of turbulence models for single-phase gas flow have been developed which compare reasonably well with experimental data. In the present work, a low-Reynolds'' k-[epsilon], closure model is chosen to describe the Reynolds stresses associated with gas-phase turbulence. This closure scheme, which involves transport equations for the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate, is valid in the turbulent core as well as the viscous sublayer. Several versions of the low-Reynolds k-[epsilon] closure are documented in the literature. However, even those models which are similar in theory often differ considerably in their quantitative and qualitative predictions, making the selection of such a model a difficult task. The purpose of this progress report is to document our findings on the performance of ten different versions of the low-Reynolds k-[epsilon] model on predicting fully developed pipe flow. The predictions are compared with the experimental data of Schildknecht, et al. (1979). With the exception of the model put forth by Hoffman (1975), the predictions of all the closures show reasonable agreement for the mean velocity profile. However, important quantitative differences exist for the turbulent kinetic energy profile. In addition, the predicted eddy viscosity profile and the wall-region profile of the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate exhibit both quantitative and qualitative differences. An effort to extend the present comparisons to include experimental measurements of other researchers is recommended in order to further evaluate the performance of the models.

  4. Combustor flow computations in general coordinates with a multigrid method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyy, Wei; Braaten, Mark E.

    The computational approach presented for single-phase combusting turbulent flowfields balances the requirements of complex physical and chemical flow interactions with those of resolving the three-dimensional geometrical constraints of the combustor contours, film cooling slots, and circular dilution holes. Attention is given to the three-dimensional grid-generation algorithm, the two-dimensional adaptive grid method applied to recirculating turbulent reacting flows, and theory/data assessments for three-dimensional combusting flows in an annular gas turbine combustor.

  5. Fast reconstruction and prediction of frozen flow turbulence based on structured Kalman filtering.

    PubMed

    Fraanje, Rufus; Rice, Justin; Verhaegen, Michel; Doelman, Niek

    2010-11-01

    Efficient and optimal prediction of frozen flow turbulence using the complete observation history of the wavefront sensor is an important issue in adaptive optics for large ground-based telescopes. At least for the sake of error budgeting and algorithm performance, the evaluation of an accurate estimate of the optimal performance of a particular adaptive optics configuration is important. However, due to the large number of grid points, high sampling rates, and the non-rationality of the turbulence power spectral density, the computational complexity of the optimal predictor is huge. This paper shows how a structure in the frozen flow propagation can be exploited to obtain a state-space innovation model with a particular sparsity structure. This sparsity structure enables one to efficiently compute a structured Kalman filter. By simulation it is shown that the performance can be improved and the computational complexity can be reduced in comparison with auto-regressive predictors of low order. PMID:21045884

  6. Viscous compressible flow direct and inverse computation and illustrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. T.; Ntone, F.

    1986-01-01

    An algorithm for laminar and turbulent viscous compressible two dimensional flows is presented. For the application of precise boundary conditions over an arbitrary body surface, a body-fitted coordinate system is used in the physical plane. A thin-layer approximation of tne Navier-Stokes equations is introduced to keep the viscous terms relatively simple. The flow field computation is performed in the transformed plane. A factorized, implicit scheme is used to facilitate the computation. Sample calculations, for Couette flow, developing pipe flow, an isolated airflow, two dimensional compressor cascade flow, and segmental compressor blade design are presented. To a certain extent, the effective use of the direct solver depends on the user's skill in setting up the gridwork, the time step size and the choice of the artificial viscosity. The design feature of the algorithm, an iterative scheme to correct geometry for a specified surface pressure distribution, works well for subsonic flows. A more elaborate correction scheme is required in treating transonic flows where local shock waves may be involved.

  7. OVERSMART Reporting Tool for Flow Computations Over Large Grid Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David L.; Chan, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Structured grid solvers such as NASA's OVERFLOW compressible Navier-Stokes flow solver can generate large data files that contain convergence histories for flow equation residuals, turbulence model equation residuals, component forces and moments, and component relative motion dynamics variables. Most of today's large-scale problems can extend to hundreds of grids, and over 100 million grid points. However, due to the lack of efficient tools, only a small fraction of information contained in these files is analyzed. OVERSMART (OVERFLOW Solution Monitoring And Reporting Tool) provides a comprehensive report of solution convergence of flow computations over large, complex grid systems. It produces a one-page executive summary of the behavior of flow equation residuals, turbulence model equation residuals, and component forces and moments. Under the automatic option, a matrix of commonly viewed plots such as residual histograms, composite residuals, sub-iteration bar graphs, and component forces and moments is automatically generated. Specific plots required by the user can also be prescribed via a command file or a graphical user interface. Output is directed to the user s computer screen and/or to an html file for archival purposes. The current implementation has been targeted for the OVERFLOW flow solver, which is used to obtain a flow solution on structured overset grids. The OVERSMART framework allows easy extension to other flow solvers.

  8. Mean Flow and Noise Prediction for a Separate Flow Jet With Chevron Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, L. Danielle; Bridges, James; Khavaran, Abbas

    2004-01-01

    Experimental and numerical results are presented here for a separate flow nozzle employing chevrons arranged in an alternating pattern on the core nozzle. Comparisons of these results demonstrate that the combination of the WIND/MGBK suite of codes can predict the noise reduction trends measured between separate flow jets with and without chevrons on the core nozzle. Mean flow predictions were validated against Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), pressure, and temperature data, and noise predictions were validated against acoustic measurements recorded in the NASA Glenn Aeroacoustic Propulsion Lab. Comparisons are also made to results from the CRAFT code. The work presented here is part of an on-going assessment of the WIND/MGBK suite for use in designing the next generation of quiet nozzles for turbofan engines.

  9. Inlet Flow Control and Prediction Technologies for Embedded Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillan, Michelle L.; Mackie, Scott A.; Gissen, Abe; Vukasinovic, Bojan; Lakebrink, Matthew T.; Glezer, Ari; Mani, Mori; Mace, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Fail-safe, hybrid, flow control (HFC) is a promising technology for meeting high-speed cruise efficiency, low-noise signature, and reduced fuel-burn goals for future, Hybrid-Wing-Body (HWB) aircraft with embedded engines. This report details the development of HFC technology that enables improved inlet performance in HWB vehicles with highly integrated inlets and embedded engines without adversely affecting vehicle performance. In addition, new test techniques for evaluating Boundary-Layer-Ingesting (BLI)-inlet flow-control technologies developed and demonstrated through this program are documented, including the ability to generate a BLI-like inlet-entrance flow in a direct-connect, wind-tunnel facility, as well as, the use of D-optimal, statistically designed experiments to optimize test efficiency and enable interpretation of results. Validated improvements in numerical analysis tools and methods accomplished through this program are also documented, including Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes CFD simulations of steady-state flow physics for baseline, BLI-inlet diffuser flow, as well as, that created by flow-control devices. Finally, numerical methods were employed in a ground-breaking attempt to directly simulate dynamic distortion. The advances in inlet technologies and prediction tools will help to meet and exceed "N+2" project goals for future HWB aircraft.

  10. Noise from Supersonic Coaxial Jets. Part 1; Mean Flow Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Morris, Philip J.

    1997-01-01

    Recent theories for supersonic jet noise have used an instability wave noise generation model to predict radiated noise. This model requires a known mean flow that has typically been described by simple analytic functions for single jet mean flows. The mean flow of supersonic coaxial jets is not described easily in terms of analytic functions. To provide these profiles at all axial locations, a numerical scheme is developed to calculate the mean flow properties of a coaxial jet. The Reynolds-averaged, compressible, parabolic boundary layer equations are solved using a mixing length turbulence model. Empirical correlations are developed to account for the effects of velocity and temperature ratios and Mach number on the shear layer spreading. Both normal velocity profile and inverted velocity profile coaxial jets are considered. The mixing length model is modified in each case to obtain reasonable results when the two stream jet merges into a single fully developed jet. The mean flow calculations show both good qualitative and quantitative agreement with measurements in single and coaxial jet flows.

  11. Computations of Flow Over a Hump Model Using Higher Order Method With Turbulence Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, Ponnampalam

    2004-01-01

    Turbulent separated flow over a two-dimensional hump is computed by solving the RANS equations with k-omega (SST) turbulence model for the baseline, steady suction and oscillatory blowing/suction flow control cases. The flow equations and the turbulent model equations are solved using a fifth-order accurate weighted essentially nonoscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and a third order, total variation diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration. Qualitatively the computed pressure distributions exhibit the same behavior as they are observed in the experiments. The computed separation regions are much longer than that are observed. However, the percentage reduction in the separation region in the steady suction case is closer to that was measured in the experiment. The computations did not predict the expected reduction in the separation length in the oscillatory case. The predicted turbulent quantities are two to three times smaller than that are measured and it points towards the deficiencies in the existing turbulent models when they are applied to strong steady/unsteady separated flows.

  12. Computations of Flow over a Hump Model Using Higher Order Method with Turbulence Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.

    2005-01-01

    Turbulent separated flow over a two-dimensional hump is computed by solving the RANS equations with k - omega (SST) turbulence model for the baseline, steady suction and oscillatory blowing/suction flow control cases. The flow equations and the turbulent model equations are solved using a fifth-order accurate weighted essentially. nonoscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and a third order, total variation diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration. Qualitatively the computed pressure distributions exhibit the same behavior as those observed in the experiments. The computed separation regions are much longer than those observed experimentally. However, the percentage reduction in the separation region in the steady suction case is closer to what was measured in the experiment. The computations did not predict the expected reduction in the separation length in the oscillatory case. The predicted turbulent quantities are two to three times smaller than the measured values pointing towards the deficiencies in the existing turbulent models when they are applied to strong steady/unsteady separated flows.

  13. Development of predictive simulation capability for reactive multiphase flow

    SciTech Connect

    VanderHeyden, W.B.; Kendrick, B.K.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a proposed three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project was terminated after the first year due to changes in funding priorities. The objective of the project was to develop a self-sustained research program for advanced computer simulation of industrial reactive multiphase flows. The prototype research problem was a three-phase alumina precipitator used in the Bayer process, a key step in aluminum refining. Accomplishments in the first year included the development of an improved reaction mechanism of the alumina precipitation growth process, the development of an efficient method for handling particle size distribution in multiphase flow simulation codes and finally the incorporation of precipitation growth and agglomeration kinetics in LANL`s CFDLIB multiphase flow code library.

  14. IHT: Tools for Computing Insolation Absorption by Particle Laden Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Grout, R. W.

    2013-10-01

    This report describes IHT, a toolkit for computing radiative heat exchange between particles. Well suited for insolation absorption computations, it is also has potential applications in combustion (sooting flames), biomass gasification processes and similar processes. The algorithm is based on the 'Photon Monte Carlo' approach and implemented in a library that can be interfaced with a variety of computational fluid dynamics codes to analyze radiative heat transfer in particle-laden flows. The emphasis in this report is on the data structures and organization of IHT for developers seeking to use the IHT toolkit to add Photon Monte Carlo capabilities to their own codes.

  15. Computational studies of flow through cross flow fans - effect of blade geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govardhan, M.; Sampat, D. Lakshmana

    2005-09-01

    This present paper describes three dimensional computational analysis of complex internal flow in a cross flow fan. A commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software code CFX was used for the computation. RNG k-ɛ two equation turbulence model was used to simulate the model with unstructured mesh. Sliding mesh interface was used at the interface between the rotating and stationary domains to capture the unsteady interactions. An accurate assessment of the present investigation is made by comparing various parameters with the available experimental data. Three impeller geometries with different blade angles and radius ratio are used in the present study. Maximum energy transfer through the impeller takes place in the region where the flow follows the blade curvature. Radial velocity is not uniform through blade channels. Some blades work in turbine mode at very low flow coefficients. Static pressure is always negative in and around the impeller region.

  16. Computational flow visualization in vibrating flow pump type artificial heart by unstructured grid.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takuma; Kawano, Satoyuki; Nakahashi, Kazuhiro; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Nitta, Shin-ichi; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki

    2003-01-01

    Computational flow visualization in the casing of vibrating flow pump (VFP) was made for various conditions based on the novel techniques of fluid dynamics. VFP type artificial heart can generate the oscillated flow and can be applied to the left ventricular assist device. Flow pattern of blood in an artificial heart is closely connected to mechanical performance and serious biomechanical problems such as hemolysis and blood coagulation. To effectively design the VFP for a left ventricular assist device, the numerical codes for solving Navier-Stokes equations were developed for three-dimensional blood flow based on the finite volume method. Furthermore, the simulation techniques based on the artificial compressibility method and the unstructured grid were also developed here. The numerical calculations were based on the precise configurations and the flow conditions of the prototype device. From the viewpoint of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), the detailed discussion of flow patterns in the casing of VFP, which were closely connected with hemolysis and blood coagulation, was made and the computational results were visualized by the use of the recent technique of computational graphics. Some useful design data of VFP were presented. PMID:12534712

  17. The origins of computer weather prediction and climate modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Peter

    2008-03-20

    Numerical simulation of an ever-increasing range of geophysical phenomena is adding enormously to our understanding of complex processes in the Earth system. The consequences for mankind of ongoing climate change will be far-reaching. Earth System Models are capable of replicating climate regimes of past millennia and are the best means we have of predicting the future of our climate. The basic ideas of numerical forecasting and climate modeling were developed about a century ago, long before the first electronic computer was constructed. There were several major practical obstacles to be overcome before numerical prediction could be put into practice. A fuller understanding of atmospheric dynamics allowed the development of simplified systems of equations; regular radiosonde observations of the free atmosphere and, later, satellite data, provided the initial conditions; stable finite difference schemes were developed; and powerful electronic computers provided a practical means of carrying out the prodigious calculations required to predict the changes in the weather. Progress in weather forecasting and in climate modeling over the past 50 years has been dramatic. In this presentation, we will trace the history of computer forecasting through the ENIAC integrations to the present day. The useful range of deterministic prediction is increasing by about one day each decade, and our understanding of climate change is growing rapidly as Earth System Models of ever-increasing sophistication are developed.

  18. The origins of computer weather prediction and climate modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Peter

    2008-03-01

    Numerical simulation of an ever-increasing range of geophysical phenomena is adding enormously to our understanding of complex processes in the Earth system. The consequences for mankind of ongoing climate change will be far-reaching. Earth System Models are capable of replicating climate regimes of past millennia and are the best means we have of predicting the future of our climate. The basic ideas of numerical forecasting and climate modeling were developed about a century ago, long before the first electronic computer was constructed. There were several major practical obstacles to be overcome before numerical prediction could be put into practice. A fuller understanding of atmospheric dynamics allowed the development of simplified systems of equations; regular radiosonde observations of the free atmosphere and, later, satellite data, provided the initial conditions; stable finite difference schemes were developed; and powerful electronic computers provided a practical means of carrying out the prodigious calculations required to predict the changes in the weather. Progress in weather forecasting and in climate modeling over the past 50 years has been dramatic. In this presentation, we will trace the history of computer forecasting through the ENIAC integrations to the present day. The useful range of deterministic prediction is increasing by about one day each decade, and our understanding of climate change is growing rapidly as Earth System Models of ever-increasing sophistication are developed.

  19. Prediction of light aircraft horizontal tail onset flows: A review and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summey, D. C.; Smetana, F. O.

    1977-01-01

    The theoretical basis of the two computer programs (WASH and WAKE) are developed. WASH calculates the location of wake-sheet streamlines behind the wing, and upwash and downwash angles ahead of and behind the wing, respectively. WAKE computes two-dimensional velocity profiles along the wake streamlines given the upper and lower surface velocity profiles at the wing trailing edge. Comparisons with experiment indicate good agreement for wake location, downwash angles, and two-dimensional velocity profiles at low to moderate angles of attack. The adaptation of the results of the two programs to predict the total onset flow at the tail is discussed.

  20. Flow in the well: computational fluid dynamics is essential in flow chamber construction

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Jörg; Frank, Wolfram; Schroten, Horst

    2007-01-01

    A perfusion system was developed to generate well defined flow conditions within a well of a standard multidish. Human vein endothelial cells were cultured under flow conditions and cell response was analyzed by microscopy. Endothelial cells became elongated and spindle shaped. As demonstrated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD), cells were cultured under well defined but time varying shear stress conditions. A damper system was introduced which reduced pulsatile flow when using volumetric pumps. The flow and the wall shear stress distribution were analyzed by CFD for the steady and unsteady flow field. Usage of the volumetric pump caused variations of the wall shear stresses despite the controlled fluid environment and introduction of a damper system. Therefore the use of CFD analysis and experimental validation is critical in developing flow chambers and studying cell response to shear stress. The system presented gives an effortless flow chamber setup within a 6-well standard multidish. PMID:19002993

  1. IHT: Tools for Computing Insolation Absorption by Particle Laden Flows

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-09-17

    INT is a toolkit for computing radiative heat exchange between particles. The algorithm is based on the the 'Photon Monte Carlo" approach described by Wang and Modest and implemented as a library that can be interfaced with a variety of CFD codes to analyze radiative heat transfer in particle laden flows.

  2. PArallel Reacting Multiphase FLOw Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-06-01

    PARMFLO is a parallel multiphase reacting flow computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. It can perform steady or unsteady simulations in three space dimensions. It is intended for use in engineering CFD analysis of industrial flow system components. Its parallel processing capabilities allow it to be applied to problems that use at least an order of magnitude more computational cells than the number that can be used on a typical single processor workstation (about 106 cellsmore » in parallel processing mode versus about io cells in serial processing mode). Alternately, by spreading the work of a CFD problem that could be run on a single workstation over a group of computers on a network, it can bring the runtime down by an order of magnitude or more (typically from many days to less than one day). The software was implemented using the industry standard Message-Passing Interface (MPI) and domain decomposition in one spatial direction. The phases of a flow problem may include an ideal gas mixture with an arbitrary number of chemical species, and dispersed droplet and particle phases. Regions of porous media may also be included within the domain. The porous media may be packed beds, foams, or monolith catalyst supports. With these features, the code is especially suited to analysis of mixing of reactants in the inlet chamber of catalytic reactors coupled to computation of product yields that result from the flow of the mixture through the catalyst coaled support structure.« less

  3. Computation of turbulent flows-state-of-the-art, 1970

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, W. C.

    1972-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of turbulent flow computation is surveyed. The formulations were generalized to increase the range of their applicability, and the excitement of current debate on equation models was brought into the review. Some new ideas on the modeling of the pressure-strain term in the Reynolds stress equations are also suggested.

  4. PArallel Reacting Multiphase FLOw Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lottes, Steven A.

    2002-06-01

    PARMFLO is a parallel multiphase reacting flow computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. It can perform steady or unsteady simulations in three space dimensions. It is intended for use in engineering CFD analysis of industrial flow system components. Its parallel processing capabilities allow it to be applied to problems that use at least an order of magnitude more computational cells than the number that can be used on a typical single processor workstation (about 106 cells in parallel processing mode versus about io cells in serial processing mode). Alternately, by spreading the work of a CFD problem that could be run on a single workstation over a group of computers on a network, it can bring the runtime down by an order of magnitude or more (typically from many days to less than one day). The software was implemented using the industry standard Message-Passing Interface (MPI) and domain decomposition in one spatial direction. The phases of a flow problem may include an ideal gas mixture with an arbitrary number of chemical species, and dispersed droplet and particle phases. Regions of porous media may also be included within the domain. The porous media may be packed beds, foams, or monolith catalyst supports. With these features, the code is especially suited to analysis of mixing of reactants in the inlet chamber of catalytic reactors coupled to computation of product yields that result from the flow of the mixture through the catalyst coaled support structure.

  5. New computer program solves wide variety of heat flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almond, J. C.

    1966-01-01

    Boeing Engineering Thermal Analyzer /BETA/ computer program uses numerical methods to provide accurate heat transfer solutions to a wide variety of heat flow problems. The program solves steady-state and transient problems in almost any situation that can be represented by a resistance-capacitance network.

  6. Chemical kinetics computer program for static and flow reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, D. A.; Scullin, V. J.

    1972-01-01

    General chemical kinetics computer program for complex gas mixtures has been developed. Program can be used for any homogeneous reaction in either one dimensional flow or static system. It is flexible, accurate, and easy to use. It can be used for any chemical system for which species thermodynamic data and reaction rate constant data are known.

  7. Computational analysis of hypersonic airbreathing aircraft flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwoyer, Douglas L.; Kumar, Ajay

    1987-01-01

    The general problem of calculating the flow fields associated with hypersonic airbreathing aircraft is presented. Unique aspects of hypersonic aircraft aerodynamics are introduced and their demands on computational fluid dynamics are outlined. Example calculations associated with inlet/forebody integration and hypersonic nozzle design are presented to illustrate the nature of the problems considered.

  8. Improved Flow Modeling in Transient Reactor Safety Analysis Computer Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Holowach, M.J.; Hochreiter, L.E.; Cheung, F.B.

    2002-07-01

    A method of accounting for fluid-to-fluid shear in between calculational cells over a wide range of flow conditions envisioned in reactor safety studies has been developed such that it may be easily implemented into a computer code such as COBRA-TF for more detailed subchannel analysis. At a given nodal height in the calculational model, equivalent hydraulic diameters are determined for each specific calculational cell using either laminar or turbulent velocity profiles. The velocity profile may be determined from a separate CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) analysis, experimental data, or existing semi-empirical relationships. The equivalent hydraulic diameter is then applied to the wall drag force calculation so as to determine the appropriate equivalent fluid-to-fluid shear caused by the wall for each cell based on the input velocity profile. This means of assigning the shear to a specific cell is independent of the actual wetted perimeter and flow area for the calculational cell. The use of this equivalent hydraulic diameter for each cell within a calculational subchannel results in a representative velocity profile which can further increase the accuracy and detail of heat transfer and fluid flow modeling within the subchannel when utilizing a thermal hydraulics systems analysis computer code such as COBRA-TF. Utilizing COBRA-TF with the flow modeling enhancement results in increased accuracy for a coarse-mesh model without the significantly greater computational and time requirements of a full-scale 3D (three-dimensional) transient CFD calculation. (authors)

  9. Transition prediction and control in subsonic flow over a hump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masad, Jamal A.; Iyer, Venkit

    1993-01-01

    The influence of a surface roughness element in the form of a two-dimensional hump on the transition location in a two-dimensional subsonic flow with a free-stream Mach number up to 0.8 is evaluated. Linear stability theory, coupled with the N-factor transition criterion, is used in the evaluation. The mean flow over the hump is calculated by solving the interacting boundary-layer equations; the viscous-inviscid coupling is taken into consideration, and the flow is solved within the separation bubble. The effects of hump height, length, location, and shape; unit Reynolds number; free-stream Mach number, continuous suction level; location of a suction strip; continuous cooling level; and location of a heating strip on the transition location are evaluated. The N-factor criterion predictions agree well with the experimental correlation of Fage; in addition, the N-factor criterion is more general and powerful than experimental correlations. The theoretically predicted effects of the hump's parameters and flow conditions on transition location are consistent and in agreement with both wind-tunnel and flight observations.

  10. Computational Analysis of Flow Field Inside Coral Colony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md Monir; Staples, Anne

    2015-11-01

    Development of the flow field inside coral colonies is a key issue for understanding coral natural uptake, photosynthesis and wave dissipation capabilities. But most of the computations and experiments conducted earlier, measured the flow outside the coral reef canopies. Experimental studies are also constrained due to the limitation of measurement techniques and limited environmental conditions. Numerical simulations can be an answer to overcome these shortcomings. In this work, a detailed, three-dimensional simulation of flow around a single coral colony was developed to examine the interaction between coral geometry and hydrodynamics. To simplify grid generation and minimize computational cost, Immersed Boundary method (IBM) was implemented. The computation of IBM involves identification of the interface between the solid body and the fluid, establishment of the grid/interface relation and identification of the forcing points on the grid and distribution of the forcing function on the corresponding points. LES was chosen as the framework to capture the turbulent flow field without requiring extensive modeling. The results presented will give insight into internal coral colony flow fields and the interaction between coral and surrounding ocean hydrodynamics.

  11. Computational flow development for unsteady viscous flows: Foundation of the numerical method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bratanow, T.; Spehert, T.

    1978-01-01

    A procedure is presented for effective consideration of viscous effects in computational development of high Reynolds number flows. The procedure is based on the interpretation of the Navier-Stokes equations as vorticity transport equations. The physics of the flow was represented in a form suitable for numerical analysis. Lighthill's concept for flow development for computational purposes was adapted. The vorticity transport equations were cast in a form convenient for computation. A statement for these equations was written using the method of weighted residuals and applying the Galerkin criterion. An integral representation of the induced velocity was applied on the basis of the Biot-Savart law. Distribution of new vorticity, produced at wing surfaces over small computational time intervals, was assumed to be confined to a thin region around the wing surfaces.

  12. A Review of Computational Methods to Predict the Risk of Rupture of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Canchi, Tejas; Kumar, S. D.; Ng, E. Y. K.; Narayanan, Sriram

    2015-01-01

    Computational methods have played an important role in health care in recent years, as determining parameters that affect a certain medical condition is not possible in experimental conditions in many cases. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods have been used to accurately determine the nature of blood flow in the cardiovascular and nervous systems and air flow in the respiratory system, thereby giving the surgeon a diagnostic tool to plan treatment accordingly. Machine learning or data mining (MLD) methods are currently used to develop models that learn from retrospective data to make a prediction regarding factors affecting the progression of a disease. These models have also been successful in incorporating factors such as patient history and occupation. MLD models can be used as a predictive tool to determine rupture potential in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) along with CFD-based prediction of parameters like wall shear stress and pressure distributions. A combination of these computer methods can be pivotal in bridging the gap between translational and outcomes research in medicine. This paper reviews the use of computational methods in the diagnosis and treatment of AAA. PMID:26509168

  13. Computational simulation of flows in an entire centrifugal heart pump.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, S; Yano, K

    1999-06-01

    A prototype computational code to numerically simulate the blood flows in an entire centrifugal heart pump has been developed. The unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved on a parallel computer, the Cray T3E. By domain decomposition, the whole flow space is decomposed to a number of subdomains for each of which a structured algebraic grid is assigned. The grids for the inlet eye and blade regions are on the rotating frame while grids for other regions are on the nonrotating frame, and the edge of the rotating grids slides over the edge of the nonrotating frame, and the edge of the rotating grids slides over the edge of the nonrotating grids. The code is able to simulate the flows in the rotor, volute, and diffuser as well as to find pump performance indicators. The present paper presents an overview of the code and describes a study on the effect of volute width. PMID:10392287

  14. Computational Predictions of the Performance Wright 'Bent End' Propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xiang-Yu; Ash, Robert L.; Bobbitt, Percy J.; Prior, Edwin (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Computational analysis of two 1911 Wright brothers 'Bent End' wooden propeller reproductions have been performed and compared with experimental test results from the Langley Full Scale Wind Tunnel. The purpose of the analysis was to check the consistency of the experimental results and to validate the reliability of the tests. This report is one part of the project on the propeller performance research of the Wright 'Bent End' propellers, intend to document the Wright brothers' pioneering propeller design contributions. Two computer codes were used in the computational predictions. The FLO-MG Navier-Stokes code is a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) code based on the Navier-Stokes Equations. It is mainly used to compute the lift coefficient and the drag coefficient at specified angles of attack at different radii. Those calculated data are the intermediate results of the computation and a part of the necessary input for the Propeller Design Analysis Code (based on Adkins and Libeck method), which is a propeller design code used to compute the propeller thrust coefficient, the propeller power coefficient and the propeller propulsive efficiency.

  15. Prediction of Transitional Flows in the Low Pressure Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, George; Xiong, Guohua

    1998-01-01

    Current turbulence models tend to give too early and too short a length of flow transition to turbulence, and hence fail to predict flow separation induced by the adverse pressure gradients and streamline flow curvatures. Our discussion will focus on the development and validation of transition models. The baseline data for model comparisons are the T3 series, which include a range of free-stream turbulence intensity and cover zero-pressure gradient to aft-loaded turbine pressure gradient flows. The method will be based on the conditioned N-S equations and a transport equation for the intermittency factor. First, several of the most popular 2-equation models in predicting flow transition are examined: k-e [Launder-Sharina], k-w [Wilcox], Lien-Leschiziner and SST [Menter] models. All models fail to predict the onset and the length of transition, even for the simplest flat plate with zero-pressure gradient(T3A). Although the predicted onset position of transition can be varied by providing different inlet turbulent energy dissipation rates, the appropriate inlet conditions for turbulence quantities should be adjusted to match the decay of the free-stream turbulence. Arguably, one may adjust the low-Reynolds-number part of the model to predict transition. This approach has so far not been very successful. However, we have found that the low-Reynolds-number model of Launder and Sharma [1974], which is an improved version of Jones and Launder [1972] gave the best overall performance. The Launder and Sharma model was designed to capture flow re-laminarization (a reverse of flow transition), but tends to give rise to a too early and too fast transition in comparison with the physical transition. The three test cases were for flows with zero pressure gradient but with different free-stream turbulent intensities. The same can be said about the model when considering flows subject to pressure gradient(T3C1). To capture the effects of transition using existing turbulence

  16. Computational Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins and Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Si, Jingna; Cui, Jing; Cheng, Jin; Wu, Rongling

    2015-01-01

    Proteins and RNA interaction have vital roles in many cellular processes such as protein synthesis, sequence encoding, RNA transfer, and gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Approximately 6%–8% of all proteins are RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Distinguishing these RBPs or their binding residues is a major aim of structural biology. Previously, a number of experimental methods were developed for the determination of protein–RNA interactions. However, these experimental methods are expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Alternatively, researchers have developed many computational approaches to predict RBPs and protein–RNA binding sites, by combining various machine learning methods and abundant sequence and/or structural features. There are three kinds of computational approaches, which are prediction from protein sequence, prediction from protein structure, and protein-RNA docking. In this paper, we review all existing studies of predictions of RNA-binding sites and RBPs and complexes, including data sets used in different approaches, sequence and structural features used in several predictors, prediction method classifications, performance comparisons, evaluation methods, and future directions. PMID:26540053

  17. Implicit preconditioned WENO scheme for steady viscous flow computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Juan-Chen; Lin, Herng; Yang, Jaw-Yen

    2009-02-01

    A class of lower-upper symmetric Gauss-Seidel implicit weighted essentially nonoscillatory (WENO) schemes is developed for solving the preconditioned Navier-Stokes equations of primitive variables with Spalart-Allmaras one-equation turbulence model. The numerical flux of the present preconditioned WENO schemes consists of a first-order part and high-order part. For first-order part, we adopt the preconditioned Roe scheme and for the high-order part, we employ preconditioned WENO methods. For comparison purpose, a preconditioned TVD scheme is also given and tested. A time-derivative preconditioning algorithm is devised and a discriminant is devised for adjusting the preconditioning parameters at low Mach numbers and turning off the preconditioning at intermediate or high Mach numbers. The computations are performed for the two-dimensional lid driven cavity flow, low subsonic viscous flow over S809 airfoil, three-dimensional low speed viscous flow over 6:1 prolate spheroid, transonic flow over ONERA-M6 wing and hypersonic flow over HB-2 model. The solutions of the present algorithms are in good agreement with the experimental data. The application of the preconditioned WENO schemes to viscous flows at all speeds not only enhances the accuracy and robustness of resolving shock and discontinuities for supersonic flows, but also improves the accuracy of low Mach number flow with complicated smooth solution structures.

  18. Physiological correlates of the flow experience during computer game playing.

    PubMed

    Harmat, László; de Manzano, Örjan; Theorell, Töres; Högman, Lennart; Fischer, Håkan; Ullén, Fredrik

    2015-07-01

    Flow is the subjective experience of effortless attention, reduced self-awareness, and enjoyment that typically occurs during optimal task performance. Previous studies have suggested that flow may be associated with a non-reciprocal coactivation of the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems and, on a cortical level, with a state of hypofrontality and implicit processing. Here, we test these hypotheses, using the computer game TETRIS as model task. The participants (n=77) played TETRIS under three conditions that differed in difficulty (Easyflow, positive affect, and effortless attention. The associations between self-reported psychological flow and physiological measures were investigated using a series of repeated measures linear mixed model analyses. The results showed that higher flow was associated with larger respiratory depth and lower LF. The higher respiratory depth during high flow is indicative of a more relaxed state with an increased parasympathetic activity, and thus provides partial support for the main hypotheses. There was no association between frontal cortical oxygenation and flow, even at liberal thresholds; i.e. we found no support that flow is related to a state of hypofrontality. PMID:25956190

  19. Direct match data flow memory for data driven computing

    DOEpatents

    Davidson, G.S.; Grafe, V.G.

    1997-10-07

    A data flow computer and method of computing is disclosed which utilizes a data driven processor node architecture. The apparatus in a preferred embodiment includes a plurality of First-In-First-Out (FIFO) registers, a plurality of related data flow memories, and a processor. The processor makes the necessary calculations and includes a control unit to generate signals to enable the appropriate FIFO register receiving the result. In a particular embodiment, there are three FIFO registers per node: an input FIFO register to receive input information form an outside source and provide it to the data flow memories; an output FIFO register to provide output information from the processor to an outside recipient; and an internal FIFO register to provide information from the processor back to the data flow memories. The data flow memories are comprised of four commonly addressed memories. A parameter memory holds the A and B parameters used in the calculations; an opcode memory holds the instruction; a target memory holds the output address; and a tag memory contains status bits for each parameter. One status bit indicates whether the corresponding parameter is in the parameter memory and one status bit to indicate whether the stored information in the corresponding data parameter is to be reused. The tag memory outputs a ``fire`` signal (signal R VALID) when all of the necessary information has been stored in the data flow memories, and thus when the instruction is ready to be fired to the processor. 11 figs.

  20. Direct match data flow memory for data driven computing

    DOEpatents

    Davidson, George S.; Grafe, Victor Gerald

    1997-01-01

    A data flow computer and method of computing is disclosed which utilizes a data driven processor node architecture. The apparatus in a preferred embodiment includes a plurality of First-In-First-Out (FIFO) registers, a plurality of related data flow memories, and a processor. The processor makes the necessary calculations and includes a control unit to generate signals to enable the appropriate FIFO register receiving the result. In a particular embodiment, there are three FIFO registers per node: an input FIFO register to receive input information form an outside source and provide it to the data flow memories; an output FIFO register to provide output information from the processor to an outside recipient; and an internal FIFO register to provide information from the processor back to the data flow memories. The data flow memories are comprised of four commonly addressed memories. A parameter memory holds the A and B parameters used in the calculations; an opcode memory holds the instruction; a target memory holds the output address; and a tag memory contains status bits for each parameter. One status bit indicates whether the corresponding parameter is in the parameter memory and one status bit to indicate whether the stored information in the corresponding data parameter is to be reused. The tag memory outputs a "fire" signal (signal R VALID) when all of the necessary information has been stored in the data flow memories, and thus when the instruction is ready to be fired to the processor.

  1. Navier-Stokes computations of aft end flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, B. C.; McDonald, H.; Shamroth, S. J.

    1982-05-01

    A Navier-Stokes code to solve the aft end flow field of missile type configurations is presented. The consistently split linearized block implicit method of McDonald and Briley is employed in modified form to handle L-shaped domains with sharp reentrant corners. Appropriate boundary conditions are applied for the supersonic flow in particular at the outer boundary so that waves generated within the flow field are allowed to pass out of the computational domain without reflecting back into it. An adaptive grid option has been incorporated into the code and has been exercised by following the shear layer in a model backstep problem. Results are presented for the supersonic turbulent flow over a nozzle boattail configuration with and without jet exhaust and the results are compared with experiment. Calculations of the 2-D turbulent supersonic flow over a right angle back step with shear layer reattachment on a 20 deg ramp are also shown, and compared with experiments. The computation shows the qualitative physical behavior of the flows and there is generally good agreement with the experimental velocity profiles through most of the free shear layer and the ramp reattachment zone.

  2. Artificial Boundary Conditions for Computation of Oscillating External Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsynkov, S. V.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new technique for the numerical treatment of external flow problems with oscillatory behavior of the solution in time. Specifically, we consider the case of unbounded compressible viscous plane flow past a finite body (airfoil). Oscillations of the flow in time may be caused by the time-periodic injection of fluid into the boundary layer, which in accordance with experimental data, may essentially increase the performance of the airfoil. To conduct the actual computations, we have to somehow restrict the original unbounded domain, that is, to introduce an artificial (external) boundary and to further consider only a finite computational domain. Consequently, we will need to formulate some artificial boundary conditions (ABC's) at the introduced external boundary. The ABC's we are aiming to obtain must meet a fundamental requirement. One should be able to uniquely complement the solution calculated inside the finite computational domain to its infinite exterior so that the original problem is solved within the desired accuracy. Our construction of such ABC's for oscillating flows is based on an essential assumption: the Navier-Stokes equations can be linearized in the far field against the free-stream back- ground. To actually compute the ABC's, we represent the far-field solution as a Fourier series in time and then apply the Difference Potentials Method (DPM) of V. S. Ryaben'kii. This paper contains a general theoretical description of the algorithm for setting the DPM-based ABC's for time-periodic external flows. Based on our experience in implementing analogous ABC's for steady-state problems (a simpler case), we expect that these boundary conditions will become an effective tool for constructing robust numerical methods to calculate oscillatory flows.

  3. Computer simulation of two-phase flow in nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Wulff, W.

    1992-09-01

    Two-phase flow models dominate the economic resource requirements for development and use of computer codes for analyzing thermohydraulic transients in nuclear power plants. Six principles are presented on mathematical modeling and selection of numerical methods, along with suggestions on programming and machine selection, all aimed at reducing the cost of analysis. Computer simulation is contrasted with traditional computer calculation. The advantages of run-time interactive access operation in a simulation environment are demonstrated. It is explained that the drift-flux model is better suited for two-phase flow analysis in nuclear reactors than the two-fluid model, because of the latter`s closure problem. The advantage of analytical over numerical integration is demonstrated. Modeling and programming techniques are presented which minimize the number of needed arithmetical and logical operations and thereby increase the simulation speed, while decreasing the cost.

  4. Defining boundary conditions for RANS predictions of urban flows using mesoscale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Sanchez, Clara; Gorle, Catherine; van Beeck, Jeroen

    2015-11-01

    Pollutant dispersion and wind flows in urban canopies are major concerns for human health and energy, and the complex nature of the flow and transport processes remains a challenge when using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to predict wind flows. The definition of the inflow boundary condition in Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations (RANS) is one of the uncertainties that will strongly influence the prediction of the flow field, and thus, the dispersion pattern. The goal of the work presented is to define a methodology that improves the level of realism in the inflow condition for RANS simulations by accounting for larger mesoscale effects. The Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) is used to forecast mesoscale flow patterns, and two different approaches are used to define inflow conditions for the RANS simulations performed with OpenFOAM: 1) WRF variables such as local velocity magnitude, ABL height and friction velocity are directly interpolated onto the boundaries of the CFD domain; 2) WRF predictions for the geostrophic wind and friction velocity are applied as a forcing boundary condition. Simulations of the Joint Urban 2003 experimental campaign in Oklahoma City have been performed using both approaches and a comparison of the results will be presented.

  5. Predictive onboard flow control for packet switching satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobinsky, Eric A.

    1992-01-01

    We outline two alternate approaches to predicting the onset of congestion in a packet switching satellite, and argue that predictive, rather than reactive, flow control is necessary for the efficient operation of such a system. The first method discussed is based on standard, statistical techniques which are used to periodically calculate a probability of near-term congestion based on arrival rate statistics. If this probability exceeds a present threshold, the satellite would transmit a rate-reduction signal to all active ground stations. The second method discussed would utilize a neural network to periodically predict the occurrence of buffer overflow based on input data which would include, in addition to arrival rates, the distributions of packet lengths, source addresses, and destination addresses.

  6. The computational modeling of supercritical carbon dioxide flow in solid wood material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gething, Brad Allen

    The use of supercritical carbon dioxide (SC CO2) as a solvent to deliver chemicals to porous media has shown promise in various industries. Recently, efforts by the wood treating industry have been made to use SC CO 2 as a replacement to more traditional methods of chemical preservative delivery. Previous studies have shown that the SC CO2 pressure treatment process is capable of impregnating solid wood materials with chemical preservatives, but concentration gradients of preservative often develop during treatment. Widespread application of the treatment process is unlikely unless the treatment inconsistencies can be improved for greater overall treating homogeneity. The development of a computational flow model to accurately predict the internal pressure of CO2 during treatment is integral to a more consistent treatment process. While similar models that attempt to describe the flow process have been proposed by Ward (1989) and Sahle-Demessie (1994), neither have been evaluated for accuracy. The present study was an evaluation of those models. More specifically, the present study evaluated the performance of a computational flow model, which was based on the viscous flow of compressible CO2 as a single phase through a porous medium at the macroscopic scale. Flow model performance was evaluated through comparisons between predicted pressures that corresponded to internal pressure development measured with inserted sensor probes during treatment of specimens. Pressure measurements were applied through a technique developed by Schneider (2000), which utilizes epoxy-sealed stainless steel tubes that are inserted into the wood as pressure probes. Two different wood species were investigated as treating specimens, Douglas-fir and shortleaf pine. Evaluations of the computational flow model revealed that it is sensitive to input parameters that relate to both processing conditions and material properties, particularly treating temperature and wood permeability

  7. Predicting equilibrium states with Reynolds stress closures in channel flow and homogeneous shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abid, R.; Speziale, C. G.

    1993-01-01

    Turbulent channel flow and homogeneous shear flow have served as basic building block flows for the testing and calibration of Reynolds stress models. A direct theoretical connection is made between homogeneous shear flow in equilibrium and the log-layer of fully-developed turbulent channel flow. It is shown that if a second-order closure model is calibrated to yield good equilibrium values for homogeneous shear flow it will also yield good results for the log-layer of channel flow provided that the Rotta coefficient is not too far removed from one. Most of the commonly used second-order closure models introduce an ad hoc wall reflection term in order to mask deficient predictions for the log-layer of channel flow that arise either from an inaccurate calibration of homogeneous shear flow or from the use of a Rotta coefficient that is too large. Illustrative model calculations are presented to demonstrate this point which has important implications for turbulence modeling.

  8. Predicting equilibrium states with Reynolds stress closures in channel flow and homogeneous shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abid, R.; Speziale, C. G.

    1992-01-01

    Turbulent channel flow and homogeneous shear flow have served as basic building block flows for the testing and calibration of Reynolds stress models. A direct theoretical connection is made between homogeneous shear flow in equilibrium and the log-layer of fully-developed turbulent channel flow. It is shown that if a second-order closure model is calibrated to yield good equilibrium values for homogeneous shear flow it will also yield good results for the log-layer of channel flow provided that the Rotta coefficient is not too far removed from one. Most of the commonly used second-order closure models introduce an ad hoc wall reflection term in order to mask deficient predictions for the log-layer of channel flow that arise either from an inaccurate calibration of homogeneous shear flow or from the use of a Rotta coefficient that is too large. Illustrative model calculations are presented to demonstrate this point which has important implications for turbulence modeling.

  9. Bubble size prediction in co-flowing streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hoeve, W.; Dollet, B.; Gordillo, J. M.; Versluis, M.; van Wijngaarden, L.; Lohse, D.

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, the size of bubbles formed through the breakup of a gaseous jet in a co-axial microfluidic device is derived. The gaseous jet surrounded by a co-flowing liquid stream breaks up into monodisperse microbubbles and the size of the bubbles is determined by the radius of the inner gas jet and the bubble formation frequency. We obtain the radius of the gas jet by solving the Navier-Stokes equations for low-Reynolds-number flows and by conservation of momentum. The prediction of the bubble size is based on the system's control parameters only, i.e. the inner gas flow rate Qi, the outer liquid flow rate Qo, and the tube radius R. For a very low gas-to-liquid flow rate ratio (Qi/Qo→0) the bubble radius scales as r_{b}/R \\propto \\sqrt{Q_{i}/Q_{o}} , independently of the inner-to-outer viscosity ratio ηi/ηo and of the type of the velocity profile in the gas, which can be either flat or parabolic, depending on whether high-molecular-weight surfactants cover the gas-liquid interface or not. However, in the case in which the gas velocity profiles are parabolic and the viscosity ratio is sufficiently low, i.e. ηi/ηoLt1, the bubble diameter scales as rb~(Qi/Qo)β, with β smaller than 1/2.

  10. Inlet Flow Control and Prediction Technologies for Embedded Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillan, Michelle L.; Gissen, Abe; Vukasinovic, Bojan; Lakebrink, Matthew T.; Glezer, Ari; Mani, Mori; Mace, James

    2010-01-01

    Fail-safe inlet flow control may enable high-speed cruise efficiency, low noise signature, and reduced fuel-burn goals for hybrid wing-body aircraft. The objectives of this program are to develop flow control and prediction methodologies for boundary-layer ingesting (BLI) inlets used in these aircraft. This report covers the second of a three year program. The approach integrates experiments and numerical simulations. Both passive and active flow-control devices were tested in a small-scale wind tunnel. Hybrid actuation approaches, combining a passive microvane and active synthetic jet, were tested in various geometric arrangements. Detailed flow measurements were taken to provide insight into the flow physics. Results of the numerical simulations were correlated against experimental data. The sensitivity of results to grid resolution and turbulence models was examined. Aerodynamic benefits from microvanes and microramps were assessed when installed in an offset BLI inlet. Benefits were quantified in terms of recovery and distortion changes. Microvanes were more effective than microramps at improving recovery and distortion.

  11. Computational predictions of energy materials using density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Anubhav; Shin, Yongwoo; Persson, Kristin A.

    2016-01-01

    In the search for new functional materials, quantum mechanics is an exciting starting point. The fundamental laws that govern the behaviour of electrons have the possibility, at the other end of the scale, to predict the performance of a material for a targeted application. In some cases, this is achievable using density functional theory (DFT). In this Review, we highlight DFT studies predicting energy-related materials that were subsequently confirmed experimentally. The attributes and limitations of DFT for the computational design of materials for lithium-ion batteries, hydrogen production and storage materials, superconductors, photovoltaics and thermoelectric materials are discussed. In the future, we expect that the accuracy of DFT-based methods will continue to improve and that growth in computing power will enable millions of materials to be virtually screened for specific applications. Thus, these examples represent a first glimpse of what may become a routine and integral step in materials discovery.

  12. Predicted Variations in Flow Patterns in a Horizontal CVD Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    1999-01-01

    Expressions in terms of common reactor operating parameters were derived for the ratio of the Grashof number to the Reynolds number, Gr/Re, the ratio of the Grashof to the square of 2 the Reynolds number, Gr/Re(exp 2), and the Rayleigh number, Ra. Values for these numbers were computed for an example horizontal CVD reactor and compared to numerical simulations to gauge their effectiveness as predictors of the presence or absence of transverse and longitudinal rolls in the reactor. Comparisons were made for both argon and hydrogen carrier gases over the pressure range 2- 101 kPa. Reasonable agreement was achieved in most cases when using Gr/Re to predict the presence of transverse rolls and Ra to predict the presence of longitudinal rolls. The ratio Gr/Re(exp 2) did not yield useful predictions regarding the presence of transverse rolls. This comparison showed that the ratio of the Grashof number to the Reynolds number, as well as the Rayleigh number, can be used to predict the presence or absence of transverse and longitudinal rolls in a horizontal CVD reactor for a given set of reactor conditions. These predictions are approximate, and care must be exercised when making predictions near transition regions.

  13. Applications of a new wall function to turbulent flow computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. S.

    1986-01-01

    A new wall function approach is developed based on a wall law suitable for incompressible turbulent boundary layers under strong adverse pressure gradients. This wall law was derived from a one-dimensional analysis of the turbulent kinetic energy equation with gradient diffusion concept employed in modeling the near-wall shear stress gradient. Numerical testing cases for the present wall functions include turbulent separating flows around an airfoil and turbulent recirculating flows in several confined regions. Improvements on the predictions using the present wall functions are illustrated. For cases of internal recirculating flows, one modification factor for improving the performance of the k-epsilon turbulence model in the flow recirculation regions is also included.

  14. Prediction of Daily Flow Duration Curves and Streamflow for Ungauged Catchments Using Regional Flow Duration Curves

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study presents a method to predict flow duration curves (FDCs) and streamflow for ungauged catchments in the Mid-Atlantic Region, USA. We selected 29 catchments from the Appalachian Plateau, Ridge and Valley, and Piedmont physiographic provinces to develop and test the propo...

  15. An experiment in hurricane track prediction using parallel computing methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Chang G.; Jwo, Jung-Sing; Lakshmivarahan, S.; Dhall, S. K.; Lewis, John M.; Velden, Christopher S.

    1994-01-01

    The barotropic model is used to explore the advantages of parallel processing in deterministic forecasting. We apply this model to the track forecasting of hurricane Elena (1985). In this particular application, solutions to systems of elliptic equations are the essence of the computational mechanics. One set of equations is associated with the decomposition of the wind into irrotational and nondivergent components - this determines the initial nondivergent state. Another set is associated with recovery of the streamfunction from the forecasted vorticity. We demonstrate that direct parallel methods based on accelerated block cyclic reduction (BCR) significantly reduce the computational time required to solve the elliptic equations germane to this decomposition and forecast problem. A 72-h track prediction was made using incremental time steps of 16 min on a network of 3000 grid points nominally separated by 100 km. The prediction took 30 sec on the 8-processor Alliant FX/8 computer. This was a speed-up of 3.7 when compared to the one-processor version. The 72-h prediction of Elena's track was made as the storm moved toward Florida's west coast. Approximately 200 km west of Tampa Bay, Elena executed a dramatic recurvature that ultimately changed its course toward the northwest. Although the barotropic track forecast was unable to capture the hurricane's tight cycloidal looping maneuver, the subsequent northwesterly movement was accurately forecasted as was the location and timing of landfall near Mobile Bay.

  16. Computational and Experimental Study of Supersonic Nozzle Flow and Shock Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Melissa B.; Elmiligui, Alaa A.; Nayani, Sudheer N.; Castner, Ray; Bruce, Walter E., IV; Inskeep, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    This study focused on the capability of NASA Tetrahedral Unstructured Software System's CFD code USM3D capability to predict the interaction between a shock and supersonic plume flow. Previous studies, published in 2004, 2009 and 2013, investigated USM3D's supersonic plume flow results versus historical experimental data. This current study builds on that research by utilizing the best practices from the early papers for properly capturing the plume flow and then adding a wedge acting as a shock generator. This computational study is in conjunction with experimental tests conducted at the Glenn Research Center 1'x1' Supersonic Wind Tunnel. The comparison of the computational and experimental data shows good agreement for location and strength of the shocks although there are vertical shifts between the data sets that may be do to the measurement technique.

  17. A dynamic hybrid RANS/LES modeling methodology for turbulent/transitional flow field prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Mohammad Faridul

    A dynamic hybrid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS)-Large Eddy Simulation (LES) modeling framework has been investigated and further developed to improve the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) prediction of turbulent flow features along with laminar-to-turbulent transitional phenomena. In recent years, the use of hybrid RANS/LES (HRL) models has become more common in CFD simulations, since HRL models offer more accuracy than RANS in regions of flow separation at a reduced cost relative to LES in attached boundary layers. The first part of this research includes evaluation and validation of a dynamic HRL (DHRL) model that aims to address issues regarding the RANS-to-LES zonal transition and explicit grid dependence, both of which are inherent to most current HRL models. Simulations of two test cases---flow over a backward facing step and flow over a wing with leading-edge ice accretion---were performed to assess the potential of the DHRL model for predicting turbulent features involved in mainly unsteady separated flow. The DHRL simulation results are compared with experimental data, along with the computational results for other HRL and RANS models. In summary, these comparisons demonstrate that the DHRL framework does address many of the weaknesses inherent in most current HRL models. Although HRL models are widely used in turbulent flow simulations, they have limitations for transitional flow predictions. Most HRL models include a fully turbulent RANS component for attached boundary layer regions. The small number of HRL models that do include transition-sensitive RANS models have issues related to the RANS model itself and to the zonal transition between RANS and LES. In order to address those issues, a new transition-sensitive HRL modeling methodology has been developed that includes the DHRL methodology and a physics-based transition-sensitive RANS model. The feasibility of the transition-sensitive dynamic HRL (TDHRL) model has been investigated by

  18. Implementation of Parallel Computing Technology to Vortex Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dacles-Mariani, Jennifer

    1999-01-01

    Mainframe supercomputers such as the Cray C90 was invaluable in obtaining large scale computations using several millions of grid points to resolve salient features of a tip vortex flow over a lifting wing. However, real flight configurations require tracking not only of the flow over several lifting wings but its growth and decay in the near- and intermediate- wake regions, not to mention the interaction of these vortices with each other. Resolving and tracking the evolution and interaction of these vortices shed from complex bodies is computationally intensive. Parallel computing technology is an attractive option in solving these flows. In planetary science vortical flows are also important in studying how planets and protoplanets form when cosmic dust and gases become gravitationally unstable and eventually form planets or protoplanets. The current paradigm for the formation of planetary systems maintains that the planets accreted from the nebula of gas and dust left over from the formation of the Sun. Traditional theory also indicate that such a preplanetary nebula took the form of flattened disk. The coagulation of dust led to the settling of aggregates toward the midplane of the disk, where they grew further into asteroid-like planetesimals. Some of the issues still remaining in this process are the onset of gravitational instability, the role of turbulence in the damping of particles and radial effects. In this study the focus will be with the role of turbulence and the radial effects.

  19. Verification, Validation, and Predictive Capability in Computational Engineering and Physics

    SciTech Connect

    OBERKAMPF, WILLIAM L.; TRUCANO, TIMOTHY G.; HIRSCH, CHARLES

    2003-02-01

    Developers of computer codes, analysts who use the codes, and decision makers who rely on the results of the analyses face a critical question: How should confidence in modeling and simulation be critically assessed? Verification and validation (V&V) of computational simulations are the primary methods for building and quantifying this confidence. Briefly, verification is the assessment of the accuracy of the solution to a computational model. Validation is the assessment of the accuracy of a computational simulation by comparison with experimental data. In verification, the relationship of the simulation to the real world is not an issue. In validation, the relationship between computation and the real world, i.e., experimental data, is the issue. This paper presents our viewpoint of the state of the art in V&V in computational physics. (In this paper we refer to all fields of computational engineering and physics, e.g., computational fluid dynamics, computational solid mechanics, structural dynamics, shock wave physics, computational chemistry, etc., as computational physics.) We do not provide a comprehensive review of the multitudinous contributions to V&V, although we do reference a large number of previous works from many fields. We have attempted to bring together many different perspectives on V&V, highlight those perspectives that are effective from a practical engineering viewpoint, suggest future research topics, and discuss key implementation issues that are necessary to improve the effectiveness of V&V. We describe our view of the framework in which predictive capability relies on V&V, as well as other factors that affect predictive capability. Our opinions about the research needs and management issues in V&V are very practical: What methods and techniques need to be developed and what changes in the views of management need to occur to increase the usefulness, reliability, and impact of computational physics for decision making about engineering

  20. Verifying a computational method for predicting extreme ground motion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, R.A.; Barall, M.; Andrews, D.J.; Duan, B.; Ma, S.; Dunham, E.M.; Gabriel, A.-A.; Kaneko, Y.; Kase, Y.; Aagaard, B.T.; Oglesby, D.D.; Ampuero, J.-P.; Hanks, T.C.; Abrahamson, N.

    2011-01-01

    In situations where seismological data is rare or nonexistent, computer simulations may be used to predict ground motions caused by future earthquakes. This is particularly practical in the case of extreme ground motions, where engineers of special buildings may need to design for an event that has not been historically observed but which may occur in the far-distant future. Once the simulations have been performed, however, they still need to be tested. The SCEC-USGS dynamic rupture code verification exercise provides a testing mechanism for simulations that involve spontaneous earthquake rupture. We have performed this examination for the specific computer code that was used to predict maximum possible ground motion near Yucca Mountain. Our SCEC-USGS group exercises have demonstrated that the specific computer code that was used for the Yucca Mountain simulations produces similar results to those produced by other computer codes when tackling the same science problem. We also found that the 3D ground motion simulations produced smaller ground motions than the 2D simulations.

  1. Computing nonhydrostatic shallow-water flow over steep terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Denlinger, R.P.; O'Connell, D. R. H.

    2008-01-01

    Flood and dambreak hazards are not limited to moderate terrain, yet most shallow-water models assume that flow occurs over gentle slopes. Shallow-water flow over rugged or steep terrain often generates significant nonhydrostatic pressures, violating the assumption of hydrostatic pressure made in most shallow-water codes. In this paper, we adapt a previously published nonhydrostatic granular flow model to simulate shallow-water flow, and we solve conservation equations using a finite volume approach and an Harten, Lax, Van Leer, and Einfeldt approximate Riemann solver that is modified for a sloping bed and transient wetting and drying conditions. To simulate bed friction, we use the law of the wall. We test the model by comparison with an analytical solution and with results of experiments in flumes that have steep (31??) or shallow (0.3??) slopes. The law of the wall provides an accurate prediction of the effect of bed roughness on mean flow velocity over two orders of magnitude of bed roughness. Our nonhydrostatic, law-of-the-wall flow simulation accurately reproduces flume measurements of front propagation speed, flow depth, and bed-shear stress for conditions of large bed roughness. ?? 2008 ASCE.

  2. Integrated Computational Solution for Predicting Skin Sensitization Potential of Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Aarti; Singh, Vivek K.; Jere, Abhay

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Skin sensitization forms a major toxicological endpoint for dermatology and cosmetic products. Recent ban on animal testing for cosmetics demands for alternative methods. We developed an integrated computational solution (SkinSense) that offers a robust solution and addresses the limitations of existing computational tools i.e. high false positive rate and/or limited coverage. Results The key components of our solution include: QSAR models selected from a combinatorial set, similarity information and literature-derived sub-structure patterns of known skin protein reactive groups. Its prediction performance on a challenge set of molecules showed accuracy = 75.32%, CCR = 74.36%, sensitivity = 70.00% and specificity = 78.72%, which is better than several existing tools including VEGA (accuracy = 45.00% and CCR = 54.17% with ‘High’ reliability scoring), DEREK (accuracy = 72.73% and CCR = 71.44%) and TOPKAT (accuracy = 60.00% and CCR = 61.67%). Although, TIMES-SS showed higher predictive power (accuracy = 90.00% and CCR = 92.86%), the coverage was very low (only 10 out of 77 molecules were predicted reliably). Conclusions Owing to improved prediction performance and coverage, our solution can serve as a useful expert system towards Integrated Approaches to Testing and Assessment for skin sensitization. It would be invaluable to cosmetic/ dermatology industry for pre-screening their molecules, and reducing time, cost and animal testing. PMID:27271321

  3. On the inconsistencies related to prediction of flow into an enclosing hood obstructed by a worker.

    PubMed

    Karaismail, Ertan; Celik, Ismail

    2010-06-01

    The recirculating flow structures formed in the wake of a worker standing in front of an enclosing fume hood were numerically investigated. Two- and three-dimensional, unsteady, laminar/turbulent computations were performed for a Reynolds number (Re) range of 1.0 x 10(3)-1.0 x 10(5). The standard k-epsilon, Renormalization group (RNG) k-epsilon, and Shear Stress Transport (SST) k-omega models were used in Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) computations, and the results were compared with each other and also with the previous predictions reported in the literature. Numerical issues regarding the grid convergence and the inadequacies of turbulence models that may come into play at low Reynolds numbers were addressed. On the whole, SST k-omega model was found to be promising for qualitatively accurate prediction of both steady and unsteady recirculatory flow patterns in the wake of the worker. On the other hand, the standard and RNG k-epsilon models failed in prediction of anticipated unsteadiness at low Reynolds numbers. In a more realistic three-dimensional simulation with SST k-omega model, the anticipated unsteady and recirculating flow field in the wake of the worker was captured. Present results seem to qualitatively agree with the deductions made from experimental analyses in the literature while conflicting with some aspects of the previously reported numerical results. The apparent inconsistencies observed between the current results and those published in the literature were elucidated. PMID:20358453

  4. Computational Analysis of the G-III Laminar Flow Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, Mujeeb R.; Liao, Wei; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2011-01-01

    Under NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project, flight experiments are planned with the primary objective of demonstrating the Discrete Roughness Elements (DRE) technology for passive laminar flow control at chord Reynolds numbers relevant to transport aircraft. In this paper, we present a preliminary computational assessment of the Gulfstream-III (G-III) aircraft wing-glove designed to attain natural laminar flow for the leading-edge sweep angle of 34.6deg. Analysis for a flight Mach number of 0.75 shows that it should be possible to achieve natural laminar flow for twice the transition Reynolds number ever achieved at this sweep angle. However, the wing-glove needs to be redesigned to effectively demonstrate passive laminar flow control using DREs. As a by-product of the computational assessment, effect of surface curvature on stationary crossflow disturbances is found to be strongly stabilizing for the current design, and it is suggested that convex surface curvature could be used as a control parameter for natural laminar flow design, provided transition occurs via stationary crossflow disturbances.

  5. Experimental and computational results from the NASA Lewis low-speed centrifugal impeller at design and part-flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chriss, R.M.; Wood, J.R.; Hathaway, M.D.

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor (LSCC) has been investigated with laser anemometry and computational analysis at two flow conditions: the design condition as well as a lower mass flow condition. Previously reported experimental and computational results at the design condition are in the literature (Hathaway et al., 1993). In that paper extensive analysis showed that inducer blade boundary layers are centrifuged outward and entrained into the tip clearance flow and hence contribute significantly to the throughflow wake. In this report results are presented for a lower mass flow condition along with further results from the design case. The data set contained herein consists of three-dimensional laser velocimeter results upstream, inside, and downstream of the impeller. In many locations data have been obtained in the blade and endwall boundary layers. The data are presented in the form of throughflow velocity contours as well as secondary flow vectors. The results reported herein illustrate the effects of flow rate on the development of the throughflow momentum wake as well as on the secondary flow. The computational results presented confirm the ability of modern computational tools to model the complex flow in a subsonic centrifugal compressor accurately. However, the blade tip shape and tip clearance must be known in order to properly simulate the flow physics. In addition, the ability to predict changes in the throughflow wake, which is largely fed by the tip clearance flow, as the impeller is throttled should give designers much better confidence in using computational tools to improve impeller performance.

  6. Flow and heat transfer predictions for film cooling.

    PubMed

    Acharya, S; Tyagi, M; Hoda, A

    2001-05-01

    Film cooling flows are characterized by a row of jets injected at an angle from the blade surface or endwalls into the heated crossflow. The resulting flowfield is quite complex, and accurate predictions of the flow and heat transfer have been difficult to obtain, particularly in the near field of the injected jet. The flowfield is characterized by a spectrum of vortical structures including the dominant kidney vortex, the horse-shoe vortex, the wake vortices and the shear layer vortices. These anisotropic and unsteady structures are not well represented by empirical or ad-hoc turbulence models, and lead to inaccurate predictions in the near field of the jet. In this paper, a variety of modeling approaches have been reviewed, and the limitations of these approaches are identified. Recent emergence of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) tools allow the resolution of the coherent structure dynamics, and it is shown in this paper, that such approaches provide improved predictions over that obtained with turbulence models. PMID:11460622

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Flows in an Oxidation Ditch Driven by a New Surface Aerator

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weidong; Li, Kun; Wang, Gan; Wang, Yingzhe

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In this article, we present a newly designed inverse umbrella surface aerator, and tested its performance in driving flow of an oxidation ditch. Results show that it has a better performance in driving the oxidation ditch than the original one with higher average velocity and more uniform flow field. We also present a computational fluid dynamics model for predicting the flow field in an oxidation ditch driven by a surface aerator. The improved momentum source term approach to simulate the flow field of the oxidation ditch driven by an inverse umbrella surface aerator was developed and validated through experiments. Four kinds of turbulent models were investigated with the approach, including the standard k−ɛ model, RNG k−ɛ model, realizable k−ɛ model, and Reynolds stress model, and the predicted data were compared with those calculated with the multiple rotating reference frame approach (MRF) and sliding mesh approach (SM). Results of the momentum source term approach are in good agreement with the experimental data, and its prediction accuracy is better than MRF, close to SM. It is also found that the momentum source term approach has lower computational expenses, is simpler to preprocess, and is easier to use. PMID:24302850

  8. Cooperative integration of stereopsis and optic flow computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhir, G.; Banerjee, Subhashis; Biswas, K. K.; Bahl, R.

    1995-12-01

    A cooperative integration of stereopsis and optic flow computation is presented. Central to our approach is the modeling of the visual processes as a sequence of coupled Markov random fields by definition of suitable interprocess interactions based on some natural constraints. The integration makes each of the individual processes better constrained and more reliable. Further, as a result of the integration, it becomes possible to obtain accurately the discontinuities in both the flow and the disparity fields along with the regions of stereo occlusion. Results on both noisy synthetic image data and real images are presented. Copyright (c) 1995 Optical Society of America

  9. Computer programs for calculating potential flow in propulsion system inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockman, N. O.; Button, S. L.

    1973-01-01

    In the course of designing inlets, particularly for VTOL and STOL propulsion systems, a calculational procedure utilizing three computer programs evolved. The chief program is the Douglas axisymmetric potential flow program called EOD which calculates the incompressible potential flow about arbitrary axisymmetric bodies. The other two programs, original with Lewis, are called SCIRCL AND COMBYN. Program SCIRCL generates input for EOD from various specified analytic shapes for the inlet components. Program COMBYN takes basic solutions output by EOD and combines them into solutions of interest, and applies a compressibility correction.

  10. Prediction of cavitation performance and choking flow limit of inducers for cold water and for fluids with thermodynamic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvage-Boutar, E.; Desclaux, J.

    1990-07-01

    Two methods of prediction of partial cavitation in inducers of rocket engine turbopumps have been developed. The first one is an analytical method previously developed to predict minimum NPSH (inlet total head minus vapor pressure) and the choking flow limit which was modified to include the computation of blade and boundary layer blockage. The second one is a method based on the work of Moore and Ruggeri (1969). This method takes into account thermodynamic effect for the prediction of the cavitation parameter Ki. For the choking flow limit, the first method can be extended to cryogenic fluids. Comparisons with available experimental data obtained with VULCAIN inducer pumping water and liquid hydrogen are presented.

  11. Laser Doppler velocimetry investigation and numerical prediction of the flowfield in an annular reverse-flow combustor sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J. T. C.; Cusworth, R. A.; Sislian, J. P.

    A two-component argon-ion laser Doppler velocimetry system operating in the dual-beam, forward scatter mode, was used to measure the mean velocity components and the corresponding normal/shear stresses of a toroidal vortex reverse-flow annular combustor sector. Measurements were obtained for cold flow with or without fuel injection, and for hot flow conditions. The effects of heat addition by combustion on the flow field and the viability of the developed two-dimensional computer code for steady, turbulent compressible flows are discussed, using a two-equation turbulence model for predicting complex combustor flow field. The measured data are useful for further evaluation of combustor modeling computer codes and mathematical modeling of processes inside a practical combustor.

  12. Prediction of inverted velocity profile for gas flow in nanochannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T. T.; Ren, Y. R.

    2014-11-01

    Velocity inversion is an interesting phenomenon of nanoscale which means that the velocity near the wall is greater than that of center. To solve this problem, fluid flow in nanochannel attracts more attention in recent years. The physical model of gas flow in two-dimensional nanochannel was established here. To describe the process with conventional control equations, Navier-Stokes equations combined with high-order accurate slip boundary conditions was used as mathematical model. With the introduction of new dimensionless variables, the problem was reduced to an ordinary differential equation. Then it was analytically solved and investigated using homotopy analysis method (HAM). The results were verified by comparing with other available experiment data. Result shows that the proposed method could predict velocity phenomenon.

  13. TH-A-9A-01: Active Optical Flow Model: Predicting Voxel-Level Dose Prediction in Spine SBRT

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J; Wu, Q.J.; Yin, F; Kirkpatrick, J; Cabrera, A; Ge, Y

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To predict voxel-level dose distribution and enable effective evaluation of cord dose sparing in spine SBRT. Methods: We present an active optical flow model (AOFM) to statistically describe cord dose variations and train a predictive model to represent correlations between AOFM and PTV contours. Thirty clinically accepted spine SBRT plans are evenly divided into training and testing datasets. The development of predictive model consists of 1) collecting a sequence of dose maps including PTV and OAR (spinal cord) as well as a set of associated PTV contours adjacent to OAR from the training dataset, 2) classifying data into five groups based on PTV's locations relative to OAR, two “Top”s, “Left”, “Right”, and “Bottom”, 3) randomly selecting a dose map as the reference in each group and applying rigid registration and optical flow deformation to match all other maps to the reference, 4) building AOFM by importing optical flow vectors and dose values into the principal component analysis (PCA), 5) applying another PCA to features of PTV and OAR contours to generate an active shape model (ASM), and 6) computing a linear regression model of correlations between AOFM and ASM.When predicting dose distribution of a new case in the testing dataset, the PTV is first assigned to a group based on its contour characteristics. Contour features are then transformed into ASM's principal coordinates of the selected group. Finally, voxel-level dose distribution is determined by mapping from the ASM space to the AOFM space using the predictive model. Results: The DVHs predicted by the AOFM-based model and those in clinical plans are comparable in training and testing datasets. At 2% volume the dose difference between predicted and clinical plans is 4.2±4.4% and 3.3±3.5% in the training and testing datasets, respectively. Conclusion: The AOFM is effective in predicting voxel-level dose distribution for spine SBRT. Partially supported by NIH/NCI under grant

  14. Two inviscid computational simulations of separated flow about airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnwell, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    Two inviscid computational simulations of separated flow about airfoils are described. The basic computational method is the line relaxation finite-difference method. Viscous separation is approximated with inviscid free-streamline separation. The point of separation is specified, and the pressure in the separation region is calculated. In the first simulation, the empiricism of constant pressure in the separation region is employed. This empiricism is easier to implement with the present method than with singularity methods. In the second simulation, acoustic theory is used to determine the pressure in the separation region. The results of both simulations are compared with experiment.

  15. Micro-Ramp Flow Control for Oblique Shock Interactions: Comparisons of Computational and Experimental Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirt, Stephanie M.; Reich, David B.; O'Connor, Michael B.

    2012-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics was used to study the effectiveness of micro-ramp vortex generators to control oblique shock boundary layer interactions. Simulations were based on experiments previously conducted in the 15- by 15-cm supersonic wind tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Four micro-ramp geometries were tested at Mach 2.0 varying the height, chord length, and spanwise spacing between micro-ramps. The overall flow field was examined. Additionally, key parameters such as boundary-layer displacement thickness, momentum thickness and incompressible shape factor were also examined. The computational results predicted the effects of the microramps well, including the trends for the impact that the devices had on the shock boundary layer interaction. However, computing the shock boundary layer interaction itself proved to be problematic since the calculations predicted more pronounced adverse effects on the boundary layer due to the shock than were seen in the experiment.

  16. Micro-Ramp Flow Control for Oblique Shock Interactions: Comparisons of Computational and Experimental Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirt, Stefanie M.; Reich, David B.; O'Connor, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics was used to study the effectiveness of micro-ramp vortex generators to control oblique shock boundary layer interactions. Simulations were based on experiments previously conducted in the 15 x 15 cm supersonic wind tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center. Four micro-ramp geometries were tested at Mach 2.0 varying the height, chord length, and spanwise spacing between micro-ramps. The overall flow field was examined. Additionally, key parameters such as boundary-layer displacement thickness, momentum thickness and incompressible shape factor were also examined. The computational results predicted the effects of the micro-ramps well, including the trends for the impact that the devices had on the shock boundary layer interaction. However, computing the shock boundary layer interaction itself proved to be problematic since the calculations predicted more pronounced adverse effects on the boundary layer due to the shock than were seen in the experiment.

  17. The modeling and prediction of multiple jet VTOL aircraft flow fields in ground effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotansky, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    An engineering methodology based on an empirical data base and analytical fluid dynamic models was developed for the prediction of propulsive lift system induced aerodynamic effects for multiple lift jet VTOL aircraft operating in the hover mode in and out of ground effect. The effects of aircraft geometry, aircraft orientation (pitch, roll) as well as height above ground are considered. Lift jet vector and splay directions fit the airframe, lift jet exit flow conditions, and both axisymmetric and rectangular nozzle exit geometry are also accommodated. The induced suckdown flows are computed from the potential flowfield induced by the turbulent entrainment of both the free jets and wall jets in ground effect and from the free jets alone out of ground effect. The methodology emphasized geometric considerations, computation of stagnation lines and fountain upwash inclination, fountain upwash formation and development, and fountain impingement on the airframe.

  18. Flow and noise predictions for the tandem cylinder aeroacoustic benchmarka)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brès, Guillaume A.; Freed, David; Wessels, Michael; Noelting, Swen; Pérot, Franck

    2012-03-01

    Flow and noise predictions for the tandem cylinder benchmark are performed using lattice Boltzmann and Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings methods. The numerical results are compared to experimental measurements from the Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel and Quiet Flow Facility (QFF) at NASA Langley Research Center. The present study focuses on two configurations: the first configuration corresponds to the typical setup with uniform inflow and spanwise periodic boundary condition. To investigate installation effects, the second configuration matches the QFF setup and geometry, including the rectangular open jet nozzle, and the two vertical side plates mounted in the span to support the test models. For both simulations, the full span of 16 cylinder diameters is simulated, matching the experimental dimensions. Overall, good agreement is obtained with the experimental surface data, flow field, and radiated noise measurements. In particular, the presence of the side plates significantly reduces the excessive spanwise coherence observed with periodic boundary conditions and improves the predictions of the tonal peak amplitude in the far-field noise spectra. Inclusion of the contributions from the side plates in the calculation of the radiated noise shows an overall increase in the predicted spectra and directivity, leading to a better match with the experimental measurements. The measured increase is about 1 to 2 dB at the main shedding frequency and harmonics, and is likely caused by reflections on the spanwise side plates. The broadband levels are also slightly higher by about 2 to 3 dB, likely due to the shear layers from the nozzle exit impacting the side plates.

  19. Simple numerical method for predicting steady compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonlavante, Ernst; Nelson, N. Duane

    1986-01-01

    A numerical method for solving the isenthalpic form of the governing equations for compressible viscous and inviscid flows was developed. The method was based on the concept of flux vector splitting in its implicit form. The method was tested on several demanding inviscid and viscous configurations. Two different forms of the implicit operator were investigated. The time marching to steady state was accelerated by the implementation of the multigrid procedure. Its various forms very effectively increased the rate of convergence of the present scheme. High quality steady state results were obtained in most of the test cases; these required only short computational times due to the relative efficiency of the basic method.

  20. Coupled melt flow and thermal stress predictions for Czochralski crystal growth

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Y.F.; Zhang, H.; Prasad, V.

    1995-12-31

    A coupled finite volume-finite element algorithm is developed to simulate the melt flows and predict the temperature distributions and thermal stresses in the Czochralski grown crystals. The computer model employs a multizone adaptive grid generation scheme together with curvilinear finite column discretization (MASTRAPP) to predict the transport phenomena associated with the crystal growth processes as well as the nonplanar melt/crystal interface shape and its dynamics (Zhang and Prasad, 1995a). The MASTRAPP has proven to be a robust and efficient scheme for the problems involving moving interfaces and free surfaces. Thermal stresses in the crystal are obtained by using a commercial finite element code, ALGOR, that uses the curvilinear mesh generated by the MASTRAPP. The numerical results show that the melt flows have a strong influence on thermal stresses in the crystal near the melt/crystal interface, and hence, melt convection must be included in the computer model for accurate stress predictions. The predicted stress phenomena agrees qualitatively with the report results.

  1. Steady and unsteady flow computation in an elbow dr aft tube with experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, T. C.; Devals, C.; Zhang, Y.; Nennemann, B.; Guibault, F.

    2010-08-01

    Steady state computations are routinely used by design engineers to evaluate and compare losses in hydraulic components. In the case of the draft tube diffuser, however, experiments have shown that while a significant number of operating conditions can adequately be evaluated using steady state computations, a few operating conditions require unsteady simulations to accurately evaluate losses. This paper presents a study that assesses the predictive capacity of a combination of steady and unsteady RANS numerical computations to predict draft tube losses over the complete range of operation of a Francis turbine. For the prediction of the draft tube performance using k-epsilon turbulence model, a methodology has been proposed to average global performance indicators of steady flow computation such as the pressure recovery factor over an adequate number of periods to obtain correct results. The methodology will be validated using two distinct flow solvers, CFX and OpenFOAM, and through a systematic comparison with experimental results obtained on the FLINDT model draft tube.

  2. Computational neurorehabilitation: modeling plasticity and learning to predict recovery.

    PubMed

    Reinkensmeyer, David J; Burdet, Etienne; Casadio, Maura; Krakauer, John W; Kwakkel, Gert; Lang, Catherine E; Swinnen, Stephan P; Ward, Nick S; Schweighofer, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Despite progress in using computational approaches to inform medicine and neuroscience in the last 30 years, there have been few attempts to model the mechanisms underlying sensorimotor rehabilitation. We argue that a fundamental understanding of neurologic recovery, and as a result accurate predictions at the individual level, will be facilitated by developing computational models of the salient neural processes, including plasticity and learning systems of the brain, and integrating them into a context specific to rehabilitation. Here, we therefore discuss Computational Neurorehabilitation, a newly emerging field aimed at modeling plasticity and motor learning to understand and improve movement recovery of individuals with neurologic impairment. We first explain how the emergence of robotics and wearable sensors for rehabilitation is providing data that make development and testing of such models increasingly feasible. We then review key aspects of plasticity and motor learning that such models will incorporate. We proceed by discussing how computational neurorehabilitation models relate to the current benchmark in rehabilitation modeling - regression-based, prognostic modeling. We then critically discuss the first computational neurorehabilitation models, which have primarily focused on modeling rehabilitation of the upper extremity after stroke, and show how even simple models have produced novel ideas for future investigation. Finally, we conclude with key directions for future research, anticipating that soon we will see the emergence of mechanistic models of motor recovery that are informed by clinical imaging results and driven by the actual movement content of rehabilitation therapy as well as wearable sensor-based records of daily activity. PMID:27130577

  3. Computer-aided light sheet flow visualization using photogrammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacy, Kathryn; Severance, Kurt; Childers, Brooks A.

    1994-01-01

    A computer-aided flow visualization process has been developed to analyze video images acquired from rotating and translating light sheet visualization systems. The computer process integrates a mathematical model for image reconstruction, advanced computer graphics concepts, and digital image processing to provide a quantitative and a visual analysis capability. The image reconstruction model, based on photogrammetry, uses knowledge of the camera and light sheet locations and orientations to project two-dimensional light sheet video images into three-dimensional space. A sophisticated computer visualization package, commonly used to analyze computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results, was chosen to interactively display the reconstructed light sheet images with the numerical surface geometry for the model or aircraft under study. The photogrammetric reconstruction technique and the image processing and computer graphics techniques and equipment are described. Results of the computer-aided process applied to both a wind tunnel translating light sheet experiment and an in-flight rotating light sheet experiment are presented. The capability to compare reconstructed experimental light sheet images with CFD solutions in the same graphics environment is also demonstrated.

  4. Towards Accurate Prediction of Turbulent, Three-Dimensional, Recirculating Flows with the NCC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iannetti, A.; Tacina, R.; Jeng, S.-M.; Cai, J.

    2001-01-01

    The National Combustion Code (NCC) was used to calculate the steady state, nonreacting flow field of a prototype Lean Direct Injection (LDI) swirler. This configuration used nine groups of eight holes drilled at a thirty-five degree angle to induce swirl. These nine groups created swirl in the same direction, or a corotating pattern. The static pressure drop across the holes was fixed at approximately four percent. Computations were performed on one quarter of the geometry, because the geometry is considered rotationally periodic every ninety degrees. The final computational grid used was approximately 2.26 million tetrahedral cells, and a cubic nonlinear k - epsilon model was used to model turbulence. The NCC results were then compared to time averaged Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) data. The LDV measurements were performed on the full geometry, but four ninths of the geometry was measured. One-, two-, and three-dimensional representations of both flow fields are presented. The NCC computations compare both qualitatively and quantitatively well to the LDV data, but differences exist downstream. The comparison is encouraging, and shows that NCC can be used for future injector design studies. To improve the flow prediction accuracy of turbulent, three-dimensional, recirculating flow fields with the NCC, recommendations are given.

  5. Coupling fluvial-hydraulic models to predict gravel transport in spatially variable flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segura, Catalina; Pitlick, John

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated spatial-temporal variations of shear stress and bed load transport at three gravel bed river reaches of the Williams Fork River, Colorado. A two-dimensional flow model was used to compute spatial distributions of shear stress (τ) for four discharge levels between one third of bankfull (Qbf) and Qbf. Results indicate that mean τ values are highly variable among sites. However, the properties of the mean-normalized distributions of τ are similar across sites for all flows. The distributions of τ are then used with a transport function to compute bed load transport rates of individual grain size fractions. Probability distributions of the instantaneous unit-width transport rates, qb, indicate that most of the bed load is transported through small portions of the bed with high τ. The mean-normalized probability distributions of qb are different among sites for all flows except at Qbf, when the distributions overlap. We also find that the grain size distribution (GSD) of the bed load adjusts with discharge to resemble the grain size distribution of the subsurface at Qbf. We extend these results to 13 locations in the basin, using the mean-normalized distributions of shear stress and measured subsurface grain sizes to compute bed load transport rates at Qbf. We found a remarkably similar shape of the qb distribution among sites highlighting the basin-wide balance between flow forces and GSD at Qbf and the potential to predict sediment flux at the watershed scale.

  6. USM3D Predictions of Supersonic Nozzle Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Melissa B.; Elmiligui, Alaa A.; Campbell, Richard L.; Nayani, Sudheer N.

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on the NASA Tetrahedral Unstructured Software System CFD code (USM3D) capability to predict supersonic plume flow. Previous studies, published in 2004 and 2009, investigated USM3D's results versus historical experimental data. This current study continued that comparison however focusing on the use of the volume souring to capture the shear layers and internal shock structure of the plume. This study was conducted using two benchmark axisymmetric supersonic jet experimental data sets. The study showed that with the use of volume sourcing, USM3D was able to capture and model a jet plume's shear layer and internal shock structure.

  7. Model-Invariant Hybrid LES-RANS Computation of Separated Flow Past Periodic Hills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The requirement that physical quantities not vary with a hybrid LESRANS model's blending parameter imposes conditions on the computation that lead to better results across LES-RANS transitions. This promises to allow placement of those transitions so that LES is performed only where required by the physics, improving computational efficiency. The approach is applied to separated flow past periodic hills, where good predictions of separation-bubble size are seen due to the gradual, controlled, LES-RANS transition and the resulting enhanced near-wall eddy viscosity.

  8. Evaluation of the three-dimensional parabolic flow computer program SHIP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Y. S.

    1978-01-01

    The three-dimensional parabolic flow program SHIP designed for predicting supersonic combustor flow fields is evaluated to determine its capabilities. The mathematical foundation and numerical procedure are reviewed; simplifications are pointed out and commented upon. The program is then evaluated numerically by applying it to several subsonic and supersonic, turbulent, reacting and nonreacting flow problems. Computational results are compared with available experimental or other analytical data. Good agreements are obtained when the simplifications on which the program is based are justified. Limitations of the program and the needs for improvement and extension are pointed out. The present three dimensional parabolic flow program appears to be potentially useful for the development of supersonic combustors.

  9. A numerical method for computing three dimensional viscous supersonic flow fields about slender bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walitt, L.; Trulio, J. G.

    1971-01-01

    A numerical method is presented for the calculation of steady, three-dimensional, viscous, compressible flow fields about slender bodies at angle of attack and at supersonic speeds. Approximations are introduced in modeling the flow in the longitudinal direction. Accordingly, the flow fields calculated with the program were computed with a model that permits viscous crossflow together with inviscid axial flow. An analysis of the errors introduced by such a treatment is presented. Numerical calculations were made and compared with experimental results for an ogive-cylinder and an airplane fuselage configuration. Generally, good agreement with experiment was obtained. However, boundary layer separation and body vortex positions differed from experimental locations on the ogive-cylinder, and the shock induced by the fuselage canopy was predicted at a slightly different location.

  10. CALCULATION OF NONLINEAR CONFIDENCE AND PREDICTION INTERVALS FOR GROUND-WATER FLOW MODELS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooley, Richard L.; Vecchia, Aldo V.

    1987-01-01

    A method is derived to efficiently compute nonlinear confidence and prediction intervals on any function of parameters derived as output from a mathematical model of a physical system. The method is applied to the problem of obtaining confidence and prediction intervals for manually-calibrated ground-water flow models. To obtain confidence and prediction intervals resulting from uncertainties in parameters, the calibrated model and information on extreme ranges and ordering of the model parameters within one or more independent groups are required. If random errors in the dependent variable are present in addition to uncertainties in parameters, then calculation of prediction intervals also requires information on the extreme range of error expected. A simple Monte Carlo method is used to compute the quantiles necessary to establish probability levels for the confidence and prediction intervals. Application of the method to a hypothetical example showed that inclusion of random errors in the dependent variable in addition to uncertainties in parameters can considerably widen the prediction intervals.

  11. Computer software improves CT drag and buckling prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.

    1998-12-31

    Coiled tubing drag and buckling prediction is very important in coiled tubing operations including drilling, completion and workover. Bit weight, packer load, and well depth penetration can be limited by a severe drag and buckling problem in coiled tubing operations. Enormous drag can be resulted from the buckling of coiled tubing, causing a lockup of coiled tubing in the wellbore. Many factors can affect coiled tubing drag and buckling, including wellbore condition, coiled tubing size, bit weight/packer load, well depth, residual bend, and wellbore pressure. This paper presents a newly developed computer software to help predict coiled tubing drag and buckling. The software`s user-friendly interface makes it easy for field engineers to predict coiled tubing drag and buckling. Three coiled tubing operation categories and several buckling criteria are used in the software to improve coiled tubing drag and buckling prediction. The advanced graphical animation helps visualize the development of coiled tubing drag and buckling in the operation process. The prediction of coiled tubing drag and buckling is improved by using this software to obtain a success in coiled tubing operations.

  12. Numerical modeling of the flow in intracranial aneurysms: prediction of regions prone to thrombus formation

    PubMed Central

    Rayz, V.L.; Boussel, L.; Lawton, M.T.; Acevedo-Bolton, G.; Ge, L.; Young, W.L.; Higashida, R.T.; Saloner, D.

    2009-01-01

    The deposition of intralumenal thrombus in intracranial aneurysms adds a risk of thrombo-embolism over and above that posed by mass-effect and rupture. In addition to biochemical factors, hemodynamic factors that are governed by lumenal geometry and blood flow rates likely play an important role in the thrombus formation and deposition process. In this study, patient-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of blood flow were constructed from MRA data for three patients who had fusiform basilar aneurysms that were thrombus-free and then proceeded to develop intra-lumenal thrombus. In order to determine whether features of the flow fields could suggest which regions had an elevated potential for thrombus deposition, the flow was modeled in the baseline, thrombus-free geometries. Pulsatile flow simulations were carried out using patient-specific inlet flow conditions measured with MR velocimetry. Newtonian and non-Newtonian blood behavior was considered. A strong similarity was found between the intra-aneurysmal regions with CFD-predicted slow, recirculating flows and the regions of thrombus deposition observed in vivo in the follow-up MR studies. In two cases with larger aneurysms, the agreement between the low velocity zones and clotted off regions improved when non-Newtonian blood behavior was taken into account. A similarity was also found between the calculated low shear stress regions and the regions that were later observed to clot. PMID:18787954

  13. Computational Optimization of a Natural Laminar Flow Experimental Wing Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartshom, Fletcher

    2012-01-01

    Computational optimization of a natural laminar flow experimental wing glove that is mounted on a business jet is presented and discussed. The process of designing a laminar flow wing glove starts with creating a two-dimensional optimized airfoil and then lofting it into a three-dimensional wing glove section. The airfoil design process does not consider the three dimensional flow effects such as cross flow due wing sweep as well as engine and body interference. Therefore, once an initial glove geometry is created from the airfoil, the three dimensional wing glove has to be optimized to ensure that the desired extent of laminar flow is maintained over the entire glove. TRANAIR, a non-linear full potential solver with a coupled boundary layer code was used as the main tool in the design and optimization process of the three-dimensional glove shape. The optimization process uses the Class-Shape-Transformation method to perturb the geometry with geometric constraints that allow for a 2-in clearance from the main wing. The three-dimensional glove shape was optimized with the objective of having a spanwise uniform pressure distribution that matches the optimized two-dimensional pressure distribution as closely as possible. Results show that with the appropriate inputs, the optimizer is able to match the two dimensional pressure distributions practically across the entire span of the wing glove. This allows for the experiment to have a much higher probability of having a large extent of natural laminar flow in flight.

  14. Transitional flow in aneurysms and the computation of haemodynamic parameters

    PubMed Central

    Poelma, Christian; Watton, Paul N.; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2015-01-01

    Haemodynamic forces appear to play an influential role in the evolution of aneurysms. This has led to numerous studies, usually based on computational fluid dynamics. Their focus is predominantly on the wall shear stress (WSS) and associated derived parameters, attempting to find correlations between particular patterns of haemodynamic indices and regions subjected to disease formation and progression. The indices are generally determined by integration of flow properties over a single cardiac cycle. In this study, we illustrate that in some cases the transitional flow in aneurysms can lead to significantly different WSS distributions in consecutive cardiac cycles. Accurate determination of time-averaged haemodynamic indices may thus require simulation of a large number of cycles, which contrasts with the common approach to determine parameters using data from a single cycle. To demonstrate the role of transitional flow, two exemplary cases are considered: flow in an abdominal aortic aneurysm and in an intracranial aneurysm. The key differences that are observed between these cases are explained in terms of the integral timescale of the transitional flows in comparison with the cardiac cycle duration: for relatively small geometries, transients will decay before the next cardiac cycle. In larger geometries, transients are still present when the systolic phase produces new instabilities. These residual fluctuations serve as random initial conditions and thus seed different flow patterns in each cycle. To judge whether statistics are converged, the derived indices from at least two successive cardiac cycles should be compared. PMID:25694540

  15. Modeling of supersonic combustor flows using parallel computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riggins, D.; Underwood, M.; Mcmillin, B.; Reeves, L.; Lu, E. J.-L.

    1992-01-01

    While current 3D CFD codes and modeling techniques have been shown capable of furnishing engineering data for complex scramjet flowfields, the usefulness of such efforts is primarily limited by solutions' CPU time requirements, and secondarily by memory requirements. Attention is presently given to the use of parallel computing capabilities for engineering CFD tools for the analysis of supersonic reacting flows, and to an illustrative incompressible CFD problem using up to 16 iPSC/2 processors with single-domain decomposition.

  16. Monthly to seasonal low flow prediction: statistical versus dynamical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionita-Scholz, Monica; Klein, Bastian; Meissner, Dennis; Rademacher, Silke

    2016-04-01

    While the societal and economical impacts of floods are well documented and assessable, the impacts of lows flows are less studied and sometimes overlooked. For example, over the western part of Europe, due to intense inland waterway transportation, the economical loses due to low flows are often similar compared to the ones due to floods. In general, the low flow aspect has the tendency to be underestimated by the scientific community. One of the best examples in this respect is the facts that at European level most of the countries have an (early) flood alert system, but in many cases no real information regarding the development, evolution and impacts of droughts. Low flows, occurring during dry periods, may result in several types of problems to society and economy: e.g. lack of water for drinking, irrigation, industrial use and power production, deterioration of water quality, inland waterway transport, agriculture, tourism, issuing and renewing waste disposal permits, and for assessing the impact of prolonged drought on aquatic ecosystems. As such, the ever-increasing demand on water resources calls for better a management, understanding and prediction of the water deficit situation and for more reliable and extended studies regarding the evolution of the low flow situations. In order to find an optimized monthly to seasonal forecast procedure for the German waterways, the Federal Institute of Hydrology (BfG) is exploring multiple approaches at the moment. On the one hand, based on the operational short- to medium-range forecasting chain, existing hydrological models are forced with two different hydro-meteorological inputs: (i) resampled historical meteorology generated by the Ensemble Streamflow Prediction approach and (ii) ensemble (re-) forecasts of ECMWF's global coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model, which have to be downscaled and bias corrected before feeding the hydrological models. As a second approach BfG evaluates in cooperation with

  17. Detailed flow measurements and predictions for a three-stage transonic fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, W. J.; Stapleton, A. W.

    1994-04-01

    Detailed flow measurements were taken at DRA Pyestock on a Rolls-Royce three-stage transonic research fan using advanced laser transit velocimetry and holography techniques to supplement the fixed pressure and temperature instrumentation. The results have been compared with predictions using the DRA S1-S2 quasi-three-dimensional flow calculation system at a range of speeds. The agreement was generally encouraging, both for the overall performance and for details of the internal flow such as positions of shock waves. Taken together with the computational efficiency of the calculations and previous experience on single-stage transonic fans and core compressors, this establishes the S1-S2 system as a viable design tool for future multistage transonic fans.

  18. A fast and accurate method to predict 2D and 3D aerodynamic boundary layer flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijleveld, H. A.; Veldman, A. E. P.

    2014-12-01

    A quasi-simultaneous interaction method is applied to predict 2D and 3D aerodynamic flows. This method is suitable for offshore wind turbine design software as it is a very accurate and computationally reasonably cheap method. This study shows the results for a NACA 0012 airfoil. The two applied solvers converge to the experimental values when the grid is refined. We also show that in separation the eigenvalues remain positive thus avoiding the Goldstein singularity at separation. In 3D we show a flow over a dent in which separation occurs. A rotating flat plat is used to show the applicability of the method for rotating flows. The shown capabilities of the method indicate that the quasi-simultaneous interaction method is suitable for design methods for offshore wind turbine blades.

  19. Prediction of Transonic Vortex Flows Using Linear and Nonlinear Turbulent Eddy Viscosity Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.; Gatski, Thomas B.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional transonic flow over a delta wing is investigated with a focus on the effect of transition and influence of turbulence stress anisotropies. The performance of linear eddy viscosity models and an explicit algebraic stress model is assessed at the start of vortex flow, and the results compared with experimental data. To assess the effect of transition location, computations that either fix transition or are fully turbulent are performed. To assess the effect of the turbulent stress anisotropy, comparisons are made between predictions from the algebraic stress model and the linear eddy viscosity models. Both transition location and turbulent stress anisotropy significantly affect the 3D flow field. The most significant effect is found to be the modeling of transition location. At a Mach number of 0.90, the computed solution changes character from steady to unsteady depending on transition onset. Accounting for the anisotropies in the turbulent stresses also considerably impacts the flow, most notably in the outboard region of flow separation.

  20. Property prediction of new semiconductors by computer modeling and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ping; Lin, Guo Q.; Zeng, Yingzhi

    2002-11-01

    A new methodology of systematic design of new materials for various applications is presented in this paper. In particular, a large number of candidate compounds that are formed by all possible combinations of the targeted elements in the periodic table are first screened and shortlisted by artificial neural network techniques. Then the quantum mechanics computation is employed to evaluate the promising candidates selected from the first step. Finally experiments are performed to further examine the computation results. In the present work, we apply this methodology to the study of semiconductors of binary (III-V and II-VI) and ternary (I-III-VI2 and II-IV-V2) compounds. Firstly, we systematically study all possible binary and ternary compounds by using pattern recognition and perform prediction of two important properties, namely band gap energy and lattice constant, with the artificial neural network model. Candidate semiconductors are then selected. On the basis of the above study, we perform first principles quantum mechanics computation for some promising II-VI binary candidates. The first principles study of the ternary candidates will be conducted in the near future, and the experiment study of the binary compounds is ongoing. The model predicted new compounds as well as the developed design methodology may be of interest to general materials scientists including these of smart materials research.

  1. Numerical computational of fluid flow through a detached retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiann, Lim Yeou; Ismail, Zuhaila; Shafie, Sharidan; Fitt, Alistair

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a phenomenon of fluid flow through a detached retina is studied. Rhegmatogeneous retinal detachment happens when vitreous humour flow through a detached retina. The exact mechanism of Rhegmatogeneous retinal detachment is complex and remains incomplete. To understand the fluid flow, a paradigm mathematical model is developed and is approximated by the lubrication theory. The numerical results of the velocity profile and pressure distribution are computed by using Finite Element Method. The effects of fluid mechanical on the retinal detachment is discussed and analyzed. Based on the analysis, it is found that the retinal detachment deformation affects the pressure distribution. It is important to comprehend the development of the retinal detachment so that a new treatment method can be developed.

  2. Computational modelling of slug flow in a capillary microreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashid, M. N.; Platte, F.; Agar, D. W.; Turek, S.

    2007-06-01

    The benefits of slug flow capillary microreactor exhibit the ability to adjust two individual transport mechanisms, i.e., convection inside the slug and diffusion between two consecutive slugs. The mass transfer rate is enhanced by internal circulation, which arises due to the shear between slug axis and continuous phase or capillary wall. The knowledge of circulation patterns within the slug plays an important role in the design of a capillary microreactor. Apart from this, well defined slug flow generation is a key activity in the development of methodology to study hydrodynamics and mass transfer. In the present paper we discuss computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling aspects of internal circulations (single phase) and slug flow generation (two-phase).

  3. Fully consistent CFD methods for incompressible flow computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolmogorov, D. K.; Shen, W. Z.; Sørensen, N. N.; Sørensen, J. N.

    2014-06-01

    Nowadays collocated grid based CFD methods are one of the most efficient tools for computations of the flows past wind turbines. To ensure the robustness of the methods they require special attention to the well-known problem of pressure-velocity coupling. Many commercial codes to ensure the pressure-velocity coupling on collocated grids use the so-called momentum interpolation method of Rhie and Chow [1]. As known, the method and some of its widely spread modifications result in solutions, which are dependent of time step at convergence. In this paper the magnitude of the dependence is shown to contribute about 0.5% into the total error in a typical turbulent flow computation. Nevertheless if coarse grids are used, the standard interpolation methods result in much higher non-consistent behavior. To overcome the problem, a recently developed interpolation method, which is independent of time step, is used. It is shown that in comparison to other time step independent method, the method may enhance the convergence rate of the SIMPLEC algorithm up to 25 %. The method is verified using turbulent flow computations around a NACA 64618 airfoil and the roll-up of a shear layer, which may appear in wind turbine wake.

  4. Computational approaches to predict bacteriophage-host relationships.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Robert A; McNair, Katelyn; Faust, Karoline; Raes, Jeroen; Dutilh, Bas E

    2016-03-01

    Metagenomics has changed the face of virus discovery by enabling the accurate identification of viral genome sequences without requiring isolation of the viruses. As a result, metagenomic virus discovery leaves the first and most fundamental question about any novel virus unanswered: What host does the virus infect? The diversity of the global virosphere and the volumes of data obtained in metagenomic sequencing projects demand computational tools for virus-host prediction. We focus on bacteriophages (phages, viruses that infect bacteria), the most abundant and diverse group of viruses found in environmental metagenomes. By analyzing 820 phages with annotated hosts, we review and assess the predictive power of in silico phage-host signals. Sequence homology approaches are the most effective at identifying known phage-host pairs. Compositional and abundance-based methods contain significant signal for phage-host classification, providing opportunities for analyzing the unknowns in viral metagenomes. Together, these computational approaches further our knowledge of the interactions between phages and their hosts. Importantly, we find that all reviewed signals significantly link phages to their hosts, illustrating how current knowledge and insights about the interaction mechanisms and ecology of coevolving phages and bacteria can be exploited to predict phage-host relationships, with potential relevance for medical and industrial applications. PMID:26657537

  5. Computational strategies for three-dimensional flow simulations on distributed computer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankar, Lakshmi N.; Weed, Richard A.

    1995-01-01

    This research effort is directed towards an examination of issues involved in porting large computational fluid dynamics codes in use within the industry to a distributed computing environment. This effort addresses strategies for implementing the distributed computing in a device independent fashion and load balancing. A flow solver called TEAM presently in use at Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Company was acquired to start this effort. The following tasks were completed: (1) The TEAM code was ported to a number of distributed computing platforms including a cluster of HP workstations located in the School of Aerospace Engineering at Georgia Tech; a cluster of DEC Alpha Workstations in the Graphics visualization lab located at Georgia Tech; a cluster of SGI workstations located at NASA Ames Research Center; and an IBM SP-2 system located at NASA ARC. (2) A number of communication strategies were implemented. Specifically, the manager-worker strategy and the worker-worker strategy were tested. (3) A variety of load balancing strategies were investigated. Specifically, the static load balancing, task queue balancing and the Crutchfield algorithm were coded and evaluated. (4) The classical explicit Runge-Kutta scheme in the TEAM solver was replaced with an LU implicit scheme. And (5) the implicit TEAM-PVM solver was extensively validated through studies of unsteady transonic flow over an F-5 wing, undergoing combined bending and torsional motion. These investigations are documented in extensive detail in the dissertation, 'Computational Strategies for Three-Dimensional Flow Simulations on Distributed Computing Systems', enclosed as an appendix.

  6. Computation of interactional aerodynamics for noise prediction of heavy lift rotorcraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennes, Christopher C.

    Many computational tools are used when developing a modern helicopter. As the design space is narrowed, more accurate and time-intensive tools are brought to bear. These tools are used to determine the effect of a design decision on the performance, handling, stability and efficiency of the aircraft. One notable parameter left out of this process is acoustics. This is due in part to the difficulty in making useful acoustics calculations that reveal the differences between various design configurations. This thesis presents a new approach designed to bridge the gap in prediction capability between fast but low-fidelity Lagrangian particle methods, and slow but high-fidelity Eulerian computational fluid dynamics simulations. A multi-pronged approach is presented. First, a simple flow solver using well-understood and tested flow solution methodologies is developed specifically to handle bodies in arbitrary motion. To this basic flow solver two new technologies are added. The first is an Immersed Boundary technique designed to be tolerant of geometric degeneracies and low-resolution grids. This new technique allows easy inclusion of complex fuselage geometries at minimal computational cost, improving the ability of a solver to capture the complex interactional aerodynamic effects expected in modern rotorcraft design. The second new technique is an extension of a concept from flow visualization where the motion of tip vortices are tracked through the solution using massless particles convecting with the local flow. In this extension of that concept, the particles maintain knowledge of the expected and actual vortex strength. As a post-processing step, when the acoustic calculations are made, these particles are used to augment the loading noise calculation and reproduce the highly-impulsive character of blade-vortex interaction noise. In combination these new techniques yield a significant improvement to the state of the art in rotorcraft blade-vortex interaction noise

  7. Challenges in Lagrangian transport and predictability in 3D flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branicki, M.; Wiggins, S.; Kirwan, A. D.; Malek-Madani, R.

    2011-12-01

    The interplay between the geometrical theory of dynamical systems and the trajectory-based description of aperiodically time-dependent fluid flows has led to significant advances in understanding the role of chaotic transport in geophysical flows at scales dominated by advection. Lagrangian transport analysis utilizing either the time-dependent geometry of intersecting stable and unstable manifolds of the so-called Distinguished Hyperbolic Trajectories (DHT), or ridges of finite-time Lyapunov exponent fields (LCS), provide a much needed and complementary insight into ephemeral mechanisms responsible for the existence of `leaky' transport barriers and 'leaky' mesoscale eddies. However, to date most oceanic applications have been confined to 2D analysis of near surface regions in 'perfect' flows not accounting for model or measurement error, and with the tacit assumption of negligible vertical velocities. I will systematically address issues concerning the regimes of applicability of two-dimensional analysis in 3D aperiodically time-dependent flows, as well as outstanding challenges in fully 3D Lagrangian transport analysis. Even for perfect horizontal velocities, little is known about the vertical extent of stable/unstable manifolds associated with DHTs and/or other special structures relevant to stratified 3D flows. In particular, their sensitivity to errors in the vertical velocities and data assimilation methods has been little studied. Rigorous results regarding the above issues will be illustrated by revealing and mathematically tractable toy models, as well as examples from a detailed study in an eddy-rich region from the Gulf of Mexico and the Mediterranean. New ways of quantifying the uncertainty in Lagrangian predictions will also be presented.

  8. Introduction: Prediction of F-16XL Flight Flow Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E.

    2009-01-01

    This special section is the result of fruitful endeavors by an international group of researchers in industry, government laboratories and university-led efforts to improve the technology readiness level of their CFD solvers through comparisons with flight data collected on the F-16XL-1 aircraft at a variety of test conditions. These 1996 flight data were documented and detailed the flight-flow physics of this aircraft through surface tufts and pressures, boundary-layer rakes and skin-friction measurements. The flight project was called the Cranked Wing Aerodynamics Project (CAWAP), due to its leading-edge sweep crank (70 degrees inboard, 50 degrees outboard), and served as a basis for the International comparisons to be made, called CAWAPI. This highly focused effort was one of two vortical flow studies facilitated by the NATO Research and Technology Organization through its Applied Vehicle Panel with a title of Understanding and Modeling Vortical Flows to Improve the Technology Readiness Level for Military Aircraft. It was given a task group number of AVT-113 and had an official start date of Spring 2003. The companion part of this task group dealt with fundamentals of vortical flow from both an experimental and numerical perspective on an analytically describable 65 degree delta-wing model for which much surface pressure data had already been measured at NASA Langley Research Center at a variety of Mach and Reynolds numbers and is called the Vortex Flow Experiment - 2 (VFE-2). These two parts or facets helped one another in understanding the predictions and data that had been or were being collected.

  9. Computational modeling for multiphase flows with spacecraft application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzgoren, Eray; Singh, Rajkeshar; Sim, Jaeheon; Shyy, Wei

    2007-05-01

    Many engineering applications involve interactions between solid, gas and liquid phases under normal or micro-gravity conditions. Numerical simulations of such fluid flows need to track the location and the shape of the fluid interface as part of the solution. The merits and basic characteristics of various approaches for numerical computations of interfacial fluid dynamics are reviewed. The computational challenges include: (i) the algorithmic complexity for handling irregularly shaped moving boundaries that can experience merger and break-up; (ii) resolution refinement techniques to maintain desirable resolution of length scales, in accordance with the evolving fluid dynamics; (iii) data structure needed to support identification of the interface and satisfaction of the physical laws in the bulk fluids as well as around the phase boundaries; and (iv) efficient parallel processing techniques required for practical engineering analysis. The present review focuses on these issues related to the Lagrangian-Eulerian approach, utilizing the immersed boundary method with marker-based tracking, as the main framework for interfacial flow computations on Cartesian grids. Specifically, we offer in-depth discussion of the organization and layout of the mesh systems for both fluid and interface representations, local adaptive refinement on two-dimensional/three-dimensional (2D/3D) Cartesian grids, and multi-level domain decomposition method that utilizes Hilbert space filling curves for parallel processing strategy. The effectiveness of individual components and overall algorithm are presented using various tests such as, binary drop-collision computations to highlight grid adaptation and interface tracking algorithms to handle complex interface behavior, and bubble/droplet placed in a vortex field with various density/viscosity ratios across interfaces to address load balancing and scalability aspects of parallel computing. A time-dependent draining flow problem motivated by

  10. A computational technique for turbulent flow of wastewater sludge.

    PubMed

    Bechtel, Tom B

    2005-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique applied to the turbulent flow of wastewater sludge in horizontal, smooth-wall, circular pipes is presented. The technique uses the Crank-Nicolson finite difference method in conjunction with the variable secant method, an algorithm for determining the pressure gradient of the flow. A simple algebraic turbulence model is used. A Bingham-plastic rheological model is used to describe the shear stress/shear rate relationship for the wastewater sludge. The method computes velocity gradient and head loss, given a fixed volumetric flow, pipe size, and solids concentration. Solids concentrations ranging from 3 to 10% (by weight) and nominal pipe sizes from 0.15 m (6 in.) to 0.36 m (14 in.) are studied. Comparison of the CFD results for water to established values serves to validate the numerical method. The head loss results are presented in terms of a head loss ratio, R(hl), which is the ratio of sludge head loss to water head loss. An empirical equation relating R(hl) to pipe velocity and solids concentration, derived from the results of the CFD calculations, is presented. The results are compared with published values of Rhl for solids concentrations of 3 and 6%. A new expression for the Fanning friction factor for wastewater sludge flow is also presented. PMID:16121510

  11. Computation of incompressible viscous flows through turbopump components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Chang, Leon

    1993-02-01

    Flow through pump components, such as an inducer and an impeller, is efficiently simulated by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The solution method is based on the pseudocompressibility approach and uses an implicit-upwind differencing scheme together with the Gauss-Seidel line relaxation method. the equations are solved in steadily rotating reference frames and the centrifugal force and the Coriolis force are added to the equation of motion. Current computations use a one-equation Baldwin-Barth turbulence model which is derived from a simplified form of the standard k-epsilon model equations. The resulting computer code is applied to the flow analysis inside a generic rocket engine pump inducer, a fuel pump impeller, and SSME high pressure fuel turbopump impeller. Numerical results of inducer flow are compared with experimental measurements. In the fuel pump impeller, the effect of downstream boundary conditions is investigated. Flow analyses at 80 percent, 100 percent, and 120 percent of design conditions are presented.

  12. Geostatistical prediction of flow-duration curves in an index-flow framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugliese, Alessio; Castellarin, Attilio; Brath, Armando

    2014-05-01

    An empirical period-of-record Flow-Duration Curve (FDC) describes the percentage of time (duration) in which a given streamflow was equaled or exceeded over an historical period of time. FDCs have always attracted a great deal of interest in engineering applications because of their ability to provide a simple yet comprehensive graphical view of the overall historical variability of streamflows in a river basin, from floods to low-flows. Nevertheless, in many practical applications one has to construct FDC in basins that are ungauged or where very few observations are available. We present in this study an application strategy of Topological kriging (or Top-kriging), which makes the geostatistical procedure capable of predicting flow-duration curves (FDCs) in ungauged catchments. Previous applications of Top-kriging mainly focused on the prediction of point streamflow indices (e.g. flood quantiles, low-flow indices, etc.). In this study Top-kriging is used to predict FDCs in ungauged sites as a weighted average of standardised empirical FDCs through the traditional linear-weighting scheme of kriging methods. Our study focuses on the prediction of FDCs for 18 unregulated catchments located in Central Italy, for which daily streamflow series with length from 5 to 40 years are available, together with information on climate referring to the same time-span of each daily streamflow sequence. Empirical FDCs are standardised by a reference index-flow value (i.e. mean annual flow, or mean annual precipitation times the catchment drainage area) and the overall deviation of the curves from this reference value is then used for expressing the hydrological similarity between catchments and for deriving the geostatistical weights. We performed an extensive leave-one-out cross-validation to quantify the accuracy of the proposed technique, and to compare it to traditional regionalisation models that were recently developed for the same study region. The cross-validation points

  13. Reduction of computer usage costs in predicting unsteady aerodynamic loadings caused by control surface motions: Analysis and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowe, W. S.; Sebastian, J. D.; Petrarca, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Results of theoretical and numerical investigations conducted to develop economical computing procedures were applied to an existing computer program that predicts unsteady aerodynamic loadings caused by leading and trailing edge control surface motions in subsonic compressible flow. Large reductions in computing costs were achieved by removing the spanwise singularity of the downwash integrand and evaluating its effect separately in closed form. Additional reductions were obtained by modifying the incremental pressure term that account for downwash singularities at control surface edges. Accuracy of theoretical predictions of unsteady loading at high reduced frequencies was increased by applying new pressure expressions that exactly satisified the high frequency boundary conditions of an oscillating control surface. Comparative computer result indicated that the revised procedures provide more accurate predictions of unsteady loadings as well as providing reduction of 50 to 80 percent in computer usage costs.

  14. Efficient computation of the spectrum of viscoelastic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valério, J. V.; Carvalho, M. S.; Tomei, C.

    2009-03-01

    The understanding of viscoelastic flows in many situations requires not only the steady state solution of the governing equations, but also its sensitivity to small perturbations. Linear stability analysis leads to a generalized eigenvalue problem (GEVP), whose numerical analysis may be challenging, even for Newtonian liquids, because the incompressibility constraint creates singularities that lead to non-physical eigenvalues at infinity. For viscoelastic flows, the difficulties increase due to the presence of continuous spectrum, related to the constitutive equations. The Couette flow of upper convected Maxwell (UCM) liquids has been used as a case study of the stability of viscoelastic flows. The spectrum consists of two discrete eigenvalues and a continuous segment with real part equal to -1/ We ( We is the Weissenberg number). Most of the approximations in the literature were obtained using spectral expansions. The eigenvalues close to the continuous part of the spectrum show very slow convergence. In this work, the linear stability of Couette flow of a UCM liquid is studied using a finite element method. A new procedure to eliminate the eigenvalues at infinity from the GEVP is proposed. The procedure takes advantage of the structure of the matrices involved and avoids the computational overhead of the usual mapping techniques. The GEVP is transformed into a non-degenerate GEVP of dimension five times smaller. The computed eigenfunctions related to the continuous spectrum are in good agreement with the analytic solutions obtained by Graham [M.D. Graham, Effect of axial flow on viscoelastic Taylor-Couette instability, J. Fluid Mech. 360 (1998) 341].

  15. PAN AIR: A computer program for predicting subsonic or supersonic linear potential flows about arbitrary configurations using a higher order panel method. Volume 2: User's manual (version 3.0)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidwell, Kenneth W.; Baruah, Pranab K.; Bussoletti, John E.; Medan, Richard T.; Conner, R. S.; Purdon, David J.

    1990-01-01

    A comprehensive description of user problem definition for the PAN AIR (Panel Aerodynamics) system is given. PAN AIR solves the 3-D linear integral equations of subsonic and supersonic flow. Influence coefficient methods are used which employ source and doublet panels as boundary surfaces. Both analysis and design boundary conditions can be used. This User's Manual describes the information needed to use the PAN AIR system. The structure and organization of PAN AIR are described, including the job control and module execution control languages for execution of the program system. The engineering input data are described, including the mathematical and physical modeling requirements. Version 3.0 strictly applies only to PAN AIR version 3.0. The major revisions include: (1) inputs and guidelines for the new FDP module (which calculates streamlines and offbody points); (2) nine new class 1 and class 2 boundary conditions to cover commonly used modeling practices, in particular the vorticity matching Kutta condition; (3) use of the CRAY solid state Storage Device (SSD); and (4) incorporation of errata and typo's together with additional explanation and guidelines.

  16. Computational wing design studies relating to natural laminar flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waggoner, Edgar G.

    1986-01-01

    Two research studies are described which directly relate to the application of natural laminar flow (NLF) technology to transonic transport-type wing planforms. Each involved using state-of-the-art computational methods to design three-dimensional wing contours which generate significant runs of favorable pressure gradients. The first study supported the Variable Sweep Transition Flight Experiment and involves design of a full-span glove which extends from the leading edge to the spoiler hinge line on the upper surface of an F-14 outer wing panel. A wing was designed computationally for a corporate transport aircraft in the second study. The resulting wing design generated favorable pressure gradients from the leading edge aft to the mid-chord on both upper and lower surfaces at the cruise design point. Detailed descriptions of the computational design approach are presented along with the various constraints imposed on each of the designs.

  17. DEEP: a general computational framework for predicting enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Kleftogiannis, Dimitrios; Kalnis, Panos; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription regulation in multicellular eukaryotes is orchestrated by a number of DNA functional elements located at gene regulatory regions. Some regulatory regions (e.g. enhancers) are located far away from the gene they affect. Identification of distal regulatory elements is a challenge for the bioinformatics research. Although existing methodologies increased the number of computationally predicted enhancers, performance inconsistency of computational models across different cell-lines, class imbalance within the learning sets and ad hoc rules for selecting enhancer candidates for supervised learning, are some key questions that require further examination. In this study we developed DEEP, a novel ensemble prediction framework. DEEP integrates three components with diverse characteristics that streamline the analysis of enhancer's properties in a great variety of cellular conditions. In our method we train many individual classification models that we combine to classify DNA regions as enhancers or non-enhancers. DEEP uses features derived from histone modification marks or attributes coming from sequence characteristics. Experimental results indicate that DEEP performs better than four state-of-the-art methods on the ENCODE data. We report the first computational enhancer prediction results on FANTOM5 data where DEEP achieves 90.2% accuracy and 90% geometric mean (GM) of specificity and sensitivity across 36 different tissues. We further present results derived using in vivo-derived enhancer data from VISTA database. DEEP-VISTA, when tested on an independent test set, achieved GM of 80.1% and accuracy of 89.64%. DEEP framework is publicly available at http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/deep/. PMID:25378307

  18. Navier-Stokes computations of lee-side flows over delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. L.; Newsome, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations for the flow over delta wings are computed with emphasis on the separated vortical flows developing on the lee side at high angles of attack. A recently developed implicit algorithm is used which employs upwind differencing for the pressure and convection terms and central differencing for the shear stress and heat transfer terms. Solutions to both the three-dimensional equations and the approximate conical flow equations are compared parametrically with an extensive experimental data base at supersonic speeds. The computations indicate that the conical flow approximation provides results in close agreement with the three-dimensional equations, even to angles of attack as high as 20 degrees. Good agreement with experimentally measured pressures and vapor screen photographs is obtained for the conditions investigated. The method predicts the classical pattern of vortical flow over a delta wing and transition to other flow patterns as the leading edge sweep angle and leading edge normal Mach number are varied.

  19. Computation of Sound Generated by Viscous Flow Over a Circular Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Jared S.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Brentner, Kenneth S.; Younis, Bassam A.

    1997-01-01

    The Lighthill acoustic analogy approach combined with Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes is used to predict the sound generated by unsteady viscous flow past a circular cylinder assuming a correlation length of 10 cylinder diameters. The two-dimensional unsteady flow field is computed using two Navier-Stokes codes at a low Mach number over a range of Reynolds numbers from 100 to 5 million. Both laminar flow as well as turbulent flow with a variety of eddy viscosity turbulence models are employed. Mean drag and Strouhal number are examined, and trends similar to experiments are observed. Computing the noise within the Reynolds number regime where transition to turbulence occurs near the separation point is problematic: laminar flow exhibits chaotic behavior and turbulent flow exhibits strong dependence on the turbulence model employed. Comparisons of far-field noise with experiment at a Reynolds number of 90,000, therefore, vary significantly, depending on the turbulence model. At a high Reynolds number outside this regime, three different turbulence models yield self-consistent results.

  20. Computation of Separated and Unsteady Flows with One- and Two-Equation Turbulence Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekaterinaris, John A.; Menter, Florian R.

    1994-01-01

    The ability of one- and two-equation turbulence models to predict unsteady separated flows over airfoils is evaluated. An implicit, factorized, upwind-biased numerical scheme is used for the integration of the compressible, Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The turbulent eddy viscosity is obtained from the computed mean flowfield by integration of the turbulent field equations. The two-equation turbulence models are discretized in space with an upwind-biased, second order accurate total variation diminishing scheme. One and two-equation turbulence models are first tested for a separated airfoil flow at fixed angle of incidence. The same models are then applied to compute the unsteady flowfields about airfoils undergoing oscillatory motion at low subsonic Mach numbers. Experimental cases where the flow has been tripped at the leading edge and where natural transition was allowed to occur naturally are considered. The more recently developed field-equation turbulence models capture the physics of unsteady separated flow significantly better than the standard kappa-epsilon and kappa-omega models. However, certain differences in the hysteresis effects are obtained. For an untripped high-Reynolds-number flow, it was found necessary to take into account the leading edge transitional flow region in order to capture the correct physical mechanism that leads to dynamic stall.

  1. Computation of oscillating airfoil flows with one- and two-equation turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekaterinaris, J. A.; Menter, F. R.

    1994-01-01

    The ability of one- and two-equation turbulence models to predict unsteady separated flows over airfoils is evaluated. An implicit, factorized, upwind-biased numerical scheme is used for the integration of the compressible, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The turbulent eddy viscosity is obtained from the computed mean flowfield by integration of the turbulent field equations. One- and two-equation turbulence models are first tested for a separated airfoil flow at fixed angle of incidence. The same models are then applied to compute the unsteady flowfields about airfoils undergoing oscillatory motion at low subsonic Mach numbers. Experimental cases where the flow has been tripped at the leading-edge and where natural transition was allowed to occur naturally are considered. The more recently developed turbulence models capture the physics of unsteady separated flow significantly better than the standard kappa-epsilon and kappa-omega models. However, certain differences in the hysteresis effects are observed. For an untripped high-Reynolds-number flow, it was found necessary to take into account the leading-edge transitional flow region to capture the correct physical mechanism that leads to dynamic stall.

  2. A Whole-Cell Computational Model Predicts Phenotype from Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Karr, Jonathan R.; Sanghvi, Jayodita C.; Macklin, Derek N.; Gutschow, Miriam V.; Jacobs, Jared M.; Bolival, Benjamin; Assad-Garcia, Nacyra; Glass, John I.; Covert, Markus W.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Understanding how complex phenotypes arise from individual molecules and their interactions is a primary challenge in biology that computational approaches are poised to tackle. We report a whole-cell computational model of the life cycle of the human pathogen Mycoplasma genitalium that includes all of its molecular components and their interactions. An integrative approach to modeling that combines diverse mathematics enabled the simultaneous inclusion of fundamentally different cellular processes and experimental measurements. Our whole-cell model accounts for all annotated gene functions and was validated against a broad range of data. The model provides insights into many previously unobserved cellular behaviors, including in vivo rates of protein-DNA association and an inverse relationship between the durations of DNA replication initiation and replication rates. In addition, experimental analysis directed by model predictions identified previously undetected kinetic parameters and biological functions. We conclude that comprehensive whole-cell models can be used to facilitate biological discovery. PMID:22817898

  3. Correlations predict gas-condensate flow through chokes

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, M.E.; Dokla, M.E. )

    1992-03-16

    Empirical correlations have developed to describe the behavior of gas-condensate flow through surface chokes. The field data were obtained from a Middle East gas-condensate reservoir and cover a wide range of flow rates and choke sizes. Correlations for gas-condensate systems have not been previously available. These new correlations will help the production engineer to size chokes for controlling production of gas-condensate wells and predicting the performance of flowing wells under various conditions. Four forms of the correlation were developed and checked against data. One form correlates choke upstream pressure with liquid production rate, gas/liquid ratio, and choke size. The second form uses gas production rate instead of the liquid rate. The other two forms use the pressure drop across the choke instead of upstream pressure. All four of the correlations are presented in this paper as nomograms. Accuracy of the different forms was checked with five error parameters: root-mean-square error, mean-absolute error, simple-mean error, mean-percent-age-absolute error, and mean-percentage error. The correlation was found to be the most accurate when pressure-drop data are used instead of choke upstream pressure.

  4. Application of two- and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics models to complex ecological stream flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yi; Diplas, Panayiotis

    2008-01-01

    SummaryComplex flow patterns generated by irregular channel topography, such as boulders, submerged large woody debris, riprap and spur dikes, provide unique habitat for many aquatic organisms. Numerical modeling of the flow structures surrounding these obstructions is challenging, yet it represents an important tool for aquatic habitat assessment. In this study, the ability of two- (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics models to reproduce these localized complex flow features is examined. The 3-D model is validated with laboratory data obtained from the literature for the case of a flow around a hemisphere under emergent and submerged conditions. The performance of the 2-D and 3-D models is then evaluated by comparing the numerical results with field measurements of flow around several boulders located at a reach of the Smith River, a regulated mountainous stream, obtained at base and peak flows. Close agreement between measured values and the velocity profiles predicted by the two models is obtained outside the wakes behind the hemisphere and boulders. However, the results suggest that in the vicinity of these obstructions the 3-D model is better suited for reproducing the circulation flow behavior at both low and high discharges. Application of the 2-D and 3-D models to meso-scale stream flows of ecological significance is furthermore demonstrated by using a recently developed spatial hydraulic metric to quantify flow complexity surrounding a number of brown trout spawning sites. It is concluded that the 3-D model can provide a much more accurate description of the heterogeneous velocity patterns favored by many aquatic species over a broad range of flows, especially under deep flow conditions when the various obstructions are submerged. Issues pertaining to selection of appropriate models for a variety of flow regimes and potential implication of the 3-D model on the development of better habitat suitability criteria are discussed. The

  5. INTEGRATING COMPUTATIONAL PROTEIN FUNCTION PREDICTION INTO DRUG DISCOVERY INITIATIVES

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Marianne A.

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceutical researchers must evaluate vast numbers of protein sequences and formulate innovative strategies for identifying valid targets and discovering leads against them as a way of accelerating drug discovery. The ever increasing number and diversity of novel protein sequences identified by genomic sequencing projects and the success of worldwide structural genomics initiatives have spurred great interest and impetus in the development of methods for accurate, computationally empowered protein function prediction and active site identification. Previously, in the absence of direct experimental evidence, homology-based protein function annotation remained the gold-standard for in silico analysis and prediction of protein function. However, with the continued exponential expansion of sequence databases, this approach is not always applicable, as fewer query protein sequences demonstrate significant homology to protein gene products of known function. As a result, several non-homology based methods for protein function prediction that are based on sequence features, structure, evolution, biochemical and genetic knowledge have emerged. Herein, we review current bioinformatic programs and approaches for protein function prediction/annotation and discuss their integration into drug discovery initiatives. The development of such methods to annotate protein functional sites and their application to large protein functional families is crucial to successfully utilizing the vast amounts of genomic sequence information available to drug discovery and development processes. PMID:25530654

  6. Program Predicts Time Courses of Human/Computer Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vera, Alonso; Howes, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    CPM X is a computer program that predicts sequences of, and amounts of time taken by, routine actions performed by a skilled person performing a task. Unlike programs that simulate the interaction of the person with the task environment, CPM X predicts the time course of events as consequences of encoded constraints on human behavior. The constraints determine which cognitive and environmental processes can occur simultaneously and which have sequential dependencies. The input to CPM X comprises (1) a description of a task and strategy in a hierarchical description language and (2) a description of architectural constraints in the form of rules governing interactions of fundamental cognitive, perceptual, and motor operations. The output of CPM X is a Program Evaluation Review Technique (PERT) chart that presents a schedule of predicted cognitive, motor, and perceptual operators interacting with a task environment. The CPM X program allows direct, a priori prediction of skilled user performance on complex human-machine systems, providing a way to assess critical interfaces before they are deployed in mission contexts.

  7. Computational prediction of the chromosome-damaging potential of chemicals.

    PubMed

    Rothfuss, Andreas; Steger-Hartmann, Thomas; Heinrich, Nikolaus; Wichard, Jörg

    2006-10-01

    We report on the generation of computer-based models for the prediction of the chromosome-damaging potential of chemicals as assessed in the in vitro chromosome aberration (CA) test. On the basis of publicly available CA-test results of more than 650 chemical substances, half of which are drug-like compounds, we generated two different computational models. The first model was realized using the (Q)SAR tool MCASE. Results obtained with this model indicate a limited performance (53%) for the assessment of a chromosome-damaging potential (sensitivity), whereas CA-test negative compounds were correctly predicted with a specificity of 75%. The low sensitivity of this model might be explained by the fact that the underlying 2D-structural descriptors only describe part of the molecular mechanism leading to the induction of chromosome aberrations, that is, direct drug-DNA interactions. The second model was constructed with a more sophisticated machine learning approach and generated a classification model based on 14 molecular descriptors, which were obtained after feature selection. The performance of this model was superior to the MCASE model, primarily because of an improved sensitivity, suggesting that the more complex molecular descriptors in combination with statistical learning approaches are better suited to model the complex nature of mechanisms leading to a positive effect in the CA-test. An analysis of misclassified pharmaceuticals by this model showed that a large part of the false-negative predicted compounds were uniquely positive in the CA-test but lacked a genotoxic potential in other mutagenicity tests of the regulatory testing battery, suggesting that biologically nonsignificant mechanisms could be responsible for the observed positive CA-test result. Since such mechanisms are not amenable to modeling approaches it is suggested that a positive prediction made by the model reflects a biologically significant genotoxic potential. An integration of the

  8. Evaluation of two swept-infinite-wing potential/viscous-flow computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arimilli, R. V.

    1976-01-01

    Two computer programs capable of predicting the potential and viscous interacting flow around wings of infinite aspect ratio was evaluated. The programs are compared in terms of their capabilities, the approximations and the methods of solution used, and the input requirements. Six airfoils, each representative of a class of airfoils, are used as test airfoils. The results predicted by the programs are presented for each airfoil at sweep angles of 0, 20, and 40 degrees over a range of angles of attack. The results show that at zero sweep both programs predicted the aerodynamic coefficients well and generally in good agreement with measurements. At 20 and 40 degrees of sweep, as there are no experimental data available, definitive conclusions cannot be drawn about the accuracy of the predictions although the results are presented and discussed. The execution times are approximately the same for the two programs.

  9. Flow separation in a computational oscillating vocal fold model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipour, Fariborz; Scherer, Ronald C.

    2004-09-01

    A finite-volume computational model that solves the time-dependent glottal airflow within a forced-oscillation model of the glottis was employed to study glottal flow separation. Tracheal input velocity was independently controlled with a sinusoidally varying parabolic velocity profile. Control parameters included flow rate (Reynolds number), oscillation frequency and amplitude of the vocal folds, and the phase difference between the superior and inferior glottal margins. Results for static divergent glottal shapes suggest that velocity increase caused glottal separation to move downstream, but reduction in velocity increase and velocity decrease moved the separation upstream. At the fixed frequency, an increase of amplitude of the glottal walls moved the separation further downstream during glottal closing. Increase of Reynolds number caused the flow separation to move upstream in the glottis. The flow separation cross-sectional ratio ranged from approximately 1.1 to 1.9 (average of 1.47) for the divergent shapes. Results suggest that there may be a strong interaction of rate of change of airflow, inertia, and wall movement. Flow separation appeared to be ``delayed'' during the vibratory cycle, leading to movement of the separation point upstream of the glottal end only after a significant divergent angle was reached, and to persist upstream into the convergent phase of the cycle.

  10. An improved version of NCOREL: A computer program for 3-D nonlinear supersonic potential flow computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siclari, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    A computer code called NCOREL (for Nonconical Relaxation) has been developed to solve for supersonic full potential flows over complex geometries. The method first solves for the conical at the apex and then marches downstream in a spherical coordinate system. Implicit relaxation techniques are used to numerically solve the full potential equation at each subsequent crossflow plane. Many improvements have been made to the original code including more reliable numerics for computing wing-body flows with multiple embedded shocks, inlet flow through simulation, wake model and entropy corrections. Line relaxation or approximate factorization schemes are optionally available. Improved internal grid generation using analytic conformal mappings, supported by a simple geometric Harris wave drag input that was originally developed for panel methods and internal geometry package are some of the new features.

  11. Material flow analysis of used personal computers in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Aya; Tasaki, Tomohiro; Terazono, Atsushi

    2009-05-01

    Most personal computers (PCs) are discarded by consumers after the data files have been moved to a new PC. Therefore, a used PC collection scheme should be created that does not depend on the distribution route of new PCs. In Japan, manufacturers' voluntary take-back recycling schemes were established in 2001 (for business PCs) and 2003 (for household PCs). At the same time, the export of used PCs from Japan increased, affecting the domestic PC reuse market. These regulatory and economic conditions would have changed the flow of used PCs. In this paper, we developed a method of minimizing the errors in estimating the material flow of used PCs. The method's features include utilization of both input and output flow data and elimination of subjective estimation as much as possible. Flow rate data from existing surveys were used for estimating the flow of used PCs in Japan for fiscal years (FY) 2000, 2001, and 2004. The results show that 3.92 million and 4.88 million used PCs were discarded in FY 2000 and 2001, respectively. Approximately two-thirds of the discarded PCs were disposed of or recycled within the country, one-fourth was reused within the country, and 8% were exported. In FY 2004, 7.47 million used PCs were discarded. The ratio of domestic disposal and recycling decreased to 37% in FY 2004, whereas the domestic reuse and export ratios increased to 37% and 26%, respectively. Flows from businesses to retailers in FY 2004 increased dramatically, which led to increased domestic reuse. An increase in the flow of used PCs from lease and rental companies to secondhand shops has led to increased exports. Results of interviews with members of PC reuse companies were and trade statistics were used to verify the results of our estimation of domestic reuse and export of used PCs. PMID:19144503

  12. FLUSH - PREDICTION OF FLOW PARAMETERS OF SLUSH HYDROGEN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, T.

    1994-01-01

    Slush hydrogen, a mixture of the solid and liquid phases of hydrogen, is a possible source of fuel for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) Project. Advantages of slush hydrogen over liquid hydrogen include greater heat capacity and greater density. However, practical use of slush hydrogen as a fuel requires systems of lines, valves, etc. which are designed to deliver the fuel in slush form with minimal solid loss as a result of pipe heating or flow friction. Engineers involved with the NASP Project developed FLUSH to calculate the pressure drop and slush hydrogen solid fraction loss for steady-state, one-dimensional flow. FLUSH solves the steady-state, one-dimensional energy equation and the Bernoulli equation for pipe flow. The program performs these calculations for each two-node element--straight pipe length, elbow, valve, fitting, or other part of the piping system--specified by the user. The user provides flow rate, upstream pressure, initial solid hydrogen fraction, element heat leak, and element parameters such as length and diameter. For each element, FLUSH first calculates the pressure drop, then figures the slush solid fraction exiting the element. The code employs GASPLUS routines to calculate thermodynamic properties for the slush hydrogen. FLUSH is written in FORTRAN IV for DEC VAX series computers running VMS. An executable is provided on the tape. The GASPLUS physical properties routines which are required for building the executable are included as one object library on the program media (full source code for GASPLUS is available separately as COSMIC Program Number LEW-15091). FLUSH is available in DEC VAX BACKUP format on a 9-track 1600 BPI magnetic tape (standard media) or on a TK50 tape cartridge. FLUSH was developed in 1989.

  13. Further development of a method for computing three-dimensional subsonic viscous flows in turbofan lobe mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S. J.; Kreskovsky, J. P.; Briley, W. R.; Mcdonald, H.

    1983-01-01

    Procedure for computing subsonic, turbulent flow in turbofan lobe mixers was extended to allow consideration of flow fields in which a swirl component of velocity may be present. Additional, an optional k-lambda turbulence model was added to the procedure. The method of specifying the initial flow field was also modified, allowing parametric specification or radial secondary flow velocities, and making it possible to consider initial flow fields which have significant inlet secondary flow vorticity. A series of example calculations was performed which demonstrate the various capabilities of the modified code. These calculations demonstrate the effects of initial secondary flows of various magnitudes, the effects of swirl, and the effects of turbulence model on the mixing process. The results of these calculations indicate that the initial secondary flows, presumed to be generated within the lobes, play a dominant role in the mixing process, and that the predicted results are relatively insensitive to the turbulence model used.

  14. Turbulent Boundary Layers in Oscillating Flows. Part 1: an Experimental and Computational Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental-computational study of the behavior of turbulent boundary layers for oscillating air flows over a plane surface with a small favorable mean pressure gradient is described. Experimental studies were conducted for boundary layers generated on the test section wall of a facility that produces a flow with a mean free stream velocity and a superposed nearly-pure sinusoidal component over a wide range of frequency. Flow at a nominal mean free stream velocity of 50 m/s were studied at atmospheric pressure and temperature at selected axial positions over a 2 m test length for frequencies ranging from 4 to 29 Hz. Quantitative experimental results are presented for unsteady velocity profiles and longitudinal turbulence levels obtained from hot wire anemometer measurements at three axial positions. Mean velocity profiles for oscillating flows were found to exhibit only small deviations from corresponding steady flow profiles, while amplitudes and phase relationships exhibited a strong dependence on axial position and frequency. Since sinusoidal flows could be generated over a wide range of frequency, studies at fixed values of reduced frequency at different axial positions were studied. Results show that there is some utility in the use of reduced frequency to correlate unsteady velocity results. The turbulence level u' sub rms was observed to vary essentially sinusoidally around values close to those measured in steady flow. However, the amplitude of oscillation and phase relations for turbulence level were found to be strongly frequency dependent. Numerical predictions were obtained using an unsteady boundary layer computational code and the Cebeci-Smith and Glushko turbulence models. Predicted quantities related to unsteady velocity profiles exhibit fair agreement with experiment when the Cebeci-Smith turbulence model is used.

  15. Assessment of Geometry and In-Flow Effects on Contra-Rotating Open Rotor Broadband Noise Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zawodny, Nikolas S.; Nark, Douglas M.; Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Application of previously formulated semi-analytical models for the prediction of broadband noise due to turbulent rotor wake interactions and rotor blade trailing edges is performed on the historical baseline F31/A31 contra-rotating open rotor configuration. Simplified two-dimensional blade element analysis is performed on cambered NACA 4-digit airfoil profiles, which are meant to serve as substitutes for the actual rotor blade sectional geometries. Rotor in-flow effects such as induced axial and tangential velocities are incorporated into the noise prediction models based on supporting computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results and simplified in-flow velocity models. Emphasis is placed on the development of simplified rotor in-flow models for the purpose of performing accurate noise predictions independent of CFD information. The broadband predictions are found to compare favorably with experimental acoustic results.

  16. Prediction of thermal conductivity of rocks by soft computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandelwal, Manoj

    2010-05-01

    The transfer of energy between two adjacent parts of rock mainly depends on its thermal conductivity. Knowledge of the thermal conductivity of rocks is necessary for the calculation of heat flow or for the longtime modeling of geothermal resources. In recent years, considerable effort has been made to develop artificial intelligence techniques to determine these properties. Present study supports the application of artificial neural network (ANN) in the study of thermal conductivity along with other intrinsic properties of rock due to its increasing importance in many areas of rock engineering, agronomy, and geoenvironmental engineering field. In this paper, an attempt has been made to predict the thermal conductivity (TC) of rocks by incorporating uniaxial compressive strength, density, porosity, and P-wave velocity using artificial neural network (ANN) technique. A three-layer feed forward back propagation neural network with 4-7-1 architecture was trained and tested using 107 experimental data sets of various rocks. Twenty new data sets were used for the validation and comparison of the TC by ANN. Multivariate regression analysis (MVRA) has also been done with same data sets of ANN. ANN and MVRA results were compared based on coefficient of determination (CoD) and mean absolute error (MAE) between experimental and predicted values of TC. It was found that CoD between measured and predicted values of TC by ANN and MVRA were 0.984 and 0.914, respectively, whereas MAE was 0.0894 and 0.2085 for ANN and MVRA, respectively.

  17. Computational Prediction of HIV-1 Resistance to Protease Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Ali; Alibés, Andreu; Noguera-Julian, Marc; Gil, Victor; Paredes, Roger; Soliva, Robert; Orozco, Modesto; Guallar, Victor

    2016-05-23

    The development of mutations in HIV-1 protease (PR) hinders the activity of antiretroviral drugs, forcing changes in drug prescription. Most resistance assessments used to date rely on expert-based rules on predefined sets of stereotypical mutations; such an information-driven approach cannot capture new polymorphisms or be applied for new drugs. Computational modeling could provide a more general assessment of drug resistance and could be made available to clinicians through the Internet. We have created a protocol involving sequence comparison and all-atom protein-ligand induced fit simulations to predict resistance at the molecular level. We first compared our predictions with the experimentally determined IC50 values of darunavir, amprenavir, ritonavir, and indinavir from reference PR mutants displaying different resistance levels. We then performed analyses on a large set of variants harboring more than 10 mutations. Finally, several sequences from real patients were analyzed for amprenavir and darunavir. Our computational approach detected all of the genotype changes triggering high-level resistance, even those involving a large number of mutations. PMID:27082876

  18. Computational analysis of an axial flow pediatric ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Throckmorton, Amy L; Untaroiu, Alexandrina; Allaire, Paul E; Wood, Houston G; Matherne, Gaynell Paul; Lim, David Scott; Peeler, Ben B; Olsen, Don B

    2004-10-01

    Longer-term (>2 weeks) mechanical circulatory support will provide an improved quality of life for thousands of pediatric cardiac failure patients per year in the United States. These pediatric patients suffer from severe congenital or acquired heart disease complicated by congestive heart failure. There are currently very few mechanical circulatory support systems available in the United States as viable options for this population. For that reason, we have designed an axial flow pediatric ventricular assist device (PVAD) with an impeller that is fully suspended by magnetic bearings. As a geometrically similar, smaller scaled version of our axial flow pump for the adult population, the PVAD has a design point of 1.5 L/min at 65 mm Hg to meet the full physiologic needs of pediatric patients. Conventional axial pump design equations and a nondimensional scaling technique were used to estimate the PVAD's initial dimensions, which allowed for the creation of computational models for performance analysis. A computational fluid dynamic analysis of the axial flow PVAD, which measures approximately 65 mm in length by 35 mm in diameter, shows that the pump will produce 1.5 L/min at 65 mm Hg for 8000 rpm. Fluid forces (approximately 1 N) were also determined for the suspension and motor design, and scalar stress values remained below 350 Pa with maximum particle residence times of approximately 0.08 milliseconds in the pump. This initial design demonstrated acceptable performance, thereby encouraging prototype manufacturing for experimental validation. PMID:15384993

  19. Computation of Free Molecular Flow in Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Casella, Andrew M.; Loyalka, Sudarsham K.; Hanson, Brady D.

    2009-11-11

    Generally the transport of gases and vapors in nuclear materials is adequately described by the diffusion equation with an effective diffusion coefficient. There are instances however, such as transport through porous or cracked media (nuclear fuels, cladding and coating materials, fuel-cladding gap, graphite, rocks, soil) where the diffusion description has limitations. In general, molecular transport is governed by intermolecular forces and collisions (interactions between multiple gas/vapor molecules) and by molecule-surface interactions. However, if nano-scale pathways exist within these materials, as has been suggested, then molecular transport can be characterized as being in the free-molecular flow regime where intermolecular interactions can be ignored and flow is determined entirely by molecule-surface collisions. Our purpose in this investigation is to focus on free molecular transport in fine capillaries of a range of shapes and to explore the effect of geometry on this transport. We have employed Monte Carlo techniques in our calculations, and for simple geometries we have benchmarked our results against some analytical and previously available results. We have used Mathematica® which has exceptional built-in symbolic and graphical capabilities, permitting easy handling of the complicated geometries and good visualization of the results. Our computations provide insights into the role of geometry in molecular transport in nuclear materials with narrow pathways for flows, and also will be useful in guiding computations that include intermolecular collisions and more realistic gas-surface collision operators.

  20. A multigrid nonoscillatory method for computing high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C. P.; Shieh, T. H.

    1993-01-01

    A multigrid method using different smoothers has been developed to solve the Euler equations discretized by a nonoscillatory scheme up to fourth order accuracy. The best smoothing property is provided by a five-stage Runge-Kutta technique with optimized coefficients, yet the most efficient smoother is a backward Euler technique in factored and diagonalized form. The singlegrid solution for a hypersonic, viscous conic flow is in excellent agreement with the solution obtained by the third order MUSCL and Roe's method. Mach 8 inviscid flow computations for a complete entry probe have shown that the accuracy is at least as good as the symmetric TVD scheme of Yee and Harten. The implicit multigrid method is four times more efficient than the explicit multigrid technique and 3.5 times faster than the single-grid implicit technique. For a Mach 8.7 inviscid flow over a blunt delta wing at 30 deg incidence, the CPU reduction factor from the three-level multigrid computation is 2.2 on a grid of 37 x 41 x 73 nodes.