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Sample records for computed tomography combined

  1. Combined positron emission tomography and computed tomography to visualize and quantify fluid flow in sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernø, M. A.; Gauteplass, J.; Hauge, L. P.; Abell, G. E.; Adamsen, T. C. H.; Graue, A.

    2015-09-01

    Here we show for the first time the combined positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) imaging of flow processes within porous rocks to quantify the development in local fluid saturations. The coupling between local rock structure and displacement fronts is demonstrated in exploratory experiments using this novel approach. We also compare quantification of 3-D temporal and spatial water saturations in two similar CO2 storage tests in sandstone imaged separately with PET and CT. The applicability of each visualization technique is evaluated for a range of displacement processes, and the favorable implementation of combining PET/CT for laboratory core analysis is discussed. We learn that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is over an order of magnitude higher for PET compared with CT for the studied processes.

  2. Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, Isabel; Geleijns, Jacob

    After its clinical introduction in 1973, computed tomography developed from an x-ray modality for axial imaging in neuroradiology into a versatile three dimensional imaging modality for a wide range of applications in for example oncology, vascular radiology, cardiology, traumatology and even in interventional radiology. Computed tomography is applied for diagnosis, follow-up studies and screening of healthy subpopulations with specific risk factors. This chapter provides a general introduction in computed tomography, covering a short history of computed tomography, technology, image quality, dosimetry, room shielding, quality control and quality criteria.

  3. Computed tomography and positron emission tomography/computed tomography surveillance after combined modality treatment of supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin lymphoma: a clinical and economic perspective.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vatsal; Buckstein, Michael; Perini, Rodolfo; Hill-Kayser, Christine; Svoboda, Jakub; Plastaras, John P

    2013-10-01

    We studied the clinical benefits of radiological imaging, in the follow-up of patients after combined modality treatment for stage I/II classical supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Imaging data were collected for 78 adults treated during 1996-2008. Median follow-up was 4.6 years. Six of the nine relapses were detected clinically. On average, 31 imaging studies/patient were performed, with an estimated cost of $12 608/patient. Chest computed tomography (CT) scans accounted for 25%, abdominopelvic CT scans 41% and positron emission tomography (PET) or PET/CT scans 22% of this expense. Only one patient recurred infradiaphragmatically. The estimated radiation dose from imaging was 399 mSv and 229 mSv per patient, in relapse and non-relapse groups, respectively. CT scans contributed over 80% of the imaging radiation exposure. The routine use of CT scans in the surveillance of patients with HL after curative treatment adds to healthcare costs and total body radiation exposure with a low yield. History and physical examination remain effective tools for the follow-up of patients. PMID:23331161

  4. Design, development and characterization of a novel neutron and x-ray combined computed tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Vaibhav

    Visualizing the three dimensional structure of objects (e.g. nuclear fuel, nuclear materials, explosives and bio materials) and phenomena (e.g. particle tracking) can be very important in nondestructive testing applications. Computed tomography systems are indispensable tools for these types of applications because they provide a versatile non-destructive technique for analysis. A novel neutron and X-ray combined computed tomography (NXCT) system has been designed and developed at the Missouri University of Science & Technology. The neutron and X-ray combined computed tomography system holds much promise for non-destructive material detection and analysis where multiple materials having similar atomic number and differing thermal cross section or vice versa may be present within an object, exclusive neutron or X-ray analysis may exhibit shortcomings in distinguishing interfaces. However, fusing neutron image and X-ray image offers the strengths of both and may provide a superior method of analysis. In addition, a feasible design of a sample positioning system which allows the user to remotely and automatically manipulate the objects makes the NXCT system viable for commercial applications. Moreover, characterization of the newly developed digital imaging system is imperative to the performance evaluation, as well as for describing the associated parameters. The performance of a combined neutron/X-ray digital imaging system was evaluated in terms of modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). This dissertation is a complete overview of the design of the NXCT system, operation, algorithms, performance evaluation and results.

  5. The Medical Case for a Positron Emission Tomography and X-ray Computed Tomography Combined Service in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Bulushi, Naima K.; Bailey, Dale; Mariani, Giuliano

    2013-01-01

    The value of a positron emission tomography and X-ray computed tomography (PET/CT) combined service in terms of diagnostic accuracy, cost-effectiveness and impact on clinical decision-making is well-documented in the literature. Its role in the management of patients presenting with cancer is shifting from early staging and restaging to the early assessment of the treatment response. Currently, the application of PET/CT has extended to non-oncological specialties—mainly neurology, cardiology and rheumatology. A further emerging application for PET/CT is the imaging of infection/inflammation. This article illustrates some of the PET/CT applications in both oncological and non-oncological disorders. In view of the absence of this modality in Oman, this article aims to increase the awareness of the importance of these imaging modalities and their significant impact on diagnosis and management in both oncological and non-oncological specialties for patients of all age groups as well as the decision-makers. PMID:24273658

  6. Combined micro computed tomography and histology study of bone augmentation and distraction osteogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilgenstein, Bernd; Deyhle, Hans; Jaquiery, Claude; Kunz, Christoph; Stalder, Anja; Stübinger, Stefan; Jundt, Gernot; Beckmann, Felix; Müller, Bert; Hieber, Simone E.

    2012-10-01

    Bone augmentation is a vital part of surgical interventions of the oral and maxillofacial area including dental implantology. Prior to implant placement, sufficient bone volume is needed to reduce the risk of peri-implantitis. While augmentation using harvested autologous bone is still considered as gold standard, many surgeons prefer bone substitutes to reduce operation time and to avoid donor site morbidity. To assess the osteogenic efficacy of commercially available augmentation materials we analyzed drill cores extracted before implant insertion. In younger patients, distraction osteogenesis is successfully applied to correct craniofacial deformities through targeted bone formation. To study the influence of mesenchymal stem cells on bone regeneration during distraction osteogenesis, human mesenchymal stem cells were injected into the distraction gap of nude rat mandibles immediately after osteotomy. The distraction was performed over eleven days to reach a distraction gap of 6 mm. Both the rat mandibles and the drill cores were scanned using synchrotron radiation-based micro computed tomography. The three-dimensional data were manually registered and compared with corresponding two-dimensional histological sections to assess bone regeneration and its morphology. The analysis of the rat mandibles indicates that bone formation is enhanced by mesenchymal stem cells injected before distraction. The bone substitutes yielded a wide range of bone volume and degree of resorption. The volume fraction of the newly formed bone was determined to 34.4% in the computed tomography dataset for the augmentation material Geistlich Bio-Oss®. The combination of computed tomography and histology allowed a complementary assessment for both bone augmentation and distraction osteogenesis.

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine Computed tomography (CT) of the spine is a diagnostic imaging ... Spine? What is CT Scanning of the Spine? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  8. Performance analysis of a neutron and X-ray combined computed tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Vaibhav; Srivastava, Anjali; Koo Lee, Hyoung; Liu, Xin

    2014-06-01

    A novel neutron and X-ray combined computed tomography system (NXCT) has been developed at the Missouri University of Science & Technology. It is believed that it will provide a superior method for non-destructive testing and evaluation. The system is housed within the Missouri University of Science & Technology Reactor (MSTR) and is the first such imaging platform and synthesis method to be developed. The system utilizes neutrons obtained directly from the reactor core and X-rays from an X-ray generator. Characterization of the newly developed digital imaging system is imperative to the performance evaluation, as well as for describing the associated parameters. The preliminary evaluation of the NXCT system was performed in terms of image uniformity, linearity and spatial resolution. Additionally, the correlation between the applied beam intensity, the resulting image quality, and the system sensitivity was investigated. The combined neutron/X-ray digital imaging system was evaluated in terms of performance parameters and results are detailed. The Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) of the X-ray imaging module was calculated using the Edge method. The spatial frequency at 10% of the MTF was found to be 8 l p/mm, which is in agreement with the value of 8.5 l p/mm determined from the square wave response method. The highest detective quantum efficiency of the X-ray imaging module was found to be 0.53. Furthermore, the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), Noise Power Spectrum (NPS) and Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE) spectrum for the neutron imaging module was also evaluated in a similar way as the X-ray imaging module. In order to improve the image quality of the neutron imaging module, a pin-hole mask phantom was used to correct the geometrical non-linearity of the delay line anode readout. The non-linearity correction of the delay line anode readout has been shown through the corrected images of perforated cadmium strip and electroformed phantom.

  9. Osteogenesis effect of guided bone regeneration combined with alveolar cleft grafting: assessment by cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Xiao, W-L; Zhang, D-Z; Chen, X-J; Yuan, C; Xue, L-F

    2016-06-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) allows for a significantly lower radiation dose than conventional computed tomography (CT) scans and provides accurate images of the alveolar cleft area. The osteogenic effect of guided bone regeneration (GBR) vs. conventional alveolar bone grafting alone for alveolar cleft defects was evaluated in this study. Sixty alveolar cleft patients were divided randomly into two groups. One group underwent GBR using acellular dermal matrix film combined with alveolar bone grafting using iliac crest bone grafts (GBR group), while the other group underwent alveolar bone grafting only (non-GBR group). CBCT images were obtained at 1 week and at 3 months following the procedure. Using Simplant 11.04 software, the bone resorption rate was calculated and compared between the two groups. The bone resorption rate from 1 week to 3 months following bone grafting without the GBR technique was 36.50±5.04%, whereas the bone resorption rate using the GBR technique was 31.69±5.50% (P=0.017). The application of autogenous iliac bone combined with the GBR technique for alveolar bone grafting of alveolar cleft patients can reduce bone resorption and result in better osteogenesis. PMID:26876144

  10. Positioning accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography in combination with a HexaPOD robot treatment table

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Juergen . E-mail: juergen.meyer@canterbury.ac.nz; Wilbert, Juergen; Baier, Kurt; Guckenberger, Matthias; Richter, Anne; Sauer, Otto; Flentje, Michael

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To scrutinize the positioning accuracy and reproducibility of a commercial hexapod robot treatment table (HRTT) in combination with a commercial cone-beam computed tomography system for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Methods and Materials: The mechanical stability of the X-ray volume imaging (XVI) system was tested in terms of reproducibility and with a focus on the moveable parts, i.e., the influence of kV panel and the source arm on the reproducibility and accuracy of both bone and gray value registration using a head-and-neck phantom. In consecutive measurements the accuracy of the HRTT for translational, rotational, and a combination of translational and rotational corrections was investigated. The operational range of the HRTT was also determined and analyzed. Results: The system performance of the XVI system alone was very stable with mean translational and rotational errors of below 0.2 mm and below 0.2{sup o}, respectively. The mean positioning accuracy of the HRTT in combination with the XVI system summarized over all measurements was below 0.3 mm and below 0.3{sup o} for translational and rotational corrections, respectively. The gray value match was more accurate than the bone match. Conclusion: The XVI image acquisition and registration procedure were highly reproducible. Both translational and rotational positioning errors can be corrected very precisely with the HRTT. The HRTT is therefore well suited to complement cone-beam computed tomography to take full advantage of position correction in six degrees of freedom for IGRT. The combination of XVI and the HRTT has the potential to improve the accuracy of high-precision treatments.

  11. Feasibility studies on explosive detection and homeland security applications using a neutron and x-ray combined computed tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, V.; Srivastava, A.; Lee, H. K.; Liu, X.

    2013-05-01

    The successful creation and operation of a neutron and X-ray combined computed tomography (NXCT) system has been demonstrated by researchers at the Missouri University of Science and Technology. The NXCT system has numerous applications in the field of material characterization and object identification in materials with a mixture of atomic numbers represented. Presently, the feasibility studies have been performed for explosive detection and homeland security applications, particularly in concealed material detection and determination of the light atomic number materials. These materials cannot be detected using traditional X-ray imaging. The new system has the capability to provide complete structural and compositional information due to the complementary nature of X-ray and neutron interactions with materials. The design of the NXCT system facilitates simultaneous and instantaneous imaging operation, promising enhanced detection capabilities of explosive materials, low atomic number materials and illicit materials for homeland security applications. In addition, a sample positioning system allowing the user to remotely and automatically manipulate the sample makes the system viable for commercial applications. Several explosives and weapon simulants have been imaged and the results are provided. The fusion algorithms which combine the data from the neutron and X-ray imaging produce superior images. This paper is a compete overview of the NXCT system for feasibility studies of explosive detection and homeland security applications. The design of the system, operation, algorithm development, and detection schemes are provided. This is the first combined neutron and X-ray computed tomography system in operation. Furthermore, the method of fusing neutron and X-ray images together is a new approach which provides high contrast images of the desired object. The system could serve as a standardized tool in nondestructive testing of many applications, especially in

  12. Computed Tomography Status

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Hansche, B. D.

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a relatively new radiographic technique which has become widely used in the medical field, where it is better known as computerized axial tomographic (CAT) scanning. This technique is also being adopted by the industrial radiographic community, although the greater range of densities, variation in samples sizes, plus possible requirement for finer resolution make it difficult to duplicate the excellent results that the medical scanners have achieved.

  13. Computed tomography status

    SciTech Connect

    Hansche, B.D.

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a relatively new radiographic technique which has become widely used in the medical field, where it is better known as computerized axial tomographic (CAT) scanning. This technique is also being adopted by the industrial radiographic community, although the greater range of densities, variation in samples sizes, plus possible requirement for finer resolution make it difficult to duplicate the excellent results that the medical scanners have achieved.

  14. Differential diagnostic value of computed tomography perfusion combined with vascular endothelial growth factor expression in head and neck lesions

    PubMed Central

    WANG, JIE; TANG, ZUOHUA; WANG, SHUYI; ZENG, WENJIAO; QIAN, WEN; WU, LINGJIE; WANG, WENZHONG; LUO, JIANFENG

    2016-01-01

    There are numerous types of head and neck lesions (HNLs), and conventional computed tomography (CT) has low specificity and sensitivity in the definitive and differential diagnosis of HNLs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the value of perfusion CT (CTP) combined with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in the differentiation between malignant and benign HNLs. In total, 41 HNLs, which were pathologically confirmed, underwent CTP and VEGF expression analysis. All lesions were divided into three groups: Group A, benign hypovascular lesions; Group B, benign hypervascular lesions; and Group C, malignant lesions. Time density curve (TDC) and CTP parameters [maximum intensity projection (MIP), blood volume (BV), blood flow (BF), mean transit time and capillary permeability] were analyzed. The association between perfusion measurements and VEGF was assessed using Pearson's correlation. TDCs were classified into three types, and type I was more frequently identified in benign tumors (Groups A and B) compared with malignant tumors (Group C) (P=0.003). Malignant tumors primarily had a TDC of type II and III. MIP, BF and BV were all significantly higher in Groups B and C compared to Group A (P<0.01). VEGF expression of malignant tumors was significantly higher than benign tumors (P=0.007). No correlation was identified between VEGF and any CTP parameter. The present findings suggest that CTP combined with VEGF may differentiate between malignant and benign HNLs, and between benign hypovascular and hypervascular lesions. PMID:27123114

  15. Computed tomography of electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossi, Richard H.; Kruse, Robert J.; Knutson, Benjamin W.

    1989-12-01

    The application of Computed Tomography (CT) and laminography was tested on a variety of electronic components. The effort was performed as a preliminary testing task assignment in the Advanced Development of X ray Computed Tomography Application program. A key area for testing was printed circuit boards for the inspection of solder bonds and in particular for leadless chip carrier devices. During the course of the task assignment several other categories of electronic devices were examined including transformers, connectors, switches from solution and contrast sensitivity phantoms developed for the programs were used to establish quantitative measures of capability used to generate images. This preliminary testing of electronics lead to the conclusion that higher resolution CT scanning is needed to resolve details of interest. CT testing on commercially available system could resolve high contrast details in the range of 2 to 4 lp/mm; however, in many electronic components finer resolution is needed to detect microcracking, voiding and other features. Further testing on high resolution system is recommended. Two areas of immediate potential economic payback for electronics inspection were identified; the inspection of high volume printed circuit board production using high speed laminography and nondestructive failure analysis studies components using high-resolution CT.

  16. Beneficial Effects of Combining Computed Tomography Enteroclysis/Enterography with Capsule Endoscopy for Screening Tumor Lesions in the Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Hiroaki; Hashimoto, Shinichi; Shimizu, Kensaku; Kawasato, Ryo; Shirasawa, Tomohiro; Yokota, Takayuki; Onoda, Hideko; Okamoto, Takeshi; Matsunaga, Naofumi; Sakaida, Isao

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To compare the efficacy of using computed tomography enteroclysis/enterography (CTE), capsule endoscopy (CE), and CTE with CE for diagnosing tumor lesions in the small intestine. Materials and Methods. We included 98 patients who underwent CE during the observation period and were subjected to CTE at our hospital from April 2008 to May 2014. Results. CTE had a significantly higher sensitivity than CE (84.6% versus 46.2%, P = 0.039), but there were no significant differences in specificity, positive or negative predictive values, or diagnostic accuracy rates. The sensitivity of CTE/CE was 100%, again significantly higher than that of CE (P = 0.002). The difference in specificity between CTE/CE and CE was not significant, but there were significant differences in positive predictive values (100% for CTE/CE versus 66.7% for CE, P = 0.012), negative predictive values (100% versus 92.1%, P = 0.008), and diagnostic accuracy rate (100% versus 89.8%, P = 0.001). The diagnostic accuracy rate was also significantly higher in CTE/CE versus CTE (100% versus 95.9%, P = 0.043). Conclusion. Our findings suggested that a combination of CTE and CE was useful for screening tumor lesions in the small intestine. This trial is registered with number UMIN000016154. PMID:25792979

  17. Sparse-view computed tomography image reconstruction via a combination of L(1) and SL(0) regularization.

    PubMed

    Qi, Hongliang; Chen, Zijia; Guo, Jingyu; Zhou, Linghong

    2015-01-01

    Low-dose computed tomography reconstruction is an important issue in the medical imaging domain. Sparse-view has been widely studied as a potential strategy. Compressed sensing (CS) method has shown great potential to reconstruct high-quality CT images from sparse-view projection data. Nonetheless, low-contrast structures tend to be blurred by the total variation (TV, L1-norm of the gradient image) regularization. Moreover, TV will produce blocky effects on smooth and edge regions. To overcome this limitation, this study has proposed an iterative image reconstruction algorithm by combining L1 regularization and smoothed L0 (SL0) regularization. SL0 is a smooth approximation of L0 norm and can solve the problem of L0 norm being sensitive to noise. To evaluate the proposed method, both qualitative and quantitative studies were conducted on a digital Shepp-Logan phantom and a real head phantom. Experimental comparative results have indicated that the proposed L1/SL0-POCS algorithm can effectively suppress noise and artifacts, as well as preserve more structural information compared to other existing methods. PMID:26405900

  18. Stored luminescence computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Chao; Wang, Ge

    2014-09-01

    Phosphor nanoparticles made of doped semiconductors and pre-excited by x-ray radiation were recently reported for their luminescence emission in the range of 650-770 nm upon near-infrared (NIR) light stimulation. These nanophosphors can be functionalized as optical probes for molecular imaging. In this paper, we present stored luminescence computed tomography to reconstruct a nanophosphor distribution in an object. The propagation of x rays in a biological object allows significantly better localization and deeper penetration. Moreover, the nanophosphors, which are pre-excited with collimated x-ray beams or focused x-ray waves, can be successively stimulated for stored luminescence emissions by variable NIR stimulation patterns. The sequentially detected luminescence signals provide more information of a nanophosphor spatial distribution for more accurate image reconstruction and higher image resolution. A realistic numerical study is performed to demonstrate the feasibility and merits of the proposed approach. PMID:25321362

  19. Computed Tomography Measuring Inside Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wozniak, James F.; Scudder, Henry J.; Anders, Jeffrey E.

    1995-01-01

    Computed tomography applied to obtain approximate measurements of radial distances from centerline of turbopump to leading edges of diffuser vanes in turbopump. Use of computed tomography has significance beyond turbopump application: example of general concept of measuring internal dimensions of assembly of parts without having to perform time-consuming task of taking assembly apart and measuring internal parts on coordinate-measuring machine.

  20. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Townsend, David W

    2008-05-01

    Accurate anatomical localization of functional abnormalities obtained with the use of positron emission tomography (PET) is known to be problematic. Although tracers such as (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) visualize certain normal anatomical structures, the spatial resolution is generally inadequate for accurate anatomic localization of pathology. Combining PET with a high-resolution anatomical imaging modality such as computed tomography (CT) can resolve the localization issue as long as the images from the two modalities are accurately coregistered. However, software-based registration techniques have difficulty accounting for differences in patient positioning and involuntary movement of internal organs, often necessitating labor-intensive nonlinear mapping that may not converge to a satisfactory result. Acquiring both CT and PET images in the same scanner obviates the need for software registration and routinely provides accurately aligned images of anatomy and function in a single scan. A CT scanner positioned in line with a PET scanner and with a common patient couch and operating console has provided a practical solution to anatomical and functional image registration. Axial translation of the couch between the 2 modalities enables both CT and PET data to be acquired during a single imaging session. In addition, the CT images can be used to generate essentially noiseless attenuation correction factors for the PET emission data. By minimizing patient movement between the CT and PET scans and accounting for the axial separation of the two modalities, accurately registered anatomical and functional images can be obtained. Since the introduction of the first PET/CT prototype more than 6 years ago, numerous patients with cancer have been scanned on commercial PET/CT devices worldwide. The commercial designs feature multidetector spiral CT and high-performance PET components. Experience has demonstrated an increased level of accuracy and confidence in the

  1. Computed tomography of the body

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.K.T.; Stanley, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    By the end of the fourth year of clinical use, the number of articles dealing with computed body tomography (CT) had increased exponentially. Over 100 articles were published during this review period. This chapter examines new application of CT in the neck, musculoskeletal system and the breast. The chapter begins with an examination of the technical aspects of the operation and performance of CT scanners during this review period. The anatomy of various regions of the body, such as neck, chest, liver and biliary system, genitourinary tract, and pelvis are examined. Brief discussions of pediatric computed tomography, computed tomography-guided biopsy, and radiation therapy are presented. (KRM)

  2. Combining micro computed tomography and three-dimensional registration to evaluate local strains in shape memory scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Bormann, Therese; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Beckmann, Felix; de Wild, Michael; Küffer, Jürg; Münch, Christoph; Hoffmann, Waldemar; Müller, Bert

    2014-02-01

    Appropriate mechanical stimulation of bony tissue enhances osseointegration of load-bearing implants. Uniaxial compression of porous implants locally results in tensile and compressive strains. Their experimental determination is the objective of this study. Selective laser melting is applied to produce open-porous NiTi scaffolds of cubic units. To measure displacement and strain fields within the compressed scaffold, the authors took advantage of synchrotron radiation-based micro computed tomography during temperature increase and non-rigid three-dimensional data registration. Uniaxial scaffold compression of 6% led to local compressive and tensile strains of up to 15%. The experiments validate modeling by means of the finite element method. Increasing the temperature during the tomography experiment from 15 to 37°C at a rate of 4 K h(-1), one can locally identify the phase transition from martensite to austenite. It starts at ≈ 24°C on the scaffolds bottom, proceeds up towards the top and terminates at ≈ 34°C on the periphery of the scaffold. The results allow not only design optimization of the scaffold architecture, but also estimation of maximal displacements before cracks are initiated and of optimized mechanical stimuli around porous metallic load-bearing implants within the physiological temperature range. PMID:24257506

  3. Neuroanatomy of cranial computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kretschmann, H.J.; Weinrich, W.

    1985-01-01

    Based on the fundamental structures visualized by means of computed tomography, the authors present the functional systems which are relevant in neurology by means of axial cross-sections. All drawings were prepared from original preparations by means of a new technique which is similar to the grey values of X-ray CT and nuclear magnetic resonance tomography. A detailed description is given of the topics of neurofunctional lesions.

  4. Impact of Pretreatment Combined {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Staging on Radiation Therapy Treatment Decisions in Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Sweet Ping; David, Steven; Alamgeer, Muhammad; Ganju, Vinod

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To assess the diagnostic performance of pretreatment {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT) and its impact on radiation therapy treatment decisions in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). Methods and Materials: Patients with LABC with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status <2 and no contraindication to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery, and adjuvant radiation therapy were enrolled on a prospective trial. All patients had pretreatment conventional imaging (CI) performed, including bilateral breast mammography and ultrasound, bone scan, and CT chest, abdomen, and pelvis scans performed. Informed consent was obtained before enrolment. Pretreatment whole-body {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans were performed on all patients, and results were compared with CI findings. Results: A total of 154 patients with LABC with no clinical or radiologic evidence of distant metastases on CI were enrolled. Median age was 49 years (range, 26-70 years). Imaging with PET/CT detected distant metastatic disease and/or locoregional disease not visualized on CI in 32 patients (20.8%). Distant metastatic disease was detected in 17 patients (11.0%): 6 had bony metastases, 5 had intrathoracic metastases (pulmonary/mediastinal), 2 had distant nodal metastases, 2 had liver metastases, 1 had pulmonary and bony metastases, and 1 had mediastinal and distant nodal metastases. Of the remaining 139 patients, nodal disease outside conventional radiation therapy fields was detected on PET/CT in 15 patients (10.8%), with involvement of ipsilateral internal mammary nodes in 13 and ipsilateral level 5 cervical nodes in 2. Conclusions: Imaging with PET/CT provides superior diagnostic and staging information in patients with LABC compared with CI, which has significant therapeutic implications with respect to radiation therapy management. Imaging with PET/CT should be considered in all patients undergoing primary

  5. Computed tomography of cryogenic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Gerd; Anderson, E.; Vogt, S.; Knochel, C.; Weiss, D.; LeGros, M.; Larabell, C.

    2001-08-30

    Due to the short wavelengths of X-rays and low numerical aperture of the Fresnel zone plates used as X-ray objectives, the depth of field is several microns. Within the focal depth, imaging a thick specimen is to a good approximation equivalent to projecting the specimen absorption. Therefore, computed tomography based on a tilt series of X-ray microscopic images can be used to reconstruct the local linear absorption coefficient and image the three-dimensional specimen structure. To preserve the structural integrity of biological objects during image acquisition, microscopy is performed at cryogenic temperatures. Tomography based on X-ray microscopic images was applied to study the distribution of male specific lethal 1 (MSL-1), a nuclear protein involved in dosage compensation in Drosophila melanogaster, which ensures that males with single X chromosome have the same amount of most X-linked gene products as females with two X chromosomes. Tomographic reconstructions of X-ray microscopic images were used to compute the local three-dimensional linear absorption coefficient revealing the arrangement of internal structures of Drosophila melanogaster cells. Combined with labelling techniques, nanotomography is a new technique to study the 3D distribution of selected proteins inside whole cells. We want to improve this technique with respect to resolution and specimen preparation. The resolution in the reconstruction can be significantly improved by reducing the angular step size to collect more viewing angles, which requires an automated data acquisition. In addition, fast-freezing with liquid ethane instead of cryogenic He gas will be applied to improve the vitrification of the hydrated samples. We also plan to apply cryo X-ray nanotomography in order to study different types of cells and their nuclear protein distributions.

  6. Coded aperture computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kerkil; Brady, David J.

    2009-08-01

    Diverse physical measurements can be modeled by X-ray transforms. While X-ray tomography is the canonical example, reference structure tomography (RST) and coded aperture snapshot spectral imaging (CASSI) are examples of physically unrelated but mathematically equivalent sensor systems. Historically, most x-ray transform based systems sample continuous distributions and apply analytical inversion processes. On the other hand, RST and CASSI generate discrete multiplexed measurements implemented with coded apertures. This multiplexing of coded measurements allows for compression of measurements from a compressed sensing perspective. Compressed sensing (CS) is a revelation that if the object has a sparse representation in some basis, then a certain number, but typically much less than what is prescribed by Shannon's sampling rate, of random projections captures enough information for a highly accurate reconstruction of the object. This paper investigates the role of coded apertures in x-ray transform measurement systems (XTMs) in terms of data efficiency and reconstruction fidelity from a CS perspective. To conduct this, we construct a unified analysis using RST and CASSI measurement models. Also, we propose a novel compressive x-ray tomography measurement scheme which also exploits coding and multiplexing, and hence shares the analysis of the other two XTMs. Using this analysis, we perform a qualitative study on how coded apertures can be exploited to implement physical random projections by "regularizing" the measurement systems. Numerical studies and simulation results demonstrate several examples of the impact of coding.

  7. The combination of digital surface scanners and cone beam computed tomography technology for guided implant surgery using 3Shape implant studio software: a case history report.

    PubMed

    Lanis, Alejandro; Álvarez Del Canto, Orlando

    2015-01-01

    The incorporation of virtual engineering into dentistry and the digitization of information are providing new perspectives and innovative alternatives for dental treatment modalities. The use of digital surface scanners with surgical planning software allows for the combination of the radiographic, prosthetic, surgical, and laboratory fields under a common virtual scenario, permitting complete digital treatment planning. In this article, the authors present a clinical case in which a guided implant surgery was performed based on a complete digital surgical plan combining the information from a cone beam computed tomography scan and the virtual simulation obtained from the 3Shape TRIOS intraoral surface scanner. The information was imported to and combined in the 3Shape Implant Studio software for guided implant surgery planning. A surgical guide was obtained by a 3D printer, and the surgical procedure was done using the Biohorizons Guided Surgery Kit and its protocol. PMID:25822304

  8. Smoking-related interstitial fibrosis combined with pulmonary emphysema: computed tomography-pathologic correlative study using lobectomy specimens

    PubMed Central

    Otani, Hideji; Tanaka, Tomonori; Murata, Kiyoshi; Fukuoka, Junya; Nitta, Norihisa; Nagatani, Yukihiro; Sonoda, Akinaga; Takahashi, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the incidence and pathologic correlation of thin-section computed tomography (TSCT) findings in smoking-related interstitial fibrosis (SRIF) with pulmonary emphysema. Patients and methods Our study included 172 consecutive patients who underwent TSCT and subsequent lobectomy. TSCT findings including clustered cysts with visible walls (CCVW) and ground-glass attenuation with/without reticulation (GGAR) were evaluated and compared in nonsmokers and smokers and among lung locations. TSCT findings, especially CCVW, were also compared with histological findings using lobectomy specimens. Results The incidence of CCVW and GGAR was significantly higher in smokers than in nonsmokers (34.1% and 40.7%, respectively, vs 2.0% and 12.2%). CCVW and GGAR were frequently found in the lower and peripheral zones. Histologically, CCVW corresponded more often with SRIF with emphysema than usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP, 63.3% vs 30%). CCVW of irregular size and shape were seen in 19 of 20 SRIF with emphysema and in seven of nine UIP-manifested areas with similar round cysts. A less-involved subpleural parenchyma was observed more frequently in SRIF with emphysema. Conclusion SRIF with emphysema is a more frequent pathological finding than UIP in patients with CCVW on TSCT. The irregular size and shape of CCVW and a less-involved subpleural parenchyma may be a clue suggesting the presence of SRIF with emphysema. PMID:27445472

  9. Computed tomography:the details.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2007-07-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is a well established technique, particularly in medical imaging, but also applied in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging. Basic CT imaging via back-projection is treated in many texts, but often with insufficient detail to appreciate subtleties such as the role of non-uniform sampling densities. Herein are given some details often neglected in many texts.

  10. Atlas of Computed Tomography Variants

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhns, L.R.; Seeger, J.

    1983-01-01

    Atlas of Computed Tomography Variants is unique in that, while others of its kind may include plain film, roentgen variants, it concentrates solely on CT images of variants which may simulate disease. Organized into four regions, it presents dicussions covering CT variants of the skull, neck and spine; thorax; abdomen; and extremities-featuring a section on the head.

  11. X-ray Computed Tomography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michael, Greg

    2001-01-01

    Describes computed tomography (CT), a medical imaging technique that produces images of transaxial planes through the human body. A CT image is reconstructed mathematically from a large number of one-dimensional projections of a plane. The technique is used in radiological examinations and radiotherapy treatment planning. (Author/MM)

  12. Computed tomography of intramuscular myxoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ekelund, L.; Herrlin, K.; Rydholm, A.

    1982-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was performed in seven patients with intramuscular myxoma. All lesions were well demarcated, of homogeneous appearance and attenuation values ranging from 10 to 60 (HU). The tumor size, as estimated at CT, correlated well with the size of the surgical specimen, which is in contrast to the findings in some high grade malignant sarcomas.

  13. Viewing Welds By Computer Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pascua, Antonio G.; Roy, Jagatjit

    1990-01-01

    Computer tomography system used to inspect welds for root penetration. Source illuminates rotating welded part with fan-shaped beam of x rays or gamma rays. Detectors in circular array on opposite side of part intercept beam and convert it into electrical signals. Computer processes signals into image of cross section of weld. Image displayed on video monitor. System offers only nondestructive way to check penetration from outside when inner surfaces inaccessible.

  14. Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT) Updated:Sep 3,2015 ... facts MDCT is a very fast type of computed tomography (CT) scan. MDCT creates pictures of the healthy ...

  15. Design and validation of a novel bioreactor principle to combine online micro-computed tomography monitoring and mechanical loading in bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagenmüller, Henri; Hitz, Marco; Merkle, Hans P.; Meinel, Lorenz; Müller, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical loading plays an important role in bone remodeling in vivo and, therefore, has been suggested as a key parameter in stem cell-based engineering of bone-like tissue in vitro. However, the optimization of loading protocols during stem cell differentiation and subsequent bone-like tissue formation is challenged by multiple input factors, which are difficult to control and validate. These include the variable cellular performance of cells harvested from different patients, nonstandardized culture media components, the choice of the biomaterial forming the scaffold, and its morphology, impacting a broader validity of mechanical stimulation regimens. To standardize the cell culture of bone-like tissue constructs, we suggest the involvement of time-lapsed feedback loops. For this purpose we present a prototype bioreactor that combines online, nondestructive monitoring using micro-computed tomography and direct mechanical loading of three-dimensional tissue engineering constructs. Validation of this system showed displacement steps down to 1 μm and cyclic sinusoidal loadings of up to 10 Hz. Load detection resolution was 0.01 N, and micro-computed tomography data were of high quality. For the first time, the developed bioreactor links time-lapsed, nondestructive, and dynamic imaging with mechanical stimulation, designed for cell culture under sterile conditions. This system is believed to substantially improve today's experimental options to study and optimize osteogenic stem cell culture and differentiation at the interface with mechanical stimulation.

  16. Using Combined X-ray Computed Tomography and Acoustic Resonance to Understand Supercritical CO2 Behavior in Fractured Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneafsey, T. J.; Nakagawa, S.

    2015-12-01

    Distribution of supercritical (sc) CO2 has a large impact on its flow behavior as well as on the properties of seismic waves used for monitoring. Simultaneous imaging of scCO2 distribution in a rock core using X-ray computed tomography (CT) and measurements of seismic waves in the laboratory can help understand how the distribution evolves as scCO2 invades through rock, and the resulting seismic signatures. To this end, we performed a series of laboratory scCO2 core-flood experiments in intact and fractured anisotropic Carbon Tan sandstone samples. In these experiments, we monitored changes in the CO2 saturation distribution and sonic-frequency acoustic resonances (yielding both seismic velocity and attenuation) over the course of the floods. A short-core resonant bar test system (Split-Hopkinson Resonant Bar Apparatus) custom fit into a long X-ray transparent pressure vessel was used for the seismic measurements, and a modified General Electric medical CT scanner was used to acquire X-ray CT data from which scCO2 saturation distributions were determined. The focus of the experiments was on the impact of single fractures on the scCO2 distribution and the seismic properties. For this reason, we examined several cases including 1. intact, 2. a closely mated fracture along the core axis, 3. a sheared fracture along the core axis (both vertical and horizontal for examining the buoyancy effect), and 4. a sheared fracture perpendicular to the core axis. For the intact and closely mated fractured cores, Young's modulus declined with increasing CO2 saturation, and attenuation increased up to about 15% CO2 saturation after which attenuation declined. For cores having wide axial fractures, the Young's modulus was lower than for the intact and closely mated cases, however did not change much with CO2 pore saturation. Much lower CO2 pore saturations were achieved in these cases. Attenuation increased more rapidly however than for the intact sample. For the core

  17. Cranial computed tomography and MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.; Rao, K.C.V.G.

    1987-01-01

    This book appears to be a hybrid between an atlas and a text. The second edition attempts to depict the current status of both computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in neuroradiology. Although only the final chapter of the book is completely devoted to cranial MR imaging, MR images are scattered throughout various other chapters. There is coverage of the major anatomic and pathophysiologic entities. There are 17 chapters with images, tables, and diagrams.

  18. Computed tomography of gynecologic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, B.H.; Moss, A.A.; Mihara, K.; Goldberg, H.I.; Glazer, G.M.

    1983-10-01

    Although computed tomography (CT) provides superb images of all areas of the body, sonography, because of its lack of ionizing radiation and its real-time and multiplanar capacities, has become the preferred initial method of evaluating the female pelvis. This has resulted in a relative paucity of information in the literature concerning CT features of benign pelvic disorders in particular and prompted the authors to review our experience with third-generation CT scanning of the uterus and ovaries.

  19. Hermaphroditism demonstrated by computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, M.E.

    1983-07-01

    The categorization of disorders of gender differentiation is based on chromosome analysis, physical examination, gonadal histology, and endocrine evaluation. In most cases of hermaphroditism, radiologic studies have been limited to assessment of associated urinary tract anomalies before surgical revconstruction. Noninvasive evaluation with computed tomography (CT) or sonography is potentially useful for investigation of internal pelvic anatomy in these cases. A case report of a 65-year-old man is reported. (KRM)

  20. A patent ductus arteriosus complicating cardiopulmonary bypass for combined coronary artery bypass grafting and aortic valve replacement only discovered by computed tomography 3D reconstruction.

    PubMed

    van Middendorp, Lars B; Maessen, Jos G; Sardari Nia, Peyman

    2014-12-01

    We describe the case of a 59-year old male patient undergoing combined coronary artery bypass grafting and aortic valve replacement. Manipulation of the heart during cardiopulmonary bypass significantly decreased venous return. Several measures were necessary to improve venous return to a level at which continuation of the procedure was safe. Based on the initial troubles with venous return, we decided to selectively cross-clamp the aorta. This resulted in a large amount of backflow of oxygenated blood from the left ventricle, necessitating additional vents in the pulmonary artery and directly in the left ventricle. The procedure was continued uneventfully, and postoperative recovery was without significant complications. Postoperative 2D computed tomography did not show any signs of a shunt, but 3D reconstruction showed a small patent ductus arteriosus. PMID:25164136

  1. Computed Tomography software and standards

    SciTech Connect

    Azevedo, S.G.; Martz, H.E.; Skeate, M.F.; Schneberk, D.J.; Roberson, G.P.

    1990-02-20

    This document establishes the software design, nomenclature, and conventions for industrial Computed Tomography (CT) used in the Nondestructive Evaluation Section at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It is mainly a users guide to the technical use of the CT computer codes, but also presents a proposed standard for describing CT experiments and reconstructions. Each part of this document specifies different aspects of the CT software organization. A set of tables at the end describes the CT parameters of interest in our project. 4 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Computed tomography of facial fractures.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Bryant

    2014-01-01

    Facial skeletal fractures are common, potentially serious, and frequently associated with other life-threatening conditions, such as traumatic brain injuries. Facial fractures can be simple or complex and sometimes involve serious complications. Computed tomography has revolutionized the rapid and precise assessment of craniofacial and neck fractures in patients with severe facial trauma. This article introduces readers to the epidemiology, skeletal anatomy and biomechanics, complications, and diagnostic imaging of facial fractures. In addition, this article describes efforts to develop and validate a quantitative scoring system for facial fracture severity and reviews treatment strategies for facial skeletal fractures. PMID:24806070

  3. Computed Tomography Imaging in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Lisa J

    2016-05-01

    Computed tomography (CT) imaging has become the mainstay of oncology, providing accurate tumor staging and follow-up imaging to monitor treatment response. Presurgical evaluation of tumors is becoming commonplace and guides surgeons as to the extent and whether complete tumor resection is possible. CT imaging plays a crucial role in radiotherapy treatment planning. CT imaging in oncology has become ubiquitous in veterinary medicine because of increased availability of this imaging modality. This article focuses on CT cancer staging in veterinary oncology, CT imaging for surgical planning, and advances in CT simulation for radiation therapy planning. PMID:26851976

  4. Computed tomography of parosteal osteosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, T.M.; Springfield, D.S.; Benjamin, M.; Bertoni, F.; Present, D.A.

    1985-05-01

    Twelve patients with parosteal osteosarcomas were evaluated by computed tomography (CT). CT accurately defined the extent of the tumors for purposes of surgical planning, although tumor bone often could not be distinguished from thickened host bone. Nine tumors invaded the medullary cavity, a feature that implies a poorer prognosis when the tumor also contains high-grade areas. Six CT studies accurately detected the medullary invasion, but three did not. Lucent areas within dense tumors contained either benign tissue or high- or low-grade tumor; CT did not differentiate among these different tissues. CT also did not reveal small satellite nodules of tumor beyond the main tumor mass.

  5. Single photon emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Piez, C.W. Jr.; Holman, B.L.

    1985-07-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is becoming an increasingly important part of routine clinical nuclear medicine. By providing tomographic reconstructions in multiple planes through the patient, SPECT expands the clinical applications in nuclear medicine as well as providing better contrast, edge definition and separation of target from background activities. Imaging techniques have been developed for the evaluation of regional cerebral blood flow using radiolabeled amines. Thus, cerebral functional imaging can be used in the diagnosis of acute cerebral infarction, cerebral vascular disease, dementia and epilepsy. SPECT plays a complementary role in the evaluation of coronary artery disease, particularly when it is coupled with thallium-201 and exercise testing. SPECT extends our diagnostic capabilities in additional areas, such as liver and bone scintigraphy as well as tumor imaging with gallium-67.

  6. Computed tomography of calcaneal fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Heger, L.; Wulff, K.; Seddiqi, M.S.A.

    1985-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of 25 fractured calcanei was performed to investigate the potential of CT in evaluating the pattern and biomechanics of these fractures. The characteristic findings of typical fractures are presented, including the number and type of principal fragments, size and dislocation of the sustentacular fragment, and involvement of the anterior and posterior facets of the subtalar joint. In 17 cases, the calcaneus consisted of four or more fragments. Furthermore, in 17 cases the sustentacular fragment included all or part of the posterior facet joint. In 18 of the 25 cases, the sustentacular fragment was displaced. It is concluded that well performed CT is an invaluable adjunct in understanding the fracture mechanism and in detecting pain-provoking impingement between the fibular malleolus and the tuberosity fragment.

  7. Computed tomography of splenic trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey, R.B.; Laing, F.C.; Federle, M.P.; Goodman, P.C.

    1981-12-01

    Fifty patients with abdominal trauma and possible splenic injury were evaluated by computed tomography (CT). CT correctly diagnosed 21 of 22 surgically proved traumatic sesions of the spleen (96%). Twenty-seven patients had no evidence of splenic injury. This was confirmed at operation in 1 patient and clinical follow-up in 26. There were one false negative and one false positive. In 5 patients (10%), CT demonstrated other clinically significant lesions, including hepatic or renal lacerations in 3 and large retroperitoneal hematomas in 2. In adolescents and adults, CT is an accurate, noninvasive method of rapidly diagnosing splenic trauma and associated injuries. Further experience is needed to assess its usefulness in evaluating splenic injuries in infants and small children.

  8. [Computed tomography and cranial paleoanthropology].

    PubMed

    Cabanis, Emmanuel Alain; Badawi-Fayad, Jackie; Iba-Zizen, Marie-Thérèse; Istoc, Adrian; de Lumley, Henry; de Lumley, Marie-Antoinette; Coppens, Yves

    2007-06-01

    Since its invention in 1972, computed tomography (C.T.) has significantly evolved. With the advent of multi-slice detectors (500 times more sensitive than conventional radiography) and high-powered computer programs, medical applications have also improved. CT is now contributing to paleoanthropological research. Its non-destructive nature is the biggest advantage for studying fossil skulls. The second advantage is the possibility of image analysis, storage, and transmission. Potential disadvantages include the possible loss of files and the need to keep up with rapid technological advances. Our experience since the late 1970s, and a recent PhD thesis, led us to describe routine applications of this method. The main contributions of CT to cranial paleoanthropology are five-fold: --Numerical anatomy with rapid acquisition and high spatial resolution (helicoidal and multidetector CT) offering digital storage and stereolithography (3D printing). --Numerical biometry (2D and 3D) can be used to create "normograms" such as the 3D craniofacial reference model used in maxillofacial surgery. --Numerical analysis offers thorough characterization of the specimen and its state of conservation and/or restoration. --From "surrealism" to virtual imaging, anatomical structures can be reconstructed, providing access to hidden or dangerous zones. --The time dimension (4D imaging) confers movement and the possibility for endoscopic simulation and internal navigation (see Iconography). New technical developments will focus on data processing and networking. It remains our duty to deal respectfully with human fossils. PMID:18402165

  9. Radiological protection in computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Rehani, M M

    2015-06-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has sustained interest in radiological protection in computed tomography (CT), and ICRP Publications 87 and 102 focused on the management of patient doses in CT and multi-detector CT (MDCT) respectively. ICRP forecasted and 'sounded the alarm' on increasing patient doses in CT, and recommended actions for manufacturers and users. One of the approaches was that safety is best achieved when it is built into the machine, rather than left as a matter of choice for users. In view of upcoming challenges posed by newer systems that use cone beam geometry for CT (CBCT), and their widened usage, often by untrained users, a new ICRP task group has been working on radiological protection issues in CBCT. Some of the issues identified by the task group are: lack of standardisation of dosimetry in CBCT; the false belief within the medical and dental community that CBCT is a 'light', low-dose CT whereas mobile CBCT units and newer applications, particularly C-arm CT in interventional procedures, involve higher doses; lack of training in radiological protection among clinical users; and lack of dose information and tracking in many applications. This paper provides a summary of approaches used in CT and MDCT, and preliminary information regarding work just published for radiological protection in CBCT. PMID:25816279

  10. Quantitative computed tomography of bone.

    PubMed

    Rüegsegger, P; Stebler, B; Dambacher, M

    1982-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is well accepted as an imaging procedure, but comparatively little effort has been made to utilize the potential capability of CT to quantify tissue densities and composition. There are two reasons for this. First, precision and accuracy of quantification are limited by nonlinear effects. These effects are nonlocal and are object and scanner dependent. Second, intraindividual and interindividual variations of tissue compositions are considerable. Single energy measurements require restrictive assumptions on tissue compositions. The diagnosis and treatment monitoring of osteopenic bone diseases with low-dose CT is given as an example of a successful application of quantitative CT. With a special-purpose CT system and an analytic procedure for the quantification of bone at peripheral measuring sites, longitudinal examinations were performed. Low-dose quantitative CT permitted quantification, on an individual basis, of the bone loss of immobilization osteoporosis on a week-by-week basis. Changes due to postmenopausal osteoporosis are less drastic, and so measurement at intervals of months is adequate. In women after menopause, 3-month intervals were used in evaluating the natural course of osteoporosis and in quantifying the effects of sodium fluoride treatment on trabecular bone. Low-dose quantitative CT has proved to be a sensitive and highly reproducible procedure for the noninvasive evaluation of bone loss or bone accretion. During a disease or therapy, each patient can be evaluated individually. PMID:7121079

  11. Comparison of Combined X-Ray Radiography and Magnetic Resonance (XMR) Imaging-Versus Computed Tomography-Based Dosimetry for the Evaluation of Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy Implants

    SciTech Connect

    Acher, Peter Rhode, Kawal; Morris, Stephen; Gaya, Andrew; Miquel, Marc; Popert, Rick; Tham, Ivan; Nichol, Janette; McLeish, Kate; Deehan, Charles; Dasgupta, Prokar; Beaney, Ronald; Keevil, Stephen F.

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To present a method for the dosimetric analysis of permanent prostate brachytherapy implants using a combination of stereoscopic X-ray radiography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (XMR) in an XMR facility, and to compare the clinical results between XMR- and computed tomography (CT)-based dosimetry. Methods and Materials: Patients who had received nonstranded iodine-125 permanent prostate brachytherapy implants underwent XMR and CT imaging 4 weeks later. Four observers outlined the prostate gland on both sets of images. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were derived, and agreement was compared among the observers and between the modalities. Results: A total of 30 patients were evaluated. Inherent XMR registration based on prior calibration and optical tracking required a further automatic seed registration step that revealed a median root mean square registration error of 4.2 mm (range, 1.6-11.4). The observers agreed significantly more closely on prostate base and apex positions as well as outlining contours on the MR images than on those from CT. Coefficients of variation were significantly higher for observed prostate volumes, D90, and V100 parameters on CT-based dosimetry as opposed to XMR. The XMR-based dosimetry showed little agreement with that from CT for all observers, with D90 95% limits of agreement ranges of 65, 118, 79, and 73 Gy for Observers 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Conclusions: The study results showed that XMR-based dosimetry offers an alternative to other imaging modalities and registration methods with the advantages of MR-based prostate delineation and confident three-dimensional reconstruction of the implant. The XMR-derived dose-volume histograms differ from the CT-derived values and demonstrate less interobserver variability.

  12. The Effects of Septal Deviation, Concha Bullosa, and Their Combination on the Depth of Posterior Palatal Arch in Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Dalili Kajan, Zahra; Khademi, Jalil; Nemati, Somayeh; Niksolat, Elmira

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Nasal breathing is the major pattern of air intake. Changes in breathing pattern alter the posture of the head, jaws and tongue that could change pressure on the jaw and teeth and affect their growth. Purpose This study aimed to investigate the relationship between septal deviations (SD) per se and in combination with concha bullosa (CB) on maxilla; particularly the depth of palatal arch. Materials and Method This descriptive-comparative study was performed on 116 cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. The images were categorized into four groups (n=29) as follows; group 1: SD+CB, group 2: only SD, group 3: neither SD nor CB, and group 4: only CB. In coronal images, deviated septal length (DSL), angle of deviated septal curve (DSCA), palatal arch depth (PAD), palatal interalveolar length (PIL), PAD/PIL ratio, septal vertical length (SVL), maxillopalatal arch angle (MPAA), interjugum distance (IJD), and jugum angle (JA) were measured. The data were statistically analyzed with Tukey's HSD and Chi-square tests. Results There were statistically significant differences in DSL and DSCA (p= 0.0001) among the four groups. The study groups were not statistically different regarding the IJD, JA, MPAA, PAD/PIL, PAD, PIL, and SVL. However, in group 1, PAD/PIL were significantly correlated with DSCA and DSL (p= 0.037, and p= 0.043, respectively). Conclusion Based on the findings of this study, simultaneous occurrence of SD and CB influenced the depth and curve of the palatal bone. The PAD/PIL ratio was negatively correlated with the DSCA angle. This correlation was associated with a decrease in PAD, indicating that concurrent occurrence of SD and CB remarkably affected the palatal base of maxilla. PMID:26966705

  13. SU-F-18C-04: A Combination of Monoenergetic Reconstruction and Stoichiometric Calibration for Tissue Characterization Using Dual Energy Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bedwani, S; Tremblay, J; Bouchard, H

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Dual energy computed tomography (DECT) pre-reconstruction methods require the prior knowledge of the X-ray source spectrum to allow extracting physical parameters needed for radiation therapy dose calculation, such as electron density (ED) and the effective atomic number (EAN). While DECT stoichiometric calibration may provide reliable performance for typical radiation therapy clinical conditions, it is yet to be adapted to prereconstruction methods. The presence of noise and inaccurate spectrum description may lead to systematic errors and artifacts which compromise the accuracy of treatment planning. Methods: A new technique is investigated which consists in applying a DECT stoichiometric calibration method to a set of monoenergetic images obtained with a DECT prereconstruction method. To evaluate the performance of this extended method, a simulation environment is developed to generate DECT scans under well controlled conditions, to reconstruct monoenergetic images of a tissue-equivalent phantom from transformed sinograms and to extract ED and EAN maps using a DECT formalism. Result: Under simulated clinical conditions, the accuracy in determining ED with the extended method versus a pre-reconstruction method alone is shown to be better than 0.35% versus 0.5%, respectively. In the presence of a realistic noise level, EAN determination presents a relative mean error that drops from 2.5% to 0.5% once the calibration is applied. Considering a spectrum alteration by a 1 mm Cu layer, EAN errors are up to 30% for the pre-reconstruction method alone versus less than 3% for the extended method. Conclusion: This study shows that combining pre-reconstruction DECT methods with a stoichiometric calibration considerably improves the accuracy and reliability of tissue characterization for radiation therapy in a clinical context. The presented method could potentially be adapted as gold standard for dose calculation methods based on DECT.

  14. Modeling pure methane hydrate dissociation using a numerical simulator from a novel combination of X-ray computed tomography and macroscopic data

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, A.; Moridis, G.J.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Sloan, Jr., E.D.

    2009-08-15

    The numerical simulator TOUGH+HYDRATE (T+H) was used to predict the transient pure methane hydrate (no sediment) dissociation data. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to visualize the methane hydrate formation and dissociation processes. A methane hydrate sample was formed from granular ice in a cylindrical vessel, and slow depressurization combined with thermal stimulation was applied to dissociate the hydrate sample. CT images showed that the water produced from the hydrate dissociation accumulated at the bottom of the vessel and increased the hydrate dissociation rate there. CT images were obtained during hydrate dissociation to confirm the radial dissociation of the hydrate sample. This radial dissociation process has implications for dissociation of hydrates in pipelines, suggesting lower dissociation times than for longitudinal dissociation. These observations were also confirmed by the numerical simulator predictions, which were in good agreement with the measured thermal data during hydrate dissociation. System pressure and sample temperature measured at the sample center followed the CH{sub 4} hydrate L{sub w}+H+V equilibrium line during hydrate dissociation. The predicted cumulative methane gas production was within 5% of the measured data. Thus, this study validated our simulation approach and assumptions, which include stationary pure methane hydrate-skeleton, equilibrium hydrate-dissociation and heat- and mass-transfer in predicting hydrate dissociation in the absence of sediments. It should be noted that the application of T+H for the pure methane hydrate system (no sediment) is outside the general applicability limits of T+H.

  15. Nondestructive computed tomography for pit inspections

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, H.; Logan, C.; Haskins, J.; Johansson, E.; Perkins, D.; Hernandez, J.M.; Schneberk, D.; Dolan, K.

    1997-02-07

    Objective is to develop new approaches to electronically capture digital radiography and computed tomography images at high x-ray energies to satisfy spatial and contrast requirements for inspection of high-density weapons components.

  16. Interlaced X-ray diffraction computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Vamvakeros, Antonios; Jacques, Simon D. M.; Di Michiel, Marco; Senecal, Pierre; Middelkoop, Vesna; Cernik, Robert J.; Beale, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction computed tomography data-collection strategy that allows, post experiment, a choice between temporal and spatial resolution is reported. This strategy enables time-resolved studies on comparatively short timescales, or alternatively allows for improved spatial resolution if the system under study, or components within it, appear to be unchanging. The application of the method for studying an Mn–Na–W/SiO2 fixed-bed reactor in situ is demonstrated. Additionally, the opportunities to improve the data-collection strategy further, enabling post-collection tuning between statistical, temporal and spatial resolutions, are discussed. In principle, the interlaced scanning approach can also be applied to other pencil-beam tomographic techniques, like X-ray fluorescence computed tomography, X-ray absorption fine structure computed tomography, pair distribution function computed tomography and tomographic scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. PMID:27047305

  17. Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) Updated:Sep 11,2015 ... Persantine) or dobutamine. The tests may take between 2 and 2 1/2 hours. What happens after ...

  18. Computed Tomography For Internal Inspection Of Castings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanna, Timothy L.

    1995-01-01

    Computed tomography used to detect internal flaws in metal castings before machining and otherwise processing them into finished parts. Saves time and money otherwise wasted on machining and other processing of castings eventually rejected because of internal defects. Knowledge of internal defects gained by use of computed tomography also provides guidance for changes in foundry techniques, procedures, and equipment to minimize defects and reduce costs.

  19. Advanced Computed-Tomography Inspection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Lowell D.; Gupta, Nand K.; Smith, Charles R.; Bernardi, Richard T.; Moore, John F.; Hediger, Lisa

    1993-01-01

    Advanced Computed Tomography Inspection System (ACTIS) is computed-tomography x-ray apparatus revealing internal structures of objects in wide range of sizes and materials. Three x-ray sources and adjustable scan geometry gives system unprecedented versatility. Gantry contains translation and rotation mechanisms scanning x-ray beam through object inspected. Distance between source and detector towers varied to suit object. System used in such diverse applications as development of new materials, refinement of manufacturing processes, and inspection of components.

  20. Computed tomography of the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Bentson, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this chapter is to review the most pertinent articles published during the past year on the subject of computed tomography of the central nervous system. The chapter contains sections on pediatric computed tomography, and on the diagnostic use of CT in white matter disease, in infectious disease, for intracranial aneurysms, trauma, and intracranial tumors. Metrizamide flow studies and contrast enhancement are also examined. (KRM)

  1. Computed Tomography of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Bryant

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic disease often is asymptomatic until tissue damage and complications occur or until malignancies have reached advanced stages and have metastasized. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography plays a central role in diagnosing, staging, and treatment planning for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. This article introduces the functional anatomy of the pancreas and common bile duct and the epidemiology, pathobiology, and computed tomography imaging of pancreatitis, calculi, and pancreatic cancer. PMID:26199449

  2. Panoramic cone beam computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Jenghwa; Zhou Lili; Wang Song; Clifford Chao, K. S.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is the main imaging tool for image-guided radiotherapy but its functionality is limited by a small imaging volume and restricted image position (imaged at the central instead of the treatment position for peripheral lesions to avoid collisions). In this paper, the authors present the concept of ''panoramic CBCT,'' which can image patients at the treatment position with an imaging volume as large as practically needed. Methods: In this novel panoramic CBCT technique, the target is scanned sequentially from multiple view angles. For each view angle, a half scan (180 deg. + {theta}{sub cone} where {theta}{sub cone} is the cone angle) is performed with the imaging panel positioned in any location along the beam path. The panoramic projection images of all views for the same gantry angle are then stitched together with the direct image stitching method (i.e., according to the reported imaging position) and full-fan, half-scan CBCT reconstruction is performed using the stitched projection images. To validate this imaging technique, the authors simulated cone-beam projection images of the Mathematical Cardiac Torso (MCAT) thorax phantom for three panoramic views. Gaps, repeated/missing columns, and different exposure levels were introduced between adjacent views to simulate imperfect image stitching due to uncertainties in imaging position or output fluctuation. A modified simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (modified SART) was developed to reconstruct CBCT images directly from the stitched projection images. As a gold standard, full-fan, full-scan (360 deg. gantry rotation) CBCT reconstructions were also performed using projection images of one imaging panel large enough to encompass the target. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and geometric distortion were evaluated to quantify the quality of reconstructed images. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to evaluate the effect of scattering on the image quality and

  3. Fracture Risk Assessment in Older Adults Using a Combination of Selected Quantitative Computed Tomography Bone Measures: A Subanalysis of the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study

    PubMed Central

    Rianon, Nahid J.; Lang, Thomas F.; Siggeirsdottir, Kristin; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Jonsson, Brynjolfur Y.; Garcia, Melissa; Yu, Binbing; Kapadia, Asha S.; Taylor, Wendell C.; Selwyn, Beatrice J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Launer, Lenore J.; Harris, Tamara B.

    2016-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) and geometric bone measures are individually associated with prevalent osteoporotic fractures. Whether an aggregate of these measures would better associate with fractures has not been examined. We examined relationships between self-reported fractures and selected bone measures acquired by quantitative computerized tomography (QCT), a composite bone score, and QCT-acquired dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry–like total femur BMD in 2110 men and 2682 women in the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study. The combined bone score was generated by summing gender-specific Z-scores for 4 QCT measures: vertebral trabecular BMD, femur neck cortical thickness, femur neck trabecular BMD, and femur neck minimal cross-sectional area. Except for the latter measure, lower scores for QCT measures, singly and combined, showed positive (p < 0.05) associations with fractures. Results remained the same in stratified models for participants not taking bone-promoting medication. In women on bone-promoting medication, greater femur neck cortical thickness and trabecular BMD were significantly associated with fracture status. However, the association between fracture and combined bone score was not stronger than the associations between fracture and individual measures or total femur BMD. Thus, the selected measures did not all similarly associate with fracture status and did not appear to have an additive effect on fracture status. PMID:23562129

  4. Computed tomography demonstration of cholecystogastric fistula.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chung Kuao

    2016-06-01

    Cholecystogastric fistula is a rare complication of chronic cholecystitis or long-standing cholelithiasis. It results from the gradual erosion of the approximated, chronically inflamed wall of the gall bladder and stomach with fistulous tract formation. The present case describes the direct visualization of a cholecystogastric fistula by computed tomography in a patient without prior biliary system complaints. PMID:27257453

  5. Computed Tomography For Inspection Of Thermistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Lloyd A.

    1991-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) enables identification of cracked thermistors without disassembly of equipment containing them. CT unit used to scan equipment and locate thermistors. Further scans made in various radial orientations perpendicular to plane of devices to find cracks. Cracks invisible in conventional x-radiographs seen.

  6. Computed tomography in the evaluation of trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Federle, M.P.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.

    1982-01-01

    This book is intended to be the current standard for computed tomography in the evaluation of trauma. It summarizes two years of experience at San Francisco General Hospital. The book is organized into seven chapters, covering head, maxillofacial, laryngeal, spinal, chest, abdominal, acetabular, and pelvic trauma. Extremity trauma is not discussed.

  7. Neutron computed tomography of rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Metzke, R W; Runck, H; Stahl, C A; Schillinger, B; Calzada, E; Mühlbauer, M; Schulz, M; Schneider, M; Priebe, H-J; Wall, W A; Guttmann, J

    2011-01-01

    Using conventional methods, three-dimensional imaging of the lung is challenging because of the low contrast between air and tissue and the large differences in dimensions between various pulmonary structures. The small distal airway structures and the high air-to-tissue ratio of lung tissue require an imaging technique which reliably discriminates between air and water. The objective of this study was to assess whether neutron computed tomography would satisfy such a requirement. This method utilizes the unique characteristic of neutrons of directly interacting with the atomic nucleus rather than being scattered by the atomic shell. Neutron computed tomography was tested in rats and allowed differentiation of larger lung structures (e.g., lobes) and distal airways. Airways could be identified reliably down to the sixth bronchial generation, in some cases even down to the tenth generation. The lung could be stabilized for sufficiently long exposure times to achieve an image resolution of 50-60 µm, which is the current physical resolution limit of the neutron computed tomography facility. Neutron computed tomography allowed excellent lung imaging without the need for additional tissue preparation or contrast media. The enhanced structural resolution obtained by applying this new research technique may improve understanding of lung physiology and respiratory therapy. PMID:21119223

  8. Computed tomography in trauma: An atlas approach

    SciTech Connect

    Toombs, B.D.; Sandler, C.

    1986-01-01

    This book discussed computed tomography in trauma. The text is organized according to mechanism of injury and site of injury. In addition to CT, some correlation with other imaging modalities is included. Blunt trauma, penetrating trauma, complications and sequelae of trauma, and use of other modalities are covered.

  9. Cerebral computed tomography, 3rd Edition

    SciTech Connect

    Weisberg, L.; Nice, C.

    1988-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the utilization of computed tomography in evaluating patients with intracranial and orbital disorders. It features clinical correlations and provides an overview of general principles, performance, and normal anatomy of CT. It covers evaluation of specific neurologic signs and symptoms, including stroke, metastatic disease, increased intracranial pressure, head injury, pediatric conditions, and more.

  10. Computed Tomography Analysis of NASA BSTRA Balls

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, R L; Schneberk, D J; Thompson, R R

    2004-10-12

    Fifteen 1.25 inch BSTRA balls were scanned with the high energy computed tomography system at LLNL. This system has a resolution limit of approximately 210 microns. A threshold of 238 microns (two voxels) was used, and no anomalies at or greater than this were observed.

  11. Computed Tomography Angiography of the Neurovascular Circulation.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Suyash; Agarwal, Mohit; Pukenas, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography angiography of the head and neck is a powerful tool for imaging and diagnosis of a plethora of disorders of the cervicocerebral vasculature. This article reviews the technique, indications, and interpretation of many of these disorders. A standard report checklist is also presented. PMID:26654397

  12. Parallel Computing for the Computed-Tomography Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon

    2008-01-01

    This software computes the tomographic reconstruction of spatial-spectral data from raw detector images of the Computed-Tomography Imaging Spectrometer (CTIS), which enables transient-level, multi-spectral imaging by capturing spatial and spectral information in a single snapshot.

  13. Real-time in vivo computed optical interferometric tomography.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Adeel; Shemonski, Nathan D; Adie, Steven G; Kim, Hee-Seok; Hwu, Wen-Mei W; Carney, P Scott; Boppart, Stephen A

    2013-06-01

    High-resolution real-time tomography of scattering tissues is important for many areas of medicine and biology(1-6). However, the compromise between transverse resolution and depth-of-field in addition to low sensitivity deep in tissue continue to impede progress towards cellular-level volumetric tomography. Computed imaging has the potential to solve these long-standing limitations. Interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM)(7-9) is a computed imaging technique enabling high-resolution volumetric tomography with spatially invariant resolution. However, its potential for clinical diagnostics remains largely untapped since full volume reconstructions required lengthy postprocessing, and the phase-stability requirements have been difficult to satisfy in vivo. Here we demonstrate how 3-D Fourier-domain resampling, in combination with high-speed optical coherence tomography (OCT), can achieve high-resolution in vivo tomography. Enhanced depth sensitivity was achieved over a depth-of-field extended in real time by more than an order of magnitude. This work lays the foundation for high-speed volumetric cellular-level tomography. PMID:23956790

  14. In Depth Analyses of LEDs by a Combination of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) and Light Microscopy (LM) Correlated with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM).

    PubMed

    Meyer, Jörg; Thomas, Christian; Tappe, Frank; Ogbazghi, Tekie

    2016-01-01

    In failure analysis, device characterization and reverse engineering of light emitting diodes (LEDs), and similar electronic components of micro-characterization, plays an important role. Commonly, different techniques like X-ray computed tomography (CT), light microscopy (LM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used separately. Similarly, the results have to be treated for each technique independently. Here a comprehensive study is shown which demonstrates the potentials leveraged by linking CT, LM and SEM. In depth characterization is performed on a white emitting LED, which can be operated throughout all characterization steps. Major advantages are: planned preparation of defined cross sections, correlation of optical properties to structural and compositional information, as well as reliable identification of different functional regions. This results from the breadth of information available from identical regions of interest (ROIs): polarization contrast, bright and dark-field LM images, as well as optical images of the LED cross section in operation. This is supplemented by SEM imaging techniques and micro-analysis using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. PMID:27341190

  15. Lymphoscintigraphy combined with single-photon emission computed tomography-computed tomography (SPECT-CT): A very effective imaging approach for identification of the site of leak in postoperative chylothorax

    PubMed Central

    Das, Jayanta; Thambudorai, Robin; Ray, Soumendranath

    2015-01-01

    Post operative chylothorax is a known complication of various thoracic surgeries. It needs identification of precise site of leak in the thoracic duct. Lymphosicintigraphy can identify chyle leak but cannot delineate exact site of leak. SPECT-CT is precise in anatomic localisation and hence SPECT-CT should be combined with every lymphoscintigraphy in evaluation of clinically suspected case of post operative chylothorax. We report such a case. PMID:25829744

  16. Computed tomography of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Haughton, V.M.; Williams, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    The book describes the computed tomographic (CT) techniques for imaging the different elements comprising the spinal column and canal. The use of intravenous and intrathecal contrast enhancement and of xenon enhancement is briefly mentioned. Reconstruction techniques and special problems regarding CT of the spine are presented. CT of the spinal cord, meninges and subarachnoid space, epidural space, intervertebral discs, facet joints, and vertebrae present normal anatomy, and several common pathologic conditions. (KRM)

  17. Real-time computed optical interferometric tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemonski, Nathan D.; Liu, Yuan-Zhi; Ahmad, Adeel; Adie, Steven G.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-03-01

    High-resolution tomography is of great importance to many areas of biomedical imaging, but with it comes several apparent tradeoffs such as a narrowing depth-of-field and increasing optical aberrations. Overcoming these challenges has attracted many hardware and computational solutions. Hardware solutions, though, can become bulky or expensive and computational approaches can require high computing power or large processing times. This study demonstrates memory efficient implementations of interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) and computational adaptive optics (CAO) - two computational approaches for overcoming the depthof- field limitation and the effect of optical aberrations in optical coherence tomography (OCT). Traditionally requiring lengthy post processing, here we report implementations of ISAM and CAO on a single GPU for real-time in vivo imaging. Real-time, camera-limited ISAM processing enabled reliable acquisition of stable data for in vivo imaging, and CAO processing on the same GPU is shown to quickly correct static aberrations. These algorithmic advances hold the promise for high-resolution volumetric imaging in time-sensitive situations as well as enabling aberrationfree cellular-level volumetric tomography.

  18. Computed tomography of Tietze syndrome.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, G; Levitt, R G; Slaker, D P; Murphy, W A

    1984-02-01

    Six patients with clinical features suggestive of Tietze syndrome had a thoracic computed tomographic (CT) examination following a normal plain film or tomographic examination (or both) of the affected costochondral junction. A chest wall mass was excluded in all six patients. The CT findings included enlargement of the costal cartilage at the site of complaint (two patients), ventral angulation of the involved costal cartilage (two patients), and normal anatomy of the costochondral junction (two patients). Exclusion of a chest wall mass by CT may obviate the need for operative intervention. PMID:6690519

  19. Computed tomography of the medulla

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Williams, A.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1982-10-01

    The medulla was studied in cadavers and in 100 patients both with and without the intrathecal administration of contrast material. The computed tomographic (CT) anatomy was correlated with the appearance on anatomic dissections. The pyramids, olives, and inferior cerebellar peduncles produced characteristic contours on cross sections of the medulla. The hypoglossal nerve by its location and course in the medullary cistern could be distinguished from the glossopharyngeal, vagal, and spinal accessory nerves. For optimal evaluation of the medulla, intrathecal administration of metrizamide and 5- and/or 1.5-mm-thick axial and coronal sections are recommended.

  20. Introducing Seismic Tomography with Computational Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, R.; Neves, M. L.; Teodoro, V.

    2011-12-01

    Learning seismic tomography principles and techniques involves advanced physical and computational knowledge. In depth learning of such computational skills is a difficult cognitive process that requires a strong background in physics, mathematics and computer programming. The corresponding learning environments and pedagogic methodologies should then involve sets of computational modelling activities with computer software systems which allow students the possibility to improve their mathematical or programming knowledge and simultaneously focus on the learning of seismic wave propagation and inverse theory. To reduce the level of cognitive opacity associated with mathematical or programming knowledge, several computer modelling systems have already been developed (Neves & Teodoro, 2010). Among such systems, Modellus is particularly well suited to achieve this goal because it is a domain general environment for explorative and expressive modelling with the following main advantages: 1) an easy and intuitive creation of mathematical models using just standard mathematical notation; 2) the simultaneous exploration of images, tables, graphs and object animations; 3) the attribution of mathematical properties expressed in the models to animated objects; and finally 4) the computation and display of mathematical quantities obtained from the analysis of images and graphs. Here we describe virtual simulations and educational exercises which enable students an easy grasp of the fundamental of seismic tomography. The simulations make the lecture more interactive and allow students the possibility to overcome their lack of advanced mathematical or programming knowledge and focus on the learning of seismological concepts and processes taking advantage of basic scientific computation methods and tools.

  1. 21 CFR 892.1200 - Emission computed tomography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Emission computed tomography system. 892.1200... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1200 Emission computed tomography system. (a) Identification. An emission computed tomography system is a device intended to detect...

  2. Role of computed tomography and radionuclide scintigraphy in the localization of osteomyelitis in flat bones

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, R.J.; Conway, J.J.; Poznanski, A.K.; Tachdjian, M.O.; Dias, L.S.; Kelikian, A.S.

    1985-03-01

    The combined use of radionuclide scintigraphy and computed tomography is recommended for evaluating children with laboratory and clinical data suggestive of flat bone osteomyelitis despite normal conventional radiographs. In addition, computed tomography may be helpful in the presence of abnormal radiographs in determining the exact location of the focus of osteomyelitis and the most suitable route for appropriate drainage or to obtain culture material.

  3. Endocrine radionuclide scintigraphy with fusion single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ka-Kit; Gandhi, Arpit; Viglianti, Benjamin L; Fig, Lorraine M; Rubello, Domenico; Gross, Milton D

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To review the benefits of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) hybrid imaging for diagnosis of various endocrine disorders. METHODS: We performed MEDLINE and PubMed searches using the terms: “SPECT/CT”; “functional anatomic mapping”; “transmission emission tomography”; “parathyroid adenoma”; “thyroid cancer”; “neuroendocrine tumor”; “adrenal”; “pheochromocytoma”; “paraganglioma”; in order to identify relevant articles published in English during the years 2003 to 2015. Reference lists from the articles were reviewed to identify additional pertinent articles. Retrieved manuscripts (case reports, reviews, meta-analyses and abstracts) concerning the application of SPECT/CT to endocrine imaging were analyzed to provide a descriptive synthesis of the utility of this technology. RESULTS: The emergence of hybrid SPECT/CT camera technology now allows simultaneous acquisition of combined multi-modality imaging, with seamless fusion of three-dimensional volume datasets. The usefulness of combining functional information to depict the bio-distribution of radiotracers that map cellular processes of the endocrine system and tumors of endocrine origin, with anatomy derived from CT, has improved the diagnostic capability of scintigraphy for a range of disorders of endocrine gland function. The literature describes benefits of SPECT/CT for 99mTc-sestamibi parathyroid scintigraphy and 99mTc-pertechnetate thyroid scintigraphy, 123I- or 131I-radioiodine for staging of differentiated thyroid carcinoma, 111In- and 99mTc- labeled somatostatin receptor analogues for detection of neuroendocrine tumors, 131I-norcholesterol (NP-59) scans for assessment of adrenal cortical hyperfunction, and 123I- or 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine imaging for evaluation of pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma. CONCLUSION: SPECT/CT exploits the synergism between the functional information from radiopharmaceutical imaging and anatomy

  4. Clinical Evaluation of Spatial Accuracy of a Fusion Imaging Technique Combining Previously Acquired Computed Tomography and Real-Time Ultrasound for Imaging of Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Hakime, Antoine Deschamps, Frederic; Garcia Marques de Carvalho, Enio; Teriitehau, Christophe; Auperin, Anne; De Baere, Thierry

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the spatial accuracy of matching volumetric computed tomography (CT) data of hepatic metastases with real-time ultrasound (US) using a fusion imaging system (VNav) according to different clinical settings. Methods: Twenty-four patients with one hepatic tumor identified on enhanced CT and US were prospectively enrolled. A set of three landmarks markers was chosen on CT and US for image registration. US and CT images were then superimposed using the fusion imaging display mode. The difference in spatial location between the tumor visible on the CT and the US on the overlay images (reviewer no. 1, comment no. 2) was measured in the lateral, anterior-posterior, and vertical axis. The maximum difference (Dmax) was evaluated for different predictive factors.CT performed 1-30 days before registration versus immediately before. Use of general anesthesia for CT and US versus no anesthesia.Anatomic landmarks versus landmarks that include at least one nonanatomic structure, such as a cyst or a calcificationResultsOverall, Dmax was 11.53 {+-} 8.38 mm. Dmax was 6.55 {+-} 7.31 mm with CT performed immediately before VNav versus 17.4 {+-} 5.18 with CT performed 1-30 days before (p < 0.0001). Dmax was 7.05 {+-} 6.95 under general anesthesia and 16.81 {+-} 6.77 without anesthesia (p < 0.0015). Landmarks including at least one nonanatomic structure increase Dmax of 5.2 mm (p < 0.0001). The lowest Dmax (1.9 {+-} 1.4 mm) was obtained when CT and VNav were performed under general anesthesia, one immediately after the other. Conclusions: VNav is accurate when adequate clinical setup is carefully selected. Only under these conditions (reviewer no. 2), liver tumors not identified on US can be accurately targeted for biopsy or radiofrequency ablation using fusion imaging.

  5. X ray computed tomography for failure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossi, Richard H.; Crews, Alan R.; Georgeson, Gary E.

    1992-08-01

    Under a preliminary testing task assignment of the Advanced Development of X-Ray Computed Tomography Application program, computed tomography (CT) has been studied for its potential as a tool to assist in failure analysis investigations. CT provides three-dimensional spatial distribution of material that can be used to assess internal configurations and material conditions nondestructively. This capability has been used in failure analysis studies to determine the position of internal components and their operation. CT is particularly advantageous on complex systems, composite failure studies, and testing under operational or environmental conditions. CT plays an important role in reducing the time and effort of a failure analysis investigation. Aircraft manufacturing or logistical facilities perform failure analysis operations routinely and could be expected to reduce schedules, reduce costs and/or improve evaluation on about 10 to 30 percent of the problems they investigate by using CT.

  6. Computed tomography of the calcaneus: normal anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Heger, L.; Wulff, K.

    1985-07-01

    The normal sectional anatomy of the calcaneus was studied as the background for interpretation of computed tomography (CT) of fractures. Multiplanar CT examination of the normal calcaneus was obtained, and sections were matched with a simplified anatomic model. Sectional anatomy in the four most important planes is described. This facilitates three-dimensional understanding of the calcaneus from sections and interpretation of CT sections obtained in any atypical plane.

  7. Computed tomography of ancient Egyptian mummies.

    PubMed

    Harwood-Nash, D C

    1979-12-01

    This first report of the application of computed tomography (CT) to the study of ancient mummies, the desiccated brain of a boy and the body of a young woman within her cartonnage, shows that CT is uniquely suitable for the study of such antiquities, a study that does not necessitate destruction of the mummy or its cartonnage. Exquisite images result that are of great paleoanatomical, paleopathological, and archeological significance. PMID:389964

  8. Single photon emission computed tomography and other selected computer topics

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.R.; Gilday, D.L.; Croft, B.Y.

    1980-01-01

    This volume includes an overview of single photon emission computed tomography and numerous papers that describe and evaluate specific systems and techniques. Papers cover such topics as Auger cameras; seven-pinhole and slant-hole collimators; brain; cardiac; and gated blood-pool studies; and the BICLET and SPECT systems.

  9. Single photon emission computed tomography-guided Cerenkov luminescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhenhua; Chen, Xueli; Liang, Jimin; Qu, Xiaochao; Chen, Duofang; Yang, Weidong; Wang, Jing; Cao, Feng; Tian, Jie

    2012-07-01

    Cerenkov luminescence tomography (CLT) has become a valuable tool for preclinical imaging because of its ability of reconstructing the three-dimensional distribution and activity of the radiopharmaceuticals. However, it is still far from a mature technology and suffers from relatively low spatial resolution due to the ill-posed inverse problem for the tomographic reconstruction. In this paper, we presented a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-guided reconstruction method for CLT, in which a priori information of the permissible source region (PSR) from SPECT imaging results was incorporated to effectively reduce the ill-posedness of the inverse reconstruction problem. The performance of the method was first validated with the experimental reconstruction of an adult athymic nude mouse implanted with a Na131I radioactive source and an adult athymic nude mouse received an intravenous tail injection of Na131I. A tissue-mimic phantom based experiment was then conducted to illustrate the ability of the proposed method in resolving double sources. Compared with the traditional PSR strategy in which the PSR was determined by the surface flux distribution, the proposed method obtained much more accurate and encouraging localization and resolution results. Preliminary results showed that the proposed SPECT-guided reconstruction method was insensitive to the regularization methods and ignored the heterogeneity of tissues which can avoid the segmentation procedure of the organs.

  10. Computed tomography to quantify tooth abrasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kofmehl, Lukas; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Filippi, Andreas; Hotz, Gerhard; Berndt-Dagassan, Dorothea; Kramis, Simon; Beckmann, Felix; Müller, Bert

    2010-09-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography, also termed digital volume tomography, has become a standard technique in dentistry, allowing for fast 3D jaw imaging including denture at moderate spatial resolution. More detailed X-ray images of restricted volumes for post-mortem studies in dental anthropology are obtained by means of micro computed tomography. The present study evaluates the impact of the pipe smoking wear on teeth morphology comparing the abraded tooth with its contra-lateral counterpart. A set of 60 teeth, loose or anchored in the jaw, from 12 dentitions have been analyzed. After the two contra-lateral teeth were scanned, one dataset has been mirrored before the two datasets were registered using affine and rigid registration algorithms. Rigid registration provides three translational and three rotational parameters to maximize the overlap of two rigid bodies. For the affine registration, three scaling factors are incorporated. Within the present investigation, affine and rigid registrations yield comparable values. The restriction to the six parameters of the rigid registration is not a limitation. The differences in size and shape between the tooth and its contra-lateral counterpart generally exhibit only a few percent in the non-abraded volume, validating that the contralateral tooth is a reasonable approximation to quantify, for example, the volume loss as the result of long-term clay pipe smoking. Therefore, this approach allows quantifying the impact of the pipe abrasion on the internal tooth morphology including root canal, dentin, and enamel volumes.

  11. Computer tomography imaging of fast plasmachemical processes

    SciTech Connect

    Denisova, N. V.; Katsnelson, S. S.; Pozdnyakov, G. A.

    2007-11-15

    Results are presented from experimental studies of the interaction of a high-enthalpy methane plasma bunch with gaseous methane in a plasmachemical reactor. The interaction of the plasma flow with the rest gas was visualized by using streak imaging and computer tomography. Tomography was applied for the first time to reconstruct the spatial structure and dynamics of the reagent zones in the microsecond range by the maximum entropy method. The reagent zones were identified from the emission of atomic hydrogen (the H{sub {alpha}} line) and molecular carbon (the Swan bands). The spatiotemporal behavior of the reagent zones was determined, and their relation to the shock-wave structure of the plasma flow was examined.

  12. Positron computed tomography: current state, clinical results and future trends

    SciTech Connect

    Schelbert, H.R.; Phelps, M.E.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1980-09-01

    An overview is presented of positron computed tomography: its advantages over single photon emission tomography, its use in metabolic studies of the heart and chemical investigation of the brain, and future trends. (ACR)

  13. Positron Computed Tomography: Current State, Clinical Results and Future Trends

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Schelbert, H. R.; Phelps, M. E.; Kuhl, D. E.

    1980-09-01

    An overview is presented of positron computed tomography: its advantages over single photon emission tomography, its use in metabolic studies of the heart and chemical investigation of the brain, and future trends. (ACR)

  14. Management of a Previously Treated, Calcified, and Dilacerated Maxillary Lateral Incisor: A Combined Nonsurgical/Surgical Approach Assisted by Cone-beam Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Dudeja, Pooja Gupta; Dudeja, Krishan Kumar; Garg, Arvind; Srivastava, Dhirendra; Grover, Shibani

    2016-06-01

    Teeth with calcified canals, dilacerated roots, and associated large periradicular lesions involving both cortical plates pose a challenge to dentists. In addition to the nonsurgical endodontic treatment, such teeth may require surgical intervention with concomitant use of bone grafting materials and barrier techniques. These techniques, when combined with the use of a host modulating agent such as platelet-rich fibrin (PRF), may improve the chances of success. A 26-year-old woman was referred for dental treatment with a recurrence of an intraoral sinus tract 2 months after periradicular surgery in the upper anterior region. Clinical and radiographic examinations revealed a calcified and perforated maxillary left lateral incisor with a severely dilacerated root as well as an associated large radiolucent lesion surrounding the roots of the maxillary left central and lateral incisors. A cone-beam computed tomographic scan of the anterior maxilla showed erosion of the labial and palatal cortical plates in the same region. A calcified canal in the lateral incisor was negotiated up to the straight line portion of the canal. Periradicular surgery with root-end resection was performed, and root-end filling was performed with mineral trioxide aggregate. The perforation present on the middle third of the labial surface of the root was repaired with mineral trioxide aggregate, and the canal was cleaned, shaped, and obturated. A PRF scaffold was prepared and used with a collagen membrane and a freeze-dried bone allograft. Follow-up visits after 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year revealed satisfactory clinical and radiographic healing. The combined use of nonsurgical and surgical modes of treatment cannot be overemphasized in this case. The use of PRF along with a bone graft and a barrier membrane may have enhanced the speed of healing and the resolution of periradicular radiolucency by enhancing bone regeneration. PMID:27140443

  15. Emerging clinical applications of computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Liguori, Carlo; Frauenfelder, Giulia; Massaroni, Carlo; Saccomandi, Paola; Giurazza, Francesco; Pitocco, Francesca; Marano, Riccardo; Schena, Emiliano

    2015-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has recently been experiencing remarkable growth as a result of technological advances and new clinical applications. This paper reviews the essential physics of X-ray CT and its major components. Also reviewed are recent promising applications of CT, ie, CT-guided procedures, CT-based thermometry, photon-counting technology, hybrid PET-CT, use of ultrafast-high pitch scanners, and potential use of dual-energy CT for material differentiations. These promising solutions and a better knowledge of their potentialities should allow CT to be used in a safe and effective manner in several clinical applications. PMID:26089707

  16. Emerging clinical applications of computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Liguori, Carlo; Frauenfelder, Giulia; Massaroni, Carlo; Saccomandi, Paola; Giurazza, Francesco; Pitocco, Francesca; Marano, Riccardo; Schena, Emiliano

    2015-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has recently been experiencing remarkable growth as a result of technological advances and new clinical applications. This paper reviews the essential physics of X-ray CT and its major components. Also reviewed are recent promising applications of CT, ie, CT-guided procedures, CT-based thermometry, photon-counting technology, hybrid PET-CT, use of ultrafast-high pitch scanners, and potential use of dual-energy CT for material differentiations. These promising solutions and a better knowledge of their potentialities should allow CT to be used in a safe and effective manner in several clinical applications. PMID:26089707

  17. Calcium Scoring and Cardiac Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Swapnesh; Budoff, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    Although recent advances in noninvasive imaging technologies have potentially improved diagnostic efficiency and clinical outcomes of patients with acute chest pain, controversy remains regarding much of the accumulated evidence. This article reviews the role of coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography in the assessment of coronary risk, and its usefulness in the emergency department in facilitating appropriate disposition decisions. Also discussed is coronary artery calcification incidentally found on CT scans when done for indications such as evaluation of pulmonary embolism or lung cancer. The evidence base and clinical applications for both techniques are described, together with cost-effectiveness and radiation exposure considerations. PMID:26567977

  18. Computed tomography of infantile hepatic hemangioendothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Lucaya, J.; Enriquez, G.; Amat, L.; Gonzalez-Rivero, M.A.

    1985-04-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was performed on five infants with hepatic hemangioendothelioma. Precontrast scans showed solitary or multiple, homogeneous, circumscribed areas with reduced attenuation values. Tiny tumoral calcifications were identified in two patients. Serial scans, after injection of a bolus of contrast material, showed early massive enhancement, which was either diffuse or peripheral. On delayed scans, multinocular tumors became isodense with surrounding liver, while all solitary ones showed varied degrees of centripetal enhancement and persistent central cleftlike unenhanced areas. The authors believe that these CT features are characteristic and obviate arteriographic confirmation.

  19. Computed tomography of cardiac pseudotumors and neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Anavekar, Nandan S; Bonnichsen, Crystal R; Foley, Thomas A; Morris, Michael F; Martinez, Matthew W; Williamson, Eric E; Glockner, James F; Miller, Dylan V; Breen, Jerome F; Araoz, Philip A

    2010-07-01

    Important features of cardiac masses can be clearly delineated on cardiac computed tomography (CT) imaging. This modality is useful in identifying the presence of a mass, its relationship with cardiac and extracardiac structures, and the features that distinguish one type of mass from another. A multimodality approach to the evaluation of cardiac tumors is advocated, with the use of echocardiography, CT imaging and magnetic resonance imaging as appropriately indicated. In this article, various cardiac masses are described, including pseudotumors and true cardiac neoplasms, and the CT imaging findings that may be useful in distinguishing these rare entities are presented. PMID:20705174

  20. Cone Beam Computed Tomography - Know its Secrets

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mohan; Shanavas, Muhammad; Sidappa, Ashwin; Kiran, Madhu

    2015-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an advanced imaging modality that has high clinical applications in the field of dentistry. CBCT proved to be a successful investigative modality that has been used for dental and maxillofacial imaging. Radiation exposure dose from CBCT is 10 times less than from conventional CT scans during maxillofacial exposure. Furthermore, CBCT is highly accurate and can provide a three-dimensional volumetric data in axial, sagittal and coronal planes. This article describes the basic technique, difference in CBCT from CT and main clinical applications of CBCT. PMID:25859112

  1. Computer Instruction on Sentence Combining.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humes, Ann

    This description of an interactive instructional computer program in sentence combining for upper elementary and middle school students begins by summarizing the content of the program, which focuses on the instructional technique in which students are given two or more short simple sentences to combine into one longer, complex and/or compound…

  2. Coronary Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Birgit; Nagel, Eike; Schoenhagen, Paul; Barkhausen, Jörg; Gerber, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomography and magnetic resonance are relatively new imaging modalities that can exceed the ability of established imaging modalities to detect present pathology or predict patient outcomes. Coronary calcium scoring may be useful in asymptomatic patients at intermediate risk. Computed tomographic coronary angiography is a first-line indication to evaluate congenitally abnormal coronary arteries and, along with stress magnetic resonance myocardial perfusion imaging, is useful in symptomatic patients with nondiagnostic conventional stress tests. Cardiac magnetic resonance is indicated for visualizing cardiac structure and function, and delayed enhancement magnetic resonance is a first-line indication for assessing myocardial viability. Imaging plaque and molecular mechanisms related to plaque rupture holds great promise for the presymptomatic detection of patients at risk for coronary events but is not yet suitable for routine clinical use. PMID:19269527

  3. Space shuttle main engine computed tomography applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sporny, Richard F.

    1990-01-01

    For the past two years the potential applications of computed tomography to the fabrication and overhaul of the Space Shuttle Main Engine were evaluated. Application tests were performed at various government and manufacturer facilities with equipment produced by four different manufacturers. The hardware scanned varied in size and complexity from a small temperature sensor and turbine blades to an assembled heat exchanger and main injector oxidizer inlet manifold. The evaluation of capabilities included the ability to identify and locate internal flaws, measure the depth of surface cracks, measure wall thickness, compare manifold design contours to actual part contours, perform automatic dimensional inspections, generate 3D computer models of actual parts, and image the relationship of the details in a complex assembly. The capabilities evaluated, with the exception of measuring the depth of surface flaws, demonstrated the existing and potential ability to perform many beneficial Space Shuttle Main Engine applications.

  4. Microscopic x-ray luminescence computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Dianwen; Zhang, Kun; Li, Changqing

    2015-03-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) was emerged as a new hybrid imaging modality, in which the x-rays are used to excite phosphors emitting optical photons to be measured for imaging. In this paper, we reported a microscopic x-ray luminescence computed tomography (microXLCT) with a spatial resolution up to hundreds of micrometers for deep targets. We use a superfine x-ray pencil beam to scan the phosphor targets. The superfine x-ray pencil beam is generated by a small collimator mounted in front of a powerful x-ray tube (93212, Oxford Instrument). A CT detector is used to image the x-ray beam. We have generated an x-ray beam with a diameter of 192 micrometers with a collimator of 100 micrometers in diameter. The emitted optical photons on the top surface of phantom are reflected by a mirror and acquired by an electron multiplier charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera (C9100-13, Hamamatsu Photonics). The microXLCT imaging system is built inside an x-ray shielding and light tight cabinet. The EMCCD camera is placed in a lead box. All the imaging components are controlled by a VC++ program. The optical photon propagation is modeled with the diffusion equation solved by the finite element method. We have applied different regularization methods including L2 and L1 in the microXLCT reconstruction algorithms. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments are used to validate the microXLCT imaging system.

  5. Comparison of computed tomography dose reporting software.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, A; Sun, Z; Pongnapang, N; Ng, K-H

    2012-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) dose reporting software facilitates the estimation of doses to patients undergoing CT examinations. In this study, comparison of three software packages, i.e. CT-Expo (version 1.5, Medizinische Hochschule, Hannover, Germany), ImPACT CT Patients Dosimetry Calculator (version 0.99×, Imaging Performance Assessment on Computed Tomography, www.impactscan.org) and WinDose (version 2.1a, Wellhofer Dosimetry, Schwarzenbruck, Germany), has been made in terms of their calculation algorithm and the results of calculated doses. Estimations were performed for head, chest, abdominal and pelvic examinations based on the protocols recommended by European guidelines using single-slice CT (SSCT) (Siemens Somatom Plus 4, Erlangen, Germany) and multi-slice CT (MSCT) (Siemens Sensation 16, Erlangen, Germany) for software-based female and male phantoms. The results showed that there are some differences in final dose reporting provided by these software packages. There are deviations of effective doses produced by these software packages. Percentages of coefficient of variance range from 3.3 to 23.4 % in SSCT and from 10.6 to 43.8 % in MSCT. It is important that researchers state the name of the software that is used to estimate the various CT dose quantities. Users must also understand the equivalent terminologies between the information obtained from the CT console and the software packages in order to use the software correctly. PMID:22155753

  6. Computed Tomography Technology: Development and Applications for Defence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baheti, G. L.; Saxena, Nisheet; Tripathi, D. K.; Songara, K. C.; Meghwal, L. R.; Meena, V. L.

    2008-09-01

    Computed Tomography(CT) has revolutionized the field of Non-Destructive Testing and Evaluation (NDT&E). Tomography for industrial applications warrants design and development of customized solutions catering to specific visualization requirements. Present paper highlights Tomography Technology Solutions implemented at Defence Laboratory, Jodhpur (DLJ). Details on the technological developments carried out and their utilization for various Defence applications has been covered.

  7. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT): Applications and potential

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, B.L.; Tumeh, S.S. )

    1990-01-26

    Single-photon emission computed tomography has received increasing attention as radiopharmaceuticals that reflect perfusion, metabolism, and receptor and cellular function have become widely available. Perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography of the brain provides functional information useful for the diagnosis and management of stroke, dementia, and epilepsy. Single-photon emission computed tomography has been applied to myocardial, skeletal, hepatic, and tumor scintigraphy, resulting in increased diagnostic accuracy over planar imaging because background activity and overlapping tissues interfere far less with activity from the target structure when tomographic techniques are used. Single-photon emission computed tomography is substantially less expensive and far more accessible than positron emission tomography and will become an increasingly attractive alternative for transferring the positron emission tomography technology to routine clinical use.

  8. Quality assessment of clinical computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berndt, Dorothea; Luckow, Marlen; Lambrecht, J. Thomas; Beckmann, Felix; Müller, Bert

    2008-08-01

    Three-dimensional images are vital for the diagnosis in dentistry and cranio-maxillofacial surgery. Artifacts caused by highly absorbing components such as metallic implants, however, limit the value of the tomograms. The dominant artifacts observed are blowout and streaks. Investigating the artifacts generated by metallic implants in a pig jaw, the data acquisition for the patients in dentistry should be optimized in a quantitative manner. A freshly explanted pig jaw including related soft-tissues served as a model system. Images were recorded varying the accelerating voltage and the beam current. The comparison with multi-slice and micro computed tomography (CT) helps to validate the approach with the dental CT system (3D-Accuitomo, Morita, Japan). The data are rigidly registered to comparatively quantify their quality. The micro CT data provide a reasonable standard for quantitative data assessment of clinical CT.

  9. Arterioportal shunts on dynamic computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, T.; Hiyama, Y.; Ohnishi, K.; Tsuchiya, S.; Kohno, K.; Nakajima, Y.; Okuda, K.

    1983-05-01

    Thirty-two patients, 20 with hepatocelluar carcinoma and 12 with liver cirrhosis, were examined by dynamic computed tomography (CT) using intravenous bolus injection of contrast medium and by celiac angiography. Dynamic CT disclosed arterioportal shunting in four cases of hepatocellular carcinoma and in one of cirrhosis. In three of the former, the arterioportal shunt was adjacent to a mass lesion on CT, suggesting tumor invasion into the portal branch. In one with hepatocellular carcinoma, the shunt was remote from the mass. In the case with cirrhosis, there was no mass. In these last two cases, the shunt might have been caused by prior percutaneous needle puncture. In another case of hepatocellular carcinoma, celiac angiography but not CT demonstrated an arterioportal shunt. Thus, dynamic CT was diagnostic in five of six cases of arteriographically demonstrated arterioportal shunts.

  10. Ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging

    DOEpatents

    Paulus, Michael J.; Sari-Sarraf, Hamed; Tobin, Jr., Kenneth William; Gleason, Shaun S.; Thomas, Jr., Clarence E.

    2002-01-01

    A method for ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging, comprising the steps of: focusing a high energy particle beam, for example x-rays or gamma-rays, onto a target object; acquiring a 2-dimensional projection data set representative of the target object; generating a corrected projection data set by applying a deconvolution algorithm, having an experimentally determined a transfer function, to the 2-dimensional data set; storing the corrected projection data set; incrementally rotating the target object through an angle of approximately 180.degree., and after each the incremental rotation, repeating the radiating, acquiring, generating and storing steps; and, after the rotating step, applying a cone-beam algorithm, for example a modified tomographic reconstruction algorithm, to the corrected projection data sets to generate a 3-dimensional image. The size of the spot focus of the beam is reduced to not greater than approximately 1 micron, and even to not greater than approximately 0.5 microns.

  11. Computed tomography of radioactive objects and materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawicka, B. D.; Murphy, R. V.; Tosello, G.; Reynolds, P. W.; Romaniszyn, T.

    1990-12-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been performed on a number of radioactive objects and materials. Several unique technical problems are associated with CT of radioactive specimens. These include general safety considerations, techniques to reduce background-radiation effects on CT images and selection criteria for the CT source to permit object penetration and to reveal accurate values of material density. In the present paper, three groups of experiments will be described, for objects with low, medium and high levels of radioactivity. CT studies on radioactive specimens will be presented. They include the following: (1) examination of individual ceramic reactor-fuel (uranium dioxide) pellets, (2) examination of fuel samples from the Three Mile Island reactor, (3) examination of a CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uraniun: registered trademark) nuclear-fuel bundle which underwent a simulated loss-of-coolant accident resulting in high-temperature damage and (4) examination of a PWR nuclear-reactor fuel assembly.

  12. System Matrix Analysis for Computed Tomography Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Liubov; Vidal, Vicent; Verdú, Gumersindo

    2015-01-01

    In practical applications of computed tomography imaging (CT), it is often the case that the set of projection data is incomplete owing to the physical conditions of the data acquisition process. On the other hand, the high radiation dose imposed on patients is also undesired. These issues demand that high quality CT images can be reconstructed from limited projection data. For this reason, iterative methods of image reconstruction have become a topic of increased research interest. Several algorithms have been proposed for few-view CT. We consider that the accurate solution of the reconstruction problem also depends on the system matrix that simulates the scanning process. In this work, we analyze the application of the Siddon method to generate elements of the matrix and we present results based on real projection data. PMID:26575482

  13. System Matrix Analysis for Computed Tomography Imaging.

    PubMed

    Flores, Liubov; Vidal, Vicent; Verdú, Gumersindo

    2015-01-01

    In practical applications of computed tomography imaging (CT), it is often the case that the set of projection data is incomplete owing to the physical conditions of the data acquisition process. On the other hand, the high radiation dose imposed on patients is also undesired. These issues demand that high quality CT images can be reconstructed from limited projection data. For this reason, iterative methods of image reconstruction have become a topic of increased research interest. Several algorithms have been proposed for few-view CT. We consider that the accurate solution of the reconstruction problem also depends on the system matrix that simulates the scanning process. In this work, we analyze the application of the Siddon method to generate elements of the matrix and we present results based on real projection data. PMID:26575482

  14. Clinically applicable gated cardiac computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Cipriano, P.R.; Nassi, M.; Brody, W.R.

    1983-03-01

    Several attempts have been made to improve cardiac images obtained with x-ray transmission computed tomography (CT) by stopping cardiac motion through electrocardiographic gating. These methods reconstruct images that correspond to time intervals of the cardiac cycle identified by electrocardiography using either a pulsed x-ray beam at a selected time in the cardiac cycle or selected measurements in retrospect from regularly pulsed measurements made over several cardiac cycles. Missing CT angles of view (line integrals) have been a major problem contributing to degradation of such gated cardiac CT images. A new method for CT reconstruction from an incomplete set of projection data is presented that can be used clinically with a standard fan-beam reconstruction algorithm to improve gated cardiac CT images.

  15. Computed tomography of the abnormal thymus

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, R.L.; Lee, J.K.T.; Sagel, S.S.; Levitt, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) should be the imaging method of choice following plain chest radiographs when a suspected thymic abnormality requires further evaluation. Based upon a six-year experience, including the evaluation of 25 patients with thymic pathology, CT was found useful in suggesting or excluding a diagnosis of thymoma and in distinguishing thymic hyperplasis from thymoma in patients with myasthenia gravis. The thickness of the thymic lobes determined by CT was found to be a more accurate indicator of infiltrative disease (thymic hyperplasia and lymphoma) than the width. CT was helpful in differentiating benign thymic cysts from solid tumors, and in defining the extent of a thymic neoplasms. On occasion, CT may suggest the specific histologic nature of a thymic lesion.

  16. Computed tomography in intracranial supratentorial osteochondroma

    SciTech Connect

    Matz, S.; Israeli, Y.; Shalit, M.N.; Cohen, M.L.

    1981-02-01

    A case of a huge intracranial frontoparietal osteochondroma in a 20-year-old man is reported. The presenting symptoms were headache, vomiting, and blurred vision. Apart from papilledema, no other abnormal neurological signs were present. A specific preoperative diagnosis could not be reached from the information provided by plain skull films, angiography, and radionuclide scan. The findings on computed tomography were those of a high density mass interspersed with small foci of lower densities, producing a honeycomb appearance, and surrounded by deposits of nodular calcification. The postcontrast scan showed a moderate degree of enhancement with preservation of the precontrast honeycomb pattern. These particular features may enable a correct preoperative histological diagnosis to be offered with a high degree of probability.

  17. Computed tomography of osteosarcoma after intraarterial chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shirkhoda, A.; Jaffe, N.; Wallace, S.; Ayala, A.; Lindell, M.M.; Zornoza, J.

    1985-01-01

    The response to intraarterial cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II (CDP) chemotherapy was evaluated by computed tomography (CT) in 33 patients with pathologically proved osteosarcoma of the long or flat bones. Twenty-one of the 33 patients had a CT scan before chemotherapy was started. In the other 12 patients, a CT scan was obtained after at least two courses of treatment, and additional studies were performed during the course of therapy. In those patients responding to treatment, the posttherapy scan revealed a remarkable decrease or complete disappearance of the associated soft-tissue mass and clear reestablishment of the fat planes between the muscle bundles that had been obscured. There was sharp definition of the peripheral margins of the calcified healing neoplasm, and the calcification in the healing tumor could be differentiated easily from that of the original bone neoplasm. CT was more accurate than conventional studies in detecting healing process and diagnosis of remission.

  18. Myocardial hypoperfusion on conventional contrast computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ching, Shing; Chung, Tak Shun

    2015-10-01

    Non–electrocardiogram (ECG)–gated contrast computed tomography (CT) is commonly performed to exclude aortic dissection in chest pain patients. Besides evaluating the aorta for dissection flap, attention should be paid to the myocardium for areas of hypoenhancement that may suggest ischemia. Current models of multidetector CT enable assessment of myocardial perfusion with minimal motion artifact even without ECG gating. Transmural hypoenhancement with preserved wall thickness in a coronary distribution is highly specific for acute myocardial infarction. We report 2 cases of acute chest pain with initial nondiagnostic studies that underwent CT aortogram to exclude dissection. Instead, the CT showed myocardial hypoenhancement in left anterior descending artery territory. Myocardial hypoenhancement occurred before ST-segment elevation on ECG, suggesting that recognition of this important finding may lead to earlier revascularization decisions. PMID:26321167

  19. Method and device for computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Lux, P.W.; Op De Beek, J.C.A.; Van Leiden, H.F.

    1983-09-06

    A computer tomography device in which the detectors are asymmetrically arranged with respect to the connecting line between the X-ray source, the center of rotation of the source, and the detectors is disclosed. The detector device produces an incomplete profile of measuring values which are supplemented with ''zeros'' during processing in order to form a number of measuring values of a complete profile. In order to avoid artefacts which are produced by the acute transients between measuring values and ''zeros'', a number of measuring values adjoining the acute transients are projected around the center of rotation and multipled by a factor so that from the zeros a smoothly increasing series of adapted measuring values is obtained.

  20. Computed tomography on small explosive parts

    SciTech Connect

    Ryon, R.W.

    1994-05-01

    We have investigated three small explosive parts for the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas using computed tomography (CT). A medium resolution, fan beam system was used to test imaging capabilities for small holes drilled into one of the parts, and to identify any inhomogeneities, cracks, voids, and inclusions if present in the other two parts. This system provides volumetric imaging. Its information is qualitative in that is allows us to see interior features but it cannot provide quantitative attenuation data. A second part of the investigation was to perform effective atomic number computed tomography on the parts using energy dispersive spectroscopy methods. We wanted to experimentally identify the {open_quotes}average{close_quotes} chemical composition of the materials in the explosive and its shell and to detect any possible inhomogeneities in composition. A single beam, nuclear spectroscopy based system was used for this work. The radiation source was a silver anode x-ray tube. By measuring x-ray attenuation at specific energies (characteristic lines and narrow bands of continuum) we are able to quantitatively determine linear attenuation coefficients. By using ratios of such measurements, density cancels out and we effectively have ratios of mass attenuation coefficients. Through a look-up scheme of mass attenuation coefficients for different elements, we can determine the weighted average chemical composition, as averaged by x-ray attenuation. We call this averaged composition the effective atomic number ({open_quotes}Z{sub eff}{close_quotes}). We thereby obtain cross sectional images of a parameter related to the averaged chemistry of the object. Such images and the underlying data can reveal, for instance, segregation of explosive and binder.

  1. Depiction of ventriculoperitoneal shunt obstruction with single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Sabire Yılmaz; Vatankulu, Betül; Uslu, Lebriz; Halac, Metin

    2016-01-01

    An 83-year-old male patient with ventriculoperitoneal shunt underwent radionuclide shunt study using single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) to evaluate the shunt patency. The planar images showed activity at the cranial region and spinal canal but no significant activity at the peritoneal cavity. However, SPECT/CT images clearly demonstrated accumulation of activity at the superior part of bifurcation level with no activity at the distal end of shunt as well as no spilling of radiotracer into the peritoneal cavity indicating shunt obstruction. SPECT/CT makes the interpretation of radionuclide shunt study more accurate and easier as compared with traditional planar images. PMID:27385906

  2. 21 CFR 892.1200 - Emission computed tomography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Emission computed tomography system. 892.1200 Section 892.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1200 Emission computed tomography system. (a) Identification. An...

  3. 21 CFR 1020.33 - Computed tomography (CT) equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Computed tomography (CT) equipment. 1020.33 Section 1020.33 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH PERFORMANCE STANDARDS FOR IONIZING RADIATION EMITTING PRODUCTS § 1020.33 Computed tomography (CT) equipment....

  4. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance findings in lipoid pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Bréchot, J M; Buy, J N; Laaban, J P; Rochemaure, J

    1991-01-01

    A case of exogenous lipoid pneumonia was documented by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Although strongly suggesting the presence of fat on T1 weighted images, magnetic resonance does not produce images specific for this condition. Computed tomography is the best imaging modality for its diagnosis. Images PMID:1750024

  5. Terahertz Computed Tomography of NASA Thermal Protection System Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Reyes-Rodriguez, S.; Zimdars, D. A.; Rauser, R. W.; Ussery, W. W.

    2011-01-01

    A terahertz axial computed tomography system has been developed that uses time domain measurements in order to form cross-sectional image slices and three-dimensional volume renderings of terahertz-transparent materials. The system can inspect samples as large as 0.0283 cubic meters (1 cubic foot) with no safety concerns as for x-ray computed tomography. In this study, the system is evaluated for its ability to detect and characterize flat bottom holes, drilled holes, and embedded voids in foam materials utilized as thermal protection on the external fuel tanks for the Space Shuttle. X-ray micro-computed tomography was also performed on the samples to compare against the terahertz computed tomography results and better define embedded voids. Limits of detectability based on depth and size for the samples used in this study are loosely defined. Image sharpness and morphology characterization ability for terahertz computed tomography are qualitatively described.

  6. Combined use of computed tomography and the lattice-Boltzmann method to investigate the influence of pore geometry of porous media on the permeability tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Striblet, J. C.; Rush, L.; Floyd, M.; Porter, M. L.; Al-Raoush, R. I.

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the impact of pore geometry of porous media on the permeability tensor. High-resolution, three-dimensional maps of natural sand systems, comprising a range of grain sizes and shapes were obtained using Synchrotron microtomography. The lattice-Boltzmann (LB) method was used to simulate saturated flow through these packs to characterize the impact of particle shape on the permeability tensor. LB computations of permeability tensor and their dependency on the internal structure of porous media will be presented and discussed.

  7. Enhancement of photoacoustic tomography in the tissue with speed-of-sound variance using ultrasound computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ren-Xiang; Chao, Tao; Xiao-Jun, Liu

    2015-11-01

    The speed-of-sound variance will decrease the imaging quality of photoacoustic tomography in acoustically inhomogeneous tissue. In this study, ultrasound computed tomography is combined with photoacoustic tomography to enhance the photoacoustic tomography in this situation. The speed-of-sound information is recovered by ultrasound computed tomography. Then, an improved delay-and-sum method is used to reconstruct the image from the photoacoustic signals. The simulation results validate that the proposed method can obtain a better photoacoustic tomography than the conventional method when the speed-of-sound variance is increased. In addition, the influences of the speed-of-sound variance and the fan-angle on the image quality are quantitatively explored to optimize the image scheme. The proposed method has a good performance even when the speed-of-sound variance reaches 14.2%. Furthermore, an optimized fan angle is revealed, which can keep the good image quality with a low cost of hardware. This study has a potential value in extending the biomedical application of photoacoustic tomography. Projection supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921504), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11422439, 11274167, and 11274171), and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education, China (Grant No. 20120091110001).

  8. Texture classification of lung computed tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pheng, Hang See; Shamsuddin, Siti M.

    2013-03-01

    Current development of algorithms in computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme is growing rapidly to assist the radiologist in medical image interpretation. Texture analysis of computed tomography (CT) scans is one of important preliminary stage in the computerized detection system and classification for lung cancer. Among different types of images features analysis, Haralick texture with variety of statistical measures has been used widely in image texture description. The extraction of texture feature values is essential to be used by a CAD especially in classification of the normal and abnormal tissue on the cross sectional CT images. This paper aims to compare experimental results using texture extraction and different machine leaning methods in the classification normal and abnormal tissues through lung CT images. The machine learning methods involve in this assessment are Artificial Immune Recognition System (AIRS), Naive Bayes, Decision Tree (J48) and Backpropagation Neural Network. AIRS is found to provide high accuracy (99.2%) and sensitivity (98.0%) in the assessment. For experiments and testing purpose, publicly available datasets in the Reference Image Database to Evaluate Therapy Response (RIDER) are used as study cases.

  9. Computed Tomography in Diagnosis of Admantinoma

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Akansha; Misra, Deepankar; Rai, Shalu; Panjwani, Sapna; Ranjan, Vikash; Prabhat, Mukul; Bhalla, Kanika; Bhatnagar, Puneet

    2015-01-01

    Context: Admantinoma is second most common benign odontogenic tumor which clinically appears as an aggressive odontogenic tumor, often asymptomatic and slow growing, associated with symptoms such as swelling, dental malocclusion, pain, and paresthesia of the affected area. The radiographic appearance may vary from unilocular to multilocular radiolucencies, imparting a characteristic honey comb, soap bubble appearance or may resemble a caricature of spider. Case Report: This report highlights the importance of conventional and advanced imaging in the diagnosis of large and invasive lesions. Patient reported with complaint of swelling in jaw, which progressively increased; and was found to be bony hard, both intra- and extraorally. Radiographs revealed large multilocular radiolucency on left body and ramus of mandible with soap bubble pattern and knife edged root resorption. Computed tomographic examination evaluated the extent of the lesion, internal structure, and relation to adjacent structures; further a reconstructed image was obtained to evaluate extent of destruction in three dimensions. Conclusion: Computed tomography has an important role in the diagnosis and treatment planning is imperative as it is superior in revealing the cortical destruction and extension into the neighboring soft tissues than conventional radiography. PMID:26110136

  10. Combining Personality Traits with Traditional Risk Factors for Coronary Stenosis: An Artificial Neural Networks Solution in Patients with Computed Tomography Detected Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Grossi, Enzo; Buscema, Massimo; Mao, Xia; Faletra, Francesco; Pasotti, Elena; Moccetti, Tiziano; Mommersteeg, Paula M. C.; Auricchio, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Background. Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a complex, multifactorial disease in which personality seems to play a role but with no definition in combination with other risk factors. Objective. To explore the nonlinear and simultaneous pathways between traditional and personality traits risk factors and coronary stenosis by Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) data mining analysis. Method. Seventy-five subjects were examined for traditional cardiac risk factors and personality traits. Analyses were based on a new data mining method using a particular artificial adaptive system, the autocontractive map (AutoCM). Results. Several traditional Cardiovascular Risk Factors (CRF) present significant relations with coronary artery plaque (CAP) presence or severity. Moreover, anger turns out to be the main factor of personality for CAP in connection with numbers of traditional risk factors. Hidden connection map showed that anger, hostility, and the Type D personality subscale social inhibition are the core factors related to the traditional cardiovascular risk factors (CRF) specifically by hypertension. Discussion. This study shows a nonlinear and simultaneous pathway between traditional risk factors and personality traits associated with coronary stenosis in CAD patients without history of cardiovascular disease. In particular, anger seems to be the main personality factor for CAP in addition to traditional risk factors. PMID:24198964

  11. Treatment of vertebral body compression fractures using percutaneous kyphoplasty guided by a combination of computed tomography and C-arm fluoroscopy with finger-touch guidance to determine the needle entry point.

    PubMed

    Wang, G Y; Zhang, C C; Ren, K; Zhang, P P; Liu, C H; Zheng, Z A; Chen, Y; Fang, R

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the results and complications of image-guided percutaneous kyphoplasty (PKP) using computed tomography (CT) and C-arm fluoroscopy, with finger-touch guidance to determine the needle entry point. Of the 86 patients (106 PKP) examined, 56 were treated for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures and 30 for vertebral tumors. All patients underwent image-guided treatment using CT and conventional fluoroscopy, with finger-touch identification of a puncture point within a small incision (1.5 to 2 cm). Partial or complete pain relief was achieved in 98% of patients within 24 h of treatment. Moreover, a significant improvement in functional mobility and reduction in analgesic use was observed. CT allowed the detection of cement leakage in 20.7% of the interventions. No bone cement leakages with neurologic symptoms were noted. All work channels were made only once, and bone cement was distributed near the center of the vertebral body. Our study confirms the efficacy of PKP treatment in osteoporotic and oncological patients. The combination of CT and C-arm fluoroscopy with finger-touch guidance reduces the risk of complications compared with conventional fluoroscopy alone, facilitates the detection of minor cement leakage, improves the operative procedure, and results in a favorable bone cement distribution. PMID:25867298

  12. The role of single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography in benign and malignant bone disease.

    PubMed

    Horger, Marius; Bares, Roland

    2006-10-01

    Radiological (plain radiographs, computed tomography [CT], magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) and nuclear medicine methods (bone scan, leukocyte scan) both provide unique information about the status of the skeleton. Both have typical strengths and weaknesses, which often lead to the sequential use of different procedures in daily routine. This use causes the unnecessary loss of time and sometimes money, if redundant information is obtained without establishing a final diagnosis. Recently, new devices for hybrid imaging (single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography [SPECT/CT], positron emission tomography/computed tomography [PET/CT]) were introduced, which allow for direct fusion of morphological (CT) and functional (SPECT, PET) data sets. With regard to skeletal abnormalities, this approach appears to be extremely useful because it combines the advantages of both techniques (high-resolution imaging of bone morphology and high sensitivity imaging of bone metabolism). By the accurate correlation of both, a new quality of bone imaging has now become accessible. Although researchers undertaking the initial studies exclusively used low-dose CT equipment, a new generation of SPECT/CT devices has emerged recently. By integrating high-resolution spiral CT, quality of bone imaging may improve once more. Ongoing prospective studies will have to show whether completely new diagnostic algorithms will come up for classification of bone disease as a consequence of this development. Besides, the role of ultrasonography and MRI for bone and soft-tissue imaging also will have to be re-evaluated. Looking at the final aim of all imaging techniques--to achieve correct diagnosis in a fast, noninvasive, comprehensive, and inexpensive way--we are now on the edge of a new era of multimodality imaging that will probably change the paths and structure of medicine in many ways. Presently, hybrid imaging using SPECT/CT has been proven to increase sensitivity and specificity

  13. Dedicated breast computed tomography: Basic aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Sarno, Antonio; Mettivier, Giovanni Russo, Paolo

    2015-06-15

    X-ray mammography of the compressed breast is well recognized as the “gold standard” for early detection of breast cancer, but its performance is not ideal. One limitation of screening mammography is tissue superposition, particularly for dense breasts. Since 2001, several research groups in the USA and in the European Union have developed computed tomography (CT) systems with digital detector technology dedicated to x-ray imaging of the uncompressed breast (breast CT or BCT) for breast cancer screening and diagnosis. This CT technology—tracing back to initial studies in the 1970s—allows some of the limitations of mammography to be overcome, keeping the levels of radiation dose to the radiosensitive breast glandular tissue similar to that of two-view mammography for the same breast size and composition. This paper presents an evaluation of the research efforts carried out in the invention, development, and improvement of BCT with dedicated scanners with state-of-the-art technology, including initial steps toward commercialization, after more than a decade of R and D in the laboratory and/or in the clinic. The intended focus here is on the technological/engineering aspects of BCT and on outlining advantages and limitations as reported in the related literature. Prospects for future research in this field are discussed.

  14. Intraperitoneal tuberculous abscess: Computed tomography features

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Peng; Chen, Jing-Jing; Wang, Xi-Zhen; Wang, Ya-Qin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the computed tomography (CT) features of intraperitoneal tuberculous abscess (IPTA). METHODS: Eight patients with IPTA confirmed by pathology were analyzed retrospectively. The clinical symptoms, medical images, and surgical findings were evaluated. Involvement of the intestine, peritoneum, viscera, and lymph nodes was also assessed. RESULTS: All 8 patients had a history of abdominal discomfort for 1 to 6 mo. Physical examination revealed a palpable abdominal mass in 6 patients. Three patients had no evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). All IPTAs (11 abscesses) were seen as a multiseptated, peripherally enhanced, hypodense mass with enlarged, rim-enhanced lymph nodes. The largest abscess diameter ranged from 4.5 cm to 12.2 cm. CT showed 2 types of IPTA: Lymph node fusion and encapsulation. Of the 8 patients, one had liver tuberculosis and one had splenic and ovarian tuberculosis. Two cases showed involvement of the terminal ileum and ileocecal junction. Ascites were found in 4 cases. Three patients had peritonitis and mesenteritis. Three patients showed involvement of the omentum. Three patients had histological evidence of caseating granuloma, and 5 had histological evidence of acid-fast bacilli. CONCLUSION: CT is crucial in the detection and characterization of IPTA. Certain CT findings are necessary for correct diagnosis. PMID:26435779

  15. Portable Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-11-01

    This user manual describes the function and use of the portable digital radiography and computed tomography (DRCT) scanner. The manual gives a general overview of x-ray imaging systems along with a description of the DRCT system. An inventory of the all the system components, organized by shipping container, is also included. In addition, detailed, step-by-step procedures are provided for all of the exercises necessary for a novice user to successfully collect digital radiographs and tomographic images of an object, including instructions on system assembly and detector calibration and system alignment. There is also a short section covering the limited system care and maintenance needs. Descriptions of the included software packages, the DRCT Digital Imager used for system operation, and the DRCT Image Processing Interface used for image viewing and tomographic data reconstruction are given in the appendixes. The appendixes also include a cheat sheet for more experienced users, a listing of known system problems and how to mitigate them, and an inventory check-off sheet suitable for copying and including with the machine for shipment purposes.

  16. Shape threat detection via adaptive computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoudi, Ahmad; Thamvichai, Ratchaneekorn; Neifeld, Mark A.

    2016-05-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is used widely for screening purposes. Conventional x-ray threat detection systems employ image reconstruction and segmentation algorithms prior to making threat/no-threat decisions. We find that in many cases these pre-processing steps can degrade detection performance. Therefore in this work we will investigate methods that operate directly on the CT measurements. We analyze a fixed-gantry system containing 25 x-ray sources and 2200 photon counting detectors. We present a new method for improving threat detection performance. This new method is a so-called greedy adaptive algorithm which at each time step uses information from previous measurements to design the next measurement. We utilize sequential hypothesis testing (SHT) in order to derive both the optimal "next measurement" and the stopping criterion to insure a target probability of error Pe. We find that selecting the next x-ray source according to such a greedy adaptive algorithm, we can reduce Pe by a factor of 42.4× relative to the conventional measurement sequence employing all 25 sources in sequence.

  17. Beam Hardening Corrections in Quantitative Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Vedula, Venumadhav; Venugopal, Manoharan; Raghu, C.; Pandey, Pramod

    2007-03-21

    Volumetric computed tomography (VCT) is the emerging 3D NDE inspection technique that gives highest throughput and better image quality. Industrial components in general demands higher x-ray energy for inspection for which polychromatic x-ray sources are used in common. Polychromatic nature of the x-rays gives rise to non-linear effects in the VCT projection data measurements called to be the beam hardening (BH) effects. BH produces prominent artifacts in the reconstructed images thereby deteriorating the image quality. Quantitative analysis such as density quantification, dimensional analysis etc., becomes difficult with the presence of these artifacts. This paper describes the BH correction using preprocessing technique for the homogeneous materials. Selection of effective energy at which the monoenergetic linear attenuation coefficient of a particular material equals to that of the polyenergetic beam is critical for BH correction. Various methods to determine the effective energy and their consequence in the quantitative measurements have been investigated in the present study. In this paper, BH corrections for heterogeneous materials have also been explored.

  18. Three energy computed tomography with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Menk, R.H.; Thomlinson, W.; Zhong, Z.; Charvet, A.M.; Arfelli, F. |; Chapman, L.

    1997-09-01

    Preliminary experiments for digital subtraction computed tomography (CT) at the K-edge of iodine (33.1 keV) were carried out at SMERF (Synchrotron Medical Research Facility X17B2) at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. The major goal was to evaluate the availability of this kind of imaging for in vivo neurological studies. Using the transvenous coronary angiography system, CT images of various samples and phantoms were taken simultaneously at two slightly different energies bracketing the K-absorption edge of iodine. The logarithmic subtraction of the two images resulted in the contrast enhancement of iodine filled structures. An additional CT image was taken at 99.57 keV (second harmonic of the fundamental wave). The third energy allowed the calculation of absolute iodine, tissue and bone images by means of a matrix inversion. A spatial resolution of 0.8 LP/mm was measured in single energy images and iodine concentrations down to 0.082 mg/ml in a 1/4 diameter detail were visible in the reconstructed subtraction image.

  19. A Detector for Proton Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Blazey, G.; et al.,

    2013-12-06

    Radiation therapy is a widely recognized treatment for cancer. Energetic protons have distinct features that set them apart from photons and make them desirable for cancer therapy as well as medical imaging. The clinical interest in heavy ion therapy is due to the fact that ions deposit almost all of their energy in a sharp peak – the Bragg peak- at the very end of their path. Proton beams can be used to precisely localize a tumor and deliver an exact dose to the tumor with small doses to the surrounding tissue. Proton computed tomography (pCT) provides direct information on the location on the target tumor, and avoids position uncertainty caused by treatment planning based on imaging with X-ray CT. The pCT project goal is to measure and reconstruct the proton relative stopping power distribution directly in situ. To ensure the full advantage of cancer treatment with 200 MeV proton beams, pCT must be realized.

  20. Cosine fitting radiography and computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pan-Yun; Zhang, Kai; Huang, Wan-Xia; Yuan, Qing-Xi; Wang, Yan; Ju, Zai-Qiang; Wu, Zi-Yu; Zhu, Pei-Ping

    2015-06-01

    A new method in diffraction-enhanced imaging computed tomography (DEI-CT) that follows the idea developed by Chapman et al. [Chapman D, Thomlinson W, Johnston R E, Washburn D, Pisano E, Gmur N, Zhong Z, Menk R, Arfelli F and Sayers D 1997 Phys. Med. Biol. 42 2015] in 1997 is proposed in this paper. Merged with a “reverse projections” algorithm, only two sets of projection datasets at two defined orientations of the analyzer crystal are needed to reconstruct the linear absorption coefficient, the decrement of the real part of the refractive index and the linear scattering coefficient of the sample. Not only does this method reduce the delivered dose to the sample without degrading the image quality, but, compared with the existing DEI-CT approaches, it simplifies data-acquisition procedures. Experimental results confirm the reliability of this new method for DEI-CT applications. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB825800), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11205189, 11375225, and U1332109), the Knowledge Innovation Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant Nos. KJCX2-YW-N42, Y4545320Y2, and 542014IHEPZZBS50659).

  1. Computed tomography imaging and angiography - principles.

    PubMed

    Kamalian, Shervin; Lev, Michael H; Gupta, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of patients with diverse neurologic disorders was forever changed in the summer of 1973, when the first commercial computed tomography (CT) scanners were introduced. Until then, the detection and characterization of intracranial or spinal lesions could only be inferred by limited spatial resolution radioisotope scans, or by the patterns of tissue and vascular displacement on invasive pneumoencaphalography and direct carotid puncture catheter arteriography. Even the earliest-generation CT scanners - which required tens of minutes for the acquisition and reconstruction of low-resolution images (128×128 matrix) - could, based on density, noninvasively distinguish infarct, hemorrhage, and other mass lesions with unprecedented accuracy. Iodinated, intravenous contrast added further sensitivity and specificity in regions of blood-brain barrier breakdown. The advent of rapid multidetector row CT scanning in the early 1990s created renewed enthusiasm for CT, with CT angiography largely replacing direct catheter angiography. More recently, iterative reconstruction postprocessing techniques have made possible high spatial resolution, reduced noise, very low radiation dose CT scanning. The speed, spatial resolution, contrast resolution, and low radiation dose capability of present-day scanners have also facilitated dual-energy imaging which, like magnetic resonance imaging, for the first time, has allowed tissue-specific CT imaging characterization of intracranial pathology. PMID:27432657

  2. Industrial computed tomography image size measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Chen; Jin-Xiao, Pan; Bin, Liu

    2009-09-01

    As one of the most useful modern detection technologies, Industrial Computed Tomography (ICT) image size measurement can correctly non-destructively measure the size of workpieces' inner construction, and it is considered as the standard for quality assurance and reverse engineering. In view of the advantages and disadvantages compared to conventional methods, this paper improves the precision of image size measurement with a new algorithm that uses an approximate function to describe edge degradation. First, this algorithm constructs the approximate function and determines the optimal point of edge detection, based on image intensity and inflexions. Then, in order to accurately extract the image edge, this algorithm is used to revise the primary image, completing construction of the CT image. Excellent results are obtained from simulations and experiments. The experimental results indicate that the relative error is 2% for the CT image when the step evolution of the image edge is pooled. The relative error of this method is decreased by as much as 1.5% compared to wavelet transformation and ridgelet transformation. Therefore, this new algorithm demonstrates increased effectiveness in extracting an accurate measurement of the CT image edge.

  3. Perfusion computed tomography in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Das, Chandan J; Thingujam, Usha; Panda, Ananya; Sharma, Sanjay; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2015-07-28

    Various imaging modalities are available for the diagnosis, staging and response evaluation of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). While contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT) is used as the standard of imaging for size, morphological evaluation and response assessment in RCC, a new functional imaging technique like perfusion CT (pCT), goes down to the molecular level and provides new perspectives in imaging of RCC. pCT depicts regional tumor perfusion and vascular permeability which are indirect parameters of tumor angiogenesis and thereby provides vital information regarding tumor microenvironment. Also response evaluation using pCT may predate the size criteria used in Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, as changes in the perfusion occurs earlier following tissue kinase inhibitors before any actual change in size. This may potentially help in predicting prognosis, better selection of therapy and more accurate and better response evaluation in patients with RCC. This article describes the techniques and role of pCT in staging and response assessment in patients with RCCs. PMID:26217456

  4. Electrode Models for Electric Current Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    CHENG, KUO-SHENG; ISAACSON, DAVID; NEWELL, J. C.; GISSER, DAVID G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper develops a mathematical model for the physical properties of electrodes suitable for use in electric current computed tomography (ECCT). The model includes the effects of discretization, shunt, and contact impedance. The complete model was validated by experiment. Bath resistivities of 284.0, 139.7, 62.3, 29.5 Ω · cm were studied. Values of “effective” contact impedance z used in the numerical approximations were 58.0, 35.0, 15.0, and 7.5 Ω · cm2, respectively. Agreement between the calculated and experimentally measured values was excellent throughout the range of bath conductivities studied. It is desirable in electrical impedance imaging systems to model the observed voltages to the same precision as they are measured in order to be able to make the highest resolution reconstructions of the internal conductivity that the measurement precision allows. The complete electrode model, which includes the effects of discretization of the current pattern, the shunt effect due to the highly conductive electrode material, and the effect of an “effective” contact impedance, allows calculation of the voltages due to any current pattern applied to a homogeneous resistivity field. PMID:2777280

  5. Quantitative investigations of megavoltage computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Myron; Kerr, Andrew; Salomons, Greg; Schreiner, L. John

    2005-04-01

    Megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) has been an active area of research and development in image guided radiation therapy. We have been investigating a particular implementation of MVCT in conjunction with studies of the potential for tomotherapy with a Cobalt-60 radiation source. In this paper, we present results comparing MVCT using a Co-60 source and a 4 MV linear accelerator to conventional kVCT imaging. The Co-60 and linac MVCT measurements were obtained with a first generation benchtop CT imager; the KVCT measurements were obtained using a Philips AcQSim CT Simulator). Phantoms containing various inserts ranging in density from air, through lung, soft tissue and bone equivalent materials and extending to high atomic number metals were imaged with the three modalities. The results enable characterization of image artifacts, CT number linearity and beam hardening. The MVCT images have sufficient contrast that soft tissue regions with 2.8% difference in electron density can be visualized. In MVCT, a linear relationship between CT numbers and electron densities extends to materials with Z ~ 60. In the 4MV CT imaging there is a position dependence of the CT numbers within a uniform water phantom, which is absent in Co-60 CT images, indicating the presence of beam hardening artifacts in the linac MVCT images. The differences between kVCT and MVCT will be discussed considering the variation of the photon interactions dominating the images. Our investigations indicate that MVCT has properties that may potentially extend its utility beyond radiation therapy.

  6. Modelling the penumbra in Computed Tomography1

    PubMed Central

    Kueh, Audrey; Warnett, Jason M.; Gibbons, Gregory J.; Brettschneider, Julia; Nichols, Thomas E.; Williams, Mark A.; Kendall, Wilfrid S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In computed tomography (CT), the spot geometry is one of the main sources of error in CT images. Since X-rays do not arise from a point source, artefacts are produced. In particular there is a penumbra effect, leading to poorly defined edges within a reconstructed volume. Penumbra models can be simulated given a fixed spot geometry and the known experimental setup. OBJECTIVE: This paper proposes to use a penumbra model, derived from Beer’s law, both to confirm spot geometry from penumbra data, and to quantify blurring in the image. METHODS: Two models for the spot geometry are considered; one consists of a single Gaussian spot, the other is a mixture model consisting of a Gaussian spot together with a larger uniform spot. RESULTS: The model consisting of a single Gaussian spot has a poor fit at the boundary. The mixture model (which adds a larger uniform spot) exhibits a much improved fit. The parameters corresponding to the uniform spot are similar across all powers, and further experiments suggest that the uniform spot produces only soft X-rays of relatively low-energy. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, the precision of radiographs can be estimated from the penumbra effect in the image. The use of a thin copper filter reduces the size of the effective penumbra. PMID:27232198

  7. Computed tomography experiments of Pantex high explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, D. E.; Martz, H. E.; Hester, L. O.; Sobczak, G.; Pratt, C. L.

    1992-04-01

    X-ray computed tomography is an advanced imaging technique which provide three-dimensional nondestructive characterization of materials, components and assemblies. The CT Project group at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the Pantex Plant are cooperating to examine the use of CT technology to inspect and characterize high-explosives pressings (e.g., PBX-9502, LX-10-2). High-explosives pressings manufactured by Pantex must be characterized prior to assembling into weapons systems; a nondestructive examination of all assembly parts would be preferable to the current sampling and destructive testing. The earlier in the processing cycle this can be done the more cost effective it will be. We have performed experiments that show that this characterization can be performed at the pressed billet stage using CT. We have detected 2-mm inclusions in a 15-cm diameter billet and 3.5-mm voids in a 20-cm diameter billet. Based on these results we show calculations that can be used to design production CT systems for characterization of high-explosives.

  8. Important Advances in Technology and Unique Applications to Cardiovascular Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chaikriangkrai, Kongkiat; Choi, Su Yeon; Nabi, Faisal; Chang, Su Min

    2014-01-01

    For the past decade, multidetector cardiac computed tomography and its main application, coronary computed tomography angiography, have been established as a noninvasive technique for anatomical assessment of coronary arteries. This new era of coronary artery evaluation by coronary computed tomography angiography has arisen from the rapid advancement in computed tomography technology, which has led to massive diagnostic and prognostic clinical studies in various patient populations. This article gives a brief overview of current multidetector cardiac computed tomography systems, developing cardiac computed tomography technologies in both hardware and software fields, innovative radiation exposure reduction measures, multidetector cardiac computed tomography functional studies, and their newer clinical applications beyond coronary computed tomography angiography. PMID:25574342

  9. Important advances in technology and unique applications to cardiovascular computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Chaikriangkrai, Kongkiat; Choi, Su Yeon; Nabi, Faisal; Chang, Su Min

    2014-01-01

    For the past decade, multidetector cardiac computed tomography and its main application, coronary computed tomography angiography, have been established as a noninvasive technique for anatomical assessment of coronary arteries. This new era of coronary artery evaluation by coronary computed tomography angiography has arisen from the rapid advancement in computed tomography technology, which has led to massive diagnostic and prognostic clinical studies in various patient populations. This article gives a brief overview of current multidetector cardiac computed tomography systems, developing cardiac computed tomography technologies in both hardware and software fields, innovative radiation exposure reduction measures, multidetector cardiac computed tomography functional studies, and their newer clinical applications beyond coronary computed tomography angiography. PMID:25574342

  10. Acute Calculous Cholecystitis Missed on Computed Tomography and Ultrasound but Diagnosed with Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Aparici, Carina Mari; Win, Aung Zaw

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 69-year-old patient who underwent ascending aortic aneurysm repair with aortic valve replacement. On postsurgical day 12, he developed leukocytosis and low-grade fevers. The chest computed tomography (CT) showed a periaortic hematoma which represents a postsurgical change from aortic aneurysm repair, and a small pericardial effusion. The abdominal ultrasound showed cholelithiasis without any sign of cholecystitis. Finally, a fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/CT examination was ordered to find the cause of fever of unknown origin, and it showed increased FDG uptake in the gallbladder wall, with no uptake in the lumen. FDG-PET/CT can diagnose acute cholecystitis in patients with nonspecific clinical symptoms and laboratory results. PMID:27625897

  11. Acute Calculous Cholecystitis Missed on Computed Tomography and Ultrasound but Diagnosed with Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Aparici, Carina Mari; Win, Aung Zaw

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 69-year-old patient who underwent ascending aortic aneurysm repair with aortic valve replacement. On postsurgical day 12, he developed leukocytosis and low-grade fevers. The chest computed tomography (CT) showed a periaortic hematoma which represents a postsurgical change from aortic aneurysm repair, and a small pericardial effusion. The abdominal ultrasound showed cholelithiasis without any sign of cholecystitis. Finally, a fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/CT examination was ordered to find the cause of fever of unknown origin, and it showed increased FDG uptake in the gallbladder wall, with no uptake in the lumen. FDG-PET/CT can diagnose acute cholecystitis in patients with nonspecific clinical symptoms and laboratory results. PMID:27625897

  12. Diagnosis of sacral perineural cysts by computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Tabas, J H; Deeb, Z L

    1986-07-01

    Three cases of sacral perineural cysts associated with chronic low-back pain are described with their myelography, computed tomography, and plain film findings. Significant findings include multiple cystic dilatations of lumbosacral nerve root sheaths, enlargement of the sacral foramina by masses isodense with cerebrospinal fluid, and asymmetric epidural fat distribution. Recognition of these findings on unenhanced computed tomography scans should preclude further evaluation by myelography and intrathecal metrizamide (Amipaque) computed tomography. These cysts are usually not the primary cause of back and leg pain. PMID:2942338

  13. Abdominal alterations in disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis: computed tomography findings*

    PubMed Central

    Vermelho, Marli Batista Fernandes; Correia, Ademir Silva; Michailowsky, Tânia Cibele de Almeida; Suzart, Elizete Kazumi Kuniyoshi; Ibanês, Aline Santos; Almeida, Lanamar Aparecida; Khoury, Zarifa; Barba, Mário Flores

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the incidence and spectrum of abdominal computed tomography imaging findings in patients with paracoccidioidomycosis. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of abdominal computed tomography images of 26 patients with disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis. Results Abnormal abdominal tomographic findings were observed in 18 patients (69.2%), while no significant finding was observed in the other 8 (30.8%) patients. Conclusion Computed tomography has demonstrated to play a relevant role in the screening and detection of abdominal abnormalities in patients with disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:25987748

  14. Non-uniform projection angle processing in computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simo, Yanic; Tayag, Tristan J.

    In this paper, we present a novel approach for the collection of computed tomography data. Non-uniform increments in projection angle may be used to reduce data acquisition time with minimal reduction in the accuracy of the reconstructed profile. The key is to exploit those projection angles which correspond to regions where the object contains few high spatial frequency components. This technique is applicable to optical phase computed tomography, as well as X-ray computed tomography. We present simulation results on intraocular lenses used in cataract surgery.

  15. The Role of Dual-Time Combined 18-Fluorideoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography and Computed Tomography in the Staging and Restaging Workup of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer, Treated With Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy and Radical Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Capirci, Carlo Rubello, Domenico; Pasini, Felice; Galeotti, Fabrizio; Bianchini, Enzo; Del Favero, Giuseppe; Panzavolta, Riccardo; Crepaldi, Giorgio; Rampin, Lucia; Facci, Enzo; Gava, Marcello; Banti, Elena; Marano, Gianfranco

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: In patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) staging and, after preoperative chemo-radiation therapy (CRT), restaging workup could be useful to tailor therapeutic approaches. Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([{sup 18}F]FDG-PET) is a promising tool for monitoring the effect of antitumor therapy. This study was aimed to evaluate the possible role of dual time sequential FDG-PET scans in the staging and restaging workup of LARC. Methods and Materials: Eighty-seven consecutive patients with LARC were enrolled. CRT consisted of external-beam intensified radiotherapy (concurrent boost), with concomitant chemotherapy PVI 5-FU (300mg/m{sup 2}/day) followed 8-10 weeks later by surgery. All patients underwent [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET/CT before and 5-6 weeks later after the completion of CRT. Measurements of FDG uptake (SUV{sub max}), and percentage of SUV{sub max} difference (Response Index = RI) between pre- and post-CRT [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET scans were evaluated. Results: Six of 87 patients were excluded due to protocol deviation. Following CRT, 40/81 patients (49%) were classified as responders according to Mandard's criteria (TRG1-2). The mean pre-CRT SUV{sub max} was significantly higher than post-CRT (15.8, vs 5.9; p < 0.001). The mean RI was significantly higher in responders than in nonresponder patients (71.3% vs 38%; p = 0.0038). Using a RI cut-off of 65% for defining response to therapy, the following parameters have been obtained: 84.5% sensitivity, 80% specificity, 81.4% positive predictive value, 84.2% negative predictive value, and 81% overall accuracy. Conclusion: These results suggest the potential role of [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET in the restaging workup after preoperative CRT in LARC. RI seems the best predictor to identify CRT response.

  16. Cardiac computed tomography in patients with acute chest pain.

    PubMed

    Nieman, Koen; Hoffmann, Udo

    2015-04-14

    The efficient and reliable evaluation of patients with acute chest pain is one of the most challenging tasks in the emergency department. Coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography may play a major role, since it permits ruling out coronary artery disease with high accuracy if performed with expertise in properly selected and prepared patients. Several randomized trials have established early cardiac CT as a viable safe and potentially more efficient alternative to functional testing in the evaluation of acute chest pain. Ongoing investigations explore whether advanced anatomic and functional assessments such as high-risk coronary plaque, resting myocardial perfusion, and left ventricular function, or the simulation of the fractional coronary flow reserve will add information to the anatomic assessment for stenosis, which would allow expanding the benefits of cardiac CT from triage to treatment decisions. Especially, the combination of high-sensitive troponins and coronary computed tomography angiography may play a valuable role in future strategies for the management of patients presenting with acute chest pain. PMID:25687351

  17. Quantitative features in the computed tomography of healthy lungs.

    PubMed Central

    Fromson, B H; Denison, D M

    1988-01-01

    This study set out to determine whether quantitative features of lung computed tomography scans could be identified that would lead to a tightly defined normal range for use in assessing patients. Fourteen normal subjects with apparently healthy lungs were studied. A technique was developed for rapid and automatic extraction of lung field data from the computed tomography scans. The Hounsfield unit histograms were constructed and, when normalised for predicted lung volumes, shown to be consistent in shape for all the subjects. A three dimensional presentation of the data in the form of a "net plot" was devised, and from this a logarithmic relationship between the area of each lung slice and its mean density was derived (r = 0.9, n = 545, p less than 0.0001). The residual density, calculated as the difference between measured density and density predicted from the relationship with area, was shown to be normally distributed with a mean of 0 and a standard deviation of 25 Hounsfield units (chi 2 test: p less than 0.05). A presentation combining this residual density with the net plot is described. PMID:3353883

  18. Signal transport in Computed Tomography detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heismann, B. J.; Bätz, L.; Pham-Gia, K.; Metzger, W.; Niederlöhner, D.; Wirth, S.

    2008-06-01

    In Computed Tomography (CT) X-ray intensities are measured by large-scale solid-state detectors. The standard set-up comprises a scintillator pixel array attached to a matrix of photo sensors, which in turn is read out by analog-to-digital conversion electronics. We have developed and validated a three-dimensional system model describing the cascaded system process. The first step comprises a Monte-Carlo (MC) tracking of the primary X-ray quanta energy deposition, taking into account the relevant fluorescence and scattering processes. The second step models the transport of optical photons in the scintillator pixels formed by a solid-state bulk with surrounding back-scattering TiO 2 walls. In a third step the individual events are integrated to a read-out signal and analyzed for their statistical properties. The system model is verified by a comparison to optical measurements. A scintillator array is excited by a needle beam X-ray source. The emitted light field is read out by a high-resolution CCD sensor. A good agreement between simulation and experiments is found, with a typical deviation in the range of 5%. The detector response function D( E, E') is used to quantify the spectral behavior. It yields the probability to measure an energy E' for an incoming quantum energy E. We calculate the expected energy < E'( E)> and link the deviations from proportionality in E to properties of the signal transport. Finally the impact of the signal transport statistics on the output signal-to-noise ratio is analyzed.

  19. Dose in x-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalender, Willi A.

    2014-02-01

    Radiation dose in x-ray computed tomography (CT) has become a topic of high interest due to the increasing numbers of CT examinations performed worldwide. This review aims to present an overview of current concepts for both scanner output metrics and for patient dosimetry and will comment on their strengths and weaknesses. Controversial issues such as the appropriateness of the CT dose index (CTDI) are discussed in detail. A review of approaches to patient dose assessment presently in practice, of the dose levels encountered and options for further dose optimization are also given and discussed. Patient dose assessment remains a topic for further improvement and for international consensus. All approaches presently in use are based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Estimates for effective dose are established, but they are crude and not patient-specific; organ dose estimates are rarely available. Patient- and organ-specific dose estimates can be provided with adequate accuracy and independent of CTDI phantom measurements by fast MC simulations. Such information, in particular on 3D dose distributions, is important and helpful in optimization efforts. Dose optimization has been performed very successfully in recent years and even resulted in applications with effective dose values of below 1 mSv. In general, a trend towards lower dose values based on technical innovations has to be acknowledged. Effective dose values are down to clearly below 10 mSv on average, and there are a number of applications such as cardiac and pediatric CT which are performed routinely below 1 mSv on modern equipment.

  20. Predicting cancer risks from dental computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Wu, T-H; Lin, W-C; Chen, W-K; Chang, Y-C; Hwang, J-J

    2015-01-01

    Dental computed tomography (CT) has become a common tool when carrying out dental implants, yet there is little information available on its associated cancer risk. The objective of this study was to estimate the lifetime-attributable risk (LAR) of cancer incidence that is associated with the radiation dose from dental CT scans and to evaluate the effect of scan position, sex, and age on the cancer risk. This retrospective cohort study involved 505 participants who underwent CT scans. The mean effective doses for male and female patients in the maxilla group were 408 and 389 µSv (P = 0.055), respectively, whereas the mean effective doses for male and female patients in the mandible groups were 475 and 450 µSv (P < 0.001), respectively. The LAR for cancer incidence after mandible CT scanning varied from 1 in 16,196 for a 30-y-old woman to 1 in 114,680 for a 70-y-old man. The organ-specific cancer risks for thyroid cancer, other cancers, leukemia, and lung cancer account for 99% of the LAR. Among patients of all ages, the estimated LAR of a mandible scan was higher than that of a maxilla scan. Furthermore, the LAR for female thyroid cancer had a peak before age 45 y. The risk for a woman aged 30 y is roughly 8 times higher than that of a woman aged 50 y. After undergoing a dental CT scan, the possible cancer risks related to sex and age across various different anatomical regions are not similar. The greatest risk due to a dental CT scan is for a mandible scan when the woman is younger than 45 y. Given the limits of the sample size, machine parameters, and the retrospective nature of this study, the results need to be interpreted within the context of this patient population. Future studies will be of value to corroborate these findings. PMID:25359782

  1. Dose in x-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kalender, Willi A

    2014-02-01

    Radiation dose in x-ray computed tomography (CT) has become a topic of high interest due to the increasing numbers of CT examinations performed worldwide. This review aims to present an overview of current concepts for both scanner output metrics and for patient dosimetry and will comment on their strengths and weaknesses. Controversial issues such as the appropriateness of the CT dose index (CTDI) are discussed in detail. A review of approaches to patient dose assessment presently in practice, of the dose levels encountered and options for further dose optimization are also given and discussed. Patient dose assessment remains a topic for further improvement and for international consensus. All approaches presently in use are based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Estimates for effective dose are established, but they are crude and not patient-specific; organ dose estimates are rarely available. Patient- and organ-specific dose estimates can be provided with adequate accuracy and independent of CTDI phantom measurements by fast MC simulations. Such information, in particular on 3D dose distributions, is important and helpful in optimization efforts. Dose optimization has been performed very successfully in recent years and even resulted in applications with effective dose values of below 1 mSv. In general, a trend towards lower dose values based on technical innovations has to be acknowledged. Effective dose values are down to clearly below 10 mSv on average, and there are a number of applications such as cardiac and pediatric CT which are performed routinely below 1 mSv on modern equipment. PMID:24434792

  2. Computed Tomography Staging of Middle Ear Cholesteatoma

    PubMed Central

    Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek Abdel; Ghonim, Mohamed Rashad; Ashraf, Bassem

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background To establish computed tomography (CT) staging of middle ear cholesteatoma and assess its impact on the selection of the surgical procedure. Material/Methods Prospective study was conducted on 61 consecutive patients (mean age 26.8 years) with middle ear cholesteatoma. CT scan of the temporal bone and surgery were performed in all patients. CT staging classified cholesteatoma according to its location in the tympanic cavity (T); extension into the mastoid (M); and associated complications (C). Cholesteatoma was staged as stage I (T1, T2), stage II (T3, M1, M2, C1), and stage III (C2). Results The overall sensitivity of CT staging of cholesteatoma compared to surgery was 88% with excellent agreement and correlation between CT findings and intra-operative findings (K=0.863, r=0.86, P=0.001). There was excellent agreement and correlation of CT staging with surgical findings for T location (K=0.811, r=0.89, P=0.001), good for M extension (K=0.734, r=0.88, P=0.001), and excellent for associated C complications (K=1.00, r=1.0, P=0.001). Atticotympanotomy was carried out in stage I (n=14), intact canal wall surgery was performed in stage II (n=38), and canal wall down surgery was done in stage III (n=5) and stage II (n=4). Conclusions We established CT staging of middle ear cholesteatoma that helps surgeons to select an appropriate surgery. PMID:26171086

  3. Helical x-ray differential phase contrast computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhihua; Thériault-Lauzier, Pascal; Bevins, Nicholas; Zambelli, Joseph; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2011-03-01

    Helical computed tomography revolutionized the field of x-ray computed tomography two decades ago. The simultaneous translation of an image object with a standard computed tomography acquisition allows for fast volumetric scan for long image objects. X-ray phase sensitive imaging methods have been studied over the past few decades to provide new contrast mechanisms for imaging an object. A Talbot-Lau grating interferometer based differential phase contrast imaging method has recently demonstrated its potential for implementation in clinical and industrial applications. In this work, the principles of helical computed tomography are extended to differential phase contrast imaging to produce volumetric reconstructions based on fan-beam data. The method demonstrates the potential for helical differential phase contrast CT to scan long objects with relatively small detector coverage in the axial direction.

  4. Use of computed tomography in nondestructive testing of polymeric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, S.; Oestman, E.

    1985-12-01

    Computed tomography has been used to detect imperfections and to measure cross-link density gradients in polymeric products, such as airplane tires, rubber shock absorbers, and filament-wound high-pressure tanks.

  5. Computed tomography of the liver in von Gierke's disease.

    PubMed

    Biondetti, P R; Fiore, D; Muzzio, P C

    1980-10-01

    The computed tomography findings in the liver of a patient with von Gierke's disease are presented. Precontrast scans demonstrated diffuse decreased density throughout the liver. In the postcontrast scans, a focal right sided hyperdense area was visualized. PMID:6931833

  6. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography--imaging protocols, artifacts, and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Bockisch, Andreas; Beyer, Thomas; Antoch, Gerald; Freudenberg, Lutz S; Kühl, Hilmar; Debatin, Jörg F; Müller, Stefan P

    2004-01-01

    There has been a longstanding interest in fused images of anatomical information, such as that provided by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems, with biological information obtainable by positron emission tomography (PET). The near-simultaneous data acquisition in a fixed combination of a PET and a CT scanner in a combined PET/CT imaging system minimizes spatial and temporal mismatches between the modalities by eliminating the need to move the patient in between exams. In addition, using the fast CT scan for PET attenuation correction, the duration of the examination is significantly reduced compared to standalone PET imaging with standard rod-transmission sources. The main source of artifacts arises from the use of the CT-data for scatter and attenuation correction of the PET images. Today, CT reconstruction algorithms cannot account for the presence of metal implants, such as dental fillings or prostheses, properly, thus resulting in streak artifacts, which are propagated into the PET image by the attenuation correction. The transformation of attenuation coefficients at X-ray energies to those at 511 keV works well for soft tissues, bone, and air, but again is insufficient for dense CT contrast agents, such as iodine or barium. Finally, mismatches, for example, due to uncoordinated respiration result in incorrect attenuation-corrected PET images. These artifacts, however, can be minimized or avoided prospectively by careful acquisition protocol considerations. In doubt, the uncorrected images almost always allow discrimination between true and artificial finding. PET/CT has to be integrated into the diagnostic workflow for harvesting the full potential of the new modality. In particular, the diagnostic power of both, the CT and the PET within the combination must not be underestimated. By combining multiple diagnostic studies within a single examination, significant logistic advantages can be expected if the combined PET

  7. Computer aided stress analysis of long bones utilizing computer tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Marom, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    A computer aided analysis method, utilizing computed tomography (CT) has been developed, which together with a finite element program determines the stress-displacement pattern in a long bone section. The CT data file provides the geometry, the density and the material properties for the generated finite element model. A three-dimensional finite element model of a tibial shaft is automatically generated from the CT file by a pre-processing procedure for a finite element program. The developed pre-processor includes an edge detection algorithm which determines the boundaries of the reconstructed cross-sectional images of the scanned bone. A mesh generation procedure than automatically generates a three-dimensional mesh of a user-selected refinement. The elastic properties needed for the stress analysis are individually determined for each model element using the radiographic density (CT number) of each pixel with the elemental borders. The elastic modulus is determined from the CT radiographic density by using an empirical relationship from the literature. The generated finite element model, together with applied loads, determined from existing gait analysis and initial displacements, comprise a formatted input for the SAP IV finite element program. The output of this program, stresses and displacements at the model elements and nodes, are sorted and displayed by a developed post-processor to provide maximum and minimum values at selected locations in the model.

  8. Cone beam computed tomography in Endodontics - a review.

    PubMed

    Patel, S; Durack, C; Abella, F; Shemesh, H; Roig, M; Lemberg, K

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) produces undistorted three-dimensional information of the maxillofacial skeleton, including the teeth and their surrounding tissues with a lower effective radiation dose than computed tomography. The aim of this paper is to: (i) review the current literature on the applications and limitations of CBCT; (ii) make recommendations for the use of CBCT in Endodontics; (iii) highlight areas of further research of CBCT in Endodontics. PMID:24697513

  9. Multiple Energy Computer Tomography (MECT) at the NSLS: Status report

    SciTech Connect

    Dilmanian, F.A.; Wu, X.Y.; Chen, Z.; Ren, B.; Slatkin, D.N.; Chapman, D.; Schleifer, M.; Staicu, F.A.; Thomlinson, W.

    1994-09-01

    Status of the synchrotron-based computed tomography (CT) system Multiple Energy Computed Tomography (MECT) system is described. MECT, that uses monochromatic beams from the X17 superconducting wiggler beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), will be used for imaging the human head and neck. An earlier prototype MECT produced images of phantoms and living rodents. This report summarizes the studies with the prototype, and describes the design, construction, and test results of the Clinical MECT system components.

  10. Image analysis of particle field by means of computed tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakayama, Mitsushige

    1987-01-01

    In order to visualize and investigate spray structures, computed tomography technique is applied to analyze droplet information. From the transmitted light intensity through the spray and/or the data of particle size distribution obtained from a Fraunhofer diffraction principle, the quantitative volume of spray droplet or local particle size was calculated and the reconstruction of spray structures was made. The background of computed tomography is described along with some experimental results of the structure of intermittent spray such as diesel spray.

  11. Correlation of tuned aperture computed tomography with conventional computed tomography for evaluation of osseous healing in calvarial defects

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Madhu K.; Nair, Umadevi P.; Seyedain, Ali; Gassner, Robert; Piesco, Nicholas; Mooney, Mark; Ganta, Sudhakar; Agarwal, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the diagnostic efficacy of iteratively restored tuned aperture computed tomography (TACT) with conventional computed tomography (CT) for evaluation of osseous healing in induced calvarial defects. Study design Fifty-six calvarial defects in 14 rabbits received 1 of 4 possible treatments: copolymer membranes with and without bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), BMSCs alone, or no treatment (control). Healing was measured after 2, 4, and 8 wks as remaining defect areas measured on TACT and CT images. Histomorphometric analyses were done on the specimens. Results Bone formation was minimal to none in control defects and those treated with BMSCs or polymer matrices alone. Healthy bone formation was noted in defects treated with polymers impregnated with BMSCs. Unresolved defect area measurements using TACT and CT of osseous healing showed a high positive correlation. Conclusions Potential for TACT to accurately detect osseous healing in surgical defects was demonstrated. High resolution of TACT combined with generation of information in 3D yields comparable performance to CT. PMID:17234546

  12. Comparison of Rates of Coronary Angiography and Combined Testing Procedures in Patients Seen in the Emergency Room With Chest Pain (But No Objective Acute Coronary Syndrome Findings) Having Coronary Computed Tomography Versus Exercise Stress Testing.

    PubMed

    Grunau, Brian; Leipsic, Jonathon; Purssell, Elizabeth; Kasteel, Naomi; Nguyen, Kimchi; Kazem, Mikameh; Naoum, Christopher; Raju, Rekha; Blanke, Philipp; Heilbron, Brett; Taylor, Carolyn; Scheuermeyer, Frank X

    2016-07-15

    Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) appears comparable to standard care, including exercise stress testing (EST), in diagnosing acute coronary syndrome in emergency department (ED) patients with chest pain but may increase downstream testing. The objective of this study was to investigate rates of post-CCTA versus post-EST testing for (1) invasive angiography and (2) all combined cardiac testing. This was a retrospective cohort study performed at 2 urban Canadian EDs involving patients aged up to 65 years with chest pain but no objective ACS findings that were evaluated with CCTA or EST at the physician's discretion. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients who had 30-day invasive angiography in each group; secondary outcomes included all subsequent 30-day cardiac testing, including nuclear medicine scanning. From July 1, 2012, to June 30, 2014, we collected 1,700 patients: 521 CCTA and 1,179 EST. Demographics and risk factors were similar in both cohorts. In the following 30 days, 30 CCTA (5.8%) and 297 EST (25.2%) patients underwent any type of additional cardiac testing (difference 19.4%, 95% CI 16.0 to 22.6), whereas 12 CCTA (2.3%) and 20 EST patients (1.7%) underwent angiography (difference 0.6%, 95% CI -0.8% to 2.6%). No patients in either group died or had a myocardial infarction within 30 days. For ED patients with chest pain who underwent brief observation, CCTA and EST had similar 30-day angiography rates, but CCTA patients underwent significantly less overall cardiac investigations. PMID:27236251

  13. [Value of positron emission tomography and computer tomography (PET/CT) for urologic malignancies].

    PubMed

    Boujelbene, N; Prior, J O; Boubaker, A; Azria, D; Schaffer, M; Gez, E; Jichlinski, P; Meuwly, J-Y; Mirimanoff, R O; Ozsahin, M; Zouhair, A

    2011-07-01

    Positron emission tomography is a functional imaging technique that allows the detection of the regional metabolic rate, and is often coupled with other morphological imaging technique such as computed tomography. The rationale for its use is based on the clearly demonstrated fact that functional changes in tumor processes happen before morphological changes. Its introduction to the clinical practice added a new dimension in conventional imaging techniques. This review presents the current and proposed indications of the use of positron emission/computed tomography for prostate, bladder and testes, and the potential role of this exam in radiotherapy planning. PMID:21507695

  14. Tuned Aperture Computed Tomography to Evaluate Osseous Healing

    PubMed Central

    Nair, M.K.; Seyedain, A.; Agarwall, S.; Webber, R.L.; Nair, U.P.; Piesco, N.P.; Mooney, M.P.; Grondahl, H.-G.

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of osseous healing is a challenging task, requiring expensive advanced imaging modalities. To improve diagnostic osseous imaging, we undertook this prospective study to explore the potential of Tuned Aperture Computed Tomography®. Eighty defects in 20 rabbit mandibles, randomly carrying an osteoblast suspension or a polymer matrix or a combination thereof or no treatment, were imaged at 3, 6, 9, and 12 weeks post-surgery. TACT slices, iteratively restored TACT, and conventional digital radiographs were evaluated. Mean-gray-value distribution within regions of interest was correlated with histomorphometric data. Lesions treated with osteoblast/polymer-matrix delivery systems demonstrated the highest mean gray-value, while the diagnostic efficacy of TACT-IR was significantly better than that of other imaging modalities (p < 0.001). Thus, TACT is an accurate imaging modality for non-destructive quantification of osseous dynamics. PMID:11597021

  15. FDG positron emission computed tomography in a study of aphasia

    SciTech Connect

    Metter, E.J.; Wasterlain, C.G.; Kuhl, D.E.; Hanson, W.R.; Phelps, M.E.

    1981-08-01

    Positron emission computed tomography (PECT) using 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) was used to investigate the correlations between clinical status, anatomy (as described by CT), and metabolism in five patients with stable aphasia resulting from ischemic cerebral infarction. Local cerebral metabolic activity was diminished in an area larger than the area of infarction demonstrated by CT. In one patient, FDG PECT revealed a metabolic lesion that probably caused the aphasic syndrome and was not apparent by CT. The data suggest that reliance on CT in delineating the extent of the brain lesion in aphasia or other neuropsychological defects can be misleading; FDG PECT may provide important additional information. Two patients with similar metabolic lesions had very different clinical syndromes, showing that even when currently available methods are combined, major gaps remain in clinicoanatomical correlations in aphasia.

  16. Sparse-Coding-Based Computed Tomography Image Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Gang-Joon

    2013-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a popular type of medical imaging that generates images of the internal structure of an object based on projection scans of the object from several angles. There are numerous methods to reconstruct the original shape of the target object from scans, but they are still dependent on the number of angles and iterations. To overcome the drawbacks of iterative reconstruction approaches like the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART), while the recovery is slightly impacted from a random noise (small amount of ℓ2 norm error) and projection scans (small amount of ℓ1 norm error) as well, we propose a medical image reconstruction methodology using the properties of sparse coding. It is a very powerful matrix factorization method which each pixel point is represented as a linear combination of a small number of basis vectors. PMID:23576898

  17. Computed tomography of mesenteric involvement in fulminant pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffery, R.B.; Federle, M.P.; Laing, F.C.

    1983-04-01

    Although extension into the mesentery has been recognized as a frequent pathway of extrapancreatic spread in acute pancreatitis, it has received relatively little attention in the computed tomography (CT) literature. The medical records and CT scans of 55 patients with severe pancreatitis were reviewed in this study; of these patients, 19 (35%) had mesenteric abnormalities, which in 11 patients (20%) represented the most extensive extrapancreatic site of the most extensive extrapancreatic site of involvement. In fulminant pancreatitis, dissection along the mesentery is an important pathway for spread of pancreatic abscesses or phlegmons. Clinical correlation suggests that a combination of mesenteric with lesser sac and anterior pararenal space involvement is frequently associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Of the 19 patients with mesenteric involvement, two died and 14 (74%) required surgery for abscesses, pseudocysts, or, in one case, a colonic fistula. The CT features of the normal mesentery and CT criteria for diagnosing mesenteric inflammatory lesions are reviewed.

  18. Cholesteatomas of the temporal bone: role of computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.W.; Voorhees, R.L.; Lufkin, R.B.; Canalis, R.

    1983-09-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the temporal bone was performed in 64 patients thought to have a cholesteatoma of the middle ear. Twenty had not had surgery before, while 44 had been operated on; special consideration was given to 21 patients who were scanned immediately before a second operation and had confirmation of the CT findings. Inflammatory disease without cholesteatoma was characterized by absence of erosion of the otic capsule or ossicular chain. Sharply circumscribed cholesteatomas were easily diagnosed by CT. When they were combined with scarring, granulation tissue, or postsurgical changes, the resulting soft-tissue masses were indistinguishable, although cholesteatoma may be suspected if there is evidence of progressive bone erosion about the middle ear. CT can play a major role in postoperative follow-up by confirming that the ear is normal and demonstrating displacement of ossicular grafts or prostheses.

  19. Three-dimensional computed tomography of the carpal ligaments.

    PubMed

    Nanno, Mitsuhiko; Viegas, Steven F

    2009-03-01

    This article details a current perspective and accurate anatomical three-dimensional descriptions of the ligaments of the wrist. The carpometacarpal ligaments, the intercarpal ligaments, and the radiocarpal ligaments are described and illustrated using a unique combination of detailed dissection, computed tomography, and a three-dimensional digitization technique. Detailed information is also provided about the ligamentous attachments of the carpometacarpal joints, the carpal bones, and the distal radius. This study improves knowledge and understanding of the normal anatomy and mechanics of the radiocarpal and intercarpal ligaments and the carpometacarpal joints, and it should help in the assessment of radiographic images and treatment of various injuries and degenerative changes seen in the wrist. The knowledge of the ligaments will further serve as a foundation for understanding the anatomy of the ligaments, the biomechanics of the wrist, and the function of the individual ligaments and their roles in joint motion and stability. PMID:19235667

  20. Data fusion in neutron and X-ray computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Schrapp, Michael J.; Goldammer, Matthias; Schulz, Michael; Issani, Siraj; Bhamidipati, Suryanarayana; Böni, Peter

    2014-10-28

    We present a fusion methodology between neutron and X-ray computed tomography (CT). On the one hand, the inspection by X-ray CT of a wide class of multimaterials in non-destructive testing applications suffers from limited information of object features. On the other hand, neutron imaging can provide complementary data in such a way that the combination of both data sets fully characterizes the object. In this contribution, a novel data fusion procedure, called Fusion Regularized Simultaneous Algebraic Reconstruction Technique, is developed where the X-ray reconstruction is modified to fulfill the available data from the imaging with neutrons. The experiments, which were obtained from an aluminum profile containing a steel screw, and attached carbon fiber plates demonstrate that the image quality in CT can be significantly improved when the proposed fusion method is used.

  1. Skeletal dosimetry in cone beam computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, B. R. B.; Ding, G. X.; Kramer, R.; Kawrakow, I.

    2009-07-15

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a relatively new patient imaging technique that has proved invaluable for treatment target verification and patient positioning during image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). It has been shown that CBCT results in additional dose to bone that may amount to 10% of the prescribed dose. In this study, voxelized human phantoms, FAX06 (adult female) and MAX06 (adult male), are used together with phase-space data collected from a realistic model of a CBCT imager to calculate dose in the red bone marrow (RBM) and bone surface cells (BSCs), the two organs at risk within the bone spongiosa, during simulated head and neck, chest and pelvis CBCT scans. The FAX06/MAX06 phantoms model spongiosa based on micro-CT images, filling the relevant phantom voxels, which are 0.12x0.12x0.12 cm{sup 3}, with 17x17x17 {mu}m{sup 3} microvoxels to form a micromatrix of trabecular bone and bone marrow. FAX06/MAX06 have already been implemented in an EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo code to simulate radiation transport in the phantoms; however, this study required significant modifications of the code to allow use of phase-space data from a simulated CBCT imager as a source and to allow scoring of total dose, RBM dose and BSC dose on a voxel-by-voxel basis. In simulated CBCT scans, the BSC dose is significantly greater than the dose to other organs at risk. For example, in a simulated head and neck scan, the average BSC dose is 25% higher than the average dose to eye lens ({approx}8.3 cGy), and 80% greater than the average dose to brain (5.7 cGy). Average dose to RBM, on the other hand, is typically only {approx}50% of the average BSC dose and less than the dose to other organs at risk (54% of the dose to eye lens and 76% of dose to brain in a head and neck scan). Thus, elevated dose in bone due to CBCT results in elevated BSC dose. This is potentially of concern when using CBCT in conjunction with radiotherapy treatment.

  2. Application of Computer Tomography for Life Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsapin, A.; Nealson, K.

    2001-01-01

    Perhaps one of the most fundamentally difficult challenges facing those who would search for life is that of scale determination. Spatial scales of life on Earth range over more than 15 orders of magnitude in mass and volume, and more than 8 orders of magnitude in 2 dimensional space. If the distribution of life is sparse in comparison to the background on which it is found, then the choice of the right scale is critical to finding that life. But how does one identify the proper scale? To put this in other words, how does one recognize the "haystacks" in which the needles (biosignatures and evidence of life) might be most profitably searched for? The problem is further exacerbated when conditions get extreme because much of the life moves from the clement surface environment into the pores and more clement environments inside of rocks, minerals and soils. Once encased in their lithic homes, these microbes become nearly impossible to study by standard techniques because of the opacity of the rocks. It is this problem that we propose to address in the work proposed here. Computer Tomography (CT) has been a very valuable tool in medicine, where the best resolution available has typically been of the order of about 0.5 mm. However, to adapt the approach for life detection of microbial endoliths, the resolution needs to be moved to the micrometer and even submicrometer levels. Thus for the studies proposed here, we begin with a commercially available instrument that can yield resolution of approximately 10 micrometers. The rational for this is twofold: first, this is the "state of the art" in laboratory instruments; and second, that while the usual size of a microbial cell is about 1 micron, microorganisms tend to live in communities that usually exceed the 10 micrometer size range. The resolution also depends on the sample size itself, so having a small lab instrument into which small samples can be placed will be beneficial to the resolution. We have now used several

  3. Skeletal dosimetry in cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Walters, B R B; Ding, G X; Kramer, R; Kawrakow, I

    2009-07-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a relatively new patient imaging technique that has proved invaluable for treatment target verification and patient positioning during image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). It has been shown that CBCT results in additional dose to bone that may amount to 10% of the prescribed dose. In this study, voxelized human phantoms, FAX06 (adult female) and MAX06 (adult male), are used together with phase-space data collected from a realistic model of a CBCT imager to calculate dose in the red bone marrow (RBM) and bone surface cells (BSCs), the two organs at risk within the bone spongiosa, during simulated head and neck, chest and pelvis CBCT scans. The FAX06/MAX06 phantoms model spongiosa based on micro-CT images, filling the relevant phantom voxels, which are 0.12 x 0.12 x 0.12 cm3, with 17 x 17 x 17 microm3 microvoxels to form a micromatrix of trabecular bone and bone marrow. FAX06/ MAX06 have already been implemented in an EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo code to simulate radiation transport in the phantoms; however, this study required significant modifications of the code to allow use of phase-space data from a simulated CBCT imager as a source and to allow scoring of total dose, RBM dose and BSC dose on a voxel-by-voxel basis. In simulated CBCT scans, the BSC dose is significantly greater than the dose to other organs at risk. For example, in a simulated head and neck scan, the average BSC dose is 25% higher than the average dose to eye lens (approximately 8.3 cGy), and 80% greater than the average dose to brain (5.7 cGy). Average dose to RBM, on the other hand, is typically only approximately 50% of the average BSC dose and less than the dose to other organs at risk (54% of the dose to eye lens and 76% of dose to brain in a head and neck scan). Thus, elevated dose in bone due to CBCT results in elevated BSC dose. This is potentially of concern when using CBCT in conjunction with radiotherapy treatment. PMID:19673190

  4. Synergistic image reconstruction for hybrid ultrasound and photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Thomas P.; Wang, Kun; Wang, Lihong V.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2015-03-01

    Conventional photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) image reconstruction methods assume that the object and surrounding medium are described by a constant speed-of-sound (SOS) value. In order to accurately recover fine structures, SOS heterogeneities should be quantified and compensated for during PACT reconstruction. To address this problem, several groups have proposed hybrid systems that combine PACT with ultrasound computed tomography (USCT). In such systems, a SOS map is reconstructed first via USCT. Consequently, this SOS map is employed to inform the PACT reconstruction method. Additionally, the SOS map can provide structural information regarding tissue, which is complementary to the functional information from the PACT image. We propose a paradigm shift in the way that images are reconstructed in hybrid PACT-USCT imaging. Inspired by our observation that information about the SOS distribution is encoded in PACT measurements, we propose to jointly reconstruct the absorbed optical energy density and SOS distributions from a combined set of USCT and PACT measurements, thereby reducing the two reconstruction problems into one. This innovative approach has several advantages over conventional approaches in which PACT and USCT images are reconstructed independently: (1) Variations in the SOS will automatically be accounted for, optimizing PACT image quality; (2) The reconstructed PACT and USCT images will possess minimal systematic artifacts because errors in the imaging models will be optimally balanced during the joint reconstruction; (3) Due to the exploitation of information regarding the SOS distribution in the full-view PACT data, our approach will permit high-resolution reconstruction of the SOS distribution from sparse array data.

  5. Photoacoustic computed tomography without accurate ultrasonic transducer responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Qiwei; Wang, Kun; Xia, Jun; Zhu, Liren; Wang, Lihong V.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2015-03-01

    Conventional photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) image reconstruction methods assume that the object and surrounding medium are described by a constant speed-of-sound (SOS) value. In order to accurately recover fine structures, SOS heterogeneities should be quantified and compensated for during PACT reconstruction. To address this problem, several groups have proposed hybrid systems that combine PACT with ultrasound computed tomography (USCT). In such systems, a SOS map is reconstructed first via USCT. Consequently, this SOS map is employed to inform the PACT reconstruction method. Additionally, the SOS map can provide structural information regarding tissue, which is complementary to the functional information from the PACT image. We propose a paradigm shift in the way that images are reconstructed in hybrid PACT-USCT imaging. Inspired by our observation that information about the SOS distribution is encoded in PACT measurements, we propose to jointly reconstruct the absorbed optical energy density and SOS distributions from a combined set of USCT and PACT measurements, thereby reducing the two reconstruction problems into one. This innovative approach has several advantages over conventional approaches in which PACT and USCT images are reconstructed independently: (1) Variations in the SOS will automatically be accounted for, optimizing PACT image quality; (2) The reconstructed PACT and USCT images will possess minimal systematic artifacts because errors in the imaging models will be optimally balanced during the joint reconstruction; (3) Due to the exploitation of information regarding the SOS distribution in the full-view PACT data, our approach will permit high-resolution reconstruction of the SOS distribution from sparse array data.

  6. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography-computed tomography in oncology.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Gerwin P; Kramer, Harald; Reiser, Maximilian F; Glaser, Christian

    2007-06-01

    The advent of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) and whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) has introduced tumor imaging with a systemic and functional approach compared with established sequential, multimodal diagnostic algorithms.Whole-body PET with [18F]-fluoro-2-desoxy-glucose is a useful imaging procedure for tumor staging and monitoring that can visualize active tumor tissue by detecting pathological glucose metabolism. The combination of PET with the detailed anatomical information of multislice computed tomography as dual-modality scanners has markedly increased lesion localization and diagnostic accuracy compared with both modalities as standalone applications.Hardware innovations, such as the introduction of multi-receiver channel whole-body MRI scanners at 1.5 and, recently, 3 T, combined with acquisition acceleration techniques, have made high-resolution WB-MRI clinically feasible. Now, a dedicated assessment of individual organs with various soft tissue contrast, spatial resolution, and contrast media dynamics can be combined with whole-body anatomical coverage in a multiplanar imaging approach. More flexible protocols (eg, T1-weighted turbo spin-echo and short inversion recovery imaging, dedicated lung imaging or dynamic contrast-enhanced studies of the abdomen) can be performed within 45 minutes.Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging has recently been proposed for tumor screening of asymptomatic individuals, and potentially life-changing diagnoses, such as formerly unknown malignancy, have been reported. However, larger patient cohort studies will have to show the cost efficiency and the clinical effectiveness of such an approach.For initial tumor staging, PET-CT has proved more accurate for the definition of T-stage and lymph node assessment, mainly because of the missing metabolic information in WB-MRI. However, new applications, such as magnetic resonance whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging or lymphotropic contrast

  7. Combined two-photon microscopy and angiographic optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bumju; Wang, Tae Jun; Li, Qingyun; Nam, Jutaek; Hwang, Sekyu; Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Sungjee; Kim, Ki Hean

    2013-08-01

    A combined two-photon microscopy (TPM) and angiographic optical coherence tomography (OCT) is developed, which can provide molecular, cellular, structural, and vascular information of tissue specimens in vivo. This combined system is implemented by adding an OCT vasculature visualization method to the previous combined TPM and OCT, and then is applied to in vivo tissue imaging. Two animal models, a mouse brain cranial window model and a mouse ear cancer model, are used. Both molecular, cellular information at local regions of tissues, and structural, vascular information at relatively larger regions are visualized in the same sections. In vivo tissue microenvironments are better elucidated by the combined TPM and angiographic OCT.

  8. Computational hemodynamics of abdominal aortic aneurysms: Three-dimensional ultrasound versus computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Owen, Benjamin; Lowe, Christopher; Ashton, Neil; Mandal, Parthasarathi; Rogers, Steven; Wein, Wolfgang; McCollum, Charles; Revell, Alistair

    2016-03-01

    The current criterion for surgical intervention in abdominal aortic aneurysms, based upon a maximal aortic diameter, is considered conservative due to the high mortality rate in case of rupture. The research community is actively investigating the use of computational mechanics tools combined with patient-specific imaging to help identify more accurate criteria. Widespread uptake of a successful metric will however be limited by the need for computed tomography, which is at present the primary image extraction method on account of the location and complex shape of the aneurysms. The use of three-dimensional ultrasound as the scanning method is more attractive on account of increased availability, reduced cost and reduced risk to patients. The suitability of three-dimensional ultrasound is assessed for this purpose in the present work; computational fluid dynamics simulations were performed on geometries obtained from the same patient using both ultrasound and computed tomography. The influence of different smoothing algorithms is investigated in the geometry preparation stage and Taubin's low-pass filter was found to best preserve geometry features. Laminar, Newtonian, steady-state simulation analysis identified haemodynamic characteristics to be qualitatively similar in terms of wall shear stress, velocity and vorticity. The study demonstrates the potential for three-dimensional ultrasound to be integrated into a more accessible patient-specific modelling tool able to identify the need for surgical intervention of abdominal aortic aneurysms. PMID:26893226

  9. Computed tomography in penetrating injury to the eye.

    PubMed

    Bhimani, S; Virapongse, C; Sarwar, M; Twist, J F

    1984-05-01

    We used computed tomography to detect and localize foreign bodies in two unusual cases of penetrating injury to the eyes. In one case, a large broken twig appeared to have penetrated the globe and the inferior rectus muscle; in the other, the globe was ruptured by many glass shards . In the first case surgery showed the computed tomographic impression to be incorrect. The globe and the inferior rectus muscle were intact and vision and motility were normal postoperatively. In the second case, swelling made direct visualization impossible, and computed tomography was used to locate the foreign bodies. PMID:6720836

  10. Computed tomography in the evaluation of Crohn disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, H.I.; Gore, R.M.; Margulis, A.R.; Moss, A.A.; Baker, E.L.

    1983-02-01

    The abdominal and pelvic computed tomographic examinations in 28 patients with Crohn disease were analyzed and correlated with conventional barium studies, sinograms, and surgical findings. Mucosal abnormalities such as aphthous lesions, pseudopolyps, and ulcerations were only imaged by conventional techniques. Computed tomography proved superior in demonstrating the mural, serosal, and mesenteric abnormalities such as bowel wall thickening (82%), fibrofatty proliferation of mesenteric fat (39%), mesenteric abscess (25%), inflammatory reaction of the mesentery (14%), and mesenteric lymphadenopathy (18%). Computed tomography was most useful clinically in defining the nature of mass effects, separation, or displacement of small bowel segments seen on small bowel series. Although conventional barium studies remain the initial diagnostic procedure in evaluating Crohn disease, computed tomography can be a useful adjunct in resolving difficult clinical and radiologic diagnostic problems.

  11. Pore scale definition and computation from tomography data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuy, P. M.; Austin, P.; Delaney, G. W.; Schwarz, M. P.

    2011-10-01

    During recent years characterisation capabilities of porous media have been transformed by advances in computation and visualisation technologies. It is now possible to obtain detailed topological and hydrodynamic information of porous media by combining tomographic and computational fluid dynamic studies. Despite the existence of these new capabilities, the characterisation process itself is based on the same antiquated experimental macroscopic concepts. We are interested in an up-scaling process where we can keep key information for every pore size present in the media in order to feed multi-scale transport models. Hydrometallurgical, environmental, food, pharmaceutical and chemical engineering are industries with process outcomes based on homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions and therefore sensitive to the reaction and transport processes happening at different pore scales. The present work addresses a key step in the information up-scaling process, i.e. a pore identification algorithm similar to alternating sequential filters. In a preliminary study, topological and hydrodynamic variables are correlated with the pore size. Micrometre and millimetre resolution tomographies are used to characterise the pore size distribution of a packed column and different rocks. Finally, we compute the inter-pore-scale redistribution function which is a measure of the heterogeneity of the media and magnitude needed in multi-scale modelling.

  12. Development of a proton Computed Tomography detector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naimuddin, Md.; Coutrakon, G.; Blazey, G.; Boi, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Erdelyi, B.; Hedin, D.; Johnson, E.; Krider, J.; Rukalin, V.; Uzunyan, S. A.; Zutshi, V.; Fordt, R.; Sellberg, G.; Rauch, J. E.; Roman, M.; Rubinov, P.; Wilson, P.

    2016-02-01

    Computer tomography is one of the most promising new methods to image abnormal tissues inside the human body. Tomography is also used to position the patient accurately before radiation therapy. Hadron therapy for treating cancer has become one of the most advantegeous and safe options. In order to fully utilize the advantages of hadron therapy, there is a necessity of performing radiography with hadrons as well. In this paper we present the development of a proton computed tomography system. Our second-generation proton tomography system consists of two upstream and two downstream trackers made up of fibers as active material and a range detector consisting of plastic scintillators. We present details of the detector system, readout electronics, and data acquisition system as well as the commissioning of the entire system. We also present preliminary results from the test beam of the range detector.

  13. Domain identification in impedance computed tomography by spline collocation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, Fumio

    1990-01-01

    A method for estimating an unknown domain in elliptic boundary value problems is considered. The problem is formulated as an inverse problem of integral equations of the second kind. A computational method is developed using a splice collocation scheme. The results can be applied to the inverse problem of impedance computed tomography (ICT) for image reconstruction.

  14. Evaluating iterative reconstruction performance in computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Baiyu Solomon, Justin; Ramirez Giraldo, Juan Carlos; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction (IR) offers notable advantages in computed tomography (CT). However, its performance characterization is complicated by its potentially nonlinear behavior, impacting performance in terms of specific tasks. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of IR with both task-specific and task-generic strategies. Methods: The performance of IR in CT was mathematically assessed with an observer model that predicted the detection accuracy in terms of the detectability index (d′). d′ was calculated based on the properties of the image noise and resolution, the observer, and the detection task. The characterizations of image noise and resolution were extended to accommodate the nonlinearity of IR. A library of tasks was mathematically modeled at a range of sizes (radius 1–4 mm), contrast levels (10–100 HU), and edge profiles (sharp and soft). Unique d′ values were calculated for each task with respect to five radiation exposure levels (volume CT dose index, CTDI{sub vol}: 3.4–64.8 mGy) and four reconstruction algorithms (filtered backprojection reconstruction, FBP; iterative reconstruction in imaging space, IRIS; and sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction with strengths of 3 and 5, SAFIRE3 and SAFIRE5; all provided by Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany). The d′ values were translated into the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) to represent human observer performance. For each task and reconstruction algorithm, a threshold dose was derived as the minimum dose required to achieve a threshold AUC of 0.9. A task-specific dose reduction potential of IR was calculated as the difference between the threshold doses for IR and FBP. A task-generic comparison was further made between IR and FBP in terms of the percent of all tasks yielding an AUC higher than the threshold. Results: IR required less dose than FBP to achieve the threshold AUC. In general, SAFIRE5 showed the most significant dose reduction

  15. Synchrotron Radiation Computed Tomography (SRCT) of Ruled Laser Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, J H; Haupt, D L

    2002-03-15

    High spatial resolution tomography benefits from a high brightness source (photons/(mr{sup 2} x source area)). A synchrotron radiation source provides extremely high continuous brightness with spectral characteristics suited to a wide variety of imaging needs. Therefore, during the initial testing of the new synchrotron radiation computed tomography (SRCT) system at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, it was suggested that we image a ruled target designed for NIF experiments. This is a detailed report of that imaging effort.

  16. Pigmented villonodular synovitis mimics metastases on fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose position emission tomography-computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Elumogo, Comfort O.; Kochenderfer, James N.; Civelek, A. Cahid

    2016-01-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a benign joint disease best characterized on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The role of fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) position emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) in the diagnosis or characterization remains unclear. PVNS displays as a focal FDG avid lesion, which can masquerade as a metastatic lesion, on PET-CET. We present a case of PVNS found on surveillance imaging of a lymphoma patient. PMID:27190776

  17. SIMULATION STUDY FOR GASEOUS FLUXES FROM AN AREA SOURCE USING COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY AND OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents a new approach to quantifying emissions from fugitive gaseous air pollution sources. Computed tomography (CT) and path-integrated optical remote sensing (PI-ORS) concentration data are combined in a new field beam geometry. Path-integrated concentrations are ...

  18. Role of computed tomography urography in the clinical evaluation of upper tract urothelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jinzaki, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Eiji; Akita, Hirotaka; Sugiura, Hiroaki; Shinmoto, Hiroshi; Oya, Mototsugu

    2016-04-01

    Intravenous urography has been widely used for the evaluation of upper tract urothelial carcinoma. However, computed tomography urography presently has a higher diagnostic accuracy for upper tract urothelial carcinoma (94.2-99.6%) than intravenous urography (80.8-84.9%), and has replaced intravenous urography as the first-line imaging test for investigating patients with a high risk of upper tract urothelial carcinoma. Although the detection rate for bladder tumors using standard computed tomography urography is not yet high enough to replace cystoscopy, the addition of a 60- to 80-s delayed scan after the administration of contrast material for the whole pelvis improves the detection rate. A drawback to computed tomography urography is the higher radiation dose of 15-35 mSv, compared with a mean effective dose of 5-10 mSv for intravenous urography. Among several approaches to reducing the radiation dose, the use of an iterative reconstruction algorithm is most likely to become an effective solution because of its simplicity. One advantage of computed tomography urography over intravenous urography is its ability to reliably differentiate between upper tract urothelial carcinoma and calculi or blood clots. Computed tomography urography also shows characteristic findings of other benign conditions. These findings, in combination with negative cytology, are very important diagnostic clues for avoiding an unnecessary nephroureterectomy. For the clinical staging, a recent study has reported the high diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography urography with respect to ≥pT3 tumors. The present review shows the current status of computed tomography urography for the evaluation of upper tract urothelial carcinoma. PMID:26750188

  19. Proposal of a computed tomography classification for hepatic alveolar echinococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Graeter, Tilmann; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Oeztuerk, Suemeyra; Haenle, Mark Martin; Mason, Richard Andrew; Hillenbrand, Andreas; Kull, Thomas; Barth, Thomas F; Kern, Peter; Gruener, Beate

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To establish a computed tomography (CT)-morphological classification for hepatic alveolar echinococcosis was the aim of the study. METHODS: The CT morphology of hepatic lesions in 228 patients with confirmed alveolar echinococcosis (AE) drawn from the Echinococcus Databank of the University Hospital of Ulm was reviewed retrospectively. For this reason, CT datasets of combined positron emission tomography (PET)-CT examinations were evaluated. The diagnosis of AE was made in patients with unequivocal seropositivity; positive histological findings following diagnostic puncture or partial resection of the liver; and/or findings typical for AE at either ultrasonography, CT, magnetic resonance imaging or PET-CT. The CT-morphological findings were grouped into the new classification scheme. RESULTS: Within the classification a lesion was dedicated to one out of five “primary morphologies” as well as to one out of six “patterns of calcification”. “primary morphology” and “pattern of calcification” are primarily focussed on separately from each other and combined, whereas the “primary morphology” V is not further characterized by a “pattern of calcification”. Based on the five primary morphologies, further descriptive sub-criteria were appended to types I-III. An analysis of the calcification pattern in relation to the primary morphology revealed the exclusive association of the central calcification with type IV primary morphology. Similarly, certain calcification patterns exhibited a clear predominance for other primary morphologies, which underscores the delimitation of the individual primary morphological types from each other. These relationships in terms of calcification patterns extend into the primary morphological sub-criteria, demonstrating the clear subordination of those criteria. CONCLUSION: The proposed CT-morphological classification (EMUC-CT) is intended to facilitate the recognition and interpretation of lesions in hepatic

  20. Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography in lung cancer and malignant lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Schillaci, Orazio

    2006-10-01

    In nuclear oncology, despite the fast-growing diffusion of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies can still play an useful clinical role in several applications. The main limitation of SPECT imaging with tumor-seeking agents is the lack of the structural delineation of the pathologic processes they detect; this drawback sometimes renders SPECT interpretation difficult and can diminish its diagnostic accuracy. Fusion with morphological studies can overcome this limitation by giving an anatomical map to scintigraphic data. In the past, software-based fusion of independently performed SPECT and CT images proved to be time-consuming and impractical for routine use. The recent development of dual-modality integrated imaging systems that provide functional (SPECT) and anatomical (CT) images in the same scanning session, with the acquired images coregistered by means of the hardware, has opened a new era in this field. The first reports indicate that SPECT/CT is very useful in cancer imaging because it is able to provide further information of clinical value in several cases. In SPECT, studies of lung cancer and malignant lymphomas using different radiopharmaceutical, hybrid images are of value in providing the correct localization of tumor sites, with a precise detection of the involved organs, and the definition of their functional status, and in allowing the exclusion of disease in sites of physiologic tracer uptake. Therefore, in lung cancer and lymphomas, hybrid SPECT/CT can play a role in the diagnosis of the primary tumor, in the staging of the disease, in the follow-up, in the monitoring of therapy, in the detection of recurrence, and in dosimetric estimations for target radionuclide therapy. PMID:16950145

  1. Diagnosis of dementia with single photon emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Jagust, W.J.; Budinger, T.F.; Reed, B.R.

    1987-03-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography is a practical modality for the study of physiologic cerebral activity in vivo. We utilized single photon emission computed tomography and N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine iodine 123 to evaluate regional cerebral blood flow in nine patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), five healthy elderly control subjects, and two patients with multi-infarct dementia. We found that all subjects with AD demonstrated flow deficits in temporoparietal cortex bilaterally, and that the ratio of activity in bilateral temporoparietal cortex to activity in the whole slice allowed the differentiation of all patients with AD from both the controls and from the patients with multi-infarct dementia. Furthermore, this ratio showed a strong correlation with disease severity in the AD group. Single photon emission computed tomography appears to be useful in the differential diagnosis of dementia and reflects clinical features of the disease.

  2. Tissue Characterization Using Energy-Selective Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Robert E.; Marshall, William H.; Lewis, Roger

    1981-07-01

    Energy-selective computed tomography has several important properties useful for in-vivo tissue characterization. Most importantly, it produces more information than conventional computed tomography. This information can be considered to be an added dimension which can be used to eliminate the ambiguities in conventional CT data. The noise in energy-selective computed tomography is also two dimensional and an un-correlated coordinate system can be defined which is needed for studying the capabilities of the technique for characterizing tissues. By using the calibration material basis set, the information from energy-selective CT can be extracted with extreme accuracy. Our preliminary experiments indicate that the technique is accurate enough to characterize the difference between gray and white matter. Most conventional systems have difficulty in distinguishing these materials, much less characterizing the reason for their differing attenuation. Thus energy-selective CT has the promise of providing extremely accurate tissue characterization based on its physical properties.

  3. The Role of Computed Tomography in Monitoring Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Rybacka, Anna; Karmelita-Katulska, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common lethal autosomal recessive disorder in the Caucasian population. Although the survival rate in patients constantly improves, lung damage is still the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis. In clinical practice, evaluation of patients' pulmonary state is made by combination of monitoring of lung function and more directly by assessing the lung structure in imaging studies. Studies showed that computed tomography findings are more sensitive as compared to the pulmonary function tests. Computed tomography can identify a wide range of morphological abnormalities in patients with cystic fibrosis, such as bronchiectasis (which is progressive, irreversible and probably the most relevant structural change in cystic fibrosis) peribronchial thickening, mucous plugging and many other disorders that occur in the course of the disease. Computed tomography has a crucial role in the assessment of pulmonary damage over time, detecting complications and monitoring treatment effects in patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:27103945

  4. Stress Computed Tomography Myocardial Perfusion Imaging: A New Topic in Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Seitun, Sara; Castiglione Morelli, Margherita; Budaj, Irilda; Boccalini, Sara; Galletto Pregliasco, Athena; Valbusa, Alberto; Cademartiri, Filippo; Ferro, Carlo

    2016-02-01

    Since its introduction about 15 years ago, coronary computed tomography angiography has become today the most accurate clinical instrument for noninvasive assessment of coronary atherosclerosis. Important technical developments have led to a continuous stream of new clinical applications together with a significant reduction in radiation dose exposure. Latest generation computed tomography scanners (≥ 64 slices) allow the possibility of performing static or dynamic perfusion imaging during stress by using coronary vasodilator agents (adenosine, dipyridamole, or regadenoson), combining both functional and anatomical information in the same examination. In this article, the emerging role and state-of-the-art of myocardial computed tomography perfusion imaging are reviewed and are illustrated by clinical cases from our experience with a second-generation dual-source 128-slice scanner (Somatom Definition Flash, Siemens; Erlangen, Germany). Technical aspects, data analysis, diagnostic accuracy, radiation dose and future prospects are reviewed. PMID:26774540

  5. The Role of Computed Tomography in Monitoring Patients with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Rybacka, Anna; Karmelita-Katulska, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cystic fibrosis is the most common lethal autosomal recessive disorder in the Caucasian population. Although the survival rate in patients constantly improves, lung damage is still the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis. In clinical practice, evaluation of patients’ pulmonary state is made by combination of monitoring of lung function and more directly by assessing the lung structure in imaging studies. Studies showed that computed tomography findings are more sensitive as compared to the pulmonary function tests. Computed tomography can identify a wide range of morphological abnormalities in patients with cystic fibrosis, such as bronchiectasis (which is progressive, irreversible and probably the most relevant structural change in cystic fibrosis) peribronchial thickening, mucous plugging and many other disorders that occur in the course of the disease. Computed tomography has a crucial role in the assessment of pulmonary damage over time, detecting complications and monitoring treatment effects in patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:27103945

  6. C-Arm Computed Tomography Compared With Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography for Treatment Planning Before Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Christoph Waggershauser, Tobias; Tiling, Reinhold; Weckbach, Sabine; Johnson, Thorsten; Meissner, Oliver; Klingenbeck-Regn, Klaus; Reiser, Maximilian; Hoffmann, Ralf Thorsten

    2011-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether rotational C-arm computed tomography (CT) allows visualization of liver metastases and adds relevant information for radioembolization (RE) treatment planning. Technetium angiography, together with C-arm CT, was performed in 47 patients to determine the feasibility for RE. C-arm CT images were compared with positron emission tomography (PET)/CT images for the detection of liver tumors. The images were also rated according one of the following three categories: (1) images that provide no additional information compared with DSA alone; (2) images that do provide additional information compared with DSA; and (2) images that had an impact on eligibility determination for and planning of the RE procedure. In all patients, 283 FDG-positive liver lesions were detected by PET. In venous contrast-phase CT, 221 (78.1%) and 15 (5.3%) of these lesions were either hypodense or hyperdense, respectively. In C-arm CT, 103 (36.4%) liver lesions were not detectable because they were outside of either the field of view or the contrast-enhanced liver segment. Another 25 (8.8%) and 98 (34.6%) of the liver lesions were either hyperdense or presented primarily as hypodense lesions with a rim enhancement, respectively. With PET/CT as the standard of reference, venous CT and C-arm CT failed to detect 47 (16.6%) and 57 (20.1%) of all liver lesions, respectively. For RE planning, C-arm CT provided no further information, provide some additional information, or had an impact on the procedure in 20 (42.5%), 15 (31.9%) and 12 (25.6%) of patients, respectively. We conclude that C-arm CT may add decisive information in patients scheduled for RE.

  7. Direct sagital computed tomography of the temporomandibular joint

    SciTech Connect

    Manzione, J.V.; Seltzer, S.E.; Katzberg, R.W.; Hammerschlag, S.B.; Chiango, B.F.

    1983-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint dysfunction is a common clinical problem that has been reported to affect 4%-28% of adults. Temporomandibular joint arthrography has shown that many of these patients have intraarticular abnormalities involving the meniscus. A noninvasive test that could demonstrate the meniscus as well as bony abnormalities of the joint would be an important advance. In an attempt to develop such a noninvasive test, we have performed direct sagittal computed tomography (CT) on cadaver temporomandibular joints and have correlated the images with anatomic sections. We are currently applying this technique clinically and report one representative example in which direct sagittal computed tomography of the temporomandibular joint accurately demonstrated an anteriorly displaced meniscus.

  8. Computed Tomography Angiography of the Small Bowel and Mesentery.

    PubMed

    Raman, Siva P; Fishman, Elliot K

    2016-01-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has largely supplanted other available radiologic modalities in the evaluation of a wide variety of different vascular and inflammatory abnormalities of the small bowel, with computed tomography angiography (CTA) playing a major role in the diagnostic efficacy of MDCT for these diseases. Improvements in CTA imaging have proved particularly valuable in the evaluation of small bowel vascular and inflammatory disorders, diagnoses in which arterial phase images might be able to offer greater information than standard venous phase imaging. This article details the MDCT imaging findings of several small bowel vascular and inflammatory disorders. PMID:26654393

  9. Personalized identification of abdominal wall hernia meshes on computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tuan D; Le, Dinh T P; Xu, Jinwei; Nguyen, Duc T; Martindale, Robert G; Deveney, Clifford W

    2014-01-01

    An abdominal wall hernia is a protrusion of the intestine through an opening or area of weakness in the abdominal wall. Correct pre-operative identification of abdominal wall hernia meshes could help surgeons adjust the surgical plan to meet the expected difficulty and morbidity of operating through or removing the previous mesh. First, we present herein for the first time the application of image analysis for automated identification of hernia meshes. Second, we discuss the novel development of a new entropy-based image texture feature using geostatistics and indicator kriging. Third, we seek to enhance the hernia mesh identification by combining the new texture feature with the gray-level co-occurrence matrix feature of the image. The two features can characterize complementary information of anatomic details of the abdominal hernia wall and its mesh on computed tomography. Experimental results have demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed study. The new computational tool has potential for personalized mesh identification which can assist surgeons in the diagnosis and repair of complex abdominal wall hernias. PMID:24184112

  10. High-resolution computed tomography reconstructions of invertebrate burrow systems

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Rachel; Boardman, Richard; Mavrogordato, Mark N.; Sinclair, Ian; Tolhurst, Trevor J.; Solan, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The architecture of biogenic structures can be highly influential in determining species contributions to major soil and sediment processes, but detailed 3-D characterisations are rare and descriptors of form and complexity are lacking. Here we provide replicate high-resolution micro-focus computed tomography (μ-CT) data for the complete burrow systems of three co-occurring, but functionally contrasting, sediment-dwelling inter-tidal invertebrates assembled alone, and in combination, in representative model aquaria. These data (≤2,000 raw image slices aquarium−1, isotropic voxel resolution, 81 μm) provide reference models that can be used for the development of novel structural analysis routines that will be of value within the fields of ecology, pedology, geomorphology, palaeobiology, ichnology and mechanical engineering. We also envisage opportunity for those investigating transport networks, vascular systems, plant rooting systems, neuron connectivity patterns, or those developing image analysis or statistics related to pattern or shape recognition. The dataset will allow investigators to develop or test novel methodology and ideas without the need to generate a complete three-dimensional computation of exemplar architecture. PMID:26396743

  11. High-resolution computed tomography reconstructions of invertebrate burrow systems.

    PubMed

    Hale, Rachel; Boardman, Richard; Mavrogordato, Mark N; Sinclair, Ian; Tolhurst, Trevor J; Solan, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The architecture of biogenic structures can be highly influential in determining species contributions to major soil and sediment processes, but detailed 3-D characterisations are rare and descriptors of form and complexity are lacking. Here we provide replicate high-resolution micro-focus computed tomography (μ-CT) data for the complete burrow systems of three co-occurring, but functionally contrasting, sediment-dwelling inter-tidal invertebrates assembled alone, and in combination, in representative model aquaria. These data (≤ 2,000 raw image slices aquarium(-1), isotropic voxel resolution, 81 μm) provide reference models that can be used for the development of novel structural analysis routines that will be of value within the fields of ecology, pedology, geomorphology, palaeobiology, ichnology and mechanical engineering. We also envisage opportunity for those investigating transport networks, vascular systems, plant rooting systems, neuron connectivity patterns, or those developing image analysis or statistics related to pattern or shape recognition. The dataset will allow investigators to develop or test novel methodology and ideas without the need to generate a complete three-dimensional computation of exemplar architecture. PMID:26396743

  12. Evaluation of the Upper Airway Morphology: The Role of Cone Beam Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    White, Susan M; Huang, Chien-Jung; Huang, Shao-Ching; Sun, Zhengzheng; Eldredge, Jeff D; Mallya, Sanjay M

    2015-09-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has several applications in dentomaxillofacial diagnosis. Frequently, the imaged volume encompasses the upper airway. This article provides a systematic approach to airway analysis and the implications of the anatomic and pathologic alterations. It discusses the role of CBCT in management of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. This paper also highlights technological advances that combine CBCT imaging with computational modeling of the airway and the potential clinical applications of such technologies. PMID:26820010

  13. Spectrum of single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography findings in patients with parathyroid adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Dhritiman; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai; Harisankar, Chidambaram Natrajan Balasubramanian; Bhattacharya, Anish; Bhadada, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism results from excessive parathyroid hormone secretion. Approximately 85% of all cases of primary hyperparathyroidism are caused by a single parathyroid adenoma; 10–15% of the cases are caused by parathyroid hyperplasia. Parathyroid carcinoma accounts for approximately 3–4% of cases of primary disease. Technetium-99m-sestamibi (MIBI), the current scintigraphic procedure of choice for preoperative parathyroid localization, can be performed in various ways. The “single-isotope, double-phase technique” is based on the fact that MIBI washes out more rapidly from the thyroid than from abnormal parathyroid tissue. However, not all parathyroid lesions retain MIBI and not all thyroid tissue washes out quickly, and subtraction imaging is helpful. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provides information for localizing parathyroid lesions, differentiating thyroid from parathyroid lesions, and detecting and localizing ectopic parathyroid lesions. Addition of CT with SPECT improves the sensitivity. This pictorial assay demonstrates various SPECT/CT patterns observed in parathyroid scintigraphy. PMID:21969785

  14. Preclinical spectral computed tomography of gold nano-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roessl, Ewald; Cormode, David; Brendel, Bernhard; Jürgen Engel, Klaus; Martens, Gerhard; Thran, Axel; Fayad, Zahi; Proksa, Roland

    2011-08-01

    Today's state-of the art clinical computed tomography (CT) scanners exclusively use energy-integrating, scintillation detector technology, despite the fact that a part of the information carried by the transmitted X-ray photons is lost during the detection process. Room-temperature semiconductors, like CdTe or CZT, operated in energy-sensitive photon-counting mode provide information about the energy of every single X-ray detection event. This capability allows novel, promising approaches to selectively image abnormal tissue types like cancerous tissue or atherosclerotic plaque with the CT modality.In this article we report on recent dual K-edge imaging results obtained in the domain of pre-clinical, energy-sensitive photon-counting CT. In this approach, the tuning of threshold levels in the detector electronics to the K-edge energy in the attenuation of contrast agents (CA) offers highly specific, quantitative imaging of the distribution of the CA on top of the conventional, morphological image information. The combination of the high specificity of the K-edge imaging technique together with the powerful tool of targeting specific diseases in the human body by dedicated contrast materials might enrich the CT modality with capabilities of functional imaging known from the nuclear medicine imaging modalities, e.g., positron-emission-tomography but with the additional advantage of high spatial and temporal resolution. We also discuss briefly the technological difficulties to be overcome when translating the technique to human CT imaging and present the results of simulations indicating the feasibility of the K-edge imaging of vulnerable plaque using targeted gold nano-particles as contrast materials. Our experiments in the pre-clinical domain show that dual-K edge imaging of iodine and gold-based CAs is feasible while our simulations for the imaging of gold CAs in the clinical case support the future possibility of translating the technique to human imaging.

  15. Computed tomography based spectral imaging for fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Bridget Kathleen

    Multispectral imaging has been used for decades in remote sensing to enhance the classification, discrimination and characterization of materials. Only recently has this same technology been similarly applied to fixed biological samples in cytogenetics, pathology and medicine. A further extension to in vivo studies is often limited by the low levels of associated fluorescence as well as the increased temporal resolution required to analyze physiological changes. In addition, the cellular response to a specific agonist is often heterogeneous across the cellular field requiring a combination of sufficient spatial and temporal resolutions. A computed tomography imaging spectrometer (CTIS) has been developed which overcomes these limitations by simultaneously collecting extended range spectral information (470--740 nm, 5 nm sampling) across a 2-D field of view (200 mum x 200 mum, 0.96 mum sampling). The CTIS uses a computer generated hologram to produce a 5 x 5 array of images with differing amounts and directions of dispersion. This set of images allows the 3-D signal (x, y, lambda) from a fluorescent sample to be mapped onto a 2-D detector array. In this way, the full spectral and spatial information is acquired for a 2-D cellular field during a single integration time (presently 2 sec for biological specimens). The CTIS's design, calibration, and underlying theory are described in detail. In addition, the capability of the CTIS to simultaneously collect the fluorescence emission of multiple fluorophores across a 2-D cellular field is demonstrated. Specifically, the combined spectral variations of seminapthorhodafluor-I and enhanced green fluorescent protein were followed in rat insulinoma cells in order to extend the linear range of intracellular pH detection.

  16. Computed tomography of the orbit - A review and an update.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Hatem A; Abdelhalim, Ahmed; Elkafrawy, Mamdouh H

    2012-10-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the orbit have been competing for the hearts and minds of health care providers for well over 2 decades. While several drawbacks pertaining to CT have been outlined since the introduction of MRI, CT remains the standard diagnostic test for evaluating cross-sectional, 2 or 3-dimensional images of the body. PMID:23961026

  17. Micro-computed tomography: an alternative method for shark ageing.

    PubMed

    Geraghty, P T; Jones, A S; Stewart, J; Macbeth, W G

    2012-04-01

    Micro-computed tomography (microCT) produced 3D reconstructions of shark Carcharhinus brevipinna vertebrae that could be virtually sectioned along any desired plane, and upon which growth bands were readily visible. When compared to manual sectioning, it proved to be a valid and repeatable means of ageing and offers several distinct advantages over other ageing methods. PMID:22497384

  18. Incarcerated obturator hernia: early diagnostic using helical computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Avaro, J-P; Biance, N; Savoie, P-H; Peycru, T; Pauleau, G; Richez, P; Charpentier, R; Balandraud, P

    2008-04-01

    Obturator hernia is a rare event with poor clinical signs. Delayed diagnosis is a cause of increased mortality due to ruptured gangrenous bowel. We report a case of incarcerated obturator hernia which highlights the usefulness of computed tomography (CT) scanning in diagnosing this condition. PMID:17628737

  19. An Easily Assembled Laboratory Exercise in Computed Tomography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mylott, Elliot; Klepetka, Ryan; Dunlap, Justin C.; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a laboratory activity in computed tomography (CT) primarily composed of a photogate and a rotary motion sensor that can be assembled quickly and partially automates data collection and analysis. We use an enclosure made with a light filter that is largely opaque in the visible spectrum but mostly transparent to the near…

  20. Computed Tomography-Enhanced Anatomy Course Using Enterprise Visualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Hila; Cohen, Haim; Medlej, Bahaa; Kornreich, Liora; Peled, Nathan; Hershkovitz, Israel

    2013-01-01

    Rapid changes in medical knowledge are forcing continuous adaptation of the basic science courses in medical schools. This article discusses a three-year experience developing a new Computed Tomography (CT)-based anatomy curriculum at the Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, including describing the motivations and reasoning for the…

  1. RADIAL COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY OF AIR CONTAMINANTS USING OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes the application of an optical remote-sensing (ORS) system to map air contaminants and locate fugitive emissions. Many ORD systems may utilize radial non-overlapping beam geometry and a computed tomography (CT) algorithm to map the concentrations in a plane. In...

  2. Evolution of the Cranial Computed Tomography Scan in Child Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Kenneth W.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A retrospective review of medical charts for 34 children with a diagnosis of child abuse, who had cranial computed tomography scans performed, revealed that some scans initially interpreted as normal were subsequently reinterpreted as abnormal, and some children's repeat scannings were interpreted as abnormal, modifying the medical and legal…

  3. 21 CFR 892.1200 - Emission computed tomography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Emission computed tomography system. 892.1200 Section 892.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... location and distribution of gamma ray- and positron-emitting radionuclides in the body and produce...

  4. 21 CFR 892.1200 - Emission computed tomography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Emission computed tomography system. 892.1200 Section 892.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... location and distribution of gamma ray- and positron-emitting radionuclides in the body and produce...

  5. 21 CFR 892.1200 - Emission computed tomography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Emission computed tomography system. 892.1200 Section 892.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... location and distribution of gamma ray- and positron-emitting radionuclides in the body and produce...

  6. Cystosarcoma phylloides: calcified pulmonary metastases detected by computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Samuels, T; Kerenyi, N; Hamilton, P

    1990-08-01

    We report the appearance of calcifications on computed tomography (CT) images of pulmonary metastases from a rare breast tumor, malignant cystosarcoma phylloides. Histologic examination of the pulmonary masses revealed malignant spindle cells with osteoid and cartilage components in the cellular stroma. This appearance has not been described previously. PMID:2169970

  7. Lumbosacral plexus lesions: correlation of clinical signs and computed tomography.

    PubMed Central

    Vock, P; Mattle, H; Studer, M; Mumenthaler, M

    1988-01-01

    Neurological signs and computed tomographic morphology were compared in 60 patients. The primary neurological deficit was most commonly located in the sacral (n = 31) or lumbar plexus (n = 23) and was most commonly caused by a neoplasm (n = 40). In 78% of the patients it correlated with the lesions detected by computed tomography (CT). CT reliably demonstrates extraspinal mass lesions, but only moderately well predicts functional signs. Images PMID:3351532

  8. Comparison of Computed Tomography Scout Based Reference Point Localization to Conventional Film and Axial Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Lan; Templeton, Alistair; Turian, Julius; Kirk, Michael; Zusag, Thomas; Chu, James C.H.

    2011-01-01

    Identification of source positions after implantation is an important step in brachytherapy planning. Reconstruction is traditionally performed from films taken by conventional simulators, but these are gradually being replaced in the clinic by computed tomography (CT) simulators. The present study explored the use of a scout image-based reconstruction algorithm that replaces the use of traditional film, while exhibiting low sensitivity to metal-induced artifacts that can appear in 3D CT methods. In addition, the accuracy of an in-house graphical software implementation of scout-based reconstruction was compared with seed location reconstructions for 2 phantoms by conventional simulator and CT measurements. One phantom was constructed using a planar fixed grid of 1.5-mm diameter ball bearings (BBs) with 40-mm spacing. The second was a Fletcher-Suit applicator embedded in Styrofoam (Dow Chemical Co., Midland, MI) with one 3.2-mm-diameter BB inserted into each of 6 surrounding holes. Conventional simulator, kilovoltage CT (kVCT), megavoltage CT, and scout-based methods were evaluated by their ability to calculate the distance between seeds (40 mm for the fixed grid, 30-120 mm in Fletcher-Suit). All methods were able to reconstruct the fixed grid distances with an average deviation of <1%. The worst single deviations (approximately 6%) were exhibited in the 2 volumetric CT methods. In the Fletcher-Suit phantom, the intermodality agreement was within approximately 3%, with the conventional sim measuring marginally larger distances, with kVCT the smallest. All of the established reconstruction methods exhibited similar abilities to detect the distances between BBs. The 3D CT-based methods, with lower axial resolution, showed more variation, particularly with the smaller BBs. With a software implementation, scout-based reconstruction is an appealing approach because it simplifies data acquisition over film-based reconstruction without requiring any specialized equipment

  9. Comparison of computed tomography scout based reference point localization to conventional film and axial computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lan; Templeton, Alistair; Turian, Julius; Kirk, Michael; Zusag, Thomas; Chu, James C H

    2011-01-01

    Identification of source positions after implantation is an important step in brachytherapy planning. Reconstruction is traditionally performed from films taken by conventional simulators, but these are gradually being replaced in the clinic by computed tomography (CT) simulators. The present study explored the use of a scout image-based reconstruction algorithm that replaces the use of traditional film, while exhibiting low sensitivity to metal-induced artifacts that can appear in 3D CT methods. In addition, the accuracy of an in-house graphical software implementation of scout-based reconstruction was compared with seed location reconstructions for 2 phantoms by conventional simulator and CT measurements. One phantom was constructed using a planar fixed grid of 1.5-mm diameter ball bearings (BBs) with 40-mm spacing. The second was a Fletcher-Suit applicator embedded in Styrofoam (Dow Chemical Co., Midland, MI) with one 3.2-mm-diameter BB inserted into each of 6 surrounding holes. Conventional simulator, kilovoltage CT (kVCT), megavoltage CT, and scout-based methods were evaluated by their ability to calculate the distance between seeds (40 mm for the fixed grid, 30-120 mm in Fletcher-Suit). All methods were able to reconstruct the fixed grid distances with an average deviation of <1%. The worst single deviations (approximately 6%) were exhibited in the 2 volumetric CT methods. In the Fletcher-Suit phantom, the intermodality agreement was within approximately 3%, with the conventional sim measuring marginally larger distances, with kVCT the smallest. All of the established reconstruction methods exhibited similar abilities to detect the distances between BBs. The 3D CT-based methods, with lower axial resolution, showed more variation, particularly with the smaller BBs. With a software implementation, scout-based reconstruction is an appealing approach because it simplifies data acquisition over film-based reconstruction without requiring any specialized equipment

  10. Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography in abdominal diseases.

    PubMed

    Schillaci, Orazio; Filippi, Luca; Danieli, Roberta; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2007-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies of the abdominal region are established in conventional nuclear medicine because of their easy and large availability, even in the most peripheral hospitals. It is well known that SPECT imaging demonstrates function, rather than anatomy. It is useful in the diagnosis of various disorders because of its ability to detect changes caused by disease before identifiable anatomic correlates and clinical manifestations exist. However, SPECT data frequently need anatomic landmarks to precisely depict the site of a focus of abnormal tracer uptake and the structures containing normal activity; the fusion with morphological studies can furnish an anatomical map to scintigraphic findings. In the past, software-based fusion of independently performed SPECT and CT or magnetic resonance images have been demonstrated to be time consuming and not useful for routine clinical employment. The recent development of dual-modality integrated imaging systems, which provide SPECT and CT images in the same scanning session, with the acquired images co-registered by means of the hardware, has created a new scenario. The first data have been mainly reported in oncology patients and indicate that SPECT/CT is very useful because it is able to provide further information of clinical value in several cases. In SPECT studies of abdominal diseases, hybrid SPECT/CT can play a role in the differential diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomas located near vascular structures, in precisely detecting and localizing active splenic tissue caused by splenosis in splenectomy patients, in providing important information for therapy optimization in patients submitted to hepatic arterial perfusion scintigraphy, in accurately identifying the involved bowel segments in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases, and in correctly localizing the bleeding sites in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:17161039

  11. Clinical optical coherence tomography combined with multiphoton tomography for evaluation of several skin disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Speicher, Marco; Bückle, Rainer; Reckfort, Julia; McKenzie, Gordon; Welzel, Julia; Koehler, Martin J.; Elsner, Peter; Kaatz, Martin

    2010-02-01

    The first clinical trial of optical coherence tomography (OCT) combined with multiphoton tomography (MPT) and dermoscopy is reported. State-of-the-art (i) OCT systems for dermatology (e.g. multibeam swept source OCT), (ii) the femtosecond laser multiphoton tomograph DermaInspectTM, and (iii) digital dermoscopes were applied to 47 patients with a diversity of skin diseases and disorders such as skin cancer, psoriasis, hemangioma, connective tissue diseases, pigmented lesions, and autoimmune bullous skin diseases. Dermoscopy, also called 'epiluminescent microscopy', provides two-dimensional color images of the skin surface. OCT imaging is based on the detection of optical reflections within the tissue measured interferometrically whereas nonlinear excitation of endogenous fluorophores and the second harmonic generation are the bases of MPT images. OCT cross sectional "wide field" image provides a typical field of view of 5 x 2 mm2 and offers fast information on the depth and the volume of the investigated lesion. In comparison, multiphoton tomography presents 0.36 x 0.36 mm2 horizontal or diagonal sections of the region of interest within seconds with submicron resolution and down to a tissue depth of 200 μm. The combination of OCT and MPT provides a synergistic optical imaging modality for early detection of skin cancer and other skin diseases.

  12. Computer tomography of large dust clouds in complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Killer, Carsten; Himpel, Michael; Melzer, André

    2014-10-15

    The dust density is a central parameter of a dusty plasma. Here, a tomography setup for the determination of the three-dimensionally resolved density distribution of spatially extended dust clouds is presented. The dust clouds consist of micron-sized particles confined in a radio frequency argon plasma, where they fill almost the entire discharge volume. First, a line-of-sight integrated dust density is obtained from extinction measurements, where the incident light from an LED panel is scattered and absorbed by the dust. Performing these extinction measurements from many different angles allows the reconstruction of the 3D dust density distribution, analogous to a computer tomography in medical applications.

  13. Artifact reduction in industrial computed tomography via data fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrapp, Michael; Goldammer, Matthias; Stephan, Jürgen

    2014-02-01

    As the most stressed part of a gas turbine the first row of turbine blades is not only a challenge for the materials used. Also the testing of these parts have to meet the highest standards. Computed tomography (CT) as the technique which could reveal the most details also provides the biggest challenges [1]: A full penetration of large sized turbine blades is often only possible at high X-ray voltages causing disproportional high costs. A reduction of the X-ray voltage is able to reduce these arising costs but yields non penetration artifacts in the reconstructed CT image. In most instances, these artifacts manifests itself as blurred and smeared regions at concave edges due to a reduced signal to noise ratio. In order to complement the missing information and to increase the overall image quality of our reconstruction, we use further imaging modalities such as a 3-D Scanner and ultrasonic imaging. A 3-D scanner is easy and cost effective to implement and is able to acquire all relevant data simultaneously with the CT projections. If, however, the interior structure is of supplemental interest, an ultrasonic imaging method is additionally used. We consider this data as a priori knowledge to employ them in an iterative reconstruction. To do so, standard iterative reconstruction methods are modified to incorporate the a priori data in a regularization approach in combination with minimizing the total variation of our image. Applying this procedure on turbine blades, we are able to reduce the apparent artifacts almost completely.

  14. Volume estimation of multidensity nodules with thoracic computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Gavrielides, Marios A; Li, Qin; Zeng, Rongping; Myers, Kyle J; Sahiner, Berkman; Petrick, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    This work focuses on volume estimation of "multidensity" lung nodules in a phantom computed tomography study. Eight objects were manufactured by enclosing spherical cores within larger spheres of double the diameter but with a different density. Different combinations of outer-shell/inner-core diameters and densities were created. The nodules were placed within an anthropomorphic phantom and scanned with various acquisition and reconstruction parameters. The volumes of the entire multidensity object as well as the inner core of the object were estimated using a model-based volume estimator. Results showed percent volume bias across all nodules and imaging protocols with slice thicknesses [Formula: see text] ranging from [Formula: see text] to 6.6% for the entire object (standard deviation ranged from 1.5% to 7.6%), and within [Formula: see text] to 5.7% for the inner-core measurement (standard deviation ranged from 2.0% to 17.7%). Overall, the estimation error was larger for the inner-core measurements, which was expected due to the smaller size of the core. Reconstructed slice thickness was found to substantially affect volumetric error for both tasks; exposure and reconstruction kernel were not. These findings provide information for understanding uncertainty in volumetry of nodules that include multiple densities such as ground glass opacities with a solid component. PMID:26844235

  15. Artifact reduction in industrial computed tomography via data fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Schrapp, Michael; Goldammer, Matthias; Stephan, Jürgen

    2014-02-18

    As the most stressed part of a gas turbine the first row of turbine blades is not only a challenge for the materials used. Also the testing of these parts have to meet the highest standards. Computed tomography (CT) as the technique which could reveal the most details also provides the biggest challenges [1]: A full penetration of large sized turbine blades is often only possible at high X-ray voltages causing disproportional high costs. A reduction of the X-ray voltage is able to reduce these arising costs but yields non penetration artifacts in the reconstructed CT image. In most instances, these artifacts manifests itself as blurred and smeared regions at concave edges due to a reduced signal to noise ratio. In order to complement the missing information and to increase the overall image quality of our reconstruction, we use further imaging modalities such as a 3-D Scanner and ultrasonic imaging. A 3-D scanner is easy and cost effective to implement and is able to acquire all relevant data simultaneously with the CT projections. If, however, the interior structure is of supplemental interest, an ultrasonic imaging method is additionally used. We consider this data as a priori knowledge to employ them in an iterative reconstruction. To do so, standard iterative reconstruction methods are modified to incorporate the a priori data in a regularization approach in combination with minimizing the total variation of our image. Applying this procedure on turbine blades, we are able to reduce the apparent artifacts almost completely.

  16. X-ray computed tomography for additive manufacturing: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, A.; Maskery, I.; Leach, R. K.

    2016-07-01

    In this review, the use of x-ray computed tomography (XCT) is examined, identifying the requirement for volumetric dimensional measurements in industrial verification of additively manufactured (AM) parts. The XCT technology and AM processes are summarised, and their historical use is documented. The use of XCT and AM as tools for medical reverse engineering is discussed, and the transition of XCT from a tool used solely for imaging to a vital metrological instrument is documented. The current states of the combined technologies are then examined in detail, separated into porosity measurements and general dimensional measurements. In the conclusions of this review, the limitation of resolution on improvement of porosity measurements and the lack of research regarding the measurement of surface texture are identified as the primary barriers to ongoing adoption of XCT in AM. The limitations of both AM and XCT regarding slow speeds and high costs, when compared to other manufacturing and measurement techniques, are also noted as general barriers to continued adoption of XCT and AM.

  17. Flip-flop phenomenon in systemic sclerosis on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Oksuzoglu, Kevser; Ozen, Gulsen; Inanir, Sabahat; Direskeneli, Rafi Haner

    2015-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a rare autoimmune disease, which may affect multiple organ systems. Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) can demonstrate the degree and anatomical extent of involvement in the entire body and coexisting malignancies in connective tissue diseases. We present a case of SSc with an increased 18F-FDG uptake in the cutaneous and subcutaneous tissues even higher than the neighboring skeletal muscles ("flip-flop phenomenon," that is, an increased 18F-FDG uptake in the skin but a decreased 18F-FDG uptake in the skeletal muscles). PMID:26430324

  18. Assessment of asthmatic inflammation using hybrid fluorescence molecular tomography-x-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaopeng; Prakash, Jaya; Ruscitti, Francesca; Glasl, Sarah; Stellari, Fabio Franco; Villetti, Gino; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear imaging plays a critical role in asthma research but is limited in its readings of biology due to the short-lived signals of radio-isotopes. We employed hybrid fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and x-ray computed tomography (XCT) for the assessment of asthmatic inflammation based on resolving cathepsin activity and matrix metalloproteinase activity in dust mite, ragweed, and Aspergillus species-challenged mice. The reconstructed multimodal fluorescence distribution showed good correspondence with ex vivo cryosection images and histological images, confirming FMT-XCT as an interesting alternative for asthma research.

  19. Computed tomography in acute cholecystitis: new observations

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, R.A.; Costello, P.; Duszlak, E.

    1983-10-01

    The computed tomographic CT findings in five patients with acute cholecystitis were analyzed. Common findings included thickening and nodularity of the gallbladder wall, cholelithiasis, and dilatation of the gallbladder lumen. Other more specific findings included poor definition of the gallbladder wall, pericholecystic fluid collections, and gas collections within the gallbladder wall. Most of the CT findings are suggestive but not pathognomonic, and correlation with the clinical, scintigraphic, and sonographic findings is necessary.

  20. Theoretical and computational aspects of seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, A. S.; Lavrentiev, M. M.; Romanov, V. G.; Romanov, M. E.

    1990-12-01

    This paper reviews aspects related to applications of seismic wave kinematics for the reconstruction of internal characteristics of an elastic medium. It presents the results of studying the inverse kinematic seismic problem and its linear analogue — problems of integral geometry, obtained in recent decades with an emphasis on the work done by Soviet scientists. Computational techniques of solving these problems are discussed. This review should be of interest to geophysicists studying the oceans, atmosphere and ionosphere as well as those studying the solid part of the Earth.

  1. Diagnosing pulmonary embolism: new computed tomography applications.

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, Konstantin; Thieme, Sven; Sommer, Wieland; Johnson, Thorsten; Reiser, Maximilian F

    2010-05-01

    Computed tomographic pulmonary angiography has become the standard of care for the evaluation of patients with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE). In addition to the direct depiction or exclusion of a pulmonary embolus in suspected PE, a number of predictive markers have been established to evaluate the patient's prognosis in acute and in chronic PE. An accurate risk stratification based on CT findings is crucial because optimal management, monitoring, and therapeutic strategies depend on the prognosis. With the recent introduction of the so-called "dual-source" CT scanners, that is, a scanner consisting of 2 tubes and 2 detectors mounted orthogonally to each other, different tube voltages can be used simultaneously, resulting in different energies of the emitted x-ray spectra (dual-energy CT; DECT). Initial results have shown that DECT is capable of iodine mapping of the pulmonary parenchyma, reliably depicting the segmental defects in iodine distribution in locations corresponding to embolic vessel occlusions. This study deals with a number of actual topics on PE imaging with multidetector CT and DECT, including the discussion of the relevant imaging findings to assess the patient's prognosis, the potential and additional benefit of dual-energy information on the parenchymal iodine distribution, the optimization of scan protocols including low-radiation dose chest pain protocols, and the discussion on future perspectives of CT in PE patients, such as the role of computer-aided diagnostic tools or the potential of ventilation imaging with DECT. PMID:20463534

  2. Computed Tomography-based Subclassification of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Dirksen, Asger; Wille, Mathilde M W

    2016-04-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is an obvious modality for subclassification of COPD. Traditionally, the pulmonary involvement of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in smokers is understood as a combination of deleterious effects of smoking on small airways (chronic bronchitis and small airways disease) and distal to the airways with destruction and loss of lung parenchyma (emphysema). However, segmentation of airways is still experimental; with contemporary high-resolution CT (HRCT) we can just see the "entrance" of small airways, and until now changes in airway morphology that have been observed in COPD are subtle. Furthermore, recent results indicate that emphysema may also be the essential pathophysiologic mechanism behind the airflow limitation of COPD. The definition of COPD excludes bronchiectasis as a symptomatic subtype of COPD, and CT findings in chronic bronchitis and exacerbations of COPD are rather unspecific. This leaves emphysema as the most obvious candidate for subclassification of COPD. Both chest radiologists and pulmonary physicians are quite familiar with the appearance of various patterns of emphysema on HRCT, such as centrilobular, panlobular, and paraseptal emphysema. However, it has not yet been possible to develop operational definitions of these patterns that can be used by computer software to automatically classify CT scans into distinct patterns. In conclusion, even though various emphysema patterns can be recognized visually, CT has not yet demonstrated a great potential for automated subclassification of COPD, and it is an open question whether it will ever be possible to achieve success equivalent to that obtained by HRCT in the area of interstitial lung diseases. PMID:27115944

  3. Clinical utility of dental cone-beam computed tomography: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Jaju, Prashant P; Jaju, Sushma P

    2014-01-01

    Panoramic radiography and computed tomography were the pillars of maxillofacial diagnosis. With the advent of cone-beam computed tomography, dental practice has seen a paradigm shift. This review article highlights the potential applications of cone-beam computed tomography in the fields of dental implantology and forensic dentistry, and its limitations in maxillofacial diagnosis. PMID:24729729

  4. 21 CFR 892.1750 - Computed tomography x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Computed tomography x-ray system. 892.1750 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1750 Computed tomography x-ray system. (a) Identification. A computed tomography x-ray system is a diagnostic x-ray system intended...

  5. Dictionary-based image denoising for dual energy computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechlem, Korbinian; Allner, Sebastian; Mei, Kai; Pfeiffer, Franz; Noël, Peter B.

    2016-03-01

    Compared to conventional computed tomography (CT), dual energy CT allows for improved material decomposition by conducting measurements at two distinct energy spectra. Since radiation exposure is a major concern in clinical CT, there is a need for tools to reduce the noise level in images while preserving diagnostic information. One way to achieve this goal is the application of image-based denoising algorithms after an analytical reconstruction has been performed. We have developed a modified dictionary denoising algorithm for dual energy CT aimed at exploiting the high spatial correlation between between images obtained from different energy spectra. Both the low-and high energy image are partitioned into small patches which are subsequently normalized. Combined patches with improved signal-to-noise ratio are formed by a weighted addition of corresponding normalized patches from both images. Assuming that corresponding low-and high energy image patches are related by a linear transformation, the signal in both patches is added coherently while noise is neglected. Conventional dictionary denoising is then performed on the combined patches. Compared to conventional dictionary denoising and bilateral filtering, our algorithm achieved superior performance in terms of qualitative and quantitative image quality measures. We demonstrate, in simulation studies, that this approach can produce 2d-histograms of the high- and low-energy reconstruction which are characterized by significantly improved material features and separation. Moreover, in comparison to other approaches that attempt denoising without simultaneously using both energy signals, superior similarity to the ground truth can be found with our proposed algorithm.

  6. Computed tomography of the normal thymus

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, R.L.; Lee, J.K.T.; Sagel, S.S.; Peterson, R.R.

    1982-01-01

    Recognition of variations in size, shape, and density of the normal thymus on computed tomographic (CT) scans is of paramount importance, less it be misinterpreted as an abnormal mediastinal mass. Studying patients subsequently proved free of active chest disease, we analyzed 154 CT scans of the mediastinum, performed on a fourth-generation scanner, to determine the incidence of visualization and appearance of the normal thymus. The thymus was seen in 100% of patients under age 30, 73% of patients between 30 and 49 years, and in 17% of patients over 49 years of age. The thickness of the thymus showed a definite decrease in size with increasing age; although the width showed a similar general tendency, a wide variation was noted within each age group. In younger patients, the density of the thymus was similar to that of muscle; the attenuation values progressively decreased in older patients, finally approaching that of fat.

  7. Giant intracranial aneurysms: rapid sequential computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, R.S.; Cohen, W.A.; Kricheff, I.I.; Redington, R.W.; Berninger, W.H.

    1982-11-01

    Giant intracranial aneurysms often present as mass lesions rather than with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Routine computed tomographic (CT) scans with contrast material will generally detect them, but erroneous diagnosis of basal meningioma is possible. Rapid sequential scanning (dynamic CT) after bolus injection of 40 ml of Renografin-76 can conclusively demonstrate an intracranial aneurysm, differentiating it from other lesions by transit-time analysis of the passage of contrast medium. In five patients, the dynamics of contrast bolus transit in aneurysms were consistently different from the dynamics in pituitary tumors, craniopharyngiomas, and meningiomas, thereby allowing a specific diagnosis. Dynamic CT was also useful after treatment of the aneurysms by carotid artery ligation and may be used as an alternative to angiographic evaluation in determining luminal patency or thrombosis.

  8. Computational adaptive optics for broadband interferometric tomography of tissues and cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adie, Steven G.; Mulligan, Jeffrey A.

    2016-03-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) can shape aberrated optical wavefronts to physically restore the constructive interference needed for high-resolution imaging. With access to the complex optical field, however, many functions of optical hardware can be achieved computationally, including focusing and the compensation of optical aberrations to restore the constructive interference required for diffraction-limited imaging performance. Holography, which employs interferometric detection of the complex optical field, was developed based on this connection between hardware and computational image formation, although this link has only recently been exploited for 3D tomographic imaging in scattering biological tissues. This talk will present the underlying imaging science behind computational image formation with optical coherence tomography (OCT) -- a beam-scanned version of broadband digital holography. Analogous to hardware AO (HAO), we demonstrate computational adaptive optics (CAO) and optimization of the computed pupil correction in 'sensorless mode' (Zernike polynomial corrections with feedback from image metrics) or with the use of 'guide-stars' in the sample. We discuss the concept of an 'isotomic volume' as the volumetric extension of the 'isoplanatic patch' introduced in astronomical AO. Recent CAO results and ongoing work is highlighted to point to the potential biomedical impact of computed broadband interferometric tomography. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of HAO vs. CAO for the effective shaping of optical wavefronts, and highlight opportunities for hybrid approaches that synergistically combine the unique advantages of hardware and computational methods for rapid volumetric tomography with cellular resolution.

  9. Computed tomography of human joints and radioactive waste drums

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, Harry E.; Roberson, G. Patrick; Hollerbach, Karin; Logan, Clinton M.; Ashby, Elaine; Bernardi, Richard

    1999-12-02

    X- and gamma-ray imaging techniques in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and assay (NDA) have seen increasing use in an array of industrial, environmental, military, and medical applications. Much of this growth in recent years is attributed to the rapid development of computed tomography (CT) and the use of NDE throughout the life-cycle of a product. Two diverse examples of CT are discussed, 1.) Our computational approach to normal joint kinematics and prosthetic joint analysis offers an opportunity to evaluate and improve prosthetic human joint replacements before they are manufactured or surgically implanted. Computed tomography data from scanned joints are segmented, resulting in the identification of bone and other tissues of interest, with emphasis on the articular surfaces. 2.) We are developing NDE and NDA techniques to analyze closed waste drums accurately and quantitatively. Active and passive computed tomography (A and PCT) is a comprehensive and accurate gamma-ray NDA method that can identify all detectable radioisotopes present in a container and measure their radioactivity.

  10. Computed tomography of human joints and radioactive waste drums

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, E; Bernardi, R; Hollerbach, K; Logan, C; Martz, H; Roberson, G P

    1999-06-01

    X- and gamma-ray imaging techniques in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and assay (NDA) have been increasing use in an array of industrial, environmental, military, and medical applications. Much of this growth in recent years is attributed to the rapid development of computed tomography (CT) and the use of NDE throughout the life-cycle of a product. Two diverse examples of CT are discussed. (1) The computational approach to normal joint kinematics and prosthetic joint analysis offers an opportunity to evaluate and improve prosthetic human joint replacements before they are manufactured or surgically implanted. Computed tomography data from scanned joints are segmented, resulting in the identification of bone and other tissues of interest, with emphasis on the articular surfaces. (2) They are developing NDE and NDE techniques to analyze closed waste drums accurately and quantitatively. Active and passive computed tomography (A and PCT) is a comprehensive and accurate gamma-ray NDA method that can identify all detectable radioisotopes present in a container and measure their radioactivity.