Science.gov

Sample records for computer based learning

  1. Lessons Learned in Computer-Based Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modesitt, Kenneth L.

    This personal account of the development of computer-based learning from the 1960s to the present argues that the 1960s were a period of gestation. Instructional applications of computers at that time included efforts to simulate physics experiments and the debut of the PLATO system, which already had the ability to deliver interactive instruction…

  2. Beliefs and Computer-Based Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiou, Guey-Fa

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the use of beliefs to guide researchers in the development of computer-based learning. Topics include properties of beliefs; beliefs about learning; beliefs about computer technologies; directions for computer-based learning, including multimedia technology, virtual reality, and groupware; and learning rationales, including…

  3. Index to Computer Based Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoye, Robert E., Ed.; Wang, Anastasia C., Ed.

    The computer-based programs and projects described in this index are listed under 98 different subject matter fields. Descrptions of programs include information on: subject field, program name and number, author, source, the program's curriculum content, prerequisites, level of instruction, type of student for which it is intended, total hours of…

  4. Computer-Based Learning in Chemistry Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pietzner, Verena

    2014-01-01

    Currently not many people would doubt that computers play an essential role in both public and private life in many countries. However, somewhat surprisingly, evidence of computer use is difficult to find in German state schools although other countries have managed to implement computer-based teaching and learning in their schools. This paper…

  5. Learning with Computer-Based Learning Environments: A Literature Review of Computer Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moos, Daniel C.; Azevedo, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Although computer-based learning environments (CBLEs) are becoming more prevalent in the classroom, empirical research has demonstrated that some students have difficulty learning with these environments. The motivation construct of computer-self efficacy plays an integral role in learning with CBLEs. This literature review synthesizes research…

  6. Cognitive Effects from Process Learning with Computer-Based Simulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breuer, Klaus; Kummer, Ruediger

    1990-01-01

    Discusses content learning versus process learning, describes process learning with computer-based simulations, and highlights an empirical study on the effects of process learning with problem-oriented, computer-managed simulations in technical vocational education classes in West Germany. Process learning within a model of the cognitive system…

  7. Adaptive Learning for ESL Based on Computation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Ya-huei; Liao, Hung-Chang

    2011-01-01

    In the conventional English as a Second Language (ESL) class-based learning environment, teachers use a fixed learning sequence and content for all students without considering the diverse needs of each individual. There is a great deal of diversity within and between classes. Hence, if students' learning outcomes are to be maximised, it is…

  8. Adult Learning in a Computer-Based ESL Acquisition Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Karen Renee

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the self-efficacy of students learning English as a Second Language on the computer-based Rosetta Stone program. The research uses a qualitative approach to explore how a readily available computer-based learning program, Rosetta Stone, can help adult immigrant students gain some English competence and so acquire a greater…

  9. A Computer-Based System for Studies in Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentner, Donald R.; And Others

    A computer-based system, called the FLOW system, was used in experimental studies of human learning. The student learns a simple computer language from printed instructions and can run his programs interactively on the FLOW system. An automated tutor simulates a human tutor who watches over the student and gives help when the student has…

  10. Entanglement-Based Machine Learning on a Quantum Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, X.-D.; Wu, D.; Su, Z.-E.; Chen, M.-C.; Wang, X.-L.; Li, Li; Liu, N.-L.; Lu, C.-Y.; Pan, J.-W.

    2015-03-01

    Machine learning, a branch of artificial intelligence, learns from previous experience to optimize performance, which is ubiquitous in various fields such as computer sciences, financial analysis, robotics, and bioinformatics. A challenge is that machine learning with the rapidly growing "big data" could become intractable for classical computers. Recently, quantum machine learning algorithms [Lloyd, Mohseni, and Rebentrost, arXiv.1307.0411] were proposed which could offer an exponential speedup over classical algorithms. Here, we report the first experimental entanglement-based classification of two-, four-, and eight-dimensional vectors to different clusters using a small-scale photonic quantum computer, which are then used to implement supervised and unsupervised machine learning. The results demonstrate the working principle of using quantum computers to manipulate and classify high-dimensional vectors, the core mathematical routine in machine learning. The method can, in principle, be scaled to larger numbers of qubits, and may provide a new route to accelerate machine learning.

  11. Entanglement-based machine learning on a quantum computer.

    PubMed

    Cai, X-D; Wu, D; Su, Z-E; Chen, M-C; Wang, X-L; Li, Li; Liu, N-L; Lu, C-Y; Pan, J-W

    2015-03-20

    Machine learning, a branch of artificial intelligence, learns from previous experience to optimize performance, which is ubiquitous in various fields such as computer sciences, financial analysis, robotics, and bioinformatics. A challenge is that machine learning with the rapidly growing "big data" could become intractable for classical computers. Recently, quantum machine learning algorithms [Lloyd, Mohseni, and Rebentrost, arXiv.1307.0411] were proposed which could offer an exponential speedup over classical algorithms. Here, we report the first experimental entanglement-based classification of two-, four-, and eight-dimensional vectors to different clusters using a small-scale photonic quantum computer, which are then used to implement supervised and unsupervised machine learning. The results demonstrate the working principle of using quantum computers to manipulate and classify high-dimensional vectors, the core mathematical routine in machine learning. The method can, in principle, be scaled to larger numbers of qubits, and may provide a new route to accelerate machine learning. PMID:25839250

  12. Experiential Learning through Computer-Based Simulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynes, Bill; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes experiential learning instructional model and simulation for student principals. Describes interactive laser videodisc simulation. Reports preliminary findings about student principal learning from simulation. Examines learning approaches by unsuccessful and successful students and learning levels of model learners. Simulation's success…

  13. Incorporating Computer-Based Learning in a Medical School Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Leonard,; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Presents the history and background for the use of computers in medical education at the Norris Medical School at the University of Southern California. Describes the current computer facilities and how computer-based learning is incorporated into the curriculum. (PR)

  14. An E-learning System based on Affective Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duo, Sun; Song, Lu Xue

    In recent years, e-learning as a learning system is very popular. But the current e-learning systems cannot instruct students effectively since they do not consider the emotional state in the context of instruction. The emergence of the theory about "Affective computing" can solve this question. It can make the computer's intelligence no longer be a pure cognitive one. In this paper, we construct an emotional intelligent e-learning system based on "Affective computing". A dimensional model is put forward to recognize and analyze the student's emotion state and a virtual teacher's avatar is offered to regulate student's learning psychology with consideration of teaching style based on his personality trait. A "man-to-man" learning environment is built to simulate the traditional classroom's pedagogy in the system.

  15. Computer-Based Training: Capitalizing on Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedwell, Wendy L.; Salas, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Computer-based training (CBT) is a methodology for providing systematic, structured learning; a useful tool when properly designed. CBT has seen a resurgence given the serious games movement, which is at the forefront of integrating primarily entertainment computer-based games into education and training. This effort represents a multidisciplinary…

  16. Aids to Computer-Based Multimedia Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Richard E.; Moreno, Roxana

    2002-01-01

    Presents a cognitive theory of multimedia learning that draws on dual coding theory, cognitive load theory, and constructivist learning theory and derives some principles of instructional design for fostering multimedia learning. These include principles of multiple representation, contiguity, coherence, modality, and redundancy. (SLD)

  17. Learning Machine, Vietnamese Based Human-Computer Interface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    The sixth session of IT@EDU98 consisted of seven papers on the topic of the learning machine--Vietnamese based human-computer interface, and was chaired by Phan Viet Hoang (Informatics College, Singapore). "Knowledge Based Approach for English Vietnamese Machine Translation" (Hoang Kiem, Dinh Dien) presents the knowledge base approach, which…

  18. How To Produce Computer-Based Learning Materials. Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellington, Henry

    A sequel to the booklet "How Computers Can Be Used in Education," this booklet begins by looking at ways in which computer-based learning (CBL) materials can be used in different types of instructional situations, i.e., mass instruction, individualized learning, and group learning. The design and production of four types of conventional CBL…

  19. Self-Regulation of Learning within Computer-Based Learning Environments: A Critical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Fielding I.; Greene, Jeffrey A.; Costich, Claudine M.

    2008-01-01

    Computer-based learning environments (CBLEs) present important opportunities for fostering learning; however, studies have shown that students have difficulty when learning with these environments. Research has identified that students' self-regulatory learning (SRL) processes may mediate the hypothesized positive relations between CBLEs and…

  20. Computer based learning in general practice--options and implementation.

    PubMed

    Mills, K A; McGlade, K

    1992-01-01

    A survey of the 30 departments of general practice in the UK revealed that only three are currently making use of any form of computer based learning materials for teaching their undergraduate students. One of the reasons for the low level of usage is likely to be the relatively poor availability of suitable courseware and lack of guidance as to how to utilise what is available. This short paper describes the types of courseware that are available and the advantages and disadvantages of using acquired courseware as opposed to writing your own. It also considers alternative strategies for making computer based learning (CBL) courseware available to students. PMID:1608334

  1. Smart Learning Services Based on Smart Cloud Computing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Svetlana; Song, Su-Mi; Yoon, Yong-Ik

    2011-01-01

    Context-aware technologies can make e-learning services smarter and more efficient since context-aware services are based on the user’s behavior. To add those technologies into existing e-learning services, a service architecture model is needed to transform the existing e-learning environment, which is situation-aware, into the environment that understands context as well. The context-awareness in e-learning may include the awareness of user profile and terminal context. In this paper, we propose a new notion of service that provides context-awareness to smart learning content in a cloud computing environment. We suggest the elastic four smarts (E4S)—smart pull, smart prospect, smart content, and smart push—concept to the cloud services so smart learning services are possible. The E4S focuses on meeting the users’ needs by collecting and analyzing users’ behavior, prospecting future services, building corresponding contents, and delivering the contents through cloud computing environment. Users’ behavior can be collected through mobile devices such as smart phones that have built-in sensors. As results, the proposed smart e-learning model in cloud computing environment provides personalized and customized learning services to its users. PMID:22164048

  2. Cloud Computing Based E-Learning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Zoube, Mohammed; El-Seoud, Samir Abou; Wyne, Mudasser F.

    2010-01-01

    Cloud computing technologies although in their early stages, have managed to change the way applications are going to be developed and accessed. These technologies are aimed at running applications as services over the internet on a flexible infrastructure. Microsoft office applications, such as word processing, excel spreadsheet, access database…

  3. Measuring Self-Regulation in Computer-Based Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schraw, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    I provide a summary of the four invited articles in this special issue and compare and contrast different methods for measuring self-regulation in computer-based learning environments (CBLEs). I present a taxonomy that distinguishes between offline and online measures and further distinguishes subcategories within each of these categories. I…

  4. Computer-based learning in neuroanatomy: A longitudinal study of learning, transfer, and retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chariker, Julia H.

    A longitudinal experiment was conducted to explore computer-based learning of neuroanatomy. Using a realistic 3D graphical model of neuroanatomy, and sections derived from the model, exploratory graphical tools were integrated into interactive computer programs so as to allow adaptive exploration. 72 participants learned either sectional anatomy alone or learned whole anatomy followed by sectional anatomy. Sectional anatomy was explored either in perceptually continuous animation or discretely, as in the use of an anatomical atlas. Learning was measured longitudinally to a high performance criterion. After learning, transfer to biomedical images and long-term retention was tested. Learning whole anatomy prior to learning sectional anatomy led to a more efficient learning experience. Learners demonstrated high levels of transfer from whole anatomy to sectional anatomy and from sectional anatomy to complex biomedical images. All learning groups demonstrated high levels of retention at 2--3 weeks.

  5. Innovative computer-based learning for breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Wingfield, Karen Louise

    Discussions with student nurses when they have been on placement on the breast cancer surgery ward highlighted their lack of knowledge about breast cancer surgery. This lack of knowledge by student nurses necessitated the development of a computer-based learning tool. A distance-learning tool was found to be an effective way of providing education, due to lack of facilities and workload on the ward. The student nurses using this tool will have better understanding of the treatments their patients are undergoing, leading to improved patient care. PMID:17353818

  6. Inquiry-Based Learning Case Studies for Computing and Computing Forensic Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Jackie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe and discuss the use of specifically-developed, inquiry-based learning materials for Computing and Forensic Computing students. Small applications have been developed which require investigation in order to de-bug code, analyse data issues and discover "illegal" behaviour. The applications are based…

  7. The Effects of Computer Supported Problem Based Learning on Students' Approaches to Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ak, Serife

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of computer supported problem based learning on students' approaches to learning. The research was conducted as a pre-test and posttest one-grouped design used to achieve the objectives of the study. The experimental process of study lasted 5 weeks and was carried out on 78 university…

  8. 2.5D dictionary learning based computed tomography reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jiajia; Eri, Haneda; Can, Ali; Ramani, Sathish; Fu, Lin; De Man, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    A computationally efficient 2.5D dictionary learning (DL) algorithm is proposed and implemented in the model- based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) framework for low-dose CT reconstruction. MBIR is based on the minimization of a cost function containing data-fitting and regularization terms to control the trade-off between data-fidelity and image noise. Due to the strong denoising performance of DL, it has previously been considered as a regularizer in MBIR, and both 2D and 3D DL implementations are possible. Compared to the 2D case, 3D DL keeps more spatial information and generates images with better quality although it requires more computation. We propose a novel 2.5D DL scheme, which leverages the computational advantage of 2D-DL, while attempting to maintain reconstruction quality similar to 3D-DL. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this new 2.5D DL scheme for MBIR in low-dose CT. By applying the 2D DL method in three different orthogonal planes and calculating the sparse coefficients accordingly, much of the 3D spatial information can be preserved without incurring the computational penalty of the 3D DL method. For performance evaluation, we use baggage phantoms with different number of projection views. In order to quantitatively compare the performance of different algorithms, we use PSNR, SSIM and region based standard deviation to measure the noise level, and use the edge response to calculate the resolution. Experimental results with full view datasets show that the different DL based algorithms have similar performance and 2.5D DL has the best resolution. Results with sparse view datasets show that 2.5D DL outperforms both 2D and 3D DL in terms of noise reduction. We also compare the computational costs, and 2.5D DL shows strong advantage over 3D DL in both full-view and sparse-view cases.

  9. Computer-based learning: games as an instructional strategy.

    PubMed

    Blake, J; Goodman, J

    1999-01-01

    Games are a creative teaching strategy that enhances learning and problem solving. Gaming strategies are being used by the authors to make learning interesting, stimulating and fun. This article focuses on the development and implementation of computer games as an instructional strategy. Positive outcomes have resulted from the use of games in the classroom. PMID:10409946

  10. Computer-Based Learning in Open and Distance Learning Institutions in Nigeria: Cautions on Use of Internet for Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okopi, Fidel Onjefu; Odeyemi, Olajumoke Janet; Adesina, Adewale

    2015-01-01

    The study has identified the areas of strengths and weaknesses in the current use of Computer Based Learning (CBL) tools in Open and Distance Learning (ODL) institutions in Nigeria. To achieve these objectives, the following research questions were proposed: (i) What are the computer-based learning tools (soft and hard ware) that are actually in…

  11. Computer-Based Learning of Neuroanatomy: A Longitudinal Study of Learning, Transfer, and Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chariker, Julia H.; Naaz, Farah; Pani, John R.

    2011-01-01

    A longitudinal experiment was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of new methods for learning neuroanatomy with computer-based instruction. Using a three-dimensional graphical model of the human brain and sections derived from the model, tools for exploring neuroanatomy were developed to encourage "adaptive exploration". This is an…

  12. The Effects of Study Tasks in a Computer-Based Chemistry Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urhahne, Detlef; Nick, Sabine; Poepping, Anna Christin; Schulz , Sarah Jayne

    2013-01-01

    The present study examines the effects of different study tasks on the acquisition of knowledge about acids and bases in a computer-based learning environment. Three different task formats were selected to create three treatment conditions: learning with gap-fill and matching tasks, learning with multiple-choice tasks, and learning only from text…

  13. Spiral and Project-Based Learning with Peer Assessment in a Computer Science Project Management Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaime, Arturo; Blanco, José Miguel; Domínguez, César; Sánchez, Ana; Heras, Jónathan; Usandizaga, Imanol

    2016-01-01

    Different learning methods such as project-based learning, spiral learning and peer assessment have been implemented in science disciplines with different outcomes. This paper presents a proposal for a project management course in the context of a computer science degree. Our proposal combines three well-known methods: project-based learning,…

  14. Computer Support for Learning Mathematics: A Learning Environment Based on Recreational Learning Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Morteo, Gabriel; Lopez, Gilberto

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce an electronic collaborative learning environment based on Interactive Instructors of Recreational Mathematics (IIRM), establishing an alternative approach for motivating students towards mathematics. The IIRM are educational software components, specializing in mathematical concepts, presented through recreational…

  15. Computer-Supported Problem-Based Learning. Final Grant Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koschmann, Timothy

    Southern Illinois University developed an instructional approach for supporting collaborative, problem-based learning (PBL) in medical education. A succession of software tools were developed and refined to implement this approach, and a technology-enriched facility, the "Collaborative Learning Lab" (CLL) was designed. The paper describes two…

  16. Improving Transfer of Learning in a Computer Based Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Jay Bee

    This report describes a program for improving the transfer of the learning of different techniques used in computer applications. The targeted population consisted of sophomores and juniors in a suburban high school in a middle class community. The problem was documented through teacher surveys, student surveys, anecdotal records and behavioral…

  17. Intel-Based Mac Computers Improve Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology & Learning, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Today, Mac computers offer schools an easy and powerful way to engage students in learning, foster 21st century skills and leverage existing software assets. Innovative software and hardware built into the Mac allows students to demonstrate their individual strengths--empowering them to be creators of content, rather than just consumers. Judging…

  18. Alternative Goal Structures for Computer Game-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ke, Fengfeng

    2008-01-01

    This field study investigated the application of cooperative, competitive, and individualistic goal structures in classroom use of computer math games and its impact on students' math performance and math learning attitudes. One hundred and sixty 5th-grade students were recruited and randomly assigned to Teams-Games-Tournament cooperative gaming,…

  19. Development of an Interactive Computer-Based Learning Strategy to Assist in Teaching Water Quality Modelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigic, Sasha; Lemckert, Charles J.

    2007-01-01

    The following paper presents a computer-based learning strategy to assist in introducing and teaching water quality modelling to undergraduate civil engineering students. As part of the learning strategy, an interactive computer-based instructional (CBI) aid was specifically developed to assist students to set up, run and analyse the output from a…

  20. Rationale, Design and Implementation of a Computer Vision-Based Interactive E-Learning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Richard Y. D.; Jin, Jesse S.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a schematic application of computer vision technologies to e-learning that is synchronous, peer-to-peer-based, and supports an instructor's interaction with non-computer teaching equipments. The article first discusses the importance of these focused e-learning areas, where the properties include accurate bidirectional…

  1. Reconceptualizing Pedagogical Usability of and Teachers' Roles in Computer Game-Based Learning in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tzuo, Pei-Wen; Ling, Jennifer Isabelle Ong Pei; Yang, Chien-Hui; Chen, Vivian Hsueh-Hua

    2012-01-01

    At present, methods for the optimal use of two approaches to computer game-based learning in school to enhance students' learning, namely, computer game play and game design, are obscure because past research has been devoted more to designing rather than evaluating the implementation of these approaches in school. In addition, most studies…

  2. Information Mapping for Computer-Based Learning and Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Robert E.; And Others

    A new conception of computer-based instructional systems is presented in this design of a system that can deliver individualized information sequences not only to learners and trainees, but to reference workers, reviewers, etc. Underlying the system is a flexible data base organized into labelled, movable information blocks according to the…

  3. Helping Students Soar to Success on Computers: An Investigation of the Soar Study Method for Computer-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jairam, Dharmananda; Kiewra, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    This study used self-report and observation techniques to investigate how students study computer-based materials. In addition, it examined if a study method called SOAR can facilitate computer-based learning. SOAR is an acronym that stands for the method's 4 theoretically driven and empirically supported components: select (S), organize (O),…

  4. The Effects of Computer-Supported Inquiry-Based Learning Methods and Peer Interaction on Learning Stellar Parallax

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruzhitskaya, Lanika

    2011-01-01

    The presented research study investigated the effects of computer-supported inquiry-based learning and peer interaction methods on effectiveness of learning a scientific concept. The stellar parallax concept was selected as a basic, and yet important in astronomy, scientific construct, which is based on a straightforward relationship of several…

  5. Problem-Based Learning Environment in Basic Computer Course: Pre-Service Teachers' Achievement and Key Factors for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Efendioglu, Akin

    2015-01-01

    This experimental study aims to determine pre-service teachers' achievements and key factors that affect the learning process with regard to problem-based learning (PBL) and lecture-based computer course (LBCC) conditions. The research results showed that the pre-service teachers in the PBL group had significantly higher achievement scores than…

  6. Construction of a Digital Learning Environment Based on Cloud Computing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Jihong; Xiong, Caiping; Liu, Huazhong

    2015-01-01

    Constructing the digital learning environment for ubiquitous learning and asynchronous distributed learning has opened up immense amounts of concrete research. However, current digital learning environments do not fully fulfill the expectations on supporting interactive group learning, shared understanding and social construction of knowledge.…

  7. [Undergraduate nursing students experience of a computer-based learning course].

    PubMed

    Alves, Rosa Helena Kreutz; Cogo, Ana Luísa Petersen

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to get to know how undergraduate nursing students at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul Nursing School experienced the computer-based learning (CBL) course: "Socio-historical process in nursing education". Five female students, who had attended the course the previous semester, were interviewed. Data were analyzed according to the thematic analysis. The final categories were: "the students' experience in the use of computer technologies" and "the students in relation to the computer-based learning experience". The flexibilization of study time and venue was pointed out as a positive factor. The students realized that CBL requires more effort and dedication when compared to conventional learning activities. We concluded that computer-based learning is an inclusive modality that allows access of students who are already involved in the labor market. PMID:19320351

  8. Discovery Learning, Representation, and Explanation within a Computer-Based Simulation: Finding the Right Mix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieber, Lloyd P.; Tzeng, Shyh-Chii; Tribble, Kelly

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore how adult users interact and learn during an interactive computer-based simulation supplemented with brief multimedia explanations of the content. A total of 52 college students interacted with a computer-based simulation of Newton's laws of motion in which they had control over the motion of a simple…

  9. CBSS Outreach Project: Computer-Based Study Strategies for Students with Learning Disabilities. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson-Inman, Lynne; Ditson, Mary

    This final report describes activities and accomplishments of the four-year Computer-Based Study Strategies (CBSS) Outreach Project at the University of Oregon. This project disseminated information about using computer-based study strategies as an intervention for students with learning disabilities and provided teachers in participating outreach…

  10. A flexible self-learning model based on granular computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ting; Wu, Yu; Li, Yinguo

    2007-04-01

    Granular Computing(GrC) is an emerging theory which simulates the process of human brain understanding and solving problems. Rough set theory is a tool for dealing with uncertainty and vagueness aspects of knowledge model. SMLGrC algorithm introduces GrC to classical rough set algorithms, and makes the length of the rules relatively short but it can not process mass data sets. In order to solve this problem, based on the analysis of the hierarchical granular model of information table, the method of Granular Distribution List(GDL) is introduced to generate granule, and a granular computing algorithm(SLMGrC) is improved. Sample Covered Factor(SCF) is also introduced to control the generation of rules when the algorithm generates conflicting rules. The improved algorithm can process mass data sets directly without influencing the validity of SLMGrC. Experiments demonstrated the validity and flexibility of our method.

  11. Learning with Computer-Based Multimedia: Gender Effects on Efficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohnl, Sabine; Bogner, Franz X.

    2012-01-01

    Up to now, only a few studies in multimedia learning have focused on gender effects. While research has mostly focused on learning success, the effect of gender on instructional efficiency (IE) has not yet been considered. Consequently, we used a quasi-experimental design to examine possible gender differences in the learning success, mental…

  12. A Study of the Efficacy of Project-Based Learning Integrated with Computer-Based Simulation--STELLA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eskrootchi, Rogheyeh; Oskrochi, G. Reza

    2010-01-01

    Incorporating computer-simulation modelling into project-based learning may be effective but requires careful planning and implementation. Teachers, especially, need pedagogical content knowledge which refers to knowledge about how students learn from materials infused with technology. This study suggests that students learn best by actively…

  13. Inventing Motivates and Prepares Student Teachers for Computer-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glogger-Frey, I.; Kappich, J.; Schwonke, R.; Holzäpfel, L.; Nückles, M.; Renkl, A.

    2015-01-01

    A brief, problem-oriented phase such as an inventing activity is one potential instructional method for preparing learners not only cognitively but also motivationally for learning. Student teachers often need to overcome motivational barriers in order to use computer-based learning opportunities. In a preliminary experiment, we found that student…

  14. Learners' Perceptions and Illusions of Adaptivity in Computer-Based Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandewaetere, Mieke; Vandercruysse, Sylke; Clarebout, Geraldine

    2012-01-01

    Research on computer-based adaptive learning environments has shown exemplary growth. Although the mechanisms of effective adaptive instruction are unraveled systematically, little is known about the relative effect of learners' perceptions of adaptivity in adaptive learning environments. As previous research has demonstrated that the learners'…

  15. Computer-Based Learning: Interleaving Whole and Sectional Representation of Neuroanatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pani, John R.; Chariker, Julia H.; Naaz, Farah

    2013-01-01

    The large volume of material to be learned in biomedical disciplines requires optimizing the efficiency of instruction. In prior work with computer-based instruction of neuroanatomy, it was relatively efficient for learners to master whole anatomy and then transfer to learning sectional anatomy. It may, however, be more efficient to continuously…

  16. An Evaluation of the Webquest as a Computer-Based Learning Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassanien, Ahmed

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the preparation and use of an internet activity for undergraduate learners in higher education (HE). It evaluates the effectiveness of using webquest as a computer-based learning (CBL) tool to support students to learn in HE. The evaluation undertaken offers insights into learner perceptions concerning the ease of use of the…

  17. Promoting Constructive Activities that Support Vicarious Learning during Computer-Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gholson, Barry; Craig, Scotty D.

    2006-01-01

    This article explores several ways computer-based instruction can be designed to support constructive activities and promote deep-level comprehension during vicarious learning. Vicarious learning, discussed in the first section, refers to knowledge acquisition under conditions in which the learner is not the addressee and does not physically…

  18. Enhancing Conceptual Learning Through Computer-Based Applets: The Effectiveness and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, George G.; Brouwer, Wytze; Nocente, Norma; Martin, Brian

    2005-01-01

    Several Canadian universities and colleges have been working together for years to build Web-accessible computer-based applets to help students learn physics concepts. This paper reports the findings from a study that evaluated the effectiveness of these applets in enhancing conceptual learning. We integrated quantitative and qualitative methods…

  19. Learning Probabilities in Computer Engineering by Using a Competency- and Problem-Based Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khoumsi, Ahmed; Hadjou, Brahim

    2005-01-01

    Our department has redesigned its electrical and computer engineering programs by adopting a learning methodology based on competence development, problem solving, and the realization of design projects. In this article, we show how this pedagogical approach has been successfully used for learning probabilities and their application to computer…

  20. Learning Outcomes and Learner Perceptions in Relation to Computer-Based Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosselle, Mieke; Sercu, Lies; Vandepitte, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on the findings obtained from an exploratory study on the effectiveness of feedback in a computer-based learning environment. The main aim of the study was to gain insight into learning outcomes and student perceptions in relation to different types of feedback. This aim was operationalised in terms of an investigation amongst…

  1. The MORPG-Based Learning System for Multiple Courses: A Case Study on Computer Science Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Kuo-Yu

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at developing a Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game-based (MORPG) Learning system which enabled instructors to construct a game scenario and manage sharable and reusable learning content for multiple courses. It used the curriculum of "Introduction to Computer Science" as a study case to assess students' learning…

  2. A Methodology for Integrating Computer-Based Learning Tools in Science Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papadouris, Nicos; Constantinou, Constantinos P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a methodology for effectively integrating computer-based learning tools in science teaching and learning. This methodology provides a means of systematic analysis to identify the capabilities of particular software tools and to formulate a series of competencies relevant to physical science that could be developed by means…

  3. Assessing Medical Students' Self-Regulation as Aptitude in Computer-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Hyuksoon S.; Kalet, Adina L.; Plass, Jan L.

    2011-01-01

    We developed a Self-Regulation Measure for Computer-based learning (SRMC) tailored toward medical students, by modifying Zimmerman's Self-Regulated Learning Interview Schedule (SRLIS) for K-12 learners. The SRMC's reliability and validity were examined in 2 studies. In Study 1, 109 first-year medical students were asked to complete the SRMC.…

  4. Argumentation-Based Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (ABCSCL): A Synthesis of 15 Years of Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noroozi, Omid; Weinberger, Armin; Biemans, Harm J. A.; Mulder, Martin; Chizari, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Learning to argue is an essential objective in education; and online environments have been found to support the sharing, constructing, and representing of arguments in multiple formats for what has been termed Argumentation-Based Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (ABCSCL). The purpose of this review is to give an overview of research in…

  5. Exploring the Presentation and Format of Help in a Computer-Based Electrical Engineering Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reisslein, Jana; Atkinson, Robert K.; Reisslein, Martin

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated whether it was more beneficial to provide the learners in computer-based learning environments access to on demand (self-regulated) help after they committed an error in problem solving or for the learning environment to externally regulate the presentation of instructional help. Furthermore, two different resentational…

  6. Web-Based Learning in the Computer-Aided Design Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sung, Wen-Tsai; Ou, S. C.

    2002-01-01

    Applies principles of constructivism and virtual reality (VR) to computer-aided design (CAD) curriculum, particularly engineering, by integrating network, VR and CAD technologies into a Web-based learning environment that expands traditional two-dimensional computer graphics into a three-dimensional real-time simulation that enhances user…

  7. Development and Assessment of a Chemistry-Based Computer Video Game as a Learning Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Hernandez, Kermin Joel

    2010-01-01

    The chemistry-based computer video game is a multidisciplinary collaboration between chemistry and computer graphics and technology fields developed to explore the use of video games as a possible learning tool. This innovative approach aims to integrate elements of commercial video game and authentic chemistry context environments into a learning…

  8. Strategies, Challenges and Prospects for Active Learning in the Computer-Based Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holbert, K. E.; Karady, G. G.

    2009-01-01

    The introduction of computer-equipped classrooms into engineering education has brought with it a host of opportunities and issues. Herein, some of the challenges and successes for creating an environment for active learning within computer-based classrooms are described. The particular teaching approach developed for undergraduate electrical…

  9. Learning about Computer-Based Education in Adult Basic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahy, Patrick J.

    In 1979 the adult basic education department at the Alberta Vocational Centre (AVC), Edmonton, began to use the Control Data PLATO system. Results of the first PLATO project showed students using PLATO learned at least as much as students in regular classes. Students learned faster and reported great satisfaction with PLATO experiences. Staff and…

  10. Computer game-based and traditional learning method: a comparison regarding students’ knowledge retention

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Educational computer games are examples of computer-assisted learning objects, representing an educational strategy of growing interest. Given the changes in the digital world over the last decades, students of the current generation expect technology to be used in advancing their learning requiring a need to change traditional passive learning methodologies to an active multisensory experimental learning methodology. The objective of this study was to compare a computer game-based learning method with a traditional learning method, regarding learning gains and knowledge retention, as means of teaching head and neck Anatomy and Physiology to Speech-Language and Hearing pathology undergraduate students. Methods Students were randomized to participate to one of the learning methods and the data analyst was blinded to which method of learning the students had received. Students’ prior knowledge (i.e. before undergoing the learning method), short-term knowledge retention and long-term knowledge retention (i.e. six months after undergoing the learning method) were assessed with a multiple choice questionnaire. Students’ performance was compared considering the three moments of assessment for both for the mean total score and for separated mean scores for Anatomy questions and for Physiology questions. Results Students that received the game-based method performed better in the pos-test assessment only when considering the Anatomy questions section. Students that received the traditional lecture performed better in both post-test and long-term post-test when considering the Anatomy and Physiology questions. Conclusions The game-based learning method is comparable to the traditional learning method in general and in short-term gains, while the traditional lecture still seems to be more effective to improve students’ short and long-term knowledge retention. PMID:23442203

  11. Brain computer interface learning for systems based on electrocorticography and intracortical microelectrode arrays

    PubMed Central

    Hiremath, Shivayogi V.; Chen, Weidong; Wang, Wei; Foldes, Stephen; Yang, Ying; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C.; Collinger, Jennifer L.; Boninger, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) system transforms neural activity into control signals for external devices in real time. A BCI user needs to learn to generate specific cortical activity patterns to control external devices effectively. We call this process BCI learning, and it often requires significant effort and time. Therefore, it is important to study this process and develop novel and efficient approaches to accelerate BCI learning. This article reviews major approaches that have been used for BCI learning, including computer-assisted learning, co-adaptive learning, operant conditioning, and sensory feedback. We focus on BCIs based on electrocorticography and intracortical microelectrode arrays for restoring motor function. This article also explores the possibility of brain modulation techniques in promoting BCI learning, such as electrical cortical stimulation, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and optogenetics. Furthermore, as proposed by recent BCI studies, we suggest that BCI learning is in many ways analogous to motor and cognitive skill learning, and therefore skill learning should be a useful metaphor to model BCI learning. PMID:26113812

  12. Learning with technology: use of case-based physical and computer simulations in professional education.

    PubMed

    Lyons, J; Miller, M; Milton, J

    1998-03-01

    This presentation will clarify contemporary ideas on the role of technology in education and how it can be employed to improve student learning experiences and outcomes. The paper will emphasise RMIT's role in providing quality education that is relevant to today's world and professional practice. It will examine a specific collaborative (RMIT & ACU), interdisciplinary project 'Pregnancy Simulator: Developing and Enhancing Student Learning of Assessment Skills'. This project consist of a physical pregnancy model connected to a multi-media computer-assisted learning package for the purpose of enhancing student learning of abdominal assessment skills. Our paper outlines an innovative technology-based teaching project and includes current educational issues or problems encountered in professional education, steps already taken to address these difficulties and how this project intends to facilitate learning. It identifies expected learning outcomes for midwives, nurses and medical students, and examines pedagogical principles applied to technological applications designed to provide guided discovery for allowing students to build confidence and competence in professional education. The case-based physical and computer simulations contextualise learning to assist transfer of learning to real world situations. This paper will also discuss how technology-based projects can be evaluated and integrated into university curricula to enhance student learning. PMID:9764007

  13. Effects of Feedback in a Computer-Based Learning Environment on Students' Learning Outcomes: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Kleij, Fabienne M.; Feskens, Remco C. W.; Eggen, Theo J. H. M.

    2015-01-01

    In this meta-analysis, we investigated the effects of methods for providing item-based feedback in a computer-based environment on students' learning outcomes. From 40 studies, 70 effect sizes were computed, which ranged from -0.78 to 2.29. A mixed model was used for the data analysis. The results show that elaborated feedback (EF; e.g., providing…

  14. Computer-based learning--an aid to successful teaching of pharmacology?

    PubMed

    E Hughes, Ian

    2002-07-01

    Various types of software have been developed for use in pharmacology courses. These include: simple drill (question and answer) software; electronic books; video material; tutorial type programs; simulations; and electronic learning environments for course organisation and delivery. These different types of software can be used in different ways to achieve very different learning objectives and gains in teaching efficiency. For example, software can be used: in tutorial and small group teaching; in lectures; to better prepare students for practical work; as a replacement for practicals; to provide options within a limited course structure; to supplement lectures and enable students to work at their own pace; to provide ongoing access to self-assessment throughout a course; to aid distance learning; as remedial teaching and to extend the student learning experience in areas which are too expensive or too time consuming or for which staff expertise does not exist. Evidence indicates that it is insufficient simply to make computer based learning material available to students. Like a laboratory class, it must be fully integrated into a module if real benefits are to be obtained. Students need to be taught how to learn from computer-based learning materials and how to integrate this learning tool in their learning strategy. Teachers need to be supported not only with information about the availability of software but, equally importantly, about how it can be integrated into modules. We are all delivering teaching and facilitating learning in a changing environment and subject to a variety of increasing pressures. It may well be that computer based learning materials may help to maintain a high quality of pharmacology teaching within this changing environment but we need more pedagogical research at the discipline level to establish how this can best be done. PMID:12107637

  15. A Multiple-Sessions Interactive Computer-Based Learning Tool for Ability Cultivation in Circuit Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Q.; Lai, L. L.; Tse, N. C. F.; Ichiyanagi, K.

    2011-01-01

    An interactive computer-based learning tool with multiple sessions is proposed in this paper, which teaches students to think and helps them recognize the merits and limitations of simulation tools so as to improve their practical abilities in electrical circuit simulation based on the case of a power converter with progressive problems. The…

  16. Computer-based learning for ESRD patient education: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Chambers, J K; Frisby, A J

    1995-07-01

    Computer use in everyday life has expanded human potential in virtually every possible arena. In health care, computer technology affects direct clinical care through diagnostics, treatment, monitoring, and documentation processes. Patient care systems use computer technology to manage billing, scheduling, and multiple other administrative functions. Computer technology for education of health care professionals has been primarily in selected undergraduate, graduate, and professional degree programs. Computer-based continuing education for health care professionals has been available for at least a decade, but computer-based patient education is just now beginning to emerge as a learning option. This article describes examples of patient education programs using different types of hardware and software and explores potential areas for further development of this area for end-stage renal disease patients and families. Computer technology is not a replacement for professional involvement in patient education, but rather offers a new arena of media to enhance and expand current teaching and learning resources. Computer-based learning is characterized by features representative of many highly regarded principles of adult education. Further, instructional design concepts used for program development are fundamentally sound for patient education. PMID:7614360

  17. Causal Learning with Local Computations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernbach, Philip M.; Sloman, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    The authors proposed and tested a psychological theory of causal structure learning based on local computations. Local computations simplify complex learning problems via cues available on individual trials to update a single causal structure hypothesis. Structural inferences from local computations make minimal demands on memory, require…

  18. The impact of computer-based versus "traditional" textbook science instruction on selected student learning outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothman, Alan H.

    This study reports the results of research designed to examine the impact of computer-based science instruction on elementary school level students' science content achievement, their attitude about science learning, their level of critical thinking-inquiry skills, and their level of cognitive and English language development. The study compared these learning outcomes resulting from a computer-based approach compared to the learning outcomes from a traditional, textbook-based approach to science instruction. The computer-based approach was inherent in a curriculum titled The Voyage of the Mimi , published by The Bank Street College Project in Science and Mathematics (1984). The study sample included 209 fifth-grade students enrolled in three schools in a suburban school district. This sample was divided into three groups, each receiving one of the following instructional treatments: (a) Mixed-instruction primarily based on the use of a hardcopy textbook in conjunction with computer-based instructional materials as one component of the science course; (b) Non-Traditional, Technology-Based -instruction fully utilizing computer-based material; and (c) Traditional, Textbook-Based-instruction utilizing only the textbook as the basis for instruction. Pre-test, or pre-treatment, data related to each of the student learning outcomes was collected at the beginning of the school year and post-test data was collected at the end of the school year. Statistical analyses of pre-test data were used as a covariate to account for possible pre-existing differences with regard to the variables examined among the three student groups. This study concluded that non-traditional, computer-based instruction in science significantly improved students' attitudes toward science learning and their level of English language development. Non-significant, positive trends were found for the following student learning outcomes: overall science achievement and development of critical thinking

  19. Computer-Based Learning: Interleaving Whole and Sectional Representation of Neuroanatomy

    PubMed Central

    Pani, John R.; Chariker, Julia H.; Naaz, Farah

    2015-01-01

    The large volume of material to be learned in biomedical disciplines requires optimizing the efficiency of instruction. In prior work with computer-based instruction of neuroanatomy, it was relatively efficient for learners to master whole anatomy and then transfer to learning sectional anatomy. It may, however, be more efficient to continuously integrate learning of whole and sectional anatomy. A study of computer-based learning of neuroanatomy was conducted to compare a basic transfer paradigm for learning whole and sectional neuroanatomy with a method in which the two forms of representation were interleaved (alternated). For all experimental groups, interactive computer programs supported an approach to instruction called adaptive exploration. Each learning trial consisted of time-limited exploration of neuroanatomy, self-timed testing, and graphical feedback. The primary result of this study was that interleaved learning of whole and sectional neuroanatomy was more efficient than the basic transfer method, without cost to long-term retention or generalization of knowledge to recognizing new images (Visible Human and MRI). PMID:22761001

  20. Practical Problem-Based Learning in Computing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Grady, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Computer Science (CS) is a relatively new disciple and how best to introduce it to new students remains an open question. Likewise, the identification of appropriate instructional strategies for the diverse topics that constitute the average curriculum remains open to debate. One approach considered by a number of practitioners in CS education…

  1. Curricular Improvements through Computation and Experiment Based Learning Modules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Fazeel; Singh, Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Engineers often need to predict how a part, mechanism or machine will perform in service, and this insight is typically achieved thorough computer simulations. Therefore, instruction in the creation and application of simulation models is essential for aspiring engineers. The purpose of this project was to develop a unified approach to teaching…

  2. Evaluating interactive computer-based scenarios designed for learning medical technology.

    PubMed

    Persson, Johanna; Dalholm, Elisabeth Hornyánszky; Wallergård, Mattias; Johansson, Gerd

    2014-11-01

    The use of medical equipment is growing in healthcare, resulting in an increased need for resources to educate users in how to manage the various devices. Learning the practical operation of a device is one thing, but learning how to work with the device in the actual clinical context is more challenging. This paper presents a computer-based simulation prototype for learning medical technology in the context of critical care. Properties from simulation and computer games have been adopted to create a visualization-based, interactive and contextually bound tool for learning. A participatory design process, including three researchers and three practitioners from a clinic for infectious diseases, was adopted to adjust the form and content of the prototype to the needs of the clinical practice and to create a situated learning experience. An evaluation with 18 practitioners showed that practitioners were positive to this type of tool for learning and that it served as a good platform for eliciting and sharing knowledge. Our conclusion is that this type of tools can be a complement to traditional learning resources to situate the learning in a context without requiring advanced technology or being resource-demanding. PMID:24898339

  3. Applying Web-Based Co-Regulated Learning to Develop Students' Learning and Involvement in a Blended Computing Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Chia-Wen

    2015-01-01

    This research investigated, via quasi-experiments, the effects of web-based co-regulated learning (CRL) on developing students' computing skills. Two classes of 68 undergraduates in a one-semester course titled "Applied Information Technology: Data Processing" were chosen for this research. The first class (CRL group, n = 38) received…

  4. Technology Support for Discussion Based Learning: From Computer Supported Collaborative Learning to the Future of Massive Open Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosé, Carolyn Penstein; Ferschke, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    This article offers a vision for technology supported collaborative and discussion-based learning at scale. It begins with historical work in the area of tutorial dialogue systems. It traces the history of that area of the field of Artificial Intelligence in Education as it has made an impact on the field of Computer-Supported Collaborative…

  5. The Effects of Study Tasks in a Computer-Based Chemistry Learning Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urhahne, Detlef; Nick, Sabine; Poepping, Anna Christin; Schulz, Sarah Jayne

    2013-12-01

    The present study examines the effects of different study tasks on the acquisition of knowledge about acids and bases in a computer-based learning environment. Three different task formats were selected to create three treatment conditions: learning with gap-fill and matching tasks, learning with multiple-choice tasks, and learning only from text and figures without any additional tasks. Participants were 196 ninth-grade students who learned with a self-developed multimedia program in a pretest-posttest control group design. Research results reveal that gap-fill and matching tasks were most effective in promoting knowledge acquisition, followed by multiple-choice tasks, and no tasks at all. The findings are in line with previous research on this topic. The effects can possibly be explained by the generation-recognition model, which predicts that gap-fill and matching tasks trigger more encompassing learning processes than multiple-choice tasks. It is concluded that instructional designers should incorporate more challenging study tasks for enhancing the effectiveness of computer-based learning environments.

  6. Spiral and Project-Based Learning with Peer Assessment in a Computer Science Project Management Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaime, Arturo; Blanco, José Miguel; Domínguez, César; Sánchez, Ana; Heras, Jónathan; Usandizaga, Imanol

    2016-02-01

    Different learning methods such as project-based learning, spiral learning and peer assessment have been implemented in science disciplines with different outcomes. This paper presents a proposal for a project management course in the context of a computer science degree. Our proposal combines three well-known methods: project-based learning, spiral learning and peer assessment. Namely, the course is articulated during a semester through the structured (progressive and incremental) development of a sequence of four projects, whose duration, scope and difficulty of management increase as the student gains theoretical and instrumental knowledge related to planning, monitoring and controlling projects. Moreover, the proposal is complemented using peer assessment. The proposal has already been implemented and validated for the last 3 years in two different universities. In the first year, project-based learning and spiral learning methods were combined. Such a combination was also employed in the other 2 years; but additionally, students had the opportunity to assess projects developed by university partners and by students of the other university. A total of 154 students have participated in the study. We obtain a gain in the quality of the subsequently projects derived from the spiral project-based learning. Moreover, this gain is significantly bigger when peer assessment is introduced. In addition, high-performance students take advantage of peer assessment from the first moment, whereas the improvement in poor-performance students is delayed.

  7. Spiral and Project-Based Learning with Peer Assessment in a Computer Science Project Management Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaime, Arturo; Blanco, José Miguel; Domínguez, César; Sánchez, Ana; Heras, Jónathan; Usandizaga, Imanol

    2016-06-01

    Different learning methods such as project-based learning, spiral learning and peer assessment have been implemented in science disciplines with different outcomes. This paper presents a proposal for a project management course in the context of a computer science degree. Our proposal combines three well-known methods: project-based learning, spiral learning and peer assessment. Namely, the course is articulated during a semester through the structured (progressive and incremental) development of a sequence of four projects, whose duration, scope and difficulty of management increase as the student gains theoretical and instrumental knowledge related to planning, monitoring and controlling projects. Moreover, the proposal is complemented using peer assessment. The proposal has already been implemented and validated for the last 3 years in two different universities. In the first year, project-based learning and spiral learning methods were combined. Such a combination was also employed in the other 2 years; but additionally, students had the opportunity to assess projects developed by university partners and by students of the other university. A total of 154 students have participated in the study. We obtain a gain in the quality of the subsequently projects derived from the spiral project-based learning. Moreover, this gain is significantly bigger when peer assessment is introduced. In addition, high-performance students take advantage of peer assessment from the first moment, whereas the improvement in poor-performance students is delayed.

  8. Computer-based learning materials for medical education: a model production.

    PubMed

    Mooney, G A; Bligh, J G

    1997-05-01

    Computer-based learning materials (CBL or courseware) have the potential to be valuable learning resources for medical education. However, CBL has failed to realize its potential primarily because of unstructured approaches towards design and development. This paper describes the courseware development model (CDM), a conceptual model produced and used by the Medical Education Unit at The University of Liverpool. The model describes a structured multi-disciplinary approach to the design and production of CBL materials. It promotes meticulous planning, communication and organization. The CDM draws on three areas of expertise: (1) education; (2) computer science; and (3) medical content. PMID:9231139

  9. Improving the learning of clinical reasoning through computer-based cognitive representation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bian; Wang, Minhong; Johnson, Janice M.; Grotzer, Tina A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Clinical reasoning is usually taught using a problem-solving approach, which is widely adopted in medical education. However, learning through problem solving is difficult as a result of the contextualization and dynamic aspects of actual problems. Moreover, knowledge acquired from problem-solving practice tends to be inert and fragmented. This study proposed a computer-based cognitive representation approach that externalizes and facilitates the complex processes in learning clinical reasoning. The approach is operationalized in a computer-based cognitive representation tool that involves argument mapping to externalize the problem-solving process and concept mapping to reveal the knowledge constructed from the problems. Methods Twenty-nine Year 3 or higher students from a medical school in east China participated in the study. Participants used the proposed approach implemented in an e-learning system to complete four learning cases in 4 weeks on an individual basis. For each case, students interacted with the problem to capture critical data, generate and justify hypotheses, make a diagnosis, recall relevant knowledge, and update their conceptual understanding of the problem domain. Meanwhile, students used the computer-based cognitive representation tool to articulate and represent the key elements and their interactions in the learning process. Results A significant improvement was found in students’ learning products from the beginning to the end of the study, consistent with students’ report of close-to-moderate progress in developing problem-solving and knowledge-construction abilities. No significant differences were found between the pretest and posttest scores with the 4-week period. The cognitive representation approach was found to provide more formative assessment. Conclusions The computer-based cognitive representation approach improved the learning of clinical reasoning in both problem solving and knowledge construction. PMID:25518871

  10. An Empirical Evaluation of Puzzle-Based Learning as an Interest Approach for Teaching Introductory Computer Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrick, K. E.

    2010-01-01

    This correspondence describes an adaptation of puzzle-based learning to teaching an introductory computer programming course. Students from two offerings of the course--with and without the puzzle-based learning--were surveyed over a two-year period. Empirical results show that the synthesis of puzzle-based learning concepts with existing course…

  11. Net Gain? The Integration of Computer-Based Learning in Six NSW Government Schools, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Debra; Schuck, Sandy; Segal, Gilda; Dwyer, Joanne; McEwen, Celina

    This study examined the impact on learning of the integration of computer-based technology (CBT). The study focused on six New South Wales (Australia) government schools that were at different stages of development of the integration of CBT. Data were gathered through classroom observations and structured interviews with key personnel, students,…

  12. Learning Mathematics by Designing, Programming, and Investigating with Interactive, Dynamic Computer-Based Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Neil; Buteau, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    As part of their undergraduate mathematics curriculum, students at Brock University learn to create and use computer-based tools with dynamic, visual interfaces, called Exploratory Objects, developed for the purpose of conducting pure or applied mathematical investigations. A student's Development Process Model of creating and using an Exploratory…

  13. A Framework for the Contextual Analysis of Computer-Based Learning Environments. Technical Report No. 527.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Michael J.; Spiro, Rand J.

    Addressing the need for a framework to distinguish the conditions under which different types of educational computing environments are productive, this paper proposes a cognitively based Contextual Analysis Framework consisting of two primary elements: (1) conceptual characteristics of the knowledge domain being learned, including the complexity…

  14. Listening Strategy Use and Influential Factors in Web-Based Computer Assisted Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, L.; Zhang, R.; Liu, C.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates second and foreign language (L2) learners' listening strategy use and factors that influence their strategy use in a Web-based computer assisted language learning (CALL) system. A strategy inventory, a factor questionnaire and a standardized listening test were used to collect data from a group of 82 Chinese students…

  15. Attention Paid to Feedback Provided by a Computer-Based Assessment for Learning on Information Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmers, Caroline; Veldkamp, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Three studies are presented on attention paid to feedback provided by a computer-based assessment for learning on information literacy. Results show that the attention paid to feedback varies greatly. In general the attention focuses on feedback of incorrectly answered questions. In each study approximately fifty percent of the respondents paid…

  16. Factors Affecting Learning of Vector Math from Computer-Based Practice: Feedback Complexity and Prior Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heckler, Andrew F.; Mikula, Brendon D.

    2016-01-01

    In experiments including over 450 university-level students, we studied the effectiveness and time efficiency of several levels of feedback complexity in simple, computer-based training utilizing static question sequences. The learning domain was simple vector math, an essential skill in introductory physics. In a unique full factorial design, we…

  17. Development and Evaluation of Computer-Based Laboratory Practical Learning Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandole, Y. B.

    2006-01-01

    Effective evaluation of educational software is a key issue for successful introduction of advanced tools in the curriculum. This paper details to developing and evaluating a tool for computer assisted learning of science laboratory courses. The process was based on the generic instructional system design model. Various categories of educational…

  18. Knowledge Cultures and the Shaping of Work-Based Learning: The Case of Computer Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nerland, Monika

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines how the knowledge culture of computer engineering--that is, the ways in which knowledge is produced, distributed, accumulated and collectively approached within this profession--serve to construct work-based learning in specific ways. Typically, the epistemic infrastructures take the form of information structures with a global…

  19. Effects of Computer Based Learning on Students' Attitudes and Achievements towards Analytical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akcay, Husamettin; Durmaz, Asli; Tuysuz, Cengiz; Feyzioglu, Burak

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of computer-based learning and traditional method on students' attitudes and achievement towards analytical chemistry. Students from Chemistry Education Department at Dokuz Eylul University (D.E.U) were selected randomly and divided into three groups; two experimental (Eg-1 and Eg-2) and a control…

  20. Formats and Prior Knowledge on Learning in a Computer-Based Lesson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ChanLin, Lih-Juan

    2001-01-01

    Investigated the effects of presentation format (animation, still graphics, text) and the students' prior knowledge on learning a computer-based physics lesson in grades eight and nine. Results of an analysis of covariance indicated that specific presentation formats are not equally effective for the different prior knowledge groups. (Author/LRW)

  1. Formative Computer-Based Assessment in Higher Education: The Effectiveness of Feedback in Supporting Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Tess

    2009-01-01

    A formative computer-based assessment (CBA) was one of three instruments used for assessment in a Bachelor of Education course at Queen's University (Ontario, Canada) with an enrolment of approximately 700 students. The formative framework fostered a self-regulated learning environment whereby feedback on the CBA was used to support rather than…

  2. Computer Based Learning in FE. A Staff Development Model. A Staff Development Publication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    This booklet describes the development and content of a model staff development pack for use in training teachers to incorporate the techniques of computer-based learning into their subject teaching. The guide consists of three parts. Part 1 outlines the aims and objectives, content, and use of the pack. Described next are seven curriculum samples…

  3. Enhancing Learning Outcomes in Computer-Based Training via Self-Generated Elaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuevas, Haydee M.; Fiore, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the utility of an instructional strategy known as the "query method" for enhancing learning outcomes in computer-based training. The query method involves an embedded guided, sentence generation task requiring elaboration of key concepts in the training material that encourages learners to "stop and…

  4. Computer-Based Exercises for Learning to Read and Spell by Deaf Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reitsma, Pieter

    2009-01-01

    There is a surprising lack of systematic research evaluating the effects of reading exercises for young deaf children. Therefore, for this article, two computer-based exercises were developed and learning effects were determined by posttests. One (spelling oriented) exercise was to select the correct word among three orthographically similar…

  5. Computer-Based Learning: The Key 'Technological Multiplier' for Technology Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Angus

    1982-01-01

    The use of computer-based learning (CBL) is discussed. The author examines the appropriate use of the technology; its cost; identifying the best potential applications of CBL; and the use of CBL by major airlines, oil companies, universities, manufacturers, and government. (CT)

  6. Supporting Student Learning: The Use of Computer-Based Formative Assessment Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peat, Mary; Franklin, Sue

    2002-01-01

    Describes the development of a variety of computer-based assessment opportunities, both formative and summative, that are available to a large first-year biology class at the University of Sydney (Australia). Discusses online access to weekly quizzes, a mock exam, and special self-assessment modules that are beneficial to student learning.…

  7. Effects of Multidimensional Concept Maps on Fourth Graders' Learning in Web-Based Computer Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Hwa-Shan; Chiou, Chei-Chang; Chiang, Heien-Kun; Lai, Sung-Hsi; Huang, Chiun-Yen; Chou, Yin-Yu

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the effect of multidimensional concept mapping instruction on students' learning performance in a web-based computer course. The subjects consisted of 103 fourth graders from an elementary school in central Taiwan. They were divided into three groups: multidimensional concept map (MCM) instruction group, Novak concept map (NCM)…

  8. Development of a Computer-Based Visualised Quantitative Learning System for Playing Violin Vibrato

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Tracy Kwei-Liang; Lin, Huann-shyang; Chen, Ching-Kong; Tsai, Jih-Long

    2015-01-01

    Traditional methods of teaching music are largely subjective, with the lack of objectivity being particularly challenging for violin students learning vibrato because of the existence of conflicting theories. By using a computer-based analysis method, this study found that maintaining temporal coincidence between the intensity peak and the target…

  9. Evaluation of Computer Based Foreign Language Learning Software by Teachers and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baz, Fatih Çagatay; Tekdal, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate Computer Based Foreign Language Learning software called Dynamic Education (DYNED) by teachers and students. The study is conducted with randomly chosen ten primary schools with the participants of 522 7th grade students and 7 English teachers. Three points Likert scale for teachers and five points Likert scale…

  10. Analyses of Receptive and Productive Korean EFL Vocabulary: Computer-Based Vocabulary Learning Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Scott Sungki

    2013-01-01

    The present research study investigated the effects of 8 versions of a computer-based vocabulary learning program on receptive and productive knowledge levels of college students. The participants were 106 male and 103 female Korean EFL students from Kyungsung University and Kwandong University in Korea. Students who participated in versions of…

  11. A Computer-Based Spatial Learning Strategy Approach That Improves Reading Comprehension and Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponce, Hector R.; Mayer, Richard E.; Lopez, Mario J.

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the effectiveness of a computer-based spatial learning strategy approach for improving reading comprehension and writing. In reading comprehension, students received scaffolded practice in translating passages into graphic organizers. In writing, students received scaffolded practice in planning to write by filling in graphic…

  12. Tool Use of Experienced Learners in Computer-Based Learning Environments: Can Tools Be Beneficial?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juarez Collazo, Norma A.; Corradi, David; Elen, Jan; Clarebout, Geraldine

    2014-01-01

    Research has documented the use of tools in computer-based learning environments as problematic, that is, learners do not use the tools and when they do, they tend to do it suboptimally. This study attempts to disentangle cause and effect of this suboptimal tool use for experienced learners. More specifically, learner variables (metacognitive and…

  13. Effects of Concreteness and Contiguity on Learning from Computer-Based Reference Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, Sribhagyam; Lewis, Daphne D.; Crooks, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    Today's technology has reached new heights that have not been fully implemented. One of the areas where technology has not yet reached its full potential is in education. This study examined the effects of concreteness of location names and contiguity of location names with textual information on learning from computer-based reference maps. The…

  14. Active, Collaborative and Case-Based Learning with Computer-Based Case Scenarios.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Robert

    1998-01-01

    Discusses ideas and observations about the development, use, and pedagogy of computer-based case scenarios. Outlines two large computer-based case scenarios written to help students develop their skills and knowledge in business information systems. Considers factors in the design of computer-based case scenarios and related activities that might…

  15. The Effects of Inquiry-Based Computer Simulation with Cooperative Learning on Scientific Thinking and Conceptual Understanding of Gas Laws

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdullah, Sopiah; Shariff, Adilah

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of inquiry-based computer simulation with heterogeneous-ability cooperative learning (HACL) and inquiry-based computer simulation with friendship cooperative learning (FCL) on (a) scientific reasoning (SR) and (b) conceptual understanding (CU) among Form Four students in Malaysian Smart…

  16. Learning Residential Electrical Wiring through Computer Simulation: The Impact of Computer-Based Learning Environments on Student Achievement and Cognitive Load

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Han-Chin; Su, I-Hsien

    2011-01-01

    Multimedia learning environments such as computer simulations are widely accepted as tools for supporting science learning. Although the design of multimedia learning environments can be domain specific, few studies have focused on the use of computer simulations for learning residential electrical wiring. This study aimed to determine whether…

  17. Learning Achievement in Solving Word-Based Mathematical Questions through a Computer-Assisted Learning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Tzu-Hua; Liu, Yuan-Chen; Chang, Hsiu-Chen

    2012-01-01

    This study developed a computer-assisted mathematical problem-solving system in the form of a network instruction website to help low-achieving second- and third-graders in mathematics with word-based addition and subtraction questions in Taiwan. According to Polya's problem-solving model, the system is designed to guide these low-achievers…

  18. A computational visual saliency model based on statistics and machine learning.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ru-Je; Lin, Wei-Song

    2014-01-01

    Identifying the type of stimuli that attracts human visual attention has been an appealing topic for scientists for many years. In particular, marking the salient regions in images is useful for both psychologists and many computer vision applications. In this paper, we propose a computational approach for producing saliency maps using statistics and machine learning methods. Based on four assumptions, three properties (Feature-Prior, Position-Prior, and Feature-Distribution) can be derived and combined by a simple intersection operation to obtain a saliency map. These properties are implemented by a similarity computation, support vector regression (SVR) technique, statistical analysis of training samples, and information theory using low-level features. This technique is able to learn the preferences of human visual behavior while simultaneously considering feature uniqueness. Experimental results show that our approach performs better in predicting human visual attention regions than 12 other models in two test databases. PMID:25084782

  19. Effects of Mobile Phone-Based App Learning Compared to Computer-Based Web Learning on Nursing Students: Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to determine the effect of mobile-based discussion versus computer-based discussion on self-directed learning readiness, academic motivation, learner-interface interaction, and flow state. Methods This randomized controlled trial was conducted at one university. Eighty-six nursing students who were able to use a computer, had home Internet access, and used a mobile phone were recruited. Participants were randomly assigned to either the mobile phone app-based discussion group (n = 45) or a computer web-based discussion group (n = 41). The effect was measured at before and after an online discussion via self-reported surveys that addressed academic motivation, self-directed learning readiness, time distortion, learner-learner interaction, learner-interface interaction, and flow state. Results The change in extrinsic motivation on identified regulation in the academic motivation (p = 0.011) as well as independence and ability to use basic study (p = 0.047) and positive orientation to the future in self-directed learning readiness (p = 0.021) from pre-intervention to post-intervention was significantly more positive in the mobile phone app-based group compared to the computer web-based discussion group. Interaction between learner and interface (p = 0.002), having clear goals (p = 0.012), and giving and receiving unambiguous feedback (p = 0.049) in flow state was significantly higher in the mobile phone app-based discussion group than it was in the computer web-based discussion group at post-test. Conclusions The mobile phone might offer more valuable learning opportunities for discussion teaching and learning methods in terms of self-directed learning readiness, academic motivation, learner-interface interaction, and the flow state of the learning process compared to the computer. PMID:25995965

  20. Role of computer-based learning in tooth carving in dentistry: An Indian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Juneja, Saurabh; Juneja, Manjushree

    2016-01-01

    Tooth carving is an important practical preclinical exercise in the curriculum in Indian dental education setup. It forms the basis of introduction to tooth anatomy, morphology and occlusion of primary and permanent teeth through practical approach. It requires enormous time and manpower to master the skill. Therefore, there is an imminent necessity to incorporate computer-based learning of the art of tooth carving for effective teaching and efficient student learning. This will ensure quality time to be spent on other academic and research activities by students and faculty in addition to adding value as a teaching aid.

  1. Role of computer-based learning in tooth carving in dentistry: An Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Juneja, Saurabh; Juneja, Manjushree

    2016-01-01

    Tooth carving is an important practical preclinical exercise in the curriculum in Indian dental education setup. It forms the basis of introduction to tooth anatomy, morphology and occlusion of primary and permanent teeth through practical approach. It requires enormous time and manpower to master the skill. Therefore, there is an imminent necessity to incorporate computer-based learning of the art of tooth carving for effective teaching and efficient student learning. This will ensure quality time to be spent on other academic and research activities by students and faculty in addition to adding value as a teaching aid. PMID:27563579

  2. Metacognitive Load--Useful, or Extraneous Concept? Metacognitive and Self-Regulatory Demands in Computer-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwonke, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Instructional design theories such as the "cognitive load theory" (CLT) or the "cognitive theory of multimedia learning" (CTML) explain learning difficulties in (computer-based) learning usually as a result of design deficiencies that hinder effective schema construction. However, learners often struggle even in well-designed…

  3. Learning Vocabulary in a Foreign Language: A Computer Software Based Model Attempt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yelbay Yilmaz, Yasemin

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at devising a vocabulary learning software that would help learners learn and retain vocabulary items effectively. Foundation linguistics and learning theories have been adapted to the foreign language vocabulary learning context using a computer software named Parole that was designed exclusively for this study. Experimental…

  4. Effects of learning structure and summarization during computer-based instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Lynn

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of learning strategy and summarization within a computer-based chemistry and physics program. Students worked individually or in cooperative dyads to complete science instruction; half of them completed summaries over the instructional content when directed to do so. The study examined the effects of learning strategy and summarization on posttest and enroute performance, attitude, time-on-task, and interaction behaviors. Results indicated no significant differences for posttest performance. Results for enroute performance indicated that practice scores for students who did not write summaries were significantly higher than for those who wrote summaries. Enroute results did not indicate a significant difference between those working in cooperative dyads and those working alone. Results for time-on-task indicated a significant interaction between learning strategy and summary condition. Students in the cooperative-no summary condition spent significantly more time on practice than those in the cooperative-summary condition. Furthermore, subjects in the individual-no summary condition spent significantly more time on practice than those in the cooperative-summary condition. Attitudes toward the computer-based program were generally positive. Students expressed positive attitudes toward the interactive exercises, the atomic animations and the on-line, interactive periodic table. Attitude scores also showed that students expressed positive feelings about the particular learning strategy to which they were assigned. Results from the study also indicated that students in the two cooperative conditions interacted together in somewhat different ways. Dyads in the summary condition exhibited significantly more helping behaviors and task-related behaviors than dyads in the no summary condition. The results of this study have implications for the design of computer-based instruction and the use of this medium with

  5. Assessing students' learning and decision-making skills using high performance web-based computational tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Akilah

    Using web-based computational tool in classrooms in conjunction with advanced computing models provide the opportunity for students to learn large scale processes, such as state, regional, and global environmental issues that are difficult to incorporate into student learning exercises with present basic models. These tools aided in bridging the gap between multi-field scale models and enhanced student learning. The expectations were that students would improve their decision-making skills by solving realistic and large scale (multi-field conditions) environmental issues that were made possible through faster computation time, larger datasets, larger scale (multi-field), and predictions over longer time periods using the Century soil organic carbon model. The Century Model was linked to a web-based series of functional pages through which students could run the model through. In this project, 239 undergraduate students' learning and decision-making skills using high performance classroom computing tools were assessed. Among the many Century Model parameters, the students were able to alter four variables (climate, crop, tillage, and soil texture). Students were able to simulate several scenarios simultaneously. The results of the study revealed that pretest for the four courses combined was found significant (P < 0.05), meaning that the pretest was a major contributor to their increased posttest score. Although, the scenario scale (multi-field conditions vs. single field conditions) factor was not statistically significant, the students completing the multi-field scenario assignment scored higher on the posttest and also had a higher increase in points from pretest to posttest. Overall, these results revealed that the tool provided had a positive impact on the students' learning which was evident in their enhanced pretest to posttest score and also their perceptions from the written evaluation they provided. Most students felt that the project was a good learning

  6. Computations underlying sensorimotor learning.

    PubMed

    Wolpert, Daniel M; Flanagan, J Randall

    2016-04-01

    The study of sensorimotor learning has a long history. With the advent of innovative techniques for studying learning at the behavioral and computational levels new insights have been gained in recent years into how the sensorimotor system acquires, retains, represents, retrieves and forgets sensorimotor tasks. In this review we highlight recent advances in the field of sensorimotor learning from a computational perspective. We focus on studies in which computational models are used to elucidate basic mechanisms underlying adaptation and skill acquisition in human behavior. PMID:26719992

  7. Computer Science Instruction in Elementary Grades, an Exploration of Computer-Based Learning Methods. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkweather, John A.

    During the exploratory phase of this two-year project, 234 instructional computer programs were written by 167 junior and senior high school students, instructed as individuals, in small groups, and in whole classes. Then a doctoral study investigated the effectiveness of computer-assisted instruction in the development of problem solving skills.…

  8. Changing How and What Children Learn in School with Computer-based Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roschelle, Jeremy M.; Pea, Roy D.; Hoadley, Christopher M.; Gordin, Douglas N.; Means, Barbara

    2000-01-01

    Explores how computer technology can help improve how and what children learn in school. Highlights several ways technology can enhance how children learn by supporting four fundamental characteristics of learning (active engagement, group participation, frequent interaction and feedback, and connections to real-world contexts). Additional…

  9. Aids to Computer-Based Multimedia Learning: A Comparison of Human Tutoring and Computer Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodicio, H. Garcia; Sanchez, E.

    2012-01-01

    Learners are usually provided with support devices because they find it difficult to learn from multimedia presentations. A key question, with no clear answer so far, is how best to present these support devices. One possibility is to insert them into the multimedia presentation (canned support), while another is to have a human agent provide them…

  10. Supervised learning with decision tree-based methods in computational and systems biology.

    PubMed

    Geurts, Pierre; Irrthum, Alexandre; Wehenkel, Louis

    2009-12-01

    At the intersection between artificial intelligence and statistics, supervised learning allows algorithms to automatically build predictive models from just observations of a system. During the last twenty years, supervised learning has been a tool of choice to analyze the always increasing and complexifying data generated in the context of molecular biology, with successful applications in genome annotation, function prediction, or biomarker discovery. Among supervised learning methods, decision tree-based methods stand out as non parametric methods that have the unique feature of combining interpretability, efficiency, and, when used in ensembles of trees, excellent accuracy. The goal of this paper is to provide an accessible and comprehensive introduction to this class of methods. The first part of the review is devoted to an intuitive but complete description of decision tree-based methods and a discussion of their strengths and limitations with respect to other supervised learning methods. The second part of the review provides a survey of their applications in the context of computational and systems biology. PMID:20023720

  11. Computers and Early Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banet, Bernard

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses the effect that microelectronic technology will have on elementary education in the decades ahead, and some of the uses of computers as learning aids for young children, including interactive games, tutorial systems, creative activity, and simulation. (MP)

  12. Design and Development of a Sample "Computer Programming" Course Tool via Story-Based E-Learning Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kose, Utku; Koc, Durmus; Yucesoy, Suleyman Anil

    2013-01-01

    This study introduces a story-based e-learning oriented course tool that was designed and developed for using within "computer programming" courses. With this tool, students can easily adapt themselves to the subjects in the context of computer programming principles, thanks to the story-based, interactive processes. By using visually…

  13. Computer Augmented Learning; A Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kindred, J.

    The report contains a description and summary of computer augmented learning devices and systems. The devices are of two general types programed instruction systems based on the teaching machines pioneered by Pressey and developed by Skinner, and the so-called "docile" systems that permit greater user-direction with the computer under student…

  14. The Goal Specificity Effect on Strategy Use and Instructional Efficiency during Computer-Based Scientific Discovery Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunsting, Josef; Wirth, Joachim; Paas, Fred

    2011-01-01

    Using a computer-based scientific discovery learning environment on buoyancy in fluids we investigated the "effects of goal specificity" (nonspecific goals vs. specific goals) for two goal types (problem solving goals vs. learning goals) on "strategy use" and "instructional efficiency". Our empirical findings close an important research gap,…

  15. MedEthEx Online: A Computer-based Learning Program in Medical Ethics and Communication Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleetwood, Janet; Vaught, Wayne; Feldman, Debra; Gracely, Edward; Kassutto, Zach; Novack, Dennis

    2000-01-01

    Assessed MedEthEx Online, a computer-based learning program, in improving communication skills as part of a required bioethics course for medical students. Exam scores of users were comparable with non-users, although computerized-learning students scored higher in specific exam areas, felt somewhat more clinically prepared, and rated the course…

  16. Simulator Building as a Problem-Based Learning Approach for Teaching Students in a Computer Architecture Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ang, Li-minn; Seng, Kah Phooi

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a Problem-Based Learning (PBL) approach to support and promote deeper student learning in a computer architecture course. A PBL approach using a simulator building activity was used to teach part of the course. The remainder of the course was taught using a traditional lecture-tutorial approach. Qualitative data was collected…

  17. Population-based learning of load balancing policies for a distributed computer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehra, Pankaj; Wah, Benjamin W.

    1993-01-01

    Effective load-balancing policies use dynamic resource information to schedule tasks in a distributed computer system. We present a novel method for automatically learning such policies. At each site in our system, we use a comparator neural network to predict the relative speedup of an incoming task using only the resource-utilization patterns obtained prior to the task's arrival. Outputs of these comparator networks are broadcast periodically over the distributed system, and the resource schedulers at each site use these values to determine the best site for executing an incoming task. The delays incurred in propagating workload information and tasks from one site to another, as well as the dynamic and unpredictable nature of workloads in multiprogrammed multiprocessors, may cause the workload pattern at the time of execution to differ from patterns prevailing at the times of load-index computation and decision making. Our load-balancing policy accommodates this uncertainty by using certain tunable parameters. We present a population-based machine-learning algorithm that adjusts these parameters in order to achieve high average speedups with respect to local execution. Our results show that our load-balancing policy, when combined with the comparator neural network for workload characterization, is effective in exploiting idle resources in a distributed computer system.

  18. Computers, Culture, and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westby, Carol; Atencio, David J.

    2002-01-01

    Opinions vary regarding the impact of computers on children and value of using computers in the education of children. This article discusses the impact of technology on culture, attitudes about technological change, the nature of literacy in a technological society, and frameworks for thinking about teaching and learning with technology.…

  19. Complexities of learning with computer-based tools: A case of inquiry about sound and music in elementary school

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnusson, Shirley J.

    1996-12-01

    Computer-based technology is increasingly becoming available for students at all grade levels in schools, and its promise and power as a learning tool is being extolled by many. From a constructive perspective, if individuals actively construct meaning from their experiences, then simply having particular tools to work with via a computer doesn't ensure that desired learning will result. Thus, it is important to examine how students construct meaning while using such tools. This study examined what fourth grade students learned from the use of two computer-based tools intended to help them understand sound and music: software that emulated an oscilloscope and allowed students to view sound waves from audio input; and software that turned the computer into an electronic keyboard, which provided students with standard pitches for comparison purposes. Principles of selective attention and pior knowledge and experiences—foundational ideas of a constructivist epistemology—were useful in understanding learning outcomes from inquiry with these tools. Our findings provide critical information for future instruction with the goal of supporting learning about sound and music from such tools. They also indicate the need for more studies examining learning from computer-based tools in specific contexts, to advance our understanding of how teachers can mediate student activity with computer-based tools to support the development of conceptual understanding.

  20. An Investigation into Students Use of a Computer-Based Social Learning Space: Lessons for Facilitating Collaborative Approaches to Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brett, Paul; Nagra, Jas

    2005-01-01

    Provision of computers in universities for self-study is taken for granted and is seen as a must have educational resource, yet it is very expensive to fund. Students report that they use the Internet as their first stop in approaching research tasks. Learning theorists posit the important role of social interaction in contributing to learning.…

  1. The effects of computer-supported inquiry-based learning methods and peer interaction on learning stellar parallax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzhitskaya, Lanika

    The presented research study investigated the effects of computer-supported inquiry-based learning and peer interaction methods on effectiveness of learning a scientific concept. The stellar parallax concept was selected as a basic, and yet important in astronomy, scientific construct, which is based on a straightforward relationship of several components presented in a simple mathematical equation: d = 1/p. The simplicity of the concept allowed the researchers to explore how the learners construct their conceptual knowledge, build mathematical skills and transfer their knowledge beyond the learning settings. A computer-based tutorial Stellar Parallax Interactive Restricted and Unrestricted Tutorial (SPIRUT) was developed for this study, and was designed to aid students' knowledge construction of the concept either in a learner-controlled or a program-controlled mode. The first investigated method in the study was enhancing engagement by the means of scaffolding for inquiry, which included scripted prompts and called for students' predictions and reflections while working in the learner-controlled or the computer-controlled version of SPIRUT. A second form of enhancing engagement was through peers working cooperatively during the learning activities. The students' level of understanding of the concept was measured by (1) the number of correct answers on a conceptual test with (2) several questions that require knowledge transfer to unfamiliar situations and (3) their ability to calculate the stellar parallax and find distances to stars. The study was conducted in the University of Missouri among 199 non-science major students enrolled in an introductory astronomy course in the fall semester 2010. The participants were divided into two main groups: one was working with SPIRUT and another group was a control group and utilized a paper-based tutorial. The SPIRUT group was further divided into the learner-controlled and the program-controlled subgroups. Students

  2. To Compare the Effects of Computer Based Learning and the Laboratory Based Learning on Students' Achievement Regarding Electric Circuits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayrak, Bekir; Kanli, Uygar; Kandil Ingeç, Sebnem

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the research problem was: "Is the computer based physics instruction as effective as laboratory intensive physics instruction with regards to academic success on electric circuits 9th grade students?" For this research of experimental quality the design of pre-test and post-test are applied with an experiment and a control…

  3. To Compare the Effects of Computer Based Learning and the Laboratory Based Learning on Students' Achievement Regarding Electric Circuits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayrak, Bekir; Kanli, Uygar; Ingec, Sebnem Kandil

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the research problem was: "Is the computer based physics instruction as effective as laboratory intensive physics instruction with regards to academic success on electric circuits 9th grade students?" For this research of experimental quality the design of pre-test and post-test are applied with an experiment and a control group.…

  4. Computer-Based Exploratory Learning Systems for Communication-Handicapped Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geoffrion, Leo D.; Goldenberg, E. Paul

    1981-01-01

    A rationale for exploratory learning via computers is presented, emphasizing the need for modeling normal communication development in children with communication handicaps, including deafness, cerebral palsy, and autism. (Author/CL)

  5. Prompting Self-Monitoring of Learning in Self-Paced Computer Based Training: the Effect on Self-Regulation and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coburn, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to investigate the effects of prompting students to monitor their use of learning strategies and comprehension while completing self-paced, work-related training in a computer-based learning environment. Study participants included 94 enlisted military volunteers, randomly assigned to one of three groups in the…

  6. Supporting Self-Regulated Learning in Computer-Based Learning Environments: Systematic Review of Effects of Scaffolding in the Domain of Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devolder, A.; van Braak, J.; Tondeur, J.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the widespread assumption that students require scaffolding support for self-regulated learning (SRL) processes in computer-based learning environments (CBLEs), there is little clarity as to which types of scaffolds are most effective. This study offers a literature review covering the various scaffolds that support SRL processes in the…

  7. Developing an Efficient Computational Method that Estimates the Ability of Students in a Web-Based Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Young-Jin

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a computational method that can efficiently estimate the ability of students from the log files of a Web-based learning environment capturing their problem solving processes. The computational method developed in this study approximates the posterior distribution of the student's ability obtained from the conventional Bayes…

  8. Factors affecting learning of vector math from computer-based practice: Feedback complexity and prior knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckler, Andrew F.; Mikula, Brendon D.

    2016-06-01

    In experiments including over 450 university-level students, we studied the effectiveness and time efficiency of several levels of feedback complexity in simple, computer-based training utilizing static question sequences. The learning domain was simple vector math, an essential skill in introductory physics. In a unique full factorial design, we studied the relative effects of "knowledge of correct response" feedback and "elaborated feedback" (i.e., a general explanation) both separately and together. A number of other factors were analyzed, including training time, physics course grade, prior knowledge of vector math, and student beliefs about both their proficiency in and the importance of vector math. We hypothesize a simple model predicting how the effectiveness of feedback depends on prior knowledge, and the results confirm this knowledge-by-treatment interaction. Most notably, elaborated feedback is the most effective feedback, especially for students with low prior knowledge and low course grade. In contrast, knowledge of correct response feedback was less effective for low-performing students, and including both kinds of feedback did not significantly improve performance compared to elaborated feedback alone. Further, while elaborated feedback resulted in higher scores, the learning rate was at best only marginally higher because the training time was slightly longer. Training time data revealed that students spent significantly more time on the elaborated feedback after answering a training question incorrectly. Finally, we found that training improved student self-reported proficiency and that belief in the importance of the learned domain improved the effectiveness of training. Overall, we found that computer based training with static question sequences and immediate elaborated feedback in the form of simple and general explanations can be an effective way to improve student performance on a physics essential skill, especially for less prepared and low

  9. Development of a Personalized Educational Computer Game Based on Students' Learning Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Sung, Han-Yu; Hung, Chun-Ming; Huang, Iwen; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, many researchers have been engaged in the development of educational computer games; however, previous studies have indicated that, without supportive models that take individual students' learning needs or difficulties into consideration, students might only show temporary interest during the learning process, and their learning…

  10. The Reverse Modality Effect: Examining Student Learning from Interactive Computer-Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inan, Fethi A.; Crooks, Steven M.; Cheon, Jongpil; Ari, Fatih; Flores, Raymond; Kurucay, Murat; Paniukov, Dmitrii

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of modality on learning from multimedia instruction. This study utilized a factorial between-subject design to examine the effects of modality on student learning outcomes, study patterns and mental effort. An interactive computer-presented diagram was developed to teach the places of…

  11. Computer-Supported Team-Based Learning: The Impact of Motivation, Enjoyment and Team Contributions on Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Elizabeth Avery; Wu, Dezhi; Passerini, Katia

    2010-01-01

    The benefits of teamwork and collaboration have long been advocated by many educational theories, such as constructivist and social learning models. Among the various applications of collaborative learning, the iterative team-based learning (TBL) process proposed by Michaelsen, Fink, and Knight (2002) has been successfully used in the classroom…

  12. Computational intelligence-based polymerase chain reaction primer selection based on a novel teaching-learning-based optimisation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Huei

    2014-12-01

    Specific primers play an important role in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) experiments, and therefore it is essential to find specific primers of outstanding quality. Unfortunately, many PCR constraints must be simultaneously inspected which makes specific primer selection difficult and time-consuming. This paper introduces a novel computational intelligence-based method, Teaching-Learning-Based Optimisation, to select the specific and feasible primers. The specified PCR product lengths of 150-300 bp and 500-800 bp with three melting temperature formulae of Wallace's formula, Bolton and McCarthy's formula and SantaLucia's formula were performed. The authors calculate optimal frequency to estimate the quality of primer selection based on a total of 500 runs for 50 random nucleotide sequences of 'Homo species' retrieved from the National Center for Biotechnology Information. The method was then fairly compared with the genetic algorithm (GA) and memetic algorithm (MA) for primer selection in the literature. The results show that the method easily found suitable primers corresponding with the setting primer constraints and had preferable performance than the GA and the MA. Furthermore, the method was also compared with the common method Primer3 according to their method type, primers presentation, parameters setting, speed and memory usage. In conclusion, it is an interesting primer selection method and a valuable tool for automatic high-throughput analysis. In the future, the usage of the primers in the wet lab needs to be validated carefully to increase the reliability of the method. PMID:25429503

  13. Effects of Computer-Based Visual Representation on Mathematics Learning and Cognitive Load

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yung, Hsin I.; Paas, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Visual representation has been recognized as a powerful learning tool in many learning domains. Based on the assumption that visual representations can support deeper understanding, we examined the effects of visual representations on learning performance and cognitive load in the domain of mathematics. An experimental condition with visual…

  14. Examining Student Opinions on Computer Use Based on the Learning Styles in Mathematics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozgen, Kemal; Bindak, Recep

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the opinions of high school students, who have different learning styles, related to computer use in mathematics education. High school students' opinions on computer use in mathematics education were collected with both qualitative and quantitative approaches in the study conducted with a survey model. For…

  15. The impact of computer-based interactive instruction (CBII) in improving the teaching-learning process in introductory college physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawad, Afif A.

    Institutes are incorporating computer-assisted instruction (CAI) into their classrooms in an effort to enhance learning. The implementation of computers into the classroom is parallel with education's role of keeping abreast with societal demands. The number of microcomputers in schools has increased tremendously. Computer Based Interactive Instruction (CBBI) software is available for the language arts, mathematics, science, social studies, etc. The traditional instruction, supplemented with CAI, seems to be more effective than traditional instruction alone. Although there is a large quantity of research regarding specific aspects of learning through computers, there seems to be a lack of information regarding the impact of computers upon student success. The goal of this study is to determine how much of CAI is implemented in higher education in the USA. Instructors from 38 states were surveyed to compare between the institutes that use Computer Based Interactive Instruction and the ones that do not and are still applying traditional delivery method. Based on the analysis of the data gathered during this study, it is concluded that the majority of instructors are now using computers in one form or another. This study has determined that the computer is a major component in the teaching of introductory physics, and therefore, may be a suitable substitute for the traditional delivery system. Computers as an instructional delivery system are an alternative that may result in a higher level of student learning for many higher education courses.

  16. Computer-Based Learning: Graphical Integration of Whole and Sectional Neuroanatomy Improves Long-Term Retention

    PubMed Central

    Naaz, Farah; Chariker, Julia H.; Pani, John R.

    2013-01-01

    A study was conducted to test the hypothesis that instruction with graphically integrated representations of whole and sectional neuroanatomy is especially effective for learning to recognize neural structures in sectional imagery (such as MRI images). Neuroanatomy was taught to two groups of participants using computer graphical models of the human brain. Both groups learned whole anatomy first with a three-dimensional model of the brain. One group then learned sectional anatomy using two-dimensional sectional representations, with the expectation that there would be transfer of learning from whole to sectional anatomy. The second group learned sectional anatomy by moving a virtual cutting plane through the three-dimensional model. In tests of long-term retention of sectional neuroanatomy, the group with graphically integrated representation recognized more neural structures that were known to be challenging to learn. This study demonstrates the use of graphical representation to facilitate a more elaborated (deeper) understanding of complex spatial relations. PMID:24563579

  17. Enhancing computing skills of low-achieving students via e-learning: a design experiment of Web-based, problem-based learning and self-regulated learning.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tsang-Hsiung; Shen, Pei-Di; Tsai, Chia-Wen

    2008-08-01

    A design experiment was conducted applying Web-based problem-based learning (PBL), self-regulated learning (SRL), or their combination to help low-achieving students improve their skills of deploying application software in a compulsory course at a vocational school in Taiwan. The effects were encouraging and mostly positive. However, students' inertia to change routines of learning inherited from a culture of taking standard tests found in e-learning practice is quite common. A teacher's awareness of these changes and associated resistance may increase likelihood of e-learning success for future trials. Some modifications of the design are thus suggested for the next round of the experiment. PMID:18721091

  18. Learning-based image preprocessing for robust computer-aided detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghupathi, Laks; Devarakota, Pandu R.; Wolf, Matthias

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that low dose computed tomography (LDCT) can be an effective screening tool to reduce lung cancer mortality. Computer-aided detection (CAD) would be a beneficial second reader for radiologists in such cases. Studies demonstrate that while iterative reconstructions (IR) improve LDCT diagnostic quality, it however degrades CAD performance significantly (increased false positives) when applied directly. For improving CAD performance, solutions such as retraining with newer data or applying a standard preprocessing technique may not be suffice due to high prevalence of CT scanners and non-uniform acquisition protocols. Here, we present a learning-based framework that can adaptively transform a wide variety of input data to boost an existing CAD performance. This not only enhances their robustness but also their applicability in clinical workflows. Our solution consists of applying a suitable pre-processing filter automatically on the given image based on its characteristics. This requires the preparation of ground truth (GT) of choosing an appropriate filter resulting in improved CAD performance. Accordingly, we propose an efficient consolidation process with a novel metric. Using key anatomical landmarks, we then derive consistent feature descriptors for the classification scheme that then uses a priority mechanism to automatically choose an optimal preprocessing filter. We demonstrate CAD prototype∗ performance improvement using hospital-scale datasets acquired from North America, Europe and Asia. Though we demonstrated our results for a lung nodule CAD, this scheme is straightforward to extend to other post-processing tools dedicated to other organs and modalities.

  19. A Social-Constructivist Adaptation of Case-Based Reasoning: Integrating oal-Based Scenarios with Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, David; Chen, Der-Thanq; Tan, Seng Chee

    2003-01-01

    Proposes a social constructivist adaptation of case-based reasoning (CBR) by incorporating computer-supported collaborative learning tools into the thinking and reasoning process. Explains goal-based scenarios (GBS) as translations of CBR into simulated learning environments and discusses the incorporation of facilitation cues and the inclusion of…

  20. Learners' Use of Communication Strategies in Text-Based and Video-Based Synchronous Computer-Mediated Communication Environments: Opportunities for Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Yu-Wan; Higgins, Steve

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the different learning opportunities enabled by text-based and video-based synchronous computer-mediated communication (SCMC) from an interactionist perspective. Six Chinese-speaking learners of English and six English-speaking learners of Chinese were paired up as tandem (reciprocal) learning dyads. Each dyad participated…

  1. Validating the ACE Model for Evaluating Student Performance Using a Teaching-Learning Process Based on Computational Modeling Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louzada, Alexandre Neves; Elia, Marcos da Fonseca; Sampaio, Fábio Ferrentini; Vidal, Andre Luiz Pestana

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is to adapt and test, in a Brazilian public school, the ACE model proposed by Borkulo for evaluating student performance as a teaching-learning process based on computational modeling systems. The ACE model is based on different types of reasoning involving three dimensions. In addition to adapting the model and introducing…

  2. Content and Processes in Problem-Based Learning: A Comparison of Computer-Mediated and Face-to-Face Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stromso, H. I.; Grottum, P.; Lycke, K. H.

    2007-01-01

    There has been an increasing interest in the use of computer-mediated communication (CMC) in problem-based learning. One line of research has been to introduce synchronous, or simultaneous, communication attempting to create text-based digital real-time interaction. Compared with face-to-face (F2F) communication, CMC may be a poorer medium…

  3. Granular Computing Approach to Two-Way Learning Based on Formal Concept Analysis in Fuzzy Datasets.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weihua; Li, Wentao

    2016-02-01

    The main task of granular computing (GrC) is about representing, constructing, and processing information granules. Information granules are formalized in many different approaches. Different formal approaches emphasize the same fundamental facet in different ways. In this paper, we propose a novel GrC method of machine learning by using formal concept description of information granules. Based on information granules, the model and mechanism of two-way learning system is constructed in fuzzy datasets. It is addressed about how to train arbitrary fuzzy information granules to become necessary, sufficient, and necessary and sufficient fuzzy information granules. Moreover, an algorithm of the presented approach is established, and the complexity of the algorithm is analyzed carefully. Finally, to interpret and help understand the theories and algorithm, a real-life case study is considered and experimental evaluation is performed by five datasets from the University of California-Irvine, which is valuable for applying these theories to deal with practical issues. PMID:25347892

  4. Assessing Medical Students’ Self-regulation as Aptitude in Computer-based Learning

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyuksoon S.; Kalet, Adina L.; Plass, Jan L.

    2013-01-01

    We developed a Self-Regulation Measure for Computer-based learning (SRMC) tailored toward medical students, by modifying Zimmerman’s Self-Regulated Learning Interview Schedule (SRLIS) for K-12 learners. The SRMC’s reliability and validity were examined in 2 studies. In Study 1, 109 first-year medical students were asked to complete the SRMC. Bivariate correlation analysis results indicated that the SRMC scores had a moderate degree of correlation with student achievement in a teacher-developed test. In Study 2, 58 third-year clerkship students completed the SRMC. Regression analysis results indicated that the frequency of medical students’ usage of self-regulation strategies was associated with their general clinical knowledge measured by a nationally standardized licensing exam. These two studies provided evidence for the reliability and concurrent validity of the SRMC to assess medical students’ self-regulation as aptitude. Future work should provide evidence to guide and improve instructional design as well as inform educational policy. PMID:20872071

  5. Improving learning with science and social studies text using computer-based concept maps for students with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Ciullo, Stephen; Falcomata, Terry S; Pfannenstiel, Kathleen; Billingsley, Glenna

    2015-01-01

    Concept maps have been used to help students with learning disabilities (LD) improve literacy skills and content learning, predominantly in secondary school. However, despite increased access to classroom technology, no previous studies have examined the efficacy of computer-based concept maps to improve learning from informational text for students with LD in elementary school. In this study, we used a concurrent delayed multiple probe design to evaluate the interactive use of computer-based concept maps on content acquisition with science and social studies texts for Hispanic students with LD in Grades 4 and 5. Findings from this study suggest that students improved content knowledge during intervention relative to a traditional instruction baseline condition. Learning outcomes and social validity information are considered to inform recommendations for future research and the feasibility of classroom implementation. PMID:25301848

  6. Exploring the Effects of Online Team-Based Learning and Co-Regulated Learning on Students' Development of Computing Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Chia-Wen

    2016-01-01

    As more and more educational institutions are providing online courses, it is necessary to design effective teaching methods integrated with technologies to benefit both teachers and students. The researcher in this study designed innovative online teaching methods of team-based learning (TBL) and co-regulated learning (CRL) to improve students'…

  7. Probabilistic reward- and punishment-based learning in opioid addiction: Experimental and computational data.

    PubMed

    Myers, Catherine E; Sheynin, Jony; Balsdon, Tarryn; Luzardo, Andre; Beck, Kevin D; Hogarth, Lee; Haber, Paul; Moustafa, Ahmed A

    2016-01-01

    Addiction is the continuation of a habit in spite of negative consequences. A vast literature gives evidence that this poor decision-making behavior in individuals addicted to drugs also generalizes to laboratory decision making tasks, suggesting that the impairment in decision-making is not limited to decisions about taking drugs. In the current experiment, opioid-addicted individuals and matched controls with no history of illicit drug use were administered a probabilistic classification task that embeds both reward-based and punishment-based learning trials, and a computational model of decision making was applied to understand the mechanisms describing individuals' performance on the task. Although behavioral results showed that opioid-addicted individuals performed as well as controls on both reward- and punishment-based learning, the modeling results suggested subtle differences in how decisions were made between the two groups. Specifically, the opioid-addicted group showed decreased tendency to repeat prior responses, meaning that they were more likely to "chase reward" when expectancies were violated, whereas controls were more likely to stick with a previously-successful response rule, despite occasional expectancy violations. This tendency to chase short-term reward, potentially at the expense of developing rules that maximize reward over the long term, may be a contributing factor to opioid addiction. Further work is indicated to better understand whether this tendency arises as a result of brain changes in the wake of continued opioid use/abuse, or might be a pre-existing factor that may contribute to risk for addiction. PMID:26381438

  8. A learning-based approach for automated quality assessment of computer-rendered images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi; Agam, Gady

    2012-01-01

    Computer generated images are common in numerous computer graphics applications such as games, modeling, and simulation. There is normally a tradeoff between the time allocated to the generation of each image frame and and the quality of the image, where better quality images require more processing time. Specifically, in the rendering of 3D objects, the surfaces of objects may be manipulated by subdividing them into smaller triangular patches and/or smoothing them so as to produce better looking renderings. Since unnecessary subdivision results in increased rendering time and unnecessary smoothing results in reduced details, there is a need to automatically determine the amount of necessary processing for producing good quality rendered images. In this paper we propose a novel supervised learning based methodology for automatically predicting the quality of rendered images of 3D objects. To perform the prediction we train on a data set which is labeled by human observers for quality. We are then able to predict the quality of renderings (not used in the training) with an average prediction error of roughly 20%. The proposed approach is compared to known techniques and is shown to produce better results.

  9. Learning Natural Selection in 4th Grade with Multi-Agent-Based Computational Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickes, Amanda Catherine; Sengupta, Pratim

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate how elementary school students develop multi-level explanations of population dynamics in a simple predator-prey ecosystem, through scaffolded interactions with a multi-agent-based computational model (MABM). The term "agent" in an MABM indicates individual computational objects or actors (e.g., cars), and these agents obey simple rules assigned or manipulated by the user (e.g., speeding up, slowing down, etc.). It is the interactions between these agents, based on the rules assigned by the user, that give rise to emergent, aggregate-level behavior (e.g., formation and movement of the traffic jam). Natural selection is such an emergent phenomenon, which has been shown to be challenging for novices (K16 students) to understand. Whereas prior research on learning evolutionary phenomena with MABMs has typically focused on high school students and beyond, we investigate how elementary students (4th graders) develop multi-level explanations of some introductory aspects of natural selection—species differentiation and population change—through scaffolded interactions with an MABM that simulates predator-prey dynamics in a simple birds-butterflies ecosystem. We conducted a semi-clinical interview based study with ten participants, in which we focused on the following: a) identifying the nature of learners' initial interpretations of salient events or elements of the represented phenomena, b) identifying the roles these interpretations play in the development of their multi-level explanations, and c) how attending to different levels of the relevant phenomena can make explicit different mechanisms to the learners. In addition, our analysis also shows that although there were differences between high- and low-performing students (in terms of being able to explain population-level behaviors) in the pre-test, these differences disappeared in the post-test.

  10. The Impact of Students' Exploration Strategies on Discovery Learning Using Computer-Based Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalgarno, Barney; Kennedy, Gregor; Bennett, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Discovery-based learning designs incorporating active exploration are common within instructional software. However, researchers have highlighted empirical evidence showing that "pure" discovery learning is of limited value and strategies which reduce complexity and provide guidance to learners are important if potential learning…

  11. Effects of Unidirectional vs. Reciprocal Teaching Strategies on Web-Based Computer Programming Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shadiev, Rustam; Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Yeh, Shih-Ching; Yang, Stephen J. H.; Wang, Jing-Liang; Han, Lin; Hsu, Guo-Liang

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate an effectiveness of unidirectional and reciprocal teaching strategies on programming learning supported by web-based learning system (VPen); particularly, how differently effective these two teaching strategies would work. In this study novice programmers were exposed to three different conditions: 1) applying no…

  12. Thinking Tools in Computer-Based Assessment: Technology Enhancements in Assessments for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Yigal

    2014-01-01

    One of the greatest concerns in schools today is how teachers can bring together assessment and learning in a way that is meaningful for students' thinking skills, while focusing on content standards. Better understanding of how different types of technology based thinking tools can be used for improving classroom teaching and learning,…

  13. Corpora Processing and Computational Scaffolding for a Web-Based English Learning Environment: The CANDLE Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liou, Hsien-Chin; Chang, Jason S; Chen, Hao-Jan; Lin, Chih-Cheng; Liaw, Meei-Ling; Gao, Zhao-Ming; Jang, Jyh-Shing Roger; Yeh, Yuli; Chuang, Thomas C.; You, Geeng-Neng

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an innovative web-based environment for English language learning with advanced data-driven and statistical approaches. The project uses various corpora, including a Chinese-English parallel corpus ("Sinorama") and various natural language processing (NLP) tools to construct effective English learning tasks…

  14. A Computer-Assisted Learning Model Based on the Digital Game Exponential Reward System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Man-Ki; Jahng, Surng-Gahb; Kim, Tae-Yong

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this research was to construct a motivational model which would stimulate voluntary and proactive learning using digital game methods offering players more freedom and control. The theoretical framework of this research lays the foundation for a pedagogical learning model based on digital games. We analyzed the game reward system, which…

  15. "Horses for Courses": Categories of Computer-Based Learning Program and Their Uses in Pharmacology Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Ian E.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the pharma-CAL-ogy project, funded by Teaching and Learning Technology Programme (TLTP), which has developed various types of software for use in pharmacology courses. Topics include course organization and delivery software, drill and practice software, tutorial-type programs, simulations, and the need to integrate computer-assisted…

  16. Optimizing Cognitive Load for Learning from Computer-Based Science Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hyunjeong; Plass, Jan L.; Homer, Bruce D.

    2006-01-01

    How can cognitive load in visual displays of computer simulations be optimized? Middle-school chemistry students (N = 257) learned with a simulation of the ideal gas law. Visual complexity was manipulated by separating the display of the simulations in two screens (low complexity) or presenting all information on one screen (high complexity). The…

  17. Connecting Expectations and Values: Students' Perceptions of Developmental Mathematics in a Computer-Based Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Karen Latrice Terrell

    2014-01-01

    Students' perceptions influence their expectations and values. According to Expectations and Values Theory of Achievement Motivation (EVT-AM), students' expectations and values impact their behaviors (Eccles & Wigfield, 2002). This study seeks to find students' perceptions of developmental mathematics in a mastery learning computer-based…

  18. Implicational Markedness and Frequency in Constraint-Based Computational Models of Phonological Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarosz, Gaja

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the interacting roles of implicational markedness and frequency from the joint perspectives of formal linguistic theory, phonological acquisition and computational modeling. The hypothesis that child grammars are rankings of universal constraints, as in Optimality Theory (Prince & Smolensky, 1993/2004), that learning involves a…

  19. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a Web-Based Learning Design for Adult Computer Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonis, Konstantinos; Daradoumis, Thanasis; Papadakis, Spyros; Simos, Christos

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on work undertaken within a pilot study concerned with the design, development, and evaluation of online computer science training courses. Drawing on recent developments in e-learning technology, these courses were structured around the principles of a learner-oriented approach for use with adult learners. The paper describes a…

  20. Using Computer-Based Testing as Alternative Assessment Method of Student Learning in Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapriati, Amalia; Zuhairi, Aminudin

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses the use of computer-based testing in distance education, based on the experience of Universitas Terbuka (UT), Indonesia. Computer-based testing has been developed at UT for reasons of meeting the specific needs of distance students as the following: (1) students' inability to sit for the scheduled test; (2) conflicting…

  1. Effects of Computer-Based Instruction on Student Learning of Psychophysiological Detection of Deception Test Question Formulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janniro, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    Describes a study conducted by the Department of Defense Polygraph Institute for their forensic science curriculum that investigated the effects of computer-based instruction on student learning of psychophysiological detection of deception test question formulation. Treatment of the experimental and control group is explained and posttest scores…

  2. The Effect of a Graph-Oriented Computer-Assisted Project-Based Learning Environment on Argumentation Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, P. -S.; Van Dyke, M.; Chen, Y.; Smith, T. J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to explore how seventh graders in a suburban school in the United States developed argumentation skills and science knowledge in a project-based learning environment that incorporated a graph-oriented, computer-assisted application. A total of 54 students (three classes) comprised this treatment…

  3. Computer-assisted instruction: guiding learning through a key features approach in a community-based medical course.

    PubMed

    Sturmberg, J P; Crowe, P; Hughes, C

    2003-05-01

    Computer assisted instruction (CAI) offers a valuable adjunct to the difficulties encountered in teaching medical students in a community-based course in rural Australia. The paper outlines the educational planning processes behind the project and provide an outline of the modular solution to the task. Preliminary results show that this approach is feasible and acceptable to guide students' learning. PMID:12881062

  4. GenieTutor: A Computer Assisted Second-Language Learning System Based on Semantic and Grammar Correctness Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Oh-Woog; Lee, Kiyoung; Kim, Young-Kil; Lee, Yunkeun

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a Dialog-Based Computer-Assisted second-Language Learning (DB-CALL) system using semantic and grammar correctness evaluations and the results of its experiment. While the system dialogues with English learners about a given topic, it automatically evaluates the grammar and content properness of their English utterances, then…

  5. Student Conceptions about the DNA Structure within a Hierarchical Organizational Level: Improvement by Experiment- and Computer-Based Outreach Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langheinrich, Jessica; Bogner, Franz X.

    2015-01-01

    As non-scientific conceptions interfere with learning processes, teachers need both, to know about them and to address them in their classrooms. For our study, based on 182 eleventh graders, we analyzed the level of conceptual understanding by implementing the "draw and write" technique during a computer-supported gene technology module.…

  6. Introducing Computers to Kindergarten Children Based on Vygotsky's Theory about Socio-Cultural Learning: The Greek Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pange, Jenny; Kontozisis, Dimitrios

    2001-01-01

    Greek preschoolers' level of knowledge about computers was examined as they participated in a classroom project to introduce them to new technologies. The project was based on Vygotsky's theory of socio-cultural learning. Findings suggest that this approach is a successful way to introduce new technologies to young children. (JPB)

  7. The Effects of CBI Lesson Sequence Type and Field Dependence on Learning from Computer-Based Cooperative Instruction in Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ipek, Ismail

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of CBI lesson sequence type and cognitive style of field dependence on learning from Computer-Based Cooperative Instruction (CBCI) in WEB on the dependent measures, achievement, reading comprehension and reading rate. Eighty-seven college undergraduate students were randomly assigned to…

  8. The Role of Technology and Computer-Based Instruction in a Disadvantaged Alternative School's Culture of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Sunnie Lee; Watson, William R.

    2011-01-01

    New approaches to instruction are increasingly being advocated to meet the needs of diverse learners. Educational researchers have identified the further development and application of computer-based instruction technologies for managing differentiated learning for all students as essential for shifting to a learner-centered paradigm of…

  9. Computer-Based Auditory Training (CBAT): Benefits for Children with Language- and Reading-Related Learning Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loo, Jenny Hooi Yin; Bamiou, Doris-Eva; Campbell, Nicci; Luxon, Linda M.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the evidence for computer-based auditory training (CBAT) in children with language, reading, and related learning difficulties, and evaluates the extent it can benefit children with auditory processing disorder (APD). Searches were confined to studies published between 2000 and 2008, and they are rated according to the level…

  10. Tool Use and Performance: Relationships between Tool- and Learner-Related Characteristics in a Computer-Based Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juarez-Collazo, Norma A.; Elen, Jan; Clarebout, Geraldine

    2013-01-01

    It is still unclear on what and how tool and learner characteristics influence tool use and consequently performance in computer-based learning environments (CBLEs). This study examines the relationships between tool-related characteristics (tool presentation: non-/embedded tool and instructional cues: non-/explained tool functionality) and…

  11. Computer-Based Graphical Displays for Enhancing Mental Animation and Improving Reasoning in Novice Learning of Probability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Danielle E.; Wu, Erin Chia-ling

    2006-01-01

    Our research suggests static and animated graphics can lead to more animated thinking and more correct problem solving in computer-based probability learning. Pilot software modules were developed for graduate online statistics courses and representation research. A study with novice graduate student statisticians compared problem solving in five…

  12. On the Development of a Computer Based Diagnostic Assessment Tool to Help in Teaching and Learning Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Afaq; Al-Mashari, Ahmed; Al-Lawati, Ali

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a computer based diagnostic tool developed to facilitate the learning process. The developed tool is capable of generating possible error syndromes associated with the answers received. The developed tool simulates the error pattern of the test results and then accordingly models the action plan to help in children's learning…

  13. The effects of computer-based dynamic visualization simulations on student learning in high school science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moodley, Sadha

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of dynamic computer-based visualizations of the classical model of particle behavior helps to improve student understanding, performance, and interest in science when used by teachers as visual presentations to complement their traditional methods of teaching. The software, Virtual Molecular Dynamics Laboratory (VMDL), was developed at the Center for Polymer Studies at Boston University through funding from the National Science Foundation. The design of the study included five pairs of classes in four different schools in New England from the inner city and from advantaged suburbs. The study employed a treatment-control group design for testing the impact of several VMDL simulations on student learning in several content areas from traditional chemistry and physical science courses. The study employed a mixed qualitative and quantitative design. The quantitative part involved administering the Group Assessment of Logical Thinking (GALT) as well as post-tests that were topic specific. An Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) was conducted on the test scores with the GALT scores serving as a covariate. Results of the ANCOVA showed that students' understanding and performance were better in classes where teachers used the computer-based dynamic visualizations to complement their traditional teaching. GALT scores were significantly different among schools but very similar within schools. They were significant in adjusting post-test scores for pre-treatment differences for only two of the schools. The treatment groups outscored the control groups in all five comparisons. The mean differences reached statistical significance at the p < .01 level in only four of the comparisons. The qualitative part of the study involved classroom observations and student interviews. Analysis of classroom observations revealed a shift in classroom dynamics to more learner-centeredness with greater engagement by students, especially in

  14. The research we still are not doing: an agenda for the study of computer-based learning.

    PubMed

    Cook, David A

    2005-06-01

    Media-comparative research-that is, the comparison of computer-based learning (CBL) to noncomputer instruction-is logically impossible because there are no valid comparison groups. Results from media-comparative studies are thus confounded and difficult to meaningfully interpret. In 1994, Friedman proposed that such research be supplanted by investigations into CBL designs, usage patterns, assessment methods, and integration. His proposal appears to have largely been ignored. In this article, the author updates the agenda for research in CBL (including Web-based learning). While media-comparative studies are confounded, CBL-CBL comparisons are often not. CBL instructional designs vary in configuration (e.g., discussion board or tutorial), instructional method (e.g., case-based learning, personalized feedback, or simulation), and presentation (e.g., screen layout, hyperlinks, or multimedia). Comparisons within one level (for example, comparing two instructional methods) facilitate evidence-based improvements, but comparisons between levels are confounded. Additional research questions within the CBL-CBL framework might include: Does adaptation of CBL in response to individual differences such as prior knowledge, computer experience, or learning style improve learning outcomes? Will integrating CBL with everyday clinical practice facilitate learning? How can simulations augment clinical training? And, how can CBL be integrated within and between institutions? In addressing these questions it is important to remember the most important outcome-effect on patients and practice-and outcomes specific to CBL including costs, cognitive structuring, and learning unique to the computer-based environment. CBL is not a panacea, but holds great promise. Realization of this potential requires that media-comparative studies be replaced by rigorous, theory-guided comparisons of CBL interventions. PMID:15917356

  15. Using a Computer-Based Audiographic Telecommunication System for Distance Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rezabek, Landra L.; And Others

    By combining the use of an existing teleconferencing network with new computer-based video technologies, the University of Wyoming has enhanced its ability to provide distance educational opportunities for students at remote sites across the state. The new computer-based audiographic system was tested during the fall semester of 1988 during the…

  16. Developing Long-Term Computing Skills among Low-Achieving Students via Web-Enabled Problem-Based Learning and Self-Regulated Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Chia-Wen; Lee, Tsang-Hsiung; Shen, Pei-Di

    2013-01-01

    Many private vocational schools in Taiwan have taken to enrolling students with lower levels of academic achievement. The authors re-designed a course and conducted a series of quasi-experiments to develop students' long-term computing skills, and examined the longitudinal effects of web-enabled, problem-based learning (PBL) and…

  17. An Exploratory Study on the Perspectives of Prospective Computer Teachers following Project-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karaman, Selcuk; Celik, Suat

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates perceptions of 29 prospective teachers about a course based on Project-Based Learning (PBL) approach. The course, "Authoring Languages in PC Environment (B-320)" lasted in 14 weeks in fall semester of 2004-2005. In this course each prospective teacher carried out a project that requires designing and developing courseware…

  18. Using Interactive Computer Technology to Enhance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pemberton, Joy R.; Borrego, Joaquin, Jr.; Cohen, Lee M.

    2006-01-01

    We assessed the effects of using LearnStar[TM], an interactive, computer-based teaching tool, as an in-class exam review method. Students with higher LearnStar review scores had higher grades. Furthermore, students' satisfaction ratings indicated that LearnStar reviews were more enjoyable and conducive to participation than traditional reviews.…

  19. Dual-Dictionary Learning-Based Iterative Image Reconstruction for Spectral Computed Tomography Application

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Ding, Huanjun; Lu, Yang; Wang, Ge; Zhao, Jun; Molloi, Sabee

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of a novel Iterative Reconstruction (IR) method coupled with Dual-Dictionary Learning (DDL) for image reconstruction in a dedicated breast Computed Tomography (CT) system based on a Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) photon-counting detector and compared it to the Filtered-Back-Projection (FBP) method with the ultimate goal of reducing the number of projections necessary for reconstruction without sacrificing image quality. Postmortem breast samples were scanned in a fan-beam CT system and were reconstructed from 100–600 projections with both IR and FBP methods. The Contrast-to-Noise Ratio (CNR) between the glandular and adipose tissues of the postmortem breast samples was calculated to compare the quality of images reconstructed from IR and FBP. The spatial resolution of the two reconstruction techniques was evaluated using Aluminum (Al) wires with diameters of 643, 813, 1020, 1290 and 1630 µm in a plastic epoxy resin phantom with diameter of 13 cm. Both the spatial resolution and the CNR were improved with IR compared to FBP for the images reconstructed from the same number of projections. In comparison with FBP reconstruction, the CNR was improved from 3.4 to 7.5 by using the IR method with 6-fold fewer projections while maintaining the same spatial resolution. The study demonstrated that the IR method coupled with DDL could significantly reduce the required number of projections for a CT reconstruction compared to FBP method while achieving a much better CNR and maintaining the same spatial resolution. From this, the radiation dose and scanning time can potentially be reduced by a factor of approximately 6 by using this IR method for image reconstruction in a CZT-based breast CT system. PMID:23192234

  20. Dual-dictionary learning-based iterative image reconstruction for spectral computed tomography application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bo; Ding, Huanjun; Lu, Yang; Wang, Ge; Zhao, Jun; Molloi, Sabee

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of a novel iterative reconstruction (IR) method coupled with dual-dictionary learning (DDL) for image reconstruction in a dedicated breast computed tomography (CT) system based on a cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) photon-counting detector and compared it to the filtered-back-projection (FBP) method with the ultimate goal of reducing the number of projections necessary for reconstruction without sacrificing the image quality. Postmortem breast samples were scanned in a fan-beam CT system and were reconstructed from 100 to 600 projections with both IR and FBP methods. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) between the glandular and adipose tissues of the postmortem breast samples was calculated to compare the quality of images reconstructed from IR and FBP. The spatial resolution of the two reconstruction techniques was evaluated using aluminum (Al) wires with diameters of 643, 813, 1020, 1290 and 1630 µm in a plastic epoxy resin phantom with a diameter of 13 cm. Both the spatial resolution and the CNR were improved with IR compared to FBP for the images reconstructed from the same number of projections. In comparison with FBP reconstruction, the CNR was improved from 3.4 to 7.5 by using the IR method with six-fold fewer projections while maintaining the same spatial resolution. The study demonstrated that the IR method coupled with DDL could significantly reduce the required number of projections for a CT reconstruction compared to the FBP method while achieving a much better CNR and maintaining the same spatial resolution. From this, the radiation dose and scanning time can potentially be reduced by a factor of approximately 6 by using this IR method for image reconstruction in a CZT-based breast CT system.

  1. Computer Assisted Learning in Numeracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollin, Freda

    Computer-assisted learning in numeracy for adults is far less developed than computer-assisted learning in literacy. Although a great many software programs exist, few are suitable for adults and many offer only drill and practice exercises instead of teaching genuine computer skills. One approach instructors can take is to have their students use…

  2. Learning with Artificial Worlds: Computer-Based Modelling in the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellar, Harvey, Ed.; And Others

    With the advent of the British National Curriculum, computer-based modeling has become an integral part of the school curriculum. This book is about modeling in education and providing children with computer tools to create and explore representations of the world. Members of the London Mental Models Group contributed their research: (1)…

  3. Effects of Textual and Animated Orienting Activities and Practice on Learning from Computer-Based Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieber, Lloyd P.; Hannafin, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes study designed to examine the effects of textual and/or computer animated orienting strategies and practice on rule-using and problem-solving skills of elementary school students using computer-assisted instruction. Four different versions of a lesson based on Isaac Newton's Law of Motion are described, and results are analyzed. (28…

  4. Learning Natural Selection in 4th Grade with Multi-Agent-Based Computational Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickes, Amanda Catherine; Sengupta, Pratim

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate how elementary school students develop multi-level explanations of population dynamics in a simple predator-prey ecosystem, through scaffolded interactions with a multi-agent-based computational model (MABM). The term "agent" in an MABM indicates individual computational objects or actors (e.g., cars), and these…

  5. What do CS students try to learn? insights from a distributed, project-based course in computer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglund, Anders; Eckerdal, Anna

    2006-09-01

    This paper explores what students taking an international project-based course in computer systems strive to learn. Through empirical, phenomenographic work we have identified three different motives that the students strive for: academic achievement; project and team working capacity; and social competence. What a student strives to learn largely influence the nature of her or his learning. Thus, the students can be thought of as taking different courses. Furthermore, the three motives can be experienced in different ways which can be more or less fruitful depending on what a student tries to achieve. We argue that it is important for a teacher to be aware of the variation in what the students want to learn, and to teach in a way that is cognizant of this spectrum of student goals.

  6. Computer Systems for Distributed and Distance Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, M.; Jackson, David

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of network-based learning focuses on a survey of computer systems for distributed and distance learning. Both Web-based systems and non-Web-based systems are reviewed in order to highlight some of the major trends of past projects and to suggest ways in which progress may be made in the future. (Contains 92 references.) (Author/LRW)

  7. Traditional versus Computer-Based Dissections in Enhancing Learning in a Tertiary Setting: A Student Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Sue; Peat, Mary; Lewis, Alison

    2002-01-01

    Describes a study that investigates both the use and usefulness of laboratory dissections and computer-based dissections in a tertiary, first-year human biology course. Explores attitudes toward dissection. (DDR)

  8. Implementing computer-based testing in distance education for advanced practice nurses: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Caudle, Patricia; Bigness, Joanne; Daniels, Judi; Gillmor-Kahn, Mickey; Knestrick, Joyce

    2011-01-01

    A distance education program utilized by graduate nursing students worldwide faces unique problems with testing. This article presents the results of a pilot study on the implementation of computer-based testing at the Frontier Nursing University. A detailed analysis of the evaluative survey completed by students in the pilot study revealed issues of hi-directional respect and trust between faculty and students and technological anxiety among students using computer-based testing. PMID:22029246

  9. Learning Mathematics with Interactive Whiteboards and Computer-Based Graphing Utility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erbas, Ayhan Kursat; Ince, Muge; Kaya, Sukru

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of a technology-supported learning environment utilizing an interactive whiteboard (IWB) and NuCalc graphing software compared to a traditional direct instruction-based environment on student achievement in graphs of quadratic functions and attitudes towards mathematics and technology. Sixty-five…

  10. Students' Perceptions of Computer-Based Learning Environments, Their Attitude towards Business Statistics, and Their Academic Achievement: Implications from a UK University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, ThuyUyen H.; Charity, Ian; Robson, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates students' perceptions of computer-based learning environments, their attitude towards business statistics, and their academic achievement in higher education. Guided by learning environments concepts and attitudinal theory, a theoretical model was proposed with two instruments, one for measuring the learning environment and…

  11. Development of an experimental paradigm in which to examine human learning using two computer-based formats.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, H M; Colt, H G; Haas, A

    2001-01-01

    Computer-based self-instructional programs are frequently promoted as means to augment or replace the traditional anatomy curricula taught in medical schools. These programs may range from static slide shows to fully immersive virtual environments. However, the impact of these learning technologies on knowledge acquisition, and their comparative cost/benefit to education remain unclear. As a consequence, we are embarking on a series of experiments to compare knowledge acquisition and the meaningful use of information among students who are learning anatomy using one of two different computer-based self-instructional formats. These studies will be based on a specially developed learning module on basic lung anatomy; they will utilize a variety of assessment tools to measure factual knowledge, conceptual understanding of spatial-anatomic relationships, and the ability to apply newly acquired knowledge of anatomy to clinical problem-solving scenarios. The primary object of this paper is to describe the design and development of the underlying test module and to outline the two computer-based formats that will be evaluated. The virtual reality (VR) environment, UCSD's Anatomic VisualizeR, provides dynamic access to 3-dimensional polygonal models of the lesson content and supports student-centered exploration and learning. The multimedia environment, Microsoft PowerPoint, provides a structured presentation of the lesson content and illustrates important anatomic structures through the use of 2-dimensional images derived by screen captures of models available in the VR learning module. This paper also provides an overview of the first experiment in the series, a pilot study using first-year medical students without previous participation in a medical school anatomy curriculum. For this study, students will be prospectively randomized into two groups, each group learning the lung anatomy lesson using one of the computer-based formats described. Immediate knowledge

  12. Assessment of Situated Learning Using Computer Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Suggests that, based on a theory of situated learning, assessment must emphasize process as much as product. Several assessment examples are given, including a computer-based planning assistant for a mathematics and science video, suggestions for computer-based portfolio assessment, and speculations about embedded assessment of virtual situations.…

  13. Facilitating Place-Based Learning in Outdoor Informal Environments with Mobile Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Heather Toomey; Land, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper advocates for place-based education to guide research and design for mobile computers used in outdoor informal environments (e.g., backyards, nature centers and parks). By bringing together research on place-based education with research on location awareness, we developed three design guidelines to support learners to develop robust…

  14. A Decade of Computer Assisted Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, P. R.

    The Computer Assisted Teaching Unit (CATU) was instituted at Queen Mary College in 1973 to provide aid to the Faculty of Engineering in developing and implementing computer-based learning procedures to support the undergraduate teaching program. Earlier computer programs had simulated electrical and nuclear systems to give students the opportunity…

  15. Digital Game-Based Learning in High School Computer Science Education: Impact on Educational Effectiveness and Student Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papastergiou, Marina

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the learning effectiveness and motivational appeal of a computer game for learning computer memory concepts, which was designed according to the curricular objectives and the subject matter of the Greek high school Computer Science (CS) curriculum, as compared to a similar application, encompassing identical…

  16. The comparative effect of individually-generated vs. collaboratively-generated computer-based concept mapping on science concept learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, So Young

    Using a quasi-experimental design, the researcher investigated the comparative effects of individually-generated and collaboratively-generated computer-based concept mapping on middle school science concept learning. Qualitative data were analyzed to explain quantitative findings. One hundred sixty-one students (74 boys and 87 girls) in eight, seventh grade science classes at a middle school in Southeast Texas completed the entire study. Using prior science performance scores to assure equivalence of student achievement across groups, the researcher assigned the teacher's classes to one of the three experimental groups. The independent variable, group, consisted of three levels: 40 students in a control group, 59 students trained to individually generate concept maps on computers, and 62 students trained to collaboratively generate concept maps on computers. The dependent variables were science concept learning as demonstrated by comprehension test scores, and quality of concept maps created by students in experimental groups as demonstrated by rubric scores. Students in the experimental groups received concept mapping training and used their newly acquired concept mapping skills to individually or collaboratively construct computer-based concept maps during study time. The control group, the individually-generated concept mapping group, and the collaboratively-generated concept mapping group had equivalent learning experiences for 50 minutes during five days, excepting that students in a control group worked independently without concept mapping activities, students in the individual group worked individually to construct concept maps, and students in the collaborative group worked collaboratively to construct concept maps during their study time. Both collaboratively and individually generated computer-based concept mapping had a positive effect on seventh grade middle school science concept learning but neither strategy was more effective than the other. However

  17. The role of visualization in learning from computer-based images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piburn, Michael D.; Reynolds, Stephen J.; McAuliffe, Carla; Leedy, Debra E.; Birk, James P.; Johnson, Julia K.

    2005-05-01

    Among the sciences, the practice of geology is especially visual. To assess the role of spatial ability in learning geology, we designed an experiment using: (1) web-based versions of spatial visualization tests, (2) a geospatial test, and (3) multimedia instructional modules built around QuickTime Virtual Reality movies. Students in control and experimental sections were administered measures of spatial orientation and visualization, as well as a content-based geospatial examination. All subjects improved significantly in their scores on spatial visualization and the geospatial examination. There was no change in their scores on spatial orientation. A three-way analysis of variance, with the geospatial examination as the dependent variable, revealed significant main effects favoring the experimental group and a significant interaction between treatment and gender. These results demonstrate that spatial ability can be improved through instruction, that learning of geological content will improve as a result, and that differences in performance between the genders can be eliminated.

  18. Student conceptions about the DNA structure within a hierarchical organizational level: Improvement by experiment- and computer-based outreach learning.

    PubMed

    Langheinrich, Jessica; Bogner, Franz X

    2015-01-01

    As non-scientific conceptions interfere with learning processes, teachers need both, to know about them and to address them in their classrooms. For our study, based on 182 eleventh graders, we analyzed the level of conceptual understanding by implementing the "draw and write" technique during a computer-supported gene technology module. To give participants the hierarchical organizational level which they have to draw, was a specific feature of our study. We introduced two objective category systems for analyzing drawings and inscriptions. Our results indicated a long- as well as a short-term increase in the level of conceptual understanding and in the number of drawn elements and their grades concerning the DNA structure. Consequently, we regard the "draw and write" technique as a tool for a teacher to get to know students' alternative conceptions. Furthermore, our study points the modification potential of hands-on and computer-supported learning modules. PMID:26481196

  19. Teaching scientific principles through a computer-based, design-centered learning environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Michael Brian

    Research on science instruction indicates that the traditional science classroom is not always effective in improving students' scientific understanding. Physics courses, in particular, do not promote the ability to apply scientific principles for many reasons, based on their focus on procedural problem-solving and lab exercises. In this dissertation, I propose the Designing-to-Learn Architecture (DTLA), a design-centered goal-based scenario (GBS) architecture, theoretically grounded in the literature on design-centered learning environments, goal-based scenarios, intelligent tutoring systems and simulations. The DTLA offers an alternative approach to addressing the issues encountered in the traditional science classroom. The architecture consists of an artifact with associated design goals; components with component options; a simulation; a reference database; and guided tutorials. I describe the design of Goin' Up?, the prototype DTL application, serving as the basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the DTLA. I present results of interview and testing protocols from the formative evaluation of Goin' Up?, suggesting that learning outcomes, though not statistically significant, could be improved through DTLA enhancements informed by usage patterns in software sessions. I conclude with an analysis of the results and suggestions for improvements to the DTLA, including additional components to address reflection, provide support for novice designers, and offer tutorial guidance on the analysis of the artifact.

  20. Gifted Students' Individual Differences in Distance-Learning Computer-Based Calculus and Linear Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, Eric W.; Suppes, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    Examined student performance in distance computer-based calculus and linear algebra courses offered by Stanford University to pre-college students as part of their Education Program for Gifted youth (EPGY). Puts special emphasis on modeling student performance over time and on capturing long-term trend effects using stochastic and nonlinear…

  1. A Review of Research on Intercultural Learning through Computer-Based Digital Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çiftçi, Emrullah Yasin

    2016-01-01

    Intercultural communication is now a crucial part of our globalizing lives; however, not everyone has an opportunity to engage in an intercultural interaction with people from different cultures. Computer-based technologies are promising in creating environments for people to communicate with people from diverse cultures. This qualitative…

  2. The Triarchic Theory of Intelligence and Computer-based Inquiry Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Bruce C.; McGee, Steven; Shin, Namsoo; Shia, Regina

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of the triarchic theory of intelligence focuses on a study of ninth graders that explored the relationships between student abilities and the cognitive and attitudinal outcomes that resulted from student immersion in a computer-based inquiry environment. Examines outcome variables related to content understanding, problem solving, and…

  3. The Relationships among Measures of Intrinsic Motivation, Instructional Design, and Learning in Computer-Based Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rezabek, Randy

    The intent of this study was to explore the intrinsic aspects of motivation, and to see if the design of instruction could positively affect learners' levels of intrinsic motivation toward the subject matter. The following questions were addressed: (1) Will different computer-based instructional treatments which have been designed to reflect…

  4. Conducting Scientific Research on Learning and Health Behavior Change with Computer-Based Health Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Richard E.; Lieberman, Debra A.

    2011-01-01

    This article is a guide for researchers interested in assessing the effectiveness of serious computer-based games (or video games, digital games, or electronic games) intended to improve health and health care. It presents a definition of health games, a rationale for their use, an overview of the current state of research, and recommendations for…

  5. Computers and Information Technology as a Learning Aid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bork, Alfred

    1985-01-01

    Reflects on major advantage of computers as learning devices--interaction--and discusses stages involved in production of materials for computer-based learning. Use of authoring languages is discouraged. A vision of the future includes hardware; producers, distributors, and users of computer-based learning materials; and educational changes…

  6. Virtual international experiences in veterinary medicine: an evaluation of students' attitudes toward computer-based learning.

    PubMed

    French, Brigitte C; Hird, David W; Romano, Patrick S; Hayes, Rick H; Nijhof, Ard M; Jongejan, Frans; Mellor, Dominic J; Singer, Randall S; Fine, Amanda E; Gay, John M; Davis, Radford G; Conrad, Patricia A

    2007-01-01

    While many studies have evaluated whether or not factual information can be effectively communicated using computer-aided tools, none has focused on establishing and changing students' attitudes toward international animal-health issues. The study reported here was designed to assess whether educational modules on an interactive computer CD elicited a change in veterinary students' interest in and attitudes toward international animal-health issues. Volunteer veterinary students at seven universities (first-year students at three universities, second-year at one, third-year at one, and fourth-year at two) were given by random assignment either an International Animal Health (IAH) CD or a control CD, ParasitoLog (PL). Participants completed a pre-CD survey to establish baseline information on interest and attitudes toward both computers and international animal-health issues. Four weeks later, a post-CD questionnaire was distributed. On the initial survey, most students expressed an interest in working in the field of veterinary medicine in another country. Responses to the three pre-CD questions relating to attitudes toward the globalization of veterinary medicine, interest in foreign animal disease, and inclusion of a core course on international health issues in the veterinary curriculum were all positive, with average values above 3 (on a five-point scale where 5 represented strong agreement or interest). Almost all students considered it beneficial to learn about animal-health issues in other countries. After students reviewed the IAH CD, we found a decrease at four universities, an increase at one university, and no change at the remaining two universities in students' interest in working in some area of international veterinary medicine. However, none of the differences was statistically significant. PMID:18287480

  7. Does Participation in a Computer-Based Learning Program in Introductory Financial Accounting Course Lead to Choosing Accounting as a Major?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owhoso, Vincent; Malgwi, Charles A.; Akpomi, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    The authors examine whether students who completed a computer-based intervention program, designed to help them develop abilities and skills in introductory accounting, later declared accounting as a major. A sample of 1,341 students participated in the study, of which 74 completed the intervention program (computer-based assisted learning [CBAL])…

  8. Computer Support for Vicarious Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monthienvichienchai, Rachada; Sasse, M. Angela

    This paper investigates how computer support for vicarious learning can be implemented by taking a principled approach to selecting and combining different media to capture educational dialogues. The main goal is to create vicarious learning materials of appropriate pedagogic content and production quality, and at the same time minimize the…

  9. Applying Web-Enabled Problem-Based Learning and Self-Regulated Learning to Enhance Computing Skills of Taiwan's Vocational Students: A Quasi-Experimental Study of a Short-Term Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Pei-Di; Lee, Tsang-Hsiung; Tsai, Chia-Wen

    2007-01-01

    Contrary to conventional expectations, the reality of computing education in Taiwan's vocational schools is not so practically oriented, and thus reveals much room for improvement. In this context, we conducted a quasi-experiment to examine the effects of applying web-based problem-based learning (PBL), web-based self-regulated learning (SRL), and…

  10. A new computational account of cognitive control over reinforcement-based decision-making: Modeling of a probabilistic learning task.

    PubMed

    Zendehrouh, Sareh

    2015-11-01

    Recent work on decision-making field offers an account of dual-system theory for decision-making process. This theory holds that this process is conducted by two main controllers: a goal-directed system and a habitual system. In the reinforcement learning (RL) domain, the habitual behaviors are connected with model-free methods, in which appropriate actions are learned through trial-and-error experiences. However, goal-directed behaviors are associated with model-based methods of RL, in which actions are selected using a model of the environment. Studies on cognitive control also suggest that during processes like decision-making, some cortical and subcortical structures work in concert to monitor the consequences of decisions and to adjust control according to current task demands. Here a computational model is presented based on dual system theory and cognitive control perspective of decision-making. The proposed model is used to simulate human performance on a variant of probabilistic learning task. The basic proposal is that the brain implements a dual controller, while an accompanying monitoring system detects some kinds of conflict including a hypothetical cost-conflict one. The simulation results address existing theories about two event-related potentials, namely error related negativity (ERN) and feedback related negativity (FRN), and explore the best account of them. Based on the results, some testable predictions are also presented. PMID:26339919

  11. Impacts and Characteristics of Computer-Based Science Inquiry Learning Environments for Precollege Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnelly, Dermot F.; Linn, Marcia C.; Ludvigsen, Sten

    2014-01-01

    The National Science Foundation-sponsored report "Fostering Learning in the Networked World" called for "a common, open platform to support communities of developers and learners in ways that enable both to take advantage of advances in the learning sciences." We review research on science inquiry learning environments (ILEs)…

  12. A knowledge-based system with learning for computer communication network design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierre, Samuel; Hoang, Hai Hoc; Tropper-Hausen, Evelyne

    1990-01-01

    Computer communication network design is well-known as complex and hard. For that reason, the most effective methods used to solve it are heuristic. Weaknesses of these techniques are listed and a new approach based on artificial intelligence for solving this problem is presented. This approach is particularly recommended for large packet switched communication networks, in the sense that it permits a high degree of reliability and offers a very flexible environment dealing with many relevant design parameters such as link cost, link capacity, and message delay.

  13. Computer Environments for Learning Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, Douglas H.; Battista, Michael T.

    1994-01-01

    Reviews research describing computer functions of construction-oriented computer environments and evaluates their contributions to students' learning of geometry. Topics discussed include constructing geometric concepts; the use of LOGO in elementary school mathematics; software that focuses on geometric construction; and implications for the…

  14. Computer-Based and Paper-Based Reading Comprehension in Adolescents with Typical Language Development and Language-Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srivastava, Pradyumn; Gray, Shelley

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: With the global expansion of technology, our reading platform has shifted from traditional text to hypertext, yet little consideration has been given to how this shift might help or hinder students' reading comprehension. The purpose of this study was to compare reading comprehension of computer-based and paper-based texts in adolescents…

  15. Computer Communications and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellman, Beryl L.

    1992-01-01

    Computer conferencing offers many opportunities for linking college students and faculty at a distance. From the Binational English and Spanish Telecommunications Network (BESTNET) has evolved a variety of bilingual video/computer/face-to-face instructional packages to serve institutions and nontraditional students on several continents. (MSE)

  16. Computer Assisted Learning Feature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Peter; Minogue, Claire

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the goals of the Computer Working Party in Great Britain, presenting their assessment of current computer hardware and the market for economics software. Examines "Running the British Economy," a macroeconomic policy simulation that investigates the links between values and policy objectives and encourages questioning of economic models.…

  17. Adaptive Device Context Based Mobile Learning Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pu, Haitao; Lin, Jinjiao; Song, Yanwei; Liu, Fasheng

    2011-01-01

    Mobile learning is e-learning delivered through mobile computing devices, which represents the next stage of computer-aided, multi-media based learning. Therefore, mobile learning is transforming the way of traditional education. However, as most current e-learning systems and their contents are not suitable for mobile devices, an approach for…

  18. Designing Communication Protocols for a Computer-Mediated Laboratory for Problem-Based Learning

    PubMed Central

    Koschmann, T.D.; Feltovich, P.J.; Myers, A.; Barrows, H.S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes some of the design criteria for a facility to support problem-based tutorials, known as the Computer-Mediated Tutorial Laboratory (CMTL). In the CMTL, a networked workstation will be provided for the tutor and each of the students. The tutor's workstation will be connected to a projection system, permitting the entire group to view the tutor's screen. The software used in the CMTL will have three components: a Patient Simulation Stack (PSS), the group/student Tutorial Stacks (TSs) and the network communication interface. The PSS represents a clinical problem; it is designed to realistically simulate an encounter with an actual patient. The TSs serve as a personalized record of what transpired in the tutorial session. Each student will maintain a private TS and the tutor will maintain a shared TS, viewable by all members of the group. The network communication interface will permit the participants in the tutorial to direct electronic messages to each other. The communication interface has two components: the client software available on the student's and tutor's workstation and the server software. The CMTL client software consists of two applications-one for sending messages and one for viewing the stream of incoming messages. Research is planned to investigate the effects of computer-mediation on the tutorial process.

  19. Supporting the Learning Process with Collaborative Concept Mapping Using Computer-based Communication Tools and Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Simone, Christina; Schmid, Richard F.; McEwen, Laura A.

    2001-01-01

    Studied the effects of a combination of student collaboration, concept mapping, and electronic technologies with 26 students in a graduate level learning theories class. Findings suggest that concept mapping and collaborative learning techniques complement each other, and that students found the combined approach useful. (SLD)

  20. Measuring Knowledge Elaboration Based on a Computer-Assisted Knowledge Map Analytical Approach to Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Lanqin; Huang, Ronghuai; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Yang, Kaicheng

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantitatively measure the level of knowledge elaboration and explore the relationships between prior knowledge of a group, group performance, and knowledge elaboration in collaborative learning. Two experiments were conducted to investigate the level of knowledge elaboration. The collaborative learning objective in…

  1. An Evaluation of an Inquiry-Based Computer-Assisted Learning Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maor, Dorit; Fraser, Barry

    1994-01-01

    This study focused on students' development of inquiry skills in a computerized learning environment. Seven Year-11 classes (n=120) interacted with a computerized database, "Birds of Antarctica," and curriculum materials while the teacher used an inquiry approach to learning. Students perceived their classes as more investigative and open-ended…

  2. E-Learning and Instructional Management System Based on Local Computer Networks and Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khazaal, Hasan F.; Abbas, Riyadh A.; Abdulridha, Basim M.; Karam, Marc; Aglan, Heshmat

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the educational efforts invested at Wasit University (WU), in Wasit, Iraq, in order to make WU the first university in that country to implement campus-wide e-learning, which is essential for any country aiming for progress through the essential goal of "Education For All"; e-learning being economic, far-reaching,…

  3. A Web-Based Computer-Aided Learning Module for an Anatomy Course Using Open Source Image Mapping Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carleton, Renee E.

    2012-01-01

    Computer-aided learning (CAL) is used increasingly to teach anatomy in post-secondary programs. Studies show that augmentation of traditional cadaver dissection and model examination by CAL can be associated with positive student learning outcomes. In order to reduce costs associated with the purchase of skeletons and models and to encourage study…

  4. The Computational Science Education Reference Desk: A tool for increasing inquiry based learning in the science classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joiner, D. A.; Stevenson, D. E.; Panoff, R. M.

    2000-12-01

    The Computational Science Reference Desk is an online tool designed to provide educators in math, physics, astronomy, biology, chemistry, and engineering with information on how to use computational science to enhance inquiry based learning in the undergraduate and pre college classroom. The Reference Desk features a showcase of original content exploration activities, including lesson plans and background materials; a catalog of websites which contain models, lesson plans, software, and instructional resources; and a forum to allow educators to communicate their ideas. Many of the recent advances in astronomy rely on the use of computer simulation, and tools are being developed by CSERD to allow students to experiment with some of the models that have guided scientific discovery. One of these models allows students to study how scientists use spectral information to determine the makeup of the interstellar medium by modeling the interstellar extinction curve using spherical grains of silicate, amorphous carbon, or graphite. Students can directly compare their model to the average interstellar extinction curve, and experiment with how small changes in their model alter the shape of the interstellar extinction curve. A simpler model allows students to visualize spatial relationships between the Earth, Moon, and Sun to understand the cause of the phases of the moon. A report on the usefulness of these models in two classes, the Computational Astrophysics workshop at The Shodor Education Foundation and the Conceptual Astronomy class at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, will be presented.

  5. Project-Based Teaching-Learning Computer-Aided Engineering Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoes, J. A.; Relvas, C.; Moreira, R.

    2004-01-01

    Computer-aided design, computer-aided manufacturing, computer-aided analysis, reverse engineering and rapid prototyping are tools that play an important key role within product design. These are areas of technical knowledge that must be part of engineering and industrial design courses' curricula. This paper describes our teaching experience of…

  6. Researching Computer-Based Collaborative Learning in Inclusive Classrooms in Cyprus: The Role of the Computer in Pupils' Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mavrou, Katerina; Lewis, Ann; Douglas, Graeme

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of a study of the role of the computer in scaffolding pupils' interaction and its effects on the disabled (D) pupils' participation and inclusion in the context of socio-cultural theories and the ideals of inclusive education. The study investigated the interactions of pairs of D and non-disabled (ND) pupils…

  7. The Role of Computer Simulation in an Inquiry-Based Learning Environment: Reconstructing Geological Events as Geologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Li-Fen; Hsu, Ying-Shao; Yeh, Yi-Fen

    2012-01-01

    Several researchers have investigated the effects of computer simulations on students' learning. However, few have focused on how simulations with authentic contexts influences students' inquiry skills. Therefore, for the purposes of this study, we developed a computer simulation (FossilSim) embedded in an authentic inquiry lesson. FossilSim…

  8. The Computer-based Lecture

    PubMed Central

    Wofford, Marcia M; Spickard, Anderson W; Wofford, James L

    2001-01-01

    Advancing computer technology, cost-containment pressures, and desire to make innovative improvements in medical education argue for moving learning resources to the computer. A reasonable target for such a strategy is the traditional clinical lecture. The purpose of the lecture, the advantages and disadvantages of “live” versus computer-based lectures, and the technical options in computerizing the lecture deserve attention in developing a cost-effective, complementary learning strategy that preserves the teacher-learner relationship. Based on a literature review of the traditional clinical lecture, we build on the strengths of the lecture format and discuss strategies for converting the lecture to a computer-based learning presentation. PMID:11520384

  9. Computer-Supported Co-operative Learning Systems: Interactive Group Technologies and Open Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Dick

    1988-01-01

    Discussion of interactive technologies and open learning focuses on computer supported cooperative work (CSCW), especially computer based message systems, and their effects on open learning. Topics discussed include cooperative learning; distance learning; individualized instruction; local area networks; group communication; and design principles…

  10. Computational... Physics Education: Letting physics learning drive the computational learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chonacky, Norman

    2011-03-01

    For several years I have been part of a team researching and rethinking why physicists are more willing to admit the value of computational modeling than to include it in what they teach. We have concluded that undergraduate faculty face characteristic barriers that discourage them from starting to integrate computation into their courses. Computational tools and resources are already developed and freely available for them to use. But there loom ill-defined ``costs'' to their course learning objectives and to them personally as instructors in undertaking this. In an attempt to understand these issues more deeply, I placed myself in the mindset of a relative novice to computational applications. My approach: focus on a physics problem first and then on the computation needed to address it. I asked: could I deepen my understanding of physics while simultaneously mastering new computational skills? My results may aid appreciation of the plight of both a novice professor contemplating the introduction of computation into a course and the students taking it. These may also provide insight into practical ways that computational physics might be integrated into an entire undergraduate curriculum. Research support from: Shodor Education Foundation; IEEE-Computer Society; and Teragrid Project. Research collaboration from Partnership for Integration of Computation into Undergraduate Physics.