Science.gov

Sample records for computer cathode ray

  1. Multiple imaging mode X-ray computed tomography for distinguishing active and inactive phases in lithium-ion battery cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komini Babu, Siddharth; Mohamed, Alexander I.; Whitacre, Jay F.; Litster, Shawn

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents the use of nanometer scale resolution X-ray computed tomography (nano-CT) in the three-dimensional (3D) imaging of a Li-ion battery cathode, including the separate volumes of active material, binder plus conductive additive, and pore. The different high and low atomic number (Z) materials are distinguished by sequentially imaging the lithium cobalt oxide electrode in absorption and then Zernike phase contrast modes. Morphological parameters of the active material and the additives are extracted from the 3D reconstructions, including the distribution of contact areas between the additives and the active material. This method could provide a better understanding of the electric current distribution and structural integrity of battery electrodes, as well as provide detailed geometries for computational models.

  2. Photoelastic illumination by using cathode-ray-tube displays.

    PubMed

    Ng, T W; Sajan, M R; Asundi, A

    1997-06-01

    The need to perform computer-aided fringe-analysis schemes in photoelasticity for automated stress analysis has necessitated further developments in specimen illumination. Commonly available cathode-ray-tube color displays are investigated for such a purpose. PMID:18253380

  3. Luminescent screen composition for cathode ray tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilborn, E. H.

    1968-01-01

    Screen composition for cathode ray tubes exhibits differential color of emission as a function of beam current variation at a constant accelerating voltage. The screen consists of a mixture of phosphors which emit different hues, have different current saturation values and exhibit a nonlinear current-brightness characteristic.

  4. The characterization of waste cathode-ray tube glass.

    PubMed

    Méar, F; Yot, P; Cambon, M; Ribes, M

    2006-01-01

    New re-use applications are needed to address the relatively large quantity of waste electronic products generated in the world. Cathode-ray tubes (CRTs) from computer monitors and TV sets are a large component of such waste. The three glass components of CRTs are the funnel, panel and neck, which are produced by various manufacturers and are now collected by asset-recovery centres. In this paper, we characterize waste funnel and panel glass from dismantled cathode-ray tubes with a view to assisting the development of new re-use applications. The heavy metal (lead, barium, and strontium) content of such glass represents an acute risk to the environment. Our results of the chemical composition for different kinds of waste CRT glass including black & white and color CRTs show that CRT glass from different producers have generally similar chemical compositions. In particular, the compositions of funnel and panel black & white CRT glass are similar, but are different to those of panel and funnel color CRT glass. We also measured the following specific properties of each type of CRT glass: density, glass transition temperature, and linear coefficient of thermal expansion. It was found that the coefficients of thermal expansion of CRT glass do not vary with their composition. In contrast, the measured densities and glass transition temperatures do vary with composition. On the basis of our experimental data and data found in the literature, we outline the main properties of several waste CRT glass currently in circulation. The aim of this study was to provide the data required to determine if this kind of waste could be entirely (or partially) re-used and to aid the search for promising methods of treatment. PMID:16427267

  5. Computer ray tracing speeds.

    PubMed

    Robb, P; Pawlowski, B

    1990-05-01

    The results of measuring the ray trace speed and compilation speed of thirty-nine computers in fifty-seven configurations, ranging from personal computers to super computers, are described. A correlation of ray trace speed has been made with the LINPACK benchmark which allows the ray trace speed to be estimated using LINPACK performance data. The results indicate that the latest generation of workstations, using CPUs based on RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Computer) technology, are as fast or faster than mainframe computers in compute-bound situations. PMID:20563112

  6. Cathode Ray Research Leading to J.J. Thomson's Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Joseph

    1997-04-01

    This paper reviews the research on the properties and nature of cathode rays that led to the discovery of the electron by J. J. Thomson in the years 1897 - 1899. During the period from about 1870 to 1897 important research on cathode rays was carried out by William Crookes and Arthur Schuster in England, by Eugen Goldstein, Heinrich Hertz, Philipp Lenard, Emil Wiechert and Walter Kaufman in Germany, and by Jean Perrin in France. This research was always tedious and often inexact because fast vacuum pumps and convenient vacuum gauges did not yet exist. Still a few of these earlier researchers narrowly missed beating J. J. Thomson to the discover of the electron.

  7. Multilayer screen gives cathode ray tube high contrast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullinger, H.; Hilborn, E. H.

    1970-01-01

    Fabrication method for cathode ray tubes uses low-cost siloxane resin formulations. The resins contain sufficient methyl or phenyl groups for solubility in organic solvents. After vaporization and baking, the polymerized material is stable under vacuum and under temperatures required for tube fabrication.

  8. Management practices for end-of-life cathode ray tube glass: Review of advances in recycling and best available technologies.

    PubMed

    Iniaghe, Paschal O; Adie, Gilbert U

    2015-11-01

    Cathode ray tubes are image display units found in computer monitors and televisions. In recent years, cathode ray tubes have been generated as waste owing to the introduction of newer and advanced technologies in image displays, such as liquid crystal displays and high definition televisions, among others. Generation and subsequent disposal of end-of-life cathode ray tubes presents a challenge owing to increasing volumes and high lead content embedded in the funnel and neck sections of the glass. Disposal in landfills and open dumping are anti-environmental practices considering the large-scale contamination of environmental media by the potential of toxic metals leaching from glass. Mitigating such environmental contamination will require sound management strategies that are environmentally friendly and economically feasible. This review covers existing and emerging management practices for end-of-life cathode ray tubes. An in-depth analysis of available technologies (glass smelting, detoxification of cathode ray tube glass, lead extraction from cathode ray tube glass) revealed that most of the techniques are environmentally friendly, but are largely confined to either laboratory scale, or are often limited owing to high cost to mount, or generate secondary pollutants, while a closed-looped method is antiquated. However, recycling in cementitious systems (cement mortar and concrete) gives an added advantage in terms of quantity of recyclable cathode ray tube glass at a given time, with minimal environmental and economic implications. With significant quantity of waste cathode ray tube glass being generated globally, cementitious systems could be economically and environmentally acceptable as a sound management practice for cathode ray tube glass, where other technologies may not be applicable. PMID:26463115

  9. 21 CFR 870.2450 - Medical cathode-ray tube display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical cathode-ray tube display. 870.2450 Section 870.2450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... cathode-ray tube display. (a) Identification. A medical cathode-ray tube display is a device...

  10. 21 CFR 870.2450 - Medical cathode-ray tube display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical cathode-ray tube display. 870.2450 Section 870.2450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... cathode-ray tube display. (a) Identification. A medical cathode-ray tube display is a device...

  11. 21 CFR 870.2450 - Medical cathode-ray tube display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical cathode-ray tube display. 870.2450 Section 870.2450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... cathode-ray tube display. (a) Identification. A medical cathode-ray tube display is a device...

  12. 21 CFR 870.2450 - Medical cathode-ray tube display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical cathode-ray tube display. 870.2450 Section 870.2450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... cathode-ray tube display. (a) Identification. A medical cathode-ray tube display is a device...

  13. 21 CFR 870.2450 - Medical cathode-ray tube display.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical cathode-ray tube display. 870.2450 Section 870.2450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... cathode-ray tube display. (a) Identification. A medical cathode-ray tube display is a device...

  14. Schematic displays for the Space Shuttle Orbiter multifunction cathode-ray-tube display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, W.

    1979-01-01

    A standardized procedure for developing cathode ray tube displayed schematic diagrams. The displaying of Spacelab information on the space shuttle orbiter multifunction cathode ray tube display system is used to illustrate this procedure. Schematic displays with the equivalent tabular displays are compared.

  15. Fabrication, characterization and integration of carbon nanotube cathodes for field emission X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderon-Colon, Xiomara

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters are now being evaluated for a wide range of vacuum electronic applications. Our laboratory pioneer in the development of CNT based field emission X-ray source technology, which has the potential to fundamentally change how X-ray radiation is generated and utilized. Applications of the CNT field emission X-ray source technology in a wide range of applications including biomedical imaging, radiation therapy, and homeland security are being actively pursued. However, problems with the performance of the CNT cathodes for X-ray generation including short lifetime at high current density, instability under high voltage, poor emission uniformity, and cathode-to-cathode inconsistency are still major obstacles for device applications. The goal of this thesis work is the development and optimization of an electrophoretic process to fabricate composite CNT films with controlled nanotube orientation and surface density, and enhanced adhesion. The CNT cathode fabrication process consist in a combination of photolithography and electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method where parameters such as SU-8 photoresist thickness, deposition time, and deposition voltage were varied to fabricate CNT cathodes with the required properties for X-ray generation. Also the development of CNT alcohol-based suspensions in context of the EPD method requirements with excellent long term stability has been accomplished. The CNT cathodes fabricated by EPD have significantly enhanced macroscopic field emission current density and long-term stability under high operating voltages. Also these CNT cathodes compared to others reported previously show significant improved field emission properties with small cathode-to-cathode variation. The integration, characterization, and evaluation of these CNT cathodes into a micro focus field emission X-ray source has been achieved with excellent X-ray source characteristics and performance including X-ray flux and stability at the

  16. SURFACE SEGREGATION STUDIES OF SOFC CATHODES: COMBINING SOFT X-RAYS AND ELECTROCHEMICAL IMPEDENCE SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Miara, Lincoln J.; Piper, L.F.J.; Davis, Jacob N.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Basu, Soumendra; Smith, K. E.; Pal, Uday B.; Gopalan, Srikanth

    2010-12-01

    A system to grow heteroepitaxial thin-films of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathodes on single crystal substrates was developed. The cathode composition investigated was 20% strontium-doped lanthanum manganite (LSM) grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on single crystal (111) yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates. By combining electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) with x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy XAS measurements, we conclude that electrically driven cation migration away from the two-phase gas-cathode interface results in improved electrochemical performance. Our results provide support to the premise that the removal of surface passivating phases containing Sr2+ and Mn2+, which readily form at elevated temperatures even in O2 atmospheric pressures, is responsible for the improved cathodic performance upon application of a bias.

  17. Investigation on emission characteristics of metal-ceramic cathode applied to industrial X-ray diode.

    PubMed

    Xun, Ma; Jianqiang, Yuan; Hongwei, Liu; Hongtao, Li; Lingyun, Wang; Ping, Jiang

    2016-06-01

    The industrial x-ray diode with high impedance configuration is usually adopted to generate repetitive x-ray, but its performance would be worsened due to lower electric field on the cathode of diode when a voltage of several hundreds of kV is applied. To improve its performance, a novel metal-ceramic cathode is proposed in this paper. Key factors (width, relative permittivity of ceramic, and so on) affecting electric field distribution on triple points are analyzed by electrostatic field calculation program, so as to optimize the design of this novel cathode. Experiments are done to study the characteristics including emission current of cathode, diode voltage duration, diode mean dynamic impedance, and diode impedance drop velocity within diode power duration. The results show that metal-ceramic cathode could improve diode performance by enhancing emission current and stabling impedance; the impedance drop velocity of diode with spoke-shaped metal-ceramic cathode was reduced to -5 Ω ns(-1) within diode power duration, comparing to -15 Ω ns(-1) with metal foil cathode. PMID:27370441

  18. Investigation on emission characteristics of metal-ceramic cathode applied to industrial X-ray diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xun, Ma; Jianqiang, Yuan; Hongwei, Liu; Hongtao, Li; Lingyun, Wang; Ping, Jiang

    2016-06-01

    The industrial x-ray diode with high impedance configuration is usually adopted to generate repetitive x-ray, but its performance would be worsened due to lower electric field on the cathode of diode when a voltage of several hundreds of kV is applied. To improve its performance, a novel metal-ceramic cathode is proposed in this paper. Key factors (width, relative permittivity of ceramic, and so on) affecting electric field distribution on triple points are analyzed by electrostatic field calculation program, so as to optimize the design of this novel cathode. Experiments are done to study the characteristics including emission current of cathode, diode voltage duration, diode mean dynamic impedance, and diode impedance drop velocity within diode power duration. The results show that metal-ceramic cathode could improve diode performance by enhancing emission current and stabling impedance; the impedance drop velocity of diode with spoke-shaped metal-ceramic cathode was reduced to -5 Ω ns-1 within diode power duration, comparing to -15 Ω ns-1 with metal foil cathode.

  19. Hollow cathodes as electron emitting plasma contactors Theory and computer modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. A.; Katz, I.; Mandell, M. J.; Parks, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    Several researchers have suggested using hollow cathodes as plasma contactors for electrodynamic tethers, particularly to prevent the Shuttle Orbiter from charging to large negative potentials. Previous studies have shown that fluid models with anomalous scattering can describe the electron transport in hollow cathode generated plasmas. An improved theory of the hollow cathode plasmas is developed and computational results using the theory are compared with laboratory experiments. Numerical predictions for a hollow cathode plasma source of the type considered for use on the Shuttle are presented, as are three-dimensional NASCAP/LEO calculations of the emitted ion trajectories and the resulting potentials in the vicinity of the Orbiter. The computer calculations show that the hollow cathode plasma source makes vastly superior contact with the ionospheric plasma compared with either an electron gun or passive ion collection by the Orbiter.

  20. Rigid indented cylindrical cathode for X-ray tube

    DOEpatents

    Hudgens, Claude R.

    1985-01-01

    A cathode assembly for a vacuum tube includes a wire filament, a straight bular anode parallel to and surrounding the wire filament, and insulating spacers for rigidly fastening the filament with respect to the anode, and with one side of the anode indented or flattened such that only one portion of the anode is heated to emitting temperatures by the filament.

  1. Computer controlled techniques for high emission density mapping of thermionic cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, J. W.; Thomas, R. E.

    1985-12-01

    Some of the techniques commonly used (e.g. SLEEP and thermionic emission microscope) for measuring emission or work function uniformity of thermionic cathode surfaces require the use of very low or near zero current densities, thus the cathode is characterized at current densities and temperatures much lower than that of a normally operating cathode. The system reported on here uses a high voltage pulse technique and is capable of measuring emission densities in the range 1 to 80 A/cm 2 at normal cathode operating temperatures. The cathode surface is scanned with an anode having a 0.025 mm aperture whose position is controlled by computer operated stepping motors. The current through the aperture to a collector electrode is measured using a sample-and-hold amplifier. Pulsing and sampling are computer synchronized with the scanning, and data for each pulse are accumulated and can be processed and displayed in several ways using the computer, including a detailed "three-dimensional" map of either the electron emission density or work function variations. The entire surface of the cathode or any portion of it can be mapped in steps as small as 0.001 mm (1μm), but typically steps of 5-100 μm were used. Measurements are presented illustrating the uniformity or nonuniformity of the electron emission densities and work functions for type-B and type-M cathodes.

  2. 40 CFR 261.41 - Notification and Recordkeeping for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse. 261.41 Section 261.41 Protection of... HAZARDOUS WASTE Exclusions/Exemptions § 261.41 Notification and Recordkeeping for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse. (a) Persons who export used, intact CRTs for reuse must send a...

  3. 40 CFR 261.41 - Notification and Recordkeeping for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse. 261.41 Section 261.41 Protection of... HAZARDOUS WASTE Exclusions/Exemptions § 261.41 Notification and Recordkeeping for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse. (a) Persons who export used, intact CRTs for reuse must send a...

  4. 40 CFR 261.41 - Notification and Recordkeeping for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse. 261.41 Section 261.41 Protection of... HAZARDOUS WASTE Exclusions/Exemptions § 261.41 Notification and Recordkeeping for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse. (a) Persons who export used, intact CRTs for reuse must send a...

  5. 40 CFR 261.41 - Notification and Recordkeeping for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse. 261.41 Section 261.41 Protection of... HAZARDOUS WASTE Exclusions/Exemptions § 261.41 Notification and Recordkeeping for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse. (a) Persons who export used, intact CRTs for reuse must send a...

  6. A Century-Old Question: Does a Crookes Paddle Wheel Cathode Ray Tube Demonstrate That Electrons Carry Momentum?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, T. E.; Calisa, Vaishnavi

    2014-01-01

    In 1879, in the midst of the debate between English and continental scientists about the nature of cathode rays, William Crookes conducted an experiment in which a small mill or "paddle wheel" was pushed along tracks inside a cathode ray tube (CRT) (similar to that shown in Fig. 1) when connected to a high-voltage induction coil. Crookes…

  7. The Fine-Beam Cathode-Ray Tube and the Observant and Enquiring Student, Part 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, John le P.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the physics of electromagnetic focussing using an imaginary dialogue between teacher and student. It is assumed that students have been introduced to the underlying theory concerning movement of a charged particle traveling with uniform speed in a magnetic field before seeing a demonstration with the fine-beam cathode-ray tube. (JN)

  8. The Fine-Beam Cathode-Ray Tube and the Observant and Enquiring Student - Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, John le P.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the fine-beam cathode-ray tube, explaining observed phenomena from a visual, qualitative viewpoint. Discusses the reason for the fineness of the beam and provides the theoretical basis for the observed circular shape of the beam when the Helmholtz field is applied. (JM)

  9. The Fine-Beam Cathode-Ray Tube and the Observant and Enquiring Student, Part 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, John le P.

    1984-01-01

    Describes (in the form of a hypothetical discussion between teacher and student) several demonstrations using the fine-beam cathode-ray tube. One is a demonstration of how a magnetic field can help to initiate and propagate a fine beam. (JN)

  10. The Fine-Beam Cathode-Ray Tube and the Observant and Enquiring Student, Part 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, John le P.

    1985-01-01

    This final article in the series on the fine-beam cathode-ray tube presents: (1) additional investigations; (2) an alternative method for the electron e/m and synchrotron radiation; and (3) two challenges to students (in a dialogue format) together with a lengthy discussion on synchrotron radiation sources. (DH)

  11. Field emission behavior of carbon nanotube yarn for micro-resolution X-ray tube cathode.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae Won; Mo, Chan Bin; Jung, Hyun Kyu; Ryu, Seongwoo; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2013-11-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) has excellent electrical and thermal conductivity and high aspect ratio for X-ray tube cathode. However, CNT field emission cathode has been shown unstable field emission and short life time due to field evaporation by high current density and detachment by electrostatic force. An alternative approach in this direction is the introduction of CNT yarn, which is a one dimensional assembly of individual carbon nanotubes bonded by the Van der Waals force. Because CNT yarn is composed with many CNTs, CNT yarns are expected to increase current density and life time for X-ray tube applications. In this research, CNT yarn was fabricated by spinning of a super-aligned CNT forest and was characterized for application to an X-ray tube cathode. CNT yarn showed a high field emission current density and a long lifetime of over 450 hours. Applying the CNT yarn field emitter to the X-ray tube cathode, it was possible to obtain micro-scale resolution images. The relationship between the field emission properties and the microstructure evolution was investigated and the unraveling effect of the CNT yarn was discussed. PMID:24245260

  12. The determination of iron, titanium, and nickel in Apollo 14 samples by cathode ray polarography.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maienthal, E. J.

    1972-01-01

    Methods have been developed and applied to the determination of iron, titanium, and nickel in Apollo 14 fine soil and rock by differential cathode ray polarography on the same sample. A 5 mg sample was sufficient for the determination of all 3 elements. Iron and titanium were determined either directly or after cupferron separation. Nickel was determined after dimethylglyoxime separation.

  13. X-ray Tube Using a Graphene Flower Cloth Field Emission Cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwai, Yusuke; Muramatsu, Kazuo; Tsuboi, Shougo; Jyouzuka, Atsuo; Nakamura, Tomonori; Onizuka, Yoshihiro; Mimura, Hidenori

    2013-10-01

    We have successfully fabricated a filament-less X-ray tube using a graphene flower cloth (GFC) field emission cathode. The GFC has numerous nanoprotrusions formed by self-standing graphene structures. The field emission current and the field enhancement factor β were 500 µA and 5600, respectively. The stability of voltage defined as a variance coefficient (σ/mean) of voltage was calculated to be 0.04% while maintaining the X-ray tube current of 300 µA. We applied our X-ray tube with the GFC field emitter to the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis of stainless steel.

  14. X-ray dose estimation from cathode ray tube monitors by Monte Carlo calculation.

    PubMed

    Khaledi, Navid; Arbabi, Azim; Dabaghi, Moloud

    2015-04-01

    Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) monitors are associated with the possible emission of bremsstrahlung radiation produced by electrons striking the monitor screen. Because of the low dose rate, accurate dosimetry is difficult. In this study, the dose equivalent (DE) and effective dose (ED) to an operator working in front of the monitor have been calculated using the Monte Carlo (MC) method by employing the MCNP code. The mean energy of photons reaching the operator was above 17 keV. The phantom ED was 454 μSv y (348 nSv h), which was reduced to 16 μSv y (12 nSv h) after adding a conventional leaded glass sheet. The ambient dose equivalent (ADE) and personal dose equivalent (PDE) for the head, neck, and thorax of the phantom were also calculated. The uncertainty of calculated ED, ADE, and PDE ranged from 3.3% to 10.7% and 4.2% to 14.6% without and with the leaded glass, respectively. PMID:25706133

  15. Exposure to hazardous substances in Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) recycling sites in France

    SciTech Connect

    Lecler, Marie-Thérèse Zimmermann, François; Silvente, Eric; Clerc, Frédéric; Chollot, Alain; Grosjean, Jérôme

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Chemical risks were assessed in the nine cathode ray tube screens recycling facilities. • The main hazardous agents are dust containing lead, cadmium, barium and yttrium. • Exposure and pollutant levels are described for different operations and processes. • All the operations and processes are concerned by significant levels of pollutants. • We suggest recommendations to reduce chemical risk. - Abstract: The Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) or e-waste recycling sector has grown considerably in the last fifteen years due to the ever shorter life cycles of consumables and an increasingly restrictive policy context. Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) from used television and computer screens represent one of the main sources of e-waste. CRTs contain toxic materials such as lead, cadmium, barium, and fluorescent powders which can be released if recycling of CRTs is not appropriate. Exposure to these harmful substances was assessed in nine workshops where CRT screens are treated. Particulate exposure levels were measured using a gravimetric method and metals were analysed by plasma emission spectrometry. The maximum levels of worker exposure were 8.8 mg/m{sup 3}, 1504.3 μg/m{sup 3}, 434.9 μg/m{sup 3}, 576.3 μg/m{sup 3} and 2894.3 μg/m{sup 3} respectively for inhalable dust, barium, cadmium, lead and yttrium. The maximum levels of airborne pollutants in static samples were 39.0 mg/m{sup 3}, 848.2 μg/m{sup 3}, 698.4 μg/m{sup 3}, 549.3 μg/m{sup 3} and 3437.9 μg/m{sup 3} for inhalable dust, barium, cadmium, lead and yttrium. The most harmful operations were identified, and preventive measures for reducing the chemical risk associated with screen recycling were proposed. Workplace measurements were used to define recommendations for reducing the chemical risks in CRT screens recycling facilities and for promoting the design and development of “clean and safe” processes in emerging recycling channels.

  16. Calibration of medium-resolution monochrome cathode ray tube displays for the purpose of board examinations.

    PubMed

    Evanoff, M G; Roehrig, H; Giffords, R S; Capp, M P; Rovinelli, R J; Hartmann, W H; Merritt, C

    2001-06-01

    This report discusses calibration and set-up procedures for medium-resolution monochrome cathode ray tubes (CRTs) taken in preparation of the oral portion of the board examination of the American Board of Radiology (ABR). The board examinations took place in more than 100 rooms of a hotel. There was one display-station (a computer and the associated CRT display) in each of the hotel rooms used for the examinations. The examinations covered the radiologic specialties cardiopulmonary, musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, vascular, pediatric, and genitourinary. The software used for set-up and calibration was the VeriLUM 4.0 package from Image Smiths in Germantown, MD. The set-up included setting minimum luminance and maximum luminance, as well as positioning of the CRT in each examination room with respect to reflections of roomlights. The calibration for the grey scale rendition was done meeting the Digital Imaging and communication in Medicine (DICOM) 14 Standard Display Function. We describe these procedures, and present the calibration data in. tables and graphs, listing initial values of minimum luminance, maximum luminance, and grey scale rendition (DICOM 14 standard display function). Changes of these parameters over the duration of the examination were observed and recorded on 11 monitors in a particular room. These changes strongly suggest that all calibrated CRTs be monitored over the duration of the examination. In addition, other CRT performance data affecting image quality such as spatial resolution should be included in set-up and image quality-control procedures. PMID:11442114

  17. Lead recovery from scrap cathode ray tube funnel glass by hydrothermal sulphidisation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wenyi; Meng, Wen; Li, Jinhui; Zhang, Chenglong; Song, Qingbin; Bai, Jianfeng; Wang, Jingwei; Li, Yingshun

    2015-10-01

    This research focused on the application of the hydrothermal sulphidisation method to separate lead from scrap cathode ray tube funnel glass. Prior to hydrothermal treatment, the cathode ray tube funnel glass was pretreated by mechanical activation. Under hydrothermal conditions, hydroxyl ions (OH(-)) were generated through an ion exchange reaction between metal ions in mechanically activated funnel glass and water, to accelerate sulphur disproportionation; no additional alkaline compound was needed. Lead contained in funnel glass was converted to lead sulphide with high efficiency. Temperature had a significant effect on the sulphidisation rate of lead in funnel glass, which increased from 25% to 90% as the temperature increased from 100 °C to 300 °C. A sulphidisation rate of 100% was achieved at a duration of 8 h at 300 °C. This process of mechanical activation and hydrothermal sulphidisation is efficient and promising for the treatment of leaded glass. PMID:26264931

  18. Experimental study of matrix carbon field-emission cathodes and computer aided design of electron guns for microwave power devices, exploring these cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Y.A.; Petrosyan, A.I.; Penzyakov, V.V.; Pimenov, V.G.; Rogovin, V.I.; Shesterkin, V.I.; Kudryashov, V.P.; Semyonov, V.C.

    1997-03-01

    The experimental study of matrix carbon field-emission cathodes (MCFECs), which has led to the stable operation of the cathodes with current emission values up to 100 mA, is described. A method of computer aided design of TWT electron guns (EGs) with MCFEC, based on the results of the MCFEC emission experimental study, is presented. The experimental MCFEC emission characteristics are used to define the field gain coefficient K and the cathode effective emission area S{sub eff}. The EG program computes the electric field upon the MCFEC surface, multiplies it by the K value and uses the Fowler{endash}Nordheim law and the S{sub eff} value to calculate the MCFEC current; the electron trajectories are computed as well. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Vacuum Society.}

  19. Disk-cathode flash x-ray tube driven by a repetitive type of Blumlein pulser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Kimura, Shingo; Isobe, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Kei; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu; Yanagisawa, Toru

    1991-04-01

    A repetitive flash x-ray generator utilizing a disk-cathode radiation tube is described. This generator consisted of the following essential components: a high voltage power supply, an energy storage condenser, a repetitive type of modified Blumlein pulser, a turbo molecular pump, and a flash x-ray tube. This high-voltage pulser consisted of the following major devices: two ceramic condensers with capacities of 85OpF, a gas gap switch driven by electric field distortion, and a coil. The two condensers were charged from -50 to -70kV, and the total capacity during main discharge was 425pF. The peak voltages of the pulser output were about -1. 4 times the condenser charged voltage. The flash x-ray tube consisted of the following major devices: a rod-shaped anode tip made of tungsten, a disk cathode made of graphite, a spattering shield, and a tube body made of acrylate resin. The anode-cathode (A-C) space was regulated from the outside of the x-ray tube by rotating the anode rod. The maximum values of the tube voltage and the current were about 80kV and 1. 2kA, respectively. The maximum pulse width was about lOOns, and the x-ray intensity was less than lpC/kg at 0. 3m per pulse. The repetition frequency was less than 50Hz, and the maximum focal spot size was equivalent to the anode diameter of 3. 0mm.

  20. Evaluation of biopolymer-modified concrete systems for disposal of cathode ray tube glass.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daeik; Petrisor, loana G; Yen, Teh Fu

    2005-07-01

    Cathode ray tubes (CRTs) from computer monitors and television sets, which contain significantly high percentage of lead (Pb) by weight, represent an enormous and growing hazardous waste problem in the United States and worldwide. As a result, new technologies are needed to cope with current CRT waste stream and increased hazard and build new markets for its recycled components, developing commercially viable concrete composites, as well as minimizing CRT disposal problems. In this study, commercially available biopolymers, such as xanthan gum, guar gum, and chitosan, were used to encapsulate CRT glass waste, reducing the Pb leachability. The biopolymers utilized contain a number of useful functional groups, such as carboxyl (xanthan), hydroxyl (guar), and amino groups (chitosan), which play important roles in binding and stabilizing Pb onto concrete structures. The use of biopolymers in concrete systems can create a stable interpenetrating cross-linking composite that will last for many years. Results from these new composites show 30% higher compressive strength than standard concrete and a sharp decrease in lead leachability from several thousand milligrams per liter initially to an amount of three-tenths milligrams per liter or lower values (much lower than the U.S. Environment Protection Agency standard for hazardous waste of 5 mg/L by the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure test), and for some of the composites leachability is below even the standard for drinking water. This efficient and cost-effective CRT-biopolymer-concrete composite is a new class of biopolymer-modified material that can potentially perform a significant role in relieving the current CRT issue. PMID:16111135

  1. What monitor can replace the cathode-ray tube for visual stimulation to elicit multifocal electroretinograms?

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Celso Soiti; Shinoda, Kei; Matsumoto, Harue; Seki, Keisuke; Nagasaka, Eiichiro; Iwata, Takeshi; Mizota, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    To compare a conventional cathode-ray tube (CRT) screen to organic light-emitting diode (OLED) and liquid crystal display (LCD) screens as visual stimulators to elicit multifocal electroretinograms (mfERGs), mfERGs were recorded from seven eyes of seven healthy volunteers (21 ± 2 years). The mfERGs elicited by a conventional CRT screen (S710, Compaq Computer Co.) were compared to those elicited by a studio-grade master OLED monitor (PVM-1741, Sony, Japan) and a conventional LCD (S1721, Flexscan, Eizo Nanao Corp., Japan). The luminance changes of each monitor were measured with a photodiode. CRT, OLED, and LCD screens with a frame frequency of 60 Hz were studied. A hexagonal stimulus array with 61 stimulus elements was created on each monitor. The serial white stimuli of the OLED screen at 60 Hz did not fuse, and that of the LCD screens fused. The amplitudes of P1 and P2 of the first-order kernels of the mfERGs were not significantly different from those elicited by the CRT and OLED screens, and the P1 amplitude of the first-order kernel elicited by the LCD stimuli was significantly smaller than that elicited by the CRT in all the groups of the averaged hexagonal elements. The implicit times were approximately 10 ms longer in almost all components elicited by the LCD screen compared to those elicited by the CRT screen. The mfERGs elicited by monitors other than the CRT should be carefully interpreted, especially those elicited by LCD screens. The OLED had good performance, and we conclude that it can replace the CRT as a stimulator for mfERGs; however, a collection of normative data is recommended. PMID:25096155

  2. Comparison of SOFC Cathode Microstructure Quantified using X-ray Nanotomography and Focused Ioni Beam-scanning Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    G Nelson; W Harris; J Lombardo; J Izzo Jr.; W Chiu; P Tanasini; M Cantoni; J Van herle; C Comninellis; et al.

    2011-12-31

    X-ray nanotomography and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) have been applied to investigate the complex 3D microstructure of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrodes at spatial resolutions of 45 nm and below. The application of near edge differential absorption for x-ray nanotomography and energy selected backscatter detection for FIB-SEM enable elemental mapping within the microstructure. Using these methods, non-destructive 3D x-ray imaging and FIB-SEM serial sectioning have been applied to compare three-dimensional elemental mapping of the LSM, YSZ, and pore phases in the SOFC cathode microstructure. The microstructural characterization of an SOFC cathode is reported based on these measurements. The results presented demonstrate the viability of x-ray nanotomography as a quantitative characterization technique and provide key insights into the SOFC cathode microstructure.

  3. Comparison of SOFC Cathode Microstructure Quantified using X-ray Nanotomography and Focused Ion Beam - Scanning Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, George J.; Harris, William H.; Lombardo, Jeffrey J.; Izzo, Jr., John R.; Chiu, W. K. S.; Tanasini, Pietro; Cantoni, Marco; Van herle, Jan; Comninellis, Christos; Andrews, Joy C.; Liu, Yijin; Pianetta, Piero; Chu, Yong

    2011-03-24

    X-ray nanotomography and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) have been applied to investigate the complex 3D microstructure of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrodes at spatial resolutions of 45 nm and below. The application of near edge differential absorption for x-ray nanotomography and energy selected backscatter detection for FIB–SEM enable elemental mapping within the microstructure. Using these methods, non-destructive 3D x-ray imaging and FIB–SEM serial sectioning have been applied to compare three-dimensional elemental mapping of the LSM, YSZ, and pore phases in the SOFC cathode microstructure. The microstructural characterization of an SOFC cathode is reported based on these measurements. The results presented demonstrate the viability of x-ray nanotomography as a quantitative characterization technique and provide key insights into the SOFC cathode microstructure.

  4. Application Of Cathode-Ray Tube Technology To The Clinical Evaluation Of Visual Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernier, Francoise; Charlier, Jacques; Nguyen, Duc D.

    1988-02-01

    Cathode-ray tubes (CRTs) have many applications in the clinical evaluation of visual functions. They have been used to test visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, visual fields, and early development of vision in preverbal children. Because CRTs provide considerable flexibility for the definition of spatial and temporal components of the stimulus, their use provides an attractive solution to many visual stimulation problems. However, there are some limitations due to the scanning of the picture frame by the electron beam and also to the electron-photon conversion process. The spatial, photometric, spectral, and temporal characteristics of a specifically designed monochromatic television system are evaluated with reference to the physiological requirements of visual tests.

  5. Characterization of Cathode Materials for Rechargeable Lithium Batteries using Synchrotron Based In Situ X-ray Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiao-Qing

    2007-05-23

    The emergence of portable telecommunication, computer equipment and ultimately hybrid electric vehicles has created a substantial interest in manufacturing rechargeable batteries that are less expensive, non-toxic, operate for longer time, small in size and weigh less. Li-ion batteries are taking an increasing share of the rechargeable battery market. The present commercial battery is based on a layered LiCoO{sub 2} cathode and a graphitized carbon anode. LiCoO{sub 2} is expensive but it has the advantage being easily manufactured in a reproducible manner. Other low cost layered compounds such as LiNiO{sub 2}, LiNi{sub 0.85}Co{sub 0.15}O{sub 2} or cubic spinels such as LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} have been considered. However, these suffer from cycle life and thermal stability problems. Recently, some battery companies have demonstrated a new concept of mixing two different types of insertion compounds to make a composite cathode, aimed at reducing cost and improving self-discharge. Reports clearly showed that this blending technique can prevent the decline in ·capacity caused by cycling or storage at elevated temperatures. However, not much work has been reported on the charge-discharge characteristics and phase transitions for these composite cathodes. Understanding the structure and structural changes of electrode materials during the electrochemical cycling is the key to develop better .lithium ion batteries. The successful commercialization of the· lithium-ion battery is mainly built on the advances in solid state chemistry of the intercalation compounds. Most of the progress in understanding the lithium ion battery materials has been obtained from x-ray diffraction studies. Up to now, most XRD studies on lithium-ion battery materials have been done ex situ. Although these ex situ XRD studies have provided important information· about the structures of battery materials, they do face three major problems. First of all, the pre-selected charge (discharge) states may

  6. Lithium and sodium battery cathode materials: computational insights into voltage, diffusion and nanostructural properties.

    PubMed

    Islam, M Saiful; Fisher, Craig A J

    2014-01-01

    Energy storage technologies are critical in addressing the global challenge of clean sustainable energy. Major advances in rechargeable batteries for portable electronics, electric vehicles and large-scale grid storage will depend on the discovery and exploitation of new high performance materials, which requires a greater fundamental understanding of their properties on the atomic and nanoscopic scales. This review describes some of the exciting progress being made in this area through use of computer simulation techniques, focusing primarily on positive electrode (cathode) materials for lithium-ion batteries, but also including a timely overview of the growing area of new cathode materials for sodium-ion batteries. In general, two main types of technique have been employed, namely electronic structure methods based on density functional theory, and atomistic potentials-based methods. A major theme of much computational work has been the significant synergy with experimental studies. The scope of contemporary work is highlighted by studies of a broad range of topical materials encompassing layered, spinel and polyanionic framework compounds such as LiCoO2, LiMn2O4 and LiFePO4 respectively. Fundamental features important to cathode performance are examined, including voltage trends, ion diffusion paths and dimensionalities, intrinsic defect chemistry, and surface properties of nanostructures. PMID:24202440

  7. COMPUTATIONAL MODELING OF CATHODIC LIMITATIONS ON LOCALIZED CORROSION OF WETTED SS 316L, AT ROOM TEMPERATURE

    SciTech Connect

    F. Cui; F.J. Presuel-Moreno; R.G. Kelly

    2005-10-13

    The ability of a SS316L surface wetted with a thin electrolyte layer to serve as an effective cathode for an active localized corrosion site was studied computationally. The dependence of the total net cathodic current, I{sub net}, supplied at the repassivation potential E{sub rp} (of the anodic crevice) on relevant physical parameters including water layer thickness (WL), chloride concentration ([Cl{sup -}]) and length of cathode (Lc) were investigated using a three-level, full factorial design. The effects of kinetic parameters including the exchange current density (i{sub o,c}) and Tafel slope ({beta}{sub c}) of oxygen reduction, the anodic passive current density (i{sub p}) (on the cathodic surface), and E{sub rp} were studied as well using three-level full factorial designs of [Cl{sup -}] and Lc with a fixed WL of 25 {micro}m. The study found that all the three parameters WL, [Cl{sup -}] and Lc as well as the interactions of Lc x WL and Lc x [Cl{sup -}] had significant impact on I{sub net}. A five-factor regression equation was obtained which fits the computation results reasonably well, but demonstrated that interactions are more complicated than can be explained with a simple linear model. Significant effects on I{sub net} were found upon varying either i{sub o,c}, {beta}{sub c}, or E{sub rp}, whereas i{sub p} in the studied range was found to have little impact. It was observed that I{sub net} asymptotically approached maximum values (I{sub max}) when Lc increased to critical minimum values. I{sub max} can be used to determine the stability of coupled localized corrosion and the critical Lc provides important information for experimental design and corrosion protection.

  8. Novel Low-Cost, Low-Power Miniature Thermionic Cathode Developed for Microwave/Millimeter Wave Tube and Cathode Ray Tube Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.

    1999-01-01

    A low cost, small size and mass, low heater power, durable high-performance barium dispenser thermionic cathode has been developed that offers significant advancements in the design, manufacture, and performance of the electron sources used in vacuum electronic devices--such as microwave (and millimeter wave) traveling-wave tubes (TWT's)--and in display devices such as high-brightness, high-resolution cathode ray tubes (CRT's). The lower cathode heater power and the reduced size and mass of the new cathode are expected to be especially beneficial in TWT's for deep space communications, where future missions are requiring smaller spacecraft, higher data transfer rates (higher frequencies and radiofrequency output power), and greater electrical efficiency. Also expected to benefit are TWT's for commercial and government communication satellites, for both low and geosynchronous Earth orbit, with additional benefits offered by lower cost and potentially higher cathode current loading. A particularly important TWT application is in the microwave power module (MPM), which is a hybrid microwave (or millimeter wave) amplifier consisting of a low-noise solid state driver, a vacuum power booster (small TWT), and an electronic power conditioner integrated into a single compact package. The attributes of compactness and potentially high electrical efficiency make the MPM very attractive for many commercial and government (civilian and defense) applications in communication and radar systems. The MPM is already finding application in defense electronic systems and is under development by NASA for deep space communications. However, for the MPM to become competitive and commercially successful, a major reduction in cost must be achieved.

  9. Interlaced X-ray diffraction computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Vamvakeros, Antonios; Jacques, Simon D. M.; Di Michiel, Marco; Senecal, Pierre; Middelkoop, Vesna; Cernik, Robert J.; Beale, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction computed tomography data-collection strategy that allows, post experiment, a choice between temporal and spatial resolution is reported. This strategy enables time-resolved studies on comparatively short timescales, or alternatively allows for improved spatial resolution if the system under study, or components within it, appear to be unchanging. The application of the method for studying an Mn–Na–W/SiO2 fixed-bed reactor in situ is demonstrated. Additionally, the opportunities to improve the data-collection strategy further, enabling post-collection tuning between statistical, temporal and spatial resolutions, are discussed. In principle, the interlaced scanning approach can also be applied to other pencil-beam tomographic techniques, like X-ray fluorescence computed tomography, X-ray absorption fine structure computed tomography, pair distribution function computed tomography and tomographic scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. PMID:27047305

  10. Compact monochromatic flash x-ray generator utilizing a disk-cathode molybdenum tube.

    PubMed

    Sato, Eiichi; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Ichimaru, Toshio; Sato, Shigehiro; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Ido, Hideaki

    2005-01-01

    The high-voltage condensers in a polarity-inversion two-stage Marx surge generator are charged from -50 to -70 kV by a power supply, and the electric charges in the condensers are discharged to an x-ray tube after closing gap switches in the surge generator with a trigger device. The x-ray tube is a demountable diode, and the turbo molecular pump evacuates air from the tube with a pressure of approximately 1 mPa. Clean molybdenum Kalpha lines are produced using a 20 microm-thick zirconium filter, since the tube utilizes a disk cathode and a rod target, and bremsstrahlung rays are not emitted in the opposite direction to that of electron acceleration. At a charging voltage of -70 kV, the instantaneous tube voltage and current were 120 kV and 1.0 kA, respectively. The x-ray pulse widths were approximately 70 ns, and the generator produced instantaneous number of Kalpha photons was approximately 3 x 10(7) photons/cm2 per pulse at 0.5 m from the source of 3.0 mm in diameter. PMID:15719954

  11. Compact monochromatic flash x-ray generator utilizing a disk-cathode molybdenum tube

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Eiichi; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Ichimaru, Toshio; Sato, Shigehiro; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Ido, Hideaki

    2005-01-01

    The high-voltage condensers in a polarity-inversion two-stage Marx surge generator are charged from -50 to -70 kV by a power supply, and the electric charges in the condensers are discharged to an x-ray tube after closing gap switches in the surge generator with a trigger device. The x-ray tube is a demountable diode, and the turbo molecular pump evacuates air from the tube with a pressure of approximately 1 mPa. Clean molybdenum K{alpha} lines are produced using a 20 {mu}m-thick zirconium filter, since the tube utilizes a disk cathode and a rod target, and bremsstrahlung rays are not emitted in the opposite direction to that of electron acceleration. At a charging voltage of -70 kV, the instantaneous tube voltage and current were 120 kV and 1.0 kA, respectively. The x-ray pulse widths were approximately 70 ns, and the generator produced instantaneous number of K{alpha} photons was approximately 3x10{sup 7} photons/cm{sup 2} per pulse at 0.5 m from the source of 3.0 mm in diameter.

  12. X-ray Computed Tomography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michael, Greg

    2001-01-01

    Describes computed tomography (CT), a medical imaging technique that produces images of transaxial planes through the human body. A CT image is reconstructed mathematically from a large number of one-dimensional projections of a plane. The technique is used in radiological examinations and radiotherapy treatment planning. (Author/MM)

  13. Deciphering the thermal behavior of lithium rich cathode material by in situ X-ray diffraction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, Shoaib; Lee, Sangwoo; Kim, Hyunchul; Yoon, Jeongbae; Jang, Donghyuk; Yoon, Jaegu; Park, Jin-Hwan; Yoon, Won-Sub

    2015-07-01

    Thermal stability is one of the critical requirements for commercial operation of high energy lithium-ion batteries. In this study, we use in situ X-ray diffraction technique to elucidate the thermal degradation mechanism of 0.5Li2MnO3-0.5LiNi0.33Co0.33Mn0.33O2 lithium rich cathode material in the absence and presence of electrolyte to simulate the real life battery conditions and compare its thermal behavior with the commercial LiNi0.33Co0.33Mn0.33O2 cathode material. We show that the thermal induced phase transformations in delithiated lithium rich cathode material are much more intense compared to similar single phase layered cathode material in the presence of electrolyte. The structural changes in both cathode materials with the temperature rise follow different trends in the absence and presence of electrolyte between 25 and 600 °C. Phase transitions are comparatively simple in the absence of electrolyte, the fully charged lithium rich cathode material demonstrates better thermal stability by maintaining its phase till 379 °C, and afterwards spinel structure is formed. In the presence of electrolyte, however, the spinel structure appears at 207 °C, subsequently it transforms to rock salt type cubic phase at 425 °C with additional metallic, metal fluoride, and metal carbonate phases.

  14. In Situ X-ray Diffraction Studies of Cathode Materials in Lithium Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X. Q.; Sun, X.; McBreen, J.; Mukerjee, S.; Gao, Yuan; Yakovleva, M. V.; Xing, X. K.; Daroux, M. L.

    1998-11-01

    There is an increasing interest in lithiated transition metal oxides because of their use as cathodes in lithium batteries. LiCoO{sub 2}, LiNiO{sub 2} and LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} are the three most widely used and studied materials, At present, although it is relative expensive and toxic, LiCoO{sub 2} is the material of choice in commercial lithium ion batteries because of its ease of manufacture, better thermal stability and cycle life. However, the potential use of lithium ion batteries with larger capacity for power tools and electric vehicles in the future will demand new cathode materials with higher energy density, lower cost and better thermal stability. LiNiO{sub 2} is isostructural with LiCoO{sub 2}. It offers lower cost and high energy density than LiCoO{sub 2}. However, it has much poorer thermal stability than LiCoO{sub 2}, in the charged (delithiated) state. Co, Al, and other elements have been used to partially replace Ni in LiNiO{sub 2} system in order to increase the thermal stability. LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} has the highest thermal stability and lowest cost and toxicity. However, the low energy density and poor cycle life at elevated temperature are the major obstacles for this material. In order to develop safer, cheaper, and better performance cathode materials, the in-depth understanding of the relationships between the thermal stability and structure, performance and structure are very important. The performance here includes energy density and cycle life of the cathode materials. X-ray diffraction (XRD) is one of the most powerful tools to study these relationships. The pioneer ex situ XRD work on cathode materials for lithium batteries was done by Ohzuku. His XRD studies on LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}, LiCoO{sub 2}, LiNiO{sub 2}, LiNi{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.5}O{sub 2}, and LiAl{sub x}Ni{sub 1-x}O{sub 2} cathodes at different states of charge have provided important guidelines for the development of these new materials. However, the kinetic nature of the battery

  15. Detoxification of cathode ray tube glass by self-propagating process.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mengjun; Zhang, Fu-Shen; Zhu, Jianxin

    2009-06-15

    A novel process for the treatment of hazardous waste Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) glass, based on self-propagating reaction, was proposed. In the process, various types of CRT glass powders were blended with suitable amount of ferric oxide and magnesium, and the mixtures could generate self-propagating reaction once locally ignited by a thermal source. Generally, the self-propagating reaction could be well maintained when the CRT glass content in the mixture was no more than 60 wt.%, and the combustion wave velocity and maximum combustion temperature decreased along with the increase in glass amount. XPS experiments showed that heavy elements in the final products became more stable and were solidified during the process. Leaching tests demonstrated that heavy metals in the final products fulfilled the environmental regulations of USEPA. It is supposed that the detoxified products have the potential of being used as construction materials. PMID:19084331

  16. Evaluation Of Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) And Veiling Glare Characteristics For Cathode Ray Tube Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banbury, J. R.

    1981-10-01

    Cathode-ray tube evaluation is becoming increasingly important in connection with the prediction of overall performance for systems incorporating an imaging display. Modulation transfer function has been measured by a method which takes account of the basic non-linearities of the crt and also offers improved accuracy by reducing the effects of phosphor screen noise. Two tests for crt internal veiling glare are discussed. Standard test conditions, which have been successfully used for a wide range of displays are described for both mtf and veiling glare. A contrast index is employed to indicate the extent of nonlinearity in the display transfer characteristic, and the paper also discusses briefly the use of generalised drive characteristics and limiting contrast curves as a supplement or alternative to modulation transfer function for definition of display performance.

  17. Innovated application of mechanical activation to separate lead from scrap cathode ray tube funnel glass.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wenyi; Li, Jinhui; Zhang, Qiwu; Saito, Fumio

    2012-04-01

    The disposal of scrap cathode ray tube (CRT) funnel glass has become a global environmental problem due to the rapid shrinkage of new CRT monitor demand, which greatly reduces the reuse for remanufacturing. To detoxificate CRT funnel glass by lead recovery with traditional metallurgical methods, mechanical activation by ball milling was introduced to pretreat the funnel glass. As a result, substantial physicochemical changes have been observed after mechanical activation including chemical breakage and defects formation in glass inner structure. These changes contribute to the easy dissolution of the activated sample in solution. High yield of 92.5% of lead from activated CRT funnel glass by diluted nitric acid leaching and successful formation of lead sulfide by sulfur sulfidization in water have also been achieved. All the results indicate that the application of mechanical activation on recovering lead from CRT funnel glass is efficient and promising, which is also probably appropriate to detoxificate any other kind of leaded glass. PMID:22385285

  18. Recovery of yttrium from cathode ray tubes and lamps’ fluorescent powders: experimental results and economic simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Innocenzi, V. De Michelis, I.; Ferella, F.; Vegliò, F.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Fluorescent powder of lamps. • Fluorescent powder of cathode ray rubes. • Recovery of yttrium from fluorescent powders. • Economic simulation for the processes to recover yttrium from WEEE. - Abstract: In this paper, yttrium recovery from fluorescent powder of lamps and cathode ray tubes (CRTs) is described. The process for treating these materials includes the following: (a) acid leaching, (b) purification of the leach liquors using sodium hydroxide and sodium sulfide, (c) precipitation of yttrium using oxalic acid, and (d) calcinations of oxalates for production of yttrium oxides. Experimental results have shown that process conditions necessary to purify the solutions and recover yttrium strongly depend on composition of the leach liquor, in other words, whether the powder comes from treatment of CRTs or lamp. In the optimal experimental conditions, the recoveries of yttrium oxide are about 95%, 55%, and 65% for CRT, lamps, and CRT/lamp mixture (called MIX) powders, respectively. The lower yields obtained during treatments of MIX and lamp powders are probably due to the co-precipitation of yttrium together with other metals contained in the lamps powder only. Yttrium loss can be reduced to minimum changing the experimental conditions with respect to the case of the CRT process. In any case, the purity of final products from CRT, lamps, and MIX is greater than 95%. Moreover, the possibility to treat simultaneously both CRT and lamp powders is very important and interesting from an industrial point of view since it could be possible to run a single plant treating fluorescent powder coming from two different electronic wastes.

  19. The Fine-Beam Cathode-Ray Tube and the Observant and Enquiring Student--Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, John le P.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses use of the fine-beam cathode-ray tube to investigate strength and direction of the earth's magnetic field, simulating discussion between student and teacher as the equipment is set up and the experiment done. Provides diagrams and illustrative photographs to aid in equipment set-up and measurement. (JM)

  20. X-ray Absorption Measurements on Nickel Cathode of Sodium-beta Alumina batteries: Fe-Ni-CI Chemical Associations

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, Mark E.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Fulton, John L.; Lemmon, John P.; Lu, Xiaochuan; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Heald, Steve M.; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Mortensen, Devon R.; Seidler, Gerald T.; Hess, Nancy J.

    2014-02-01

    Sections of Na-Al-NiCl2 cathodes from sodium-beta alumina ZEBRA batteries have been characterized with X-ray fluorescence mapping, and XANES measurements to probe the microstructure, elemental correlation, and chemical speciation after voltage cycling. Cycling was performed under identical load conditions at either 240 or 280 °C operating temperature and subsequently quenched in either the charged or discharged state. X-ray fluorescence mapping and XANES measurements were made adjacent to the current collector and β"-Al2O3 solid electrolyte interfaces to detect possible gradients in chemical properties across the cathode. An FeS additive, introduced during battery synthesis, was found to be present as either Fe metal or an Fe(II) chloride in all cathode samples. X-ray fluorescence mapping reveals an operating temperature and charge-state dependent spatial correlation between Fe, Ni, and Cl concentration. XANES measurements indicate that both Ni and Fe are chemically reactive and shift between metallic and chloride phases in the charged and discharged states, respectively. However the percentage of chemically active Ni and Fe is significantly less in the cell operated at lower temperature. Additionally, the cathode appeared chemically homogeneous at the scale of our X-ray measurements.

  1. X-ray absorption measurements on nickel cathode of sodium-beta alumina batteries: Fe-Ni-Cl chemical associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, Mark E.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Fulton, John L.; Lemmon, John P.; Lu, Xiaochuan; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Heald, Steve M.; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Mortensen, Devon. R.; Seidler, Gerald T.; Hess, Nancy J.

    2014-02-01

    Sections of Na-Al-NiCl2 cathodes from sodium-beta alumina ZEBRA batteries have been characterized with X-ray fluorescence mapping, and XANES measurements to probe the microstructure, elemental correlation, and chemical speciation after voltage cycling. Cycling was performed under identical load conditions at either 240 or 280 °C operating temperature and subsequently quenched in either the charged or discharged state. X-ray fluorescence mapping and XANES measurements were made adjacent to the current collector and β″-Al2O3 solid electrolyte interfaces to detect possible gradients in chemical properties across the cathode. An FeS additive, introduced during battery synthesis, was found to be present as either Fe metal or an Fe(II) chloride in all cathode samples. X-ray fluorescence mapping reveals an operating temperature and charge-state dependent spatial correlation between Fe, Ni, and Cl concentration. XANES measurements indicate that both Ni and Fe are chemically reactive and shift between metallic and chloride phases in the charged and discharged states, respectively. However the percentage of chemically active Ni and Fe is significantly less in the cell operated at lower temperature. Additionally, the cathode appeared chemically homogeneous at the scale of our X-ray measurements.

  2. 40 CFR 261.40 - Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling. 261.40 Section 261.40 Protection of Environment...) Exported for Recycling. Used, intact CRTs exported for recycling are not solid wastes if they meet...

  3. 40 CFR 261.40 - Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling. 261.40 Section 261.40 Protection of Environment...) Exported for Recycling. Used, intact CRTs exported for recycling are not solid wastes if they meet...

  4. 40 CFR 261.39 - Conditional Exclusion for Used, Broken Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... complete until any such claim is resolved in accordance with 40 CFR 260.2. (v) The export of CRTs is... CFR part 266, subpart C instead of the requirements of this section. ... Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass Undergoing Recycling. 261.39 Section 261.39 Protection...

  5. 40 CFR 261.39 - Conditional Exclusion for Used, Broken Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... complete until any such claim is resolved in accordance with 40 CFR 260.2. (v) The export of CRTs is... CFR part 266, subpart C instead of the requirements of this section. § 261.39, Nt. Effective Date Note... Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass Undergoing Recycling. 261.39 Section 261.39 Protection...

  6. 40 CFR 261.39 - Conditional Exclusion for Used, Broken Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... complete until any such claim is resolved in accordance with 40 CFR 260.2. (v) The export of CRTs is... CFR part 266, subpart C instead of the requirements of this section. ... Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass Undergoing Recycling. 261.39 Section 261.39 Protection...

  7. 40 CFR 261.40 - Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling. 261.40 Section 261.40 Protection of Environment...) Exported for Recycling. Used, intact CRTs exported for recycling are not solid wastes if they meet...

  8. 40 CFR 261.40 - Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling. 261.40 Section 261.40 Protection of Environment...) Exported for Recycling. Used, intact CRTs exported for recycling are not solid wastes if they meet...

  9. 40 CFR 261.40 - Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling. 261.40 Section 261.40 Protection of Environment...) Exported for Recycling. Used, intact CRTs exported for recycling are not solid wastes if they meet...

  10. 40 CFR 261.39 - Conditional Exclusion for Used, Broken Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... complete until any such claim is resolved in accordance with 40 CFR 260.2. (v) The export of CRTs is... CFR part 266, subpart C instead of the requirements of this section. ... Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass Undergoing Recycling. 261.39 Section 261.39 Protection...

  11. 40 CFR 261.39 - Conditional Exclusion for Used, Broken Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... complete until any such claim is resolved in accordance with 40 CFR 260.2. (v) The export of CRTs is... CFR part 266, subpart C instead of the requirements of this section. ... Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass Undergoing Recycling. 261.39 Section 261.39 Protection...

  12. High Power Experiment of X-Band Thermionic Cathode RF Gun for Compton Scattering X-ray Source

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Fumito; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Dobashi, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Tomohiko; Meng, De; Urakawa, Junji; Higo, Toshiyasu; Akemoto, Mitsuo; Matsuo, Kenichi; Sakae, Hisaharu; Yamamoto, Masashi

    2006-11-27

    We are currently developing a compact monochromatic X-ray source based on laser-electron collision. To realize remarkably compact-, high-intensity- and highly-stable-system, we adopt an X-band multi-bunch liner accelerator (linac) and reliable Q-switch laser. The X-ray yields by the multi-bunch electron beam and Q-switch Nd: YAG laser of 1.4 J/10 ns (FWHM) (532 nm, second harmonic) is 107 photons/RF-pulse (108 photons/sec for 10 Hz operation). The injector of the system consists of a 3.5-cell X-band thermionic cathode RF gun and an alpha magnet. So far we have achieved beam generation from the X-band thermionic cathode RF gun. The peak beam energy is 2 MeV. This experimental high energy ({approx}2 MeV) beam generation from the X-band thermionic cathode RF gun is the first in the world. In this paper, we describe the system of the Compton scattering X-ray source based on the X-band linac, experimental results of X-band thermionic cathode RF gun and the details of the experimental setup for Compton scattering X-ray generation that are under construction.

  13. Microscopic x-ray luminescence computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Dianwen; Zhang, Kun; Li, Changqing

    2015-03-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) was emerged as a new hybrid imaging modality, in which the x-rays are used to excite phosphors emitting optical photons to be measured for imaging. In this paper, we reported a microscopic x-ray luminescence computed tomography (microXLCT) with a spatial resolution up to hundreds of micrometers for deep targets. We use a superfine x-ray pencil beam to scan the phosphor targets. The superfine x-ray pencil beam is generated by a small collimator mounted in front of a powerful x-ray tube (93212, Oxford Instrument). A CT detector is used to image the x-ray beam. We have generated an x-ray beam with a diameter of 192 micrometers with a collimator of 100 micrometers in diameter. The emitted optical photons on the top surface of phantom are reflected by a mirror and acquired by an electron multiplier charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera (C9100-13, Hamamatsu Photonics). The microXLCT imaging system is built inside an x-ray shielding and light tight cabinet. The EMCCD camera is placed in a lead box. All the imaging components are controlled by a VC++ program. The optical photon propagation is modeled with the diffusion equation solved by the finite element method. We have applied different regularization methods including L2 and L1 in the microXLCT reconstruction algorithms. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments are used to validate the microXLCT imaging system.

  14. X-ray Diffraction Studies of the Structure and Thermochemistry of Alkaline-Earth Oxide-Coated Thermionic Cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karikari, E. K.; Bassey, E.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    1998-01-01

    NASA LeRC has a broad, active cathode technology development program in which both experimental and theoretical studies are being employed to further development of thermionic cathodes for use as electron sources in vacuum devices for communications and other space applications. One important type of thermionic cathode under development is the alkaline-earth oxide-coated (BaO, SrO, CaO) cathode. Significant improvements in the emission characteristics of this cathode have been obtained through modification of the chemical composition and morphology of the oxide coating, with the best result thus far coming from the addition of In2O3 and Sc2O3. Whereas the In2O3 produces a finer, more uniform particle structure, the exact chemical state and role of the Sc2O3 in the emission enhancement is unknown. The purpose of this cooperative agreement is to combine the studies of the surface chemistry and electron emission at NASA LeRC of chemically modified oxide coatings with a study of the thermochemistry and crystal structure using X-ray diffraction equipment and expertise at Clark Atlanta University (CAU). The study at CAU is intended to provide the description and understanding of the structure and thermochemistry needed for further improvement and optimization of the modified coatings. A description of the experimental procedure, preliminary X-ray diffraction test results, together with the design of an ultrahigh vacuum chamber necessary for high temperature thermochemistry studies will be presented.

  15. Lead extraction from cathode ray tube funnel glass melted under different oxidizing conditions.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takashi

    2015-07-15

    Lead was extracted into hydrochloric acid from cathode ray tube funnel glass melted under reducing atmosphere, oxidizing atmosphere, or a sequential combination of both to mechanistically investigate effects of the melting atmosphere on lead extraction. Melting funnel glass in a reductive atmosphere led to the generation of metallic lead particles that were readily soluble in the acid, increasing the quantity of lead extracted into the acid. Meanwhile, the glass product obtained after melting funnel glass in an oxidative atmosphere exhibited higher corrosion resistance in the acid, and the quantity of lead extracted from the treated glass decreased. However, Na2CO3 addition to the glass during melting hindered the enhancement of corrosion resistance and the immobilization of lead in the acid. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis of the treated glass samples showed that the positions of the peak or the profiles of the spectra attributed to Pb 4f, Si 2p, and O 1s signals were modified by oxidative melting, an indication that oxidative melting results in structural changes in the SiO2 framework of the glass. PMID:25819768

  16. Disk-cathode flash X-ray tube driven by a repetitive two-stage Marx pulser.

    PubMed

    Kimura, S; Sato, E; Sagae, M; Shikoda, A; Oizumi, T; Takahashi, K; Tamakawa, Y; Yanagisawa, T

    1993-07-01

    Fundamental studies of a repetitive flash X-ray generator using a disk-cathode radiation tube are described. The high-voltage pulser employed a modified two-stage surge-Marx circuit. The two condensers in the pulser were charged from 40 to 60 kV, and the electric charges were discharged to the X-ray tube repetitively to generate flash X-rays. The total capacity during the main discharge was 425 pF, and the maximum output voltage from the pulser was about 1.9 times the charged voltage. The flash X-ray tube was of the demountable-diode type and was composed of a rod-shaped anode tip made of tungsten, a disk cathode made of graphite and a tube body made of polymethylmethacrylate. The peak tube voltage was primarily determined by the anode-cathode (A-C) space, and the peak tube current was less than 0.5 kA. Thus the maximum photon energy could be easily controlled by varying the A-C space, and the tube current roughly increased according to increases in the charged voltage. The pulse width ranged from 40 to 100 ns, and the X-ray intensity was less than 1.1 microC kg-1 at 0.5 m per pulse. The repetition rate was less than 50 Hz, and the effective focal spot size was equivalent to the anode diameter. PMID:8231324

  17. Use of limestone powder during incorporation of Pb-containing cathode ray tube waste in self-compacting concrete.

    PubMed

    Sua-iam, Gritsada; Makul, Natt

    2013-10-15

    For several decades, cathode ray tubes (CRTs) were the primary display component of televisions and computers. The CRT glass envelope contains sufficient levels of lead oxide (PbO) to be considered hazardous, and there is a need for effective methods of permanently encapsulating this material during waste disposal. We examined the effect of adding limestone powder (LS) on the fresh and cured properties of self-compacting concrete (SCC) mixtures containing waste CRT glass. The SCC mixtures were prepared using Type 1 Portland cement at a constant cement content of 600 kg/m(3) and a water-to-cement ratio (w/c) of 0.38. CRT glass waste cullet was blended with river sand in proportions of 20 or 40% by weight. To suppress potential viscosity effects limestone powder was added at levels of 5, 10, or 15% by weight. The slump flow time, slump flow diameter, V-funnel flow time, Marsh cone flow time, and setting time of the fresh concrete were tested, as well as the compressive strength and ultrasonic pulse velocity of the hardened concrete. Addition of limestone powder improved the fresh and hardened properties. Pb leaching levels from the cured concrete were within US EPA allowable limits. PMID:23892134

  18. Chandra X-Ray Observatory Computer Rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This is a computer rendering of the fully developed Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO), formerly Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). In 1999, the AXAF was renamed the CXO in honor of the late Indian-American Novel Laureate Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar. The CXO is the most sophisticated and the world's most powerful x-ray telescope ever built. It is designed to observe x-rays from high energy regions of the Universe, such as hot gas in the renmants of exploded stars. It produces picture-like images of x-ray emissions analogous to those made in visible light, as well as gathers data on the chemical composition of x-ray radiating objects. The CXO helps astronomers world-wide better understand the structure and evolution of the universe by studying powerful sources of x-ray such as exploding stars, matter falling into black holes, and other exotic celestial objects. The Observatory has three major parts: (1) the x-ray telescope, whose mirrors will focus x-rays from celestial objects; (2) the science instruments that record the x-rays so that x-ray images can be produced and analyzed; and (3) the spacecraft, which provides the environment necessary for the telescope and the instruments to work. TRW, Inc. was the prime contractor for the development of the CXO and NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center was responsible for its project management. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations of the CXO for NASA from Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Observatory was launched July 22, 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, STS-93 mission. (Image courtesy of TRW).

  19. A Compact X-ray Generator Using a Nanostructured Field Emission Cathode and a Microstructured Transmission Anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, S.; Hill, F. A.; Heubel, E. V.; Velás quez-García, L. F.

    2013-12-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and preliminary characterization of a compact X-ray generator for improved X-ray absorption imaging that uses a nanostructured field emission cathode (FEC) as the electron source and a microstructured transmission anode as the X-ray generating element. FECs consume less power, respond faster, and tolerate lower vacuum than thermionic cathodes used in conventional X-ray generators. The use of a transmission anode, instead of a conventional reflection anode, allows filtering of the background radiation (brems strahlung) while allowing efficient generation of X-rays at lower voltages by exciting atomic shell transitions, resulting in emission of X-rays with narrow spectral linewidth for sharper imaging of biological tissue. The fabricated FEC contains arrays of self-aligned, gated field emitters that turn on at bias voltages under 30 V and transmit 99.5% of the electrons to the anode. The FEC emits a maximum current of 1.2 μA per field emitter (588 μA total array current) at a bias voltage of 85 V. A facility is built and tested to generate X-rays with an FEC and a transmission anode. Using the facility, we obtained an X-ray absorption image of an ex-vivos ample that clearly shows softtissue and fine bone structures.

  20. Recovery of yttrium from fluorescent powder of cathode ray tube, CRT: Zn removal by sulphide precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Innocenzi, Valentina; De Michelis, Ida; Ferella, Francesco; Beolchini, Francesca; Kopacek, Bernd

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Treatment of fluorescent powder of CRT waste. • Factorial experimental designs to study acid leaching of fluorescent powder and the purification of leach liquors. • Recover of yttrium by precipitation using oxalic acid. • Suitable flowsheet to recover yttrium from fluorescent powder. - Abstract: This work is focused on the recovery of yttrium and zinc from fluorescent powder of cathode ray tube (CRT). Metals are extracted by sulphuric acid in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Leaching tests are carried out according to a 2{sup 2} full factorial plan and the highest extraction yields for yttrium and zinc equal to 100% are observed under the following conditions: 3 M of sulphuric acid, 10% v/v of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrated solution at 30% v/v, 10% w/w pulp density, 70 °C and 3 h of reaction. Two series of precipitation tests for zinc are carried out: a 2{sup 2} full factorial design and a completely randomized factorial design. In these series the factors investigated are pH of solution during the precipitation and the amount of sodium sulphide added to precipitate zinc sulphide. The data of these tests are used to describe two empirical mathematical models for zinc and yttrium precipitation yields by regression analysis. The highest precipitation yields for zinc are obtained under the following conditions: pH equal to 2–2.5% and 10–12% v/v of Na{sub 2}S concentrated solution at 10% w/v. In these conditions the coprecipitation of yttrium is of 15–20%. Finally further yttrium precipitation experiments by oxalic acid on the residual solutions, after removing of zinc, show that yttrium could be recovered and calcined to obtain the final product as yttrium oxide. The achieved results allow to propose a CRT recycling process based on leaching of fluorescent powder from cathode ray tube and recovery of yttrium oxide after removing of zinc by precipitation. The final recovery of yttrium is 75–80%.

  1. Water-soluble lead in cathode ray tube funnel glass melted in a reductive atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    In the reduction-melting process, lead can be recovered from cathode ray tube funnel glass (PbO=25wt%); however, resulting glass residues still contain approximately 1-2wt% of unrecovered lead. For environmental protection in the residue disposal or recycling, it is important to evaluate the quantities of water-soluble species among the unrecovered lead. This study examined water-soluble lead species generated in the reduction-melting process of the funnel glass and factors determining their generation. In the reduction-melting, metallic lead was generated by reducing lead oxides in the glass, and a part of the metallic lead remained in the glass residue. Such unrecovered metallic lead can dissolve in water depending on its pH level and was regarded as water-soluble lead. When 10g Na2CO3 was added to 20g funnel glass during reduction-melting, the resulting glass contained high concentrations of sodium. In a water leaching of the glass, the obtained leachate was alkalized by the sodium-rich glass (pH=12.7-13.0). The unrecovered metallic lead in the glass was extracted in the alkalized leachate. The quantity of the unrecovered metallic lead (water-soluble lead) in the glass decreased when the melting time, melting temperature, and carbon dosage were controlled during reduction-melting. PMID:27209518

  2. Study on the mechanical and environmental properties of concrete containing cathode ray tube glass aggregate.

    PubMed

    Romero, Diego; James, Jacqueline; Mora, Rodrigo; Hays, Carol D

    2013-07-01

    Cathode ray tube (CRT) glass is considered a hazardous material due to its lead toxicity. In addition, current disposal practices are being phased out due to their adverse environmental impacts. In this project, CRT glass was used as a fine aggregate replacement in concrete. Life-cycle material characterization was conducted by evaluating the durability and strength of the CRT-Concrete. Leaching tests were also conducted to investigate whether the material meets drinking water limits for Pb. Test results show that the plastic state of the CRT-Concrete was affected by the angularity of the glass particles. Moreover, the compressive strength of CRT-Concrete met and exceeded that of the control specimen. However, CRT-Concrete was susceptible to expansive alkali-silica reactions when more than 10% CRT replacement was used. Environmental leaching results show that lead concentrations from CRT-Concrete are below the drinking water limits depending on the CRT volume replacement and if biopolymers are used. PMID:23628215

  3. Visual Evoked Potential Using Head-Mounted Display Versus Cathode Ray Tube: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyo Seon; Im, Sang Hee; Kim, Yong Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To present a new stimulation method based on the use of a head-mounted display (HMD) during pattern reversal visual evoked potential (PR-VEP) testing and to compare variables of HMD to those of conventional cathode ray tube (CRT). Methods Twenty-three normal subjects without visual problems were recruited. PR-VEPs were generated using CRT or HMD stimuli. VEP outcome measures included latencies (N75, P100, and N145) and peak-to-peak amplitudes (N75–P100 and P100–N145). Subjective discomfort associated with HMD was determined using a self-administered questionnaire. Results PR-VEPs generated by HMD stimuli showed typical triphasic waveforms, the components of which were found to be correlated with those obtained using conventional CRT stimuli. Self-administered discomfort questionnaires revealed that HMD was more comfortable in some aspects. It allowed subjects to concentrate better than CRT. Conclusion The described HMD stimulation can be used as an alternative to the standard CRT stimulation for PR-VEPs. PR-VEP testing using HMD has potential applications in clinical practice and visual system research because HMD can be used on a wider range of subjects compared to CRT. PMID:27152285

  4. Recovering lead from cathode ray tube funnel glass by mechano-chemical extraction in alkaline solution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chenglong; Wang, Jingwei; Bai, Jianfeng; Guan, Jie; Wu, Wenjie; Guo, Cuixiang

    2013-07-01

    This study evaluates the efficiency of lead (Pb) extraction from cathode ray tube (CRT) funnel glass in strongly alkaline solution using mechanical activation in a ball mill as the chemical breakage and defects formed in the inner structures will contribute to the easy dissolution of the activated Pb glass. The combination of mechanical activation and a chemical leaching process in a single operation (mechano-chemical leaching) is more effective than the mechanical activation and subsequent chemical leaching. More than 97% of Pb in the CRT funnel glass can be extracted with a stirring ball mill leaching process in 5 M sodium hydroxide at 70°C. The diameter of the stainless steel balls as the activation medium is 5 mm; the mass ratio of ball to raw materials is 25:1. Pb powder with a purity of 97% can be obtained by electrowinning from the leaching solution. The Pb-depleted solution can be recycled into the leaching step. After Pb is removed, the solid leaching residues can be used for preparation of foam glass. Thus, a novel hydrometallurgical process for recovering Pb from CRT funnel glass in alkaline solution is proposed. PMID:23592759

  5. Beam characterization of a lab bench cold cathode ultra-soft X-ray generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ounoughi, N.; Mavon, C.; Belafrites, A.; Groetz, J.-E.; Fromm, M.

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this work is to characterize the Ultra Soft X-ray (USX, 1.5 keV, Al Kα) photon beam of a customized lab bench cold cathode generator. Within this generator, the electron beam is slowed down in a thin aluminium foil (16 μm) supported by an easily exchangeable anode. It is shown that the thickness of the foil and the anode configuration determine the spatial distribution and the fluence rate of the photon beam, whereas accelerating voltage determines both fluence rate and energy spectrum feature. It is shown also that under specific operation parameters (i.e. accelerating voltage), a Gaussian energy distribution of the beam can be generated which is centred on the energy of the Al Kα line (1.5 keV). Dosimetric films of GAFCHROMIC® HD-810 were used to estimate the photon fluence rate distribution of the beam. Its variation, when the generator acts as a monoenergetic source, was characterized with the two different configurations of the anode assembly. Finally, it is verified that the anode assembly consisting in a flat washer, on which the aluminium foil is set, acts as a simple point-source.

  6. Determination of Optimal Parameters for Dual-Layer Cathode of Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Using Computational Intelligence-Aided Design

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Huang, Weina; Peng, Bei

    2014-01-01

    Because of the demands for sustainable and renewable energy, fuel cells have become increasingly popular, particularly the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC). Among the various components, the cathode plays a key role in the operation of a PEFC. In this study, a quantitative dual-layer cathode model was proposed for determining the optimal parameters that minimize the over-potential difference and improve the efficiency using a newly developed bat swarm algorithm with a variable population embedded in the computational intelligence-aided design. The simulation results were in agreement with previously reported results, suggesting that the proposed technique has potential applications for automating and optimizing the design of PEFCs. PMID:25490761

  7. Hard X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Heteroepitaxial Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathode Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Jacob N.; Miara, Lincoln J.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Gopalan, Srikanth; Pal, Uday B.; Woicik, Joseph C.; Basu, Soumendra N.; Ludwig, Karl F.

    2012-12-01

    Commonly, SOFCs are operated at high temperatures (above 800°C). At these temperatures expensive housing is needed to contain an operating stack as well as coatings to contain the oxidation of the metallic interconnects. Lowering the temperature of an operating device would allow for more conventional materials to be used, thus lowering overall cost. Understanding the surface chemical states of cations in the surface of the SOFC cathode is vital to designing a system that will perform well at lower temperatures. The samples studied were grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). 20% strontium doped lanthanum manganite (LSM-20) was grown on YSZ and NGO (neodymium gallate). The films on YSZ have a fiber texture. LSM-20 on NGO is heteroepitaxial. Lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF-6428) films were grown on LAO and YSZ with a GDC barrier layer. Total X-ray Reflection Fluorescence (TXRF) was used to depth profile the samples. In a typical experiment, the angle of the incident beam is varied though the critical angle. Below the critical angle, the x-ray decays as an evanescent wave and will only penetrate the top few nanometers. TXRF experiments done on LSM films have suggested strontium segregates to the surface and form strontium enriched nanoparticles (1). It should be pointed out that past studies have focused on 30% strontium A-site doping, but this project uses 20% strontium doped lanthanum manganite. XANES and EXAFS data were taken as a function of incoming angle to probe composition as a function of depth. XANES spectra can be difficult to analyze fully. For other materials density functional theory calculations compared to near edge measurements have been a good way to understand the 3d valence electrons (2).

  8. Characterization of Cr poisoning in a solid oxide fuel cell cathode using a high-energy x-ray microbeam.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D. J.; Almer, J.; Cruse, T.

    2010-01-01

    A key feature of planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) is the feasibility of using metallic interconnects made of high temperature ferritic stainless steels, which reduce system cost while providing excellent electric conductivity. Such interconnects, however, contain high levels of chromium, which has been found to be associated with SOFC cathode performance degradation at SOFC operating temperatures; a phenomenon known as Cr poisoning. Here, we demonstrate an accurate measurement of the phase and concentration distributions of Cr species in a degraded SOFC, as well as related properties including deviatoric strain, integrated porosity, and lattice parameter variation, using high energy microbeam X-ray diffraction and radiography. We unambiguously identify (MnCr){sub 3}O{sub 4} and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} as the two main contaminant phases and find that their concentrations correlate strongly with the cathode layer composition. Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} deposition within the active cathode region reduces porosity and produces compressive residual strains, which hinders the reactant gas percolation and can cause structural breakdown of the SOFC cathode. The information obtained through this study can be used to better understand the Cr-poisoning mechanism and improve SOFC design.

  9. Protein-Support Interactions for Rationally Designed Bilirubin Oxidase Based Cathode: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Matanovic, Ivana; Babanova, Sofia; Chavez, Madelaine Seow; Atanassov, Plamen

    2016-04-21

    An example of biocathode based on bilirubin oxidase (BOx) was used to demonstrate how density functional theory can be combined with docking simulations in order to study the interface interactions between the enzyme and specifically designed electrode surface. The electrode surface was modified through the adsorption of bilirubin, the natural substrate for BOx, and the prepared electrode was electrochemically characterized using potentiostatic measurements. The experimentally determined current densities showed that the presence of bilirubin led to significant improvement of the cathode operation. On the basis of the computationally calculated binding energies of bilirubin to the graphene support and BOx and the analysis of the positioning of bilirubin relative to the support and T1 Cu atom of the enzyme, we hypothesize that the bilirubin serves as a geometric and electronic extension of the support. The computational results further confirm that the modification of the electrode surface with bilirubin provides an optimal orientation of BOx toward the support but also show that bilirubin facilitates the interfacial electron transfer by decreasing the distance between the electrode surface and the T1 Cu atom. PMID:27015361

  10. Factors influencing leaching of PBDEs from waste cathode ray tube plastic housings.

    PubMed

    Stubbings, William A; Harrad, Stuart

    2016-11-01

    Samples of waste cathode ray tube (CRT) plastic housings were exposed to Milli-Q® water containing dissolved humic matter at concentrations of 0, 100 and 1000mgL(-1) as leaching fluid under laboratory conditions, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) determined in the resulting leachate. Despite the relatively hydrophobic physicochemical properties of PBDEs, concentrations of ƩPBDEs in the leachate from the leaching experiments in this study ranged from 14,000 to 200,000ngL(-1). PBDE leaching appears to be a second order process, whereby a period of initially intense dissolution of more labile PBDEs is followed by a slower stage corresponding to external diffusion of the soluble residue in the material. The bulk of transfer of PBDEs to the leaching fluid occurs within the first 6h of contact, during which time we suggest that the most labile PBDEs are "washed" off the surface of the CRT plastics. The predominant congeners in the chips were BDE-209 (2600mgkg(-1)) and BDE 183 (220mgkg(-1)). The impacts on PBDE leaching of leachate pH and temperature were also examined. Increasing the temperature of leaching fluids from 20 to 80°C, enhances the leachability of BDE-209 and BDE-99 from plastics. In all cases, the alkaline pH8.5 examined, resulted in the greatest PBDE concentrations in leachate. Agitation of the waste/leachate mixture enhances PBDE leaching from CRT plastics. Potential evidence for debromination of heavy congeners to the lower brominated and more bioavailable BDEs was observed. Specifically, BDEs-47, -85 and -100 were detected in the leachates, but were absent from the CRT plastics themselves. PMID:27436776

  11. Removal of lead from cathode ray tube funnel glass by generating the sodium silicate.

    PubMed

    Hu, Biao; Zhao, Shuangshuang; Zhang, Shuhao

    2015-01-01

    In the disposal of electronic waste, cathode ray tube (CRT) funnel glass is an environmental problem of old television sets. Removal of the lead from CRT funnel glass can prevent its release into the environment and allow its reuse. In this research, we reference the dry progress productive technology of sodium silicate, the waste CRT glass was dealt with sodium silicate frit melted and sodium silicate frit dissolved. Adding a certain amount of Na ₂CO₃to the waste CRT glass bases on the material composition and content of it, then the specific modulus of sodium silicate frit is obtained by melting progress. The silicon, potassium and sodium compounds of the sodium silicate frit are dissolved under the conditions of high temperature and pressure by using water as solvent, which shows the tendency that different temperature, pressure, liquid-solid ratio and dissolving time have effect on the result of dissolving. At 175°C(0.75MPa), liquid-solid ratio is 1.5:1, the dissolving time is 1h, the dissolution rate of sodium silicate frit is 44.725%. By using sodium sulfide to separate hydrolysis solution and to collect lead compounds in the solution, the recovery rate of lead in dissolving reached 100% and we can get clean sodium silicate and high purity of lead compounds. The method presented in this research can recycle not only the lead but also the sodium, potassium and other inorganic minerals in CRT glass and can obtain the comprehensive utilization of leaded glass. PMID:25946963

  12. Environmental burdens in the management of end-of-life cathode ray tubes.

    PubMed

    Rocchetti, Laura; Beolchini, Francesca

    2014-02-01

    We compared the environmental burdens in the management of end-of life cathode ray tubes (CRTs) within two frameworks according to the different technologies of the production of televisions/monitors. In the first case, CRT recycling is addressed to the recovery of the panel and funnel glass for the manufacturing of new CRT screens. In the second case, where flat screen technology has replaced that of CRT, the recycling is addressed to the recovery of the glass cullet and lead for other applications. The impacts were evaluated according to the problem-oriented methodology of the Institute of Environmental Sciences, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands. Our data confirm that in both cases, the recycling treatment allows benefits to be gained for the environment through the recovery of the secondary raw materials. These benefits are higher for the "CRT technology" framework (1 kg CO2 saved per CRT) than for the "flat screen technology" (0.9 kg CO2 saved, per CRT, as the highest possible), mainly due to the high energy consumption for lead separation from the funnel glass. Furthermore, the recovery of yttrium from the fluorescent powders that are a residue of the recycling treatment would further improve the CO2 credit for both the frameworks considered, which would provide a further saving of about 0.75 kg CO2 per CRT, net of the energy and raw materials needed for the recovery. Overall, this study confirms that, even with a change in the destination of the recovered materials, the recycling processes provide a benefit for the environment: indeed the higher loads for the environment are balanced by avoiding the primary production of the recovered materials. PMID:24238800

  13. Removal of lead from cathode ray tube funnel glass by combined thermal treatment and leaching processes.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takashi; Nishimura, Fumihiro; Yonezawa, Susumu

    2015-11-01

    The reduction melting process is useful to recover toxic lead from cathode ray tube funnel glass; however, this process generates SiO2-containing residues that are disposed in landfill sites. To reduce the volume of landfill waste, it is desirable to recycle the SiO2-containing residues. In this study, SiO2 powder was recovered from the residue generated by reduction melting. The funnel glass was treated by a process combining reduction melting at 1000°C and annealing at 700°C to recover a large quantity of lead from the glass. The oxide phase generated by the thermal treatment was subjected to water leaching and acid leaching with 1M hydrochloric acid to wash out unwanted non-SiO2 elements for SiO2 purification. In the water washing, the oxide phase was microparticulated, and porous structures formed on the oxide surfaces. This increased the surface area of the oxide phase, and the unwanted elements were effectively washed out during the subsequent acid leaching. By controlling the acid leaching time and the amount of added acid, porous and amorphous SiO2 (purity >95 wt%) was recovered. In the obtained SiO2-concentrated product, unrecovered lead remained at concentrations of 0.25-0.79 wt%. When the Na2CO3 dosage in the thermal treatment was increased, the lead removal by acid leaching was enhanced, and the lead concentration in the obtained product decreased to 0.016 wt%. PMID:26022339

  14. 81.114- University Reactor Infrastructure and Education Support / Prompt Gamma-ray Activation Analysis of Lithioum Ion Battery Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Manthiram, Arumugam; Landsberger, S.

    2006-11-11

    This project focuses on the use of the Prompt Gamma-ray Activation Analysis (PGAA) technique available at the Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory of the University of Texas at Austin to precisely determine the hydrogen (proton) contents in layered oxide cathode samples obtained by chemical lithium extraction in order to obtain a better understanding of the factors limiting the practical capacities and overall performance of lithium ion battery cathodes. The project takes careful precautionary experimental measures to avoid proton contamination both from solvents used in chemical delithiation and from ambient moisture. The results obtained from PGAA are complemented by the data obtained from other techniques such as thermogravimetric analysis, redox titration, atomic absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and mass spectroscopic analysis of the evolved gas on heating. The research results broaden our understanding of the structure-property-performance relationships of lithium ion battery cathodes and could aid the design and development of new better performing lithium ion batteries for consumer (portable and electric vehicles), military, and space applications.

  15. First principle computational and experimental studies of cathode materials for lithium ion rechargeable batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saavedra Arias, Jose Javier

    We have studied the properties of spinel and layered cathode materials for Li ion rechargeable batteries. The analysis was done by first principle calculations, and experimental techniques to elucidate materials that can substitute the presently commercialized material, namely LiCoO 2. We have studied the influence of Ni substitution for Mn in spinel Li 2MnO4. To understand the effects of this substitution on the crystal structure and electronic properties, first principle DFT calculations were performed using VASP. The substitution was done systematically for up to 25% of Mn replacement by Ni in a super cell configuration. Furthermore, the influence of Ni substitution on lithium hoping pathways between the two stable Li positions was also studied by first principle calculations in LiMn 2-xNixO4. These calculations revealed that Ni substitution for Mn in LiMn2O4 indeed improved Li ion mobility. Thereafter, systematic experimental studies were performed on LiMn 2-xNixO4 (0ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. The electrochemical performance of LiMn2-xNi xO4 materials was evaluated in two electrode CR2032 type coin cell configuration with Li metal as anode and liquid electrolyte (1 M LiPF6 in EC:DMC=1:1 v/v). Our results showed significant enhancement in the electrochemical properties with 25% of Ni substitution in LiMn 2O4, which is in good agreement with the theoretical calculations. We also studied layered cathode materials both theoretically and experimentally. The First principle calculations in conjunction with alloy metal method were used to evaluate the average voltage and phase stability of LiMO2 (M=Co, Ni, Mn, W) systems. By formation energy analysis we established that LiNi0.8Co0.1Mn0.1O2 is a promising candidate cathode material. Single

  16. Offshore cathodic protection design, inspection, and computer modeling: Innovations from the 1980s

    SciTech Connect

    Gartland, P.O.; Strommen, R.D.; Osvoll, H.; Johnsen, R. )

    1993-12-01

    Throughout the 1980s, equipment was used increasingly to monitor electric fields (EF) strength/current density in CP surveys of North Sea structures. Probes for remote-operated vehicle (ROV) and diver operations are used to measure simultaneously the potential and the EF strength at exposed steel, at typical stand-off anodes, at sacrificial bracelet anodes on pipelines, and so on. A sensitive system for such purposes is based on a pair of electrodes at the tips of a T-shaped spindle rotating at a known frequency. The 1980s saw several innovations in the field of offshore cathodic protection (CP). The increasing use of organic coatings on offshore structures is more or less a result of the need to reduce the number of anodes. In a design incorporating coatings, coating breakdown plays a key role. In later years, aluminum-coated structures have been introduced for submerged conditions. It seems that in the future, aluminum coatings will be used merely as barrier coatings. The bare aluminum coating has a very low current demand on the order or 10 mA/m[sup 2] or less. Emphasis is now on CP design by computer modeling and on data retrieved during inspections using sophisticated equipment and procedures. The effect of the innovations on traditional design, on design verification, and on retrofitting is discussed in relation to relevant cases and field work. Future applications that may give better insight into CP system performance at reduced cost are also suggested.

  17. X ray computed tomography for failure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossi, Richard H.; Crews, Alan R.; Georgeson, Gary E.

    1992-08-01

    Under a preliminary testing task assignment of the Advanced Development of X-Ray Computed Tomography Application program, computed tomography (CT) has been studied for its potential as a tool to assist in failure analysis investigations. CT provides three-dimensional spatial distribution of material that can be used to assess internal configurations and material conditions nondestructively. This capability has been used in failure analysis studies to determine the position of internal components and their operation. CT is particularly advantageous on complex systems, composite failure studies, and testing under operational or environmental conditions. CT plays an important role in reducing the time and effort of a failure analysis investigation. Aircraft manufacturing or logistical facilities perform failure analysis operations routinely and could be expected to reduce schedules, reduce costs and/or improve evaluation on about 10 to 30 percent of the problems they investigate by using CT.

  18. Relating voltage and thermal safety in Li-ion battery cathodes: a high-throughput computational study.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anubhav; Hautier, Geoffroy; Ong, Shyue Ping; Dacek, Stephen; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2015-02-28

    High voltage and high thermal safety are desirable characteristics of cathode materials, but difficult to achieve simultaneously. This work uses high-throughput density functional theory computations to evaluate the link between voltage and safety (as estimated by thermodynamic O2 release temperatures) for over 1400 cathode materials. Our study indicates that a strong inverse relationship exists between voltage and safety: just over half the variance in O2 release temperature can be explained by voltage alone. We examine the effect of polyanion group, redox couple, and ratio of oxygen to counter-cation on both voltage and safety. As expected, our data demonstrates that polyanion groups improve safety when comparing compounds with similar voltages. However, a counterintuitive result of our study is that polyanion groups produce either no benefit or reduce safety when comparing compounds with the same redox couple. Using our data set, we tabulate voltages and oxidation potentials for over 105 combinations of redox couple/anion, which can be used towards the design and rationalization of new cathode materials. Overall, only a few compounds in our study, representing limited redox couple/polyanion combinations, exhibit both high voltage and high safety. We discuss these compounds in more detail as well as the opportunities for designing safe, high-voltage cathodes. PMID:25636088

  19. Simple cathode design for Li–S batteries: cell performance and mechanistic insights by in operando X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Kulisch, Jörn; Sommer, Heino; Brezesinski, Torsten; Janek, Jürgen

    2014-09-21

    Rechargeable batteries have been receiving increasing attention over the past several years, particularly with regard to the accelerated development of electric vehicles, but also for their potential in grid storage applications. Among the broad range of cathode active materials, elemental sulfur has the highest theoretical specific capacity, thereby making it one of the most promising positive electrode materials these days. In the present work, we show that already a simple cathode design (cathodes with a non-optimized composite microstructure) provides good electrochemical performance both in coin and pouch cells with sulfur loadings of 2 mg cm−2. Our research data demonstrate that (1) specific capacities of 1000 mA h g−1 can be achieved over 60 cycles at room temperature while the cyclability at elevated temperatures (here, θ > 40 °C) is poor, (2) the discharge is the kinetically rate-limiting process, (3) the major fraction of active sulfur in the electrode is lost during the formation cycle at C/50 and (4) the Li–S cells suffer from drying-out due to continuous electrolyte decomposition on the lithium metal anode. In addition, in operando X-ray diffraction shows Li2S formation (grain size of <10 nm) on discharge and the appearance of single phase β-sulfur in the sub-100 nm size range – rather than the thermodynamically stable orthorhombic polymorph (α-sulfur) – by the end of the charge cycle. PMID:25077958

  20. Study of Explosive Electron Emission from a Pin Cathode Using High Resolution Point-Projection X-Ray Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.; Parkevich, E. V.; Tilikin, I. N.; Mingaleev, A. R.; Agafonov, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Most studies of Explosive Electron Emission (EEE) are based on the idea of cathode flares developing after explosion of metal whiskers (micron scale pins) on the cathode surface. The physical state of the pin material, the spatial structure of the explosion and its origin are still a matter of conjecture. In this work we used high-resolution point projection x-ray radiography to observe micron scale pin explosion in a high-current diode. Pin cathodes made from 10-25 micron Cu or Mo wires were placed in gaps in return current circuits of hybrid X-pinches on the XP and BIN pulsers. Pin lengths were varied over a range 1-4 mm and pin-anode gaps within 0.05-3 mm. The diode current and voltage were measured. In experiments with small pin-anode gap (0.1 - 1 mm) development of an expanded dense core of the pin was observed except the pin tip with length 100-200 microns indicating significant energy deposition in the wire material. In experiments with bigger gaps there was no visible wire core expansion within the spatial resolution of the experimental technique. Work at Cornell was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration Stewardship Sciences Academic Programs under Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement No. DE-NA0001836 and at the Lebedev Institute by the RSF grant 142200273.

  1. Design of a High Field Stress, Velvet Cathode for the Flash X-Ray (FXR) Induction Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T; Brown, C; Fleming, D; Kreitzer, B; Lewis, K; Ong, M; Zentler, J

    2007-06-08

    A new cathode design has been proposed for the Flash X-Ray (FXR) induction linear accelerator with the goal of lowering the beam emittance. The original design uses a conventional Pierce geometry and applies a peak field of 134 kV/cm (no beam) to the velvet emission surface. Voltage/current measurements indicate that the velvet begins emitting near this peak field value and images of the cathode show a very non-uniform distribution of plasma light. The new design has a flat cathode/shroud profile that allows for a peak field stress of 230 kV/cm on the velvet. The emission area is reduced by about a factor of four to generate the same total current due to the greater field stress. The relatively fast acceleration of the beam, approximately 2.5 MeV in 10 cm, reduces space charge forces that tend to hollow the beam for a flat, non-Pierce geometry. The higher field stress achieved with the same rise time is expected to lead to an earlier and more uniform plasma formation over the velvet surface. Simulations and initial testing are presented.

  2. Environmental burdens in the management of end-of-life cathode ray tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Rocchetti, Laura; Beolchini, Francesca

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • The paper deals with different management options for end-of-life CRTs. • The environmental burdens for disposal and recycling are presented. • Recycling treatments allows to gain benefits for the environment. • Further treatments for fluorescent powders determine CO{sub 2} credits. • More efforts should be directed towards recycling. - Abstract: We compared the environmental burdens in the management of end-of life cathode ray tubes (CRTs) within two frameworks according to the different technologies of the production of televisions/monitors. In the first case, CRT recycling is addressed to the recovery of the panel and funnel glass for the manufacturing of new CRT screens. In the second case, where flat screen technology has replaced that of CRT, the recycling is addressed to the recovery of the glass cullet and lead for other applications. The impacts were evaluated according to the problem-oriented methodology of the Institute of Environmental Sciences, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands. Our data confirm that in both cases, the recycling treatment allows benefits to be gained for the environment through the recovery of the secondary raw materials. These benefits are higher for the “CRT technology” framework (1 kg CO{sub 2} saved per CRT) than for the “flat screen technology” (0.9 kg CO{sub 2} saved, per CRT, as the highest possible), mainly due to the high energy consumption for lead separation from the funnel glass. Furthermore, the recovery of yttrium from the fluorescent powders that are a residue of the recycling treatment would further improve the CO{sub 2} credit for both the frameworks considered, which would provide a further saving of about 0.75 kg CO{sub 2} per CRT, net of the energy and raw materials needed for the recovery. Overall, this study confirms that, even with a change in the destination of the recovered materials, the recycling processes provide a benefit for the environment: indeed the higher loads

  3. Some Observations on the Adaptation of the Cathode Ray Oscillograph to the Recording of Bio-Electrical Phenomena, with Special Reference to the Electrocardiogram

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Douglas

    1936-01-01

    The mechanism of the Cathode Ray Oscillograph is described and illustrated. The character of the cathode ray image (“spot”), produced when the ray impinges on the fluorescent screen, is briefly considered. Simple associated circuits are explained (including a “Time base” circuit). The advantages and disadvantages of the Cathode ray tube as a bio-electrical recording device are briefly examined. Some of the problems associated with the design of a suitable amplifier are dealt with, in conjunction with the amount of amplification to be performed and the time relations of the electrical transient to be examined, taking the electrocardiogram as an illustration. A very short account of the theory of amplifier distortions is given, and a practical method of examining these by means of an “artificial patient” is described and demonstrated. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 9AFig. 9BFig. 10 PMID:19990669

  4. A Century-Old Question: Does a Crookes Paddle Wheel Cathode Ray Tube Demonstrate that Electrons Carry Momentum?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphrey, T. E.; Calisa, Vaishnavi

    2014-03-01

    In 1879, in the midst of the debate between English and continental scientists about the nature of cathode rays, William Crookes conducted an experiment in which a small mill or "paddle wheel" was pushed along tracks inside a cathode ray tube (CRT) (similar to that shown in Fig. 1) when connected to a high-voltage induction coil. Crookes attributed the motion of the wheel to momentum transfer from the cathode rays (electrons) to the wheel, and interpreted the experiment as providing evidence that cathode rays were particles. In 1903 Thomson discounted Crookes' interpretation by calculating that the rate of momentum transfer (which he estimated at no more than 2×10-3 dyn, equivalent to 2×10-8 N) would be far too small to account for the observed motion of the wheel,2 instead attributing the motion to the radiometric effect. The misconception was not laid to rest, however, and despite an effort in 1961 to draw attention to Thomson's original work and so remove the error from textbooks,3 the notion that a Crookes paddle wheel CRT demonstrates that electrons carry momentum continues to be taught in high school physics courses4 and wheel. We then measured the actual acceleration of the wheel in the CRT by video analysis of its motion and determined the moment of inertia of the wheel along with its mass and dimensions. We could then compare the force, which really acts on the wheel to produce the observed motion to the maximum impulsive force that is supplied by the electrons. Our measurements yield a maximum impulsive force due to the electrons [ F e l = ( 1.1 ± 0.3 ) × 10 - 8 N ], which is within a factor of two of Thomson's estimate, and which is more than two orders of magnitude smaller than the force that is responsible for the observed acceleration of the paddle wheel [ F W = ( 6 ± 2 ) × 10 - 6 N ]. This means that the rotation of the wheel is certainly not due to transferred momentum from the electron beam, and the results of the experiment should not be

  5. Three-dimensional X-ray microcomputed tomography of carbonates and biofilm on operated cathode in single chamber microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Santini, Maurizio; Guilizzoni, Manfredo; Lorenzi, Massimo; Atanassov, Plamen; Marsili, Enrico; Fest-Santini, Stephanie; Cristiani, Pierangela; Santoro, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Power output limitation is one of the main concerns that need to be addressed for full-scale applications of the microbial fuel cell technology. Fouling and biofilm growth on the cathode of single chamber microbial fuel cells (SCMFC) affects their performance in long-term operation with wastewater. In this study, the authors report the power output and cathode polarization curves of a membraneless SCMFC, fed with raw primary wastewater and sodium acetate for over 6 months. At the end of the experiment, the whole cathode surface is analyzed through X-ray microcomputed tomography (microCT), scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) to characterize the fouling layer and the biofilm. EDX shows the distribution of Ca, Na, K, P, S, and other elements on the two faces of the cathode. Na-carbonates and Ca-carbonates are predominant on the air (outer) side and the water (inner) side, respectively. The three-dimensional reconstruction by X-ray microCT shows biofilm spots unevenly distributed above the Ca-carbonate layer on the inner (water) side of the cathode. These results indicate that carbonates layer, rather than biofilm, might lower the oxygen reduction reaction rate at the cathode during long-term SCMFC operation. PMID:26357848

  6. Lightweight Cathodes For Nickel Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, Doris L.

    1996-01-01

    Lightweight cathodes for rechargeable nickel-based electrochemical cells undergoing development. In cathodes, mats of nickel fibers are substrates providing structural support of, and electrical contact with, active cathode material. Offers specific energies greater than sintered nickel plaque cathodes. Electrodes used in rechargeable batteries for applications in which weight major concern, including laptop computers, cellular phones, flashlights, soldiers' backpacks, and electric vehicles.

  7. In situ synchrotron x-ray studies of LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    McBreen, J.; Mukerjee, S.; Yang, X.Q.

    1997-05-01

    LiCoO{sub 2} cathodes are now used in most commercial lithium ion batteries. LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} is an attractive low cost alternative. However, it is difficult to make reproducibly. At Brookhaven National Laboratory two in situ synchrotron x-ray techniques, that are available at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), have been used to investigate LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The techniques are x-ray absorption and high resolution x-ray diffraction. With x-ray absorption it is possible to follow the changes in the Mn oxidation state and the changes in the Mn-O and Mn-Mn bond lengths on cycling. Also it is possible to detect amorphous phases. The high energy x-rays at the diffraction Beam Lines at the NSLS (up to 24 KeV) permit in situ x-ray diffraction, in the transmission mode, in thin lithium and lithium ion cells. The evolution of the structural chances that occur on cycling can be followed. These in situ measurements were done on Li/LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cells with a liquid electrolyte (1 M LiPF{sub 6} in a 1:1:3 PC:EC:DMC solvent).

  8. Utilization of cathode ray tube waste: encapsulation of PbO-containing funnel glass in Portland cement clinker.

    PubMed

    Lairaksa, Nirut; Moon, Anthony R; Makul, Natt

    2013-03-15

    The disposal of cathode ray tube (CRT) generates large quantities of leaded glass waste. The encapsulation of glass from the funnel portion of CRT in cement clinker was investigated. Samples of cement raw material containing 0 (control), 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, or 0.5 wt% of CRT funnel glass ground to less than 75 μm were heated to 1480 °C in an electric furnace for 1.5 h at a heating rate of 5 °C/min to produce cement clinker. The Pb encapsulation and chemical composition of the clinkers were analysed using X-ray techniques and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The maximum PbO encapsulation occurred in mixtures containing 0.1 wt% funnel glass. PMID:23376301

  9. U-shape rotating anti-cathode compact X-ray generator: 20 times stronger than the commercially available X-ray source

    PubMed Central

    Sakabe, N.; Sakabe, K.; Ohsawa, S.; Sakai, T.; Kobayakawa, H.; Sugimura, T.; Ikeda, M.; Tawada, M.; Watanabe, N.; Sasaki, K.; Wakatsuki, M.

    2013-01-01

    A new type of U-shape anti-cathode X-ray generator in which the inner surface of a cylindrical target is irradiated by an electron beam has been made by modifying a conventional rotating anti-cathode X-ray generator whose brightness in the catalog is 12 kW mm−2. The target material (Cu), target radius (50 mm) and rotating speed (6000 r.p.m.) were not changed in this modification. A brightness of 52 kW mm−2 was obtained by this U-shape-type X-ray generator. This means that the brightness of the new type is 4.3 times greater than that of the old unmodified one. Furthermore, the new-type X-ray generator yielded a brightness of 129 kW mm−2 by adding a carbon coating on the Cu target. This means an overall increase of brightness of ten times. The original generator has the highest brightness in the generators of the same class (having a radius of 50 mm and rotation speed of 6000 r.p.m.). Observations showed that Cu Kα counts at vertical incidence of the electron beam onto the surface of the new target, which is initially optically smooth, decrease as the surface is roughened by a severe thermal stress caused by strong electron beam exposure. Further observation reveals, however, that oblique incidence of the electron beam onto the roughened surface drastically increased the X-ray output and amounts to twice as much as that from a smooth surface at vertical incidence. Thus, at the present stage, an overall increase of brightness has been realised at a level 20 times stronger than that of the original commercially offered X-ray generator that we modified. PMID:24121322

  10. Proceedings of the workshop on X-ray computed microtomography

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This report consists of vugraphs from the nine presentations at the conference. Titles of the presentations are: CMT: Applications and Techniques; Computer Microtomography Using X-rays from Third Generation Synchrotron X-ray; Approaches to Soft-X-ray Nanotomography; Diffraction Enhanced Tomography; X-ray Computed Microtomography Applications at the NSLS; XCMT Applications in Forestry and Forest Products; 3DMA: Investigating Three Dimensional Pore Geometry from High Resolution Images; X-ray Computed Microtomography Studies of Volcanic Rock; and 3-D Visualization of Tomographic Volumes.

  11. Electronic structure of the polymer-cathode interface of an organic electroluminescent device investigated using operando hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeuchi, J.; Hamamatsu, H.; Miyamoto, T.; Tanaka, S.; Yamashita, Y.; Yoshikawa, H.; Ueda, S.

    2015-08-01

    The electronic structure of a polymer-cathode interface of an operating organic light-emitting diode (OLED) was directly investigated using hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES). The potential distribution profile of the light-emitting copolymer layer as a function of the depth under the Al/Ba cathode layer in the OLED depended on the bias voltage. We found that band bending occurred in the copolymer of 9,9-dioctylfluorene (50%) and N-(4-(2-butyl)-phenyl)diphenylamine (F8-PFB) layer near the cathode at 0 V bias, while a linear potential distribution formed in the F8-PFB when a bias voltage was applied to the OLED. Direct observation of the built-in potential and that band bending formed in the F8-PFB layer in the operating OLED suggested that charges moved in the F8-PFB layer before electron injection from the cathode.

  12. Electronic structure of the polymer-cathode interface of an organic electroluminescent device investigated using operando hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeuchi, J.; Hamamatsu, H.; Miyamoto, T.; Tanaka, S.; Yamashita, Y.; Yoshikawa, H.; Ueda, S.

    2015-08-28

    The electronic structure of a polymer-cathode interface of an operating organic light-emitting diode (OLED) was directly investigated using hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES). The potential distribution profile of the light-emitting copolymer layer as a function of the depth under the Al/Ba cathode layer in the OLED depended on the bias voltage. We found that band bending occurred in the copolymer of 9,9-dioctylfluorene (50%) and N-(4-(2-butyl)-phenyl)diphenylamine (F8-PFB) layer near the cathode at 0 V bias, while a linear potential distribution formed in the F8-PFB when a bias voltage was applied to the OLED. Direct observation of the built-in potential and that band bending formed in the F8-PFB layer in the operating OLED suggested that charges moved in the F8-PFB layer before electron injection from the cathode.

  13. In Situ X-ray Diffraction Studies of Li(sub x)Mn(sub 2)O(sub 4) Cathode Materials by Synchrotron X-ray Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X. Q.; Sun, X.; Lee, S. J.; McBreen, J.; Mukerjee, S.; Daroux, M. L.; Xing, X. K.

    1998-11-01

    In Situ x-ray diffraction studies on Li{sub x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel cathode materials during charge-discharge cycles were carried out by using a synchrotron as x-ray source. Lithium rich (x = 1.03-1.06) spinel materials obtained from two different sources were studied. Three cubic phases with different lattice constants were observed during charge-discharge cycles in all the samples when a Sufficiently low charge-discharge rate (C/10) was used. There are two regions of two-phase coexistence between these three phases, indicating that both phase transitions are first order. The separation of the Bragg peaks representing these three phases varies from sample to sample and also depends on the charge-discharge rate. These results show that the de-intercalation of lithium in lithium-rich spinel cathode materials proceeds through a series of phase transitions from a lithium-rich phase to a lithium-poor phase and finally to a {lambda}-MnO{sub 2} like cubic phase, rather than through a continuous lattice constant contraction in a single phase.

  14. Solid Electrolyte/Electrode Interfaces: Atomistic Behavior Analyzed Via UHV-AFM, Surface Spectroscopies, and Computer Simulations Computational and Experimental Studies of the Cathode/Electrolyte Interface in Oxide Thin Film Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Garofalini, Stephen H

    2012-03-21

    The goals of the research were to understand the structural, dynamic, and chemical properties of solid electrolyte surfaces and the cathode/electrolyte interface at an atomistic and nanometer level using both computational and experimental techniques.

  15. Energy-efficient modification of reduction-melting for lead recovery from cathode ray tube funnel glass

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Takashi Yonezawa, Susumu

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: • We recovered Pb from cathode ray tube funnel glass using reduction melting process. • We modified the melting process to achieve Pb recovery with low energy consumption. • Pb in the funnel glass is efficiently recovered at 1000 °C by adding Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. • Pb remaining in the glass after reduction melting is extracted with 1 M HCl. • 98% of Pb in the funnel glass was recovered by reduction melting and HCl leaching. - Abstract: Lead can be recovered from funnel glass of waste cathode ray tubes via reduction melting. While low-temperature melting is necessary for reduced energy consumption, previously proposed methods required high melting temperatures (1400 °C) for the reduction melting. In this study, the reduction melting of the funnel glass was performed at 900–1000 °C using a lab-scale reactor with varying concentrations of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} at different melting temperatures and melting times. The optimum Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} dosage and melting temperature for efficient lead recovery was 0.5 g per 1 g of the funnel glass and 1000 °C respectively. By the reduction melting with the mentioned conditions, 92% of the lead in the funnel glass was recovered in 60 min. However, further lead recovery was difficult because the rate of the lead recovery decreased as with the recovery of increasing quantity of the lead from the glass. Thus, the lead remaining in the glass after the reduction melting was extracted with 1 M HCl, and the lead recovery improved to 98%.

  16. SPECIAL ISSUE DEVOTED TO THE 80TH ANNIVERSARY OF ACADEMICIAN N G BASOV'S BIRTH: Threshold and efficiency of a laser cathode-ray tube at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovskii, Vladimir I.; Popov, Yurii M.

    2003-01-01

    The main factors determining the lasing threshold and efficiency of a laser cathode-ray tube at room temperature are considered. Recent achievements obtained by using laser screens made of the II — VI compound single crystals are discussed. It is shown that multilayer heterostructures allow the reduction in the lasing threshold by several times.

  17. A tetrahedron beam computed tomography benchtop system with a multiple pixel field emission x-ray tube

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xiaochao; Kim, Joshua; Laganis, Philip; Schulze, Derek; Liang, Yongguang; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of Tetrahedron Beam Computed Tomography (TBCT) using a carbon nanotube (CNT) multiple pixel field emission x-ray (MPFEX) tube. Methods: A multiple pixel x-ray source facilitates the creation of novel x-ray imaging modalities. In a previous publication, the authors proposed a Tetrahedron Beam Computed Tomography (TBCT) imaging system which comprises a linear source array and a linear detector array that are orthogonal to each other. TBCT is expected to reduce scatter compared with Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and to have better detector performance. Therefore, it may produce improved image quality for image guided radiotherapy. In this study, a TBCT benchtop system has been developed with an MPFEX tube. The tube has 75 CNT cold cathodes, which generate 75 x-ray focal spots on an elongated anode, and has 4 mm pixel spacing. An in-house-developed, 5-row CT detector array using silicon photodiodes and CdWO{sub 4} scintillators was employed in the system. Hardware and software were developed for tube control and detector data acquisition. The raw data were preprocessed for beam hardening and detector response linearity and were reconstructed with an FDK-based image reconstruction algorithm. Results: The focal spots were measured at about 1 x 2 mm{sup 2} using a star phantom. Each cathode generates around 3 mA cathode current with 2190 V gate voltage. The benchtop system is able to perform TBCT scans with a prolonged scanning time. Images of a commercial CT phantom were successfully acquired. Conclusions: A prototype system was developed, and preliminary phantom images were successfully acquired. MPFEX is a promising x-ray source for TBCT. Further improvement of tube output is needed in order for it to be used in clinical TBCT systems.

  18. Dose in x-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalender, Willi A.

    2014-02-01

    Radiation dose in x-ray computed tomography (CT) has become a topic of high interest due to the increasing numbers of CT examinations performed worldwide. This review aims to present an overview of current concepts for both scanner output metrics and for patient dosimetry and will comment on their strengths and weaknesses. Controversial issues such as the appropriateness of the CT dose index (CTDI) are discussed in detail. A review of approaches to patient dose assessment presently in practice, of the dose levels encountered and options for further dose optimization are also given and discussed. Patient dose assessment remains a topic for further improvement and for international consensus. All approaches presently in use are based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Estimates for effective dose are established, but they are crude and not patient-specific; organ dose estimates are rarely available. Patient- and organ-specific dose estimates can be provided with adequate accuracy and independent of CTDI phantom measurements by fast MC simulations. Such information, in particular on 3D dose distributions, is important and helpful in optimization efforts. Dose optimization has been performed very successfully in recent years and even resulted in applications with effective dose values of below 1 mSv. In general, a trend towards lower dose values based on technical innovations has to be acknowledged. Effective dose values are down to clearly below 10 mSv on average, and there are a number of applications such as cardiac and pediatric CT which are performed routinely below 1 mSv on modern equipment.

  19. Dose in x-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kalender, Willi A

    2014-02-01

    Radiation dose in x-ray computed tomography (CT) has become a topic of high interest due to the increasing numbers of CT examinations performed worldwide. This review aims to present an overview of current concepts for both scanner output metrics and for patient dosimetry and will comment on their strengths and weaknesses. Controversial issues such as the appropriateness of the CT dose index (CTDI) are discussed in detail. A review of approaches to patient dose assessment presently in practice, of the dose levels encountered and options for further dose optimization are also given and discussed. Patient dose assessment remains a topic for further improvement and for international consensus. All approaches presently in use are based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Estimates for effective dose are established, but they are crude and not patient-specific; organ dose estimates are rarely available. Patient- and organ-specific dose estimates can be provided with adequate accuracy and independent of CTDI phantom measurements by fast MC simulations. Such information, in particular on 3D dose distributions, is important and helpful in optimization efforts. Dose optimization has been performed very successfully in recent years and even resulted in applications with effective dose values of below 1 mSv. In general, a trend towards lower dose values based on technical innovations has to be acknowledged. Effective dose values are down to clearly below 10 mSv on average, and there are a number of applications such as cardiac and pediatric CT which are performed routinely below 1 mSv on modern equipment. PMID:24434792

  20. Computer Graphics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Jeanne W.

    1970-01-01

    Computer graphics have been called the most exciting development in computer technology. At the University of Michigan, three kinds of graphics output equipment are now being used: symbolic printers, line plotters or drafting devices, and cathode-ray tubes (CRT). Six examples are given that demonstrate the range of graphics use at the University.…

  1. Computational Investigation of Chevrel Phase Cathodes for Ca2+ Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smeu, Manuel

    While batteries employing Li ions are best suited for applications were portability is important, less expensive alternatives may be employed when size and weight are less critical. Batteries utilizing Ca ions have received very little attention to date due to difficulties in identifying adequate anode materials and electrolytes, although advancements have been made on both fronts. If these challenges can be overcome, Ca can offer an abundant and affordable alternative to Li for grid storage and in other applications where portability is not a priority. For such technologies, appropriate cathodes need to be identified that will allow for reversible intercalation of Ca2+ ions and that can provide a desirable voltage. To this end, we investigate the Chevrel phase (CP) compounds Mo6X8 (X = S, Se, Te), which can intercalate Mg2+ and Ca2+, among many other ions. We use density functional theory (DFT) to calculate the voltage profiles of various guest intercalation ions (Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba) in the CP material. The electronic properties of this material will be discussed, along with the capacity and the energetics associated with ions diffusing through the CP structure. This work also offers insights into how the cathode properties may be fine-tuned by carefully selecting its constituents.

  2. Computer assisted analysis of medical x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, Ewert

    1996-01-01

    X-rays were originally used to expose film. The early computers did not have enough capacity to handle images with useful resolution. The rapid development of computer technology over the last few decades has, however, led to the introduction of computers into radiology. In this overview paper, the various possible roles of computers in radiology are examined. The state of the art is briefly presented, and some predictions about the future are made.

  3. PRELIMINARY IN-SITU X-RAY ABSORPTION FINE STRUCTURE EXAMINATION OF PT/C AND PTCO/C CATHODE CATALYSTS IN AN OPERATIONAL POLYMER ELECTROLYTE FUEL CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, B.T.; Myers, D.J.; Smith, M.C.

    2009-01-01

    State-of-the-art polymer electrolyte fuel cells require a conditioning period to reach optimized cell performance. There is insuffi cient understanding about the behavior of catalysts during this period, especially with regard to the changing environment of the cathode electrocatalyst, which is typically Pt nanoparticles supported on high surface area Vulcan XC-72 carbon (Pt/C). The purpose of this research was to record preliminary observations of the changing environment during the conditioning phase using X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. XAFS was recorded for a Pt/C cathode at the Pt L3-edge and a PtCo/C cathode at both the Pt L3-edge and Co K-edge. Using precision machined graphite cell-blocks, both transmission and fl uorescence data were recorded at Sector 12-BM-B of Argonne National Laboratory’s Advanced Photon Source. The fl uorescence and transmission edge steps allow for a working description of the changing electrocatalyst environment, especially water concentration, at the anode and cathode as functions of operating parameters. These features are discussed in the context of how future analysis may correlate with potential, current and changing apparent thickness of the membrane electrode assembly through loss of catalyst materials (anode, cathode, carbon support). Such direct knowledge of the effect of the conditioning protocol on the electrocatalyst may lead to better catalyst design. In turn, this may lead to minimizing, or even eliminating, the conditioning period.

  4. Opportunities for X-ray Science in Future Computing Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, Ian

    2011-02-09

    The world of computing continues to evolve rapidly. In just the past 10 years, we have seen the emergence of petascale supercomputing, cloud computing that provides on-demand computing and storage with considerable economies of scale, software-as-a-service methods that permit outsourcing of complex processes, and grid computing that enables federation of resources across institutional boundaries. These trends show no sign of slowing down. The next 10 years will surely see exascale, new cloud offerings, and other terabit networks. This talk reviews various of these developments and discusses their potential implications for x-ray science and x-ray facilities.

  5. 40 CFR 261.41 - Notification and Recordkeeping for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Reuse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Exclusions/Exemptions § 261.41 Notification and Recordkeeping for Used, Intact Cathode...

  6. Effects of cathode and electrolyte properties on lithium-air battery performance: Computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Artem V.; Chertovich, Alexander V.; Itkis, Daniil M.; Goodilin, Eugene A.; Khokhlov, Alexei R.

    2015-04-01

    Li/O2 batteries draw much attention due to its outstanding theoretical specific energy, but the value of practically achievable specific energy is still under the question. In this paper we employ a numerical model of Li/O2 cell, which takes into account mass transport processes, to simulate non-uniform product precipitation at different discharge current densities in acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide and 1,2-dimethoxyethane-based electrolytes. Even for 1,2-dimethoxyethane, which has the highest oxygen mobility and solubility, oxygen transport restrictions at 1 mA/cm2 lead to cell-level specific energy of about 650 Wh/kg if a pure oxygen is supplied to the cell. Finally, in order to assist the ongoing search for new cathode materials, which can be alternative to carbon, we also investigate the effect of electrode material density on cell-level specific energy and show that materials with densities up to 10 g/cm3 can be used without serious penalty to the specific energy.

  7. Energy-efficient modification of reduction-melting for lead recovery from cathode ray tube funnel glass.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takashi; Yonezawa, Susumu

    2013-08-01

    Lead can be recovered from funnel glass of waste cathode ray tubes via reduction melting. While low-temperature melting is necessary for reduced energy consumption, previously proposed methods required high melting temperatures (1400 °C) for the reduction melting. In this study, the reduction melting of the funnel glass was performed at 900-1000 °C using a lab-scale reactor with varying concentrations of Na(2)CO(3) at different melting temperatures and melting times. The optimum Na(2)CO(3) dosage and melting temperature for efficient lead recovery was 0.5 g per 1g of the funnel glass and 1000 °C respectively. By the reduction melting with the mentioned conditions, 92% of the lead in the funnel glass was recovered in 60 min. However, further lead recovery was difficult because the rate of the lead recovery decreased as with the recovery of increasing quantity of the lead from the glass. Thus, the lead remaining in the glass after the reduction melting was extracted with 1M HCl, and the lead recovery improved to 98%. PMID:23711698

  8. Characterization of lead, barium and strontium leachability from foam glasses elaborated using waste cathode ray-tube glasses.

    PubMed

    Yot, Pascal G; Méar, François O

    2011-01-15

    Foam glass manufacture is a promising mode for re-using cathode ray tube (CRT) glasses. Nevertheless, because CRTs employ glasses containing heavy metals such as lead, barium and strontium, the leaching behaviour of foam glasses fabricated from CRTs must be understood. Using the AFNOR X 31-210 leaching assessment procedure, the degree of element inertization in foam glasses synthesized from waste CRT glasses (funnel and panel glasses, containing lead and barium/strontium respectively) were determined. The amount of leached lead from foam glasses prepared from funnel glass depends on the nature and concentration of the reducing agent. The effects of the reducing agents on the generation of cellular structure in the fabrication of foam glass were studied. The fraction of lead released from foam glass was less than those extracted from funnel glass and was lower than the statutory limit. Leached concentrations of barium and strontium were found to be approximately constant in various tests and were also below regulatory limits. PMID:20940082

  9. Extraction of metallic lead from cathode ray tube (CRT) funnel glass by thermal reduction with metallic iron.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xingwen; Shih, Kaimin; Liu, Chengshuai; Wang, Fei

    2013-09-01

    A novel and effective process of thermal reduction treatment with the addition of metallic iron (Fe(0)) to recover lead from cathode ray tube (CRT) funnel glass is introduced. The key technological breakthrough of this process is the use of a relatively lower temperature and an inexpensive reducing agent to extract the metallic lead. The influences of temperature, the reducing agent content, and the holding time for lead reduction were examined to determine the optimal extraction efficiency. The lead extraction efficiency first increased and then decreased with increasing temperature. The maximum lead extraction efficiency occurred at 700 °C. The growth of crystalline lead first increased significantly with an increase in the Fe content, reaching maximum growth at an Fe addition of 50 wt %. The most effective treatment time was determined to be 30 min, as the vitrification of lead back to the glass matrix occurred under longer treatment times. The experimentally derived results indicate that a 58 wt % lead extraction can be achieved with the optimized operational parameters (50 wt % Fe addition, heating at 700 °C for 30 min) in a single extraction operation. PMID:23915263

  10. Characteristics of a multi-keV monochromatic point x-ray source based on vacuum diode with laser-produced plasma as cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorti, A.; Raghuramaiah, M.; Naik, P. A.; Gupta, P. D.

    2004-11-01

    Temporal, spatial and spectral characteristics of a multi-keV monochromatic point x-ray source based on vacuum diode with laser-produced plasma as cathode are presented. Electrons from a laser-produced aluminium plasma were accelerated towards a conical point tip titanium anode to generate K-shell x-ray radiation. Approximately 10^{10} photons/pulse were generated in x-ray pulses of sim18 to sim28 ns duration from a source of sim300 mum diameter, at hnu = 4.51 keV (K_{al} emission of titanium), with a brightness of sim10^{20} photons/cm^2/s/sr. This was sufficient to record single-shot x-ray radiographs of physical objects on a DEF-5 x-ray film kept at a distance of up to sim10 cm.

  11. A novel surface-sensitive X-ray absorption spectroscopic detector to study the thermal decomposition of cathode materials for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonaka, Takamasa; Okuda, Chikaaki; Oka, Hideaki; Nishimura, Yusaku F.; Makimura, Yoshinari; Kondo, Yasuhito; Dohmae, Kazuhiko; Takeuchi, Yoji

    2016-09-01

    A surface-sensitive conversion-electron-yield X-ray absorption fine structure (CEY-XAFS) detector that operates at elevated temperatures is developed to investigate the thermal decomposition of cathode materials for Li-ion batteries. The detector enables measurements with the sample temperature controlled from room temperature up to 450 °C. The detector is applied to the LiNi0.75Co0.15Al0.05Mg0.05O2 cathode material at 0% state of charge (SOC) and 50% SOC to examine the chemical changes that occur during heating in the absence of an electrolyte. The combination of surface-sensitive CEY-XAFS and bulk-sensitive transmission-mode XAFS shows that the reduction of Ni and Co ions begins at the surface of the cathode particles at around 150 °C, and propagates inside the particle upon further heating. These changes with heating are irreversible and are more obvious at 50% SOC than at 0% SOC. The fraction of reduced Ni ions is larger than that of reduced Co ions. These results demonstrate the capability of the developed detector to obtain important information for the safe employment of this cathode material in Li-ion batteries.

  12. Cathodic protection for nuclear waste packaging under gamma ray irradiation by using TiO{sub 2} coating combined with glass scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisawa, Ryutaro; Tsujikawa, Shigeo

    1995-12-31

    The photoelectrochemical behaviors of a TiO{sub 2} single crystal and TiO{sub 2} coating were studied, for the purposes of cathodic protection of stainless steels and Cu via the TiO{sub 2} coating combined with glass scintillators under gamma ray irradiation. It was confirmed that a TiO{sub 2} coating could protect 304 stainless steel cathodically from crevice corrosion under illumination. A logarithmic relationship between the photopotential of single crystal TiO{sub 2} (rutile) and light intensity was found, moreover, the photopotential was found to be least noble when wavelength equals 375 nm. Under illumination by gamma rays combined with the glass scintillators, the electrode potential of single crystal TiO{sub 2} was found to shift in the less noble direction by about 200 mV. Therefore, the technique of cathodic protection by TiO{sub 2} coating is considered to be applicable to protect the packaging metal from corrosion for a long time.

  13. Helical x-ray differential phase contrast computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhihua; Thériault-Lauzier, Pascal; Bevins, Nicholas; Zambelli, Joseph; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2011-03-01

    Helical computed tomography revolutionized the field of x-ray computed tomography two decades ago. The simultaneous translation of an image object with a standard computed tomography acquisition allows for fast volumetric scan for long image objects. X-ray phase sensitive imaging methods have been studied over the past few decades to provide new contrast mechanisms for imaging an object. A Talbot-Lau grating interferometer based differential phase contrast imaging method has recently demonstrated its potential for implementation in clinical and industrial applications. In this work, the principles of helical computed tomography are extended to differential phase contrast imaging to produce volumetric reconstructions based on fan-beam data. The method demonstrates the potential for helical differential phase contrast CT to scan long objects with relatively small detector coverage in the axial direction.

  14. Recent advances in first principles computational research of cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ying Shirley; Arroyo-de Dompablo, M Elena

    2013-05-21

    To meet the increasing demands of energy storage, particularly for transportation applications such as plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, researchers will need to develop improved lithium-ion battery electrode materials that exhibit high energy density, high power, better safety, and longer cycle life. The acceleration of materials discovery, synthesis, and optimization will benefit from the combination of both experimental and computational methods. First principles (ab Initio) computational methods have been widely used in materials science and can play an important role in accelerating the development and optimization of new energy storage materials. These methods can prescreen previously unknown compounds and can explain complex phenomena observed with these compounds. Intercalation compounds, where Li(+) ions insert into the host structure without causing significant rearrangement of the original structure, have served as the workhorse for lithium ion rechargeable battery electrodes. Intercalation compounds will also facilitate the development of new battery chemistries such as sodium-ion batteries. During the electrochemical discharge reaction process, the intercalating species travel from the negative to the positive electrode, driving the transition metal ion in the positive electrode to a lower oxidation state, which delivers useful current. Many materials properties change as a function of the intercalating species concentrations (at different state of charge). Therefore, researchers will need to understand and control these dynamic changes to optimize the electrochemical performance of the cell. In this Account, we focus on first-principles computational investigations toward understanding, controlling, and improving the intrinsic properties of five well known high energy density Li intercalation electrode materials: layered oxides (LiMO2), spinel oxides (LiM2O4), olivine phosphates (LiMPO4), silicates-Li2MSiO4, and the tavorite-LiM(XO4)F (M = 3d

  15. X-ray Crystallographic Computations Using a Programmable Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attard, Alfred E.; Lee, Henry C.

    1979-01-01

    Describes six crystallographic programs which have been developed to illustrate the range of usefulness of programmable calculators in providing computational assistance in chemical analysis. These programs are suitable for the analysis of x-ray diffraction data in the laboratory by students. (HM)

  16. Computational determination of absorbed dose distributions from gamma ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuanyu; Inanc, Feyzi

    2001-04-01

    A biomedical procedure known as brachytherapy involves insertion of many radioactive seeds into a sick gland for eliminating sick tissue. For such implementations, the spatial distribution of absorbed dose is very important. A simulation tool has been developed to determine the spatial distribution of absorbed dose in heterogeneous environments where the gamma ray source consists of many small internal radiation emitters. The computation is base on integral transport method and the computations are done in a parallel fashion. Preliminary results involving 137Cs and 125I sources surrounded by water and comparison of the results to the experimental and computational data available in the literature are presented.

  17. Research Into Characteristics of X-Ray Emission Laser Beams from Solid-State Cathode Medium of High-Current Glow Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabut, Alexander B.

    2006-02-01

    X-ray emissions ranging 1.2-3.0 keV with dose rate up to 1.0 Gy/s have been registered in experiments with high-current Glow Discharge. The emissions energy and intensity depend on the cathode material, the kind of plasma-forming gas, and the discharge parameters. The experiments were carried out on the high-current glow discharge device using D2, H2, Kr, and Xe at pressure up to 10 Torr, as well as cathode samples made from Al, Sc, Ti, Ni, Nb, Zr, Mo, Pd, Ta, W, Pt, at current up to 500 mA, and discharge voltage of 500-2500 V. Two emission modes were revealed under the experiments: (1) Diffusion X-rays was observed as separate X-ray bursts (up to 5 × 105 bursts a second and up to 106 X-ray quanta in a burst), (2) X-rays in the form of laser microbeams (up to 104 beams a second and up to 1010 X-ray of quanta in a beam, angular divergence was up to 10-4, the duration of the separate laser beams must be τ = 3 × 10-13-3 × 10-14 s, the separate beam power must be 107-108 W). The emission of the X-ray laser beams occurred when the discharge occurred and within 100 ms after turning off the current. The results of experimental research into the characteristics of secondary penetrating radiation occurring when interacting primary X-ray beams from a solid-state cathode medium with targets made of various materials are reported. It was shown that the secondary radiation consisted of fast electrons. Secondary radiation of two types was observed: (1) The emission with a continuous temporal spectrum in the form of separate bursts with intensity up to 106 fast electrons a burst. (2) The emission with a discrete temporal spectrum and emission rate up to 1010 fast electrons a burst. A third type of the penetrating radiation was observed as well. This type was recorded directly by the photomultiplier placed behind of the target without the scintillator. The abnormal high penetrating ability of this radiation type requires additional research to explain. The obtained results

  18. 21 CFR 892.1750 - Computed tomography x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Computed tomography x-ray system. 892.1750 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1750 Computed tomography x-ray system. (a) Identification. A computed tomography x-ray system is a diagnostic x-ray system intended...

  19. Multiple pinhole collimator based X-ray luminescence computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Dianwen; Lun, Michael; Li, Changqing

    2016-07-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) is an emerging hybrid imaging modality, which is able to improve the spatial resolution of optical imaging to hundreds of micrometers for deep targets by using superfine X-ray pencil beams. However, due to the low X-ray photon utilization efficiency in a single pinhole collimator based XLCT, it takes a long time to acquire measurement data. Herein, we propose a multiple pinhole collimator based XLCT, in which multiple X-ray beams are generated to scan a sample at multiple positions simultaneously. Compared with the single pinhole based XLCT, the multiple X-ray beam scanning method requires much less measurement time. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments have been performed to demonstrate the feasibility of the multiple X-ray beam scanning method. In one numerical simulation, we used four X-ray beams to scan a cylindrical object with 6 deeply embedded targets. With measurements from 6 angular projections, all 6 targets have been reconstructed successfully. In the phantom experiment, we generated two X-ray pencil beams with a collimator manufactured in-house. Two capillary targets with 0.6 mm edge-to-edge distance embedded in a cylindrical phantom have been reconstructed successfully. With the two beam scanning, we reduced the data acquisition time by 50%. From the reconstructed XLCT images, we found that the Dice similarity of targets is 85.11% and the distance error between two targets is less than 3%. We have measured the radiation dose during XLCT scan and found that the radiation dose, 1.475 mSv, is in the range of a typical CT scan. We have measured the changes of the collimated X-ray beam size and intensity at different distances from the collimator. We have also studied the effects of beam size and intensity in the reconstruction of XLCT. PMID:27446686

  20. Multiple pinhole collimator based X-ray luminescence computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Dianwen; Lun, Michael; Li, Changqing

    2016-01-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) is an emerging hybrid imaging modality, which is able to improve the spatial resolution of optical imaging to hundreds of micrometers for deep targets by using superfine X-ray pencil beams. However, due to the low X-ray photon utilization efficiency in a single pinhole collimator based XLCT, it takes a long time to acquire measurement data. Herein, we propose a multiple pinhole collimator based XLCT, in which multiple X-ray beams are generated to scan a sample at multiple positions simultaneously. Compared with the single pinhole based XLCT, the multiple X-ray beam scanning method requires much less measurement time. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments have been performed to demonstrate the feasibility of the multiple X-ray beam scanning method. In one numerical simulation, we used four X-ray beams to scan a cylindrical object with 6 deeply embedded targets. With measurements from 6 angular projections, all 6 targets have been reconstructed successfully. In the phantom experiment, we generated two X-ray pencil beams with a collimator manufactured in-house. Two capillary targets with 0.6 mm edge-to-edge distance embedded in a cylindrical phantom have been reconstructed successfully. With the two beam scanning, we reduced the data acquisition time by 50%. From the reconstructed XLCT images, we found that the Dice similarity of targets is 85.11% and the distance error between two targets is less than 3%. We have measured the radiation dose during XLCT scan and found that the radiation dose, 1.475 mSv, is in the range of a typical CT scan. We have measured the changes of the collimated X-ray beam size and intensity at different distances from the collimator. We have also studied the effects of beam size and intensity in the reconstruction of XLCT. PMID:27446686

  1. Multiscale modeling of lithium-ion battery electrodes based on nano-scale X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashkooli, Ali Ghorbani; Farhad, Siamak; Lee, Dong Un; Feng, Kun; Litster, Shawn; Babu, Siddharth Komini; Zhu, Likun; Chen, Zhongwei

    2016-03-01

    A multiscale platform has been developed to model lithium ion battery (LIB) electrodes based on the real microstructure morphology. This multiscale framework consists of a microscale level where the electrode microstructure architecture is modeled and a macroscale level where discharge/charge is simulated. The coupling between two scales are performed in real time unlike using common surrogate based models for microscale. For microscale geometry 3D microstructure is reconstructed based on the nano-scale X-ray computed tomography data replacing typical computer generated microstructure. It is shown that this model can predict the experimental performance of LiFePO4 (LFP) cathode at different discharge rates more accurate than the conventional homogenous models. The approach employed in this study provides valuable insight into the spatial distribution of lithium -ion inside the real microstructure of LIB electrodes. The inhomogenous microstructure of LFP causes a wider range of physical and electrochemical properties in microscale compared to homogenous models.

  2. Cathodic protection: Theory and practice

    SciTech Connect

    Ashworth, V.; Booker, C.J.L.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents an account of cathodic protection. It covers the advances made over the past decade, both in terms of understanding the complexity of the systems to which cathodic protection has been applied and assuring the reliability of the designs which have evolved. It shows how computer-validated design is superseding empirical design. The use of field gradient measurements for current output, acoustic transmission of potential data, and monitoring and surveying of cathodic protection systems are included.

  3. Updated Computational Model of Cosmic Rays Near Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONeill, Patrick M.

    2006-01-01

    An updated computational model of the galactic-cosmic-ray (GCR) environment in the vicinity of the Earth, Earth s Moon, and Mars has been developed, and updated software has been developed to implement the updated model. This model accounts for solar modulation of the cosmic-ray contribution for each element from hydrogen through iron by computationally propagating the local interplanetary spectrum of each element through the heliosphere. The propagation is effected by solving the Fokker-Planck diffusion, convection, energy-loss boundary-value problem. The Advanced Composition Explorer NASA satellite has provided new data on GCR energy spectra. These new data were used to update the original model and greatly improve the accuracy of prediction of interplanetary GCR.

  4. Data fusion in neutron and X-ray computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Schrapp, Michael J.; Goldammer, Matthias; Schulz, Michael; Issani, Siraj; Bhamidipati, Suryanarayana; Böni, Peter

    2014-10-28

    We present a fusion methodology between neutron and X-ray computed tomography (CT). On the one hand, the inspection by X-ray CT of a wide class of multimaterials in non-destructive testing applications suffers from limited information of object features. On the other hand, neutron imaging can provide complementary data in such a way that the combination of both data sets fully characterizes the object. In this contribution, a novel data fusion procedure, called Fusion Regularized Simultaneous Algebraic Reconstruction Technique, is developed where the X-ray reconstruction is modified to fulfill the available data from the imaging with neutrons. The experiments, which were obtained from an aluminum profile containing a steel screw, and attached carbon fiber plates demonstrate that the image quality in CT can be significantly improved when the proposed fusion method is used.

  5. X-Ray Computed Tomography Monitors Damage in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baaklini, George Y.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center recently codeveloped a state-of-the-art x-ray CT facility (designated SMS SMARTSCAN model 100-112 CITA by Scientific Measurement Systems, Inc., Austin, Texas). This multipurpose, modularized, digital x-ray facility includes an imaging system for digital radiography, CT, and computed laminography. The system consists of a 160-kV microfocus x-ray source, a solid-state charge-coupled device (CCD) area detector, a five-axis object-positioning subassembly, and a Sun SPARCstation-based computer system that controls data acquisition and image processing. The x-ray source provides a beam spot size down to 3 microns. The area detector system consists of a 50- by 50- by 3-mm-thick terbium-doped glass fiber-optic scintillation screen, a right-angle mirror, and a scientific-grade, digital CCD camera with a resolution of 1000 by 1018 pixels and 10-bit digitization at ambient cooling. The digital output is recorded with a high-speed, 16-bit frame grabber that allows data to be binned. The detector can be configured to provide a small field-of-view, approximately 45 by 45 mm in cross section, or a larger field-of-view, approximately 60 by 60 mm in cross section. Whenever the highest spatial resolution is desired, the small field-of-view is used, and for larger samples with some reduction in spatial resolution, the larger field-of-view is used.

  6. Computational techniques in gamma-ray skyshine analysis

    SciTech Connect

    George, D.L.

    1988-12-01

    Two computer codes were developed to analyze gamma-ray skyshine, the scattering of gamma photons by air molecules. A review of previous gamma-ray skyshine studies discusses several Monte Carlo codes, programs using a single-scatter model, and the MicroSkyshine program for microcomputers. A benchmark gamma-ray skyshine experiment performed at Kansas State University is also described. A single-scatter numerical model was presented which traces photons from the source to their first scatter, then applies a buildup factor along a direct path from the scattering point to a detector. The FORTRAN code SKY, developed with this model before the present study, was modified to use Gauss quadrature, recent photon attenuation data and a more accurate buildup approximation. The resulting code, SILOGP, computes response from a point photon source on the axis of a silo, with and without concrete shielding over the opening. Another program, WALLGP, was developed using the same model to compute response from a point gamma source behind a perfectly absorbing wall, with and without shielding overhead. 29 refs., 48 figs., 13 tabs.

  7. High-resolution X-ray projection radiography of a pin cathode in a high-current vacuum diode using X-pinch radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkevich, E. V.; Tilikin, I. N.; Agafonov, A. V.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Romanova, V. M.; Mingaleev, A. R.; Savinov, S. Yu.; Mesyats, G. A.; Pikuz, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    To study processes in a high-current vacuum diode with a cathode in the form of a single pin made of a metallic wire 20-30 μm in diameter, the method of high-resolution projection X-ray radiography with an X-pinch as a source has been used. A strong inhomogeneity of the energy contribution to the wire has been revealed. The smallest energy release has been observed near the end of the pin, where the electric field strength is maximal. Hard X rays, as well as the ejection of matter from the anode, have been observed, indicating the generation of an electron beam with the parameters characteristic of explosive electron emission in the diode with this configuration. The data obtained indicate complex processes occurring in the diode. Possible scenarios of their development have been considered.

  8. In situ synchrotron x-ray studies of dense thin-film strontium-doped lanthanum manganite solid oxide fuel cell cathodes.

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, K. C.; Ingram, B.; Kavaipatti, B.; Yildiz, B.; Hennessy, D.; Salvador, P.; Leyarovski, N.; You, H.; Carnegie Mellon Univ.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.

    2009-01-01

    Using a model cathode-electrolyte system composed of epitaxial thin-films of La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3-{delta}} (LSM) on single crystal yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), we investigated changes in the cation concentration profile in the LSM during heating and under applied potential using grazing incidence x-rays. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) was used to grow epitaxial LSM(011) on YSZ(111). At room temperature, we find that Sr segregates to form Sr enriched nanoparticles and upon heating the sample to 700 C, Sr is slowly reincorporated into the film. We also find different amounts of Sr segregation as the X-ray beam is moved across the sample. The variation in the amount of Sr segregation is greater on the sample that has been subject to 72 hours of applied potential, suggesting that the electrochemistry plays a role in the Sr segregation.

  9. Effects of X-Ray Dose On Rhizosphere Studies Using X-Ray Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zappala, Susan; Helliwell, Jonathan R.; Tracy, Saoirse R.; Mairhofer, Stefan; Sturrock, Craig J.; Pridmore, Tony; Bennett, Malcolm; Mooney, Sacha J.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is a non-destructive imaging technique originally designed for diagnostic medicine, which was adopted for rhizosphere and soil science applications in the early 1980s. X-ray CT enables researchers to simultaneously visualise and quantify the heterogeneous soil matrix of mineral grains, organic matter, air-filled pores and water-filled pores. Additionally, X-ray CT allows visualisation of plant roots in situ without the need for traditional invasive methods such as root washing. However, one routinely unreported aspect of X-ray CT is the potential effect of X-ray dose on the soil-borne microorganisms and plants in rhizosphere investigations. Here we aimed to i) highlight the need for more consistent reporting of X-ray CT parameters for dose to sample, ii) to provide an overview of previously reported impacts of X-rays on soil microorganisms and plant roots and iii) present new data investigating the response of plant roots and microbial communities to X-ray exposure. Fewer than 5% of the 126 publications included in the literature review contained sufficient information to calculate dose and only 2.4% of the publications explicitly state an estimate of dose received by each sample. We conducted a study involving rice roots growing in soil, observing no significant difference between the numbers of root tips, root volume and total root length in scanned versus unscanned samples. In parallel, a soil microbe experiment scanning samples over a total of 24 weeks observed no significant difference between the scanned and unscanned microbial biomass values. We conclude from the literature review and our own experiments that X-ray CT does not impact plant growth or soil microbial populations when employing a low level of dose (<30 Gy). However, the call for higher throughput X-ray CT means that doses that biological samples receive are likely to increase and thus should be closely monitored. PMID:23840640

  10. On the features of bursts of neutrons, hard x-rays and alpha-particles in the pulse vacuum discharge with a virtual cathode and self-organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurilenkov, Yu K.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Gus'kov, S. Yu; Samoylov, I. S.; Ostashev, V. E.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we continue the discussion of the experimental results on the yield of DD neutrons and hard x-rays in the nanosecond vacuum discharge (NVD) with a virtual cathode, which was started in the previous article of this issue, and previously (Kurilenkov Y K et al 2006 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39 4375). We have considered here the regimes of very dense interelectrode aerosol ensembles, in which diffusion of even hard x-rays is found. The yield of DD neutrons in these regimes is conditioned not only by the head-on deuteron-deuteron collisions in the potential well of virtual cathode, but also by the channel of “deuteron-deuterium cluster” reaction, which exceeds overall yield of neutrons per a shot by more than an order of magnitude, bringing it up to ∼ 107/(4π). Very bright bursts of hard x-rays are also represented and discussed here. Presumably, their nature may be associated with the appearance in the NVD of some properties of random laser in the x-ray spectrum. Good preceding agreeing of the experiment on the DD fusion in the NVD with its particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations provides a basis to begin consideration of nuclear burning “proton-boron” in the NVD, which will be accompanied by the release of alpha particles only. With this objective in view, there has been started the PIC-simulation of aneutronic burning of p-B11, and its preliminary results are presented.

  11. Helical differential X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian; Willner, Marian; Chen, Liyuan; Tan, Renbo; Achterhold, Klaus; Bech, Martin; Herzen, Julia; Kunka, Danays; Mohr, Juergen; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2014-05-01

    We report on the first experimental results of helical differential phase-contrast computed tomography (helical DPC-CT) with a laboratory X-ray tube source and a Talbot-Lau grating interferometer. The results experimentally verify the feasibility of helical data acquisition and reconstruction in phase-contrast imaging, in analogy to its use in clinical CT systems. This allows fast and continuous volumetric scans for long objects with lengths exceeding the dimension of the detector. Since helical CT revolutionized the field of medical CT several years ago, we anticipate that this method will bring the same significant impact on the future medical and industrial applications of X-ray DPC-CT. PMID:24518822

  12. Ultrafast three-dimensional x-ray computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bieberle, Martina; Barthel, Frank; Hampel, Uwe; Menz, Hans-Juergen; Mayer, Hans-Georg

    2011-01-17

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a well established visualization technique in medicine and nondestructive testing. However, since CT scanning requires sampling of radiographic projections from different viewing angles, common CT systems with mechanically moving parts are too slow for dynamic imaging, for instance of multiphase flows or live animals. Here, we introduce an ultrafast three-dimensional x-ray CT method based on electron beam scanning, which achieves volume rates of 500 s{sup -1}. Primary experiments revealed the capability of this method to recover the structure of phase boundaries in gas-solid and gas-liquid two-phase flows, which undergo three-dimensional structural changes in the millisecond scale.

  13. Ultrafast three-dimensional x-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieberle, Martina; Barthel, Frank; Menz, Hans-Jürgen; Mayer, Hans-Georg; Hampel, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a well established visualization technique in medicine and nondestructive testing. However, since CT scanning requires sampling of radiographic projections from different viewing angles, common CT systems with mechanically moving parts are too slow for dynamic imaging, for instance of multiphase flows or live animals. Here, we introduce an ultrafast three-dimensional x-ray CT method based on electron beam scanning, which achieves volume rates of 500 s-1. Primary experiments revealed the capability of this method to recover the structure of phase boundaries in gas-solid and gas-liquid two-phase flows, which undergo three-dimensional structural changes in the millisecond scale.

  14. Wolter X-Ray Microscope Computed Tomography Ray-Trace Model with Preliminary Simulation Results

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J A

    2006-02-27

    It is proposed to build a Wolter X-ray Microscope Computed Tomography System in order to characterize objects to sub-micrometer resolution. Wolter Optics Systems use hyperbolic, elliptical, and/or parabolic mirrors to reflect x-rays in order to focus or magnify an image. Wolter Optics have been used as telescopes and as microscopes. As microscopes they have been used for a number of purposes such as measuring emission x-rays and x-ray fluoresce of thin biological samples. Standard Computed Tomography (CT) Systems use 2D radiographic images, from a series of rotational angles, acquired by passing x-rays through an object to reconstruct a 3D image of the object. The x-ray paths in a Wolter X-ray Microscope will be considerably different than those of a standard CT system. There is little information about the 2D radiographic images that can be expected from such a system. There are questions about the quality, resolution and focusing range of an image created with such a system. It is not known whether characterization information can be obtained from these images and whether these 2D images can be reconstructed to 3D images of the object. A code has been developed to model the 2D radiographic image created by an object in a Wolter X-ray Microscope. This code simply follows the x-ray through the object and optics. There is no modeling at this point of other effects, such as scattering, reflection losses etc. Any object, of appropriate size, can be used in the model code. A series of simulations using a number of different objects was run to study the effects of the optics. The next step will be to use this model to reconstruct an object from the simulated data. Funding for the project ended before this goal could be accomplished. The following documentation includes: (1) background information on current X-ray imaging systems, (2) background on Wolter Optics, (3) description of the Wolter System being used, (4) purpose, limitations and development of the modeling

  15. Cathodic arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2003-10-29

    Cathodic arc plasma deposition has become the technology of choice for hard, wear and corrosion resistant coatings for a variety of applications. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions, and emerging high-tech applications are briefly reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas standout due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bias. Industrial processes often use cathodic arc plasma in reactive mode. In contrast, the science of arcs has focused on the case of vacuum arcs. Future research directions include closing the knowledge gap for reactive mode, large area coating, linear sources and filters, metal plasma immersion process, with application in high-tech and biomedical fields.

  16. Quantitative cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography/X-ray computed tomography imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Dongmei; Zhu, Shouping Chen, Xueli; Chao, Tiantian; Cao, Xu; Zhao, Fengjun; Huang, Liyu; Liang, Jimin

    2014-11-10

    X-ray luminescence tomography (XLT) is an imaging technology based on X-ray-excitable materials. The main purpose of this paper is to obtain quantitative luminescence concentration using the structural information of the X-ray computed tomography (XCT) in the hybrid cone beam XLT/XCT system. A multi-wavelength luminescence cone beam XLT method with the structural a priori information is presented to relieve the severe ill-posedness problem in the cone beam XLT. The nanophosphors and phantom experiments were undertaken to access the linear relationship of the system response. Then, an in vivo mouse experiment was conducted. The in vivo experimental results show that the recovered concentration error as low as 6.67% with the location error of 0.85 mm can be achieved. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can accurately recover the nanophosphor inclusion and realize the quantitative imaging.

  17. A portable x-ray source with a nanostructured Pt-coated silicon field emission cathode for absorption imaging of low-Z materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Anirban; Swanwick, Michael E.; Fomani, Arash A.; Velásquez-García, Luis Fernando

    2015-06-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of a portable x-ray generator for imaging of low-atomic number materials such as biological soft tissue. The system uses a self-aligned, gated, Pt-coated silicon field emitter cathode with two arrays of 62 500 nano-sharp tips arranged in a square grid with 10 μm emitter pitch, and a natural convection-cooled reflection anode composed of a Cu bar coated with a thin Mo film. Characterization of the field emitter array demonstrated continuous emission of 1 mA electron current (16 mA cm  -  2) with  >95% current transmission at a 150 V gate-emitter bias voltage for over 20 h with no degradation. The emission of the x-ray source was characterized across a range of anode bias voltages to maximize the fraction of photons from the characteristic K-shell peaks of the Mo film to produce a quasi-monochromatic photon beam, which enables capturing high-contrast images of low-atomic number materials. The x-ray source operating at the optimum anode bias voltage, i.e. 35 kV, was used to image ex vivo and nonorganic samples in x-ray fluoroscopic mode while varying the tube current; the images resolve feature sizes as small as ~160 µm.

  18. Mitigated phase transition during first cycle of a Li-rich layered cathode studied by in operando synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Song, Bohang; Day, Sarah J; Sui, Tan; Lu, Li; Tang, Chiu C; Korsunsky, Alexander M

    2016-02-14

    In operando synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction (SXPD) studies were conducted to investigate the phase transition of Li-rich Li(Li0.2Ni0.13Mn0.54Co0.13)O2 and Cr-doped Li(Li0.2Ni0.13Mn0.54Co0.03Cr0.10)O2 cathodes during the first charge/discharge cycle. Crystallographic (lattice parameters) and mechanical (domain size and microstrain) information was collected from SXPD full pattern refinement. It was found that Cr substitution at Co-site benefits in suppressing the activation of Li2MnO3 domains upon 1st charge, and thus mitigates the phase transition. As a consequence, Cr-doped layered cathode holds a better reversibility in terms of a full recovery of both lattice parameters and nano-domain size after a whole charge/discharge cycle. The effects of different cycling rates on the structural change were also discussed. PMID:26799191

  19. X-ray computed tomography using curvelet sparse regularization

    SciTech Connect

    Wieczorek, Matthias Vogel, Jakob; Lasser, Tobias; Frikel, Jürgen; Demaret, Laurent; Eggl, Elena; Pfeiffer, Franz; Kopp, Felix; Noël, Peter B.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Reconstruction of x-ray computed tomography (CT) data remains a mathematically challenging problem in medical imaging. Complementing the standard analytical reconstruction methods, sparse regularization is growing in importance, as it allows inclusion of prior knowledge. The paper presents a method for sparse regularization based on the curvelet frame for the application to iterative reconstruction in x-ray computed tomography. Methods: In this work, the authors present an iterative reconstruction approach based on the alternating direction method of multipliers using curvelet sparse regularization. Results: Evaluation of the method is performed on a specifically crafted numerical phantom dataset to highlight the method’s strengths. Additional evaluation is performed on two real datasets from commercial scanners with different noise characteristics, a clinical bone sample acquired in a micro-CT and a human abdomen scanned in a diagnostic CT. The results clearly illustrate that curvelet sparse regularization has characteristic strengths. In particular, it improves the restoration and resolution of highly directional, high contrast features with smooth contrast variations. The authors also compare this approach to the popular technique of total variation and to traditional filtered backprojection. Conclusions: The authors conclude that curvelet sparse regularization is able to improve reconstruction quality by reducing noise while preserving highly directional features.

  20. Multi-Mounted X-Ray Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian; Liu, Zhenzhong; Wang, Jingzheng

    2016-01-01

    Most existing X-ray computed tomography (CT) techniques work in single-mounted mode and need to scan the inspected objects one by one. It is time-consuming and not acceptable for the inspection in a large scale. In this paper, we report a multi-mounted CT method and its first engineering implementation. It consists of a multi-mounted scanning geometry and the corresponding algebraic iterative reconstruction algorithm. This approach permits the CT rotation scanning of multiple objects simultaneously without the increase of penetration thickness and the signal crosstalk. Compared with the conventional single-mounted methods, it has the potential to improve the imaging efficiency and suppress the artifacts from the beam hardening and the scatter. This work comprises a numerical study of the method and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a developed multi-mounted X-ray CT prototype system. We believe that this technique is of particular interest for pushing the engineering applications of X-ray CT. PMID:27073911

  1. Multi-Mounted X-Ray Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jian; Liu, Zhenzhong; Wang, Jingzheng

    2016-01-01

    Most existing X-ray computed tomography (CT) techniques work in single-mounted mode and need to scan the inspected objects one by one. It is time-consuming and not acceptable for the inspection in a large scale. In this paper, we report a multi-mounted CT method and its first engineering implementation. It consists of a multi-mounted scanning geometry and the corresponding algebraic iterative reconstruction algorithm. This approach permits the CT rotation scanning of multiple objects simultaneously without the increase of penetration thickness and the signal crosstalk. Compared with the conventional single-mounted methods, it has the potential to improve the imaging efficiency and suppress the artifacts from the beam hardening and the scatter. This work comprises a numerical study of the method and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a developed multi-mounted X-ray CT prototype system. We believe that this technique is of particular interest for pushing the engineering applications of X-ray CT. PMID:27073911

  2. (sup 6)Li and (sup 7)MAS NMR and In Situ X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Lithium Manganate Cathode Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young Joo; Wang, Francis; Grey, Clare P.; Mukerjee, Sanjeev; McBreen, James

    1998-11-30

    {sup 6}Li MAS NMR spectra of lithium manganese oxides with differing manganese oxidation states (LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Li{sub 4}Mn{sub 5}O{sub 12}, Li{sub 2}Mn{sub 4}O{sub 9}, and Li{sub 2}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4}) are presented. Improved understanding of the lithium NMR spectra of these model compounds is used to interpret the local structure of the Li{sub x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathode materials following electrochemical Li{sup +} deintercalation to various charging levels. In situ x-ray diffraction patterns of the same material during charging are also reported for comparison. Evidence for two-phase behavior for x <0.4 (Li{sub x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4}) is seen by both NMR and diffraction.

  3. Visualization of x-ray computer tomography using computer-generated holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daibo, Masahiro; Tayama, Norio

    1998-09-01

    The theory converted from x-ray projection data to the hologram directly by combining the computer tomography (CT) with the computer generated hologram (CGH), is proposed. The purpose of this study is to offer the theory for realizing the all- electronic and high-speed seeing through 3D visualization system, which is for the application to medical diagnosis and non- destructive testing. First, the CT is expressed using the pseudo- inverse matrix which is obtained by the singular value decomposition. CGH is expressed in the matrix style. Next, `projection to hologram conversion' (PTHC) matrix is calculated by the multiplication of phase matrix of CGH with pseudo-inverse matrix of the CT. Finally, the projection vector is converted to the hologram vector directly, by multiplication of the PTHC matrix with the projection vector. Incorporating holographic analog computation into CT reconstruction, it becomes possible that the calculation amount is drastically reduced. We demonstrate the CT cross section which is reconstituted by He-Ne laser in the 3D space from the real x-ray projection data acquired by x-ray television equipment, using our direct conversion technique.

  4. Geoscience Applications of Synchrotron X-ray Computed Microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivers, M. L.

    2009-05-01

    Computed microtomography is the extension to micron spatial resolution of the CAT scanning technique developed for medical imaging. Synchrotron sources are ideal for the method, since they provide a monochromatic, parallel beam with high intensity. High energy storage rings such as the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory produce x-rays with high energy, high brilliance, and high coherence. All of these factors combine to produce an extremely powerful imaging tool for earth science research. Techniques that have been developed include: - Absorption and phase contrast computed tomography with spatial resolution approaching one micron - Differential contrast computed tomography, imaging above and below the absorption edge of a particular element - High-pressure tomography, imaging inside a pressure cell at pressures above 10GPa - High speed radiography, with 100 microsecond temporal resolution - Fluorescence tomography, imaging the 3-D distribution of elements present at ppm concentrations. - Radiographic strain measurements during deformation at high confining pressure, combined with precise x- ray diffraction measurements to determine stress. These techniques have been applied to important problems in earth and environmental sciences, including: - The 3-D distribution of aqueous and organic liquids in porous media, with applications in contaminated groundwater and petroleum recovery. - The kinetics of bubble formation in magma chambers, which control explosive volcanism. - Accurate crystal size distributions in volcanic systems, important for understanding the evolution of magma chambers. - The equation-of-state of amorphous materials at high pressure using both direct measurements of volume as a function of pressure and also by measuring the change x-ray absorption coefficient as a function of pressure. - The formation of frost flowers on Arctic sea-ice, which is important in controlling the atmospheric chemistry of mercury. - The distribution of

  5. Surface and in-depth characterization of lithium-ion battery cathodes at different cycle states using confocal micro-X-ray fluorescence-X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, Magnus; Schlifke, Annalena; Falk, Mareike; Janek, Jürgen; Fröba, Michael; Fittschen, Ursula Elisabeth Adriane

    2013-07-01

    The cathode material LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 for lithium-ion batteries has been studied with confocal micro-X-ray fluorescence (CMXRF) combined with X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) at the Mn-K edge and the Ni-K edge. This technique allows for a non-destructive, spatially resolved (x, y and z) investigation of the oxidation states of surface areas and to some extent of deeper layers of the electrode. Until now CMXRF-XANES has been applied to a limited number of applications, mainly geo-science. Here, we introduce this technique to material science applications and show its performance to study a part of a working system. A novel mesoporous LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 material was cycled (charged and discharged) to investigate the effects on the oxidation states at the cathode/electrolyte interface. With this approach the degradation of Mn3 + to Mn4 + only observable at the surface of the electrode could be directly shown. The spatially resolved non-destructive analysis provides knowledge helpful for further understanding of deterioration and the development of high voltage battery materials, because of its nondestructive nature it will be also suitable to monitor processes during battery cycling.

  6. X- and {gamma}-ray computed tomography applications at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, G.P.; Martz, H.E.; Schneberk, D.J.; Azevedo, S.G.

    1993-04-01

    Members of the Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Section at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have implemented the advanced three-dimensional imaging technique of x and {gamma}-ray computed tomography (CAT or CT) for industrial and scientific nondestructive evaluation. This technique provides internal and external views of materials, components, and assemblies nonintrusively. Our research and development includes building CT scanners as well as data preprocessing, image reconstruction, display and analysis algorithms. These capabilities have been applied for a variety of industrial and scientific NDE applications where objects can range in size from 1 mm{sup 3} to 1 m{sup 3}. Here we discuss the usefulness of Cr to evaluate: Ballistic target materials, high-explosives shape charges, missile nosetips, and reactor-fuel tubes.

  7. ADVANCES IN X-RAY COMPUTED MICROTOMOGRAPHY AT THE NSLS.

    SciTech Connect

    DOWD,B.A.

    1998-08-07

    The X-Ray Computed Microtomography workstation at beamline X27A at the NSLS has been utilized by scientists from a broad range of disciplines from industrial materials processing to environmental science. The most recent applications are presented here as well as a description of the facility that has evolved to accommodate a wide variety of materials and sample sizes. One of the most exciting new developments reported here resulted from a pursuit of faster reconstruction techniques. A Fast Filtered Back Transform (FFBT) reconstruction program has been developed and implemented, that is based on a refinement of the ''gridding'' algorithm first developed for use with radio astronomical data. This program has reduced the reconstruction time to 8.5 sec for a 929 x 929 pixel{sup 2} slice on an R10,000 CPU, more than 8x reduction compared with the Filtered Back-Projection method.

  8. Advances in x-ray computed microtomography at the NSLS

    SciTech Connect

    Dowd, B.A.; Andrews, A.B.; Marr, R.B.; Siddons, D.P.; Jones, K.W.; Peskin, A.M.

    1998-08-01

    The X-Ray Computed Microtomography workstation at beamline X27A at the NSLS has been utilized by scientists from a broad range of disciplines from industrial materials processing to environmental science. The most recent applications are presented here as well as a description of the facility that has evolved to accommodate a wide variety of materials and sample sizes. One of the most exciting new developments reported here resulted from a pursuit of faster reconstruction techniques. A Fast Filtered Back Transform (FFBT) reconstruction program has been developed and implemented, that is based on a refinement of the gridding algorithm first developed for use with radio astronomical data. This program has reduced the reconstruction time to 8.5 sec for a 929 x 929 pixel{sup 2} slice on an R10,000 CPU, more than 8x reduction compared with the Filtered Back-Projection method.

  9. Computing elastic moduli on 3-D X-ray computed tomography image stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garboczi, E. J.; Kushch, V. I.

    2015-03-01

    A numerical task of current interest is to compute the effective elastic properties of a random composite material by operating on a 3D digital image of its microstructure obtained via X-ray computed tomography (CT). The 3-D image is usually sub-sampled since an X-ray CT image is typically of order 10003 voxels or larger, which is considered to be a very large finite element problem. Two main questions for the validity of any such study are then: can the sub-sample size be made sufficiently large to capture enough of the important details of the random microstructure so that the computed moduli can be thought of as accurate, and what boundary conditions should be chosen for these sub-samples? This paper contributes to the answer of both questions by studying a simulated X-ray CT cylindrical microstructure with three phases, cut from a random model system with known elastic properties. A new hybrid numerical method is introduced, which makes use of finite element solutions coupled with exact solutions for elastic moduli of square arrays of parallel cylindrical fibers. The new method allows, in principle, all of the microstructural data to be used when the X-ray CT image is in the form of a cylinder, which is often the case. Appendix A describes a similar algorithm for spherical sub-samples, which may be of use when examining the mechanical properties of particles. Cubic sub-samples are also taken from this simulated X-ray CT structure to investigate the effect of two different kinds of boundary conditions: forced periodic and fixed displacements. It is found that using forced periodic displacements on the non-geometrically periodic cubic sub-samples always gave more accurate results than using fixed displacements, although with about the same precision. The larger the cubic sub-sample, the more accurate and precise was the elastic computation, and using the complete cylindrical sample with the new method gave still more accurate and precise results. Fortran 90

  10. X-ray diffraction computed tomography: a survey and description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleuker, Ulf

    1997-10-01

    Coherently scattered x-rays are mainly confined to a forward peaked cone, which exhibits, due to their coherence, structural information of the atomic arrangement in the sample. Coherent scattering in amorphous materials, which are of random short range order, therefore results in board diffraction ring patter, whereas crystalline substance show more confined diffraction rings or even Brag spots. X-ray diffraction computed tomography (XRDCT) reconstructs the intensities diffracted from extended objects on a square image grid and thus retrieves the local structure. A short survey is presented about what information can be extracted from diffraction experiments. Hereby a new method is proposed to use the Rietveld refinement for quantitative XRDCT. Also the possible use of XRDCT to reconstruct the spatial distribution of preferred orientation axis is suggested. An imaging system for XRDCT, consisting of a medical image intensifier tube and CCD readout system, is presented, which includes a modified beam stop for recording the intensity of the transmitted beam. Depending on the application this imaging system cam work in first generation or second generation tomography mode. Furthermore a new approach for the reconstruction of the differential coherent cross-section is proposed. It includes an absorption correction based on weighted sinograms. The introduced reconstruction strategy is elucidated by experimental result from a simple phantom. The measured data also validate the simulation program, written to study more complex phantoms under different experimental conditions. Finally possible applications in medical and material science are discussed. A design for a mammography setup using x-ray diffraction is presented.

  11. A new computationally-efficient computer program for simulating spectral gamma-ray logs

    SciTech Connect

    Conaway, J.G.

    1995-12-31

    Several techniques to improve the accuracy of radionuclide concentration estimates as a function of depth from gamma-ray logs have appeared in the literature. Much of that work was driven by interest in uranium as an economic mineral. More recently, the problem of mapping and monitoring artificial gamma-emitting contaminants in the ground has rekindled interest in improving the accuracy of radioelement concentration estimates from gamma-ray logs. We are looking at new approaches to accomplishing such improvements. The first step in this effort has been to develop a new computational model of a spectral gamma-ray logging sonde in a borehole environment. The model supports attenuation in any combination of materials arranged in 2-D cylindrical geometry, including any combination of attenuating materials in the borehole, formation, and logging sonde. The model can also handle any distribution of sources in the formation. The model considers unscattered radiation only, as represented by the background-corrected area under a given spectral photopeak as a function of depth. Benchmark calculations using the standard Monte Carlo model MCNP show excellent agreement with total gamma flux estimates with a computation time of about 0.01% of the time required for the MCNP calculations. This model lacks the flexibility of MCNP, although for this application a great deal can be accomplished without that flexibility.

  12. Combined Experimental and Computational Studies of a Na2 Ni1-x Cux Fe(CN)6 Cathode with Tunable Potential for Aqueous Rechargeable Sodium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Hung, Tai-Feng; Chou, Hung-Lung; Yeh, Yu-Wen; Chang, Wen-Sheng; Yang, Chang-Chung

    2015-10-26

    Herein, potential-tunable Na2 Ni1-x Cux Fe(CN)6 nanoparticles with three-dimensional frameworks and large interstitial spaces were synthesized as alternative cathode materials for aqueous sodium-ion batteries by controlling the molar ratio of Ni(II) to Cu(II) at ambient temperature. The influence of the value of x on the crystalline structure, lattice parameters, electrochemical properties, and charge transfer of the resultant compound was explored by using powder X-ray diffractometry, density functional theory, cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge techniques, and Bader charge analysis. Of the various formulations investigated, that with x=0.25 delivered the highest reversible capacity, superior rate capability, and outstanding cycling performance. These attributes are ascribed to its unique face-centered cubic structure for facile sodium-ion insertion/extraction and the strong interactions between Cu and N atoms, which promote structural stability. PMID:26350587

  13. 21 CFR 892.1750 - Computed tomography x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Computed tomography x-ray system. 892.1750 Section 892.1750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1750 Computed tomography x-ray system. (a) Identification. A computed...

  14. TU-A-9A-07: X-Ray Acoustic Computed Tomography (XACT): 100% Sensitivity to X-Ray Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, L; Ahmad, M; Nikoozadeh, A; Pratx, G; Khuri-Yakub, B; Xing, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To assess whether X-ray acoustic computed tomography (XACT) is more sensitive to X-ray absorption than that of the conventional X-ray imaging. Methods: First, a theoretical model was built to analyze the X-ray absorption sensitivity of XACT imaging and conventional X-ray imaging. Second, an XACT imaging system was developed to evaluate the X-ray induced acoustic signal generation as well as the sensitivity improvement over transmission x-ray imaging. Ultra-short x-ray pulses (60-nanosecond) were generated from an X-ray source operated at the energy of 150 kVp with a 10-Hz repetition rate. The X-ray pulse was synchronized with the acoustic detection via a x-ray scintillation triggering to acquire the X-ray induced acoustic signal. Results: Theoretical analysis shows that X-ray induced acoustic signal is sensitive only to the X-ray absorption, while completely insensitive to out the X-ray scattering and fluorescence. XACT has reduced background and increased contrast-to-noise ratio, and therefore has increased sensitivity compared to transmission x-ray imaging. For a 50-μm size, gadolinium insertion in tissue exposed to 40 keV X-rays; the sensitivity of XACT imaging is about 28.9 times higher than that of conventional X-ray imaging. Conclusion: X-ray acoustic computer tomography (XACT) as a new imaging modality combines X-ray absorption contrast and high ultrasonic resolution in a single modality. It is feasible to improve the imaging sensitivity with XACT imaging compared with conventional X-ray imaging. Taking advantage of the high ultrasonic resolution, it is possible to perform 3-D imaging with a single x-ray pulse with arrays of transducers without any mechanical motion of the imaging system. This single-shot capability offers the potential of reducing radiation dose by a factor of 1000, and imaging 100 times faster when compared to the conventional X-ray CT, and thus revolutionizing x-ray imaging applications in medicine and biology. The authors

  15. X-ray Computed Tomography Observation of Methane Hydrate Dissociation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomutsa, L.; Freifeld, B.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Stern, L.A.

    2002-01-01

    Deposits of naturally occurring methane hydrate have been identified in permafrost and deep oceanic environments with global reserves estimated to be twice the total amount of energy stored in fossil fuels. The fundamental behavior of methane hydrate in natural formations, while poorly understood, is of critical importance if the economic recovery of methane from hydrates is to be accomplished. In this study, computed X-ray tomography (CT) scanning is used to image an advancing dissociation front in a heterogeneous gas hydrate/sand sample at 0.1 MPa. The cylindrical methane hydrate and sand aggregate, 2.54 cm in diameter and 6.3 cm long, was contained in a PVC sample holder that was insulated on all but one end. At the uninsulated end, the dissociated gas was captured and the volume of gas monitored. The sample was initially imaged axially using X-ray CT scanning within the methane hydrate stability zone by keeping the sample temperature at 77??K. Subsequently, as the sample warmed through the methane hydrate dissociation point at 194??K and room pressure, gas was produced and the temperature at the bottom of the sample plug was monitored while CT images were acquired. The experiment showed that CT imaging can resolve the reduction in density (as seen by a reduction in beam attenuation) of the hydrate/sand aggregate due to the dissociation of methane hydrate. In addition, a comparison of CT images with gas flow and temperature measurements reveals that the CT scanner is able to resolve accurately and spatially the advancing dissociation front. Future experiments designed to better understand the thermodynamics of hydrate dissociation are planned to take advantage of the temporal and spatial resolution that the CT scanner provides.

  16. X-ray Computed Tomography of coal: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Maylotte, D.H.; Spiro, C.L.; Kosky, P.G.; Lamby, E.J.

    1986-12-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is a method of mapping with x-rays the internal structures of coal. The technique normally produces 2-D images of the internal structures of an object. These images can be recast to create pseudo 3-D representations. CT of coal has been explored for a variety of different applications to coal and coal processing technology. In a comparison of CT data with conventional coal analyses and petrography, CT was found to offer a good indication of the total ash content of the coal. The spatial distribution of the coal mineral matter as seen with CT has been suggested as an indicator of coal washability. Studies of gas flow through coal using xenon gas as a tracer have shown the extremely complicated nature of the modes of penetration of gas through coal, with significant differences in the rates at which the gas can pass along and across the bedding planes of coal. In a special furnace designed to allow CT images to be taken while the coal was being heated, the pyrolysis and gasification of coal have been studied. Gasification rates with steam and CO/sub 2/ for a range of coal ranks have been obtained, and the location of the gasification reactions within the piece of coal can be seen. Coal drying and the progress of the pyrolysis wave into coal have been examined when the coal was subjected to the kind of sudden temperature jump that it might experience in fixed bed gasifier applications. CT has also been used to examine stable flow structures within model fluidized beds and the accessibility of lump coal to microbial desulfurization. 53 refs., 242 figs., 26 tabs.

  17. Note: Effect of photodiode aluminum cathode frame on spectral sensitivity in the soft x-ray energy band

    SciTech Connect

    McGarry, M. B. Den Hartog, D. J.; Goetz, J. A.; Johnson, J.; Franz, P.

    2014-09-15

    Silicon photodiodes used for soft x-ray detection typically have a thin metal electrode partially covering the active area of the photodiode, which subtly alters the spectral sensitivity of the photodiode. As a specific example, AXUV4BST photodiodes from International Radiation Detectors have a 1.0 μm thick aluminum frame covering 19% of the active area of the photodiode, which attenuates the measured x-ray signal below ∼6 keV. This effect has a small systematic impact on the electron temperature calculated from measurements of soft x-ray bremsstrahlung emission from a high-temperature plasma. Although the systematic error introduced by the aluminum frame is only a few percent in typical experimental conditions on the Madison Symmetric Torus, it may be more significant for other instruments that use similar detectors.

  18. Note: Effect of photodiode aluminum cathode frame on spectral sensitivity in the soft x-ray energy band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGarry, M. B.; Franz, P.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Goetz, J. A.; Johnson, J.

    2014-09-01

    Silicon photodiodes used for soft x-ray detection typically have a thin metal electrode partially covering the active area of the photodiode, which subtly alters the spectral sensitivity of the photodiode. As a specific example, AXUV4BST photodiodes from International Radiation Detectors have a 1.0 μm thick aluminum frame covering 19% of the active area of the photodiode, which attenuates the measured x-ray signal below ˜6 keV. This effect has a small systematic impact on the electron temperature calculated from measurements of soft x-ray bremsstrahlung emission from a high-temperature plasma. Although the systematic error introduced by the aluminum frame is only a few percent in typical experimental conditions on the Madison Symmetric Torus, it may be more significant for other instruments that use similar detectors.

  19. Modeling and characterization of X-ray yield in a polychromatic, lab-scale, X-ray computed tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, J. C. E.; Chawla, Nikhilesh

    2015-05-01

    A modular X-ray computed micro-tomography (μXCT) system is characterized in terms of X-ray yield resulting both from the generated X-ray spectrum and from X-ray detection with an energy-sensitive detector. The X-ray computed tomography system is composed of a commercially available cone-beam microfocus X-ray source and a modular optically-coupled-CCD-scintillator X-ray detector. The X-ray yield is measured and reported in units independent from exposure time, X-ray tube beam target current, and cone-beam-to-detector geometry. The polychromatic X-ray source is modeled as a broad Bremsstrahlung X-ray spectrum in order to understand the effect of the controllable parameters, that is, X-ray tube accelerating voltage and X-ray beam filtering. An approach is adopted which expresses the absolute number of emitted X-rays. The response of the energy-sensitive detector to the modeled spectrum is modeled as a function of scintillator composition and thickness. The detection efficiency model for the polychromatic X-ray detector considers the response of the light collection system and the electronic imaging array in order to predict absolute count yield under the studied conditions. The modeling approach is applied to the specific hardware implemented in the current μXCT system. The model's predictions for absolute detection rate are in reasonable agreement with measured values under a range of conditions applied to the system for X-ray microtomography imaging, particularly for the LuAG:Ce scintillator material.

  20. Revealing electronic structure changes in Chevrel phase cathodes upon Mg insertion using X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wan, Liwen F; Wright, Joshua; Perdue, Brian R; Fister, Timothy T; Kim, Soojeong; Apblett, Christopher A; Prendergast, David

    2016-06-29

    Following previous work predicting the electronic response of the Chevrel phase Mo6S8 upon Mg insertion (Thöle et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015, 17, 22548), we provide the experimental proof, evident in X-ray absorption spectroscopy, to illustrate the charge compensation mechanism of the Chevrel phase compound during Mg insertion and de-insertion processes. PMID:27314253

  1. Scale analysis using X-ray microfluorescence and computed radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candeias, J. P.; de Oliveira, D. F.; dos Anjos, M. J.; Lopes, R. T.

    2014-02-01

    Scale deposits are the most common and most troublesome damage problems in the oil field and can occur in both production and injection wells. They occur because the minerals in produced water exceed their saturation limit as temperatures and pressures change. Scale can vary in appearance from hard crystalline material to soft, friable material and the deposits can contain other minerals and impurities such as paraffin, salt and iron. In severe conditions, scale creates a significant restriction, or even a plug, in the production tubing. This study was conducted to qualify the elements present in scale samples and quantify the thickness of the scale layer using synchrotron radiation micro-X-ray fluorescence (SRμXRF) and computed radiography (CR) techniques. The SRμXRF results showed that the elements found in the scale samples were strontium, barium, calcium, chromium, sulfur and iron. The CR analysis showed that the thickness of the scale layer was identified and quantified with accuracy. These results can help in the decision making about removing the deposited scale.

  2. X-ray computed tomography for additive manufacturing: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, A.; Maskery, I.; Leach, R. K.

    2016-07-01

    In this review, the use of x-ray computed tomography (XCT) is examined, identifying the requirement for volumetric dimensional measurements in industrial verification of additively manufactured (AM) parts. The XCT technology and AM processes are summarised, and their historical use is documented. The use of XCT and AM as tools for medical reverse engineering is discussed, and the transition of XCT from a tool used solely for imaging to a vital metrological instrument is documented. The current states of the combined technologies are then examined in detail, separated into porosity measurements and general dimensional measurements. In the conclusions of this review, the limitation of resolution on improvement of porosity measurements and the lack of research regarding the measurement of surface texture are identified as the primary barriers to ongoing adoption of XCT in AM. The limitations of both AM and XCT regarding slow speeds and high costs, when compared to other manufacturing and measurement techniques, are also noted as general barriers to continued adoption of XCT and AM.

  3. Mixed polyanion glass cathodes: Glass-state conversion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kercher, Andrew K.; Kolopus, James A.; Carroll, Kyler; Unocic, Raymond R.; Kirklin, S.; Wolverton, C.; Stooksbury, Shelby L.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Dudney, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    Mixed polyanion (MP) glasses can undergo glass-state conversion (GSC) reactions to provide an alternate class of high-capacity cathode materials. GSC reactions have been demonstrated in phosphate/vanadate glasses with Ag, Co, Cu, Fe, and Ni cations. These MP glasses provided high capacity and good high power performance, but suffer from moderate voltages, large voltage hysteresis, and significant capacity fade with cycling. Details of the GSC reaction have been revealed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy of ex situ cathodes at key states of charge. Using the Open Quantum Materials Database (OQMD), a computational thermodynamic model has been developed to predict the near-equilibrium voltages of glass-state conversion reactions in MP glasses.

  4. Mixed polyanion glass cathodes: Glass-state conversion reactions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kercher, Andrew K.; Kolopus, James A.; Carroll, Kyler; Unocic, Raymond R.; Kirklin, S.; Wolverton, C.; Stooksbury, Shelby L.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Dudney, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    Mixed polyanion (MP) glasses can undergo glass-state conversion (GSC) reactions to provide an alternate class of high-capacity cathode materials. GSC reactions have been demonstrated in phosphate/vanadate glasses with Ag, Co, Cu, Fe, and Ni cations. These MP glasses provided high capacity and good high power performance, but suffer from moderate voltages, large voltage hysteresis, and significant capacity fade with cycling. Details of the GSC reaction have been revealed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy of ex situ cathodes at key states of charge. Using the Open Quantum Materials Database (OQMD), a computational thermodynamic model hasmore » been developed to predict the near-equilibrium voltages of glass-state conversion reactions in MP glasses.« less

  5. X-ray and gamma-ray computed tomography for industrial nondestructive testing and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costello, Ian; Wells, Peter; Davis, John R.; Benci, Nino; Skerrett, David; Davies, D. R.

    1994-03-01

    This paper presents an overview of two recently constructed computed tomography (CT) scanners that have been designed to provide structural information for industrially relevant materials and components. CT enables cross-sectional slices of an object to be nondestructively imaged and represented as a map of linear attenuation coefficient. As linear attenuation is the product of mass attenuation and density, this usually enables a straightforward interpretation of the image in terms of density. The two instruments are a transportable scanner using a 160 kV(peak) powered x-ray tube for the inspection of wooden power poles up to 450 mm in diameter, and an industrial scanning system designed around an Ir-192 gamma-ray source for materials characterization and the testing and evaluation of castings, ceramics, and composites. The images presented in this paper have generally been reconstructed using the summation convolution back-projection (SCBP) method, and this technique is outlined. Direct Fourier reconstruction is also used and compared with the SCBP method. A brief discussion is offered on incorporating edge detection methods into the image reconstruction process for the improved identification of defects such as cracks and voids.

  6. 21 CFR 892.1750 - Computed tomography x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Computed tomography x-ray system. 892.1750 Section 892.1750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... produce cross-sectional images of the body by computer reconstruction of x-ray transmission data from...

  7. 21 CFR 892.1750 - Computed tomography x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Computed tomography x-ray system. 892.1750 Section 892.1750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... produce cross-sectional images of the body by computer reconstruction of x-ray transmission data from...

  8. 21 CFR 892.1750 - Computed tomography x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Computed tomography x-ray system. 892.1750 Section 892.1750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... produce cross-sectional images of the body by computer reconstruction of x-ray transmission data from...

  9. Dynamic study of sub-micro sized LiFePO4 cathodes by in-situ tender X-ray absorption near edge structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongniu; Wang, Huixin; Yang, Jinli; Zhou, Jigang; Hu, Yongfeng; Xiao, Qunfeng; Fang, Haitao; Sham, Tsun-Kong

    2016-01-01

    Olivine-type phosphates (LiMPO4, M = Fe, Mn, Co) are promising cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries that are generally accepted to follow first order equilibrium phase transformations. Herein, the phase transformation dynamics of sub-micro sized LiFePO4 particles with limited rate capability at a low current density of 0.14 C was investigated. An in-situ X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) measurement was conducted at the Fe and P K-edge for the dynamic studies upon lithiation and delithiation. Fe K-edge XANES spectra demonstrate that not only lithium-rich intermediate phase LixFePO4 (x = 0.6-0.75), but also lithium-poor intermediate phase LiyFePO4 (y = 0.1-0.25) exist during the charge and discharge, respectively. Furthermore, during charge and discharge, a fluctuation of the FePO4 and LiFePO4 fractions obtained by liner combination fitting around the imaginary phase fractions followed Faraday's law and the equilibrium first-order two-phase transformation versus reaction time is present, respectively. The charging and discharging process has a reversible phase transformation dynamics with symmetric structural evolution routes. P K-edge XANES spectra reveal an enrichment of PF6-1 anions at the surface of the electrode during charging.

  10. Reduction-melting combined with a Na₂CO₃ flux recycling process for lead recovery from cathode ray tube funnel glass.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takashi; Yonezawa, Susumu

    2014-08-01

    With large quantity of flux (Na2CO3), lead can be recovered from the funnel glass of waste cathode-ray tubes via reduction-melting at 1000°C. To reduce flux cost, a technique to recover added flux from the generated oxide phase is also important in order to recycle the flux recovered from the reduction-melting process. In this study, the phase separation of sodium and the crystallization of water-soluble sodium silicates were induced after the reduction-melting process to enhance the leachability of sodium in the oxide phase and to extract the sodium from the phase for the recovery of Na2CO3 as flux. A reductive atmosphere promoted the phase separation and crystallization, and the leachability of sodium from the oxide phase was enhanced. The optimum temperature and treatment time for increasing the leachability were 700°C and 2h, respectively. After treatment, more than 90% of the sodium in the oxide phase was extracted in water. NaHCO3 can be recovered by carbonization of the solution containing sodium ions using carbon dioxide gas, decomposed to Na2CO3 at 50°C and recycled for use in the reduction-melting process. PMID:24816522

  11. Digital computer processing of X-ray photos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathan, R.; Selzer, R. H.

    1967-01-01

    Digital computers correct various distortions in medical and biological photographs. One of the principal methods of computer enhancement involves the use of a two-dimensional digital filter to modify the frequency spectrum of the picture. Another computer processing method is image subtraction.

  12. Computers in Communications and Education at Coast Community College District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luskin, Bernard J.; Ruth, Monty W.

    Coast Community College District in Orange County, California is a leader among community colleges in the instructional use computers. The district's hardware consists of an IBM system 370 model 155 computer, over 80 typewriter terminals, 12 cathode ray tubes (CRT), and several microfiche image projection devices. Better than 700 computer-assisted…

  13. TPASS: a gamma-ray spectrum analysis and isotope identification computer code

    SciTech Connect

    Dickens, J.K.

    1981-03-01

    The gamma-ray spectral data-reduction and analysis computer code TPASS is described. This computer code is used to analyze complex Ge(Li) gamma-ray spectra to obtain peak areas corrected for detector efficiencies, from which are determined gamma-ray yields. These yields are compared with an isotope gamma-ray data file to determine the contributions to the observed spectrum from decay of specific radionuclides. A complete FORTRAN listing of the code and a complex test case are given.

  14. Elucidating the degradation mechanism of the cathode catalyst of PEFCs by a combination of electrochemical methods and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Monzó, J; van der Vliet, D F; Yanson, A; Rodriguez, P

    2016-08-10

    In this study, we report a methodology which enables the determination of the degradation mechanisms responsible for catalyst deterioration under different accelerated stress protocols (ASPs) by combining measurements of the electrochemical surface area (ECSA) and Pt content (by X-ray fluorescence). The validation of this method was assessed on high surface area unsupported Pt nanoparticles (Pt-NPs), Pt nanoparticles supported on TaC (Pt/TaC) and Pt nanoparticles supported on Vulcan carbon (Pt/Vulcan). In the load cycle protocol, the degradation of Pt-NPs and Pt/Vulcan follows associative processes (e.g. agglomeration) in the first 2000 cycles, however, in successive cycles the degradation goes through dissociative processes such as Pt dissolution, as is evident from a similar decay of ECSA and Pt content. In contrast, the degradation mechanism for Pt nanoparticles dispersed on TaC occurs continuously through the dissociative processes (e.g. Pt dissolution or particle detachment), with similar decay rates of both Pt content and ECSA. In the start-up/shut-down protocol, high surface area Pt-NPs follow associative processes (e.g. Ostwald ripening) in the first 4000 cycles, after which the degradation continues through dissociative processes. On the other hand, dissociative mechanisms always govern the degradation of Pt/TaC under start-up/shut-down protocol conditions. Finally, we report that Pt nanoparticles supported on TaC exhibit the highest catalytic activity and long term durability of the three nanoparticle systems tested. This makes Pt/TaC a potentially valuable catalyst system for application in polymer electrolyte fuel cell cathodes. PMID:27464340

  15. Operando and in situ X-ray spectroscopies of degradation in La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O(3-δ) thin film cathodes in fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Lai, Samson Y; Ding, Dong; Liu, Mingfei; Liu, Meilin; Alamgir, Faisal M

    2014-11-01

    Information from ex situ characterization can fall short in describing complex materials systems simultaneously exposed to multiple external stimuli. Operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to probe the local atomistic and electronic structure of specific elements in a La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O(3-δ) (LSCF) thin film cathode exposed to air contaminated with H2O and CO2 under operating conditions. While impedance spectroscopy showed that the polarization resistance of the LSCF cathode increased upon exposure to both contaminants at 750 °C, XAS near-edge and extended fine structure showed that the degree of oxidation for Fe and Co decreases with increasing temperature. Synchrotron-based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy tracked the formation and removal of a carbonate species, a Co phase, and different oxygen moieties as functions of temperature and gas. The combined information provides insight into the fundamental mechanism by which H2O and CO2 cause degradation in the cathode of solid oxide fuel cells. PMID:25205041

  16. Carbon nanotube based field emission X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuan

    This dissertation describes the development of field emission (FE) x-ray sources with a carbon-nanotube (CNT) cathode. Field emission x-rays have advantages over conventional x-rays by replacing the thermionic cathode with a cold cathode so that electrons are emitted at room temperature and emission is voltage controllable. CNTs are found to be excellent electron emitters with low threshold fields and high current density which makes them ideal for generate field emission x-rays. Macroscopic CNT cold cathodes are prepared and the parameters to tune their field emission properties are studied: structure and morphology of CNT cathodes, temperature as well as electronic work function of CNT. Macroscopic CNT cathodes with optimized performance are chosen to build a high-resolution x-ray imaging system. The system can readily generate x-ray radiation with continuous variation of temporal resolution up to nanoseconds and spatial resolution down to 10 micron. Its potential applications for dynamic x-ray imaging and micro-computed tomography are also demonstrated. The performance characteristics of this compact and versatile system are promising for non-destructive testing and for non-invasive small-animal imaging for biomedical research.

  17. X-Ray Micro-Computed Tomography Imaging of the Buzzard Coulee Chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melanson, D.; Samson, C.; Herd, R. K.; Fry, C.; McCausland, P. J. A.; Umoh, J.; Holdsworth, D. W.

    2012-03-01

    This abstract outlines research and some results of X-ray micro-computed tomography imaging of the Buzzard Coulee H4 chondrite. A comparison of bulk density results and an analysis of radio-density profile curves are discussed.

  18. Computational Astrophysics Consortium 3 - Supernovae, Gamma-Ray Bursts and Nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, Stan

    2014-08-29

    Final project report for UCSC's participation in the Computational Astrophysics Consortium - Supernovae, Gamma-Ray Bursts and Nucleosynthesis. As an appendix, the report of the entire Consortium is also appended.

  19. Deterministic Computer-Controlled Polishing Process for High-Energy X-Ray Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Gufran S.; Gubarev, Mikhail; Speegle, Chet; Ramsey, Brian

    2010-01-01

    A deterministic computer-controlled polishing process for large X-ray mirror mandrels is presented. Using tool s influence function and material removal rate extracted from polishing experiments, design considerations of polishing laps and optimized operating parameters are discussed

  20. Arbutin: Isolation, X-ray structure and computional studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nycz, Jacek E.; Malecki, Grzegorz; Morag, Monika; Nowak, Gerard; Ponikiewski, Lukasz; Kusz, Joachim; Switlicka, Anna

    2010-09-01

    Arbutin, an active component originated from Serratula quinquefolia for skin-whitening use and treating skin related allergic inflammation, was characterized by microanalysis, FTIR, UV-Vis, multinuclear NMR spectroscopy, and single crystal X-ray diffraction method. The geometries of the studied compound were optimized in singlet states using the density functional theory (DFT) method with B3LYP functional. Electronic spectra were calculated by TDDFT method. In general, the predicted bond lengths and angles are in a good agreement with the values based on the X-ray crystal structure data.

  1. Hollow cathode apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A hollow cathode apparatus is described, which can be rapidly and reliably started. An ignitor positioned upstream from the hollow cathode, generates a puff of plasma that flows with the primary gas to be ionized through the cathode. The plasma puff creates a high voltage breakdown between the downstream end of the cathode and a keeper electrode, to heat the cathode to an electron-emitting temperature.

  2. Nanotube cathodes.

    SciTech Connect

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Siegal, Michael P.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise for applications in many diverse areas of technology. In this report we describe our efforts to develop high-current cathodes from a variety of nanotubes deposited under a variety of conditions. Our goal was to develop a one-inch-diameter cathode capable of emitting 10 amperes of electron current for one second with an applied potential of 50 kV. This combination of current and pulse duration significantly exceeds previously reported nanotube-cathode performance. This project was planned for two years duration. In the first year, we tested the electron-emission characteristics of nanotube arrays fabricated under a variety of conditions. In the second year, we planned to select the best processing conditions, to fabricate larger cathode samples, and to test them on a high-power relativistic electron beam generator. In the first year, much effort was made to control nanotube arrays in terms of nanotube diameter and average spacing apart. When the project began, we believed that nanotubes approximately 10 nm in diameter would yield sufficient electron emission properties, based on the work of others in the field. Therefore, much of our focus was placed on measured field emission from such nanotubes grown on a variety of metallized surfaces and with varying average spacing between individual nanotubes. We easily reproduced the field emission properties typically measured by others from multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays. Interestingly, we did this without having the helpful vertical alignment to enhance emission; our nanotubes were randomly oriented. The good emission was most likely possible due to the improved crystallinity, and therefore, electrical conductivity, of our nanotubes compared to those in the literature. However, toward the end of the project, we learned that while these 10-nm-diameter CNTs had superior crystalline structure to the work of others studying field emission from multi-wall CNT arrays, these nanotubes still

  3. Human thyroid specimen imaging by fluorescent x-ray computed tomography with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Tohoru; Yu, Quanwen; Yashiro, Toru; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Hasegawa, Yasuo; Itai, Yuji; Akatsuka, Takao

    1999-09-01

    Fluorescent x-ray computed tomography (FXCT) is being developed to detect non-radioactive contrast materials in living specimens. The FXCT system consists of a silicon (111) channel cut monochromator, an x-ray slit and a collimator for fluorescent x ray detection, a scanning table for the target organ and an x-ray detector for fluorescent x-ray and transmission x-ray. To reduce Compton scattering overlapped on the fluorescent K(alpha) line, incident monochromatic x-ray was set at 37 keV. The FXCT clearly imaged a human thyroid gland and iodine content was estimated quantitatively. In a case of hyperthyroidism, the two-dimensional distribution of iodine content was not uniform, and thyroid cancer had a small amount of iodine. FXCT can be used to detect iodine within thyroid gland quantitatively and to delineate its distribution.

  4. Analysis of cathode geometry to minimize cathode erosion in direct current microplasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Causa, Federica; Ghezzi, Francesco; Caniello, Roberto; Grosso, Giovanni; Dellasega, David

    2012-12-15

    Microplasma jets are now widely used for deposition, etching, and materials processing. The present study focuses on the investigation of the influence of cathode geometry on deposition quality, for microplasma jet deposition systems in low vacuum. The interest here is understanding the influence of hydrogen on sputtering and/or evaporation of the electrodes. Samples obtained with two cathode geometries with tapered and rectangular cross-sections have been investigated experimentally by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy. Samples obtained with a tapered-geometry cathode present heavy contamination, demonstrating cathode erosion, while samples obtained with a rectangular-cross-section cathode are free from contamination. These experimental characteristics were explained by modelling results showing a larger radial component of the electric field at the cathode inner wall of the tapered cathode. As a result, ion acceleration is larger, explaining the observed cathode erosion in this case. Results from the present investigation also show that the ratio of radial to axial field components is larger for the rectangular geometry case, thus, qualitatively explaining the presence of micro-hollow cathode discharge over a wide range of currents observed in this case. In the light of the above findings, the rectangular cathode geometry is considered to be more effective to achieve cleaner deposition.

  5. Investigation of solid electrolyte interface (SEI) film on LiCoO2 cathode in fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC)-containing electrolyte by 2D correlation X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yeonju; Shin, Su Hyun; Hwang, Hoon; Lee, Sung Man; Kim, Sung Phil; Choi, Hyun Chul; Jung, Young Mee

    2014-07-01

    The effects of fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) on the electrochemical performance of the LiCoO2 cathode were investigated by galvanostatic charge-discharge testing and cyclic voltammetry (CV). It was found that FEC has a positive effect on cycling stability and also improves cell performance. We also studied solid electrolyte interface (SEI) film on the LiCoO2 cathode, using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and 2D correlation spectroscopy. The 2D correlation XPS spectra showed that, initially, the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVdF) binder and electrolyte components are decomposed, after which SEI components are formed on the LiCoO2 cathode surface. In the FEC-containing electrolyte, the polycarbonate components are more abundant than in the FEC-free electrolyte. The formed carbonates in SEI film can act as Li+-conducting materials in reducing the electrode/electrolyte interfacial impedance. This hypothesis is supported by the results of an electrochemical impedance spectrum (EIS) analysis.

  6. HIGH-PERFORMANCE COMPUTING FOR THE STUDY OF EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE MATERIALS USING SYNCHROTRON X-RAY COMPUTED MICROTOMOGRAPHY.

    SciTech Connect

    FENG,H.; JONES,K.W.; MCGUIGAN,M.; SMITH,G.J.; SPILETIC,J.

    2001-10-12

    Synchrotron x-ray computed microtomography (CMT) is a non-destructive method for examination of rock, soil, and other types of samples studied in the earth and environmental sciences. The high x-ray intensities of the synchrotron source make possible the acquisition of tomographic volumes at a high rate that requires the application of high-performance computing techniques for data reconstruction to produce the three-dimensional volumes, for their visualization, and for data analysis. These problems are exacerbated by the need to share information between collaborators at widely separated locations over both local and tide-area networks. A summary of the CMT technique and examples of applications are given here together with a discussion of the applications of high-performance computing methods to improve the experimental techniques and analysis of the data.

  7. X-ray structures and computational studies of several cathinones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nycz, Jacek E.; Malecki, Grzegorz; Zawiazalec, Marcin; Pazdziorek, Tadeusz

    2011-09-01

    2-(Ethylamino)-1-(4-methylphenyl)propan-1-one (shortly named 4-MEC) ( 1a), 1-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-2-(methylamino)propan-1-one (shortly named methylone or 3,4-methylenedioxymethcathinone) ( 1b), 1-(3,4-dimethylphenyl)-2-(methylamino)propan-1-one ( 1c), 2-methylamino-1-(4-methylphenyl)propan-1-one (shortly named mephedrone; 4-MMC or 4-methylmethcathinone) ( 1d) and 2-(methylamino)-1-phenylbutan-1-one (shortly named buphedrone) ( 1e) and their aminium salts ( 2a-e), are examples of cathinones which were characterized by FTIR, UV-Vis, multinuclear NMR spectroscopy. By single crystal X-ray diffraction method structures of 2a, 2b, 2c and 2d were determined. NMR solution spectra showed readily diagnostic H-1 and C-13 signals from methyl, ethyl, N-methyl or N-ethyl groups. The diastereotopic methylene protons of 1a appear as an ABX 3, and 1e and 2e appear as an ABMX 3 system. The geometries of the studied compounds were optimized in singlet states using the density functional theory (DFT) method with B3LYP functional. Electronic spectra were calculated by TDDFT method. In general, the predicted bond lengths and angles are in good agreement with the values based on the X-ray crystal structure data.

  8. X-ray computed tomography for virtually unrolling damaged papyri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allegra, Dario; Ciliberto, Enrico; Ciliberto, Paolo; Petrillo, Giuseppe; Stanco, Filippo; Trombatore, Claudia

    2016-03-01

    The regular format for ancient works of literature was the papyrus roll. Recently many efforts to perform virtual restoration of this archeological artifact have been done. In fact the case of ancient rolled papyrus is very intriguing. Old papyruses are the substrates of very important historical information, probably being the use of papyrus dated to the Pre-Dynastic Period. Papyrus degradation is often very hard so that physical unrolling is sometime absolutely impossible. In this paper, authors describe their effort in setting a new virtual restoration methodology based on software manipulation of X-ray tomographic images. A realistic model, obtained by painting a hieroglyph inscription of Thutmosis III on a papyrus substrate made by the original method described by Plinius the Elder and by pigments and binders compatible with the Egyptian use (ochers with natural glue), was made for the X-ray investigation. A GE Optima 660 64 slice was used to obtain a stack of tomographic slices of the rolled model. Each slice appears as spiral. The intensity variations along the cross-sectional result from ink on the papyrus. The files were elaborated with original software, written by the use of MATLAB high-level language, and the final result was quite similar to the radiography of the physically unrolled sheet.

  9. Evaluation of the use of six diagnostic X-ray spectra computer codes.

    PubMed

    Meyer, P; Buffard, E; Mertz, L; Kennel, C; Constantinesco, A; Siffert, P

    2004-03-01

    A knowledge of photon energy spectra emitted from X-ray tubes in radiology is crucial for many research domains in the medical field. Since spectrometry is difficult because of high photon fluence rates, a convenient solution is to use computational models. This paper describes the use of six computer codes based on semiempirical or empirical models. The use of the codes was assessed, notably by comparing theoretical half value layers and air kerma with measurements on five different X-ray tubes used in a research hospital. It was found that three out of the six computer codes give relative spectra very close to those produced by X-ray units equipped with constant potential generators: the mean difference between measured and modelled half value layer was less than 3% with a standard deviation of 3.6% whatever the tube and the applied voltage. Absolute output is less accurate: for four computer codes, the mean difference between the measured and modelled air kerma was between 18% and 36%, with a standard deviation of 9% whatever the tube (except for the single phase generator) and the applied voltage. One of the codes gives a good output and beam quality for X-ray units equipped with 100% ripple voltage generators. The use of computational codes as described in this paper provides a means of modelling relative diagnostic X-ray spectra, the usefulness of the tube output data depending on the accuracy required by the end user. PMID:15020364

  10. Sintered wire cathode

    DOEpatents

    Falce, Louis R.; Ives, R. Lawrence

    2009-06-09

    A porous cathode structure is fabricated from a plurality of wires which are placed in proximity to each other in elevated temperature and pressure for a sintering time. The sintering process produces the porous cathode structure which may be divided into a plurality of individual porous cathodes, one of which may be placed into a dispenser cathode support which includes a cavity for containing a work function reduction material such as BaO, CaO, and Al.sub.2O.sub.3. The work function reduction material migrates through the pores of the porous cathode from a work replenishment surface adjacent to the cavity of the dispenser cathode support to an emitting cathode surface, thereby providing a dispenser cathode which has a uniform work function and therefore a uniform electron emission.

  11. Surface Characterization of the LCLS RF Gun Cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Brachmann, Axel; Decker, Franz-Josef; Ding, Yuantao; Dowell, David; Emma, Paul; Frisch, Josef; Gilevich, Sasha; Hays, Gregory; Hering, Philippe; Huang, Zhirong; Iverson, Richard; Loos, Henrik; Miahnahri, Alan; Nordlund, Dennis; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Pianetta, Piero; Turner, James; Welch, James; White, William; Wu, Juhao; Xiang, Dao; /SLAC

    2012-06-25

    The first copper cathode installed in the LCLS RF gun was used during LCLS commissioning for more than a year. However, after high charge operation (> 500 pC), the cathode showed a decline of quantum efficiency within the area of drive laser illumination. They report results of SEM, XPS and XAS studies that were carried out on this cathode after it was removed from the gun. X-ray absorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveal surface contamination by various hydrocarbon compounds. In addition they report on the performance of the second installed cathode with emphasis on the spatial distribution of electron emission.

  12. Optimization of X-ray tomography through a cooperative computing system in grid

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, Moin Goraya, Major Singh

    2015-08-28

    Cooperative Computing implemented as Cooperative Computing System (CCS) in grid has been proved a considerably reliable technique to execute the tasks with real time constraints in a grid environment. This technique can be applied in many high performance distributed computing applications. HPC has a large number of applications in various fields of physics. One such application in radiation physics is X-ray tomography. X-Ray tomography contains numerous applications in various fields of science, technology and research. As the technology is changing from analog to digital in almost all the scenarios, this paper presents an idea towards the attachment of X-ray tomography assembly to HPC environment so as to obtain the highly reliable optimization.

  13. A computer program to trace seismic ray distribution in complex two-dimensional geological models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yacoub, Nazieh K.; Scott, James H.

    1970-01-01

    A computer program has been developed to trace seismic rays and their amplitudes and energies through complex two-dimensional geological models, for which boundaries between elastic units are defined by a series of digitized X-, Y-coordinate values. Input data for the program includes problem identification, control parameters, model coordinates and elastic parameter for the elastic units. The program evaluates the partitioning of ray amplitude and energy at elastic boundaries, computes the total travel time, total travel distance and other parameters for rays arising at the earth's surface. Instructions are given for punching program control cards and data cards, and for arranging input card decks. An example of printer output for a simple problem is presented. The program is written in FORTRAN IV language. The listing of the program is shown in the Appendix, with an example output from a CDC-6600 computer.

  14. Pressed boride cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolski, W.

    1985-01-01

    Results of experimental studies of emission cathodes made from lanthanum, yttrium, and gadolinium hexaborides are presented. Maximum thermal emission was obtained from lanthanum hexaboride electrodes. The hexaboride cathodes operated stably under conditions of large current density power draw, at high voltages and poor vacuum. A microtron electron gun with a lanthanum hexaboride cathode is described.

  15. X-ray acoustic computed tomography with pulsed x-ray beam from a medical linear accelerator

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Han, Bin; Carpenter, Colin; Pratx, Guillem; Kuang, Yu; Xing, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The feasibility of medical imaging using a medical linear accelerator to generate acoustic waves is investigated. This modality, x-ray acoustic computed tomography (XACT), has the potential to enable deeper tissue penetration in tissue than photoacoustic tomography via laser excitation. Methods: Short pulsed (μs-range) 10 MV x-ray beams with dose-rate of approximately 30 Gy/min were generated from a medical linear accelerator. The acoustic signals were collected with an ultrasound transducer (500 KHz central frequency) positioned around an object. The transducer, driven by a computer-controlled step motor to scan around the object, detected the resulting acoustic signals in the imaging plane at each scanning position. A pulse preamplifier, with a bandwidth of 20 KHz–2 MHz at −3 dB, and switchable gains of 40 and 60 dB, received the signals from the transducer and delivered the amplified signals to a secondary amplifier. The secondary amplifier had bandwidth of 20 KHz–30 MHz at −3 dB, and a gain range of 10–60 dB. Signals were recorded and averaged 128 times by an oscilloscope. A sampling rate of 100 MHz was used to record 2500 data points at each view angle. One set of data incorporated 200 positions as the receiver moved 360°. The x-ray generated acoustic image was then reconstructed with the filtered back projection algorithm. Results: The x-ray generated acoustic signals were detected from a lead rod embedded in a chicken breast tissue. The authors found that the acoustic signal was proportional to the x-ray dose deposition, with a correlation of 0.998. The two-dimensional XACT images of the lead rod embedded in chicken breast tissue were found to be in good agreement with the shape of the object. Conclusions: The first x-ray acoustic computed tomography image is presented. The new modality may be useful for a number of applications, such as providing the location of a fiducial, or monitoring x-ray dose distribution during radiation therapy

  16. Spectrally resolving and scattering-compensated x-ray luminescence/fluorescence computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Wenxiang; Shen, Haiou; Wang, Ge

    2011-01-01

    The nanophosphors, or other similar materials, emit near-infrared (NIR) light upon x-ray excitation. They were designed as optical probes for in vivo visualization and analysis of molecular and cellular targets, pathways, and responses. Based on the previous work on x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) and x-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT), here we propose a spectrally-resolving and scattering-compensated x-ray luminescence/fluorescence computed tomography (SXLCT or SXFCT) approach to quantify a spatial distribution of nanophosphors (other similar materials or chemical elements) within a biological object. In this paper, the x-ray scattering is taken into account in the reconstruction algorithm. The NIR scattering is described in the diffusion approximation model. Then, x-ray excitations are applied with different spectra, and NIR signals are measured in a spectrally resolving fashion. Finally, a linear relationship is established between the nanophosphor distribution and measured NIR data using the finite element method and inverted using the compressive sensing technique. The numerical simulation results demonstrate the feasibility and merits of the proposed approach. PMID:21721815

  17. Collimator Width Optimization in X-Ray Luminescent Computed Tomography (XLCT) with Selective Excitation Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, S.; Kappiyoor, R.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray luminescent computed tomography (XLCT) is a promising new functional imaging modality based on computed tomography (CT). This imaging technique uses X-ray excitable nanophosphors to illuminate objects of interest in the visible spectrum. Though there are several validations of the underlying technology, none of them have addressed the issues of performance optimality for a given design of the imaging system. This study addresses the issue of obtaining best image quality through optimizing collimator width to balance the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and resolution. The results can be generalized as to any XLCT system employing a selective excitation scheme. PMID:25642356

  18. Computer solutions for studying correlations between solar magnetic fields and Skylab X-ray observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teuber, D.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Hagyard, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    A method is described which correlates the NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Image Data Processing System (IDAPS) and MSFC magnetograph data to X-ray and H-alpha observations from the Skylab mission. Solutions of Laplace's equation in three dimensions, based on the magnetograph data, are convolved with observed X-ray and H-alpha regions. Matched filtering (template matching) provides a best fit of the observed X-ray regions to the computed total magnetic vector magnitude between 10,000 and 15,000 km above the photosphere.

  19. Computed radiography as a gamma ray detector--dose response and applications.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, D S; McLeod, R W

    2004-08-21

    Computed radiography (CR) can be used for imaging the spatial distribution of photon emissions from radionuclides. Its wide dynamic range and good response to medium energy gamma rays reduces the need for long exposure times. Measurements of small doses can be performed without having to pre-sensitize the computed radiography plates via an x-ray exposure, as required with screen-film systems. Cassette-based Agfa MD30 and Kodak GP25 CR plates were used in applications involving the detection of gamma ray emissions from technetium-99m and iodine-131. Cassette entrance doses as small as 1 microGy (140 keV gamma rays) produce noisy images, but the images are suitable for applications such as the detection of breaks in radiation protection barriers. A consequence of the gamma ray sensitivity of CR plates is the possibility that some nuclear medicine patients may fog their x-rays if the x-ray is taken soon after their radiopharmaceutical injection. The investigation showed that such fogging is likely to be diffuse. PMID:15446787

  20. Minimal-resource computer program for automatic generation of ocean wave ray or crest diagrams in shoaling waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.; Lecroy, S. R.; Morris, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program for studying linear ocean wave refraction is described. The program features random-access modular bathymetry data storage. Three bottom topography approximation techniques are available in the program which provide varying degrees of bathymetry data smoothing. Refraction diagrams are generated automatically and can be displayed graphically in three forms: Ray patterns with specified uniform deepwater ray density, ray patterns with controlled nearshore ray density, or crest patterns constructed by using a cubic polynomial to approximate crest segments between adjacent rays.

  1. LiNi(0.5)Mn(1.5)O4 high-voltage cathode coated with Li4Ti5O12: a hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) study.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Malte; Gellert, Michael; Chen, Min; Drescher, Hans-Jörg; Kachel, Stefan Renato; Zhou, Han; Zugermeier, Malte; Gorgoi, Mihaela; Roling, Bernhard; Gottfried, J Michael

    2015-12-21

    A Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) film was coated as buffer layer onto a LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) high-voltage cathode, and after cycling of the cathode in a battery electrolyte, the LTO film was investigated by means of synchrotron radiation based hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES). By tuning the photon energy between 2 keV and 6 keV, we obtained non-destructive depth profiles of the coating material with probing depths ranging from 6 nm to 20 nm. The coating was found to be covered by a few nanometers thin surface layer resulting from electrolyte decomposition. This layer consisted predominantly of organic polymers as well as metal fluorides and fluorophosphates. A positive influence of the Li4Ti5O12 coating with regard to the size and stability of the surface layer was found. The coating itself consisted of a uniform mixture of Li(I), Ti(IV), Ni(II) and Mn(IV) oxides that most likely adopted a spinel structure by forming a solid solution of the two spinels LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 and Li4Ti5O12 with Li, Mn, Ni and Ti cations mixing on the spinel octahedral sites. The diffusion of Ni and Mn ions into the Li4Ti5O12 lattice occurred during the heat treatment when preparing the cathode. The doping of Li4Ti5O12 with the open d-shell ions Ni(2+) (d(8)) and Mn(4+) (d(3)) should increase the electronic conductivity of the coating significantly, as was found in previous studies. The complex signal structure of the Ti 2p, Ni 2p and Mn 2p core levels provides insight into the chemical nature of the transition metal ions. PMID:26563554

  2. Scattering-compensated cone beam x-ray luminescence computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng; Rong, Junyan; Pu, Huangsheng; Liu, Wenlei; Liao, Qimei; Lu, Hongbing

    2016-04-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) opens new possibilities to perform molecular imaging with x-ray. It is a dual modality imaging technique based on the principle that some nanophosphors can emit near-infrared (NIR) light when excited by x-rays. The x-ray scattering effect is a great issue in both CT and XLCT reconstruction. It has been shown that if the scattering effect compensated, the reconstruction average relative error can be reduced from 40% to 12% in the in the pencil beam XLCT. However, the scattering effect in the cone beam XLCT has not been proved. To verify and reduce the scattering effect, we proposed scattering-compensated cone beam x-ray luminescence computed tomography using an added leading to prevent the spare x-ray outside the irradiated phantom in order to decrease the scattering effect. Phantom experiments of two tubes filled with Y2O3:Eu3+ indicated that the proposed method could reduce the scattering by a degree of 30% and can reduce the location error from 1.8mm to 1.2mm. Hence, the proposed method was feasible to the general case and actual experiments and it is easy to implement.

  3. Analytical computation of stray light in nested mirror modules for x-ray telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, Daniele

    2015-09-01

    Stray light in X-ray telescopes are a well-known issue. Unlike rays focused via a double reflection by usual grazing-incidence geometries such as the Wolter-I, stray rays coming from off-axis sources are reflected only once by either the parabolic or the hyperbolic segment. Although not focused, stray light may represent a major source of background and ghost images especially when observing a field of faint sources in the vicinities of another, more intense, just outside the field of view of the telescope. The stray light problem is faced by mounting a pre-collimator in front of the mirror module, in order to shade a part of the reflective surfaces that may give rise to singly-reflected rays. Studying the expected stray light impact, and consequently designing a pre-collimator, is a typical ray-tracing problem, usually time and computation consuming, especially if we consider that rays propagate throughout a densely nested structure. This in turn requires one to pay attention to all the possible obstructions, increasing the complexity of the simulation. In contrast, approaching the problems of stray light calculation from an analytical viewpoint largely simplifies the problem, and may also ease the task of designing an effective pre-collimator. In this work we expose an analytical formalism that can be used to compute the stray light in a nested optical module in a fast and effective way, accounting for obstruction effects.

  4. 3D chemical imaging in the laboratory by hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Egan, C. K.; Jacques, S. D. M.; Wilson, M. D.; Veale, M. C.; Seller, P.; Beale, A. M.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; Withers, P. J.; Cernik, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    We report the development of laboratory based hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography which allows the internal elemental chemistry of an object to be reconstructed and visualised in three dimensions. The method employs a spectroscopic X-ray imaging detector with sufficient energy resolution to distinguish individual elemental absorption edges. Elemental distributions can then be made by K-edge subtraction, or alternatively by voxel-wise spectral fitting to give relative atomic concentrations. We demonstrate its application to two material systems: studying the distribution of catalyst material on porous substrates for industrial scale chemical processing; and mapping of minerals and inclusion phases inside a mineralised ore sample. The method makes use of a standard laboratory X-ray source with measurement times similar to that required for conventional computed tomography. PMID:26514938

  5. 3D chemical imaging in the laboratory by hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Egan, C K; Jacques, S D M; Wilson, M D; Veale, M C; Seller, P; Beale, A M; Pattrick, R A D; Withers, P J; Cernik, R J

    2015-01-01

    We report the development of laboratory based hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography which allows the internal elemental chemistry of an object to be reconstructed and visualised in three dimensions. The method employs a spectroscopic X-ray imaging detector with sufficient energy resolution to distinguish individual elemental absorption edges. Elemental distributions can then be made by K-edge subtraction, or alternatively by voxel-wise spectral fitting to give relative atomic concentrations. We demonstrate its application to two material systems: studying the distribution of catalyst material on porous substrates for industrial scale chemical processing; and mapping of minerals and inclusion phases inside a mineralised ore sample. The method makes use of a standard laboratory X-ray source with measurement times similar to that required for conventional computed tomography. PMID:26514938

  6. Multiple pinhole collimator based microscopic x-ray luminescence computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Dianwen; Li, Changqing

    2016-03-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) is a new hybrid imaging modality, which has the capability to improve optical spatial resolution to hundreds of micrometers for deep targets. In this paper, we report a multiple pinhole collimator based microscopic X-ray luminescence computed tomography (microXLCT) system for small animal imaging. Superfine collimated X-ray pencil beams are used to excite deeply embedded phosphor particles, allowing us to obtain sub-millimeter optical spatial resolution in deep tissues. Multiple collimated X-ray beams are generated by mounting an array of pinholes in the front of a powerful X-ray tube. With multiple X-ray beams scanning, the phosphor particles in the region of the multiple beams are excited simultaneously, which requires less scanning time compared with a single beam scanning. The emitted optical photons on the top surface of the phantom are measured with an electron multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera. Meanwhile, an X-ray detector is used to determine the X-ray beam size and position, which are used as structural guidance in the microXLCT image reconstruction. To validate the performance of our proposed multiple pinhole based microXLCT imaging system, we have performed numerical simulations and a phantom experiment. In the numerical simulations, we simulated a cylindrical phantom with two and six embedded targets, respectively. In the simulations, we used four parallel X-ray beams with the beam diameter of 0.1 mm and the beam interval of 3.2 mm. We can reconstruct deeply embedded multiple targets with a target diameter of 0.2 mm using measurements in six projections, which indicated that four parallel X-ray beam scan could reduce scanning time without comprising the reconstructed image quality. In the phantom experiment, we generated two parallel X-ray beams with the beam diameter of 0.5 mm and the beam interval of 4.2 mm. We scanned a phantom of one target with the two parallel X-ray beams. The target was

  7. Lookup tables to compute high energy cosmic ray induced atmospheric ionization and changes in atmospheric chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Atri, Dimitra; Melott, Adrian L.; Thomas, Brian C. E-mail: melott@ku.edu

    2010-05-01

    A variety of events such as gamma-ray bursts and supernovae may expose the Earth to an increased flux of high-energy cosmic rays, with potentially important effects on the biosphere. Existing atmospheric chemistry software does not have the capability of incorporating the effects of substantial cosmic ray flux above 10 GeV. An atmospheric code, the NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center two-dimensional (latitude, altitude) time-dependent atmospheric model (NGSFC), is used to study atmospheric chemistry changes. Using CORSIKA, we have created tables that can be used to compute high energy cosmic ray (10 GeV–1 PeV) induced atmospheric ionization and also, with the use of the NGSFC code, can be used to simulate the resulting atmospheric chemistry changes. We discuss the tables, their uses, weaknesses, and strengths.

  8. Synchrotron Investigations of SOFC Cathode Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Idzerda, Yves

    2013-09-30

    The atomic variations occurring in cathode/electrolyte interface regions of La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3-δ} (LSCF) cathodes and other SOFC related materials have been investigated and characterized using soft X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) and diffuse soft X-ray Resonant Scattering (XRS). X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy in the soft X-ray region (soft XAS) is shown to be a sensitive technique to quantify the disruption that occurs and can be used to suggest a concrete mechanism for the degradation. For LSC, LSF, and LSCF films, a significant degradation mechanism is shown to be Sr out-diffusion. By using the XAS spectra of hexavalent Cr in SrCrO4 and trivalent Cr in Cr2O3, the driving factor for Sr segregation was identified to be the oxygen vacancy concentration at the anode and cathode side of of symmetric LSCF/GDC/LSCF heterostructures. This is direct evidence of vacancy induced cation diffusion and is shown to be a significant indicator of cathode/electrolyte interfacial degradation. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is used to identify the occupation of the A-sites and B-sites for LSC, LSF, and LSCF cathodes doped with other transition metals, including doping induced migration of Sr to the anti-site for Sr, a significant cathode degradation indicator. By using spatially resolved valence mapping of Co, a complete picture of the surface electrochemistry can be determined. This is especially important in identifying degradation phenomena where the degradation is spatially localized to the extremities of the electrochemistry and not the average. For samples that have electrochemical parameters that are measured to be spatially uniform, the Co valence modifications were correlated to the effects of current density, overpotential, and humidity.

  9. High Quality Image of Biomedical Object by X-ray Refraction Based Contrast Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, E.; Maksimenko, A.; Sugiyama, H.; Hirano, K.; Hyodo, K.; Shimao, D.; Nishino, Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Yuasa, T.; Ichihara, S.; Arai, Y.; Ando, M.

    2007-01-01

    Recently we have developed a new Computed Tomography (CT) algorithm for refraction contrast that uses the optics of diffraction-enhanced imaging. We applied this new method to visualize soft tissue which is not visualized by the current absorption based contrast. The meaning of the contrast that appears in refraction-contrast X-ray CT images must be clarified from a biologic or anatomic point of view. It has been reported that the contrast is made with the specific gravity map with a range of approximately 10 μarc sec. However, the relationship between the contrast and biologic or anatomic findings has not been investigated, to our knowledge. We compared refraction-contrast X-ray CT images with microscopic X-ray images, and we evaluated refractive indexes of pathologic lesions on phase-contrast X-ray CT images. We focused our attenuation of breast cancer and lung cancer as samples. X-ray refraction based Computed Tomography was appeared to be a pathological ability to depict the boundary between cancer nest and normal tissue, and inner structure of the disease.

  10. Erosion of thermionic cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemchinsky, Valerian

    2013-09-01

    Two types of the thermionic cathodes are used in industry: a) Tungsten (doped with thoria or pure) cathodes burning in a unreactive gas, and b) Thermo-chemical cathodes, such as a Hafnium cathode burning in oxygen plasma gas (mostly used plasma cutting). Both types of the cathodes experience cycle (arc on/off) erosion and constant current erosion. Available experimental data for both types of cathodes and both types of erosions (constant current and cycling) are presented and discussed. Based on the model the constant current erosion rate is calculated. Comparison of the results of the calculations with the experimental data show reasonable agreement. Existing hypotheses on cycling erosion are also discussed. For the Tungsten cathode, it is suggested that the start erosion is mainly due to the cold cathode mode (vacuum arc mode) of the arc operation that takes place just after the arc ignition. The presented estimation doesn't contradict this hypothesis. For the Hafnium cathode, the model of the ``open can'' erosion is supported by recently published observations.

  11. Synchrotron-based X-ray computed tomography during compression loading of cellular materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cordes, Nikolaus L.; Henderson, Kevin; Stannard, Tyler; Williams, Jason J.; Xiao, Xianghui; Robinson, Mathew W. C.; Schaedler, Tobias A.; Chawla, Nikhilesh; Patterson, Brian M.

    2015-04-29

    Three-dimensional X-ray computed tomography (CT) of in situ dynamic processes provides internal snapshot images as a function of time. Tomograms are mathematically reconstructed from a series of radiographs taken in rapid succession as the specimen is rotated in small angular increments. In addition to spatial resolution, temporal resolution is important. Thus temporal resolution indicates how close together in time two distinct tomograms can be acquired. Tomograms taken in rapid succession allow detailed analyses of internal processes that cannot be obtained by other means. This article describes the state-of-the-art for such measurements acquired using synchrotron radiation as the X-ray source.

  12. Terahertz, X-ray and neutron computed tomography of an Eighteenth Dynasty Egyptian sealed pottery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, E.; Bessou, M.; Ziéglé, A.; Hervé, M.-C.; Szentmiklósi, L.; Kasztovszky, Z. S.; Kis, Z.; Menu, M.

    2014-09-01

    An Eighteenth Dynasty Egyptian sealed pottery stored at the Museum of Aquitaine (Bordeaux, France) has been investigated using terahertz radiation, X-rays and neutrons. THz computed tomography revealed nondestructively the presence of content, whereas X-rays and neutrons analyzed more precisely the fabrication process and conservation of the pottery together with the nature of this content owing to higher spatial resolution and contrast. With neutron tomography, we determined the method used to seal the jar as well as the finer structure of the inner content. Neutron-induced prompt gamma spectroscopy was finally applied to measure the elemental composition of the content, which is supposed to consist of dried germinated seeds.

  13. SAVLOC, computer program for automatic control and analysis of X-ray fluorescence experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    A program for a PDP-15 computer is presented which provides for control and analysis of trace element determinations by using X-ray fluorescence. The program simultaneously handles data accumulation for one sample and analysis of data from previous samples. Data accumulation consists of sample changing, timing, and data storage. Analysis requires the locating of peaks in X-ray spectra, determination of intensities of peaks, identification of origins of peaks, and determination of a real density of the element responsible for each peak. The program may be run in either a manual (supervised) mode or an automatic (unsupervised) mode.

  14. Synchrotron-based X-ray computed tomography during compression loading of cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cordes, Nikolaus L.; Henderson, Kevin; Stannard, Tyler; Williams, Jason J.; Xiao, Xianghui; Robinson, Mathew W. C.; Schaedler, Tobias A.; Chawla, Nikhilesh; Patterson, Brian M.

    2015-04-29

    Three-dimensional X-ray computed tomography (CT) of in situ dynamic processes provides internal snapshot images as a function of time. Tomograms are mathematically reconstructed from a series of radiographs taken in rapid succession as the specimen is rotated in small angular increments. In addition to spatial resolution, temporal resolution is important. Thus temporal resolution indicates how close together in time two distinct tomograms can be acquired. Tomograms taken in rapid succession allow detailed analyses of internal processes that cannot be obtained by other means. This article describes the state-of-the-art for such measurements acquired using synchrotron radiation as the X-ray source.

  15. Development of spray coated cathodes for RITS-6.

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, Sean; Leckbee, Joshua J.; Miller, Stephen Samuel

    2013-09-01

    This report documents work conducted in FY13 to conduct a feasibility study on thermal spray coated cathodes to be used in the RITS-6 accelerator in an attempt to improve surface uniformity and repeatability. Currently, the cathodes are coated with colloidal silver by means of painting by hand. It is believed that improving the cathode coating process could simplify experimental setup and improve flash x-ray radiographic performance. This report documents the experimental setup and summarizes the results of our feasibility study. Lastly, it describes the path forward and potential challenges that must be overcome in order to improve the process for creating uniform and repeatable silver coatings for cathodes.

  16. Measuring the efficacy of a root biobarrier with x-ray computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Tollner, E.W.; Murphy, C.E. Jr. . Dept. of Agricultural Engineering)

    1990-08-16

    X-ray computed tomography is a useful tool for investigating soil physical properties nondestructively. There is a need to develop proper calibration relationships between soil properties and the x-ray absorption coefficient. The objective of the work was to evaluate soil factors affecting the x-ray absorption coefficient. Based on a theoretical analysis, experimental data from five soils and on results of several other investigators, it was concluded that for many applications, one calibration relationship is applicable to a wide range of soils. The montmorillinitic clay used in the study required special handling due to the extreme shrinkage of this soil upon drying. Knowledge of chemical composition enables approximations but not exact predictions of the x-ray absorption coefficient. The results suggested some reasonable alternative to exhaustive calibration for each anticipated soil condition. Quantification of root activity in terms of root growth and indirectly through water uptake is necessary for understanding plant growth dynamics. X-ray computed tomography (CT) enables qualitative as well as two quantitative outputs, one of which can lead to conclusions regarding root activity. A greenhouse study involving soil columns (Lakeland sand, bulk density 1.4 Mg/m{sup 3}) planted to soybean, Bahiagras, and control (no vegetation) was conducted in 1989. A treflan based on chemical barrier was placed in half of the soil column of each species. The mean x-ray absorption correlated to water content. Results suggested that root presence can also be indirectly inferred based on water content drawn down during planned stress events. It was concluded that x-ray CT may have a niche in soil-water-plant relation studies, particularly when plant species have large roots. 35 refs., 13 figs., 8 tabs.

  17. X-ray solution scattering combined with computation characterizing protein folds and multiple conformational states : computation and application.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S.; Park, S.; Makowski, L.; Roux, B.

    2009-02-01

    Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is an increasingly powerful technique to characterize the structure of biomolecules in solution. We present a computational method for accurately and efficiently computing the solution scattering curve from a protein with dynamical fluctuations. The method is built upon a coarse-grained (CG) representation of the protein. This CG approach takes advantage of the low-resolution character of solution scattering. It allows rapid determination of the scattering pattern from conformations extracted from CG simulations to obtain scattering characterization of the protein conformational landscapes. Important elements incorporated in the method include an effective residue-based structure factor for each amino acid, an explicit treatment of the hydration layer at the surface of the protein, and an ensemble average of scattering from all accessible conformations to account for macromolecular flexibility. The CG model is calibrated and illustrated to accurately reproduce the experimental scattering curve of Hen egg white lysozyme. We then illustrate the computational method by calculating the solution scattering pattern of several representative protein folds and multiple conformational states. The results suggest that solution scattering data, when combined with a reliable computational method, have great potential for a better structural description of multi-domain complexes in different functional states, and for recognizing structural folds when sequence similarity to a protein of known structure is low. Possible applications of the method are discussed.

  18. BraX-Ray: an X-ray of the Brazilian computer science graduate programs.

    PubMed

    Digiampietri, Luciano A; Mena-Chalco, Jesús P; Vaz de Melo, Pedro O S; Malheiro, Ana P R; Meira, Dânia N O; Franco, Laryssa F; Oliveira, Leonardo B

    2014-01-01

    Research productivity assessment is increasingly relevant for allocation of research funds. On one hand, this assessment is challenging because it involves both qualitative and quantitative analysis of several characteristics, most of them subjective in nature. On the other hand, current tools and academic social networks make bibliometric data web-available to everyone for free. Those tools, especially when combined with other data, are able to create a rich environment from which information on research productivity can be extracted. In this context, our work aims at characterizing the Brazilian Computer Science graduate programs and the relationship among themselves. We (i) present views of the programs from different perspectives, (ii) rank the programs according to each perspective and a combination of them, (iii) show correlation between assessment metrics, (iv) discuss how programs relate to another, and (v) infer aspects that boost programs' research productivity. The results indicate that programs with a higher insertion in the coauthorship network topology also possess a higher research productivity between 2004 and 2009. PMID:24728179

  19. BraX-Ray: An X-Ray of the Brazilian Computer Science Graduate Programs

    PubMed Central

    Digiampietri, Luciano A.; Mena-Chalco, Jesús P.; Vaz de Melo, Pedro O. S.; Malheiro, Ana P. R.; Meira, Dânia N. O.; Franco, Laryssa F.; Oliveira, Leonardo B.

    2014-01-01

    Research productivity assessment is increasingly relevant for allocation of research funds. On one hand, this assessment is challenging because it involves both qualitative and quantitative analysis of several characteristics, most of them subjective in nature. On the other hand, current tools and academic social networks make bibliometric data web-available to everyone for free. Those tools, especially when combined with other data, are able to create a rich environment from which information on research productivity can be extracted. In this context, our work aims at characterizing the Brazilian Computer Science graduate programs and the relationship among themselves. We (i) present views of the programs from different perspectives, (ii) rank the programs according to each perspective and a combination of them, (iii) show correlation between assessment metrics, (iv) discuss how programs relate to another, and (v) infer aspects that boost programs' research productivity. The results indicate that programs with a higher insertion in the coauthorship network topology also possess a higher research productivity between 2004 and 2009. PMID:24728179

  20. New Findings on the Phase Transitions in Li(sub 1-x)CoO(sub 2) and Li(sub 1-x)NiO(sub 2) Cathode Materials During Cycling: In Situ Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X. Q.; Sun, X.; McBreen, J.

    1999-10-17

    The authors have utilized synchrotron x-ray radiation to perform ''in situ'' x-ray diffraction studies on Li{sub 1-x}CoO{sub 2} and Li{sub 1-x}NiO{sub 2} cathodes. A C/10 charging rate was used for a Li/Li{sub 1-x}CoO{sub 2} cell. For the Li/Li{sub 1-x}NiO{sub 2} cells, C/13 and C/84 rates were applied. The in situ XRD data were collected during the first charge from 3.5 to 5.2 V. For the Li{sub 1-x}CoO{sub 2} cathode, in the composition range of x = 0 to x = 0.5, a new intermediate phase H2a was observed in addition to the two expected hexagonal phases H1 and H2. In the region very close to x = 0.5, some spectral signatures for the formation of a monoclinic phase M1 were also observed. Further, in the x = 0.8 to x = 1 region, the formation of a CdI{sub 2} type hexagonal phase has been confirmed. However, this new phase is transformed from a CdCl{sub 2} type hexagonal phase, rather than from a monoclinic phase M2 as previously reported in the literature. For the Li{sub 1-x}NiO{sub 2} system, by taking the advantage of the high resolution in 2{theta} angles through the synchrotron based XRD technique, they were able to identify a two-phase coexistence region of hexagonal phase H1 and H2, which has been mistakenly indexed as a single phase region for monoclinic phase M1. Interesting similarities and differences between these two systems are also discussed.

  1. Accelerating statistical image reconstruction algorithms for fan-beam x-ray CT using cloud computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Somesh; Rao, A. Ravishankar; Sheinin, Vadim

    2011-03-01

    Statistical image reconstruction algorithms potentially offer many advantages to x-ray computed tomography (CT), e.g. lower radiation dose. But, their adoption in practical CT scanners requires extra computation power, which is traditionally provided by incorporating additional computing hardware (e.g. CPU-clusters, GPUs, FPGAs etc.) into a scanner. An alternative solution is to access the required computation power over the internet from a cloud computing service, which is orders-of-magnitude more cost-effective. This is because users only pay a small pay-as-you-go fee for the computation resources used (i.e. CPU time, storage etc.), and completely avoid purchase, maintenance and upgrade costs. In this paper, we investigate the benefits and shortcomings of using cloud computing for statistical image reconstruction. We parallelized the most time-consuming parts of our application, the forward and back projectors, using MapReduce, the standard parallelization library on clouds. From preliminary investigations, we found that a large speedup is possible at a very low cost. But, communication overheads inside MapReduce can limit the maximum speedup, and a better MapReduce implementation might become necessary in the future. All the experiments for this paper, including development and testing, were completed on the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) for less than $20.

  2. Toward robotic X-ray vision - New directions for computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, R.

    1985-12-01

    With the advent of industrial computed tomography (CT or reconstruction from projections), which is of much wider scope than medical CT, the basic mathematical and physical assumptions need to be reconsidered. This paper considers the ramifications of the indeterminacy theorem and the underdetermined nature of the reconstruction equations. A search for truth rather than honesty in their solution is suggested. The use of steered microbeams, CT with few photons, multimedia CT, and the CT of soft (deformable) objects are discussed. The latter subject suggests that CT should become amalgamated with finite element analysis and computer-aided. The computational load of 3-D robotic X-ray vision may require fifth-generation computers.

  3. X-ray ptychographic computed tomography at 16 nm isotropic 3D resolution

    PubMed Central

    Holler, M.; Diaz, A.; Guizar-Sicairos, M.; Karvinen, P.; Färm, Elina; Härkönen, Emma; Ritala, Mikko; Menzel, A.; Raabe, J.; Bunk, O.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray ptychography is a scanning variant of coherent diffractive imaging with the ability to image large fields of view at high resolution. It further allows imaging of non-isolated specimens and can produce quantitative mapping of the electron density distribution in 3D when combined with computed tomography. The method does not require imaging lenses, which makes it dose efficient and suitable to multi-keV X-rays, where efficient photon counting, pixelated detectors are available. Here we present the first highly resolved quantitative X-ray ptychographic tomography of an extended object yielding 16 nm isotropic 3D resolution recorded at 2 Å wavelength. This first-of-its-kind demonstration paves the way for ptychographic X-ray tomography to become a promising method for X-ray imaging of representative sample volumes at unmatched resolution, opening tremendous potential for characterizing samples in materials science and biology by filling the resolution gap between electron microscopy and other X-ray imaging techniques. PMID:24457289

  4. Full parallax three-dimensional computer generated hologram with occlusion effect using ray casting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Tan, Qiaofeng; Jin, Guofan

    2013-02-01

    Holographic display is capable of reconstructing the whole optical wave field of a three-dimensional (3D) scene. It is the only one among all the 3D display techniques that can produce all the depth cues. With the development of computing technology and spatial light modulators, computer generated holograms (CGHs) can now be used to produce dynamic 3D images of synthetic objects. Computation holography becomes highly complicated and demanding when it is employed to produce real 3D images. Here we present a novel algorithm for generating a full parallax 3D CGH with occlusion effect, which is an important property of 3D perception, but has often been neglected in fully computed hologram synthesis. The ray casting technique, which is widely used in computer graphics, is introduced to handle the occlusion issue of CGH computation. Horizontally and vertically distributed rays are projected from each hologram sample to the 3D objects to obtain the complex amplitude distribution. The occlusion issue is handled by performing ray casting calculations to all the hologram samples. The proposed algorithm has no restriction on or approximation to the 3D objects, and hence it can produce reconstructed images with correct shading effect and no visible artifacts. Programmable graphics processing unit (GPU) is used to perform parallel calculation. This is made possible because each hologram sample belongs to an independent operation. To demonstrate the performance of our proposed algorithm, an optical experiment is performed to reconstruct the 3D scene by using a phase-only spatial light modulator. We can easily perceive the accommodation cue by focusing our eyes on different depths of the scene and the motion parallax cue with occlusion effect by moving our eyes around. The experiment result confirms that the CGHs produced by our algorithm can successfully reconstruct 3D images with all the depth cues.

  5. Modified nickel oxides as cathode materials for MCFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daza, L.; Rangel, C. M.; Baranda, J.; Casais, M. T.; Martínez, M. J.; Alonso, J. A.

    The preparation and subsequent oxidation of nickel cathodes modified by impregnation with cerium were evaluated by surface and bulk analysis. The cerium impregnated cathodes showed the same pore size distribution curve types and the same morphology as the reference nickel cathode. The measured nickel oxide dissolution rate in the molten carbonate mixture indicated that a minimum corrosion was evident for cathodes with 0.3-1 wt.% cerium oxide content. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed in the cathode characterization. As can be seen by SEM, the corrosion treatments produce marked modifications on the sample surfaces that appear more prominent for the cerium-free sample. The results also show that the lithiation process is a very significant factor that can improve the efficiency of the cell, but needs to be controlled because it can also produce very damaging effects such as the modification of the cathode volume by the formation on new compounds.

  6. Optimized blind gamma-ray pulsar searches at fixed computing budget

    SciTech Connect

    Pletsch, Holger J.; Clark, Colin J.

    2014-11-01

    The sensitivity of blind gamma-ray pulsar searches in multiple years worth of photon data, as from the Fermi LAT, is primarily limited by the finite computational resources available. Addressing this 'needle in a haystack' problem, here we present methods for optimizing blind searches to achieve the highest sensitivity at fixed computing cost. For both coherent and semicoherent methods, we consider their statistical properties and study their search sensitivity under computational constraints. The results validate a multistage strategy, where the first stage scans the entire parameter space using an efficient semicoherent method and promising candidates are then refined through a fully coherent analysis. We also find that for the first stage of a blind search incoherent harmonic summing of powers is not worthwhile at fixed computing cost for typical gamma-ray pulsars. Further enhancing sensitivity, we present efficiency-improved interpolation techniques for the semicoherent search stage. Via realistic simulations we demonstrate that overall these optimizations can significantly lower the minimum detectable pulsed fraction by almost 50% at the same computational expense.

  7. Step-and-shoot data acquisition and reconstruction for cardiac x-ray computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh Jiang; Londt, John; Vass, Melissa; Li, Jay; Tang Xiangyang; Okerlund, Darin

    2006-11-15

    Coronary artery imaging with x-ray computed tomography (CT) is one of the most recent advancements in CT clinical applications. Although existing ''state-of-the-art'' clinical protocols today utilize helical data acquisition, it suffers from the lack of ability to handle irregular heart rate and relatively high x-ray dose to patients. In this paper, we propose a step-and-shoot data acquisition protocol that significantly overcomes these shortcomings. The key to the proposed protocol is the large volume coverage (40 mm) enabled by the cone beam CT scanner, which allows the coverage of the entire heart in 3 to 4 steps. In addition, we propose a gated complementary reconstruction algorithm that overcomes the longitudinal truncation problem resulting from the cone beam geometry. Computer simulations, phantom experiments, and clinical studies were conducted to validate our approach.

  8. 3-D Multiphase Segmentation of X-Ray Micro Computed Tomography Data of Geologic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuller, M.; Kulkarni, R.; Fink, W.

    2011-12-01

    Advancements of noninvasive imaging methods such as X-Ray Computed Tomography (CT) led to a recent surge of applications in Geoscience. While substantial efforts and resources have been devoted to advance CT technology and micro-scale analysis, the development of a stable 3-D multiphase image segmentation method applicable to large datasets is lacking. To eliminate the need for wet/dry or dual energy scans, image alignment, and subtraction analysis, commonly applied in synchrotron X-Ray micro CT, a segmentation method based on a Bayesian Markov Random Field (MRF) framework amenable to true 3-D multiphase processing was developed and evaluated. Furthermore, several heuristic and deterministic combinatorial optimization schemes required to solve the labeling problem of the MRF image model were implemented and tested for computational efficiency and their impact on segmentation results. Test results for natural and artificial porous media datasets demonstrate great potential of the MRF image model for 3-D multiphase segmentation.

  9. Design, development and characterization of a novel neutron and x-ray combined computed tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Vaibhav

    Visualizing the three dimensional structure of objects (e.g. nuclear fuel, nuclear materials, explosives and bio materials) and phenomena (e.g. particle tracking) can be very important in nondestructive testing applications. Computed tomography systems are indispensable tools for these types of applications because they provide a versatile non-destructive technique for analysis. A novel neutron and X-ray combined computed tomography (NXCT) system has been designed and developed at the Missouri University of Science & Technology. The neutron and X-ray combined computed tomography system holds much promise for non-destructive material detection and analysis where multiple materials having similar atomic number and differing thermal cross section or vice versa may be present within an object, exclusive neutron or X-ray analysis may exhibit shortcomings in distinguishing interfaces. However, fusing neutron image and X-ray image offers the strengths of both and may provide a superior method of analysis. In addition, a feasible design of a sample positioning system which allows the user to remotely and automatically manipulate the objects makes the NXCT system viable for commercial applications. Moreover, characterization of the newly developed digital imaging system is imperative to the performance evaluation, as well as for describing the associated parameters. The performance of a combined neutron/X-ray digital imaging system was evaluated in terms of modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). This dissertation is a complete overview of the design of the NXCT system, operation, algorithms, performance evaluation and results.

  10. Real time method and computer system for identifying radioactive materials from HPGe gamma-ray spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark S.; Howard, Douglas E.; Wong, James L.; Jessup, James L.; Bianchini, Greg M.; Miller, Wayne O.

    2007-10-23

    A real-time method and computer system for identifying radioactive materials which collects gamma count rates from a HPGe gamma-radiation detector to produce a high-resolution gamma-ray energy spectrum. A library of nuclear material definitions ("library definitions") is provided, with each uniquely associated with a nuclide or isotope material and each comprising at least one logic condition associated with a spectral parameter of a gamma-ray energy spectrum. The method determines whether the spectral parameters of said high-resolution gamma-ray energy spectrum satisfy all the logic conditions of any one of the library definitions, and subsequently uniquely identifies the material type as that nuclide or isotope material associated with the satisfied library definition. The method is iteratively repeated to update the spectrum and identification in real time.