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1

Networking: A Necessary Component in a Computer-Literacy Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses factors to be considered when planning and implementing a local area network (LAN) for personal computers within a school or an organization. Topics addressed include reasons for networking, characteristics of LANs, organizing a LAN, workstations, disk servers, and file servers. (Contains six references.) (LRW)

Norales, Francisca O.

1993-01-01

2

Students' Understanding of Computer Networks in an Internationally Distributed Course  

Microsoft Academic Search

The different ways in which concepts within computer net- works are understood by master level students who take an internationally distributed project-based course have been identified in an empirical, qualitative, phenomenographic research project. Students, working in teams of six, three in each of the participating countries, collaborate to produce a software system to control a modified version of a toy.

Anders Berglund; Arnold Neville Pears

2003-01-01

3

Innovation of laboratory exercises in course Distributed systems and computer networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper is focused on innovation of laboratory exercises in course Distributed Systems and Computer Networks. These exercises were introduced in November of 2012 and replaced older exercises in order to reflect real life applications.

Sou?ek, Pavel; Slavata, Old?ich; Holub, Jan

2013-09-01

4

Designing a Versatile Dedicated Computing Lab to Support Computer Network Courses: Insights from a Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Providing adequate computing lab support for Management Information Systems (MIS) and Computer Science (CS) programs is a perennial challenge for most academic institutions in the US and abroad. Factors, such as lack of physical space, budgetary constraints, conflicting needs of different courses, and rapid obsolescence of computing technology,…

Gercek, Gokhan; Saleem, Naveed

2006-01-01

5

Networking Computers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This tutorial provides a basic overview of the type of networks a computer can be part of. Students will gain an understanding of the different types of computer networks. Flash is required to view this interactive lesson.

2013-07-15

6

Computer Networks  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

CS4403 is an introduction to computer communications, network architectures, protocol hierarchies, and the open systems interconnection model. Topics covered include modeling, analysis, and specification of protocols, wide area networks, local area networks, and client/server architectures.

Apon, Amy

7

Computer Networks  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

CSC 344. Computer Networks (3) Prerequisite: CSC 242. The theory and application of inter-computer communication. Local-area and wide-area networks; data transmission and error correction; OSI and TCP/IP layering protocols; ethernet, token ring, token bus and other network technologies; network topologies; the client-server model; bridges and multi-protocol routers; the Internet. Applications include electronic funds transfer and distributed databases.

Hudson, Mr T.

2003-04-21

8

Computer Networks  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Teachers' Domain presents this interactive lesson on computer networks, which includes three parts: an introduction, network structure, and routers. The concepts covered include various types of networks (local area networks and wide area networks) and the three common components of networks: links, nodes, and routers. Different kinds of network topologies and the basics of how data travels between networks are also covered. The lesson includes 26 screens with reading materials as well as a supplemental background essay, discussion questions, and standards alignment from Teachers' Domain.

2010-07-11

9

Networking computers.  

PubMed

This decade the role of the personal computer has shifted dramatically from a desktop device designed to increase individual productivity and efficiency to an instrument of communication linking people and machines in different places with one another. A computer in one city can communicate with another that may be thousands of miles away. Networking is how this is accomplished. Just like the voice network used by the telephone, computer networks transmit data and other information via modems over these same telephone lines. A network can be created over both short and long distances. Networks can be established within a hospital or medical building or over many hospitals or buildings covering many geographic areas. Those confined to one location are called LANs, local area networks. Those that link computers in one building to those at other locations are known as WANs, or wide area networks. The ultimate wide area network is the one we've all been hearing so much about these days--the Internet, and its World Wide Web. Setting up a network is a process that requires careful planning and commitment. To avoid potential pitfalls and to make certain the network you establish meets your needs today and several years down the road, several steps need to be followed. This article reviews the initial steps involved in getting ready to network. PMID:10166063

McBride, D C

1997-03-01

10

Introduction to Computing Course Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developed to aid intermediate-level teachers and principals in initiating and developing computer literacy programs for their students, this document is a guide for the development of a one-semester course--Introduction to Computing--for the seventh and eighth grades. The course is designed to provide opportunities for students to develop computer

Hawaii State Dept. of Education, Honolulu. Office of Instructional Services.

11

Computer Networks As Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computer networks are inherently social networks, linking people, organizations, and knowledge. They are social institutions that should not be studied in isolation but as integrated into everyday lives. The proliferation of computer networks has facilitated a deemphasis on group solidarities at work and in the community and afforded a turn to networked societies that are loosely bounded and sparsely knit.

Barry Wellman

2001-01-01

12

A laboratory based capstone course in computer security for undergraduates  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe a laboratory based capstone course in computer security for undergraduates. The course is based on a sequence of hands-on laboratory exercises for four teams of students. It emphasizes defensive tools and techniques at the expense of attacks; it also takes a network centered view where student teams set up and configure entire networks. In this paper, we describe

Mike O'Leary

2006-01-01

13

Projects for a Computer Graphics Programming Course  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the key points in creating an effective computer science course is developing the projects students will do in the course. This note describes a set of projects for an introductory computer graphics programming course with a focus on science applications in a computer science program. These projects are intended to allow the course to be both an effective

Steve Cunningham

2000-01-01

14

A MULTIDISCIPLINARY COURSE IN COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY  

Microsoft Academic Search

An elective course in computational biology is presented. The focus of the course is on the design and analysis of algorithms with applications in molecular biology. The course is offered to both computer science and biology students and taught by a pair of instructors, one from each of the two disciplines. The course includes, each week, a computer laboratory component.

Brian Tjaden

15

Queues and Network Computers.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

With the advent of the network computer has come an increasing movement towards developing the necessary analytical tools to properly evaluate and improve these networks. One such tool is system modeling to assist in performance evaluation of networks and...

L. A. Da Rin Mills

1973-01-01

16

Online Courses: MSU National Teachers Enhancement Network  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Teachers Enhancement Network (NTEN) offers online, graduate-level science courses from a world-class public research university. NTEN was one of the first online professional development programs for K-12 teachers, and has offered courses si

1900-01-01

17

Establishing network computer forensics classes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses the deployment of computer forensics classes at undergraduate and graduate levels in a shared classroom\\/lab environment. The course content combined broad-based computer forensics theory and practice with hands-on forensics tools, including networked EnCase Enterprise forensics software. Our discussion covers teaching and learning issues from the perspectives of the instructors and the graduate and undergraduate students. Lessons learned

Louise L. Soe; Dan Manson; Marcy Wright

2004-01-01

18

Quantum Computational Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The theory of quantum computational networks is the quantum generalization of the theory of logic circuits used in classical computing machines. Quantum gates are the generalization of classical logic gates. A single type of gate, the univeral quantum gate, together with quantum 'unit wires', is adequate for constructing networks with any possible quantum computational property.

D. Deutsch

1989-01-01

19

Integrated online courseware for computer science courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computer Science CourseWare (CSCW) is a Web-based integrated online courseware system for the management of computer science courses developed by the Miami University Department of Computer Science and Systems Analysis. The system is designed to support a unified student experience for content delivery and programming (and general) assignment management. CSCW promotes incremental development through rapid feedback for students with its

Michael T. Helmick

2007-01-01

20

Promoting social networks among Computer Science students  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main scientific aim of this study was to investigate how Computer Science students regarded their social networks among study colleagues. The study was conducted at the Research Lab for Educational Technologies (University of Vienna) in order to find connecting factors for improving students' networks by means of curricular design as well as in single courses. Social Networks drawings and

Kathrin Figl; Sonja Kabicher; Katharina Toifl

2008-01-01

21

Computational thinking in high school courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

The number of undergraduates entering computer science has declined in recent years. This is paralleled by a drop in the number of high school students taking the CS AP exam and the number of high schools offering computer science courses. The declines come at a time when career opportunities in CS continue to grow and computer science graduates are seen

Vicki H. Allan; Valerie Barr; Dennis Brylow; Susanne E. Hambrusch

2010-01-01

22

Computer Network Interconnection: Problems and Prospects. Computer Science & Technology Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report examines the current situation regarding the interconnection of computer networks, especially packet switched networks (PSNs). The emphasis is on idntifying the barriers to interconnection and on surveying approaches to a solution, rather than recommending any single course of action. Sufficient organizational and technical background…

Cotton, Ira W.

23

Neural Network Trainer through Computer Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper introduces a neural network training tool through computer networks. The following algorithms, such as neuron by neuron (NBN) , error back propagation (EBP), Levenberg Marquardt (LM) and its improved versions are implemented in two different computing methods, traditional forward-backward computation and newly developed forward-only computation. The training tool can handle not only conventional multilayer perceptron (MLP) networks, but

Nam Pham; Hao Yu; Bogdan M. Wilamowski

2010-01-01

24

The Educational Computing Course. [SITE 2002 Section].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document contains the following papers on the educational computing course from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2002 conference: (1) "Integrating Media Literacy into a Technology Course for Preservice Secondary Teachers" (Gregg Brownell and Nancy Brownell); (2) "From Video Tutors to Electronic Portfolios:…

Bump, Wren, Ed.

25

Computer Network Resources for Physical Geography Instruction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Asserts that the use of computer networks provides an important and effective resource for geography instruction. Describes the use of the Internet network in physical geography instruction. Provides an example of the use of Internet resources in a climatology/meteorology course. (CFR)

Bishop, Michael P.; And Others

1993-01-01

26

Computers and society courses and computer literacy (panel session)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This panel will report on the progress and results of an NSF funded project of ACM to prepare a bibliography of materials in the area of computer impact on society and to identify objectives for computers and society and computer literacy courses. The project committee has computerized about 3000 annotated entries in the bibliography and has provided the capability of

Richard Austing; William Cotterman; Gerald Engel; Ellis Horowitz

1976-01-01

27

Computing in the Introductory Physics Course  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the Matter & Interactions version of the calculus-based introductory physics course (http://www4.ncsu.edu/ ˜rwchabay/mi) , students write programs in VPython (http://vpython.org) to model physical systems and to calculate and visualize electric and magnetic fields. VPython is unusually easy to learn, produces navigable 3D animations as a side effect of physics computations, and supports full vector calculations. The high speed of current computers makes sophisticated numerical analysis techniques unnecessary. Students can use simple first-order Euler integration, cutting the step size until the behavior of the system no longer changes. In mechanics, iterative application of the momentum principle gives students a sense of the time-evolution character of Newton's second law which is usually missing from the standard course. In E, students calculate electric and magnetic fields numerically and display them in 3D. We are currently studying the impact of introducing computational physics into the introductory course.

Chabay, Ruth; Sherwood, Bruce

2004-03-01

28

Augmenting Computer Networks.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Three methods of augmenting computer networks by adding at most one link per processor are discussed: (1) A tree of N nodes may be augmented such that the resulting graph has diameter no greater than 4log sub 2((N+2)/3)-2. Thi O(N(3)) algorithm can be app...

S. H. Bokhari A. D. Raza

1984-01-01

29

Computer-aided learning in artificial neural networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the development and evaluation of a computer-aided learning (CAL) package for a graduate course in artificial neural networks (ANNs). The package has been evaluated over a period of two academic years, both as an educational supplement to a conventional lecture course and as a completely self-sufficient, remotely taught course. The course is accessed via the World Wide

J. V. Ringwood; G. Galvin

2002-01-01

30

Failure case study: An instructive method for teaching computer network engineering  

Microsoft Academic Search

The computer network engineering course, one of essential and popular courses to train the network engineer, requires students to master comprehensive theories on network engineering and experienced practice skills. In this paper, we propose the failure case study method for teaching the computer network engineering course. The applications of the failure case study method are presented with six examples both

Liyang Yu; Wei Zhang

2010-01-01

31

A Survey of Computer Science Capstone Course Literature  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this article, we surveyed literature related to undergraduate computer science capstone courses. The survey was organized around course and project issues. Course issues included: course models, learning theories, course goals, course topics, student evaluation, and course evaluation. Project issues included: software process models, software…

Dugan, Robert F., Jr.

2011-01-01

32

Virtual Network Computing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Virtual Network Computing software package, a product of AT&T Laboratories Cambridge, is one of the more useful and decidedly different utilities than generally appears in our Network Tools section. This software, although it is complex in nature and has a technical-sounding moniker, allows one to use just about any computer remotely across a local area network or even the Internet. To accomplish this remote use, the system actually displays the entire desktop of the remote computer in a window on the local computer. Amazingly, you can display and use a Macintosh desktop, for example, on your Win95/98/NT system or a Win95/98/NT desktop on your Unix system or any other combination of these possibilities. The system is simple to install and works quite well. Although minor bugs are noticeable, the system is complete enough to allow, for example, the remote use of many popular Windows programs on a Unix system. The VNC system is free to download and use and runs on Win95/98/NT, SPARC Solaris, Linux, and DEC Alpha OSF1. Beta versions of the software are also available for the Macintosh and Windows CE 2.x.

33

A Laboratory Computer Science Course for Liberal Arts Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new laboratory course in computer science for liberal arts students has been developed by the author. This breadth-first course covers 13 topics in computer science in a lecture course, while a co-requisite laboratory course provides lab experience with 13 prepared experiments. The Scheme programming notation is used consistently in lecture and laboratory as a lingua franca for computer science.

John E. Howland

1995-01-01

34

What is Philosophy of Computer Science? Experience from the Swedish National Course  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents experience from the Swedish National Course in Philosophy of Computer Science held at MDH University during 2004. Participants from a number of Swedish universities attended this cross-disciplinary course, organized for the first time, with the aim of introducing the research field of Computing Philosophy in Sweden. The paper describes the organization of a PI - network which

Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic

35

Computer Networks and Networking: A Primer.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Provides a basic introduction to computer networks and networking terminology. Topics addressed include modems; the Internet; TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol); transmission lines; Internet Protocol numbers; network traffic; Fidonet; file transfer protocol (FTP); TELNET; electronic mail; discussion groups; LISTSERV; USENET;…

Collins, Mauri P.

1993-01-01

36

An introductory computer science course for non-majors  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes an approach to an introductory computer science course designed especially for students who are not specifically required to take a computer course and thus ordinarily receive no appreciation for computers or computing. This is the third semester this course has been offered. Student enrollment has been 31, 46 and 41 respectively. We anticipate higher enrollment figures next

Roger L. Wainwright

1980-01-01

37

Distributed computing with parallel networking  

Microsoft Academic Search

For many large scientific applications, computing on a cluster is a viable, economical alternative to a dedicated parallel machine. Application performance on a cluster is largely determined by the speed of the underlying communication network. The authors use a parallel network approach to improve the communication network performance. More specifically, they use multiple networks based on Ethernet to improve the

K. Maly; M. Zubair; S. Kelbar

1993-01-01

38

Alternatives to the traditional first course in computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The first course in Computer Science at the University of Scranton has evolved over a number of years as a course in problem solving utilizing the computer. Bearing in mind that such a course should provide relatively standard programming tools, the course uses a structured derivative of FORTRAN promoting top-down stepwise refinement in programming methodology as well as encourages the

John G. Meinke; John A. Beidler

1981-01-01

39

Bloodshot eyes: workload issues in computer science project courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Workload issue in computer s cience project courses are addressed in this paper. We briefly discuss why high workloads occur in p roject courses and the reasons they are a p roblem. We then d escribe some course changes we made to reduce the workload in a software engineering project course, without compromising course quality. The techniques include: adopting an

Judy Brown

2000-01-01

40

A self-paced first course in computer science  

Microsoft Academic Search

As demand for a first course in computer science increases, more efficient and effective approaches to such a course become increasingly desirable. This paper describes the development and use of a completely self-paced CAI course at The Evergreen State College. Use of behavioral objectives in designing the course is explained, the content of the course is outlined, the process used

John O. Aikin

1981-01-01

41

A laboratory for a computers and programming course  

Microsoft Academic Search

The computer organization and assembly language course is part of most of computer science undergraduate curricula. With the advance of microcomputers into small business and engineering firms even management information systems and engineering majors are enrolling in this course. The work described here began in 1978 to upgrade this sophomore course in computer fundamentals. The goal was to make the

Henry R. Bauer; Richard L. Oliver; David E. Winkel

1980-01-01

42

Work in progress — Women in Computing Honors course  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present our experience in teaching Honors course Women in Computing that was offered for the first time in Fall 2009. The course is cross listed with Women's Studies and provides Honors students with interdisciplinary experience. This course provides an opportunity for students to learn about pioneering women of computing and their contribution into computing field, as well as modern

Yana Kortsarts

2010-01-01

43

Radical changes in class discussion using networked computers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the effects of conducting class discussion on a local area network. A real time networking program (INTERCHANGE) was used for class discussion in freshman and senior literature courses and in a graduate humanities computing class. Pseudonyms, collaborative exams and essays, and computer-assisted reading were tested, along with organization of the students by sex and personality type. At

Jerome Bump

1990-01-01

44

Online Courses: MSU National Teachers Enhancement Network (NTEN)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Teachers Enhancement Network (NTEN) offers online, graduate-level science courses from a world-class public research university. NTEN was one of the first online professional development programs for K-12 teachers, and has offered courses sin

1900-01-01

45

Computing spin networks  

SciTech Connect

We expand a set of notions recently introduced providing the general setting for a universal representation of the quantum structure on which quantum information stands. The dynamical evolution process associated with generic quantum information manipulation is based on the (re)coupling theory of SU (2) angular momenta. Such scheme automatically incorporates all the essential features that make quantum information encoding much more efficient than classical: it is fully discrete; it deals with inherently entangled states, naturally endowed with a tensor product structure; it allows for generic encoding patterns. The model proposed can be thought of as the non-Boolean generalization of the quantum circuit model, with unitary gates expressed in terms of 3nj coefficients connecting inequivalent binary coupling schemes of n + 1 angular momentum variables, as well as Wigner rotations in the eigenspace of the total angular momentum. A crucial role is played by elementary j-gates (6j symbols) which satisfy algebraic identities that make the structure of the model similar to 'state sum models' employed in discretizing topological quantum field theories and quantum gravity. The spin network simulator can thus be viewed also as a Combinatorial QFT model for computation. The semiclassical limit (large j) is discussed.

Marzuoli, Annalisa [Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica, Universita degli Studi di Pavia, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pavia, via A. Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy)]. E-mail: annalisa.marzuoli@pv.infn.it; Rasetti, Mario [Dipartimento di Fisica, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia, Politecnico di Torino, corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)]. E-mail: rasetti@isi36a.isi.it

2005-08-01

46

A study of the first course in computers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the first course in computers as taught at community colleges, colleges, or universities. The paper is divided into two major parts. The first part describes four Approaches and three courses. The four Approaches refer to the mix of language constructs and computer concepts; the Approaches underlie the presentation used in teaching the three courses. The second part

William B. Gruener; Steven M. Graziano

1978-01-01

47

A bioinformatics course in the computer science curriculum  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many colleges and universities have recently begun offering courses and degree programs in bioinformatics. This paper describes an Introduction to Bioinformatics course that emphasizes the informatics issues, and can be taught to upper-level undergraduate computer science students and graduate students. The course can be adapted to fit the interests and experience of a faculty member in computer science who has

Charles Morrow; Dawn Wilkins

2004-01-01

48

An operating systems course using stand alone computers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Curriculum '78 [3] describes a course in Operating Systems and Computer Architecture. In the course outline it is stated, “The laboratory for this course would ideally use a small computer where the students could actually implement sections of operating systems and have them fail without serious consequence to other users”. Also in the recommendations for the Software Engineering Subject Area

Samuel J. Wiley

1982-01-01

49

The effects of an introductory computer course on the attitudes of older adults towards computers  

Microsoft Academic Search

An introductory computer course was offered to adults 60 years and older. A computer attitude survey was administered before and after the course in order to uncover preexisting concerns and reveal those attitudes most affected by the course. Attitudes following the course were marked by highly positive changes. Survey results revealed that after the course the participants felt better acquainted

J. Morgan Morris

1992-01-01

50

Programming languages for introductory computing courses: a position paper  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the question of the programming language to be used in introductory computing courses. It is found that there are three distinct groups of students that have to be catered for in introductory courses: the \\

N. Solntseff

1978-01-01

51

Teaching Computer Ethics: Experiences of Integrating Ethics into Computer Science Courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computer ethics could be taught at least in two ways: integrating ethics into computer science (CS) courses or arranging computer ethics course. In this report the experiences from the experiment of integrating ethics into CS courses are presented. I n this experiment the integration means adding groupworks and dilemma discussions to the exercises of CS courses. Dilemma discussion as a

Tero Vartiainen

1998-01-01

52

Redesigning and revitalizing two networking courses in an undergraduate information technology degree program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Information technology is a fast changing discipline and is being conceived as a practical discipline. Information technology graduates are expected to possess relevant, practical experience when dealing with many facets of computing systems, especially in the areas of data communication, network design and administration. An information technology program of a mid-sized state university redesigned and revitalized two networking courses. They

Kam Fui Lau

2010-01-01

53

Reliable Computing Over Mobile Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Mobile networks and hosts have assumed an in-creasing importance in recent years and will pervade future distributed computing systems. In order to meet user requirements for reliable operation over mobile networks, protocols that mitigate their current limi-tations, such as slow and unreliable links, need to be found. In the paper we discuss the di culties associated with extending existing

Luis E. T. Rodrigues; Henrique Fonseca; Paulo Veríssimo

1995-01-01

54

An Individually Paced Introductory Course in Network Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes some results of a course in network analysis taught to all electrical and mechanical engineering sophomores at the University of New Hampshire. The report covers two years experience with the course. The first year (spring 1971) forty students took the course under an individually prescribed instruction approach (IPI) while fifty students were taught with the standard lecture-recitation

John L. Pokoski; David E. Limbert

1973-01-01

55

Problem-Based Learning for Foundation Computer Science Courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

The foundation courses in Computer Science pose particular challenges for teacher and learner alike. This paper describes some of these challenges and how we have designed Problem-Based Learning (PBL) courses to address them. We discuss the particular problems we were keen to overcome: the pure technical focus of many courses; the problems of individual learning and the need to establish

Mike Barg; Alan Fekete; Tony Greening; Owen Hollands; Judy Kay; Jeffrey H. Kingston; Kathryn Crawford

2000-01-01

56

A computer-based course in spectrogram reading  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe a computer-based course in spectrogram reading built with the CSLU Toolkit. The principal teaching tool is SpeechView, a Toolkit component that allows students to interact with speech waveform files, spectrograms, and labels. These capabilities are essential for a course in spectrogram reading. Other Toolkit modules bring additional capabilities to the course: (1) an animated face allows students to

Tim Carmell; John-Paul Hosom; Ron Cole

1999-01-01

57

Combining Cases and Computer Simulations in Strategic Management Courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, the author compared the effectiveness of two different strategic management course designs: one centered on case discussions and the other combining a computer-based simulation with some cases. In addition to evaluation of the research literature, the study involved experiments with six course sections composed of 130 students, Both course designs produced statistically equivalent learning outcomes; there were

Rex C. Mitchell

2004-01-01

58

A design of computer network time transfer  

Microsoft Academic Search

A design of computer network time transfer is discussed in this paper, and a method to realize the standard time transfer through computer network system is described and an instruction for a software of network time transmission is introduced too.

Haibo Yuan; Bian Li; Feng Ping; Bai Yan

2000-01-01

59

Computer architecture course database: implementation and status report  

Microsoft Academic Search

A database of course materials in computer architecture is being developed on the World-Wide Web. Its goal is to allow instructors at different institutions to share materials and develop them jointly. This database comprises problems downloaded from the Web sites of courses in computer architecture at universities around the world. The site is searchable by classification or fulltext string for

Edward F. Gehringer; Ana E. Goulart; Xiaokang Sang; Chenhao Geng

1998-01-01

60

Increasing learning and decreasing costs in a computer fluency course  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the results of a redesign of a large enrollment computer fluency course for non computer science majors. The goals of the redesign were to increase learning and to decrease costs using technology. The paper discusses the motivations and the components of the course redesign. The results show that costs did decrease and that learning did increase in

Deborah Walters; Carl Alphonce; Barbara Sherman; Debra Burhans; Helene Kershner

2002-01-01

61

A Course in Social and Ethical Issues in Computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years many computer science educators have struggled with the problem of how to include instruction on social and ethical issues in the computing curriculum. This article describes one approach to solving this problem. It outlines a course called Perspectives in Computing that the author has taught for junior and senior computer science majors. One unifying theme of the

W. James Bradley

1995-01-01

62

The Use of Computers in Accountancy Courses: A New Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bhaskar (1982, 1983) proposed a list of 26 topics, classified under three categories (computer science, computer as a computational tool, computer-aided instruction), for the use of computers in accountancy courses. This scheme is argued to be confusing, as some topics are classified wrongly, and is replaced by a new seven-category scheme. Among other things, computer-aided instruction is found to have

M. C. Er; A. C. Ng

1989-01-01

63

Computer Science Career Network.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

TopCoder built a new community for students 13-18 years of age with long-term goals to increase by thousands the number of U.S. students who pursue Computer Science (CS)-related degrees, to attract and retain tens or hundreds of thousands of community par...

J. Ford M. Lydon

2013-01-01

64

Research and Realization of Computer Network Complex Practical Teaching Platform of Virtual Reality  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analyzing teaching status of computer network practical courses in colleges and universities, the paper proposes the design program and the specific implementation method of complex practical teaching platform of virtual reality computer network, and builds a general practical teaching environment of computer network, which can combine reality with virtual, break the constrains of time and space, improve the utilization of

Zhang Jie; Zhang Jianwei; Dou Yaxing

2012-01-01

65

Work in progress-adaptation of a computer networks curriculum for nontechnical audience  

Microsoft Academic Search

A variety of computer networks related courses are being offered as part of mainstream curricula at the undergraduate as well as graduate level in many engineering and computer science programs. The pervasiveness of computer networks in all aspects of industry and education make a basic understanding of networking as important to nonscience majors as other scientific disciplines such as physics

Jay Pfaffman; Itamar Elhanany

2004-01-01

66

Collective network for computer structures  

SciTech Connect

A system and method for enabling high-speed, low-latency global collective communications among interconnected processing nodes. The global collective network optimally enables collective reduction operations to be performed during parallel algorithm operations executing in a computer structure having a plurality of the interconnected processing nodes. Router devices ate included that interconnect the nodes of the network via links to facilitate performance of low-latency global processing operations at nodes of the virtual network and class structures. The global collective network may be configured to provide global barrier and interrupt functionality in asynchronous or synchronized manner. When implemented in a massively-parallel supercomputing structure, the global collective network is physically and logically partitionable according to needs of a processing algorithm.

Blumrich, Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Chen, Dong (Croton On Hudson, NY); Gara, Alan (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E. (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Hoenicke, Dirk (Ossining, NY); Takken, Todd E. (Brewster, NY); Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D. (Wernau, DE); Vranas, Pavlos M. (Bedford Hills, NY)

2011-08-16

67

Computational acceleration using neural networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The author's recent participation in the Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) program has resulted in the development of a patent pending technology that enables the construction of very large and fast artificial neural networks. Through the use of UNICON's CogniMax? pattern recognition technology we believe that systems can be constructed that exploit the power of "exhaustive learning" for the benefit of certain types of complex and slow computational problems. This paper presents a theoretical study that describes one potentially beneficial application of exhaustive learning. It describes how a very large and fast Radial Basis Function (RBF) artificial Neural Network (NN) can be used to implement a useful computational system. Viewed another way, it presents an unusual method of transforming a complex, always-precise, and slow computational problem into a fuzzy pattern recognition problem where other methods are available to effectively improve computational performance. The method described recognizes that the need for computational precision in a problem domain sometimes varies throughout the domain's Feature Space (FS) and high precision may only be needed in limited areas. These observations can then be exploited to the benefit of overall computational performance. Addressing computational reliability, we describe how existing always-precise computational methods can be used to reliably train the NN to perform the computational interpolation function. The author recognizes that the method described is not applicable to every situation, but over the last 8 months we have been surprised at how often this method can be applied to enable interesting and effective solutions.

Cadaret, Paul

2008-05-01

68

Simulation of reliability in multiserver computer networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The performance in terms of reliability of computer multiserver networks motivates this paper. The probability limit theorem is derived on the extreme queue length in open multiserver queueing networks in heavy traffic and applied to a reliability model for multiserver computer networks where we relate the time of failure of a multiserver computer network to the system parameters.

Minkevi?ius, Saulius

2012-11-01

69

Computer networks in communication survey research  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper explores the feasibility of using computer networks as communication survey research instruments. Also covered are the use of computers and computer networks in survey studies; a listing of the advantages and disadvantages of network surveys as compared with mail, phone, and fax surveys; a description of the development steps of network surveys; and a comparison of differences in

Chien Chou

1997-01-01

70

Deterrents to women taking computer science courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

The United States faces a shortage of computer scientists. Despite the current economic downturn, the most recent estimate indicates a labor force shortage of IT professionals. The shortage of IT professionals, and especially of computer scientists, provides impetus for increasing the representation of women in computer science (CS). We examine why so few students, and particularly few women, choose to

SYLVIA BEYER; KRISTINA RYNES; SUSAN HALLER

2004-01-01

71

Course Content for a Telecommunication Course in an End-User Computing Support Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A modified Delphi panel of telecommunications educators developed a list of specific content topics for a business telecommunications course. Major content areas were recommended: local and wide area networks, media, hardware, e-mail, emerging technologies, network topologies, data signals, conceptual foundations, and social and ethical issues.…

Crews, Tena B.; Ray, Charles M.

1998-01-01

72

Student Learning Networks on Residential Field Courses: Does Size Matter?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes learner and tutor reports of a learning network that formed during the completion of investigative projects on a residential field course. Staff and students recorded project-related interactions, who they were with and how long they lasted over four phases during the field course. An enquiry based learning format challenged…

Langan, A. Mark; Cullen, W. Rod; Shuker, David M.

2008-01-01

73

Software Engineering Beginning in the First Computer Science Course  

Microsoft Academic Search

The demand for computing and computing power is increasing at a rapid pace. With this demand, the ability to develop, enhance and maintain software is a top priority. Educating students to do competent work in software development, enhancement and maintenance has become a complex problem. Software engineering concepts are typically not introduced in beginning computer science courses. Students do not

Jane C. Prey; James P. Cohoon; Grag Fife

1994-01-01

74

Course Goals in Computer Education, K-12.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Designed to be used in conjunction with a school district's educational goals and focusing on what is to be learned rather than the methodology to be used, the program and course goals presented here are intended as guidelines for planning and evaluating ...

B. Allenbrand

1979-01-01

75

Computers, Curricula and Courses: Assessing the Gains.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Researchers at the University of Birmingham (United Kingdom) have built a large database of every-day English and dictionary (COBUILD) for producing better English-as-a-Second/Foreign-Language teaching and learning materials. The lexical syllabus and the English course that has evolved from is are discussed. (23 references) (Author/LB)|

Tickoo, Makhan Lal

1988-01-01

76

Optimal monitoring of computer networks  

SciTech Connect

The authors apply the ideas from optimal design theory to the very specific area of monitoring large computer networks. The behavior of these networks is so complex and uncertain that it is quite natural to use the statistical methods of experimental design which were originated in such areas as biology, behavioral sciences and agriculture, where the random character of phenomena is a crucial component and systems are too complicated to be described by some sophisticated deterministic models. They want to emphasize that only the first steps have been completed, and relatively simple underlying concepts about network functions have been used. Their immediate goal is to initiate studies focused on developing efficient experimental design techniques which can be used by practitioners working with large networks operating and evolving in a random environment.

Fedorov, V.V.; Flanagan, D.

1997-08-01

77

Numerical Computations in US Undergraduate Physics Courses  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A recent study using email and Web surveys gathered responses from physics faculty members across the US about their use of numerical computations in the classroom. Responses showed a strong commitment to computational activities from some physics faculty, and a frustration over the lack of such activities from others.

Fuller, Robert G.

2008-06-07

78

Computational modeling of biochemical networks using COPASI.  

PubMed

Computational modeling and simulation of biochemical networks is at the core of systems biology and this includes many types of analyses that can aid understanding of how these systems work. COPASI is a generic software package for modeling and simulation of biochemical networks which provides many of these analyses in convenient ways that do not require the user to program or to have deep knowledge of the numerical algorithms. Here we provide a description of how these modeling techniques can be applied to biochemical models using COPASI. The focus is both on practical aspects of software usage as well as on the utility of these analyses in aiding biological understanding. Practical examples are described for steady-state and time-course simulations, stoichiometric analyses, parameter scanning, sensitivity analysis (including metabolic control analysis), global optimization, parameter estimation, and stochastic simulation. The examples used are all published models that are available in the BioModels database in SBML format. PMID:19399433

Mendes, Pedro; Hoops, Stefan; Sahle, Sven; Gauges, Ralph; Dada, Joseph; Kummer, Ursula

2009-01-01

79

Stand-Alone Computer Courses in Teachers' IT Training  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The stand-alone computer course is the earliest IT training model in teacher education. Designed in the early 1980s, the course responded to increasing demands from schools that teachers have adequate technology skills. The primary goal was to improve technology proficiency among preservice teachers. Research later determined that student…

Wang, Yu-Mei

2006-01-01

80

Cyber-Seniors: Planning Computer Courses for Older Adults.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study was designed to solicit responses from senior citizens (adults over the age of 55) who had enrolled in a computer course after retirement. The information is intended to aid program planners for seniors in developing future courses. Seventy-six seniors from four local sites (Puget Sound, Washington) and two nationwide online services…

Donohue, Sue; Herres, Lorelei

81

Hazard Communication Project: Computer Based Training Course (for Microcomputers).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The software is computer based training with the following course objectives: to inform employees of their employer's requirements under the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard (29 CFR 1910.1200); to instruct employees on the procedures for obtaining and u...

S. Fisher

1989-01-01

82

Designing a Service-Oriented Computing Course for High Schools  

Microsoft Academic Search

Service-Oriented Computing (SOC) is becoming the dominating paradigm for software development in many areas, including e-business, robotics, gaming, and scientific computation. One of the key issues lagging behind is the education. In spite of significant progress in SOC applications, SOC education has not been taught in introductory classes. Existing SOC courses are graduate or senior-level courses in universities that require

Wei-tek Tsai; Yinong Chen; Xin Sun

2007-01-01

83

Matlab Toolbox for a First Computer Graphics Course for Engineers  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This paper describes a new Matlab toolbox designed for teaching a first Computer Graphics course for Engineering students.\\u000a The aim of the toolbox is to provide the students with a tool for a comprehensive overview on the fundamentals of Computer\\u000a Graphics in terms of basic algorithms and techniques. Firstly, the paper discusses the design of such a course taking into

A. Gálvez; A. Iglesias; C. Otero; R. Togores

84

Social networking: the new computer fluency?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a course in online social networking that is flexible enough to meet the needs of most CS0 courses. Two sections of the course were taught at the College of Charleston during the Spring 2009 semester. We describe our experiences, we outline the topics and we offer suggestions on how the topics can meet the objectives of more

Tarsem S. Purewal Jr.

2010-01-01

85

Self-Taught Computer Engineering Course.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The application of computer-aided learning is still in its infancy in higher education. This paper examines some of the reasons for its slow uptake and then describes a project to develop courseware for a large proportion of the Electronic Engineering syl...

J. N. Coleman D. J. Kinniment F. P. Burns A. M. Koelmans

1996-01-01

86

CG1, a course generating program for computer-assisted instruction  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we discuss a computer program which assists authors in producing computer-assisted instruction courses. The courses are executable computer programs. The course generator, CG-1, is an interactive program which produces a course program as the result of a conversation between the computer and the course author carried on entirely in natural language. The generated programs are in a

Charles T Meadow; Douglas W Waugh; Forrest E Miller

1968-01-01

87

Incorporating ethics in computing courses extra class activities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Teaching ethics in undergraduate computing-oriented courses is important because the specific nature of the development and application of software products affects the professional and personal interests of so many people. Two different approaches in teaching ethics for computer science and information systems students are described here. The first approach consists of incorporating ethical concepts into the teaching material of several

Fani Zlatarova

2004-01-01

88

Introducing computer tools into a first course in electrical engineering  

Microsoft Academic Search

At a school where engineering students have immediate access to a personal computer, it is important that they become familiar with that tool early in their studies. In introductory engineering courses it is also important that the students learn to perceive the computer as a tool and not as an end in itself. Achieving these goals requires a careful integration

Don Y. Northam

1995-01-01

89

Enhancing Theory of Computation Teaching Through Integration with other Courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Teaching and learning, theory of computation is a challenging task from both the perspective since it involves the abstract notions and mathematical background. Moreover, representation of its relevance to other computer science courses is inadequate. Due to the importance of closer interaction between theoretical and applied scientists, motivation among students is required, which may be done by increasing interest and

Mukta Goyal; Shelly Sachdeva

2009-01-01

90

The Teaching of Data Structures Course for Computer Specialty  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data Structures is a core curriculum of computer specialty, which aims to cultivate undergraduates' abilities of selecting appropriate data structures to develop high quality application prog rams. Its contents include principles of programming, sta ck, queue, recursion, list, string, search, sort, table , information retrieving, tree, graph, etc. This pape r presents our teaching of Data Structures course for computer

Yanqin Zhu

91

A Computer Course for Business Students: Teacher's Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This teacher's guide is for a course designed to teach business students the fundamentals of the BASIC language and computer programming using a series of business-oriented programs. Each lesson contains an introduction, flow charts, and computer programs. The six lesson topics are print-out and format control, count-average, withholding tax…

Waterhouse, Ann

92

Course 10: Three Lectures on Biological Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

1 Enzymatic networks. Proofreading knots: How DNA topoisomerases disentangle DNA 1.1 Length scales and energy scales 1.2 DNA topology 1.3 Topoisomerases 1.4 Knots and supercoils 1.5 Topological equilibrium 1.6 Can topoisomerases recognize topology? 1.7 Proposal: Kinetic proofreading 1.8 How to do it twice 1.9 The care and proofreading of knots 1.10 Suppression of supercoils 1.11 Problems and outlook 1.12 Disquisition 2 Gene expression networks. Methods for analysis of DNA chip experiments 2.1 The regulation of gene expression 2.2 Gene expression arrays 2.3 Analysis of array data 2.4 Some simplifying assumptions 2.5 Probeset analysis 2.6 Discussion 3 Neural and gene expression networks: Song-induced gene expression in the canary brain 3.1 The study of songbirds 3.2 Canary song 3.3 ZENK 3.4 The blush 3.5 Histological analysis 3.6 Natural vs. artificial 3.7 The Blush II: gAP 3.8 Meditation

Magnasco, M. O.

93

Reliability testing technology for computer network applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computer network reliability testing is an important technology for network reliability evaluation. Focused on reliability testing for computer network applications, the testing profile building method, the sample selection method, the failure criterions setting method and the index evaluation method are researched. Finally, the testing process is explained with a testing case.

Ruiying Li; Ning Huang; Shuo Li; Rui Kang; Shuo Chang

2009-01-01

94

Fishman's sampling plan for computing network reliability  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper analyzes a sampling method proposed by Fishman (1986) for computing the 2-terminal and global reliability of a network. It describes the sampling algorithm, and computation experiments on networks corresponding to a real situation as well as examples from the literature. A communication network is modeled by an undirected graph as a function of the set of vertices (the

Eugène Manzi; Martine Labbé; Guy Latouche; Francesco Maffioli

2001-01-01

95

Networked Computers' Incorporated Role in Collaborative Learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Networked computers are increasingly being used in collaborative learning. To understand what roles networked computers have in collaborative learning over distances, systems developers need conceptual frameworks that address the triadic complexity of knowledge construction, social interaction and technical issues. Some theoretical accounts of this relationship exits, but in terms of usefulness for systems design and how the role of networked

Annita Fjuk; Ole Smørdal

2001-01-01

96

A Study of Computer Impact on Society and Computer Literacy Courses and Materials.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This description of a project to review computer impact on society and computer literacy courses and materials includes the effort to gather and maintain a comprehensive bibliography, an analysis of the literature currently included, a set of objectives for courses, and future plans for refinement. (Author/JEG)

Austing, Richard H.

1978-01-01

97

Research on the Design of Network Courses Based on Constructivism  

Microsoft Academic Search

A network course is a new organizational form of teaching content, while constructivism is the core theory in the field of contemporary educational technology. According to constructivism theory, knowledge is not mainly acquired by learning from teachers, but by means of meaning construction. Scene, collaboration, conversation and meaning construction are the four elements of the learning environment. Based on the

Hanyang Luo; Xiaoling Li

2009-01-01

98

No computers? No problem! Active and cooperative learning in an introductory computer science course  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the use of active and cooperative learning techniques in an introductory computer science (Java) course. During classroom sessions, the instructor had a computer\\/projector, but students had no computer access. The challenge was to teach programming to students who were not at computers. One technique involved completion of short programming exercises in small heterogeneous teams. A typical two-hour

Cheryl A. Dugas

2008-01-01

99

Teaching socially intelligent computing principles in introductory computer science courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concept of artificial intelligence has long captured the imagination of popular culture, perhaps even inspiring some to pursue formal study in computer science. There is a growing interest in an offshoot of the basic idea of machine intelligence called \\

Alan Shaw

2012-01-01

100

An Infrared Network for Mobile Computers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The PARCTAB infrared network provides a flexible infrastructure for research into wireless mobile computing. The network consists of a collection of room-sized cells each wired with a base station transceiver. Mobile computers communicate with transceivers through a carrier sense multiple access (CSMA) protocol and act as terminals for applications executing on remote hosts. Each mobile computer is represented by a

Norman Adams; Bill N. Schilit; Michael M. Tso; Roy Want

1993-01-01

101

A Term Project for a Course on Computer Forensics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The typical approach to creating an examination disk for exercises and projects in a course on computer forensics is for the instructor to populate a piece of media with evidence to be retrieved. While such an approach supports the simple use of forensic tools, in many cases the use of an instructor-developed examination disk avoids utilizing…

Harrison, Warren

2006-01-01

102

Case study resources for an ethics and computing course  

Microsoft Academic Search

Case studies can be an effective part of an ethics and computing course. However, it is often time-consuming for the instructor to build a list of good case studies. This is especially true if the instructor wants to use real-life incidents for the cases. Even for the instructor who prefers to use “anonymized” or “synthetic” case studies, a compilation of

Kevin Bowyer

1997-01-01

103

A software engineering approach to first year computer science courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

The first year computer science sequence at Arizona State University is described. These courses have a software engineering emphasis, with students introduced to the tools and techniques of high quality software development. Students are given the opportunity to apply these techniques to all phases of the software life cycle.

Gary Ford

1982-01-01

104

First course in computer science, a small survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

In many disciplines, the introductory courses are well standardized as to what should be covered, how the subject is to be taught, and how student's performance is to be measured. Such is certainly not the case in Computer Science, where we constantly debate what should be taught, what programming language is to be used, the nature of assignments to be

T. Furugori; P. Jalics

1977-01-01

105

Effects of a Television Distance Education Course in Computer Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Presents an analysis of the learning outcomes pertaining to one unit of the undergraduate television distance-education course, Information Technology, in the computer science program at University Laval (Quebec, Canada). Investigates the relative effects of television distance education versus tradition classroom teaching on learning…

Boulet, Marie-Michele; Boudreault, Serge; Guerette, Louis

1998-01-01

106

Experimental, cooperative labs in a first course in computer architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Laboratory sessions for a first course in computer architecture require a considerable amount of thought. This is especially true if one of the goals of these labs is to capture, in a cooperative learning environment, some of the scientific method that is inherent in physical science labs. This paper describes the nature of these labs and gives examples. In addition,

Patricia J. Teller

1997-01-01

107

Quantum Computing through Quantum Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Entanglement of two Aharonov-Bohm (AB) rings, or two artificial atoms, is similar to the entanglement of spins from two electrons. The directions of the angular momentum of two AB rings serve as the inputs for a basic two-bit computing in the quantum network. The question is whether the read-out is to be performed under a short and weak external perturbation? We found that a stronger entanglement than the situation needed for a quantum superposition combines with a strong external terminal connections is the only solution for robust classical readouts. A ``half-adder'' example will be presented. There has to be an inter-relation between internal and external coupling strengths. They are so adjusted for each other so that read-outs are possible.

Wu, Cheng

2013-03-01

108

A first course in computing with applications to biology.  

PubMed

We believe that undergraduate biology students must acquire a foundational background in computing including how to formulate a computational problem; develop an algorithmic solution; implement their solution in software and then test, document and use their code to explore biological phenomena. Moreover, by learning these skills in the first year, students acquire a powerful tool set that they can use and build on throughout their studies. To address this need, we have developed a first-year undergraduate course that teaches students the foundations of computational thinking and programming in the context of problems in biology. This article describes the structure and content of the course and summarizes assessment data on both affective and learning outcomes. PMID:23449003

Libeskind-Hadas, Ran; Bush, Eliot

2013-02-28

109

HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING ON NETWORKS OF PERSONAL COMPUTERS  

Microsoft Academic Search

A recent trend in high performance computing (HPC) is to use networks of workstations (NOW) as a cheaper alternative to massively parallel multiprocessors or supercomputers. In such parallel systems (NOW's) individual workstations, in our home conditions on the base of powerful personal computers, are connected through widely used communication standard networks and co-operate to solve one large problem. Each workstation

Hanuliak J. Ing

110

Computer Science and Technology: Design Alternatives for Computer Network Security.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The security problems associated with a network of computers are an extension of those of stand-alone computer systems, but require additional security controls due to the distributed and autonomous nature of the network components. The purpose of this in...

G. D. Cole D. K. Branstad

1978-01-01

111

The Evolution of a Computational Earth and Space Science Course  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Motivated by the need to better prepare undergraduate students at the City University of New York (CUNY) for NASA research experiences, a series of courses and workshops in Computational Earth and Space Science has been developed and piloted for both CUNY faculty and students. The outcome is the institutionalization of a Computational Earth and Space Science course team-taught by faculty at Medgar Evers College (MEC) and the City College for New York (CCNY). While the course is specifically targeted towards undergraduate students, participants include CUNY faculty and graduate students. Course participants gain familiarity with software tools, image processing and data analysis and modeling techniques used in Earth and Space Science applications and research of interest to NASA and related agencies. The course borrows concepts and ideas from a workshop session given at South Carolina State University; innovative Scientific Programming Courses at MEC; an intersession IDL workshop for CUNY faculty and students hosted by CCNY; and a cross-listed Special Topics course team-taught at both CCNY and MEC. The importance for faculty lies in strengthening undergraduate research mentorship by becoming aware of areas and techniques of special interest to NASA, as well as to contributing to data reduction in parallel areas of science. The program provides the necessary knowledge for student participants to take advantage of local and national research programs, and to enhance their value in the scientific workforce. [Curriculum development is supported by NASA MU-SPIN NCC5-530 and NASA Space Science/Minority Initiative NAG5-10142.

Johnson, L. P.; Austin, S.; Steiner, J.

2003-05-01

112

The Effect of Computer Literacy Course on Students' Attitudes toward Computer Applications  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Studies indicate that the use of technologies as teaching aids and tools for self-study is influenced by students' attitudes toward computers and their applications. The purpose of this study is to determine whether taking a Computer Literacy and Applications (CLA) course has an impact on students' attitudes toward computer applications, across…

Erlich, Zippy; Gadot, Rivka; Shahak, Daphna

2009-01-01

113

Green computer science courses. No more labs full of computers, we?re going mobile!  

Microsoft Academic Search

Traditionally computer sciences courses have been taught using laboratories full of expensive desktop computers. This approach may have been valid in the 80, 90?s and even the early part of this decade. This paper suggests that buying; maintaining and replacing laboratories full of computers are no longer a requirement. This paper raises the issues associated with such a ?bold? step,

G. Hill; E. Svennevik; S. Turner

2011-01-01

114

Inductive Learning with a Computational Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper introduces a computational network which combines heterogeneous rule-extraction algorithms for intelligent data analysis. Combining induction programs may alleviate the possible negative effects of data set representation and individual program's influences, such as inductive bias. The application of the computational network to a diabetes data set shows that, when combining the various programs, an increase in rule set accuracy

H. L. Viktor; Ian Cloete

1998-01-01

115

Providing Network Monitoring Service for Grid Computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Collecting, correlating and extracting network performance information is an important premise for effective Grid applications and services. Based on the intrinsic relationship between the Internet and Grid computing, we extend the network performance monitoring activities in the Internet to the Grid scenario and develop a scalable, interoperable Grid network measurements and monitoring system (GMMPro) which is mainly derived from the

Junfeng Wang; Mingtian Zhou; Hongxia Zhou

2004-01-01

116

Recurrent Neural Networks for Music Computation  

Microsoft Academic Search

musical system depends on a history of past states. Recurrent (neural) networks have been deployed as models for learning musical processes. We first present a tutorial discussion of recurrent networks, covering those that have been used for music learning. Following this, we examine a thread of development of these recurrent networks for music computation that shows how more intricate music

Judy A. Franklin

2006-01-01

117

Computer networks as human system interface  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the dramatic increase of network bandwidth and decrease of network latency and because of development of new network programming technologies, the dynamic websites provide dynamic interaction to the end user and at the same time implement asynchronous client-server communication in the background. Many applications are being deployed through the computer and are becoming more popular and are effective means

Nam Pham; Bogdan M. Wilamowski; A. Malimowski

2010-01-01

118

Computer-Based Information Networks: Selected Examples.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The history, purpose, and operation of six computer-based information networks are described in general and nontechnical terms. In the introduction the many definitions of an information network are explored. Ohio College Library Center's network (OCLC) is the first example. OCLC began in 1963, and since early 1973 has been extending its services…

Hardesty, Larry

119

Super-speed computer interfaces and networks  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Research into super-speed computer interfaces has been directed towards identifying networking requirements from compute-intensive applications that are crucial to DOE programs. In particular, both the DOE Energy Research High Performance Computing Research Centers (HPCRC) and the DOE Defense Programs Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) have planned applications that will require large increases in network bandwidth. This project was set up to help network researchers identify those networking requirements and to plan the development of such networks. Based on studies, research, and LANL-sponsored workshops, this project helped forge the beginnings for multi-gigabit/sec network research and developments that today is being lead by Los Alamos in the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 6.4 gigabit/sec specification called HIPPI-6400.

Tolmie, D.E.; St. John, W.; DuBois, D.H. [and others

1997-10-01

120

Computing preimages of Boolean networks  

PubMed Central

In this paper we present an algorithm based on the sum-product algorithm that finds elements in the preimage of a feed-forward Boolean networks given an output of the network. Our probabilistic method runs in linear time with respect to the number of nodes in the network. We evaluate our algorithm for randomly constructed Boolean networks and a regulatory network of Escherichia coli and found that it gives a valid solution in most cases.

2013-01-01

121

Telecommunications, local area networks, and computers-integrated network control  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author examines the telecommunications local area network, and computer-integrated network control system (TLC, INC) concept which uses modern network management principles to detect service-affecting problems so that corrective action can be applied to restore service. The information is presented to network managers on a high-resolution color graphic workstation in real time. An operation overview of the TLC, INC is

MICHAEL B. FREEMAN

1988-01-01

122

Exploring Constructivist Learning Theory and Course Visualization on Computer Graphics  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Constructivist learning theory has shown its advantages on learning system by improving students’ interests and ability. In\\u000a this paper, we introduce some research works of constructivist learning theory and some successful methods from ACM\\/IEEE-CS\\u000a CC2001 course. Application for GV (Graphics and Visual Computing) shows the power that integrating constructivist view of\\u000a learning with the real learning environment. Based on PLATFORM

Yiming Zhao; Mingmin Zhang; Shu Wang; Yefang Chen

2005-01-01

123

Computer network management based on TMN  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Computer Network Management is the most important work of the computer network. Two problems in managing of a professional network must be solved, one is to standardize the relationship between the professional network and the management network, and the other is to ensure the security of the network. The first problem will be discussed here. We put forward a new idea here, that is, to build standard computer management network and standard professional network. First, we give a standard model of the relationship between the management network and its subordinate professional network. This model is different with the TMN. It distinguishes the management network and the subordinate professional network clearly in the notion, the place and the property of all the sockets is determined. Subsequently, the corresponding function structure and physical architecture are given together. For each kind of architecture, we define the related rules respectively. These rules are: the relationship between the function module, the standard of the interface, protocol architecture. Then, the procedure of communication signal processing is analyzed. The requirements of all the programming sockets are explained. Finally, we explain some related topics briefly.

Li, Yanpeng; Li, Xiang; Zhuang, Zhaowen

2002-09-01

124

Policies to Enhance Computer and Network Forensics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Internet is growing explosively, as is thenumber of crimes committed against or using computers. As aresponse to the growth of computer crime, the field of Computerand Network Forensics emerged. Computer forensics is the artof discovering and retrieving information about a crime in such away to make it admissible in court. It is after-the-fact in that theonly preventative capability of

Alec Yasinsac; Yanet Manzano

2001-01-01

125

Multidimensional neural growing networks and computer intelligence  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines information-computation processes in time and in space and some aspects of computer intelligence using multidimensional matrix neural growing networks. In particular, issues of object-oriented {open_quotes}thinking{close_quotes} of computers are considered.

Yashchenko, V.A.

1995-03-01

126

Computational gene network analysis reveals TNF-induced angiogenesis  

PubMed Central

Background TNF (Tumor Necrosis Factor-?) induces HUVEC (Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells) to proliferate and form new blood vessels. This TNF-induced angiogenesis plays a key role in cancer and rheumatic disease. However, the molecular system that underlies TNF-induced angiogenesis is largely unknown. Methods We analyzed the gene expression changes stimulated by TNF in HUVEC over a time course using microarrays to reveal the molecular system underlying TNF-induced angiogenesis. Traditional k-means clustering analysis was performed to identify informative temporal gene expression patterns buried in the time course data. Functional enrichment analysis using DAVID was then performed for each cluster. The genes that belonged to informative clusters were then used as the input for gene network analysis using a Bayesian network and nonparametric regression method. Based on this TNF-induced gene network, we searched for sub-networks related to angiogenesis by integrating existing biological knowledge. Results k-means clustering of the TNF stimulated time course microarray gene expression data, followed by functional enrichment analysis identified three biologically informative clusters related to apoptosis, cellular proliferation and angiogenesis. These three clusters included 648 genes in total, which were used to estimate dynamic Bayesian networks. Based on the estimated TNF-induced gene networks, we hypothesized that a sub-network including IL6 and IL8 inhibits apoptosis and promotes TNF-induced angiogenesis. More particularly, IL6 promotes TNF-induced angiogenesis by inducing NF-?B and IL8, which are strong cell growth factors. Conclusions Computational gene network analysis revealed a novel molecular system that may play an important role in the TNF-induced angiogenesis seen in cancer and rheumatic disease. This analysis suggests that Bayesian network analysis linked to functional annotation may be a powerful tool to provide insight into disease.

2012-01-01

127

Engineering Technology Programs Courses Guide for Computer Aided Design and Computer Aided Manufacturing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide describes the requirements for courses in computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) that are part of engineering technology programs conducted in vocational-technical schools in Georgia. The guide is organized in five sections. The first section provides a rationale for occupations in design and in production,…

Georgia Univ., Athens. Div. of Vocational Education.

128

Topics in Computer Literacy as Elements of Two Introductory College Mathematics Courses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Explains the integrated approach implemented by James Madison University, Virginia, in enhancing computer literacy. Reviews the changes in the mathematics courses and provides topical listings and outlines of the courses that emphasize computer applications. (ML)|

Spresser, Diane M.

1986-01-01

129

SPIDER - a Computer Aided Manufacturing Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Western Electric SPIDER System is a Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) Network controlling and supporting manufacturing processes at multiple locations. The hierarchical network interfaces with current Computer Aided Design (CAD) Systems within Bell Telephone Laboratories and Western Electric to complete the CAD-CAM link for new electronic switching systems.(1,2) new electronic switching systems. The project acronym, SPIDER, stands for Shared Production

Michael E. Walsh

1977-01-01

130

Interaction Wearable Computer with Networked Virtual Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of this research is to propose a technique to integrate the mobile reality system into the legacy networked virtual\\u000a environment. This research composes of two essential research domains, one is networked virtual environment (NVE) and the\\u000a other is mobile computing. With the proposed technique, a user can use a mobile device to join a networked virtual environment\\u000a and

Jiung-yao Huang; Ming-chih Tung; Huan-chao Keh; Ji-jen Wu; Kun-hang Lee; Chung-hsien Tsai

2009-01-01

131

Bringing a large computer network into FOCUS  

SciTech Connect

The development and implementation of the Facility for Operations Control and Utilization Statistics (FOCUS), a new centralized node in the Integrated Computing Network of the Los Alamos National Laboratory is described. FOCUS consists of production control, performance measurement, and network information subsystems. The software engineering practices on which the development was based are discussed, with emphasis on the application of those practices to network systems development.

Morse, N.R.; Thompson, J.L.

1982-01-01

132

Computing with Structured Connections Networks.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Rapid advances both in the neurosciences and in computer science are beginning to lead to a new interest in computational models linking animal brains and behavior. In computer science, there is a large and growing body of knowledge about parallel computa...

J. A. Feldman M. A. Fanty N. Goddard K. Lynne

1987-01-01

133

Computational Aspects of Analyzing Social Network Dynamics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Motivated by applications such as the spread of epi- demics and the propagation of influence in social networks, we propose a formal model for analyz- ing the dynamics of such networks. Our model is a stochastic version of discrete dynamical sys- tems. Using this model, we formulate and study the computational complexity of two fundamental problems (called reachability and predecessor

Christopher L. Barrett; Harry B. Hunt III; Madhav V. Marathe; S. S. Ravi; Daniel J. Rosenkrantz; Richard Edwin Stearns; Mayur Thakur

2007-01-01

134

Kerberos: an authentication service for computer networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

When using authentication based on cryptography, an attacker listening to the network gains no information that would enable it to falsely claim another's identity. Kerberos is the most commonly used example of this type of authentication technology. The authors concentrate on authentication for real-time, interactive services that are offered on computer networks. They use the term real-time loosely to mean

B. Clifford Neuman; T. Ts'o

1994-01-01

135

Introduction to backpropagation neural network computation.  

PubMed

Neurocomputing is computer modeling based, in part, upon simulation of the structure and function of the brain. Neural networks excel in pattern recognition, that is, the ability to recognize a set of previously learned data. Although their use is rapidly growing in engineering, they are new to the pharmaceutical community. This article introduces neurocomputing using the backpropagation network (BPN). PMID:8456062

Erb, R J

1993-02-01

136

Introduction to Backpropagation Neural Network Computation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Neurocomputing is computer modeling based, in part, upon simulation of the structure and function of the brain. Neural networks excel in pattern recognition, that is, the ability to recognize a set of previously learned data. Although their use is rapidly growing in engineering, they are new to the pharmaceutical community. This article introduces neurocomputing using the backpropagation network (BPN).

Randall J. Erb

1993-01-01

137

Harvesting knowledge from computer mediated social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This paper aims to focus on how the advantages of computer mediated social networks (CMSN) can be effectively harnessed to create value for organizations in the form of ready knowledge and quick solutions to problems. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A knowledge capture technique – the Delphi technique – was fused into the social networking process. A model was designed to

Oluwafemi S. Ogunseye; Philip K. Adetiloye; Samuel O. Idowu; Olusegun Folorunso; Adio T. Akinwale

2011-01-01

138

Computational Power and Correlation in Quantum Computational Tensor Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigate relations between computational power and correlation in resource states for quantum computational tensor network, which is a general framework for measurement-based quantum computation. We find that if the size of resource states is finite, not all resource states allow correct projective measurements in the correlation space, which is related to non-vanishing two-point correlations in the resource states. On

Keisuke Fujii; Tomoyuki Morimae

2011-01-01

139

Mobile computing in next generation wireless networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we attempt to describe the evolving status of wireless communications and its impact on the future of mobile computing. We present a historical perspective and elucidate the technical challenges facing mobile computing in the next generation of wireless networks. Next generation wireless includes the cellular evolution towards third generation systems (W-CDMA, cdma2000, etc.) and the proliferation of

Prathima Agrawal; David Famolari

1999-01-01

140

Pedagogical Utilization and Assessment of the Statistic Online Computational Resource in Introductory Probability and Statistics Courses.  

PubMed

Technology-based instruction represents a new recent pedagogical paradigm that is rooted in the realization that new generations are much more comfortable with, and excited about, new technologies. The rapid technological advancement over the past decade has fueled an enormous demand for the integration of modern networking, informational and computational tools with classical pedagogical instruments. Consequently, teaching with technology typically involves utilizing a variety of IT and multimedia resources for online learning, course management, electronic course materials, and novel tools of communication, engagement, experimental, critical thinking and assessment.The NSF-funded Statistics Online Computational Resource (SOCR) provides a number of interactive tools for enhancing instruction in various undergraduate and graduate courses in probability and statistics. These resources include online instructional materials, statistical calculators, interactive graphical user interfaces, computational and simulation applets, tools for data analysis and visualization. The tools provided as part of SOCR include conceptual simulations and statistical computing interfaces, which are designed to bridge between the introductory and the more advanced computational and applied probability and statistics courses. In this manuscript, we describe our designs for utilizing SOCR technology in instruction in a recent study. In addition, present the results of the effectiveness of using SOCR tools at two different course intensity levels on three outcome measures: exam scores, student satisfaction and choice of technology to complete assignments. Learning styles assessment was completed at baseline. We have used three very different designs for three different undergraduate classes. Each course included a treatment group, using the SOCR resources, and a control group, using classical instruction techniques. Our findings include marginal effects of the SOCR treatment per individual classes; however, pooling the results across all courses and sections, SOCR effects on the treatment groups were exceptionally robust and significant. Coupling these findings with a clear decrease in the variance of the quantitative examination measures in the treatment groups indicates that employing technology, like SOCR, in a sound pedagogical and scientific manner enhances overall the students' understanding and suggests better long-term knowledge retention. PMID:19750185

Dinov, Ivo D; Sanchez, Juana; Christou, Nicolas

2008-01-01

141

Pedagogical Utilization and Assessment of the Statistic Online Computational Resource in Introductory Probability and Statistics Courses  

PubMed Central

Technology-based instruction represents a new recent pedagogical paradigm that is rooted in the realization that new generations are much more comfortable with, and excited about, new technologies. The rapid technological advancement over the past decade has fueled an enormous demand for the integration of modern networking, informational and computational tools with classical pedagogical instruments. Consequently, teaching with technology typically involves utilizing a variety of IT and multimedia resources for online learning, course management, electronic course materials, and novel tools of communication, engagement, experimental, critical thinking and assessment. The NSF-funded Statistics Online Computational Resource (SOCR) provides a number of interactive tools for enhancing instruction in various undergraduate and graduate courses in probability and statistics. These resources include online instructional materials, statistical calculators, interactive graphical user interfaces, computational and simulation applets, tools for data analysis and visualization. The tools provided as part of SOCR include conceptual simulations and statistical computing interfaces, which are designed to bridge between the introductory and the more advanced computational and applied probability and statistics courses. In this manuscript, we describe our designs for utilizing SOCR technology in instruction in a recent study. In addition, present the results of the effectiveness of using SOCR tools at two different course intensity levels on three outcome measures: exam scores, student satisfaction and choice of technology to complete assignments. Learning styles assessment was completed at baseline. We have used three very different designs for three different undergraduate classes. Each course included a treatment group, using the SOCR resources, and a control group, using classical instruction techniques. Our findings include marginal effects of the SOCR treatment per individual classes; however, pooling the results across all courses and sections, SOCR effects on the treatment groups were exceptionally robust and significant. Coupling these findings with a clear decrease in the variance of the quantitative examination measures in the treatment groups indicates that employing technology, like SOCR, in a sound pedagogical and scientific manner enhances overall the students’ understanding and suggests better long-term knowledge retention.

Dinov, Ivo D.; Sanchez, Juana; Christou, Nicolas

2009-01-01

142

Customizing Network Functions for High Performance Cloud Computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new cloud computing architecture introducing customization of network functions based on active network is studied. To flexibly reconfigure the network functions depending on the requirement of each cloud computing environment, network functions are deployed on a virtual machine. Customizable sequences of network functions are essential for cloud computing environments. The content-based packet marking mechanism is introduced to transfer packets

Takahiro Miyamoto; Michiaki Hayashi; Hideaki Tanaka

2009-01-01

143

Computer methods in electric network analysis  

SciTech Connect

The computational algorithms utilized in power system analysis have more than just a minor overlap with those used in electronic circuit computer aided design. This paper describes the computer methods that are common to both areas and highlights the differences in application through brief examples. Recognizing this commonality has stimulated the exchange of useful techniques in both areas and has the potential of fostering new approaches to electric network analysis through the interchange of ideas.

Saver, P.; Hajj, I.; Pai, M.; Trick, T.

1983-06-01

144

Research and practice of Human-Computer Interaction in CAI of computer course  

Microsoft Academic Search

Human-Computer Interaction has always been an important part in software's design and development, especially for CAI, how to make sure that learners can master the knowledge faster and better is what the designers of the software have to think about. This paper uses CAI for Course of Algorithm as an example, and discusses the ways and methods of the application

Wei Yu; Feng Su; Du Xiaoyu

2010-01-01

145

The Use of Auxiliary Resources on Introductory Computing Courses for Engineering  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the present study we analyzed several resources that could be used as auxiliary tools on Introductory Computing courses, based on the course on this subject lectured at the Polytechnic School of the University of Sao Paulo (EPUSP\\/Brazil) to first-year undergraduate students. Programming courses develop abilities which will be useful to not only Electrical or Computing Engineers, but any engineer's

F. C. N. Campos; G. S. Olguin

146

Computing with structured connections networks. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

Rapid advances both in the neurosciences and in computer science are beginning to lead to a new interest in computational models linking animal brains and behavior. In computer science, there is a large and growing body of knowledge about parallel computation and another, largely separate, science of artificial intelligence. The idea of looking directly at massively parallel realizations of intelligent activity promises to be fruitful for the study of both natural and artificial computations. Much attention has been directed towards the biological implications of this interdisciplinary effort, but there are equally important relations with computational theory, hardware and software. This article focuses on the design and use of massively parallel computational models, particularly in artificial intelligence. Much of the recent work on massively parallel computation has been carried out by physicists and examines the emergent behavior of large, unstructured collections of computing units. We are more concerned with how one can design, realize and analyze networks that embody the specific computational structures needed to solve hard problems. Adaptation and learning are treated as ways to improve structured networks, not as a replacement for analysis and design.

Feldman, J.A.; Fanty, M.A.; Goddard, N.; Lynne, K.

1987-04-01

147

Integrated Computer Network for Acute Patient Care  

PubMed Central

Care of the acutely ill hospitalized patient places unusual demands on the practicing physician. Large amounts of physiologic, laboratory and other patient related data must be quickly and efficiently obtained and acted upon. The therapy for these patients is complex and time dependent and must be accurately documented. To help meet these demands an integrated computer network has been established to speed data communications, provide integrated data reporting and assist in medical decision-making. Experience with this computer network and its impact on patient care are discussed.

Gardner, Reed M.; Pryor, T. Allan; Clayton, Paul D.; Evans, R. Scott

1984-01-01

148

Network virtualization for cloud computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cloud computing enables a transparent access to information technology (IT) services such that the users do not need to know\\u000a the location and characteristics of the relevant resources. While IT resource virtualization and service abstraction have\\u000a been widely investigated, data transport within the cloud and its efficient control have not received much attention in the\\u000a technical literature. In fact, connectivity

Fabio Baroncelli; Barbara Martini; Piero Castoldi

2010-01-01

149

Computer Based Collaborative Problem Solving for Introductory Courses in Physics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We discuss collaborative problem solving computer-based recitation style. The course is designed by Lee [1], and the idea was proposed before by Christian, Belloni and Titus [2,3]. The students find the problems on a web-page containing simulations (physlets) and they write the solutions on an accompanying worksheet after discussing it with a classmate. Physlets have the advantage of being much more like real-world problems than textbook problems. We also compare two protocols for web-based instruction using simulations in an introductory physics class [1]. The inquiry protocol allowed students to control input parameters while the worked example protocol did not. We will discuss which of the two methods is more efficient in relation to Scientific Discovery Learning and Cognitive Load Theory. 1. Lee, Kevin M., Nicoll, Gayle and Brooks, Dave W. (2004). ``A Comparison of Inquiry and Worked Example Web-Based Instruction Using Physlets'', Journal of Science Education and Technology 13, No. 1: 81-88. 2. Christian, W., and Belloni, M. (2001). Physlets: Teaching Physics With Interactive Curricular Material, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ. 3. Christian,W., and Titus,A. (1998). ``Developing web-based curricula using Java Physlets.'' Computers in Physics 12: 227--232.

Ilie, Carolina; Lee, Kevin

2010-03-01

150

Analytic and simulation methods in computer network design  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Seventies are here and so are computer networks! The time sharing industry dominated the Sixties and it appears that computer networks will play a similar role in the Seventies. The need has now arisen for many of these time-shared systems to share each others' resources by coupling them together over a communication network thereby creating a computer network. The

Leonard Kleinrock

1970-01-01

151

Use of Computer-Mediated Communication in a Teaching Practicum Course  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates how Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) can be effectively used in a teaching practicum course to enhance preservice teachers learning. We constructed a web-based CMC system and used it in a Teaching Practicum course. Computer science preservice teachers and experienced secondary school computer teachers, who served as mentors, participated in the study. The research findings indicate that the preservice

Cheng-Chih Wu; Greg C. Lee

2004-01-01

152

Evaluating the Effectiveness of Collaborative Computer-Intensive Projects in an Undergraduate Psychometrics Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Undergraduate psychometrics classes often use computer-intensive active learning projects. However, little research has examined active learning or computer-intensive projects in psychometrics courses. We describe two computer-intensive collaborative learning projects used to teach the design and evaluation of psychological tests. Course

Barchard, Kimberly A.; Pace, Larry A.

2010-01-01

153

The impact of a computers and society course on student perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report describes a course entitled “Perspectives on computers and society” and presents findings from student assessments of course impact and attitude change. Almost all of the class members were computer science majors and they entered with rather favorable attitudes toward computerization. By the end of the quarter they were slightly less favorable toward the computer because of its perceived

P. J. Nicholson; W. R. Franta; R. E. Anderson

1973-01-01

154

Graphical problem solving and visual communication in the beginning computer graphics course  

Microsoft Academic Search

The beginning computer graphics course can teach much more than just computer graphics. It can also provide an excellent introduction to graphical problem solving and visual communication, and in so doing can be an excellent complement to other computer science courses that teach more analytical problem solving. This paper describes the graphical problem-solving and visual communication contexts and discusses how

Steve Cunningham

2002-01-01

155

Gender Differences in the Choice of Computer Courses: Applying an Expectancy-Value Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

The choice of computer courses has a direct influence on the development of computer literacy. It is alarming, therefore, that girls seem to choose computer courses less frequently than boys. The present paper examines (a) whether these often-reported gender differences also occur at the early high school level (Study 1) and (b) how these differences can be predicted by applying

Oliver Dickhäuser; Joachim Stiensmeier-Pelster

2003-01-01

156

Gender differences in the choice of computer courses: applying an expectancy-value model  

Microsoft Academic Search

The choice of computer courses has a direct influence on the development of computer literacy. It is alarming, therefore, that girls seem to choose computer courses less frequently than boys. The present paper examines (a) whether these often-reported gender differences also occur at the early high school level (Study 1) and (b) how these differences can be predicted by applying

OLIVER DICKHÄUSER; JOACHIM STIENSMEIER-PELSTER

2003-01-01

157

Computer Modeling of the Local Telephone Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we describe the structure and operation of an innovative computer-based model of the local exchange telephone network known as the HCPM. This model can be used in a variety of regulatory arenas, since it provides a regulatory agency with an independent source of information about the forward-looking costs of providing local telephone service. The model can also

C. A. Bush; D. M. Kennet; J. Prisbrey; W. W. Sharkey; Vaikunth Gupta

2001-01-01

158

A computational laboratory for evolutionary trade networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study presents, motivates, and illustrates the use of a computational laboratory (CL) for the investigation of evolu- tionary trade network formation among strategically interacting buyers, sellers, and dealers. The CL, referred to as the Trade Net- work Game Laboratory (TNG Lab), is targeted for the Microsoft Windows desktop. The TNG Lab is both modular and extensible and has a

David Mcfadzean; Leigh Tesfatsion; Deron Stewart

2001-01-01

159

Free Software and Information via Computer Network.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Through "anonymous ftp" accounts accessible over the Internet computer network, one can obtain much free quality software, documentation, and information relevant to meteorology. A program named archie can locate sites that offer desired software. This article lists some of the more useful sites and give suggestions for distributing software. Bitnet users have LISTSERV sources for software and information as well as connections to Internet.

Ahlquist, Jon

1993-03-01

160

Computing and communicating statistics in sensor networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the computing and communicating statistics in sensor networks. A deterministic sequence of message passing between sensors, result in the vector of function values being, communicated to the fusion center, for any combination of individual measurement vectors. A wireless communication model using protocols is also discussed.

Arvind Giridhar; P. R. Kumar

2004-01-01

161

Manual for Museum Computer Network Data Preparation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual describes information processing procedures for Museum Computer Network (MCN) systems. The first section contains general rules for preparation of input: conventions for all data; conventions for controlling the appearance of output; conventions for automatic sorting of data; conventions for user specified sorting of data; and…

Vance, David

162

Advanced networks and computing in healthcare  

PubMed Central

As computing and network capabilities continue to rise, it becomes increasingly important to understand the varied applications for using them to provide healthcare. The objective of this review is to identify key characteristics and attributes of healthcare applications involving the use of advanced computing and communication technologies, drawing upon 45 research and development projects in telemedicine and other aspects of healthcare funded by the National Library of Medicine over the past 12?years. Only projects publishing in the professional literature were included in the review. Four projects did not publish beyond their final reports. In addition, the authors drew on their first-hand experience as project officers, reviewers and monitors of the work. Major themes in the corpus of work were identified, characterizing key attributes of advanced computing and network applications in healthcare. Advanced computing and network applications are relevant to a range of healthcare settings and specialties, but they are most appropriate for solving a narrower range of problems in each. Healthcare projects undertaken primarily to explore potential have also demonstrated effectiveness and depend on the quality of network service as much as bandwidth. Many applications are enabling, making it possible to provide service or conduct research that previously was not possible or to achieve outcomes in addition to those for which projects were undertaken. Most notable are advances in imaging and visualization, collaboration and sense of presence, and mobility in communication and information-resource use.

Ackerman, Michael

2011-01-01

163

Design and research on network teaching platform of document retrieval course  

Microsoft Academic Search

Compared with the traditional teaching mode, the use of the network teaching platform of document retrieval course has many compelling advantages. The network teaching platform of document retrieval course should be designed to constructivism learning theory as the foundation and basis and implement principles of openness, interactivity, dynamic, and maintainability, and so on. Thus it sets up a “learner centered”

Jianguo Zhang; Xiaozhong Li

2012-01-01

164

Creating Asynchronous Learning Networks in Mathematics, Science, and Engineering Courses for Home-Based Learners  

Microsoft Academic Search

Northern Virginia Community College's (NVCC) Extended Learning Institute (ELI) and faculty at NVCC's Annandale campus are developing distance education engineering, mathematics, chemistry, and physics courses leading to an associate in science engineering degree. Incorporating asynchronous learning networks (ALNs) into course design enables the development of courses that integrate interaction and collaboration with self-paced, independent modes of learning. Developing such a

John Sener

1997-01-01

165

Distributed sensor networks with collective computation  

SciTech Connect

Simulations of a network of N sensors have been performed. The simulation space contains a number of sound sources and a large number of sensors. Each sensor is equipped with an omni-directional microphone and is capable of measuring only the time of arrival of a signal. Sensors are able to wirelessly transmit and receive packets of information, and have some computing power. The sensors were programmed to merge all information (received packets as well as local measurements) into a 'world view' for that node. This world view is then transmitted. In this way, information can slowly diffuse across the network. One node was monitored in the network as a proxy for when information had diffused across the network. Simulations demonstrated that the energy expended per sensor per time step was approximately independent of N.

Lanman, D. R. (Douglas R.)

2001-01-01

166

[Renewal of NIHS computer network system].  

PubMed

Updated version of National Institute of Health Sciences Computer Network System (NIHS-NET) is described. In order to reduce its electric power consumption, the main server system was newly built using the virtual machine technology. The service that each machine provided in the previous network system should be maintained as much as possible. Thus, the individual server was constructed for each service, because a virtual server often show decrement in its performance as compared with a physical server. As a result, though the number of virtual servers was increased and the network communication became complicated among the servers, the conventional service was able to be maintained, and security level was able to be rather improved, along with saving electrical powers. The updated NIHS-NET bears multiple security countermeasures. To maximal use of these measures, awareness for the network security by all users is expected. PMID:23243992

Segawa, Katsunori; Nakano, Tatsuya; Saito, Yoshiro

2012-01-01

167

Computer Modeling of Planetary Surface Temperatures in Introductory Astronomy Courses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Barker, T., and Goodman, J. C., Wheaton College, Norton, MA Computer modeling is an essential part of astronomical research, and so it is important that students be exposed to its powers and limitations in the first (and, perhaps, only) astronomy course they take in college. Building on the ideas of Walter Robinson (“Modeling Dynamic Systems,” Springer, 2002) we have found that STELLA software (ISEE Systems) allows introductory astronomy students to do sophisticated modeling by the end of two classes of instruction, with no previous experience in computer programming or calculus. STELLA’s graphical interface allows students to visualize systems in terms of “flows” in and out of “stocks,” avoiding the need to invoke differential equations. Linking flows and stocks allows feedback systems to be constructed. Students begin by building an easily understood system: a leaky bucket. This is a simple negative feedback system in which the volume in the bucket (a “stock”) depends on a fixed inflow rate and an outflow that increases in proportion to the volume in the bucket. Students explore how changing inflow rate and feedback parameters affect the steady-state volume and equilibration time of the system. This model is completed within a 50-minute class meeting. In the next class, students are given an analogous but more sophisticated problem: modeling a planetary surface temperature (“stock”) that depends on the “flow” of energy from the Sun, the planetary albedo, the outgoing flow of infrared radiation from the planet’s surface, and the infrared return from the atmosphere. Students then compare their STELLA model equilibrium temperatures to observed planetary temperatures, which agree with model ones for worlds without atmospheres, but give underestimates for planets with atmospheres, thus introducing students to the concept of greenhouse warming. We find that if we give the students part of this model at the start of a 50-minute class they are able to build the rest of the model and run planetary simulations by the end of class.

Barker, Timothy; Goodman, J.

2013-01-01

168

Work in progress - implementing a wireless local area network course  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wireless local area networks were once considered a niche network solution. Today, a wireless local area network (WLAN) is no longer just an add-on piece to commercial networks. All industries are being impacted by the flexibility, low-cost, and new markets that WLANs are spurring. One foundational aspect of a wireless network is its inherent nature to be insecure from hackers

D. C. Dellacca

2005-01-01

169

Integrating psychoeducation in a basic computer skills course for people suffering from social anxiety: participants' experiences  

PubMed Central

We describe a psychoeducational program integrated in a basic computer skills course for participants suffering from social anxiety. The two main aims of the course were: that the participants learn basic computer skills, and that the participants learn to cope better with social anxiety. Computer skills were taught by a qualified teacher. Psychoeducation and cognitive therapy skills, including topics such as anxiety coping, self-accept, and self-regulation, were taught by a clinical psychologist. Thirteen of 16 participants completed the course, which lasted 11 weeks. A qualitative analysis was performed, drawing on observations during the course and on interviews with the participants. The participants were positive about the integration of psychoeducation sessions in the computer course, and described positive outcomes for both elements, including improved computer skills, improved self-esteem, and reduced social anxiety. Most participants were motivated to undertake further occupational rehabilitation after the course.

Lohr, Hildegard D; Rosenvinge, Jan H; Wynn, Rolf

2011-01-01

170

Computer Networking Status, Trends and Utility for the Federal Government.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report examines current computer networking offerings and projects technological and economic trends for the industry. The products and services of the sixty suppliers included in the survey typify the computer networking resources currently available...

1980-01-01

171

Network Information Center and Computer Augmented Team Interaction.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The research reported is aimed at the development of online computer aids for augmenting the performance of individuals and teams engaged in intellectual work, and the development of the Network Information Center for the ARPA Computer Network. The report...

D. C. Engelbart

1971-01-01

172

Highly reliable computer network for real time system.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Many of computer networks have been studied different trends regarding the network architecture and the various protocols that govern data transfers and guarantee a reliable communication among all a hierarchical network structure has been proposed to pro...

F. A. Mohammed A. A. Omar N. M. A. Ayad M. A. I. Madkour M. K. Ibrahim

1988-01-01

173

Computer networks. Citations from the NTIS data base  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Research reports on aspects of computer networks, including hardware, software, data transmission, time sharing, and applicable theory to network design are cited. Specific studies on the ARPA networks, and other such systems are listed.

Jones, J. E.

1980-08-01

174

Philosophy of Language. Course Notes for a Tutorial on Computational Semantics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This course was part of a tutorial focusing on the state of computational semantics, i.e., the state of work on natural language within the artificial intelligence (AI) paradigm. The discussion in the course centered on the philosophers Richard Montague and Ludwig Wittgenstein. The course was divided into three sections: (1)…

Wilks, Yorick

175

Techniques for Developing a Syllabus/Website for a Computer Mediated Learning (CML) Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Computer mediated learning (CML) courses can overcome the temporal and spatial obstacles of isolated commuter students with busy schedules. Whether presented online or as an add-on to an on-campus course, the CML course needs a good syllabus. This paper discusses components of a CML syllabus and online activities for students. Typical components…

Bull, Kay Sather; Kimball, Sarah; Stansberry, Susan

176

Integrated theory and practice - an approach to the first computer science course  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1975 the authors began an undergraduate computer science major and devised a one year foundation course as the basic building block of this major. The dual objectives of this foundation course are explained; an easily accessible minicomputer environment for interactive FORTRAN program development work in this course is also described. As the authors now look back to 1975 the

Walter S. Szalajka; Philip Walch

1979-01-01

177

Models and simulation for analysis of a computer network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computer communication networks are becoming common items in office and manufacturing environments. Electrical component characteristics and network operation are understood by a small number of engineers and designers with knowledge about communication networks. This lack of widespread knowledge was recognized when a high-speed computer communication network was being installed in the integrated circuit (IC) fabrication facility in the Solid-State Electronics

1993-01-01

178

THE CASE FOR TEACHING NETWORK PROTOCOLS TO COMPUTER FORENSICS EXAMINERS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most computer forensics experts are well-versed in basic computer hardware technology, operating systems, common software applications, and computer forensics tools. And while many have rudimentary knowledge about the Internet and simple network-lookup tools, they are not trained in the analysis of network communication protocols and the use of packet sniffers. This paper describes digital forensics applications for network analysis and

Gary C. Kessler; Matt Fasulo

179

Powers of 10: the case for changing the first course in computer graphics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The growing maturity of computer graphics technology now makes it possible to view the introductory graphics course in a general computer science curriculum in a new light. Instead of requiring highly specialized techniques and a great deal of mathematics before a student can produce significant work, the course can now be built around generally-accepted standard graphics standard APIs. This opens

Steve Cunningham

2000-01-01

180

Analysis of Grouping Strategy for Presentation Exercise in Computer Literacy Course  

Microsoft Academic Search

Presentation exercise using computer was introduced in the computer literacy course for freshmen. The course con- sisted of three classes, and the average skill level of the classes had been evenly balanced based on the midterm ex- amination scores before the exercise began. In the classes, the participants were divided into groups of three students. For this, we imposed different

Masahide Nakamura; Michio Nakanishi; Akira Harada

181

Happenstance and Compromise: A Gendered Analysis of Students' Computing Degree Course Selection  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The number of students choosing to study computing at university continues to decline this century, with an even sharper decline in female students. This article presents the results of a series of interviews with university students studying computing courses in Australia that uncovered the influence of happenstance and compromise on course

Lang, Catherine

2010-01-01

182

Computer Assisted Instruction Program Development in the Civilization Course : Ancient India Civilization  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objectives of this research were (1) to develop the content based computer assisted instruction program in the Civilization Course on the topic : Ancient India Civilization (2) to study the efficient of the content based computer assisted instruction program in the Civilization Course on the topic : Ancient India Civilization (3) to study the learning progress of student who

Uangkoon Puttinate

183

THE DEVELOPMENT AND PRESENTATION OF FOUR COLLEGE COURSES BY COMPUTER TELEPROCESSING. FINAL REPORT.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|THIS IS A FINAL REPORT ON THE DEVELOPMENT AND PRESENTATION OF FOUR COLLEGE COURSES BY COMPUTER TELEPROCESSING FROM APRIL 1964 TO JUNE 1967. IT OUTLINES THE PROGRESS MADE TOWARDS THE PREPARATION, DEVELOPMENT, AND EVALUATION OF MATERIALS FOR COMPUTER PRESENTATION OF COURSES IN AUDIOLOGY, MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING, ENGINEERING ECONOMICS, AND MODERN…

MITZEL, HAROLD E.

184

Computer Networks teaching by microlearning principles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In nowadays there are many kinds of problems in the system of higher education. One of them is: everyday students get very huge amount of information. All of them take very big amount of time for a student to understand lesson and it is very hard for him/her to do everything in time. This paper explains a study of work microlearning application for computer networks. It consists of general introduction and purpose.

A, Zhamanov; M, Zhamapor

2013-04-01

185

Computational power and correlation in a quantum computational tensor network  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate relationships between computational power and correlation in resource states for quantum computational tensor network, which is a general framework for measurement-based quantum computation. We find that if the size of resource states is finite, not all resource states allow correct projective measurements in the correlation space, which is related to nonvanishing two-point correlations in the resource states. On the other hand, for infinite-size resource states, we can always implement correct projective measurements if the resource state can simulate arbitrary single-qubit rotations, since such a resource state exhibits exponentially decaying two-point correlations. This implies that a many-body state whose two-point correlation cannot be upper bounded by an exponentially decaying function cannot simulate arbitrary single-qubit rotations.

Fujii, Keisuke; Morimae, Tomoyuki

2012-03-01

186

Computational classifiers for predicting the short-term course of Multiple sclerosis  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity and specificity) of clinical, imaging and motor evoked potentials (MEP) for predicting the short-term prognosis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods We obtained clinical data, MRI and MEP from a prospective cohort of 51 patients and 20 matched controls followed for two years. Clinical end-points recorded were: 1) expanded disability status scale (EDSS), 2) disability progression, and 3) new relapses. We constructed computational classifiers (Bayesian, random decision-trees, simple logistic-linear regression-and neural networks) and calculated their accuracy by means of a 10-fold cross-validation method. We also validated our findings with a second cohort of 96 MS patients from a second center. Results We found that disability at baseline, grey matter volume and MEP were the variables that better correlated with clinical end-points, although their diagnostic accuracy was low. However, classifiers combining the most informative variables, namely baseline disability (EDSS), MRI lesion load and central motor conduction time (CMCT), were much more accurate in predicting future disability. Using the most informative variables (especially EDSS and CMCT) we developed a neural network (NNet) that attained a good performance for predicting the EDSS change. The predictive ability of the neural network was validated in an independent cohort obtaining similar accuracy (80%) for predicting the change in the EDSS two years later. Conclusions The usefulness of clinical variables for predicting the course of MS on an individual basis is limited, despite being associated with the disease course. By training a NNet with the most informative variables we achieved a good accuracy for predicting short-term disability.

2011-01-01

187

Network security for virtual machine in cloud computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cloud computing is the next generation of networking computing, since it can deliver both software and hardware as on-demand resources and services over the Internet. Undoubtedly, one of the significant concerns in cloud computing is security. Virtualization is a key feature of cloud computing. In this paper, we focus on the security of virtual network in virtualized environment. First, we

Hanqian Wu; Yi Ding; C. Winer; Li Yao

2010-01-01

188

Artificial Kohonen's neural networks for computer capillarometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Analysis of disorders in microhemocirculation appearing during development of various genesis pathological processes allows to manifest their start-up and pathogenic mechanisms. Numerical estimation of capillary and arteriolar-veinular bed parameters gives a possibility to predict development of these states. Automatically controlled estimation of even simple parameters of microhemocirculation bed, such as vessel length in the eye conjuctiva, their amount, size, winding, etc., allows to speak about a new method in the express diagnostics of computer capillarometry. The present work is devoted to the methods of automated determination of microvessel length. The problem is solved by application of one-dimension Kohonen's networks for adaptive uniform piecewise approximation of capillary images. Kohonen's units are the approximation points, and their position is set during the self-organization of the neural network.

Doncow, Sergey; Orbachevskyi, Leonid; Birukow, Valentin; Stepanova, Nina V.

1998-04-01

189

Gaussian graphical model for identifying significantly responsive regulatory networks from time course high-throughput data.  

PubMed

With rapid accumulation of functional relationships between biological molecules, knowledge-based networks have been constructed and stocked in many databases. These networks provide curated and comprehensive information for functional linkages among genes and proteins, whereas their activities are highly related with specific phenotypes and conditions. To evaluate a knowledge-based network in a specific condition, the consistency between its structure and conditionally specific gene expression profiling data are an important criterion. In this study, the authors propose a Gaussian graphical model to evaluate the documented regulatory networks by the consistency between network architectures and time course gene expression profiles. They derive a dynamic Bayesian network model to evaluate gene regulatory networks in both simulated and true time course microarray data. The regulatory networks are evaluated by matching network structure with gene expression to achieve consistency measurement. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the authors method, they identify significant regulatory networks in response to the time course of circadian rhythm. The knowledge-based networks are screened and ranked by their structural consistencies with dynamic gene expression profiling. PMID:24067414

Liu, Zhi-Ping; Zhang, Wanwei; Horimoto, Katsuhisa; Chen, Luonan

2013-10-01

190

Beyond word processing: Networked computers in ESL writing classes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Networks were introduced to English as a second language (ESL) classes only recently. Hence, to date, only a few empirical studies have investigated effects of networked computers on ESL student writing. This study compared ESL students in first-year English classes writing in two contexts: in a networked computer class and in a traditional lecture-style class. The aim was to determine

George Braine

1997-01-01

191

ANALYTICAL MODELS OF DISTRIBUTED COMPUTER BASED COMMUNICATION NETWORKS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rapid rate of growth of computer based communication systems (e.g. distributed computer networks, mobile data networks) has resulted in a renewed and intensive interest in modelling of such systems. Efficient design of their service facilities leads to the sharing of resources among users. Such public shared networks are largely oversubscribed by independent users, who make random demands on the

Hanuliak I; Velky Diel

192

ENHANCING COLLABORATION IN BUSINESS INFORMATION SYSTEMS COURSES WITH COMPUTER-MEDIATED COMMUNICATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

Global expansion has made it essential for companies to conduct team work through computer- mediated communication. Therefore, to prepare students for success in the business world, instructors must help students develop necessary skills to collaborate via computer systems. This paper outlines collaborative activities used in Business Information Systems courses to help students practice and develop computer-mediated communication skills.

Pam A. Dupin-Bryant

2004-01-01

193

Computer Course Articulation among High Schools and Colleges and Universities in the State of Arizona.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to determine the extent of communication between Arizona's secondary schools and postsecondary institutions concerning computer education and computer literacy. A document analysis of college catalogs and a survey of 70 school districts determined the extent of advanced placement courses, computer education services,…

Babcock, Gifford M.

194

Learning about Learning in an Introductory Educational Computing Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The introductory technology course for preservice teachers provides a forum for them to develop technological competency as they reflect on their own learning processes, develop a deeper understanding of learning theory, examine the relationship between theory and practice, critique the nature of school-based learning experiences, and analyze…

Niederhauser, Dale S.; Salmen, Donna J.; Fields, Matt

195

Teachers of Advertising Media Courses Describe Techniques, Show Computer Applications.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Reports on a survey of university advertising media teachers regarding textbooks and instructional aids used, teaching techniques, computer applications, student placement, instructor background, and faculty publishing. (SR)|

Lancaster, Kent M.; Martin, Thomas C.

1989-01-01

196

LAN Configuration and Analysis: Projects for the Data Communications and Networking Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|We implemented two local area network (LAN) projects in our introductory data communications and networking course. The first project required students to develop a LAN from scratch for a small imaginary organization. The second project required student groups to analyze a LAN for a real world small organization. By allowing students to apply…

Chen, Fang; Brabston, Mary

2011-01-01

197

Exploring the Potential Perceptions of Social Networking Systems in University Courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

This project sought to determine the feasibility of using a social networking site, specifically Facebook ® , as a study aide for a biology content course for elementary education majors at a comprehensive Midwestern university. One hundred and ten students were surveyed as to their current social network usage and their possible use of such sites in an educational setting.

John D. Ophus; Jason T. Abbitt

198

Seamless networked mobile computing realized by wireless Internet access  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper gives a solution for a seamless network platform which brings flexible network connectivity into the mobile computing world. Areas being studied include future communication architecture, IP mobility support, flexible accessible radio with low power RF devices, programmable modems and software oriented MAC technologies. We discuss how to harmonize network-layer mobility and the wireless network to realize the seamless

Tomoki OHSAWA; Kazuhiro OKANOUE; Mohammad MADIHIAN; K. Ishii; Y. Kakura

1996-01-01

199

Tuning computer communications networks and protocols  

SciTech Connect

Current computer network protocols are very robust and capable of being used in a variety of different environments. Typically, the implementations of these protocols come to the user with preset parameters that provide reasonable performance for low delay- bandwidth product environments with low error rates, but these defaults do not necessarily provide optimal performance for high delay-bandwidth, high error rate environments. To provide optimal performance from the user's perspective, which is application to application, all equivalent layers of the protocol must be tuned. The key to tuning protocols is reducing idle time on the links caused by various protocol layers waiting for acknowledgments. The circuit bandwidth, propagation delay, error rate, number of outstanding packets, buffer length, number of buffers, and buffer size can all affect the observed idle time. Experiments have been conducted on test bed systems, and on live satellite and terrestrial circuits. Observations from these experiments led the authors to draw conclusions about the locations of common bottlenecks. Various aspects of network tuning and certain specific issues relating to the tuning of three protocols (DECnet, TCP/IP, NETEX) over various media types (point-to-point and broadcast) under several different conditions (terrestrial and satellite) are examined in this paper. Also described are the lessons learned about protocol and network tuning. 3 refs., 2 tabs.

Witzke, E.L. (Proteus Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Pierson, L.G. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1991-01-01

200

Visualization techniques for computer network defense  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Effective visual analysis of computer network defense (CND) information is challenging due to the volume and complexity of both the raw and analyzed network data. A typical CND is comprised of multiple niche intrusion detection tools, each of which performs network data analysis and produces a unique alerting output. The state-of-the-practice in the situational awareness of CND data is the prevalent use of custom-developed scripts by Information Technology (IT) professionals to retrieve, organize, and understand potential threat events. We propose a new visual analytics framework, called the Oak Ridge Cyber Analytics (ORCA) system, for CND data that allows an operator to interact with all detection tool outputs simultaneously. Aggregated alert events are presented in multiple coordinated views with timeline, cluster, and swarm model analysis displays. These displays are complemented with both supervised and semi-supervised machine learning classifiers. The intent of the visual analytics framework is to improve CND situational awareness, to enable an analyst to quickly navigate and analyze thousands of detected events, and to combine sophisticated data analysis techniques with interactive visualization such that patterns of anomalous activities may be more easily identified and investigated.

Beaver, Justin M.; Steed, Chad A.; Patton, Robert M.; Cui, Xiaohui; Schultz, Matthew

2011-05-01

201

Email networks and the spread of computer viruses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many computer viruses spread via electronic mail, making use of computer users'email address books as a source for email addresses of new victims. These address books form a directed social network of connections between individuals over which the virus spreads. Here we investigate empirically the structure of this network using data drawn from a large computer installation, and discuss the

M. E. J. Newman; Stephanie Forrest; Justin Balthrop

2002-01-01

202

Usage of neural networks in ubiquitous computing systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of most perspective techniques for sensing in ubiquitous computing systems is neural networks. In this paper we describe features of usage of neural networks in ubiquitous computing and its implementation for solving of some tasks in middleware ubiquitous computing system for smart environment.

Andrey V. Gavrilov

2008-01-01

203

Mobile Computing and Ubiquitous Networking: Concepts, Technologies and Challenges.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Analyzes concepts, technologies and challenges related to mobile computing and networking. Defines basic concepts of cellular systems. Describes the evolution of wireless technologies that constitute the foundations of mobile computing and ubiquitous networking. Presents characterization and issues of mobile computing. Analyzes economical and…

Pierre, Samuel

2001-01-01

204

The Effects of Cognitive Learning Style and Prior Computer Experience on Taiwanese College Students' Computer Self-Efficacy in Computer Literacy Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examines the influences of learners' characteristics on the development of computer self-efficacy using the GOMS (goal, operators, methods, and selection rules) model. Students' learning style, prior computer course experience, and computer self-efficacy were measured in the pretest, and computer self-efficacy was measured in the…

Shiue, Ya-Ming

2003-01-01

205

Learning Motivation in E-Learning Facilitated Computer Programming Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Computer programming skills constitute one of the core competencies that graduates from many disciplines, such as engineering and computer science, are expected to possess. Developing good programming skills typically requires students to do a lot of practice, which cannot sustain unless they are adequately motivated. This paper reports a…

Law, Kris M. Y.; Lee, Victor C. S.; Yu, Y. T.

2010-01-01

206

Problem-based learning in an introductory computer engineering course  

Microsoft Academic Search

As systems increase in complexity and technology advances, curriculum and laboratories are challenged to keep pace. This is especially true in computer engineering, which has seen dramatic growth in the scope and diversity of computer-based systems. One of the key challenges is developing the educational context for the new technologies, which are being encountered earlier and earlier in a student's

Aaron Striegel; Diane T. Rover

2002-01-01

207

The Computer-Oriented Calculus Course at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the experiences and conclusions of a long-range program to revitalize undergraduate instruction in mathematics utilizing state-of-the-art workstations and the computer algebra system, Maple, and includes two examples of this type of instructional improvement. Focuses on computer-intensive calculus. (MKR)

Boyce, William E.; Ecker, Joe

1995-01-01

208

Introductory Computer-Based Mechanics; A One Week Sample Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Very little material exists for utilizing the computer in the physics classroom, and even that little is not widely known. It is hoped that this monograph will provide some stimulus both to innovation and to discussion of the role of the computer in physics education. The paper describes how this might be achieved with a detailed account of one…

Bork, Alfred M.; And Others

209

Panel on integrating security concepts into existing computer courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently, computer security has come to the forefront of public awareness. With the onslaught of worms such as Code Red, national (U.S.) concern has increased about cyber terrorism and the information infrastructure. One educational response has been the emergence of a number of computer security degree programs - at the undergraduate level, e.g., East Stroudsburg State University of PA, and

Paul Mullins; Jim Wolfe; Michael Fry; Erik L. Wynters; William C. Calhoun; Robert Montante; William Oblitey

2002-01-01

210

Work in progress — integrating multiple computer science disciplines via a technical game development course  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a new course in development that utilizes technical game development as the unifying subject. This matches a goal of our Computer Science program to provide opportunities for students to utilize multiple CS topics in a single course. Doing so results in those subjects being reinforced and expanded by repeating them in a new context, it also provides

James Dean Mathias

2008-01-01

211

Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a Web-Based Learning Design for Adult Computer Science Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper reports on work undertaken within a pilot study concerned with the design, development, and evaluation of online computer science training courses. Drawing on recent developments in e-learning technology, these courses were structured around the principles of a learner-oriented approach for use with adult learners. The paper describes…

Antonis, Konstantinos; Daradoumis, Thanasis; Papadakis, Spyros; Simos, Christos

2011-01-01

212

Affective Learning in Online Multimedia and Lecture Versions of an Introductory Computing Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study evaluated students' affective learning in an introductory computing course that was taught in Hong Kong once in a lecture format and twice in a rich interactive multimedia online format to 414 college students in all. A simplified experience sampling method was used to assess affective learning at the midterm and end of each course in…

Moneta, Giovanni B.; Kekkonen-Moneta, Synnove S.

2007-01-01

213

Classification of students' performance in computer programming course according to learning style  

Microsoft Academic Search

In information technology related programs, computer programming courses are made compulsory subjects in most institutions of learning. However there are many reports on poor performance among students in such courses. Previous studies examined some of the variables influencing students' performance using statistical data analysis. The critical point of this study is the use of classification algorithm to extract patterns which

Slaiman Farag Abdusalam; Cik Fazilah Hibadullah; B. M. Shuaibu

2009-01-01

214

Application of schema theory in the course of foundations of computers  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the paper, combined with the course of foundations of computers, applications of schema theory in the teaching of the course are introduced. Further, guided by the theory, the concrete methods how to activate original schemas and keep helping students building up new schemas in students' brain are probed.

Wengou Jing; Rongfang Gao

2009-01-01

215

Instructional Strategies and Tactics for the Design of Introductory Computer Programming Courses in High School.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compares the expert, spiral, and reading approaches to instructional strategies for introductory computer programming courses. Based on ACT (Adaptive Control of Thought) theory and relevant research, the differences between declarative and procedural instruction are identified, and six tactics used to design courses and evaluate strategies are…

Van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.; Krammer, Hein P. M.

1987-01-01

216

Educational Impact of Digital Visualization Tools on Digital Character Production Computer Science Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Digital character production courses have traditionally been taught in art departments. The digital character production course at the University of Utah is centered, drawing uniformly from art and engineering disciplines. Its design has evolved to include a synergy of computer science, functional art and human anatomy. It gives students an…

van Langeveld, Mark Christensen

2009-01-01

217

Two freshman courses which introduce digital electronics, programming, computers, and interfacing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article describes two one-credit freshman courses intended to familiarize students with the laboratory use of computers. The courses provide an introduction to programming in a high level language (BASIC) and in assembly language and to the design and construction of simple digital circuits. A final project requires students to interface an electronic thermometer to an S-100 Bus machine.

Seligmann, P.; Spencer, C. D.

1985-04-01

218

Computer Aids for the Design of Electric Distribution Networks.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A set of computer aids for the planning of distribution networks is described. The networks are allowed to contain dispersed generation, and dispersed storage. Direct-control-load-management techniques are also allowed as are indirect techniques such as t...

P. C. Constantopoulos M. Golibersuch V. Kalyan M. McNitt T. E. Morton

1981-01-01

219

Methodology for Characterizing a Generic Local Area Computer Network.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This thesis establishes a methodology for a manager of information systems to use when choosing a local area network (LAN) for an organization's computer communications. The methodology proposed describes the various decisions about a network that must be...

T. L. Koontz

1986-01-01

220

Computational functions in biochemical reaction networks.  

PubMed Central

In prior work we demonstrated the implementation of logic gates, sequential computers (universal Turing machines), and parallel computers by means of the kinetics of chemical reaction mechanisms. In the present article we develop this subject further by first investigating the computational properties of several enzymatic (single and multiple) reaction mechanisms: we show their steady states are analogous to either Boolean or fuzzy logic gates. Nearly perfect digital function is obtained only in the regime in which the enzymes are saturated with their substrates. With these enzymatic gates, we construct combinational chemical networks that execute a given truth-table. The dynamic range of a network's output is strongly affected by "input/output matching" conditions among the internal gate elements. We find a simple mechanism, similar to the interconversion of fructose-6-phosphate between its two bisphosphate forms (fructose-1,6-bisphosphate and fructose-2,6-bisphosphate), that functions analogously to an AND gate. When the simple model is supplanted with one in which the enzyme rate laws are derived from experimental data, the steady state of the mechanism functions as an asymmetric fuzzy aggregation operator with properties akin to a fuzzy AND gate. The qualitative behavior of the mechanism does not change when situated within a large model of glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and the TCA cycle. The mechanism, in this case, switches the pathway's mode from glycolysis to gluconeogenesis in response to chemical signals of low blood glucose (cAMP) and abundant fuel for the TCA cycle (acetyl coenzyme A). Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16

Arkin, A; Ross, J

1994-01-01

221

Increasing engagement and enrollment in breadth-first introductory courses using authentic computing tasks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The breadth-first approach to teaching introductory computer science is one way of dispelling the common misperception that programming is the sole task of the computer scientist. The breadth-first approach is particularly useful in courses for non-majors. Hands-on activities that make up laboratory assignments for these courses tend to focus on learning to program or simulations of program execution. These activities

Ryan L. McFall; Matthew DeJongh

2011-01-01

222

Social Studies: Application Units. Course II, Teachers. Computer-Oriented Curriculum. REACT (Relevant Educational Applications of Computer Technology).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This book is one of a series in Course II of the Relevant Educational Applications of Computer Technology (REACT) Project. It is designed to point out to teachers two of the major applications of computers in the social sciences: simulation and data analysis. The first section contains a variety of simulation units organized under the following…

Tecnica Education Corp., San Carlos, CA.

223

The Effects of Computer-Assisted Instruction on Jordanian College Students' Achievements in an Introductory Computer Science Course  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of traditional instruction (TI) plus Computer-Assisted Instruction (CAI) versus TI alone on college students' achievements in an introductory computer science course. This study was conducted at a small government university in Jordan using a Quasi-experimental, nonequivalent control group design. A courseware was developed to investigate the difference between two groups

Mohammed Ali; Ahmed Akour

224

Computer networking in an ambulatory health care setting.  

PubMed

Computers are a ubiquitous part of the ambulatory health care environment. Although stand-alone computers may be adequate for a small practice, networked computers can create much more powerful and cost-effective computerized systems. Local area networks allow groups of computers to share peripheral devices and computerized information within an office or cluster of offices. Wide area networks allow computers to securely share devices and information across a large geographical area. Either singly or in combination, these networks can be used to create robust systems to help physicians automate their practices and improve their access to important clinical information. In this article, we will examine common network configurations, explain how they function, and provide examples of real-world implementations of networking technology in health care. PMID:10662271

Alger, R; Berkowitz, L L; Bergeron, B; Buskett, D

225

Computer Networks as Social Networks: Collaborative Work, Telework, and Virtual Community  

Microsoft Academic Search

When computer networks link people as well as machines, they become social networks. Such computer-supported social networks (CSSNs) are becoming im- portant bases of virtual communities, computer-supported cooperative work, and telework. Computer-mediated communication such as electronic mail and com- puterized conferencing is usually text-based and asynchronous. It has limited social presence, and on-line communications are often more uninhibited, cre- ative,

Barry Wellman; Janet Salaff; Dimitrina Dimitrova; Laura Garton; Milena Gulia; Caroline Haythornthwaite

1996-01-01

226

Computer Network Attack and Its Effectiveness against Non-State Actors.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Computer Network Attack (CNA) is a subset of Computer Network Operations (CNO), which is a core capability of Information Operations. CNA is defined as operations to disrupt, deny, degrade, or destroy information resident in computers and computer network...

T. D. Presby

2006-01-01

227

Computer Literacy Course for Teacher for the 21st Century  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The life and activities of every man in the transitional period from the second to the third millennium has been characterized by huge changes that resulted from scientific and technological revolution in which dominates a highly developed IT-Communicational Technology. This paper concludes that to attain IT-literacy and computer literacy would…

Tatkovic, Nevenka; Ruzic, Maja

2004-01-01

228

Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Computer Information Systems Technology. Computer Information Systems Technology (Program CIP: 52.1201--Management Information Systems & Business Data). Computer Programming (Program CIP: 52.1201). Network Support (Program CIP: 52.1290--Computer Network Support Technology). Postsecondary Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for two programs in the state's postsecondary-level computer information systems technology cluster: computer programming and network support. Presented in the introduction are program descriptions and suggested course

Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

229

Free and Open-Source Software for a Course on Network Management: Authoring and Enactment of Scripts Based on Collaborative Learning Strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) case study in engineering education carried out within the context of a network management course. The case study shows that the use of two computing tools developed by the authors and based on free-and open-source software (FOSS) provide significant educational benefits over traditional engineering pedagogical approaches in terms of both concepts and

Davinia Hernandez-Leo; Miguel L. Bote-Lorenzo; Juan I. Asensio-Perez; Eduardo Gocmez-Sanchez; Eloy D. Villasclaras-Fernandez; IvÁn M. Jorrin-Abellan; Yannis A. Dimitriadis

2007-01-01

230

Computer, Video, and Rapid-Cycling Plant Projects in an Undergraduate Plant Breeding Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Studies the perceived effectiveness of four student projects involving videotape production, computer conferencing, microcomputer simulation, and rapid-cycling Brassica breeding for undergraduate plant breeding students in two course offerings in consecutive years. Linking of the computer conferencing and video projects improved the rating of the…

Michaels, T. E.

1993-01-01

231

Effects of types of active learning activity on two junior-level computer engineering courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

In several computer engineering and computer science courses, it has been observed that active learning activities (ALAs) aid the students in better understanding of the technical material. In this paper, we explore the influence of the type of the ALA and the academic quality of the student on the effectiveness of the technique. We perform the study in two junior

Saurabh Bagchi; Mark C. Johnson; Somali Chaterji

2008-01-01

232

Design and Delivery of Multiple Server-Side Computer Languages Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Given the emergence of service-oriented architecture, IS students need to be knowledgeable of multiple server-side computer programming languages to be able to meet the needs of the job market. This paper outlines the pedagogy of an innovative course of multiple server-side computer languages for the undergraduate IS majors. The paper discusses…

Wang, Shouhong; Wang, Hai

2011-01-01

233

Advantages and disadvantages of using various computer tools in electrical engineering courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses different computer tools used to help deliver, administer, and teach the material covered in two basic undergraduate courses in electrical engineering. The computer facilities, programs and tutorials developed are discussed; however, the paper concentrates more on analyzing the results of using these tools in the student learning process. The students' marks and the results of several student

C. A. Canizares; Zeno T. Faur

1997-01-01

234

The Use of a Computer Algebra System in Capstone Mathematics Courses for Undergraduate Mathematics Majors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the use of a computer algebra system in a capstone mathematics course for undergraduate mathematics majors preparing to teach secondary school mathematics. Provides sample exercises intended to demonstrate how the power of a computer algebra system such as MAPLE can contribute to desired outcomes including reinforcing and strengthening…

Harris, Gary A.

2000-01-01

235

Landuse: A Computer Program for Laboratory Use in Economic Geography Courses, Technical Paper No. 8.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This technical report describes a digital computer program on the spatial structure of agricultural production and how it can be used in economic geography courses. Chapters one through four, respectively, (1) examine the use of digital computers in the teaching of college geography, (2) analyze the von Thunen theory which postulates laws that…

Marble, Duane F.; Anderson, Bruce M.

236

Relationships among Learning Styles and Motivation with Computer-Aided Instruction in an Agronomy Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Multi-media learning tools were developed to enhance student learning for an introductory agronomy course at Iowa State University. During fall 2002, the new interactive computer program, called Computer Interactive Multimedia Program for Learning Enhancement (CIMPLE) was incorporated into the teaching, learning, and assessment processes of the…

McAndrews, Gina M.; Mullen, Russell E.; Chadwick, Scott A.

2005-01-01

237

A Novel Use of Computer Simulation in an Applied Pharmacokinetics Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The use of a package of interactive computer programs designed to simulate pharmacokinetic monitoring of drug therapy in a required undergraduate applied pharmacokinetics course is described. Students were assigned the problem of maintaining therapeutic drug concentrations in a computer generated "patient" as an adjunct to classroom instruction.…

Sullivan, Timothy J.

1982-01-01

238

Theory VI. Computational Materials Sciences Network (CMSN)  

SciTech Connect

The Computational Materials Sciences Network (CMSN) is a virtual center consisting of scientists interested in working together, across organizational and disciplinary boundaries, to formulate and pursue projects that reflect challenging and relevant computational research in the materials sciences. The projects appropriate for this center involve those problems best pursued through broad cooperative efforts, rather than those key problems best tackled by single investigator groups. CMSN operates similarly to the DOE Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials, coordinated by George Samara at Sandia. As in the Synthesis and Processing Center, the intent of the modest funding for CMSN is to foster partnering and collective activities. All CMSN proposals undergo external peer review and are judged foremost on the quality and timeliness of the science and also on criteria relevant to the objective of the center, especially concerning a strategy for partnering. More details about CMSN can be found on the CMSN webpages at: http://cmpweb.ameslab.gov/ccms/CMSN-homepage.html.

Zhang, Z Y

2008-06-25

239

A study of the impact of computer applications supplementation in college computer literacy courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two intact computer science computer literacy classes at Middle Tennessee State University in the spring of 1988 were used in a study which hypothesized that alternating computer applications lessons (word processing, data base and spreadsheets) with computer literacy theory lessons would increase interest in computers, increase knowledge of computer literacy, and decrease the gender gap in computer interest and knowledge

Joe Mack Thweatt

1988-01-01

240

Evaluating Computer Lab Modules for Large Biology Courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reports a two-year investigation of students' perceptions of computer laboratory modules (CLM's, also known as Bio LabStations) in a university-level, non-majors biology sequence. During the 1995-1996 academic year, we conducted field observations of students' use of the CLM's for two semesters. At the end of the second semester we developed, administered, and analyzed a written survey (n=626). During

MARY B. NAKHLEH; DEANNA L. AUBERRY; DAVID C. EICHINGER

2000-01-01

241

APS Poster Presentation and Networking Courses Help Trainees Prepare for Experimental Biology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article is on page 89 of The Physiologist, June 2012. APS offered two Online Professional Skills Training courses this spring to help trainees prepare for the 2012 Experimental Biology meeting: ÃÂHow to Present a Scientific PosterÃÂ and ÃÂHow to Network at a Scientific Meeting.ÃÂ This was the first year that the courses were held and they were both well received.

APS Education Office (American Physiological Society Education Office)

2012-06-01

242

Piecewise Network Awareness Service for Wireless\\/Mobile Pervasive Computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a piecewise framework for network awareness service (NAS) for wireless\\/mobile pervasive computing. We investigate how piecewise consideration of wired and wireless elements of the framework architecture benefits service advertisement and discovery and network-awareness techniques. We also discuss scalability of the NAS framework with respect to platform computing capabilities. The framework is suitable for a wide range of

Liang Cheng; Ivan Marsic

2002-01-01

243

A testbed for mobile networked computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rapid deployment of wireless access technology, along with the emergence of high speed integrated service networks, promises to provide users with ubiquitous access to multimedia information in the near future. We are building an experimental testbed system, SWAN (Seamless Wireless ATM Network), to mimic this emerging networking environment. Our wireless access network is organized according to a nanocellular design

Prathima Agrawal; Abhaya Asthana; Mark Cravatts; Eoin Hyden; Paul Krzyzanowski; Partho Mishra; B. Narendran; Mani Srivastava; John Trotter

1995-01-01

244

Understanding Social Networks Properties for Trustworthy Computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ever-increasing popularity of social networks opens new directions for leveraging social networks to build primitives for security and communication, in many contexts. Such primitives utilize the trust in these social networks to ensure collaboration and algorithmic properties exhibited in such networks to argue for the effectiveness of such primitives. Despite the importance of such properties and their quality to

Abedelaziz Mohaisen; Huy Tran; Nicholas Hopper; Yongdae Kim

2011-01-01

245

Granular computing for Intelligent Social Network modeling and cooperative decisions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our objective here is to take a step toward the development of intelligent social network analysis using granular computing. In particular one can start by expressing in a human focused manner concepts associated with social networks then formalize these concepts using fuzzy sets and then evaluate these concepts with respect to social networks which have been represented using set based

Ronald R. Yager

2008-01-01

246

Design of computer communication networks under link reliability constraints  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a method to design a cost effective computer communication network which employs unreliable links. The design is aimed at obtaining a minimum cost network which satisfies the given constraints of grade of service defined in terms of the degree of availability of the network and the node to node traffic capacities in normal conditions. We present a

Debashis Saha; A. Mukherjee; S. K. Dutta

1993-01-01

247

Computational organizational network modeling: Strategies and an example  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper articulates the logic of computational organizational modeling as a strategy for theory construction and testing in the field of organizational communication networks. The paper introduces, Blanche, and objectoriented simulation environment that supports quantitative modeling and analysis of the evolution of organizational networks. Blanche relies on the conceptual primitives of attributes that describe network nodes and links that connect

Andrew Hyatt; Noshir Contractor; Patricia Jones

1996-01-01

248

CSIN (Chemical Substances Information Network) Workbook: U.S. Geological Survey Training Course for Chemical Substances Information Network.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Chemical Substances Information Network (CSIN) is a computer interface that provides a gateway to facilitate searching and retrieving bibliographic and factual data from a large selection of online databases maintained by Dialog, SDC, NLM, BRS, OHS, C...

1984-01-01

249

Improving Computing Courses from the Points of View of Students and Teachers: A Review and an Empirical Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The improvement of computing courses is a permanent need and is a goal established by any teacher. Suggestions of possible course improvements should be made by teachers and students. Computer project-based courses involving a significant number of people pose difficulties to listening to all their opinions. The purpose of our research is…

Sampaio, Alberto; Sampaio, Isabel

2012-01-01

250

Collaboration in computer science: a network science approach. Part I  

Microsoft Academic Search

Co-authorship in publications within a discipline uncovers interesting properties of the analysed field. We represent collaboration in academic papers of computer science in terms of differently grained networks, including those sub-networks that emerge from conference and journal co-authorship only. We take advantage of the network science paraphernalia to take a picture of computer science collaboration including all papers published in

Massimo Franceschet

2010-01-01

251

Computer Communication Network Upgrade for Optimal Capacity Related Reliability  

Microsoft Academic Search

Capacity-related reliability (CRR) computes the probability that a computer communication network (CCN) has at least a bandwidth Wmin between a pair of nodes. The quality of service (QoS) metric extends the terminal-reliability and the network-flow measures to capture the effects of any required message bandwidth, channel capacity, and network connectivity in a CCN, where links (connection services) are subject to

Kok Yong Lim; Sieteng Soh; Suresh Rai

2005-01-01

252

Teacher's Guide to Using Computer Networks for Written Interaction: Classroom Activities for Collaborative Learning with Networked Computers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Intended for a broad spectrum of teachers using or considering using computers networks for written interaction, this teacher's guide presents techniques and behaviors that encourage and support learning on a computer classroom environment. The 21 essays that make up the book are written by people involved in the ENFI (Electronic Networks For…

Beil, Don, Ed.

253

Empirical Study of Topology Effects on Diagnosis in Computer Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we compare the efficiency of fault detection and diagnosis in networks having different topological properties, such as scale-free networks and Erdos-Renyi random graphs. Efficiency measures include both the number of tests (e.g., end-to-end network probes) necessary for diagnosis and the computational complexity of diagnosis. We observe that diagnosis in scale-free networks typically requires significantly larger number of

Natalia Odintsova; Irina Rish

2007-01-01

254

Human-computer interaction system design and implementation in network  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, based on the research of the existing network human-computer interaction systems, a new network human-computer interaction sub-system design method is proposed. This method can not only overcome the shortcomings of the existing human-computer interaction systems, but also can provide users a standard and friendly interface, allowing users to master a variety of text retrieval operations without special

Changchun Pan

2010-01-01

255

Biomolecular Computing by In Vitro Transcriptional Networks.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This grant supported the initial development of a novel biochemical system, in vitro transcriptional networks, that can be programmed to construct arbitrary circuits. These systems are a simplification of genetic regulatory networks. The foundational theo...

E. Winfree J. Kim S. Lee S. Mohanty K. Shantz

2004-01-01

256

Computational Experience with Radial Basis Function Networks.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report discusses the use of Radial Basis Functions for use in neural networks for hand-printed character recognition. The results are expected to apply to other applications of neural networks for classifying input patterns.

J. L. Blue

1993-01-01

257

The performance analysis of computer communication networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many communication networks can be modeled as Markov chains of Quasi-Birth-Death (QBD) type, M\\/G\\/1-type or G\\/M\\/1-type. For the purpose of analyzing and optimizing the performance of these communication networks, these three classes of processes are studied extensively in this thesis.^ Carrier Sense Multiple Access (CSMA) networks can be modeled as QBD processes. To better understand these networks, a recently proposed

Ji Zhang

1989-01-01

258

Rigidity, Computation, and Randomization in Network Localization  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we provide a theoretical foundation for the problem of network localization in which some nodes know their locations and other nodes determine their locations by measuring the distances to their neighbors. We construct grounded graphs to model network localization and apply graph rigidity theory to test the conditions for unique localizability and to construct uniquely localizable networks.

Tolga Eren; David Kiyoshi Goldenberg; Walter Whiteley; Yang Richard Yang; A. Stephen Morse; Brian D. O. Anderson; Peter N. Belhumeur

2004-01-01

259

Community readiness for a computer-based health information network.  

PubMed

The need for timely and accurate communication among healthcare providers has prompted the development of computer-based health information networks that allow patient and client information to be shared among agencies. This article reports the findings of a study to assess whether residents of an upstate New York community were ready for a computer-based health information network to facilitate delivery of long term care services. Focus group sessions, which involved both consumers and professionals, revealed that security of personal information was of concern to healthcare providers, attorneys, and consumers. Physicians were the most enthusiastic about the possibility of a computer-based health information network. Consumers and other healthcare professionals, including nurses, indicated that such a network would be helpful to them personally. Nurses and other healthcare professionals need to be knowledgeable about the use of computer-based health information networks and other electronic information systems as this trend continues to spread across the U.S. PMID:16929715

Ervin, Naomi E; Berry, Michelle M

260

Dynamic computation of network statistics via updating schema.  

PubMed

Given a large network, computing statistics such as clustering coefficient, or modularity, is costly for large networks. When one more edge or vertex is added, traditional methods require that the full (expensive) computation be redone on this slightly modified graph. Alternatively, we introduce here a new approach: under modification to the graph, we update the statistics instead of computing them from scratch. In this paper we provide update schemes for a number of popular statistics, to include degree distribution, clustering coefficient, assortativity, and modularity. Our primary aim is to reduce the computational complexity needed to track the evolving behavior of large networks. As an important consequence, this approach provides efficient methods which may support modeling the evolution of dynamic networks to identify and understand critical transitions. Using the updating scheme, the network statistics can be computed much faster than re-calculating each time that the network evolves. We also note that the update formula can be used to determine which edge or node will lead to the extremal change of network statistics, providing a way of predicting or designing network evolution rules that would optimize some chosen statistic. We present our evolution methods in terms of a network statistics differential notation. PMID:19392027

Sun, Jie; Bagrow, James P; Bollt, Erik M; Skufca, Joseph D

2009-03-30

261

Life-Course Events, Social Networks, and the Emergence of Violence among Female Gang Members  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Using data gathered from a multi-year field study, this article identifies specific life-course events shared by gang-affiliated women. Gangs emerge as a cultural adaptation or pro-social community response to poverty and racial isolation. Through the use of a social-network approach, data show that violence dramatically increases in the period…

Fleisher, Mark S.; Krienert, Jessie L.

2004-01-01

262

Design of a Competitive and Collaborative Learning Strategy in a Communication Networks Course  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, an educational methodology based on collaborative and competitive learning is proposed. The suggested approach has been successfully applied to an undergraduate com- munication networks course, which is part of the core curriculum of the three-year degree in telecommunications engineering at the University of Valladolid in Spain. This methodology is supported by two tools: the Moodle wiki for

Luisa M. Regueras; Elena Verdú; María Jesús Verdú; Juan Pablo de Castro

2011-01-01

263

E-Learning in Hong Kong: comparing learning outcomes in online multimedia and lecture versions of an introductory computing course  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper evaluates the effectiveness of Web-based, highly interactive, and multimedia-rich e-learning materials by comparing students' learning outcomes in the lecture and online versions of an introductory computing course. The course versions differed only in that face-to-face lectures were replaced with e-learning modules in the online course; the other course elements (laboratory sessions, use of computer-mediated communications, examinations) were the

Synnove Kekkonen-Moneta; Giovanni B Moneta

2002-01-01

264

Interactive knowledge networks for interdisciplinary course navigation within Moodle.  

PubMed

Web-based hypermedia learning environments are widely used in modern education and seem particularly well suited for interdisciplinary learning. Previous work has identified guidance through these complex environments as a crucial problem of their acceptance and efficiency. We reasoned that map-based navigation might provide straightforward and effortless orientation. To achieve this, we developed a clickable and user-oriented concept map-based navigation plugin. This tool is implemented as an extension of Moodle, a widely used learning management system. It visualizes inner and interdisciplinary relations between learning objects and is generated dynamically depending on user set parameters and interactions. This plugin leaves the choice of navigation type to the user and supports direct guidance. Previously developed and evaluated face-to-face interdisciplinary learning materials bridging physiology and physics courses of a medical curriculum were integrated as learning objects, the relations of which were defined by metadata. Learning objects included text pages, self-assessments, videos, animations, and simulations. In a field study, we analyzed the effects of this learning environment on physiology and physics knowledge as well as the transfer ability of third-term medical students. Data were generated from pre- and posttest questionnaires and from tracking student navigation. Use of the hypermedia environment resulted in a significant increase of knowledge and transfer capability. Furthermore, the efficiency of learning was enhanced. We conclude that hypermedia environments based on Moodle and enriched by concept map-based navigation tools can significantly support interdisciplinary learning. Implementation of adaptivity may further strengthen this approach. PMID:23209009

Scherl, Andre; Dethleffsen, Kathrin; Meyer, Michael

2012-12-01

265

Thera-Network: A Wearable Computing Network to Motivate Exercise in Patients Undergoing Physical Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a growing field of smart medical devices for home use. The Thera-Network is designed for patients under the care of a physical therapist. A 2004 survey by the author notes that motivation and regulation are the largest deterrents for patients participating in a course of at home exercise between therapy sessions. With the Thera-Network, motivation is offered through

Janna C. Kimel

2005-01-01

266

OCEAN: The Open Computation Exchange and Arbitration Network, A Market Approach to Meta Computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the Proceedings of the International Symposium on Parallel and Distributed Computing (ISPDC'03) Abstractó Rapid advancements in processor and networking technologies have led to the evolution of cluster and grid computing frameworks. These high-performance computing en- vironments exploit geographically distributed, diverse resources with the goal of providing efcient computing solutions to all kinds of parallel and distributed applications. OCEAN (Open

Pradeep Padala; Cyrus Harrison; Nicholas Pelfort; Erwin Jansen; Michael P. Frank; Chaitanya Chokkareddy

2003-01-01

267

Fundamentals of Biometric System Design: New Course for Electrical, Computer, and Software Engineering Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biometrics is a unique area of multidisciplinary engineering practice. We address this specific-application area in our classes on ¿Fundamentals of Biometric System Design¿ for the senior undergraduate electrical, computer, and software engineering students. This one-semester course covers various aspects of engineering design of biometric systems such as formulation and analysis of design goals, choosing computing platform, including application-specific DSP processors;

Svetlana N. Yanushkevich; Anna V. Shmerko

2009-01-01

268

Syntactic Computations in the Language Network: Characterizing Dynamic Network Properties Using Representational Similarity Analysis  

PubMed Central

The core human capacity of syntactic analysis involves a left hemisphere network involving left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) and posterior middle temporal gyrus (LMTG) and the anatomical connections between them. Here we use magnetoencephalography (MEG) to determine the spatio-temporal properties of syntactic computations in this network. Listeners heard spoken sentences containing a local syntactic ambiguity (e.g., “… landing planes …”), at the offset of which they heard a disambiguating verb and decided whether it was an acceptable/unacceptable continuation of the sentence. We charted the time-course of processing and resolving syntactic ambiguity by measuring MEG responses from the onset of each word in the ambiguous phrase and the disambiguating word. We used representational similarity analysis (RSA) to characterize syntactic information represented in the LIFG and left posterior middle temporal gyrus (LpMTG) over time and to investigate their relationship to each other. Testing a variety of lexico-syntactic and ambiguity models against the MEG data, our results suggest early lexico-syntactic responses in the LpMTG and later effects of ambiguity in the LIFG, pointing to a clear differentiation in the functional roles of these two regions. Our results suggest the LpMTG represents and transmits lexical information to the LIFG, which responds to and resolves the ambiguity.

Tyler, Lorraine K.; Cheung, Teresa P. L.; Devereux, Barry J.; Clarke, Alex

2013-01-01

269

High-performance neural networks. [Neural computers  

SciTech Connect

The new Forth hardware architectures offer an intermediate solution to high-performance neural networks while the theory and programming details of neural networks for synthetic intelligence are developed. This approach has been used successfully to determine the parameters and run the resulting network for a synthetic insect consisting of a 200-node ''brain'' with 1760 interconnections. Both the insect's environment and its sensor input have thus far been simulated. However, the frequency-coded nature of the Browning network allows easy replacement of the simulated sensors by real-world counterparts.

Dress, W.B.

1987-06-01

270

The Benefits of Combining Computer Technology and Traditional Teaching Methods in Large Enrollment Geocscience Courses  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes a study in which data on exam performances and attitudes toward the use of technology were collected from large enrollment, entry-level Geoscience courses over a span of seven semesters. The data were examined to determine if the use of computers as a presentation tool and the incorporation of the internet as a means to give students increased exposure to course content (notes) increased exam scores and knowledge of Earth Sciences. It was noted that one of the important points about the Geosciences is their prominent visual component, an aspect that is well-addressed by the use of computers and the internet. The researchers found that most students found web-based notes to be useful and average exam scores improved. Comprehensive final exam scores also improved, suggesting better preparation for exams and more retention of course information.

Durbin, James

2002-01-01

271

An Intervention To Remediate Developmental Students' Procrastination in a Computer-Based PSI Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Examines the effectiveness of a personalized learning assistance intervention to overcome developmental students' procrastination in a computer-based introductory psychology course taught with the Personalized System of Instruction (PSI). An evaluation of the intervention suggests that it was effective in getting the procrastinating students to…

Brothen, Thomas; Bazzarre, M. Elizabeth

1998-01-01

272

Distributed Training for the Reserve Component: Course Conversion and Implementation Guidelines for Computer Conferencing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this handbook is to provide background and guidelines for course designers and instructional developers who will be developing Reserve Component training for the United States military using asynchronous computer conferencing techniques. The recommendations in this report are based on an international review of the literature in…

Hahn, H. A.; And Others

273

Applying Computer-Assisted Musical Instruction to Music Appreciation Course: An Example with Chinese Musical Instruments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study aims to explore the effectiveness of computer-assisted musical instruction (CAMI) in the Learning Chinese Musical Instruments (LCMI) course. The CAMI software for Chinese musical instruments was developed and administered to 228 students in a vocational high school. A pretest-posttest non-equivalent control group design with three…

Lou, Shi-Jer; Guo, Yuan-Chang; Zhu, Yi-Zhen; Shih, Ru-Chu; Dzan, Wei-Yuan

2011-01-01

274

A Computer-Assisted Instruction Course in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Respiratory Diseases.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A computer-assisted simulation of the "chart method" of teaching has been developed and was used to provide instruction in clinical decision-making in the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary diseases. The course requires a student to reach and defend a diagnosis and to provide appropriate treatment for each of 10 simulated cases. Evaluation of…

Crocco, John A.; And Others

1975-01-01

275

Computer Aided Instruction for a Course in Boolean Algebra and Logic Design. Final Report (Revised).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The use of computers to prepare deficient college and graduate students for courses that build upon previously acquired information would solve the growing problem of professors who must spend up to one third of their class time in review of material. But examination of students who were taught Boolean Algebra and Logic Design by means of…

Roy, Rob

276

Evaluation of Teaching and Learning Processes in a Computer-Supported Mechanical Engineering Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evaluates the teaching and learning processes in a computer-supported first-year undergraduate course in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Surrey (England). Students saw the workshop delivery as being more interesting, effective, and efficient than lecture-based delivery; help from the tutor was seen as the most…

Brown, Alan

1995-01-01

277

A Treatment of Computational Precision, Number Representation, and Large Integers in an Introductory Fortran Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Computational precision is sometimes given short shrift in a first programming course. Treating this topic requires discussing integer and floating-point number representations and inaccuracies that may result from their use. An example of a moderately simple programming problem from elementary statistics was examined. It forced students to…

Richardson, William H., Jr.

2006-01-01

278

Investigating pair-programming in a 2 nd -year software development and design computer science course  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the results of a pair programming experiment conducted at the University of Auckland (NZ) during the first semester of 2004. It involved 300 second year Computer Science students attending a software design and construction course. We investigated similar issues to those reported in [26] and employed a subset of the questionnaires used by Laurie Williams et al.

Emilia Mendes; Lubna Basil Al-Fakhri; Andrew Luxton-Reilly

2005-01-01

279

Community College Uses a Video-Game Lab to Lure Students to Computer Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A computer lab has become one of the most popular hangouts at Northern Virginia Community College after officials decided to load its PCs with popular video games, install a PlayStation and an Xbox, and declare it "for gamers only." The goal of this lab is to entice students to take game-design and other IT courses. John Min, dean of business…

Young, Jeffrey R.

2007-01-01

280

Computer/Technology Skills Standard Course of Study and Grade Level Competencies 6-12  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Computer/Technology Skills Standard Course of Study describes the progressive development of knowledge and skills in six strands: (1) Societal and Ethical Issues; (2) Database; (3) Spreadsheet Keyboard; (4) Utilization/Word Processing/Desktop Publishing; (5) Multimedia/Presentation, and (6) Telecommunications/Internet. The revision process…

North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, 2004

2004-01-01

281

Computer Simulation of the Alonso Household Location Model in the Microeconomics Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Computer simulation of the Alonso household location model can enrich the intermediate microeconomics course. The model includes decisions on location, land space, and other goods and is a valuable complement to the usual textbook model of household consumption. It has three decision variables, one of which is a "bad," and one good's price is a…

Bolton, Roger E.

2005-01-01

282

Student attitudes toward statistics before and after a computer-integrated introductory statistics course  

Microsoft Academic Search

A validated questionnaire measuring the attitude of engineering students toward statistics was administered to 46 male and 17 female undergraduate engineers during the first and last week of class. The objective was to test the hypothesis that a newly designed computer-integrated statistics course positively affects students' attitudes toward statistics. For the students as a whole, no significant difference is found

Teri Reed Rhoads; Norma Faris Hubele

2000-01-01

283

Active and Collaborative Learning in an Introductory Electrical and Computer Engineering Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Active and collaborative learning instruments were introduced into an introductory electrical and computer engineering course. These instruments were designed to assess specific learning objectives and program outcomes. Results show that students developed an understanding comparable to that of more advanced students assessed later in the…

Kotru, Sushma; Burkett, Susan L.; Jackson, David Jeff

2010-01-01

284

Development of Online Cognitive and Algorithm Tests as Assessment Tools in Introductory Computer Science Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper presents the online cognitive and algorithm tests, which were developed in order to determine if certain cognitive factors and fundamental algorithms correlate with the performance of students in their introductory computer science course. The tests were implemented among Management Information Systems majors from the Philippines and…

Avancena, Aimee Theresa; Nishihara, Akinori; Vergara, John Paul

2012-01-01

285

Learning computer systems in a distributed course: Problematizing content and context  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, a research study of learning computer systems in a complex, internationally distributed course environment is described. The relation between a learner and the object of his\\/her studies being in focus in phenomenographic research is enhanced to encompass also the relation between the learner and factors that together form the environment of which the learning of the subject

Anders Berglund

2002-01-01

286

A Queueing Network Analysis of Computer Communication Networks with Window Flow Control  

Microsoft Academic Search

A computer communication network with window flow control is modeled by a closed multichain queueing network. The severe computational limitation of previous solution algorithms is overcome with a heuristic derived from the recently found mean value analysis. A large numerical example is given.

MARTIN REISER

1979-01-01

287

Mapping Neural Network Back-Propagation onto Parallel Computers with Computation\\/Communication Overlapping  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is shown in [6] that mapping neural networks onto existing parallel computers leads to an unsatisfactory efficiency, except for irregularly connected networks, with several distinguishable highly connected regions. This paper shows how a four step decomposition of the back-propagation algorithm allows to introduce computation\\/communication overlapping so as to improve any parallel mapping of differentiable feed-forward neural networks. This solution

Bernard Girau

1995-01-01

288

Hamming Net and LVQ Neural Networks for Classification of Computer Network Attacks: A Comparative Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a comparative analysis of results obtained when applying Hamming Net and LVQ (Learning Vector Quantization) classifiers neural networks to recognize attack signatures in datasets. Strings similar to those located on payload field in computer networks packets are inserted in these neural networks for pattern classification. Since 2004, when it was presented for the first time, ANNIDA system

Lília De Sá Silva; Adriana C. Ferrari Dos Santos; Antonio Montes; Jose Demisio Da Silva Simoes

2006-01-01

289

New Design for Interfacing Computers to the Octopus Network.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory has several large-scale computers which are connected to the Octopus network. Several difficulties arise in providing adequate resources along with reliable performance. To alleviate some of these problems a new method of...

L. J. Sloan

1977-01-01

290

Computer Network Defense for the United States of America.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The terrorist attacks of September 11th 2001 have brought increased attention to the nation's vulnerabilities. One of these vulnerabilities is the nation's computer networks. While a level of vulnerability was acknowledged prior to 11 September, little wa...

2002-01-01

291

Wireless Networks: New Meaning to Ubiquitous Computing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Discusses the use of wireless technology in academic libraries. Topics include wireless networks; standards (IEEE 802.11); wired versus wireless; why libraries implement wireless technology; wireless local area networks (WLANs); WLAN security; examples of wireless use at Indiana State University and Morrisville College (New York); and useful…

Drew, Wilfred, Jr.

2003-01-01

292

Use of computer network bulletin board systems by disabled persons.  

PubMed Central

Computer-based electronic support groups are being used by persons facing physical and emotional challenges. Twenty-six users of disability-related electronic support groups responded to a survey designed to determine computer network use and benefits users gain through their network use. The survey included questions about network use for general communication and support, enhancement of communication ability, attainment of knowledge on specific topics, and employment enhancement. Statistically significant results were obtained concerning the perceived benefits of emotional support and communication in relation to network use. Only a small number (n = 9) reported use of the network for employment purposes. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using networks to provide information, services, assistance, and support for disabled and their care providers.

Hassett, M.; Lowder, C.; Rutan, D.

1992-01-01

293

Phoebus: Network Middleware for Next-Generation Network Computing  

SciTech Connect

The Phoebus project investigated algorithms, protocols, and middleware infrastructure to improve end-to-end performance in high speed, dynamic networks. The Phoebus system essentially serves as an adaptation point for networks with disparate capabilities or provisioning. This adaptation can take a variety of forms including acting as a provisioning agent across multiple signaling domains, providing transport protocol adaptation points, and mapping between distributed resource reservation paradigms and the optical network control plane. We have successfully developed the system and demonstrated benefits. The Phoebus system was deployed in Internet2 and in ESnet, as well as in GEANT2, RNP in Brazil and over international links to Korea and Japan. Phoebus is a system that implements a new protocol and associated forwarding infrastructure for improving throughput in high-speed dynamic networks. It was developed to serve the needs of large DOE applications on high-performance networks. The idea underlying the Phoebus model is to embed Phoebus Gateways (PGs) in the network as on-ramps to dynamic circuit networks. The gateways act as protocol translators that allow legacy applications to use dedicated paths with high performance.

Martin Swany

2012-06-16

294

Computational Intelligence for Network Intrusion Detection: Recent Contributions  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Computational intelligence has figured prominently in many solutions to the network intrusion detection problem since the\\u000a 1990s. This prominence and popularity has continued in the contributions of the recent past. These contributions present the\\u000a success and potential of computational intelligence in network intrusion detection systems for tasks such as feature selection,\\u000a signature generation, anomaly detection, classification, and clustering. This paper

Asim Karim

2005-01-01

295

A Novel Dynamic Immunization Strategy for Computer Network Epidemics  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Current immunization strategies for computer network epidemics are based on the assumption that the vaccines are ready before\\u000a the epidemics, and it is obviously unrealistic in computer network. Our study of the targeted immunization on Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR) epidemiological model shows the efficiency of the targeted immunization decreases sharply with time gap between the\\u000a vaccines and epidemics considered. We propose a

Zhifei Tao; Hai Jin; Zongfen Han; En Cheng

2006-01-01

296

Trusted Computing: Providing Security for Peer-to-Peer Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we demonstrate the application of Trusted Computing to securing Peer-to-Peer (P2P) networks. We identify a central challenge in providing many of the security services within these networks, namely the absence of stable verifiable peer identi- ties. We employ the functionalities provided by Trusted Computing technology to establish a pseudonymous au- thentication scheme for peers and extend this

Shane Balfe; Amit D. Lakhani; Kenneth G. Paterson

2005-01-01

297

Visualisation of the Dynamics of Computer-mediated Community Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we will demonstrate the potential of processing and visualising the dynamics of computer-mediated communities by means of Social Network Analysis. According to the fact that computer-mediated community systems are manifested also as structured data, we use data structures like e-mail, discussion boards, and bibliography sources for an automatic transformation into social network data formats. Currently our developed

Andreas Harrer; Sam Zeini; Sabrina Ziebarth; Daniel Münter

298

Mining Social Networks on the Mexican Computer Science Community  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scientific communities around the world are increasingly paying more attention to collaborative networks to ensure they remain\\u000a competitive, the Computer Science (CS) community is not an exception. Discovering collaboration opportunities is a challenging\\u000a problem in social networks. Traditional social network analysis allows us to observe which authors are already collaborating,\\u000a how often they are related to each other, and how

Huberto Ayanegui-Santiago; Orion Fausto Reyes-galaviz; Alberto Chávez-Aragón; Federico Ramírez-Cruz; Alberto Portilla; Luciano García-Bañuelos

2009-01-01

299

Fuzzy Logic, Neural Networks, and Soft Computing.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The past few years have witnessed a rapid growth of interest in a cluster of modes of modeling and computation which may be described collectively as soft computing. The distinguishing characteristic of soft computing is that its primary aims are to achie...

L. A. Zadeh

1994-01-01

300

The Role of Computer Networks in Aerospace Engineering.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents selected results from an empirical investigation into the use of computer networks in aerospace engineering based on data from a national mail survey. The need for user-based studies of electronic networking is discussed, and a copy of the questionnaire used in the survey is appended. (Contains 46 references.) (LRW)

Bishop, Ann Peterson

1994-01-01

301

The Complex Network of Evolutionary Computation Authors: an Initial Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

EC paper authors form a complex network of co-authorship which is, by itself, a example of an evolving system with its own rules, concept of fitness, and patterns of attachment. In this paper we explore the network of authors of evolutionary computation papers found in a major bibliographic database. We examine its macroscopic properties, and compare it with other co-authorship

Carlos Cotta; Juan-Julian Merelo

2005-01-01

302

The Role of Computer Networks in Aerospace Engineering  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents selected results from an empirical investigation into the use of computer networks in aersopace engineering. Such networks allow aerospace engineers to communicate with people and access remote resources through electronic mail, file transfer, and remote log-in. The study drew its subjects from private sector, government and academic organizations in the U.S. aerospace industry. Data presented here were

Ann Peterson Bishop

1994-01-01

303

Economics of Computing: The Case of Centralized Network File Servers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses computer networking and the cost effectiveness of decentralization, including local area networks. A planned experiment with a centralized approach to the operation and management of file servers at the University of South Carolina is described that hopes to realize cost savings and the avoidance of staffing problems. (Contains four…

Solomon, Martin B.

1994-01-01

304

A multilayer neural network system for computer access security  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a new multilayer neural network system to identify computer users. The input vectors were made up of the time intervals between successive keystrokes created by users while typing a known sequence of characters. Each input vector was classified into one of several classes, thereby identifying the user who typed the character sequence. Three types of networks were

M. S. Obaidat; D. T. Macchairolo

1994-01-01

305

Computer Networks as Instructional and Collaborative Distance Learning Environments.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Reports on the early stages of a project at the U.S. Air Force Academy, in which the instructional applications of a networked classroom laboratory, an intranet, and the Internet are explored as well as the effectiveness and efficiency of groupware and computer networks as instructional environments. Presents the results of the first pilot tests.…

Schrum, Lynne; Lamb, Theodore A.

1997-01-01

306

The Computer Chronicles: A Newswire Network for Kids.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Computer Chronicle Newswire Network (for Inter Learn, Inc.) offers an electronic newswire service modeled on United Press International (UPI) and Associated Press (AP) specially designed to help young people publish their own local versions of an international newspaper. The network is described, with information on how to join provided. (JN)

Classroom Computer Learning, 1986

1986-01-01

307

Fault Detection of Computer Communication Networks Using an Expert System  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main objective of this study was to build an expert system for assisting the network administrator in his work of management and administration of the computer communication network. Theory of operation of the proposed expert system depends on using a time series model capable of forecasting the various performance parameters as: delay, utilization and collision frequency. When the expert

Ibrahiem M. M. El Emary

308

Collision-Free Access Control for Computer Communication Bus Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper considers access control for local area computer communication networks. We propose two distributed access control schemes for a bus network. The schemes are simple and asynchronous, and provide for collision-free communication among ports. In addition, one of the schemes provides a bounded, guaranteed time to transmisidon for each port. We also show that this scheme is efficient in

Kapali P. Eswaran; V. Carl Hamacher; Gerald S. Shedler

1981-01-01

309

Computer Network Security: Best Practices for Alberta School Jurisdictions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper provides a snapshot of the computer network security industry and addresses specific issues related to network security in public education. The following topics are covered: (1) security policy, including reasons for establishing a policy, risk assessment, areas to consider, audit tools; (2) workstations, including physical security,…

Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton.

310

Neural networks in computational materials science: training algorithms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Neural networks can be used in principle in an unbiased way for a multitude of pattern recognition and interpolation problems within computational material science. Reliably finding the weights of large feed-forward neural networks with both accuracy and speed is crucial to their use. In this paper, the rate of convergence of numerous optimization techniques that can be used to determine

A. J. Skinner; J. Q. Broughton

1995-01-01

311

Computationally Efficient Neural Network Intrusion Security Awareness  

SciTech Connect

An enhanced version of an algorithm to provide anomaly based intrusion detection alerts for cyber security state awareness is detailed. A unique aspect is the training of an error back-propagation neural network with intrusion detection rule features to provide a recognition basis. Network packet details are subsequently provided to the trained network to produce a classification. This leverages rule knowledge sets to produce classifications for anomaly based systems. Several test cases executed on ICMP protocol revealed a 60% identification rate of true positives. This rate matched the previous work, but 70% less memory was used and the run time was reduced to less than 1 second from 37 seconds.

Todd Vollmer; Milos Manic

2009-08-01

312

For a social network analysis of computer networks: a sociological perspective on collaborative work and virtual community  

Microsoft Academic Search

When computer networks link people as well as machines, they become social networks. Social network analysis provides a useful approach to moving beyond the concept of “group” in studying virtual communities and computer supported cooperative work and telework. Such computer supported social networks (CSSNS) sustain strong, intermediate and weak ties that provide information and social support in both specialized and

Barry Wellman

1996-01-01

313

Computational significance of transient dynamics in cortical networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Neural responses are most often characterized in terms of the sets of environmental or internal conditions or stimuli with which their firing rate are correlated increases or decreases. Their transient (nonstationary) temporal profiles of activity have received comparatively less attention. Similarly, the computational framework of attractor neural networks puts most emphasis on the representational or computational properties of the stable

Daniel Durstewitz; Gustavo Deco

2008-01-01

314

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF INDUSTRIAL PROCESSES IN COMPUTER NETWORK ENVIRONMENTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we look at an application of distributed computing power of computer networks in simulation studies of industrial systems modelled by dynamic sto- chastic processes. Stochastic simulation is an invaluable tool for studying such processes but, unfortunately, obtaining the final results with an acceptable level of precision, even in the case of moderately complex sys- tems can be

K. Pawlikowski; G. Ewing; D. McNickle

315

What Networking of Information Can Do for Cloud Computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cloud computing is making it possible to separate the process of building an infrastructure for service provisioning from the business of providing end user services. Today, such infrastructures are normally provided in large data centres and the applications are executed remotely from the users. One reason for this is that cloud computing requires a reasonably stable infrastructure and networking environment,

Börje Ohlman; Anders Eriksson; René Rembarz

2009-01-01

316

TCP computational energy cost within wireless Mobile Ad Hoc Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we present the results from a detailed energy measurement study of different TCP variants when used in Mobile Ad hoc Network environments. More precisely, we focus on the node-level cost of the TCP protocol; also know as the computational energy cost. In fact, the computational energy consumption is the most important part of TCP energy consumption. This

Alaa SEDDIK-GHALEB; Yacine GHAMRI-DOUDANE; Sidi-Mohammed SENOUCI

2009-01-01

317

Radical Changes in Class Discussion Using Networked Computers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

University of Texas (Austin) freshman and senior English literature students and graduate humanities students tested a synchronous local area computer network's applicability for classroom discussion and collaborative exams and essays. Student responses to 50-70 research questions show advantages of computer-assisted classroom discussion (CACD)…

Bump, Jerome

1990-01-01

318

New Computational Approaches for Analysis of cis-Regulatory Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The investigation and modeling of gene regulatory networks requires computational tools specific to the task. We present several locally developed software tools that have been used in support of our ongoing research into the embryogenesis of the sea urchin. These tools are especially well suited to iterative refinement of models through experimental and computational investigation. They include: BioArray, a macroarray

C. Titus Brown; Alistair G. Rust; Peter J. C. Clarke; Zhengjun Pan; Maria J. Schilstra; Tristan De Buysscher; Gareth Griffin; Barbara J. Wold; R. Andrew Cameron; Eric H. Davidson; Hamid Bolouri

2002-01-01

319

Quantum computation and the evaluation of tensor networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a quantum algorithm that additively approximates the value of a tensor network to a certain scale. When combined with existing results, this provides a complete problem for quantum computation. The result is a simple new way of looking at quantum computation in which unitary gates are replaced by tensors and time is replaced by the order in which

Itai Arad; Zeph Landau

2008-01-01

320

Optical interconnection networks for high-performance computing systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Enabled by silicon photonic technology, optical interconnection networks have the potential to be a key disruptive technology in computing and communication industries. The enduring pursuit of performance gains in computing, combined with stringent power constraints, has fostered the ever-growing computational parallelism associated with chip multiprocessors, memory systems, high-performance computing systems and data centers. Sustaining these parallelism growths introduces unique challenges for on- and off-chip communications, shifting the focus toward novel and fundamentally different communication approaches. Chip-scale photonic interconnection networks, enabled by high-performance silicon photonic devices, offer unprecedented bandwidth scalability with reduced power consumption. We demonstrate that the silicon photonic platforms have already produced all the high-performance photonic devices required to realize these types of networks. Through extensive empirical characterization in much of our work, we demonstrate such feasibility of waveguides, modulators, switches and photodetectors. We also demonstrate systems that simultaneously combine many functionalities to achieve more complex building blocks. We propose novel silicon photonic devices, subsystems, network topologies and architectures to enable unprecedented performance of these photonic interconnection networks. Furthermore, the advantages of photonic interconnection networks extend far beyond the chip, offering advanced communication environments for memory systems, high-performance computing systems, and data centers.

Biberman, Aleksandr; Bergman, Keren

2012-04-01

321

Improving Student Performance in a First-Year Geography Course: Examining the Importance of Computer-Assisted Formative Assessment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The main objective of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of computer-assisted formative assessment in a large, first-year undergraduate geography course. In particular, the paper evaluates the impact of computer-assisted multiple-choice practice tests on student performance in the course as well as student opinions of this type of…

Wilson, Kathi; Boyd, Cleo; Chen, Liwen; Jamal, Sarosh

2011-01-01

322

A One-Credit Hands-On Introductory Course in Electrical and Computer Engineering Using a Variety of Topic Modules  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper describes a one-credit laboratory course for freshmen majoring in electrical and computer engineering (ECE). The course is motivational in nature and exposes the students to a wide range of areas of electrical and computer engineering. The authors believe it is important to give freshmen a broad perspective of what ECE is all about,…

Pierre, J. W.; Tuffner, F. K.; Anderson, J. R.; Whitman, D. L.; Ula, A. H. M. S.; Kubichek, R. F.; Wright, C. H. G.; Barrett, S. F.; Cupal, J. J.; Hamann, J. C.

2009-01-01

323

The Use of a PDP-11/20 Computer in a Non-Calculus General Physics Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Computer-assisted instruction supplements traditional methods in a non-calculus physics course offered at Seattle Pacific College. Thirty-five science majors enrolled in the first quarter and 32 continued in the second term. The hardware for the course consists of a PDP-11/20 computer and eight teletype terminals; additional peripheral equipment…

Yu, David U. L.

324

Synchronizing computer clocks using a local area network  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Researchers completed the first tests of a method to synchronize the clocks of networked computers to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) time scale. The method uses a server computer to disseminate the time to other clients on the same local-area network. The server is synchronized to NIST using the ACTS protocol over a dial-up telephone line. The software in both the server and the parameters of this model are used to adjust the time of the local clock and the interval between calibration requests in a statistically optimum way. The algorithm maximizes the time between calibrations while at the same time keeping the time of the local clock correct within a specific tolerance. The method can be extended to synchronize computers linked over wide-area networks, and an experiment to test the performance of the algorithms over such networks is being planned.

Levine, Judah

1990-05-01

325

TNS program - A computer simulation package for Intelsat TDMA network  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

TNS (TDMA Network Simulation) program is a computer simulation package developed for the evaluation, test, and analysis of all the protocols in the Intelsat TDMA network. The TNS program faithfully simulates the dynamic operation of the network taking account of the satellite motion, and makes it even possible to simulate the network operation under some abnormal conditions, such as terminal function failure and transponder failure. This paper describes the TNS program in terms of its design approach, its capabilities, its structure, its input and output data, and its operation. An example simulation for the whole system start-up procedure assuming the Atlantic Ocean region is also presented.

Shinonaga, H.; Yamasaki, N.; Koga, K.; Muratani, T.; Wu, W. W.

1985-10-01

326

Introducing computer architecture education in the first course of computer science career  

Microsoft Academic Search

The introduction of computer architecture in computer science studies has created a demand for a highly simplified architecture and graphical tools to illustrate its operation. This paper presents the approach followed at the University of Oviedo. The main concepts introduced to the students are relative to RISC instruction sets, data-path architecture, control steps within instructions and microinstructions.

José R. Arias; Daniel F. García

1998-01-01

327

Home Care Nursing via Computer Networks: Justification and Design Specifications  

PubMed Central

High-tech home care includes the use of information technologies, such as computer networks, to provide direct care to patients in the home. This paper presents the justification and design of a project using a free, public access computer network to deliver home care nursing. The intervention attempts to reduce isolation and improve problem solving among home care patients and their informal caregivers. Three modules comprise the intervention: a decision module, a communications module, and an information data base. This paper describes the experimental evaluation of the project, and discusses issues in the delivery of nursing care via computers.

Brennan, Patricia Flatley

1988-01-01

328

Network system design affects distributed parallel computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computational Grid is essential for scientific advance, and advanced technology research and development because single system computing power is restricted by processor clock speed advancing. Increment of processor clock speed starts decreasing due to the minimum size of silicon dies v.s the distance that electrons can travel in one clock cycle driven by the light speed. The maximum processor clock

2006-01-01

329

Overlapping Computations and Communications in Torus Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

A fundamental aspect in the design of parallel applications consists in minimizing communications: reducing the number of messages, or overlapping computations and communications. The objective of this paper is the design of parallel algorithms that use processors and expensive resources such as communications efficiently. We present a partial embedding of computation and communication graphs that have a cubic or planar

Álvaro Suárez; Carmen N. Ojeda-guerra

1996-01-01

330

Epidemic Spreading of Computer Worms in Fixed Wireless Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Worms are stand-alone computer viruses which use networks for their spreading among computing devices. The last few years\\u000a have seen the emergence of a new type of worms which specifically target portable computing devices, such as smartphones and\\u000a laptops. The novel feature of these worms is that they do not necessarily require Internet connectivity for their propagation\\u000a but can spread

Maziar Nekovee

2007-01-01

331

Using artificial neural networks to detect unknown computer worms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Detecting computer worms is a highly challenging task. We present a new approach that uses artificial neural networks (ANN)\\u000a to detect the presence of computer worms based on measurements of computer behavior. We compare ANN to three other classification\\u000a methods and show the advantages of ANN for detection of known worms. We then proceed to evaluate ANN’s ability to detect

Dima Stopel; Robert Moskovitch; Zvi Boger; Yuval Shahar; Yuval Elovici

2009-01-01

332

Computational Intelligence in Visual Sensor Networks: Improving Video Processing Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this chapter we will describe several approaches to develop video analysis and segmentation systems based on visual sensor\\u000a networks using computational intelligence. We review the types of problems and algorithms used, and how computational intelligence\\u000a paradigms can help to build competitive solutions. computational intelligence is used here from an “engineering” point of\\u000a view: the designer is provided with tools

Miguel A. Patricio; F. Castanedo; A. Berlanga; O. Pérez; J. García; José Molina

333

MTX (Microwave Tokamak Experiment) data acquisition and analysis computer network  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For the MTX experiment, we use a network of computers for plasma diagnostic data acquisition and analysis. This multivendor network employs VMS, UNIX, and BASIC based computers connected in a local area Ethernet network. Some of the data is acquired directly into a VAX/VMS computer cluster over a fiber-optic serial CAMAC highway. Several HP-Unix workstations and HP-BASIC instrument control computers acquire and analyze data for the more data intensive or specialized diagnostics. The VAX/VMS system is used for global analysis of the data and serves as the central data archiving and retrieval manager. Shot synchronization and control of data flow are implemented by task-to-task message passing using our interprocess communication system. The system has been in operation during our initial MTX tokamak and FEL experiments; it has operated reliably with data rates typically in the range of 5 megabytes/shot without limiting the experimental shot rate.

Butner, D. N.; Casper, T. A.; Brown, M. D.; Drlik, M.; Meyer, W. H.; Moller, J. M.

1990-06-01

334

Integrated evolutionary computation neural network quality controller for automated systems  

SciTech Connect

With increasing competition in the global market, more and more stringent quality standards and specifications are being demands at lower costs. Manufacturing applications of computing power are becoming more common. The application of neural networks to identification and control of dynamic processes has been discussed. The limitations of using neural networks for control purposes has been pointed out and a different technique, evolutionary computation, has been discussed. The results of identifying and controlling an unstable, dynamic process using evolutionary computation methods has been presented. A framework for an integrated system, using both neural networks and evolutionary computation, has been proposed to identify the process and then control the product quality, in a dynamic, multivariable system, in real-time.

Patro, S.; Kolarik, W.J. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Dept. of Industrial Engineering

1999-06-01

335

Pedagogical utilization and assessment of the statistic online computational resource in introductory probability and statistics courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Technology-based instruction represents a new recent pedagogical paradigm that is rooted in the realization that new generations are much more comfortable with, and excited about, new technologies. The rapid technological advancement over the past decade has fueled an enormous demand for the integration of modern networking, informational and computational tools with classical pedagogical instruments. Consequently, teaching with technology typically involves

Ivo D. Dinov; Juana Sanchez; Nicolas Christou

2008-01-01

336

Recursive regularization for inferring gene networks from time-course gene expression profiles  

PubMed Central

Background Inferring gene networks from time-course microarray experiments with vector autoregressive (VAR) model is the process of identifying functional associations between genes through multivariate time series. This problem can be cast as a variable selection problem in Statistics. One of the promising methods for variable selection is the elastic net proposed by Zou and Hastie (2005). However, VAR modeling with the elastic net succeeds in increasing the number of true positives while it also results in increasing the number of false positives. Results By incorporating relative importance of the VAR coefficients into the elastic net, we propose a new class of regularization, called recursive elastic net, to increase the capability of the elastic net and estimate gene networks based on the VAR model. The recursive elastic net can reduce the number of false positives gradually by updating the importance. Numerical simulations and comparisons demonstrate that the proposed method succeeds in reducing the number of false positives drastically while keeping the high number of true positives in the network inference and achieves two or more times higher true discovery rate (the proportion of true positives among the selected edges) than the competing methods even when the number of time points is small. We also compared our method with various reverse-engineering algorithms on experimental data of MCF-7 breast cancer cells stimulated with two ErbB ligands, EGF and HRG. Conclusion The recursive elastic net is a powerful tool for inferring gene networks from time-course gene expression profiles.

Shimamura, Teppei; Imoto, Seiya; Yamaguchi, Rui; Fujita, Andre; Nagasaki, Masao; Miyano, Satoru

2009-01-01

337

NGCE - Network Graphs for Computer Epidemiologists  

Microsoft Academic Search

Graphs are useful data structures capable of efficiently repre- senting a variety of technological and social networks. They are therefore utilized in simulation-based studies of new algorithms and protocols. In- spired by the popular tgff (Task Graphs For Free) toolkit, which creates task graphs for embedded systems, we present the ngce ,a n easy to use graph generator that produces

Vasileios Vlachos; Vassiliki Vouzi; Damianos Chatziantoniou; Diomidis Spinellis

2005-01-01

338

Logic of Computation in Biological Regulatory Networks.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Our goal in this project was to study, formalize and model biological regulatory processes and explore potential computational paradigms that are inspired by those new abstractions. We focused on developing appropriate level models for gene regulation, in...

J. Bruck P. W. Sternberg

2002-01-01

339

[Research toward a heterogeneous networked computing cluster  

SciTech Connect

Over the last year the Systems Development Group, SDG, has been involved in a number of projects. The primary projects include extending the UNIX version of DQS, a DCE version of DQS, a Java based queuing system, a Computer Aided Learning and Instruction model and working with the Florida Department of Law Enforcement in the formation of the Florida Computer Crime Center. Additionally SDG has assisted a number of state and local agencies. A synopsis of these projects is contained in this report.

Duke, D.W.; Green, T.P.

1998-08-11

340

Evaluating student motivation in constructivistic, problem-based introductory computer science courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Keeping students motivated is a particularly challenging goal in undergraduate service courses such as introductory computer science for the natural sciences. Our experience shows that to jump-start motivation, students must experience an increase in their problem-solving compe- tence, a capability that is built upon a combined mastery of concepts and skills. To achieve this, we integrate and support problem-solving from

Lukas Faessler; Hans Hinterberger; Markus Dahinden; Marco Wyss

2006-01-01

341

Gifted Students' Individual Dierences in Computer-Based Algebra and Precalculus Courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article we summarize data from mathematically gifted middle school students working through home-computer-based rst-year algebra, second-year algebra, and precalculus courses. Although these students represented only the extreme upper end of the full range of mathematical ability, they nevertheless dis- played considerable individual variation on all observed outcomes with little relation to psat score, sex or age. About equal

Constance Stillinger; Patrick Suppes

342

Electronic peer review and peer grading in computer-science courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have implemented a peer-grading system for review of student assignments over the World-Wide Web and used it in approximately eight computer-science courses. Students prepare their assignments and submit them to our Peer Grader (PG) system. Other students are then assigned to review and grade the assignments. The system allows authors and reviewers to communicate with authors being able to

Edward F. Gehringer

2001-01-01

343

Computer Manipulatives in an Ordinary Differential Equations Course: Development, Implementation, and Assessment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The d'Arbeloff Interactive Mathematics Project or d'AIMP is an initiative that seeks to enhance and ultimately transform the teaching and learning of introductory mathematics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. A result of this project is a suite of "mathlets," a carefully developed set of dynamic computer applets for use in the university's ordinary differential equations course. In this paper, we present the rationale for such computer innovations, the philosophy behind their design, as well as a discussion of their careful development and implementation. Survey results are reported which yielded positive student feedback and suggestions for improvement.

Miller, Haynes R.; Upton, Deborah S.

2008-04-01

344

Creating a two-layered augmented artificial immune system for application to computer network intrusion detection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Computer network security has become a very serious concern of commercial, industrial, and military organizations due to the increasing number of network threats such as outsider intrusions and insider covert activities. An important security element of course is network intrusion detection which is a difficult real world problem that has been addressed through many different solution attempts. Using an artificial immune system has been shown to be one of the most promising results. By enhancing jREMISA, a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm inspired artificial immune system, with a secondary defense layer; we produce improved accuracy of intrusion classification and a flexibility in responsiveness. This responsiveness can be leveraged to provide a much more powerful and accurate system, through the use of increased processing time and dedicated hardware which has the flexibility of being located out of band.

Judge, Matthew G.; Lamont, Gary B.

2009-05-01

345

Neural network based computer leather matching system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The structure and design of a neural network-based computerized leather matching system are introduced. Measurements for stable conditions of taking pictures, drawing and selecting of color and texture characteristics, and two self-organizing map (SOM)-based leather clustering methods are discussed. More than 84% of the online leather clustering results using the system are consistent with the results of manual matching

Cai Min; Han Liqun

1997-01-01

346

Six Networks on a Universal Neuromorphic Computing Substrate  

PubMed Central

In this study, we present a highly configurable neuromorphic computing substrate and use it for emulating several types of neural networks. At the heart of this system lies a mixed-signal chip, with analog implementations of neurons and synapses and digital transmission of action potentials. Major advantages of this emulation device, which has been explicitly designed as a universal neural network emulator, are its inherent parallelism and high acceleration factor compared to conventional computers. Its configurability allows the realization of almost arbitrary network topologies and the use of widely varied neuronal and synaptic parameters. Fixed-pattern noise inherent to analog circuitry is reduced by calibration routines. An integrated development environment allows neuroscientists to operate the device without any prior knowledge of neuromorphic circuit design. As a showcase for the capabilities of the system, we describe the successful emulation of six different neural networks which cover a broad spectrum of both structure and functionality.

Pfeil, Thomas; Grubl, Andreas; Jeltsch, Sebastian; Muller, Eric; Muller, Paul; Petrovici, Mihai A.; Schmuker, Michael; Bruderle, Daniel; Schemmel, Johannes; Meier, Karlheinz

2013-01-01

347

Schemas and neural networks for sixth generation computing  

SciTech Connect

The study of animal and human brains suggests overall architectural principles for sixth generation computers. Each such machine will comprise a network of more specialized devices, with many of these devices structured as highly parallel arrays of interacting neuron-like, possibly adaptive, components. The authors stress the interaction between computational neurobiology and neural engineering and note the two grains of analysis of schemas and neural networks, arguing that schemas will be the programming language of the sixth generation. After a brief introduction to the variety of neuron models now current, schemas are exemplified in a discussion of high-level vision. The paper emphasizes the domain-specific structure neural networks, as well as emphasizing that technologists have much to learn from the study of neurobiological systems. The authors close with a brief account of adaptation and the programming of sixth generation computers.

Arbib, M.A. (Center for Neural Engineering, Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (US))

1989-04-01

348

Computer-Mediated Social Networking for Mentoring of Health Professionals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health professionals (HPs) appear to be aware of computer-mediated social networking in terms of the software, but there are\\u000a few examples of it being integrated into clinical practice, education or professional development. Yet social networking has\\u000a the potential to play a role in the facilitation of mentoring support and professional development which has been recognized\\u000a as vital to maintaining the

Sarah Stewart

2008-01-01

349

Computationally Efficient Mutual Entity Authentication in Wireless Sensor Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Mutual entity authentication plays an important role in securing wireless sensor networks. In this paper, we present a computationally\\u000a efficient authentication framework, based on learning parity with noise problem. The authentication only requires the simplest\\u000a bit-operations, which makes it suitable for resource-restrained wireless sensor networks. The framework not only presents\\u000a an approach to securely combine two one-way authentication protocols from

Zhijun Li; Guang Gong

2009-01-01

350

Distributed Sensor Network With Collective Computation For Situational Awareness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Initiated under Laboratory Directed R&D funding we have engaged in empirical studies, theory development, and initial hardware development for a ground-based Distributed Sensor Network with Collective Computation (DSN-CC). A DSN-CC is a network that uses node-to-node communication and on-board processing to achieve gains in response time, power usage, communication bandwidth, detection resolution, and robustness. DSN-CCs are applicable to both military

Jared S. Dreicer; Anders M. Jorgensen; Eric E. Dors

2002-01-01

351

Distributed Sensor Network With Collective Computation For Situational Awareness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Initiated under Laboratory Directed R&D funding we have engaged in empirical studies, theory development, and initial hardware development for a ground-based Distributed Sensor Network with Collective Computation (DSN-CC). A DSN -CC is a network that uses node-to-node communication and on-board processing to achieve gains in response time, power usage, communication bandwidth, detection resolution, and robustness. DSN-CCs are applicable to both

Jared S. Dreicer; Anders M. Jorgensen; Eric E. Dors

2002-01-01

352

Social Networking to Support Collaboration in Computational Grids  

Microsoft Academic Search

Grids are complex systems that aggregate large amounts of distributed computational resources to perform large scale simulations\\u000a and analysis by multiple research groups. In this paper we unveil its social networks: actors that participate in a Grid and\\u000a relationships among those Grid actors. Social networking information can be used as a means to increase awareness and to facilitate\\u000a collaboration among

Oscar Ardaiz; Isaac Chao; Ramón Sangüesa

2007-01-01

353

Automotive suspension control through a computer communication network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Closed-loop stability and performance-related studies performed on a multiplex communication network called Carlink, being considered for automotive applications, are discussed. Tests done on an automotive suspension control model, in which the active control signal is applied through the multiplex network as a real-time hybrid computer\\/hardware-in-the-loop experiment are outlined. The stability of the system is considered using analytical approaches developed by

U. Ozguner; H. Goktas; H. Chant; J. Winkelman; M. Liubakka; R. Krtolica

1992-01-01

354

Network performance model for TCP\\/IP based cluster computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new communication model, called the PlogPT model, is proposed to predict communication performance in a commodity cluster where computing nodes communicate using TCP\\/IP. This model extends the PlogP model in order to consider the variation of bandwidth brought about by bottleneck links in network switches and the delay of packet retransmission by TCP\\/IP handling. Network switches are modeled as

Akihiro Nomura; Hiroya Matsuba; Yutaka Ishikawa

2007-01-01

355

The computer and you a proposed new course on the impact of computers on society  

Microsoft Academic Search

That the applications of computer systems are having an increasing impact on the lives of people at present as well as for the foreseeable future has become commonly accepted to almost everyone, particularly to the citizens of highly industrialized countries such as the United States. Creating and implementing means for educating people to cope with the issues and problems raised

W. B. Andrews

1972-01-01

356

CCAM: A Connectivity-Clustered Access Method for Networks and Network Computations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current spatial database management systems (SDBMS) provide efficient access methods and operators for point and range queries over collections of spatial points, line segments, and polygons. However, it is not clear if existing spatial access methods can efficiently support network computations which traverse line segments in a spatial network based on connectivity rather than geographic proximity. The expected I\\/O cost

Shashi Shekhar; Duen-ren Liu

1997-01-01

357

Action Potential Timing and Neural Network Computation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Evolutionary selection drives neurobiology to exploit the peculiarities of nerve cells for effective computation. Action potentials, impulses by which nerve cells communicate, last .001--.002 sec. Typical cellular rates of generating action potentials in the brain are 2-50/sec. If information is processed using rates of generation of action potentials as the carrier, then the effective 'clock speed' of neuronal computation must be ~<10 Hz. When action potential timing is used for information representation and computation, the effective 'clock speed' can be at least ten times faster. The computational problems that must be solved by an animal exploring an object-filled odor environment can be addressed by a simple collective algorithm that exploits the large number of olfactory receptor types. It can be plausibly implemented on neuronal 'wetware' by exploiting action potential timing. There is considerable commonality to 'what is an object' in vision, speech, and olfaction. Algorithms that can recognize a known odor in the presence an unknown odor background are closely related to algorithms capable of recognizing known spoken words in the presence of a background from another speaker.

Hopfield, John J.

2000-03-01

358

Modelling amorphous computations with transcription networks  

PubMed Central

The power of electronic computation is due in part to the development of modular gate structures that can be coupled to carry out sophisticated logical operations and whose performance can be readily modelled. However, the equivalences between electronic and biochemical operations are far from obvious. In order to help cross between these disciplines, we develop an analogy between complementary metal oxide semiconductor and transcriptional logic gates. We surmise that these transcriptional logic gates might prove to be useful in amorphous computations and model the abilities of immobilized gates to form patterns. Finally, to begin to implement these computations, we design unique hairpin transcriptional gates and then characterize these gates in a binary latch similar to that already demonstrated by Kim et al. (Kim, White & Winfree 2006 Mol. Syst. Biol. 2, 68 (doi:10.1038/msb4100099)). The hairpin transcriptional gates are uniquely suited to the design of a complementary NAND gate that can serve as an underlying basis of molecular computing that can output matter rather than electronic information.

Simpson, Zack Booth; Tsai, Timothy L.; Nguyen, Nam; Chen, Xi; Ellington, Andrew D.

2009-01-01

359

Computer Networks in Elementary and Secondary Education,  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Computer communication is becoming a useful and versatile tool for education at the K-12 level for students, teachers, and administrators. Adoption of the technology is at a formative stage, and a complete picture of how it will be integrated into educati...

E. Dowdy

1987-01-01

360

The study of collaborative learning based on Virtual Learning Community: A research of graduate students' network course  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper introduces the connotation of cooperative learning and network environment based cooperative learning at first. Then, an analysis of cooperative learning in the course “Learning Science and Technology” presented which is a post-graduate online course of Educational Technology, Capital Normal University. Finally, we lay out some strategies to enhance the effectiveness of cooperative learning based on the Virtual Learning

Qi Yang; Zhang Dongwei

2010-01-01

361

Microcosm to Cosmos: The Growth of a Divisional Computer Network  

PubMed Central

In 1982, we reported the deployment of a network of microcomputers in the Division of Gastroenterology[1]. This network was based upon Corvus Systems Omninet®. Corvus was one of the very first firms to offer networking products for PC's. This PC development occurred coincident with the planning phase of the Johns Hopkins Hospital's multisegment ethernet project. A rich communications infra-structure is now in place at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions[2,3]. Shortly after the hospital development under the direction of the Operational and Clinical Systems Division (OCS) development began, the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine began an Integrated Academic Information Management Systems (IAIMS) planning effort. We now present a model that uses aspects of all three planning efforts (PC networks, Hospital Information Systems & IAIMS) to build a divisional computing facility. This facility is viewed as a terminal leaf on then institutional network diagram. Nevertheless, it is noteworthy that this leaf, the divisional resource in the Division of Gastroenterology (GASNET), has a rich substructure and functionality of its own, perhaps revealing the recursive nature of network architecture. The current status, design and function of the GASNET computational facility is discussed. Among the major positive aspects of this design are the sharing and centralization of MS-DOS software, the high-speed DOS/Unix link that makes available most of the our institution's computing resources.

Johannes, R.S.; Kahane, Stephen N.

1987-01-01

362

Navigating Traditional Chinese Medicine Network Pharmacology and Computational Tools  

PubMed Central

The concept of “network target” has ushered in a new era in the field of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). As a new research approach, network pharmacology is based on the analysis of network models and systems biology. Taking advantage of advancements in systems biology, a high degree of integration data analysis strategy and interpretable visualization provides deeper insights into the underlying mechanisms of TCM theories, including the principles of herb combination, biological foundations of herb or herbal formulae action, and molecular basis of TCM syndromes. In this study, we review several recent developments in TCM network pharmacology research and discuss their potential for bridging the gap between traditional and modern medicine. We briefly summarize the two main functional applications of TCM network models: understanding/uncovering and predicting/discovering. In particular, we focus on how TCM network pharmacology research is conducted and highlight different computational tools, such as network-based and machine learning algorithms, and sources that have been proposed and applied to the different steps involved in the research process. To make network pharmacology research commonplace, some basic network definitions and analysis methods are presented.

Chen, Jia-Lei; Xu, Li-Wen

2013-01-01

363

Cardiac mitochondrial network excitability: insights from computational analysis  

PubMed Central

In the heart, mitochondria form a regular lattice and function as a coordinated, nonlinear network to continuously produce ATP to meet the high-energy demand of the cardiomyocytes. Cardiac mitochondria also exhibit properties of an excitable system: electrical or chemical signals can spread within or among cells in the syncytium. The detailed mechanisms by which signals pass among individual elements (mitochondria) across the network are still not completely understood, although emerging studies suggest that network excitability might be mediated by the local diffusion and autocatalytic release of messenger molecules such as reactive oxygen species and/or Ca2+. In this short review, we have attempted to described recent advances in the field of cardiac mitochondrial network excitability. Specifically, we have focused on how mitochondria communicate with each other through the diffusion and regeneration of messenger molecules to initiate and propagate waves or oscillations, as revealed by computational models of mitochondrial network.

O'Rourke, Brian

2012-01-01

364

Quantum computer networks with the orbital angular momentum of light  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Inside computer networks, different information processing tasks are necessary to deliver the user data efficiently. This processing can also be done in the quantum domain. We present simple optical quantum networks where the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of a single photon is used as an ancillary degree of freedom which controls decisions at the network level. Linear optical elements are enough to provide important network primitives such as multiplexing and routing. First we show how to build a simple multiplexer and demultiplexer which combine photonic qubits and separate them again at the receiver. We also give two different self-routing networks where the OAM of an input photon is enough to make it find its desired destination.

Garcia-Escartin, Juan Carlos; Chamorro-Posada, Pedro

2012-09-01

365

Gender Effects of Computer Use in a Conceptual Physics Lab Course  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It's always hard to know what to expect when bringing computers into an educational setting, as things are always changing. Student skills with computers are different today than they were 10 years ago, and 20 years ago almost counts as an alien world. Still, one hopes that some of these changes result in positive trends, such as student attitudes toward the use of computers in the classroom. During the course of the Wandering Interactive Lecture Demonstration Project,1 we've seen a notable gender gap in some aspects of the previous experience of students, and worried that it might impact their learning. So we administered a number of surveys to see if we were right to be worried.

van Domelen, Dave

2010-11-01

366

Curriculum Reform Research of Computer Network Technology Based on School-Enterprise Cooperation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There is growing concern about falling levels of student engagement with school science, as evidenced by studies of student attitudes, and decreasing participation at the post compulsory level. College-enterprise cooperation model is a new model of cultivating application-typed talents in college by cooperating with enterprises. In the paper, we analyze the teaching problems in the course of "Computer Network Technology", propose guidelines with teaching practice. Then we explored the reform ways to enhance students' self-learning ability. Finally, the conclusion is given.

Liu, Peng

367

Overview of the human brain as a distributed computing network  

SciTech Connect

The hierarchically organized human brain is viewed as a prime example of a massively parallel, adaptive information processing and process control system. A brief overview of the human brain is provided for computer architects, in hopes that the principles of massive parallelism, dense connectivity and self-organization of assemblies of processing elements will prove relevant to the design of fifth generation VLSI computing networks. 6 references.

Gevins, A.S.

1983-01-01

368

Quantum Computation and the Evaluation of Tensor Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a quantum algorithm that additively approximates the value of a\\u000atensor network to a certain scale. When combined with existing results, this\\u000aprovides a complete problem for quantum computation. The result is a simple new\\u000away of looking at quantum computation in which unitary gates are replaced by\\u000atensors and time is replaced by the order in which

Itai Arad; Zeph Landau

2010-01-01

369

A Suggested Computation for Maximal Multi-Commodity Network Flows  

Microsoft Academic Search

A simplex computation for an arc-chain formulation of the maximal multi-commodity network flow problem is proposed. Since the number of variables in this formulation is too large to be dealt with explicitly, the computation treats non-basic variables implicitly by replacing the usual method of determining a vector to enter the basis with several applications of a combinatorial algorithm for finding

L. R. Ford Jr.; D. R. Fulkerson

1958-01-01

370

Computing with Competition in Biochemical Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cells rely on limited resources such as enzymes or transcription factors to process signals and make decisions. However, independent cellular pathways often compete for a common molecular resource. Competition is difficult to analyze because of its nonlinear global nature, and its role remains unclear. Here we show how decision pathways such as transcription networks may exploit competition to process information. Competition for one resource leads to the recognition of convex sets of patterns, whereas competition for several resources (overlapping or cascaded regulons) allows even more general pattern recognition. Competition also generates surprising couplings, such as correlating species that share no resource but a common competitor. The mechanism we propose relies on three primitives that are ubiquitous in cells: multiinput motifs, competition for a resource, and positive feedback loops.

Genot, Anthony J.; Fujii, Teruo; Rondelez, Yannick

2012-11-01

371

Computing with competition in biochemical networks.  

PubMed

Cells rely on limited resources such as enzymes or transcription factors to process signals and make decisions. However, independent cellular pathways often compete for a common molecular resource. Competition is difficult to analyze because of its nonlinear global nature, and its role remains unclear. Here we show how decision pathways such as transcription networks may exploit competition to process information. Competition for one resource leads to the recognition of convex sets of patterns, whereas competition for several resources (overlapping or cascaded regulons) allows even more general pattern recognition. Competition also generates surprising couplings, such as correlating species that share no resource but a common competitor. The mechanism we propose relies on three primitives that are ubiquitous in cells: multiinput motifs, competition for a resource, and positive feedback loops. PMID:23215526

Genot, Anthony J; Fujii, Teruo; Rondelez, Yannick

2012-11-13

372

Identifying failure in a tree network of a parallel computer  

DOEpatents

Methods, parallel computers, and products are provided for identifying failure in a tree network of a parallel computer. The parallel computer includes one or more processing sets including an I/O node and a plurality of compute nodes. For each processing set embodiments include selecting a set of test compute nodes, the test compute nodes being a subset of the compute nodes of the processing set; measuring the performance of the I/O node of the processing set; measuring the performance of the selected set of test compute nodes; calculating a current test value in dependence upon the measured performance of the I/O node of the processing set, the measured performance of the set of test compute nodes, and a predetermined value for I/O node performance; and comparing the current test value with a predetermined tree performance threshold. If the current test value is below the predetermined tree performance threshold, embodiments include selecting another set of test compute nodes. If the current test value is not below the predetermined tree performance threshold, embodiments include selecting from the test compute nodes one or more potential problem nodes and testing individually potential problem nodes and links to potential problem nodes.

Archer, Charles J. (Rochester, MN); Pinnow, Kurt W. (Rochester, MN); Wallenfelt, Brian P. (Eden Prairie, MN)

2010-08-24

373

A computational study of routing algorithms for realistic transportation networks  

SciTech Connect

The authors carry out an experimental analysis of a number of shortest path (routing) algorithms investigated in the context of the TRANSIMS (Transportation Analysis and Simulation System) project. The main focus of the paper is to study how various heuristic and exact solutions, associated data structures affected the computational performance of the software developed especially for realistic transportation networks. For this purpose the authors have used Dallas Fort-Worth road network with very high degree of resolution. The following general results are obtained: (1) they discuss and experimentally analyze various one-one shortest path algorithms, which include classical exact algorithms studied in the literature as well as heuristic solutions that are designed to take into account the geometric structure of the input instances; (2) they describe a number of extensions to the basic shortest path algorithm. These extensions were primarily motivated by practical problems arising in TRANSIMS and ITS (Intelligent Transportation Systems) related technologies. Extensions discussed include--(i) time dependent networks, (ii) multi-modal networks, (iii) networks with public transportation and associated schedules. Computational results are provided to empirically compare the efficiency of various algorithms. The studies indicate that a modified Dijkstra`s algorithm is computationally fast and an excellent candidate for use in various transportation planning applications as well as ITS related technologies.

Jacob, R.; Marathe, M.V.; Nagel, K.

1998-12-01

374

A new interconnection network for parallel computer with low diameter  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we propose and analyze the new interconnection network for parallel computer, called graycube. The graycube has the same number of nodes and edges as hypercube, but it's diameter is about one half of the equivalent hypercube. It has simple recursive structure, routing and broadcasting algorithms. Since hypercube can be embedded into graycube with dialation 2, algorithms developed

Nak-keun Joo; Hyeong-seok Lim

1997-01-01

375

A Taxonomy of Biologically Inspired Research in Computer Networking  

Microsoft Academic Search

The natural world is enormous, dynamic, incredibly diverse, and highly complex. Despite the inherent challenges of surviving in such a world, biological organisms evolve, self-organize, self-repair, navigate, and ourish. Generally, they do so with only local knowledge and without any centralized control. Our computer networks are increasingly facing similar challenges as they grow larger in size, but are yet to

Michael Meisel; Vasileios Pappas; Lixia Zhang

376

ThreadMarks: Shared Memory Computing on Networks of Workstations  

Microsoft Academic Search

TreadMarks supports parallel computing on networks of workstations by providing the applicationwith a shared memory abstraction. Shared memory facilitates the transition from sequential toparallel programs. After identifying possible sources of parallelism in the code, most of the datastructures can be retained without change, and only synchronization needs to be added to achieve acorrect shared memory parallel program. Additional transformations may

Cristiana Amza; Alan L. Cox; Sandhya Dwarkadas; Peter J. Keleher; Honghui Lu; Ramakrishnan Rajamony; Weimin Yu; Willy Zwaenepoel

1996-01-01

377

Networking Foundations for Collaborative Computing at Internet Scope  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite significant proliferation of Internet services in recent years, technology for computer-supported coopera- tive work and groupware have not progressed at the same rate. A wider distribution of the work force motivates the need for networked multimedia and groupware at Internet scope and for larger groups of end-users. In particular, synchronous telecollaboration enables people in different geographic locations to bridge

Peter Dommel; J. J. Garcia-Luna-Aceves

378

Data transfer bottlenecks over SPARC-based computer networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we report on a data collection and analysis study of data transfers over a SPARC-based computer workstation network. The objectives of this study are to identify the performance characteristics and bottlenecks of these types of transfers. Measurements of performance over both Ethernet and CDDI LANs are made using two application level benchmarking programs: SPIMS and TTCP. It

Emilie T. Saulnier; Betty J. Bortscheller

1995-01-01

379

An Analysis of Attitudes toward Computer Networks and Internet Addiction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to explore the interplay between young people's attitudes toward computer networks and Internet addiction. After analyzing questionnaire responses of an initial sample of 615 Taiwanese high school students, 78 subjects, viewed as possible Internet addicts, were selected for further explorations. It was found that…

Tsai, Chin-Chung; Lin, Sunny S. J.

380

Computational Templates, Neural Network Dynamics, and Symbolic Logic  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper looks at the relationship between subsymbolic neural networks and symbolic logical systems from a philosophy of science perspective. More specifically, the point of view is that of Paul Humphreys' philosophical account of the organization of scientific knowledge (Humphreys, Paul. Extending Ourselves - Computational Science, Empiricism and the Scientific Method. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004.) Humphreys considers the units

Otto Lappi

2007-01-01

381

Adaptive parallel computing on heterogeneous networks with mpC  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper presents a new advanced version ofthe mpC parallel language. The language was designed specially for programming high-performance parallel computations on heteroge- neous networks ofcomputers. The advanced version allows the programmer to define at runtime all the main features of the underlying parallel algorithm, which have an impact on the application execution perfor- mance, namely, the total number ofparticipating

Alexey L. Lastovetsky

2002-01-01

382

Scaling Behaviors of Traffic in Computer Communication Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we present an empirical study on the scaling behaviors of traffic in computer communication networks. It is shown that the data shipped by the web server have a symmetry heavy-tailed distribution, with the corresponding cumulative distributions of both negative and positive tails can be well fitted by a Levy regime or an extendedly asymptotic power-law form. We

Pei-Ling Zhou; Shi-Min Cai; Tao Zhou; Zhong-Qian Fu

2006-01-01

383

Network Forensic Computing Based on ANN-PCA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The network forensic computing is faced with the question of the massive information stream analyses. Two solutions including feature extracting and classification mining were proposed. The main work includes features extracting with ANN-PCA, classification mining after features extracting in FAAR algorithm which we proposed to mine association rules based on PCA and fuzzy classification technology. The experiment indicates that the

Youdong Zhang; Yongjun Ren; Jiangdong Wang; Liming Fang

2007-01-01

384

Computer-mediated interactions through English for Elite Police Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of English for Elite Police Network program is to provide an interactive platform for trainees, instructors, police experts and other participants so as to enhance interests as well as efficiency in professional English learning and training. Computer-mediated interactions are strengthened in both police English learning and policing skills training through role-playing, discussing and interacting in scenarios which enable

Zhongwen Liu

2011-01-01

385

Is It Ethical for Patents to Be Issued for the Computer Algorithms that Affect Course Management Systems for Distance Learning?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article discusses the impact of patents for computer algorithms in course management systems. Referring to historical documents and court cases, the positive and negative aspects of software patents are presented. The key argument is the accessibility to algorithms comprising a course management software program such as Blackboard. The…

Moreau, Nancy

2008-01-01

386

The Relationship of Student Motivation and Self-Regulated Learning Strategies to Performance in an Undergraduate Computer Literacy Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship among students' reports about their goal orientation, self-efficacy and self-regulated strategy, use and their academic performance in a Computer Literacy course as indicated by course grade. Also investigated were students' reports about their most preferred and utilized study techniques…

Niemczyk, Mary C.; Savenye, Wilhelmina C.

387

The Development and Evaluation of a Teleprocessed Computer-Assisted Instruction Course in the Recognition of Malarial Parasites.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report covers the development and evaluation of a computer-assisted instruction course in the recognition of malarial parasites, which includes stage discrimination, species discrimination, and case histories. Segments developed use Coursewriter as a...

H. E. Mitzel

1968-01-01

388

Teaching the cloud - experiences in designing and teaching an undergraduate-level course in cloud computing at the Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cloud computing is a disruptive technology, one that embodies a major conceptual shift and is rapidly changing the way users, developers, and organizations work with computing infrastructure. Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar offered a one-semester undergraduate course to introduce students to cloud computing. In this paper we describe our approach and experiences in designing the course. We describe course elements

M. Suhail Rehman; Majd F. Sakr

2011-01-01

389

Economic Path Scheduling for Mobile Agent System on Computer Network  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mobile agent technology has a lot of gains to offer network-centric applications. The technology promises to be very suitable for narrow-bandwidth networks by reducing network latency and allowing transparent per-to-per computing. Multi-agent technology had been proposed for many network-centric applications with little or no path scheduling algorithms. This paper describes the need for path scheduling algorithms for agents in multi-agent systems. Traveling salesman problem (TSP) scheme is used to model ordered agents and the unordered agents schedule their path based on random distribution. The two types of agents were modeled and simulated based on bandwidth usage and response time as performance metrics. Our simulation results shows that ordered agents have superior performance against unordered agents. The ordered agents exhibit lower bandwidth usage and higher response time.

Olajubu, E. A.

390

Global tree network for computing structures enabling global processing operations  

SciTech Connect

A system and method for enabling high-speed, low-latency global tree network communications among processing nodes interconnected according to a tree network structure. The global tree network enables collective reduction operations to be performed during parallel algorithm operations executing in a computer structure having a plurality of the interconnected processing nodes. Router devices are included that interconnect the nodes of the tree via links to facilitate performance of low-latency global processing operations at nodes of the virtual tree and sub-tree structures. The global operations performed include one or more of: broadcast operations downstream from a root node to leaf nodes of a virtual tree, reduction operations upstream from leaf nodes to the root node in the virtual tree, and point-to-point message passing from any node to the root node. The global tree network is configurable to provide global barrier and interrupt functionality in asynchronous or synchronized manner, and, is physically and logically partitionable.

Blumrich; Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Chen, Dong (Croton-On-Hudson, NY); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E. (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Hoenicke, Dirk (Ossining, NY); Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D. (Mount Kisco, NY); Takken, Todd E. (Mount Kisco, NY); Vranas, Pavlos M. (Bedford Hills, NY)

2010-01-19

391

The computational core and fixed point organization in Boolean networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we analyse large random Boolean networks in terms of a constraint satisfaction problem. We first develop an algorithmic scheme which allows us to prune simple logical cascades and underdetermined variables, returning thereby the computational core of the network. Second, we apply the cavity method to analyse the number and organization of fixed points. We find in particular a phase transition between an easy and a complex regulatory phase, the latter being characterized by the existence of an exponential number of macroscopically separated fixed point clusters. The different techniques developed are reinterpreted as algorithms for the analysis of single Boolean networks, and they are applied in the analysis of and in silico experiments on the gene regulatory networks of baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and the segment-polarity genes of the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster.

Correale, L.; Leone, M.; Pagnani, A.; Weigt, M.; Zecchina, R.

2006-03-01

392

Reduction of dynamical biochemical reactions networks in computational biology  

PubMed Central

Biochemical networks are used in computational biology, to model mechanistic details of systems involved in cell signaling, metabolism, and regulation of gene expression. Parametric and structural uncertainty, as well as combinatorial explosion are strong obstacles against analyzing the dynamics of large models of this type. Multiscaleness, an important property of these networks, can be used to get past some of these obstacles. Networks with many well separated time scales, can be reduced to simpler models, in a way that depends only on the orders of magnitude and not on the exact values of the kinetic parameters. The main idea used for such robust simplifications of networks is the concept of dominance among model elements, allowing hierarchical organization of these elements according to their effects on the network dynamics. This concept finds a natural formulation in tropical geometry. We revisit, in the light of these new ideas, the main approaches to model reduction of reaction networks, such as quasi-steady state (QSS) and quasi-equilibrium approximations (QE), and provide practical recipes for model reduction of linear and non-linear networks. We also discuss the application of model reduction to the problem of parameter identification, via backward pruning machine learning techniques.

Radulescu, O.; Gorban, A. N.; Zinovyev, A.; Noel, V.

2012-01-01

393

Computation with spikes in a winner-take-all network.  

PubMed

The winner-take-all (WTA) computation in networks of recurrently connected neurons is an important decision element of many models of cortical processing. However, analytical studies of the WTA performance in recurrent networks have generally addressed rate-based models. Very few have addressed networks of spiking neurons, which are relevant for understanding the biological networks themselves and also for the development of neuromorphic electronic neurons that commmunicate by action potential like address-events. Here, we make steps in that direction by using a simplified Markov model of the spiking network to examine analytically the ability of a spike-based WTA network to discriminate the statistics of inputs ranging from stationary regular to nonstationary Poisson events. Our work extends previous theoretical results showing that a WTA recurrent network receiving regular spike inputs can select the correct winner within one interspike interval. We show first for the case of spike rate inputs that input discrimination and the effects of self-excitation and inhibition on this discrimination are consistent with results obtained from the standard rate-based WTA models. We also extend this discrimination analysis of spiking WTAs to nonstationary inputs with time-varying spike rates resembling statistics of real-world sensory stimuli. We conclude that spiking WTAs are consistent with their continuous counterparts for steady-state inputs, but they also exhibit high discrimination performance with nonstationary inputs. PMID:19548795

Oster, Matthias; Douglas, Rodney; Liu, Shih-Chii

2009-09-01

394

A program of computer-aided coordination analysis for an undergraduate course in protective relaying  

SciTech Connect

This paper introduces a program used as a practicing tool for the protective relaying course of undergraduate level. This progress allows students to practice protective devices coordination in power systems on a personal computer by representing the time-current curve with dynamic computer graphics. The program is also provided with a debugging system that is designed to inform the user of any problem found in his protection scheme. In order to make students fully understand the dynamic performance of protective devices coordination, the program allows students to assign the location of a fault and it will display the operating time of the protective devices according to the tripping sequence. The program also has the function of automatic coordination analysis, the results of which can be compared with the user's scheme and can also help the user to have a better understanding of what are actually used in the industry today.

Chu, W.C.; Liu, M.C. (Tatung Inst. of Tech., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China))

1992-11-01

395

A combinatorial intelligent computing approach for resolving the delay and flow assignment in computer communication networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, the average end-to-end delay of packets in a computer communication network is investigated. The network delay depends mainly on the transmission route and its flow assignment, and can be decreased through a suitable route selection and flow assignment scheme. The route selection is a static virtual-circuit assignment issue and can be consider as a 0–1 quadratic programming

Xinyu Wu; Junrong Xu; Wai Kai Chen

1999-01-01

396

Communication networks for autonomous mobile robot computer architectures and distributed real-time computing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Communication networks play an increasingly important role in many areas of computing. This dissertation introduces an interprocessor communication network for mobile robot computer architectures and real-time communication networks for distributed real-time computing. In both cases, the objective of the research is to provide communication with very low delay. Mobile robot tasks such as collision avoidance and dynamic navigation change over time and exhibit a high degree of cooperation. The segmented bus is a reconfigurable interconnection network for intelligent mobile robot applications. The segmented bus employs a preemptive circuit-switched message transfer technique for low delay. For mobile robot applications, analysis suggests that message delays are lower on the segmented bus as compared to alternatives such as the multiple bus. Interactive real-time message streams are used in continuous media distributed sensing and command/control applications. These streams require low end-to-end delay bounds and zero-loss. This dissertation offers solutions to message-stream admission and low latency message transfers for interactive real-time message streams on communication networks. The proposed adaptive stream admission procedure is shown to admit more streams to a network than previous approaches. The proposed preemphasis cut-through data transfer mechanism reduces the minimum achievable end-to-end delay bound of a packet-switched network to values approaching circuit-switched techniques. To obtain low latencies on integrated broadband networks, the asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) must support bound-delay, zero-loss data transfers. A message-level delay control mechanism based on preemptive cut-through is presented. Hardware and software to implement message-level delay control are described results show a significant reduction in computation requirements when message-level delay control is used on ATM switch processors.

Aras, Caglan Mehmet

1993-12-01

397

Analysis of Intrusion Detection and Attack Proliferation in Computer Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the popular models to describe computer worm propagation is the Susceptible-Infected (SI) model [1]. This model of worm propagation has been implemented on the simulation toolkit Network Simulator v2 (ns-2) [2]. The ns-2 toolkit has the capability to simulate networks of different topologies. The topology studied in this work, however, is that of a simple star-topology. This work introduces our initial efforts to learn the relevant quantities describing an infection given synthetic data obtained from running the ns-2 worm model. We aim to use Bayesian methods to gain a predictive understanding of how computer infections spread in real world network topologies. This understanding would greatly reinforce dissemination of targeted immunization strategies, which may prevent real-world epidemics. The data consist of reports of infection from a subset of nodes in a large network during an attack. The infection equation obtained from [1] enables us to derive a likelihood function for the infection reports. This prior information can be used in the Bayesian framework to obtain the posterior probabilities for network properties of interest, such as the rate at which nodes contact one another (also referred to as contact rate or scan rate). Our preliminary analyses indicate an effective spread rate of only 1/5th the actual scan rate used for a star-type of topology. This implies that as the population becomes saturated with infected nodes the actual spread rate will become much less than the scan rate used in the simulation.

Rangan, Prahalad; Knuth, Kevin H.

2007-11-01

398

Computing Tutte polynomials of contact networks in classrooms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Objective: The topological complexity of contact networks in classrooms and the potential transmission of an infectious disease were analyzed by sex and age. Methods: The Tutte polynomials, some topological properties and the number of spanning trees were used to algebraically compute the topological complexity. Computations were made with the Maple package GraphTheory. Published data of mutually reported social contacts within a classroom taken from primary school, consisting of children in the age ranges of 4-5, 7-8 and 10-11, were used. Results: The algebraic complexity of the Tutte polynomial and the probability of disease transmission increases with age. The contact networks are not bipartite graphs, gender segregation was observed especially in younger children. Conclusion: Tutte polynomials are tools to understand the topology of the contact networks and to derive numerical indexes of such topologies. It is possible to establish relationships between the Tutte polynomial of a given contact network and the potential transmission of an infectious disease within such network

Hincapié, Doracelly; Ospina, Juan

2013-05-01

399

Use of Physical Simulation, Computer Simulation, and a Common Product in a Series of Courses to Illu  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Use of Physical & Computer Simulation and a Standard Product in a Series of Courses to Illustrate Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering Technology Principles This presentation will explain the use of Physical Three-Dimensional Simulation and Computer Simulation coupled with a simple, standard product to teach various principles of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering Technology throughout several different courses. This product (a simple model wagon), along with a variety of options, is threaded through several courses, allowing students to keep a common frame of reference, while seeing how the various principles within the courses tie together. Every course has a team oriented lab project which allows the students to build their team work and communication skills. This teaching methodology also allows the use of active, hands-on learning for the purpose of process improvement and leadership development. As the courses progress, the students will experience the transformation of the product assembly process from rudimentary assembly, to the effective use of fixtures and workstation design to reduce operator effort and improve productivity. It culminates with the course on Lean Manufacturing which also introduces the use of production simulation using in-house designed and manufactured equipment that allows us to integrate component manufacturing along with product assembly. The presentation will include video clips of the various course projects and principles, a computer simulation and samples of the products. The use of these concepts presented allows students to experience real life examples in the classroom that closely mimic what they will see in industry.

Carlisle, Tom; Winarchick, Charlie

2010-02-22

400

Three-dimensional Courses of Zygomaticofacial and Zygomaticotemporal Canals Using Micro-computed Tomography in Korean.  

PubMed

The zygomatic nerve (ZN), which originates from the maxillary nerve at the pterygopalatine fossa, enters the orbit through the inferior orbital fissure. Within the lateral region of the orbit, the ZN divides into the zygomaticofacial (ZF) and zygomaticotemporal (ZT) nerves. The ZF and ZT nerves then pass on to the face and temporal region through the zygomaticoorbital foramen and enter their own bony canals within the zygomatic bone. However, multiple zygomaticofacial and zygomaticotemporal canals (ZFCs and ZTCs, respectively) can be observed, and their detailed intrabony courses are unknown. The aim of this study was clarify the three-dimensional intrabony courses and running patterns of the ZFCs and ZTCs, both to obtain a detailed anatomical description and for clinical purposes. Fourteen sides of the zygomatic bones were scanned as two-dimensional images using a micro-computed tomography (CT), with 32-?m slice thickness. Intrabony structures of each canals were three-dimensionally reconstructed and analyzed using Mimics computer software (Version 10.01; Materialise, Leuven, Belgium). We found that some ZTC was originated from ZFC. In 71.4% of the specimens, the ZTC(s) divided from the intrabony canal along the course of the ZFC(s). In other cases, 28.6% of ZTCs were opened through each corresponding ZT foramen. Zygomaticofacial canal originates from zygomaticoorbital foramen, divided into some of ZTCs, and is finally opened as ZF foramen. This new anatomical description of the intrabony structures of the ZFC(s) and ZTC(s) within the zygomatic bone by micro-CT technology provided helpful information to surgeons performing clinical procedures such as Le Fort osteotomy and reconstructive surgeries in the midface region. PMID:24036727

Kim, Hong-San; Oh, Jin-Ho; Choi, Da-Yae; Lee, Jae-Gi; Choi, Jong-Hoon; Hu, Kyung-Seok; Kim, Hee-Jin; Yang, Hun-Mu

2013-09-01

401

A Distributed Algorithm for Constructing Minimal Spanning Trees in Computer-Communication Networks.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper presents a distributed algorithm for constructing minimal spanning trees in computer-communication networks. The algorithm can be executed concurrently and asynchronously by the different computers of the network. This algorithm is also suitabl...

Y. K. Dalal

1976-01-01

402

Quantum computational tensor network on string-net condensate  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

String-net condensate is a new class of materials which exhibits quantum topological order. Here we study the measurement-based quantum computation on the simplest example of string-net condensate, namely the Z2 gauge string-net condensate on the two-dimensional hexagonal lattice, by using the framework of quantum computational tensor network. We show that universal measurement-based quantum computation is possible by coupling two correlation space wires with a physical two-body interaction. We also show that universal measurement-based quantum computation is possible solely with single-qubit measurements if the sign of the coefficient of each closed-loop configuration in the state is tuned. These results suggest that even the simplest example of string-net condensate is equipped with the correlation space that has the capacity for the application to quantum information processing.

Morimae, Tomoyuki

2012-06-01

403

SHORT COURSE PROCEEDINGS: APPLICATIONS OF COMPUTER PROGRAMS IN THE PRELIMINARY DESIGN OF WASTEWATER TREATMENT FACILITIES; SECTION I. WORKSHOP LECTURES  

EPA Science Inventory

This document contains the material used for the Short Course on the Applications of Computer Programs in the Preliminary Design of Wastewater Treatment Facilities. It covers the role of computer programs in preliminary design and use of the Exec Program to determine the effect o...

404

Implementing Collaborative Project-Based Learning using the Tablet PC to enhance student learning in engineering and computer science courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increasing the retention rate of engineering\\/ computer science students and enhancing student design skills are two major challenges in engineering education. This paper presents a team effort to implement Collaborative Project-based Learning (CPBL) using Tablet PC technology in a broad spectrum of engineering and computer science courses from freshman to senior level. Presented here are a number of innovative teaching

Zanj Avery; Mauricio Castillo; Huiping Guo; Jiang Guo; Nancy Warter-Perez; Deborah S. Won; Jane Dong

2010-01-01

405

Applying Intelligent Computing Techniques to Modeling Biological Networks from Expression Data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Constructing biological networks is one of the most important issues in systems biology. However, constructing a network from data manually takes a considerable large amount of time, therefore an automated procedure is advocated. To automate the procedure of network construction, in this work we use two intelligent computing techniques, genetic programming and neural computation, to infer two kinds of network

Wei-po Lee; Kung-cheng Yang

2008-01-01

406

Orchestration of Network-Wide Active Measurements for Supporting Distributed Computing Applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent computing applications such as videocon- ferencing and Grid computing run their tasks on distributed computing resources connected through networks. For such applications, knowledge of the network status such as delay, jitter, and available bandwidth can help them select proper network resources to meet the Quality of Service (QoS) re- quirements. Also, the applications can dynamically change the resource selection

Prasad Calyam; Chang-gun Lee; Eylem Ekici; Mark Haffner; Nathan Howes

2007-01-01

407

A tutoring strategy supporting system for distance learning on computer networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the fast development of computer networks, people can access information and communicate with others without being constrained by space and time. Through network communications, people can discuss things with others to solve their problems. Therefore, how to implement distance cooperative computer-assisted learning (CAL) systems on computer networks becomes an interesting and challenging issue. In this paper, the authors present

Gwo-Jen Hwang

1998-01-01

408

Recurrent Quantum Neural Networks:. a Paradigm for Subjective Computing Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A complete scientific theory that can integrate material objects with mental objects is capable of heralding the next stage of scientific revolution. Mental qualities such as experienced smell or taste has yet to be quantified in scientific domain. This chapter is devoted to this idea of subjective computation where mental qualities can be quantified. Schroedinger wave equation has been used in a recurrent quantum neural network framework to solve problems such as stochastic filtering, system identification and adaptive control.

Behera, Laxmidhar

2005-10-01

409

Computational study of noise in a large signal transduction network  

PubMed Central

Background Biochemical systems are inherently noisy due to the discrete reaction events that occur in a random manner. Although noise is often perceived as a disturbing factor, the system might actually benefit from it. In order to understand the role of noise better, its quality must be studied in a quantitative manner. Computational analysis and modeling play an essential role in this demanding endeavor. Results We implemented a large nonlinear signal transduction network combining protein kinase C, mitogen-activated protein kinase, phospholipase A2, and ? isoform of phospholipase C networks. We simulated the network in 300 different cellular volumes using the exact Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm and analyzed the results in both the time and frequency domain. In order to perform simulations in a reasonable time, we used modern parallel computing techniques. The analysis revealed that time and frequency domain characteristics depend on the system volume. The simulation results also indicated that there are several kinds of noise processes in the network, all of them representing different kinds of low-frequency fluctuations. In the simulations, the power of noise decreased on all frequencies when the system volume was increased. Conclusions We concluded that basic frequency domain techniques can be applied to the analysis of simulation results produced by the Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm. This approach is suited not only to the study of fluctuations but also to the study of pure noise processes. Noise seems to have an important role in biochemical systems and its properties can be numerically studied by simulating the reacting system in different cellular volumes. Parallel computing techniques make it possible to run massive simulations in hundreds of volumes and, as a result, accurate statistics can be obtained from computational studies.

2011-01-01

410

A Reconfigurable Monitoring System for Large-Scale Network Computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The dynamic nature of large-size Network Computing Systems (NCSs) and the varying monitoring demands from the end-users pose\\u000a serious challenges for monitoring systems (MSs). A statically configured MS initially adjusted to perform optimally may end\\u000a performing poorly. A reconfiguration mechanism for a distributed MS is proposed. It enables the MS to react to changes in\\u000a the available resources, operating conditions,

Rajesh Subramanyan; José Miguel-alonso; José A. B. Fortes

2003-01-01

411

Neural networks and pattern recognition in human-computer interaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on the activities of the workshop held on Sunday 28th April at the CHI'91 conference. Participants were there to discuss different ideas, methods and approaches to using pattern recognition in human-computer interaction.The workshop aimed to bring together researchers using novel methodologies, such as neural networks, in HCI applications, as well as practitioners using alternative or more traditional

Janet Finlay; Russell Beale

1993-01-01

412

A parallel neural network computing for the maximum clique problem  

Microsoft Academic Search

A novel computational model for large-scale maximum clique problems is proposed and tested. The maximum clique problem is first formulated as an unconstrained quadratic zero-one programming and it is solved by minimizing the weight summation over the same partition in a newly constructed graph. The proposed maximum neural network has the following advantages: (1) coefficient-parameter tuning in the motion equation

Kuo Chun Lee; Nobuo Funabiki; Y. B. Cho; Yoshiyasu Takefuji

1991-01-01

413

Computing combinatorial intervention strategies and failure modes in signaling networks.  

PubMed

The identification of combinatorial intervention strategies and the elucidation of failure modes that may cause aberrant behavior of cellular signaling networks are highly relevant topics in cell biology, medicine, and pharmaceutical industry. We have recently introduced the concept of minimal intervention sets (MISs)--minimal combinations of knock-ins and knock-outs provoking a desired/observed response in certain target nodes--to tackle those problems within a Boolean/logical framework. We first generalize the notion of MISs and then present several techniques for search space reduction facilitating the enumeration of MISs in networks of realistic size. One strategy exploits topological information about network-wide interdependencies between the nodes to discard unfavorable single interventions. A similar technique checks during the algorithm whether all target nodes of an intervention problem can be influenced in appropriate direction (up/down) by the interventions contained in MIS candidates. Another strategy takes lessons from electrical engineering: certain interventions are equivalent with respect to their effect on the target nodes and can therefore be grouped in fault equivalence classes (FECs). FECs resulting from so-called structural equivalence can be easily computed in a preprocessing step, with the advantage that only one representative per class needs to be considered when constructing the MISs in the main algorithm. With intervention problems from realistic networks as benchmarks, we show that these algorithmic improvements may reduce the computation time up to 99%, increasing the applicability of MISs in practice. PMID:20078396

Samaga, Regina; Von Kamp, Axel; Klamt, Steffen

2010-01-01

414

Power Consumption Evaluation of Distributed Computing Network Considering Traffic Locality  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

When computing resources are consolidated in a few huge data centers, a massive amount of data is transferred to each data center over a wide area network (WAN). This results in increased power consumption in the WAN. A distributed computing network (DCN), such as a content delivery network, can reduce the traffic from/to the data center, thereby decreasing the power consumed in the WAN. In this paper, we focus on the energy-saving aspect of the DCN and evaluate its effectiveness, especially considering traffic locality, i.e., the amount of traffic related to the geographical vicinity. We first formulate the problem of optimizing the DCN power consumption and describe the DCN in detail. Then, numerical evaluations show that, when there is strong traffic locality and the router has ideal energy proportionality, the system's power consumption is reduced to about 50% of the power consumed in the case where a DCN is not used; moreover, this advantage becomes even larger (up to about 30%) when the data center is located farthest from the center of the network topology.

Ogawa, Yukio; Hasegawa, Go; Murata, Masayuki

415

Experimental, analytical and computational investigation of bimodal elastomer networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Advances in the synthesis of macromolecular materials have led to the creation of special classes of elastomers called bimodal because of their bimodal distributions of linear starting oligomers. Numerous studies on these materials have documented anomalous increases in ultimate strength and toughness at certain mixture combinations of the constituents but have not yet identified a cause for this behavior. In addition, the ability to predict optimal mixtures still eludes polymer chemists. Constitutive models for the behavior of bimodal materials are also unable to predict material behavior, but instead tend to capture results using complicated curve fitting and iterative schemes. This thesis uncovers topological and micromechanical sources of these enhanced properties using periodic, topological simulations of chain-level network formation and develops a constitutive model of the aggregate bimodal network. Using a topological framework, in conjunction with the eight-chain averaging scheme of Arruda and Boyce, this work develops optical and mechanical constitutive models for bimodal elastomers whose results compare favorably with data in the literature. The resulting bimodal network theory is able to predict material response for a range of bimodal compositions using only two sets of data, a direct improvement over previous models. The micromechanics of elastomeric deformation and chain orientation as described by the eight-chain model are further validated by comparing optical and mechanical data generated during large deformation shear tests on unimodal materials with finite element simulations. In addition, a newly developed optical anisotropy model for the Raman tensor of polymeric materials, generated using an eight-chain unit cell model, is shown to compare favorably with tensile data in the literature. Results generated using NETSIM, a computer program developed in this thesis, have revealed naturally occurring, self-reinforcing topological features associated with experimentally observed increases in ultimate strength and toughness. The ability to predict increases in the populations of these topologies allows for the prediction of optimal bimodal mixtures and the definition of a metric of network optimality. The sol and gel fraction predictions from NETSIM also compare well with results obtained from experimental network synthesis and previous computational simulations. After formation, each molecular chain is assigned a modified entropic force-stretch law and the undeformed network is annealed, clearly illustrating how initial chain length distributions in bimodal materials deviate from the r.m.s. assumption. The results of computational annealing also highlight several structural features that have been observed experimentally in the literature. Results of the computational deformation of simulated, three dimensional networks show enhancements to strain hardening in networks with compositions similar to those which exhibited enhanced toughness in experiments. These enhanced, simulated networks also show increases in the orientation versus stretch response over compositionally similar networks. Orientation response results support previous experimental results. Increased occurrence of the doubled connection topology is found to enhance strain hardening in simulated networks and to be a positive factor in enhanced strain energy seen in experiments. The density of single cyclics, while having a positive correlation in the enhanced strain energy seen in experiments appears to negate the effect of increased populations of doubled connections in simulations.

von Lockette, Paris Robert

416

Computers and clinical judgment: the role of physician networks.  

PubMed

In order to study the relationship between physician networks and utilization of a computer-based hospital information system (HIS), blockmodel analysis and multidimensional scaling were used to analyze and spatially represent the network of professional relations among 24 physicians in a private group practice. A blockmodel analysis of patient referrals, consultations, discussions, and on-call coverage identified four groups of physicians who share common locations and perform similar roles within the network. Investigation of the shared attributes of these groups supports this relational structure. The results suggest that the center-periphery model of diffusion of new ideas among professionals may be too simplistic. Instead, the communication network may involve multiple central cohesive subgroups of physicians who differentially initiate patient referrals and consultations with physicians in other subgroups. Network location was found to have a significant effect on the adoption and utilization of the HIS independently of background and practice characteristics of physicians. The results also suggest that adoption of an innovation and its implementation or utilization may involve separate processes that need to be differentiated in future research. PMID:4012350

Anderson, J G; Jay, S J

1985-01-01

417

Issues common to Australian critical infrastructure providers SCADA networks discovered through computer and network vulnerability analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on generic issues discovered as a result of conducting computer and network vulnerability assessments (CNVA) on Australian critical infrastructure providers. Generic issues discovered included policy, governance, IT specific such as segregation, patching and updating. Physical security was also lacking in some cases. Another issue was that previous security audits had failed to identify any of these issues.

Craig Valli

2008-01-01

418

Hazard Communication Project: computer-based training course (for microcomputers). Software  

SciTech Connect

The software is computer-based training with the following course objectives: to inform employees of their employer's requirements under the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard (29 CFR 1910.1200); to instruct employees on the procedures for obtaining and using information on hazardous materials, including understanding labeling systems and understanding the material safety data sheet (MSDS) information; to provide information on 11 classes of chemicals, including their common uses, potential physical and health hazards, detection methods, and safety measures to follow. There are 14 lessons, ranging in length from 30 minutes to 1 (one) hour. Software Description: The software is written in the UNISON language for use on an IBM PC or compatible machines using MS DOS operating system. It requires 378K of memory. Special requirements are an EGA graphics card and monitor. The program will not run on monochrome or CGA systems.

Fisher, S.

1989-03-01

419

An effective method for computing the noise in biochemical networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a simple yet effective method, which is based on power series expansion, for computing exact binomial moments that can be in turn used to compute steady-state probability distributions as well as the noise in linear or nonlinear biochemical reaction networks. When the method is applied to representative reaction networks such as the ON-OFF models of gene expression, gene models of promoter progression, gene auto-regulatory models, and common signaling motifs, the exact formulae for computing the intensities of noise in the species of interest or steady-state distributions are analytically given. Interestingly, we find that positive (negative) feedback does not enlarge (reduce) noise as claimed in previous works but has a counter-intuitive effect and that the multi-OFF (or ON) mechanism always attenuates the noise in contrast to the common ON-OFF mechanism and can modulate the noise to the lowest level independently of the mRNA mean. Except for its power in deriving analytical expressions for distributions and noise, our method is programmable and has apparent advantages in reducing computational cost.

Zhang, Jiajun; Nie, Qing; He, Miao; Zhou, Tianshou

2013-02-01

420

An effective method for computing the noise in biochemical networks.  

PubMed

We present a simple yet effective method, which is based on power series expansion, for computing exact binomial moments that can be in turn used to compute steady-state probability distributions as well as the noise in linear or nonlinear biochemical reaction networks. When the method is applied to representative reaction networks such as the ON-OFF models of gene expression, gene models of promoter progression, gene auto-regulatory models, and common signaling motifs, the exact formulae for computing the intensities of noise in the species of interest or steady-state distributions are analytically given. Interestingly, we find that positive (negative) feedback does not enlarge (reduce) noise as claimed in previous works but has a counter-intuitive effect and that the multi-OFF (or ON) mechanism always attenuates the noise in contrast to the common ON-OFF mechanism and can modulate the noise to the lowest level independently of the mRNA mean. Except for its power in deriving analytical expressions for distributions and noise, our method is programmable and has apparent advantages in reducing computational cost. PMID:23464139

Zhang, Jiajun; Nie, Qing; He, Miao; Zhou, Tianshou

2013-02-28

421

Line-plane broadcasting in a data communications network of a parallel computer  

DOEpatents

Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for line-plane broadcasting in a data communications network of a parallel computer, the parallel computer comprising a plurality of compute nodes connected together through the network, the network optimized for point to point data communications and characterized by at least a first dimension, a second dimension, and a third dimension, that include: initiating, by a broadcasting compute node, a broadcast operation, including sending a message to all of the compute nodes along an axis of the first dimension for the network; sending, by each compute node along the axis of the first dimension, the message to all of the compute nodes along an axis of the second dimension for the network; and sending, by each compute node along the axis of the second dimension, the message to all of the compute nodes along an axis of the third dimension for the network.

Archer, Charles J. (Rochester, MN); Berg, Jeremy E. (Rochester, MN); Blocksome, Michael A. (Rochester, MN); Smith, Brian E. (Rochester, MN)

2010-11-23

422

Computational Models and Emergent Properties of Respiratory Neural Networks  

PubMed Central

Computational models of the neural control system for breathing in mammals provide a theoretical and computational framework bringing together experimental data obtained from different animal preparations under various experimental conditions. Many of these models were developed in parallel and iteratively with experimental studies and provided predictions guiding new experiments. This data-driven modeling approach has advanced our understanding of respiratory network architecture and neural mechanisms underlying generation of the respiratory rhythm and pattern, including their functional reorganization under different physiological conditions. Models reviewed here vary in neurobiological details and computational complexity and span multiple spatiotemporal scales of respiratory control mechanisms. Recent models describe interacting populations of respiratory neurons spatially distributed within the Bötzinger and pre-Bötzinger complexes and rostral ventrolateral medulla that contain core circuits of the respiratory central pattern generator (CPG). Network interactions within these circuits along with intrinsic rhythmogenic properties of neurons form a hierarchy of multiple rhythm generation mechanisms. The functional expression of these mechanisms is controlled by input drives from other brainstem components, including the retrotrapezoid nucleus and pons, which regulate the dynamic behavior of the core circuitry. The emerging view is that the brainstem respiratory network has rhythmogenic capabilities at multiple levels of circuit organization. This allows flexible, state-dependent expression of different neural pattern-generation mechanisms under various physiological conditions, enabling a wide repertoire of respiratory behaviors. Some models consider control of the respiratory CPG by pulmonary feedback and network reconfiguration during defensive behaviors such as cough. Future directions in modeling of the respiratory CPG are considered.

Lindsey, Bruce G.; Rybak, Ilya A.; Smith, Jeffrey C.

2012-01-01

423

High End Computer Network Testbedding at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Earth & Space Data Computing (ESDC) Division, at the Goddard Space Flight Center, is involved in development and demonstrating various high end computer networking capabilities. The ESDC has several high end super computers. These are used to run: (1)...

J. P. Gary

1998-01-01

424

Measures of effectiveness for BMD mid-course tracking on MIMD massively parallel computers  

SciTech Connect

The TRC code, a mid-course tracking code for ballistic missiles, has previously been implemented on a 1024-processor MIMD (Multiple Instruction -- Multiple Data) massively parallel computer. Measures of Effectiveness (MOE) for this algorithm have been developed for this computing environment. The MOE code is run in parallel with the TRC code. Particularly useful MOEs include the number of missed objects (real objects for which the TRC algorithm did not construct a track); of ghost tracks (tracks not corresponding to a real object); of redundant tracks (multiple tracks corresponding to a single real object); and of unresolved objects (multiple objects corresponding to a single track). All of these are expressed as a function of time, and tend to maximize during the time in which real objects are spawned (multiple reentry vehicles per post-boost vehicle). As well, it is possible to measure the track-truth separation as a function of time. A set of calculations is presented illustrating these MOEs as a function of time for a case with 99 post-boost vehicles, each of which spawns 9 reentry vehicles.

VanDyke, J.P.; Tomkins, J.L.; Furnish, M.D.

1995-05-01

425

Blogging within a Social Networking Site as a Form of Literature Response in a Teacher Education Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this qualitative study was to document how pre-service teachers in a children's literature course experienced blogging on a social networking site as a form of literature response. Understanding how pre-service teachers experience these tools can inform the ways we instruct them to integrate Web 2.0 tools into their teaching.…

Hutchison, Amy; Wang, Wei

2012-01-01

426

Blogging within a Social Networking Site as a Form of Literature Response in a Teacher Education Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this qualitative study was to document how pre-service teachers in a children's literature course experienced blogging on a social networking site as a form of literature response. Understanding how pre-service teachers experience these tools can inform the ways we instruct them to integrate Web 2.0 tools into their teaching.…

Hutchison, Amy; Wang, Wei

2012-01-01

427

World: A multipurpose GPS-network computer package  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

WORLD is a multipurpose package to compute geodetic positions in geometry and gravity space. Here undifferenced GPS carrier beat phase observations are processed in the free network mode, namely by the prototype program called PUMA. Within two alternative model formulations, the classical Gauß-Markov Model and the so-called Mixed Model, simultaneously estimated / predicted parameters are those of type (i) Cartesian ground station coordinates (geodetic positioning), (ii) Cartesian satellite coordinates (orbit determination), (iii) receiver- and satellite-specific bias terms, (iv) initial epoch ambiguities and (v) proportional tropospheric corrections. The Mixed Model parameters appear from linearization as a point of stochastic prior information. Namely the weight matrices of stochastic prior information, e.g. for orbit parameters, is assumed to be known. Estimators of type BLUE and predictors of type inhom BLIP and hom BLUP are used. Chapter four discusses in all detail the real analysis of GPS satellite networks of free type. Most notable are the estimated bias terms ?, ?, ?, in a twofold classification model. The operability of PUMA is demonstrated by the use of multistation phase observations (Wild-Magnavox WM 101-receivers) in a local Berlin network (six station network). It is documented that in spite of the advanced phase observation modelling an internal relative baseline accuracy (utmost length 30 km) of the order of 3 to 5 ppm is achievable. In addition, the influence of orbital prior information on ground station measures, point position as well as accuracy, is demonstrated.

Grafarend, Erik W.; Lindlohr, Wolfgang

428

Prediction of Student Course Selection in Online Higher Education Institutes Using Neural Network  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Students are required to choose courses they are interested in for the coming semester. Due to restrictions, including lack of sufficient resources and overheads of running several courses, some universities might not offer all of a student's desirable courses. Universities must know every student's demands for every course prior to each semester…

Kardan, Ahmad A.; Sadeghi, Hamid; Ghidary, Saeed Shiry; Sani, Mohammad Reza Fani

2013-01-01

429

Efficient Immunization Strategies for Computer Networks and Populations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an effective immunization strategy for computer networks and populations with broad and, in particular, scale-free degree distributions. The proposed strategy, acquaintance immunization, calls for the immunization of random acquaintances of random nodes (individuals). The strategy requires no knowledge of the node degrees or any other global knowledge, as do targeted immunization strategies. We study analytically the critical threshold for complete immunization. We also study the strategy with respect to the susceptible-infected-removed epidemiological model. We show that the immunization threshold is dramatically reduced with the suggested strategy, for all studied cases.

Cohen, Reuven; Havlin, Shlomo; Ben-Avraham, Daniel

2003-12-01

430

Distributed process manager for an engineering network computer  

SciTech Connect

MP is a manager for systems of cooperating processes in a local area network of engineering workstations. MP supports transparent continuation by maintaining multiple copies of each process on different workstations. Computational bandwidth is optimized by executing processes in parallel on different workstations. Responsiveness is high because workstations compete among themselves to respond to requests. The technique is to select a master from among a set of replicates of a process by a competitive election between the copies. Migration of the master when a fault occurs or when response slows down is effected by inducing the election of a new master. Competitive response stabilizes system behavior under load, so MP exhibits realtime behaviors.

Gait, J.

1987-08-01

431

Finding and Analyzing Social Collaboration Networks in the Mexican Computer Science Community  

Microsoft Academic Search

Collaboration of peers is rather common in some scientific communities and is being facilitated with the advances in telecommunication and computer networking technologies. In this paper, we analyze the collaboration networks formed among Mexican computer science scholars, using social network analysis techniques. A series of measurements are performed to identify some patterns of collaboration both among individuals and among Mexican

L. Garcia-Bauelos; Alberto Portilla; A. Chavez-Aragon; O. F. Reyes-Galaviz; H. Ayanegui-Santiago

2009-01-01

432

The research of Cloud Computing based on service plane over optical networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The implementation of Cloud Computing over optical networks faces many challenges and opportunities. A cloud computing architecture over optical networks is proposed based on the service plane. And the validity of the architecture we proposed was experimentally demonstrated in our Adaptive Multi-Service Optical Network testbed.

Zhen Li; Dahai Han; Jie Zhang; Xiuzhong Chen; Wanyi Gu; Yuefeng Ji

2009-01-01

433

Providing Network Performance Isolation in VDE-Based Cloud Computing Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a cloud computing system, virtual machines owned by different clients are co-hosted on a single physical machine. It is vital to isolate network performance between the clients for ensuring fair usage of the constrained and shared network resources of the physical machine. Unfortunately, the existing network performance isolation techniques are not effective for cloud computing systems because they are

Vijeta Rathore; Jonghun Yoo; Jaesoo Lee; Seongsoo Hong

2011-01-01

434

NML Computation Algorithms for Tree-Structured Multinomial Bayesian Networks  

PubMed Central

Typical problems in bioinformatics involve large discrete datasets. Therefore, in order to apply statistical methods in such domains, it is important to develop efficient algorithms suitable for discrete data. The minimum description length (MDL) principle is a theoretically well-founded, general framework for performing statistical inference. The mathematical formalization of MDL is based on the normalized maximum likelihood (NML) distribution, which has several desirable theoretical properties. In the case of discrete data, straightforward computation of the NML distribution requires exponential time with respect to the sample size, since the definition involves a sum over all the possible data samples of a fixed size. In this paper, we first review some existing algorithms for efficient NML computation in the case of multinomial and naive Bayes model families. Then we proceed by extending these algorithms to more complex, tree-structured Bayesian networks.

2007-01-01

435

Brain without mind: Computer simulation of neural networks with modifiable neuronal interactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aspects of brain function are examined in terms of a nonlinear dynamical system of highly interconnected neuron-like binary decision elements. The model neurons operate synchronously in discrete time, according to deterministic or probabilistic equations of motion. Plasticity of the nervous system, which underlies such cognitive collective phenomena as adaptive development, learning, and memory, is represented by temporal modification of interneuronal connection strengths depending on momentary or recent neural activity. A formal basis is presented for the construction of local plasticity algorithms, or connection-modification routines, spanning a large class. To build an intuitive understanding of the behavior of discrete-time network models, extensive computer simulations have been carried out (a) for nets with fixed, quasirandom connectivity and (b) for nets with connections that evolve under one or another choice of plasticity algorithm. From the former experiments, insights are gained concerning the spontaneous emergence of order in the form of cyclic modes of neuronal activity. In the course of the latter experiments, a simple plasticity routine (``brainwashing,'' or ``anti-learning'') was identified which, applied to nets with initially quasirandom connectivity, creates model networks which provide more felicitous starting points for computer experiments on the engramming of content-addressable memories and on learning more generally. The potential relevance of this algorithm to developmental neurobiology and to sleep states is discussed. The model considered is at the same time a synthesis of earlier synchronous neural-network models and an elaboration upon them; accordingly, the present article offers both a focused review of the dynamical properties of such systems and a selection of new findings derived from computer simulation.

Clark, John W.; Rafelski, Johann; Winston, Jeffrey V.

1985-07-01

436

Computationally efficient measure of topological redundancy of biological and social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is well known that biological and social interaction networks have a varying degree of redundancy, though a consensus of the precise cause of this is so far lacking. In this paper, we introduce a topological redundancy measure for labeled directed networks that is formal, computationally efficient, and applicable to a variety of directed networks such as cellular signaling, and metabolic and social interaction networks. We demonstrate the computational efficiency of our measure by computing its value and statistical significance on a number of biological and social networks with up to several thousands of nodes and edges. Our results suggest a number of interesting observations: (1) Social networks are more redundant that their biological counterparts, (2) transcriptional networks are less redundant than signaling networks, (3) the topological redundancy of the C. elegans metabolic network is largely due to its inclusion of currency metabolites, and (4) the redundancy of signaling networks is highly (negatively) correlated with the monotonicity of their dynamics.

Albert, Réka; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Hegde, Rashmi; Sivanathan, Gowri Sangeetha; Gitter, Anthony; Gürsoy, Gamze; Paul, Pradyut; Sontag, Eduardo

2011-09-01

437

Efficient shortest-path-tree computation in network routing based on pulse-coupled neural networks.  

PubMed

Shortest path tree (SPT) computation is a critical issue for routers using link-state routing protocols, such as the most commonly used open shortest path first and intermediate system to intermediate system. Each router needs to recompute a new SPT rooted from itself whenever a change happens in the link state. Most commercial routers do this computation by deleting the current SPT and building a new one using static algorithms such as the Dijkstra algorithm at the beginning. Such recomputation of an entire SPT is inefficient, which may consume a considerable amount of CPU time and result in a time delay in the network. Some dynamic updating methods using the information in the updated SPT have been proposed in recent years. However, there are still many limitations in those dynamic algorithms. In this paper, a new modified model of pulse-coupled neural networks (M-PCNNs) is proposed for the SPT computation. It is rigorously proved that the proposed model is capable of solving some optimization problems, such as the SPT. A static algorithm is proposed based on the M-PCNNs to compute the SPT efficiently for large-scale problems. In addition, a dynamic algorithm that makes use of the structure of the previously computed SPT is proposed, which significantly improves the efficiency of the algorithm. Simulation results demonstrate the effective and efficient performance of the proposed approach. PMID:23144039

Qu, Hong; Yi, Zhang; Yang, Simon X

2012-10-23

438

A Senior-Graduate Level Course in Biomedical Instrumentation and Computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

A senior-graduate level course is described in which some of the material of traditional bioinstrumentation courses is presented in conjunction with laboratory applications of a minicomputer. During the course each student 1) learns aspects of the fundamental properties of bioelectrodes, transducers, and safe human biopotential measurement techniques, 2) uses a minicomputer as a laboratory instrument, and 3) initiates and completes

Spencer L. Bement; Clyde L. Owings

1976-01-01

439

A data mining course for computer science: primary sources and implementations  

Microsoft Academic Search

An undergraduate elective course in data mining provides a strong opportunity for students to learn research skills, practice data structures, and enhance their understanding of algorithms. I have developed a data mining course built around the idea of using research-level papers as the primary reading material for the course, and implementing data min- ing algorithms for the assignments. Such a

David R. Musicant

2006-01-01

440

The Effect of Computer-Mediated Communication on Anonymous End-of-Course Teaching Evaluations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this study was to determine if the nature of student comments on anonymous end-of-course evaluations differed relative to course delivery medium. Comments evaluated were submitted by 202 graduate students enrolled in face-to-face (F2F) and online versions of research and statistics courses over a four-year period. Results suggested…

Rhea, Nancy; Rovai, Alfred; Ponton, Michael; Derrick, Gail; Davis, John

2007-01-01

441

Measuring Cognitive and Affective Performance in a Statistics Course that uses Online Computer Statistics Modules  

Microsoft Academic Search

The advancement of educational technology has stimulated new ways to present course content. The goal of this research was to study the effect that computerized statistics modules (introductory platforms for statistics principles) have on students in an engineering statistics course. Effect was measured on two levels: cognitive and affective. Students from the engineering statistics course at the University of Oklahoma

Barry Mauldin; Teri Reed Rhoads

2001-01-01

442

Recent Results in Photonic Quantum Computations, Simulations and Quantum Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The applications of photonic entanglement manifold and reach from quantum communication [1] to quantum metrology [2] and optical quantum computing [3]. The advantage of the photon's mobility makes optical quantum computing unprecedented in speed, including feed-forward operations with high fidelity [4]. During the last few years the degree of control over photonic multi-particle entanglement has improved substantially and allows for not only overcoming the random nature of spontaneous emission sources [5], but also for the quantum simulation of other quantum systems. Here, I will also present the simulation of four spin-1/2 particles interacting via any Heisenberg-type Hamiltonian [6]. Moreover, recent experimental and theoretical progress, using the concepts of measurement-based quantum computation, indicates that photons are best suited for quantum networks. I will also present present results for the realization for such a client-server environment, where quantum information is communicated and computed using the same physical system [7]. References: [1] PRL 103, 020503 (2009); [2] Nature 429, 158 (2004); [3] Nature 434, 169 (2005); [4] Nature 445, 65 (2007); [5] Nature Photon 4, 553 (2010); [6] Nature Physics 7, 399 (2011); [7] in press.

Walther, Philip

2012-02-01

443

Complex network problems in physics, computer science and biology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There is a close relation between physics and mathematics and the exchange of ideas between these two sciences are well established. However until few years ago there was no such a close relation between physics and computer science. Even more, only recently biologists started to use methods and tools from statistical physics in order to study the behavior of complex system. In this thesis we concentrate on applying and analyzing several methods borrowed from computer science to biology and also we use methods from statistical physics in solving hard problems from computer science. In recent years physicists have been interested in studying the behavior of complex networks. Physics is an experimental science in which theoretical predictions are compared to experiments. In this definition, the term prediction plays a very important role: although the system is complex, it is still possible to get predictions for its behavior, but these predictions are of a probabilistic nature. Spin glasses, lattice gases or the Potts model are a few examples of complex systems in physics. Spin glasses and many frustrated antiferromagnets map exactly to computer science problems in the NP-hard class defined in Chapter 1. In Chapter 1 we discuss a common result from artificial intelligence (AI) which shows that there are some problems which are NP-complete, with the implication that these problems are difficult to solve. We introduce a few well known hard problems from computer science (Satisfiability, Coloring, Vertex Cover together with Maximum Independent Set and Number Partitioning) and then discuss their mapping to problems from physics. In Chapter 2 we provide a short review of combinatorial optimization algorithms and their applications to ground state problems in disordered systems. We discuss the cavity method initially developed for studying the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model of spin glasses. We extend this model to the study of a specific case of spin glass on the Bethe lattice at zero temperature and then we apply this formalism to the K-SAT problem defined in Chapter 1. The phase transition which physicists study often corresponds to a change in the computational complexity of the corresponding computer science problem. Chapter 3 presents phase transitions which are specific to the problems discussed in Chapter 1 and also known results for the K-SAT problem. We discuss the replica method and experimental evidences of replica symmetry breaking. The physics approach to hard problems is based on replica methods which are difficult to understand. In Chapter 4 we develop novel methods for studying hard problems using methods similar to the message passing techniques that were discussed in Chapter 2. Although we concentrated on the symmetric case, cavity methods show promise for generalizing our methods to the un-symmetric case. As has been highlighted by John Hopfield, several key features of biological systems are not shared by physical systems. Although living entities follow the laws of physics and chemistry, the fact that organisms adapt and reproduce introduces an essential ingredient that is missing in the physical sciences. In order to extract information from networks many algorithm have been developed. In Chapter 5 we apply polynomial algorithms like minimum spanning tree in order to study and construct gene regulatory networks from experimental data. As future work we propose the use of algorithms like min-cut/max-flow and Dijkstra for understanding key properties of these networks.

Cojocaru, Radu Ionut

444

A Multi-Year Investigation of the Relationship between Pedagogy, Computer Use and Course Effectiveness in Postsecondary Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study investigated the change in the relationship between pedagogy, computer-use and students' perceptions about course-effectiveness over time. Students from a Canadian university completed a questionnaire in two different years (2003 = 1,834 participants and 2007 = 1,866 participants). Of greatest interest were characteristics of…

Tamim, Rana M.; Lowerison, Gretchen; Schmid, Richard F.; Bernard, Robert M.; Abrami, Philip C.

2011-01-01

445

Investigating pair-programming in a 2nd-year software development and design computer science course  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the results of a pair programming experiment conducted at the University of Auckland (NZ) during the first semester of 2004. It involved 300 second year Computer Science students attending a software design and construction course. We investigated similar issues to those reported in [26] and employed a subset of the questionnaires used by Laurie Williams et al.

Emilia Mendes; Lubna Basil Al-Fakhri; Andrew Luxton-Reilly

2005-01-01

446

A Triangulated Study of Academic Language Needs of Iranian Students of Computer Engineering: Are the Courses on Track?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Even though English for Specific Academic Purposes (ESAP) courses constitute a significant part of the Iranian university curriculum, curriculum developers have generally developed the programs based on intuition. This study assessed the present and target situation academic language needs of undergraduate students of computer engineering. To this…

Atai, Mahmood Reza; Shoja, Leila

2011-01-01

447

A Computer-Assisted Instruction Course on Laboratory Detection of Malarial Parasites in Human Blood. Interim Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In cooperation with the United States Navy, this project was undertaken to examine the feasibility of computer assisted instruction in clinical malaria recognition, to train a small group of Naval personnel in techniques of creating and presenting such material, and to evaluate the course by giving it to a representative sample of Naval medical…

Mitzel, Harold E.

448

E-Learning in Hong Kong: Comparing Learning Outcomes in Online Multimedia and Lecture Versions of an Introductory Computing Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evaluates the effectiveness of Web-based, interactive, multimedia electronic learning materials by comparing students' learning outcomes in the lecture and online versions of an introductory computing course at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Suggests that the use of carefully designed interactive electronic learning modules…

Kekkonen-Moneta, Synnove; Moneta, Giovanni B.

2002-01-01

449

Computer Aided Design in FE. Some Suggestions on the Inclusion of CAD Topics in Mechanical Engineering Courses. An Occasional Paper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report investigates the feasibility of including computer aided design (CAD) materials in engineering courses. Section 1 briefly discusses the inevitability of CAD being adopted widely by British industry and the consequent need for its inclusion in engineering syllabi at all levels. A short description of what is meant by CAD follows in…

Ingham, P. C.

450

Work In Progress: Using Tablet PCs to Integrate Lecture and Laboratory in an Introductory Electrical and Computer Engineering Course  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the Spring of 2006, tablet PCs were used in a new introductory course in Electrical and Computer Engineering to bridge the gap between lecture and laboratory activities. Additionally, the tablet PCs facilitated active learning in the classroom, such as by wirelessly recording feedback on concept questions and enabling collaborative problem solving. These activities allowed lecture content and pacing to

Lisa G. Huettel

2006-01-01

451

A replicated experiment of pair-programming in a 2nd-year software development and design computer science course  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the results of a replicated pair programming experiment conducted at the University of Auckland (NZ) during the first semester of 2005. It involved 190 second year Computer Science students attending a software design and construction course. We replicated the experiment described in (18), investigating similar issues to those reported in (32) and employing a subset of the

Emilia Mendes; Lubna Basil Al-fakhri; Andrew Luxton-reilly

2006-01-01

452

Computational Wireless Network Backplane: Performance in a Distributed Speaker Identification Application Postprint.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A major challenge in the DoD's next-generation network-centric information systems concerns on-demand provisioning of computation and network infrastructures at tactical network edges (e.g., deploying wireless airborne or hybrid air/ground networks). To s...

C. Lin C. Su D. Vlah H. T. Kung J. Grieco

2008-01-01

453

Universal quantum computation in a semiconductor quantum wire network  

SciTech Connect

Universal quantum computation (UQC) using Majorana fermions on a two-dimensional topological superconducting (TS) medium remains an outstanding open problem. This is because the quantum gate set that can be generated by braiding of the Majorana fermions does not include any two-qubit gate and also no single-qubit {pi}/8 phase gate. In principle, it is possible to create these crucial extra gates using quantum interference of Majorana fermion currents. However, it is not clear if the motion of the various order parameter defects (vortices, domain walls, etc.), to which the Majorana fermions are bound in a TS medium, can be quantum coherent. We show that these obstacles can be overcome using a semiconductor quantum wire network in the vicinity of an s-wave superconductor, by constructing topologically protected two-qubit gates and any arbitrary single-qubit phase gate in a topologically unprotected manner, which can be error corrected using magic-state distillation. Thus our strategy, using a judicious combination of topologically protected and unprotected gate operations, realizes UQC on a quantum wire network with a remarkably high error threshold of 0.14 as compared to 10{sup -3} to 10{sup -4} in ordinary unprotected quantum computation.

Sau, Jay D.; Das Sarma, S. [Condensed Matter Theory Center and Joint Quantum Institute, Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-4111 (United States); Tewari, Sumanta [Condensed Matter Theory Center and Joint Quantum Institute, Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-4111 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States)

2010-11-15

454

Computer simulation of a model network for the erythrocyte cytoskeleton.  

PubMed Central

The geometry and mechanical properties of the human erythrocyte membrane cytoskeleton are investigated by a computer simulation in which the cytoskeleton is represented by a network of polymer chains. Four elastic moduli as well as the area and thickness are predicted for the chain network as a function of temperature and the number of segments in each chain. Comparisons are made with mean field arguments to examine the importance of steric interactions in determining network properties. Applied to the red blood cell, the simulation predicts that in the bilayer plane the membrane cytoskeleton has a shear modulus of 10 +/- 2 x 10(-6) J/m2 and an areal compression modulus of 17 +/- 2 x 10(-6) J/m2. The volume compression modulus and the transverse Young's modulus of the cytoskeleton are predicted to be 1.2 +/- 0.1 x 10(3) J/m3 and 2.0 +/- 0.1 x 10(3) J/m3, respectively. Elements of the cytoskeleton are predicted to have a mean displacement from the bilayer plane of 15 nm. The simulation agrees with some, but not all, of the shear modulus measurements. The other predicted moduli have not been measured. Images FIGURE 1

Boal, D H

1994-01-01

455

Using an isolated network laboratory to teach advanced networks and security  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses the use of an isolated network laboratory to teach computer security using persistent cooperative groups and an active learning approach. Computer security and computer security education are areas of increasing importance as computer systems become more interconnected. When offered, undergraduate and graduate computer security courses are routinely taught using a traditional lecture format. If the course includes

John M. D. Hill; Curtis A. Carver Jr.; Jeffrey W. Humphries; Udo W. Pooch

2001-01-01

456

Including Internet insurance as part of a hospital computer network security plan.  

PubMed

Cyber attacks on a hospital's computer network is a new crime to be reckoned with. Should your hospital consider internet insurance? The author explains this new phenomenon and presents a risk assessment for determining network vulnerabilities. PMID:11951384

Riccardi, Ken

2002-01-01

457

Software for the SONET Computer Network Intended for Automation of Scientific Experiments.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The results of the first stage of works on development of the computer network SONET (Scientific Oriented Network) intended for complex solution of the problem of automation of scientific experiments performed with beams of pulsed research reactors IBR-30...

I. V. Aleksandrova A. V. Alfimenko R. Veber V. M. Sever'yanov

1982-01-01

458

High-performance computing and networking as tools for accurate emission computed tomography reconstruction.  

PubMed

It is well known that the quantitative potential of emission computed tomography (ECT) relies on the ability to compensate for resolution, attenuation and scatter effects. Reconstruction algorithms which are able to take these effects into account are highly demanding in terms of computing resources. The reported work aimed to investigate the use of a parallel high-performance computing platform for ECT reconstruction taking into account an accurate model of the acquisition of single-photon emission tomographic (SPET) data. An iterative algorithm with an accurate model of the variable system response was ported on the MIMD (Multiple Instruction Multiple Data) parallel architecture of a 64-node Cray T3D massively parallel computer. The system was organized to make it easily accessible even from low-cost PC-based workstations through standard TCP/IP networking. A complete brain study of 30 (64x64) slices could be reconstructed from a set of 90 (64x64) projections with ten iterations of the conjugate gradients algorithm in 9 s, corresponding to an actual speed-up factor of 135. This work demonstrated the possibility of exploiting remote high-performance computing and networking resources from hospital sites by means of low-cost workstations using standard communication protocols without particular problems for routine use. The achievable speed-up factors allow the assessment of the clinical benefit of advanced reconstruction techniques which require a heavy computational burden for the compensation effects such as variable spatial resolution, scatter and attenuation. The possibility of using the same software on the same hardware platform with data acquired in different laboratories with various kinds of SPET instrumentation is appealing for software quality control and for the evaluation of the clinical impact of the reconstruction methods. PMID:9096089

Passeri, A; Formiconi, A R; De Cristofaro, M T; Pupi, A; Meldolesi, U

1997-04-01

459

Evaluation of a computer networking class in information technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Information Technology (IT) is a rapidly-developing discipline. IT instructors often design new courses to meet changing needs. There is also a need to evaluate courses once they have been designed and implemented. Evaluation of courses leads to improvements in the learning experiences for students and better understanding of the educational process and outcomes for course designers and instructors. Evaluation and

C. Richard G. Helps; Joseph J. Ekstrom

2008-01-01

460

Students at the University of Abertay Dundee Learn Computer Hacking to Defend Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this article, the author describes a new cybersecurity course at the University of Abertay Dundee in Scotland. Geoffrey R. Lund, leader of the software-applications program at Abertay, says the course prepares students for a rapidly growing job market by teaching that the best defense is a good offense. Professors set up a network of 20 or so…

Vance, Erik

2007-01-01

461

Using FarmVille in an Introductory Managerial Accounting Course to Engage Students, Enhance Comprehension, and Develop Social Networking Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article explores the use of the free Zynga computer game FarmVille, which is played in conjunction with Facebook[R], to facilitate active learning in a managerial accounting course. Results indicate that it invokes an improved understanding of the accounting content, particularly among nonaccounting majors; a high level of student…

Krom, Cynthia L.

2012-01-01

462

Time course of fMRI-activation in language and spatial networks during sentence comprehension.  

PubMed

Functional neuroimaging previously has been considered to provide inadequate temporal resolution to study changes of brain states as a function of cognitive computations; however, we have obtained evidence of differential amounts of brain activity related to high-level cognition (sentence processing) within 1.5 s of stimulus onset. The study used an event-related paradigm with high-speed echoplanar functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to trace the time course of the brain activation in the temporal and parietal regions as participants comprehended single sentences describing a spatial configuration. Within the first set of images, on average 1 s from when the participant begins to read a sentence, there was significant activation in a key cortical area involved in language comprehension (the left posterior temporal gyrus) and visuospatial processing (the left and right parietal regions). In all three areas, the amount of activation during sentence comprehension was higher for negative sentences than for their affirmative counterparts, which are linguistically less complex. The effect of negation indicates that the activation in these areas is modulated by the difficulty of the linguistic processing. These results suggest a relatively rapid coactivation in both linguistic and spatial cortical regions to support the integration of information from multiple processing streams. PMID:10417254

Carpenter, P A; Just, M A; Keller, T A; Eddy, W F; Thulborn, K R

1999-08-01

463

Evaluation of the CAI (Computer Assisted Instruction) Segments of the Tow Field Test Set and the Hawk CW (Continuous Wave) Radar Repair Courses.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The objective of this study was to conduct an evaluation of the computer assisted instruction (CAI) segments of the TOW Field Test Set (TFTS) Course and the HAWK Continuous Wave Radar Repair Course conducted at MMC/S. Computer Assisted Instruction for bot...

G. W. Levy L. D. Francis L. G. Welling

1983-01-01

464

The Development and Evaluation of a Teleprocessed Computer-Assisted Instruction Course in the Recognition of Malarial Parasites. Final Report; May 1, 1967 - June 30, 1968.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A computer-assisted instruction course in the recognition of malarial parasites was developed and evaluated. The course includes stage discrimination, species discrimination, and case histories. Segments developed use COURSEWRITER as an author language and are presented via a display terminal that permits two-way communication with an IBM computer

Mitzel, Harold E.

465

Challenges of Protecting Personal Information in an Expanding Federal Computer Network Environment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report addresses the continuing concern, expressed by various congressional sources, over the ability to protect personal information in large computer networks. An overview of privacy and computer security problems is presented together with possibl...

1978-01-01

466

Computational models of signalling networks for non-linear control.  

PubMed

Artificial signalling networks (ASNs) are a computational approach inspired by the signalling processes inside cells that decode outside environmental information. Using evolutionary algorithms to induce complex behaviours, we show how chaotic dynamics in a conservative dynamical system can be controlled. Such dynamics are of particular interest as they mimic the inherent complexity of non-linear physical systems in the real world. Considering the main biological interpretations of cellular signalling, in which complex behaviours and robust cellular responses emerge from the interaction of multiple pathways, we introduce two ASN representations: a stand-alone ASN and a coupled ASN. In particular we note how sophisticated cellular communication mechanisms can lead to effective controllers, where complicated problems can be divided into smaller and independent tasks. PMID:23499817

Fuente, Luis A; Lones, Michael A; Turner, Alexander P; Stepney, Susan; Caves, Leo S; Tyrrell, Andy M

2013-03-14

467

Identification of optimal drug combinations targeting cellular networks: integrating phospho-proteomics and computational network analysis  

PubMed Central

Targeted therapeutics hold tremendous promise in inhibiting cancer cell proliferation. However, targeting proteins individually can be compensated for by bypass mechanisms and activation of regulatory loops. Designing optimal therapeutic combinations must therefore take into consideration the complex dynamic networks in the cell. In this study, we analyzed the insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) signaling network in the MDA-MB231 breast cancer cell line. We used reverse phase protein array to measure the transient changes in the phosphorylation of proteins after IGF-1 stimulation. We developed a computational procedure that integrated mass-action modeling with particle swarm optimization to train the model against the experimental data and infer the unknown model parameters. The trained model was used to predict how targeting individual signaling proteins altered the rest of the network and identify drug combinations that minimally increased phosphorylation of other proteins elsewhere in the network. Experimental testing of the modeling predictions showed that optimal drug combinations inhibited cell signaling and proliferation, while non-optimal combination of inhibitors increased phosphorylation of non-targeted proteins and rescued cells from cell death. The integrative approach described here is useful for generating experimental intervention strategies that could optimize drug combinations and discover novel pharmacologic targets for cancer therapy.

Iadevaia, Sergio; Lu, Yiling; Morales, Fabiana C.; Mills, Gordon B.; Ram, Prahlad T.

2010-01-01

468

Using Blogging and Laptop Computers to Improve Writing Skills on a Vocational Training Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The action research project described in this paper was part of an initiative to bring about change in the way courses are delivered in the vocational trades area at UNITEC New Zealand. We decided to focus on students' writing on a new Level 3 course--the Certificate in Automotive and Mechanical Engineering (C.A.M.E.) in which all participants…

Marsden, Nick; Piggot-Irvine, Eileen

2012-01-01

469

Gift young engineers: An extra-curricular initiative for updating computer and electrical engineering courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

The curricula of engineering courses are well defined by the central government for all Brazilian universities. Indeed, there are some mandatory determinations that must be fulfilled prior to the accreditation of any engineering course in Brazil. Modifications must be submitted for evaluation beforehand, resulting in a process that sometimes takes years to be approved. That is a secure way to

Vicente Ferreira de Lucena; Jose Pinheiro de Queiroz Neto; Joao Edgar Chaves Filho; Waldir Sabino da Silva; Lucas Carvalho Cordeiro

2011-01-01

470

The Disconnect of the Non-Computer Information Systems Major to the Information Systems Literacy Course  

Microsoft Academic Search

How does one teach introductory Information Systems concepts along with application software to students with a variety of backgrounds? Information Systems literacy courses such as this exist in many University core curriculums. What can be done to help the students see the value of this course as it applies to their major, no matter what it may be? This paper

Jeanne Baugh

471

The Use of Computer-Assisted Auditing Techniques in the Auditing Course: Further Evidence  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on the use of an auditing software package, Audit Command Language (ACL), in the auditing course at our university. As the professors teaching this course, we realized the importance of introducing our students to technology in auditing. Students used the educational version of the ACL program to perform audit procedures on data files devel- oped by accounting

Frank J. Coglitore; Diane M. Matson

472

Distributed Sensor Network With Collective Computation For Situational Awareness  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Initiated under Laboratory Directed R&D funding we have engaged in empirical studies, theory development, and initial hardware development for a ground-based Distributed Sensor Network with Collective Computation (DSN-CC). A DSN-CC is a network that uses node-to-node communication and on-board processing to achieve gains in response time, power usage, communication bandwidth, detection resolution, and robustness. DSN-CCs are applicable to both military and civilian problems where massive amounts of data gathered over a large area must be processed to yield timely conclusions. We have built prototype hardware DSN-CC nodes. Each node has self-contained power and is 6''×10''×2''. Each node contains a battery pack with power feed from a solar panel that forms the lid, a central processing board, a GPS card, and radio card. Further system properties will be discussed, as will scenarios in which the system might be used to counter Nuclear/Biological/Chemical (NBC) threats of unconventional warfare. Mid-year in FY02 this DSN-CC research project received funding from the Office of Nonproliferation Research and Engineering (NA-22), NNSA to support nuclear proliferation technology development.

Dreicer, Jared S.; Jorgensen, Anders M.; Dors, Eric E.

2002-10-01

473

WaveJava: Wavelet-based network computing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wavelet is a powerful theory, but its successful application still needs suitable programming tools. Java is a simple, object-oriented, distributed, interpreted, robust, secure, architecture-neutral, portable, high-performance, multi- threaded, dynamic language. This paper addresses the design and development of a cross-platform software environment for experimenting and applying wavelet theory. WaveJava, a wavelet class library designed by the object-orient programming, is developed to take advantage of the wavelets features, such as multi-resolution analysis and parallel processing in the networking computing. A new application architecture is designed for the net-wide distributed client-server environment. The data are transmitted with multi-resolution packets. At the distributed sites around the net, these data packets are done the matching or recognition processing in parallel. The results are fed back to determine the next operation. So, the more robust results can be arrived quickly. The WaveJava is easy to use and expand for special application. This paper gives a solution for the distributed fingerprint information processing system. It also fits for some other net-base multimedia information processing, such as network library, remote teaching and filmless picture archiving and communications.

Ma, Kun; Jiao, Li-Cheng; Shi, Zhuoer

1997-04-01

474

Application Fundamentals of Distributed, High-Performance Computing and Networking Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

For the application of high-performance, distributed computing systems in solving complex computational problems with high real-time demands and in order to meet the real-time requirements on the underlying communication system the paper deals with application fundamentals of distributed, high-performance computing and networking systems. Evaluation of hard-bounded, worst-case, real-time computing and networking performances and latency and bandwidth evaluation of distributed, high-performance

H. Westphal; D. Popovic

1994-01-01

475

Determination of time-course change rate for arterial xenon using the time course of tissue xenon concentration in xenon-enhanced computed tomography  

SciTech Connect

In calculating tissue blood flow (TBF) according to the Fick principle, time-course information on arterial tracer concentration is indispensable and has a considerable influence on the accuracy of calculated TBF. In TBF measurement by xenon-enhanced computed tomography (Xe-CT), nonradioactive xenon gas is administered by inhalation as a tracer, and end-tidal xenon is used as a substitute for arterial xenon. There has been the assumption that the time-course change rate for end-tidal xenon concentration (Ke) and that for arterial xenon concentration (Ka) are substantially equal. Respiratory gas sampling is noninvasive to the patient and Ke can be easily measured by exponential curve fitting to end-tidal xenon concentrations. However, it is pointed out that there would be a large difference between Ke and Ka in many cases. The purpose of this work was to develop a method of determining the Ka value using the time course of tissue xenon concentration in Xe-CT. The authors incorporated Ka into the Kety autoradiographic equation as a parameter to be solved, and developed a method of least-squares to obtain the solution for Ka from the time-course changes in xenon concentration in the tissue. The authors applied this method of least-squares to the data from Xe-CT abdominal studies performed on 17 patients; the solution for Ka was found pixel by pixel in the spleen, and its Ka map was created for each patient. On the one hand, the authors obtained the average value of the Ka map of the spleen as the calculated Ka (Ka{sub calc}) for each patient. On the other hand, the authors measured Ka (Ka{sub meas}) using the time-course changes in CT enhancement in the abdominal aorta for each patient. There was a good correlation between Ka{sub calc} and Ka{sub meas} (r=0.966, P<0.0001), and these two Ka values were close to each other (Ka{sub calc}=0.935xKa{sub meas}+0.089). This demonstrates that Ka{sub calc} would be close to the true Ka value. Accuracy of TBF by Xe-CT can be improved with use of the average value of the Ka map of an organ like the spleen that has a single blood supply (only arterial inflow)

Sase, Shigeru; Takahashi, Hideaki; Ikeda, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Minoru; Matsumoto, Nobuyuki; Suzuki, Michihiro [Anzai Medical Co., Ltd., 3-9-15 Nishi-Shinagawa, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-0033 (Japan); Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, School of Medicine, St. Marianna University, 2-16-1 Miyamae-ku, Sugao, Kawasaki 216-5811 (Japan)

2008-06-15

476

Study of Neuronal Properties, Synaptic Plasticity and Network Interactions Using a Computer Reconstituted Neuronal Network Derived from Fundamental Biophysical Principles.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The primary research goal is to understand the parallel signal processing capabilities of biological neurons, neural networks and their functions in the central nervous system. The research is focused on computational neuroscience and the analysis of the ...

D. C. Tam

1992-01-01

477

Improved inference of gene regulatory networks through integrated Bayesian clustering and dynamic modeling of time-course expression data.  

PubMed

Inferring gene regulatory networks from expression data is difficult, but it is common and often useful. Most network problems are under-determined--there are more parameters than data points--and therefore data or parameter set reduction is often necessary. Correlation between variables in the model also contributes to confound network coefficient inference. In this paper, we present an algorithm that uses integrated, probabilistic clustering to ease the problems of under-determination and correlated variables within a fully Bayesian framework. Specifically, ours is a dynamic Bayesian network with integrated Gaussian mixture clustering, which we fit using variational Bayesian methods. We show, using public, simulated time-course data sets from the DREAM4 Challenge, that our algorithm outperforms non-clustering methods in many cases (7 out of 25) with fewer samples, rarely underperforming (1 out of 25), and often selects a non-clustering model if it better describes the data. Source code (GNU Octave) for BAyesian Clustering Over Networks (BACON) and sample data are available at: http://code.google.com/p/bacon-for-genetic-networks. PMID:23935862

Godsey, Brian

2013-07-23

478

A self-study of teaching reform in a University Business Computing Course: “...it all went wrong...”  

Microsoft Academic Search

From 1991 to 1993, I conducted a qualitative investigation of the influence of open discourse on technicism in a University\\u000a Business Computing Course. I discontinued the research on realizing, through a reflective self-study, that I had acted unethically.\\u000a To address this breach of ethics, I conducted a psychology-oriented inquiry, from 1993 to 1996, to delve deeply, using heuristic\\u000a reflection, into

Mark Campbell Williams

2000-01-01

479

Computer-mediated communication and the linking of students, text, and author on an ESL writing course listserv  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper addresses an issue of interest to many first- (L1) and second-language (L2) writing theorists and teachers: the role(s) that computer-mediated communication (CMC) can play in making writing instruction more effective and more meaningful, particularly in the highly technological early years of the twenty-first century. This paper explores the use of CMC in the form of a writing course

Alan Hirvela

2007-01-01

480

Online Courses: MSU National Teachers Enhancement Network: The Dirt on Soil Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Dirt on Soil Science is a 1 credit graduate course for K-6 elementary school teachers who are interested in understanding the basic principles of soil science. This online course lasts 6-weeks and includes conversing with your instructor and classmat

1900-01-01

481

An introductory course on Human-Computer Interaction: Programme, bibliography, practical classes and assignments  

Microsoft Academic Search

As computing curricula have evolved, human–computer interaction has gradually become part of many of them, and the recent ACM\\/IEEE report on the core of computing science and engineering includes human–computer interaction as one of the fundamental sub-areas that should be addressed. However, both technology and human–computer interaction are developing rapidly, thus a continuous effort is needed to maintain a programme,

Beatriz Sousa Santos

2006-01-01

482

Teaching applied computing without programming: a case-based introductory course for general education  

Microsoft Academic Search

We introduce general-education students to key ideas in applied computing through case studies from computer graphics, computer animation, image processing, computer vision, information retrieval, and artificial intelligence. Each case study consists of two lectures: one an intuitive exposition of relevant computer-science concepts, and the other a hands-on introduction to a working system that embodies these concepts. Students use these systems

Joe Marks; William T. Freeman; Henry H. Leitner

2001-01-01

483

Extended CADLIVE: a novel graphical notation for design of biochemical network maps and computational pathway analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biochemical network maps are helpful for understanding the mechanism of how a collection of biochemical reactions generate particular functions within a cell. We developed a new and computationally feasible notation that enables drawing a wide resolution map from the domain- level reactions to phenomenological events and implemented it as the extended GUI network constructor of CADLIVE (Computer-Aided Design of LIVing

Hiroyuki Kurata; Kentaro Inoue; Kazuhiro Maeda; Koichi Masaki; Yuki Shimokawa; Quanyu Zhao

2007-01-01

484

Fluid centrality: a social network analysis of social–technical relations in computer?mediated communication  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, centrality is explored as a measure of computer?mediated communication (CMC) in networked learning. Centrality measure is quite common in performing social network analysis (SNA) and in analysing social cohesion, strength of ties and influence in CMC, and computer?supported collaborative learning research. It argues that measuring centrality using SNA is rather misleading, that in fact, it is a

Judith Guevarra Enriquez

2010-01-01

485

A cooperative learning of computer networking with portable laboratories using virtual machine  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper shows a working project that organizes a set of jobs to improve the learning of computer networking. It uses virtual machine to create a portable laboratory on which students do hands-on exercises anywhere. It first developed an ability indicator of computer networking. Then an online curriculum material is made and available on the Internet. Students are learning the

Fuh-Gwo Chen; Kuo-Yi Chen; Chin-Yang Lin

2010-01-01

486

A neural network based context-aware handoff algorithm for multimedia computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The access of multimedia computing in wireless networks is concerned with the efficiency of handoff because of the irretrievable property of real-time data delivery. To lessen throughput degradation leading to media computing disruption perceived by users, this paper presents a link quality based handoff algorithm. Neural networks are used to learn the correlation between link quality estimator and the corresponding

Tsungnan Lin; Chiapin Wang; Po-Chiang Lin

2005-01-01

487

Design and analysis of high-speed common channel computer networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The new technologies developed in material science and physics will provide new transmission media for future telecommunication networks which have extremely high capacity and almost perfect transmission quality. To design a network which uses such media is a new challenge for the computer communication engineers. The important new property is that transmission speed will be faster than the computing speed

Lin

1989-01-01

488

Fluid Centrality: A Social Network Analysis of Social-Technical Relations in Computer-Mediated Communication  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, centrality is explored as a measure of computer-mediated communication (CMC) in networked learning. Centrality measure is quite common in performing social network analysis (SNA) and in analysing social cohesion, strength of ties and influence in CMC, and computer-supported collaborative learning research. It argues that measuring…

Enriquez, Judith Guevarra

2010-01-01

489

A Simulation Evaluation Study of Neural Network Techniques to Computer User Identification  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a simulation of neural network systems for identifying computer users. A comparative evaluation study of three neural network paradigms as applied to the identification of computer users using keystroke intervals when typing a well-known phrase is made. The input vectors were made up of the time intervals between successive keystrokes created by users while typing characters. Each

Mohammad S. Obaidat; Balqies Sadoun

1997-01-01

490

Fluid Centrality: A Social Network Analysis of Social-Technical Relations in Computer-Mediated Communication  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this article, centrality is explored as a measure of computer-mediated communication (CMC) in networked learning. Centrality measure is quite common in performing social network analysis (SNA) and in analysing social cohesion, strength of ties and influence in CMC, and computer-supported collaborative learning research. It argues that…

Enriquez, Judith Guevarra

2010-01-01

491

Computer simulation of the segmental neural network generating locomotion in lamprey by using populations of network interneurons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Realistic computer simulations of the experimentally established local spinal cord neural network generating swimming in the lamprey have been performed. Populations of network interneurons were used in which cellular properties, like cell size and membrane conductance including voltage dependent ion channels were randomly distributed around experimentally obtained mean values, as were synaptic conductances (kainate\\/AMPA, NMDA, glycine) and delays. This population

Jeanette Hellgren; Sten Grillner; Anders Lansner

1992-01-01

492

On the chronometry and metrology of computer network timescales and their application to the network time protocol  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper summarizes issues in computer network timekeeping with respect to the Network Time Protocol, which is used to synchronize time in many of the hosts and gateways of the Internet. It describes the methods used to coordinate and disseminate international time services and how they are incorporated into NTP time servers. It discusses the hazards on reckoning NTP dates

David L. Mills

1991-01-01

493

Information and Computer Technology Management Challenges in the Networked World: Implications for Libraries in Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

The networked world is characterized by high-speed, universal access and application of information and computer technology in schools, government offices, libraries, businesses, health care facilities, and homes. Such a networked world is synonymous with the information society characterized by universal access and the ability of people to seek information, evaluate it, and use it meaningfully. The networked world, like the

Stephen M. Mutula

2008-01-01

494

Development of Computer-Supported Collaborative Social Networks in a Distributed Learning Community  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examines the formation and change of collaborative learning social networks in a distributed learning community. A social network perspective is employed to understand how collaborative networks evolved over time when 31 distributed learners collaborated on a design project using a computer-mediated communication system during two…

Cho, H.; Lee, J.-S.; Stefanone, M.; Gay, G.

2005-01-01

495

Finding a place to stand: Negotiating the spatial configuration of the networked computer classroom  

Microsoft Academic Search

The spatial dynamics of the Internet-networked computer classroom fundamentally alter the ways instructors and students use and perceive pedagogical space. Network connectivity exposes the indeterminacy of classroom space, distracting students, disorienting instructors and challenging their authority, and displacing a classroom's apparent centrality. Theorizing the spatiality of both traditional and networked class-rooms, however, reveals that both exhibit indeterminate spatial characteristics, but

Roxanne Kent-Drury

1998-01-01

496

Proc. of a Course of Lectures and Computer Workshops on Computer Simulation of Multi-Phase Flows  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The lecture topics in a course on computerized simulation of multiphase flow are summarized. Topic categories include the following: Fundamentals of two-phase flow prediction procedures, loss-of-coolant accidents in pressurized water reactors (PWR), one-dimensional two-phase simulation and applications of multiphase flow simulation in the chemical industry, in fuel technology, and in environmental processes.

Spalding, D. B.; Markatos, N. C.

1983-07-01

497

Locating hardware faults in a data communications network of a parallel computer  

DOEpatents

Hardware faults location in a data communications network of a parallel computer. Such a parallel computer includes a plurality of compute nodes and a data communications network that couples the compute nodes for data communications and organizes the compute node as a tree. Locating hardware faults includes identifying a next compute node as a parent node and a root of a parent test tree, identifying for each child compute node of the parent node a child test tree having the child compute node as root, running a same test suite on the parent test tree and each child test tree, and identifying the parent compute node as having a defective link connected from the parent compute node to a child compute node if the test suite fails on the parent test tree and succeeds on all the child test trees.

Archer, Charles J. (Rochester, MN); Megerian, Mark G. (Rochester, MN); Ratterman, Joseph D. (Rochester, MN); Smith, Brian E. (Rochester, MN)

2010-01-12

498

Analysis of microcomputer network for computer-assisted mining research. Information circular/1992  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Bureau of Mines is conducting research that will lead to computer-assisted mining equipment. The research will facilitate improvements in safety by relocating workers from dangerous areas and will increase production by providing more accurate control with less down-time of equipment. A Bureau-developed microcomputer network enhances the research by permitting a group of diverse computers to interact with a mining machine as well as with each other over a common data link. The network is composed of specially integrated off-the-shelf hardware and industry-standard operating system and programming languages. Using the network, researchers can conduct various experiments with the mining machine using a diverse group of sensors, computers, and microcontrollers. The report of investigation gives a brief background on the Bureau's work in computer-assisted mining followed by discussions on the network hardware and architecture, the network packets, and an analysis of network operation.

Fries, E.F.

1992-01-01

499

Sending Learning Pills to Mobile Devices in Class to Enhance Student Performance and Motivation in Network Services Configuration Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Teaching electrical and computer software engineers how to configure network services normally requires the detailed presentation of many configuration commands and their numerous parameters. Students tend to find it difficult to maintain acceptable levels of motivation. In many cases, this results in their not attending classes and not…

Munoz-Organero, M.; Munoz-Merino, P. J.; Kloos, C. D.

2012-01-01

500

Interrupted cognition in an undergraduate programming course  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computer and Information Science courses are frequently taught in networked computer laboratories where students have access to advanced development environments, connectivity, communications, and multi-media capabilities. Advanced connectivity and communications can have positive or negative effects on learning. One cause for concern can be interruptions from emails, cell phones, and instant messages. This paper presents a theoretical foundation for Technology Interrupted

Kay Wijekumar; Paul Meidinger

2005-01-01