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Sample records for computer networking courses

  1. Student Motivation in Computer Networking Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsin, Wen-Jung

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces several hands-on projects that have been used to motivate students in learning various computer networking concepts. These projects are shown to be very useful and applicable to the learners' daily tasks and activities such as emailing, Web browsing, and online shopping and banking, and lead to an unexpected byproduct,…

  2. Improving a Computer Networks Course Using the Partov Simulation Engine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Momeni, B.; Kharrazi, M.

    2012-01-01

    Computer networks courses are hard to teach as there are many details in the protocols and techniques involved that are difficult to grasp. Employing programming assignments as part of the course helps students to obtain a better understanding and gain further insight into the theoretical lectures. In this paper, the Partov simulation engine and…

  3. Software Assisted Syllabus Preparation for Computer Networks Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ercan, Tuncay; Sahin, Yasar Guneri

    2007-01-01

    Course descriptions prepared by the lecturers in the beginning of the academic year do not get any feed back from the students enrolled it. These syllabuses are not only used for the future semesters, but also used by the other lecturers without even making any changes. This causes a negative effect on the student education since many of the…

  4. Designing a Versatile Dedicated Computing Lab to Support Computer Network Courses: Insights from a Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gercek, Gokhan; Saleem, Naveed

    2006-01-01

    Providing adequate computing lab support for Management Information Systems (MIS) and Computer Science (CS) programs is a perennial challenge for most academic institutions in the US and abroad. Factors, such as lack of physical space, budgetary constraints, conflicting needs of different courses, and rapid obsolescence of computing technology,…

  5. Spring 2007 Course details EE650: "Advanced Topics in Computer Networks"

    E-print Network

    and network traces. For each topic, we will first introduce the corresponding research problem/area (e@usc.edu Phone: 213-7404453 Office: RTH 409 (more info on the next page) #12;Spring 2007 Course details 2 Lecture application should not be part of the course lectures. More info about this presentation, called research

  6. Computer ethics: A capstone course

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, T.G.; Abunawass, A.M.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents a capstone course on computer ethics required for all computer science majors in our program. The course was designed to encourage students to evaluate their own personal value systems in terms of the established values in computer science as represented by the ACM Code of Ethics. The structure, activities, and topics of the course as well as assessment of the students are presented. Observations on various course components and student evaluations of the course are also presented.

  7. Network Programming 1 Computer Networks

    E-print Network

    Verschelde, Jan

    Network Programming 1 Computer Networks transmission media and network topologies client to Computer Science (MCS 260) network programming L-39 20 April 2015 1 / 29 #12;Network Programming 1 Computer. Intro to Computer Science (MCS 260) network programming L-39 20 April 2015 3 / 29 #12;Network Topologies

  8. Course Details Computer Organization Performance Engineering 9859

    E-print Network

    Peters, Dennis

    Details Computer Organization Performance Outline Objective Review basic computer architecture topicsCourse Details Computer Organization Performance Engineering 9859 CoE Fundamentals -- Computer Computer Organization Performance Course Details Classes Monday, Wednesday, Friday 9 ­ 10 EN-4033 Course

  9. BE562 Computational Biology: Genomes, Networks, Evolution Fall 2014 Course Information

    E-print Network

    Vajda, Sandor

    will provide skeleton code in Python, but you may use a different programming language if you so choose in computational biology, and we provide hands on experience analyzing large-scale biological data sets. Topics including: dynamic programming, hashing, Gibbs sampling, Expectation Maximization, hidden Markov models

  10. Conception of a course for professional training and education in the field of computer and mobile forensics, part III: network forensics and penetration testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröger, Knut; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2014-02-01

    IT security and computer forensics are important components in the information technology. From year to year, incidents and crimes increase that target IT systems or were done with their help. More and more companies and authorities have security problems in their own IT infrastructure. To respond to these incidents professionally, it is important to have well trained staff. The fact that many agencies and companies work with very sensitive data make it necessary to further train the own employees in the field of network forensics and penetration testing. Motivated by these facts, this paper - a continuation of a paper of January 2012 [1], which showed the conception of a course for professional training and education in the field of computer and mobile forensics - addresses the practical implementation important relationships of network forensic and penetration testing.

  11. Outcome CS-d. Be familiar with principles of computer organization, operating systems, and networks. The assessment is performed with respect to the key abilities that the students are expected to acquire in specific courses that have been

    E-print Network

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    outcome maps into. ** For example "exam 1, problem 1" *** For Grade give the class average on an "A=4.0, BOutcome CS-d. Be familiar with principles of computer organization, operating systems, and networks in specific courses that have been identified with respect to this outcome. Course Performance indicators CS

  12. Computer Literacy: Course Description [and] Computer Awareness: Module Syllabus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This course description outlines an independent-study computer awareness course for community college faculty that uses videotapes, computer-assisted instruction, and individual study modules. The outline includes the rationale for the course and the media to be used; time required to complete the course; the goals of the course; the topics…

  13. SCHOOL OF COMPUTING COURSE PETITION FORM

    E-print Network

    Lindstrom, Gary

    SCHOOL OF COMPUTING COURSE PETITION FORM Please carefully review the instructions for petitions petition form is required for each course petitioned. Transfer courses must have been taken: ______________________ PETITION TO SUBSTITUTE with Course You Took (EX: CS 142)CS Major Requirement (EX: CS 1410) Approval

  14. Philosophy of Computer Science: An Introductory Course

    E-print Network

    Rapaport, William J.

    Philosophy of Computer Science: An Introductory Course William J. Rapaport Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Department of Philosophy, and Center for Cognitive Science State University://www.cse.buffalo.edu/rapaport/ June 21, 2005 1 #12;Philosophy of Computer Science: An Introductory Course Abstract There are many

  15. Taught Course Centre Short Course "Computational Methods for Uncertainty Quantification"

    E-print Network

    Scheichl, Robert

    Taught Course Centre Short Course "Computational Methods for Uncertainty Quantification" Robert to avoid stability problems with the explicit Euler method. Compare the cost to achieve a certain tolerance to formulate a simple model problem that encapsulates the essential question. What type of uncertainty is it

  16. Course Outline Computing Science Department

    E-print Network

    Gosselin, Louis A.

    Network Security (3,1,0) Fall 2015 Instructor: Phone/Voice Mail: Office: E-Mail: Office Hours: CALENDAR, security standards and protocols, virtual private networks, and wireless network security. Students also 3 & B1- Chapter 11 & B1- Chapter 12 1.5 9. Wireless Network Security 9.1 Introduction to Wireless

  17. Computer Network Resources for Physical Geography Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Michael P.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Asserts that the use of computer networks provides an important and effective resource for geography instruction. Describes the use of the Internet network in physical geography instruction. Provides an example of the use of Internet resources in a climatology/meteorology course. (CFR)

  18. Hyperswitch Communication Network Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, John C.; Chow, Edward T.; Priel, Moshe; Upchurch, Edwin T.

    1993-01-01

    Hyperswitch Communications Network (HCN) computer is prototype multiple-processor computer being developed. Incorporates improved version of hyperswitch communication network described in "Hyperswitch Network For Hypercube Computer" (NPO-16905). Designed to support high-level software and expansion of itself. HCN computer is message-passing, multiple-instruction/multiple-data computer offering significant advantages over older single-processor and bus-based multiple-processor computers, with respect to price/performance ratio, reliability, availability, and manufacturing. Design of HCN operating-system software provides flexible computing environment accommodating both parallel and distributed processing. Also achieves balance among following competing factors; performance in processing and communications, ease of use, and tolerance of (and recovery from) faults.

  19. Computer Mapping in a Regional Geography Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gossette, Frank; Wheeler, Jean Dykema

    1993-01-01

    Describes a college level course in which computer mapping is incorporated into the geography curriculum. Discusses problems associated with using commercial mapping software in the general geography classroom. Concludes that students have reduced computer anxiety and a better understanding of geographic concepts as a result of the computer

  20. The Educational Computing Course. [SITE 2002 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bump, Wren, Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on the educational computing course from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2002 conference: (1) "Integrating Media Literacy into a Technology Course for Preservice Secondary Teachers" (Gregg Brownell and Nancy Brownell); (2) "From Video Tutors to Electronic Portfolios:…

  1. Gateways among Academic Computer Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCredie, John W.

    National intercampus computer networks are discussed, along with six illustrative networks. Attention is focused on computer networks with significant academic usage through which special software is available to manage resources in the network. It is noted that computer networks have widespread use among academics for communication in the form of…

  2. Community structure in introductory physics course networks

    E-print Network

    Traxler, Adrienne L

    2015-01-01

    Student-to-student interactions are foundational to many active learning environments, but are most often studied using qualitative methods. Network analysis tools provide a quantitative complement to this picture, allowing researchers to describe the social interactions of whole classrooms as systems. Past results from introductory physics courses have suggested a sharp division in the formation of social structure between large lecture sections and small studio classroom environments. Extending those results, this study focuses on calculus-based introductory physics courses at a large public university with a heavily commuter and nontraditional student population. Community detection network methods are used to characterize pre- and post-course collaborative structure in several sections, and differences are considered between small and large classes. These results are compared with expectations from earlier findings, and comment on implications for instruction and further study.

  3. 6.857 Network and Computer Security, Fall 2003

    E-print Network

    Rivest, Ronald

    6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department's Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include ...

  4. A Survey of Computer Science Capstone Course Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dugan, Robert F., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we surveyed literature related to undergraduate computer science capstone courses. The survey was organized around course and project issues. Course issues included: course models, learning theories, course goals, course topics, student evaluation, and course evaluation. Project issues included: software process models, software…

  5. Computers, Networks and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Alan C.

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is how globally networked, easy-to-use computers can enhance learning only within an educational environment that encourages students to question "facts" and seek challenges. The strengths and weaknesses of computers used as amplifiers for learning are described. (KR)

  6. Educational Computer Networks: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crume, Charles E.; Maddux, Cleborne D.

    1990-01-01

    Describes the growth of educational computer networks in three main categories: (1) networks for sharing peripheral equipment; (2) networks for exchanging information; and (3) networks for addressing instructional needs. The use of microcomputers and mainframe computers is examined, networks in public schools and universities are described, and…

  7. Plagiarism in computer science courses

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.K.

    1994-12-31

    Plagiarism of computer programs has long been a problem in higher education. Ease of electronic copying, vague understanding by students as to what constitutes plagiarism, increasing acceptance of plagiarism by students, lack of enforcement by instructors and school administrators, and a whole host of other factors contribute to plagiarism. The first step in curbing plagiarism is prevention, the second (and much less preferable) is detection. History files and software metrics can be used as a tool to aid in detecting possible plagiarism. This paper gives advice concerning how to deal with plagiarism and with using software monitors to detect plagiarism.

  8. A social implications of computing course which teaches computer ethics

    SciTech Connect

    Pulliam, S.C.

    1994-12-31

    Computers are integral to today`s world, forming our society as well as responding to it, In recognition of this interaction, as well as in response to requirements by the Computer Science Accrediting Board (CSAB), many schools are incorporating computer ethics and values and addressing the social implications of computing within their curriculum. The approach discussed here is through a separate course, rather than relying on the integration of specific topics throughout the curriculum.

  9. The Impact of a Computers and Society Course on Student Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, P. J.; And Others

    A course at the University of Minnesota entitled "Perspectives on Computers and Society" explores the social significance of computers. Topics covered include public perceptions of computers, biological and artificial information processing, the economics and technology of hardware, computer networks and software, data banks and the right to…

  10. Combining Cloud Networks and Course Management Systems for Enhanced Analysis in Teaching Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrams, Neal M.

    2012-01-01

    A cloud network system is combined with standard computing applications and a course management system to provide a robust method for sharing data among students. This system provides a unique method to improve data analysis by easily increasing the amount of sampled data available for analysis. The data can be shared within one course as well as…

  11. Using Virtualization and Automatic Evaluation: Adapting Network Services Management Courses to the EHEA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ros, S.; Robles-Gomez, A.; Hernandez, R.; Caminero, A. C.; Pastor, R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper outlines the adaptation of a course on the management of network services in operating systems, called NetServicesOS, to the context of the new European Higher Education Area (EHEA). NetServicesOS is a mandatory course in one of the official graduate programs in the Faculty of Computer Science at the Universidad Nacional de Educacion a…

  12. Goethe Gossips with Grass: Using Computer Chatting Software in an Introductory Literature Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Catherine C.

    1999-01-01

    Students in a third-year introduction to German literature course chatted over networked computers, using "FirstClass" software. A brief description of the course design is provided with detailed information on how the three chat sessions were organized. (Author/VWL)

  13. Computer Networks and Networking: A Primer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Mauri P.

    1993-01-01

    Provides a basic introduction to computer networks and networking terminology. Topics addressed include modems; the Internet; TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol); transmission lines; Internet Protocol numbers; network traffic; Fidonet; file transfer protocol (FTP); TELNET; electronic mail; discussion groups; LISTSERV; USENET;…

  14. Center for Networked Center for Networked Computing

    E-print Network

    Wu, Jie

    - spatiotemporal properties - can be learned over time Adaptive battery charge schedule - task failure ratio vs on an empirical battery model obtained from experiments. Our solution - achieves a 68.26% lower task failure ratioCenter for Networked Computing Center for Networked Computing Adaptive Battery Charge Scheduling

  15. Minimizing Computation in Convolutional Neural Networks

    E-print Network

    Cong, Jason "Jingsheng"

    Minimizing Computation in Convolutional Neural Networks Jason Cong and Bingjun Xiao Computer. Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) have been successfully used for many computer vision applications. It would Convolutional neural networks (CNNs) were extended from artificial neural networks (ANNs) and customized

  16. Delay estimation in computer networks 

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Nicholas Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Computer networks are becoming increasingly large and complex; more so with the recent penetration of the internet into all walks of life. It is essential to be able to monitor and to analyse networks in a timely and ...

  17. Computer Science 78 Computer Networks or hacking the network, part II

    E-print Network

    Campbell, Andrew T.

    - such as, the Internet - else, things remain too abstract. You will write approximately 3000 lines of C Overview Welcome to the world on computer networks. Ever wondered what makes the Internet tick? Want to gain the skills that would allow you to implement the Internet? Read on .... The ORC: This course

  18. A CAD (Classroom Assessment Design) of a Computer Programming Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawi, Nazir S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a CAD (classroom assessment design) of an entry-level undergraduate computer programming course "Computer Programming I". CAD has been the product of a long experience in teaching computer programming courses including teaching "Computer Programming I" 22 times. Each semester, CAD is evaluated and modified for the subsequent…

  19. Improving Student Engagement Using Course-Based Social Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imlawi, Jehad Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    This study proposes an engagement model that supports use of course-based online social networks for engaging student, and hence, improving their educational outcomes. This research demonstrates that instructors who create course-based online social networks to communicate with students can increase the student engagement in these online social…

  20. Integrating Emerging Topics through Online Team Design in a Hybrid Communication Networks Course: Interaction Patterns and Impact of Prior Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reisslein, Jana; Seeling, Patrick; Reisslein, Martin

    2005-01-01

    An important challenge in the introductory communication networks course in electrical and computer engineering curricula is to integrate emerging topics, such as wireless Internet access and network security, into the already content-intensive course. At the same time it is essential to provide students with experiences in online collaboration,…

  1. Information visualization courses for students with a computer science background.

    PubMed

    Kerren, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Linnaeus University offers two master's courses in information visualization for computer science students with programming experience. This article briefly describes the syllabi, exercises, and practices developed for these courses. PMID:24807935

  2. List of specialized courses for the Department of Communications and Computer Engineering

    E-print Network

    Kaji, Hajime

    List of specialized courses for the Department of Communications and Computer Engineering (I 2 Signal Processing 2 2 Communications and Computer Engineering Laboratory 2 4 Information Network semester Electrodynamics 2 2 Electronic Circuits 2 2 Communication Systems 2 2 Software Engineering 2 2

  3. Augmenting computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, S. H.; Raza, A. D.

    1984-01-01

    Three methods of augmenting computer networks by adding at most one link per processor are discussed: (1) A tree of N nodes may be augmented such that the resulting graph has diameter no greater than 4log sub 2((N+2)/3)-2. Thi O(N(3)) algorithm can be applied to any spanning tree of a connected graph to reduce the diameter of that graph to O(log N); (2) Given a binary tree T and a chain C of N nodes each, C may be augmented to produce C so that T is a subgraph of C. This algorithm is O(N) and may be used to produce augmented chains or rings that have diameter no greater than 2log sub 2((N+2)/3) and are planar; (3) Any rectangular two-dimensional 4 (8) nearest neighbor array of size N = 2(k) may be augmented so that it can emulate a single step shuffle-exchange network of size N/2 in 3(t) time steps.

  4. Measurement of Computer Communication Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrams, Marshall D.; And Others

    Measures, tools, and techniques applicable to the performance measurement of computer communication networks are described for technicians who procure computer services from a remote access network. Cost considerations are discussed as a major component of evaluation, and measurement and evaluation methodologies are surveyed. External measurement…

  5. Computational Thinking in High School Courses Vicki Allan

    E-print Network

    Allan, Vicki H.

    Computational Thinking in High School Courses Vicki Allan Computer Science Utah State University in recent years. This is paralleled by a drop in the number of high school students taking the CS AP exam and the number of high schools offering computer science courses. The declines come at a time when career

  6. Spring 2012 Course: Bayesian Networks and Decision Graphs

    E-print Network

    Valtorta, Marco

    reasoning. Course text: Finn V. Jensen and Thomas D. Nielsen. Bayesian Networks and Decision Graphs, 2nd to the development of dynamic (time-repeating) Bayesian networks. From an algorithmic perspective, Bayesian networks have proven to be a fertile ground for the use of graph algorithms, non-serial dynamic programming

  7. Fall 2010 Course: Bayesian Networks and Decision Graphs

    E-print Network

    Valtorta, Marco

    reasoning. Course text: Finn V. Jensen and Thomas D. Nielsen. Bayesian Networks and Decision Graphs, 2nd to the development of dynamic (time-repeating) Bayesian networks. From an algorithmic perspective, Bayesian networks have proven to be a fertile ground for the use of graph algorithms, non-serial dynamic programming

  8. Launching a Business French Course: Networking with New Partners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doss-Quinby, Eglal

    1989-01-01

    Describes networking options that could be helpful in creating business French courses or incorporating business materials in French throughout the foreign language curriculum. Partnerships with organizations, other faculty members, and students are suggested. (CB)

  9. Queueing in networks of computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1991-01-01

    The designers of networks of computers must assess the capacity of the network to complete work within reasonable times. The utilization law, Little's law, forced-flow law, and response time formula are simple tools that can be used to calculate throughput and response times of networks. Bottleneck analysis can be used to calculate simple lower bounds on response time in terms of individual server parameters and the load on network as a whole. These simple results are important tools for all users of scientific networks - back of the envelope calculations can quickly reveal the effects of distant servers on local throughput and response time.

  10. Student Learning Networks on Residential Field Courses: Does Size Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langan, A. Mark; Cullen, W. Rod; Shuker, David M.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes learner and tutor reports of a learning network that formed during the completion of investigative projects on a residential field course. Staff and students recorded project-related interactions, who they were with and how long they lasted over four phases during the field course. An enquiry based learning format challenged…

  11. Integrating Computational Chemistry into a Course in Classical Thermodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martini, Sheridan R.; Hartzell, Cynthia J.

    2015-01-01

    Computational chemistry is commonly addressed in the quantum mechanics course of undergraduate physical chemistry curricula. Since quantum mechanics traditionally follows the thermodynamics course, there is a lack of curricula relating computational chemistry to thermodynamics. A method integrating molecular modeling software into a semester long…

  12. Computer Vision (I) Course Number: 526 U1090

    E-print Network

    Ouhyoung, Ming

    Computer Vision (I) Course Number: 526 U1090 Credits: 3 Time: Tuesday 6, 7, 8 (2:10PM-5:00PM and robot vision through extensive course projects. Textbook: R. M. Haralick and L. G. Shapiro, Computer and Robot Vision, Vol. I, Addison Wesley, Reading, MA, 1992. Reference: R. Jain, R. Kasturi, and B. G

  13. LINCS: Livermore's network architecture. [Octopus computing network

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    Octopus, a local computing network that has been evolving at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for over fifteen years, is currently undergoing a major revision. The primary purpose of the revision is to consolidate and redefine the variety of conventions and formats, which have grown up over the years, into a single standard family of protocols, the Livermore Interactive Network Communication Standard (LINCS). This standard treats the entire network as a single distributed operating system such that access to a computing resource is obtained in a single way, whether that resource is local (on the same computer as the accessing process) or remote (on another computer). LINCS encompasses not only communication but also such issues as the relationship of customer to server processes and the structure, naming, and protection of resources. The discussion includes: an overview of the Livermore user community and computing hardware, the functions and structure of each of the seven layers of LINCS protocol, the reasons why we have designed our own protocols and why we are dissatisfied by the directions that current protocol standards are taking.

  14. Computer (PC/Network) Coordinator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This publication contains 22 subjects appropriate for use in a competency list for the occupation of computer (PC/network) coordinator, 1 of 12 occupations within the business/computer technologies cluster. Each unit consists of a number of competencies; a list of competency builders is provided for each competency. Titles of the 22 units are as…

  15. Computing on Anonymous Quantum Network

    E-print Network

    Hirotada Kobayashi; Keiji Matsumoto; Seiichiro Tani

    2010-01-29

    This paper considers distributed computing on an anonymous quantum network, a network in which no party has a unique identifier and quantum communication and computation are available. It is proved that the leader election problem can exactly (i.e., without error in bounded time) be solved with at most the same complexity up to a constant factor as that of exactly computing symmetric functions (without intermediate measurements for a distributed and superposed input), if the number of parties is given to every party. A corollary of this result is a more efficient quantum leader election algorithm than existing ones: the new quantum algorithm runs in O(n) rounds with bit complexity O(mn^2), on an anonymous quantum network with n parties and m communication links. Another corollary is the first quantum algorithm that exactly computes any computable Boolean function with round complexity O(n) and with smaller bit complexity than that of existing classical algorithms in the worst case over all (computable) Boolean functions and network topologies. More generally, any n-qubit state can be shared with that complexity on an anonymous quantum network with n parties.

  16. Course Content for a Telecommunication Course in an End-User Computing Support Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crews, Tena B.; Ray, Charles M.

    1998-01-01

    A modified Delphi panel of telecommunications educators developed a list of specific content topics for a business telecommunications course. Major content areas were recommended: local and wide area networks, media, hardware, e-mail, emerging technologies, network topologies, data signals, conceptual foundations, and social and ethical issues.…

  17. Computer Network Security- The Challenges of Securing a Computer Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Vincent, Jr.

    2011-01-01

    This article is intended to give the reader an overall perspective on what it takes to design, implement, enforce and secure a computer network in the federal and corporate world to insure the confidentiality, integrity and availability of information. While we will be giving you an overview of network design and security, this article will concentrate on the technology and human factors of securing a network and the challenges faced by those doing so. It will cover the large number of policies and the limits of technology and physical efforts to enforce such policies.

  18. The Effect of a Short Computer Course on Attitudes Toward the Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melnick, Murray; And Others

    In the spring of 1969, a short computer course comprising three hours of lectures and two hours of working with a computer was offered at Hofstra University to 101 natural science students. A questionnaire, which was designed to assess the impact of the 5-hour course, was administered to the students before and after they took the course. This…

  19. "Horses for Courses": Categories of Computer-Based Learning Program and Their Uses in Pharmacology Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Ian E.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the pharma-CAL-ogy project, funded by Teaching and Learning Technology Programme (TLTP), which has developed various types of software for use in pharmacology courses. Topics include course organization and delivery software, drill and practice software, tutorial-type programs, simulations, and the need to integrate computer-assisted…

  20. Simulation of reliability in multiserver computer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minkevi?ius, Saulius

    2012-11-01

    The performance in terms of reliability of computer multiserver networks motivates this paper. The probability limit theorem is derived on the extreme queue length in open multiserver queueing networks in heavy traffic and applied to a reliability model for multiserver computer networks where we relate the time of failure of a multiserver computer network to the system parameters.

  1. Combining Cases and Computer Simulations in Strategic Management Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Rex C.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the author compared the effectiveness of two different strategic management course designs: one centered on case discussions and the other combining a computer-based simulation with some cases. In addition to evaluation of the research literature, the study involved experiments with six course sections composed of 130 students, Both…

  2. An Elective Course on Computer-Aided Process Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommerfeld, Jude T.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate chemical engineering course which has been offered at the Georgia Institute of Technology. The objectives, structure, instructional materials and content of this course, which emphasizes the structure and usage of computer-aided design systems, are also included. (HM)

  3. Collective network for computer structures

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich, Matthias A; Coteus, Paul W; Chen, Dong; Gara, Alan; Giampapa, Mark E; Heidelberger, Philip; Hoenicke, Dirk; Takken, Todd E; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D; Vranas, Pavlos M

    2014-01-07

    A system and method for enabling high-speed, low-latency global collective communications among interconnected processing nodes. The global collective network optimally enables collective reduction operations to be performed during parallel algorithm operations executing in a computer structure having a plurality of the interconnected processing nodes. Router devices are included that interconnect the nodes of the network via links to facilitate performance of low-latency global processing operations at nodes of the virtual network. The global collective network may be configured to provide global barrier and interrupt functionality in asynchronous or synchronized manner. When implemented in a massively-parallel supercomputing structure, the global collective network is physically and logically partitionable according to the needs of a processing algorithm.

  4. Collective network for computer structures

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich, Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Chen, Dong (Croton On Hudson, NY); Gara, Alan (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E. (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Hoenicke, Dirk (Ossining, NY); Takken, Todd E. (Brewster, NY); Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D. (Wernau, DE); Vranas, Pavlos M. (Bedford Hills, NY)

    2011-08-16

    A system and method for enabling high-speed, low-latency global collective communications among interconnected processing nodes. The global collective network optimally enables collective reduction operations to be performed during parallel algorithm operations executing in a computer structure having a plurality of the interconnected processing nodes. Router devices ate included that interconnect the nodes of the network via links to facilitate performance of low-latency global processing operations at nodes of the virtual network and class structures. The global collective network may be configured to provide global barrier and interrupt functionality in asynchronous or synchronized manner. When implemented in a massively-parallel supercomputing structure, the global collective network is physically and logically partitionable according to needs of a processing algorithm.

  5. Networking DEC and IBM computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mish, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    Local Area Networking of DEC and IBM computers within the structure of the ISO-OSI Seven Layer Reference Model at a raw signaling speed of 1 Mops or greater are discussed. After an introduction to the ISO-OSI Reference Model nd the IEEE-802 Draft Standard for Local Area Networks (LANs), there follows a detailed discussion and comparison of the products available from a variety of manufactures to perform this networking task. A summary of these products is presented in a table.

  6. Hyperswitch Network For Hypercube Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Edward; Madan, Herbert; Peterson, John

    1989-01-01

    Data-driven dynamic switching enables high speed data transfer. Proposed hyperswitch network based on mixed static and dynamic topologies. Routing header modified in response to congestion or faults encountered as path established. Static topology meets requirement if nodes have switching elements that perform necessary routing header revisions dynamically. Hypercube topology now being implemented with switching element in each computer node aimed at designing very-richly-interconnected multicomputer system. Interconnection network connects great number of small computer nodes, using fixed hypercube topology, characterized by point-to-point links between nodes.

  7. Graduate school introductory computational simulation course pedagogy

    E-print Network

    Proctor, Laura L. (Laura Lynne), 1975-

    2009-01-01

    Numerical methods and algorithms have developed and matured vastly over the past three decades now that computational analysis can be performed on almost any personal computer. There is a need to be able to teach and present ...

  8. Demonstrations of Neural Network Computations Involving Students

    PubMed Central

    May, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    David Marr famously proposed three levels of analysis (implementational, algorithmic, and computational) for understanding information processing systems such as the brain. While two of these levels are commonly taught in neuroscience courses (the implementational level through neurophysiology and the computational level through systems/cognitive neuroscience), the algorithmic level is typically neglected. This leaves an explanatory gap in students’ understanding of how, for example, the flow of sodium ions enables cognition. Neural networks bridge these two levels by demonstrating how collections of interacting neuron-like units can give rise to more overtly cognitive phenomena. The demonstrations in this paper are intended to facilitate instructors’ introduction and exploration of how neurons “process information.” PMID:23493501

  9. Optical computer switching network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clymer, B.; Collins, S. A., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The design for an optical switching system for minicomputers that uses an optical spatial light modulator such as a Hughes liquid crystal light valve is presented. The switching system is designed to connect 80 minicomputers coupled to the switching system by optical fibers. The system has two major parts: the connection system that connects the data lines by which the computers communicate via a two-dimensional optical matrix array and the control system that controls which computers are connected. The basic system, the matrix-based connecting system, and some of the optical components to be used are described. Finally, the details of the control system are given and illustrated with a discussion of timing.

  10. Genetic networks and soft computing.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Sushmita; Das, Ranajit; Hayashi, Yoichi

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of gene regulatory networks provides enormous information on various fundamental cellular processes involving growth, development, hormone secretion, and cellular communication. Their extraction from available gene expression profiles is a challenging problem. Such reverse engineering of genetic networks offers insight into cellular activity toward prediction of adverse effects of new drugs or possible identification of new drug targets. Tasks such as classification, clustering, and feature selection enable efficient mining of knowledge about gene interactions in the form of networks. It is known that biological data is prone to different kinds of noise and ambiguity. Soft computing tools, such as fuzzy sets, evolutionary strategies, and neurocomputing, have been found to be helpful in providing low-cost, acceptable solutions in the presence of various types of uncertainties. In this paper, we survey the role of these soft methodologies and their hybridizations, for the purpose of generating genetic networks. PMID:21071800

  11. 9. Evolutionary Computation in Intelligent Network Management

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Thomas

    9. Evolutionary Computation in Intelligent Network Management Ajith Abraham Natural Computation Lab performance with artificial neural networks and classification and regression trees. Second, we use systems against threats to confidentiality, integrity, and availability. There are two types of intruders

  12. Collaborative Teaching and Learning in a Networked Course Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kontopoulos, Ourania; Ford, Vivian; Roth, Stacy

    2007-01-01

    We report on a partnership between a librarian and two other community college teachers (a humanist and a social scientist) working to establish "networked courses" that use the model and techniques of collaborative teaching and learning in an interdisciplinary setting. In this partnership--and, in fact, in any interdisciplinary context--the role…

  13. A Computer Course for Business Students: Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waterhouse, Ann

    This teacher's guide is for a course designed to teach business students the fundamentals of the BASIC language and computer programming using a series of business-oriented programs. Each lesson contains an introduction, flow charts, and computer programs. The six lesson topics are print-out and format control, count-average, withholding tax…

  14. Course 10: Three Lectures on Biological Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnasco, M. O.

    1 Enzymatic networks. Proofreading knots: How DNA topoisomerases disentangle DNA 1.1 Length scales and energy scales 1.2 DNA topology 1.3 Topoisomerases 1.4 Knots and supercoils 1.5 Topological equilibrium 1.6 Can topoisomerases recognize topology? 1.7 Proposal: Kinetic proofreading 1.8 How to do it twice 1.9 The care and proofreading of knots 1.10 Suppression of supercoils 1.11 Problems and outlook 1.12 Disquisition 2 Gene expression networks. Methods for analysis of DNA chip experiments 2.1 The regulation of gene expression 2.2 Gene expression arrays 2.3 Analysis of array data 2.4 Some simplifying assumptions 2.5 Probeset analysis 2.6 Discussion 3 Neural and gene expression networks: Song-induced gene expression in the canary brain 3.1 The study of songbirds 3.2 Canary song 3.3 ZENK 3.4 The blush 3.5 Histological analysis 3.6 Natural vs. artificial 3.7 The Blush II: gAP 3.8 Meditation

  15. Using Computers in Undergraduate Economics Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Saul Z.; Harmon, Oscar

    Seven computer assignments for undergraduate economics students that concentrate on building a foundation for programming higher level mathematical calculations are described. The purpose of each assignment, the computer program for it, and the correct answers are provided. "Introduction to Text Editing" acquaints the student with some basic…

  16. Computer Usage in Advanced History Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klier, John D.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the use of computers in two college European history seminars. Students were required to perform online database searches to prepare their bibliographies, and to check their writing mechanics using a mainframe computer software package. Concludes that student-generated data searches should be included in required historical methods…

  17. Integrating ethical topics in a traditional computer science course

    SciTech Connect

    Winrich, L.B.

    1994-12-31

    It is never hard to find additional, often unconventional, topics which seem to beg inclusion in standard courses. A dynamic discipline like computer science usually provides a steady stream of new technical ideas to vie for time and attention with more traditional material. As difficult as it may be to keep standard CS courses up-to-date with technical innovations, it often seems even more difficult to include non-technical topics even when there is universal agreement on their importance, Inevitably the question of whether or not such inclusion will compromise the technical content of the course arises. This paper describes an attempt to include two such topics in a traditional course in data structures. The two topics are writing and ethics and, although the effort concentrates on the inclusion of ethical questions in a standard CS course, writing is the vehicle for accomplishing this goal. Furthermore, the inclusion writing in the CS curriculum is certainly recognized as a desirable outcome.

  18. Impact of Multimedia and Network Services on an Introductory Level Course

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russ, John C.

    1996-01-01

    We will demonstrate and describe the impact of our use of multimedia and network connectivity on a sophomore-level introductory course in materials science. This class services all engineering students, resulting in large (more than 150) class sections with no hands-on laboratory. In 1990 we began to develop computer graphics that might substitute for some laboratory or real-world experiences, and demonstrate relationships hard to show with static textbook images or chalkboard drawings. We created a comprehensive series of modules that cover the entire course content. Called VIMS (Visualizations in Materials Science), these are available in the form of a CD-ROM and also via the internet.

  19. Computer networking at SLR stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novotny, Antonin

    1993-01-01

    There are several existing communication methods to deliver data from the satellite laser ranging (SLR) station to the SLR data center and back: telephonmodem, telex, and computer networks. The SLR scientific community has been exploiting mainly INTERNET, BITNET/EARN, and SPAN. The total of 56 countries are connected to INTERNET and the number of nodes is exponentially growing. The computer networks mentioned above and others are connected through E-mail protocol. The scientific progress of SLR requires the increase of communication speed and the amount of the transmitted data. The TOPEX/POSEIDON test campaign required to deliver Quick Look data (1.7 kB/pass) from a SLR site to SLR data center within 8 hours and full rate data (up to 500 kB/pass) within 24 hours. We developed networking for the remote SLR station in Helwan, Egypt. The reliable scheme for data delivery consists of: compression of MERIT2 format (up to 89 percent), encoding to ASCII Me (files); and e-mail sending from SLR station--e-mail receiving, decoding, and decompression at the center. We do propose to use the ZIP method for compression/decompression and the UUCODE method for ASCII encoding/decoding. This method will be useful for stations connected via telephonemodems or commercial networks. The electronics delivery could solve the problem of the too late receiving of the FR data by SLR data center.

  20. Networking Course Syllabus in Accredited Library and Information Science Programs: A Comparative Analysis Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abouserie, Hossam Eldin Mohamed Refaat

    2009-01-01

    The study investigated networking courses offered in accredited Library and Information Science schools in the United States in 2009. The study analyzed and compared network syllabi according to Course Syllabus Evaluation Rubric to obtain in-depth understanding of basic features and characteristics of networking courses taught. The study embraced…

  1. Creating a Computer Science Canon: a Course of "Classic" Readings in Computer Science

    E-print Network

    Eisenberg, Michael A.

    Creating a Computer Science Canon: a Course of "Classic" Readings in Computer Science Michael Eisenberg Department of Computer Science and Institute of Cognitive Science University of Colorado Boulder, CO 80309-0430 duck@cs.colorado.edu Abstract Computer science has a reputation of being a discipline

  2. Software For Monitoring A Computer Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Young H.

    1992-01-01

    SNMAT is rule-based expert-system computer program designed to assist personnel in monitoring status of computer network and identifying defective computers, workstations, and other components of network. Also assists in training network operators. Network for SNMAT located at Space Flight Operations Center (SFOC) at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Intended to serve as data-reduction system providing windows, menus, and graphs, enabling users to focus on relevant information. SNMAT expected to be adaptable to other computer networks; for example in management of repair, maintenance, and security, or in administration of planning systems, billing systems, or archives.

  3. COMPUTER NETWORKS ECE Department, University of Toronto

    E-print Network

    ? #12;Trends and Challenges in Computer Networks Internet of Things: Networks of sensors and devicesCOMPUTER NETWORKS AREA 5 ECE Department, University of Toronto #12;The Internet is the largest engineering artifact in history You are here #12;The number of hosts connected to the Internet continues

  4. Computer-Oriented Calculus Courses Using Finite Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sheldon P.

    The so-called discrete approach in calculus instruction involves introducing topics from the calculus of finite differences and finite sums, both for motivation and as useful tools for applications of the calculus. In particular, it provides an ideal setting in which to incorporate computers into calculus courses. This approach has been…

  5. An Undergraduate Electrical Engineering Course on Computer Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Engineering Education, Washington, DC.

    Outlined is an undergraduate electrical engineering course on computer organization designed to meet the need for electrical engineers familiar with digital system design. The program includes both hardware and software aspects of digital systems essential to design function and correlates design and organizational aspects of the subject. The…

  6. A Term Project for a Course on Computer Forensics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Warren

    2006-01-01

    The typical approach to creating an examination disk for exercises and projects in a course on computer forensics is for the instructor to populate a piece of media with evidence to be retrieved. While such an approach supports the simple use of forensic tools, in many cases the use of an instructor-developed examination disk avoids utilizing some…

  7. Multimedia Instructional Tools and Student Learning in Computer Applications Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Debra Laier

    2013-01-01

    Advances in technology and changes in educational strategies have resulted in the integration of technology into the classroom. Multimedia instructional tools (MMIT) have been identified as a way to provide student-centered active-learning instructional material to students. MMITs are common in introductory computer applications courses based on…

  8. Code 672 observational science branch computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, D. W.; Shirk, H. G.

    1988-01-01

    In general, networking increases productivity due to the speed of transmission, easy access to remote computers, ability to share files, and increased availability of peripherals. Two different networks within the Observational Science Branch are described in detail.

  9. A first course in computing with applications to biology.

    PubMed

    Libeskind-Hadas, Ran; Bush, Eliot

    2013-09-01

    We believe that undergraduate biology students must acquire a foundational background in computing including how to formulate a computational problem; develop an algorithmic solution; implement their solution in software and then test, document and use their code to explore biological phenomena. Moreover, by learning these skills in the first year, students acquire a powerful tool set that they can use and build on throughout their studies. To address this need, we have developed a first-year undergraduate course that teaches students the foundations of computational thinking and programming in the context of problems in biology. This article describes the structure and content of the course and summarizes assessment data on both affective and learning outcomes. PMID:23449003

  10. Computability in Anonymous Networks: Revocable vs. Irrecovable Outputs

    E-print Network

    Computability in Anonymous Networks: Revocable vs. Irrecovable Outputs Yuval Emek 1 Jochen Seidel 2 Zurich ­ Distributed Computing Group ­ www.disco.ethz.ch #12;Anonymous Networks #12;Computability in Anonymous Networks #12;Computability in Anonymous Networks Computable Not Computable #12;Computability

  11. Impact of Microcomputers on Educational Computer Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kniefel, David R.; Just, Steven B.

    1979-01-01

    Examines the rationale for the development of educational computer networks and the potential consequences of the microcomputer revolution. Suggests that rather than being competitive, microcomputers and mainframes are complementary computing environments. (Author/IRT)

  12. Prediction and Assessment of Student Behaviour in Open and Distance Education in Computers Using Bayesian Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xenos, Michalis

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a methodological approach based on Bayesian Networks for modelling the behaviour of the students of a bachelor course in computers in an Open University that deploys distance educational methods. It describes the structure of the model, its application for modelling the behaviour of student groups in the Informatics Course of…

  13. Profiles of Motivated Self-Regulation in College Computer Science Courses: Differences in Major versus Required Non-Major Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shell, Duane F.; Soh, Leen-Kiat

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to utilize a profiling approach to understand differences in motivation and strategic self-regulation among post-secondary STEM students in major versus required non-major computer science courses. Participants were 233 students from required introductory computer science courses (194 men; 35 women; 4 unknown) at…

  14. Using E-Mail across Computer Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazari, Sunil

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the use of telecommunications technology to exchange electronic mail, files, and messages across different computer networks. Networks highlighted include ARPA Internet; BITNET; USENET; FidoNet; MCI Mail; and CompuServe. Examples of the successful use of networks in higher education are given. (Six references) (LRW)

  15. Neural-Network Computer Transforms Coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Josin, Gary M.

    1990-01-01

    Numerical simulation demonstrated ability of conceptual neural-network computer to generalize what it has "learned" from few examples. Ability to generalize achieved with even simple neural network (relatively few neurons) and after exposure of network to only few "training" examples. Ability to obtain fairly accurate mappings after only few training examples used to provide solutions to otherwise intractable mapping problems.

  16. Super-speed computer interfaces and networks

    SciTech Connect

    Tolmie, D.E.; St. John, W.; DuBois, D.H.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Research into super-speed computer interfaces has been directed towards identifying networking requirements from compute-intensive applications that are crucial to DOE programs. In particular, both the DOE Energy Research High Performance Computing Research Centers (HPCRC) and the DOE Defense Programs Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) have planned applications that will require large increases in network bandwidth. This project was set up to help network researchers identify those networking requirements and to plan the development of such networks. Based on studies, research, and LANL-sponsored workshops, this project helped forge the beginnings for multi-gigabit/sec network research and developments that today is being lead by Los Alamos in the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 6.4 gigabit/sec specification called HIPPI-6400.

  17. MED4/345: Computer-Administered Formative Quizzes in a Basic Science Course

    PubMed Central

    Ogilvie, R

    1999-01-01

    Introduction Computer-administered quizzes were introduced into a Cell Biology and Histology course to provide students a means to assess their progress in the course and faculty the opportunity to monitor students' mastery of the course content. Methods The computer quizzes, including graphics, were presented on-line using LXR software (www.lxrtest.com) for specific time periods (7 - 14 days) during the course. The aim of this effort was to provide students formative assessment and assistance with pacing their study of course materials. Each computer quiz consisted of 20 - 30 questions with images. Extra credit was earned for each quiz if 70% of the items were answered correctly. The quizzes were served over the campus network to as many as 70 computer workstations, distributed to various locations in our department and the library. Each quiz was accessible once, by a unique user name and password for each student and a time limit set, allowing up to 90 seconds for each question. Feedback was given to the student for each question; the correct answer and a formative instructional statement intended to reinforce the fact or concept being evaluated. Global feedback on each quiz was provided for the entire class. This feedback was delivered on-line, on the course's web site. Results We have found that computer-administered course examinations are an efficient and acceptable means of assessing students' learning formatively. They permit a quick examination of the students' mastery of the course content. Such an approach allows for appropriate feedback to be provided in a timely manner and, if needed, instruction could be modified. No serious problems were encountered during the three years we have administered over 4,000 individual quizzes on-line. Greater than 90% of the students elected to participate in this optional activity with more than 85% receiving extra credit for their overall course grade. The computer quizzes were accepted by the students as a useful activity to pace their study and helpful to provide feedback about their mastery of the course content. Discussion We have gained confidence through the experience of administering quizzes on-line over our Local Area Network. Our plans are to develop the quizzes and full examinations to be delivered over the Web. Web-based examining has the obvious advantage of using unlimited and cross-platform workstations. However, we are cautiously optimistic about this approach. We recognise that one of the main obstacles in examining over the Web is the potential of collusion or plagiarism. Students that choose the option to take their examination off-campus cannot be checked if they used course notes and/or other resources to answer the questions during the exam. Thus, the control of examination behavior is potentially a serious problem to overcome.

  18. Computer network management based on TMN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanpeng; Li, Xiang; Zhuang, Zhaowen

    2002-09-01

    Computer Network Management is the most important work of the computer network. Two problems in managing of a professional network must be solved, one is to standardize the relationship between the professional network and the management network, and the other is to ensure the security of the network. The first problem will be discussed here. We put forward a new idea here, that is, to build standard computer management network and standard professional network. First, we give a standard model of the relationship between the management network and its subordinate professional network. This model is different with the TMN. It distinguishes the management network and the subordinate professional network clearly in the notion, the place and the property of all the sockets is determined. Subsequently, the corresponding function structure and physical architecture are given together. For each kind of architecture, we define the related rules respectively. These rules are: the relationship between the function module, the standard of the interface, protocol architecture. Then, the procedure of communication signal processing is analyzed. The requirements of all the programming sockets are explained. Finally, we explain some related topics briefly.

  19. Pedagogical Utilization and Assessment of the Statistic Online Computational Resource in Introductory Probability and Statistics Courses

    PubMed Central

    Dinov, Ivo D.; Sanchez, Juana; Christou, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    Technology-based instruction represents a new recent pedagogical paradigm that is rooted in the realization that new generations are much more comfortable with, and excited about, new technologies. The rapid technological advancement over the past decade has fueled an enormous demand for the integration of modern networking, informational and computational tools with classical pedagogical instruments. Consequently, teaching with technology typically involves utilizing a variety of IT and multimedia resources for online learning, course management, electronic course materials, and novel tools of communication, engagement, experimental, critical thinking and assessment. The NSF-funded Statistics Online Computational Resource (SOCR) provides a number of interactive tools for enhancing instruction in various undergraduate and graduate courses in probability and statistics. These resources include online instructional materials, statistical calculators, interactive graphical user interfaces, computational and simulation applets, tools for data analysis and visualization. The tools provided as part of SOCR include conceptual simulations and statistical computing interfaces, which are designed to bridge between the introductory and the more advanced computational and applied probability and statistics courses. In this manuscript, we describe our designs for utilizing SOCR technology in instruction in a recent study. In addition, present the results of the effectiveness of using SOCR tools at two different course intensity levels on three outcome measures: exam scores, student satisfaction and choice of technology to complete assignments. Learning styles assessment was completed at baseline. We have used three very different designs for three different undergraduate classes. Each course included a treatment group, using the SOCR resources, and a control group, using classical instruction techniques. Our findings include marginal effects of the SOCR treatment per individual classes; however, pooling the results across all courses and sections, SOCR effects on the treatment groups were exceptionally robust and significant. Coupling these findings with a clear decrease in the variance of the quantitative examination measures in the treatment groups indicates that employing technology, like SOCR, in a sound pedagogical and scientific manner enhances overall the students’ understanding and suggests better long-term knowledge retention. PMID:19750185

  20. Queuing theory models for computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galant, David C.

    1989-01-01

    A set of simple queuing theory models which can model the average response of a network of computers to a given traffic load has been implemented using a spreadsheet. The impact of variations in traffic patterns and intensities, channel capacities, and message protocols can be assessed using them because of the lack of fine detail in the network traffic rates, traffic patterns, and the hardware used to implement the networks. A sample use of the models applied to a realistic problem is included in appendix A. Appendix B provides a glossary of terms used in this paper. This Ames Research Center computer communication network is an evolving network of local area networks (LANs) connected via gateways and high-speed backbone communication channels. Intelligent planning of expansion and improvement requires understanding the behavior of the individual LANs as well as the collection of networks as a whole.

  1. Gateways among Academic Computer Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCredie, John W.

    1984-01-01

    Local area networks for intracampus facilities and national inter-campus networks are discussed. Descriptions of some of these networks (ARPAnet, BITNET, CSNET, EDUNET, MAILNET, RLIN, AND USENET) are provided that illustrate the wide range of academic applications currently available. (Author/MLW)

  2. Computer network environment planning and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalphin, John F.

    1989-01-01

    The GSFC Computer Network Environment provides a broadband RF cable between campus buildings and ethernet spines in buildings for the interlinking of Local Area Networks (LANs). This system provides terminal and computer linkage among host and user systems thereby providing E-mail services, file exchange capability, and certain distributed computing opportunities. The Environment is designed to be transparent and supports multiple protocols. Networking at Goddard has a short history and has been under coordinated control of a Network Steering Committee for slightly more than two years; network growth has been rapid with more than 1500 nodes currently addressed and greater expansion expected. A new RF cable system with a different topology is being installed during summer 1989; consideration of a fiber optics system for the future will begin soon. Summmer study was directed toward Network Steering Committee operation and planning plus consideration of Center Network Environment analysis and modeling. Biweekly Steering Committee meetings were attended to learn the background of the network and the concerns of those managing it. Suggestions for historical data gathering have been made to support future planning and modeling. Data Systems Dynamic Simulator, a simulation package developed at NASA and maintained at GSFC was studied as a possible modeling tool for the network environment. A modeling concept based on a hierarchical model was hypothesized for further development. Such a model would allow input of newly updated parameters and would provide an estimation of the behavior of the network.

  3. Some Specifications for a Computer-Oriented First Course in Electrical Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Engineering Education, Washington, DC.

    Reported are specifications for a computer-oriented first course in electrical engineering giving new direction to the development of texts and alternative courses of study. Guidelines for choice of topics, a statement of fundamental concepts, pitfalls to avoid, and some sample course outlines are given. The study of circuits through computer

  4. Designing for Deeper Learning in a Blended Computer Science Course for Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grover, Shuchi; Pea, Roy; Cooper, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this research was to create and test an introductory computer science course for middle school. Titled "Foundations for Advancing Computational Thinking" (FACT), the course aims to prepare and motivate middle school learners for future engagement with algorithmic problem solving. FACT was also piloted as a seven-week course

  5. Massively Open Online Course for Educators (MOOC-Ed) Network Dataset

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellogg, Shaun; Edelmann, Achim

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the Massively Open Online Course for Educators (MOOC-Ed) network dataset. It entails information on two online communication networks resulting from two consecutive offerings of the MOOC called "The Digital Learning Transition in K-12 Schools" in spring and fall 2013. The courses were offered to educators from the USA…

  6. Deterministic Function Computation with Chemical Reaction Networks

    E-print Network

    Doty, David

    controllers for biochemical systems, "wet robots", smart drugs, etc. Need to understand theoretical principles1 Deterministic Function Computation with Chemical Reaction Networks David Doty (joint work with Ho for existing systems) #12;3 Cells are smart: controlled by signaling and regulatory networks source: David

  7. Neural networks applications to control and computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luxemburg, Leon A.

    1994-01-01

    Several interrelated problems in the area of neural network computations are described. First an interpolation problem is considered, then a control problem is reduced to a problem of interpolation by a neural network via Lyapunov function approach, and finally a new, faster method of learning as compared with the gradient descent method, was introduced.

  8. Computer Networks A Simple Network Analyzer

    E-print Network

    with the syntax and options of the ping program. If you type in just ping at the command prompt, you will see a list of options. Try to understand the following ping requests: ping -l 2000 www.google.com ping ­l advanced capture filters. Click Start. 5. Ping any remote computer -- for instance, www.yahoo.com, using

  9. Multimedia computer support for a course in ground control

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, D.A.; Unal, A.

    1996-12-31

    A prototype multimedia compact disc (CD) was created using the facilities at the Rock Mechanics and Explosives Research Center (RMERC) of the University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR) to teach a portion of a course in Ground Control. Multimedia computers offer an environment where audio-visual presentations can be made in an interactive fashion. Together with relevant animation clips, video clips, and 3-D representations, the difficulties in describing mining processes and earth structures can be overcome. This paper describes the experience gained in preparing interactive multimedia lectures on computers. The hardware and software used in creating the sound commentary, 3-D graphics, animation clips, video clips, and movies are listed. The structure of the program and how interactivity was achieved is explained in detail. Such an instructional tool is not only an excellent supplement to regular courses but it also is an inexpensive and effective way of providing distance education for mining engineers working at remote locations scattered all over the country.

  10. Effects of Computer Course on Computer Self-Efficacy, Computer Attitudes and Achievements of Young Individuals in Siirt, Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çelik, Halil Coskun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of computer courses on young individuals' computer self-efficacy, attitudes and achievement. The study group of this research included 60 unemployed young individuals (18-25 ages) in total; 30 in the experimental group and 30 in the control group. An experimental research model with…

  11. Computer Networking with the Victorian Correspondence School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conboy, Ian

    During 1985 the Education Department installed two-way radios in 44 remote secondary schools in Victoria, Australia, to improve turn-around time for correspondence assignments. Subsequently, teacher supervisors at Melbourne's Correspondence School sought ways to further augument audio interactivity with computer networking. Computer equipment was…

  12. Optimization of an interactive distributive computer network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, V.

    1985-01-01

    The activities under a cooperative agreement for the development of a computer network are briefly summarized. Research activities covered are: computer operating systems optimization and integration; software development and implementation of the IRIS (Infrared Imaging of Shuttle) Experiment; and software design, development, and implementation of the APS (Aerosol Particle System) Experiment.

  13. Spontaneous Ad Hoc Mobile Cloud Computing Network

    PubMed Central

    Lacuesta, Raquel; Sendra, Sandra; Peñalver, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing helps users and companies to share computing resources instead of having local servers or personal devices to handle the applications. Smart devices are becoming one of the main information processing devices. Their computing features are reaching levels that let them create a mobile cloud computing network. But sometimes they are not able to create it and collaborate actively in the cloud because it is difficult for them to build easily a spontaneous network and configure its parameters. For this reason, in this paper, we are going to present the design and deployment of a spontaneous ad hoc mobile cloud computing network. In order to perform it, we have developed a trusted algorithm that is able to manage the activity of the nodes when they join and leave the network. The paper shows the network procedures and classes that have been designed. Our simulation results using Castalia show that our proposal presents a good efficiency and network performance even by using high number of nodes. PMID:25202715

  14. Spontaneous ad hoc mobile cloud computing network.

    PubMed

    Lacuesta, Raquel; Lloret, Jaime; Sendra, Sandra; Peñalver, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing helps users and companies to share computing resources instead of having local servers or personal devices to handle the applications. Smart devices are becoming one of the main information processing devices. Their computing features are reaching levels that let them create a mobile cloud computing network. But sometimes they are not able to create it and collaborate actively in the cloud because it is difficult for them to build easily a spontaneous network and configure its parameters. For this reason, in this paper, we are going to present the design and deployment of a spontaneous ad hoc mobile cloud computing network. In order to perform it, we have developed a trusted algorithm that is able to manage the activity of the nodes when they join and leave the network. The paper shows the network procedures and classes that have been designed. Our simulation results using Castalia show that our proposal presents a good efficiency and network performance even by using high number of nodes. PMID:25202715

  15. Using Microcomputer Simulations in the Classroom: Examples from Undergraduate and Faculty Computer Literacy Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Jeffrey A.

    Examples of the use of computer simulations in two undergraduate courses, (American Foreign Policy and Introduction to International Politics), and a faculty computer literacy course on simulations and artificial intelligence, are provided in this compilation of various instructional items. A list of computer simulations available for various…

  16. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Collaborative Computer-Intensive Projects in an Undergraduate Psychometrics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barchard, Kimberly A.; Pace, Larry A.

    2010-01-01

    Undergraduate psychometrics classes often use computer-intensive active learning projects. However, little research has examined active learning or computer-intensive projects in psychometrics courses. We describe two computer-intensive collaborative learning projects used to teach the design and evaluation of psychological tests. Course

  17. Path Not Found: Disparities in Access to Computer Science Courses in California High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Alexis; McAlear, Frieda; Scott, Allison

    2015-01-01

    "Path Not Found: Disparities in Access to Computer Science Courses in California High Schools" exposes one of the foundational causes of underrepresentation in computing: disparities in access to computer science courses in California's public high schools. This report provides new, detailed data on these disparities by student body…

  18. A Textbook for a First Course in Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zingg, D. W.; Pulliam, T. H.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses the textbook, Fundamentals of Computational Fluid Dynamics by Lomax, Pulliam, and Zingg, which is intended for a graduate level first course in computational fluid dynamics. This textbook emphasizes fundamental concepts in developing, analyzing, and understanding numerical methods for the partial differential equations governing the physics of fluid flow. Its underlying philosophy is that the theory of linear algebra and the attendant eigenanalysis of linear systems provides a mathematical framework to describe and unify most numerical methods in common use in the field of fluid dynamics. Two linear model equations, the linear convection and diffusion equations, are used to illustrate concepts throughout. Emphasis is on the semi-discrete approach, in which the governing partial differential equations (PDE's) are reduced to systems of ordinary differential equations (ODE's) through a discretization of the spatial derivatives. The ordinary differential equations are then reduced to ordinary difference equations (O(Delta)E's) using a time-marching method. This methodology, using the progression from PDE through ODE's to O(Delta)E's, together with the use of the eigensystems of tridiagonal matrices and the theory of O(Delta)E's, gives the book its distinctiveness and provides a sound basis for a deep understanding of fundamental concepts in computational fluid dynamics.

  19. Professional networking using computer-mediated communication.

    PubMed

    Washer, Peter

    Traditionally, professionals have networked with others in their field through attending conferences, professional organizations, direct mailing, and via the workplace. Recently, there have been new possibilities to network with other professionals using the internet. This article looks at the possibilities that the internet offers for professional networking, particularly e-mailing lists, newsgroups and membership databases, and compares them against more traditional methods of professional networking. The different types of computer-mediated communication are discussed and their relative merits and disadvantages are examined. The benefits and potential pitfalls of internet professional networking, as it relates to the nursing profession, are examined. Practical advice is offered on how the internet can be used as a means to foster professional networks of academic, clinical or research interests. PMID:12388908

  20. Probability 1 computation with chemical reaction networks Rachel Cummings

    E-print Network

    Probability 1 computation with chemical reaction networks Rachel Cummings David Doty David Soloveichik§ Abstract The computational power of stochastic chemical reaction networks (CRNs) varies signifi computation. How can chemical reactions process information, make decisions, and solve problems? A natural

  1. Profiles of Motivated Self-Regulation in College Computer Science Courses: Differences in Major versus Required Non-Major Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shell, Duane F.; Soh, Leen-Kiat

    2013-12-01

    The goal of the present study was to utilize a profiling approach to understand differences in motivation and strategic self-regulation among post-secondary STEM students in major versus required non-major computer science courses. Participants were 233 students from required introductory computer science courses (194 men; 35 women; 4 unknown) at a large Midwestern state university. Cluster analysis identified five profiles: (1) a strategic profile of a highly motivated by-any-means good strategy user; (2) a knowledge-building profile of an intrinsically motivated autonomous, mastery-oriented student; (3) a surface learning profile of a utility motivated minimally engaged student; (4) an apathetic profile of an amotivational disengaged student; and (5) a learned helpless profile of a motivated but unable to effectively self-regulate student. Among CS majors and students in courses in their major field, the strategic and knowledge-building profiles were the most prevalent. Among non-CS majors and students in required non-major courses, the learned helpless, surface learning, and apathetic profiles were the most prevalent. Students in the strategic and knowledge-building profiles had significantly higher retention of computational thinking knowledge than students in other profiles. Students in the apathetic and surface learning profiles saw little instrumentality of the course for their future academic and career objectives. Findings show that students in STEM fields taking required computer science courses exhibit the same constellation of motivated strategic self-regulation profiles found in other post-secondary and K-12 settings.

  2. Computer Networking Thomas G. Robertazzi

    E-print Network

    Robertazzi, Thomas G.

    -mathematical, introduction to the technology of networks. This includes discussions of types of communication, many National Laboratory for making me aware of many recent technological developments. Thanks are also due . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 1.3.1 Frequency Division Multiplexing (FDM) . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 1.3.2 Time Division

  3. Meteorological Monitoring And Warning Computer Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Randolph J.; Dianic, Allan V.; Moore, Lien N.

    1996-01-01

    Meteorological monitoring system (MMS) computer network tracks weather conditions and issues warnings when weather hazards are about to occur. Receives data from such meteorological instruments as wind sensors on towers and lightning detectors, and compares data with weather restrictions specified for outdoor activities. If weather violates restriction, network generates audible and visible alarms to alert people involved in activity. Also displays weather and toxic diffusion data and disseminates weather forecasts, advisories, and warnings to workstations.

  4. An Evaluation of the Computer Science 11E Course Offered During the Spring Semester of 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durward, M. Lynne; Ellis, E. N.

    The evaluation of Computer Science 11E, a locally-developed course offered in six Vancouver secondary schools, consisted of four parts: a questionnaire to teachers concerning all aspects of their courses, as well as their own evaluation of the program, a questionnaire to students designed to determine their attitude toward the course and what they…

  5. On computer vision in wireless sensor networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Nina M.; Ko, Teresa H.

    2004-09-01

    Wireless sensor networks allow detailed sensing of otherwise unknown and inaccessible environments. While it would be beneficial to include cameras in a wireless sensor network because images are so rich in information, the power cost of transmitting an image across the wireless network can dramatically shorten the lifespan of the sensor nodes. This paper describe a new paradigm for the incorporation of imaging into wireless networks. Rather than focusing on transmitting images across the network, we show how an image can be processed locally for key features using simple detectors. Contrasted with traditional event detection systems that trigger an image capture, this enables a new class of sensors which uses a low power imaging sensor to detect a variety of visual cues. Sharing these features among relevant nodes cues specific actions to better provide information about the environment. We report on various existing techniques developed for traditional computer vision research which can aid in this work.

  6. Proposal for a Science, Technology and Society Course Universal Computation and the Information Age

    E-print Network

    O'Donnell, Tom

    Proposal for a Science, Technology and Society Course Universal Computation and the Information AgeMay2003 1 Description "Universality1 " and the entire age of programmable machine computation was born . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (734)-651-0077 The University of Michigan

  7. Computational Modeling of Mammalian Signaling Networks

    PubMed Central

    Hughey, Jacob J; Lee, Timothy K; Covert, Markus W

    2011-01-01

    One of the most exciting developments in signal transduction research has been the proliferation of studies in which a biological discovery was initiated by computational modeling. Here we review the major efforts that enable such studies. First, we describe the experimental technologies that are generally used to identify the molecular components and interactions in, and dynamic behavior exhibited by, a network of interest. Next, we review the mathematical approaches that are used to model signaling network behavior. Finally, we focus on three specific instances of “model-driven discovery”: cases in which computational modeling of a signaling network has led to new insights which have been verified experimentally. Signal transduction networks are the bridge between the extraordinarily complex extracellular environment and a carefully orchestrated cellular response. These networks are largely composed of proteins which can interact, move to specific cellular locations, or be modified or degraded. The integration of these events often leads to the activation or inactivation of transcription factors, which then induce or repress the expression of thousands of genes. Because of this critical role in translating environmental cues to cellular behaviors, malfunctioning signaling networks can lead to a variety of pathologies. One example is cancer, in which many of the key genes found to be involved in cancer onset and development are components of signaling pathways [1, 2]. A detailed understanding of the cellular signaling networks underlying such diseases would likely be extremely useful in developing new treatments. However, the complexity of signaling networks is such that their integrated functions cannot be determined without computational simulation. In recent years, mathematical modeling of signal transduction has led to some exciting new findings and biological discoveries. Here, we review the work that has enabled computational modeling of mammalian signaling networks, as well as the demonstrated value of such modeling. We begin by reviewing the experimental techniques commonly associated with model-building efforts, in terms of mapping network interactions as well as determining the dynamic network response to perturbation. We then discuss modeling strategies, and finally focus on three cases that dramatically illustrate the power of models to discover new biology. PMID:20836022

  8. Converting an Experimental Laboratory Course from Paper and Pencil to Computer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Maryellen; Geraci, Lisa

    2004-01-01

    This article provides suggestions for developing a laboratory-based research methods course using computers. We describe important considerations for creating this type of course including selecting software, choosing experiments, and teaching students with different levels of computer skill. We also include 3 model projects that required…

  9. Happenstance and Compromise: A Gendered Analysis of Students' Computing Degree Course Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The number of students choosing to study computing at university continues to decline this century, with an even sharper decline in female students. This article presents the results of a series of interviews with university students studying computing courses in Australia that uncovered the influence of happenstance and compromise on course

  10. A Survey and Evaluation of Simulators Suitable for Teaching Courses in Computer Architecture and Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikolic, B.; Radivojevic, Z.; Djordjevic, J.; Milutinovic, V.

    2009-01-01

    Courses in Computer Architecture and Organization are regularly included in Computer Engineering curricula. These courses are usually organized in such a way that students obtain not only a purely theoretical experience, but also a practical understanding of the topics lectured. This practical work is usually done in a laboratory using simulators…

  11. Time-course gene profiling and networks in demethylated retinoblastoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Malusa, Federico; Taranta, Monia; Zaki, Nazar; Cinti, Caterina; Capobianco, Enrico

    2015-09-15

    Retinoblastoma, a very aggressive cancer of the developing retina, initiatiates by the biallelic loss of RB1 gene, and progresses very quickly following RB1 inactivation. While its genome is stable, multiple pathways are deregulated, also epigenetically. After reviewing the main findings in relation with recently validated markers, we propose an integrative bioinformatics approach to include in the previous group new markers obtained from the analysis of a single cell line subject to epigenetic treatment. In particular, differentially expressed genes are identified from time course microarray experiments on the WERI-RB1 cell line treated with 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (decitabine; DAC). By inducing demethylation of CpG island in promoter genes that are involved in biological processes, for instance apoptosis, we performed the following main integrative analysis steps: i) Gene expression profiling at 48h, 72h and 96h after DAC treatment; ii) Time differential gene co-expression networks and iii) Context-driven marker association (transcriptional factor regulated protein networks, master regulatory paths). The observed DAC-driven temporal profiles and regulatory connectivity patterns are obtained by the application of computational tools, with support from curated literature. It is worth emphasizing the capacity of networks to reconcile multi-type evidences, thus generating testable hypotheses made available by systems scale predictive inference power. Despite our small experimental setting, we propose through such integrations valuable impacts of epigenetic treatment in terms of gene expression measurements, and then validate evidenced apoptotic effects. PMID:26143641

  12. CSCE 190: Computing in the Modern World 1. Course number and name: CSCE 190: Computing in the Modern World

    E-print Network

    Valtorta, Marco

    will come from websites of professional organizations. 5. Specific course information a. Catalog description: An introduction to the field of computing: trends in computing technology, the profession, and careers important milestone events in the history of computing. · Identify some advanced directions in computing

  13. Interaction, Critical Thinking, and Social Network Analysis (SNA) in Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thormann, Joan; Gable, Samuel; Fidalgo, Patricia Seferlis; Blakeslee, George

    2013-01-01

    This study tried to ascertain a possible relationship between the number of student moderators (1, 2, and 3), online interactions, and critical thinking of K-12 educators enrolled in an online course that was taught from a constructivist approach. The course topic was use of technology in special education. Social network analysis (SNA) and…

  14. Parallel Computation of Unsteady Flows on a Network of Workstations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Parallel computation of unsteady flows requires significant computational resources. The utilization of a network of workstations seems an efficient solution to the problem where large problems can be treated at a reasonable cost. This approach requires the solution of several problems: 1) the partitioning and distribution of the problem over a network of workstation, 2) efficient communication tools, 3) managing the system efficiently for a given problem. Of course, there is the question of the efficiency of any given numerical algorithm to such a computing system. NPARC code was chosen as a sample for the application. For the explicit version of the NPARC code both two- and three-dimensional problems were studied. Again both steady and unsteady problems were investigated. The issues studied as a part of the research program were: 1) how to distribute the data between the workstations, 2) how to compute and how to communicate at each node efficiently, 3) how to balance the load distribution. In the following, a summary of these activities is presented. Details of the work have been presented and published as referenced.

  15. Multiple network alignment on quantum computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskin, Anmer; Grama, Ananth; Kais, Sabre

    2014-09-01

    Comparative analyses of graph structured datasets underly diverse problems. Examples of these problems include identification of conserved functional components (biochemical interactions) across species, structural similarity of large biomolecules, and recurring patterns of interactions in social networks. A large class of such analyses methods quantify the topological similarity of nodes across networks. The resulting correspondence of nodes across networks, also called node alignment, can be used to identify invariant subgraphs across the input graphs. Given $k$ graphs as input, alignment algorithms use topological information to assign a similarity score to each $k$-tuple of nodes, with elements (nodes) drawn from each of the input graphs. Nodes are considered similar if their neighbors are also similar. An alternate, equivalent view of these network alignment algorithms is to consider the Kronecker product of the input graphs, and to identify high-ranked nodes in the Kronecker product graph. Conventional methods such as PageRank and HITS (Hypertext Induced Topic Selection) can be used for this purpose. These methods typically require computation of the principal eigenvector of a suitably modified Kronecker product matrix of the input graphs. We adopt this alternate view of the problem to address the problem of multiple network alignment. Using the phase estimation algorithm, we show that the multiple network alignment problem can be efficiently solved on quantum computers. We characterize the accuracy and performance of our method, and show that it can deliver exponential speedups over conventional (non-quantum) methods.

  16. Multiple network alignment on quantum computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskin, Anmer; Grama, Ananth; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-01

    Comparative analyses of graph-structured datasets underly diverse problems. Examples of these problems include identification of conserved functional components (biochemical interactions) across species, structural similarity of large biomolecules, and recurring patterns of interactions in social networks. A large class of such analyses methods quantify the topological similarity of nodes across networks. The resulting correspondence of nodes across networks, also called node alignment, can be used to identify invariant subgraphs across the input graphs. Given graphs as input, alignment algorithms use topological information to assign a similarity score to each -tuple of nodes, with elements (nodes) drawn from each of the input graphs. Nodes are considered similar if their neighbors are also similar. An alternate, equivalent view of these network alignment algorithms is to consider the Kronecker product of the input graphs and to identify high-ranked nodes in the Kronecker product graph. Conventional methods such as PageRank and HITS (Hypertext-Induced Topic Selection) can be used for this purpose. These methods typically require computation of the principal eigenvector of a suitably modified Kronecker product matrix of the input graphs. We adopt this alternate view of the problem to address the problem of multiple network alignment. Using the phase estimation algorithm, we show that the multiple network alignment problem can be efficiently solved on quantum computers. We characterize the accuracy and performance of our method and show that it can deliver exponential speedups over conventional (non-quantum) methods.

  17. Reducing the diameters of computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, S. H.; Raza, A. D.

    1986-01-01

    Three methods of reducing the diameters of computer networks by adding additional processor to processor links under the constraint that no more than one I/O port be added to each processor are discussed. This is equivalent to adding edges to a given graph under the constraint that the degree of any node be increased, at most, by one.

  18. COMP 347: Computer Networks Cisco Laboratory 1

    E-print Network

    Hamey, Len

    COMP 347: Computer Networks Cisco Laboratory 1 Introduction to Cisco IOS Objective · Log and thoroughly understand the `Theory' section before proceeding to the lab exercises. Theory Most Cisco routers run on an operating system referred to as IOS. Cisco IOS (originally Internetwork Operating System

  19. Advanced networks and computing in healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Michael

    2011-01-01

    As computing and network capabilities continue to rise, it becomes increasingly important to understand the varied applications for using them to provide healthcare. The objective of this review is to identify key characteristics and attributes of healthcare applications involving the use of advanced computing and communication technologies, drawing upon 45 research and development projects in telemedicine and other aspects of healthcare funded by the National Library of Medicine over the past 12?years. Only projects publishing in the professional literature were included in the review. Four projects did not publish beyond their final reports. In addition, the authors drew on their first-hand experience as project officers, reviewers and monitors of the work. Major themes in the corpus of work were identified, characterizing key attributes of advanced computing and network applications in healthcare. Advanced computing and network applications are relevant to a range of healthcare settings and specialties, but they are most appropriate for solving a narrower range of problems in each. Healthcare projects undertaken primarily to explore potential have also demonstrated effectiveness and depend on the quality of network service as much as bandwidth. Many applications are enabling, making it possible to provide service or conduct research that previously was not possible or to achieve outcomes in addition to those for which projects were undertaken. Most notable are advances in imaging and visualization, collaboration and sense of presence, and mobility in communication and information-resource use. PMID:21486877

  20. Computer Modeling of Planetary Surface Temperatures in Introductory Astronomy Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Timothy; Goodman, J.

    2013-01-01

    Barker, T., and Goodman, J. C., Wheaton College, Norton, MA Computer modeling is an essential part of astronomical research, and so it is important that students be exposed to its powers and limitations in the first (and, perhaps, only) astronomy course they take in college. Building on the ideas of Walter Robinson (“Modeling Dynamic Systems,” Springer, 2002) we have found that STELLA software (ISEE Systems) allows introductory astronomy students to do sophisticated modeling by the end of two classes of instruction, with no previous experience in computer programming or calculus. STELLA’s graphical interface allows students to visualize systems in terms of “flows” in and out of “stocks,” avoiding the need to invoke differential equations. Linking flows and stocks allows feedback systems to be constructed. Students begin by building an easily understood system: a leaky bucket. This is a simple negative feedback system in which the volume in the bucket (a “stock”) depends on a fixed inflow rate and an outflow that increases in proportion to the volume in the bucket. Students explore how changing inflow rate and feedback parameters affect the steady-state volume and equilibration time of the system. This model is completed within a 50-minute class meeting. In the next class, students are given an analogous but more sophisticated problem: modeling a planetary surface temperature (“stock”) that depends on the “flow” of energy from the Sun, the planetary albedo, the outgoing flow of infrared radiation from the planet’s surface, and the infrared return from the atmosphere. Students then compare their STELLA model equilibrium temperatures to observed planetary temperatures, which agree with model ones for worlds without atmospheres, but give underestimates for planets with atmospheres, thus introducing students to the concept of greenhouse warming. We find that if we give the students part of this model at the start of a 50-minute class they are able to build the rest of the model and run planetary simulations by the end of class.

  1. Program Predicts Time Courses of Human/Computer Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vera, Alonso; Howes, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    CPM X is a computer program that predicts sequences of, and amounts of time taken by, routine actions performed by a skilled person performing a task. Unlike programs that simulate the interaction of the person with the task environment, CPM X predicts the time course of events as consequences of encoded constraints on human behavior. The constraints determine which cognitive and environmental processes can occur simultaneously and which have sequential dependencies. The input to CPM X comprises (1) a description of a task and strategy in a hierarchical description language and (2) a description of architectural constraints in the form of rules governing interactions of fundamental cognitive, perceptual, and motor operations. The output of CPM X is a Program Evaluation Review Technique (PERT) chart that presents a schedule of predicted cognitive, motor, and perceptual operators interacting with a task environment. The CPM X program allows direct, a priori prediction of skilled user performance on complex human-machine systems, providing a way to assess critical interfaces before they are deployed in mission contexts.

  2. Anonymous Transactions in Computer Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolev, Shlomi; Kopeetsky, Marina

    We present schemes for providing anonymous transactions while privacy and anonymity are preserved, providing user anonymous authentication in distributed networks such as the Internet. We first present a practical scheme for anonymous transactions while the transaction resolution is assisted by a Trusted Authority. This practical scheme is extended to a theoretical scheme where a Trusted Authority is not involved in the transaction resolution. Given an authority that generates for each player hard to produce evidence EVID (e. g., problem instance with or without a solution) to each player, the identity of a user U is defined by the ability to prove possession of said evidence. We use Zero-Knowledge proof techniques to repeatedly identify U by providing a proof that U has evidence EVID, without revealing EVID, therefore avoiding identity theft.

  3. Advanced Scientific Computing Research Network Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, Charles; Bell, Greg; Canon, Shane; Dart, Eli; Dattoria, Vince; Goodwin, Dave; Lee, Jason; Hicks, Susan; Holohan, Ed; Klasky, Scott; Lauzon, Carolyn; Rogers, Jim; Shipman, Galen; Skinner, David; Tierney, Brian

    2013-03-08

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 25 years. In October 2012, ESnet and the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) of the DOE SC organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by the ASCR program office. The requirements identified at the review are summarized in the Findings section, and are described in more detail in the body of the report.

  4. Computer networks. Citations from the NTIS data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J. E.

    1980-08-01

    Research reports on aspects of computer networks, including hardware, software, data transmission, time sharing, and applicable theory to network design are cited. Specific studies on the ARPA networks, and other such systems are listed.

  5. Course 5 Neural Networks and Deep Learning Program 1. Introduction

    E-print Network

    Cardeñosa, Jesús

    .1. The problem of learning several hidden layers. 5.2. Whole-network training 5.2.1. Deep networks initialization to Training Restricted Boltzmann Machines Unsupervised Feature Learning and Deep Learning tutorial: http://ufldl.stanford.edu/wiki

  6. Using satellite communications for a mobile computer network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyman, Douglas J.

    1993-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: patrol car automation, mobile computer network, network requirements, network design overview, MCN mobile network software, MCN hub operation, mobile satellite software, hub satellite software, the benefits of patrol car automation, the benefits of satellite mobile computing, and national law enforcement satellite.

  7. Who Do You Know? Demonstrating Networking in a Careers in Psychology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segrist, Dan J.; Pawlow, Laura A.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a classroom activity designed to visually depict the ability of networking to increase potential job contacts. We implemented the activity in two sections of a Careers in Psychology course. Use of the activity resulted in significant increases in the number of potential networking contacts generated by…

  8. LAN Configuration and Analysis: Projects for the Data Communications and Networking Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Fang; Brabston, Mary

    2011-01-01

    We implemented two local area network (LAN) projects in our introductory data communications and networking course. The first project required students to develop a LAN from scratch for a small imaginary organization. The second project required student groups to analyze a LAN for a real world small organization. By allowing students to apply what…

  9. Computability in Anonymous Networks: Revocable vs. Irrecovable Outputs

    E-print Network

    Computability in Anonymous Networks: Revocable vs. Irrecovable Outputs Yuval Emek1 , Jochen Seidel2. What can be computed in an anonymous network, where nodes are not equipped with unique identifiers computed output value: Two classes of problems solvable in anonymous networks are defined, where

  10. Pushing sensor network computation to the edge

    SciTech Connect

    Jean, Evens; Collins, Robert; Hurson, Ali; Sedigh, Sahra; Jiao, Yu

    2009-01-01

    Sensor Networks consist of multiple devices equipped with some sensing apparatus. The devices in the network may be homogeneous or heterogeneous, yet they will coordinate in order to accomplish a pre-defined task. With the rising interest in the use of Sensor Networks in various applications, the sensor nodes need to subsist in a dynamic environment and react in a timely fashion to environmental stimuli. Unfortunately, the current paradigm in Sensor Network relies on static tasking of the nodes to support a common task; which ultimately leads to deployment of various networks to cover a common area so long as the tasks and owners of these networks differ. Straying away from this paradigm, our work introduces a framework to enable nodes to support dynamic tasking in a dynamic environment by pushing computation to the edge through FPGA-based reconfigurable nodes with increased processing power. Furthermore, we contend that the sensing apparatus available on the nodes limits the range of applications that such nodes will support. As such, reconfigurability of the nodes can yield the most efficient and responsive hardware implementation of algorithms to support common tasks of applications. The benefits of our approach are highlighted through the introduction of a target-tracking node that is reconfigurable and provides increased response time to stimuli.

  11. Spiking network simulation code for petascale computers

    PubMed Central

    Kunkel, Susanne; Schmidt, Maximilian; Eppler, Jochen M.; Plesser, Hans E.; Masumoto, Gen; Igarashi, Jun; Ishii, Shin; Fukai, Tomoki; Morrison, Abigail; Diesmann, Markus; Helias, Moritz

    2014-01-01

    Brain-scale networks exhibit a breathtaking heterogeneity in the dynamical properties and parameters of their constituents. At cellular resolution, the entities of theory are neurons and synapses and over the past decade researchers have learned to manage the heterogeneity of neurons and synapses with efficient data structures. Already early parallel simulation codes stored synapses in a distributed fashion such that a synapse solely consumes memory on the compute node harboring the target neuron. As petaflop computers with some 100,000 nodes become increasingly available for neuroscience, new challenges arise for neuronal network simulation software: Each neuron contacts on the order of 10,000 other neurons and thus has targets only on a fraction of all compute nodes; furthermore, for any given source neuron, at most a single synapse is typically created on any compute node. From the viewpoint of an individual compute node, the heterogeneity in the synaptic target lists thus collapses along two dimensions: the dimension of the types of synapses and the dimension of the number of synapses of a given type. Here we present a data structure taking advantage of this double collapse using metaprogramming techniques. After introducing the relevant scaling scenario for brain-scale simulations, we quantitatively discuss the performance on two supercomputers. We show that the novel architecture scales to the largest petascale supercomputers available today. PMID:25346682

  12. Fuzzy logic, neural networks, and soft computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zadeh, Lofti A.

    1994-01-01

    The past few years have witnessed a rapid growth of interest in a cluster of modes of modeling and computation which may be described collectively as soft computing. The distinguishing characteristic of soft computing is that its primary aims are to achieve tractability, robustness, low cost, and high MIQ (machine intelligence quotient) through an exploitation of the tolerance for imprecision and uncertainty. Thus, in soft computing what is usually sought is an approximate solution to a precisely formulated problem or, more typically, an approximate solution to an imprecisely formulated problem. A simple case in point is the problem of parking a car. Generally, humans can park a car rather easily because the final position of the car is not specified exactly. If it were specified to within, say, a few millimeters and a fraction of a degree, it would take hours or days of maneuvering and precise measurements of distance and angular position to solve the problem. What this simple example points to is the fact that, in general, high precision carries a high cost. The challenge, then, is to exploit the tolerance for imprecision by devising methods of computation which lead to an acceptable solution at low cost. By its nature, soft computing is much closer to human reasoning than the traditional modes of computation. At this juncture, the major components of soft computing are fuzzy logic (FL), neural network theory (NN), and probabilistic reasoning techniques (PR), including genetic algorithms, chaos theory, and part of learning theory. Increasingly, these techniques are used in combination to achieve significant improvement in performance and adaptability. Among the important application areas for soft computing are control systems, expert systems, data compression techniques, image processing, and decision support systems. It may be argued that it is soft computing, rather than the traditional hard computing, that should be viewed as the foundation for artificial intelligence. In the years ahead, this may well become a widely held position.

  13. Criteria development for upgrading computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Efe, Kemal

    1995-01-01

    Being an infrastructure system, the computer network has a fundamental role in the day to day activities of personnel working at KSC. It is easily appreciated that the lack of 'satisfactory' network performance can have a high 'cost' for KSC. Yet, this seemingly obvious concept is quite difficult to demonstrate. At what point do we say that performance is below the lowest tolerable level? How do we know when the 'cost' of using the system at the current level of degraded performance exceeds the cost of upgrading it? In this research, we consider the cost and performance factors that may have an effect in decision making in regards to upgrading computer networks. Cost factors are detailed in terms of 'direct costs' and 'subjective costs'. Performance factors are examined in terms of 'required performance' and 'offered performance.' Required performance is further examined by presenting a methodology for trend analysis based on applying interpolation methods to observed traffic levels. Offered performance levels are analyzed by deriving simple equations to evaluate network performance. The results are evaluated in the light of recommended upgrade policies currently in use for telephone exchange systems, similarities and differences between the two types of services are discussed.

  14. Spring 2014 Course: Bayesian Networks and Decision Graphs

    E-print Network

    Valtorta, Marco

    Graphs, 2nd edition, Springer, 2007. Diet Region of China Family History Serum Selenium Genotype Keshan to the development of dynamic (time-repeating) Bayesian networks. From an algorithmic perspective, Bayesian networks have proven to be a fertile ground for the use of graph algorithms, non-serial dynamic programming

  15. Curriculum and Course Syllabi for a High-School Program in Computer Science

    E-print Network

    Harel, David

    Curriculum and Course Syllabi for a High-School Program in Computer Science #3; Judith Gal-Ezer y in computer science and has been supervising the preparation of a comprehensive study program based on it the foundations of algorithmics, and teaches programming as a way to get the computer to carry out an algorithm

  16. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a Web-Based Learning Design for Adult Computer Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonis, Konstantinos; Daradoumis, Thanasis; Papadakis, Spyros; Simos, Christos

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on work undertaken within a pilot study concerned with the design, development, and evaluation of online computer science training courses. Drawing on recent developments in e-learning technology, these courses were structured around the principles of a learner-oriented approach for use with adult learners. The paper describes a…

  17. An Educational Environment for Teaching a Course in Computer Architecture and Organization

    E-print Network

    Milenkovi, Aleksandar

    year course in Programming methodology and languages. In them they study, first, the binary arithmetic, the programming methodology, the assembly language and high level programming languages such as Fortran, Pascal1 An Educational Environment for Teaching a Course in Computer Architecture and Organization Jovan

  18. Portraits of PBL: Course Objectives and Students' Study Strategies in Computer Engineering, Psychology and Physiotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahlgren, Madeleine Abrandt

    2000-01-01

    Compares the role of course objectives in relation to students' study strategies in problem-based learning (PBL). Results comprise data from three PBL programs at Linkopings University (Sweden), in physiotherapy, psychology, and computer engineering. Faculty provided course objectives to function as supportive structures and guides for students'…

  19. Learning Computing Topics in Undergraduate Information Systems Courses: Managing Perceived Difficulty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Jeffrey D.; Knapp, Janice

    2014-01-01

    Learning technical computing skills is increasingly important in our technology driven society. However, learning technical skills in information systems (IS) courses can be difficult. More than 20 percent of students in some technical courses may dropout or fail. Unfortunately, little is known about students' perceptions of the difficulty of…

  20. Affective Learning in Online Multimedia and Lecture Versions of an Introductory Computing Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moneta, Giovanni B.; Kekkonen-Moneta, Synnove S.

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated students' affective learning in an introductory computing course that was taught in Hong Kong once in a lecture format and twice in a rich interactive multimedia online format to 414 college students in all. A simplified experience sampling method was used to assess affective learning at the midterm and end of each course in…

  1. Toward a Singleton Undergraduate Computer Graphics Course in Small and Medium-Sized Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shesh, Amit

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the evolution of a single undergraduate computer graphics course over five semesters, driven by a primary question: if one could offer only one undergraduate course in graphics, what would it include? This constraint is relevant to many small and medium-sized colleges that lack resources, adequate expertise, and enrollment…

  2. Educational Impact of Digital Visualization Tools on Digital Character Production Computer Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Langeveld, Mark Christensen

    2009-01-01

    Digital character production courses have traditionally been taught in art departments. The digital character production course at the University of Utah is centered, drawing uniformly from art and engineering disciplines. Its design has evolved to include a synergy of computer science, functional art and human anatomy. It gives students an…

  3. Computational Fact Checking from Knowledge Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ciampaglia, Giovanni Luca; Shiralkar, Prashant; Rocha, Luis M.; Bollen, Johan; Menczer, Filippo; Flammini, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Traditional fact checking by expert journalists cannot keep up with the enormous volume of information that is now generated online. Computational fact checking may significantly enhance our ability to evaluate the veracity of dubious information. Here we show that the complexities of human fact checking can be approximated quite well by finding the shortest path between concept nodes under properly defined semantic proximity metrics on knowledge graphs. Framed as a network problem this approach is feasible with efficient computational techniques. We evaluate this approach by examining tens of thousands of claims related to history, entertainment, geography, and biographical information using a public knowledge graph extracted from Wikipedia. Statements independently known to be true consistently receive higher support via our method than do false ones. These findings represent a significant step toward scalable computational fact-checking methods that may one day mitigate the spread of harmful misinformation. PMID:26083336

  4. Un Cours de composition francaise par ordinateur (A Computer-Based Course in French Composition).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landes, Anne; Kaplan, Alice

    1988-01-01

    The origins, organization, and methods of a Columbia University course offering computer-based instruction in French composition are outlined, and the progress of four individual students is described. (MSE)

  5. A Network Approach to Bipolar Symptomatology in Patients with Different Course Types

    PubMed Central

    Koenders, M. A.; de Kleijn, R.; Giltay, E. J.; Elzinga, B. M.; Spinhoven, P.; Spijker, A. T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The longitudinal mood course is highly variable among patients with bipolar disorder(BD). One of the strongest predictors of the future disease course is the past disease course, implying that the vulnerability for developing a specific pattern of symptoms is rather consistent over time. We therefore investigated whether BD patients with different longitudinal course types have symptom correlation networks with typical characteristics. To this end we used network analysis, a rather novel approach in the field of psychiatry. Method Based on two-year monthly life charts, 125 patients with complete 2 year data were categorized into three groups: i.e., a minimally impaired (n = 47), a predominantly depressed (n = 42) and a cycling course (n = 36). Associations between symptoms were defined as the groupwise Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient between each pair of items of the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) and the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS). Weighted symptom networks and centrality measures were compared among the three groups. Results The weighted networks significantly differed among the three groups, with manic and depressed symptoms being most strongly interconnected in the cycling group. The symptoms with top centrality that were most interconnected also differed among the course group; central symptoms in the stable group were elevated mood and increased speech, in the depressed group loss of self-esteem and psychomotor slowness, and in the cycling group concentration loss and suicidality. Conclusion Symptom networks based on the timepoints with most severe symptoms of bipolar patients with different longitudinal course types are significantly different. The clinical interpretation of this finding and its implications are discussed. PMID:26505477

  6. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Computer Information Systems Technology. Computer Information Systems Technology (Program CIP: 52.1201--Management Information Systems & Business Data). Computer Programming (Program CIP: 52.1201). Network Support (Program CIP: 52.1290--Computer Network Support Technology). Postsecondary Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for two programs in the state's postsecondary-level computer information systems technology cluster: computer programming and network support. Presented in the introduction are program descriptions and suggested course

  7. Guide to sharing personal computer resources via local area networks

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, L.

    1986-03-01

    This Guide is for professional staff who commonly need computing tools on personal computers, minicomputers, mainframe computers, and supercomputers. It provides information and recommendations about personal computer local area networks in the context of the larger scheme of computing tools and services at the Laboratory. The material presented here is for the person considering installation of a personal computer local area network. Chapter 1 introduces the reader to the concept of personal computer local area networks and provides background material on networking. Chapter 2 summarizes Computing Services' evaluation of personal computer local area networking in general terms. Chapter 3 describes the technical and functional details of Computing Services' Personal Computer Local Area Network Evaluation and Demonstration Project. Chapters 4 and 5 are for individuals who are familiar with personal computing and who will be responsible for establishing a local area network. Chapter 4 covers technical issues relating to the prototype network installation in Building 221. Chapter 5 warns potential users what to expect when establishing a local area network. 7 figs., 9 tabs.

  8. A programming course in bioinformatics for computer and information science students.

    PubMed

    Altman, R B; Koza, J

    1996-01-01

    We have created a course entitled "Representations and Algorithms for Computational Molecular Biology" with three specific goals in mind. First, we want to provide a technical introduction for computer science and medical information science students to the challenges of computing with molecular biology data, particularly the advantages of having easy access to real-world data sets. Second, we want to equip the students with the skills required of productive research assistants in molecular biology computing research projects. Finally, we want to provide a showcase for local investigators to describe their work in the context of a course that provide adequate background information. In order to achieve these goals, we have created a programming course, in which three major projects and six smaller assignments are assigned during the quarter. We stress fundamental representations and algorithms during the first part of the course in lectures given by the core faculty, and then have more focused lectures in which faculty research interests are highlighted. The course stressed issues of structural molecular biology, in order to better motivate the critical issues in sequence analysis. The culmination of the course was a challenge to the students to use a version of protein threading to predict which members of a set of unknown sequences were globins. The course was well received, and has been made a core requirement in the Medical Information Sciences program. PMID:9390224

  9. An Investigation of Student Practices in Asynchronous Computer Conferencing Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Vanessa L.; Hewitt, Jim

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the online practices of students enrolled in graduate-level distance education courses. Using interviews and a questionnaire as data sources, the study sought to: (a) identify common practices that students adopt in asynchronous discussions, and (b) gain an understanding of why students adopt them. An analysis of the data…

  10. CIS 4398 Project in Computer Science Course: CIS 4389

    E-print Network

    Wolfgang, Paul

    Time: WF 2:00 ­ 3:20 M 2:00 ­ 3:50 Place: WF TL305A (class) W CC200 (lab) Instructor: Paul Wolfgang:50 Course Web Page: www.cis.temple.edu/~wolfgang Prerequisites: C- or better in: CIS 3238 Software Design

  11. Computer Science Pre-Professional Courses Degree Plan for Bachelor of Science Degree in Computer Science 2005

    E-print Network

    Huang, Haiying

    Computer Science Pre-Professional Courses Degree Plan for Bachelor of Science Degree in Computer Science 2005 Sophomore 1st Semester 16hrs Sophomore 2nd Semester 15hrs Freshman 2nd Semester 17hrs ENGL 1302 Composition II POLS 2311 US Government MATH 2425 Calculus II CSE 2340 Introduction to Digital

  12. Computer Science Pre-Professional Courses Degree Plan for Bachelor of Science Degree in Computer Science 2006

    E-print Network

    Huang, Haiying

    Computer Science Pre-Professional Courses Degree Plan for Bachelor of Science Degree in Computer Science 2006 Sophomore 1st Semester 16hrs Sophomore 2nd Semester 15hrs Freshman 2nd Semester 17hrs/C++) ENGL 1302 Composition II POLS 2311 US Government MATH 2425 Calculus II CSE 2340 Introduction to Digital

  13. Social Studies: Application Units. Course II, Teachers. Computer-Oriented Curriculum. REACT (Relevant Educational Applications of Computer Technology).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tecnica Education Corp., San Carlos, CA.

    This book is one of a series in Course II of the Relevant Educational Applications of Computer Technology (REACT) Project. It is designed to point out to teachers two of the major applications of computers in the social sciences: simulation and data analysis. The first section contains a variety of simulation units organized under the following…

  14. Some queuing network models of computer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herndon, E. S.

    1980-01-01

    Queuing network models of a computer system operating with a single workload type are presented. Program algorithms are adapted for use on the Texas Instruments SR-52 programmable calculator. By slightly altering the algorithm to process the G and H matrices row by row instead of column by column, six devices and an unlimited job/terminal population could be handled on the SR-52. Techniques are also introduced for handling a simple load dependent server and for studying interactive systems with fixed multiprogramming limits.

  15. Mobile Computing and Ubiquitous Networking: Concepts, Technologies and Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierre, Samuel

    2001-01-01

    Analyzes concepts, technologies and challenges related to mobile computing and networking. Defines basic concepts of cellular systems. Describes the evolution of wireless technologies that constitute the foundations of mobile computing and ubiquitous networking. Presents characterization and issues of mobile computing. Analyzes economical and…

  16. Computer and Network Security Original Implementation: January 24, 1995

    E-print Network

    Hung, I-Kuai

    Computer and Network Security Original Implementation: January 24, 1995 Last Revision: November 2, 2015 This policy establishes the conditions and security requirements for the use of computing equipment and networks at Stephen F. Austin State University (SFA). Computing equipment includes desktops

  17. Causal Attributions of Success and Failure Made by Undergraduate Students in an Introductory-Level Computer Programming Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawi, N.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to identify the causal attributions of business computing students in an introductory computer programming course, in the computer science department at Notre Dame University, Louaize. Forty-five male and female undergraduates who completed the computer programming course that extended for a 13-week semester…

  18. Computational Neuropsychiatry - Schizophrenia as a Cognitive Brain Network Disorder

    E-print Network

    Dauvermann, Maria R.

    Computational modeling of functional brain networks in fMRI data has advanced the understanding of higher cognitive function. It is hypothesized that functional networks mediating higher cognitive processes are disrupted ...

  19. Network coding for distributed quantum computation over cluster and butterfly networks

    E-print Network

    Seiseki Akibue; Mio Murao

    2015-03-26

    To apply network coding for quantum computation, we study the distributed implementation of unitary operations over all separated input and output nodes of quantum networks. We consider a setting of networks where quantum communication between nodes is restricted to sending just a qubit, but classical communication is unrestricted. We analyze which N-qubit unitary operations are implementable over cluster networks by investigating transformations of a given cluster network into quantum circuits. We show that any two-qubit unitary operation is implementable over the butterfly network and the grail network, which are fundamental primitive networks for classical network coding. We also analyze probabilistic implementations of unitary operations over cluster networks.

  20. Normalizing Social Networking in a Beginners' Japanese Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morofushi, Mari; Pasfield-Neofitou, Sarah Ellen

    2014-01-01

    With the spread of the Internet, students now have greater opportunities to use Japanese outside of the classroom. For example, they can interact with other Japanese speakers through instant messaging or social networking, or utilize online dictionaries and translation tools to decipher websites in ways that would be impossible with traditional…

  1. Improving Computing Courses from the Points of View of Students and Teachers: A Review and an Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampaio, Alberto; Sampaio, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    The improvement of computing courses is a permanent need and is a goal established by any teacher. Suggestions of possible course improvements should be made by teachers and students. Computer project-based courses involving a significant number of people pose difficulties to listening to all their opinions. The purpose of our research is twofold:…

  2. Visualization techniques for computer network defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaver, Justin M.; Steed, Chad A.; Patton, Robert M.; Cui, Xiaohui; Schultz, Matthew

    2011-06-01

    Effective visual analysis of computer network defense (CND) information is challenging due to the volume and complexity of both the raw and analyzed network data. A typical CND is comprised of multiple niche intrusion detection tools, each of which performs network data analysis and produces a unique alerting output. The state-of-the-practice in the situational awareness of CND data is the prevalent use of custom-developed scripts by Information Technology (IT) professionals to retrieve, organize, and understand potential threat events. We propose a new visual analytics framework, called the Oak Ridge Cyber Analytics (ORCA) system, for CND data that allows an operator to interact with all detection tool outputs simultaneously. Aggregated alert events are presented in multiple coordinated views with timeline, cluster, and swarm model analysis displays. These displays are complemented with both supervised and semi-supervised machine learning classifiers. The intent of the visual analytics framework is to improve CND situational awareness, to enable an analyst to quickly navigate and analyze thousands of detected events, and to combine sophisticated data analysis techniques with interactive visualization such that patterns of anomalous activities may be more easily identified and investigated.

  3. Visualization Techniques for Computer Network Defense

    SciTech Connect

    Beaver, Justin M; Steed, Chad A; Patton, Robert M; Cui, Xiaohui; Schultz, Matthew A

    2011-01-01

    Effective visual analysis of computer network defense (CND) information is challenging due to the volume and complexity of both the raw and analyzed network data. A typical CND is comprised of multiple niche intrusion detection tools, each of which performs network data analysis and produces a unique alerting output. The state-of-the-practice in the situational awareness of CND data is the prevalent use of custom-developed scripts by Information Technology (IT) professionals to retrieve, organize, and understand potential threat events. We propose a new visual analytics framework, called the Oak Ridge Cyber Analytics (ORCA) system, for CND data that allows an operator to interact with all detection tool outputs simultaneously. Aggregated alert events are presented in multiple coordinated views with timeline, cluster, and swarm model analysis displays. These displays are complemented with both supervised and semi-supervised machine learning classifiers. The intent of the visual analytics framework is to improve CND situational awareness, to enable an analyst to quickly navigate and analyze thousands of detected events, and to combine sophisticated data analysis techniques with interactive visualization such that patterns of anomalous activities may be more easily identified and investigated.

  4. A complex network approach to cloud computing

    E-print Network

    Travieso, Gonzalo; Bruno, Odemir Martinez; Costa, Luciano da Fontoura

    2015-01-01

    Cloud computing has become an important means to speed up computing. One problem influencing heavily the performance of such systems is the choice of nodes as servers responsible for executing the users' tasks. In this article we report how complex networks can be used to model such a problem. More specifically, we investigate the performance of the processing respectively to cloud systems underlain by Erdos-Renyi and Barabasi-Albert topology containing two servers. Cloud networks involving two communities not necessarily of the same size are also considered in our analysis. The performance of each configuration is quantified in terms of two indices: the cost of communication between the user and the nearest server, and the balance of the distribution of tasks between the two servers. Regarding the latter index, the ER topology provides better performance than the BA case for smaller average degrees and opposite behavior for larger average degrees. With respect to the cost, smaller values are found in the BA ...

  5. Quantum computation over the butterfly network

    E-print Network

    Akihito Soeda; Yoshiyuki Kinjo; Peter S. Turner; Mio Murao

    2011-07-14

    In order to investigate distributed quantum computation under restricted network resources, we introduce a quantum computation task over the butterfly network where both quantum and classical communications are limited. We consider deterministically performing a two-qubit global unitary operation on two unknown inputs given at different nodes, with outputs at two distinct nodes. By using a particular resource setting introduced by M. Hayashi [Phys. Rev. A \\textbf{76}, 040301(R) (2007)], which is capable of performing a swap operation by adding two maximally entangled qubits (ebits) between the two input nodes, we show that unitary operations can be performed without adding any entanglement resource, if and only if the unitary operations are locally unitary equivalent to controlled unitary operations. Our protocol is optimal in the sense that the unitary operations cannot be implemented if we relax the specifications of any of the channels. We also construct protocols for performing controlled traceless unitary operations with a 1-ebit resource and for performing global Clifford operations with a 2-ebit resource.

  6. Quantum computation over the butterfly network

    SciTech Connect

    Soeda, Akihito; Kinjo, Yoshiyuki; Turner, Peter S.; Murao, Mio

    2011-07-15

    In order to investigate distributed quantum computation under restricted network resources, we introduce a quantum computation task over the butterfly network where both quantum and classical communications are limited. We consider deterministically performing a two-qubit global unitary operation on two unknown inputs given at different nodes, with outputs at two distinct nodes. By using a particular resource setting introduced by M. Hayashi [Phys. Rev. A 76, 040301(R) (2007)], which is capable of performing a swap operation by adding two maximally entangled qubits (ebits) between the two input nodes, we show that unitary operations can be performed without adding any entanglement resource, if and only if the unitary operations are locally unitary equivalent to controlled unitary operations. Our protocol is optimal in the sense that the unitary operations cannot be implemented if we relax the specifications of any of the channels. We also construct protocols for performing controlled traceless unitary operations with a 1-ebit resource and for performing global Clifford operations with a 2-ebit resource.

  7. Computer, Video, and Rapid-Cycling Plant Projects in an Undergraduate Plant Breeding Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaels, T. E.

    1993-01-01

    Studies the perceived effectiveness of four student projects involving videotape production, computer conferencing, microcomputer simulation, and rapid-cycling Brassica breeding for undergraduate plant breeding students in two course offerings in consecutive years. Linking of the computer conferencing and video projects improved the rating of the…

  8. 63 2012-13SuggestedCoursePlan COMPUTER SCIENCE (GAMES)

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Chongwu

    Graphics CSCI 486: Serious Game Development CSCI 491AL: Final Game Project CSCI 491BL: Final Game Project63 2012-13SuggestedCoursePlan COMPUTER SCIENCE (GAMES) FIRST YEAR FALL: 16 units SPRING: 18 units & INTERACT. MEDIA (10 UNITS) CTAN 452: Intro to Computer Animation CTIN 488: Game Design Workshop CTIN 489

  9. Design and Delivery of Multiple Server-Side Computer Languages Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shouhong; Wang, Hai

    2011-01-01

    Given the emergence of service-oriented architecture, IS students need to be knowledgeable of multiple server-side computer programming languages to be able to meet the needs of the job market. This paper outlines the pedagogy of an innovative course of multiple server-side computer languages for the undergraduate IS majors. The paper discusses…

  10. Capstone Course: Wireless Sensor Networks Experiment for WCC: Channel and Antenna Characterization

    E-print Network

    muse Capstone Course: Wireless Sensor Networks Experiment for WCC: Channel and Antenna running, and modify it to produce more useful restuls. 5. Explore the characteristics of wireless running Windows (XP or Vista) · TI eZ430-RF2500 MSP430 Wireless Development Tool · TI's CCS integrated

  11. Life-Course Events, Social Networks, and the Emergence of Violence among Female Gang Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleisher, Mark S.; Krienert, Jessie L.

    2004-01-01

    Using data gathered from a multi-year field study, this article identifies specific life-course events shared by gang-affiliated women. Gangs emerge as a cultural adaptation or pro-social community response to poverty and racial isolation. Through the use of a social-network approach, data show that violence dramatically increases in the period…

  12. Design of a Competitive and Collaborative Learning Strategy in a Communication Networks Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regueras, L. M.; Verdu, E.; Verdu, M. J.; de Castro, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, an educational methodology based on collaborative and competitive learning is proposed. The suggested approach has been successfully applied to an undergraduate communication networks course, which is part of the core curriculum of the three-year degree in telecommunications engineering at the University of Valladolid in Spain. This…

  13. Culture, Role and Group Work: A Social Network Analysis Perspective on an Online Collaborative Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stepanyan, Karen; Mather, Richard; Dalrymple, Roger

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the patterns of network dynamics within a multicultural online collaborative learning environment. It analyses the interaction of participants (both students and facilitators) within a discussion board that was established as part of a 3-month online collaborative course. The study employs longitudinal probabilistic social…

  14. Integrating Computer-Mediated Communication into an EAP Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Xiao; Cao, Ru-hua

    2006-01-01

    The development of the computer along with the widespread use of the Internet has rapidly promoted Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) as a very important communication media, which can be used widely and effectively in foreign language teaching and learning. This essay tries to explore the advantages of CMC as well as its proposed application,…

  15. Learning Motivation in E-Learning Facilitated Computer Programming Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, Kris M. Y.; Lee, Victor C. S.; Yu, Y. T.

    2010-01-01

    Computer programming skills constitute one of the core competencies that graduates from many disciplines, such as engineering and computer science, are expected to possess. Developing good programming skills typically requires students to do a lot of practice, which cannot sustain unless they are adequately motivated. This paper reports a…

  16. Distributed Computer Networks in Support of Complex Group Practices

    PubMed Central

    Wess, Bernard P.

    1978-01-01

    The economics of medical computer networks are presented in context with the patient care and administrative goals of medical networks. Design alternatives and network topologies are discussed with an emphasis on medical network design requirements in distributed data base design, telecommunications, satellite systems, and software engineering. The success of the medical computer networking technology is predicated on the ability of medical and data processing professionals to design comprehensive, efficient, and virtually impenetrable security systems to protect data bases, network access and services, and patient confidentiality.

  17. Communications Training Courses Across the Leopold Leadership Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayden, T.; Gerber, L. R.; Silver, W. L.

    2012-12-01

    For nearly fifteen years, the Leopold Leadership Program has provided science communication training and support to mid-career academic environmental researchers from across North America. There has been an emphasis throughout on effective communication to non-scientific audiences. Increasingly, Leopold fellows have been developing communications courses for their own students, responding to the need for future scientists to be able to communicate well with the public, the media, policy makers and other audiences. At a June 2012 reunion meeting, a group of past fellows and communications trainers conducted a curriculum exchange, sharing experiences and ideas for successful inclusion of communications training in environmental science curricula. This presentation will present case studies from several institutions, including the use of podcasting, web columns, social media, in-person presentation and other presentation styles for connecting general audiences. We will share best practices, challenges and recommendations for curriculum development and institutional acceptance.

  18. Network-Aware Partitioning of Computation in Diamond

    E-print Network

    Network-Aware Partitioning of Computation in Diamond Alex Nizhner1 Larry Huston2 Peter Steenkiste Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Abstract The Diamond storage architecture enables efficient interactive search efficient use of resources under dynamic conditions, Diamond adaptively partitions computation among

  19. Network Computer Technology. Phase I: Viability and Promise within NASA's Desktop Computing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paluzzi, Peter; Miller, Rosalind; Kurihara, West; Eskey, Megan

    1998-01-01

    Over the past several months, major industry vendors have made a business case for the network computer as a win-win solution toward lowering total cost of ownership. This report provides results from Phase I of the Ames Research Center network computer evaluation project. It identifies factors to be considered for determining cost of ownership; further, it examines where, when, and how network computer technology might fit in NASA's desktop computing architecture.

  20. Network Patch Cables Demystified: A Super Activity for Computer Networking Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Douglas L.

    2004-01-01

    This article de-mystifies network patch cable secrets so that people can connect their computers and transfer those pesky files--without screaming at the cables. It describes a network cabling activity that can offer students a great hands-on opportunity for working with the tools, techniques, and media used in computer networking. Since the…

  1. A Quasi-Experimental Study of Three Online Learning Courses in Computing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connolly, Thomas M.; MacArthur, Ewan; Stansfield, Mark; McLellan, Evelyn

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a 3-year quasi-experimental study of three Masters courses in computing. The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which the teaching and learning of these courses were enhanced by being developed and delivered in an online format as compared to face-to-face full-time and part-time delivery. Key…

  2. Efficiently modeling neural networks on massively parallel computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farber, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    Neural networks are a very useful tool for analyzing and modeling complex real world systems. Applying neural network simulations to real world problems generally involves large amounts of data and massive amounts of computation. To efficiently handle the computational requirements of large problems, we have implemented at Los Alamos a highly efficient neural network compiler for serial computers, vector computers, vector parallel computers, and fine grain SIMD computers such as the CM-2 connection machine. This paper describes the mapping used by the compiler to implement feed-forward backpropagation neural networks for a SIMD (Single Instruction Multiple Data) architecture parallel computer. Thinking Machines Corporation has benchmarked our code at 1.3 billion interconnects per second (approximately 3 gigaflops) on a 64,000 processor CM-2 connection machine (Singer 1990). This mapping is applicable to other SIMD computers and can be implemented on MIMD computers such as the CM-5 connection machine. Our mapping has virtually no communications overhead with the exception of the communications required for a global summation across the processors (which has a sub-linear runtime growth on the order of O(log(number of processors)). We can efficiently model very large neural networks which have many neurons and interconnects and our mapping can extend to arbitrarily large networks (within memory limitations) by merging the memory space of separate processors with fast adjacent processor interprocessor communications. This paper will consider the simulation of only feed forward neural network although this method is extendable to recurrent networks.

  3. A topology for computer networks with good survivability characteristics and low transmission delays between node computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, G. L.; Jiang, D. P.

    1984-01-01

    Various network topologies are developed which have not appeared in the literature before which result in minimum diameter graphs for computer networks having connectivity four. The topologies presented have good survivability characteristics and result in more topologies being available for computer network designers which achieve the minimum diameter resulting in small transmission delays.

  4. Artificial neural networks: fundamentals, computing, design, and application.

    PubMed

    Basheer, I A; Hajmeer, M

    2000-12-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) are relatively new computational tools that have found extensive utilization in solving many complex real-world problems. The attractiveness of ANNs comes from their remarkable information processing characteristics pertinent mainly to nonlinearity, high parallelism, fault and noise tolerance, and learning and generalization capabilities. This paper aims to familiarize the reader with ANN-based computing (neurocomputing) and to serve as a useful companion practical guide and toolkit for the ANNs modeler along the course of ANN project development. The history of the evolution of neurocomputing and its relation to the field of neurobiology is briefly discussed. ANNs are compared to both expert systems and statistical regression and their advantages and limitations are outlined. A bird's eye review of the various types of ANNs and the related learning rules is presented, with special emphasis on backpropagation (BP) ANNs theory and design. A generalized methodology for developing successful ANNs projects from conceptualization, to design, to implementation, is described. The most common problems that BPANNs developers face during training are summarized in conjunction with possible causes and remedies. Finally, as a practical application, BPANNs were used to model the microbial growth curves of S. flexneri. The developed model was reasonably accurate in simulating both training and test time-dependent growth curves as affected by temperature and pH. PMID:11084225

  5. Compute and Storage Clouds Using Wide Area High Performance Networks

    E-print Network

    Grossman, Robert

    Compute and Storage Clouds Using Wide Area High Performance Networks Robert L. Grossman Yunhong Gu. The infrastructure consists of a storage cloud called Sector and a compute cloud called Sphere. We describe two (record- based, column-based or object-based services); and a compute cloud provides computational

  6. Mobile Cloud Networking: Mobile Network, Compute, and Storage as One Service

    E-print Network

    Braun, Torsten

    Mobile Cloud Networking: Mobile Network, Compute, and Storage as One Service On-Demand Almerima-based mobile communication and application platform. 1 Introduction Today's Cloud Computing is confided to data centres and one of the weakest points of the established Cloud Computing value proposition is that it does

  7. Neural Networks for Breast Cancer Diagnosis School of Computer Science

    E-print Network

    Yao, Xin

    Neural Networks for Breast Cancer Diagnosis Xin Yao School of Computer Science The University neural network based approaches to breast cancer diag- nosis, both of which have displayed good general- isation. The first approach is based on evolution- ary artificial neural networks. In this approach

  8. SNAP: A computer program for generating symbolic network functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, P. M.; Alderson, G. E.

    1970-01-01

    The computer program SNAP (symbolic network analysis program) generates symbolic network functions for networks containing R, L, and C type elements and all four types of controlled sources. The program is efficient with respect to program storage and execution time. A discussion of the basic algorithms is presented, together with user's and programmer's guides.

  9. Mapping Hypercube Computations onto Partitioned Optical Passive Star Networks

    E-print Network

    Mei, Alessandro

    . The number of couplers used is g2 . Such an architecture will be denoted by POPS(d, g). The POPS networkMapping Hypercube Computations onto Partitioned Optical Passive Star Networks Alessandro Mei Op- tical Passive Stars (POPS) network with g groups and d processors per group can simulate either

  10. A Computational Model of Mitigating Disease Spread in Spatial Networks

    E-print Network

    Buffalo, State University of New York

    A Computational Model of Mitigating Disease Spread in Spatial Networks Taehyong Kim1 , Kang Li1 consider the problem of disease spreading and containment in spatial networks, where our computational model is capable of detecting disease progression to initiate processes mitigating infection

  11. Computer-Based Semantic Network in Molecular Biology: A Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callman, Joshua L.; And Others

    This paper analyzes the hardware and software features that would be desirable in a computer-based semantic network system for representing biology knowledge. It then describes in detail a prototype network of molecular biology knowledge that has been developed using Filevision software and a Macintosh computer. The prototype contains about 100…

  12. Computer Literacy Course for Teacher for the 21st Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatkovic, Nevenka; Ruzic, Maja

    2004-01-01

    The life and activities of every man in the transitional period from the second to the third millennium has been characterized by huge changes that resulted from scientific and technological revolution in which dominates a highly developed IT-Communicational Technology. This paper concludes that to attain IT-literacy and computer literacy would…

  13. Computing the Local Field Potential (LFP) from Integrate-and-Fire Network Models.

    PubMed

    Mazzoni, Alberto; Lindén, Henrik; Cuntz, Hermann; Lansner, Anders; Panzeri, Stefano; Einevoll, Gaute T

    2015-12-01

    Leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) network models are commonly used to study how the spiking dynamics of neural networks changes with stimuli, tasks or dynamic network states. However, neurophysiological studies in vivo often rather measure the mass activity of neuronal microcircuits with the local field potential (LFP). Given that LFPs are generated by spatially separated currents across the neuronal membrane, they cannot be computed directly from quantities defined in models of point-like LIF neurons. Here, we explore the best approximation for predicting the LFP based on standard output from point-neuron LIF networks. To search for this best "LFP proxy", we compared LFP predictions from candidate proxies based on LIF network output (e.g, firing rates, membrane potentials, synaptic currents) with "ground-truth" LFP obtained when the LIF network synaptic input currents were injected into an analogous three-dimensional (3D) network model of multi-compartmental neurons with realistic morphology, spatial distributions of somata and synapses. We found that a specific fixed linear combination of the LIF synaptic currents provided an accurate LFP proxy, accounting for most of the variance of the LFP time course observed in the 3D network for all recording locations. This proxy performed well over a broad set of conditions, including substantial variations of the neuronal morphologies. Our results provide a simple formula for estimating the time course of the LFP from LIF network simulations in cases where a single pyramidal population dominates the LFP generation, and thereby facilitate quantitative comparison between computational models and experimental LFP recordings in vivo. PMID:26657024

  14. Computing the Local Field Potential (LFP) from Integrate-and-Fire Network Models

    PubMed Central

    Cuntz, Hermann; Lansner, Anders; Panzeri, Stefano; Einevoll, Gaute T.

    2015-01-01

    Leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) network models are commonly used to study how the spiking dynamics of neural networks changes with stimuli, tasks or dynamic network states. However, neurophysiological studies in vivo often rather measure the mass activity of neuronal microcircuits with the local field potential (LFP). Given that LFPs are generated by spatially separated currents across the neuronal membrane, they cannot be computed directly from quantities defined in models of point-like LIF neurons. Here, we explore the best approximation for predicting the LFP based on standard output from point-neuron LIF networks. To search for this best “LFP proxy”, we compared LFP predictions from candidate proxies based on LIF network output (e.g, firing rates, membrane potentials, synaptic currents) with “ground-truth” LFP obtained when the LIF network synaptic input currents were injected into an analogous three-dimensional (3D) network model of multi-compartmental neurons with realistic morphology, spatial distributions of somata and synapses. We found that a specific fixed linear combination of the LIF synaptic currents provided an accurate LFP proxy, accounting for most of the variance of the LFP time course observed in the 3D network for all recording locations. This proxy performed well over a broad set of conditions, including substantial variations of the neuronal morphologies. Our results provide a simple formula for estimating the time course of the LFP from LIF network simulations in cases where a single pyramidal population dominates the LFP generation, and thereby facilitate quantitative comparison between computational models and experimental LFP recordings in vivo. PMID:26657024

  15. Measuring Computer Science Knowledge Level of Hungarian Students Specialized in Informatics with Romanian Students Attending a Science Course or a Mathematics-Informatics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiss, Gabor

    2012-01-01

    An analysis of Information Technology knowledge of Hungarian and Romanian students was made with the help of a self developed web based Informatics Test. The goal of this research is an analysis of the Computer Science knowledge level of Hungarian and Romanian students attending a Science course or a Mathematics-Informatics course. Analysed was…

  16. Theory VI. Computational Materials Sciences Network (CMSN)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z Y

    2008-06-25

    The Computational Materials Sciences Network (CMSN) is a virtual center consisting of scientists interested in working together, across organizational and disciplinary boundaries, to formulate and pursue projects that reflect challenging and relevant computational research in the materials sciences. The projects appropriate for this center involve those problems best pursued through broad cooperative efforts, rather than those key problems best tackled by single investigator groups. CMSN operates similarly to the DOE Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials, coordinated by George Samara at Sandia. As in the Synthesis and Processing Center, the intent of the modest funding for CMSN is to foster partnering and collective activities. All CMSN proposals undergo external peer review and are judged foremost on the quality and timeliness of the science and also on criteria relevant to the objective of the center, especially concerning a strategy for partnering. More details about CMSN can be found on the CMSN webpages at: http://cmpweb.ameslab.gov/ccms/CMSN-homepage.html.

  17. 10 CFR 73.54 - Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...computer and communication systems and networks. 73.54 Section 73.54 Energy...computer and communication systems and networks. By November 23, 2009 each...computer and communication systems and networks are adequately protected against...

  18. 10 CFR 73.54 - Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...computer and communication systems and networks. 73.54 Section 73.54 Energy...computer and communication systems and networks. By November 23, 2009 each...computer and communication systems and networks are adequately protected against...

  19. Syntactic Computations in the Language Network: Characterizing Dynamic Network Properties Using Representational Similarity Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Lorraine K.; Cheung, Teresa P. L.; Devereux, Barry J.; Clarke, Alex

    2013-01-01

    The core human capacity of syntactic analysis involves a left hemisphere network involving left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) and posterior middle temporal gyrus (LMTG) and the anatomical connections between them. Here we use magnetoencephalography (MEG) to determine the spatio-temporal properties of syntactic computations in this network. Listeners heard spoken sentences containing a local syntactic ambiguity (e.g., “… landing planes …”), at the offset of which they heard a disambiguating verb and decided whether it was an acceptable/unacceptable continuation of the sentence. We charted the time-course of processing and resolving syntactic ambiguity by measuring MEG responses from the onset of each word in the ambiguous phrase and the disambiguating word. We used representational similarity analysis (RSA) to characterize syntactic information represented in the LIFG and left posterior middle temporal gyrus (LpMTG) over time and to investigate their relationship to each other. Testing a variety of lexico-syntactic and ambiguity models against the MEG data, our results suggest early lexico-syntactic responses in the LpMTG and later effects of ambiguity in the LIFG, pointing to a clear differentiation in the functional roles of these two regions. Our results suggest the LpMTG represents and transmits lexical information to the LIFG, which responds to and resolves the ambiguity. PMID:23730293

  20. Examining the Impact of Teacher-Generated Feedback in Online Math Courses Where Computer-Assisted Instruction Is Embedded

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoey, Rebecca Simon

    2012-01-01

    Teacher feedback and interaction are factors of success and satisfaction in online courses, but courses designed for computer-assisted instruction (CAI) require less communication between a teacher and student. The goal of this research was to examine the impact of teachers' feedback in online self-paced secondary math courses where CAI was…

  1. A Senior-level Computer Hardware Organization Course: Designing a Single Board Computer

    E-print Network

    Conrad, James M.

    their design decisions and describing their experiences with the design and simulation process. Prerequisite microprocessor organization course. Textbook and Lab Manuals Since this course uses the Motorola 68000 as a base needed. These books are: · Microprocessor Systems Design: 68000 Hardware, Software, and Interfacing, Alan

  2. The MORPG-Based Learning System for Multiple Courses: A Case Study on Computer Science Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Kuo-Yu

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at developing a Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game-based (MORPG) Learning system which enabled instructors to construct a game scenario and manage sharable and reusable learning content for multiple courses. It used the curriculum of "Introduction to Computer Science" as a study case to assess students' learning…

  3. Multimedia Instructional Tools' Impact on Student Motivation and Learning Strategies in Computer Applications Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Debra; Wang, Shuyan

    2015-01-01

    Multimedia instructional tools (MMIT) have been identified as a way effectively and economically present instructional material. MMITs are commonly used in introductory computer applications courses as MMITs should be effective in increasing student knowledge and positively impact motivation and learning strategies, without increasing costs. This…

  4. A Study on the Methods of Assessment and Strategy of Knowledge Sharing in Computer Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Pat P. W.

    2014-01-01

    With the advancement of information and communication technology, collaboration and knowledge sharing through technology is facilitated which enhances the learning process and improves the learning efficiency. The purpose of this paper is to review the methods of assessment and strategy of collaboration and knowledge sharing in a computer course,…

  5. Integration of Major Computer Program Packages into Experimental Courses: A Freshman Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipschitz, Irving

    1981-01-01

    Describes the use of the Gaussian 70 computer programs to carry out quantum chemical calculations, including single calculations, geometry, optimization, and potential surface scans. Includes a summary of student activities and benefits for students in an honors freshman chemistry course. (SK)

  6. Math 484: Mathematical & Computational Modeling Course Information and Syllabus Spring 2013

    E-print Network

    problems that arise in industry, government, science and engineering. 1. Main objective is to teach mathMath 484: Mathematical & Computational Modeling Course Information and Syllabus ­ Spring 2013 students how to build mathematical models to physical problems. 2. Be able to solve modeling problems

  7. Math 484: Mathematical & Computational Modeling Course Information and Syllabus Spring 2012

    E-print Network

    problems that arise in industry, government, science and engineering. 1. Main objective is to teach mathMath 484: Mathematical & Computational Modeling Course Information and Syllabus ­ Spring 2012 students how to build mathematical models to physical problems. 2. Be able to solve modeling problems

  8. Enhancing Learning in Introductory Computer Science Courses through SCALE: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verginis, I.; Gogoulou, A.; Gouli, E.; Boubouka, M.; Grigoriadou, M.

    2011-01-01

    The work presented in this paper aims to support and promote the learning process in introductory computer science courses through the Web-based, adaptive, activity-oriented learning environment known as Supporting Collaboration and Adaptation in a Learning Environment (SCALE). The environment engages students actively in the learning process and…

  9. Introducing Creativity in a Design Laboratory for a Freshman Level Electrical and Computer Engineering Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkett, Susan L.; Kotru, Sushma; Lusth, John C.; McCallum, Debra; Dunlap, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Dunlap, The University of Alabama, USA ABSTRACT In the electrical and computer engineering (ECE) curriculum at The University of Alabama, freshmen are introduced to fundamental electrical concepts and units, DC circuit analysis techniques, operational amplifiers, circuit simulation, design, and professional ethics. The two credit course has both…

  10. Computer/ Technology Skills Standard Course of Study and Grade Level Competencies, 6-8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The Computer/Technology Skills Standard Course of Study describes the progressive development of knowledge and skills in six strands: Societal and Ethical Issues, Database, Spreadsheet Keyboard Utilization/Word Processing/Desktop Publishing, Multimedia/Presentation, and Telecommunications/Internet. In the primary grades, the objectives focus on…

  11. Computer/Technology Skills: Standard Course of Study and Grade Level Competencies 3-5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The "Computer/Technology Skills Standard Course of Study" describes the progressive development of knowledge and skills in six strands: Societal and Ethical Issues, Database, Spreadsheet Keyboard Utilization/Word Processing/Desktop Publishing, Multimedia/Presentation, and Telecommunications/Internet. In the primary grades, the objectives focus on…

  12. Developing and Validating Test Items for First-Year Computer Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vahrenhold, Jan; Paul, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    We report on the development, validation, and implementation of a collection of test items designed to detect misconceptions related to first-year computer science courses. To this end, we reworked the development scheme proposed by Almstrum et al. ("SIGCSE Bulletin" 38(4):132-145, 2006) to include students' artifacts and to…

  13. Success in Institutionalizing Basic Computer Skills Courses at a Community College Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodge, Lucy

    This article outlines the development of basic computer literacy skills courses under the auspices of the Title III Grant awarded to San Jose City College (SJCC) of San Jose, California by the United States Department of Education (Grant no. PO31A980093, Strengthening Institutions, 1998-2003). The grant has been in effect for 3 years, and grant…

  14. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering 1. Course number and name

    E-print Network

    Haimovich, Alexander

    transmission line parameters, system modeling, economic operations of power systems, load flow studies, short. Power flow analysis. #12;g. Economic operation of power systems h. Balanced and unbalanced faultsDepartment of Electrical and Computer Engineering 1. Course number and name ECE 442 ­ Power Systems

  15. A Treatment of Computational Precision, Number Representation, and Large Integers in an Introductory Fortran Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, William H., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Computational precision is sometimes given short shrift in a first programming course. Treating this topic requires discussing integer and floating-point number representations and inaccuracies that may result from their use. An example of a moderately simple programming problem from elementary statistics was examined. It forced students to…

  16. An Assessment of the "Diploma in Computer Engineering" Course in the Technical Education System in Nepal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basnet, Kul Bahadur; Kim, Jinsoo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the Diploma in Computer Engineering (DCE) courses offered at affiliated schools of the Council for Technical Education and Vocational Training (CTEVT) with a focus on the goals of the curriculum and employment opportunities. Document analysis, questionnaires, focus group discussions and semi-structured…

  17. Effects of a Hypertext Computer Program on Academic Performance in a Special Education Course for Nonmajors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojewski, Jay W.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    No significant differences in academic achievement or problem-solving ability were found when 212 undergraduate and graduate students in an introductory special education course received class lecture alone or class lecture and either a hypertext-based instructional program or a linear drill-practice computer-assisted instructional program.…

  18. Teaching Web Application Development: A Case Study in a Computer Science Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Fabro, Marcos Didonet; de Alimeda, Eduardo Cunha; Sluzarski, Fabiano

    2012-01-01

    Teaching web development in Computer Science undergraduate courses is a difficult task. Often, there is a gap between the students' experiences and the reality in the industry. As a consequence, the students are not always well-prepared once they get the degree. This gap is due to several reasons, such as the complexity of the assignments, the…

  19. Maintaining Pedagogical Integrity of a Computer Mediated Course Delivery in Social Foundations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Shelley; Cobb-Roberts, Deirdre; Shircliffe, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    Transforming a face to face course to a computer mediated format in social foundations (interdisciplinary field in education), while maintaining pedagogical integrity, involves strategic collaboration between instructional technologists and content area experts. This type of planned partnership requires open dialogue and a mutual respect for prior…

  20. Applying Computer-Assisted Musical Instruction to Music Appreciation Course: An Example with Chinese Musical Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lou, Shi-Jer; Guo, Yuan-Chang; Zhu, Yi-Zhen; Shih, Ru-Chu; Dzan, Wei-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to explore the effectiveness of computer-assisted musical instruction (CAMI) in the Learning Chinese Musical Instruments (LCMI) course. The CAMI software for Chinese musical instruments was developed and administered to 228 students in a vocational high school. A pretest-posttest non-equivalent control group design with three…

  1. Computer/Technology Skills Standard Course of Study and Grade Level Competencies 6-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The Computer/Technology Skills Standard Course of Study describes the progressive development of knowledge and skills in six strands: (1) Societal and Ethical Issues; (2) Database; (3) Spreadsheet Keyboard; (4) Utilization/Word Processing/Desktop Publishing; (5) Multimedia/Presentation, and (6) Telecommunications/Internet. The revision process…

  2. Use of Standardized Test Scores to Predict Success in a Computer Applications Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Robert V.; King, Stephanie B.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to see if a relationship existed between American College Testing (ACT) scores (i.e., English, reading, mathematics, science reasoning, and composite) and student success in a computer applications course at a Mississippi community college. The study showed that while the ACT scores were excellent predictors of…

  3. Development of Online Cognitive and Algorithm Tests as Assessment Tools in Introductory Computer Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avancena, Aimee Theresa; Nishihara, Akinori; Vergara, John Paul

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the online cognitive and algorithm tests, which were developed in order to determine if certain cognitive factors and fundamental algorithms correlate with the performance of students in their introductory computer science course. The tests were implemented among Management Information Systems majors from the Philippines and…

  4. A Computer-Assisted-Instruction Course in Vocabulary Building through Latin and Greek Roots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scanlan, Richard T.

    1976-01-01

    A course in the enlargement of students' English vocabulary through the study of Latin and Greek roots and their derivatives was developed by the Department of Classics at the University of Illinois. The class makes use of computer assisted instruction on the PLATO IV system. (Author/RM)

  5. A major problem in teaching com-puter architecture and organization courses is

    E-print Network

    Milenkovi, Aleksandar

    66 A major problem in teaching com- puter architecture and organization courses is how to help. Numerous researchers involved in computer architecture and orga- nization education have tackled. First, it must cover an extensive range of com- puter architecture and organization topics. Second

  6. Intoduction to Complex Systems A new course for students in the Physical Sciences, Computer Sciences, and

    E-print Network

    Buldyrev, Sergey

    Intoduction to Complex Systems A new course for students in the Physical Sciences, Computer Sciences, and Mathematics, by Professor Sergey Buldyrev. The definition of a complex system is somewhat of complex systems. The main idea of this emerging branch of science is that some aspects of complex systems

  7. Programming Languages or Generic Software Tools, for Beginners' Courses in Computer Literacy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuwirth, Erich

    1987-01-01

    Discussion of methods that can be used to teach beginner courses in computer literacy focuses on students aged 10-12. The value of using a programing language versus using a generic software package is highlighted; Logo and Prolog are reviewed; and the use of databases is discussed. (LRW)

  8. Performance Measures in Courses Using Computer-Aided Personalized System of Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, C. R.; Pear, J. J.

    2008-01-01

    Archived data from four courses taught with computer-aided personalized system of instruction (CAPSI)--an online, self-paced, instructional program--were used to explore the relationship between objectively rescored final exam grades, peer reviewing, and progress rate--i.e., the rate at which students completed unit tests. There was a strong…

  9. Distributed Training for the Reserve Component: Course Conversion and Implementation Guidelines for Computer Conferencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, H. A.; And Others

    The purpose of this handbook is to provide background and guidelines for course designers and instructional developers who will be developing Reserve Component training for the United States military using asynchronous computer conferencing techniques. The recommendations in this report are based on an international review of the literature in…

  10. A discrete computer network model with expanding dimensions

    E-print Network

    Yuming Shi; Guanrong Chen

    2007-05-07

    Complex networks with expanding dimensions are studied, where the networks may be directed and weighted, and network nodes are varying in discrete time in the sense that some new nodes may be added and some old nodes may be removed from time to time. A model of such networks in computer data transmission is discussed. Each node on the network has fixed dimensionality, while the dimension of the whole network is defined by the total number of nodes. Based on the spectacular properties of data transmission on computer networks, some new concepts of stable and unstable networks differing from the classical Lyapunov stability are defined. In particular, a special unstable network model, called devil network, is introduced and discussed. It is further found that a variety of structures and connection weights affects the network stability substantially. Several criteria on stability, instability, and devil network are established for a rather general class of networks, where some conditions are actually necessary and sufficient. Mathematically, this paper makes a first attempt to rigorously formulate a fundamental issue of modeling discrete linear time-varying systems with expanding dimensions and study their basic stability property.

  11. A Novel College Network Resource Management Method using Cloud Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chen

    At present information construction of college mainly has construction of college networks and management information system; there are many problems during the process of information. Cloud computing is development of distributed processing, parallel processing and grid computing, which make data stored on the cloud, make software and services placed in the cloud and build on top of various standards and protocols, you can get it through all kinds of equipments. This article introduces cloud computing and function of cloud computing, then analyzes the exiting problems of college network resource management, the cloud computing technology and methods are applied in the construction of college information sharing platform.

  12. Using high-performance networks to enable computational aerosciences applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Marjory J.

    1992-01-01

    One component of the U.S. Federal High Performance Computing and Communications Program (HPCCP) is the establishment of a gigabit network to provide a communications infrastructure for researchers across the nation. This gigabit network will provide new services and capabilities, in addition to increased bandwidth, to enable future applications. An understanding of these applications is necessary to guide the development of the gigabit network and other high-performance networks of the future. In this paper we focus on computational aerosciences applications run remotely using the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) facility located at NASA Ames Research Center. We characterize these applications in terms of network-related parameters and relate user experiences that reveal limitations imposed by the current wide-area networking infrastructure. Then we investigate how the development of a nationwide gigabit network would enable users of the NAS facility to work in new, more productive ways.

  13. The computational power of interactive recurrent neural networks.

    PubMed

    Cabessa, Jérémie; Siegelmann, Hava T

    2012-04-01

    In classical computation, rational- and real-weighted recurrent neural networks were shown to be respectively equivalent to and strictly more powerful than the standard Turing machine model. Here, we study the computational power of recurrent neural networks in a more biologically oriented computational framework, capturing the aspects of sequential interactivity and persistence of memory. In this context, we prove that so-called interactive rational- and real-weighted neural networks show the same computational powers as interactive Turing machines and interactive Turing machines with advice, respectively. A mathematical characterization of each of these computational powers is also provided. It follows from these results that interactive real-weighted neural networks can perform uncountably many more translations of information than interactive Turing machines, making them capable of super-Turing capabilities. PMID:22295978

  14. HeNCE: A Heterogeneous Network Computing Environment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Beguelin, Adam; Dongarra, Jack J.; Geist, George Al; Manchek, Robert; Moore, Keith

    1994-01-01

    Network computing seeks to utilize the aggregate resources of many networked computers to solve a single problem. In so doing it is often possible to obtain supercomputer performance from an inexpensive local area network. The drawback is that network computing is complicated and error prone when done by hand, especially if the computers have different operating systems and data formats and are thus heterogeneous. The heterogeneous network computing environment (HeNCE) is an integrated graphical environment for creating and running parallel programs over a heterogeneous collection of computers. It is built on a lower level package called parallel virtual machine (PVM).more »The HeNCE philosophy of parallel programming is to have the programmer graphically specify the parallelism of a computation and to automate, as much as possible, the tasks of writing, compiling, executing, debugging, and tracing the network computation. Key to HeNCE is a graphical language based on directed graphs that describe the parallelism and data dependencies of an application. Nodes in the graphs represent conventional Fortran or C subroutines and the arcs represent data and control flow. This article describes the present state of HeNCE, its capabilities, limitations, and areas of future research.« less

  15. Detecting shifts in gene regulatory networks during time-course experiments at single-time-point temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Yoichi; Seno, Shigeto; Matsuda, Hideo

    2015-10-01

    Comprehensively understanding the dynamics of biological systems is one of the greatest challenges in biology. Vastly improved biological technologies have provided vast amounts of information that must be understood by bioinformatics and systems biology researchers. Gene regulations have been frequently modeled by ordinary differential equations or graphical models based on time-course gene expression profiles. The state-of-the-art computational approaches for analyzing gene regulations assume that their models are same throughout time-course experiments. However, these approaches cannot easily analyze transient changes at a time point, such as diauxic shift. We propose a score that analyzes the gene regulations at each time point. The score is based on the information gains of information criterion values. The method detects the shifts in gene regulatory networks (GRNs) during time-course experiments with single-time-point resolution. The effectiveness of the method is evaluated on the diauxic shift from glucose to lactose in Escherichia coli. Gene regulation shifts were detected at two time points: the first corresponding to the time at which the growth of E. coli ceased and the second corresponding to the end of the experiment, when the nutrient sources (glucose and lactose) had become exhausted. According to these results, the proposed score and method can appropriately detect the time of gene regulation shifts. The method based on the proposed score provides a new tool for analyzing dynamic biological systems. Because the score value indicates the strength of gene regulation at each time point in a gene expression profile, it can potentially infer hidden GRNs from time-course experiments. PMID:26508425

  16. The Use of a PDP-11/20 Computer in a Non-Calculus General Physics Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, David U. L.

    Computer-assisted instruction supplements traditional methods in a non-calculus physics course offered at Seattle Pacific College. Thirty-five science majors enrolled in the first quarter and 32 continued in the second term. The hardware for the course consists of a PDP-11/20 computer and eight teletype terminals; additional peripheral equipment…

  17. Design and Development of a Sample "Computer Programming" Course Tool via Story-Based E-Learning Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kose, Utku; Koc, Durmus; Yucesoy, Suleyman Anil

    2013-01-01

    This study introduces a story-based e-learning oriented course tool that was designed and developed for using within "computer programming" courses. With this tool, students can easily adapt themselves to the subjects in the context of computer programming principles, thanks to the story-based, interactive processes. By using visually…

  18. 308 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NETWORKING, VOL. 10, NO. 3, JUNE 2002 Hop Integrity in Computer Networks

    E-print Network

    Huang, Chin-Tser

    to computer . Thus, computer is flooded by pong messages that it had not requested. B. SYN Attack To establish, message replay, network protocol, router, security, smurf attack, SYN attack. I. INTRODUCTION MOST that the network can provide hop integrity, and thus overcome most denial-of-service attacks. These three proto

  19. Parallel CFD design on network-based computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Samson

    1995-01-01

    Combining multiple engineering workstations into a network-based heterogeneous parallel computer allows application of aerodynamic optimization with advanced computational fluid dynamics codes, which can be computationally expensive on mainframe supercomputers. This paper introduces a nonlinear quasi-Newton optimizer designed for this network-based heterogeneous parallel computing environment utilizing a software called Parallel Virtual Machine. This paper will introduce the methodology behind coupling a Parabolized Navier-Stokes flow solver to the nonlinear optimizer. This parallel optimization package is applied to reduce the wave drag of a body of revolution and a wing/body configuration with results of 5% to 6% drag reduction.

  20. CFD Optimization on Network-Based Parallel Computer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Samson H.; Holst, Terry L. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Combining multiple engineering workstations into a network-based heterogeneous parallel computer allows application of aerodynamic optimization with advance computational fluid dynamics codes, which is computationally expensive in mainframe supercomputer. This paper introduces a nonlinear quasi-Newton optimizer designed for this network-based heterogeneous parallel computer on a software called Parallel Virtual Machine. This paper will introduce the methodology behind coupling a Parabolized Navier-Stokes flow solver to the nonlinear optimizer. This parallel optimization package has been applied to reduce the wave drag of a body of revolution and a wing/body configuration with results of 5% to 6% drag reduction.

  1. Parallel CFD design on network-based computer

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, S.

    1995-09-01

    Combining multiple engineering workstations into a network-based heterogeneous parallel computer allows application of aerodynamic optimization with advanced computational fluid dynamics codes, which can be computationally expensive on mainframe supercomputers. This paper introduces a nonlinear quasi-Newton optimizer designed for this network-based heterogeneous parallel computing environment utilizing a software called Parallel Virtual Machine. This paper will introduce the methodology behind coupling a Parabolized Navier-Stokes flow solver to the nonlinear optimizer. This parallel optimization package is applied to reduce the wave drag of a body of revolution and a wing/body configuration with results of 5% to 6% drag reduction.

  2. Computers, Electronic Networking and Education: Some American Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, David

    1991-01-01

    Describes new developments in distributed educational computing at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT, "Athena"), Carnegie Mellon University ("Andrew"), Brown University "Intermedia"), Electronic University Network (California), Western Behavioral Sciences Institute (California), and University of California, Irvine. Topics discussed…

  3. Spreadsheet Analysis Of Queuing In A Computer Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galant, David C.

    1992-01-01

    Method of analyzing responses of computer network based on simple queuing-theory mathmatical models via spreadsheet program. Effects of variations in traffic, capacities of channels, and message protocols assessed.

  4. Low Computation and Low Latency Algorithms for Distributed Sensor Network

    E-print Network

    Cevher, Volkan

    Low Computation and Low Latency Algorithms for Distributed Sensor Network Initialization M. Borkar algorithm: a low complexity implementation and a low latency implementation. To demonstrate that is responsible for combining the incoming information and producing meaningful estimates, and (ii) distributed

  5. Electrooptical adaptive switching network for the hypercube computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, E.; Peterson, J.

    1988-01-01

    An all-optical network design for the hyperswitch network using regular free-space interconnects between electronic processor nodes is presented. The adaptive routing model used is described, and an adaptive routing control example is presented. The design demonstrates that existing electrooptical techniques are sufficient for implementing efficient parallel architectures without the need for more complex means of implementing arbitrary interconnection schemes. The electrooptical hyperswitch network significantly improves the communication performance of the hypercube computer.

  6. Dissecting the transcription networks of a cell using computational genomics

    E-print Network

    Babu, M. Madan

    Dissecting the transcription networks of a cell using computational genomics Hao Lià and Wei Wangy to systematically dissect transcriptional regulatory networks. Effective algorithms have been developed to predict cis-regulatory elements in a genome, to identify the target genes of transcription factors, to infer

  7. Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing Sensor network applications and

    E-print Network

    Roussos, George

    range outdoors Integrated Humidity, Temperature, and Light sensors Programming and data collection via-network distributed processing. Temperature Time Value 2:00 15 4:00 12 Temperature Time Value 2:00 10 4:00 13 HumidityMobile and Ubiquitous Computing Sensor network applications and research challenges Niki Trigoni

  8. Computing the Viscosity of Supercooled Liquids: Markov Network Model

    E-print Network

    Lin, Xi

    Computing the Viscosity of Supercooled Liquids: Markov Network Model Ju Li1 *, Akihiro Kushima1, when liquid viscosity changes continuously by more than ten orders of magnitude, is challenging Network model to calculate the shear viscosity of deeply supercooled liquids based on numerical sampling

  9. Computation of blocking probability for large circuit switched networks

    E-print Network

    Wong, Eric Wing-Ming

    Terms--Erlang Fixed Point Approximation, Erlang B Formula, circuit switched networks, blocking [No. 9380044]. blocked traffic (which initially can be set to zero). Then, end- to-end blocking1 Computation of blocking probability for large circuit switched networks Vyacheslav Abramov, Shuo

  10. Computation of blocking probability for large circuit switched networks

    E-print Network

    Zukerman, Moshe

    Terms--Erlang Fixed Point Approximation, Erlang B Formula, circuit switched networks, blocking initially can be set to zero). Then, end- to-end blocking probabilities on all links are recalculated1 Computation of blocking probability for large circuit switched networks Vyacheslav Abramov, Shuo

  11. Computer Network Security: Best Practices for Alberta School Jurisdictions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton.

    This paper provides a snapshot of the computer network security industry and addresses specific issues related to network security in public education. The following topics are covered: (1) security policy, including reasons for establishing a policy, risk assessment, areas to consider, audit tools; (2) workstations, including physical security,…

  12. Creating a two-layered augmented artificial immune system for application to computer network intrusion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, Matthew G.; Lamont, Gary B.

    2009-05-01

    Computer network security has become a very serious concern of commercial, industrial, and military organizations due to the increasing number of network threats such as outsider intrusions and insider covert activities. An important security element of course is network intrusion detection which is a difficult real world problem that has been addressed through many different solution attempts. Using an artificial immune system has been shown to be one of the most promising results. By enhancing jREMISA, a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm inspired artificial immune system, with a secondary defense layer; we produce improved accuracy of intrusion classification and a flexibility in responsiveness. This responsiveness can be leveraged to provide a much more powerful and accurate system, through the use of increased processing time and dedicated hardware which has the flexibility of being located out of band.

  13. Phoebus: Network Middleware for Next-Generation Network Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Swany

    2012-06-16

    The Phoebus project investigated algorithms, protocols, and middleware infrastructure to improve end-to-end performance in high speed, dynamic networks. The Phoebus system essentially serves as an adaptation point for networks with disparate capabilities or provisioning. This adaptation can take a variety of forms including acting as a provisioning agent across multiple signaling domains, providing transport protocol adaptation points, and mapping between distributed resource reservation paradigms and the optical network control plane. We have successfully developed the system and demonstrated benefits. The Phoebus system was deployed in Internet2 and in ESnet, as well as in GEANT2, RNP in Brazil and over international links to Korea and Japan. Phoebus is a system that implements a new protocol and associated forwarding infrastructure for improving throughput in high-speed dynamic networks. It was developed to serve the needs of large DOE applications on high-performance networks. The idea underlying the Phoebus model is to embed Phoebus Gateways (PGs) in the network as on-ramps to dynamic circuit networks. The gateways act as protocol translators that allow legacy applications to use dedicated paths with high performance.

  14. Topological properties of robust biological and computational networks

    PubMed Central

    Navlakha, Saket; He, Xin; Faloutsos, Christos; Bar-Joseph, Ziv

    2014-01-01

    Network robustness is an important principle in biology and engineering. Previous studies of global networks have identified both redundancy and sparseness as topological properties used by robust networks. By focusing on molecular subnetworks, or modules, we show that module topology is tightly linked to the level of environmental variability (noise) the module expects to encounter. Modules internal to the cell that are less exposed to environmental noise are more connected and less robust than external modules. A similar design principle is used by several other biological networks. We propose a simple change to the evolutionary gene duplication model which gives rise to the rich range of module topologies observed within real networks. We apply these observations to evaluate and design communication networks that are specifically optimized for noisy or malicious environments. Combined, joint analysis of biological and computational networks leads to novel algorithms and insights benefiting both fields. PMID:24789562

  15. Wireless Networks: New Meaning to Ubiquitous Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drew, Wilfred, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the use of wireless technology in academic libraries. Topics include wireless networks; standards (IEEE 802.11); wired versus wireless; why libraries implement wireless technology; wireless local area networks (WLANs); WLAN security; examples of wireless use at Indiana State University and Morrisville College (New York); and useful…

  16. Applications of bio-inspired computational intelligence in optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins Filho, Joaquim F.; Bastos Filho, Carmelo J. A.; Chaves, Daniel A. R.

    2012-12-01

    Computational intelligence techniques have appeared as efficient alternatives to solve complex problems, such as in optimization of multi-objective problems. These techniques have been used to solve hard problems in optical networks, such as the impairment-aware routing and wavelength assignment problem, the design of the physical and the logical topology, and the placement of high cost devices along the network where necessary, such as regenerators and wavelength converters. This paper presents some examples of the use of evolutionary computation, swarm intelligence and neurocomputing to solve these optical network problems.

  17. Get the Whole Story before You Plug into a Computer Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernot, David

    1989-01-01

    Explains the myths and marvels of computer networks; cites how several schools are utilizing networking; and summarizes where the major computer companies stand today when it comes to networking. (MLF)

  18. Methodical Approaches to Teaching of Computer Modeling in Computer Science Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakhimzhanova, B. Lyazzat; Issabayeva, N. Darazha; Khakimova, Tiyshtik; Bolyskhanova, J. Madina

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to justify of the formation technique of representation of modeling methodology at computer science lessons. The necessity of studying computer modeling is that the current trends of strengthening of general education and worldview functions of computer science define the necessity of additional research of the…

  19. Network-Aware Partitioning of Computation in Diamond

    E-print Network

    Network-Aware Partitioning of Computation in Diamond Alex Nizhner 1 Larry Huston 2 Peter Steenkiste Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Abstract The Diamond storage architecture enables eÆcient interactive searchÆcient use of resources under dynamic conditions, Diamond adaptively partitions computation among the storage

  20. Temporal Distance Metrics for Social Network Analysis Computer Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Hand, Steven

    of Cambridge jkt27@cam.ac.uk Mirco Musolesi Computer Laboratory University of Cambridge mm753@cam.ac.uk Cecilia Mascolo Computer Laboratory University of Cambridge cm542@cam.ac.uk Vito Latora Dipartimento di Fisica- tracted a lot of attention as social networking applications and mobile sensing devices have given us

  1. Throughput and Fairness in Random Access Networks Computer Science Department

    E-print Network

    Throughput and Fairness in Random Access Networks Hoon Chang Computer Science Department Columbia University New York, NY 10027 Email: hchang@cs.columbia.edu Vishal Misra Computer Science Department Columbia an throughput analysis of log- utility and max-min fairness. Assuming all nodes interfere with each other

  2. BECUN. The Educational Computer User's Network at Battelle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, OH.

    The Educational Computer User's Network at Battelle Columbus Laboratories is a cooperative computer center effort between a group of Ohio colleges, secondary schools, and a large research-oriented organization. This description of the program includes the historical background, program concept, data processing development, hardware and software,…

  3. Synchronizing computer clocks using a local area network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Judah

    1990-01-01

    Researchers completed the first tests of a method to synchronize the clocks of networked computers to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) time scale. The method uses a server computer to disseminate the time to other clients on the same local-area network. The server is synchronized to NIST using the ACTS protocol over a dial-up telephone line. The software in both the server and the parameters of this model are used to adjust the time of the local clock and the interval between calibration requests in a statistically optimum way. The algorithm maximizes the time between calibrations while at the same time keeping the time of the local clock correct within a specific tolerance. The method can be extended to synchronize computers linked over wide-area networks, and an experiment to test the performance of the algorithms over such networks is being planned.

  4. Time-dependent collective behavior in a computer network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jian; Wang, Jian; Xu, Zanxin; Li, Bing

    2006-08-01

    The collective dynamics of large-scale computer networks remains elusive due to not only the internal adaptive behaviors of network-wide flows, but also the spatial-temporal changes in the external environment. In this paper, we investigate the time-dependent collective behavior by using a computer network model, recently developed to study space-time characteristics of congestion in large networks. We use the evolving correlation pattern, the largest eigenvalue, and the information entropy to analyze the macroscopic pattern of changing network congestion. We find the collective behavior becomes more pronounced during transient periods of pattern shifting, and the macroscopic pattern becomes gradually indistinct as the observed timescale increases to some extent. We also find that the evolving pattern of spatial-temporal correlation is more useful to reveal the time-dependent collective behavior of our model at different forcing levels.

  5. Computationally Efficient Neural Network Intrusion Security Awareness

    SciTech Connect

    Todd Vollmer; Milos Manic

    2009-08-01

    An enhanced version of an algorithm to provide anomaly based intrusion detection alerts for cyber security state awareness is detailed. A unique aspect is the training of an error back-propagation neural network with intrusion detection rule features to provide a recognition basis. Network packet details are subsequently provided to the trained network to produce a classification. This leverages rule knowledge sets to produce classifications for anomaly based systems. Several test cases executed on ICMP protocol revealed a 60% identification rate of true positives. This rate matched the previous work, but 70% less memory was used and the run time was reduced to less than 1 second from 37 seconds.

  6. Home Care Nursing via Computer Networks: Justification and Design Specifications

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Patricia Flatley

    1988-01-01

    High-tech home care includes the use of information technologies, such as computer networks, to provide direct care to patients in the home. This paper presents the justification and design of a project using a free, public access computer network to deliver home care nursing. The intervention attempts to reduce isolation and improve problem solving among home care patients and their informal caregivers. Three modules comprise the intervention: a decision module, a communications module, and an information data base. This paper describes the experimental evaluation of the project, and discusses issues in the delivery of nursing care via computers.

  7. Computational Verification of Network Programs in Coq

    E-print Network

    Hamlen, Kevin W.

    -level network programming lan- guage. We build on recent work by Monsanto et al. [10], which defined the syn. #12;OpenFlow. Drawing on the NetCore compilation algorithm of Monsanto et al., Guha et al. formalized

  8. Optical processing for future computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Husain, A.; Haugen, P. R.; Hutcheson, L. D.; Warrior, J.; Murray, N.; Beatty, M.

    1986-01-01

    In the development of future data management systems, such as the NASA Space Station, a major problem represents the design and implementation of a high performance communication network which is self-correcting and repairing, flexible, and evolvable. To obtain the goal of designing such a network, it will be essential to incorporate distributed adaptive network control techniques. The present paper provides an outline of the functional and communication network requirements for the Space Station data management system. Attention is given to the mathematical representation of the operations being carried out to provide the required functionality at each layer of communication protocol on the model. The possible implementation of specific communication functions in optics is also considered.

  9. Quantization in acquisition and computation networks

    E-print Network

    Sun, John Zheng

    2013-01-01

    In modern systems, it is often desirable to extract relevant information from large amounts of data collected at different spatial locations. Applications include sensor networks, wearable health-monitoring devices and a ...

  10. Integrated evolutionary computation neural network quality controller for automated systems

    SciTech Connect

    Patro, S.; Kolarik, W.J.

    1999-06-01

    With increasing competition in the global market, more and more stringent quality standards and specifications are being demands at lower costs. Manufacturing applications of computing power are becoming more common. The application of neural networks to identification and control of dynamic processes has been discussed. The limitations of using neural networks for control purposes has been pointed out and a different technique, evolutionary computation, has been discussed. The results of identifying and controlling an unstable, dynamic process using evolutionary computation methods has been presented. A framework for an integrated system, using both neural networks and evolutionary computation, has been proposed to identify the process and then control the product quality, in a dynamic, multivariable system, in real-time.

  11. Student performance in computer modeling and problem solving in a modern introductory physics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohlmyer, Matthew Adam

    Matter & Interactions, an innovative introductory physics curriculum developed by Ruth Chabay and Bruce Sherwood, emphasizes computer modeling and fundamental physical principles. Two think-aloud protocol studies were conducted to investigate the performance of students from this curriculum in solving physics problems that require computer modeling. Experiment 1 examined whether Matter & Interactions students would, given the choice, use computer modeling to solve difficult problems that required predicting motion, and how their solution approaches differed from those of students from a traditional introductory physics course. Though they did not overwhelmingly choose computer modeling, some M&I students did write computer models successfully or apply the iterative algorithm by hand. The solution approaches of M&I students and traditional course students differed qualitatively in their use of the momentum principle and pre-derived special case formulas. In experiment 2, Matter & Interactions students were observed while they wrote programs in the VPython language in order to examine their difficulties with computer modeling. Areas of difficulty included determining initial conditions, distinguishing between simulated time and the time step, and updating momentum and position. Especially troublesome for students was the multistep procedure for calculating a force that changes with time. Students' understanding of the structure of a computer model improved by the end of the semester as shown by their performance on a line sorting task. Students with fewer difficulties proceeded through the computer model in a more linear, straightforward fashion. Instruction was revised based on initial findings from the first phase of the experiment. Students in the second phase of the experiment, who had used the revised instruction, had fewer difficulties on the same tasks, though other factors may have been involved in the improvement.

  12. 10 CFR 73.54 - Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks...Sites § 73.54 Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks...shall provide high assurance that digital computer and communication systems and...

  13. 10 CFR 73.54 - Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks...Sites § 73.54 Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks...shall provide high assurance that digital computer and communication systems and...

  14. 10 CFR 73.54 - Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks...Sites § 73.54 Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks...shall provide high assurance that digital computer and communication systems and...

  15. Realistic computer network simulation for network intrusion detection dataset generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payer, Garrett

    2015-05-01

    The KDD-99 Cup dataset is dead. While it can continue to be used as a toy example, the age of this dataset makes it all but useless for intrusion detection research and data mining. Many of the attacks used within the dataset are obsolete and do not reflect the features important for intrusion detection in today's networks. Creating a new dataset encompassing a large cross section of the attacks found on the Internet today could be useful, but would eventually fall to the same problem as the KDD-99 Cup; its usefulness would diminish after a period of time. To continue research into intrusion detection, the generation of new datasets needs to be as dynamic and as quick as the attacker. Simply examining existing network traffic and using domain experts such as intrusion analysts to label traffic is inefficient, expensive, and not scalable. The only viable methodology is simulation using technologies including virtualization, attack-toolsets such as Metasploit and Armitage, and sophisticated emulation of threat and user behavior. Simulating actual user behavior and network intrusion events dynamically not only allows researchers to vary scenarios quickly, but enables online testing of intrusion detection mechanisms by interacting with data as it is generated. As new threat behaviors are identified, they can be added to the simulation to make quicker determinations as to the effectiveness of existing and ongoing network intrusion technology, methodology and models.

  16. [The use of computers and networking in the neurosurgical field].

    PubMed

    Oizumi, T; Ohira, T; Kawase, T

    1999-02-01

    Due to the improvements in computer and network technology, we are able to use medical information easily and safely on the network in medical institutions. In our department, we constructed and used an original Intranet with light fibers. The network links the outpatient room, ward, operation room, staff room and the examination room. Moreover, many computers and medical instruments are connected to the Intranet. Since our original Intranet has no connection with the outside network, we are able to access the patient's medical information safely. Using access management of identity and a password on the server, the client can present the medical information with sound and movie upon request of the patients and their families, medical students, nurses and doctors. Doctors can also search and input the patient's most recent medical information on a network database of every client. By linking the examination machine and operation aided instrument to the Intranet, we were able to forward the patient's medical information to the operation aided instrument easily and quickly. Furthermore, we will be able to perform tele-medicine and tele-operation in the near future: that is, the medical staff can guide the neurosurgical operation outside of the operation room with a microscope and computer view using picture mutual communication devices. By strict access to the management of our Intranet, we are able to use the medical information effectively for patient's treatment, operation, education and study on the network with no connection to the outside network. PMID:10097628

  17. Is It Ethical for Patents to Be Issued for the Computer Algorithms that Affect Course Management Systems for Distance Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreau, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the impact of patents for computer algorithms in course management systems. Referring to historical documents and court cases, the positive and negative aspects of software patents are presented. The key argument is the accessibility to algorithms comprising a course management software program such as Blackboard. The…

  18. Teaching High Performance Computing: Lessons from a flipped classroom, project-based course on finite element methods

    E-print Network

    Bangerth, Wolfgang

    Teaching High Performance Computing: Lessons from a flipped classroom, project-based course as a project course with a flipped classroom. The contribution of this paper is to describe a practitioner't. Keywords-HPC education, flipped classroom, teaching and technology, journaling, reflective writing

  19. Computing with Mobile Agents in Distributed Networks

    E-print Network

    Kranakis, Evangelos

    1.1 Introduction Mobile agents are software entities with the capacity for motion that can act on behalf of their user with a certain degree of autonomy in order to accomplish a variety of computing computing, and second to overcome the limitations of user interfaces. 1.1.1 What is a mobile agent

  20. Abstract -This paper introduces a neural network training tool through computer networks. The following algorithms,

    E-print Network

    Wilamowski, Bogdan Maciej

    in the form of image. The PHP network programming language supports for dynamic web-pages. Its communication into PHP scripts very efficiently. This feature makes PHP more powerful for the web programming. HTML a company or a school. Several tools of computer network programming are available today including Java, CGI

  1. ANU College of Engineering & Computer Science 2014 Course Selection Master of Engineering Honours 7711HMENG 96 units

    E-print Network

    (3591) Engineering Materials ENGN6627 (7578) Robotics ENGN6626 (3905) Digital Communications COMP8110ANU College of Engineering & Computer Science 2014 Course Selection Master of Engineering Honours (2912) Introduction to Systems Engineering ENGN8120 (8506) Systems Modelling Engineering Electives 48

  2. Computer Science and Engineering Pre-Professional Courses Degree Plan for Bachelor of Science Degree in Computer Science and Engineering 2005

    E-print Network

    Huang, Haiying

    Technical Elective CSE 4317 Computer System Design Project II 3 Hrs Fine Arts Elective 3 Hrs Math/ScienceComputer Science and Engineering Pre-Professional Courses Degree Plan for Bachelor of Science Degree in Computer Science and Engineering 2005 Sophomore 1st Semester 16hrs Sophomore 2nd Semester 16hrs

  3. The Effect of Prior Experience with Computers, Statistical Self-Efficacy, and Computer Anxiety on Students' Achievement in an Introductory Statistics Course: A Partial Least Squares Path Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abd-El-Fattah, Sabry M.

    2005-01-01

    A Partial Least Squares Path Analysis technique was used to test the effect of students' prior experience with computers, statistical self-efficacy, and computer anxiety on their achievement in an introductory statistics course. Computer Anxiety Rating Scale and Current Statistics Self-Efficacy Scale were administered to a sample of 64 first-year…

  4. Six Networks on a Universal Neuromorphic Computing Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Pfeil, Thomas; Grübl, Andreas; Jeltsch, Sebastian; Müller, Eric; Müller, Paul; Petrovici, Mihai A.; Schmuker, Michael; Brüderle, Daniel; Schemmel, Johannes; Meier, Karlheinz

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we present a highly configurable neuromorphic computing substrate and use it for emulating several types of neural networks. At the heart of this system lies a mixed-signal chip, with analog implementations of neurons and synapses and digital transmission of action potentials. Major advantages of this emulation device, which has been explicitly designed as a universal neural network emulator, are its inherent parallelism and high acceleration factor compared to conventional computers. Its configurability allows the realization of almost arbitrary network topologies and the use of widely varied neuronal and synaptic parameters. Fixed-pattern noise inherent to analog circuitry is reduced by calibration routines. An integrated development environment allows neuroscientists to operate the device without any prior knowledge of neuromorphic circuit design. As a showcase for the capabilities of the system, we describe the successful emulation of six different neural networks which cover a broad spectrum of both structure and functionality. PMID:23423583

  5. Gender Effects of Computer Use in a Conceptual Physics Lab Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Domelen, Dave

    2010-11-01

    It's always hard to know what to expect when bringing computers into an educational setting, as things are always changing. Student skills with computers are different today than they were 10 years ago, and 20 years ago almost counts as an alien world. Still, one hopes that some of these changes result in positive trends, such as student attitudes toward the use of computers in the classroom. During the course of the Wandering Interactive Lecture Demonstration Project, we've seen a notable gender gap in some aspects of the previous experience of students, and worried that it might impact their learning. So we administered a number of surveys to see if we were right to be worried.

  6. Distributed computation of graphics primitives on a transputer network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Graham K.

    1988-01-01

    A method is developed for distributing the computation of graphics primitives on a parallel processing network. Off-the-shelf transputer boards are used to perform the graphics transformations and scan-conversion tasks that would normally be assigned to a single transputer based display processor. Each node in the network performs a single graphics primitive computation. Frequently requested tasks can be duplicated on several nodes. The results indicate that the current distribution of commands on the graphics network shows a performance degradation when compared to the graphics display board alone. A change to more computation per node for every communication (perform more complex tasks on each node) may cause the desired increase in throughput.

  7. Synchronization-based computation through networks of coupled oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Malagarriga, Daniel; García-Vellisca, Mariano A.; Villa, Alessandro E. P.; Buldú, Javier M.; García-Ojalvo, Jordi; Pons, Antonio J.

    2015-01-01

    The mesoscopic activity of the brain is strongly dynamical, while at the same time exhibits remarkable computational capabilities. In order to examine how these two features coexist, here we show that the patterns of synchronized oscillations displayed by networks of neural mass models, representing cortical columns, can be used as substrates for Boolean-like computations. Our results reveal that the same neural mass network may process different combinations of dynamical inputs as different logical operations or combinations of them. This dynamical feature of the network allows it to process complex inputs in a very sophisticated manner. The results are reproduced experimentally with electronic circuits of coupled Chua oscillators, showing the robustness of this kind of computation to the intrinsic noise and parameter mismatch of the coupled oscillators. We also show that the information-processing capabilities of coupled oscillations go beyond the simple juxtaposition of logic gates. PMID:26300765

  8. Distributed Computing and MEMS Accelerometers: The Quake Catcher Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, J. F.; Cochran, E. S.; Christensen, C.; Jakka, R. S.

    2008-12-01

    Recent advances in distributed computing provide exciting opportunities for seismic data collection. We are in the early stages of implementing a high density, low cost strong-motion network for rapid response and early warning by placing accelerometers in schools, homes, offices, government buildings, fire houses and more. The Quake Catcher Network (QCN) employs existing networked laptops and desktops to form a dense, distributed computing seismic network. Costs for this network are minimal because the QCN uses 1) strong motion sensors (accelerometers) already internal to many laptops and 2) low-cost universal serial bus (USB) accelerometers for use with desktops. The Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC!) provides a free, proven paradigm for involving the public in large-scale computational research projects. The QCN leverages public participation to fully implement the seismic network. As such engaging the public to participate in seismic data collection is not only an integral part of the project, but an added value to the QCN. The software provides the client-user with a screen-saver displaying seismic data recorded on their laptop or recently detected earthquakes. Furthermore, this project installs sensors in K-12 classrooms as an educational tool for teaching science. Through a variety of interactive experiments students can learn about earthquakes and the hazards earthquakes pose. In the first six months of limited release of the QCN software, we successfully received triggers and waveforms from laptops near the M 4.7 April 25, 2008 earthquake in Reno, Nevada and the M 5.4 July 29, 2008 earthquake in Chino, California (as well as a few 3.6 and higher events). This fall we continued to expand the network further by installing seismometers in K-12 schools, museums, and government buildings in the greater Los Angeles basin and the San Francisco Bay Area. By summer 2009 we expect to have 1000 USB sensors deployed in California, in addition to any current or new laptop users.

  9. Performance evaluation of scalable parallel computing networks 

    E-print Network

    Wilkinson, Robert Todd

    1996-01-01

    Performance analysis is a widely accepted technique used by many computer system designers. It can predict actual system performance, while helping to identify problems in the design or areas for improvement. Furthermore, if the simulation model...

  10. Network Nation: Human Communication via Computer

    E-print Network

    Kiesler, Sara

    defined key problem areas in computer-mediated communication and Internet research that remain today #12;3 how to manage distributed work teams, what to do about free riders in online groups, addiction

  11. high-performance computing networked embedded systems

    E-print Network

    Engineering U the dean's view #12;Editor Nina Welding Production Joanne Birdsell Marty Schalm Photography Matt the next generation of high-productivity computing systems, whether through the use of Processing- in

  12. Computers and Networks Part I Jen Golbeck

    E-print Network

    Golbeck, Jennifer

    " (developed for the government ­ Mechanical: essentially a big adding machine: early machines filled a room ­ Microchips: designed for missile guidance · Software: initial applications were military ­ Numeric: computing gun angles ­ Symbolic: code-breaking #12;14 Commercial

  13. [Research toward a heterogeneous networked computing cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Duke, D.W.; Green, T.P.

    1998-08-11

    Over the last year the Systems Development Group, SDG, has been involved in a number of projects. The primary projects include extending the UNIX version of DQS, a DCE version of DQS, a Java based queuing system, a Computer Aided Learning and Instruction model and working with the Florida Department of Law Enforcement in the formation of the Florida Computer Crime Center. Additionally SDG has assisted a number of state and local agencies. A synopsis of these projects is contained in this report.

  14. Computational approach in estimating the need of ditch network maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauren, Ari; Hökkä, Hannu; Launiainen, Samuli; Palviainen, Marjo; Repo, Tapani; Leena, Finer; Piirainen, Sirpa

    2015-04-01

    Ditch network maintenance (DNM), implemented annually in 70 000 ha area in Finland, is the most controversial of all forest management practices. Nationwide, it is estimated to increase the forest growth by 1…3 million m3 per year, but simultaneously to cause 65 000 tons export of suspended solids and 71 tons of phosphorus (P) to water courses. A systematic approach that allows simultaneous quantification of the positive and negative effects of DNM is required. Excess water in the rooting zone slows the gas exchange and decreases biological activity interfering with the forest growth in boreal forested peatlands. DNM is needed when: 1) the excess water in the rooting zone restricts the forest growth before the DNM, and 2) after the DNM the growth restriction ceases or decreases, and 3) the benefits of DNM are greater than the caused adverse effects. Aeration in the rooting zone can be used as a drainage criterion. Aeration is affected by several factors such as meteorological conditions, tree stand properties, hydraulic properties of peat, ditch depth, and ditch spacing. We developed a 2-dimensional DNM simulator that allows the user to adjust these factors and to evaluate their effect on the soil aeration at different distance from the drainage ditch. DNM simulator computes hydrological processes and soil aeration along a water flowpath between two ditches. Applying daily time step it calculates evapotranspiration, snow accumulation and melt, infiltration, soil water storage, ground water level, soil water content, air-filled porosity and runoff. The model performance in hydrology has been tested against independent high frequency field monitoring data. Soil aeration at different distance from the ditch is computed under steady-state assumption using an empirical oxygen consumption model, simulated air-filled porosity, and diffusion coefficient at different depths in soil. Aeration is adequate and forest growth rate is not limited by poor aeration if the computed oxygen concentration under the rooting zone is > 0. In other case, the forest growth rate is scaled down with a proportion of the realized oxygen flux and the potential oxygen consumption. The growth limitation coefficient is integrated over the area between the ditches and over the simulation time. The growth limitation approach is being validated against field measured data. Concentration of suspended solids and phosphorus in runoff water are derived from empirical equations. The export load is computed by multiplying the daily concentration with the simulated runoff. The concentration of suspended solids depends on the texture of soil, and the time elapsed from the DNM, and the P concentration depends on the prevailing ground water level. The export loads are integrated over the simulation time. The computational evaluation of the benefits and the adverse effects of DNM allow us to locate DNM activities to suitable sites and to avoid it on other sites. The simulator allows a systematic optimization of DNM activity.

  15. Analytical Computation of the Epidemic Threshold on Temporal Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdano, Eugenio; Ferreri, Luca; Poletto, Chiara; Colizza, Vittoria

    2015-04-01

    The time variation of contacts in a networked system may fundamentally alter the properties of spreading processes and affect the condition for large-scale propagation, as encoded in the epidemic threshold. Despite the great interest in the problem for the physics, applied mathematics, computer science, and epidemiology communities, a full theoretical understanding is still missing and currently limited to the cases where the time-scale separation holds between spreading and network dynamics or to specific temporal network models. We consider a Markov chain description of the susceptible-infectious-susceptible process on an arbitrary temporal network. By adopting a multilayer perspective, we develop a general analytical derivation of the epidemic threshold in terms of the spectral radius of a matrix that encodes both network structure and disease dynamics. The accuracy of the approach is confirmed on a set of temporal models and empirical networks and against numerical results. In addition, we explore how the threshold changes when varying the overall time of observation of the temporal network, so as to provide insights on the optimal time window for data collection of empirical temporal networked systems. Our framework is of both fundamental and practical interest, as it offers novel understanding of the interplay between temporal networks and spreading dynamics.

  16. Navigating Traditional Chinese Medicine Network Pharmacology and Computational Tools

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jia-Lei; Xu, Li-Wen

    2013-01-01

    The concept of “network target” has ushered in a new era in the field of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). As a new research approach, network pharmacology is based on the analysis of network models and systems biology. Taking advantage of advancements in systems biology, a high degree of integration data analysis strategy and interpretable visualization provides deeper insights into the underlying mechanisms of TCM theories, including the principles of herb combination, biological foundations of herb or herbal formulae action, and molecular basis of TCM syndromes. In this study, we review several recent developments in TCM network pharmacology research and discuss their potential for bridging the gap between traditional and modern medicine. We briefly summarize the two main functional applications of TCM network models: understanding/uncovering and predicting/discovering. In particular, we focus on how TCM network pharmacology research is conducted and highlight different computational tools, such as network-based and machine learning algorithms, and sources that have been proposed and applied to the different steps involved in the research process. To make network pharmacology research commonplace, some basic network definitions and analysis methods are presented. PMID:23983798

  17. Test experience on an ultrareliable computer communication network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    The dispersed sensor processing mesh (DSPM) is an experimental, ultrareliable, fault-tolerant computer communications network that exhibits an organic-like ability to regenerate itself after suffering damage. The regeneration is accomplished by two routines - grow and repair. This paper discusses the DSPM concept for achieving fault tolerance and provides a brief description of the mechanization of both the experiment and the six-node experimental network. The main topic of this paper is the system performance of the growth algorithm contained in the grow routine. The characteristics imbued to DSPM by the growth algorithm are also discussed. Data from an experimental DSPM network and software simulation of larger DSPM-type networks are used to examine the inherent limitation on growth time by the growth algorithm and the relationship of growth time to network size and topology.

  18. Test experience on an ultrareliable computer communication network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    The dispersed sensor processing mesh (DSPM) is an experimental, ultra-reliable, fault-tolerant computer communications network that exhibits an organic-like ability to regenerate itself after suffering damage. The regeneration is accomplished by two routines - grow and repair. This paper discusses the DSPM concept for achieving fault tolerance and provides a brief description of the mechanization of both the experiment and the six-node experimental network. The main topic of this paper is the system performance of the growth algorithm contained in the grow routine. The characteristics imbued to DSPM by the growth algorithm are also discussed. Data from an experimental DSPM network and software simulation of larger DSPM-type networks are used to examine the inherent limitation on growth time by the growth algorithm and the relationship of growth time to network size and topology.

  19. A tradeoff study of switching systems in computer communication networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kermani, P.; Kleinrock, L.

    1980-12-01

    This paper is concerned with a comparison study of three switching techniques used in computer-based communication networks: circuit switching, message (packet) switching, and cut-through switching. The comparison is based on the delay performance as obtained through analytic models of these techniques. For circuit switching, the model reflects the phenomenon of channel reservation through which it can be shown that when circuit switching is used, data communication networks saturate rapidly. Through numerical examples, it is shown that the boundary between the areas of relative effectiveness of these switching techniques depends very much on the network topology (more precisely the path length of communication), the message length, and the useful utilization.

  20. A local area computer network expert system framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominy, Robert

    1987-01-01

    Over the past years an expert system called LANES designed to detect and isolate faults in the Goddard-wide Hybrid Local Area Computer Network (LACN) was developed. As a result, the need for developing a more generic LACN fault isolation expert system has become apparent. An object oriented approach was explored to create a set of generic classes, objects, rules, and methods that would be necessary to meet this need. The object classes provide a convenient mechanism for separating high level information from low level network specific information. This approach yeilds a framework which can be applied to different network configurations and be easily expanded to meet new needs.

  1. Autonomous Perceptron Neural Network Inspired from Quantum computing

    E-print Network

    M. Zidan; A. Sagheer; N. Metwally

    2015-10-02

    Recently with the rapid development of technology, there are a lot of applications require to achieve low-cost learning in order to accomplish inexpensive computation. However the known computational power of classical artificial neural networks (CANN), they are not capable to provide low-cost learning due to many reasons such as linearity, complexity of architecture, etc. In contrast, quantum neural networks (QNN) may be representing a good computational alternate to CANN, based on the computational power of quantum bit (qubit) over the classical bit. In this paper, a new algorithm of quantum perceptron neural network based only on one neuron is introduced to overcome some limitations of the classical perceptron neural networks. The proposed algorithm is capable to construct its own set of activation operators that enough to accomplish the learning process in a limited number of iterations and, consequently, reduces the cost of computation. For evaluation purpose, we utilize the proposed algorithm to solve five problems using real and artificial data. It is shown throughout the paper that promising results are provided and compared favorably with other reported algorithms

  2. Distributed Computing over Optical Networks Wei Guo, Yaohui Jin, Weiqiang Sun, Weisheng Hu

    E-print Network

    Distributed Computing over Optical Networks Wei Guo, Yaohui Jin, Weiqiang Sun, Weisheng Hu State and challenges of distributed computing over optical network. The Terabits Optical Network Integrated Computing of technology, the infrastructure presents new challenges: · In the infrastructure, the computational resources

  3. Proteus: a reconfigurable computational network for computer vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haralick, Robert M.; Somani, Arun K.; Wittenbrink, Craig M.; Johnson, Robert; Cooper, Kenneth; Shapiro, Linda G.; Phillips, Ihsin T.; Hwang, Jenq N.; Cheung, William; Yao, Yung H.; Chen, Chung-Ho; Yang, Larry; Daugherty, Brian; Lorbeski, Bob; Loving, Kent; Miller, Tom; Parkins, Larye; Soos, Steven L.

    1992-04-01

    The Proteus architecture is a highly parallel MIMD, multiple instruction, multiple-data machine, optimized for large granularity tasks such as machine vision and image processing The system can achieve 20 Giga-flops (80 Giga-flops peak). It accepts data via multiple serial links at a rate of up to 640 megabytes/second. The system employs a hierarchical reconfigurable interconnection network with the highest level being a circuit switched Enhanced Hypercube serial interconnection network for internal data transfers. The system is designed to use 256 to 1,024 RISC processors. The processors use one megabyte external Read/Write Allocating Caches for reduced multiprocessor contention. The system detects, locates, and replaces faulty subsystems using redundant hardware to facilitate fault tolerance. The parallelism is directly controllable through an advanced software system for partitioning, scheduling, and development. System software includes a translator for the INSIGHT language, a parallel debugger, low and high level simulators, and a message passing system for all control needs. Image processing application software includes a variety of point operators neighborhood, operators, convolution, and the mathematical morphology operations of binary and gray scale dilation, erosion, opening, and closing.

  4. Chaotic Behavior in Computer Mediated Network Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Herbert; Kurtze, Douglas

    1996-01-01

    Examines the use of chaos theory in modelling time series data generated by computer-mediated communication (CMC). Data generated by CMC discussion groups are examined for the presence of chaotic behavior and to assess the variance which can be accounted for by the deterministic mechanism. (Author/LRW)

  5. Dynamic and Computational Models of Recurrent Networks

    E-print Network

    of computation itself." John von Neumann The effort that was made in this work to take a small step forward, for the many years of guidance and teaching he dedicated to our research. We spent many hours of discussion skillfully went over the English in this manuscript. To my beloved parents who always stood behind me. I am

  6. Computer-Communications Networks and Teletraffic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Switzer, I.

    Bi-directional cable TV (CATV) systems that are being installed today may not be well suited for computer communications. Older CATV systems are being modified to bi-directional transmission and most new systems are being built with bi-directional capability included. The extreme bandwidth requirement for carrying 20 or more TV channels on a…

  7. Properties of sparse penalties on inferring gene regulatory networks from time-course gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Zhi; Wu, Fang-Xiang; Zhang, Wen-Jun

    2015-02-01

    Genes regulate each other and form a gene regulatory network (GRN) to realise biological functions. Elucidating GRN from experimental data remains a challenging problem in systems biology. Numerous techniques have been developed and sparse linear regression methods become a promising approach to infer accurate GRNs. However, most linear methods are either based on steady-state gene expression data or their statistical properties are not analysed. Here, two sparse penalties, adaptive least absolute shrinkage and selection operator and smoothly clipped absolute deviation, are proposed to infer GRNs from time-course gene expression data based on an auto-regressive model and their Oracle properties are proved under mild conditions. The effectiveness of those methods is demonstrated by applications to in silico and real biological data. PMID:25569860

  8. A computational study of routing algorithms for realistic transportation networks

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, R.; Marathe, M.V.; Nagel, K.

    1998-12-01

    The authors carry out an experimental analysis of a number of shortest path (routing) algorithms investigated in the context of the TRANSIMS (Transportation Analysis and Simulation System) project. The main focus of the paper is to study how various heuristic and exact solutions, associated data structures affected the computational performance of the software developed especially for realistic transportation networks. For this purpose the authors have used Dallas Fort-Worth road network with very high degree of resolution. The following general results are obtained: (1) they discuss and experimentally analyze various one-one shortest path algorithms, which include classical exact algorithms studied in the literature as well as heuristic solutions that are designed to take into account the geometric structure of the input instances; (2) they describe a number of extensions to the basic shortest path algorithm. These extensions were primarily motivated by practical problems arising in TRANSIMS and ITS (Intelligent Transportation Systems) related technologies. Extensions discussed include--(i) time dependent networks, (ii) multi-modal networks, (iii) networks with public transportation and associated schedules. Computational results are provided to empirically compare the efficiency of various algorithms. The studies indicate that a modified Dijkstra`s algorithm is computationally fast and an excellent candidate for use in various transportation planning applications as well as ITS related technologies.

  9. Recurrent Neural Network for Computing the Drazin Inverse.

    PubMed

    Stanimirovic, Predrag S; Zivkovic, Ivan S; Wei, Yimin

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a recurrent neural network (RNN) for computing the Drazin inverse of a real matrix in real time. This recurrent neural network (RNN) is composed of n independent parts (subnetworks), where n is the order of the input matrix. These subnetworks can operate concurrently, so parallel and distributed processing can be achieved. In this way, the computational advantages over the existing sequential algorithms can be attained in real-time applications. The RNN defined in this paper is convenient for an implementation in an electronic circuit. The number of neurons in the neural network is the same as the number of elements in the output matrix, which represents the Drazin inverse. The difference between the proposed RNN and the existing ones for the Drazin inverse computation lies in their network architecture and dynamics. The conditions that ensure the stability of the defined RNN as well as its convergence toward the Drazin inverse are considered. In addition, illustrative examples and examples of application to the practical engineering problems are discussed to show the efficacy of the proposed neural network. PMID:25706892

  10. Identifying failure in a tree network of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J. (Rochester, MN); Pinnow, Kurt W. (Rochester, MN); Wallenfelt, Brian P. (Eden Prairie, MN)

    2010-08-24

    Methods, parallel computers, and products are provided for identifying failure in a tree network of a parallel computer. The parallel computer includes one or more processing sets including an I/O node and a plurality of compute nodes. For each processing set embodiments include selecting a set of test compute nodes, the test compute nodes being a subset of the compute nodes of the processing set; measuring the performance of the I/O node of the processing set; measuring the performance of the selected set of test compute nodes; calculating a current test value in dependence upon the measured performance of the I/O node of the processing set, the measured performance of the set of test compute nodes, and a predetermined value for I/O node performance; and comparing the current test value with a predetermined tree performance threshold. If the current test value is below the predetermined tree performance threshold, embodiments include selecting another set of test compute nodes. If the current test value is not below the predetermined tree performance threshold, embodiments include selecting from the test compute nodes one or more potential problem nodes and testing individually potential problem nodes and links to potential problem nodes.

  11. Universal computation by networks of model cortical columns Patrick Simen

    E-print Network

    Lewis, Richard

    of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan Email: psimen@eecs.umich.edu Thad Polk and Rick Lewis Psychology Dept. University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan Eric Freedman Psychology Dept. University of Michigan Flint the computational power of networks of columns and show that every Turing machine maps in a straightforward fashion

  12. THE LEARNINGONLINE NETWORK WITH COMPUTER-ASSISTED PERSONALIZED

    E-print Network

    THE LEARNINGONLINE NETWORK WITH COMPUTER-ASSISTED PERSONALIZED APPROACH (LON-CAPA) Gerd Kortemeyer-Assisted Personalized Approach (LON-CAPA.) The roots of this system go back ten years, when a group of faculty and child ecology, geology, human food and nutrition, human medicine, mathematics, medical technology

  13. aiVIS Artificial Immune Network Visualisation Computing Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Kent, University of

    The field of Artificial Immune Systems (AIS) is the use of the natural immune system as a metaphor: immune networks, self organising maps, exploratory data analysis, artificial immune systems, cluster to Computer Scientists (Paton, 1994). Recently, increased use has been made of the natural immune system

  14. An Analysis of Attitudes toward Computer Networks and Internet Addiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Chin-Chung; Lin, Sunny S. J.

    The purpose of this study was to explore the interplay between young people's attitudes toward computer networks and Internet addiction. After analyzing questionnaire responses of an initial sample of 615 Taiwanese high school students, 78 subjects, viewed as possible Internet addicts, were selected for further explorations. It was found that…

  15. Quantum Cryptographic Network based on Quantum Memories Computer Science Department

    E-print Network

    Biham, Eli

    Quantum Cryptographic Network based on Quantum Memories Eli Biham Computer Science Department transmission of information. We present a quantum cryptographic system, in which users store particles in the same center. Unlike other quantum cryptographic systems, it can work without quantum channels

  16. Journal of Network and Computer Applications 30 (2007) 823840

    E-print Network

    Chen, Shigang

    2007-01-01

    .ufl.edu (Y. Tang), wedu@ecs.syr.edu (W. Du). #12;SYN flooding attack (Schuba et al., 1997), and the UDP flooding attack (Gibson, 2002). Besides the one-packet kills, most DoS attacks flood the serversJournal of Network and Computer Applications 30 (2007) 823­840 Stateful DDoS attacks and targeted

  17. Computational Intelligence in Multimedia Networking and Communications: Trends and

    E-print Network

    Guturu, Parthasarathy

    Computational Intelligence in Multimedia Networking and Communications: Trends and Future and future directions of research are also presented. 1 Introduction We currently live in an age of information revolution. With high impact ap- plications launched every day in various fields such as e-commerce

  18. UNIVERSITE DE MONTREAL PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT OF CLOUD COMPUTING NETWORKS

    E-print Network

    Meunier, Michel

    ´EPARTEMENT DE G´ENIE ´ELECTRIQUE ´ECOLE POLYTECHNIQUE DE MONTR´EAL TH`ESE PR´ESENT´EE EN VUE DE L'OBTENTION DU OF CLOUD COMPUTING NETWORKS pr´esent´ee par: LARUMBE Federico en vue de l'obtention du dipl^ome de

  19. Computer aided nonlinear electrical networks analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slapnicar, P.

    1977-01-01

    Techniques used in simulating an electrical circuit with nonlinear elements for use in computer-aided circuit analysis programs are described. Elements of the circuit include capacitors, resistors, inductors, transistors, diodes, and voltage and current sources (constant or time varying). Simulation features are discussed for dc, ac, and/or transient circuit analysis. Calculations are based on the model approach of formulating the circuit equations. A particular solution of transient analysis for nonlinear storage elements is described.

  20. The relationship among self-regulation, internet use, and academic achievement in a computer literacy course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YangKim, SungHee

    This research was a correlational study of the relationship among self-regulation, students' nonacademic internet browsing, and academic achievement in an undergraduate computer literacy class. Nonacademic internet browsing during class can be a distraction from student academic studies. There has been little research on the role of self-regulation on nonacademic internet browsing in influencing academic achievement. Undergraduate computer literacy classes were used as samples (n= 39) for measuring these variables. Data were collected during three class periods in two sections of the computer literacy course taught by one instructor. The data consisted of a demographic survey, selected and modified items from the GVU 10th WWW User Survey Questionnaire, selected items of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire, and measures of internet use. There were low correlations between self-regulation and academic grades (r= .18, p > .05) and self-regulation and internet use (r= -.14, p > .05). None of the correlations were statistically significant. Also, there was no statistically significant correlation between internet use and academic achievement (r= -.23, p >.05). Self-regulation was highly correlated to self-efficacy (r= .53, p < .05). Total internet access was highly correlated to nonacademic related internet browsing (r= .96, p < .01). Although not statistically significant, the consistent negative correlations between nonacademic internet use with both self-regulation and achievement indicate that the internet may present an attractive distraction to achievement which may be due to lack of self-regulation. The implication of embedded instruction of self-regulation in the computer literacy course was discussed to enhance self-regulated internet use. Further study of interaction of self-regulated internet use and academic achievement is recommended.

  1. Predicting Student Performance in a Computer-Assisted Instruction Communication Center Operator Course in the Marine Corps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skiles, Stephen C.

    This study investigated the utility of aptitude and learning rates for initial study units as predictors of time-to-mastery in an individualized, mastery-based course taught largely by TICCIT (Time-Shared, Interactive, Computer-Controlled Information Television) computer assisted instruction. A TICCIT student station includes a color television, a…

  2. Matlab CourseHands-on workshop The computer is a tool at the heart of science: writing articles, analyzing and

    E-print Network

    Hoepffner, Jérôme

    Matlab CourseHands-on workshop The computer is a tool at the heart of science: writing articles and complex, and stored in the memory of computers. It is clear that special programming skills are needed to manipulate this data; on one hand to visualize it (data must be seen), and on the other hand to extract

  3. A quantum neural network computes its own relative phase

    E-print Network

    E. C. Behrman; J. E. Steck

    2013-01-13

    Complete characterization of the state of a quantum system made up of subsystems requires determination of relative phase, because of interference effects between the subsystems. For a system of qubits used as a quantum computer this is especially vital, because the entanglement, which is the basis for the quantum advantage in computing, depends intricately on phase. We present here a first step towards that determination, in which we use a two-qubit quantum system as a quantum neural network, which is trained to compute and output its own relative phase.

  4. Blogging within a Social Networking Site as a Form of Literature Response in a Teacher Education Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchison, Amy; Wang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to document how pre-service teachers in a children's literature course experienced blogging on a social networking site as a form of literature response. Understanding how pre-service teachers experience these tools can inform the ways we instruct them to integrate Web 2.0 tools into their teaching.…

  5. Global tree network for computing structures enabling global processing operations

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich; Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Chen, Dong (Croton-On-Hudson, NY); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E. (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Hoenicke, Dirk (Ossining, NY); Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D. (Mount Kisco, NY); Takken, Todd E. (Mount Kisco, NY); Vranas, Pavlos M. (Bedford Hills, NY)

    2010-01-19

    A system and method for enabling high-speed, low-latency global tree network communications among processing nodes interconnected according to a tree network structure. The global tree network enables collective reduction operations to be performed during parallel algorithm operations executing in a computer structure having a plurality of the interconnected processing nodes. Router devices are included that interconnect the nodes of the tree via links to facilitate performance of low-latency global processing operations at nodes of the virtual tree and sub-tree structures. The global operations performed include one or more of: broadcast operations downstream from a root node to leaf nodes of a virtual tree, reduction operations upstream from leaf nodes to the root node in the virtual tree, and point-to-point message passing from any node to the root node. The global tree network is configurable to provide global barrier and interrupt functionality in asynchronous or synchronized manner, and, is physically and logically partitionable.

  6. Reduction of dynamical biochemical reactions networks in computational biology

    PubMed Central

    Radulescu, O.; Gorban, A. N.; Zinovyev, A.; Noel, V.

    2012-01-01

    Biochemical networks are used in computational biology, to model mechanistic details of systems involved in cell signaling, metabolism, and regulation of gene expression. Parametric and structural uncertainty, as well as combinatorial explosion are strong obstacles against analyzing the dynamics of large models of this type. Multiscaleness, an important property of these networks, can be used to get past some of these obstacles. Networks with many well separated time scales, can be reduced to simpler models, in a way that depends only on the orders of magnitude and not on the exact values of the kinetic parameters. The main idea used for such robust simplifications of networks is the concept of dominance among model elements, allowing hierarchical organization of these elements according to their effects on the network dynamics. This concept finds a natural formulation in tropical geometry. We revisit, in the light of these new ideas, the main approaches to model reduction of reaction networks, such as quasi-steady state (QSS) and quasi-equilibrium approximations (QE), and provide practical recipes for model reduction of linear and non-linear networks. We also discuss the application of model reduction to the problem of parameter identification, via backward pruning machine learning techniques. PMID:22833754

  7. Computational and experimental approaches for modeling gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Goutsias, J; Lee, N H

    2007-01-01

    To understand most cellular processes, one must understand how genetic information is processed. A formidable challenge is the dissection of gene regulatory networks to delineate how eukaryotic cells coordinate and govern patterns of gene expression that ultimately lead to a phenotype. In this paper, we review several approaches for modeling eukaryotic gene regulatory networks and for reverse engineering such networks from experimental observations. Since we are interested in elucidating the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms of colon cancer progression, we use this important biological problem to illustrate various aspects of modeling gene regulation. We discuss four important models: gene networks, transcriptional regulatory systems, Boolean networks, and dynamical Bayesian networks. We review state-of-the-art functional genomics techniques, such as gene expression profiling, cis-regulatory element identification, TF target gene identification, and gene silencing by RNA interference, which can be used to extract information about gene regulation. We can employ this information, in conjunction with appropriately designed reverse engineering algorithms, to construct a computational model of gene regulation that sufficiently predicts experimental observations. In the last part of this review, we focus on the problem of reverse engineering transcriptional regulatory networks by gene perturbations. We mathematically formulate this problem and discuss the role of experimental resolution in our ability to reconstruct accurate models of gene regulation. We conclude, by discussing a promising approach for inferring a transcriptional regulatory system from microarray data obtained by gene perturbations. PMID:17504165

  8. Computation emerges from adaptive synchronization of networking neurons.

    PubMed

    Zanin, Massimiliano; Del Pozo, Francisco; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    The activity of networking neurons is largely characterized by the alternation of synchronous and asynchronous spiking sequences. One of the most relevant challenges that scientists are facing today is, then, relating that evidence with the fundamental mechanisms through which the brain computes and processes information, as well as with the arousal (or progress) of a number of neurological illnesses. In other words, the problem is how to associate an organized dynamics of interacting neural assemblies to a computational task. Here we show that computation can be seen as a feature emerging from the collective dynamics of an ensemble of networking neurons, which interact by means of adaptive dynamical connections. Namely, by associating logical states to synchronous neuron's dynamics, we show how the usual Boolean logics can be fully recovered, and a universal Turing machine can be constructed. Furthermore, we show that, besides the static binary gates, a wider class of logical operations can be efficiently constructed as the fundamental computational elements interact within an adaptive network, each operation being represented by a specific motif. Our approach qualitatively differs from the past attempts to encode information and compute with complex systems, where computation was instead the consequence of the application of control loops enforcing a desired state into the specific system's dynamics. Being the result of an emergent process, the computation mechanism here described is not limited to a binary Boolean logic, but it can involve a much larger number of states. As such, our results can enlighten new concepts for the understanding of the real computing processes taking place in the brain. PMID:22073167

  9. Policy on Appropriate Use of Computer and Network Resources Policy on Appropriate Use of

    E-print Network

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    , computer laboratory equipment, workstations, Internet connection(s), cable television plant, University, appropriate, hacking, misuse. #12;Policy on Appropriate Use of Computer and Network Resources Page 2 3

  10. On the Relationship Between Supply Chain and Transportation Network Equilibria: A Supernetwork Equivalence with Computations

    E-print Network

    Nagurney, Anna

    On the Relationship Between Supply Chain and Transportation Network Equilibria: A Supernetwork Equivalence with Computations Anna Nagurney Department of Finance and Operations Management Isenberg School the relationship between supply chain network equi- librium and transportation network equilibrium. We demonstrate

  11. Rules of the Road for Users of Smithsonian Computers and Networks

    E-print Network

    Miller, Scott

    Rules of the Road for Users of Smithsonian Computers and Networks Introduction Smithsonian systems, networks and other computer resources are shared among Smithsonian employees, interns, visiting scholars, contractors, and volunteers. SInet provides access to Smithsonian application systems that operate

  12. A Programming Methodology for Designing Block Recursive Algorithms on Various Computer Networks

    E-print Network

    Chung, Yeh-Ching

    A Programming Methodology for Designing Block Recursive Algorithms on Various Computer Networks as the framework of a programming methodology for designing block recursive algorithms on various computer networks formulas using induction. Keywords: programming methodology, tensor product, block recursive algorithm

  13. A RECONFIGURABLE COMPUTING ARCHITECTURE FOR IMPLEMENTING ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS ON FPGA

    E-print Network

    Areibi, Shawki M

    A RECONFIGURABLE COMPUTING ARCHITECTURE FOR IMPLEMENTING ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS ON FPGA Kristian Nichols, 2004 #12;ABSTRACT A RECONFIGURABLE COMPUTING ARCHITECTURE FOR IMPLEMENTING ARTIFICIAL Professor Shawki Areibi Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), and the backpropagation algorithm in particular

  14. Computing Path Tables for Quickest Multipaths In Computer Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Grimmell, W.C.

    2004-12-21

    We consider the transmission of a message from a source node to a terminal node in a network with n nodes and m links where the message is divided into parts and each part is transmitted over a different path in a set of paths from the source node to the terminal node. Here each link is characterized by a bandwidth and delay. The set of paths together with their transmission rates used for the message is referred to as a multipath. We present two algorithms that produce a minimum-end-to-end message delay multipath path table that, for every message length, specifies a multipath that will achieve the minimum end-to-end delay. The algorithms also generate a function that maps the minimum end-to-end message delay to the message length. The time complexities of the algorithms are O(n{sup 2}((n{sup 2}/logn) + m)min(D{sub max}, C{sub max})) and O(nm(C{sub max} + nmin(D{sub max}, C{sub max}))) when the link delays and bandwidths are non-negative integers. Here D{sub max} and C{sub max} are respectively the maximum link delay and maximum link bandwidth and C{sub max} and D{sub max} are greater than zero.

  15. Computer Science and Engineering Pre-Professional Courses Degree Plan for Bachelor of Science Degree in Computer Science and Engineering 2006

    E-print Network

    Huang, Haiying

    System Design Project II 3 Hrs Fine Arts Elective 3 Hrs Math/Science Elective 3 Hrs Technical ElectiveComputer Science and Engineering Pre-Professional Courses Degree Plan for Bachelor of Science Degree in Computer Science and Engineering 2006 Sophomore 1st Semester 16hrs Sophomore 2nd Semester 16hrs

  16. ANU College of Engineering & Computer Science 2014 Course Selection Master of Computing 7706XMCOMP 96 units over 2 years (or p/t equivalent)

    E-print Network

    ANU College of Engineering & Computer Science 2014 Course Selection Master of Computing 7706XMCOMP taken in first year (18 units) ENGN8150 Professional Communication 1 ENGN8160 Professional Communication in Software Engineering (Spec: SE) COMP6353 (4600) Systems Engineering for Software Engineers (Spec: SE) COMP

  17. Bifurcation-based adiabatic quantum computation with a nonlinear oscillator network: Toward quantum soft computing

    E-print Network

    Hayato Goto

    2015-12-28

    The dynamics of nonlinear systems qualitatively change depending on their parameters, which is called bifurcation. A quantum-mechanical nonlinear oscillator can yield a quantum superposition of two oscillation states, known as a Schr\\"odinger cat state, via quantum adiabatic evolution through its bifurcation point. Here we propose a quantum computer comprising such quantum nonlinear oscillators, instead of quantum bits, to solve hard combinatorial optimization problems. The nonlinear oscillator network finds optimal solutions via quantum adiabatic evolution, where nonlinear terms are increased slowly, in contrast to conventional adiabatic quantum computation or quantum annealing, where quantum fluctuation terms are decreased slowly. As a result of numerical simulations, it is concluded that quantum superposition and quantum fluctuation work effectively to find optimal solutions. It is also notable that the present computer is analogous to neural computers, which are also networks of nonlinear components. Thus, the present scheme will open new possibilities for quantum computation, nonlinear science, and artificial intelligence.

  18. US computer research networks: Current and future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kratochvil, D.; Sood, D.; Verostko, A.

    1989-01-01

    During the last decade, NASA LeRC's Communication Program has conducted a series of telecommunications forecasting studies to project trends and requirements and to identify critical telecommunications technologies that must be developed to meet future requirements. The Government Networks Division of Contel Federal Systems has assisted NASA in these studies, and the current study builds upon these earlier efforts. The current major thrust of the NASA Communications Program is aimed at developing the high risk, advanced, communications satellite and terminal technologies required to significantly increase the capacity of future communications systems. Also, major new technological, economic, and social-political events and trends are now shaping the communications industry of the future. Therefore, a re-examination of future telecommunications needs and requirements is necessary to enable NASA to make management decisions in its Communications Program and to ensure the proper technologies and systems are addressed. This study, through a series of Task Orders, is helping NASA define the likely communication service needs and requirements of the future and thereby ensuring that the most appropriate technology developments are pursued.

  19. Analysis of a Campus-wide Wireless Network Department of Computer Science

    E-print Network

    Kotz, David

    Analysis of a Campus-wide Wireless Network David Kotz Department of Computer Science Dartmouth campus popu- lation, using a campus-wide network of 476 access points spread over 161 buildings. Our Descriptors C.2.1 [Computer-Communication Networks]: Network Archi- tecture and Design--Wireless communication

  20. Prediction of Student Course Selection in Online Higher Education Institutes Using Neural Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kardan, Ahmad A.; Sadeghi, Hamid; Ghidary, Saeed Shiry; Sani, Mohammad Reza Fani

    2013-01-01

    Students are required to choose courses they are interested in for the coming semester. Due to restrictions, including lack of sufficient resources and overheads of running several courses, some universities might not offer all of a student's desirable courses. Universities must know every student's demands for every course prior to each semester…

  1. Computing Tutte polynomials of contact networks in classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hincapié, Doracelly; Ospina, Juan

    2013-05-01

    Objective: The topological complexity of contact networks in classrooms and the potential transmission of an infectious disease were analyzed by sex and age. Methods: The Tutte polynomials, some topological properties and the number of spanning trees were used to algebraically compute the topological complexity. Computations were made with the Maple package GraphTheory. Published data of mutually reported social contacts within a classroom taken from primary school, consisting of children in the age ranges of 4-5, 7-8 and 10-11, were used. Results: The algebraic complexity of the Tutte polynomial and the probability of disease transmission increases with age. The contact networks are not bipartite graphs, gender segregation was observed especially in younger children. Conclusion: Tutte polynomials are tools to understand the topology of the contact networks and to derive numerical indexes of such topologies. It is possible to establish relationships between the Tutte polynomial of a given contact network and the potential transmission of an infectious disease within such network

  2. Open Problems in Network-aware Data Management in Exa-scale Computing and Terabit Networking Era

    SciTech Connect

    Balman, Mehmet; Byna, Surendra

    2011-12-06

    Accessing and managing large amounts of data is a great challenge in collaborative computing environments where resources and users are geographically distributed. Recent advances in network technology led to next-generation high-performance networks, allowing high-bandwidth connectivity. Efficient use of the network infrastructure is necessary in order to address the increasing data and compute requirements of large-scale applications. We discuss several open problems, evaluate emerging trends, and articulate our perspectives in network-aware data management.

  3. Parallelized reliability estimation of reconfigurable computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.; Das, Subhendu; Palumbo, Dan

    1990-01-01

    A parallelized system, ASSURE, for computing the reliability of embedded avionics flight control systems which are able to reconfigure themselves in the event of failure is described. ASSURE accepts a grammar that describes a reliability semi-Markov state-space. From this it creates a parallel program that simultaneously generates and analyzes the state-space, placing upper and lower bounds on the probability of system failure. ASSURE is implemented on a 32-node Intel iPSC/860, and has achieved high processor efficiencies on real problems. Through a combination of improved algorithms, exploitation of parallelism, and use of an advanced microprocessor architecture, ASSURE has reduced the execution time on substantial problems by a factor of one thousand over previous workstation implementations. Furthermore, ASSURE's parallel execution rate on the iPSC/860 is an order of magnitude faster than its serial execution rate on a Cray-2 supercomputer. While dynamic load balancing is necessary for ASSURE's good performance, it is needed only infrequently; the particular method of load balancing used does not substantially affect performance.

  4. Quantum computational tensor network on string-net condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2012-06-01

    String-net condensate is a new class of materials which exhibits quantum topological order. Here we study the measurement-based quantum computation on the simplest example of string-net condensate, namely the Z2 gauge string-net condensate on the two-dimensional hexagonal lattice, by using the framework of quantum computational tensor network. We show that universal measurement-based quantum computation is possible by coupling two correlation space wires with a physical two-body interaction. We also show that universal measurement-based quantum computation is possible solely with single-qubit measurements if the sign of the coefficient of each closed-loop configuration in the state is tuned. These results suggest that even the simplest example of string-net condensate is equipped with the correlation space that has the capacity for the application to quantum information processing.

  5. Deep Space Network (DSN), Network Operations Control Center (NOCC) computer-human interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellman, Alvin; Carlton, Magdi

    1993-01-01

    The Network Operations Control Center (NOCC) of the DSN is responsible for scheduling the resources of DSN, and monitoring all multi-mission spacecraft tracking activities in real-time. Operations performs this job with computer systems at JPL connected to over 100 computers at Goldstone, Australia and Spain. The old computer system became obsolete, and the first version of the new system was installed in 1991. Significant improvements for the computer-human interfaces became the dominant theme for the replacement project. Major issues required innovating problem solving. Among these issues were: How to present several thousand data elements on displays without overloading the operator? What is the best graphical representation of DSN end-to-end data flow? How to operate the system without memorizing mnemonics of hundreds of operator directives? Which computing environment will meet the competing performance requirements? This paper presents the technical challenges, engineering solutions, and results of the NOCC computer-human interface design.

  6. Compiling gate networks on an Ising quantum computer

    SciTech Connect

    Bowdrey, M.D.; Jones, J.A.; Knill, E.; Laflamme, R.

    2005-09-15

    Here we describe a simple mechanical procedure for compiling a quantum gate network into the natural gates (pulses and delays) for an Ising quantum computer. The aim is not necessarily to generate the most efficient pulse sequence, but rather to develop an efficient compilation algorithm that can be easily implemented in large spin systems. The key observation is that it is not always necessary to refocus all the undesired couplings in a spin system. Instead, the coupling evolution can simply be tracked and then corrected at some later time. Although described within the language of NMR, the algorithm is applicable to any design of quantum computer based on Ising couplings.

  7. Line-plane broadcasting in a data communications network of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J. (Rochester, MN); Berg, Jeremy E. (Rochester, MN); Blocksome, Michael A. (Rochester, MN); Smith, Brian E. (Rochester, MN)

    2010-11-23

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for line-plane broadcasting in a data communications network of a parallel computer, the parallel computer comprising a plurality of compute nodes connected together through the network, the network optimized for point to point data communications and characterized by at least a first dimension, a second dimension, and a third dimension, that include: initiating, by a broadcasting compute node, a broadcast operation, including sending a message to all of the compute nodes along an axis of the first dimension for the network; sending, by each compute node along the axis of the first dimension, the message to all of the compute nodes along an axis of the second dimension for the network; and sending, by each compute node along the axis of the second dimension, the message to all of the compute nodes along an axis of the third dimension for the network.

  8. Line-plane broadcasting in a data communications network of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Berg, Jeremy E.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Smith, Brian E.

    2010-06-08

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for line-plane broadcasting in a data communications network of a parallel computer, the parallel computer comprising a plurality of compute nodes connected together through the network, the network optimized for point to point data communications and characterized by at least a first dimension, a second dimension, and a third dimension, that include: initiating, by a broadcasting compute node, a broadcast operation, including sending a message to all of the compute nodes along an axis of the first dimension for the network; sending, by each compute node along the axis of the first dimension, the message to all of the compute nodes along an axis of the second dimension for the network; and sending, by each compute node along the axis of the second dimension, the message to all of the compute nodes along an axis of the third dimension for the network.

  9. The role of computer networks in remote sensing data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swain, P. H.; Phillips, T. L.; Lindenlaub, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that computer networks can be used to make data processing facilities available to the remote sensing community both quickly and effectively. An experiment to test this hypothesis is being conducted by the Laboratory for Applications of Remote Sensing at Purdue University, with the participation of potential users at several remote sites. Initial indications have been highly favorable, although final evaluation awaits further experience and the accumulation of usage data.

  10. Inference of gene interaction networks using conserved subsequential patterns from multiple time course gene expression datasets

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Motivation Deciphering gene interaction networks (GINs) from time-course gene expression (TCGx) data is highly valuable to understand gene behaviors (e.g., activation, inhibition, time-lagged causality) at the system level. Existing methods usually use a global or local proximity measure to infer GINs from a single dataset. As the noise contained in a single data set is hardly self-resolved, the results are sometimes not reliable. Also, these proximity measurements cannot handle the co-existence of the various in vivo positive, negative and time-lagged gene interactions. Methods and results We propose to infer reliable GINs from multiple TCGx datasets using a novel conserved subsequential pattern of gene expression. A subsequential pattern is a maximal subset of genes sharing positive, negative or time-lagged correlations of one expression template on their own subsets of time points. Based on these patterns, a GIN can be built from each of the datasets. It is assumed that reliable gene interactions would be detected repeatedly. We thus use conserved gene pairs from the individual GINs of the multiple TCGx datasets to construct a reliable GIN for a species. We apply our method on six TCGx datasets related to yeast cell cycle, and validate the reliable GINs using protein interaction networks, biopathways and transcription factor-gene regulations. We also compare the reliable GINs with those GINs reconstructed by a global proximity measure Pearson correlation coefficient method from single datasets. It has been demonstrated that our reliable GINs achieve much better prediction performance especially with much higher precision. The functional enrichment analysis also suggests that gene sets in a reliable GIN are more functionally significant. Our method is especially useful to decipher GINs from multiple TCGx datasets related to less studied organisms where little knowledge is available except gene expression data. PMID:26681650

  11. Using FarmVille in an Introductory Managerial Accounting Course to Engage Students, Enhance Comprehension, and Develop Social Networking Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krom, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the use of the free Zynga computer game FarmVille, which is played in conjunction with Facebook[R], to facilitate active learning in a managerial accounting course. Results indicate that it invokes an improved understanding of the accounting content, particularly among nonaccounting majors; a high level of student…

  12. A group LASSO-based method for robustly inferring gene regulatory networks from multiple time-course datasets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As an abstract mapping of the gene regulations in the cell, gene regulatory network is important to both biological research study and practical applications. The reverse engineering of gene regulatory networks from microarray gene expression data is a challenging research problem in systems biology. With the development of biological technologies, multiple time-course gene expression datasets might be collected for a specific gene network under different circumstances. The inference of a gene regulatory network can be improved by integrating these multiple datasets. It is also known that gene expression data may be contaminated with large errors or outliers, which may affect the inference results. Results A novel method, Huber group LASSO, is proposed to infer the same underlying network topology from multiple time-course gene expression datasets as well as to take the robustness to large error or outliers into account. To solve the optimization problem involved in the proposed method, an efficient algorithm which combines the ideas of auxiliary function minimization and block descent is developed. A stability selection method is adapted to our method to find a network topology consisting of edges with scores. The proposed method is applied to both simulation datasets and real experimental datasets. It shows that Huber group LASSO outperforms the group LASSO in terms of both areas under receiver operating characteristic curves and areas under the precision-recall curves. Conclusions The convergence analysis of the algorithm theoretically shows that the sequence generated from the algorithm converges to the optimal solution of the problem. The simulation and real data examples demonstrate the effectiveness of the Huber group LASSO in integrating multiple time-course gene expression datasets and improving the resistance to large errors or outliers. PMID:25350697

  13. An effective method for computing the noise in biochemical networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiajun; Nie, Qing; He, Miao; Zhou, Tianshou

    2013-01-01

    We present a simple yet effective method, which is based on power series expansion, for computing exact binomial moments that can be in turn used to compute steady-state probability distributions as well as the noise in linear or nonlinear biochemical reaction networks. When the method is applied to representative reaction networks such as the ON-OFF models of gene expression, gene models of promoter progression, gene auto-regulatory models, and common signaling motifs, the exact formulae for computing the intensities of noise in the species of interest or steady-state distributions are analytically given. Interestingly, we find that positive (negative) feedback does not enlarge (reduce) noise as claimed in previous works but has a counter-intuitive effect and that the multi-OFF (or ON) mechanism always attenuates the noise in contrast to the common ON-OFF mechanism and can modulate the noise to the lowest level independently of the mRNA mean. Except for its power in deriving analytical expressions for distributions and noise, our method is programmable and has apparent advantages in reducing computational cost. PMID:23464139

  14. Measures of effectiveness for BMD mid-course tracking on MIMD massively parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    VanDyke, J.P.; Tomkins, J.L.; Furnish, M.D.

    1995-05-01

    The TRC code, a mid-course tracking code for ballistic missiles, has previously been implemented on a 1024-processor MIMD (Multiple Instruction -- Multiple Data) massively parallel computer. Measures of Effectiveness (MOE) for this algorithm have been developed for this computing environment. The MOE code is run in parallel with the TRC code. Particularly useful MOEs include the number of missed objects (real objects for which the TRC algorithm did not construct a track); of ghost tracks (tracks not corresponding to a real object); of redundant tracks (multiple tracks corresponding to a single real object); and of unresolved objects (multiple objects corresponding to a single track). All of these are expressed as a function of time, and tend to maximize during the time in which real objects are spawned (multiple reentry vehicles per post-boost vehicle). As well, it is possible to measure the track-truth separation as a function of time. A set of calculations is presented illustrating these MOEs as a function of time for a case with 99 post-boost vehicles, each of which spawns 9 reentry vehicles.

  15. New parallel vision environment in heterogeneous networked computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung N.; Choi, Tae-Sun; Ramakrishna, R. S.

    1998-09-01

    Many vision tasks are very complex and computationally intensive. Real time requirements further aggravate the situation. They usually involve both structured (low-level vision) and unstructured (high-level vision) computations. Parallel approaches offer hope in this context. Parallel approaches to vision tasks and scheduling schemes for their implementation receive special emphasis in this paper. Architectural issues are also addressed. The aim is to design algorithms which can be implemented on low cost heterogeneous networks running PVM. Issues connected with general purpose architectures also receive attention. The proposed ideas have been illustrated through a practical example (of eye location from an image sequence). Next generation multimedia environments are expected to routinely employ such high performance computing platforms.

  16. Report on Computing and Networking in the Space Science Laboratory by the SSL Computer Committee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L. (editor)

    1993-01-01

    The Space Science Laboratory (SSL) at Marshall Space Flight Center is a multiprogram facility. Scientific research is conducted in four discipline areas: earth science and applications, solar-terrestrial physics, astrophysics, and microgravity science and applications. Representatives from each of these discipline areas participate in a Laboratory computer requirements committee, which developed this document. The purpose is to establish and discuss Laboratory objectives for computing and networking in support of science. The purpose is also to lay the foundation for a collective, multiprogram approach to providing these services. Special recognition is given to the importance of the national and international efforts of our research communities toward the development of interoperable, network-based computer applications.

  17. Brain without mind: Computer simulation of neural networks with modifiable neuronal interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, John W.; Rafelski, Johann; Winston, Jeffrey V.

    1985-07-01

    Aspects of brain function are examined in terms of a nonlinear dynamical system of highly interconnected neuron-like binary decision elements. The model neurons operate synchronously in discrete time, according to deterministic or probabilistic equations of motion. Plasticity of the nervous system, which underlies such cognitive collective phenomena as adaptive development, learning, and memory, is represented by temporal modification of interneuronal connection strengths depending on momentary or recent neural activity. A formal basis is presented for the construction of local plasticity algorithms, or connection-modification routines, spanning a large class. To build an intuitive understanding of the behavior of discrete-time network models, extensive computer simulations have been carried out (a) for nets with fixed, quasirandom connectivity and (b) for nets with connections that evolve under one or another choice of plasticity algorithm. From the former experiments, insights are gained concerning the spontaneous emergence of order in the form of cyclic modes of neuronal activity. In the course of the latter experiments, a simple plasticity routine (“brainwashing,” or “anti-learning”) was identified which, applied to nets with initially quasirandom connectivity, creates model networks which provide more felicitous starting points for computer experiments on the engramming of content-addressable memories and on learning more generally. The potential relevance of this algorithm to developmental neurobiology and to sleep states is discussed. The model considered is at the same time a synthesis of earlier synchronous neural-network models and an elaboration upon them; accordingly, the present article offers both a focused review of the dynamical properties of such systems and a selection of new findings derived from computer simulation.

  18. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING NETWORK: COMPUTATION IN NEURAL SYSTEMS Network: Comput. Neural Syst. 12 (2001) 141174 www.iop.org/Journals/ne PII: S0954-898X(01)22486-5

    E-print Network

    Nykamp, Duane Q.

    2001-01-01

    INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING NETWORK: COMPUTATION IN NEURAL SYSTEMS Network: Comput. Neural Syst population, one calculates the evolution of a probability density function (PDF) which describes role in network dynamics. Embellishments incorporating more realistic synaptic kinetics

  19. Students at the University of Abertay Dundee Learn Computer Hacking to Defend Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vance, Erik

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a new cybersecurity course at the University of Abertay Dundee in Scotland. Geoffrey R. Lund, leader of the software-applications program at Abertay, says the course prepares students for a rapidly growing job market by teaching that the best defense is a good offense. Professors set up a network of 20 or so…

  20. Reconfigurable modular computer networks for spacecraft on-board processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rennels, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    The core electronics subsystems on unmanned spacecraft, which have been sent over the last 20 years to investigate the moon, Mars, Venus, and Mercury, have progressed through an evolution from simple fixed controllers and analog computers in the 1960's to general-purpose digital computers in current designs. This evolution is now moving in the direction of distributed computer networks. Current Voyager spacecraft already use three on-board computers. One is used to store commands and provide overall spacecraft management. Another is used for instrument control and telemetry collection, and the third computer is used for attitude control and scientific instrument pointing. An examination of the control logic in the instruments shows that, for many, it is cost-effective to replace the sequencing logic with a microcomputer. The Unified Data System architecture considered consists of a set of standard microcomputers connected by several redundant buses. A typical self-checking computer module will contain 23 RAMs, two microprocessors, one memory interface, three bus interfaces, and one core building block.

  1. Use of a New "Moodle" Module for Improving the Teaching of a Basic Course on Computer Architecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trenas, M. A.; Ramos, J.; Gutierrez, E. D.; Romero, S.; Corbera, F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes how a new "Moodle" module, called "CTPracticals", is applied to the teaching of the practical content of a basic computer organization course. In the core of the module, an automatic verification engine enables it to process the VHDL designs automatically as they are submitted. Moreover, a straightforward modification of this…

  2. Problem-Based Learning Environment in Basic Computer Course: Pre-Service Teachers' Achievement and Key Factors for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Efendioglu, Akin

    2015-01-01

    This experimental study aims to determine pre-service teachers' achievements and key factors that affect the learning process with regard to problem-based learning (PBL) and lecture-based computer course (LBCC) conditions. The research results showed that the pre-service teachers in the PBL group had significantly higher achievement scores than…

  3. Computer-Mediated Word-of-Mouth Communication: The Influence of Mixed Reviews on Student Perceptions of Instructors and Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Autumn; Edwards, Chad

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to test the influence of mixed reviews appearing as computer-mediated word-of-mouth communication (WOM) on student perceptions of instructors (attractiveness and credibility) and attitudes toward learning course content (affective learning and state motivation). Using the heuristic-systematic processing model, it…

  4. Applying Web-Based Co-Regulated Learning to Develop Students' Learning and Involvement in a Blended Computing Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Chia-Wen

    2015-01-01

    This research investigated, via quasi-experiments, the effects of web-based co-regulated learning (CRL) on developing students' computing skills. Two classes of 68 undergraduates in a one-semester course titled "Applied Information Technology: Data Processing" were chosen for this research. The first class (CRL group, n = 38) received…

  5. Effects of Computer Assisted Instruction on Students' Attitudes towards Science Courses in Turkey: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tekbiyik, Ahmet; Birinci Konur, Kader; Pirasa, Nimet

    2008-01-01

    Many primary studies have been performed to reveal the effects of computer assisted instruction (CAI) on students' attitudes towards science courses. In determining the effectiveness of these studies, gathering and evaluating of the studies at some characteristics play an important role. The aim of this study is to determine meta-analytically the…

  6. Reflective Behaviors under a Web-Based Portfolio Assessment Environment for High School Students in a Computer Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Chi-Cheng; Chen, Cheng-Chuan; Chen, Yi-Hui

    2012-01-01

    This research attempted to categorize reflection in a Web-based portfolio assessment using the Chinese Word Segmenting System (CWSS). Another aim of this research was to explore reflective performance in which individual differences were further examined. Participants were 45 eight-grade students from a junior high school taking a computer course.…

  7. Implementation of Service Learning and Civic Engagement for Computer Information Systems Students through a Course Project at the Hashemite University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Khasawneh, Ahmad; Hammad, Bashar K.

    2013-01-01

    Service learning methodologies provide information systems students with the opportunity to create and implement systems in real-world, public service-oriented social contexts. This paper presents a case study of integrating a service learning project into an undergraduate Computer Information Systems course titled "Information Systems"…

  8. NEW COURSE NUMBER: ENG ME 585 ENG. MN 585 Interactive Computation for CAD/CAM Fall 2006

    E-print Network

    Lin, Xi

    NEW COURSE NUMBER: ENG ME 585 ENG. MN 585 Interactive Computation for CAD/CAM Fall 2006 Instructor/internet technology with CAD/CAM to provide an integrated platform for factory automation. No prior knowledge a various level of automation, b. Each automated sub-processes may incorporate a universal or customized CAD

  9. The Effects of Cooperative and Individualistic Learning Structures on Achievement in a College-Level Computer-Aided Drafting Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swab, A. Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    This study of cooperative learning in post-secondary engineering education investigated achievement of engineering students enrolled in two intact sections of a computer-aided drafting (CAD) course. Quasi-experimental and qualitative methods were employed in comparing student achievement resulting from out-of-class cooperative and individualistic…

  10. The Effect of Interactive e-Book on Students' Achievement at Najran University in Computer in Education Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebied, Mohammed Mohammed Ahmed; Rahman, Shimaa Ahmed Abdul

    2015-01-01

    The current study aims to examine the effect of interactive e-books on students' achievement at Najran University in computer in education course. Quasi-experimental study design is used in the study and to collect data the researchers built achievement test to measure the dependent variable represented in the achievement affected by experimental…

  11. Exploring Students Intentions to Study Computer Science and Identifying the Differences among ICT and Programming Based Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giannakos, Michail N.

    2014-01-01

    Computer Science (CS) courses comprise both Programming and Information and Communication Technology (ICT) issues; however these two areas have substantial differences, inter alia the attitudes and beliefs of the students regarding the intended learning content. In this research, factors from the Social Cognitive Theory and Unified Theory of…

  12. Development, Implementation, and Cost-Assessment of an Integrated Computer-Assisted Instruction Course on Drug Interactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Narducci, Warren A.

    1985-01-01

    A study of the feasibility of using integrated, computer-assisted instruction in a drug interaction course revealed that despite the high initial time and financial investment, the potential educational benefits and high student acceptance of the instruction supports its application in other curriculum areas. (MSE)

  13. A Computer-Assisted Instruction Course on Laboratory Detection of Malarial Parasites in Human Blood. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitzel, Harold E.

    In cooperation with the United States Navy, this project was undertaken to examine the feasibility of computer assisted instruction in clinical malaria recognition, to train a small group of Naval personnel in techniques of creating and presenting such material, and to evaluate the course by giving it to a representative sample of Naval medical…

  14. Effects of Computer-Aided Personalized System of Instruction in Developing Knowledge and Critical Thinking in Blended Learning Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svenningsen, Louis; Pear, Joseph J.

    2011-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to assess an online version of Keller's personalized system of instruction, called computer-aided personalized system of instruction (CAPSI), as part of a blended learning design with regard to course knowledge and critical thinking development. In Experiment 1, two lecture sections of an introduction to University…

  15. Network Monitoring and Fault Detection on the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Campus Computer Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sng, Dennis Cheng-Hong

    The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) has a large campus computer network serving a community of about 20,000 users. With such a large network, it is inevitable that there are a wide variety of technologies co-existing in a multi-vendor environment. Effective network monitoring tools can help monitor traffic and link usage, as well…

  16. Advances in Computer Network Timekeeping NSF Division of Network and Computer Reserach Grant NCR9301002

    E-print Network

    Mills, David L.

    by contracts and grants from DARPA ITO, U.S. Naval Surface Weapons Center and U.S. Army Research Laboratories common points of failure and dealing with sometimes cranky Unix kernels and computer clocks with la

  17. Basic and Advanced Science and Technology Academies of Research Computer Technology Course

    E-print Network

    Challinger, Judy

    course and uses portions of courseware provided by Hewlett Packard Systems. Course topics will include completion of the course the student will: · Be able to disassemble a PC by removing all internal components of the flow of information between the various components during the execution of an application. · Be aware

  18. Teaching Advanced Concepts in Computer Networks: VNUML-UM Virtualization Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Pereniguez-Garcia, F.; Marin-Lopez, R.; Ruiz-Martinez, P. M.; Skarmeta-Gomez, A. F.

    2013-01-01

    In the teaching of computer networks the main problem that arises is the high price and limited number of network devices the students can work with in the laboratories. Nowadays, with virtualization we can overcome this limitation. In this paper, we present a methodology that allows students to learn advanced computer network concepts through…

  19. Teachers, Computer Networks, and the Internet at TechCity High.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robins, Jenny

    Where other educational technologies like television, the VCR and the stand-alone computer have failed to have much of an impact in public schools, local school networks and the Internet have been succeeding. As of 1997, 89% of America's high schools were connected to a computer network. This paper presents a view of network technology from the…

  20. Marie Curie Initial Training Network in Advanced Techniques in Computational Mechanics Page 1 of 4

    E-print Network

    Huerta, Antonio

    Marie Curie Initial Training Network in Advanced Techniques in Computational Mechanics ATCoMe Page): ....................................... ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... #12;Marie Curie Initial Training Network in Advanced Techniques in Computational Mechanics ATCoMe Page Speaking Reading Writing English French Spanish German Portuguese #12;Marie Curie Initial Training Network

  1. Networking & the Internet No computer is an island --it needs to talk to other

    E-print Network

    Dahlquist, Kam D.

    Networking & the Internet · No computer is an island -- it needs to talk to other computers "telling a machine how to do things," the specialty of networking is all about "telling a machine how, to name a few · The Internet is a network...which happens to be very wide area, based on open technologies

  2. Computationally efficient measure of topological redundancy of biological and social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Réka; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Hegde, Rashmi; Sivanathan, Gowri Sangeetha; Gitter, Anthony; Gürsoy, Gamze; Paul, Pradyut; Sontag, Eduardo

    2011-09-01

    It is well known that biological and social interaction networks have a varying degree of redundancy, though a consensus of the precise cause of this is so far lacking. In this paper, we introduce a topological redundancy measure for labeled directed networks that is formal, computationally efficient, and applicable to a variety of directed networks such as cellular signaling, and metabolic and social interaction networks. We demonstrate the computational efficiency of our measure by computing its value and statistical significance on a number of biological and social networks with up to several thousands of nodes and edges. Our results suggest a number of interesting observations: (1) Social networks are more redundant that their biological counterparts, (2) transcriptional networks are less redundant than signaling networks, (3) the topological redundancy of the C. elegans metabolic network is largely due to its inclusion of currency metabolites, and (4) the redundancy of signaling networks is highly (negatively) correlated with the monotonicity of their dynamics.

  3. An efficient network for interconnecting remote monitoring instruments and computers

    SciTech Connect

    Halbig, J.K.; Gainer, K.E.; Klosterbuer, S.F.

    1994-08-01

    Remote monitoring instrumentation must be connected with computers and other instruments. The cost and intrusiveness of installing cables in new and existing plants presents problems for the facility and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The authors have tested a network that could accomplish this interconnection using mass-produced commercial components developed for use in industrial applications. Unlike components in the hardware of most networks, the components--manufactured and distributed in North America, Europe, and Asia--lend themselves to small and low-powered applications. The heart of the network is a chip with three microprocessors and proprietary network software contained in Read Only Memory. In addition to all nonuser levels of protocol, the software also contains message authentication capabilities. This chip can be interfaced to a variety of transmission media, for example, RS-485 lines, fiber topic cables, rf waves, and standard ac power lines. The use of power lines as the transmission medium in a facility could significantly reduce cabling costs.

  4. The Development and Evaluation of a Teleprocessed Computer-Assisted Instruction Course in the Recognition of Malarial Parasites. Final Report; May 1, 1967 - June 30, 1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitzel, Harold E.

    A computer-assisted instruction course in the recognition of malarial parasites was developed and evaluated. The course includes stage discrimination, species discrimination, and case histories. Segments developed use COURSEWRITER as an author language and are presented via a display terminal that permits two-way communication with an IBM computer

  5. ATM Networking: Issues and Challenges Ahead Department of Computer and Information Science

    E-print Network

    Jain, Raj

    ATM Networking: Issues and Challenges Ahead Raj Jain Department of Computer and Information Science begins with a discussion of current trends in networking and a historical reviews of past networking that the users bene t from ATM networks involves several other related disciplines. These are reviewed. 1 Trend

  6. Evolving Neural Networks for Chlorophyll-a Prediction School of Computer Science

    E-print Network

    Yao, Xin

    Evolving Neural Networks for Chlorophyll-a Prediction Xin Yao School of Computer Science@u-aizu.ac.jp Abstract This paper studies the application of evolutionary arti cial neural networks to chlorophyll-a pre networks and discover novel arti cial neural networks for solving a problem. 1 Introduction Chlorophyll

  7. 10 CFR 73.54 - Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Protection of digital computer and communication systems... computer and communication systems and networks. By November 23, 2009 each licensee currently licensed to... provide high assurance that digital computer and communication systems and networks are...

  8. 10 CFR 73.54 - Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Protection of digital computer and communication systems... computer and communication systems and networks. By November 23, 2009 each licensee currently licensed to... provide high assurance that digital computer and communication systems and networks are...

  9. 10 CFR 73.54 - Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Protection of digital computer and communication systems... computer and communication systems and networks. By November 23, 2009 each licensee currently licensed to... provide high assurance that digital computer and communication systems and networks are...

  10. 10 CFR 73.54 - Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Protection of digital computer and communication systems... computer and communication systems and networks. By November 23, 2009 each licensee currently licensed to... provide high assurance that digital computer and communication systems and networks are...

  11. 10 CFR 73.54 - Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Protection of digital computer and communication systems... computer and communication systems and networks. By November 23, 2009 each licensee currently licensed to... provide high assurance that digital computer and communication systems and networks are...

  12. Comparative Analysis of Logistic Regression and Artificial Neural Network for Computer-Aided

    E-print Network

    Venkatesh, Santosh S.

    Comparative Analysis of Logistic Regression and Artificial Neural Network for Computer, MD, Chandra M. Sehgal, PhD Rationale and Objective. To compare logistic regression and artificial classifiers, logistic regression, and an artificial neural network to differentiate between malignant

  13. Including Internet insurance as part of a hospital computer network security plan.

    PubMed

    Riccardi, Ken

    2002-01-01

    Cyber attacks on a hospital's computer network is a new crime to be reckoned with. Should your hospital consider internet insurance? The author explains this new phenomenon and presents a risk assessment for determining network vulnerabilities. PMID:11951384

  14. KERNEL-BASED GENE REGULATORY NETWORK INFERENCE Department of Computing Science, University of Alberta,

    E-print Network

    Guo, Yuhong

    KERNEL-BASED GENE REGULATORY NETWORK INFERENCE Yi Shi Department of Computing Science, University regulatory networks from gene expression data that exploits several important factors previously neglected and gene competition. In particular, our approach infers regulatory relationships by encouraging genes

  15. Application of a distributed network in computational fluid dynamic simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Manish; Feng, Jinzhang; Merkle, Charles L.; Deshpande, Ashish

    1994-01-01

    A general-purpose 3-D, incompressible Navier-Stokes algorithm is implemented on a network of concurrently operating workstations using parallel virtual machine (PVM) and compared with its performance on a CRAY Y-MP and on an Intel iPSC/860. The problem is relatively computationally intensive, and has a communication structure based primarily on nearest-neighbor communication, making it ideally suited to message passing. Such problems are frequently encountered in computational fluid dynamics (CDF), and their solution is increasingly in demand. The communication structure is explicitly coded in the implementation to fully exploit the regularity in message passing in order to produce a near-optimal solution. Results are presented for various grid sizes using up to eight processors.

  16. Determination of time-course change rate for arterial xenon using the time course of tissue xenon concentration in xenon-enhanced computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Sase, Shigeru; Takahashi, Hideaki; Ikeda, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Minoru; Matsumoto, Nobuyuki; Suzuki, Michihiro

    2008-06-15

    In calculating tissue blood flow (TBF) according to the Fick principle, time-course information on arterial tracer concentration is indispensable and has a considerable influence on the accuracy of calculated TBF. In TBF measurement by xenon-enhanced computed tomography (Xe-CT), nonradioactive xenon gas is administered by inhalation as a tracer, and end-tidal xenon is used as a substitute for arterial xenon. There has been the assumption that the time-course change rate for end-tidal xenon concentration (Ke) and that for arterial xenon concentration (Ka) are substantially equal. Respiratory gas sampling is noninvasive to the patient and Ke can be easily measured by exponential curve fitting to end-tidal xenon concentrations. However, it is pointed out that there would be a large difference between Ke and Ka in many cases. The purpose of this work was to develop a method of determining the Ka value using the time course of tissue xenon concentration in Xe-CT. The authors incorporated Ka into the Kety autoradiographic equation as a parameter to be solved, and developed a method of least-squares to obtain the solution for Ka from the time-course changes in xenon concentration in the tissue. The authors applied this method of least-squares to the data from Xe-CT abdominal studies performed on 17 patients; the solution for Ka was found pixel by pixel in the spleen, and its Ka map was created for each patient. On the one hand, the authors obtained the average value of the Ka map of the spleen as the calculated Ka (Ka{sub calc}) for each patient. On the other hand, the authors measured Ka (Ka{sub meas}) using the time-course changes in CT enhancement in the abdominal aorta for each patient. There was a good correlation between Ka{sub calc} and Ka{sub meas} (r=0.966, P<0.0001), and these two Ka values were close to each other (Ka{sub calc}=0.935xKa{sub meas}+0.089). This demonstrates that Ka{sub calc} would be close to the true Ka value. Accuracy of TBF by Xe-CT can be improved with use of the average value of the Ka map of an organ like the spleen that has a single blood supply (only arterial inflow)

  17. Using Blogging and Laptop Computers to Improve Writing Skills on a Vocational Training Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsden, Nick; Piggot-Irvine, Eileen

    2012-01-01

    The action research project described in this paper was part of an initiative to bring about change in the way courses are delivered in the vocational trades area at UNITEC New Zealand. We decided to focus on students' writing on a new Level 3 course--the Certificate in Automotive and Mechanical Engineering (C.A.M.E.) in which all participants had…

  18. Peer-Led Team Learning in Mathematics Courses for Freshmen Engineering and Computer Science Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reisel, John R.; Jablonski, Marissa R.; Munson, Ethan; Hosseini, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Peer-led Team Learning (PLTL) is an instructional method reported to increase student learning in STEM courses. As mathematics is a significant hurdle for many freshmen engineering students, a PLTL program was implemented for students to attempt to improve their course performance. Here, an analysis of PLTL for freshmen engineering students in…

  19. Transforming an Introductory Linear Algebra Course with a TI-92 Hand-Held Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quesada, Antonio R.

    2003-01-01

    Describes how the introduction of the TI-92 transformed a traditional first semester linear algebra course into a matrix-oriented course that emphasized conceptual understanding, relevant applications, and numerical issues. Indicates an increase in students' overall performance as they found the calculator very useful, believed it helped them…

  20. Innovative Teaching: An Empirical Study of Computer-Aided Instruction in Quantitative Business Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonul, Fusun F.; Solano, Roger A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate business undergraduate mathematics-based courses in a blended environment of online assignments and exams and offline lectures, and report the impact on academic performance of factors such as classroom attendance, web-based course supplements, and homework. We present results from both ordinary least squares and fixed effects,…

  1. LSANSST DERS KATALOG FORMU (GRADUATE COURSE CATALOGUE FORM)

    E-print Network

    Bayazit, Ulug

    Hesaplama Pervasive Computing Kodu (Code) Yariyili (Semester) Kredisi (Local Credits) AKTS Kredisi (ECTS Credits) Ders Seviyesi (Course Level) BLG 6XXE Güz (Fall) 3 7.5 Doktora (Ph.D.) Lisansüstü Program networks), context- awareness, sensors, and programming for limited and mobile devices. The course also

  2. Investigation of Source of Motivation in a Hybrid Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delialioglu, Omer

    2005-01-01

    The current study investigated the sources of motivation for learning in a hybrid course. The subjects of the study were 25 students taking a hybrid course that was designed and developed covering computer networks topics. An interview form that revealed answers about the motivation source of the students was developed and used in the study. One…

  3. Sending Learning Pills to Mobile Devices in Class to Enhance Student Performance and Motivation in Network Services Configuration Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz-Organero, M.; Munoz-Merino, P. J.; Kloos, C. D.

    2012-01-01

    Teaching electrical and computer software engineers how to configure network services normally requires the detailed presentation of many configuration commands and their numerous parameters. Students tend to find it difficult to maintain acceptable levels of motivation. In many cases, this results in their not attending classes and not dedicating…

  4. Network for Computational Nanotechnology (NCN) Purdue, Norfolk State, Northwestern, UC Berkeley, Univ. of Illinois, UTEP

    E-print Network

    Network for Computational Nanotechnology (NCN) Purdue, Norfolk State, Northwestern, UC Berkeley Efficient Parallel Computing GAA NW Electron Density Id-Vgs ·3D Quantum Transport Solver ·Accurate ·Strain and material parameter extraction from large atomistic domain ·Ballistic transport (no scattering

  5. Providing full point-to-point communications among compute nodes of an operational group in a global combining network of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J; Faraj, Ahmad A; Inglett, Todd A; Ratterman, Joseph D

    2013-04-16

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for providing full point-to-point communications among compute nodes of an operational group in a global combining network of a parallel computer, each compute node connected to each adjacent compute node in the global combining network through a link, that include: receiving a network packet in a compute node, the network packet specifying a destination compute node; selecting, in dependence upon the destination compute node, at least one of the links for the compute node along which to forward the network packet toward the destination compute node; and forwarding the network packet along the selected link to the adjacent compute node connected to the compute node through the selected link.

  6. Optimization of analytical laboratory work using computer networking and databasing

    SciTech Connect

    Upp, D.L.; Metcalf, R.A.

    1996-06-01

    The Health Physics Analysis Laboratory (HPAL) performs around 600,000 analyses for radioactive nuclides each year at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Analysis matrices vary from nasal swipes, air filters, work area swipes, liquids, to the bottoms of shoes and cat litter. HPAL uses 8 liquid scintillation counters, 8 gas proportional counters, and 9 high purity germanium detectors in 5 laboratories to perform these analyses. HPAL has developed a computer network between the labs and software to produce analysis results. The software and hardware package includes barcode sample tracking, log-in, chain of custody, analysis calculations, analysis result printing, and utility programs. All data are written to a database, mirrored on a central server, and eventually written to CD-ROM to provide for online historical results. This system has greatly reduced the work required to provide for analysis results as well as improving the quality of the work performed.

  7. Construction of a closed polymer network for computer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamerlin, Natasha; Ekholm, Tobias; Carlsson, Tobias; Elvingson, Christer

    2014-10-01

    Computer simulations are an important tool for linking the behaviour of polymer materials to the properties of the constituent polymer chains. In simulations, one normally uses periodic boundary conditions to mimic a macroscopic system. For a cross-linked polymer network, this will impose restrictions on the motion of the polymer chains at the borders of the simulation cell. We present a new method for constructing a three-dimensional closed network without periodic boundaries by embedding the system onto the surface of a sphere in four dimensions. This method can also be used to construct finite-sized gel particles for simulating the swelling of particles in a surrounding solvent. The method is described in algorithmic detail to allow the incorporation of the method into different types of simulation programs. We also present the results of Brownian dynamics simulations, analyzing the end-to-end distribution, radial distribution function, and the pore size distribution for different volume fractions and for chains with varying stiffness.

  8. Ethics across the computer science curriculum: privacy modules in an introductory database course.

    PubMed

    Appel, Florence

    2005-10-01

    This paper describes the author's experience of infusing an introductory database course with privacy content, and the on-going project entitled Integrating Ethics Into the Database Curriculum, that evolved from that experience. The project, which has received funding from the National Science Foundation, involves the creation of a set of privacy modules that can be implemented systematically by database educators throughout the database design thread of an undergraduate course. PMID:16279760

  9. Computational Mechanism Design for Information Fusion within Sensor Networks

    E-print Network

    Roberts, Stephen

    information fusion sensor network sce- nario. Keywords: sensor network, information economy, multi- agent science, game theory and economics, to engineer sensor networks with predictable and desirable proper efficient use of a limited global resource (in this

  10. Computational Strategies for Large-Scale MILP Transshipment Models for Heat Exchanger Network Synthesis

    E-print Network

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    1 Computational Strategies for Large-Scale MILP Transshipment Models for Heat Exchanger Network Determining the minimum number of units is an important step in heat exchanger network synthesis (HENS Words heat exchanger network synthesis (HENS), transshipment model, mixed-integer linear programming

  11. INFORMATION ISSN 1343-4500 Computing an Incompressible Viscous Fluid Flow Using Neural Network Based

    E-print Network

    INFORMATION ISSN 1343-4500 Computing an Incompressible Viscous Fluid Flow Using Neural Network Neural Networks (ANN) with Modified Adaptive Smoothing Errors (MASE) based on back-propagation algorithm [6]. More recently, are envisioned neural networks approaches as an effective way of developing

  12. Networks of Artificial Neurons, Single Layer Perceptrons Neural Computation : Lecture 3

    E-print Network

    Bullinaria, John

    Networks of Artificial Neurons, Single Layer Perceptrons Neural Computation : Lecture 3 © John A. Bullinaria, 2014 1. Networks of McCulloch-Pitts Neurons 2. Single Layer Feed-Forward Neural Networks: The Perceptron 3. Implementing Logic Gates with McCulloch-Pitts Neurons 4. Finding Weights Analytically 5

  13. Networking Lessons: From Computers to Water Iyswarya Narayanan, Venkatesh Sarangan, Arunchandar Vasan

    E-print Network

    Srinivasan, Aravind

    - working can be applied in water distribution networks to improve their energy footprint and/or efficiencyNetworking Lessons: From Computers to Water Iyswarya Narayanan, Venkatesh Sarangan, Arunchandar networking can be used to better water distribution; (ii) we focus on a specific infrastructure enhancement

  14. management, multiprocessor architectures, high performance stor age systems, video server architectures, and computer networks.

    E-print Network

    , and R. H. Katz. Handoffs in Cellular Wireless Networks: The Daedalus Imple­ mentation and Experience at the University of California at Berkeley. His research interests are in the areas of computer networks, wireless is in the area of reliable data transport over heterogeneous networking technologies. Hari received a B. Tech

  15. Speed faults in computation by chemical reaction networks Ho-Lin Chen

    E-print Network

    Speed faults in computation by chemical reaction networks Ho-Lin Chen Rachel Cummings David Doty§ David Soloveichik¶ Abstract Chemical reaction networks (CRNs) formally model chemistry in a well in natural sciences is that of chemical reaction networks (CRNs), i.e., (finite) sets of chemical reactions

  16. On the Utility of Abstraction in Labeling Actors in Social Networks Computer Science Department

    E-print Network

    Honavar, Vasant

    .g., Facebook, and social media e.g., Flickr has resulted in exponential increase in the amount of data in a social network: social networking advertising systems that show the advertisements to actorsOn the Utility of Abstraction in Labeling Actors in Social Networks Ngot Bui Computer Science

  17. Computational inference of transcriptional regulatory networks from expression proling and transcription

    E-print Network

    Weng, Zhiping

    Computational inference of transcriptional regulatory networks from expression pro®ling and transcription factor binding site identi®cation Peter M. Haverty1 , Ulla Hansen1,2 and Zhiping Weng1,3,* 1 ABSTRACT We have developed a computational method for transcriptional regulatory network inference, CARRIE

  18. Market-based computational task assignment within autonomous wireless sensor networks

    E-print Network

    Lynch, Jerome P.

    Market-based computational task assignment within autonomous wireless sensor networks Andrew T, improved wireless technologies have enabled the low-cost deployment of large numbers of sensors for the post-processing of sensor data. With new parallel algorithms being developed for in-network computation

  19. An AgentBased Computational Model for the Evolution of Trade Networks \\Lambda

    E-print Network

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    An Agent­Based Computational Model for the Evolution of Trade Networks \\Lambda David McFadzean Kumo. This paper describes an agent­based computational model for studying the formation and evolution of trade can be used to study the formation and evolution of trade networks under alternatively specified

  20. Computational Intelligence in Telecommunications Networks, W. Pedrycz and A.V. Vasilakos (Eds.), CRC Press, 2000

    E-print Network

    Kansas, University of

    Computational Intelligence in Telecommunications Networks, W. Pedrycz and A.V. Vasilakos (Eds.), CRC Press, 2000 1 Intelligent Agents in Telecommunication Networks Costas Tsatsoulis and Leen-Kiat Soh Information and Telecommunication Technology Center (ITTC) Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer

  1. Design and implementation of a distributed virtual machine for networked computers

    E-print Network

    Grimm, Robert

    Design and implementation of a distributed virtual machine for networked computers Emin Gün Sirer, architecture and performance of a distributed virtual machine (DVM) for networked computers. DVMs rely sacrificing performance. Our DVM implements the Java virtual machine, runs on x86 and DEC Alpha processors

  2. Towards Virtual Networks for Virtual Machine Grid Computing Ananth I. Sundararaj Peter A. Dinda

    E-print Network

    Dinda, Peter A.

    Towards Virtual Networks for Virtual Machine Grid Computing Ananth I. Sundararaj Peter A. Dinda Virtual machines can greatly simplify wide-area dis- tributed computing by lowering the level that in effect connects the virtual machine to the home network of the user, making the connectivity problem

  3. Fluid Centrality: A Social Network Analysis of Social-Technical Relations in Computer-Mediated Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enriquez, Judith Guevarra

    2010-01-01

    In this article, centrality is explored as a measure of computer-mediated communication (CMC) in networked learning. Centrality measure is quite common in performing social network analysis (SNA) and in analysing social cohesion, strength of ties and influence in CMC, and computer-supported collaborative learning research. It argues that measuring…

  4. The Effectiveness of Using Virtual Laboratories to Teach Computer Networking Skills in Zambia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lampi, Evans

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of using virtual labs to train students in computer networking skills, when real equipment is limited or unavailable, is uncertain. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of using virtual labs to train students in the acquisition of computer network configuration and troubleshooting skills. The study was…

  5. Fiber networking at Argonne: A distributed, multiapplication, multivendor computing environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhfuss, T.C.; Phillips, P.T.; Morgan, W.W.

    1991-01-01

    In order to support existing and future applications, Argonne is installing a Laboratory-wide fiber optic cable plant. It has been designed to support an integrated data/video service consisting of a Laboratory-wide FDDI network and video teleconferencing system and has the capacity for future gigabit per second networks. This paper describes Argonne applications expected to push existing network capacity, our current network configuration, networking research activities, and future networking plans. 1 ref., 10 figs.

  6. On Training Efficiency and Computational Costs of a Feed Forward Neural Network: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Laudani, Antonino; Lozito, Gabriele Maria; Riganti Fulginei, Francesco; Salvini, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive review on the problem of choosing a suitable activation function for the hidden layer of a feed forward neural network has been widely investigated. Since the nonlinear component of a neural network is the main contributor to the network mapping capabilities, the different choices that may lead to enhanced performances, in terms of training, generalization, or computational costs, are analyzed, both in general-purpose and in embedded computing environments. Finally, a strategy to convert a network configuration between different activation functions without altering the network mapping capabilities will be presented. PMID:26417368

  7. Analysis of microcomputer network for computer-assisted mining research. Information circular/1992

    SciTech Connect

    Fries, E.F.

    1992-01-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines is conducting research that will lead to computer-assisted mining equipment. The research will facilitate improvements in safety by relocating workers from dangerous areas and will increase production by providing more accurate control with less down-time of equipment. A Bureau-developed microcomputer network enhances the research by permitting a group of diverse computers to interact with a mining machine as well as with each other over a common data link. The network is composed of specially integrated off-the-shelf hardware and industry-standard operating system and programming languages. Using the network, researchers can conduct various experiments with the mining machine using a diverse group of sensors, computers, and microcontrollers. The report of investigation gives a brief background on the Bureau's work in computer-assisted mining followed by discussions on the network hardware and architecture, the network packets, and an analysis of network operation.

  8. DISCRETE EVENT SIMULATION OF OPTICAL SWITCH MATRIX PERFORMANCE IN COMPUTER NETWORKS

    SciTech Connect

    Imam, Neena; Poole, Stephen W

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present application of a Discrete Event Simulator (DES) for performance modeling of optical switching devices in computer networks. Network simulators are valuable tools in situations where one cannot investigate the system directly. This situation may arise if the system under study does not exist yet or the cost of studying the system directly is prohibitive. Most available network simulators are based on the paradigm of discrete-event-based simulation. As computer networks become increasingly larger and more complex, sophisticated DES tool chains have become available for both commercial and academic research. Some well-known simulators are NS2, NS3, OPNET, and OMNEST. For this research, we have applied OMNEST for the purpose of simulating multi-wavelength performance of optical switch matrices in computer interconnection networks. Our results suggest that the application of DES to computer interconnection networks provides valuable insight in device performance and aids in topology and system optimization.

  9. Measuring the Impact of App Inventor for Android and Studio-Based Learning in an Introductory Computer Science Course for Non-Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Khuloud Nasser

    2012-01-01

    A reexamination of the traditional instruction of introductory computer science (CS) courses is becoming a necessity. Introductory CS courses tend to have high attrition rates and low success rates. In many universities, the CS department suffered from low enrollment for several years compared to other majors. Multiple studies have linked these…

  10. INTERACT-CANCER. The Development and Evaluation of a Computer-Assisted Course on Communication Skills for Medical Specialists in Oncology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulsman, Robert L.; Ros, Wynand J. G.; Janssen, Miriam; Winnubst, Jacques A. M.

    1997-01-01

    An interactive, computer-assisted communications skills course, which can fit easily into the busy schedule of medical specialists is presented. A new training method was developed and tested for its appeal to the target group (N=33). Course was evaluated for its relevance, value, and attraction. Results are included and discussed. (EMK)

  11. Proceedings of Student-Faculty Research Day, CSIS, Pace University, May 2nd Management of Real-World Projects in University Computing Courses

    E-print Network

    Tappert, Charles

    of Real-World Projects in University Computing Courses Hamilton Scott Seidenberg School of CSIS, Pace the experience of the real world as it relate to the projects pursued by students during the capstone course, the student's learn to develop and exercise important skills sets such as technical, managerial

  12. Locating hardware faults in a data communications network of a parallel computer

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, Charles J.; Megerian, Mark G.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2010-01-12

    Hardware faults location in a data communications network of a parallel computer. Such a parallel computer includes a plurality of compute nodes and a data communications network that couples the compute nodes for data communications and organizes the compute node as a tree. Locating hardware faults includes identifying a next compute node as a parent node and a root of a parent test tree, identifying for each child compute node of the parent node a child test tree having the child compute node as root, running a same test suite on the parent test tree and each child test tree, and identifying the parent compute node as having a defective link connected from the parent compute node to a child compute node if the test suite fails on the parent test tree and succeeds on all the child test trees.

  13. Calculating a checksum with inactive networking components in a computing system

    DOEpatents

    Aho, Michael E; Chen, Dong; Eisley, Noel A; Gooding, Thomas M; Heidelberger, Philip; Tauferner, Andrew T

    2014-12-16

    Calculating a checksum utilizing inactive networking components in a computing system, including: identifying, by a checksum distribution manager, an inactive networking component, wherein the inactive networking component includes a checksum calculation engine for computing a checksum; sending, to the inactive networking component by the checksum distribution manager, metadata describing a block of data to be transmitted by an active networking component; calculating, by the inactive networking component, a checksum for the block of data; transmitting, to the checksum distribution manager from the inactive networking component, the checksum for the block of data; and sending, by the active networking component, a data communications message that includes the block of data and the checksum for the block of data.

  14. Calculating a checksum with inactive networking components in a computing system

    DOEpatents

    Aho, Michael E; Chen, Dong; Eisley, Noel A; Gooding, Thomas M; Heidelberger, Philip; Tauferner, Andrew T

    2015-01-27

    Calculating a checksum utilizing inactive networking components in a computing system, including: identifying, by a checksum distribution manager, an inactive networking component, wherein the inactive networking component includes a checksum calculation engine for computing a checksum; sending, to the inactive networking component by the checksum distribution manager, metadata describing a block of data to be transmitted by an active networking component; calculating, by the inactive networking component, a checksum for the block of data; transmitting, to the checksum distribution manager from the inactive networking component, the checksum for the block of data; and sending, by the active networking component, a data communications message that includes the block of data and the checksum for the block of data.

  15. Page 280 Courses: Computer and Engineering Science (CES) Sonoma State University 2015-2016 Catalog Computer and Engineering Science (CES)

    E-print Network

    Ravikumar, B.

    of linear time-invariant systems, correlation, convolu- tion, impulse response, complex variables, Fourier and LED's, fiber optics, and optical radiation detectors. Prerequisites: a course in modern Physics (suchHySiCS oF SeMiConduCtor deviCeS (3) Lecture, 3 hours. Semiconductor materials, crystal structure and growth

  16. Different Audiences but Similar Engagement Goals: In-Progress Work on Two Course Transformations

    E-print Network

    Knorr, Edwin M.

    component compared to a "traditional" lecture, with one of them adopting a flipped classroom approach programming, data structures, teaching, learning, course transformation, student engagement, flipped classroom Education, Curriculum. General Terms Classroom pedagogy, active learning. Keywords Computer networking, C

  17. An Introductory Course on Service-Oriented Computing for High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, W. T.; Chen, Yinong; Cheng, Calvin; Sun, Xin; Bitter, Gary; White, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Service-Oriented Computing (SOC) is a new computing paradigm that has been adopted by major computer companies as well as government agencies such as the Department of Defense for mission-critical applications. SOC is being used for developing Web and electronic business applications, as well as robotics, gaming, and scientific applications. Yet,…

  18. Spacelab data analysis using the space plasma computer analysis network (SCAN) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    The Space-plasma Computer Analysis Network (SCAN) currently connects a large number of U.S. Spacelab investigators into a common computer network. Used primarily by plasma physics researchers at present, SCAN provides access to Spacelab investigators in other areas of space science, to Spacelab and non-Spacelab correlative data bases, and to large Class VI computational facilities for modeling. SCAN links computers together at remote institutions used by space researchers, utilizing commercially available software for computer-to-computer communications. Started by the NASA's Office of Space Science in mid 1980, SCAN presently contains ten system nodes located at major universities and space research laboratories, with fourteen new nodes projected for the near future. The Stanford University computer gateways allow SCAN users to connect onto the ARPANET and TELENET overseas networks.

  19. Navigation Maps in a Computer-Networked Hypertext Learning System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Chien; Lin, Hua

    A study of first-year college students (n=121) in Taiwan investigated the effects of navigation maps and learner cognitive styles on performance in searches for information, estimation of course scope, and the development of cognitive maps within a hypertext learning course. Students were tested to determine level of perceptual field dependence…

  20. Preparing and Updating Group Education Plans Using Questionnaire for Computer Related Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin, Yasar Guneri; Ercan, Tuncay

    2007-01-01

    Course syllabuses are usually prepared by the instructors without any feedback observed and assembled from target students. More, even sometimes these syllabuses are used for many years with little alterations by the instructors. This situation affects the education negatively, because many of the students come with different backgrounds and…

  1. Witches, History, and Microcomputers: A Computer-Assisted Course on the Salem Witch Trials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latner, Richard B.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the addition of a microcomputer component to a Tulane University (Louisiana) undergraduate history course on the Salem witchcraft trials. Discusses the use of a statistical package and a data set to analyze and display data and the enhancement of the active learning approach by introducing students to quantitative methods of historical…

  2. Investigating Computer-Based Formative Assessments in a Medical Terminology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilbanks, Jammie T.

    2012-01-01

    Research has been conducted on the effectiveness of formative assessments and on effectively teaching medical terminology; however, research had not been conducted on the use of formative assessments in a medical terminology course. A quantitative study was performed which captured data from a pretest, self-assessment, four module exams, and a…

  3. COURSE TERM TITLE REQUIREMENTS CISC101 2013-14 F Elements of Computing Science I

    E-print Network

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    of elementary Python or willingness to learn. Effective communication in English Must know Flash and ActionScript or be willing to learn them quickly for the course. Effective Comminication in English. 2 terms of experience communication in English Willingness to learn fundamentals of PYTHON language. Effective communication

  4. An Investigative Laboratory Course in Human Physiology Using Computer Technology and Collaborative Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FitzPatrick, Kathleen A.

    2004-01-01

    Active investigative student-directed experiences in laboratory science are being encouraged by national science organizations. A growing body of evidence from classroom assessment supports their effectiveness. This study describes four years of implementation and assessment of an investigative laboratory course in human physiology for 65…

  5. Long-Term, Non-Computer, Communication Simulations as Course Integration Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, James P.

    2008-01-01

    This article offers a few guidelines for constructing effective simulations. It presents a sample class activity called simulated public hearing which aims to integrate the various elements of a public speaking course into a more comprehensive whole. Properly designed, simulated hearings have elements of persuasive, informative, and impromptu…

  6. Teaching the Second Computer Science Course: Lessons Learned and Directions for the New

    E-print Network

    Kopec, Danny

    of Information Services, Columbus School for Girls Dick Close Department of Science, United States Coast Guard. Experience at Three Institutions #12;The United States Coast Guard Academy (New London, Connecticut) CS2 is a course that has always been changing; a moving target. CS2 was first introduced at the U. S. Coast Guard

  7. A Time Sequence-Oriented Concept Map Approach to Developing Educational Computer Games for History Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Hui-Chun; Yang, Kai-Hsiang; Chen, Jing-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Concept maps have been recognized as an effective tool for students to organize their knowledge; however, in history courses, it is important for students to learn and organize historical events according to the time of their occurrence. Therefore, in this study, a time sequence-oriented concept map approach is proposed for developing a game-based…

  8. Convergent and Divergent Computer-Mediated Communication Tasks in an English for Academic Purposes Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Daniel O.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the implementation of technology-mediated tasks in an English for academic purposes (EAP) curriculum at a Japanese university. The course addressed the needs of English majors at the school by enabling more efficient completion of academic work, including essay writing. One way that technology supported this goal was through…

  9. Using a Modular Construction Kit for the Realization of an Interactive Computer Graphics Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Reinhard; Hanisch, Frank

    Recently, platform independent software components, like JavaBeans, have appeared that allow writing reusable components and composing them in a visual builder tool into new applications. This paper describes the use of such models to transform an existing course into a modular construction kit consisting of components of teaching text and program…

  10. Discovering All the Available Means for Computer Assisted Instruction: Adapting Available University Facilities for the Small to Medium-Sized Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuehn, Scott A.

    Computer networks connecting members of a class can provide an effective, efficient means to exchange commentary, field and answer questions, submit and grade assignments, and post class information. Mainframe networks--large computers used by universities before the advent of microcomputers--serve the needs of many users at once. Mainframe users…

  11. Designing a parallel evolutionary algorithm for inferring gene networks on the cloud computing environment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To improve the tedious task of reconstructing gene networks through testing experimentally the possible interactions between genes, it becomes a trend to adopt the automated reverse engineering procedure instead. Some evolutionary algorithms have been suggested for deriving network parameters. However, to infer large networks by the evolutionary algorithm, it is necessary to address two important issues: premature convergence and high computational cost. To tackle the former problem and to enhance the performance of traditional evolutionary algorithms, it is advisable to use parallel model evolutionary algorithms. To overcome the latter and to speed up the computation, it is advocated to adopt the mechanism of cloud computing as a promising solution: most popular is the method of MapReduce programming model, a fault-tolerant framework to implement parallel algorithms for inferring large gene networks. Results This work presents a practical framework to infer large gene networks, by developing and parallelizing a hybrid GA-PSO optimization method. Our parallel method is extended to work with the Hadoop MapReduce programming model and is executed in different cloud computing environments. To evaluate the proposed approach, we use a well-known open-source software GeneNetWeaver to create several yeast S. cerevisiae sub-networks and use them to produce gene profiles. Experiments have been conducted and the results have been analyzed. They show that our parallel approach can be successfully used to infer networks with desired behaviors and the computation time can be largely reduced. Conclusions Parallel population-based algorithms can effectively determine network parameters and they perform better than the widely-used sequential algorithms in gene network inference. These parallel algorithms can be distributed to the cloud computing environment to speed up the computation. By coupling the parallel model population-based optimization method and the parallel computational framework, high quality solutions can be obtained within relatively short time. This integrated approach is a promising way for inferring large networks. PMID:24428926

  12. Developing CLUE: A Formative Evaluation System for Computer Network Learning Courseware.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Chien

    1999-01-01

    Describes the design and development of the Computer Logging of User Entries (CLUE) system for evaluating computer network-based learning courseware, or Web-based distance-education courseware. CLUE is an innovative evaluation system that combines computer-logging techniques with self-reporting methods used widely in the field of formative…

  13. Network and Computer Performance in Malicious Environments: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

    E-print Network

    Bremler-Barr, Anat

    Ben-Porat, Anat Bremler-Barr and Hanoch Levy Abstract--Performance analysis and the design of computer]). In performance evaluation U. Ben-Porat is with the Computer Engineering and Networks Laboratory (TIK), ETH, Zurich, Switzerland. email: ehud.benporat@tik.ee.ethz.ch. Anat Bremler-Barr is with the Computer Science

  14. IEEE Network July/August 20114 loud computing is a recent trend in information

    E-print Network

    Pallis, George

    a respected information source on foundational research and trends in cloud computing. The first article, and delivered. The key driving forces behind the emergence of cloud computing include the overcapacity of today of storage, and progressive improvements in networking technologies. Cloud computing opens new per- spectives

  15. A Feasibility Study of Synthesizing Subsurfaces Modeled with Computational Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.; Housner, Jerrold M.; Szewczyk, Z. Peter

    1998-01-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of synthesizing substructures modeled with computational neural networks. Substructures are modeled individually with computational neural networks and the response of the assembled structure is predicted by synthesizing the neural networks. A superposition approach is applied to synthesize models for statically determinate substructures while an interface displacement collocation approach is used to synthesize statically indeterminate substructure models. Beam and plate substructures along with components of a complicated Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) model are used in this feasibility study. In this paper, the limitations and difficulties of synthesizing substructures modeled with neural networks are also discussed.

  16. Inferring Social Ties across Heterogenous Networks Department of Computer

    E-print Network

    Kleinberg, Jon

    a mobile communication network, we can leverage the friendships for a "word-of-mouth" promotion of a new product. However, in most online networks (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Slashdot

  17. Evolution of Ubiquitous Computing with Sensor Networks in Urban Environments

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    communication transceiver, sensor, power supply unit, machine controllers, and microcontrollers on a MEMS (Mi nodes, which collect the data from an isolated ad hoc network, or delay/connection tolerant networks [2

  18. Adaptive Management of Computing and Network Resources for Spacecraft Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfarr, Barbara; Welch, Lonnie R.; Detter, Ryan; Tjaden, Brett; Huh, Eui-Nam; Szczur, Martha R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    It is likely that NASA's future spacecraft systems will consist of distributed processes which will handle dynamically varying workloads in response to perceived scientific events, the spacecraft environment, spacecraft anomalies and user commands. Since all situations and possible uses of sensors cannot be anticipated during pre-deployment phases, an approach for dynamically adapting the allocation of distributed computational and communication resources is needed. To address this, we are evolving the DeSiDeRaTa adaptive resource management approach to enable reconfigurable ground and space information systems. The DeSiDeRaTa approach embodies a set of middleware mechanisms for adapting resource allocations, and a framework for reasoning about the real-time performance of distributed application systems. The framework and middleware will be extended to accommodate (1) the dynamic aspects of intra-constellation network topologies, and (2) the complete real-time path from the instrument to the user. We are developing a ground-based testbed that will enable NASA to perform early evaluation of adaptive resource management techniques without the expense of first deploying them in space. The benefits of the proposed effort are numerous, including the ability to use sensors in new ways not anticipated at design time; the production of information technology that ties the sensor web together; the accommodation of greater numbers of missions with fewer resources; and the opportunity to leverage the DeSiDeRaTa project's expertise, infrastructure and models for adaptive resource management for distributed real-time systems.

  19. Honey characterization using computer vision system and artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Shafiee, Sahameh; Minaei, Saeid; Moghaddam-Charkari, Nasrollah; Barzegar, Mohsen

    2014-09-15

    This paper reports the development of a computer vision system (CVS) for non-destructive characterization of honey based on colour and its correlated chemical attributes including ash content (AC), antioxidant activity (AA), and total phenolic content (TPC). Artificial neural network (ANN) models were applied to transform RGB values of images to CIE L*a*b* colourimetric measurements and to predict AC, TPC and AA from colour features of images. The developed ANN models were able to convert RGB values to CIE L*a*b* colourimetric parameters with low generalization error of 1.01±0.99. In addition, the developed models for prediction of AC, TPC and AA showed high performance based on colour parameters of honey images, as the R(2) values for prediction were 0.99, 0.98, and 0.87, for AC, AA and TPC, respectively. The experimental results show the effectiveness and possibility of applying CVS for non-destructive honey characterization by the industry. PMID:24767037

  20. Providing nearest neighbor point-to-point communications among compute nodes of an operational group in a global combining network of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Faraj, Ahmad A.; Inglett, Todd A.; Ratterman, Joseph D.

    2012-10-23

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for providing nearest neighbor point-to-point communications among compute nodes of an operational group in a global combining network of a parallel computer, each compute node connected to each adjacent compute node in the global combining network through a link, that include: identifying each link in the global combining network for each compute node of the operational group; designating one of a plurality of point-to-point class routing identifiers for each link such that no compute node in the operational group is connected to two adjacent compute nodes in the operational group with links designated for the same class routing identifiers; and configuring each compute node of the operational group for point-to-point communications with each adjacent compute node in the global combining network through the link between that compute node and that adjacent compute node using that link's designated class routing identifier.

  1. Nordic Journal of Computing SERVICE-CONSTRAINED NETWORK DESIGN

    E-print Network

    Sundaram, Ravi

    node in the graph, under another cost function, (i.e., every node of the graph is within a prespeci ed on the following problem (and its variants): nd a low-cost network, under one cost function, that services every for the next generation of wide-area backbone networks (Green 1992]). The optical network is a pure data

  2. IK1350 Protocols in Computer Networks/ Protokoll i datorntverk

    E-print Network

    Maguire Jr., Gerald Q.

    · Accounting management · Performance management · Security management #12;Maguire Network Management Process: Applications: Network Management and VoIP Lecture notes of G. Q. Maguire Jr. For use in conjunction with TCP;Maguire Lecture 5: Outline Applications: Network Management and VoIP 544 of maguire@kth.se 2008

  3. Course Syllabus Page 1 University of Texas at Dallas--Computer Science Program

    E-print Network

    Venkatesan, S.

    : There will be two exams---Exam I on Feb 26 and Exam II on April 16. The exams are closed book, closed notes. All and book) in the class on Jan 31, Feb 21, March 26 and April 16. These will be short quizzes, start 1 March 26 Quiz 3 April 16 Quiz 4 April 18 Exam 2 May 2 Long Quiz . Course & Instructor Policies

  4. Friendly Neighborhood Computer Project. Extension of the IBM NJE network to DEC VAX computers

    SciTech Connect

    Raffenetti, R.C.; Bertoncini, P.J.; Engert, D.E.

    1984-07-01

    This manual is divided into six chapters. The first is an overview of the VAX NJE emulator system and describes what can be done with the VAX NJE emulator software. The second chapter describes the commands that users of the VAX systems will use. Each command description includes the format of the command, a list of valid options and parameters and their meanings, and several short examples of command use. The third chapter describes the commands and capabilities for sending general, sequential files from and to VAX VMS nodes. The fourth chapter describes how to transmit data to a VAX from other computer systems on the network. The fifth chapter explains how to exchange electronic mail with IBM CMS users and with users of other VAX VMS systems connected by NJE communications. The sixth chapter describes operator procedures and the additional commands operators may use.

  5. 3-D components of a biological neural network visualized in computer generated imagery. II - Macular neural network organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Meyer, Glenn; Lam, Tony; Cutler, Lynn; Vaziri, Parshaw

    1990-01-01

    Computer-assisted reconstructions of small parts of the macular neural network show how the nerve terminals and receptive fields are organized in 3-dimensional space. This biological neural network is anatomically organized for parallel distributed processing of information. Processing appears to be more complex than in computer-based neural network, because spatiotemporal factors figure into synaptic weighting. Serial reconstruction data show anatomical arrangements which suggest that (1) assemblies of cells analyze and distribute information with inbuilt redundancy, to improve reliability; (2) feedforward/feedback loops provide the capacity for presynaptic modulation of output during processing; (3) constrained randomness in connectivities contributes to adaptability; and (4) local variations in network complexity permit differing analyses of incoming signals to take place simultaneously. The last inference suggests that there may be segregation of information flow to central stations subserving particular functions.

  6. Computer Network Availability at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque NM: Measurement and Perception

    SciTech Connect

    NELSON,SPENCER D.; TOLENDINO,LAWRENCE F.

    1999-11-01

    The desire to provide a measure of computer network availability at Sandia National Laboratories has existed for along time. Several attempts were made to build this measure by accurately recording network failures, identifying the type of network element involved, the root cause of the problem, and the time to repair the fault. Recognizing the limitations of available methods, it became obvious that another approach of determining network availability had to be defined. The chosen concept involved the periodic sampling of network services and applications from various network locations. A measure of ''network'' availability was then calculated based on the ratio of polling success to failure. The effort required to gather the information and produce a useful metric is not prohibitive and the information gained has verified long held feelings regarding network performance with real data.

  7. An efficient data assimilation schema for restoration and extension of gene regulatory networks using time-course observation data.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Takanori; Mori, Tomoya; Yamaguchi, Rui; Imoto, Seiya; Miyano, Satoru; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2014-11-01

    Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) play a central role in sustaining complex biological systems in cells. Although we can construct GRNs by integrating biological interactions that have been recorded in literature, they can include suspicious data and a lack of information. Therefore, there has been an urgent need for an approach by which the validity of constructed networks can be evaluated; simulation-based methods have been applied in which biological observational data are assimilated. However, these methods apply nonlinear models that require high computational power to evaluate even one network consisting of only several genes. Therefore, to explore candidate networks whose simulation models can better predict the data by modifying and extending literature-based GRNs, an efficient and versatile method is urgently required. We applied a combinatorial transcription model, which can represent combinatorial regulatory effects of genes, as a biological simulation model, to reproduce the dynamic behavior of gene expressions within a state space model. Under the model, we applied the unscented Kalman filter to obtain the approximate posterior probability distribution of the hidden state to efficiently estimate parameter values maximizing prediction ability for observational data by the EM-algorithm. Utilizing the method, we propose a novel algorithm to modify GRNs reported in the literature so that their simulation models become consistent with observed data. The effectiveness of our approach was validated through comparison analysis to the previous methods using synthetic networks. Finally, as an application example, a Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG)-based yeast cell cycle network was extended with additional candidate genes to better predict the real mRNA expressions data using the proposed method. PMID:25244077

  8. An Efficient Data Assimilation Schema for Restoration and Extension of Gene Regulatory Networks Using Time-Course Observation Data

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Tomoya; Yamaguchi, Rui; Imoto, Seiya; Miyano, Satoru; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) play a central role in sustaining complex biological systems in cells. Although we can construct GRNs by integrating biological interactions that have been recorded in literature, they can include suspicious data and a lack of information. Therefore, there has been an urgent need for an approach by which the validity of constructed networks can be evaluated; simulation-based methods have been applied in which biological observational data are assimilated. However, these methods apply nonlinear models that require high computational power to evaluate even one network consisting of only several genes. Therefore, to explore candidate networks whose simulation models can better predict the data by modifying and extending literature-based GRNs, an efficient and versatile method is urgently required. We applied a combinatorial transcription model, which can represent combinatorial regulatory effects of genes, as a biological simulation model, to reproduce the dynamic behavior of gene expressions within a state space model. Under the model, we applied the unscented Kalman filter to obtain the approximate posterior probability distribution of the hidden state to efficiently estimate parameter values maximizing prediction ability for observational data by the EM-algorithm. Utilizing the method, we propose a novel algorithm to modify GRNs reported in the literature so that their simulation models become consistent with observed data. The effectiveness of our approach was validated through comparison analysis to the previous methods using synthetic networks. Finally, as an application example, a Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG)-based yeast cell cycle network was extended with additional candidate genes to better predict the real mRNA expressions data using the proposed method. PMID:25244077

  9. CDA6530: Performance Models of Computers and Networks

    E-print Network

    Zou, Cliff C.

    practical probability theory Review several useful random processes Basic queuing theory Practical homework Mainly for the first half course on knowledge: probability, random process, queuing theory process, queuing theory Programming projects Simple project: each student individual work Complex

  10. Gender Effects of Computer Use in a Conceptual Physics Lab Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Domelen, Dave

    2010-01-01

    It's always hard to know what to expect when bringing computers into an educational setting, as things are always changing. Student skills with computers are different today than they were 10 years ago, and 20 years ago almost counts as an alien world. Still, one hopes that some of these changes result in positive trends, such as student attitudes…

  11. Cognitive Correlates of Performance in Algorithms in a Computer Science Course for High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avancena, Aimee Theresa; Nishihara, Akinori

    2014-01-01

    Computer science for high school faces many challenging issues. One of these is whether the students possess the appropriate cognitive ability for learning the fundamentals of computer science. Online tests were created based on known cognitive factors and fundamental algorithms and were implemented among the second grade students in the…

  12. A Series of Molecular Dynamics and Homology Modeling Computer Labs for an Undergraduate Molecular Modeling Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmore, Donald E.; Guayasamin, Ryann C.; Kieffer, Madeleine E.

    2010-01-01

    As computational modeling plays an increasingly central role in biochemical research, it is important to provide students with exposure to common modeling methods in their undergraduate curriculum. This article describes a series of computer labs designed to introduce undergraduate students to energy minimization, molecular dynamics simulations,…

  13. Impacts of Mobile Computing on Student Learning in the University: A Comparison of Course Assessment Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkes, Mark; Hategekimana, Claver

    2010-01-01

    This study focuses on the impact of wireless, mobile computing tools on student assessment outcomes. In a campus-wide wireless, mobile computing environment at an upper Midwest university, an empirical analysis is applied to understand the relationship between student performance and Tablet PC use. An experimental/control group comparison of…

  14. Language Arts, Social Studies and Science. Apple IIGS Computer Appleworks Data Base Training Mini Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.; And Others

    These training minicourse materials include class schedules, a description of class composition, class outlines, and a list of handouts for using AppleWorks database applications with the Apple IIGS computer in language arts, social studies, and science. Classes for each content area include introductions to the Apple IIGS computer, to the…

  15. Using Free Computational Resources to Illustrate the Drug Design Process in an Undergraduate Medicinal Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodrigues, Ricardo P.; Andrade, Saulo F.; Mantoani, Susimaire P.; Eifler-Lima, Vera L.; Silva, Vinicius B.; Kawano, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in, and dissemination of, computer technologies in the field of drug research now enable the use of molecular modeling tools to teach important concepts of drug design to chemistry and pharmacy students. A series of computer laboratories is described to introduce undergraduate students to commonly adopted "in silico" drug design…

  16. Main control computer security model of closed network systems protection against cyber attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymen, Bilal

    2014-06-01

    The model that brings the data input/output under control in closed network systems, that maintains the system securely, and that controls the flow of information through the Main Control Computer which also brings the network traffic under control against cyber-attacks. The network, which can be controlled single-handedly thanks to the system designed to enable the network users to make data entry into the system or to extract data from the system securely, intends to minimize the security gaps. Moreover, data input/output record can be kept by means of the user account assigned for each user, and it is also possible to carry out retroactive tracking, if requested. Because the measures that need to be taken for each computer on the network regarding cyber security, do require high cost; it has been intended to provide a cost-effective working environment with this model, only if the Main Control Computer has the updated hardware.

  17. Introduction to Information Systems Hardware basics, computer networks and architectures, proto-

    E-print Network

    Kallenrode, May-Britt

    Teaching Introduction to Information Systems Hardware basics, computer networks and architectures, proto- cols, software basics, spreadsheet analysis, business process modelling, data modelling, programming. IT Controlling Through its practical problems and its character as a case study seminar

  18. Heterogeneous photonic integrated circuits and their applications in computing, networking, and imaging

    E-print Network

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    Heterogeneous photonic integrated circuits and their applications in computing, networking integration, photonic integrated circuits, optical interconnects. 1. INTRODUCTION The continuing exponential on integrated circuits to offer scalability, high performance, and cost-effectiveness. Such demands have been

  19. Multiproduct Humanitarian Healthcare Supply Chains: A Network Modeling and Computational Framework

    E-print Network

    Nagurney, Anna

    chain management in terms of both methodology and application, healthcare supply chains, andMultiproduct Humanitarian Healthcare Supply Chains: A Network Modeling and Computational Framework Anna Nagurney and Min Yu Department of Finance and Operations Management Isenberg School of Management

  20. COMPUTING AN ADAPTIVE MESH IN FLUID PROBLEMS USING NEURAL NETWORK AND GENETIC ALGORITHM WITH ADAPTIVE RELAXATION

    E-print Network

    COMPUTING AN ADAPTIVE MESH IN FLUID PROBLEMS USING NEURAL NETWORK AND GENETIC ALGORITHM) and Adaptive Smoothing Errors (ASE), and a Genetic Algorithm (GA) employing a new concept named Adaptive; genetic algorithm; adaptive mesh; finite element method #12;