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1

EECE 553 Computer Network Architecture Course Syllabus, Fall 2012  

E-print Network

these services. Emphasis will be given on network components and design issues. Textbooks: [1]. Computer Networks-0-12-385059-1) Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of Probabilistic & Statistics. Class Location & Times: Science Library 206: Quizzes 25% (5% x 5) A mini project 5% Midterm 35% Final 35% Academic Honesty All students must adhere

Chen, Yu

2

CS273 Foundations of Parallel and Network computing. Course Information: Spring 2003.  

E-print Network

CS­273 Foundations of Parallel and Network computing. Course Information: Spring 2003. Instructors@cs.berkeley.edu) Lectures: Monday and Wednesdays 10:30­12:00 in 405 Soda Hall; Web page: http computing. Leader election. Routing with local information. Object location data structures for wide area

Rao, Satish

3

Software Assisted Syllabus Preparation for Computer Networks Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Course descriptions prepared by the lecturers in the beginning of the academic year do not get any feed back from the students enrolled it. These syllabuses are not only used for the future semesters, but also used by the other lecturers without even making any changes. This causes a negative effect on the student education since many of the

Ercan, Tuncay; Sahin, Yasar Guneri

2007-01-01

4

Designing a Versatile Dedicated Computing Lab to Support Computer Network Courses: Insights from a Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Providing adequate computing lab support for Management Information Systems (MIS) and Computer Science (CS) programs is a perennial challenge for most academic institutions in the US and abroad. Factors, such as lack of physical space, budgetary constraints, conflicting needs of different courses, and rapid obsolescence of computing technology,

Gercek, Gokhan; Saleem, Naveed

2006-01-01

5

Motivating students' participation in a computer networks course by means of magic, drama and games.  

PubMed

The recent economic crisis has forced many universities to cut down expenses by packing students into large lecture groups. The problem with large auditoria is that they discourage dialogue between students and faculty and they burden participation. Adding to this, students in computer science courses usually find the field to be full of theoretical and technical concepts. Lack of understanding leads them to lose interest and / or motivation. Classroom experience shows that the lecturer could employ alternative teaching methods, especially for early-year undergraduate students, in order to grasp their interest and introduce basic concepts. This paper describes some of the approaches that may be used to keep students interested and make them feel comfortable as they comprehend basic concepts in computer networks. The lecturing procedure was enriched with games, magic tricks and dramatic representations. This approach was used experimentally for two semesters and the results were more than encouraging. PMID:25105085

Hilas, Constantinos S; Politis, Anastasios

2014-01-01

6

Computer Networks  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

CS4403 is an introduction to computer communications, network architectures, protocol hierarchies, and the open systems interconnection model. Topics covered include modeling, analysis, and specification of protocols, wide area networks, local area networks, and client/server architectures.

Apon, Amy

7

Automating introductory computer science courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a project we have recently started for automating introductory computer science courses. Why should these courses be automated? At the University of Illinois there are currently about 2000 students per semester taking various introductory programming courses: engineers, social scientists, teachers, physical scientists, computer science majors, etc., each group having its own particular needs. These courses are taught

Jurg Nievergelt; Edward M. Reingold

1973-01-01

8

Engineering and Computing Undergraduate Courses  

E-print Network

Faculty of Engineering and Computing Undergraduate Courses (including Architecture, Aerospace, Building, Civil Engineering and Mathematics) #12;2 Contents Coventry University 4 About Coventry 5 Facilities 6 Department of Computing 8 Department of Mathematics and Control Engineering 15 Department

Low, Robert

9

Fall Semester Technical College Course Computer Engineering Course Requirements  

E-print Network

First Year Fall Semester Technical College Course Computer Engineering Course Requirements EGR 281 Technical College Course Computer Engineering Course Requirements EGR 283 CSCE 146 ENG 102 ENGL 102 Computer Engineering Course Requirements ECE 102 ELCT 102 ECE 211 CSCE 211 MAT 240 MATH 241 PHY 221 PHYS

Almor, Amit

10

ANU College of Engineering & Computer Science 2014 Course Selection Graduate Diploma of Computing 6706XGDCP  

E-print Network

ANU College of Engineering & Computer Science 2014 Course Selection Graduate Diploma of Computing) Formal Methods in Software Engineering COMP6331 (5052) Computer Networks COMP6310 (7574) Concurrent Engineers Computing elective COMP6260 Formal Methods in Software Engineering COMP8705 Communication

Zhou, Xiangyun "Sean"

11

Computer science for secondary schools: Course content  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computers and computing are topics of discussion in many curriculum areas in secondary school. The four courses recommended by this task group, however, have computing as their primary content. The courses are: 1) Introduction to Computer Science I (a full year course) 2) Introduction to Computer Science II (a full year course) 3) Introduction to a High-level Computer Language (a

1984-01-01

12

Short Course on Computational Illumination  

E-print Network

Short Course on Computational Illumination Matthew Turk Computer Science Department and Media ArtsD, Media Arts and Science (MIT Media Lab) Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Cambridge, MA) Automatic! · Useful visual cues ­ Presence ­ Location ­ Identity (and age, sex, nationality, etc.) ­ Facial expression

California at Santa Barbara, University of

13

Resources for Computational Geophysics Courses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An important skill that students in solid Earth physics need to acquire is the ability to write computer programs that can be used for the processing, analysis, and modeling of geophysical data and phenomena. Therefore, this skill (which we call "computational geophysics") is a core part of any undergraduate geophysics curriculum. In this Forum, we share our personal experience in teaching such a course.

Keers, Henk; Rondenay, Stphane; Harlap, Yal.; Nordmo, Ivar

2014-09-01

14

Advanced Optical Networks Course Type: Graduate Course  

E-print Network

Transmitters and Modulators Optical Receivers Optical Amplifiers Optical Switching Elements Optical Networks and Management Impairment Aware Routing Optical Circuit Switching Optical Packet Switching Optical Burst Switching Energy Awareness in Optical Networking Network Modeling Tools Network Design Guidelines Academic

Arizona, University of

15

Advanced Computer Networks  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The purpose of this class will be to focus on advanced topics in computer networking. The goal of this class is to prepare students to do research in networking or cluster computing, including employment in leading edge networking positions.

Apon, Amy

16

A computer science freshman orientation course  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes an orientation course for beginning computer science majors. The course is different from the CS 1 or computer literacy courses, but similar in intent and content to orientation courses in engineering, business, and other fields. Its purpose is to give students an overview of computer science and an idea of what computer professionals do so that students

Curtis R. Cook

1996-01-01

17

Conception of a course for professional training and education in the field of computer and mobile forensics, part III: network forensics and penetration testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

IT security and computer forensics are important components in the information technology. From year to year, incidents and crimes increase that target IT systems or were done with their help. More and more companies and authorities have security problems in their own IT infrastructure. To respond to these incidents professionally, it is important to have well trained staff. The fact that many agencies and companies work with very sensitive data make it necessary to further train the own employees in the field of network forensics and penetration testing. Motivated by these facts, this paper - a continuation of a paper of January 2012 [1], which showed the conception of a course for professional training and education in the field of computer and mobile forensics - addresses the practical implementation important relationships of network forensic and penetration testing.

Krger, Knut; Creutzburg, Reiner

2014-02-01

18

Bayesian Network Computations in BN  

E-print Network

Bayesian Network Computations in BN Applications Probabilistic computations in Bayesian Networks computations in Bayesian Networks #12;Bayesian Network Computations in BN Applications Outline 1 Bayesian Network Introduction Evidence Junction Tree 2 Computations in BN Potentials Inward/Outward Conditional

Nuel, Gregory

19

Resourcesharing computer communications networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development of resource-sharing networks can facilitate the provision of a wide range of economic and reliable computer services. Computer-communication networks allow the sharing of specialized computer resources such as data bases, programs, and hardware. Such a network consists of both the computer resources and a communications system interconnecting them and allowing their full utilization to be achieved. In addition,

ROBERT E. KAHN

1972-01-01

20

Center for Networked Center for Networked Computing  

E-print Network

Center for Networked Computing Center for Networked Computing Adaptive Battery Charge Scheduling.wu}@temple.edu Presenter: Pouya Ostovari #12;Center for Networked Computing Center for Networked Computing Motivation for Networked Computing Center for Networked Computing Problem What is a good voltage threshold to trigger

Wu, Jie

21

Computational Verb Neural Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

When any attribute value in a conventional neural network is verbified, the result is a computational verb neural network(VNN). We can verbify inputs, outputs, biases, weights and many other attributes of conventional neural networks. In this paper, we reported two types of VNNs. The first one consists of computational verb inputs and numerical output. The second one consists of computational

Tao Yang

2007-01-01

22

Adding GPU Computing to Computer Organization Courses David Bunde  

E-print Network

techniques to teach CUDA in elective courses. The emerging ACM/IEEE Computer Science Curricula 2013 undergraduate computer organization course. One practical reason to teach GPU computing is the availabilityAdding GPU Computing to Computer Organization Courses David Bunde Knox College Galesburg, Illinois

Bunde, David

23

Software Engineering Practice in Computer Science Courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper seeks to combine a traditional computer science course with software engineering process. A computer science course such as computer graphics, digital image processing, compiler or operating systems gives a chance to students working in a group to write a realistic large project of almost 3000 lines and make it function correctly. The course involves a team programming project.

Shoma Chatterjee

2008-01-01

24

Computer Science 78 Computer Networks or hacking the network, part II  

E-print Network

Computer Science 78 Computer Networks ­ or hacking the network, part II In what follows, we discuss Overview Welcome to the world on computer networks. Ever wondered what makes the Internet tick? Want to gain the skills that would allow you to implement the Internet? Read on .... The ORC: This course

Campbell, Andrew T.

25

Online Courses: MSU National Teachers Enhancement Network  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Teachers Enhancement Network (NTEN) offers online, graduate-level science courses from a world-class public research university. NTEN was one of the first online professional development programs for K-12 teachers, and has offered courses si

1900-01-01

26

Computer Networking for Educators.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book is intended to introduce the basic concepts of connecting computers together and to equip individuals with the technical background necessary to begin constructing small networks. For those already experienced with creating and maintaining computer networks, the book can help in considering the creation of a schoolwide network. The book

McCain, Ted D. E.; Ekelund, Mark

27

Course continuity in the Computer Science curriculum  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Computer Science curriculum partitions the subject matter into discrete courses. This division, however, is artificial and arbitrary, and, when exacerbated by a number of additional factors, leads to an apparent lack of continuity among Computer Science courses. As a result, students never perceive Computer Science as an integral discipline, nor understand and appreciate the close interrelationships that link the

Richard Connelly; Haldun Hadimioglu; David Herscovici; Lubomir Ivanov; Mark Hoffman

2005-01-01

28

Computer networking at FERMILAB  

SciTech Connect

Management aspects of data communications facilities at Fermilab are described. Local area networks include Ferminet, a broadband CATV system which serves as a backbone-type carrier for high-speed data traffic between major network nodes; micom network, four Micom Micro-600/2A port selectors via private twisted pair cables, dedicated telephone circuits, or Micom 800/2 statistical multiplexors; and Decnet/Ethernet, several small local area networks which provide host-to-host communications for about 35 VAX computers systems. Wide area (off site) computer networking includes an off site Micom network which provides access to all of Fermilab's computer systems for 10 universities via leased lines or modem; Tymnet, used by many European and Japanese collaborations: Physnet, used for shared data processing task communications by large collaborations of universities; Bitnet, used for file transfer, electronic mail, and communications with CERN; and Mfenet, for access to supercomputers. Plans to participate in Hepnet are also addressed. 3 figs. (DWL)

Chartrand, G.

1986-05-01

29

Hyperswitch Communication Network Computer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Hyperswitch Communications Network (HCN) computer is prototype multiple-processor computer being developed. Incorporates improved version of hyperswitch communication network described in "Hyperswitch Network For Hypercube Computer" (NPO-16905). Designed to support high-level software and expansion of itself. HCN computer is message-passing, multiple-instruction/multiple-data computer offering significant advantages over older single-processor and bus-based multiple-processor computers, with respect to price/performance ratio, reliability, availability, and manufacturing. Design of HCN operating-system software provides flexible computing environment accommodating both parallel and distributed processing. Also achieves balance among following competing factors; performance in processing and communications, ease of use, and tolerance of (and recovery from) faults.

Peterson, John C.; Chow, Edward T.; Priel, Moshe; Upchurch, Edwin T.

1993-01-01

30

Computers: Networks, Registration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A computer network serves 53 schools and colleges in North Carolina; Essex County College in New Jersey has an on-line computer registration system that is used by students and administrators to enter information or ask questions. (Author/MLF)

Nation's Schools and Colleges, 1975

1975-01-01

31

Computers, Networks and Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discussed is how globally networked, easy-to-use computers can enhance learning only within an educational environment that encourages students to question "facts" and seek challenges. The strengths and weaknesses of computers used as amplifiers for learning are described. (KR)

Kay, Alan C.

1991-01-01

32

Connecting with Computer Science: Course Overview  

E-print Network

, analyze, and reflect. The next five paragraphs elaborate a little on what these five words connote in the context of this course. Understand. Computing concepts are organized along three themes: data, interfaces on the computer. You will get a little exposure to the art of computer programming, but this is not a core

Condon, Anne

33

MPhil in Computational Biology Course Guide  

E-print Network

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 3.5 SG -- Statistical Genetics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 3 and is the Course Director for the MPhil programme in Computational Biology. He is also Professor of Cancer Research biology, human genetics, population genetics, statistical genetics, molecular evolution and bioinformatics

Cambridge, University of

34

Computer network programming  

SciTech Connect

The programs running on a computer network can be divided into two parts, the Network Operating System and the user applications. Any high level language translator, such as C, JAVA, BASIC, FORTRAN, or COBOL, runs under NOS as a programming tool to produce network application programs or software. Each application program while running on the network provides the human user with network application services, such as remote data base search, retrieval, etc. The Network Operating System should provide a simple and elegant system interface to all the network application programs. This programming interface may request the Transport layer services on behalf of a network application program. The primary goals are to achieve programming convenience, and to avoid complexity. In a 5-layer network model, the system interface is comprised of a group of system calls which are collectively known as the session layer with its own Session Protocol Data Units. This is a position paper discussing the basic system primitives which reside between a network application program and the Transport layer, and a programming example of using such primitives.

Hsu, J.Y. [California Polytechnic State Univ., San Luis Obispo, CA (United States)

1996-12-31

35

Computer and information networks.  

PubMed

The most basic conclusion coming out of the EDUCOM seminars is that computer networking must be acknowledged as an important new mode for obtaining information and computation (15). It is a real alternative that needs to be given serious attention in current planning and decision-making. Yet the fact is that many institutions are not taking account of networks when they confer on whether or how to replace their main computer. Articulation of the possibilities of computer networks goes back to the early 1960's and before, and working networks have been in evidence for several years now, both commercially and in universities. What is new, however, is the unmistakable recognition-bordering on a sense of the inevitable-that networks are finally practical and here to stay. The visionary and promotional phases of computer networks are over. It is time for hard-nosed comparative analysis (16). Another conclusion of the seminars has to do with the factors that hinder the fuller development of networking. The major problems to be overcome in applying networks to research and education are political, organizational, and economic in nature rather than technological. This is not to say that the hardware and software problems of linking computers and information systems are completely solved, but they are not the big bottlenecks at present. Research and educational institutions must find ways to organize themselves as well as their computers to work together for greater resource sharing. The coming of age of networks takes on special significance as a result of widespread dissatisfactions expressed with the present computing situation. There is a feeling that the current mode of autonomous, self-sufficient operation in the provision of computing and information services is frequently wasteful, deficient, and unresponsive to users' needs because of duplication of effort from one installation to another, incompatibilities, and inadequate documentation, program support, and user assistance. Complaints about the relative lack of uniform standards and the paucity of information on what programs and data are available and how to get and use them are commonplace. The human tendency, when beset by problems such as these, is to seek a savior in the next new technology-networks in this case. But networking does not in and of itself offer a solution to current deficiencies. What it does offer is a promising vehicle with which to bring about important changes in user practices, institutional procedures, and government policy that can lead to effective solutions. Thus more critical than whether networking is developed and applied is how it is developed and applied. For example, networking emphasizes the need for standards and good documentation. Unless effective mechanisms are developed and strong measures taken in networking to ensure that suitable standards and documentation are developed, present inadequacies could get worse, not better. PMID:4730053

Greenberger, M; Aronofsky, J; McKenney, J L; Massy, W F

1973-10-01

36

Course Description Grid Computing, NGSSC, 2p  

E-print Network

Course Description Grid Computing, NGSSC, 2p Erik Elmroth, Olle Mulmo, and Leif Nixon February 14- ing and state-of-the-art grid software, understanding and practical experience of how computational: Application projects, software development projects, political and administrative aspects on grids, emerging

Elmroth, Erik

37

School of Meteorology Course Computational Fluid Dynamics  

E-print Network

School of Meteorology Course Fall 2013 Computational Fluid Dynamics METR 5344 Instructor: Prof teaches the background theories and numerical methods for solving fluid dynamics and related problems Equations in Geophysical Fluid Dynamics by Dale R. Durran. Computational Techniques for Fluid Dynamics (1991

Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

38

Computer Science Adjunct Faculty Position for Computer Networks and Database Systems  

E-print Network

Computer Science Adjunct Faculty Position for Computer Networks and Database Systems Connecticut College is seeking an adjunct professor (rank open) of computer science to teach Computer Networks (COM315 have a Masters or equivalent in Computer Science or related field. The catalog course descriptions

Plotkin, Joshua B.

39

Network Coding for Function Computation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this dissertation, the following "network computing problem" is considered. Source nodes in a directed acyclic network generate independent messages and a single receiver node computes a target function f of the messages. The objective is to maximize the average number of times f can be computed per network usage, i.e., the "computing

Appuswamy, Rathinakumar

2011-01-01

40

6.857 Network and Computer Security, Fall 2003  

E-print Network

6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department'sComputer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include ...

Rivest, Ronald

41

Virtual Network Computing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Virtual Network Computing software package, a product of AT&T Laboratories Cambridge, is one of the more useful and decidedly different utilities than generally appears in our Network Tools section. This software, although it is complex in nature and has a technical-sounding moniker, allows one to use just about any computer remotely across a local area network or even the Internet. To accomplish this remote use, the system actually displays the entire desktop of the remote computer in a window on the local computer. Amazingly, you can display and use a Macintosh desktop, for example, on your Win95/98/NT system or a Win95/98/NT desktop on your Unix system or any other combination of these possibilities. The system is simple to install and works quite well. Although minor bugs are noticeable, the system is complete enough to allow, for example, the remote use of many popular Windows programs on a Unix system. The VNC system is free to download and use and runs on Win95/98/NT, SPARC Solaris, Linux, and DEC Alpha OSF1. Beta versions of the software are also available for the Macintosh and Windows CE 2.x.

42

Guest Editor's Introduction: Computation in Physics Courses  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

You know one if you see one, but can you define a computational physics course in general? Even more fundamentally, can you specify what role numerical computations should have in any standard physics course? The quest to address such questions was the motivation for a project that has culminated in the publication of this special issue. I believe and hope that our non-physicist readers will regard this special issue as an opportunity to gather information and learn lessons that extend beyond physics to other disciplines.

Winch, David

2008-07-23

43

A survey of computer science capstone course literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, we surveyed literature related to undergraduate computer science capstone courses. The survey was organized around course and project issues. Course issues included: course models, learning theories, course goals, course topics, student evaluation, and course evaluation. Project issues included: software process models, software process phases, project type, documentation, tools, groups, and instructor administration. We reflected on these issues

Robert F. Dugan Jr.

2011-01-01

44

A Survey of Computer Science Capstone Course Literature  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, we surveyed literature related to undergraduate computer science capstone courses. The survey was organized around course and project issues. Course issues included: course models, learning theories, course goals, course topics, student evaluation, and course evaluation. Project issues included: software process models, software

Dugan, Robert F., Jr.

2011-01-01

45

Computer Networks and Networking: A Primer.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides a basic introduction to computer networks and networking terminology. Topics addressed include modems; the Internet; TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol); transmission lines; Internet Protocol numbers; network traffic; Fidonet; file transfer protocol (FTP); TELNET; electronic mail; discussion groups; LISTSERV; USENET;

Collins, Mauri P.

1993-01-01

46

Encryption and Secure Computer Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is increasing growth in the number of computer networks in use and in the kinds of distributed computing applications available on these networks This increase, together with concern about privacy, security, and integrity of information exchange, has created considerable interest in the use of encryptlon to protect information in the networks This survey is directed at the reader who

Gerald J. Popek; Charles S. Kline

1979-01-01

47

University of Freiburg Computer Networks and Telematics  

E-print Network

1 University of Freiburg Computer Networks and Telematics Prof. Christian Schindelhauer Ad Hoc of Freiburg Institute of Computer Science Computer Networks and Telematics Prof. Christian Schindelhauer of Freiburg Institute of Computer Science Computer Networks and Telematics Prof. Christian Schindelhauer

Schindelhauer, Christian

48

Distributed Computation in Dynamic Networks  

E-print Network

In this report we investigate distributed computation in dynamic networks in which the network topology changes from round to round. We consider a worst-case model in which the communication links for each round are chosen ...

Oshman, Rotem

2009-11-10

49

A Computer-based Course in Classical Mechanics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes and illustrates the tutorial and homework exercise lessons, student routing, course organization, administration, and evaluation of a PLATO computer-based course in classical mechanics. An appendix lists 41 lessons developed for the course. (CMV)

Kane, D.; Sherwood, B.

1980-01-01

50

Introduction Computer Networking  

E-print Network

network edge; hosts, access net, physical media v network core: packet/circuit switching, Internet Introduction 1-2 Chapter 1: roadmap 1.1 What is the Internet? 1.2 Network edge v end systems, access networks events network protocols: v machines rather than humans v all communication activity in Internet governed

Cheng, Xiuzhen "Susan"

51

The Iowa Regional Computer Network  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A look at the Iowa Regional Network, which was established in order to provide large scale computing capability to medium sized institutions, and to share experience in developing the use of computing in support of instruction. (Author)

Weeg, Gerard; Shomper, Charles

1974-01-01

52

Augmenting computer networks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Three methods of augmenting computer networks by adding at most one link per processor are discussed: (1) A tree of N nodes may be augmented such that the resulting graph has diameter no greater than 4log sub 2((N+2)/3)-2. Thi O(N(3)) algorithm can be applied to any spanning tree of a connected graph to reduce the diameter of that graph to O(log N); (2) Given a binary tree T and a chain C of N nodes each, C may be augmented to produce C so that T is a subgraph of C. This algorithm is O(N) and may be used to produce augmented chains or rings that have diameter no greater than 2log sub 2((N+2)/3) and are planar; (3) Any rectangular two-dimensional 4 (8) nearest neighbor array of size N = 2(k) may be augmented so that it can emulate a single step shuffle-exchange network of size N/2 in 3(t) time steps.

Bokhari, S. H.; Raza, A. D.

1984-01-01

53

Bloodshot eyes: workload issues in computer science project courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Workload issue in computer s cience project courses are addressed in this paper. We briefly discuss why high workloads occur in p roject courses and the reasons they are a p roblem. We then d escribe some course changes we made to reduce the workload in a software engineering project course, without compromising course quality. The techniques include: adopting an

Judy Brown

2000-01-01

54

Computer Networking at FERMILAB.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Management aspects of data communications facilities at Fermilab are described. Local area networks include Ferminet, a broadband CATV system which serves as a backbone-type carrier for high-speed data traffic between major network nodes; micom network, f...

G. Chartrand

1986-01-01

55

Online Courses: MSU National Teachers Enhancement Network (NTEN)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Teachers Enhancement Network (NTEN) offers online, graduate-level science courses from a world-class public research university. NTEN was one of the first online professional development programs for K-12 teachers, and has offered courses sin

1900-01-01

56

Computer networking at FERMILAB  

Microsoft Academic Search

Management aspects of data communications facilities at Fermilab are described. Local area networks include Ferminet, a broadband CATV system which serves as a backbone-type carrier for high-speed data traffic between major network nodes; micom network, four Micom Micro-600\\/2A port selectors via private twisted pair cables, dedicated telephone circuits, or Micom 800\\/2 statistical multiplexors; and Decnet\\/Ethernet, several small local area networks

Chartrand

1986-01-01

57

A CAD (Classroom Assessment Design) of a Computer Programming Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents a CAD (classroom assessment design) of an entry-level undergraduate computer programming course "Computer Programming I". CAD has been the product of a long experience in teaching computer programming courses including teaching "Computer Programming I" 22 times. Each semester, CAD is evaluated and modified for the subsequent

Hawi, Nazir S.

2012-01-01

58

Using Virtualization and Automatic Evaluation: Adapting Network Services Management Courses to the EHEA  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper outlines the adaptation of a course on the management of network services in operating systems, called NetServicesOS, to the context of the new European Higher Education Area (EHEA). NetServicesOS is a mandatory course in one of the official graduate programs in the Faculty of Computer Science at the Universidad Nacional de Educacion a

Ros, S.; Robles-Gomez, A.; Hernandez, R.; Caminero, A. C.; Pastor, R.

2012-01-01

59

Mobile Computing/Mobile Computing/Mobile Computing/Mobile Computing/ Mobile NetworksMobile NetworksMobile NetworksMobile Networks  

E-print Network

Mobile Computing/Mobile Computing/Mobile Computing/Mobile Computing/ Mobile NetworksMobile NetworksMobile NetworksMobile Networks Mobile IP Prof. Chansu Yu Quiz What is the role of IP? Does the router have two IP for Wired Network Mobile IP Overview Basic Mobile IP Agent Discovery Registration Tunneling Route

Yu, Chansu

60

Queueing in networks of computers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The designers of networks of computers must assess the capacity of the network to complete work within reasonable times. The utilization law, Little's law, forced-flow law, and response time formula are simple tools that can be used to calculate throughput and response times of networks. Bottleneck analysis can be used to calculate simple lower bounds on response time in terms of individual server parameters and the load on network as a whole. These simple results are important tools for all users of scientific networks - back of the envelope calculations can quickly reveal the effects of distant servers on local throughput and response time.

Denning, Peter J.

1991-01-01

61

Computer networks: prospects for scientists.  

PubMed

Computer networks are an integral part of the rapid expansion of computing. Their emergence depends both on evolving communication technologies, such as packet-switching and satellites, and on diverse experiments and innovations in the software tools that exploit communications. The tools provide computer users with facilities such as electronic mail, access to remote computers, and electronic bulletin boards. Scientists can both adapt and extend tools to meet the communication needs of their work, and several networks are developing to serve particular scientific communities. PMID:17747849

Newell, A; Sproull, R F

1982-02-12

62

Computer Networking at SLR Stations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

There are several existing communication methods to deliver data from the satellite laser ranging (SLR) station to the SLR data center and back: telephonmodem, telex, and computer networks. The SLR scientific community has been exploiting mainly INTERNET,...

A. Novotny

1993-01-01

63

Computational Thinking in High School Courses Vicki Allan  

E-print Network

Computational Thinking in High School Courses Vicki Allan Computer Science Utah State University in recent years. This is paralleled by a drop in the number of high school students taking the CS AP exam and the number of high schools offering computer science courses. The declines come at a time when career

Allan, Vicki H.

64

Computer (PC/Network) Coordinator.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication contains 22 subjects appropriate for use in a competency list for the occupation of computer (PC/network) coordinator, 1 of 12 occupations within the business/computer technologies cluster. Each unit consists of a number of competencies; a list of competency builders is provided for each competency. Titles of the 22 units are as

Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

65

Computing on Anonymous Quantum Network  

E-print Network

This paper considers distributed computing on an anonymous quantum network, a network in which no party has a unique identifier and quantum communication and computation are available. It is proved that the leader election problem can exactly (i.e., without error in bounded time) be solved with at most the same complexity up to a constant factor as that of exactly computing symmetric functions (without intermediate measurements for a distributed and superposed input), if the number of parties is given to every party. A corollary of this result is a more efficient quantum leader election algorithm than existing ones: the new quantum algorithm runs in O(n) rounds with bit complexity O(mn^2), on an anonymous quantum network with n parties and m communication links. Another corollary is the first quantum algorithm that exactly computes any computable Boolean function with round complexity O(n) and with smaller bit complexity than that of existing classical algorithms in the worst case over all (computable) Boolean functions and network topologies. More generally, any n-qubit state can be shared with that complexity on an anonymous quantum network with n parties.

Hirotada Kobayashi; Keiji Matsumoto; Seiichiro Tani

2010-01-29

66

5. Networked computing and the Internet  

E-print Network

5. Networked computing and the Internet David Keil Introduction to Information Technology 7 120 Introduction to Information Technology 5. Networked and Internet computing 1. Networked computing to Information Technology 7/13 2 Reading: Evans et al, Chs. 7, 8, 12 #12;5. Networked computing and the Internet

Keil, David M.

67

Computer Interfacing: An Undergraduate Course for Scientists and Engineers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described is an undergraduate course of computer interfacing for scientists and engineers which incorporates the use of digital computers and associated interfacing elements with experiments and special projects performed in an on-line environment in the laboratory. (SL)

Peters, Philip B.; Settle, Frank A.

1976-01-01

68

Computer Network Security- The Challenges of Securing a Computer Network  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This article is intended to give the reader an overall perspective on what it takes to design, implement, enforce and secure a computer network in the federal and corporate world to insure the confidentiality, integrity and availability of information. While we will be giving you an overview of network design and security, this article will concentrate on the technology and human factors of securing a network and the challenges faced by those doing so. It will cover the large number of policies and the limits of technology and physical efforts to enforce such policies.

Scotti, Vincent, Jr.

2011-01-01

69

An Introduction to Computing: Content for a High School Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A general outline of the topics that might be covered in a computers and computing course for high school students is provided. Topics are listed in the order in which they should be taught, and the relative amount of time to be spent on each topic is suggested. Seven units are included in the course outline: (1) general introduction, (2) using

Rogers, Jean B.

70

Incorporating Virtual Reality Concepts into the Introductory Computer Graphics Course  

Microsoft Academic Search

While an exciting and contemporary field, the subject of virtual reality (VR) receives little treatment in most undergraduate computer science curriculums. This paper describes the author's efforts to provide an overview of VR as the final component of his introductory computer graphics course. Specifically, students learn about the defining characteristics of VR and some of its enabling technologies. The course

Daniel C. Cliburn

71

A Model Instructional Computing Course for Preservice Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Foundations of Instructional Computing is a required one-semester, two credit course in the Education Department of Montana State University (Bozeman). The major objective of the course is to help preservice teachers develop use of computer technology that is confident, thoughtful, and integrated into their individual teaching philosophy and

Cimikowski, Linda; Cook, Joan

72

Hyperswitch Network For Hypercube Computer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Data-driven dynamic switching enables high speed data transfer. Proposed hyperswitch network based on mixed static and dynamic topologies. Routing header modified in response to congestion or faults encountered as path established. Static topology meets requirement if nodes have switching elements that perform necessary routing header revisions dynamically. Hypercube topology now being implemented with switching element in each computer node aimed at designing very-richly-interconnected multicomputer system. Interconnection network connects great number of small computer nodes, using fixed hypercube topology, characterized by point-to-point links between nodes.

Chow, Edward; Madan, Herbert; Peterson, John

1989-01-01

73

Collective network for computer structures  

DOEpatents

A system and method for enabling high-speed, low-latency global collective communications among interconnected processing nodes. The global collective network optimally enables collective reduction operations to be performed during parallel algorithm operations executing in a computer structure having a plurality of the interconnected processing nodes. Router devices ate included that interconnect the nodes of the network via links to facilitate performance of low-latency global processing operations at nodes of the virtual network and class structures. The global collective network may be configured to provide global barrier and interrupt functionality in asynchronous or synchronized manner. When implemented in a massively-parallel supercomputing structure, the global collective network is physically and logically partitionable according to needs of a processing algorithm.

Blumrich, Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Chen, Dong (Croton On Hudson, NY); Gara, Alan (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E. (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Hoenicke, Dirk (Ossining, NY); Takken, Todd E. (Brewster, NY); Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D. (Wernau, DE); Vranas, Pavlos M. (Bedford Hills, NY)

2011-08-16

74

Computing motion using resistive networks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent developments in the theory of early vision are described which lead from the formulation of the motion problem as an ill-posed one to its solution by minimizing certain 'cost' functions. These cost or energy functions can be mapped onto simple analog and digital resistive networks. It is shown how the optical flow can be computed by injecting currents into resistive networks and recording the resulting stationary voltage distribution at each node. These networks can be implemented in cMOS VLSI circuits and represent plausible candidates for biological vision systems.

Koch, Christof; Luo, Jin; Mead, Carver; Hutchinson, James

1988-01-01

75

Networking DEC and IBM computers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Local Area Networking of DEC and IBM computers within the structure of the ISO-OSI Seven Layer Reference Model at a raw signaling speed of 1 Mops or greater are discussed. After an introduction to the ISO-OSI Reference Model nd the IEEE-802 Draft Standard for Local Area Networks (LANs), there follows a detailed discussion and comparison of the products available from a variety of manufactures to perform this networking task. A summary of these products is presented in a table.

Mish, W. H.

1983-01-01

76

Optical computer switching network  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The design for an optical switching system for minicomputers that uses an optical spatial light modulator such as a Hughes liquid crystal light valve is presented. The switching system is designed to connect 80 minicomputers coupled to the switching system by optical fibers. The system has two major parts: the connection system that connects the data lines by which the computers communicate via a two-dimensional optical matrix array and the control system that controls which computers are connected. The basic system, the matrix-based connecting system, and some of the optical components to be used are described. Finally, the details of the control system are given and illustrated with a discussion of timing.

Clymer, B.; Collins, S. A., Jr.

1985-01-01

77

See Course Restrictions Sheet College of Engineering and Computer Science  

E-print Network

See Course Restrictions Sheet College of Engineering and Computer Science Computer Science Name & Minimum Grade C- CIS252 Intro. to Computer Science 4 CIS275 Intro. to Discrete Mathematics 3 CIS341 Comp) Minimum Grade C- At least 9 credits of Upper Division MUST be in Computer Science E Upper Div

Mather, Patrick T.

78

See Course Restrictions Sheet College of Engineering and Computer Science  

E-print Network

See Course Restrictions Sheet College of Engineering and Computer Science Computer Science Name CSC 111 3 Comp Sci Core (33 cr) 2.667 GPA & Minimum Grade C- CIS252 Intro. to Computer Science 4 CIS (18 cr) Minimum Grade C- At least 9 credits of Upper Division MUST be in Computer Science E Upper Div

Mather, Patrick T.

79

See Course Restrictions Sheet College of Engineering and Computer Science  

E-print Network

See Course Restrictions Sheet College of Engineering and Computer Science Computer Science Name (33 cr) 3.0 GPA & Minimum Grade C- CIS252 Intro. to Computer Science 4 CIS275 Intro. to Discrete be in Computer Science E Upper Div ______________ 3 N Upper Div ______________ 3 T Upper Div ______________ 3

Mather, Patrick T.

80

Simulation of reliability in multiserver computer networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The performance in terms of reliability of computer multiserver networks motivates this paper. The probability limit theorem is derived on the extreme queue length in open multiserver queueing networks in heavy traffic and applied to a reliability model for multiserver computer networks where we relate the time of failure of a multiserver computer network to the system parameters.

Minkevi?ius, Saulius

2012-11-01

81

Distributed Loop Computer Networks: A Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Distributed loop computer networks are extensions of the ring networks and are widelyused in the design and implementation of local area networks and parallel processingarchitectures. We give a survey of recent results on this class of interconnection networks.We pay special attention to the actual computation of the minimum diameterand the construction of loop networks which can achieve this optimal number.

Jean-claude Bermond; Francesc Comellas; D. Frank Hsu

1995-01-01

82

Mission impossible? [FBI computer network  

Microsoft Academic Search

With a new computer network automated investigative tools, and more channels for sharing information, the FBI hopes to finally know what it knows. The fall of 2001 saw the start of an ambitious program of modernization, which seems to recognize that the barriers that prevent the FBI from analyzing and sharing data are as much cultural as technological. These include

J. Kumagai

2003-01-01

83

A Standard for Computer Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development of suitable standards is a vital key to developing ing the full potential of multi-access computer networks. To date work is being done on only a few of the standards that will be required, and among these few, progress is distressingly slow. Divergent procedures are rapidly becoming entrenched in areas where there should be standards and if the

T. H. Bonn

1971-01-01

84

Course Syllabus ICS 51 -Introductory Computer Organization  

E-print Network

, Pearson Education/Prentice-Hall Headphones or Speakers: The online version of the course has all lectures prerecorded as video clips and voice over PowerPoint. You will need headphones or speakers to follow

Loudon, Catherine

85

Computational Inference of Neural Information Flow Networks  

E-print Network

Computational Inference of Neural Information Flow Networks V. Anne Smith1[¤ , Jing Yu1,2[¤ , Tom V, Hartemink AJ, Jarvis ED (2006) Computational inference of neural information flow networks. PLoS Comput Biol connectivity networks. But traffic congestion, power blackouts, packet routing, computation, and animal

Jarvis, Erich D.

86

UNCORRECTEDPROOF 2 Optimal computation with attractor networks  

E-print Network

UNCORRECTEDPROOF 2 Optimal computation with attractor networks 3 Peter E. Latham a,*, Sophie Deneve reliable computations with noisy population codes. 9 We show that such networks can perform computations small that biologically plausible 12 networks can compute optimally. We demonstrate that this result

Pouget, Alexandre

87

On the Quality of Computer Network Measurements.  

E-print Network

??Due to the complex diversity of contemporary Internet-services, computer network measurements have gained considerable interest during recent years. Since they supply network research, development and (more)

Arlos, Patrik

2005-01-01

88

ELEC3030 (EL336) Computer Networks S Chen ELEC3030 Computer Networks  

E-print Network

ELEC3030 (EL336) Computer Networks S Chen ELEC3030 Computer Networks Professor Sheng Chen: Building · Data link layer · Network layer 1 #12;ELEC3030 (EL336) Computer Networks S Chen Overview · Two most important aspects of computer networks are hardware and software · Hardware: as communication is a primary

Chen, Sheng

89

Student Learning Networks on Residential Field Courses: Does Size Matter?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes learner and tutor reports of a learning network that formed during the completion of investigative projects on a residential field course. Staff and students recorded project-related interactions, who they were with and how long they lasted over four phases during the field course. An enquiry based learning format challenged

Langan, A. Mark; Cullen, W. Rod; Shuker, David M.

2008-01-01

90

Course Content for a Telecommunication Course in an End-User Computing Support Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A modified Delphi panel of telecommunications educators developed a list of specific content topics for a business telecommunications course. Major content areas were recommended: local and wide area networks, media, hardware, e-mail, emerging technologies, network topologies, data signals, conceptual foundations, and social and ethical issues.

Crews, Tena B.; Ray, Charles M.

1998-01-01

91

Graduate school introductory computational simulation course pedagogy  

E-print Network

Numerical methods and algorithms have developed and matured vastly over the past three decades now that computational analysis can be performed on almost any personal computer. There is a need to be able to teach and present ...

Proctor, Laura L. (Laura Lynne), 1975-

2009-01-01

92

Deterrents to women taking computer science courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

The United States faces a shortage of computer scientists. Despite the current economic downturn, the most recent estimate indicates a labor force shortage of IT professionals. The shortage of IT professionals, and especially of computer scientists, provides impetus for increasing the representation of women in computer science (CS). We examine why so few students, and particularly few women, choose to

SYLVIA BEYER; KRISTINA RYNES; SUSAN HALLER

2004-01-01

93

Time-course of cortical networks involved in working memory  

PubMed Central

Working memory (WM) is one of the most studied cognitive constructs. Although many neuroimaging studies have identified brain networks involved in WM, the time course of these networks remains unclear. In this paper we use dense-array electroencephalography (dEEG) to capture neural signals during performance of a standard WM task, the n-back task, and a blend of principal components analysis and independent components analysis (PCA/ICA) to statistically identify networks of WM and their time courses. Results reveal a visual cortex centric network, that also includes the posterior cingulate cortex, that is active prior to stimulus onset and that appears to reflect anticipatory, attention-related processes. After stimulus onset, the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, lateral prefrontal prefrontal cortex, and temporal poles become associated with the prestimulus network. This second network appears to reflect executive control processes. Following activation of the second network, the cortices of the temporo-parietal junction with the temporal lobe structures seen in the first and second networks re-engage. This third network appears to reflect activity of the ventral attention network involved in control of attentional reorientation. The results point to important temporal features of network dynamics that integrate multiple subsystems of the ventral attention network with the default mode network in the performance of working memory tasks. PMID:24523686

Luu, Phan; Caggiano, Daniel M.; Geyer, Alexandra; Lewis, Jenn; Cohn, Joseph; Tucker, Don M.

2014-01-01

94

Visualizing Trends in Student Performance Across Computer Science Courses  

E-print Network

and Mason identify several of the reasons why students leave Computer Science. They point out that studentsVisualizing Trends in Student Performance Across Computer Science Courses Dana Wortman University@cs.umbc.edu ABSTRACT Student retention is an important topic in Computer Science departments across the country

Rheingans, Penny

95

Laboratories for a Liberal Education Computer Science Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Computer science and other computer related fields are faced with the high velocity of change in technology. Far more important than the knowledge of a particular software package is the liberal education skills that are learned in the process. This paper reviews the laboratory component of a new computer science course offered at Miami University

Kiper, James D.; Bishop-Clark, Cathy

96

Addressing Small Computers in the First OS Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Small computers are emerging as important components of the contemporary computing scene. Their operating systems vary from specialized software for an embedded system to the same style of OS used on a generic desktop or server computer. This article describes a course in which systems are classified by their hardware capability and the

Nutt, Gary

2006-01-01

97

Books for the Computational Dynamics course Vincent Icke Sterrewacht Leiden  

E-print Network

Books for the Computational Dynamics course Vincent Icke ­ Sterrewacht Leiden Binney, J. Adventures in celestial me- chanics Wiley, New York, 2E1D, 1998 0-471-13317-5 14 ­ Books for Computational-521-77486-1 Hockney, R.W., & Eastwood, J.W. Computer simulation using particles Hilger, Bristol, 1E1D, 1988 0

Icke, Vincent

98

The Course as Token: A Construction of/by Networks.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the way in which a new applied-physics course introduced in British Columbia as part of a program in applied academics can be seen to construct different networks in different contexts. Employs actor network theory (ANT). Contains 20 references. (DDR)

Gaskell, Jim; Hepburn, Gary

1998-01-01

99

Strategies for encouraging individual achievement in introductory computer science courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Provide extensive opportunities for extra-credit work. In my introductory courses, students have many opportunities to go beyond the course requirements and undertake more challenging tasks. The primary forms for these extra-credit opportunities are open-ended extensions on assignments and programming contests. Students in introductory computer science courses often vary widely in background and ability. As a result, some students are bored

Eric Roberts

2000-01-01

100

"Horses for Courses": Categories of Computer-Based Learning Program and Their Uses in Pharmacology Courses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the pharma-CAL-ogy project, funded by Teaching and Learning Technology Programme (TLTP), which has developed various types of software for use in pharmacology courses. Topics include course organization and delivery software, drill and practice software, tutorial-type programs, simulations, and the need to integrate computer-assisted

Hughes, Ian E.

1998-01-01

101

Development of a Computer Communications Course Plus Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a computer communication course (and its associated laboratory) developed for electrical engineering students at the University of Florida. The course teaches seniors and graduate students the theoretical limits that affect the implementation of serial digital communications and surveys the interface standards, data link protocols, and

Couch, Leon W.; Shaffer, Charles V.

1985-01-01

102

An Elective Course on Computer-Aided Process Design.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an undergraduate chemical engineering course which has been offered at the Georgia Institute of Technology. The objectives, structure, instructional materials and content of this course, which emphasizes the structure and usage of computer-aided design systems, are also included. (HM)

Sommerfeld, Jude T.

1979-01-01

103

Combining Cases and Computer Simulations in Strategic Management Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, the author compared the effectiveness of two different strategic management course designs: one centered on case discussions and the other combining a computer-based simulation with some cases. In addition to evaluation of the research literature, the study involved experiments with six course sections composed of 130 students, Both

Mitchell, Rex C.

2004-01-01

104

Facilitating Successful Online Computing Courses While Minimising Extra Tutor Workload  

Microsoft Academic Search

A key problem in facilitating a successful online course is the highly time-consuming nature of the administrative and pedagogical tasks involved. It is also difficult to achieve a community of learners online, since the lecturer has to overcome the natural reticence of students to post in shared class spaces. In computing courses an additional factor is the tendency of some

Stuart Young; Mae McSporran

2004-01-01

105

Cyber-Seniors: Planning Computer Courses for Older Adults.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was designed to solicit responses from senior citizens (adults over the age of 55) who had enrolled in a computer course after retirement. The information is intended to aid program planners for seniors in developing future courses. Seventy-six seniors from four local sites (Puget Sound, Washington) and two nationwide online services

Donohue, Sue; Herres, Lorelei

106

A first course in computer programming for mechanical engineers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The first course in computer programming for Mechanical and Aerospace Engineers at San Jose? State University is undergoing substantial renovation to better serve the educational needs of the students in the program. The renovated course emphasizes development of algorithmic problem solving skills and familiarity with the C programming language, Excel, and Matlab. Extensive use is made of Ch, a C

Burford Furman; Eric Wertz

2010-01-01

107

Snowmass 2013 Computing Frontier: Networking  

E-print Network

Computing has become a major component of all particle physics experiments and in many areas of theoretical particle physics. Progress in HEP experiment and theory will require significantly more computing, software development, storage, and networking, with different projects stretching future capabilities in different ways. However, there are many common needs among different areas in HEP, so more community planning is advised to increase efficiency. Careful and continuing review of the topics we studied, i.e., user needs and capabilities of current and future technology, is needed.

Gregory Bell; Michael Ernst

2013-11-11

108

Are Hopfield Networks Faster Than Conventional Computers?  

E-print Network

Are Hopfield Networks Faster Than Conventional Computers? Ian Parberry and Hung-Li Tseng Department that conventional computers can be exponentially faster than planar Hopfield networks: although there are planar network can be found by a conventional computer in polynomial time. The theory of PLS-completeness gives

Parberry, Ian

109

Using Computers in Undergraduate Economics Courses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Seven computer assignments for undergraduate economics students that concentrate on building a foundation for programming higher level mathematical calculations are described. The purpose of each assignment, the computer program for it, and the correct answers are provided. "Introduction to Text Editing" acquaints the student with some basic

Barr, Saul Z.; Harmon, Oscar

110

Computer networking at SLR stations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There are several existing communication methods to deliver data from the satellite laser ranging (SLR) station to the SLR data center and back: telephonmodem, telex, and computer networks. The SLR scientific community has been exploiting mainly INTERNET, BITNET/EARN, and SPAN. The total of 56 countries are connected to INTERNET and the number of nodes is exponentially growing. The computer networks mentioned above and others are connected through E-mail protocol. The scientific progress of SLR requires the increase of communication speed and the amount of the transmitted data. The TOPEX/POSEIDON test campaign required to deliver Quick Look data (1.7 kB/pass) from a SLR site to SLR data center within 8 hours and full rate data (up to 500 kB/pass) within 24 hours. We developed networking for the remote SLR station in Helwan, Egypt. The reliable scheme for data delivery consists of: compression of MERIT2 format (up to 89 percent), encoding to ASCII Me (files); and e-mail sending from SLR station--e-mail receiving, decoding, and decompression at the center. We do propose to use the ZIP method for compression/decompression and the UUCODE method for ASCII encoding/decoding. This method will be useful for stations connected via telephonemodems or commercial networks. The electronics delivery could solve the problem of the too late receiving of the FR data by SLR data center.

Novotny, Antonin

1993-06-01

111

A nontraditional computer graphics course for computer science students  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recent theoretical and technological advancement in computer graphics has brought not only exciting changes to the computing field but also new challenges to computer science educators. One of the challenges is effective teaching of computer graphics to computer science students. Several speakers at the SIGGRAPH \\

Zhigalzg Xiang

1994-01-01

112

Computer network development to achieve resource sharing  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper a computer network is defined to be a set of autonomous, independent computer systems, interconnected so as to permit interactive resource sharing between any pair of systems. An overview of the need for a computer network, the requirements of a computer communication system, a description of the properties of the communication system chosen, and the potential uses

Lawrence G. Roberts; Barry D. Wessler

1970-01-01

113

ONLINE SOCIAL NETWORK ANALYTICS Course Syllabus  

E-print Network

of the opportunities, challenges and threats arising by online social media as far as businesses and the society in a World Transformed by Social Technologies: Harvard Business Press. Papers Albert, R., Jeong, H conference on World Wide Web, Lyon, France. Cardoso, G., & Lamy, C. (2011). Social Networks: Communication

114

A "BIG-IDEAS" COMPUTATION THEORY COURSE FOR THE UNDERGRADUATE  

E-print Network

likely to be rele- vant to a student's non-theoretical endeavors. By explaining why these are the "big to major topics in "practical" computing and by elucidating the theoretical/mathematical underpinningsA "BIG-IDEAS" COMPUTATION THEORY COURSE FOR THE UNDERGRADUATE Arnold L. Rosenberg Department

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

115

Computer-Assisted Instruction in an Elementary College Economics Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the effectiveness of the computer component of a cost effective college course in economics. The main computer ingredients consisted of seven instructional lessons, three one-hour exams, a sophisticated record-keeping system, and note-writing capability. Tables are included. (Author/CHC)

Paden, Donald W.; Barr, Michael D.

1980-01-01

116

Introducing computer tools into a first course in electrical engineering  

Microsoft Academic Search

At a school where engineering students have immediate access to a personal computer, it is important that they become familiar with that tool early in their studies. In introductory engineering courses it is also important that the students learn to perceive the computer as a tool and not as an end in itself. Achieving these goals requires a careful integration

Don Y. Northam

1995-01-01

117

59 2013-14 Suggested Course Plan COMPUTER SCIENCE (GAMES)  

E-print Network

. vI ANIMATION & INTERACT. MEdIA (10 UNITS) CTAn 452: Intro to Computer Animation CTIn 488: Game Academy ITP 280: Video Game Production ITP 380: Video Game Programming ITP 485: Programming Game Engines59 2013-14 Suggested Course Plan COMPUTER SCIENCE (GAMES) FIRST YEAR FALL: 16 units SPRING: 18

Zhou, Chongwu

118

A Computer Course for Business Students: Teacher's Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This teacher's guide is for a course designed to teach business students the fundamentals of the BASIC language and computer programming using a series of business-oriented programs. Each lesson contains an introduction, flow charts, and computer programs. The six lesson topics are print-out and format control, count-average, withholding tax

Waterhouse, Ann

119

Incorporating ethics in computing courses extra class activities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Teaching ethics in undergraduate computing-oriented courses is important because the specific nature of the development and application of software products affects the professional and personal interests of so many people. Two different approaches in teaching ethics for computer science and information systems students are described here. The first approach consists of incorporating ethical concepts into the teaching material of several

Fani Zlatarova

2004-01-01

120

Delayed commutation in quantum computer networks  

E-print Network

In the same way that classical computer networks connect and enhance the capabilities of classical computers, quantum networks can combine the advantages of quantum information and communications. We propose a non-classical network element, a delayed commutation switch, that can solve the problem of switching time in packet switching networks. With the help of some local ancillary qubits and superdense codes we can route the information after part of it has left the network node.

Garcia-Escartin, J C; Chamorro-Posada, Pedro; Garcia-Escartin, Juan Carlos

2005-01-01

121

Delayed commutation in quantum computer networks  

E-print Network

In the same way that classical computer networks connect and enhance the capabilities of classical computers, quantum networks can combine the advantages of quantum information and communications. We propose a non-classical network element, a delayed commutation switch, that can solve the problem of switching time in packet switching networks. With the help of some local ancillary qubits and superdense codes we can route the information after part of it has left the network node.

Juan Carlos Garcia-Escartin; Pedro Chamorro-Posada

2005-11-03

122

MTX data acquisition and analysis computer network  

Microsoft Academic Search

For the MTX experiment, we use a network of computers for plasma diagnostic data acquisition and analysis. This multivendor network employs VMS, UNIX, and BASIC based computers connected in a local area Ethernet network. Some of the data is acquired directly into a VAX\\/VMS computer cluster over a fiber-optic serial CAMAC highway. Several HP-Unix workstations and HP-BASIC instrument control computers

D. N. Butner; T. A. Casper; M. D. Brown; M. Drlik; W. H. Meyer; J. M. Moller

1990-01-01

123

Course 10: Three Lectures on Biological Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

1 Enzymatic networks. Proofreading knots: How DNA topoisomerases disentangle DNA 1.1 Length scales and energy scales 1.2 DNA topology 1.3 Topoisomerases 1.4 Knots and supercoils 1.5 Topological equilibrium 1.6 Can topoisomerases recognize topology? 1.7 Proposal: Kinetic proofreading 1.8 How to do it twice 1.9 The care and proofreading of knots 1.10 Suppression of supercoils 1.11 Problems and outlook 1.12 Disquisition 2 Gene expression networks. Methods for analysis of DNA chip experiments 2.1 The regulation of gene expression 2.2 Gene expression arrays 2.3 Analysis of array data 2.4 Some simplifying assumptions 2.5 Probeset analysis 2.6 Discussion 3 Neural and gene expression networks: Song-induced gene expression in the canary brain 3.1 The study of songbirds 3.2 Canary song 3.3 ZENK 3.4 The blush 3.5 Histological analysis 3.6 Natural vs. artificial 3.7 The Blush II: gAP 3.8 Meditation

Magnasco, M. O.

124

Introduction to Computer Networks Computer Networking: A Top Down Approach  

E-print Network

??? · Network edge · Network core · Network access and physical media · Internet structure and ISPs · Delay · Network core · Network access and physical media · Internet structure and ISPs · Delay & loss in packet the Internet, 4th edition. Jim Kurose, Keith Ross, Addison-Wesley, July 2007 ­ The best intro-level network

Dong, Yingfei

125

Inference of dynamic networks using time-course data.  

PubMed

Cells execute their functions through dynamic operations of biological networks. Dynamic networks delineate the operation of biological networks in terms of temporal changes of abundances or activities of nodes (proteins and RNAs), as well as formation of new edges and disappearance of existing edges over time. Global genomic and proteomic technologies can be used to decode dynamic networks. However, using these experimental methods, it is still challenging to identify temporal transition of nodes and edges. Thus, several computational methods for estimating dynamic topological and functional characteristics of networks have been introduced. In this review, we summarize concepts and applications of these computational methods for inferring dynamic networks and further summarize methods for estimating spatial transition of biological networks. PMID:23698724

Kim, Yongsoo; Han, Seungmin; Choi, Seungjin; Hwang, Daehee

2014-03-01

126

A Computer Security Course in the Undergraduate Computer Science Curriculum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the importance of computer security and considers criminal, national security, and personal privacy threats posed by security breakdown. Several examples are given, including incidents involving computer viruses. Objectives, content, instructional strategies, resources, and a sample examination for an experimental undergraduate computer

Spillman, Richard

1992-01-01

127

Terminal-oriented computer-communication networks.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Four examples of currently operating computer-communication networks are described in this tutorial paper. They include the TYMNET network, the GE Information Services network, the NASDAQ over-the-counter stock-quotation system, and the Computer Sciences Infonet. These networks all use programmable concentrators for combining a multiplicity of terminals. Included in the discussion for each network is a description of the overall network structure, the handling and transmission of messages, communication requirements, routing and reliability consideration where applicable, operating data and design specifications where available, and unique design features in the area of computer communications.

Schwartz, M.; Boorstyn, R. R.; Pickholtz, R. L.

1972-01-01

128

Software For Monitoring A Computer Network  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

SNMAT is rule-based expert-system computer program designed to assist personnel in monitoring status of computer network and identifying defective computers, workstations, and other components of network. Also assists in training network operators. Network for SNMAT located at Space Flight Operations Center (SFOC) at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Intended to serve as data-reduction system providing windows, menus, and graphs, enabling users to focus on relevant information. SNMAT expected to be adaptable to other computer networks; for example in management of repair, maintenance, and security, or in administration of planning systems, billing systems, or archives.

Lee, Young H.

1992-01-01

129

Theoretical and Computational Advances for Network Diversion  

E-print Network

Theoretical and Computational Advances for Network Diversion Christopher A. Cullenbine Division and Business, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 The network-diversion problem (ND) is defined,000 edges. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. NETWORKS, Vol. 000(00), 000­000 2013 Keywords: network diversion

130

Distributed computation in wireless and dynamic networks  

E-print Network

Today's wireless networks tend to be centralized: they are organized around a fixed central backbone such as a network of cellular towers or wireless access points. However, as mobile computing devices continue to shrink ...

Oshman, Rotei

2012-01-01

131

Code 672 observational science branch computer networks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In general, networking increases productivity due to the speed of transmission, easy access to remote computers, ability to share files, and increased availability of peripherals. Two different networks within the Observational Science Branch are described in detail.

Hancock, D. W.; Shirk, H. G.

1988-01-01

132

Creating a Computer Science Canon: a Course of "Classic" Readings in Computer Science  

E-print Network

Creating a Computer Science Canon: a Course of "Classic" Readings in Computer Science Michael Eisenberg Department of Computer Science and Institute of Cognitive Science University of Colorado Boulder, CO 80309-0430 duck@cs.colorado.edu Abstract Computer science has a reputation of being a discipline

Eisenberg, Michael A.

133

Integration of Major Computer Program Packages into Experimental Courses: Organic Synthesis Design and the Computer.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents discussion on: (1) computer assisted synthesis in industry and academia; (2) computer applications to teaching organic synthesis; (3) a computer program (ORGSYN) incorporating reactions to synthesize aliphatic compounds; and (4) the design of a computer program as a heuristic device in an introductory organic course. (SK)

Sandel, Bonnie Burns; Solomon, Robert W.

1981-01-01

134

A Scalable, Robust Network for Parallel Computing  

E-print Network

the rewards in physics, chemistry, bioinformatics, and medicine, among other fields of knowledge. Several an emerging global computational organism, bringing "life" to Sun Microsystem's phrase "The network

Cappello, Peter

135

Researching the development of team competencies in computer science courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

The capability to effectively work in teams has been a key competence for computer scientists for a long time. Gradually, more attention is paid to developing this generic competence as part of academic curricula. At the University of Vienna, we have conducted and researched a number of different courses that were aimed at developing studentspsila team competencies along with subject

Kathrin Figl; Renate Motschnig

2008-01-01

136

ELECTRICAL, COMPUTER, AND SYSTEMS ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT ABET COURSE SYLLABUS  

E-print Network

and within materials. Introduction to vector calculus and computer-aided analysis and design methods, and other design tools for distributed circuits. Pre-Requisite Courses: ECSE-2010 Electric Circuits and MATH's Equations, Maple to evaluate integrals, Matlab for various purposes, Agilent Intuilink for capturing data

Lü, James Jian-Qiang

137

Predicting performance in an introductory computer science course  

Microsoft Academic Search

A group of 269 first-semester freshmen was used to predict both performance in an introductory computer science course and first-semester college grade point average by using information regarding the students' programs and performance in high school along with American College Testing Program (ACT) test scores.

D. F. Butcher; W. A. Muth

1985-01-01

138

Impact of Multimedia and Network Services on an Introductory Level Course  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We will demonstrate and describe the impact of our use of multimedia and network connectivity on a sophomore-level introductory course in materials science. This class services all engineering students, resulting in large (more than 150) class sections with no hands-on laboratory. In 1990 we began to develop computer graphics that might substitute for some laboratory or real-world experiences, and demonstrate relationships hard to show with static textbook images or chalkboard drawings. We created a comprehensive series of modules that cover the entire course content. Called VIMS (Visualizations in Materials Science), these are available in the form of a CD-ROM and also via the internet.

Russ, John C.

1996-01-01

139

Motivation and nonmajors in computer science: identifying discrete audiences for introductory courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Traditional introductory computer science (CS) courses have had little success engaging non-computer science majors. At the Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, where introductory CS courses are a requirement for CS majors and nonmajors alike, two tailored introductory courses were introduced as an alternative to the traditional course. The results were encouraging: more nonmajors succeeded (completed and passed) in tailored courses

Andrea Forte; Mark Guzdial

2005-01-01

140

Analysis and Design of Reliable Computer Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the design of a computer network, one of the fundamental considerations is the reliability and availability of the communication paths between all pairs of centers in the network. These characteristics are strongly dependent on the topological layout of the communication links in addition to the reliability and availability of the individual computer systems and communication facilities. Based on graph

R. Wilkov

1972-01-01

141

Managing secure computer systems and networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

No computer system or computer network can today be operated without the necessary security measures to secure and protect the electronic assets stored, processed and transmitted using such systems and networks. Very often the effort in managing such security and protection measures are totally underestimated. This paper provides an overview of the security management needed to secure and protect a

1996-01-01

142

Understanding Social Networks Properties for Trustworthy Computing  

E-print Network

these properties and understand the relationship among them and to other characteristics of social networks. We for the effectiveness of applications built on top of the social network. While most applications and primitives builtUnderstanding Social Networks Properties for Trustworthy Computing Abedelaziz Mohaisen, Huy Tran

Kim, Dae-Shik

143

Neural-Network Computer Transforms Coordinates  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Numerical simulation demonstrated ability of conceptual neural-network computer to generalize what it has "learned" from few examples. Ability to generalize achieved with even simple neural network (relatively few neurons) and after exposure of network to only few "training" examples. Ability to obtain fairly accurate mappings after only few training examples used to provide solutions to otherwise intractable mapping problems.

Josin, Gary M.

1990-01-01

144

Using E-Mail across Computer Networks.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the use of telecommunications technology to exchange electronic mail, files, and messages across different computer networks. Networks highlighted include ARPA Internet; BITNET; USENET; FidoNet; MCI Mail; and CompuServe. Examples of the successful use of networks in higher education are given. (Six references) (LRW)

Hazari, Sunil

1990-01-01

145

Computing aggregates for monitoring wireless sensor networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wireless sensor networks involve very large numbers of small, low-power, wireless devices. Given their unattended nature, and their potential applications in harsh environments, we need a monitoring infrastructure that indicates system failures and resource depletion. We describe an architecture for sensor network monitoring, then focus on one aspect of this architecture: continuously computing aggregates (sum, average, count) of network properties

Jerry Zhao; Ramesh Govindan; Deborah Estrin

2003-01-01

146

Super-speed computer interfaces and networks  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Research into super-speed computer interfaces has been directed towards identifying networking requirements from compute-intensive applications that are crucial to DOE programs. In particular, both the DOE Energy Research High Performance Computing Research Centers (HPCRC) and the DOE Defense Programs Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) have planned applications that will require large increases in network bandwidth. This project was set up to help network researchers identify those networking requirements and to plan the development of such networks. Based on studies, research, and LANL-sponsored workshops, this project helped forge the beginnings for multi-gigabit/sec network research and developments that today is being lead by Los Alamos in the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 6.4 gigabit/sec specification called HIPPI-6400.

Tolmie, D.E.; St. John, W.; DuBois, D.H. [and others

1997-10-01

147

Documentary of MFENET, a national computer network  

Microsoft Academic Search

The national Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Network (MFENET) is a newly operational star network of geographically separated heterogeneous hosts and a communications subnetwork of PDP-11 processors. Host processors interfaced to the subnetwork currently include a CDC 7600 at the Central Computer Center (CCC) and several DECsystem-10's at User Service Centers (USC's). The network was funded by a U.S. government agency

Shuttleworth

1977-01-01

148

Networking Course Syllabus in Accredited Library and Information Science Programs: A Comparative Analysis Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study investigated networking courses offered in accredited Library and Information Science schools in the United States in 2009. The study analyzed and compared network syllabi according to Course Syllabus Evaluation Rubric to obtain in-depth understanding of basic features and characteristics of networking courses taught. The study embraced

Abouserie, Hossam Eldin Mohamed Refaat

2009-01-01

149

Integrating network awareness in ATLAS distributed computing  

E-print Network

A crucial contributor to the success of the massively scaled global computing system that delivers the analysis needs of the LHC experiments is the networking infrastructure upon which the system is built. The experiments have been able to exploit excellent high-bandwidth networking in adapting their computing models for the most efficient utilization of resources. New advanced networking technologies now becoming available such as software defined networks hold the potential of further leveraging the network to optimize workflows and dataflows, through proactive control of the network fabric on the part of high level applications such as experiment workload management and data management systems. End to end monitoring of networking and data flow performance further allows applications to adapt based on real time conditions. We will describe efforts underway in ATLAS on integrating network awareness at the application level, particularly in workload management.

De, K; The ATLAS collaboration; Klimentov, A; Maeno, T; Mckee, S; Nilsson, P; Petrosyan, A; Vukotic, I; Wenaus, T

2014-01-01

150

Computer network management based on TMN  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Computer Network Management is the most important work of the computer network. Two problems in managing of a professional network must be solved, one is to standardize the relationship between the professional network and the management network, and the other is to ensure the security of the network. The first problem will be discussed here. We put forward a new idea here, that is, to build standard computer management network and standard professional network. First, we give a standard model of the relationship between the management network and its subordinate professional network. This model is different with the TMN. It distinguishes the management network and the subordinate professional network clearly in the notion, the place and the property of all the sockets is determined. Subsequently, the corresponding function structure and physical architecture are given together. For each kind of architecture, we define the related rules respectively. These rules are: the relationship between the function module, the standard of the interface, protocol architecture. Then, the procedure of communication signal processing is analyzed. The requirements of all the programming sockets are explained. Finally, we explain some related topics briefly.

Li, Yanpeng; Li, Xiang; Zhuang, Zhaowen

2002-09-01

151

Queuing theory models for computer networks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A set of simple queuing theory models which can model the average response of a network of computers to a given traffic load has been implemented using a spreadsheet. The impact of variations in traffic patterns and intensities, channel capacities, and message protocols can be assessed using them because of the lack of fine detail in the network traffic rates, traffic patterns, and the hardware used to implement the networks. A sample use of the models applied to a realistic problem is included in appendix A. Appendix B provides a glossary of terms used in this paper. This Ames Research Center computer communication network is an evolving network of local area networks (LANs) connected via gateways and high-speed backbone communication channels. Intelligent planning of expansion and improvement requires understanding the behavior of the individual LANs as well as the collection of networks as a whole.

Galant, David C.

1989-01-01

152

A Survey of Computer Network Topology and Analysis Examples  

E-print Network

A Survey of Computer Network Topology and Analysis Examples Brett Meador, brett an introduction to Computer Network Topology. Definitions of Physical and Logical Topologies are provided. Additionally common Computer Network realizations of Physical Topologies are reviewed. This is followed

Jain, Raj

153

Research and Implementation of Computer Simulation System for Neural Networks  

E-print Network

Research and Implementation of Computer Simulation System for Neural Networks Chen, Houjin Yuan computer simulation system for neural networks was designed and implemented including system architecture network; Computer simulation; Mathematical modeling; Data representation Neurons are specific cells

Byrne, John H.

154

A Binary Feedback Scheme for Congestion Avoidance in Computer Networks  

E-print Network

A Binary Feedback Scheme for Congestion Avoidance in Computer Networks K. K. RAMAKRISHNAN and RAJ and pathological overload conditions. Categories and Subject Descriptors: C.2.1 [Computer-Communication Networks and forward networks; C.2.3 [Computer Communication Networks]: Network Operations-network monitoring; C.4

Jain, Raj

155

Remote versus Traditional Learning in a Computer Networks Marc-Alain Steinemann, Torsten Braun  

E-print Network

Remote versus Traditional Learning in a Computer Networks Laboratory Marc-Alain Steinemann, Torsten Didactic aspects of Internet-based courses are somewhat different from the didactic aspects of traditional university courses. In this paper the didactical as well as the technical differences between the traditional

Braun, Torsten

156

Computing in context: integrating an embedded computing project into a course on ethical and societal issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

A hands-on embedded computing project is introduced into an undergraduate social sciences course. In the pilot mod- ule, nine student teams created working prototypes, using the technology to address social, ecological and ethical is- sues. The teams included freshman to senior level computer science majors, other technical majors, and non-technical students. Most students became highly engaged in the activ- ity,

Fred G. Martin; Sarah Kuhn

2006-01-01

157

Computing in context: integrating an embedded computing project into a course on ethical and societal issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

A hands-on embedded computing project is introduced into an undergraduate social sciences course. In the pilot module, nine student teams created working prototypes, using the technology to address social, ecological and ethical issues. The teams included freshman to senior level computer science majors, other technical majors, and non-technical students. Most students became highly engaged in the activity, developed exciting ideas,

Fred G. Martin; Sarah Kuhn

2006-01-01

158

Computer network environment planning and analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The GSFC Computer Network Environment provides a broadband RF cable between campus buildings and ethernet spines in buildings for the interlinking of Local Area Networks (LANs). This system provides terminal and computer linkage among host and user systems thereby providing E-mail services, file exchange capability, and certain distributed computing opportunities. The Environment is designed to be transparent and supports multiple protocols. Networking at Goddard has a short history and has been under coordinated control of a Network Steering Committee for slightly more than two years; network growth has been rapid with more than 1500 nodes currently addressed and greater expansion expected. A new RF cable system with a different topology is being installed during summer 1989; consideration of a fiber optics system for the future will begin soon. Summmer study was directed toward Network Steering Committee operation and planning plus consideration of Center Network Environment analysis and modeling. Biweekly Steering Committee meetings were attended to learn the background of the network and the concerns of those managing it. Suggestions for historical data gathering have been made to support future planning and modeling. Data Systems Dynamic Simulator, a simulation package developed at NASA and maintained at GSFC was studied as a possible modeling tool for the network environment. A modeling concept based on a hierarchical model was hypothesized for further development. Such a model would allow input of newly updated parameters and would provide an estimation of the behavior of the network.

Dalphin, John F.

1989-01-01

159

Profiles of Motivated Self-Regulation in College Computer Science Courses: Differences in Major versus Required Non-Major Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal of the present study was to utilize a profiling approach to understand differences in motivation and strategic self-regulation among post-secondary STEM students in major versus required non-major computer science courses. Participants were 233 students from required introductory computer science courses (194 men; 35 women; 4 unknown) at

Shell, Duane F.; Soh, Leen-Kiat

2013-01-01

160

Bringing a large computer network into FOCUS  

SciTech Connect

The development and implementation of the Facility for Operations Control and Utilization Statistics (FOCUS), a new centralized node in the Integrated Computing Network of the Los Alamos National Laboratory is described. FOCUS consists of production control, performance measurement, and network information subsystems. The software engineering practices on which the development was based are discussed, with emphasis on the application of those practices to network systems development.

Morse, N.R.; Thompson, J.L.

1982-01-01

161

Kerberos: an authentication service for computer networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

When using authentication based on cryptography, an attacker listening to the network gains no information that would enable it to falsely claim another's identity. Kerberos is the most commonly used example of this type of authentication technology. The authors concentrate on authentication for real-time, interactive services that are offered on computer networks. They use the term real-time loosely to mean

B. Clifford Neuman; T. Ts'o

1994-01-01

162

Computing Wikipedia Edit-Networks Ulrik Brandes  

E-print Network

, The Netherlands D.P.A.M.Korssen-vanRaaij@uvt.nl ABSTRACT This technical paper reviews the definition of Wikipedia clarify in Sect. 2.1 how we handle reverts, duplicated text, and text that has been moved to a different location on the page. An algorithm to compute edit-networks is detailed in Sect. 2. 1.1 Network Model

Brandes, Ulrik

163

Congestion avoidance in computer networks with a connectionless network layer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Widespread use of computer networks and the use of varied technology for the interconnection of computers has made congestion a signi cant problem. In this report, we summarize our research on congestion avoidance. We compare the concept of congestion avoidance with that of congestion control. Brie y, congestion control is a recovery mechanism, while conges-tion avoidance is a prevention mechanism.

R. Jain; D. M Ch

1987-01-01

164

FOR A SOCIAL NETWORK ANALYSIS OF COMPUTER NETWORKS  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT When computer networks link people as well as machines, they,become,social,networks.,Social network,analysis provides,a useful approach,to moving,beyond,the concept of group in studying,virtual communities,and computer supported,cooperative,work,and telework. Such computer supported social networks (CSSNS) sustain strong, inter- mediate,and weak,ties that provide,information,and social support,in both,specialized,and,broadly-based,relation- ships. They foster informal,workplace,communities,that are usually partial and narrowly-focused, although some do,become,encompassing,and,broadly-based.,CSSNS connect,workers,within,and,between,organizations,who often are physically,dispersed. The nature of

Barry Wellman

165

Spin Networks and Anyonic Topological Computing II  

E-print Network

We review the q-deformed spin network approach to topological quantum field theory and apply these methods to produce unitary representations of the braid groups that are dense in the unitary groups. The simplest case of these models is the Fibonacci model, itself universal for quantum computation. We here formulate these braid group representations in a shape suitable for computation and algebraic work.

Louis H. Kauffman; Samuel J. Lomonaco Jr

2007-07-25

166

Incremental Centrality Computations for Dynamic Social Networks  

E-print Network

.carley@cs.cmu.edu Carnegie Mellon University Keywords: Centrality Computation, Incremental Algorithm Design, Dynamic Social solving the all-pairs shortest path problem. However, most of these metrics were designed for staticIncremental Centrality Computations for Dynamic Social Networks Miray Kas, Matthew Wachs, L

Sadeh, Norman M.

167

Optimization of an interactive distributive computer network  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The activities under a cooperative agreement for the development of a computer network are briefly summarized. Research activities covered are: computer operating systems optimization and integration; software development and implementation of the IRIS (Infrared Imaging of Shuttle) Experiment; and software design, development, and implementation of the APS (Aerosol Particle System) Experiment.

Frederick, V.

1985-01-01

168

The Networked Computer Science Technical Report Library  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Networked Computer Science Technical Report Library (NCSTRL 1 ) is a distributed digital library of research results from computer science departments and laboratories in the USA and abroad. NCSTRL benefits readers, authors, and departments. Researchers throughout the world can use familiar Internet tools (the World Wide Web) to search for, browse, read, and download technical reports from participating institutions.

James R. Davis; Carl Lagoze

1996-01-01

169

Course Syllabus MA 4404 (4-0) Structure and Analysis of Complex Networks  

E-print Network

Course Syllabus MA 4404 (4-0) Structure and Analysis of Complex Networks Spring 2014 Contact Description This course focuses on the emerging science of complex networks and their applications, through on the dynamically evolving complex networks, learn about the ongoing research in the field, and apply

Gera, Ralucca

170

MTX data acquisition and analysis computer network  

SciTech Connect

For the MTX experiment, we use a network of computers for plasma diagnostic data acquisition and analysis. This multivendor network employs VMS, UNIX, and BASIC based computers connected in a local area Ethernet network. Some of the data is acquired directly into a VAX/VMS computer cluster over a fiber-optic serial CAMAC highway. Several HP-Unix workstations and HP-BASIC instrument control computers acquire and analyze data for the more data intensive or specialized diagnostics. The VAX/VMS system is used for global analysis of the data and serves as the central data archiving and retrieval manager. Shot synchronization and control of data flow are implemented by task-to-task message passing using our interprocess communication system. The system has been in operation during our initial MTX tokamak and FEL experiments; it has operated reliably with data rates typically in the range of 5 Mbytes/shot without limiting the experimental shot rate.

Butner, D.N.; Casper, T.A.; Brown, M.D.; Drlik, M.; Meyer, W.H.; Moller, J.M. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, CA (USA))

1990-10-01

171

Pedagogical Utilization and Assessment of the Statistic Online Computational Resource in Introductory Probability and Statistics Courses.  

PubMed

Technology-based instruction represents a new recent pedagogical paradigm that is rooted in the realization that new generations are much more comfortable with, and excited about, new technologies. The rapid technological advancement over the past decade has fueled an enormous demand for the integration of modern networking, informational and computational tools with classical pedagogical instruments. Consequently, teaching with technology typically involves utilizing a variety of IT and multimedia resources for online learning, course management, electronic course materials, and novel tools of communication, engagement, experimental, critical thinking and assessment.The NSF-funded Statistics Online Computational Resource (SOCR) provides a number of interactive tools for enhancing instruction in various undergraduate and graduate courses in probability and statistics. These resources include online instructional materials, statistical calculators, interactive graphical user interfaces, computational and simulation applets, tools for data analysis and visualization. The tools provided as part of SOCR include conceptual simulations and statistical computing interfaces, which are designed to bridge between the introductory and the more advanced computational and applied probability and statistics courses. In this manuscript, we describe our designs for utilizing SOCR technology in instruction in a recent study. In addition, present the results of the effectiveness of using SOCR tools at two different course intensity levels on three outcome measures: exam scores, student satisfaction and choice of technology to complete assignments. Learning styles assessment was completed at baseline. We have used three very different designs for three different undergraduate classes. Each course included a treatment group, using the SOCR resources, and a control group, using classical instruction techniques. Our findings include marginal effects of the SOCR treatment per individual classes; however, pooling the results across all courses and sections, SOCR effects on the treatment groups were exceptionally robust and significant. Coupling these findings with a clear decrease in the variance of the quantitative examination measures in the treatment groups indicates that employing technology, like SOCR, in a sound pedagogical and scientific manner enhances overall the students' understanding and suggests better long-term knowledge retention. PMID:19750185

Dinov, Ivo D; Sanchez, Juana; Christou, Nicolas

2008-01-01

172

Pedagogical Utilization and Assessment of the Statistic Online Computational Resource in Introductory Probability and Statistics Courses  

PubMed Central

Technology-based instruction represents a new recent pedagogical paradigm that is rooted in the realization that new generations are much more comfortable with, and excited about, new technologies. The rapid technological advancement over the past decade has fueled an enormous demand for the integration of modern networking, informational and computational tools with classical pedagogical instruments. Consequently, teaching with technology typically involves utilizing a variety of IT and multimedia resources for online learning, course management, electronic course materials, and novel tools of communication, engagement, experimental, critical thinking and assessment. The NSF-funded Statistics Online Computational Resource (SOCR) provides a number of interactive tools for enhancing instruction in various undergraduate and graduate courses in probability and statistics. These resources include online instructional materials, statistical calculators, interactive graphical user interfaces, computational and simulation applets, tools for data analysis and visualization. The tools provided as part of SOCR include conceptual simulations and statistical computing interfaces, which are designed to bridge between the introductory and the more advanced computational and applied probability and statistics courses. In this manuscript, we describe our designs for utilizing SOCR technology in instruction in a recent study. In addition, present the results of the effectiveness of using SOCR tools at two different course intensity levels on three outcome measures: exam scores, student satisfaction and choice of technology to complete assignments. Learning styles assessment was completed at baseline. We have used three very different designs for three different undergraduate classes. Each course included a treatment group, using the SOCR resources, and a control group, using classical instruction techniques. Our findings include marginal effects of the SOCR treatment per individual classes; however, pooling the results across all courses and sections, SOCR effects on the treatment groups were exceptionally robust and significant. Coupling these findings with a clear decrease in the variance of the quantitative examination measures in the treatment groups indicates that employing technology, like SOCR, in a sound pedagogical and scientific manner enhances overall the students understanding and suggests better long-term knowledge retention. PMID:19750185

Dinov, Ivo D.; Sanchez, Juana; Christou, Nicolas

2009-01-01

173

Multimedia computer support for a course in ground control  

SciTech Connect

A prototype multimedia compact disc (CD) was created using the facilities at the Rock Mechanics and Explosives Research Center (RMERC) of the University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR) to teach a portion of a course in Ground Control. Multimedia computers offer an environment where audio-visual presentations can be made in an interactive fashion. Together with relevant animation clips, video clips, and 3-D representations, the difficulties in describing mining processes and earth structures can be overcome. This paper describes the experience gained in preparing interactive multimedia lectures on computers. The hardware and software used in creating the sound commentary, 3-D graphics, animation clips, video clips, and movies are listed. The structure of the program and how interactivity was achieved is explained in detail. Such an instructional tool is not only an excellent supplement to regular courses but it also is an inexpensive and effective way of providing distance education for mining engineers working at remote locations scattered all over the country.

Summers, D.A.; Unal, A. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States)

1996-12-31

174

Staged circuit switching for network computers  

SciTech Connect

Staged cricuit switching (SCS) is a message-switching technique which combines a new protocol with new communication hardware. Protocol and hardware are designed specifically for networks which are intended to function as integrated, general-purpose MIMD machines, i.e. for network computers. The SCS protocol is a form of circuit switching which degrades automatically into packet switching when unavailable output lines make further extension of a partial circuit impossible. The SCS hardware uses a front-end crossbar switch to multiplex some small number of communication channels among all of a given node's incident links. Together, hardware and protocol represent an attempt to convert spare bandwidth into lower network delays. They also allow experimentation with networks which reconfigure themselves dynamically in response to measured traffic patterns. SCS is compared with packet switching, circuit switching and the virtual cut-through protocol of P. Kermani and L.Kleinrock (see Comput. Networks, vol.3, p.267, 1979, and IEEE Trans. Comput. C-29,12, p.1052, December 1980), and an SCS implementation designed for the SBN network computer is discussed. 23 references.

Arango, M.; Gelernter, D.; Badr, H.; Bernstein, A.J.

1983-03-01

175

Computations in Quantum Tensor Networks  

E-print Network

The computation of the ground state (i.e. the eigenvector related to the smallest eigenvalue) is an important task in the simulation of quantum many-body systems. As the dimension of the underlying vector space grows exponentially in the number of particles, one has to consider appropriate subsets promising both convenient approximation properties and efficient computations. The variational ansatz for this numerical approach leads to the minimization of the Rayleigh quotient. The Alternating Least Squares technique is then applied to break down the eigenvector computation to problems of appropriate size, which can be solved by classical methods. Efficient computations require fast computation of the matrix-vector product and of the inner product of two decomposed vectors. To this end, both appropriate representations of vectors and efficient contraction schemes are needed. Here approaches from many-body quantum physics for one-dimensional and two-dimensional systems (Matrix Product States and Projected Entangled Pair States) are treated mathematically in terms of tensors. We give the definition of these concepts, bring some results concerning uniqueness and numerical stability and show how computations can be executed efficiently within these concepts. Based on this overview we present some modifications and generalizations of these concepts and show that they still allow efficient computations such as applicable contraction schemes. In this context we consider the minimization of the Rayleigh quotient in terms of the {\\sc parafac} (CP) formalism, where we also allow different tensor partitions. This approach makes use of efficient contraction schemes for the calculation of inner products in a way that can easily be extended to the mps format but also to higher dimensional problems.

T. Huckle; K. Waldherr; T. Schulte-Herbrueggen

2012-12-20

176

Integrating emerging topics through online team design in a hybrid communication networks course: Interaction patterns and impact  

E-print Network

Integrating emerging topics through online team design in a hybrid communication networks course to an emerging communication networks topic. The online team design project was evaluated with a thematic. All rights reserved. Keywords: Asynchronous communication; Communication networks course; Emerging

Reisslein, Martin

177

Estimating computer communication network performance using network simulations  

SciTech Connect

A generalized queuing model simulation of store-and-forward computer communication networks is developed and implemented using Simulation Language for Alternative Modeling (SLAM). A baseline simulation model is validated by comparison with published analytic models. The baseline model is expanded to include an ACK/NAK data link protocol, four-level message precedence, finite queues, and a response traffic scenario. Network performance, as indicated by average message delay and message throughput, is estimated using the simulation model.

Garcia, A.B.

1985-01-01

178

Computing with structured connections networks. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

Rapid advances both in the neurosciences and in computer science are beginning to lead to a new interest in computational models linking animal brains and behavior. In computer science, there is a large and growing body of knowledge about parallel computation and another, largely separate, science of artificial intelligence. The idea of looking directly at massively parallel realizations of intelligent activity promises to be fruitful for the study of both natural and artificial computations. Much attention has been directed towards the biological implications of this interdisciplinary effort, but there are equally important relations with computational theory, hardware and software. This article focuses on the design and use of massively parallel computational models, particularly in artificial intelligence. Much of the recent work on massively parallel computation has been carried out by physicists and examines the emergent behavior of large, unstructured collections of computing units. We are more concerned with how one can design, realize and analyze networks that embody the specific computational structures needed to solve hard problems. Adaptation and learning are treated as ways to improve structured networks, not as a replacement for analysis and design.

Feldman, J.A.; Fanty, M.A.; Goddard, N.; Lynne, K.

1987-04-01

179

Routing to Multiple Destinations in Computer Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Algorithms for effectively routing messages from a source to multiple destination nodes in a store-and-forward computer network are studied. The focus is on minimizing the network cost (NC), which is the sum of weights of the links in the routing path. Several heuristic algorithms are studied for finding the NC minimum path (which is an NP-complete problem). Among them are

KADABA BHARATH-KUMAR; JEFFREY M. JAFFE

1983-01-01

180

Meteorological Monitoring And Warning Computer Network  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Meteorological monitoring system (MMS) computer network tracks weather conditions and issues warnings when weather hazards are about to occur. Receives data from such meteorological instruments as wind sensors on towers and lightning detectors, and compares data with weather restrictions specified for outdoor activities. If weather violates restriction, network generates audible and visible alarms to alert people involved in activity. Also displays weather and toxic diffusion data and disseminates weather forecasts, advisories, and warnings to workstations.

Evans, Randolph J.; Dianic, Allan V.; Moore, Lien N.

1996-01-01

181

Computations in Quantum Tensor Networks  

E-print Network

with N legs ( ) ( ) ( ) = jjiijiij yxa , i j Matrix-vector product ­ contraction over index i: #12;First and TT: Description Computations/Contractions Normalizations (SVD, DMRG) PEPS, MERA, MPO Eigenvalue Notation ix i Vector (1 leg): ( ) jiija , i j Matrix (2 legs): Niix ...1 ... i1 i2 ... iN General tensor

Cengarle, María Victoria

182

CAREL: Computer Aided Reliability Evaluator for Distributed Computing Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

An efficient method to compute the terminal reliability (the probability of communication between a pair of nodes) of a distributed computing system (DCS) is presented. It is assumed that the graph model G(V,E) for DCS is given and that the path and\\/or cut information for the network G(V,E) is available. Boolean algebraic concepts are used to define four operators: compare,

Sieteng Soh; Suresh Rai

1991-01-01

183

Computer science for secondary schools: course content recommendations of the ACM education board elementary and secondary schools subcommittee  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computers and computing are topics of discussion in many curriculum areas in secondary school. The four courses recommended by this task group, however, have computing as their primary content. The courses are:Introduction to Computer Science I (a full year course)Introduction to Computer Science II (a full year course)Introduction to a High-level Computer Language (a half-year course)Applications and Implications of Computers

Fred Archberger; Robert M. Aiken; John C. Arch; Michael R. Haney; John D. Lawson Jr.; Cheryl Lemke; Thomas A. Swanson; Samuel F. Tumolo

1985-01-01

184

STUDENT COMPUTER USE IN SELECTED UNDERGRADUATE AGRICULTURE COURSES: AN EXAMINATION OF REQUIRED TASKS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Faculty members in a college of agriculture were surveyed to determine the computer tasks required of students enrolled in selected undergraduate courses (a = 63). Over 50% of the courses requiredstudents to complete one or more tasks in the areas of wordprocessing, Internet use and electronic mail. Less than 50% of the courses required any use of spreadsheets, databases, computer

Donald M. Johnson

2000-01-01

185

Math 484: Mathematical & Computational Modeling Course Information and Syllabus Spring 2013  

E-print Network

Math 484: Mathematical & Computational Modeling Course Information and Syllabus ­ Spring 2013 problems that arise in industry, government, science and engineering. 1. Main objective is to teach math Prerequisites Math 407 or equivalent first course in scientific computing. Math 455 or equivalent first course

186

Math 484: Mathematical & Computational Modeling Course Information and Syllabus Spring 2012  

E-print Network

Math 484: Mathematical & Computational Modeling Course Information and Syllabus ­ Spring 2012 problems that arise in industry, government, science and engineering. 1. Main objective is to teach math Prerequisites Math 407 or equivalent first course in scientific computing. Math 455 or equivalent first course

187

Computation of signal delays in RC networks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A model for signal delay computation in RC networks is presented. The strength of the paradigm is its generality and simplicity. The definition of delay is applicable to RC meshes with potential resistive attenuating paths to ground. The algorithms can also be applied to undriven circuits (static charge sharing) and circuits with initial charge. To compute the delays, each node in the network is explored locally to derive a system of sparse linear equations. The solutions of the system are delay values based on the Elmore time constant at each point in the circuit.

Hidalgo, Juan Carlos; Narendran, Paliath; Chaiken, Seth

1993-01-01

188

A Textbook for a First Course in Computational Fluid Dynamics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes and discusses the textbook, Fundamentals of Computational Fluid Dynamics by Lomax, Pulliam, and Zingg, which is intended for a graduate level first course in computational fluid dynamics. This textbook emphasizes fundamental concepts in developing, analyzing, and understanding numerical methods for the partial differential equations governing the physics of fluid flow. Its underlying philosophy is that the theory of linear algebra and the attendant eigenanalysis of linear systems provides a mathematical framework to describe and unify most numerical methods in common use in the field of fluid dynamics. Two linear model equations, the linear convection and diffusion equations, are used to illustrate concepts throughout. Emphasis is on the semi-discrete approach, in which the governing partial differential equations (PDE's) are reduced to systems of ordinary differential equations (ODE's) through a discretization of the spatial derivatives. The ordinary differential equations are then reduced to ordinary difference equations (O(Delta)E's) using a time-marching method. This methodology, using the progression from PDE through ODE's to O(Delta)E's, together with the use of the eigensystems of tridiagonal matrices and the theory of O(Delta)E's, gives the book its distinctiveness and provides a sound basis for a deep understanding of fundamental concepts in computational fluid dynamics.

Zingg, D. W.; Pulliam, T. H.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

1999-01-01

189

Anonymous Transactions in Computer Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present schemes for providing anonymous transactions while privacy and anonymity are preserved, providing user anonymous authentication in distributed networks such as the Internet. We first present a practical scheme for anonymous transactions while the transaction resolution is assisted by a Trusted Authority. This practical scheme is extended to a theoretical scheme where a Trusted Authority is not involved in the transaction resolution. Given an authority that generates for each player hard to produce evidence EVID (e. g., problem instance with or without a solution) to each player, the identity of a user U is defined by the ability to prove possession of said evidence. We use Zero-Knowledge proof techniques to repeatedly identify U by providing a proof that U has evidence EVID, without revealing EVID, therefore avoiding identity theft.

Dolev, Shlomi; Kopeetsky, Marina

190

Analytic and simulation methods in computer network design  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Seventies are here and so are computer networks! The time sharing industry dominated the Sixties and it appears that computer networks will play a similar role in the Seventies. The need has now arisen for many of these time-shared systems to share each others' resources by coupling them together over a communication network thereby creating a computer network. The

Leonard Kleinrock

1970-01-01

191

Computer-Aided Modeling of Spread Spectrum Packet Radio Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

A set of computer-based modeling tools to help understand the performance and behavior of spread spectrum networks is presented. These tools allow for numerical evaluation of important network performance measures and experimentation with network parameters. A connectivity model for a direct sequence spread spectrum packet radio network which allows the computation of network throughput and can be used to study

Elvino S. Sousa; John A. Silvester; Thomas D. Papavassiliou

1991-01-01

192

COMPUTATIONS IN SOCIAL NETWORK A thesis submitted  

E-print Network

COMPUTATIONS IN SOCIAL NETWORK A thesis submitted to Kent State University in partial fulfillment S Shaikh B.E, Pune University, 2000 M.S, Kent State University, 2007 Approved by Dr. Javed I Khan , Advisor........................................................................................................ 10 2.2. Reputation Reasoning System

Khan, Javed I.

193

Spin Networks and Anyonic Topological Computing  

E-print Network

We review the q-deformed spin network approact to Topological Quantum Field Theory and apply these methods to produce unitary representations of the braid groups that are dense in the unitary groups. These methods produce a concise proof that quantum computation can be performed within a single representation of the Artin Braid Group.

Louis H. Kauffman; Samuel J. Lomonaco Jr

2006-03-15

194

Spin network setting of topological quantum computation  

E-print Network

The spin network simulator model represents a bridge between (generalised) circuit schemes for standard quantum computation and approaches based on notions from Topological Quantum Field Theories (TQFTs). The key tool is provided by the fiber space structure underlying the model which exhibits combinatorial properties closely related to SU(2) state sum models, widely employed in discretizing TQFTs and quantum gravity in low spacetime dimensions.

Annalisa Marzuoli; Mario Rasetti

2004-07-15

195

Computers and Networks Part I Jen Golbeck  

E-print Network

and networks ­ Know how to think about "space", "time", and "speed" ­ Understand of how computers store data and move data around ­ Be able to evaluate tradeoffs between different technologies #12;3 Binary · 0s and 1 it takes data to travel from source to destination · Bandwidth: the amount of data that can be transmitted

Golbeck, Jennifer

196

Reducing the diameters of computer networks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Three methods of reducing the diameters of computer networks by adding additional processor to processor links under the constraint that no more than one I/O port be added to each processor are discussed. This is equivalent to adding edges to a given graph under the constraint that the degree of any node be increased, at most, by one.

Bokhari, S. H.; Raza, A. D.

1986-01-01

197

Delay Compensation in Networked Computer Games  

E-print Network

players in a virtual environment. As a result, games such as these are highly interactive and tendDelay Compensation in Networked Computer Games Robert F. Buchheit January, 2004 Master's Project #12;2 Table of Contents Abstract 1. Introduction 2. Background 3. Game Development Prototype Game

Liberatore, Vincenzo

198

Manual for Museum Computer Network Data Preparation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual describes information processing procedures for Museum Computer Network (MCN) systems. The first section contains general rules for preparation of input: conventions for all data; conventions for controlling the appearance of output; conventions for automatic sorting of data; conventions for user specified sorting of data; and

Vance, David

199

Query optimization in star computer networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Query processing is investigated for relational databases distributed over several computers organized in a star network. Minimal response-time processing strategies are presented for queries involving the select, project, and join commands. These strategies depend on system parameters such as communication costs and different machine processing speeds; database parameters such as relation cardinality and file size; and query parameters such as

Larry Kerschberg; Peter D. Ting; S. Bing Yao

1982-01-01

200

Multiple network alignment on quantum computers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Comparative analyses of graph structured datasets underly diverse problems. Examples of these problems include identification of conserved functional components (biochemical interactions) across species, structural similarity of large biomolecules, and recurring patterns of interactions in social networks. A large class of such analyses methods quantify the topological similarity of nodes across networks. The resulting correspondence of nodes across networks, also called node alignment, can be used to identify invariant subgraphs across the input graphs. Given $k$ graphs as input, alignment algorithms use topological information to assign a similarity score to each $k$-tuple of nodes, with elements (nodes) drawn from each of the input graphs. Nodes are considered similar if their neighbors are also similar. An alternate, equivalent view of these network alignment algorithms is to consider the Kronecker product of the input graphs, and to identify high-ranked nodes in the Kronecker product graph. Conventional methods such as PageRank and HITS (Hypertext Induced Topic Selection) can be used for this purpose. These methods typically require computation of the principal eigenvector of a suitably modified Kronecker product matrix of the input graphs. We adopt this alternate view of the problem to address the problem of multiple network alignment. Using the phase estimation algorithm, we show that the multiple network alignment problem can be efficiently solved on quantum computers. We characterize the accuracy and performance of our method, and show that it can deliver exponential speedups over conventional (non-quantum) methods.

Daskin, Anmer; Grama, Ananth; Kais, Sabre

2014-09-01

201

Modeling Computations in a Semantic Network  

E-print Network

Semantic network research has seen a resurgence from its early history in the cognitive sciences with the inception of the Semantic Web initiative. The Semantic Web effort has brought forth an array of technologies that support the encoding, storage, and querying of the semantic network data structure at the world stage. Currently, the popular conception of the Semantic Web is that of a data modeling medium where real and conceptual entities are related in semantically meaningful ways. However, new models have emerged that explicitly encode procedural information within the semantic network substrate. With these new technologies, the Semantic Web has evolved from a data modeling medium to a computational medium. This article provides a classification of existing computational modeling efforts and the requirements of supporting technologies that will aid in the further growth of this burgeoning domain.

Marko A. Rodriguez; Johan Bollen

2007-05-31

202

On Private Computation in Incomplete Networks Amos Beimel  

E-print Network

On Private Computation in Incomplete Networks Amos Beimel Dept. of Computer Science, Ben Gurion is what functions can be privately computed in a given incom- plete network. Every function can be privately computed in two-connected networks with at least three parties. Thus, the question is interesting

Beimel, Amos

203

On Private Computation in Incomplete Networks # Amos Beimel  

E-print Network

On Private Computation in Incomplete Networks # Amos Beimel Dept. of Computer Science, Ben Gurion is what functions can be privately computed in a given incom­ plete network. Every function can be privately computed in two­connected networks with at least three parties. Thus, the question is interesting

Beimel, Amos

204

1/1 (2003), 137152 A first course in computer science  

E-print Network

1/1 (2003), 137­152 A first course in computer science: Languages and goals Dennis C. Smolarski Abstract. The College Board Advanced Placement exam in computer science will use the language Java starting computer science courses at the univer- sity level. This article reviews the purpose of an introductory

Smolarski, Dennis C.

205

An Educational Environment for Teaching a Course in Computer Architecture and Organization  

E-print Network

1 An Educational Environment for Teaching a Course in Computer Architecture and Organization Jovan@kiklop.etf.bg.ac.yu Abstract: The paper presents an educational environment for teaching a course in Computer architecture and organization. It is made up of an educational computer system, a reference manual, a software package and a set

Milenkovi, Aleksandar

206

Distributed sensor networks with collective computation  

SciTech Connect

Simulations of a network of N sensors have been performed. The simulation space contains a number of sound sources and a large number of sensors. Each sensor is equipped with an omni-directional microphone and is capable of measuring only the time of arrival of a signal. Sensors are able to wirelessly transmit and receive packets of information, and have some computing power. The sensors were programmed to merge all information (received packets as well as local measurements) into a 'world view' for that node. This world view is then transmitted. In this way, information can slowly diffuse across the network. One node was monitored in the network as a proxy for when information had diffused across the network. Simulations demonstrated that the energy expended per sensor per time step was approximately independent of N.

Lanman, D. R. (Douglas R.)

2001-01-01

207

Textile Graphics\\/Computer Aided: A course taught at the Fashion Institute of Technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Textile Graphics\\/Computer Aided is the first course presented in the U.S. dealing with the processes of computer aided textile design and manufacture. Given to students and members of the textile industry at the Fashion Institute of Technology, the course is composed of 15 modules, each accompanied by a computer workshop, and is taught using a team-teaching approach. The course is

Ann C. Gubiotti; Pat Velderman; Nitta P. Dooner; Janice R. Lourie; Kay James; Lynn Nowakowski

1973-01-01

208

Computed tomography-enhanced anatomy course using enterprise visualization.  

PubMed

Rapid changes in medical knowledge are forcing continuous adaptation of the basic science courses in medical schools. This article discusses a three-year experience developing a new Computed Tomography (CT)-based anatomy curriculum at the Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, including describing the motivations and reasoning for the new curriculum, the CT-based learning system itself, practical examples of visual dissections, and student assessments of the new curriculum. At the heart of this new curriculum is the emphasis on studying anatomy by navigating inside the bodies of various living individuals utilizing a CT viewer. To assess the students' experience with the new CT-based learning method, an anonymous questionnaire was administered at the end of the course for three consecutive academic years: 2008/2009, 2009/2010, 2010/2011. Based upon the results, modifications were made to the curriculum in the summers of 2009 and 2010. Results showed that: (1) during these three years the number of students extensively using the CT system quadrupled (from 11% to 46%); (2) students' satisfaction from radiologists involvement increased by 150%; and (3) student appreciation of the CT-based learning method significantly increased (from 13% to 68%). It was concluded that discouraging results (mainly negative feedback from students) during the first years and a priori opposition from the teaching staff should not weaken efforts to develop new teaching methods in the field of anatomy. Incorporating a new curriculum requires time and patience. Student and staff satisfaction, along with utilization of the new system, will increase with the improvement of impeding factors. PMID:23401203

May, Hila; Cohen, Haim; Medlej, Bahaa; Kornreich, Liora; Peled, Nathan; Hershkovitz, Israel

2013-01-01

209

Profiles of Motivated Self-Regulation in College Computer Science Courses: Differences in Major versus Required Non-Major Courses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The goal of the present study was to utilize a profiling approach to understand differences in motivation and strategic self-regulation among post-secondary STEM students in major versus required non-major computer science courses. Participants were 233 students from required introductory computer science courses (194 men; 35 women; 4 unknown) at a large Midwestern state university. Cluster analysis identified five profiles: (1) a strategic profile of a highly motivated by-any-means good strategy user; (2) a knowledge-building profile of an intrinsically motivated autonomous, mastery-oriented student; (3) a surface learning profile of a utility motivated minimally engaged student; (4) an apathetic profile of an amotivational disengaged student; and (5) a learned helpless profile of a motivated but unable to effectively self-regulate student. Among CS majors and students in courses in their major field, the strategic and knowledge-building profiles were the most prevalent. Among non-CS majors and students in required non-major courses, the learned helpless, surface learning, and apathetic profiles were the most prevalent. Students in the strategic and knowledge-building profiles had significantly higher retention of computational thinking knowledge than students in other profiles. Students in the apathetic and surface learning profiles saw little instrumentality of the course for their future academic and career objectives. Findings show that students in STEM fields taking required computer science courses exhibit the same constellation of motivated strategic self-regulation profiles found in other post-secondary and K-12 settings.

Shell, Duane F.; Soh, Leen-Kiat

2013-12-01

210

Network and Academic Computing Services (NACS) offers telephone, network, 800Mhz radio, and computing services in  

E-print Network

1. 2. Network and Academic Computing Services (NACS) offers telephone, network, 800Mhz radio programs include instruction in web page creation and design, use of presentation software such as Power access to a library of site- licensed and open source software ("DCSlib") at no charge. You may set up

Brody, James P.

211

Experiences with a personal computer network in electrical engineering education  

Microsoft Academic Search

At the ESAT (Electronics, Systems, Automation, Technology) laboratory of the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven in Belgium extensive efforts have been made on the implementation of exercise sessions on a PC network. Since 1986, 13 different exercise sessions of eight different courses take place on the network for 300 students in the last three years of electrical engineering. The courses cover several

J. Vandewalle; D. Reniers; B. De Moor

1990-01-01

212

Parallel Computation of Unsteady Flows on a Network of Workstations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Parallel computation of unsteady flows requires significant computational resources. The utilization of a network of workstations seems an efficient solution to the problem where large problems can be treated at a reasonable cost. This approach requires the solution of several problems: 1) the partitioning and distribution of the problem over a network of workstation, 2) efficient communication tools, 3) managing the system efficiently for a given problem. Of course, there is the question of the efficiency of any given numerical algorithm to such a computing system. NPARC code was chosen as a sample for the application. For the explicit version of the NPARC code both two- and three-dimensional problems were studied. Again both steady and unsteady problems were investigated. The issues studied as a part of the research program were: 1) how to distribute the data between the workstations, 2) how to compute and how to communicate at each node efficiently, 3) how to balance the load distribution. In the following, a summary of these activities is presented. Details of the work have been presented and published as referenced.

1997-01-01

213

Computational Inference of Neural Information Flow Networks  

PubMed Central

Determining how information flows along anatomical brain pathways is a fundamental requirement for understanding how animals perceive their environments, learn, and behave. Attempts to reveal such neural information flow have been made using linear computational methods, but neural interactions are known to be nonlinear. Here, we demonstrate that a dynamic Bayesian network (DBN) inference algorithm we originally developed to infer nonlinear transcriptional regulatory networks from gene expression data collected with microarrays is also successful at inferring nonlinear neural information flow networks from electrophysiology data collected with microelectrode arrays. The inferred networks we recover from the songbird auditory pathway are correctly restricted to a subset of known anatomical paths, are consistent with timing of the system, and reveal both the importance of reciprocal feedback in auditory processing and greater information flow to higher-order auditory areas when birds hear natural as opposed to synthetic sounds. A linear method applied to the same data incorrectly produces networks with information flow to non-neural tissue and over paths known not to exist. To our knowledge, this study represents the first biologically validated demonstration of an algorithm to successfully infer neural information flow networks. PMID:17121460

Smulders, Tom V; Hartemink, Alexander J; Jarvis, Erich D

2006-01-01

214

Program Predicts Time Courses of Human/Computer Interactions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

CPM X is a computer program that predicts sequences of, and amounts of time taken by, routine actions performed by a skilled person performing a task. Unlike programs that simulate the interaction of the person with the task environment, CPM X predicts the time course of events as consequences of encoded constraints on human behavior. The constraints determine which cognitive and environmental processes can occur simultaneously and which have sequential dependencies. The input to CPM X comprises (1) a description of a task and strategy in a hierarchical description language and (2) a description of architectural constraints in the form of rules governing interactions of fundamental cognitive, perceptual, and motor operations. The output of CPM X is a Program Evaluation Review Technique (PERT) chart that presents a schedule of predicted cognitive, motor, and perceptual operators interacting with a task environment. The CPM X program allows direct, a priori prediction of skilled user performance on complex human-machine systems, providing a way to assess critical interfaces before they are deployed in mission contexts.

Vera, Alonso; Howes, Andrew

2005-01-01

215

The dangers of heterogeneous network computing: heterogeneous networks considered harmful  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the issue of writing reliable numerical software for networks of heterogeneous computers. Much software has been written for distributed memory parallel computers and in principal such software could readily be ported to networks of machines, such as a collection of workstations connected by Ethernet, but if such a network is not homogeneous there are special challenges that need to be addressed. The symptoms can range from erroneous results returned without warning to deadlock. Some of the problems are straightforward to solve, but for others the solutions are not so obvious and indeed in some cases, such as the method of bisection which we shall discuss in the report, we have not yet decided upon a satisfactory solution that does not incur an unacceptable overhead. Making software robust on heterogeneous systems often requires additional communication. In this report we describe and illustrate the problems and, where possible, suggest solutions so that others may be aware of the potential pitfalls and either avoid them or, if that is not possible, ensure that their software is not used on heterogeneous networks.

Demmel, J.; Stanley, K. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Dongarra, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hammarling, S.; Osstrouchov, S. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1996-12-31

216

Spiking network simulation code for petascale computers  

PubMed Central

Brain-scale networks exhibit a breathtaking heterogeneity in the dynamical properties and parameters of their constituents. At cellular resolution, the entities of theory are neurons and synapses and over the past decade researchers have learned to manage the heterogeneity of neurons and synapses with efficient data structures. Already early parallel simulation codes stored synapses in a distributed fashion such that a synapse solely consumes memory on the compute node harboring the target neuron. As petaflop computers with some 100,000 nodes become increasingly available for neuroscience, new challenges arise for neuronal network simulation software: Each neuron contacts on the order of 10,000 other neurons and thus has targets only on a fraction of all compute nodes; furthermore, for any given source neuron, at most a single synapse is typically created on any compute node. From the viewpoint of an individual compute node, the heterogeneity in the synaptic target lists thus collapses along two dimensions: the dimension of the types of synapses and the dimension of the number of synapses of a given type. Here we present a data structure taking advantage of this double collapse using metaprogramming techniques. After introducing the relevant scaling scenario for brain-scale simulations, we quantitatively discuss the performance on two supercomputers. We show that the novel architecture scales to the largest petascale supercomputers available today. PMID:25346682

Kunkel, Susanne; Schmidt, Maximilian; Eppler, Jochen M.; Plesser, Hans E.; Masumoto, Gen; Igarashi, Jun; Ishii, Shin; Fukai, Tomoki; Morrison, Abigail; Diesmann, Markus; Helias, Moritz

2014-01-01

217

Using satellite communications for a mobile computer network  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The topics discussed include the following: patrol car automation, mobile computer network, network requirements, network design overview, MCN mobile network software, MCN hub operation, mobile satellite software, hub satellite software, the benefits of patrol car automation, the benefits of satellite mobile computing, and national law enforcement satellite.

Wyman, Douglas J.

1993-01-01

218

Computational Complexity of Network Reliability Analysis: An Overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents an overview of results related to the computational complexity of network reliability analysis problems. Network reliability analysis problems deal with the determination of reliability measures for stochastic networks. We show how these problems are related to the more familiar computational network problems of recognizing certain subnetworks, finding optimal subnetworks, and counting certain subnetworks. We use these relationships

Michael O. Ball

1986-01-01

219

Networked Computer Science Technical Reports Library  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The goal of the Networked Computer Science Technical Report Library (NCSTRL, pronounced "ancestral") is to provide access to research papers produced at over 60 computer science departments and laboratories worldwide. Users may browse an institution's collection by author or year of publication, or may search through either a simple or an advanced interface. The site aims to advance the field of CS through resource sharing and by exploring related implementation issues. A word of caution: unless using a singular, unique term, avoid the simple search method since "or" operators are implied. Your best bet for searching multiple terms is the advanced search option.

2005-10-28

220

Networked Computer Science Technical Reports Library  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The goal of the Networked Computer Science Technical Report Library (NCSTRL, pronounced "ancestral") is to provide access to research papers produced at over 60 computer science departments and laboratories worldwide. Users may browse an institution's collection by author or year of publication, or may search through either a simple or an advanced interface. The site aims to advance the field of CS through resource sharing and by exploring related implementation issues. A word of caution: unless using a singular, unique term, avoid the simple search method since "or" operators are implied. Your best bet for searching multiple terms is the advanced search option.

1995-01-01

221

LabVIEW and G as a Computing Language Course Mukkai Krishnamoorthy and Sibylle Schupp,  

E-print Network

G isn't C! LabVIEW and G as a Computing Language Course Mukkai Krishnamoorthy and Sibylle Schupp, {moorthy,schupp}@cs.rpi.edu Department of Computer Science, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute,Troy,NY 12180

Bystroff, Chris

222

Pixel Cinematography: A Lighting Approach for Computer Graphics (SIGGRAPH 96 - Course 30)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A set of course notes that teaches aspects of cinematography for computer graphics. It includes topics on scene composition, camera placement and movement, and methods of lighting for creating computer graphics images and animations.

2002-02-28

223

Philosophy of Language. Course Notes for a Tutorial on Computational Semantics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This course was part of a tutorial focusing on the state of computational semantics, i.e., the state of work on natural language within the artificial intelligence (AI) paradigm. The discussion in the course centered on the philosophers Richard Montague and Ludwig Wittgenstein. The course was divided into three sections: (1)

Wilks, Yorick

224

Linear Codes, Target Function Classes, and Network Computing Capacity  

E-print Network

Linear Codes, Target Function Classes, and Network Computing Capacity Rathinakumar Appuswamy Submitted: May 6, 2011 Abstract We study the use of linear codes for network computing in single of such bounds [10,11,23]. Network computing, on the other hand, considers a more general problem in which each

Franceschetti, Massimo

225

Analytic and simulation methods in computer network design*  

E-print Network

Analytic and simulation methods in computer network design* by LEONARD KLEINROCK University of California Los Angeles, California INTRODUCTION The Seventies are here and so are computer networks! The time sharing industry dominated the Sixties and it appears that computer networks will play a similar role

Kleinrock, Leonard

226

Presentation and major design aspects of the CYCLADES computer network  

Microsoft Academic Search

A computer network is being developed in France, under government sponsorship, to link about twenty heterogeneous computers located in universities, research and D.P. Centers. Goals are to set up a prototype network in order to foster experiment in various areas, such as: data communications, computer interaction, cooperative research, distributed data bases. The network is intended to be both, an object

Louis Pouzin

1973-01-01

227

Fundamentals of Large Sensor Networks: Connectivity, Capacity, Clocks and Computation  

E-print Network

1 Fundamentals of Large Sensor Networks: Connectivity, Capacity, Clocks and Computation Nikolaos M and operational issues related to large sensor networks - connectivity, capacity, clocks and function computation needs to study optimal strategies for in-network aggregation of data, in order to reliably compute

228

Distributed Computing in Fault-Prone Dynamic Networks Philipp Brandes  

E-print Network

Distributed Computing in Fault-Prone Dynamic Networks Philipp Brandes Computer Engineering & Department of Computer Science University of Paderborn fmadh@upb.de ABSTRACT Dynamics in networks is caused and Networks Lab (TIK) ETH Zurich pbrandes@ethz.ch Friedhelm Meyer auf der Heide Heinz Nixdorf Institute

229

Computer Networks in K-12 Education Jon M. Peha  

E-print Network

Computer Networks in K-12 Education Jon M. Peha Carnegie Mellon University peha@cmu.edu, www are Using Computer Networks," Educational Leadership: Journal of the Association for Supervision Computer networks have already revolutionized many of the institutions and endeavors that involve

Peha, Jon M.

230

Computability in Anonymous Networks: Revocable vs. Irrecovable Outputs  

E-print Network

Computability in Anonymous Networks: Revocable vs. Irrecovable Outputs Yuval Emek1 , Jochen Seidel2. What can be computed in an anonymous network, where nodes are not equipped with unique identifiers computed output value: Two classes of problems solvable in anonymous networks are defined, where

231

A Binary Feedback Scheme for Congestion Avoidance in Computer Networks with a Connectionless Network Layer  

E-print Network

A Binary Feedback Scheme for Congestion Avoidance in Computer Networks with a Connectionless Avoidance in Computer Networks with a Connectionless Network Layer K. K. Ramakrishnan and Raj Jain the performance of the scheme under transient changes in the net- 1 Introduction Congestion in computer networks

Jain, Raj

232

SFI WORKSHOP: RESILIENT AND ADAPTIVE DEFENCE OF COMPUTING NETWORKS 2002 1 Genetically Induced Communication Network  

E-print Network

SFI WORKSHOP: RESILIENT AND ADAPTIVE DEFENCE OF COMPUTING NETWORKS 2002 1 Genetically Induced: Resilient and Adaptive Defence of Computing Networks 2002) Abstract--This paper presents the architecture. ­ perform customized computation on packets flowing through them. The network is called an "ac- tive network

Fernandez, Thomas

233

Criteria development for upgrading computer networks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Being an infrastructure system, the computer network has a fundamental role in the day to day activities of personnel working at KSC. It is easily appreciated that the lack of 'satisfactory' network performance can have a high 'cost' for KSC. Yet, this seemingly obvious concept is quite difficult to demonstrate. At what point do we say that performance is below the lowest tolerable level? How do we know when the 'cost' of using the system at the current level of degraded performance exceeds the cost of upgrading it? In this research, we consider the cost and performance factors that may have an effect in decision making in regards to upgrading computer networks. Cost factors are detailed in terms of 'direct costs' and 'subjective costs'. Performance factors are examined in terms of 'required performance' and 'offered performance.' Required performance is further examined by presenting a methodology for trend analysis based on applying interpolation methods to observed traffic levels. Offered performance levels are analyzed by deriving simple equations to evaluate network performance. The results are evaluated in the light of recommended upgrade policies currently in use for telephone exchange systems, similarities and differences between the two types of services are discussed.

Efe, Kemal

1995-01-01

234

Belle II Experiment Network and Computing  

E-print Network

The Belle experiment, part of a broad-based search for new physics, is a collaboration of approximately 400 physicists from 55 institutions across four continents. The Belle detector is located at the KEKB accelerator in Tsukuba, Japan. The Belle detector was operated at the asymmetric electron-positron collider KEKB from 1999-2010. The detector accumulated more than 1/ab of integrated luminosity corresponding to more than 2 PB of data near 10 GeV center-of-mass energy. Recently, KEK has initiated a $400 million accelerator upgrade to be called SuperKEKB, designed to produce instantaneous and integrated luminosity two orders of magnitude greater than KEKB. The new international collaboration at SuperKEKB is called Belle II. The first data from Belle II/SuperKEKB is expected in 2015. In October 2012, senior members of the Belle II collaboration gathered at PNNL to discuss the computing and networking requirements of the Belle II experiment with ESnet staff and other computing and networking experts. The day-and-a-half-long workshop characterized the instruments and facilities used in the experiment, the process of science for Belle II, and the computing and networking equipment and configuration requirements to realize the full scientific potential of the collaboration's work. The requirements identified at the Belle II Experiment Requirements workshop are summarized in this report.

David M. Asner; Eli Dart; Takanori Hara

2013-08-03

235

Computational Power and Correlation in Quantum Computational Tensor Network  

E-print Network

We investigate relations between computational power and correlation in resource states for quantum computational tensor network, which is a general framework for measurement-based quantum computation. We find that if the size of resource states is finite, not all resource states allow correct projective measurements in the correlation space, which is related to non-vanishing two-point correlations in the resource states. On the other hand, for infinite-size resource states, we can always implement correct projective measurements if the resource state can simulate arbitrary single-qubit rotations, since such a resource state exhibits exponentially-decaying two-point correlations. This implies that a many-body state whose two-point correlation cannot be upperbounded by an exponentially-decaying function cannot simulate arbitrary single-qubit rotations.

Keisuke Fujii; Tomoyuki Morimae

2011-06-17

236

A Computer Literacy Course at Colleges of Education: What and How.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A report recently released by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) promotes the use of technology in colleges of education. To respond to the professional call, several teacher education programs have been offering computer courses to help the future teachers. This research examined one of the computer courses, an

Leh, Amy S. C.

237

Happenstance and compromise: a gendered analysis of students' computing degree course selection  

Microsoft Academic Search

The number of students choosing to study computing at university continues to decline this century, with an even sharper decline in female students. This article presents the results of a series of interviews with university students studying computing courses in Australia that uncovered the influence of happenstance and compromise on course choice. This investigation provides an insight into the contributing

Catherine Lang

2010-01-01

238

Using Microcomputers Simulations in the Classroom: Examples from Undergraduate and Faculty Computer Literacy Courses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a discussion of how computer simulations are used in two undergraduate social science courses and a faculty computer literacy course on simulations and artificial intelligence. Includes a list of 60 simulations for use on mainframes and microcomputers. Entries include type of hardware required, publisher's address, and cost. Sample

Hart, Jeffrey A.

1985-01-01

239

Analysis of Grouping Strategy for Presentation Exercise in Computer Literacy Course  

Microsoft Academic Search

Presentation exercise using computer was introduced in the computer literacy course for freshmen. The course con- sisted of three classes, and the average skill level of the classes had been evenly balanced based on the midterm ex- amination scores before the exercise began. In the classes, the participants were divided into groups of three students. For this, we imposed different

Masahide Nakamura; Michio Nakanishi; Akira Harada

240

A Survey and Evaluation of Simulators Suitable for Teaching Courses in Computer Architecture and Organization  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Courses in Computer Architecture and Organization are regularly included in Computer Engineering curricula. These courses are usually organized in such a way that students obtain not only a purely theoretical experience, but also a practical understanding of the topics lectured. This practical work is usually done in a laboratory using simulators

Nikolic, B.; Radivojevic, Z.; Djordjevic, J.; Milutinovic, V.

2009-01-01

241

Happenstance and Compromise: A Gendered Analysis of Students' Computing Degree Course Selection  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The number of students choosing to study computing at university continues to decline this century, with an even sharper decline in female students. This article presents the results of a series of interviews with university students studying computing courses in Australia that uncovered the influence of happenstance and compromise on course

Lang, Catherine

2010-01-01

242

Pervasive computing and wireless optical network technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For reaching the destination that user can operate simply to complete complicated work with high quality in time, elements for pervasive computing should be integrated into an active system. Embedded, nomandic, adaptive and broadband intelligent services will be necessary in the system. The novel Intelligent Pervasive Computing Technologies (IPCT) make those services including high speed services and low speed services etc be provided well. The crucial component parts are the Backbone Mobile Managing technologies (BMM), the Access Mobile Managing technologies (AMM), The Supplementary Independent Mobile Managing Technologies (SIMMT) and so forth. Wireless optical networks are necessities of implementing IPCT. Another key of running IPCT is to optimize the configuration, especially the logic. The pivot of operating is Wireless Optical Agent (WOA) and corresponding contributories. Experiments with simulation indicate IPCT bring high performances for pervasive computing.

Xue, Cai; Cai, Ran; Cai, Guishun; Zeng, Lang; Xue, Lin

2005-11-01

243

Computational drug repositioning through heterogeneous network clustering  

PubMed Central

Background Given the costly and time consuming process and high attrition rates in drug discovery and development, drug repositioning or drug repurposing is considered as a viable strategy both to replenish the drying out drug pipelines and to surmount the innovation gap. Although there is a growing recognition that mechanistic relationships from molecular to systems level should be integrated into drug discovery paradigms, relatively few studies have integrated information about heterogeneous networks into computational drug-repositioning candidate discovery platforms. Results Using known disease-gene and drug-target relationships from the KEGG database, we built a weighted disease and drug heterogeneous network. The nodes represent drugs or diseases while the edges represent shared gene, biological process, pathway, phenotype or a combination of these features. We clustered this weighted network to identify modules and then assembled all possible drug-disease pairs (putative drug repositioning candidates) from these modules. We validated our predictions by testing their robustness and evaluated them by their overlap with drug indications that were either reported in published literature or investigated in clinical trials. Conclusions Previous computational approaches for drug repositioning focused either on drug-drug and disease-disease similarity approaches whereas we have taken a more holistic approach by considering drug-disease relationships also. Further, we considered not only gene but also other features to build the disease drug networks. Despite the relative simplicity of our approach, based on the robustness analyses and the overlap of some of our predictions with drug indications that are under investigation, we believe our approach could complement the current computational approaches for drug repositioning candidate discovery. PMID:24564976

2013-01-01

244

Incorporating PBL in a High School Computer Science Course  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study was conducted with 605 high-school students in 13 classes of a typical high school in northern Taiwan. In the paper, we detail the past conduct of the course, the revised PBL-induced course design, and our experimental design. We discuss how we circumvented the usual challenges faced with PBL and some of the pragmatic issues faced during our implementation.

Ling-Chian Chang; Greg C Lee

2006-01-01

245

Large introductory computer science classes: strategies for effective course management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Traditionally, a large introductory course meant a lecture hall with a single lecturer talking and students taking notes---but no longer. Today a wide variety of techniques, not only in the classroom but in labs and faculty offices and cyberspace, can make a large introductory course an extremely effective educational experience. We explore these practices, with pointers for further information, as

David G. Kay

1998-01-01

246

Computational capabilities of graph neural networks.  

PubMed

In this paper, we will consider the approximation properties of a recently introduced neural network model called graph neural network (GNN), which can be used to process-structured data inputs, e.g., acyclic graphs, cyclic graphs, and directed or undirected graphs. This class of neural networks implements a function tau(G,n) is an element of IR(m) that maps a graph G and one of its nodes n onto an m-dimensional Euclidean space. We characterize the functions that can be approximated by GNNs, in probability, up to any prescribed degree of precision. This set contains the maps that satisfy a property called preservation of the unfolding equivalence, and includes most of the practically useful functions on graphs; the only known exception is when the input graph contains particular patterns of symmetries when unfolding equivalence may not be preserved. The result can be considered an extension of the universal approximation property established for the classic feedforward neural networks (FNNs). Some experimental examples are used to show the computational capabilities of the proposed model. PMID:19129034

Scarselli, Franco; Gori, Marco; Tsoi, Ah Chung; Hagenbuchner, Markus; Monfardini, Gabriele

2009-01-01

247

LON-CAPA: The LearningOnline Network with CAPA Course Coordinator Interface  

E-print Network

LON-CAPA: The LearningOnline Network with CAPA Course Coordinator Interface Accessibility, such as the suppression of images, the suppression of java applets, the suppression of embedded multimedia, and the black

248

A Practice-Oriented Course on the Principles of Computation, Programming, and System Design and Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a We propose a simple foundation for a practice-oriented undergraduate course that links seamlessly computation theory to principles\\u000a and methods for high-level computer-based system development and analysis. Starting from the fundamental notion of virtual\\u000a machine computations, which is phrased for both synchronous and asynchronous systems in terms of Abstract State Machines,\\u000a the course covers in a uniform way the basics of

Egon Brger

2004-01-01

249

MTX (Microwave Tokamak Experiment) data acquisition and analysis computer network  

Microsoft Academic Search

For the MTX experiment, we use a network of computers for plasma diagnostic data acquisition and analysis. This multivendor network employs VMS, UNIX, and BASIC based computers connected in a local area Ethernet network. Some of the data is acquired directly into a VAX\\/VMS computer cluster over a fiber-optic serial CAMAC highway. Several HP-Unix workstations and HP-BASIC instrument control computers

D. N. Butner; T. A. Casper; M. D. Brown; M. Drlik; W. H. Meyer; J. M. Moller

1990-01-01

250

Geometric Effects and Computation in Spin Networks  

E-print Network

When initially introduced, a Hamiltonian that realises perfect transfer of a quantum state was found to be analogous to an x-rotation of a large spin. In this paper we extend the analogy further to demonstrate geometric effects by performing rotations on the spin. Such effects can be used to determine properties of the chain, such as its length, in a robust manner. Alternatively, they can form the basis of a spin network quantum computer. We demonstrate a universal set of gates in such a system by both dynamical and geometrical means.

Alastair Kay; Marie Ericsson

2005-04-08

251

Interconnection Networks for Scalable Quantum Computers  

E-print Network

We show that the problem of communication in a quantum computer reduces to constructing reliable quantum channels by distributing high-fidelity EPR pairs. We develop analytical models of the latency, bandwidth, error rate and resource utilization of such channels, and show that 100s of qubits must be distributed to accommodate a single data communication. Next, we show that a grid of teleportation nodes forms a good substrate on which to distribute EPR pairs. We also explore the control requirements for such a network. Finally, we propose a specific routing architecture and simulate the communication patterns of the Quantum Fourier Transform to demonstrate the impact of resource contention.

Nemanja Isailovic; Yatish Patel; Mark Whitney; John Kubiatowicz

2006-04-07

252

Some queuing network models of computer systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Queuing network models of a computer system operating with a single workload type are presented. Program algorithms are adapted for use on the Texas Instruments SR-52 programmable calculator. By slightly altering the algorithm to process the G and H matrices row by row instead of column by column, six devices and an unlimited job/terminal population could be handled on the SR-52. Techniques are also introduced for handling a simple load dependent server and for studying interactive systems with fixed multiprogramming limits.

Herndon, E. S.

1980-01-01

253

Interaction, Critical Thinking, and Social Network Analysis (SNA) in Online Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study tried to ascertain a possible relationship between the number of student moderators (1, 2, and 3), online interactions, and critical thinking of K-12 educators enrolled in an online course that was taught from a constructivist approach. The course topic was use of technology in special education. Social network analysis (SNA) and

Thormann, Joan; Gable, Samuel; Fidalgo, Patricia Seferlis; Blakeslee, George

2013-01-01

254

Teaching neural networks using LEGO handy board robots in an artificial intelligence course  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we propose a novel method for teaching neural networks with back propagation in an undergraduate Artificial Intelligence course. We use an agent based approach in the course, as outlined in the textbook Artificial Intelligence A Modern Approach by Stuart Russell and Peter Norvig [7]. The students build a robot agent whose task is to learn path-following behavior

Susan P. Imberman

2003-01-01

255

Guide to sharing personal computer resources via local area networks  

SciTech Connect

This Guide is for professional staff who commonly need computing tools on personal computers, minicomputers, mainframe computers, and supercomputers. It provides information and recommendations about personal computer local area networks in the context of the larger scheme of computing tools and services at the Laboratory. The material presented here is for the person considering installation of a personal computer local area network. Chapter 1 introduces the reader to the concept of personal computer local area networks and provides background material on networking. Chapter 2 summarizes Computing Services' evaluation of personal computer local area networking in general terms. Chapter 3 describes the technical and functional details of Computing Services' Personal Computer Local Area Network Evaluation and Demonstration Project. Chapters 4 and 5 are for individuals who are familiar with personal computing and who will be responsible for establishing a local area network. Chapter 4 covers technical issues relating to the prototype network installation in Building 221. Chapter 5 warns potential users what to expect when establishing a local area network. 7 figs., 9 tabs.

Winkler, L.

1986-03-01

256

The terminal IMP for the ARPA computer network  

Microsoft Academic Search

A little over three years ago the Advanced Research Projects Agency of the Department of Defense (ARPA) began implementation of an entirely new venture in computer communications: a network that would allow for the interconnection, via common-carrier circuits, of dissimilar computers at widely separated, ARPA-sponsored research centers. This network, which has come to be known as the ARPA Network, presently

S. M. Ornstein; F. E. Heart; W. R. Crowther; H. K. Rising; S. B. Russell; A. Michel

1972-01-01

257

Computational Cognitive Neuroscience Assignment 1: Hopeld networks, Schizophrenia and the  

E-print Network

Computational Cognitive Neuroscience Assignment 1: Hopeld networks, Schizophrenia results; it does, however, result in somewhat faster convergence in the computer model. 1.1 Hopeld network and the Izhikevich Neuron Model Grigorios Sotiropoulos, 0563640 25th February 2010 1 Hopeld Attractor Network

Seriès, Peggy

258

TYMNET - A tutorial survey of a computer communications network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Describes the special features of TYMNET, a computer communications network developed in 1970 by Tymshare, Inc., of Cupertino, CA. Although originally developed for time-shared purposes, TYMNET has taken on a network function as well, much like the GE network [I]. In addition to providing connection to its own computer systems for interactive processing, remote job entry (RJE), and other user

M. Schwartz

1976-01-01

259

1 Research Group on Computer Networks and Distributed Systems  

E-print Network

design for embedded networked devices Data gathering, either for event recognition or for monitoring1 Research Group on Computer Networks and Distributed Systems 1.1 Personnel Head: Prof. Dr. T for Computer Networks and Distributed Systems (Rechnernetze und Verteilte Systeme, RVS) has been active since

Sola, Rolf Haenni

260

Networking from a network coding perspective Submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer  

E-print Network

in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Abstract Network coding generalizes network operation beyondNetworking from a network coding perspective by Tracey Ho Submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor

Bruck, Jehoshua (Shuki)

261

Deterministic Function Computation with Chemical Reaction Networks*  

PubMed Central

Chemical reaction networks (CRNs) formally model chemistry in a well-mixed solution. CRNs are widely used to describe information processing occurring in natural cellular regulatory networks, and with upcoming advances in synthetic biology, CRNs are a promising language for the design of artificial molecular control circuitry. Nonetheless, despite the widespread use of CRNs in the natural sciences, the range of computational behaviors exhibited by CRNs is not well understood. CRNs have been shown to be efficiently Turing-universal (i.e., able to simulate arbitrary algorithms) when allowing for a small probability of error. CRNs that are guaranteed to converge on a correct answer, on the other hand, have been shown to decide only the semilinear predicates (a multi-dimensional generalization of eventually periodic sets). We introduce the notion of function, rather than predicate, computation by representing the output of a function f : ?k ? ?l by a count of some molecular species, i.e., if the CRN starts with x1, , xk molecules of some input species X1, , Xk, the CRN is guaranteed to converge to having f(x1, , xk) molecules of the output species Y1, , Yl. We show that a function f : ?k ? ?l is deterministically computed by a CRN if and only if its graph {(x, y) ? ?k ?l ? f(x) = y} is a semilinear set. Finally, we show that each semilinear function f (a function whose graph is a semilinear set) can be computed by a CRN on input x in expected time O(polylog ?x?1).

Chen, Ho-Lin; Doty, David; Soloveichik, David

2013-01-01

262

school of Computer Science & Statistics COURSE CODE TR033  

E-print Network

, healthcare, education and many more: "...the Irish-owned software sector is still growing fast, almost 10 Certificate: HC 3 Mathematics Other Examination Systems: www.tcd.ie/Admissions/undergraduate Computer Science the theory and practice of the development of computer systems, exposing you to the whole range of computing

O'Mahony, Donal E.

263

An Experimental Analysis of Computer-Mediated Instruction and Student Attitudes in a Principles of Financial Accounting Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Accounting students received either traditional instruction (n=46) or used computer-mediated communication and WebCT course management software. There were no significant differences in attitudes about the course. However, computer users were more positive about course delivery and course management tools. (Contains 17 references.) (SK)

Basile, Anthony; D'Aquila, Jill M.

2002-01-01

264

Tuning computer communications networks and protocols  

SciTech Connect

Current computer network protocols are very robust and capable of being used in a variety of different environments. Typically, the implementations of these protocols come to the user with preset parameters that provide reasonable performance for low delay- bandwidth product environments with low error rates, but these defaults do not necessarily provide optimal performance for high delay-bandwidth, high error rate environments. To provide optimal performance from the user's perspective, which is application to application, all equivalent layers of the protocol must be tuned. The key to tuning protocols is reducing idle time on the links caused by various protocol layers waiting for acknowledgments. The circuit bandwidth, propagation delay, error rate, number of outstanding packets, buffer length, number of buffers, and buffer size can all affect the observed idle time. Experiments have been conducted on test bed systems, and on live satellite and terrestrial circuits. Observations from these experiments led the authors to draw conclusions about the locations of common bottlenecks. Various aspects of network tuning and certain specific issues relating to the tuning of three protocols (DECnet, TCP/IP, NETEX) over various media types (point-to-point and broadcast) under several different conditions (terrestrial and satellite) are examined in this paper. Also described are the lessons learned about protocol and network tuning. 3 refs., 2 tabs.

Witzke, E.L. (Proteus Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Pierson, L.G. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1991-01-01

265

Visualization Techniques for Computer Network Defense  

SciTech Connect

Effective visual analysis of computer network defense (CND) information is challenging due to the volume and complexity of both the raw and analyzed network data. A typical CND is comprised of multiple niche intrusion detection tools, each of which performs network data analysis and produces a unique alerting output. The state-of-the-practice in the situational awareness of CND data is the prevalent use of custom-developed scripts by Information Technology (IT) professionals to retrieve, organize, and understand potential threat events. We propose a new visual analytics framework, called the Oak Ridge Cyber Analytics (ORCA) system, for CND data that allows an operator to interact with all detection tool outputs simultaneously. Aggregated alert events are presented in multiple coordinated views with timeline, cluster, and swarm model analysis displays. These displays are complemented with both supervised and semi-supervised machine learning classifiers. The intent of the visual analytics framework is to improve CND situational awareness, to enable an analyst to quickly navigate and analyze thousands of detected events, and to combine sophisticated data analysis techniques with interactive visualization such that patterns of anomalous activities may be more easily identified and investigated.

Beaver, Justin M [ORNL; Steed, Chad A [ORNL; Patton, Robert M [ORNL; Cui, Xiaohui [ORNL; Schultz, Matthew A [ORNL

2011-01-01

266

Distributed Computing in Fault-Prone Dynamic Networks  

E-print Network

Distributed Computing in Fault-Prone Dynamic Networks Philipp Brandes, Friedhelm Meyer auf der in a dynamic network with changing connections #12;Introduction Moving nodes in a dynamic network with changing connections Given highly dynamic network with n nodes But n unknown Needed for many basic tasks all

267

Optimal program and data locations in computer networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

An optimization procedure for the allocation of program and data files in a computer network is presented. This algorithm takes into account the dependencies between files and programs such as occur in real heterogeneous computer networks. Insights into whether or not to convert programs from one computer to another can also be gained from the model. A search procedure for

Howard L. Morgan; K. Dan Levin

1977-01-01

268

Mobile Computing and Ubiquitous Networking: Concepts, Technologies and Challenges.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Analyzes concepts, technologies and challenges related to mobile computing and networking. Defines basic concepts of cellular systems. Describes the evolution of wireless technologies that constitute the foundations of mobile computing and ubiquitous networking. Presents characterization and issues of mobile computing. Analyzes economical and

Pierre, Samuel

2001-01-01

269

The LearningOnline Network with Computer-  

E-print Network

Management · Content Repository · Content Assembly · Course Management · Assessment · Open Source and Free this content a complete course management system to readily deploy this content 2 LON-CAPA 7 Bottom: Content-CAPA 14 Top: Complete Course Management System · Course Navigation Tools · Communication features

270

Talking about Code: Integrating Pedagogical Code Reviews into Early Computing Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Given the increasing importance of soft skills in the computing profession, there is good reason to provide students withmore opportunities to learn and practice those skills in undergraduate computing courses. Toward that end, we have developed an active learning approach for computing education called the "Pedagogical Code Review"

Hundhausen, Christopher D.; Agrawal, Anukrati; Agarwal, Pawan

2013-01-01

271

E-LEARNING AND E-ASSESSMENT FOR A COMPUTER PROGRAMMING COURSE  

E-print Network

E-LEARNING AND E-ASSESSMENT FOR A COMPUTER PROGRAMMING COURSE Zenon Harley1 , Eric Harley2 1@skythink.com, eharley@ryerson.ca Abstract We have developed an e-learning and e-assessment tool for a first year. Keywords: e-learning, e-assessment, computer programming, encryption. 1 INTRODUCTION Computers are widely

Harley, Eric R.

272

Research on Application Data Mining to Teaching of Basic Computer Courses in Universities  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the rapid development of information technology, computer technology has been getting more widely used in daily life, thus, it is necessary for each university graduates grasp basic technical skills of computers. However, usually a teacher will be responsible for teaching many college students basic computer courses, so it is difficult to ensure the quality of the teaching with the

Ye Zhiwei; Hu Zhengbing; Chen Hongwei; Liu Wei

2010-01-01

273

The impact of gender-differentiated golf course features on women's networking  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose The purpose of this paper is to consider whether golf functions as a networking barrier for women in professions that require networking for career success. Design\\/methodology\\/approach Data from 496 golf courses, in addition to demographic data and data about salaries in sales, managerial, and marketing and sales professions in the USA, were used to assess if differences

Michelle M. Arthur; Robert G. Del Campo; Harry J. van Buren III

2011-01-01

274

Roadmap: Computer Technology Network Technology Associate of Applied Business  

E-print Network

21007 Internet Ethics and Policies 3 US 10097 Destination Kent State: First Year Experience 1 Area Network Troubleshooting or COMT 21110 Internetworking or COMT 21200 Ethical Hacking 3 Two courses 21200 Ethical Hacking 3 Choose one of the courses not taken in previous semester COMT Elective 3

Khan, Javed I.

275

Computational Analysis of Viscoelastic Properties of Crosslinked Actin Networks  

E-print Network

Computational Analysis of Viscoelastic Properties of Crosslinked Actin Networks Taeyoon Kim1 dominant structural constituent is the actin cytoskeleton composed mainly of actin and actin crosslinking proteins (ACPs). Thus, knowledge of rheological properties of actin networks is crucial for understanding

Kamm, Roger D.

276

Computational Neuropsychiatry - Schizophrenia as a Cognitive Brain Network Disorder  

E-print Network

Computational modeling of functional brain networks in fMRI data has advanced the understanding of higher cognitive function. It is hypothesized that functional networks mediating higher cognitive processes are disrupted ...

Dauvermann, Maria R.

277

Learning rules and network repair in spike-timing-based computation networks  

E-print Network

Learning rules and network repair in spike-timing-based computation networks J. J. Hopfield allows noise to degrade the function of a network. Ongoing network self-repair is thus necessary. We de patterns of a functioning network. These plasticity rules for self-repair also provide the basis

Brody, Carlos

278

Computational functions in biochemical reaction networks.  

PubMed Central

In prior work we demonstrated the implementation of logic gates, sequential computers (universal Turing machines), and parallel computers by means of the kinetics of chemical reaction mechanisms. In the present article we develop this subject further by first investigating the computational properties of several enzymatic (single and multiple) reaction mechanisms: we show their steady states are analogous to either Boolean or fuzzy logic gates. Nearly perfect digital function is obtained only in the regime in which the enzymes are saturated with their substrates. With these enzymatic gates, we construct combinational chemical networks that execute a given truth-table. The dynamic range of a network's output is strongly affected by "input/output matching" conditions among the internal gate elements. We find a simple mechanism, similar to the interconversion of fructose-6-phosphate between its two bisphosphate forms (fructose-1,6-bisphosphate and fructose-2,6-bisphosphate), that functions analogously to an AND gate. When the simple model is supplanted with one in which the enzyme rate laws are derived from experimental data, the steady state of the mechanism functions as an asymmetric fuzzy aggregation operator with properties akin to a fuzzy AND gate. The qualitative behavior of the mechanism does not change when situated within a large model of glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and the TCA cycle. The mechanism, in this case, switches the pathway's mode from glycolysis to gluconeogenesis in response to chemical signals of low blood glucose (cAMP) and abundant fuel for the TCA cycle (acetyl coenzyme A). Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 PMID:7948674

Arkin, A; Ross, J

1994-01-01

279

An Investigation of Student Practices in Asynchronous Computer Conferencing Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the online practices of students enrolled in graduate-level distance education courses. Using interviews and a questionnaire as data sources, the study sought to: (a) identify common practices that students adopt in asynchronous discussions, and (b) gain an understanding of why students adopt them. An analysis of the data

Peters, Vanessa L.; Hewitt, Jim

2010-01-01

280

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE COURSES AVAILABLE TO FIRST-  

E-print Network

, and the Middle East. The relations between these regions, the Americas and Europe. MAX 123 Critical Issues as the number of academic credits. E&CS #12;COURSE PREFIXES AAA - Asian American Studies AAS - African American...................................................................................... 6 #12;Social Science Division Subject Catalog # AAA 101 Introduction to Asian/Asian-American Studies

Mohan, Chilukuri K.

281

Computation and control with neural networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As energies have increased exponentially with time, so have the size and complexity of accelerators and control systems. Neural networks (NNs) may offer the kinds of improvements in computation and control that are needed to maintain acceptable functionality. For control, their associative characteristics could provide signal conversion or data translation. Because they can do any computation such as least-squares, they can close feedback loops autonomously to provide intelligent control at the point of action rather than at a central location that requires transfers, conversions, hand-shaking and other costly repetitions like input protection. Both computation and control can be integrated on a single chip, a printed circuit or an optical equivalent that is also inherently faster through full parallel operation. For such reasons one expects lower costs and better results. Such systems could be optimized by integrating sensor and signal-processing functions. Distributed nets of such hardware could communicate and provide global monitoring and multiprocessing in various ways, e.g. via token, slotted or parallel rings (or Steiner trees), for compatibility with existing systems. Problems and advantages of this approach, such as an optimal, real-time Turing machine, are discussed. Simple examples are simulated and hardware implemented using discrete elements that demonstrate some basic characteristics of learning and parallelism. Future "microprocessors" are predicted and requested on this basis.

Corneliusen, A.; Terdal, P.; Knight, T.; Spencer, J.

1990-08-01

282

Educational Impact of Digital Visualization Tools on Digital Character Production Computer Science Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Digital character production courses have traditionally been taught in art departments. The digital character production course at the University of Utah is centered, drawing uniformly from art and engineering disciplines. Its design has evolved to include a synergy of computer science, functional art and human anatomy. It gives students an

van Langeveld, Mark Christensen

2009-01-01

283

Work in Progress - Collaboration Pedagogy in the Introductory Computer Science Programming Course for Engineers  

Microsoft Academic Search

First-year engineering students at Purdue University most frequently select CS 158, a C Programming course, to satisfy their computer programming requirement. During the Spring 2005 semester 915 students elected CS 158 and a major effort was made to introduce collaborative teaming on course assignments including projects and in weekly laboratories. It is believed that such collaboration represents how professional engineers

William N. Crum; Brenda Capobianco

2005-01-01

284

Portraits of PBL: Course Objectives and Students' Study Strategies in Computer Engineering, Psychology and Physiotherapy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compares the role of course objectives in relation to students' study strategies in problem-based learning (PBL). Results comprise data from three PBL programs at Linkopings University (Sweden), in physiotherapy, psychology, and computer engineering. Faculty provided course objectives to function as supportive structures and guides for students'

Dahlgren, Madeleine Abrandt

2000-01-01

285

Improving performance and retention in computer science courses using a virtual game show  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the many factors that contribute to the decline in Computer Science retention is poor performance in foundation programming courses. In the Introduction to Programming course here at UNC Charlotte, it has been observed that poor assessment performance is often attributed to students feeling they understand material when they often don't. This iteration of the Dr. Chestr Show seeks

Carl Arrington Jr.; Dale-Marie Wilson; Lorrie Lehmann

2011-01-01

286

Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a Web-Based Learning Design for Adult Computer Science Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports on work undertaken within a pilot study concerned with the design, development, and evaluation of online computer science training courses. Drawing on recent developments in e-learning technology, these courses were structured around the principles of a learner-oriented approach for use with adult learners. The paper describes a

Antonis, Konstantinos; Daradoumis, Thanasis; Papadakis, Spyros; Simos, Christos

2011-01-01

287

Investigating a New Way To Teach Law: A Computer-based Commercial Law Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the successful use of an interactive, computer-based format supplemented by online chats to provide a two-credit-hour commercial law course at the University of Tennessee College of Law. (EV)

Lloyd, Robert M.

2000-01-01

288

A Computer Network Protocol for Library and Information Science Applications. NCLIS/NBS Task Force on Computer Network Protocol.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document describes a proposed computer to computer protocol for electronic communication of digital information over a nationwide library bibliographic network. The protocol allows application tasks at one site on the network to converse with application tasks at any other site, regardless of differences in computer architecture or operating

National Commission on Libraries and Information Science, Washington, DC.

289

Colorado School of Mines Minor's Computer Use Waiver Form For Mines Computer Account(s) and Network Access  

E-print Network

For Mines Computer Account(s) and Network Access Student & Parent Program Contact Person and keep the Computer and Network Access Agreement of this document). 2. Colorado School of Mines Computer and Network Access Agreement

290

Contributing to success in an introductory computer science course: a study of twelve factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was conducted to determine factors that promote success in an introductory college computer science course. The model included twelve possible predictive factors including math background, attribution for success\\/failure (luck, effort, difficulty of task, and ability), domain specific self-efficacy, encouragement, comfort level in the course, work style preference, previous programming experience, previous non-programming computer experience, and gender. Subjects included

Brenda Cantwell Wilson; Sharon Shrock

2001-01-01

291

Analysis of proctor marking accuracy in a computer-aided personalized system of instruction course.  

PubMed

In a computer-aided version of Keller's personalized system of instruction (CAPSI), students within a course were assigned by a computer to be proctors for tests. Archived data from a CAPSI-taught behavior modification course were analyzed to assess proctor accuracy in marking answers as correct or incorrect. Overall accuracy was increased by having each test marked independently by two proctors, and was higher on incorrect answers when the degree of incorrectness was larger. PMID:12365747

Martin, Toby L; Pear, Joseph J; Martin, Garry L

2002-01-01

292

Increasing engagement and enrollment in breadth-first introductory courses using authentic computing tasks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The breadth-first approach to teaching introductory computer science is one way of dispelling the common misperception that programming is the sole task of the computer scientist. The breadth-first approach is particularly useful in courses for non-majors. Hands-on activities that make up laboratory assignments for these courses tend to focus on learning to program or simulations of program execution. These activities

Ryan L. McFall; Matthew DeJongh

2011-01-01

293

Performamatics: Experiences with Connecting a Computer Science Course to a Design Arts Course  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our work is based on a partnership betweenthe a Computer Science(CS) and Art, Music, and English departments in the area of exhibition and performance technologies. We define these areas broadly to encompass all CS applications in the creative and performing arts. These areas not only resonate with today's media-rich culture, but reinforce the fact that virtually all computer applications now

Jesse M. Heines; Jim Jeffers; Sarah Kuhn

294

Problem-based learning in an introductory computer engineering course  

Microsoft Academic Search

As systems increase in complexity and technology advances, curriculum and laboratories are challenged to keep pace. This is especially true in computer engineering, which has seen dramatic growth in the scope and diversity of computer-based systems. One of the key challenges is developing the educational context for the new technologies, which are being encountered earlier and earlier in a student's

Aaron Striegel; Diane T. Rover

2002-01-01

295

Introductory Computer-Based Mechanics; A One Week Sample Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Very little material exists for utilizing the computer in the physics classroom, and even that little is not widely known. It is hoped that this monograph will provide some stimulus both to innovation and to discussion of the role of the computer in physics education. The paper describes how this might be achieved with a detailed account of one

Bork, Alfred M.; And Others

296

The Effects of Computer-Assisted Instruction on Jordanian College Students' Achievements in an Introductory Computer Science Course  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of traditional instruction (TI) plus Computer-Assisted Instruction (CAI) versus TI alone on college students' achievements in an introductory computer science course. This study was conducted at a small government university in Jordan using a Quasi-experimental, nonequivalent control group design. A courseware was developed to investigate the difference between two groups

Mohammed Ali; Ahmed Akour

297

Social Studies: Application Units. Course II, Teachers. Computer-Oriented Curriculum. REACT (Relevant Educational Applications of Computer Technology).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book is one of a series in Course II of the Relevant Educational Applications of Computer Technology (REACT) Project. It is designed to point out to teachers two of the major applications of computers in the social sciences: simulation and data analysis. The first section contains a variety of simulation units organized under the following

Tecnica Education Corp., San Carlos, CA.

298

An internet role-game for the laboratory of network security course  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the last few years, many universities and educational institutions have introduced computer security related courses to their degree programs. The majority of these courses feature intensive laboratory activity based on live experiments of attack and defense techniques by means of team games organized as \\

Luigi Catuogno; Alfredo De Santis

2008-01-01

299

Network Computer Technology. Phase I: Viability and Promise within NASA's Desktop Computing Environment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Over the past several months, major industry vendors have made a business case for the network computer as a win-win solution toward lowering total cost of ownership. This report provides results from Phase I of the Ames Research Center network computer evaluation project. It identifies factors to be considered for determining cost of ownership; further, it examines where, when, and how network computer technology might fit in NASA's desktop computing architecture.

Paluzzi, Peter; Miller, Rosalind; Kurihara, West; Eskey, Megan

1998-01-01

300

Computational Intelligence in Multimedia Networking and Communications: Trends and  

E-print Network

Computational Intelligence in Multimedia Networking and Communications: Trends and Future multimedia researchers in recent times have developed computational intelligence (CI) based methods. From these applications, it appears that the various computa- tional intelligence frameworks

Guturu, Parthasarathy

301

Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Computer Information Systems Technology. Computer Information Systems Technology (Program CIP: 52.1201--Management Information Systems & Business Data). Computer Programming (Program CIP: 52.1201). Network Support (Program CIP: 52.1290--Computer Network Support Technology). Postsecondary Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for two programs in the state's postsecondary-level computer information systems technology cluster: computer programming and network support. Presented in the introduction are program descriptions and suggested course

Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

302

Computer Networks as Social Networks: Collaborative Work, Telework, and Virtual Community  

Microsoft Academic Search

When computer networks link people as well as machines, they become social networks. Such computer-supported social networks (CSSNs) are becoming im- portant bases of virtual communities, computer-supported cooperative work, and telework. Computer-mediated communication such as electronic mail and com- puterized conferencing is usually text-based and asynchronous. It has limited social presence, and on-line communications are often more uninhibited, cre- ative,

Barry Wellman; Janet Salaff; Dimitrina Dimitrova; Laura Garton; Milena Gulia; Caroline Haythornthwaite

1996-01-01

303

Signal Processing and Computational Model for Neural Networks Chen, Houjin Yuan, Baozong  

E-print Network

Signal Processing and Computational Model for Neural Networks Chen, Houjin Yuan, Baozong Institute processing, Computational model, Computer Simulation; 1. Introduction Neural networks have the ability properties and one computer simulation system for neural networks was designed and implemented. In order

Byrne, John H.

304

OPTI 646-Introduction to Quantum Information and Computation Course Description  

E-print Network

-level quantum mechanics is essential. Textbook: Quantum Information and Computation lecture notes by John. Foundations Review of quantum mechanics-Hilbert space, operators, postulates, tensor products, density Information theory - Shannon and Von Neumann entropy, distinction between classical and quantum information

Arizona, University of

305

A topology for computer networks with good survivability characteristics and low transmission delays between node computers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Various network topologies are developed which have not appeared in the literature before which result in minimum diameter graphs for computer networks having connectivity four. The topologies presented have good survivability characteristics and result in more topologies being available for computer network designers which achieve the minimum diameter resulting in small transmission delays.

Kelly, G. L.; Jiang, D. P.

1984-01-01

306

Efficiently modeling neural networks on massively parallel computers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Neural networks are a very useful tool for analyzing and modeling complex real world systems. Applying neural network simulations to real world problems generally involves large amounts of data and massive amounts of computation. To efficiently handle the computational requirements of large problems, we have implemented at Los Alamos a highly efficient neural network compiler for serial computers, vector computers, vector parallel computers, and fine grain SIMD computers such as the CM-2 connection machine. This paper describes the mapping used by the compiler to implement feed-forward backpropagation neural networks for a SIMD (Single Instruction Multiple Data) architecture parallel computer. Thinking Machines Corporation has benchmarked our code at 1.3 billion interconnects per second (approximately 3 gigaflops) on a 64,000 processor CM-2 connection machine (Singer 1990). This mapping is applicable to other SIMD computers and can be implemented on MIMD computers such as the CM-5 connection machine. Our mapping has virtually no communications overhead with the exception of the communications required for a global summation across the processors (which has a sub-linear runtime growth on the order of O(log(number of processors)). We can efficiently model very large neural networks which have many neurons and interconnects and our mapping can extend to arbitrarily large networks (within memory limitations) by merging the memory space of separate processors with fast adjacent processor interprocessor communications. This paper will consider the simulation of only feed forward neural network although this method is extendable to recurrent networks.

Farber, Robert M.

1993-01-01

307

Theory VI. Computational Materials Sciences Network (CMSN)  

SciTech Connect

The Computational Materials Sciences Network (CMSN) is a virtual center consisting of scientists interested in working together, across organizational and disciplinary boundaries, to formulate and pursue projects that reflect challenging and relevant computational research in the materials sciences. The projects appropriate for this center involve those problems best pursued through broad cooperative efforts, rather than those key problems best tackled by single investigator groups. CMSN operates similarly to the DOE Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials, coordinated by George Samara at Sandia. As in the Synthesis and Processing Center, the intent of the modest funding for CMSN is to foster partnering and collective activities. All CMSN proposals undergo external peer review and are judged foremost on the quality and timeliness of the science and also on criteria relevant to the objective of the center, especially concerning a strategy for partnering. More details about CMSN can be found on the CMSN webpages at: http://cmpweb.ameslab.gov/ccms/CMSN-homepage.html.

Zhang, Z Y

2008-06-25

308

Free and Open-Source Software for a Course on Network Management: Authoring and Enactment of Scripts Based on Collaborative Learning Strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) case study in engineering education carried out within the context of a network management course. The case study shows that the use of two computing tools developed by the authors and based on free-and open-source software (FOSS) provide significant educational benefits over traditional engineering pedagogical approaches in terms of both concepts and

Davinia Hernandez-Leo; Miguel L. Bote-Lorenzo; Juan I. Asensio-Perez; Eduardo Gocmez-Sanchez; Eloy D. Villasclaras-Fernandez; Ivn M. Jorrin-Abellan; Yannis A. Dimitriadis

2007-01-01

309

Network Patch Cables Demystified: A Super Activity for Computer Networking Technology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article de-mystifies network patch cable secrets so that people can connect their computers and transfer those pesky files--without screaming at the cables. It describes a network cabling activity that can offer students a great hands-on opportunity for working with the tools, techniques, and media used in computer networking. Since the

Brown, Douglas L.

2004-01-01

310

The Missing Link: Putting the Network in Networked Cloud Computing  

E-print Network

with private IP networks linking virtual machines allocated at multiple sites (RENCI, Duke, and UNC virtual servers at multiple points in the network, together with bandwidth-provisioned network pipes with radically different forms of networking by running experimental systems within private isolated slices

Chase, Jeffrey S.

311

A new dynamic Bayesian network (DBN) approach for identifying gene regulatory networks from time course microarray data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Motivation:Signaling pathways are dynamic,events that take place over a given period of time. In order to identify these pathways, expression data over time are required. Dynamic Bayesian Network(DBN) is animportant approach for predictinggene regulatory networks from time course expression data. However, two fundamental problems greatly reducethe effectiveness of current DBN methods. The first problem is the relatively low accuracy

Min Zou; Suzanne D. Conzen

2005-01-01

312

Normalizing Social Networking in a Beginners' Japanese Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the spread of the Internet, students now have greater opportunities to use Japanese outside of the classroom. For example, they can interact with other Japanese speakers through instant messaging or social networking, or utilize online dictionaries and translation tools to decipher websites in ways that would be impossible with traditional

Morofushi, Mari; Pasfield-Neofitou, Sarah Ellen

2014-01-01

313

Understanding Social Networks Properties for Trustworthy Computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ever-increasing popularity of social networks opens new directions for leveraging social networks to build primitives for security and communication, in many contexts. Such primitives utilize the trust in these social networks to ensure collaboration and algorithmic properties exhibited in such networks to argue for the effectiveness of such primitives. Despite the importance of such properties and their quality to

Abedelaziz Mohaisen; Huy Tran; Nicholas Hopper; Yongdae Kim

2011-01-01

314

Routing Techniques Used in Computer Communication Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

An overview is provided in this paper of the routing procedures used in a number of operating networks, as well as in two commercial network architectures. The networks include TYMNET, ARPANET, and TRANSPAC. The network architectures discussed are the IBM SNA and the DEC DNA. The routing algorithms all tend to fall in the shortest path class. In the introductory

MISCHA SCHWARTZ; THOMSS E. STERN

1980-01-01

315

CUBAN COMPUTER NETWORKS AND THEIR IMPACT  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper summarizes the current state of Cuban networks and discusses some of the potential, mar- ginal impacts of those networks. We summarize the state of four networks with international connec- tions. While much smaller and less powerful than networks in developed nations like the United States, they have grown substantially since 1992 and are sig- nificant relative to other

316

Topological considerations in the design of the ARPA computer network  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ARPA Network will provide store-and-forward communication paths between a set of computer centers distributed across the continental United States. The message handling tasks at each node in the network are performed by a special purpose Interface Message Processor (IMP) located at each computer center. The centers will be interconnected through the IMPs by fully duplex telephone lines, of typically

H. Frank; I. T. Frisch; W. Chou

1970-01-01

317

Escape from the Computer Lab: Education in Mobile Wireless Networks  

E-print Network

Escape from the Computer Lab: Education in Mobile Wireless Networks Elizabeth M. Belding@cs.ucsb.edu Abstract As mobile wireless network technology becomes widespread, the importance of education about this new form of communication is becoming critical. One of the benefits of mobile computing education

Belding-Royer, Elizabeth M.

318

Computational Intelligence in Wireless Sensor Networks: A Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are networks of distributed autonomous devices that can sense or monitor physical or environmental conditions cooperatively. WSNs face many challenges, mainly caused by communication failures, storage and computational constraints and limited power supply. Paradigms of computational intelligence (CI) have been successfully used in recent years to address various challenges such as data aggregation and fusion, energy

Raghavendra V. Kulkarni; Anna Forster; Ganesh Kumar Venayagamoorthy

2011-01-01

319

Word Reading in Damaged Connectionist Networks: Computational and Neuropsychological Implications  

E-print Network

that computation in these networks reflects important properties of neural computation. One piece of evidence often in patients with neurological damage. To the extent that this held, a detailed investigation of the behavior of a network is evaluated by testing how well its performance generalizes to novel external input drawn from

Plaut, David C.

320

The Network Computer: Is It Right for Education?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the network computer, originally conceived as an alternative device to personal computers to access the Internet and World Wide Web, from a technology perspective and looks at potential uses in education. Describes network architecture; discusses uses for library research, educational technology laboratories, and distance education.

Galbreath, Jeremy

1999-01-01

321

Inferring Social Ties across Heterogenous Networks Department of Computer  

E-print Network

the type of social relationships by learning across heterogeneous networks. The framework incorporates the type of social relationships in a target network, by bor- rowing knowledge from a different sourceInferring Social Ties across Heterogenous Networks Jie Tang Department of Computer Science Tsinghua

Kleinberg, Jon

322

Partial Coverage in Homological Sensor Networks School of Computer Science  

E-print Network

and wireless commu- nications has a considerable impact on advancing the state of wireless sensor networks Networks have emerged as a promising solution for various applications which include health, militaryPartial Coverage in Homological Sensor Networks Hui Zhang School of Computer Science

Dobson, Simon

323

Nordic Journal of Computing Path layout on tree networks  

E-print Network

decisions, that is, a packet is switched in the network according to a label it carries. The conceptNordic Journal of Computing Path layout on tree networks: Bounds in different label switching characteristics of paths in three label switching protocols, MPLS, ATM and TRAINET. We focus on tree networks

Bremler-Barr, Anat

324

Effects of types of active learning activity on two junior-level computer engineering courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

In several computer engineering and computer science courses, it has been observed that active learning activities (ALAs) aid the students in better understanding of the technical material. In this paper, we explore the influence of the type of the ALA and the academic quality of the student on the effectiveness of the technique. We perform the study in two junior

Saurabh Bagchi; Mark C. Johnson; Somali Chaterji

2008-01-01

325

Computer, Video, and Rapid-Cycling Plant Projects in an Undergraduate Plant Breeding Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studies the perceived effectiveness of four student projects involving videotape production, computer conferencing, microcomputer simulation, and rapid-cycling Brassica breeding for undergraduate plant breeding students in two course offerings in consecutive years. Linking of the computer conferencing and video projects improved the rating of the

Michaels, T. E.

1993-01-01

326

Advantages and disadvantages of using various computer tools in electrical engineering courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses different computer tools used to help deliver, administer, and teach the material covered in two basic undergraduate courses in electrical engineering. The computer facilities, programs and tutorials developed are discussed; however, the paper concentrates more on analyzing the results of using these tools in the student learning process. The students' marks and the results of several student

C. A. Canizares; Zeno T. Faur

1997-01-01

327

Relationships among Learning Styles and Motivation with Computer-Aided Instruction in an Agronomy Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Multi-media learning tools were developed to enhance student learning for an introductory agronomy course at Iowa State University. During fall 2002, the new interactive computer program, called Computer Interactive Multimedia Program for Learning Enhancement (CIMPLE) was incorporated into the teaching, learning, and assessment processes of the

McAndrews, Gina M.; Mullen, Russell E.; Chadwick, Scott A.

2005-01-01

328

COURSE CONTINUITY IN THE COMPUTER SCIENCE Richard Connelly, Providence College, Providence, RI, rconnell@providence.edu  

E-print Network

matter into discrete courses. This division, however, is artificial and arbitrary, and, when exacerbated. As a result, students never perceive Computer Science as an integral discipline, nor understand and appreciate University, Hamden, CT As faculty in Computer Science, we agree that a well-educated practitioner should

Ivanov, Lubomir

329

Recursive algorithms in computer science courses: Fibonacci numbers and binomial coefficients  

Microsoft Academic Search

We observe that the computational inefficiency of branched recursive functions was not appropriately covered in almost all textbooks for computer science courses in the first three years of the curriculum. Fibonacci numbers and binomial coefficients were frequently used as examples of branched recursive functions. However, their exponential time complexity was rarely claimed and never completely proved in the textbooks. Alternative

I. Stojmenovic; Binomial Coefficients

2000-01-01

330

63 2012-13SuggestedCoursePlan COMPUTER SCIENCE (GAMES)  

E-print Network

& INTERACT. MEDIA (10 UNITS) CTAN 452: Intro to Computer Animation CTIN 488: Game Design Workshop CTIN 489 Hardware Architectures ENGR 102: Engineering Freshmen Academy ITP 280: Video Game Production ITP 380: Video63 2012-13SuggestedCoursePlan COMPUTER SCIENCE (GAMES) FIRST YEAR FALL: 16 units SPRING: 18 units

Zhou, Chongwu

331

Design and Delivery of Multiple Server-Side Computer Languages Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Given the emergence of service-oriented architecture, IS students need to be knowledgeable of multiple server-side computer programming languages to be able to meet the needs of the job market. This paper outlines the pedagogy of an innovative course of multiple server-side computer languages for the undergraduate IS majors. The paper discusses

Wang, Shouhong; Wang, Hai

2011-01-01

332

Towards Student Instrumentation of Computer-Based Algebra Systems in University Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There are many perceived benefits of using technology, such as computer algebra systems, in undergraduate mathematics courses. However, attaining these benefits sometimes proves elusive. Some of the key variables are the teaching approach and the student instrumentation of the technology. This paper considers the instrumentation of computer-based

Stewart, Sepideh; Thomas, Michael O. J.; Hannah, John

2005-01-01

333

Computer Assisted Problem Solving in an Introductory Statistics Course. Technical Report No. 56.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The computer assisted problem solving system (CAPS) described in this booklet administered "homework" problem sets designed to develop students' computational, estimation, and procedural skills. These skills were related to important concepts in an introductory statistics course. CAPS generated unique data, judged student performance, provided

Anderson, Thomas H.; And Others

334

Visualizing trends in student performance across computer science courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Student retention is an important topic in Computer Science departments across the country. Keeping strong students and helping struggling students perform better are two fundamental components of improving retention. Isolating the cause(s) of students leaving the major is an important area of research. We endeavor to explore this problem using a visualization tool to probe student data within the beginning

Dana Wortman; Penny Rheingans

2007-01-01

335

Visualizing trends in student performance across computer science courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT Student retention is an important topic in Computer Science departments across the country. Keeping strong students and helping struggling students perform better are two fun- damental components,of improving retention. Isolating the cause(s) of students leaving the major is an important area of research. We endeavor to explore this problem using a vi- sualization tool to probe student data within

Dana Wortman; Penny Rheingans

2007-01-01

336

Interdisciplinary travel courses in computer science (abstract only)  

Microsoft Academic Search

In today's world, many students are being encouraged not only to participate in class work and internships, but to travel and gain experiential knowledge. At Presbyterian College, students are required to complete either a research\\/internship class or an experiential\\/travel class as a part of their general education requirements. Computer science students were often going on trips with other departments to

Paige H. Meeker

2012-01-01

337

A Collaborative Undergraduate Course for Pen-based Computing using Tablet PCs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pen-based technology provides new means for interfacing with digital computers. At Purdue University, we have been developing courses that allows computer science undergraduates to explore non-traditional human-computer interfaces, to implement complex working systems, and to give them hands-on experience in developing team projects. After the first two years, we have successfully implemented a multitude of pen-based applications, across a wide-range

Daniel G. Aliaga; Gustavo Rodriguez-River; Dongyan Xu

338

Communications Training Courses Across the Leopold Leadership Network  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For nearly fifteen years, the Leopold Leadership Program has provided science communication training and support to mid-career academic environmental researchers from across North America. There has been an emphasis throughout on effective communication to non-scientific audiences. Increasingly, Leopold fellows have been developing communications courses for their own students, responding to the need for future scientists to be able to communicate well with the public, the media, policy makers and other audiences. At a June 2012 reunion meeting, a group of past fellows and communications trainers conducted a curriculum exchange, sharing experiences and ideas for successful inclusion of communications training in environmental science curricula. This presentation will present case studies from several institutions, including the use of podcasting, web columns, social media, in-person presentation and other presentation styles for connecting general audiences. We will share best practices, challenges and recommendations for curriculum development and institutional acceptance.

Hayden, T.; Gerber, L. R.; Silver, W. L.

2012-12-01

339

Computer analysis of general linear networks using digraphs.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Investigation of the application of digraphs in analyzing general electronic networks, and development of a computer program based on a particular digraph method developed by Chen. The Chen digraph method is a topological method for solution of networks and serves as a shortcut when hand calculations are required. The advantage offered by this method of analysis is that the results are in symbolic form. It is limited, however, by the size of network that may be handled. Usually hand calculations become too tedious for networks larger than about five nodes, depending on how many elements the network contains. Direct determinant expansion for a five-node network is a very tedious process also.

Mcclenahan, J. O.; Chan, S.-P.

1972-01-01

340

Packet switching networks for multiprocessors and data flow computers  

SciTech Connect

Most packet switched multistage networks have been proposed to use a unique path between any source and destination. We propose to add a few extra stages to create multiple paths between any source and destination. Connection principles of such multipath networks for packet switching are presented. Performance of such networks is analyzed for possible use in multiprocessor systems or in data flow computers. The major improvement of the proposed networks lies in significantly reduced packet wait delays in buffers, especially under heavy traffic conditions. The tradeoffs between reduced network delays and increased hardware cost are studied. Optimal design criteria and systematic procedures are provided for developing multipath packet switching networks.

Chin, C.Y.; Hwang, K.

1984-11-01

341

MIT OpenCourseWare: Introduction to Computer Science and Programming  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

If you're hoping to test your mettle in the world of computer science, you'd do well to check out this informative and erudite course offered as part of the OpenCourseWare initiative at MIT. The course was created by Professors Eric Grimson and John Guttag, and it includes a syllabus, readings, lecture videos, assignments, and exams. The materials here are "aimed at students with little or no programming experience." Visitors might want to start out by looking over the syllabus, and then move on to the "Readings" area. Here they can find selected excerpts from key texts, including "How to Think Like a Computer Scientist". Even better are the lecture videos from the course, such as "Binary search, bubble and selection sorts" and "Divide and conquer methods, merge sort, exceptions". The truly ambitious will also want to look over the assignments and exams offered here.

342

STUDENTS ENROLLED IN SELECTED UPPER-DIVISION AGRICULTURE COURSES: AN EXAMINATION OF COMPUTER EXPERIENCES, SELF-EFFICACY AND KNOWLEDGE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Students (E = 169) enrolled in eight upper-division agriculture courses at a land-grant university were surveyed during the Fall 1999 semester to determine their computer experiences, computer self- efficacy, and computer knowledge. The students reported a variety of computer experiences, with 79% having completed a computer course and 66% owning a computer. Over one-half of the students had received formal

Donald M. Johnson

343

Computer Experiences, Self-Efficacy and Knowledge of Students Enrolled in Selected Upper-Division University Agriculture Courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Students (n = 169) enrolled in eight upper-division agriculture courses at a land-grant university were surveyed during the Fall 1999 semester to determine their computer experiences, computer self-efficacy, and computer knowledge. The students reported a variety of computer experiences, with 79% having completed a computer course and 66% owning a computer. Over one-half of the students had received formal instruction

Donald M. Johnson; James A. Ferguson; Melissa L. Lester

344

CSCE 515: Computer Network Programming Course Description. CSCE 515 is a course focusing on the programming aspects of computer networks.  

E-print Network

purpose is to give you hands on experience with the concepts taught in the class. DO NOT copy code from projects in a short write up as well. The writeups will be graded based upon the technical content. Any material covered in class is fair game. But I reserve the right to examine your ability to go

Xu, Wenyuan

345

CNT3004: Computer Network Concepts Spring 2011  

E-print Network

, and File Transfer Chapter 27 WWW and HTTP Chapter 31 Network Security #12; Error Detection and Correction Chapter 11 Data Link Control Chapter 14 Wireless LANs Chapter 15 Connecting LANs, Backbone Networks, and Virtual LANs Chapter 19 Network Layer Addressing (only the basic

Zou, Cliff C.

346

A Computer Network for Social Scientists.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a microcomputer-based network developed at the University of California Los Angeles to support education in the social sciences. Topics discussed include technological, managerial, and academic considerations of university networking; the use of the network in teaching macroeconomics, social demographics, and symbolic logic; and possible

Gerber, Barry

1989-01-01

347

Thera-Network: A Wearable Computing Network to Motivate Exercise in Patients Undergoing Physical Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a growing field of smart medical devices for home use. The Thera-Network is designed for patients under the care of a physical therapist. A 2004 survey by the author notes that motivation and regulation are the largest deterrents for patients participating in a course of at home exercise between therapy sessions. With the Thera-Network, motivation is offered through

Janna C. Kimel

2005-01-01

348

A discrete computer network model with expanding dimensions  

E-print Network

Complex networks with expanding dimensions are studied, where the networks may be directed and weighted, and network nodes are varying in discrete time in the sense that some new nodes may be added and some old nodes may be removed from time to time. A model of such networks in computer data transmission is discussed. Each node on the network has fixed dimensionality, while the dimension of the whole network is defined by the total number of nodes. Based on the spectacular properties of data transmission on computer networks, some new concepts of stable and unstable networks differing from the classical Lyapunov stability are defined. In particular, a special unstable network model, called devil network, is introduced and discussed. It is further found that a variety of structures and connection weights affects the network stability substantially. Several criteria on stability, instability, and devil network are established for a rather general class of networks, where some conditions are actually necessary and sufficient. Mathematically, this paper makes a first attempt to rigorously formulate a fundamental issue of modeling discrete linear time-varying systems with expanding dimensions and study their basic stability property.

Yuming Shi; Guanrong Chen

2007-05-07

349

Culture, Role and Group Work: A Social Network Analysis Perspective on an Online Collaborative Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses the patterns of network dynamics within a multicultural online collaborative learning environment. It analyses the interaction of participants (both students and facilitators) within a discussion board that was established as part of a 3-month online collaborative course. The study employs longitudinal probabilistic social

Stepanyan, Karen; Mather, Richard; Dalrymple, Roger

2014-01-01

350

Life-Course Events, Social Networks, and the Emergence of Violence among Female Gang Members  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using data gathered from a multi-year field study, this article identifies specific life-course events shared by gang-affiliated women. Gangs emerge as a cultural adaptation or pro-social community response to poverty and racial isolation. Through the use of a social-network approach, data show that violence dramatically increases in the period

Fleisher, Mark S.; Krienert, Jessie L.

2004-01-01

351

Using high-performance networks to enable computational aerosciences applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One component of the U.S. Federal High Performance Computing and Communications Program (HPCCP) is the establishment of a gigabit network to provide a communications infrastructure for researchers across the nation. This gigabit network will provide new services and capabilities, in addition to increased bandwidth, to enable future applications. An understanding of these applications is necessary to guide the development of the gigabit network and other high-performance networks of the future. In this paper we focus on computational aerosciences applications run remotely using the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) facility located at NASA Ames Research Center. We characterize these applications in terms of network-related parameters and relate user experiences that reveal limitations imposed by the current wide-area networking infrastructure. Then we investigate how the development of a nationwide gigabit network would enable users of the NAS facility to work in new, more productive ways.

Johnson, Marjory J.

1992-01-01

352

CSM Academic Computing and Networking Computer Commons Lab Reservation/Use  

E-print Network

CSM Academic Computing and Networking (AC&N) Computer Commons Lab Reservation/Use Policies that the main AC&N office is the contact for lab and equipment reservations, not the Computer Commons front desk-vested consultant at the Computer Commons front desk in CT 156 should check the equipment back in. Make sure

353

Interactive knowledge networks for interdisciplinary course navigation within Moodle  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Web-based hypermedia learning environments are widely used in modern education and seem particularly well suited for interdisciplinary learning. Previous work has identified guidance through these complex environments as a crucial problem of their acceptance and efficiency. We reasoned that map-based navigation might provide straightforward and effortless orientation. To achieve this, we developed a clickable and user-oriented concept map-based navigation plugin. This tool is implemented as an extension of Moodle, a widely used learning management system. It visualizes inner and interdisciplinary relations between learning objects and is generated dynamically depending on user set parameters and interactions. This plugin leaves the choice of navigation type to the user and supports direct guidance. Previously developed and evaluated face-to-face interdisciplinary learning materials bridging physiology and physics courses of a medical curriculum were integrated as learning objects, the relations of which were defined by metadata. Learning objects included text pages, self-assessments, videos, animations, and simulations. In a field study, we analyzed the effects of this learning environment on physiology and physics knowledge as well as the transfer ability of third-term medical students. Data were generated from pre- and posttest questionnaires and from tracking student navigation. Use of the hypermedia environment resulted in a significant increase of knowledge and transfer capability. Furthermore, the efficiency of learning was enhanced. We conclude that hypermedia environments based on Moodle and enriched by concept map-based navigation tools can significantly support interdisciplinary learning. Implementation of adaptivity may further strengthen this approach.

Peter M Thule (Emory University/Atlanta VA Medical Center); Kathrin Dethleffsen (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit¤t); Michael Meyer (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit¤t)

2012-12-01

354

Interactive knowledge networks for interdisciplinary course navigation within Moodle.  

PubMed

Web-based hypermedia learning environments are widely used in modern education and seem particularly well suited for interdisciplinary learning. Previous work has identified guidance through these complex environments as a crucial problem of their acceptance and efficiency. We reasoned that map-based navigation might provide straightforward and effortless orientation. To achieve this, we developed a clickable and user-oriented concept map-based navigation plugin. This tool is implemented as an extension of Moodle, a widely used learning management system. It visualizes inner and interdisciplinary relations between learning objects and is generated dynamically depending on user set parameters and interactions. This plugin leaves the choice of navigation type to the user and supports direct guidance. Previously developed and evaluated face-to-face interdisciplinary learning materials bridging physiology and physics courses of a medical curriculum were integrated as learning objects, the relations of which were defined by metadata. Learning objects included text pages, self-assessments, videos, animations, and simulations. In a field study, we analyzed the effects of this learning environment on physiology and physics knowledge as well as the transfer ability of third-term medical students. Data were generated from pre- and posttest questionnaires and from tracking student navigation. Use of the hypermedia environment resulted in a significant increase of knowledge and transfer capability. Furthermore, the efficiency of learning was enhanced. We conclude that hypermedia environments based on Moodle and enriched by concept map-based navigation tools can significantly support interdisciplinary learning. Implementation of adaptivity may further strengthen this approach. PMID:23209009

Scherl, Andre; Dethleffsen, Kathrin; Meyer, Michael

2012-12-01

355

Syntactic Computations in the Language Network: Characterizing Dynamic Network Properties Using Representational Similarity Analysis  

PubMed Central

The core human capacity of syntactic analysis involves a left hemisphere network involving left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) and posterior middle temporal gyrus (LMTG) and the anatomical connections between them. Here we use magnetoencephalography (MEG) to determine the spatio-temporal properties of syntactic computations in this network. Listeners heard spoken sentences containing a local syntactic ambiguity (e.g., landing planes ), at the offset of which they heard a disambiguating verb and decided whether it was an acceptable/unacceptable continuation of the sentence. We charted the time-course of processing and resolving syntactic ambiguity by measuring MEG responses from the onset of each word in the ambiguous phrase and the disambiguating word. We used representational similarity analysis (RSA) to characterize syntactic information represented in the LIFG and left posterior middle temporal gyrus (LpMTG) over time and to investigate their relationship to each other. Testing a variety of lexico-syntactic and ambiguity models against the MEG data, our results suggest early lexico-syntactic responses in the LpMTG and later effects of ambiguity in the LIFG, pointing to a clear differentiation in the functional roles of these two regions. Our results suggest the LpMTG represents and transmits lexical information to the LIFG, which responds to and resolves the ambiguity. PMID:23730293

Tyler, Lorraine K.; Cheung, Teresa P. L.; Devereux, Barry J.; Clarke, Alex

2013-01-01

356

Syntactic computations in the language network: characterizing dynamic network properties using representational similarity analysis.  

PubMed

The core human capacity of syntactic analysis involves a left hemisphere network involving left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) and posterior middle temporal gyrus (LMTG) and the anatomical connections between them. Here we use magnetoencephalography (MEG) to determine the spatio-temporal properties of syntactic computations in this network. Listeners heard spoken sentences containing a local syntactic ambiguity (e.g., " landing planes "), at the offset of which they heard a disambiguating verb and decided whether it was an acceptable/unacceptable continuation of the sentence. We charted the time-course of processing and resolving syntactic ambiguity by measuring MEG responses from the onset of each word in the ambiguous phrase and the disambiguating word. We used representational similarity analysis (RSA) to characterize syntactic information represented in the LIFG and left posterior middle temporal gyrus (LpMTG) over time and to investigate their relationship to each other. Testing a variety of lexico-syntactic and ambiguity models against the MEG data, our results suggest early lexico-syntactic responses in the LpMTG and later effects of ambiguity in the LIFG, pointing to a clear differentiation in the functional roles of these two regions. Our results suggest the LpMTG represents and transmits lexical information to the LIFG, which responds to and resolves the ambiguity. PMID:23730293

Tyler, Lorraine K; Cheung, Teresa P L; Devereux, Barry J; Clarke, Alex

2013-01-01

357

Computational Verb Cellular Networks: Part II-One-Dimensional Computational Verb Local  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computational verb cellular networks (CVCNs) are a new kind of cellular computational platform where the local rules are computational verb rules. In a sister paper(60) 2D CVCNs were studied. In this paper, 1D CVCNs with 1D computational verb local rules are studied. The bifurcations of patterns in 1D CVCNs with computational verb local rules consisting of two computational verbs decrease

2009-01-01

358

The one-way quantum computer - a non-network model of quantum computation  

E-print Network

A one-way quantum computer works by only performing a sequence of one-qubit measurements on a particular entangled multi-qubit state, the cluster state. No non-local operations are required in the process of computation. Any quantum logic network can be simulated on the one-way quantum computer. On the other hand, the network model of quantum computation cannot explain all ways of processing quantum information possible with the one-way quantum computer. In this paper, two examples of the non-network character of the one-way quantum computer are given. First, circuits in the Clifford group can be performed in a single time step. Second, the realisation of a particular circuit --the bit-reversal gate-- on the one-way quantum computer has no network interpretation. (Submitted to J. Mod. Opt, Gdansk ESF QIT conference issue.)

Robert Raussendorf; Daniel E. Browne; Hans J. Briegel

2001-08-27

359

Computer Science Master's Project A Network Packet Analyzer with Database Support  

E-print Network

Computer Science Master's Project A Network Packet Analyzer with Database Support BY Chi Yu Chan computer networks. Network packets are units of data traveling in these computer networks, and they carry the fully connected computer networks. For example, in [4] the source-destination information was used

Varela, Carlos

360

Computer science and minority colleges & universities: The Jackson State University NSF educational computing network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Jackson State University is the lead institution in a Cooperative Regional Educational Computing Network. The network is funded by the National Science Foundation. When it began operating in January, 1974, it involved eleven (11) other participating institutions. Now there are seventeen (17). The purpose of the network is to provide appropriate equipment, with an accompanying massive educational effort, so as

Jesse Lewis

1976-01-01

361

A Queueing Network Analysis of Computer Communication Networks with Window Flow Control  

Microsoft Academic Search

A computer communication network with window flow control is modeled by a closed multichain queueing network. The severe computational limitation of previous solution algorithms is overcome with a heuristic derived from the recently found mean value analysis. A large numerical example is given.

MARTIN REISER

1979-01-01

362

A network security case study; The Los Alamos National Laboratory integrated computer network  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on a study to validate the Graphical Network Representation (GRPHREP) model which is being conducted on the Los Alamos National Laboratory Integrated Computer Network (ICN). The GRPHREP model is a software system application based on graph theory and object-oriented programming methodologies. It codified the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5637.1, which is concerned with classified computer secret

J. S. Dreicer; L. Stoltz

1991-01-01

363

On the Chronometry and Metrology of Computer Network Timescales and their Application to the Network Time  

E-print Network

On the Chronometry and Metrology of Computer Network Timescales and their Application, and on calendar metrology, which is the determination of conventional civiltimeand date according to the modern, D.L. On the chronology and metrology of computer network timescales and their application

Mills, David L.

364

On the Chronometry and Metrology of Computer Network Timescales and their Application to the Network Time  

E-print Network

On the Chronometry and Metrology of Computer Network Timescales and their Application, and on calendar metrology, which is the determination of conventional civil time and date according to the modern. Reprinted from: Mills, D.L. On the chronology and metrology of computer network timescales and thei

Mills, David L.

365

Towards a Theory of In-Network Computation in Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-print Network

support for aggregate queries over sensor networks [1]. At a fundamental level, therefore, resides this application. For overall system efficiency, it may be necessary for nodes to perform computations on data a wireless sensor network should efficiently perform such distributed computation. We review several existing

366

Congestion Avoidance in Computer Networks With a Connectionless Network Layer: Concepts, Goals and Methodology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Congestion occurs ill a computer uetwork when the resource demandsexceed the capacity. Packets may be lost due to too lnuch queuingin the uetwork. During cougestion, the network throughput lnay dropand the path delay may become very high. A congestion control scheme}mlps the network to recover froln the congestion state. A congestionavoidance scheme allows a network to operate in the region

Raj Jain; K. K. Ramakrishnan

1987-01-01

367

CFD Optimization on Network-Based Parallel Computer System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Combining multiple engineering workstations into a network-based heterogeneous parallel computer allows application of aerodynamic optimization with advance computational fluid dynamics codes, which is computationally expensive in mainframe supercomputer. This paper introduces a nonlinear quasi-Newton optimizer designed for this network-based heterogeneous parallel computer on a software called Parallel Virtual Machine. This paper will introduce the methodology behind coupling a Parabolized Navier-Stokes flow solver to the nonlinear optimizer. This parallel optimization package has been applied to reduce the wave drag of a body of revolution and a wing/body configuration with results of 5% to 6% drag reduction.

Cheung, Samson H.; VanDalsem, William (Technical Monitor)

1994-01-01

368

Parallel CFD design on network-based computer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Combining multiple engineering workstations into a network-based heterogeneous parallel computer allows application of aerodynamic optimization with advanced computational fluid dynamics codes, which can be computationally expensive on mainframe supercomputers. This paper introduces a nonlinear quasi-Newton optimizer designed for this network-based heterogeneous parallel computing environment utilizing a software called Parallel Virtual Machine. This paper will introduce the methodology behind coupling a Parabolized Navier-Stokes flow solver to the nonlinear optimizer. This parallel optimization package is applied to reduce the wave drag of a body of revolution and a wing/body configuration with results of 5% to 6% drag reduction.

Cheung, Samson

1995-01-01

369

CNT3004: Computer Network Concepts Summer 2012  

E-print Network

for Chapter 25) Chapter 25 Domain Name System Chapter 26 Remote Logging, Electronic Mail, and File Transfer Detection and Correction Chapter 11 Data Link Control Chapter 14 Wireless LANs Chapter 15 Connecting LANs, Backbone Networks, and Virtual LANs Chapter 19 Network Layer Addressing (only the basic concepts needed

Zou, Cliff C.

370

Models of Computation for Networks on Chip Axel Jantsch  

E-print Network

Productivity Gap Source: International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors 1999 10 #12;ArbitraryModels of Computation for Networks on Chip Axel Jantsch Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm #12;Platform Characteristics · Tradeoff between efficiency and cost · Application area specific

Jantsch, Axel

371

Spreadsheet Analysis Of Queuing In A Computer Network  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Method of analyzing responses of computer network based on simple queuing-theory mathmatical models via spreadsheet program. Effects of variations in traffic, capacities of channels, and message protocols assessed.

Galant, David C.

1992-01-01

372

International Financial Networks with Intermediation: Modeling, Analysis, and Computations  

E-print Network

of the various financial agents/sectors in an economy, such as banks, households, insurance companies, etc is typically associated with financial businesses, including banks, savings institutions, investmentInternational Financial Networks with Intermediation: Modeling, Analysis, and Computations Anna

Nagurney, Anna

373

Computers, Electronic Networking and Education: Some American Experiences.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes new developments in distributed educational computing at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT, "Athena"), Carnegie Mellon University ("Andrew"), Brown University "Intermedia"), Electronic University Network (California), Western Behavioral Sciences Institute (California), and University of California, Irvine. Topics discussed

McConnell, David

1991-01-01

374

Phoebus: Network Middleware for Next-Generation Network Computing  

SciTech Connect

The Phoebus project investigated algorithms, protocols, and middleware infrastructure to improve end-to-end performance in high speed, dynamic networks. The Phoebus system essentially serves as an adaptation point for networks with disparate capabilities or provisioning. This adaptation can take a variety of forms including acting as a provisioning agent across multiple signaling domains, providing transport protocol adaptation points, and mapping between distributed resource reservation paradigms and the optical network control plane. We have successfully developed the system and demonstrated benefits. The Phoebus system was deployed in Internet2 and in ESnet, as well as in GEANT2, RNP in Brazil and over international links to Korea and Japan. Phoebus is a system that implements a new protocol and associated forwarding infrastructure for improving throughput in high-speed dynamic networks. It was developed to serve the needs of large DOE applications on high-performance networks. The idea underlying the Phoebus model is to embed Phoebus Gateways (PGs) in the network as on-ramps to dynamic circuit networks. The gateways act as protocol translators that allow legacy applications to use dedicated paths with high performance.

Martin Swany

2012-06-16

375

Numerical methods in optics: A course about learning physics through computing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many advanced undergraduates find it difficult to connect abstract mathematical formalisms with the concrete physical phenomena that they describe. A course in optics from a numerical methods point of view is described. Its purpose is to exploit the students' familiarity with computng in order to more effectively learn the physics involved in a number of realistic phenomena. The combination of demonstrations, computer calculations, and computer graphics display of the results can prove to be a useful tool in developing physical intuition in students.

Lock, James A.

1987-12-01

376

59 2014-15 Suggested Course Plan CompuTeR sCIenCe (games)  

E-print Network

380: Video Game Programming ITp 485: Programming Game Engines Special nOteS GEN ED. IV: Engineering59 2014-15 Suggested Course Plan CompuTeR sCIenCe (games) FIRST YEAR FALL: 17 units SPRING: 16 GEN ED. IV GEN ED. V GEN ED. VI anImaTIon & InTeRaCT. medIa (14 unITs) CTAN 452: Intro to Computer

Zhou, Chongwu

377

Embedding a Design Studio Course in a Conventional Computer Science Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Within undergraduate Computer Science, Human Computer Interaction is often considered a blend of user-centered requirements\\u000a analysis, design, implementation and evaluation. While most are teachable within the constraints of a conventional undergraduate\\u000a lecture course, design is much more difficult to pass on. We know that design-oriented programs (e.g., arts, industrial design,\\u000a and architecture) teach design practice as arising from the culture

Saul Greenberg

378

C.S. 222, Winter 2011, Computer Algorithms Course Outline I assume that everyone has had a good undergraduate course in this area,  

E-print Network

C.S. 222, Winter 2011, Computer Algorithms Course Outline I assume that everyone has had a good in undergraduate material to rectify those defi- ciencies by themselves, using the videos if needed. There are also

Gusfield, Daniel M.

379

MIT OpenCourseWare: Introduction to Computer Science and Programming  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

For those individuals who have yet to experience one of MIT's OpenCourseWare offerings, this is a great place to start. This site provides access to the spring 2011 version of Professor John Guttag's popular "Introduction to Computer Science and Programming." This course is aimed at students with "little or no programming experience," and its goal is to help students feel "justifiably confident of their ability to write small programs that allow them to accomplish useful goals." The materials here include a complete set of lecture videos, resources for each video (such as handouts and slides), recitation videos by the course teaching assistants, and homework problems with sample student solutions. The site also includes self-assessment tools and a Further Study area, which includes collection of links to supplement the course materials.

Guttag, John

2012-05-25

380

Pwning Level Bosses in MATLAB: Student Reactions to a Game-Inspired Computational Physics Course  

E-print Network

We investigated student reactions to two computational physics courses incorporating several videogame-like aspects. These included use of gaming terminology such as "levels," "weapons," and "bosses"; a game-style point system linked to course grades; a self-paced schedule with no deadlines; a mastery design in which only entirely correct attempts earn credit, but students can retry until they succeed; immediate feedback via self-test code; an assignment progression from "minions" (small, focused tasks) to "level bosses" (integrative tasks); and believable, authentic assignment scenarios. Through semi-structured interviews and course evaluations, we found that a majority of students considered the courses effective and the game-like aspects beneficial. In particular, many claimed that the point system increased their motivation; the self-paced nature caused them to reflect on their self-discipline; the possibility and necessity of repeating assignments until perfect aided learning; and the authentic tasks hel...

Beatty, Ian D

2014-01-01

381

Electrooptical adaptive switching network for the hypercube computer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An all-optical network design for the hyperswitch network using regular free-space interconnects between electronic processor nodes is presented. The adaptive routing model used is described, and an adaptive routing control example is presented. The design demonstrates that existing electrooptical techniques are sufficient for implementing efficient parallel architectures without the need for more complex means of implementing arbitrary interconnection schemes. The electrooptical hyperswitch network significantly improves the communication performance of the hypercube computer.

Chow, E.; Peterson, J.

1988-01-01

382

A Wavelength Division Multiple Access Network for Computer Communication  

Microsoft Academic Search

A first-generation design, called Rainbow, for optical wavelength division multiaccess (WDMA) computer networks is described. The Rainbow research prototype takes the form of a direct detection, circuit-switched metropolitan-area-network (MAN) backbone consisting of 32 IBM PD\\/2's as gateway stations, communicating with each other at 200-Mb\\/s data rates and submillisecond switching times. The prototype architectural options for realizing WDMA networks are discussed,

Nicholas R. Dono; Paul E. Green Jr.; Karen Liu; Rajiv Ramaswami; Franklin Fuk-Kay Tong

1990-01-01

383

The Benefits of Combining Computer Technology and Traditional Teaching Methods in Large Enrollment Geocscience Courses  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes a study in which data on exam performances and attitudes toward the use of technology were collected from large enrollment, entry-level Geoscience courses over a span of seven semesters. The data were examined to determine if the use of computers as a presentation tool and the incorporation of the internet as a means to give students increased exposure to course content (notes) increased exam scores and knowledge of Earth Sciences. It was noted that one of the important points about the Geosciences is their prominent visual component, an aspect that is well-addressed by the use of computers and the internet. The researchers found that most students found web-based notes to be useful and average exam scores improved. Comprehensive final exam scores also improved, suggesting better preparation for exams and more retention of course information.

Durbin, James

2002-01-01

384

Multigrain Parallelism for Eigenvalue Computations on Networks of Clusters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clusters of workstations have become a cost-effective means of performing scientific computations. However, large network latencies, resource sharing, and heterogeneity found in networks of clusters and Grids can impede the performance of applications not specifically tailored for use in such environments. A typical example is the traditional fine grain implementations of Krylov-like iterative methods, a central component in many scientific

James R. Mccombs; Andreas Stathopoulos

2002-01-01

385

Computer Network Security: Best Practices for Alberta School Jurisdictions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper provides a snapshot of the computer network security industry and addresses specific issues related to network security in public education. The following topics are covered: (1) security policy, including reasons for establishing a policy, risk assessment, areas to consider, audit tools; (2) workstations, including physical security,

Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton.

386

An optimal algorithm for mutual exclusion in computer networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

An algorithm is proposed that creates mutual exclu-sion in a computer network whose nodes communicate only by messages and do not share memory. It is assumed that there is an error-free underlying communications network in which transit times may vary and messages may not be delivered in the order sent. Nodes are assumed to operate correctly; the consequences of node

Glenn Ricart; Ashok K. Agrawala

1981-01-01

387

Pricing in Computer Networks: Reshaping the Research Agenda  

Microsoft Academic Search

As the Internet makes the transition from research testbed to commercial enter- prise, the topic of pricing in computer networks has suddenly attracted great attention. Much of the discussion in the network design community and the popular press centers on the usage-based vs. fiat pricing debate. The more academic literature has largely fo- cused on devising optimal pricing policies; achieving

S. Shenker; D. Clark; D. Estrin; S. Herzog

1995-01-01

388

Pricing in computer networks: Reshaping the research agenda  

Microsoft Academic Search

As the internet makes the transition from research testbed to commercial enterprise, the topic of pricing in computer networks has suddenly attracted great attention. Much of the discussion in the network design community and the popular press centers on the usage-based versus flat pricing debate. The more academic literature has largely focused on devising optimal pricing policies; achieving optimal welfare

Scott Shenker; David Clark; Deborah Estrin; Shai Herzog

1996-01-01

389

CPS 472/572: Computer Networking Spring 1997  

E-print Network

Communications, Computer Networks and Open Systems by Fred Halsall, Fourth Edition Text: Internetworking with TCP readings will be assigned during the lecture. Overview, terminology, standards Bridging Protocols: Transparent Bridging, Spanning­Tree Network Layer Protocols Routing Protocols: Unicast, Multicast, Broadcast

Clark, Russell J.

390

The Role of Computer Networks in Aerospace Engineering  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents selected results from an empirical investigation into the use of computer networks in aersopace engineering. Such networks allow aerospace engineers to communicate with people and access remote resources through electronic mail, file transfer, and remote log-in. The study drew its subjects from private sector, government and academic organizations in the U.S. aerospace industry. Data presented here were

Ann Peterson Bishop

1994-01-01

391

The University of Michigan's Computer-Aided Engineering Network.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an overview of the Computer-Aided Engineering Network (CAEN) of the University of Michigan. Describes its arrangement of workstations, communication networks, and servers. Outlines the factors considered in hardware and software decision making. Reviews the program's impact on students. (ML)

Atkins, D. E.; Olsen, Leslie A.

1986-01-01

392

The Role of Computer Networks in Aerospace Engineering.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents selected results from an empirical investigation into the use of computer networks in aerospace engineering based on data from a national mail survey. The need for user-based studies of electronic networking is discussed, and a copy of the questionnaire used in the survey is appended. (Contains 46 references.) (LRW)

Bishop, Ann Peterson

1994-01-01

393

SOLAR: BUILDING A CONTEXT FUSION NETWORK FOR PERVASIVE COMPUTING  

E-print Network

SOLAR: BUILDING A CONTEXT FUSION NETWORK FOR PERVASIVE COMPUTING Dartmouth Technical Report TR2004 of Graduate Studies #12;c Copyright by Guanling Chen 2004 #12;Abstract of the Dissertation SOLAR: BUILDING- textual data. In this dissertation, we present a Context Fusion Network (CFN), called Solar, which

394

Low Computation and Low Latency Algorithms for Distributed Sensor Network  

E-print Network

maneuvering targets in smart sensor networks consisting of acoustic and radar sensors. Keywords: Monte CarloLow Computation and Low Latency Algorithms for Distributed Sensor Network Initialization M. Borkar, V. Cevher and J.H. McClellan Abstract In this paper, we show how an underlying system's state vector

Cevher, Volkan

395

Robust and Distributed Computation of Aggregates in Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-print Network

theory, Aggregate, Data query, Stochastic processes. I. INTRODUCTION Sensor nodes are usually deployed aggregate information in wireless sensor networks. DRG is more efficient than another randomized distributed1 Robust and Distributed Computation of Aggregates in Wireless Sensor Networks Jen-Yeu Chen, Gopal

Chen, Jen-Yeu "Cosmos"

396

Keyword-based Correlated Network Computation over Large Social Media  

E-print Network

and edges represent relationships between entities of the social media. Discovering keyword-based correlatedKeyword-based Correlated Network Computation over Large Social Media Jianxin Li Swinburne- liferation of social media, e.g., millions of blog posts, micro- blog posts, and social networks

Liu, Chengfei

397

An interactive network of time-sharing computers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the design and implementation of an experimental interactive time-sharing network of computers created as a joint effort by Carnegie-Mellon University (CMU), Princeton University and the Research Division of IBM. The motivation behind the creation, the functional capabilities, and applications of the network are some of the key points addressed. Design philosophy and major implementation considerations are thoroughly

Ronald M. Rutledge; Albin L. Vareha; Lee C. Varian; Allan H. Weis; Salomon F. Seroussi; James W. Mayer; Joan F. Jaffe; Mary Anne K. Angell

1969-01-01

398

The Implementation and Evaluation of a Computer Simulation Game in a University Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper compares the impact of lecture plus a computer simulation and lecture alone on a broad range of measures, such as students' attitudes, attendance, learning, and information seeking behavior. Results showed that in order to maximize the positive effects, the simulation should be implemented as early in the course as possible. (Author/JAZ)

Taylor, Milton

1987-01-01

399

A Computer-Assisted Instruction Course in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Respiratory Diseases.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A computer-assisted simulation of the "chart method" of teaching has been developed and was used to provide instruction in clinical decision-making in the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary diseases. The course requires a student to reach and defend a diagnosis and to provide appropriate treatment for each of 10 simulated cases. Evaluation of

Crocco, John A.; And Others

1975-01-01

400

Applying Computer-Assisted Musical Instruction to Music Appreciation Course: An Example with Chinese Musical Instruments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study aims to explore the effectiveness of computer-assisted musical instruction (CAMI) in the Learning Chinese Musical Instruments (LCMI) course. The CAMI software for Chinese musical instruments was developed and administered to 228 students in a vocational high school. A pretest-posttest non-equivalent control group design with three

Lou, Shi-Jer; Guo, Yuan-Chang; Zhu, Yi-Zhen; Shih, Ru-Chu; Dzan, Wei-Yuan

2011-01-01

401

Development of Online Cognitive and Algorithm Tests as Assessment Tools in Introductory Computer Science Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents the online cognitive and algorithm tests, which were developed in order to determine if certain cognitive factors and fundamental algorithms correlate with the performance of students in their introductory computer science course. The tests were implemented among Management Information Systems majors from the Philippines and

Avancena, Aimee Theresa; Nishihara, Akinori; Vergara, John Paul

2012-01-01

402

A Treatment of Computational Precision, Number Representation, and Large Integers in an Introductory Fortran Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Computational precision is sometimes given short shrift in a first programming course. Treating this topic requires discussing integer and floating-point number representations and inaccuracies that may result from their use. An example of a moderately simple programming problem from elementary statistics was examined. It forced students to

Richardson, William H., Jr.

2006-01-01

403

A Survey of Knowledge Management Skills Acquisition in an Online Team-Based Distributed Computing Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper investigates students' perceptions of their acquisition of knowledge management skills, namely thinking and team-building skills, resulting from the integration of various resources and technologies into an entirely team-based, online upper level distributed computing (DC) information systems (IS) course. Results seem to indicate that

Thomas, Jennifer D. E.

2007-01-01

404

Distributed Training for the Reserve Component: Course Conversion and Implementation Guidelines for Computer Conferencing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this handbook is to provide background and guidelines for course designers and instructional developers who will be developing Reserve Component training for the United States military using asynchronous computer conferencing techniques. The recommendations in this report are based on an international review of the literature in

Hahn, H. A.; And Others

405

Genome evolution, metabolism and Course Computational Biology 2013/2014; Paulien Hogeweg;  

E-print Network

evolution? Evolution of genome size in virtual cells based on "plausable" minimal multilevel 'cell Direct) #12;multilevel model of virual cell + dynamics #12;evolution of virtual cells · Population12 Genome evolution, metabolism and parameters Course Computational Biology 2013/2014; Paulien

Utrecht, Universiteit

406

Active and Collaborative Learning in an Introductory Electrical and Computer Engineering Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Active and collaborative learning instruments were introduced into an introductory electrical and computer engineering course. These instruments were designed to assess specific learning objectives and program outcomes. Results show that students developed an understanding comparable to that of more advanced students assessed later in the

Kotru, Sushma; Burkett, Susan L.; Jackson, David Jeff

2010-01-01

407

An Assessment of the "Diploma in Computer Engineering" Course in the Technical Education System in Nepal  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to assess the Diploma in Computer Engineering (DCE) courses offered at affiliated schools of the Council for Technical Education and Vocational Training (CTEVT) with a focus on the goals of the curriculum and employment opportunities. Document analysis, questionnaires, focus group discussions and semi-structured

Basnet, Kul Bahadur; Kim, Jinsoo

2010-01-01

408

Performance Measures in Courses Using Computer-Aided Personalized System of Instruction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Archived data from four courses taught with computer-aided personalized system of instruction (CAPSI)--an online, self-paced, instructional program--were used to explore the relationship between objectively rescored final exam grades, peer reviewing, and progress rate--i.e., the rate at which students completed unit tests. There was a strong

Springer, C. R.; Pear, J. J.

2008-01-01

409

GNG4120: Technology entrepreneurship for engineers and computer scientists Course description  

E-print Network

covers career choice, building a team, venture capital, and boards of advisers. #12;· Project deliverable issues about how to finance such a high-technology venture. Week 5 (Oct. 4th ) Marketing Guest speaker 4GNG4120: Technology entrepreneurship for engineers and computer scientists Course description

Petriu, Emil M.

410

Design Process for a Non-majors Computing Course Mark Guzdial  

E-print Network

edu- cation [8]. The course that we developed, Introduction to Media Com- putation, is an introduction to computing contextualized around the theme of manipulating and creating media. Stu- dents really do program--creating Photoshop-like filters (such as generating negative and greyscale images), reversing and splicing sounds

Guzdial, Mark

411

Computer/Technology Skills Standard Course of Study and Grade Level Competencies 6-12  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Computer/Technology Skills Standard Course of Study describes the progressive development of knowledge and skills in six strands: (1) Societal and Ethical Issues; (2) Database; (3) Spreadsheet Keyboard; (4) Utilization/Word Processing/Desktop Publishing; (5) Multimedia/Presentation, and (6) Telecommunications/Internet. The revision process

North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, 2004

2004-01-01

412

WebStars: Holistic, Arts-Based College Curriculum in a Computer Applications Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of my qualitative, action study was to gain a better understanding of the effects of an experimental college course in computer applications. This inquiry was made concerning both the teacher's and learners' points of view. A holistic, arts-based approach was used by the researcher/teacher in order to design, develop and facilitate a

Karsten, Selia

2004-01-01

413

Developing and Validating Test Items for First-Year Computer Science Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We report on the development, validation, and implementation of a collection of test items designed to detect misconceptions related to first-year computer science courses. To this end, we reworked the development scheme proposed by Almstrum et al. ("SIGCSE Bulletin" 38(4):132-145, 2006) to include students' artifacts and to

Vahrenhold, Jan; Paul, Wolfgang

2014-01-01

414

Enhancing Learning in Introductory Computer Science Courses through SCALE: An Empirical Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The work presented in this paper aims to support and promote the learning process in introductory computer science courses through the Web-based, adaptive, activity-oriented learning environment known as Supporting Collaboration and Adaptation in a Learning Environment (SCALE). The environment engages students actively in the learning process and

Verginis, I.; Gogoulou, A.; Gouli, E.; Boubouka, M.; Grigoriadou, M.

2011-01-01

415

Exploring Interactive and Dynamic Simulations Using a Computer Algebra System in an Advanced Placement Chemistry Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article describes the use of Mathematica, a computer algebra system (CAS), in a high school chemistry course. Mathematica was used to generate a graph, where a slider controls the value of parameter(s) in the equation; thus, students can visualize the effect of the parameter(s) on the behavior of the system. Also, Mathematica can show the

Matsumoto, Paul S.

2014-01-01

416

Computer/ Technology Skills Standard Course of Study and Grade Level Competencies, 6-8  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Computer/Technology Skills Standard Course of Study describes the progressive development of knowledge and skills in six strands: Societal and Ethical Issues, Database, Spreadsheet Keyboard Utilization/Word Processing/Desktop Publishing, Multimedia/Presentation, and Telecommunications/Internet. In the primary grades, the objectives focus on

North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, 2004

2004-01-01

417

Computer/Technology Skills: Standard Course of Study and Grade Level Competencies 3-5  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The "Computer/Technology Skills Standard Course of Study" describes the progressive development of knowledge and skills in six strands: Societal and Ethical Issues, Database, Spreadsheet Keyboard Utilization/Word Processing/Desktop Publishing, Multimedia/Presentation, and Telecommunications/Internet. In the primary grades, the objectives focus on

North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, 2004

2004-01-01

418

UPF Study Abroad Program 2014 Course Syllabus Modern Statistical Computing in R  

E-print Network

in everyday computational tasks with datasets of all kinds, skilled in applications of elementary statistical concepts of statistics based on simulations and writing a report of a quantitative analysis. Course with their own laptops. Method of Assessment Class participation (15%) homework and mini project (20%) (the

419

The one-way quantum computer--a non-network model of quantum computation  

Microsoft Academic Search

A one-way quantum computer (QCC) works by performing a sequence of one-qubit measurements on a particular entangled multi-qubit state, the cluster state. No non-local operations are required in the process of computation. Any quantum logic network can be simulated on the QCC. On the other hand, the network model of quantum computation cannot explain all ways of processing quantum information

Robert Raussendorf; Daniel E. Browne; Hans J. Briegel

2002-01-01

420

The Comparative Effects of an Introductory versus a Content-Specific Computer Course for Educators on Computer Anxiety and Stages of Concern.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, the effects of an introductory computer class versus a content-specific course, computers across the curriculum class were examined for changes in computer anxiety and computer concerns. Computer anxiety was measured with a modified version of the Spielberger Self Evaluation Instrument. To track and compare changes in pre-service

Overbaugh, Richard C.; Reed, W. Michael

421

Computing Nature: A Network of Networks of Concurrent Information Processes  

E-print Network

This text presents the research field of natural/unconventional computing as it appears in the book COMPUTING NATURE. The articles discussed consist a selection of works from the Symposium on Natural Computing at AISB-IACAP (British Society for the Study of Artificial Intelligence and the Simulation of Behaviour and The International Association for Computing and Philosophy) World Congress 2012, held at the University of Birmingham, celebrating Turing centenary. The COMPUTING NATURE is about nature considered as the totality of physical existence, the universe. By physical we mean all phenomena, objects and processes, that are possible to detect either directly by our senses or via instruments. Historically, there have been many ways of describing the universe (cosmic egg, cosmic tree, theistic universe, mechanistic universe) while a particularly prominent contemporary approach is computational universe, as discussed in this article.

Gordana Dodig Crnkovic; Raffaela Giovagnoli

2012-10-29

422

For a social network analysis of computer networks: a sociological perspective on collaborative work and virtual community  

Microsoft Academic Search

When computer networks link people as well as machines, they become social networks. Social network analysis provides a useful approach to moving beyond the concept of group in studying virtual communities and computer supported cooperative work and telework. Such computer supported social networks (CSSNS) sustain strong, intermediate and weak ties that provide information and social support in both specialized and

Barry Wellman

1996-01-01

423

Quantization in acquisition and computation networks  

E-print Network

In modern systems, it is often desirable to extract relevant information from large amounts of data collected at different spatial locations. Applications include sensor networks, wearable health-monitoring devices and a ...

Sun, John Zheng

2013-01-01

424

Optical processing for future computer networks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the development of future data management systems, such as the NASA Space Station, a major problem represents the design and implementation of a high performance communication network which is self-correcting and repairing, flexible, and evolvable. To obtain the goal of designing such a network, it will be essential to incorporate distributed adaptive network control techniques. The present paper provides an outline of the functional and communication network requirements for the Space Station data management system. Attention is given to the mathematical representation of the operations being carried out to provide the required functionality at each layer of communication protocol on the model. The possible implementation of specific communication functions in optics is also considered.

Husain, A.; Haugen, P. R.; Hutcheson, L. D.; Warrior, J.; Murray, N.; Beatty, M.

1986-01-01

425

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON EDUCATION, VOL. 43, NO. 3, AUGUST 2000 273 Recursive Algorithms in Computer Science Courses  

E-print Network

be covered in the first year introductory computer science courses, in the second year data structure course a very simple form of a chain, where each vertex has only one child. This child corresponds to the single in any data structure course. Their time complexity is proportional to the size of a traversed tree

Stojmenovic, Ivan

426

A Quantum Neural Network Computes Entanglement  

E-print Network

An outstanding problem in quantum computing is the calculation of entanglement, for which no closed-form algorithm exists. Here we solve that problem, and demonstrate the utility of a quantum neural computer, by showing, in simulation, that such a device can be trained to calculate the entanglement of an input state, something neither an algorithmic quantum computer nor a classical neural net can do.

E. C. Behrman; V. Chandrashekar; Z. Wang; C. K. Belur; J. E. Steck; S. R. Skinner

2002-02-22

427

FORTY "STRANGE" COMPUTER-DISCOVERED [and COMPUTER-PROVED (of course!)  

E-print Network

of this article is in its form. A computer discoveri* *ng ab initio, humanly- nice results, worthy of the name FORTY "STRANGE" COMPUTER-DISCOVERED [and COMPUTER* * and annotated Zeilberger algorithm, implemented in the Maple package twoFone. Foreword (by Human Doron

Zeilberger, Doron

428

Validation of gene regulatory network models inferred from time-course gene expression data at arbitrary time intervals  

E-print Network

Validation of gene regulatory network models inferred from time-course gene expression data between gene expression measurements. A generalization of the dynamic Bayesian network model that allows to a dynamic Bayesian network. In this paper, we approximate gene regulation by a linear model g (xi) = · xi

Imoto, Seiya

429

Function-oriented protocols for the ARPA computer network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Much has been said about the mechanics of the ARPA Computer Network (ARPANET) and especially about the organization of its communications subnet. Until recently the main effort has gone into the implementation of an ARPANET user-level communications interface. Operating just above the communications subnet in ARPANET HOST Computers, this ARPANET interface is intended to serve as a foundation for the

Stephen D. Crocker; John F. Heafner; Robert M. Metcalfe; Jonathan B. Postel

1972-01-01

430

Network Analysis and Visualization for Understanding Social Computing  

E-print Network

Theory Can Computing Evolve? #12;1) Focus on National Priorities & Impact · Health, energy, education Priorities & Impact · Health, energy, education, business innovation · Disaster response, community safetyNetwork Analysis and Visualization for Understanding Social Computing Ben Shneiderman ben

Shneiderman, Ben

431

Policy Issues in Computer Networks: Multi-Access Information Systems.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As computer databases become more publicly accessible through public networks, there is a growing need to provide effective protection for proprietary information. Without adequate assurances that their works will be protected, authors and other copyright owners may be reluctant to allow the full text of their works to be accessed through computer

Lyons, Patrice A.

432

Accessorizing with Networks : The Possibilities of Building with Computational Textiles  

E-print Network

Accessorizing with Networks : The Possibilities of Building with Computational Textiles Gauri Nanda Textiles Gauri Nanda BFA Media and Music Technology University of Michigan December 2001 Submitted of Building with Computational Textiles Gauri Nanda BFA Media and Music Technology University of Michigan

Bove Jr., V. Michael

433

New Computational Approaches for Analysis of cis-Regulatory Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The investigation and modeling of gene regulatory networks requires computational tools specific to the task. We present several locally developed software tools that have been used in support of our ongoing research into the embryogenesis of the sea urchin. These tools are especially well suited to iterative refinement of models through experimental and computational investigation. They include: BioArray, a macroarray

C. Titus Brown; Alistair G. Rust; Peter J. C. Clarke; Zhengjun Pan; Maria J. Schilstra; Tristan De Buysscher; Gareth Griffin; Barbara J. Wold; R. Andrew Cameron; Eric H. Davidson; Hamid Bolouri

2002-01-01

434

Ethernet:distributed packet switching for local computer networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ethernet is a branching broadcast communication system for carrying digital data packets among locally distributed computing stations. The packet transport mechanism provided by Ethernet has been used to build systems which can be viewed as either local computer networks or loosely coupled multiprocessors. An Ethernet's shared communication facility, its Ether, is a passive broadcast medium with no central control. Coordination

Robert M. Metcalfe

1976-01-01

435

Throughput and Fairness in Random Access Networks Computer Science Department  

E-print Network

Throughput and Fairness in Random Access Networks Hoon Chang Computer Science Department Columbia University New York, NY 10027 Email: hchang@cs.columbia.edu Vishal Misra Computer Science Department Columbia an throughput analysis of log- utility and max-min fairness. Assuming all nodes interfere with each other

436

Recurrent kernel machines: computing with infinite echo state networks.  

PubMed

Echo state networks (ESNs) are large, random recurrent neural networks with a single trained linear readout layer. Despite the untrained nature of the recurrent weights, they are capable of performing universal computations on temporal input data, which makes them interesting for both theoretical research and practical applications. The key to their success lies in the fact that the network computes a broad set of nonlinear, spatiotemporal mappings of the input data, on which linear regression or classification can easily be performed. One could consider the reservoir as a spatiotemporal kernel, in which the mapping to a high-dimensional space is computed explicitly. In this letter, we build on this idea and extend the concept of ESNs to infinite-sized recurrent neural networks, which can be considered recursive kernels that subsequently can be used to create recursive support vector machines. We present the theoretical framework, provide several practical examples of recursive kernels, and apply them to typical temporal tasks. PMID:21851278

Hermans, Michiel; Schrauwen, Benjamin

2012-01-01

437

Synchronizing computer clocks using a local area network  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Researchers completed the first tests of a method to synchronize the clocks of networked computers to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) time scale. The method uses a server computer to disseminate the time to other clients on the same local-area network. The server is synchronized to NIST using the ACTS protocol over a dial-up telephone line. The software in both the server and the parameters of this model are used to adjust the time of the local clock and the interval between calibration requests in a statistically optimum way. The algorithm maximizes the time between calibrations while at the same time keeping the time of the local clock correct within a specific tolerance. The method can be extended to synchronize computers linked over wide-area networks, and an experiment to test the performance of the algorithms over such networks is being planned.

Levine, Judah

1990-01-01

438

Neural strategies to handle routing in computer networks.  

PubMed

In this paper, the authors adopt a neural approach to deal with the problem of routing in a packet switching network. The aim is to define a routing strategy which will combine the advantages of both the centralized and the distributed approaches. The neural approach presented is based on the idea of inserting a neural network (N/N) into each node in the computer network which will be responsible for computing the route between its node and the immediately adjacent one. Two distributed routing solutions are presented in the paper based on an optimizing network and a mapping network. The routing obtainable and the implementation resources needed for the two approaches are evaluated. Finally, the performance offered by the neural strategies proposed is compared with that offered by classical distributed and centralized routing solutions. As a parameter of merit, the effect of overloading caused by the additional traffic present in each solution is used. PMID:8293232

Cavalieri, S; Di Stefano, A; Mirabella, O

1993-09-01

439

Coordinating Computing, Network and Archiving activities within INAF  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

When INAF was reformed, it was decided to create a `Computing, Network and Archives Service' within the Projects Department, in order to coordinate all computer-related activities and to properly harmonize management and development policies in the field. A `Computing, Network and Archives Committee' was immediately nominated for the duration of one year to cope with the immediate needs. The Committee has the task of identifying and making operational strategies to coordinate activities in the areas of interest, improving service to all users, implementing synergies and economies, while guaranteeing a single INAF contact point for all external institutions working in the field.

Pasian, F.; Bodo, G.; Fini, L.; Garilli, B.; Longo, G.; Massimino, P.; Nanni, M.; Smareglia, R.

440

MTX (Microwave Tokamak Experiment) data acquisition and analysis computer network  

SciTech Connect

For the MTX experiment, we use a network of computers for plasma diagnostic data acquisition and analysis. This multivendor network employs VMS, UNIX, and BASIC based computers connected in a local area Ethernet network. Some of the data is acquired directly into a VAX/VMS computer cluster over a fiber-optic serial CAMAC highway. Several HP-Unix workstations and HP-BASIC instrument control computers acquire and analyze data for the more data intensive or specialized diagnostics. The VAX/VMS system is used for global analysis of the data and serves as the central data archiving and retrieval manager. Shot synchronization and control of data flow are implemented by task-to-task message passing using our interprocess communication system. The system has been in operation during our initial MTX tokamak and FEL experiments; it has operated reliably with data rates typically in the range of 5 megabytes/shot without limiting the experimental shot rate.

Butner, D.N.; Casper, T.A.; Brown, M.D.; Drlik, M.; Meyer, W.H.; Moller, J.M.

1990-06-01

441

Integrated evolutionary computation neural network quality controller for automated systems  

SciTech Connect

With increasing competition in the global market, more and more stringent quality standards and specifications are being demands at lower costs. Manufacturing applications of computing power are becoming more common. The application of neural networks to identification and control of dynamic processes has been discussed. The limitations of using neural networks for control purposes has been pointed out and a different technique, evolutionary computation, has been discussed. The results of identifying and controlling an unstable, dynamic process using evolutionary computation methods has been presented. A framework for an integrated system, using both neural networks and evolutionary computation, has been proposed to identify the process and then control the product quality, in a dynamic, multivariable system, in real-time.

Patro, S.; Kolarik, W.J. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Dept. of Industrial Engineering

1999-06-01

442

The Use of a PDP-11/20 Computer in a Non-Calculus General Physics Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Computer-assisted instruction supplements traditional methods in a non-calculus physics course offered at Seattle Pacific College. Thirty-five science majors enrolled in the first quarter and 32 continued in the second term. The hardware for the course consists of a PDP-11/20 computer and eight teletype terminals; additional peripheral equipment

Yu, David U. L.

443

Design and Development of a Sample "Computer Programming" Course Tool via Story-Based E-Learning Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study introduces a story-based e-learning oriented course tool that was designed and developed for using within "computer programming" courses. With this tool, students can easily adapt themselves to the subjects in the context of computer programming principles, thanks to the story-based, interactive processes. By using visually

Kose, Utku; Koc, Durmus; Yucesoy, Suleyman Anil

2013-01-01

444

A One-Credit Hands-On Introductory Course in Electrical and Computer Engineering Using a Variety of Topic Modules  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes a one-credit laboratory course for freshmen majoring in electrical and computer engineering (ECE). The course is motivational in nature and exposes the students to a wide range of areas of electrical and computer engineering. The authors believe it is important to give freshmen a broad perspective of what ECE is all about, and

Pierre, J. W.; Tuffner, F. K.; Anderson, J. R.; Whitman, D. L.; Ula, A. H. M. S.; Kubichek, R. F.; Wright, C. H. G.; Barrett, S. F.; Cupal, J. J.; Hamann, J. C.

2009-01-01

445

Improving Student Performance in a First-Year Geography Course: Examining the Importance of Computer-Assisted Formative Assessment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The main objective of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of computer-assisted formative assessment in a large, first-year undergraduate geography course. In particular, the paper evaluates the impact of computer-assisted multiple-choice practice tests on student performance in the course as well as student opinions of this type of

Wilson, Kathi; Boyd, Cleo; Chen, Liwen; Jamal, Sarosh

2011-01-01

446

Control and its Application to Computer Networks 1-1 Control and its Application to  

E-print Network

1 Control and its Application to Computer Networks 1-1 Control and its Application to Computer Networks EEN634, Spring 2007 Department of ECE, UMiami Control and its Application to Computer Networks 1 and network application Small gain and passivity theorem #12;2 Control and its Application to Computer

Fan, Xingzhe

447

Master of Science in Computer Networking The Department of Electrical Engineering  

E-print Network

Master of Science in Computer Networking The Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science offers a Master of Science degree in the area of computer networking. This area has become the demand for networking experts who would design, deploy, support, and maintain computer networks

448

Master in Computer Science Advanced Networking  

E-print Network

.) is limited, thus you have to select the more important things to design and discuss and leave behind others employees have full access to the Internet, and both R&D and production (it is a Software Engineering company) make a heavy use of the network. · The company servers must be reachable from the Internet

Lo Cigno, Renato Antonio

449

Computer program for compressible flow network analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Program solves problem of an arbitrarily connected one dimensional compressible flow network with pumping in the channels and momentum balancing at flow junctions. Program includes pressure drop calculations for impingement flow and flow through pin fin arrangements, as currently found in many air cooled turbine bucket and vane cooling configurations.

Wilton, M. E.; Murtaugh, J. P.

1973-01-01

450

Network Nation: Human Communication via Computer  

E-print Network

, and the elderly and handicapped are released from the confines of their infirmities to skim the electronic terrain, whose dissertation topic was "gratitude" end up reading a techie book like Network Nation? I owe-up reading, including Murray Turoff's (1972) paper on Delphi anonymous online decision making. The federal

Kiesler, Sara

451

Computational analysis of biological networks: Measuring evolutionary rewiring and predicting regulatory relationship  

E-print Network

Abstract Computational analysis of biological networks: Measuring evolutionary rewiring and predicting regulatory relationship Chong Shou 2011 Biological networks represent various types of molecular;Computational analysis of biological networks: Measuring evolutionary rewiring and predicting regulatory

Gerstein, Mark

452

Performance evaluation of scalable parallel computing networks  

E-print Network

Performance analysis is a widely accepted technique used by many computer system designers. It can predict actual system performance, while helping to identify problems in the design or areas for improvement. Furthermore, if the simulation model...

Wilkinson, Robert Todd

2012-06-07

453

[Research toward a heterogeneous networked computing cluster  

SciTech Connect

Over the last year the Systems Development Group, SDG, has been involved in a number of projects. The primary projects include extending the UNIX version of DQS, a DCE version of DQS, a Java based queuing system, a Computer Aided Learning and Instruction model and working with the Florida Department of Law Enforcement in the formation of the Florida Computer Crime Center. Additionally SDG has assisted a number of state and local agencies. A synopsis of these projects is contained in this report.

Duke, D.W.; Green, T.P.

1998-08-11

454

Computer network access to scientific information systems for minority universities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The evolution of computer networking technology has lead to the establishment of a massive networking infrastructure which interconnects various types of computing resources at many government, academic, and corporate institutions. A large segment of this infrastructure has been developed to facilitate information exchange and resource sharing within the scientific community. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) supports both the development and the application of computer networks which provide its community with access to many valuable multi-disciplinary scientific information systems and on-line databases. Recognizing the need to extend the benefits of this advanced networking technology to the under-represented community, the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) in the Space Data and Computing Division at the Goddard Space Flight Center has developed the Minority University-Space Interdisciplinary Network (MU-SPIN) Program: a major networking and education initiative for Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and Minority Universities (MUs). In this paper, we will briefly explain the various components of the MU-SPIN Program while highlighting how, by providing access to scientific information systems and on-line data, it promotes a higher level of collaboration among faculty and students and NASA scientists.

Thomas, Valerie L.; Wakim, Nagi T.

1993-08-01

455

Creating a two-layered augmented artificial immune system for application to computer network intrusion detection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Computer network security has become a very serious concern of commercial, industrial, and military organizations due to the increasing number of network threats such as outsider intrusions and insider covert activities. An important security element of course is network intrusion detection which is a difficult real world problem that has been addressed through many different solution attempts. Using an artificial immune system has been shown to be one of the most promising results. By enhancing jREMISA, a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm inspired artificial immune system, with a secondary defense layer; we produce improved accuracy of intrusion classification and a flexibility in responsiveness. This responsiveness can be leveraged to provide a much more powerful and accurate system, through the use of increased processing time and dedicated hardware which has the flexibility of being located out of band.

Judge, Matthew G.; Lamont, Gary B.

2009-05-01

456

THE NEED FOR AND CONTENTS OF A COURSE IN FORENSIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS & COMPUTER SCIENCE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CAPE TOWN  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper aims to investigate the need for and contents of a course in forensic Information Systems and Computer Science at UCT. In order to do this, the reader is introduced to computer crime and shown how the forensic process of identifying, preserving, recovering, analyzing, and documenting computer data supposedly used in crimes committed using computers is helping in investigating

A. STANDER; B. CANNY; A. WITTE

457

Mines Computer and Network Access Agreement For Affiliated Programs (26-Feb-2013) Page 1 of 2 Colorado School of Mines Computer and Network Access Agreement  

E-print Network

the vending machines. But please be careful of equipment and considerate of others-2013) Page 1 of 2 Colorado School of Mines Computer and Network Access. Guidelines Colorado School of Mines computing and networking resources are provided

458

EEL4720/5721 Reconfigurable Computing (dual-listed course) Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering  

E-print Network

Engineering University of Florida Fall Semester 2014 Catalog Description: Prereq: EEL4712C or EEL5764- 0470052631. M. Gokhale and P. Graham, Reconfigurable Computing: Accelerating Computation with Field Tools (~1 week) Technology mapping Placement & routing V. Register Transfer (RT)/Logic Synthesis (1

Fang, Yuguang "Michael"

459

Index : A Rule Based Expert System For Computer Network Maintenance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Communications is an expert intensive discipline. The application of expert systems for maintenance of large and complex networks, mainly as an aid in trouble shooting, can simplify the task of network management. The important steps involved in troubleshooting are fault detection, fault reporting, fault interpretation and fault isolation. At present, Network Maintenance Facilities are capable of detecting and reporting the faults to network personnel. Fault interpretation refers to the next step in the process, which involves coming up with reasons for the failure. Fault interpretation can be characterized in two ways. First, it involves such a diversity of facts that it is difficult to predict. Secondly, it embodies a wealth of knowledge in the form of network management personnel. The application of expert systems in these interpretive tasks is an important step towards automation of network maintenance. In this paper, INDEX (Intelligent Network Diagnosis Expediter), a rule based production system for computer network alarm interpretation is described. It acts as an intelligent filter for people analyzing network alarms. INDEX analyzes the alarms in the network and identifies proper maintenance action to be taken.The important feature of this production system is that it is data driven. Working memory is the principal data repository of production systems and its contents represent the current state of the problem. Control is based upon which productions match the constantly changing working memory elements. Implementation of the prototype is in OPS83. Major issues in rule based system development such as rule base organization, implementation and efficiency are discussed.

Chaganty, Srinivas; Pitchai, Anandhi; Morgan, Thomas W.

1988-03-01

460

Distributed Computing with the CLAN Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

CLAN (Collapsed LAN) is a high performance user- level network targeted at the server room. It presents a simple low-level interface to applications: connection- oriented non-coherent shared memory for data transfer, and Tripwire, a user-level programmable CAM for syn- chronisation. This simple interface is implemented using only hardware state machines on the NIC, yet is flexible enough to support many

David Riddoch; Kieran Mansley; Steve Pope

2002-01-01

461

Computational inference of transcriptional regulatory networks from expression proling and transcription  

E-print Network

Computational inference of transcriptional regulatory networks from expression pro ABSTRACT We have developed a computational method for transcriptional regulatory network inference, CARRIE (Computational Ascertainment of Regu- latory Relationships Inferred from Expression), which combines microarray

Babu, M. Madan

462

10 CFR 73.54 - Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-01-01 false Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks...Sites 73.54 Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks...shall provide high assurance that digital computer and communication systems and...

2013-01-01

463

10 CFR 73.54 - Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks.  

...2014-01-01 false Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks...Sites 73.54 Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks...shall provide high assurance that digital computer and communication systems and...

2014-01-01

464

10 CFR 73.54 - Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-01-01 false Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks...Sites 73.54 Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks...shall provide high assurance that digital computer and communication systems and...

2012-01-01

465

10 CFR 73.54 - Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-01-01 false Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks...Sites 73.54 Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks...shall provide high assurance that digital computer and communication systems and...

2011-01-01

466

10 CFR 73.54 - Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 false Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks...Sites 73.54 Protection of digital computer and communication systems and networks...shall provide high assurance that digital computer and communication systems and...

2010-01-01

467

Computer Manipulatives in an Ordinary Differential Equations Course: Development, Implementation, and Assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The dArbeloff Interactive Mathematics Project or dAIMP is an initiative that seeks to enhance and ultimately transform the\\u000a teaching and learning of introductory mathematics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. A result of this project is\\u000a a suite of mathlets, a carefully developed set of dynamic computer applets for use in the universitys ordinary differential\\u000a equations course. In this paper,

Haynes R. Miller; Deborah S. Upton

2008-01-01

468

Multidetector computed tomography findings of an asymptomatic levoatrial cardinal vein with an interatrial course.  

PubMed

A 57-year-old female patient with a family history of coronary artery disease admitted to our hospital for the coronary check-up. A coronary angiography was performed with ECG-gated 128 slice dual source computed tomography.Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) showed, in addition to the normal coronary arteries, a persistent levoatrial cardinal vein (LCV) draining into vena cava superior. ECG-gated cardiac MDCT is a useful tool showing the origin, course, and drainage site of LCV. PMID:24068692

Gen, B; Solak, A; Sahin, N; Gr, S; Oztrk, A; Kalayc?o?lu, S

2013-08-01

469

Embedded Networking CarRing II: A Real-Time Computer Network as Successor of Flexray?  

E-print Network

Embedded Networking CarRing II: A Real-Time Computer Network as Successor of Flexray? M. Wille This paper presents a proposal how to avoid today's problems in car electronics, mainly controllers, with respect to scalability, usability and effectiveness. Contemporary car controllers lack of common standards

Zachmann, Gabriel

470

Savannah River Laboratory local area computer network  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) has been using minicomputers and microcomputers for nearly twenty years to support the research and development needs of the site. There are currently in use at SRL over sixty of these systems providing experimental data acquisition, runtime control, runtime and postrun analysis, data archiving, and reporting services for individual experiments. More recently, many personal computers

Johnson

1982-01-01

471

A network security case study; The Los Alamos National Laboratory integrated computer network  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on a study to validate the Graphical Network Representation (GRPHREP) model which is being conducted on the Los Alamos National Laboratory Integrated Computer Network (ICN). The GRPHREP model is a software system application based on graph theory and object-oriented programming methodologies. It codified the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5637.1, which is concerned with classified computer secret policy, restrictions, and requirements. The Los Alamos ICN is required to control access to and support large-scale scientific and administrative computing. Thus, large-scale scientific and administrative computing. Thus we felt that this large, complex, and dynamic network would provide a good test for the graphical and functional capabilities of the model. Furthermore, the ICN is composed of multiple partitions that reflect the sensitivity and classification of the computation (data) and designate the required clearance level for the user.

Dreicer, J.S.; Stoltz, L. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

1991-01-01

472

Computational analysis of light scattering from collagen fiber networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Neoplastic progression in epithelial tissues is accompanied by structural and morphological changes in the stromal collagen matrix. We used the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method, a popular computational technique for full-vector solution of complex problems in electromagnetics, to establish a relationship between structural properties of collagen fiber networks and light scattering, and to analyze how neoplastic changes alter stromal scattering properties. To create realistic collagen network models, we acquired optical sections from the stroma of fresh normal and neoplastic oral cavity biopsies using fluorescence confocal microscopy. These optical sections were then processed to construct three-dimensional collagen networks of different sizes as FDTD model input. Image analysis revealed that volume fraction of collagen fibers in the stroma decreases with neoplastic progression, and statistical texture features computed suggest that fibers tend to be more disconnected in neoplastic stroma. The FDTD modeling results showed that neoplastic fiber networks have smaller scattering cross-sections compared to normal networks of the same size, whereas high-angle scattering probabilities tend to be higher for neoplastic networks. Characterization of stromal scattering is expected to provide a basis to better interpret spectroscopic optical signals and to develop more reliable computational models to describe photon propagation in epithelial tissues.

Arifler, Dizem; Pavlova, Ina; Gillenwater, Ann; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

2007-07-01

473

Quantum Multiplexing for Quantum Computer Networks  

E-print Network

In communication networks many different channels must share a limited amount of resources. In order to allow for multiple simultaneous communications, multiple access techniques are routinely employed. With quantum communication, it is possible to share a new kind of resource. All of the system channels can be accommodated into a single channel in a larger Hilbert space. In the scheme, a single line combines the information of all the users, and, at the receiver, the original quantum channels are recovered. The given multiplexer/demultiplexer circuit can perform this n qubits to qudit transformation. Connections with superdense coding and classical multiple access schemes are discussed.

Juan Carlos Garcia-Escartin; Pedro Chamorro-Posada

2007-01-22

474

ExamNet asynchronous learning network: augmenting face-to-face courses with student-developed exam questions  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper investigates how students' attitude and performance are affected by using an asynchronous learning network (ALN) to augment exams in a traditional lecture\\/lab course. Students used the ExamNet ALN to create, critique, and revise a database of questions that subsequently was drawn upon for course exams. Overall, students considered ExamNet to be useful and important in understanding course material,

E. Vance Wilson

2004-01-01

475

Quantum computation and the evaluation of tensor networks  

E-print Network

We present a quantum algorithm that additively approximates the value of a tensor network to a certain scale. When combined with existing results, this provides a complete problem for quantum computation. The result is a simple new way of looking at quantum computation in which unitary gates are replaced by tensors and time is replaced by the order in which the tensor-network is "swallowed". We use this result to derive new quantum algorithms that approximate the partition function of a variety of classical statistical mechanics models, including the Potts model.

Itai Arad; Zeph Landau

2008-05-01

476

Navigating traditional chinese medicine network pharmacology and computational tools.  

PubMed

The concept of "network target" has ushered in a new era in the field of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). As a new research approach, network pharmacology is based on the analysis of network models and systems biology. Taking advantage of advancements in systems biology, a high degree of integration data analysis strategy and interpretable visualization provides deeper insights into the underlying mechanisms of TCM theories, including the principles of herb combination, biological foundations of herb or herbal formulae action, and molecular basis of TCM syndromes. In this study, we review several recent developments in TCM network pharmacology research and discuss their potential for bridging the gap between traditional and modern medicine. We briefly summarize the two main functional applications of TCM network models: understanding/uncovering and predicting/discovering. In particular, we focus on how TCM network pharmacology research is conducted and highlight different computational tools, such as network-based and machine learning algorithms, and sources that have been proposed and applied to the different steps involved in the research process. To make network pharmacology research commonplace, some basic network definitions and analysis methods are presented. PMID:23983798

Yang, Ming; Chen, Jia-Lei; Xu, Li-Wen; Ji, Guang

2013-01-01

477

Navigating Traditional Chinese Medicine Network Pharmacology and Computational Tools  

PubMed Central

The concept of network target has ushered in a new era in the field of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). As a new research approach, network pharmacology is based on the analysis of network models and systems biology. Taking advantage of advancements in systems biology, a high degree of integration data analysis strategy and interpretable visualization provides deeper insights into the underlying mechanisms of TCM theories, including the principles of herb combination, biological foundations of herb or herbal formulae action, and molecular basis of TCM syndromes. In this study, we review several recent developments in TCM network pharmacology research and discuss their potential for bridging the gap between traditional and modern medicine. We briefly summarize the two main functional applications of TCM network models: understanding/uncovering and predicting/discovering. In particular, we focus on how TCM network pharmacology research is conducted and highlight different computational tools, such as network-based and machine learning algorithms, and sources that have been proposed and applied to the different steps involved in the research process. To make network pharmacology research commonplace, some basic network definitions and analysis methods are presented. PMID:23983798

Chen, Jia-Lei; Xu, Li-Wen

2013-01-01

478

Quantum computer networks with the orbital angular momentum of light  

E-print Network

Inside computer networks, different information processing tasks are necessary to deliver the user data efficiently. This processing can also be done in the quantum domain. We present simple optical quantum networks where the orbital angular momentum of a single photon is used as an ancillary degree of freedom which controls decisions at the network level. Linear optical elements are enough to provide important network primitives like multiplexing and routing. First we show how to build a simple multiplexer and demultiplexer which combine photonic qubits and separate them again at the receiver. We also give two different self-routing networks where the OAM of an input photon is enough to make it find its desired destination.

Juan Carlos Garcia-Escartin; Pedro Chamorro-Posada

2012-07-03

479

Test experience on an ultrareliable computer communication network  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The dispersed sensor processing mesh (DSPM) is an experimental, ultrareliable, fault-tolerant computer communications network that exhibits an organic-like ability to regenerate itself after suffering damage. The regeneration is accomplished by two routines - grow and repair. This paper discusses the DSPM concept for achieving fault tolerance and provides a brief description of the mechanization of both the experiment and the six-node experimental network. The main topic of this paper is the system performance of the growth algorithm contained in the grow routine. The characteristics imbued to DSPM by the growth algorithm are also discussed. Data from an experimental DSPM network and software simulation of larger DSPM-type networks are used to examine the inherent limitation on growth time by the growth algorithm and the relationship of growth time to network size and topology.

Abbott, L. W.

1984-01-01

480

Test experience on an ultrareliable computer communication network  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The dispersed sensor processing mesh (DSPM) is an experimental, ultra-reliable, fault-tolerant computer communications network that exhibits an organic-like ability to regenerate itself after suffering damage. The regeneration is accomplished by two routines - grow and repair. This paper discusses the DSPM concept for achieving fault tolerance and provides a brief description of the mechanization of both the experiment and the six-node experimental network. The main topic of this paper is the system performance of the growth algorithm contained in the grow routine. The characteristics imbued to DSPM by the growth algorithm are also discussed. Data from an experimental DSPM network and software simulation of larger DSPM-type networks are used to examine the inherent limitation on growth time by the growth algorithm and the relationship of growth time to network size and topology.

Abbott, L. W.

1984-01-01

481

A local area computer network expert system framework  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Over the past years an expert system called LANES designed to detect and isolate faults in the Goddard-wide Hybrid Local Area Computer Network (LACN) was developed. As a result, the need for developing a more generic LACN fault isolation expert system has become apparent. An object oriented approach was explored to create a set of generic classes, objects, rules, and methods that would be necessary to meet this need. The object classes provide a convenient mechanism for separating high level information from low level network specific information. This approach yeilds a framework which can be applied to different network configurations and be easily expanded to meet new needs.

Dominy, Robert

1987-01-01

482

Computing and Applying Trust in Web-based Social Networks  

E-print Network

The proliferation of web-based social networks has lead to new innovations in social networking, particularly by allowing users to describe their relationships beyond a basic connection. In this dissertation, I look specifically at trust in web-based social networks, how it can be computed, and how it can be used in applications. I begin with a definition of trust and a description of several properties that affect how it is used in algorithms. This is complemented by a survey of web-based social networks to gain an understanding of their scope, the types of relationship information available, and the current state of trust. The computational problem of trust is to determine how much one person in the network should trust another person to whom they are not connected. I present two sets of algorithms for calculating these trust inferences: one for networks with binary trust ratings, and one for continuous ratings. For each rating scheme, the algorithms are built upon the defined notions of trust. Each is then analyzed theoretically and with respect to simulated and actual trust networks to determine how accurately they calculate the opinions of people in the system. I show that in both rating schemes the algorithms

Jennifer Ann Golbeck

2005-01-01

483

Computer aided nonlinear electrical networks analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Techniques used in simulating an electrical circuit with nonlinear elements for use in computer-aided circuit analysis programs are described. Elements of the circuit include capacitors, resistors, inductors, transistors, diodes, and voltage and current sources (constant or time varying). Simulation features are discussed for dc, ac, and/or transient circuit analysis. Calculations are based on the model approach of formulating the circuit equations. A particular solution of transient analysis for nonlinear storage elements is described.

Slapnicar, P.

1977-01-01

484

Small-world networks in neuronal populations: a computational perspective.  

PubMed

The analysis of the brain in terms of integrated neural networks may offer insights on the reciprocal relation between structure and information processing. Even with inherent technical limits, many studies acknowledge neuron spatial arrangements and communication modes as key factors. In this perspective, we investigated the functional organization of neuronal networks by explicitly assuming a specific functional topology, the small-world network. We developed two different computational approaches. Firstly, we asked whether neuronal populations actually express small-world properties during a definite task, such as a learning task. For this purpose we developed the Inductive Conceptual Network (ICN), which is a hierarchical bio-inspired spiking network, capable of learning invariant patterns by using variable-order Markov models implemented in its nodes. As a result, we actually observed small-world topologies during learning in the ICN. Speculating that the expression of small-world networks is not solely related to learning tasks, we then built a de facto network assuming that the information processing in the brain may occur through functional small-world topologies. In this de facto network, synchronous spikes reflected functional small-world network dependencies. In order to verify the consistency of the assumption, we tested the null-hypothesis by replacing the small-world networks with random networks. As a result, only small world networks exhibited functional biomimetic characteristics such as timing and rate codes, conventional coding strategies and neuronal avalanches, which are cascades of bursting activities with a power-law distribution. Our results suggest that small-world functional configurations are liable to underpin brain information processing at neuronal level. PMID:23632438

Zippo, Antonio G; Gelsomino, Giuliana; Van Duin, Pieter; Nencini, Sara; Caramenti, Gian Carlo; Valente, Maurizio; Biella, Gabriele E M

2013-08-01

485

Computing with competition in biochemical networks.  

PubMed

Cells rely on limited resources such as enzymes or transcription factors to process signals and make decisions. However, independent cellular pathways often compete for a common molecular resource. Competition is difficult to analyze because of its nonlinear global nature, and its role remains unclear. Here we show how decision pathways such as transcription networks may exploit competition to process information. Competition for one resource leads to the recognition of convex sets of patterns, whereas competition for several resources (overlapping or cascaded regulons) allows even more general pattern recognition. Competition also generates surprising couplings, such as correlating species that share no resource but a common competitor. The mechanism we propose relies on three primitives that are ubiquitous in cells: multiinput motifs, competition for a resource, and positive feedback loops. PMID:23215526

Genot, Anthony J; Fujii, Teruo; Rondelez, Yannick

2012-11-16

486

Network Coding: A Computational Perspective Michael Langberg1 Alexander Sprintson2 Jehoshua Bruck1  

E-print Network

Network Coding: A Computational Perspective Michael Langberg1 Alexander Sprintson2 Jehoshua Bruck1 Abstract-- In this work, we study the computational perspec- tive of network coding, focusing on two issues. First, we address the computational complexity of finding a network code for acyclic multicast networks

Bruck, Jehoshua (Shuki)

487

Identifiability of Flow Distributions from Link Measurements with Applications to Computer Networks  

E-print Network

Identifiability of Flow Distributions from Link Measurements with Applications to Computer Networks by recent developments in computer networks. In this paper (i) we introduce a number of models for multi Introduction An increasing variety of network data is available from modern computer networks. These data

Michailidis, George

488

College of Engineering, Boston University Spring 2013 EC541 Computer Communication Networks  

E-print Network

College of Engineering, Boston University Spring 2013 EC541 Computer Communication Networks of fundamental concepts in computer networking o Queueing and delay models in communication networks o Little references: · S. Keshav, An engineering approach to computer networking, Addison-Wesley 1997 · L. Kleinrock

Goldberg, Bennett

489

Perceptions of teaching and learning automata theory in a college-level computer science course  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This dissertation identifies and describes student and instructor perceptions that contribute to effective teaching and learning of Automata Theory in a competitive college-level Computer Science program. Effective teaching is the ability to create an appropriate learning environment in order to provide effective learning. We define effective learning as the ability of a student to meet instructor set learning objectives, demonstrating this by passing the course, while reporting a good learning experience. We conducted our investigation through a detailed qualitative case study of two sections (118 students) of Automata Theory (CS 341) at The University of Texas at Austin taught by Dr. Lily Quilt. Because Automata Theory has a fixed curriculum in the sense that many curricula and textbooks agree on what Automata Theory contains, differences being depth and amount of material to cover in a single course, a case study would allow for generalizable findings. Automata Theory is especially problematic in a Computer Science curriculum since students are not experienced in abstract thinking before taking this course, fail to understand the relevance of the theory, and prefer classes with more concrete activities such as programming. This creates a special challenge for any instructor of Automata Theory as motivation becomes critical for student learning. Through the use of student surveys, instructor interviews, classroom observation, material and course grade analysis we sought to understand what students perceived, what instructors expected of students, and how those perceptions played out in the classroom in terms of structure and instruction. Our goal was to create suggestions that would lead to a better designed course and thus a higher student success rate in Automata Theory. We created a unique theoretical basis, pedagogical positivism, on which to study college-level courses. Pedagogical positivism states that through examining instructor and student perceptions of teaching and learning, improvements to a course are possible. These improvements can eventually develop a "best practice" instructional environment. This view is not possible under a strictly constructivist learning theory as there is no way to teach a group of individuals in a "best" way. Using this theoretical basis, we examined the gathered data from CS 341. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

Weidmann, Phoebe Kay

490

A Three-Dimensional Computational Model of Collagen Network Mechanics  

PubMed Central

Extracellular matrix (ECM) strongly influences cellular behaviors, including cell proliferation, adhesion, and particularly migration. In cancer, the rigidity of the stromal collagen environment is thought to control tumor aggressiveness, and collagen alignment has been linked to tumor cell invasion. While the mechanical properties of collagen at both the single fiber scale and the bulk gel scale are quite well studied, how the fiber network responds to local stress or deformation, both structurally and mechanically, is poorly understood. This intermediate scale knowledge is important to understanding cell-ECM interactions and is the focus of this study. We have developed a three-dimensional elastic collagen fiber network model (bead-and-spring model) and studied fiber network behaviors for various biophysical conditions: collagen density, crosslinker strength, crosslinker density, and fiber orientation (random vs. prealigned). We found the best-fit crosslinker parameter values using shear simulation tests in a small strain region. Using this calibrated collagen model, we simulated both shear and tensile tests in a large linear strain region for different network geometry conditions. The results suggest that network geometry is a key determinant of the mechanical properties of the fiber network. We further demonstrated how the fiber network structure and mechanics evolves with a local formation, mimicking the effect of pulling by a pseudopod during cell migration. Our computational fiber network model is a step toward a full biomechanical model of cellular behaviors in various ECM conditions. PMID:25386649

Lee, Byoungkoo; Zhou, Xin; Riching, Kristin; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Keely, Patricia J.; Guelcher, Scott A.; Weaver, Alissa M.; Jiang, Yi

2014-01-01

491

Identifying failure in a tree network of a parallel computer  

DOEpatents

Methods, parallel computers, and products are provided for identifying failure in a tree network of a parallel computer. The parallel computer includes one or more processing sets including an I/O node and a plurality of compute nodes. For each processing set embodiments include selecting a set of test compute nodes, the test compute nodes being a subset of the compute nodes of the processing set; measuring the performance of the I/O node of the processing set; measuring the performance of the selected set of test compute nodes; calculating a current test value in dependence upon the measured performance of the I/O node of the processing set, the measured performance of the set of test compute nodes, and a predetermined value for I/O node performance; and comparing the current test value with a predetermined tree performance threshold. If the current test value is below the predetermined tree performance threshold, embodiments include selecting another set of test compute nodes. If the current test value is not below the predetermined tree performance threshold, embodiments include selecting from the test compute nodes one or more potential problem nodes and testing individually potential problem nodes and links to potential problem nodes.

Archer, Charles J. (Rochester, MN); Pinnow, Kurt W. (Rochester, MN); Wallenfelt, Brian P. (Eden Prairie, MN)

2010-08-24

492

A computational study of routing algorithms for realistic transportation networks  

SciTech Connect

The authors carry out an experimental analysis of a number of shortest path (routing) algorithms investigated in the context of the TRANSIMS (Transportation Analysis and Simulation System) project. The main focus of the paper is to study how various heuristic and exact solutions, associated data structures affected the computational performance of the software developed especially for realistic transportation networks. For this purpose the authors have used Dallas Fort-Worth road network with very high degree of resolution. The following general results are obtained: (1) they discuss and experimentally analyze various one-one shortest path algorithms, which include classical exact algorithms studied in the literature as well as heuristic solutions that are designed to take into account the geometric structure of the input instances; (2) they describe a number of extensions to the basic shortest path algorithm. These extensions were primarily motivated by practical problems arising in TRANSIMS and ITS (Intelligent Transportation Systems) related technologies. Extensions discussed include--(i) time dependent networks, (ii) multi-modal networks, (iii) networks with public transportation and associated schedules. Computational results are provided to empirically compare the efficiency of various algorithms. The studies indicate that a modified Dijkstra`s algorithm is computationally fast and an excellent candidate for use in various transportation planning applications as well as ITS related technologies.

Jacob, R.; Marathe, M.V.; Nagel, K.

1998-12-01

493

162 Electrical and Computer Engineering 163 Courses and projects that actively involve them in their own education and  

E-print Network

162 Electrical and Computer Engineering 163 · Courses and projects that actively involve them of technology Graduate and undergraduate programs in electrical and computer engineering offer concentrations in electrical and computer engineering that the student can build upon to construct a custom program. Because

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

494

COMPUTER ENGINEERING TECHNICAL ELECTIVES (d) 12 credits. ECE Courses all ECE prerequisites must be passed with a C or better  

E-print Network

COMPUTER ENGINEERING TECHNICAL ELECTIVES (d) 12 credits. ECE Courses � all ECE prerequisites must Based Systems (ECE451) 4 F ECE554 Computer Architecture (ECE452 or CS470) 3 F ECE555 Robot Motion Software Development Methods (CS253) 3 F, S CS410 Intro to Computer Graphics (CS253, MATH229 or MATH369) 4

495

Gender Effects of Computer Use in a Conceptual Physics Lab Course  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It's always hard to know what to expect when bringing computers into an educational setting, as things are always changing. Student skills with computers are different today than they were 10 years ago, and 20 years ago almost counts as an alien world. Still, one hopes that some of these changes result in positive trends, such as student attitudes toward the use of computers in the classroom. During the course of the Wandering Interactive Lecture Demonstration Project, we've seen a notable gender gap in some aspects of the previous experience of students, and worried that it might impact their learning. So we administered a number of surveys to see if we were right to be worried.

Van Domelen, Dave

2010-11-01

496

System/360 Computer Assisted Network Scheduling (CANS) System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Computer assisted scheduling techniques that produce conflict-free and efficient schedules have been developed and implemented to meet needs of the Manned Space Flight Network. CANS system provides effective management of resources in complex scheduling environment. System is automated resource scheduling, controlling, planning, information storage and retrieval tool.

Brewer, A. C.

1972-01-01

497

Somniloquy: Maintaining network connectivity while your computer sleeps  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reducing the energy consumption of computers is becoming increasingly important with rising energy costs and environmental concerns. It is doubly important for mobile devices, whose battery lifetime is always an issue. Sleep states such as S3 (suspend) save energy but make it impossible to communicate directly with a device across a network. Therefore, many people do not use S3 and

Yuvraj Agarwal; Steve Hodges; James Scott; Ranveer Chandra; Victor Bahl; Rajesh Gupta

2008-01-01

498

ThreadMarks: Shared Memory Computing on Networks of Workstations  

Microsoft Academic Search

TreadMarks supports parallel computing on networks of workstations by providing the applicationwith a shared memory abstraction. Shared memory facilitates the transition from sequential toparallel programs. After identifying possible sources of parallelism in the code, most of the datastructures can be retained without change, and only synchronization needs to be added to achieve acorrect shared memory parallel program. Additional transformations may

Cristiana Amza; Alan L. Cox; Sandhya Dwarkadas; Peter J. Keleher; Honghui Lu; Ramakrishnan Rajamony; Weimin Yu; Willy Zwaenepoel

1996-01-01

499

Quantum Cryptographic Network based on Quantum Memories Computer Science Department  

E-print Network

Quantum Cryptographic Network based on Quantum Memories Eli Biham Computer Science Department, Switzerland Tal Mor Department of Physics Technion Haifa 32000, Israel (September 24, 1996) Abstract Quantum transmission of information. We present a quantum cryptographic system, in which users store particles

Biham, Eli

500

Computer program for network synthesis by frequency response fit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Computer program synthesizes a passive network by minimizing the difference in desired and actual frequency response. The program solves for the critical points of the error function /weighted least squares fit between calculated and desired frequency response/ by the multivariable Newton-Raphson method with components constrained to an admissible region.

Green, S.

1967-01-01