Sample records for computer networking courses

  1. Student Motivation in Computer Networking Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsin, Wen-Jung

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces several hands-on projects that have been used to motivate students in learning various computer networking concepts. These projects are shown to be very useful and applicable to the learners' daily tasks and activities such as emailing, Web browsing, and online shopping and banking, and lead to an unexpected byproduct,…

  2. Improving a Computer Networks Course Using the Partov Simulation Engine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Momeni, B.; Kharrazi, M.

    2012-01-01

    Computer networks courses are hard to teach as there are many details in the protocols and techniques involved that are difficult to grasp. Employing programming assignments as part of the course helps students to obtain a better understanding and gain further insight into the theoretical lectures. In this paper, the Partov simulation engine and…

  3. Designing a Versatile Dedicated Computing Lab to Support Computer Network Courses: Insights from a Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gercek, Gokhan; Saleem, Naveed

    2006-01-01

    Providing adequate computing lab support for Management Information Systems (MIS) and Computer Science (CS) programs is a perennial challenge for most academic institutions in the US and abroad. Factors, such as lack of physical space, budgetary constraints, conflicting needs of different courses, and rapid obsolescence of computing technology,…

  4. BE562 Computational Biology: Genomes, Networks, Evolution Fall 2013 Course Information

    E-print Network

    Vajda, Sandor

    include: Genomes: sequence analysis, gene prediction, genome alignment and assembly, database search, stochastic context-free grammars, graph analysis, flux balance analysis, and Bayesian networks. Prerequisites in this course will be based on the following: Problem sets (35%) Midterm Exam (20%) Final Project (40

  5. BE562 Computational Biology: Genomes, Networks, Evolution Fall 2014 Course Information

    E-print Network

    include: Genomes: sequence analysis, gene prediction, genome alignment and assembly, database search, stochastic context-free grammars, graph analysis, flux balance analysis, and Bayesian networks. Prerequisites in this course will be based on the following: Problem sets (35%) Midterm Exam (20%) Final Project (40

  6. Networking Computers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This tutorial provides a basic overview of the type of networks a computer can be part of. Students will gain an understanding of the different types of computer networks. Flash is required to view this interactive lesson.

  7. Network and Computer Security

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Rivest, Ronald L.

    A wide variety of educational resources and course materials are available through the Massachusetts Institute of Technologyâ??s Open Courseware Project. This particular course â??Network and Computer Securityâ?ť contains problem sets and exams with solutions as well as a full reading list that is accessible to the public. Some of the topics covered in this course are: cryptography, authentication and identification schemes, viruses, software protection, firewalls, and electronic commerce among others. Computer science students will find the reading materials and practice problems available here especially useful. This is an excellent source of information for anyone who is currently studying or interested in network and computer security.

  8. Elements, Systems, and Computation: A Five Year Experiment in Combining Networks, Digital Systems, and Numerical Techniques in the First Course

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael L. Dertouzos

    1971-01-01

    This paper discusses an experimental course developed at the Department of Electrical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, during the last five years. Taught during the second year, the course introduces the student to electrical networks, continuous systems, combinational (logic) networks, finite-state machines, and some numerical methods. The material is taught through the common vehicle of the state model, and

  9. Computer Networks

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mr Thomas Hudson

    CSC 344. Computer Networks (3) Prerequisite: CSC 242. The theory and application of inter-computer communication. Local-area and wide-area networks; data transmission and error correction; OSI and TCP/IP layering protocols; ethernet, token ring, token bus and other network technologies; network topologies; the client-server model; bridges and multi-protocol routers; the Internet. Applications include electronic funds transfer and distributed databases.

  10. Introduction to Computing Course Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii State Dept. of Education, Honolulu. Office of Instructional Services.

    Developed to aid intermediate-level teachers and principals in initiating and developing computer literacy programs for their students, this document is a guide for the development of a one-semester course--Introduction to Computing--for the seventh and eighth grades. The course is designed to provide opportunities for students to develop computer

  11. Engineering and Computing Undergraduate Courses

    E-print Network

    Low, Robert

    Faculty of Engineering and Computing Undergraduate Courses (including Architecture, Aerospace, Building, Civil Engineering and Mathematics) #12;2 Contents Coventry University 4 About Coventry 5 Facilities 6 Department of Computing 8 Department of Mathematics and Control Engineering 15 Department

  12. Computer Individualizes Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1974

    1974-01-01

    A new teaching aid, designed to monitor each freshman chemistry student's progress, to identify specific weaknesses and strengths in his grasp of course material, and to prescribe individual study assignments, is described. (DT)

  13. BE562 Computational Biology: Genomes, Networks, Evolution Fall 2012 Course Information

    E-print Network

    Vajda, Sandor

    include: Genomes: sequence analysis, gene finding, RNA folding, genome alignment and assembly, database sampling, Expectation Maximization, hidden Markov models, stochastic context-free grammars, graph analysis in this course will be based on the following: Problem sets (35%) Midterm Exam (20%) Final Project (40

  14. Using An Instructional Operating System In Teaching Computer Security Courses

    E-print Network

    Du, Wenliang "Kevin"

    Using An Instructional Operating System In Teaching Computer Security Courses Wenliang Du Systems Assurance Institute Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Syracuse University 121 Link) developed for operating system and network courses. We use SMinix as a basic framework, and build laboratory

  15. Conception of a course for professional training and education in the field of computer and mobile forensics, part III: network forensics and penetration testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröger, Knut; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2014-02-01

    IT security and computer forensics are important components in the information technology. From year to year, incidents and crimes increase that target IT systems or were done with their help. More and more companies and authorities have security problems in their own IT infrastructure. To respond to these incidents professionally, it is important to have well trained staff. The fact that many agencies and companies work with very sensitive data make it necessary to further train the own employees in the field of network forensics and penetration testing. Motivated by these facts, this paper - a continuation of a paper of January 2012 [1], which showed the conception of a course for professional training and education in the field of computer and mobile forensics - addresses the practical implementation important relationships of network forensic and penetration testing.

  16. Expanding Teachers' Thinking in Computer Curriculum Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bechtelheimer, Lynne; Tamashiro, Roy

    This paper describes the effects two graduate level computer curriculum courses had upon participating teachers. One course examined instructional strategies involving computers which made for effective and practical lessons in language arts, social studies, science and mathematics. The other course introduced teachers to ways of using software in…

  17. Bayesian Network Computations in BN

    E-print Network

    Nuel, Gregory

    Bayesian Network Computations in BN Applications Probabilistic computations in Bayesian Networks computations in Bayesian Networks #12;Bayesian Network Computations in BN Applications Outline 1 Bayesian Network Introduction Evidence Junction Tree 2 Computations in BN Potentials Inward/Outward Conditional

  18. Computer Networks As Social Networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barry Wellman

    2001-01-01

    Computer networks are inherently social networks, linking people, organizations, and knowledge. They are social institutions that should not be studied in isolation but as integrated into everyday lives. The proliferation of computer networks has facilitated a deemphasis on group solidarities at work and in the community and afforded a turn to networked societies that are loosely bounded and sparsely knit.

  19. Advanced Computer Networks

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Amy Apon

    The purpose of this class will be to focus on advanced topics in computer networking. The goal of this class is to prepare students to do research in networking or cluster computing, including employment in leading edge networking positions.

  20. SUR 3641 Surveying Computations Course Syllabus

    E-print Network

    Florida, University of

    SUR 3641 ­ Surveying Computations Course Syllabus INSTRUCTOR: Prof. Dave Gibson Office 303 Reed Lab Reference (not required): Elementary Surveying, Wolf and Ghilani COURSE OVERVIEW: Introduction to surveying computations, COGO. Coordinate computations, traversing, inversing, bearing/bearing, bearing/distance, distance

  1. Resourcesharing computer communications networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ROBERT E. KAHN

    1972-01-01

    The development of resource-sharing networks can facilitate the provision of a wide range of economic and reliable computer services. Computer-communication networks allow the sharing of specialized computer resources such as data bases, programs, and hardware. Such a network consists of both the computer resources and a communications system interconnecting them and allowing their full utilization to be achieved. In addition,

  2. Center for Networked Center for Networked Computing

    E-print Network

    Wu, Jie

    Center for Networked Computing Center for Networked Computing Adaptive Battery Charge Scheduling.wu}@temple.edu Presenter: Pouya Ostovari #12;Center for Networked Computing Center for Networked Computing Motivation for Networked Computing Center for Networked Computing Problem What is a good voltage threshold to trigger

  3. Educational Computing Course. [SITE 2001 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bump, Wren, Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on the educational computing course from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2001 conference: "Using a Flexible Format To Create a Constructivist Learning Environment in the Educational Computing Course" (Wren M. Bump); "Technological Diversity: Managing Differing Technology…

  4. Computational Verb Neural Networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tao Yang

    2007-01-01

    When any attribute value in a conventional neural network is verbified, the result is a computational verb neural network(VNN). We can verbify inputs, outputs, biases, weights and many other attributes of conventional neural networks. In this paper, we reported two types of VNNs. The first one consists of computational verb inputs and numerical output. The second one consists of computational

  5. A Computer Applications Course for Biology Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ralph, Charles L.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a computer applications course developed for undergraduate biology students (primarily sophomores) to teach word processing, database and spreadsheet programs, graphing programs, telecommunications, and file transfer procedures. AppleWorks software is discussed, course content is explained, and the microcomputer laboratory is described.…

  6. Quantum Computational Networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Deutsch

    1989-01-01

    The theory of quantum computational networks is the quantum generalization of the theory of logic circuits used in classical computing machines. Quantum gates are the generalization of classical logic gates. A single type of gate, the univeral quantum gate, together with quantum 'unit wires', is adequate for constructing networks with any possible quantum computational property.

  7. A course in Computational Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawitscher, George

    2011-03-01

    This course, taught at UConn, has several objectives: 1) To make the students comfortable in using MATLAB; 2) To reveal the existence of unavoidable inaccuracies due to numerical roundoff errors and algorithm inaccuracies; 3) to introduce modern spectral expansion methods [1], and compare them with conventional finite difference methods. Some of the projects assigned in the course will be described, such as the motion of a falling parachute, and the vibrations of an inhomogeneous vibrating string [2]. [4pt] [1] Lloyd N. Trefethen, "Spectral Methods in MATLAB (SIAM, Philadelphia, PA, 2000)"; John P. Boyd, "Chebyshev and Fourier Spectral Methods," (Dover Publications, Inc. Mineola, New York, Second revised edition, 2001). [2] G. Rawitscher and J. Liss, "The vibrating inhomogeneous string," Am. J. of Phys., to be published; and arXiv:1006,1913v1 [physics.comp-ph

  8. A Course in Computational Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawitscher, George

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this undergraduate course, is 1) to familiarize the student with a tool like MATLAB for solving homework problems in other courses, or qualify for a job later on. And 2. to understand accuracy and suitability properties of the algorithms used. Rather than emphasizing numerical techniques, the focus is on physics problems, such as: the decent of a parachute, the oscillation of a pendulum for large angles, the vibrational modes of a clamped inhomogenous string, and least square fitting. These are coupled with a discussion of numerical algorithms such as the comparison of various types of quadratures, properties of basis functions for expansions, including Chebyshev polynomials and Sturm-Liouville functions, matrices, their eigenvalues and singular value decompositions. Examples will be presented in this talk, a manual is in preparation. )

  9. Study on college basketball course network platform

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Li Zengxue; Zuo Yong; Li Chao; Li Xiaohui

    2012-01-01

    Sports teaching is an important part of university curriculum. As an elective course, the basketball class should become the emphasis of the teaching reform. Through the teaching contrast, the conclusion comes as no surprise that the college basketball course network platform is necessary and efficient.

  10. Computer science undergraduate capstone course

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Clinton P. Fuelling; Anne-Marie Lancaster; Mark C. Kertstetter; R. Waldo Roth; William A. Brown; Richard K. Reidenbach; Ekawan Wongsawatgul

    1988-01-01

    Curriculum concerns of the computer science discipline continue to require refinements in this rapidly changing field. We have established curriculum guidelines and we have two years experience in the accrediting process of the CSAB. Remarks such as “I do not consider the topic of … to be in the computer science discipline” and “At least the topic of … is

  11. Effectiveness of Simulation in a Hybrid and Online Networking Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Brian H.

    2003-01-01

    Reports on a study that compares the performance of students enrolled in two sections of a Web-based computer networking course: one utilizing a simulation package and the second utilizing a static, graphical software package. Analysis shows statistically significant improvements in performance in the simulation group compared to the…

  12. Studying the performance of a firewall in network courses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    José M. Garrido

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a simple simulation model of a firewall to derive several performance metrics and briefly argues on the importance and value of modeling and simulation in courses that study various aspects of perimeter defense in network security.The simulation model mentioned previously is part of an effort by faculty of our department to develop a multi-disciplinary repository of computational

  13. Computer Maintenance Technology. Suggested Basic Course Outline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    This competency-based basic course outline is designed for a two-year secondary program in computer maintenance technology. The first year is devoted to basic electricity and electronics, the second to the troubleshooting, maintenance, and service of microcomputers. (The repair section is based upon the Apple II computer, disc drive, monitor, and…

  14. A Survey of Computer Science Capstone Course Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dugan, Robert F., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we surveyed literature related to undergraduate computer science capstone courses. The survey was organized around course and project issues. Course issues included: course models, learning theories, course goals, course topics, student evaluation, and course evaluation. Project issues included: software process models, software…

  15. Computer Network Resources for Physical Geography Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Michael P.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Asserts that the use of computer networks provides an important and effective resource for geography instruction. Describes the use of the Internet network in physical geography instruction. Provides an example of the use of Internet resources in a climatology/meteorology course. (CFR)

  16. K-12 Computer Networking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Review, 1993

    1993-01-01

    The "ERIC Review" is published three times a year and announces research results, publications, and new programs relevant to each issue's theme topic. This issue explores computer networking in elementary and secondary schools via two principal articles: "Plugging into the 'Net'" (Michael B. Eisenberg and Donald P. Ely); and "Computer Networks for…

  17. Computer networking at FERMILAB

    SciTech Connect

    Chartrand, G.

    1986-05-01

    Management aspects of data communications facilities at Fermilab are described. Local area networks include Ferminet, a broadband CATV system which serves as a backbone-type carrier for high-speed data traffic between major network nodes; micom network, four Micom Micro-600/2A port selectors via private twisted pair cables, dedicated telephone circuits, or Micom 800/2 statistical multiplexors; and Decnet/Ethernet, several small local area networks which provide host-to-host communications for about 35 VAX computers systems. Wide area (off site) computer networking includes an off site Micom network which provides access to all of Fermilab's computer systems for 10 universities via leased lines or modem; Tymnet, used by many European and Japanese collaborations: Physnet, used for shared data processing task communications by large collaborations of universities; Bitnet, used for file transfer, electronic mail, and communications with CERN; and Mfenet, for access to supercomputers. Plans to participate in Hepnet are also addressed. 3 figs. (DWL)

  18. Computer Systems and Network Manager

    E-print Network

    Computer Systems and Network Manager Fort Collins, Colorado POSITION A Computers Systems activities. RESPONSIBILITIES The successful candidate will perform computer systems and network administration, including computer hardware, systems software, applications software, and all configurations

  19. 6.857 Network and Computer Security, Fall 2003

    E-print Network

    Rivest, Ronald

    6.857 is an upper-level undergraduate, first-year graduate course on network and computer security. It fits within the department's Computer Systems and Architecture Engineering concentration. Topics covered include ...

  20. Computers across the Curriculum: Teaching a Computer Literacy Course for Multi-Disciplinary Use in a Network Environment--Content and Pedagogy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ormerod, Dana E.

    Kent State University (Ohio) Regional Campuses have conducted surveys of their applied business associate degree graduates in office management, accounting, business management, and their employers. Responses indicated the need for computer literacy appropriate to the employment situation. In addition, instructors of traditional liberal arts…

  1. A CAD (Classroom Assessment Design) of a Computer Programming Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawi, Nazir S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a CAD (classroom assessment design) of an entry-level undergraduate computer programming course "Computer Programming I". CAD has been the product of a long experience in teaching computer programming courses including teaching "Computer Programming I" 22 times. Each semester, CAD is evaluated and modified for the subsequent…

  2. Closeness Possible through Computer Networking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, Julie E.

    1989-01-01

    Points out the benefits of computer networking for scholastic journalism. Discusses three systems currently offering networking possibilities for publications: the Student Press Information Network; the Youth Communication Service; and the Dow Jones Newspaper Fund's electronic mail system. (MS)

  3. Symmetric network computation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Pritchard; Santosh Vempala

    2006-01-01

    We introduce a simple new model of distributed compu- tation | nite-state symmetric graph automata (FSSGA) | which captures the qualitative properties common to fault-tolerant distributed algorithms. Roughly speaking, the computation evolves homogeneously in the entire network, with each node acting symmetrically and with limited re- sources. As a building block, we demonstrate the equiv- alence of two automaton models

  4. Introduction Computer Networking

    E-print Network

    Cheng, Xiuzhen "Susan"

    1 Chapter 1 Introduction Computer Networking: A Top Down Approach , 5th edition. Jim Kurose, Keith and enjoy! JFK/KWR All material copyright 1996-2010 J.F Kurose and K.W. Ross, All Rights Reserved protocol: Q: Other human protocols? Hi Hi Got the time? 2:00 TCP connection response Get http://www.awl.com/kurose

  5. The evolution of an introductory computer engineering course

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. B. Hudson; D. M. Gruenbacher

    1998-01-01

    EECE 241 is a required core course for Electrical and Computer Engineering students and a service course for other curricula. The presentation format has evolved to an integrated lecture and laboratory experience serving in excess of 100 students each semester. This course had been refined to: minimize faculty time commitment, allow hands on experiences, reinforce basic breadboarding and computer skills,

  6. Making connections: Modeling epidemiological networks in mathematical modeling and HPC courses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Angela B. Shiflet; George W. Shiflet

    2011-01-01

    Significant applications that demonstrate fundamental concepts and techniques are vital in computational science education. In this paper, we discuss development of simulations involving social networks and individual-based epidemiology that are appropriate for modeling and simulation, mathematical modeling, and high performance computing courses. Consideration of the computational graph theory concepts in this context can empower students to develop similar models for

  7. Computer Design in an Introductory Course--Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spoerri, Peter

    1990-01-01

    Describes the use of a logic circuit simulator to design a computer in an introductory computer course. Discusses the design of a sequence generator, control circuits, and testing of a computer's instruction set. (YP)

  8. Using Virtualization and Automatic Evaluation: Adapting Network Services Management Courses to the EHEA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ros, S.; Robles-Gomez, A.; Hernandez, R.; Caminero, A. C.; Pastor, R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper outlines the adaptation of a course on the management of network services in operating systems, called NetServicesOS, to the context of the new European Higher Education Area (EHEA). NetServicesOS is a mandatory course in one of the official graduate programs in the Faculty of Computer Science at the Universidad Nacional de Educacion a…

  9. Teaching Computer Ethics: Experiences of Integrating Ethics into Computer Science Courses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tero Vartiainen

    1998-01-01

    Computer ethics could be taught at least in two ways: integrating ethics into computer science (CS) courses or arranging computer ethics course. In this report the experiences from the experiment of integrating ethics into CS courses are presented. I n this experiment the integration means adding groupworks and dilemma discussions to the exercises of CS courses. Dilemma discussion as a

  10. Virtual Network Computing

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Virtual Network Computing software package, a product of AT&T Laboratories Cambridge, is one of the more useful and decidedly different utilities than generally appears in our Network Tools section. This software, although it is complex in nature and has a technical-sounding moniker, allows one to use just about any computer remotely across a local area network or even the Internet. To accomplish this remote use, the system actually displays the entire desktop of the remote computer in a window on the local computer. Amazingly, you can display and use a Macintosh desktop, for example, on your Win95/98/NT system or a Win95/98/NT desktop on your Unix system or any other combination of these possibilities. The system is simple to install and works quite well. Although minor bugs are noticeable, the system is complete enough to allow, for example, the remote use of many popular Windows programs on a Unix system. The VNC system is free to download and use and runs on Win95/98/NT, SPARC Solaris, Linux, and DEC Alpha OSF1. Beta versions of the software are also available for the Macintosh and Windows CE 2.x.

  11. Online Courses: MSU National Teachers Enhancement Network (NTEN)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1900-01-01

    The National Teachers Enhancement Network (NTEN) offers online, graduate-level science courses from a world-class public research university. NTEN was one of the first online professional development programs for K-12 teachers, and has offered courses sin

  12. A "BIG-IDEAS" COMPUTATION THEORY COURSE FOR THE UNDERGRADUATE

    E-print Network

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    A "BIG-IDEAS" COMPUTATION THEORY COURSE FOR THE UNDERGRADUATE Arnold L. Rosenberg Department of Computer Science University of Massachusetts Amherst Amherst, MA 01003, USA rsnbrg@cs.umass.edu Abstract A "big-ideas" approach to an undergraduate Computation Theory course is described. The aim

  13. Encryption and Secure Computer Networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerald J. Popek; Charles S. Kline

    1979-01-01

    There is increasing growth in the number of computer networks in use and in the kinds of distributed computing applications available on these networks This increase, together with concern about privacy, security, and integrity of information exchange, has created considerable interest in the use of encryptlon to protect information in the networks This survey is directed at the reader who

  14. Integrating Emerging Topics through Online Team Design in a Hybrid Communication Networks Course: Interaction Patterns and Impact of Prior Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reisslein, Jana; Seeling, Patrick; Reisslein, Martin

    2005-01-01

    An important challenge in the introductory communication networks course in electrical and computer engineering curricula is to integrate emerging topics, such as wireless Internet access and network security, into the already content-intensive course. At the same time it is essential to provide students with experiences in online collaboration,…

  15. Computer Science 78 Computer Networks or hacking the network, part II

    E-print Network

    Campbell, Andrew T.

    - such as, the Internet - else, things remain too abstract. You will write approximately 3000 lines of C Overview Welcome to the world on computer networks. Ever wondered what makes the Internet tick? Want to gain the skills that would allow you to implement the Internet? Read on .... The ORC: This course

  16. Delay estimation in computer networks 

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Nicholas Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Computer networks are becoming increasingly large and complex; more so with the recent penetration of the internet into all walks of life. It is essential to be able to monitor and to analyse networks in a timely and ...

  17. Distributed computation in dynamic networks

    E-print Network

    Kuhn, Fabian

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we investigate distributed computation in dynamic networks in which the network topology changes from round to round. We consider a worst-case model in which the communication links for each round are chosen ...

  18. Distributed Computation in Dynamic Networks

    E-print Network

    Oshman, Rotem

    2009-11-10

    In this report we investigate distributed computation in dynamic networks in which the network topology changes from round to round. We consider a worst-case model in which the communication links for each round are chosen ...

  19. An Introduction to Computing: Content for a High School Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Jean B.

    A general outline of the topics that might be covered in a computers and computing course for high school students is provided. Topics are listed in the order in which they should be taught, and the relative amount of time to be spent on each topic is suggested. Seven units are included in the course outline: (1) general introduction, (2) using…

  20. A Web-based computer architecture course database

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edward F. Gehringer; Tony M. Louca

    2000-01-01

    A Web-based database of course materials in computer architecture is being developed. Its goal is to allow instructors at different institutions to share independently developed materials and to develop new materials jointly. This database comprises problems and lectures downloaded (with permission) from the Websites of courses in computer architecture at universities around the world. The site is searchable by classification

  1. Teaching instructional design in a computer literacy course

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wilhelmina C. Savenye; Gayle V. Davidson; Patricia L. Smith

    1991-01-01

    Knowledge of instructional design principles can help teachers integrate technology such as computers into their classroom instruction. This article describes a required computer literacy course for preservice teachers which was redesigned to include substantial components to teach instructional design. Also described are the results of a study conducted to examine the effectiveness of the instructional design training. End-of-course measures indicated

  2. Improving Student Engagement Using Course-Based Social Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imlawi, Jehad Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    This study proposes an engagement model that supports use of course-based online social networks for engaging student, and hence, improving their educational outcomes. This research demonstrates that instructors who create course-based online social networks to communicate with students can increase the student engagement in these online social…

  3. Course Content for a Telecommunication Course in an End-User Computing Support Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crews, Tena B.; Ray, Charles M.

    1998-01-01

    A modified Delphi panel of telecommunications educators developed a list of specific content topics for a business telecommunications course. Major content areas were recommended: local and wide area networks, media, hardware, e-mail, emerging technologies, network topologies, data signals, conceptual foundations, and social and ethical issues.…

  4. Designing and implementing a cyberwar laboratory exercise for a computer security course

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul J. Wagner; Jason M. Wudi

    2004-01-01

    The development of a cyberwar laboratory exercise for a computer security course raises many pedagogical and management issues relating to the structure of the laboratory, its network and the exercise itself. We have designed, implemented and given such an exercise, and faced many of these issues. Evaluation of this exercise leads to multiple insights about the proper goals, structure and

  5. A new qualitative metric for assessing advanced graduate courses in computer engineering and science

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sumit Ghosh

    2000-01-01

    Presents a philosophy underlying the design of a few advanced and graduate courses at ASU in the subdisciplines of HDLs, communications networks, computer-aided design of digital systems, distributed systems, distributed algorithms, and modeling and simulation. The philosophy has given rise to a new metric-the extent and significance of the knowledge “discovered” by the students, towards evaluating the quality of such

  6. Of Bugs, Bytes, LANS and Viruses: The Changing Countenance of Computer Courses in Administrator Preparation Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, William H.

    Instruction in computing over the past three decades has experienced dramatic changes in both method and substance. Beginning with on-the-job training, courses evolved to become highly sophisticated and widespread in education. The second decade, the 70's, focused on mainframe use, and the third decade on micros and widely networked systems.…

  7. Sharing Writing through Computer Networking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fey, Marion H.

    1997-01-01

    Suggests computer networking can support the essential purposes of the collaborative-writing movement, offering opportunities for sharing writing. Notes that literacy teachers are exploring the connectivity of computer networking through numerous designs that use either real-time or asynchronous communication. Discusses new roles for students and…

  8. Eradicating Computer Viruses on Networks

    E-print Network

    Huang, Jinyu

    2012-01-01

    Spread of computer viruses can be modeled as the SIS (susceptible-infected-susceptible) epidemic propagation. We show that in order to ensure the random immunization or the targeted immunization effectively prevent computer viruses propagation on homogeneous networks, we should install antivirus programs in every computer node and frequently update those programs. This may produce large work and cost to install and update antivirus programs. Then we propose a new policy called "network monitors" to tackle this problem. In this policy, we only install and update antivirus programs for small number of computer nodes, namely the "network monitors". Further, the "network monitors" can monitor their neighboring nodes' behavior. This mechanism incur relative small cost to install and update antivirus programs.We also indicate that the policy of the "network monitors" is efficient to protect the network's safety. Numerical simulations confirm our analysis.

  9. SITE, University of Ottawa Winter 2014 CSI 5169 (COMP 5304) Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing

    E-print Network

    Stojmenovic, Ivan

    SITE, University of Ottawa Winter 2014 CSI 5169 (COMP 5304) Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing Course description: CSI 5169 (COMP 5304) WIRELESS NETWORKS AND MOBILE COMPUTING (3 cr.) (S, T) Computational aspects and applications of design and analysis of mobile and wireless networking. Topics include

  10. Augmenting computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, S. H.; Raza, A. D.

    1984-01-01

    Three methods of augmenting computer networks by adding at most one link per processor are discussed: (1) A tree of N nodes may be augmented such that the resulting graph has diameter no greater than 4log sub 2((N+2)/3)-2. Thi O(N(3)) algorithm can be applied to any spanning tree of a connected graph to reduce the diameter of that graph to O(log N); (2) Given a binary tree T and a chain C of N nodes each, C may be augmented to produce C so that T is a subgraph of C. This algorithm is O(N) and may be used to produce augmented chains or rings that have diameter no greater than 2log sub 2((N+2)/3) and are planar; (3) Any rectangular two-dimensional 4 (8) nearest neighbor array of size N = 2(k) may be augmented so that it can emulate a single step shuffle-exchange network of size N/2 in 3(t) time steps.

  11. Mobile Computing/Mobile Computing/Mobile Computing/Mobile Computing/ Mobile NetworksMobile NetworksMobile NetworksMobile Networks

    E-print Network

    Yu, Chansu

    Mobile Computing/Mobile Computing/Mobile Computing/Mobile Computing/ Mobile NetworksMobile NetworksMobile NetworksMobile Networks Mobile IP Prof. Chansu Yu Quiz What is the role of IP? Does the router have two IP for Wired Network Mobile IP Overview Basic Mobile IP Agent Discovery Registration Tunneling Route

  12. "Horses for Courses": Categories of Computer-Based Learning Program and Their Uses in Pharmacology Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Ian E.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the pharma-CAL-ogy project, funded by Teaching and Learning Technology Programme (TLTP), which has developed various types of software for use in pharmacology courses. Topics include course organization and delivery software, drill and practice software, tutorial-type programs, simulations, and the need to integrate computer-assisted…

  13. A cornerstone course for Freshman computer science students

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philip R. Prins; Charles H. Burris Jr

    1998-01-01

    “Why are we studying this?” “What area of Computer Science should I concentrate on?” “Are the really good Computer Scientists all hackers and nerds?” To answer questions like these and to attract young people seeking a career that will benefit society, we describe and make a case for, a Freshman seminar course for the Computer Science (CS) major. Just as

  14. Addressing Small Computers in the First OS Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nutt, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Small computers are emerging as important components of the contemporary computing scene. Their operating systems vary from specialized software for an embedded system to the same style of OS used on a generic desktop or server computer. This article describes a course in which systems are classified by their hardware capability and the…

  15. Laboratories for a Liberal Education Computer Science Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiper, James D.; Bishop-Clark, Cathy

    Computer science and other computer related fields are faced with the high velocity of change in technology. Far more important than the knowledge of a particular software package is the liberal education skills that are learned in the process. This paper reviews the laboratory component of a new computer science course offered at Miami University…

  16. HARDWARE COURSES AND THE UNDERGRADUATE COMPUTER SCIENCE CURRICULUM AT SMALL COLLEGES

    E-print Network

    Ivanov, Lubomir

    HARDWARE COURSES AND THE UNDERGRADUATE COMPUTER SCIENCE CURRICULUM AT SMALL COLLEGES ABSTRACT Hardware courses have always been a part of the undergraduate Computer Science (CS) curriculum at small consider hardware courses essentially useless, kept in the Computer Science undergraduate curriculum

  17. Personal Computer Usage in Community College Accounting Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerullo, Michael; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Reports on the results of a 1985 survey of two-year community colleges that was conducted to determine the use of personal computers in accounting courses. Types of hardware and software used are discussed, planned purchases are indicated, courses using microcomputers are described, and future use is explored. (four references) (LRW)

  18. A Mobile Robotics Course for Undergraduate Students in Computer Science

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alvaro Soto; Pablo Espinace; Ruben Mitnik

    2006-01-01

    A first generation of mobile robots able to cope with the high uncertainty of natural environments is starting to emerge. As a consequence, there is an increasing need for theoretical and practical courses that can formally teach the state of the art of the technology. This paper describes our experience teaching a mobile robotics course as part of our computer

  19. Designing a Service-Oriented Computing Course for High Schools

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wei-tek Tsai; Yinong Chen; Xin Sun

    2007-01-01

    Service-Oriented Computing (SOC) is becoming the dominating paradigm for software development in many areas, including e-business, robotics, gaming, and scientific computation. One of the key issues lagging behind is the education. In spite of significant progress in SOC applications, SOC education has not been taught in introductory classes. Existing SOC courses are graduate or senior-level courses in universities that require

  20. Graduate school introductory computational simulation course pedagogy

    E-print Network

    Proctor, Laura L. (Laura Lynne), 1975-

    2009-01-01

    Numerical methods and algorithms have developed and matured vastly over the past three decades now that computational analysis can be performed on almost any personal computer. There is a need to be able to teach and present ...

  1. A Crash Course in Computer Tom Chothia

    E-print Network

    Chothia, Tom

    ,000's of computers via bugs in web-browsers ­ Spam, phishing attacks. ­ DoS attacks · Governments: ­ Unbelievable computing power ­ Wiretaps ­ Lawyers · ISPs, Service providers ­ Don't break laws. ­ Do "spy

  2. Computer Networks Rutgers University

    E-print Network

    Badrinath, B. R.

    us: Management l Professor: Badri Nath l http://www.cs.rutgers.edu/~badri l badri@cs.rutgers.edu l Office hours: Wednesday 1:30 : 3:30 PM l TA: Amruta Gokhale l amrutag@cs.rutgers.edu l Course info l http://www.cs.rutgers.edu/~badri/552.html #12;3 Course Web Page l Course schedule l Reading list l Lecture notes l Announcements l

  3. Student Learning Networks on Residential Field Courses: Does Size Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langan, A. Mark; Cullen, W. Rod; Shuker, David M.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes learner and tutor reports of a learning network that formed during the completion of investigative projects on a residential field course. Staff and students recorded project-related interactions, who they were with and how long they lasted over four phases during the field course. An enquiry based learning format challenged…

  4. COURSE ANNOUNCEMENT FALL 2005 Introduction to Computational

    E-print Network

    Czygrinow, Andrzej

    , and computational approaches to genetic and physical mapping, DNA sequencing, and phylogenetic reconstruction, and software packages for tree reconstruction will be covered. Instructor: Sharon Crook, Dept. of Mathematics

  5. 5. Networked computing and the Internet

    E-print Network

    Keil, David M.

    5. Networked computing and the Internet David Keil Introduction to Information Technology 7 120 Introduction to Information Technology 5. Networked and Internet computing 1. Networked computing to Information Technology 7/13 2 Reading: Evans et al, Chs. 7, 8, 12 #12;5. Networked computing and the Internet

  6. Neural networks for computed tomography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Morisue; K. Sakai; H. Koinuma

    1992-01-01

    Proposes a novel application of neural networks to cognitive tasks of computed tomography (CT). The principle of Hopfield type neural networks to reconstruct the image from the projected densities is described. The technique of reconstruction is based on the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART). Simulation results for a model of an image, where the reconstruction space was divided into 32×32 elements

  7. Mock trials and role-playing in computer ethics courses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roxanne L. Canosa; Joan M. Lucas

    2008-01-01

    Mock trials are an effective and fun way of eliciting thoughtful dialogue from students, and encouraging them to produce incisive analyses of current ethical dilemmas related to computers and society. This paper describes our experience using mock trials in two computer ethics courses. Each trial was centered on a specific controversial and ethically or legally ambiguous topic related to current

  8. Incorporating ethics in computing courses extra class activities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fani Zlatarova

    2004-01-01

    Teaching ethics in undergraduate computing-oriented courses is important because the specific nature of the development and application of software products affects the professional and personal interests of so many people. Two different approaches in teaching ethics for computer science and information systems students are described here. The first approach consists of incorporating ethical concepts into the teaching material of several

  9. Using Alice in a Computer Science Survey Course

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jill Courte; Elizabeth V. Howard; Cathy Bishop-Clark

    2005-01-01

    Students in an introductory computer science survey course for non-majors used the 3-D interactive programming environment Alice for their programming module. With Alice, students create animated worlds using a variety of objects and easily accessed program- ming constructs. Alice has previously been used successfully to provide a gentle intro- duction to computer programming in a fun and enjoyable way, and

  10. Time-course of cortical networks involved in working memory

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Phan; Caggiano, Daniel M.; Geyer, Alexandra; Lewis, Jenn; Cohn, Joseph; Tucker, Don M.

    2014-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is one of the most studied cognitive constructs. Although many neuroimaging studies have identified brain networks involved in WM, the time course of these networks remains unclear. In this paper we use dense-array electroencephalography (dEEG) to capture neural signals during performance of a standard WM task, the n-back task, and a blend of principal components analysis and independent components analysis (PCA/ICA) to statistically identify networks of WM and their time courses. Results reveal a visual cortex centric network, that also includes the posterior cingulate cortex, that is active prior to stimulus onset and that appears to reflect anticipatory, attention-related processes. After stimulus onset, the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, lateral prefrontal prefrontal cortex, and temporal poles become associated with the prestimulus network. This second network appears to reflect executive control processes. Following activation of the second network, the cortices of the temporo-parietal junction with the temporal lobe structures seen in the first and second networks re-engage. This third network appears to reflect activity of the ventral attention network involved in control of attentional reorientation. The results point to important temporal features of network dynamics that integrate multiple subsystems of the ventral attention network with the default mode network in the performance of working memory tasks. PMID:24523686

  11. Computer Vision Research Teaching Modules for Community College Computer Science and Engineering Courses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dwight Egbert; George Bebis; Dave Williams

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes computer vision teaching modules we have developed for use in several courses at the University of Nevada as part of a Combined Research and Curriculum Development (CRCD) project, sponsored by NSF. Modules developed to date include programming projects for CS1 and\\/or CS2 courses, an image compression module for an introductory logic course, a digital camera interfacing module

  12. A Laboratory Based Capstone Course in Computer Security for Undergraduates

    E-print Network

    O'Leary, Michael

    of students in our isolated test laboratory. In each exercise, students design and construct their own network prior specific permission and/or a fee. SIGCSE'06, March 3­5, 2006, Houston, Texas, USA. Copyright 2006 in the development of an in- formation security and assurance laboratory while Mateti [11] describes such a course

  13. Mobile Computing/ Mobile Networks

    E-print Network

    Yu, Chansu

    research to improve radar signals and communications ARPANet (Advanced Research Projects Agency network comments on Internet polices, politics, and oversee other boards such as IETF The Internet Assigned

  14. Computer (PC/Network) Coordinator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This publication contains 22 subjects appropriate for use in a competency list for the occupation of computer (PC/network) coordinator, 1 of 12 occupations within the business/computer technologies cluster. Each unit consists of a number of competencies; a list of competency builders is provided for each competency. Titles of the 22 units are as…

  15. Global cooperation project in computer programming course

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Macek; Bozena Mannova; Josef Kolar; Barbara Williams

    1999-01-01

    A Global Cooperation Project was conducted with computer science classes at the Czech Technical University and North Hennepin Community College. The project was a pilot project for teaching team cooperation on a global scale. For three months the students worked in teams consisting of team members from remote places (Czech Republic and Minnesota). Students learned how to use modern Internet-based

  16. Power Efficiency in Wireless Network Distributed Computing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dinesh Datla; Xuetao Chen; Timothy R. Newman; Jeffrey H. Reed; Tamal Bose

    2009-01-01

    Advanced wireless applications such as sensor networks involve a close interaction between the communication and computation processes that deliver the services under stringent power constraints. Wireless network distributed computing (WNDC) is a potential solution to reducing the power consumption per node as well as that of the network. In WNDC, a computational task is executed among a network of collaborative

  17. Distributed Loop Computer Networks: A Survey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-claude Bermond; Francesc Comellas; D. Frank Hsu

    1995-01-01

    Distributed loop computer networks are extensions of the ring networks and are widelyused in the design and implementation of local area networks and parallel processingarchitectures. We give a survey of recent results on this class of interconnection networks.We pay special attention to the actual computation of the minimum diameterand the construction of loop networks which can achieve this optimal number.

  18. Computer Network Security- The Challenges of Securing a Computer Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Vincent, Jr.

    2011-01-01

    This article is intended to give the reader an overall perspective on what it takes to design, implement, enforce and secure a computer network in the federal and corporate world to insure the confidentiality, integrity and availability of information. While we will be giving you an overview of network design and security, this article will concentrate on the technology and human factors of securing a network and the challenges faced by those doing so. It will cover the large number of policies and the limits of technology and physical efforts to enforce such policies.

  19. Integration of Major Computer Program Packages into Experimental Courses: Organic Synthesis Design and the Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandel, Bonnie Burns; Solomon, Robert W.

    1981-01-01

    Presents discussion on: (1) computer assisted synthesis in industry and academia; (2) computer applications to teaching organic synthesis; (3) a computer program (ORGSYN) incorporating reactions to synthesize aliphatic compounds; and (4) the design of a computer program as a heuristic device in an introductory organic course. (SK)

  20. A Computer Security Course in the Undergraduate Computer Science Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spillman, Richard

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the importance of computer security and considers criminal, national security, and personal privacy threats posed by security breakdown. Several examples are given, including incidents involving computer viruses. Objectives, content, instructional strategies, resources, and a sample examination for an experimental undergraduate computer

  1. Computational Inference of Neural Information Flow Networks

    E-print Network

    Jarvis, Erich D.

    Computational Inference of Neural Information Flow Networks V. Anne Smith1[¤ , Jing Yu1,2[¤ , Tom V, Hartemink AJ, Jarvis ED (2006) Computational inference of neural information flow networks. PLoS Comput Biol connectivity networks. But traffic congestion, power blackouts, packet routing, computation, and animal

  2. UNCORRECTEDPROOF 2 Optimal computation with attractor networks

    E-print Network

    Pouget, Alexandre

    UNCORRECTEDPROOF 2 Optimal computation with attractor networks 3 Peter E. Latham a,*, Sophie Deneve reliable computations with noisy population codes. 9 We show that such networks can perform computations small that biologically plausible 12 networks can compute optimally. We demonstrate that this result

  3. Comparison of On-Line and Traditional Computer Literacy Courses for Preservice Teachers: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurbuz, Tarkan; Yildirim, Soner; Ozden, M. Yasar

    2001-01-01

    Investigated the effectiveness of two computer literacy courses for preservice teachers, one offered online and one through traditional methods. Compared courses in terms of their effectiveness on computer attitudes and learning experiences about computers, and considered gender effects, previous computer courses, previous computer attitudes, and…

  4. Bilingual Teaching of Computer Networks: Research and Practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jian Feng

    2010-01-01

    Under the background of economic globalization, bilingual teaching became one of the hotspots of teaching reform in China. At first, the concept and essence of bilingual teaching is studied, the related education policies in China are analyzed, and the necessity and significance of offering bilingual teaching in Computer Networks course are explored. Then, based on practice and experiences of bilingual

  5. Roadmap: Computer Technology Network Technology Associate of Applied Business

    E-print Network

    Khan, Javed I.

    as critical (in boldface and shaded areas) must be completed in the semester listed to ensure a timelyRoadmap: Computer Technology ­ Network Technology ­ Associate of Applied Business [RE graduation. Kent Core Summary (visit www.kent.edu/catalog/kent-core for course list) Kent Core Categories

  6. Collective network for computer structures

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich, Matthias A; Coteus, Paul W; Chen, Dong; Gara, Alan; Giampapa, Mark E; Heidelberger, Philip; Hoenicke, Dirk; Takken, Todd E; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D; Vranas, Pavlos M

    2014-01-07

    A system and method for enabling high-speed, low-latency global collective communications among interconnected processing nodes. The global collective network optimally enables collective reduction operations to be performed during parallel algorithm operations executing in a computer structure having a plurality of the interconnected processing nodes. Router devices are included that interconnect the nodes of the network via links to facilitate performance of low-latency global processing operations at nodes of the virtual network. The global collective network may be configured to provide global barrier and interrupt functionality in asynchronous or synchronized manner. When implemented in a massively-parallel supercomputing structure, the global collective network is physically and logically partitionable according to the needs of a processing algorithm.

  7. Collective network for computer structures

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich, Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Chen, Dong (Croton On Hudson, NY); Gara, Alan (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E. (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Hoenicke, Dirk (Ossining, NY); Takken, Todd E. (Brewster, NY); Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D. (Wernau, DE); Vranas, Pavlos M. (Bedford Hills, NY)

    2011-08-16

    A system and method for enabling high-speed, low-latency global collective communications among interconnected processing nodes. The global collective network optimally enables collective reduction operations to be performed during parallel algorithm operations executing in a computer structure having a plurality of the interconnected processing nodes. Router devices ate included that interconnect the nodes of the network via links to facilitate performance of low-latency global processing operations at nodes of the virtual network and class structures. The global collective network may be configured to provide global barrier and interrupt functionality in asynchronous or synchronized manner. When implemented in a massively-parallel supercomputing structure, the global collective network is physically and logically partitionable according to needs of a processing algorithm.

  8. Computing motion using resistive networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Christof; Luo, Jin; Mead, Carver; Hutchinson, James

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments in the theory of early vision are described which lead from the formulation of the motion problem as an ill-posed one to its solution by minimizing certain 'cost' functions. These cost or energy functions can be mapped onto simple analog and digital resistive networks. It is shown how the optical flow can be computed by injecting currents into resistive networks and recording the resulting stationary voltage distribution at each node. These networks can be implemented in cMOS VLSI circuits and represent plausible candidates for biological vision systems.

  9. Networking DEC and IBM computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mish, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    Local Area Networking of DEC and IBM computers within the structure of the ISO-OSI Seven Layer Reference Model at a raw signaling speed of 1 Mops or greater are discussed. After an introduction to the ISO-OSI Reference Model nd the IEEE-802 Draft Standard for Local Area Networks (LANs), there follows a detailed discussion and comparison of the products available from a variety of manufactures to perform this networking task. A summary of these products is presented in a table.

  10. COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE COURSES AVAILABLE TO FIRST-

    E-print Network

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    - Physics PSC - Political Science PSY - Psychology REL - Religion SOC - Sociology WRT - Writing WGS - WomenCOLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE COURSES AVAILABLE TO FIRST- YEAR STUDENTS FALL 2014 Studies ANT - Anthropology BIO - Biology CHE - Chemistry EAR - Earth Science ECN - Economics ETS - English

  11. Computer-Mediated Communication in Library Credit Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewald, Nancy H.

    1996-01-01

    Describes two undergraduate library credit courses using computer-mediated communication. The first focuses on information searching and electronic resources in the students' areas of study. The second teaches basic research skills, the use of Netscape, and the use of e-mail and conferencing software in four areas: library studies; health…

  12. A Term Project for a Course on Computer Forensics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Warren

    2006-01-01

    The typical approach to creating an examination disk for exercises and projects in a course on computer forensics is for the instructor to populate a piece of media with evidence to be retrieved. While such an approach supports the simple use of forensic tools, in many cases the use of an instructor-developed examination disk avoids utilizing some…

  13. Evaluating Computer Lab Modules for Large Biology Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichinger, David C.; And Others

    This paper describes the first phase of a study to investigate students' evaluations of computer laboratory modules in a university-level, non-majors biology course. The National Science Foundation-funded project has two primary goals: (1) to develop programmable, multifunctional Bio LabStations for data collection and analysis, lab extensions,…

  14. First course in computer science, a small survey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Furugori; P. Jalics

    1977-01-01

    In many disciplines, the introductory courses are well standardized as to what should be covered, how the subject is to be taught, and how student's performance is to be measured. Such is certainly not the case in Computer Science, where we constantly debate what should be taught, what programming language is to be used, the nature of assignments to be

  15. Interpersonal Presence in Computer-Mediated Conferencing Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herod, L.

    Interpersonal presence refers to the cues individuals use to form impressions of one another and form/maintain relationships. The physical cues used to convey interpersonal presence in face-to-face learning environments are absent in text-based computer-mediated conferencing (CMC) courses. Learners' perceptions of interpersonal presence in CMC…

  16. Computer lessons for a social psychology research methods course

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Russell H. Fazio; Martin H. Backler

    1983-01-01

    The development and use of three computer-based lessons for an undergraduate course on research methods in social psychology\\u000a are described. One lesson is essentially a tutorial on main effects and interactions. Two additional lessons are simulations\\u000a demonstrating the concepts of experimental power and survey sampling. A rationale and description of each lesson is provided.

  17. The Use of Blackboard in Computer Information Systems Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figueroa, Sandy; Huie, Carol

    This paper focuses on the rationale for incorporating Blackboard, a Web-authoring software package, as the knowledge construction tool in computer information system courses. The authors illustrate previous strategies they incorporated in their classes, and they present their uses of Blackboard. They point out their reactions as teachers, and the…

  18. Undergraduate computational science and engineering programs and courses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter R. Turner; Angela B. Shiflet; Steve Cunningham; Kris Stewart; Andrew T. Phillips; Ignatios E Vakalis

    2002-01-01

    This 90-minute panel session will discuss recent and future developments in incorporating Computational Science and Engineering into the undergraduate curriculum. There is a companion session devoted to tools and techniques and so the focus here is on programs and courses.The panelists will demonstrate a clear uniformity of purpose but a wide variety of approaches to increasing the CSE experience of

  19. Computed Tomography-Enhanced Anatomy Course Using Enterprise Visualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Hila; Cohen, Haim; Medlej, Bahaa; Kornreich, Liora; Peled, Nathan; Hershkovitz, Israel

    2013-01-01

    Rapid changes in medical knowledge are forcing continuous adaptation of the basic science courses in medical schools. This article discusses a three-year experience developing a new Computed Tomography (CT)-based anatomy curriculum at the Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, including describing the motivations and reasoning for the…

  20. Teaching Advanced Programming Concepts in Introductory Computing Courses: A

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kleanthis Thramboulidis

    Teaching object-oriented programming in introductory computer courses is still an area not well understood by instructors and teachers. A new approach, quite different from the one used to teach the procedural paradigm, is required. We have developed and used for several years a teaching approach that is greatly influenced by constructivism, which stresses the importance of prior knowledge on top

  1. Computational acceleration using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadaret, Paul

    2008-04-01

    The author's recent participation in the Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) program has resulted in the development of a patent pending technology that enables the construction of very large and fast artificial neural networks. Through the use of UNICON's CogniMax pattern recognition technology we believe that systems can be constructed that exploit the power of "exhaustive learning" for the benefit of certain types of complex and slow computational problems. This paper presents a theoretical study that describes one potentially beneficial application of exhaustive learning. It describes how a very large and fast Radial Basis Function (RBF) artificial Neural Network (NN) can be used to implement a useful computational system. Viewed another way, it presents an unusual method of transforming a complex, always-precise, and slow computational problem into a fuzzy pattern recognition problem where other methods are available to effectively improve computational performance. The method described recognizes that the need for computational precision in a problem domain sometimes varies throughout the domain's Feature Space (FS) and high precision may only be needed in limited areas. These observations can then be exploited to the benefit of overall computational performance. Addressing computational reliability, we describe how existing always-precise computational methods can be used to reliably train the NN to perform the computational interpolation function. The author recognizes that the method described is not applicable to every situation, but over the last 8 months we have been surprised at how often this method can be applied to enable interesting and effective solutions.

  2. Demonstrations of Neural Network Computations Involving Students

    PubMed Central

    May, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    David Marr famously proposed three levels of analysis (implementational, algorithmic, and computational) for understanding information processing systems such as the brain. While two of these levels are commonly taught in neuroscience courses (the implementational level through neurophysiology and the computational level through systems/cognitive neuroscience), the algorithmic level is typically neglected. This leaves an explanatory gap in students’ understanding of how, for example, the flow of sodium ions enables cognition. Neural networks bridge these two levels by demonstrating how collections of interacting neuron-like units can give rise to more overtly cognitive phenomena. The demonstrations in this paper are intended to facilitate instructors’ introduction and exploration of how neurons “process information.” PMID:23493501

  3. Mission impossible? [FBI computer network

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Kumagai

    2003-01-01

    With a new computer network automated investigative tools, and more channels for sharing information, the FBI hopes to finally know what it knows. The fall of 2001 saw the start of an ambitious program of modernization, which seems to recognize that the barriers that prevent the FBI from analyzing and sharing data are as much cultural as technological. These include

  4. A Standard for Computer Networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. H. Bonn

    1971-01-01

    The development of suitable standards is a vital key to developing ing the full potential of multi-access computer networks. To date work is being done on only a few of the standards that will be required, and among these few, progress is distressingly slow. Divergent procedures are rapidly becoming entrenched in areas where there should be standards and if the

  5. Computer Networking with Commercially Prepared Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Marilyn R.; And Others

    A federally funded project investigated a computer networking system in special education being implemented in Johnson County, Wyoming. The goals of the networking system project were: (1) to demonstrate a computer networking system as it applies to an educational setting; and (2) to conduct a research project to study the effects of computer

  6. ECE 456: Computer Networks Pre-requisites

    E-print Network

    Schumacher, Russ

    ECE 456: Computer Networks - - - Pre-requisites: - ECE 251;ECE 303/STAT 303; CS 160 or (CS 155; CS calls - Sensor Networking ­ A brief introduction - Future trends in networking and computing 156; CS 157). - Able to write programs in a computer language such as C, C++, Java, Perl or Python

  7. Are Hopfield Networks Faster Than Conventional Computers?

    E-print Network

    Parberry, Ian

    Are Hopfield Networks Faster Than Conventional Computers? Ian Parberry and Hung-Li Tseng Department that conventional computers can be exponentially faster than planar Hopfield networks: although there are planar network can be found by a conventional computer in polynomial time. The theory of PLS-completeness gives

  8. Impact of Multimedia and Network Services on an Introductory Level Course

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russ, John C.

    1996-01-01

    We will demonstrate and describe the impact of our use of multimedia and network connectivity on a sophomore-level introductory course in materials science. This class services all engineering students, resulting in large (more than 150) class sections with no hands-on laboratory. In 1990 we began to develop computer graphics that might substitute for some laboratory or real-world experiences, and demonstrate relationships hard to show with static textbook images or chalkboard drawings. We created a comprehensive series of modules that cover the entire course content. Called VIMS (Visualizations in Materials Science), these are available in the form of a CD-ROM and also via the internet.

  9. Networked Computers Promote Computer Literacy and Computer-Assisted Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, James A.

    1984-01-01

    To provide computer literacy training for its elementary and secondary schools, the Indianapolis city-wide school district is midway through a three-year, $10 million project involving the installation of more than 10,000 microcomputers linked by numerous local area networks. This program of coordinated resource sharing is described. (JN)

  10. Course 10: Three Lectures on Biological Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnasco, M. O.

    1 Enzymatic networks. Proofreading knots: How DNA topoisomerases disentangle DNA 1.1 Length scales and energy scales 1.2 DNA topology 1.3 Topoisomerases 1.4 Knots and supercoils 1.5 Topological equilibrium 1.6 Can topoisomerases recognize topology? 1.7 Proposal: Kinetic proofreading 1.8 How to do it twice 1.9 The care and proofreading of knots 1.10 Suppression of supercoils 1.11 Problems and outlook 1.12 Disquisition 2 Gene expression networks. Methods for analysis of DNA chip experiments 2.1 The regulation of gene expression 2.2 Gene expression arrays 2.3 Analysis of array data 2.4 Some simplifying assumptions 2.5 Probeset analysis 2.6 Discussion 3 Neural and gene expression networks: Song-induced gene expression in the canary brain 3.1 The study of songbirds 3.2 Canary song 3.3 ZENK 3.4 The blush 3.5 Histological analysis 3.6 Natural vs. artificial 3.7 The Blush II: gAP 3.8 Meditation

  11. Networking Course Syllabus in Accredited Library and Information Science Programs: A Comparative Analysis Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abouserie, Hossam Eldin Mohamed Refaat

    2009-01-01

    The study investigated networking courses offered in accredited Library and Information Science schools in the United States in 2009. The study analyzed and compared network syllabi according to Course Syllabus Evaluation Rubric to obtain in-depth understanding of basic features and characteristics of networking courses taught. The study embraced…

  12. Computer network development to achieve resource sharing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lawrence G. Roberts; Barry D. Wessler

    1970-01-01

    In this paper a computer network is defined to be a set of autonomous, independent computer systems, interconnected so as to permit interactive resource sharing between any pair of systems. An overview of the need for a computer network, the requirements of a computer communication system, a description of the properties of the communication system chosen, and the potential uses

  13. Profiles of Motivated Self-Regulation in College Computer Science Courses: Differences in Major versus Required Non-Major Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shell, Duane F.; Soh, Leen-Kiat

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to utilize a profiling approach to understand differences in motivation and strategic self-regulation among post-secondary STEM students in major versus required non-major computer science courses. Participants were 233 students from required introductory computer science courses (194 men; 35 women; 4 unknown) at…

  14. Computer network security for the radiology enterprise.

    PubMed

    Eng, J

    2001-08-01

    As computer networks become an integral part of the radiology practice, it is appropriate to raise concerns regarding their security. The purpose of this article is to present an overview of computer network security risks and preventive strategies as they pertain to the radiology enterprise. A number of technologies are available that provide strong deterrence against attacks on networks and networked computer systems in the radiology enterprise. While effective, these technologies must be supplemented with vigilant user and system management. PMID:11477230

  15. Delayed commutation in quantum computer networks

    E-print Network

    Juan Carlos Garcia-Escartin; Pedro Chamorro-Posada

    2005-12-02

    In the same way that classical computer networks connect and enhance the capabilities of classical computers, quantum networks can combine the advantages of quantum information and communications. We propose a non-classical network element, a delayed commutation switch, that can solve the problem of switching time in packet switching networks. With the help of some local ancillary qubits and superdense codes we can route the information after part of it has left the network node.

  16. Snowmass 2013 Computing Frontier: Networking

    E-print Network

    Gregory Bell; Michael Ernst

    2013-11-11

    Computing has become a major component of all particle physics experiments and in many areas of theoretical particle physics. Progress in HEP experiment and theory will require significantly more computing, software development, storage, and networking, with different projects stretching future capabilities in different ways. However, there are many common needs among different areas in HEP, so more community planning is advised to increase efficiency. Careful and continuing review of the topics we studied, i.e., user needs and capabilities of current and future technology, is needed.

  17. Computer networking at SLR stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novotny, Antonin

    1993-01-01

    There are several existing communication methods to deliver data from the satellite laser ranging (SLR) station to the SLR data center and back: telephonmodem, telex, and computer networks. The SLR scientific community has been exploiting mainly INTERNET, BITNET/EARN, and SPAN. The total of 56 countries are connected to INTERNET and the number of nodes is exponentially growing. The computer networks mentioned above and others are connected through E-mail protocol. The scientific progress of SLR requires the increase of communication speed and the amount of the transmitted data. The TOPEX/POSEIDON test campaign required to deliver Quick Look data (1.7 kB/pass) from a SLR site to SLR data center within 8 hours and full rate data (up to 500 kB/pass) within 24 hours. We developed networking for the remote SLR station in Helwan, Egypt. The reliable scheme for data delivery consists of: compression of MERIT2 format (up to 89 percent), encoding to ASCII Me (files); and e-mail sending from SLR station--e-mail receiving, decoding, and decompression at the center. We do propose to use the ZIP method for compression/decompression and the UUCODE method for ASCII encoding/decoding. This method will be useful for stations connected via telephonemodems or commercial networks. The electronics delivery could solve the problem of the too late receiving of the FR data by SLR data center.

  18. MTX data acquisition and analysis computer network

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. N. Butner; T. A. Casper; M. D. Brown; M. Drlik; W. H. Meyer; J. M. Moller

    1990-01-01

    For the MTX experiment, we use a network of computers for plasma diagnostic data acquisition and analysis. This multivendor network employs VMS, UNIX, and BASIC based computers connected in a local area Ethernet network. Some of the data is acquired directly into a VAX\\/VMS computer cluster over a fiber-optic serial CAMAC highway. Several HP-Unix workstations and HP-BASIC instrument control computers

  19. Software For Monitoring A Computer Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Young H.

    1992-01-01

    SNMAT is rule-based expert-system computer program designed to assist personnel in monitoring status of computer network and identifying defective computers, workstations, and other components of network. Also assists in training network operators. Network for SNMAT located at Space Flight Operations Center (SFOC) at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Intended to serve as data-reduction system providing windows, menus, and graphs, enabling users to focus on relevant information. SNMAT expected to be adaptable to other computer networks; for example in management of repair, maintenance, and security, or in administration of planning systems, billing systems, or archives.

  20. Re-inventing the introductory computer graphics course: providing tools for a wider audience

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steve Cunningham

    2000-01-01

    In ACM\\/IEEE Curriculum 91 (TUC 91) and in earlier curriculum statements on computer science, the computer graphics course in computer science focused on fundamental algorithms and techniques for creating images and animations. Forthcoming curriculum statements are going to find a need to expand the role of courses such as computer graphics in the undergraduate computer science curriculum (CUN 98). In

  1. From opportunistic networks to opportunistic computing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marco Conti; S. Giordano; M. May; A. Passarella

    2010-01-01

    Personal computing devices, such as smart-phones and PDAs, are commonplace, bundle several wireless network interfaces, can support compute intensive tasks, and are equipped with powerful means to produce multimedia content. Thus, they provide the resources for what we envision as a human pervasive network: a network formed by user devices, suitable to convey to users rich multimedia content and services

  2. Introducing networking and distributed systems concepts in an undergraduate-accessible wireless sensor networks course

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sami Rollins

    2011-01-01

    The field of wireless sensor networks is growing rapidly and there is increasing interest in providing students with a foundation in the area. Curriculum in the field, however, is fairly limited and most courses reach only advanced graduate students. Undergraduate students typically lack the background, for example in distributed systems and networking, to digest the topics and assignments of a

  3. Theoretical and Computational Advances for Network Diversion

    E-print Network

    Theoretical and Computational Advances for Network Diversion Christopher A. Cullenbine Division and Business, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 The network-diversion problem (ND) is defined,000 edges. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. NETWORKS, Vol. 000(00), 000­000 2013 Keywords: network diversion

  4. Pedagogical Utilization and Assessment of the Statistic Online Computational Resource in Introductory Probability and Statistics Courses

    PubMed Central

    Dinov, Ivo D.; Sanchez, Juana; Christou, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    Technology-based instruction represents a new recent pedagogical paradigm that is rooted in the realization that new generations are much more comfortable with, and excited about, new technologies. The rapid technological advancement over the past decade has fueled an enormous demand for the integration of modern networking, informational and computational tools with classical pedagogical instruments. Consequently, teaching with technology typically involves utilizing a variety of IT and multimedia resources for online learning, course management, electronic course materials, and novel tools of communication, engagement, experimental, critical thinking and assessment. The NSF-funded Statistics Online Computational Resource (SOCR) provides a number of interactive tools for enhancing instruction in various undergraduate and graduate courses in probability and statistics. These resources include online instructional materials, statistical calculators, interactive graphical user interfaces, computational and simulation applets, tools for data analysis and visualization. The tools provided as part of SOCR include conceptual simulations and statistical computing interfaces, which are designed to bridge between the introductory and the more advanced computational and applied probability and statistics courses. In this manuscript, we describe our designs for utilizing SOCR technology in instruction in a recent study. In addition, present the results of the effectiveness of using SOCR tools at two different course intensity levels on three outcome measures: exam scores, student satisfaction and choice of technology to complete assignments. Learning styles assessment was completed at baseline. We have used three very different designs for three different undergraduate classes. Each course included a treatment group, using the SOCR resources, and a control group, using classical instruction techniques. Our findings include marginal effects of the SOCR treatment per individual classes; however, pooling the results across all courses and sections, SOCR effects on the treatment groups were exceptionally robust and significant. Coupling these findings with a clear decrease in the variance of the quantitative examination measures in the treatment groups indicates that employing technology, like SOCR, in a sound pedagogical and scientific manner enhances overall the students’ understanding and suggests better long-term knowledge retention. PMID:19750185

  5. Pedagogical Utilization and Assessment of the Statistic Online Computational Resource in Introductory Probability and Statistics Courses.

    PubMed

    Dinov, Ivo D; Sanchez, Juana; Christou, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    Technology-based instruction represents a new recent pedagogical paradigm that is rooted in the realization that new generations are much more comfortable with, and excited about, new technologies. The rapid technological advancement over the past decade has fueled an enormous demand for the integration of modern networking, informational and computational tools with classical pedagogical instruments. Consequently, teaching with technology typically involves utilizing a variety of IT and multimedia resources for online learning, course management, electronic course materials, and novel tools of communication, engagement, experimental, critical thinking and assessment.The NSF-funded Statistics Online Computational Resource (SOCR) provides a number of interactive tools for enhancing instruction in various undergraduate and graduate courses in probability and statistics. These resources include online instructional materials, statistical calculators, interactive graphical user interfaces, computational and simulation applets, tools for data analysis and visualization. The tools provided as part of SOCR include conceptual simulations and statistical computing interfaces, which are designed to bridge between the introductory and the more advanced computational and applied probability and statistics courses. In this manuscript, we describe our designs for utilizing SOCR technology in instruction in a recent study. In addition, present the results of the effectiveness of using SOCR tools at two different course intensity levels on three outcome measures: exam scores, student satisfaction and choice of technology to complete assignments. Learning styles assessment was completed at baseline. We have used three very different designs for three different undergraduate classes. Each course included a treatment group, using the SOCR resources, and a control group, using classical instruction techniques. Our findings include marginal effects of the SOCR treatment per individual classes; however, pooling the results across all courses and sections, SOCR effects on the treatment groups were exceptionally robust and significant. Coupling these findings with a clear decrease in the variance of the quantitative examination measures in the treatment groups indicates that employing technology, like SOCR, in a sound pedagogical and scientific manner enhances overall the students' understanding and suggests better long-term knowledge retention. PMID:19750185

  6. An Infrared Network for Mobile Computers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Norman Adams; Bill N. Schilit; Michael M. Tso; Roy Want

    1993-01-01

    The PARCTAB infrared network provides a flexible infrastructure for research into wireless mobile computing. The network consists of a collection of room-sized cells each wired with a base station transceiver. Mobile computers communicate with transceivers through a carrier sense multiple access (CSMA) protocol and act as terminals for applications executing on remote hosts. Each mobile computer is represented by a

  7. Code 672 observational science branch computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, D. W.; Shirk, H. G.

    1988-01-01

    In general, networking increases productivity due to the speed of transmission, easy access to remote computers, ability to share files, and increased availability of peripherals. Two different networks within the Observational Science Branch are described in detail.

  8. Distributed computation in wireless and dynamic networks

    E-print Network

    Oshman, Rotei

    2012-01-01

    Today's wireless networks tend to be centralized: they are organized around a fixed central backbone such as a network of cellular towers or wireless access points. However, as mobile computing devices continue to shrink ...

  9. ECE Department College of Engineering, Boston University EC441 Introduction to Computer Networking

    E-print Network

    ECE Department College of Engineering, Boston University EC441 Introduction to Computer Networking working knowledge of MATLAB and Java would be helpful. Course Description: This course is introduction. · Transport Protocols: UDP, TCP, Flow and congestion control. · Applications: World Wide Web (HTTP), Domain

  10. Parallel Computing with “Intelligent Optical Networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ted H. Szyrnanski

    Parallel computing on a class of networks called “Intelligent Optical Networks” is examined. Traditional All-Optical and Passive-Optical networks have very limited abilities to process data in the all-optical\\u000a layer. In contrast, we propose the concept of an “Intelligent Optical Network”, which has the ability to process and buffer\\u000a vast amounts of data within the optoelectronic layer. Intelligent Optical Networks are

  11. Math 484: Mathematical & Computational Modeling Course Information and Syllabus Spring 2013

    E-print Network

    Math 484: Mathematical & Computational Modeling Course Information and Syllabus ­ Spring 2013 problems that arise in industry, government, science and engineering. 1. Main objective is to teach math Prerequisites Math 407 or equivalent first course in scientific computing. Math 455 or equivalent first course

  12. Math 484: Mathematical & Computational Modeling Course Information and Syllabus Spring 2012

    E-print Network

    Math 484: Mathematical & Computational Modeling Course Information and Syllabus ­ Spring 2012 problems that arise in industry, government, science and engineering. 1. Main objective is to teach math Prerequisites Math 407 or equivalent first course in scientific computing. Math 455 or equivalent first course

  13. Multimedia computer support for a course in ground control

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, D.A.; Unal, A. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States)

    1996-12-31

    A prototype multimedia compact disc (CD) was created using the facilities at the Rock Mechanics and Explosives Research Center (RMERC) of the University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR) to teach a portion of a course in Ground Control. Multimedia computers offer an environment where audio-visual presentations can be made in an interactive fashion. Together with relevant animation clips, video clips, and 3-D representations, the difficulties in describing mining processes and earth structures can be overcome. This paper describes the experience gained in preparing interactive multimedia lectures on computers. The hardware and software used in creating the sound commentary, 3-D graphics, animation clips, video clips, and movies are listed. The structure of the program and how interactivity was achieved is explained in detail. Such an instructional tool is not only an excellent supplement to regular courses but it also is an inexpensive and effective way of providing distance education for mining engineers working at remote locations scattered all over the country.

  14. Effects of Computer Course on Computer Self-Efficacy, Computer Attitudes and Achievements of Young Individuals in Siirt, Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çelik, Halil Coskun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of computer courses on young individuals' computer self-efficacy, attitudes and achievement. The study group of this research included 60 unemployed young individuals (18-25 ages) in total; 30 in the experimental group and 30 in the control group. An experimental research model with…

  15. Recurrent Neural Networks for Music Computation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Judy A. Franklin

    2006-01-01

    musical system depends on a history of past states. Recurrent (neural) networks have been deployed as models for learning musical processes. We first present a tutorial discussion of recurrent networks, covering those that have been used for music learning. Following this, we examine a thread of development of these recurrent networks for music computation that shows how more intricate music

  16. Computing aggregates for monitoring wireless sensor networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jerry Zhao; Ramesh Govindan; Deborah Estrin

    2003-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks involve very large numbers of small, low-power, wireless devices. Given their unattended nature, and their potential applications in harsh environments, we need a monitoring infrastructure that indicates system failures and resource depletion. We describe an architecture for sensor network monitoring, then focus on one aspect of this architecture: continuously computing aggregates (sum, average, count) of network properties

  17. Computer networks as human system interface

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nam Pham; Bogdan M. Wilamowski; A. Malimowski

    2010-01-01

    With the dramatic increase of network bandwidth and decrease of network latency and because of development of new network programming technologies, the dynamic websites provide dynamic interaction to the end user and at the same time implement asynchronous client-server communication in the background. Many applications are being deployed through the computer and are becoming more popular and are effective means

  18. Visualization techniques for computer network defense

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Justin M. Beaver; Chad A. Steed; Robert M. Patton; Xiaohui Cui; Matthew A Schultz

    2011-01-01

    Effective visual analysis of computer network defense (CND) information is challenging due to the volume and complexity of both the raw and analyzed network data. A typical CND is comprised of multiple niche intrusion detection tools, each of which performs network data analysis and produces a unique alerting output. The state-of-the-practice in the situational awareness of CND data is the

  19. Using E-Mail across Computer Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazari, Sunil

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the use of telecommunications technology to exchange electronic mail, files, and messages across different computer networks. Networks highlighted include ARPA Internet; BITNET; USENET; FidoNet; MCI Mail; and CompuServe. Examples of the successful use of networks in higher education are given. (Six references) (LRW)

  20. Why the network matters in cloud computing

    E-print Network

    Fisher, Kathleen

    this promise, and security concerns still loom AT&T NetBond AT&T network enabled cloud computing providesWhy the network matters in cloud computing The promise of cloud hinges on flexibility, agility highly-secure access, with the cloud functioning just like another MPLS VPN site. It also allows

  1. Analysis and Design of Reliable Computer Networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Wilkov

    1972-01-01

    In the design of a computer network, one of the fundamental considerations is the reliability and availability of the communication paths between all pairs of centers in the network. These characteristics are strongly dependent on the topological layout of the communication links in addition to the reliability and availability of the individual computer systems and communication facilities. Based on graph

  2. Super-speed computer interfaces and networks

    SciTech Connect

    Tolmie, D.E.; St. John, W.; DuBois, D.H. [and others

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Research into super-speed computer interfaces has been directed towards identifying networking requirements from compute-intensive applications that are crucial to DOE programs. In particular, both the DOE Energy Research High Performance Computing Research Centers (HPCRC) and the DOE Defense Programs Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) have planned applications that will require large increases in network bandwidth. This project was set up to help network researchers identify those networking requirements and to plan the development of such networks. Based on studies, research, and LANL-sponsored workshops, this project helped forge the beginnings for multi-gigabit/sec network research and developments that today is being lead by Los Alamos in the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 6.4 gigabit/sec specification called HIPPI-6400.

  3. A Survey of Computer Network Topology and Analysis Examples

    E-print Network

    Jain, Raj

    A Survey of Computer Network Topology and Analysis Examples Brett Meador, brett an introduction to Computer Network Topology. Definitions of Physical and Logical Topologies are provided. Additionally common Computer Network realizations of Physical Topologies are reviewed. This is followed

  4. Research and Implementation of Computer Simulation System for Neural Networks

    E-print Network

    Byrne, John H.

    Research and Implementation of Computer Simulation System for Neural Networks Chen, Houjin Yuan computer simulation system for neural networks was designed and implemented including system architecture network; Computer simulation; Mathematical modeling; Data representation Neurons are specific cells

  5. A Textbook for a First Course in Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zingg, D. W.; Pulliam, T. H.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses the textbook, Fundamentals of Computational Fluid Dynamics by Lomax, Pulliam, and Zingg, which is intended for a graduate level first course in computational fluid dynamics. This textbook emphasizes fundamental concepts in developing, analyzing, and understanding numerical methods for the partial differential equations governing the physics of fluid flow. Its underlying philosophy is that the theory of linear algebra and the attendant eigenanalysis of linear systems provides a mathematical framework to describe and unify most numerical methods in common use in the field of fluid dynamics. Two linear model equations, the linear convection and diffusion equations, are used to illustrate concepts throughout. Emphasis is on the semi-discrete approach, in which the governing partial differential equations (PDE's) are reduced to systems of ordinary differential equations (ODE's) through a discretization of the spatial derivatives. The ordinary differential equations are then reduced to ordinary difference equations (O(Delta)E's) using a time-marching method. This methodology, using the progression from PDE through ODE's to O(Delta)E's, together with the use of the eigensystems of tridiagonal matrices and the theory of O(Delta)E's, gives the book its distinctiveness and provides a sound basis for a deep understanding of fundamental concepts in computational fluid dynamics.

  6. 3: Parallelism in Microprocessors Course on "Scalable Computing". Vittorio Scarano 3: Parallelism in Microprocessors

    E-print Network

    Scarano, Vittorio

    3: Parallelism in Microprocessors Course on "Scalable Computing". Vittorio Scarano 3: Parallelism in Microprocessors Seminars in Scalable Computing Vittorio Scarano Universit`a di Salerno Dottorato di Ricerca in Informatica 1/65 3: Parallelism in Microprocessors Course on "Scalable Computing". Vittorio Scarano Plan 1

  7. 1/1 (2003), 137152 A first course in computer science

    E-print Network

    Smolarski, Dennis C.

    1/1 (2003), 137­152 A first course in computer science: Languages and goals Dennis C. Smolarski Abstract. The College Board Advanced Placement exam in computer science will use the language Java starting computer science courses at the univer- sity level. This article reviews the purpose of an introductory

  8. Work in progress - assessment of the effects of a computer ethics course on student attitudes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Slomka

    2004-01-01

    The Computer Science Department at Texas State University, San Marcos, recently added a new stand-alone computer ethics course to the required undergraduate curriculum at the sophomore level. A pre and post course assessment instrument was developed and administered for the first time in the fall 2003 semester. The assessment instrument presented commonly occurring professional and general computer-related situations and asked

  9. Gender Differences in the Choice of Computer Courses: Applying an Expectancy-Value Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oliver Dickhäuser; Joachim Stiensmeier-Pelster

    2003-01-01

    The choice of computer courses has a direct influence on the development of computer literacy. It is alarming, therefore, that girls seem to choose computer courses less frequently than boys. The present paper examines (a) whether these often-reported gender differences also occur at the early high school level (Study 1) and (b) how these differences can be predicted by applying

  10. Gender differences in the choice of computer courses: applying an expectancy-value model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    OLIVER DICKHÄUSER; JOACHIM STIENSMEIER-PELSTER

    2003-01-01

    The choice of computer courses has a direct influence on the development of computer literacy. It is alarming, therefore, that girls seem to choose computer courses less frequently than boys. The present paper examines (a) whether these often-reported gender differences also occur at the early high school level (Study 1) and (b) how these differences can be predicted by applying

  11. Using Microcomputer Simulations in the Classroom: Examples from Undergraduate and Faculty Computer Literacy Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Jeffrey A.

    Examples of the use of computer simulations in two undergraduate courses, (American Foreign Policy and Introduction to International Politics), and a faculty computer literacy course on simulations and artificial intelligence, are provided in this compilation of various instructional items. A list of computer simulations available for various…

  12. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Collaborative Computer-Intensive Projects in an Undergraduate Psychometrics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barchard, Kimberly A.; Pace, Larry A.

    2010-01-01

    Undergraduate psychometrics classes often use computer-intensive active learning projects. However, little research has examined active learning or computer-intensive projects in psychometrics courses. We describe two computer-intensive collaborative learning projects used to teach the design and evaluation of psychological tests. Course

  13. A Binary Feedback Scheme for Congestion Avoidance in Computer Networks

    E-print Network

    Jain, Raj

    A Binary Feedback Scheme for Congestion Avoidance in Computer Networks K. K. RAMAKRISHNAN and RAJ and pathological overload conditions. Categories and Subject Descriptors: C.2.1 [Computer-Communication Networks and forward networks; C.2.3 [Computer Communication Networks]: Network Operations-network monitoring; C.4

  14. Evaluating the effectiveness of collaborative computer-intensive projects in an undergraduate psychometrics course

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kimberly A. Barchard; Larry A. Pace

    2010-01-01

    Undergraduate psychometrics classes often use computer-intensive active learning projects. However, little research has examined active learning or computer-intensive projects in psychometrics courses. We describe two computer-intensive collaborative learning projects used to teach the design and evaluation of psychological tests. Course evaluations were significantly above the department average, and students perceived the projects as effective in meeting course objectives and improving

  15. Profiles of Motivated Self-Regulation in College Computer Science Courses: Differences in Major versus Required Non-Major Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shell, Duane F.; Soh, Leen-Kiat

    2013-12-01

    The goal of the present study was to utilize a profiling approach to understand differences in motivation and strategic self-regulation among post-secondary STEM students in major versus required non-major computer science courses. Participants were 233 students from required introductory computer science courses (194 men; 35 women; 4 unknown) at a large Midwestern state university. Cluster analysis identified five profiles: (1) a strategic profile of a highly motivated by-any-means good strategy user; (2) a knowledge-building profile of an intrinsically motivated autonomous, mastery-oriented student; (3) a surface learning profile of a utility motivated minimally engaged student; (4) an apathetic profile of an amotivational disengaged student; and (5) a learned helpless profile of a motivated but unable to effectively self-regulate student. Among CS majors and students in courses in their major field, the strategic and knowledge-building profiles were the most prevalent. Among non-CS majors and students in required non-major courses, the learned helpless, surface learning, and apathetic profiles were the most prevalent. Students in the strategic and knowledge-building profiles had significantly higher retention of computational thinking knowledge than students in other profiles. Students in the apathetic and surface learning profiles saw little instrumentality of the course for their future academic and career objectives. Findings show that students in STEM fields taking required computer science courses exhibit the same constellation of motivated strategic self-regulation profiles found in other post-secondary and K-12 settings.

  16. Computer Science Adjunct Faculty Position for Computer Networks and Database Systems

    E-print Network

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    Computer Science Adjunct Faculty Position for Computer Networks and Database Systems Connecticut College is seeking an adjunct professor (rank open) of computer science to teach Computer Networks (COM315: COMPUTER SCIENCE 315 COMPUTER NETWORKS Characteristics and applications of various networking technologies

  17. Airlines Network Optimization using Evolutionary Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Hiroki; Kato, Yasuhiko; Sakagami, Tomoya

    In recent years, various networks have come to exist in our surroundings. Not only the internet and airline routes can be thought of as networks: protein interactions are also networks. An “economic network design problem” can be discussed by assuming that a vertex is an economic player and that a link represents some connection between economic players. In this paper, the Airlines network is taken up as an example of an “economic network design problem”, and the Airlines network which the profit of the entire Airlines industry is maximized is clarified. The Airlines network is modeled based on connections models proposed by Jackson and Wolinsky, and the utility function of the network is defined. In addition, the optimization simulation using the evolutionary computation is shown for a domestic airline in Japan.

  18. Development of an Online Laboratory for Computer-Integrated Manufacturing Courses

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Alungbe, Gabriel

    This paper describes the development of an online laboratory for students in Computer-Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) courses. Computer-Integrated Manufacturing is a comprehensive topic taught in a 400 level course to senior undergraduate students, and in a 600 level online course to graduate students. Teaching computer-integrated manufacturing courses can be a challenge because of the breadth of topics spanning from manufacturing technology to electronic technology and computer technology which encompasses concepts from manufacturing processes such as modeling and milling, to manufacturing automation systems and manufacturing information management systems. Laboratory experiences are important for technology students in the CIM courses to reinforce theories and concepts presented in class lectures. Therefore, the ability to offer hands-on lab experiences to both traditional students and online students is vital to effective learning [1]. The development of an online laboratory will enable participation in laboratory experiences by distance students. It is also motivated by the fact that presently, as never before, the demand for access to the laboratory facilities is growing rapidly in engineering and technology programs. Being able to make the laboratory infrastructure accessible as virtual laboratories, available 24 hours a day and 7 days a week, goes far in addressing these challenges, and would also contribute to lowering the costs of operating laboratories. Additionally, online virtua laboratories will provide the opportunity for students to explore the advanced technologies applied in implementing web-based remote control/monitor solutions, so to prepare them for their future careers. Current technology enables the remote access of equipment and instruments via the Internet. With the rapid developments of computer networks and Internet technologies along with dramatic improvements in the processing power of personal computers, online virtual laboratories are now a reality [2]. In the early 1990s, the first remotely shared control system laboratory was proposed in the 1991 ASEE Frontiers in Education Conference. The system enables sharing of laboratory data between universities using networked workstations. Since then, a variety of remote experimentation activities have been developed in universities, such as microelectronic experiments for transistor characterization, engineering introduction experiments for circuits and devices, online experiments for control systems, and remote experiments using a scanning electron microscope [3]. The purpose of the CIM online laboratory is to provide students lab facilities and lab activities that can be accessed locally through the campus LAN network and remotely through the Internet. This paper concentrates on the development of a web-based motor control system and a wet process control system for the online laboratory. This paper introduces the hardware integration and software applications implemented in the systems, examines the procedures for the development of mechatronic systems, demonstrates the operation of the web-based control systems, and describes the lab activities that can be developed for the online laboratory.

  19. Integrating psychoeducation in a basic computer skills course for people suffering from social anxiety: participants’ experiences

    PubMed Central

    Löhr, Hildegard D; Rosenvinge, Jan H; Wynn, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    We describe a psychoeducational program integrated in a basic computer skills course for participants suffering from social anxiety. The two main aims of the course were: that the participants learn basic computer skills, and that the participants learn to cope better with social anxiety. Computer skills were taught by a qualified teacher. Psychoeducation and cognitive therapy skills, including topics such as anxiety coping, self-accept, and self-regulation, were taught by a clinical psychologist. Thirteen of 16 participants completed the course, which lasted 11 weeks. A qualitative analysis was performed, drawing on observations during the course and on interviews with the participants. The participants were positive about the integration of psychoeducation sessions in the computer course, and described positive outcomes for both elements, including improved computer skills, improved self-esteem, and reduced social anxiety. Most participants were motivated to undertake further occupational rehabilitation after the course. PMID:21966225

  20. Computer Based Collaborative Problem Solving for Introductory Courses in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, Carolina; Lee, Kevin

    2010-03-01

    We discuss collaborative problem solving computer-based recitation style. The course is designed by Lee [1], and the idea was proposed before by Christian, Belloni and Titus [2,3]. The students find the problems on a web-page containing simulations (physlets) and they write the solutions on an accompanying worksheet after discussing it with a classmate. Physlets have the advantage of being much more like real-world problems than textbook problems. We also compare two protocols for web-based instruction using simulations in an introductory physics class [1]. The inquiry protocol allowed students to control input parameters while the worked example protocol did not. We will discuss which of the two methods is more efficient in relation to Scientific Discovery Learning and Cognitive Load Theory. 1. Lee, Kevin M., Nicoll, Gayle and Brooks, Dave W. (2004). ``A Comparison of Inquiry and Worked Example Web-Based Instruction Using Physlets'', Journal of Science Education and Technology 13, No. 1: 81-88. 2. Christian, W., and Belloni, M. (2001). Physlets: Teaching Physics With Interactive Curricular Material, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ. 3. Christian,W., and Titus,A. (1998). ``Developing web-based curricula using Java Physlets.'' Computers in Physics 12: 227--232.

  1. Queuing theory models for computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galant, David C.

    1989-01-01

    A set of simple queuing theory models which can model the average response of a network of computers to a given traffic load has been implemented using a spreadsheet. The impact of variations in traffic patterns and intensities, channel capacities, and message protocols can be assessed using them because of the lack of fine detail in the network traffic rates, traffic patterns, and the hardware used to implement the networks. A sample use of the models applied to a realistic problem is included in appendix A. Appendix B provides a glossary of terms used in this paper. This Ames Research Center computer communication network is an evolving network of local area networks (LANs) connected via gateways and high-speed backbone communication channels. Intelligent planning of expansion and improvement requires understanding the behavior of the individual LANs as well as the collection of networks as a whole.

  2. Multidimensional neural growing networks and computer intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchenko, V.A.

    1995-03-01

    This paper examines information-computation processes in time and in space and some aspects of computer intelligence using multidimensional matrix neural growing networks. In particular, issues of object-oriented {open_quotes}thinking{close_quotes} of computers are considered.

  3. Does Computer Coursework Transfer into Teaching Practice? A Follow-up Study of Teachers in a Computer Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keirns, Johanna

    1992-01-01

    Reports on a follow-up study of teachers in a course to meet certification requirements. Entry and exit questionnaires indicated that teachers' personal computer skills increased and that their integration of computers into instructional practice was extended by the course, which directly affected their outlook on technology use. (SM)

  4. Enhancing Basic Course Values and Reducing Problems with a Computer-Assisted Student Assessment Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babich, Roger M.

    To alleviate problems with course content, procedure, and philosophy identified by basic communication skills students and faculty, the University of Oklahoma developed a computer assisted Student Assessment Center (SAC) as a basic communication course adjunct. The SAC allows students from all sections of the course to take each of the four unit…

  5. Work in progress — Direct assessment of course outcomes in a computer modeling and simulation class

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keith Garfield

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents experiences with implementing a grading technique to closely couple student performance on specific course outcomes with student grades. The course selected for this technique is an undergraduate computer modeling and simulation course, which required an individual research component in addition to assignments and in-class tests. This class tested a technique whereby assignment of aggregated numerical scores for

  6. Computed tomography-enhanced anatomy course using enterprise visualization.

    PubMed

    May, Hila; Cohen, Haim; Medlej, Bahaa; Kornreich, Liora; Peled, Nathan; Hershkovitz, Israel

    2013-01-01

    Rapid changes in medical knowledge are forcing continuous adaptation of the basic science courses in medical schools. This article discusses a three-year experience developing a new Computed Tomography (CT)-based anatomy curriculum at the Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, including describing the motivations and reasoning for the new curriculum, the CT-based learning system itself, practical examples of visual dissections, and student assessments of the new curriculum. At the heart of this new curriculum is the emphasis on studying anatomy by navigating inside the bodies of various living individuals utilizing a CT viewer. To assess the students' experience with the new CT-based learning method, an anonymous questionnaire was administered at the end of the course for three consecutive academic years: 2008/2009, 2009/2010, 2010/2011. Based upon the results, modifications were made to the curriculum in the summers of 2009 and 2010. Results showed that: (1) during these three years the number of students extensively using the CT system quadrupled (from 11% to 46%); (2) students' satisfaction from radiologists involvement increased by 150%; and (3) student appreciation of the CT-based learning method significantly increased (from 13% to 68%). It was concluded that discouraging results (mainly negative feedback from students) during the first years and a priori opposition from the teaching staff should not weaken efforts to develop new teaching methods in the field of anatomy. Incorporating a new curriculum requires time and patience. Student and staff satisfaction, along with utilization of the new system, will increase with the improvement of impeding factors. PMID:23401203

  7. Pixel Cinematography: A Lighting Approach for Computer Graphics (SIGGRAPH 96 - Course 30)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    A set of course notes that teaches aspects of cinematography for computer graphics. It includes topics on scene composition, camera placement and movement, and methods of lighting for creating computer graphics images and animations.

  8. Computer network environment planning and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalphin, John F.

    1989-01-01

    The GSFC Computer Network Environment provides a broadband RF cable between campus buildings and ethernet spines in buildings for the interlinking of Local Area Networks (LANs). This system provides terminal and computer linkage among host and user systems thereby providing E-mail services, file exchange capability, and certain distributed computing opportunities. The Environment is designed to be transparent and supports multiple protocols. Networking at Goddard has a short history and has been under coordinated control of a Network Steering Committee for slightly more than two years; network growth has been rapid with more than 1500 nodes currently addressed and greater expansion expected. A new RF cable system with a different topology is being installed during summer 1989; consideration of a fiber optics system for the future will begin soon. Summmer study was directed toward Network Steering Committee operation and planning plus consideration of Center Network Environment analysis and modeling. Biweekly Steering Committee meetings were attended to learn the background of the network and the concerns of those managing it. Suggestions for historical data gathering have been made to support future planning and modeling. Data Systems Dynamic Simulator, a simulation package developed at NASA and maintained at GSFC was studied as a possible modeling tool for the network environment. A modeling concept based on a hierarchical model was hypothesized for further development. Such a model would allow input of newly updated parameters and would provide an estimation of the behavior of the network.

  9. Integrated PVM Framework Supports Heterogeneous Network Computing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jack J. Dongarra; G. a. Geist; V. s. Sunderam

    1993-01-01

    The Parallel Virtual Machine #PVM#, an integrated framework forheterogeneous network computing, lets scientists exploit collections ofnetworked machines when carrying out complex scienti#c computations.Under PVM, a user-de#ned grouping of serial, parallel, andvector computers appears as one large distributed-memory machine.Con#guring a personal parallel virtual computer involves simply listingthe names of the machines in a #le that is read when PVM is started.Applications

  10. Computing Network Bill Viewed as High Priority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, David

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is the High Performance Computing Act of 1991 which would provide federal funding for the establishment of a National Research and Education network. The rationale for the proposed legislation is discussed. (CW)

  11. Report on WRITE; A Computer Assisted Instruction Course in Written English Usage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunwell, Stephen; And Others

    A computer-assisted instructional (CAI) course, WRITE, was used at the Poughkeepsie, New York, Middle School to help 5th through 8th graders with spelling and word usage problems. The course used the Coursewriter III language and an IBM System/360 computer; students received self-paced instructional programs at typewriter terminals. All teaching…

  12. Computer Controlled Test Systems. Introduction. A Course Based on the IEEE 488 Bus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrmann, Eric J.

    An introductory course in computer automated tests and measurement systems based on the International Test Instrument-Computer Interface Standard, the IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers)-488, is presented in this study guide. This course is designed to: (1) introduce the electronics engineering technician to the functional…

  13. An Educational Environment for Teaching a Course in Computer Architecture and Organization

    E-print Network

    Milenkovi, Aleksandar

    1 An Educational Environment for Teaching a Course in Computer Architecture and Organization Jovan@kiklop.etf.bg.ac.yu Abstract: The paper presents an educational environment for teaching a course in Computer architecture Djordjevic, Aleksandar Milenkovic, Nenad Grbanovic, Miroslav Bojovic Faculty of Electrical Engineering

  14. Education: a syllabus survey: examining the state of current practice in introductory computer graphics courses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rosalee Wolfe

    1999-01-01

    This column is the second in a series revisiting the introductory computer graphics course for undergraduate computer science majors. It has been 10 years since the last formal discussions resulted in a list of topics for [2]. Of the 23 collected, two were strictly for graduate students and one was primarily an image-processing course. This column examines the remaining 20

  15. Happenstance and Compromise: A Gendered Analysis of Students' Computing Degree Course Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The number of students choosing to study computing at university continues to decline this century, with an even sharper decline in female students. This article presents the results of a series of interviews with university students studying computing courses in Australia that uncovered the influence of happenstance and compromise on course

  16. Design and Evaluation of a Computer Science and Engineering Course for Middle School Girls

    E-print Network

    Dourish,Paul

    Design and Evaluation of a Computer Science and Engineering Course for Middle School Girls Gabriela engagement and interest in STEM curricula, particularly among girls and underrepresented minorities [3 and tested a computing course for middle school girls, and this work resulted in three best practices: hands

  17. A Survey and Evaluation of Simulators Suitable for Teaching Courses in Computer Architecture and Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikolic, B.; Radivojevic, Z.; Djordjevic, J.; Milutinovic, V.

    2009-01-01

    Courses in Computer Architecture and Organization are regularly included in Computer Engineering curricula. These courses are usually organized in such a way that students obtain not only a purely theoretical experience, but also a practical understanding of the topics lectured. This practical work is usually done in a laboratory using simulators…

  18. Bringing a large computer network into FOCUS

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, N.R.; Thompson, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    The development and implementation of the Facility for Operations Control and Utilization Statistics (FOCUS), a new centralized node in the Integrated Computing Network of the Los Alamos National Laboratory is described. FOCUS consists of production control, performance measurement, and network information subsystems. The software engineering practices on which the development was based are discussed, with emphasis on the application of those practices to network systems development.

  19. Reliability computation of multistage interconnection networks

    SciTech Connect

    Botting, C. (Bell Northern Research, Research Triangle Park (US)); Rai, S. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (USA)); Agrawal, D.P. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (USA))

    1989-04-01

    Multistage interconnection networks (MINs) are widely used as interconnection media in multiprocessing environments. Three reliability measures are particularly important for MINs: terminal-, broadcast-, and network-reliability. This paper presents a general algorithm that generates a reliability expression for these measures. The reliability is analyzed under the assumption of statistical independence of failure. Nonetheless, failure dependencies can also be solved. This method is appropriate for analyzing other computer networks.

  20. Computer Modeling of Planetary Surface Temperatures in Introductory Astronomy Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Timothy; Goodman, J.

    2013-01-01

    Barker, T., and Goodman, J. C., Wheaton College, Norton, MA Computer modeling is an essential part of astronomical research, and so it is important that students be exposed to its powers and limitations in the first (and, perhaps, only) astronomy course they take in college. Building on the ideas of Walter Robinson (“Modeling Dynamic Systems,” Springer, 2002) we have found that STELLA software (ISEE Systems) allows introductory astronomy students to do sophisticated modeling by the end of two classes of instruction, with no previous experience in computer programming or calculus. STELLA’s graphical interface allows students to visualize systems in terms of “flows” in and out of “stocks,” avoiding the need to invoke differential equations. Linking flows and stocks allows feedback systems to be constructed. Students begin by building an easily understood system: a leaky bucket. This is a simple negative feedback system in which the volume in the bucket (a “stock”) depends on a fixed inflow rate and an outflow that increases in proportion to the volume in the bucket. Students explore how changing inflow rate and feedback parameters affect the steady-state volume and equilibration time of the system. This model is completed within a 50-minute class meeting. In the next class, students are given an analogous but more sophisticated problem: modeling a planetary surface temperature (“stock”) that depends on the “flow” of energy from the Sun, the planetary albedo, the outgoing flow of infrared radiation from the planet’s surface, and the infrared return from the atmosphere. Students then compare their STELLA model equilibrium temperatures to observed planetary temperatures, which agree with model ones for worlds without atmospheres, but give underestimates for planets with atmospheres, thus introducing students to the concept of greenhouse warming. We find that if we give the students part of this model at the start of a 50-minute class they are able to build the rest of the model and run planetary simulations by the end of class.

  1. Reconfigurable computing for learning Bayesian networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Narges Bani Asadi; Teresa H. Meng; Wing H. Wong

    2008-01-01

    Learning the structure of Bayesian networks(BNs) is known to be NP-complete and most of the recent work in the field is based on heuristics. Many recent approaches to the problem trade correctness and exactness for faster computation and are still computationally infeasible, except for networks with few variables. In this paper we present a software\\/hardware co-design approach to learning Bayesian

  2. Evolving ATLAS Computing For Today's Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campana, S.; Barreiro Megino, F.; Jezequel, S.; Negri, G.; Serfon, C.; Ueda, I.

    2012-12-01

    The ATLAS computing infrastructure was designed many years ago based on the assumption of rather limited network connectivity between computing centres. ATLAS sites have been organized in a hierarchical model, where only a static subset of all possible network links can be exploited and a static subset of well connected sites (CERN and the Tier-1s) can cover important functional roles such as hosting master copies of the data.

  3. Kerberos: an authentication service for computer networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Clifford Neuman; T. Ts'o

    1994-01-01

    When using authentication based on cryptography, an attacker listening to the network gains no information that would enable it to falsely claim another's identity. Kerberos is the most commonly used example of this type of authentication technology. The authors concentrate on authentication for real-time, interactive services that are offered on computer networks. They use the term real-time loosely to mean

  4. Quantum computing with spin networks Andrew Landahl

    E-print Network

    Landahl, Andrew J.

    Quantum computing with spin networks Andrew Landahl , Matthias Christandl , Nilanjana Datta, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA, UK Abstract. We present a class of spin this process. We prove that N-spin hypercube networks with equal-strength nearest-neighbor Heisenberg and XY

  5. Functional Topology Classification of Biological Computing Networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pablo Blinder; Itay Baruchi; Vladislav Volman; Herbert Levine; Danny Baranes; Eshel Ben Jacob

    2005-01-01

    Current analyses of complex biological networks focus either on their global statistical connectivity properties (e.g. topological path lengths and nodes connectivity ranks) or the statistics of specific local connectivity circuits (motives). Here we present a different approach - Functional Topology, to enable identification of hidden topological and geometrical fingerprints of biological computing networks that afford their functioning - the form-function

  6. Computer Networks and African Studies Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntz, Patricia S.

    The use of electronic communication in the 12 Title VI African Studies Centers is discussed, and the networks available for their use are reviewed. It is argued that the African Studies Centers should be on the cutting edge of contemporary electronic communication and that computer networks should be a fundamental aspect of their programs. An…

  7. "Gendered cities; identities, activities, networks a life course approach" Seminar of the Commission on Gender and Geography of the

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    "Gendered cities; identities, activities, networks ­ a life course approach" Seminar Celimontana, May 30-31 2003 Industrial activities, circular mobilities and new gender identity; the example cities; identities, activities, networks ­ a life course approach, Seminar of the Commission on Gender

  8. Program Predicts Time Courses of Human/Computer Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vera, Alonso; Howes, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    CPM X is a computer program that predicts sequences of, and amounts of time taken by, routine actions performed by a skilled person performing a task. Unlike programs that simulate the interaction of the person with the task environment, CPM X predicts the time course of events as consequences of encoded constraints on human behavior. The constraints determine which cognitive and environmental processes can occur simultaneously and which have sequential dependencies. The input to CPM X comprises (1) a description of a task and strategy in a hierarchical description language and (2) a description of architectural constraints in the form of rules governing interactions of fundamental cognitive, perceptual, and motor operations. The output of CPM X is a Program Evaluation Review Technique (PERT) chart that presents a schedule of predicted cognitive, motor, and perceptual operators interacting with a task environment. The CPM X program allows direct, a priori prediction of skilled user performance on complex human-machine systems, providing a way to assess critical interfaces before they are deployed in mission contexts.

  9. Reservoir Computing Approaches to Recurrent Neural Network Training Mantas Lukosevicius

    E-print Network

    Reservoir Computing Approaches to Recurrent Neural Network Training Mantas Lukosevicius , Herbert recurrent neural network (RNN) training, where an RNN (the reservoir) is generated randomly and only, Connectionist, Recurrent Neural Network, Echo State Network, Liquid State Machine 1. Introduction Artificial

  10. Computing with Geometry as an Undergraduate Course: A Three-Year Experience

    E-print Network

    Shene, Ching-Kuang

    field involving computer science, engineering and mathematics. It has relationships to many other ar science curriculum, computing with geometry is virtually missing in spite of its impact on computerComputing with Geometry as an Undergraduate Course: A Three-Year Experience John L. Lowther

  11. Manual for Museum Computer Network GRIPHOS Application.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vance, David

    This is the second in a series of manuals prepared by the Museum Computer Network explaining the use of General Retrieval and Information Processor for Humanities Oriented Studies (GRIPHOS). The user with little or no background in electronic data processing is introduced to the use of the various computer programs of the GRIPHOS system and the…

  12. Spin Networks and Anyonic Topological Computing II

    E-print Network

    Louis H. Kauffman; Samuel J. Lomonaco Jr

    2007-07-25

    We review the q-deformed spin network approach to topological quantum field theory and apply these methods to produce unitary representations of the braid groups that are dense in the unitary groups. The simplest case of these models is the Fibonacci model, itself universal for quantum computation. We here formulate these braid group representations in a shape suitable for computation and algebraic work.

  13. Computer Networking with the Victorian Correspondence School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conboy, Ian

    During 1985 the Education Department installed two-way radios in 44 remote secondary schools in Victoria, Australia, to improve turn-around time for correspondence assignments. Subsequently, teacher supervisors at Melbourne's Correspondence School sought ways to further augument audio interactivity with computer networking. Computer equipment was…

  14. The Networked Computer Science Technical Report Library

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James R. Davis; Carl Lagoze

    1996-01-01

    The Networked Computer Science Technical Report Library (NCSTRL 1 ) is a distributed digital library of research results from computer science departments and laboratories in the USA and abroad. NCSTRL benefits readers, authors, and departments. Researchers throughout the world can use familiar Internet tools (the World Wide Web) to search for, browse, read, and download technical reports from participating institutions.

  15. Spontaneous Ad Hoc Mobile Cloud Computing Network

    PubMed Central

    Lacuesta, Raquel; Sendra, Sandra; Peńalver, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing helps users and companies to share computing resources instead of having local servers or personal devices to handle the applications. Smart devices are becoming one of the main information processing devices. Their computing features are reaching levels that let them create a mobile cloud computing network. But sometimes they are not able to create it and collaborate actively in the cloud because it is difficult for them to build easily a spontaneous network and configure its parameters. For this reason, in this paper, we are going to present the design and deployment of a spontaneous ad hoc mobile cloud computing network. In order to perform it, we have developed a trusted algorithm that is able to manage the activity of the nodes when they join and leave the network. The paper shows the network procedures and classes that have been designed. Our simulation results using Castalia show that our proposal presents a good efficiency and network performance even by using high number of nodes. PMID:25202715

  16. Towards a syllabus repository for computer science courses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Manas Tungare; Xiaoyan Yu; William Cameron; Guofang Teng; Manuel A. Pérez-quińones; Lillian N. Cassel; Weiguo Fan; Edward A. Fox

    2007-01-01

    A syllabus defines the contents of a course, as well as other in- formation such as resources and assignments. In this paper, we report on our work towards creating a syllabus repository of Com- puter Science courses across universities in the USA. We present some statistics from our initial collection of 8000+ syllabi. We show a syllabus creator that is

  17. Congestion avoidance in computer networks with a connectionless network layer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Jain; D. M Ch

    1987-01-01

    Widespread use of computer networks and the use of varied technology for the interconnection of computers has made congestion a signi cant problem. In this report, we summarize our research on congestion avoidance. We compare the concept of congestion avoidance with that of congestion control. Brie y, congestion control is a recovery mechanism, while conges-tion avoidance is a prevention mechanism.

  18. MTX data acquisition and analysis computer network

    SciTech Connect

    Butner, D.N.; Casper, T.A.; Brown, M.D.; Drlik, M.; Meyer, W.H.; Moller, J.M. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, CA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    For the MTX experiment, we use a network of computers for plasma diagnostic data acquisition and analysis. This multivendor network employs VMS, UNIX, and BASIC based computers connected in a local area Ethernet network. Some of the data is acquired directly into a VAX/VMS computer cluster over a fiber-optic serial CAMAC highway. Several HP-Unix workstations and HP-BASIC instrument control computers acquire and analyze data for the more data intensive or specialized diagnostics. The VAX/VMS system is used for global analysis of the data and serves as the central data archiving and retrieval manager. Shot synchronization and control of data flow are implemented by task-to-task message passing using our interprocess communication system. The system has been in operation during our initial MTX tokamak and FEL experiments; it has operated reliably with data rates typically in the range of 5 Mbytes/shot without limiting the experimental shot rate.

  19. Different Audiences but Similar Engagement Goals: In-Progress Work on Two Course Transformations

    E-print Network

    Knorr, Edwin M.

    strategies in a major revision of one course (CPSC 317: computer networking), and in a new course (CPSC 259 and active learning deployment strategies for our other courses. For example, because CPSC 259 is a fairly new course, and is a terminal computing course (i.e., it has no CPSC successor courses), we have more

  20. An Experimental Analysis of Computer-Mediated Instruction and Student Attitudes in a Principles of Financial Accounting Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basile, Anthony; D'Aquila, Jill M.

    2002-01-01

    Accounting students received either traditional instruction (n=46) or used computer-mediated communication and WebCT course management software. There were no significant differences in attitudes about the course. However, computer users were more positive about course delivery and course management tools. (Contains 17 references.) (SK)

  1. Cellular automaton modeling of computer network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhiliang; Deng, Zhidong; Sun, Zengqi

    2002-04-01

    The dramatically increasing growth of computer network has brought us more and more complex systems that reveals plenty of nonlinear complex phenomena. On the other hand, cellular automaton model used to be in the study of a variety of nonlinear and spatially extended systems. This paper proposes a simplified cellular model for computer network, namely the NaSch network model, which is originated at the NaSch model of road traffic. Typically, the NaSch network model is a one-dimension cellular automaton and consists of two kinds of cells, i.e. node cell and link cell. In this paper, the node cell stands for switch nodes in computer network, such as routers and switchers, while the link cell is the abstract of the lines of communication among these switch nodes. The simulation results show that this model indeed captures some of properties of flux of computer networks. The space-time plots illustrate that the randomization in this modeling plays an important role in the emerging of self-organization of congestion. It also demonstrates that the density of packet is another key factor to having influence on congestion. On the contrary, the boundary condition has few contribution to our model.

  2. Analytic and simulation methods in computer network design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leonard Kleinrock

    1970-01-01

    The Seventies are here and so are computer networks! The time sharing industry dominated the Sixties and it appears that computer networks will play a similar role in the Seventies. The need has now arisen for many of these time-shared systems to share each others' resources by coupling them together over a communication network thereby creating a computer network. The

  3. Computer Aided Chemical Engineering CHEN 3600 Spring 2010 Course Outcomes

    E-print Network

    Ashurst, W. Robert

    subject material essential to the course is covered as well as detailing the degree of mastery expected (including "best model" selection via F-statistic). 4. Record, modify and write Excel macros. Write VBA user

  4. On Private Computation in Incomplete Networks # Amos Beimel

    E-print Network

    Beimel, Amos

    On Private Computation in Incomplete Networks # Amos Beimel Dept. of Computer Science, Ben Gurion is what functions can be privately computed in a given incom­ plete network. Every function can be privately computed in two­connected networks with at least three parties. Thus, the question is interesting

  5. On Private Computation in Incomplete Networks Amos Beimel

    E-print Network

    Beimel, Amos

    On Private Computation in Incomplete Networks Amos Beimel Dept. of Computer Science, Ben Gurion is what functions can be privately computed in a given incom- plete network. Every function can be privately computed in two-connected networks with at least three parties. Thus, the question is interesting

  6. FALL 2014 TEXTBOOKS -Mathematics & Computer Science COURSE INSTRUCTOR TEXT(s)

    E-print Network

    Seldin, Jonathan P.

    FALL 2014 TEXTBOOKS - Mathematics & Computer Science COURSE INSTRUCTOR TEXT(s) CPSC 1000A Zhang Invitation to Computer Science, 6th ed. (Schneider) CPSC 1000B Bennett Invitation to Computer Science, 6th ed. (Schneider) CPSC 1620A/B Chali C++ Programming, 7th ed. (Malik) CPSC 1620C Benkoczi C++ Programming, 7th ed

  7. FALL 2014 TEXTBOOKS -Mathematics & Computer Science COURSE INSTRUCTOR TEXT(s)

    E-print Network

    Seldin, Jonathan P.

    FALL 2014 TEXTBOOKS - Mathematics & Computer Science COURSE INSTRUCTOR TEXT(s) CPSC 1000A Zhang Invitation to Computer Science, 6th ed. (Schneider) CPSC 1000B Grant Invitation to Computer Science, 6th ed. (Schneider) CPSC 1620A/B Chali C++ Programming, 7th ed. (Malik) CPSC 1620C Benkoczi C++ Programming, 7th ed

  8. An Adaptive Theory of Computation Online Course in ActiveMath

    E-print Network

    Fleischer, Rudolf

    usually spans three important topics that are at the core of the computer science (CS) curriculum of Computer Science and IIPL Fudan University Shanghai, China rudolf@fudan.edu.cn MinEr Liang Software School course for un- dergraduates spans three important topics that are at the core of the computer science (CS

  9. Talking about Code: Integrating Pedagogical Code Reviews into Early Computing Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hundhausen, Christopher D.; Agrawal, Anukrati; Agarwal, Pawan

    2013-01-01

    Given the increasing importance of soft skills in the computing profession, there is good reason to provide students withmore opportunities to learn and practice those skills in undergraduate computing courses. Toward that end, we have developed an active learning approach for computing education called the "Pedagogical Code Review"…

  10. Copyright is held by the author/owner. RUNNING A COMPUTER SECURITY COURSE

    E-print Network

    Riabov, Vladimir V.

    A COMPUTER SECURITY COURSE: CHALLENGES, TOOLS, AND PROJECTS* POSTER SESSION Vladimir V. Riabov and Bryan J. Higgs Department of Mathematics and Computer Science Rivier College Nashua, NH, 03060 603 897-8613 vriabov@rivier.edu and bryanhiggs@gmail.com Challenges and effective ways of instruction in computer

  11. Curriculum and Course Syllabi for a High-School Program in Computer Science

    E-print Network

    Harel, David

    Curriculum and Course Syllabi for a High-School Program in Computer Science #3; Judith Gal-Ezer y in computer science and has been supervising the preparation of a comprehensive study program based on it the foundations of algorithmics, and teaches programming as a way to get the computer to carry out an algorithm

  12. Routing to Multiple Destinations in Computer Networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KADABA BHARATH-KUMAR; JEFFREY M. JAFFE

    1983-01-01

    Algorithms for effectively routing messages from a source to multiple destination nodes in a store-and-forward computer network are studied. The focus is on minimizing the network cost (NC), which is the sum of weights of the links in the routing path. Several heuristic algorithms are studied for finding the NC minimum path (which is an NP-complete problem). Among them are

  13. Educational Impact of Digital Visualization Tools on Digital Character Production Computer Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Langeveld, Mark Christensen

    2009-01-01

    Digital character production courses have traditionally been taught in art departments. The digital character production course at the University of Utah is centered, drawing uniformly from art and engineering disciplines. Its design has evolved to include a synergy of computer science, functional art and human anatomy. It gives students an…

  14. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a Web-Based Learning Design for Adult Computer Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonis, Konstantinos; Daradoumis, Thanasis; Papadakis, Spyros; Simos, Christos

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on work undertaken within a pilot study concerned with the design, development, and evaluation of online computer science training courses. Drawing on recent developments in e-learning technology, these courses were structured around the principles of a learner-oriented approach for use with adult learners. The paper describes a…

  15. Utilizing Computer Mediated Technology in the Basic Communication Course: "Organizational Implications."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, J. Derek

    A basic public speaking/communication course at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, a general degree requirement, is using computer mediated technologies to make the class more innovative and applicable. The basic course should provide experiential knowledge of the fundamentals of delivering an effective presentation, and, in a more general…

  16. A Matched-Pairs Study of Interactive Computer Laboratory Activities in a Liberal Arts Math Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Frederick; Butler, Melanie

    2011-01-01

    This paper details the culmination of a large, multi-year study on the effects of an interactive computer laboratory component in a large liberal arts math course at a state university. After several semesters of piloting these laboratory activities in the course, one of two sections, taught by the same senior instructor, was randomly selected to…

  17. Discussing Course Literature Online: Analysis of Macro Speech Acts in an Asynchronous Computer Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosunen, Riitta

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a macro speech act analysis of computer-mediated conferencing on a university course on language pedagogy. Students read scholarly articles on language learning and discussed them online, in order to make sense of them collaboratively in preparation for a reflective essay. The study explores how the course participants made use…

  18. Affective Learning in Online Multimedia and Lecture Versions of an Introductory Computing Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moneta, Giovanni B.; Kekkonen-Moneta, Synnove S.

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated students' affective learning in an introductory computing course that was taught in Hong Kong once in a lecture format and twice in a rich interactive multimedia online format to 414 college students in all. A simplified experience sampling method was used to assess affective learning at the midterm and end of each course in…

  19. Formal Methods, Design, and Collaborative Learning in the First Computer Science Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troeger, Douglas R.

    1995-01-01

    A new introductory computer science course at City College of New York builds on a foundation of logic to teach programming based on a "design idea," a strong departure from conventional programming courses. Reduced attrition and increased student and teacher enthusiasm have resulted. (MSE)

  20. The Development of a Distance-Taught Introductory Computing Course in the South Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahlman, Gerrit W.; Robertshaw, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Presents a case study of a "hands-on" computing course taught both on- and off-campus at the University of the South Pacific. Topics discussed include the use of microcomputers in developing countries; course development; written and audiovisual materials; and the use of satellite tutorials and local tutors. (LRW)

  1. The Development and Presentation of Four Different College Courses by Computer Teleprocessing. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitzel, Harold E.; Wodtke, Kenneth H.

    A computer-assisted instruction (CAI) project undertaken in 1965 sought to: 1) teach college instructors to prepare quality CAI curricula; 2) ascertain student attitudes toward CAI; 3) compare CAI with the lecture method; and 4) demonstrate prototypical CAI courses. Teachers were successfully trained in the use of Coursewriter and prepared courses

  2. Human-Computer Course Overview Interaction Design HCI Design I Fall 2007

    E-print Network

    Blevis, Eli

    Interaction #1 2 3 9.11 9.13 Understanding Users #2 3 4 9.18 9.20 Collaboration #3 4 5 9.25 9.27 Affect #4 5 6Human-Computer Course Overview Interaction Design HCI Design I · Fall 2007 Course Syllabus HCI, Interaction, Understanding Users, Design Methods, Usability and Evaluation, Prototyping, Collaboration Design

  3. Distributed neural computations for embedded sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peckens, Courtney A.; Lynch, Jerome P.; Pei, Jin-Song

    2011-04-01

    Wireless sensing technologies have recently emerged as an inexpensive and robust method of data collection in a variety of structural monitoring applications. In comparison with cabled monitoring systems, wireless systems offer low-cost and low-power communication between a network of sensing devices. Wireless sensing networks possess embedded data processing capabilities which allow for data processing directly at the sensor, thereby eliminating the need for the transmission of raw data. In this study, the Volterra/Weiner neural network (VWNN), a powerful modeling tool for nonlinear hysteretic behavior, is decentralized for embedment in a network of wireless sensors so as to take advantage of each sensor's processing capabilities. The VWNN was chosen for modeling nonlinear dynamic systems because its architecture is computationally efficient and allows computational tasks to be decomposed for parallel execution. In the algorithm, each sensor collects it own data and performs a series of calculations. It then shares its resulting calculations with every other sensor in the network, while the other sensors are simultaneously exchanging their information. Because resource conservation is important in embedded sensor design, the data is pruned wherever possible to eliminate excessive communication between sensors. Once a sensor has its required data, it continues its calculations and computes a prediction of the system acceleration. The VWNN is embedded in the computational core of the Narada wireless sensor node for on-line execution. Data generated by a steel framed structure excited by seismic ground motions is used for validation of the embedded VWNN model.

  4. Computational Statistical Methods for Social Network Models

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, David R.; Krivitsky, Pavel N.; Schweinberger, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We review the broad range of recent statistical work in social network models, with emphasis on computational aspects of these methods. Particular focus is applied to exponential-family random graph models (ERGM) and latent variable models for data on complete networks observed at a single time point, though we also briefly review many methods for incompletely observed networks and networks observed at multiple time points. Although we mention far more modeling techniques than we can possibly cover in depth, we provide numerous citations to current literature. We illustrate several of the methods on a small, well-known network dataset, Sampson’s monks, providing code where possible so that these analyses may be duplicated. PMID:23828720

  5. On computer vision in wireless sensor networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Nina M.; Ko, Teresa H.

    2004-09-01

    Wireless sensor networks allow detailed sensing of otherwise unknown and inaccessible environments. While it would be beneficial to include cameras in a wireless sensor network because images are so rich in information, the power cost of transmitting an image across the wireless network can dramatically shorten the lifespan of the sensor nodes. This paper describe a new paradigm for the incorporation of imaging into wireless networks. Rather than focusing on transmitting images across the network, we show how an image can be processed locally for key features using simple detectors. Contrasted with traditional event detection systems that trigger an image capture, this enables a new class of sensors which uses a low power imaging sensor to detect a variety of visual cues. Sharing these features among relevant nodes cues specific actions to better provide information about the environment. We report on various existing techniques developed for traditional computer vision research which can aid in this work.

  6. Incorporating Computer Literacy into a Mathematics Course for Preservice Elementary Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewar, Jacqueline M.

    1986-01-01

    Teaching computer literacy to preservice teachers is advocated. How such a component was added to a mathematics course for preservice elementary teachers at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles is described. (MNS)

  7. Designing and Implementing a Cyberwar Laboratory Exercise for a Computer Security Course

    E-print Network

    Wagner, Paul J.

    Designing and Implementing a Cyberwar Laboratory Exercise for a Computer Security Course Paul J 54701 {wagnerpj,wudijm}@uwec.edu Abstract The development of a cyberwar laboratory exercise Management, Design, Experimentation, Security. Keywords Cyberwar, Security, Cybersecurity, Laboratory

  8. DOE contractor radiation safety CBT (computer based training) course

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, P.R.

    1986-01-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company developed a generic Radiation Worker safety CBT course for Department of Energy contractors. Task analysis concentrated on actual and potential tasks and included visits to fourteen different contractor sites. Team Design and Prototype verification formed the major portion of the development phase. Lesson entry was accomplished using the WISE author system from WICAT Systems, Inc. The course features graded task simulations for both Pretest and Final; fourteen Topics in five Lessons, each Topic keyed to ''Critical Acts'' and Questions in the Pretest and Final; Automatic, Intensive, and Manual modes of instruction available for each Lesson; Practical Problems and Sample Questions associated with each Topic; and provisions for local configuration in several areas. The course is deliverable on IBM PC compatible equipment. 2 refs.

  9. Teaching neural networks using LEGO handy board robots in an artificial intelligence course

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan P. Imberman

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we propose a novel method for teaching neural networks with back propagation in an undergraduate Artificial Intelligence course. We use an agent based approach in the course, as outlined in the textbook Artificial Intelligence A Modern Approach by Stuart Russell and Peter Norvig [7]. The students build a robot agent whose task is to learn path-following behavior

  10. Interaction, Critical Thinking, and Social Network Analysis (SNA) in Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thormann, Joan; Gable, Samuel; Fidalgo, Patricia Seferlis; Blakeslee, George

    2013-01-01

    This study tried to ascertain a possible relationship between the number of student moderators (1, 2, and 3), online interactions, and critical thinking of K-12 educators enrolled in an online course that was taught from a constructivist approach. The course topic was use of technology in special education. Social network analysis (SNA) and…

  11. Analysis of proctor marking accuracy in a computer-aided personalized system of instruction course.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Toby L; Pear, Joseph J; Martin, Garry L

    2002-01-01

    In a computer-aided version of Keller's personalized system of instruction (CAPSI), students within a course were assigned by a computer to be proctors for tests. Archived data from a CAPSI-taught behavior modification course were analyzed to assess proctor accuracy in marking answers as correct or incorrect. Overall accuracy was increased by having each test marked independently by two proctors, and was higher on incorrect answers when the degree of incorrectness was larger. PMID:12365747

  12. Parallel Computation of Unsteady Flows on a Network of Workstations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Parallel computation of unsteady flows requires significant computational resources. The utilization of a network of workstations seems an efficient solution to the problem where large problems can be treated at a reasonable cost. This approach requires the solution of several problems: 1) the partitioning and distribution of the problem over a network of workstation, 2) efficient communication tools, 3) managing the system efficiently for a given problem. Of course, there is the question of the efficiency of any given numerical algorithm to such a computing system. NPARC code was chosen as a sample for the application. For the explicit version of the NPARC code both two- and three-dimensional problems were studied. Again both steady and unsteady problems were investigated. The issues studied as a part of the research program were: 1) how to distribute the data between the workstations, 2) how to compute and how to communicate at each node efficiently, 3) how to balance the load distribution. In the following, a summary of these activities is presented. Details of the work have been presented and published as referenced.

  13. Computational Modeling of Mammalian Signaling Networks

    PubMed Central

    Hughey, Jacob J; Lee, Timothy K; Covert, Markus W

    2011-01-01

    One of the most exciting developments in signal transduction research has been the proliferation of studies in which a biological discovery was initiated by computational modeling. Here we review the major efforts that enable such studies. First, we describe the experimental technologies that are generally used to identify the molecular components and interactions in, and dynamic behavior exhibited by, a network of interest. Next, we review the mathematical approaches that are used to model signaling network behavior. Finally, we focus on three specific instances of “model-driven discovery”: cases in which computational modeling of a signaling network has led to new insights which have been verified experimentally. Signal transduction networks are the bridge between the extraordinarily complex extracellular environment and a carefully orchestrated cellular response. These networks are largely composed of proteins which can interact, move to specific cellular locations, or be modified or degraded. The integration of these events often leads to the activation or inactivation of transcription factors, which then induce or repress the expression of thousands of genes. Because of this critical role in translating environmental cues to cellular behaviors, malfunctioning signaling networks can lead to a variety of pathologies. One example is cancer, in which many of the key genes found to be involved in cancer onset and development are components of signaling pathways [1, 2]. A detailed understanding of the cellular signaling networks underlying such diseases would likely be extremely useful in developing new treatments. However, the complexity of signaling networks is such that their integrated functions cannot be determined without computational simulation. In recent years, mathematical modeling of signal transduction has led to some exciting new findings and biological discoveries. Here, we review the work that has enabled computational modeling of mammalian signaling networks, as well as the demonstrated value of such modeling. We begin by reviewing the experimental techniques commonly associated with model-building efforts, in terms of mapping network interactions as well as determining the dynamic network response to perturbation. We then discuss modeling strategies, and finally focus on three cases that dramatically illustrate the power of models to discover new biology. PMID:20836022

  14. An Investigation of Student Practices in Asynchronous Computer Conferencing Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Vanessa L.; Hewitt, Jim

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the online practices of students enrolled in graduate-level distance education courses. Using interviews and a questionnaire as data sources, the study sought to: (a) identify common practices that students adopt in asynchronous discussions, and (b) gain an understanding of why students adopt them. An analysis of the data…

  15. CIS 4398 Project in Computer Science Course: CIS 4389

    E-print Network

    Wolfgang, Paul

    Time: WF 2:00 ­ 3:20 M 2:00 ­ 3:50 Place: WF TL305A (class) W CC200 (lab) Instructor: Paul Wolfgang:50 Course Web Page: www.cis.temple.edu/~wolfgang Prerequisites: C- or better in: CIS 3238 Software Design

  16. An investigation of student practices in asynchronous computer conferencing courses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vanessa L. Peters; Jim Hewitt

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the online practices of students enrolled in graduate-level distance education courses. Using interviews and a questionnaire as data sources, the study sought to: (a) identify common practices that students adopt in asynchronous discussions, and (b) gain an understanding of why students adopt them. An analysis of the data suggests that many of the practices are coping mechanisms

  17. Computations in Quantum Tensor Networks

    E-print Network

    T. Huckle; K. Waldherr; T. Schulte-Herbrueggen

    2012-12-21

    The computation of the ground state (i.e. the eigenvector related to the smallest eigenvalue) is an important task in the simulation of quantum many-body systems. As the dimension of the underlying vector space grows exponentially in the number of particles, one has to consider appropriate subsets promising both convenient approximation properties and efficient computations. The variational ansatz for this numerical approach leads to the minimization of the Rayleigh quotient. The Alternating Least Squares technique is then applied to break down the eigenvector computation to problems of appropriate size, which can be solved by classical methods. Efficient computations require fast computation of the matrix-vector product and of the inner product of two decomposed vectors. To this end, both appropriate representations of vectors and efficient contraction schemes are needed. Here approaches from many-body quantum physics for one-dimensional and two-dimensional systems (Matrix Product States and Projected Entangled Pair States) are treated mathematically in terms of tensors. We give the definition of these concepts, bring some results concerning uniqueness and numerical stability and show how computations can be executed efficiently within these concepts. Based on this overview we present some modifications and generalizations of these concepts and show that they still allow efficient computations such as applicable contraction schemes. In this context we consider the minimization of the Rayleigh quotient in terms of the {\\sc parafac} (CP) formalism, where we also allow different tensor partitions. This approach makes use of efficient contraction schemes for the calculation of inner products in a way that can easily be extended to the mps format but also to higher dimensional problems.

  18. Instructional Effectiveness of Computer Technology in Non-Computer-Oriented Courses as Perceived by South Dakota High School Business Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, June; Molstad, Lynette

    1999-01-01

    Survey responses from 191 South Dakota high school business teachers indicated that 98% use computers in teaching noncomputer-oriented courses, primarily using word processing, accounting, grading, simulation and spreadsheet software. They felt computers enhance instructional quality, increase student interest, and help match abilities to tasks.…

  19. Social Studies: Application Units. Course II, Teachers. Computer-Oriented Curriculum. REACT (Relevant Educational Applications of Computer Technology).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tecnica Education Corp., San Carlos, CA.

    This book is one of a series in Course II of the Relevant Educational Applications of Computer Technology (REACT) Project. It is designed to point out to teachers two of the major applications of computers in the social sciences: simulation and data analysis. The first section contains a variety of simulation units organized under the following…

  20. Multiple Network Alignment on Quantum Computers

    E-print Network

    Anmer Daskin; Ananth Grama; Sabre Kais

    2014-08-26

    Comparative analyses of graph structured datasets underly diverse problems. Examples of these problems include identification of conserved functional components (biochemical interactions) across species, structural similarity of large biomolecules, and recurring patterns of interactions in social networks. A large class of such analyses methods quantify the topological similarity of nodes across networks. The resulting correspondence of nodes across networks, also called node alignment, can be used to identify invariant subgraphs across the input graphs. Given $k$ graphs as input, alignment algorithms use topological information to assign a similarity score to each $k$-tuple of nodes, with elements (nodes) drawn from each of the input graphs. Nodes are considered similar if their neighbors are also similar. An alternate, equivalent view of these network alignment algorithms is to consider the Kronecker product of the input graphs, and to identify high-ranked nodes in the Kronecker product graph. Conventional methods such as PageRank and HITS (Hypertext Induced Topic Selection) can be used for this purpose. These methods typically require computation of the principal eigenvector of a suitably modified Kronecker product matrix of the input graphs. We adopt this alternate view of the problem to address the problem of multiple network alignment. Using the phase estimation algorithm, we show that the multiple network alignment problem can be efficiently solved on quantum computers. We characterize the accuracy and performance of our method, and show that it can deliver exponential speedups over conventional (non-quantum) methods.

  1. Multiple network alignment on quantum computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskin, Anmer; Grama, Ananth; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-01

    Comparative analyses of graph-structured datasets underly diverse problems. Examples of these problems include identification of conserved functional components (biochemical interactions) across species, structural similarity of large biomolecules, and recurring patterns of interactions in social networks. A large class of such analyses methods quantify the topological similarity of nodes across networks. The resulting correspondence of nodes across networks, also called node alignment, can be used to identify invariant subgraphs across the input graphs. Given graphs as input, alignment algorithms use topological information to assign a similarity score to each -tuple of nodes, with elements (nodes) drawn from each of the input graphs. Nodes are considered similar if their neighbors are also similar. An alternate, equivalent view of these network alignment algorithms is to consider the Kronecker product of the input graphs and to identify high-ranked nodes in the Kronecker product graph. Conventional methods such as PageRank and HITS (Hypertext-Induced Topic Selection) can be used for this purpose. These methods typically require computation of the principal eigenvector of a suitably modified Kronecker product matrix of the input graphs. We adopt this alternate view of the problem to address the problem of multiple network alignment. Using the phase estimation algorithm, we show that the multiple network alignment problem can be efficiently solved on quantum computers. We characterize the accuracy and performance of our method and show that it can deliver exponential speedups over conventional (non-quantum) methods.

  2. Multiple network alignment on quantum computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskin, Anmer; Grama, Ananth; Kais, Sabre

    2014-09-01

    Comparative analyses of graph structured datasets underly diverse problems. Examples of these problems include identification of conserved functional components (biochemical interactions) across species, structural similarity of large biomolecules, and recurring patterns of interactions in social networks. A large class of such analyses methods quantify the topological similarity of nodes across networks. The resulting correspondence of nodes across networks, also called node alignment, can be used to identify invariant subgraphs across the input graphs. Given $k$ graphs as input, alignment algorithms use topological information to assign a similarity score to each $k$-tuple of nodes, with elements (nodes) drawn from each of the input graphs. Nodes are considered similar if their neighbors are also similar. An alternate, equivalent view of these network alignment algorithms is to consider the Kronecker product of the input graphs, and to identify high-ranked nodes in the Kronecker product graph. Conventional methods such as PageRank and HITS (Hypertext Induced Topic Selection) can be used for this purpose. These methods typically require computation of the principal eigenvector of a suitably modified Kronecker product matrix of the input graphs. We adopt this alternate view of the problem to address the problem of multiple network alignment. Using the phase estimation algorithm, we show that the multiple network alignment problem can be efficiently solved on quantum computers. We characterize the accuracy and performance of our method, and show that it can deliver exponential speedups over conventional (non-quantum) methods.

  3. Computer network and system remote management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Peksens; V. Zagursky

    2003-01-01

    This article contains information about computer network and system remote management technologies such as SNMP, DMI and WBM, including an architectural overview and mutual comparison. There is also a look in a practical usage of these technologies as well as in management problems. In the main, it describes the author's provided management mechanism based on SNMP modifications. Finally, several pieces

  4. Manual for Museum Computer Network Data Preparation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vance, David

    This manual describes information processing procedures for Museum Computer Network (MCN) systems. The first section contains general rules for preparation of input: conventions for all data; conventions for controlling the appearance of output; conventions for automatic sorting of data; conventions for user specified sorting of data; and…

  5. Query optimization in star computer networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Larry Kerschberg; Peter D. Ting; S. Bing Yao

    1982-01-01

    Query processing is investigated for relational databases distributed over several computers organized in a star network. Minimal response-time processing strategies are presented for queries involving the select, project, and join commands. These strategies depend on system parameters such as communication costs and different machine processing speeds; database parameters such as relation cardinality and file size; and query parameters such as

  6. Precision synchronization of computer network clocks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David L. Mills

    1994-01-01

    This paper builds on previous work involving the Network Time Protocol, which is used to synchronize computer clocks in the Internet. It describes a series of incremental improvements in system hardware and software which result in significantly better accuracy and stability, especially in primary time servers directly synchronized to radio or satellite time services. These improvements include novel interfacing techniques

  7. Spin Networks and Anyonic Topological Computing

    E-print Network

    Louis H. Kauffman; Samuel J. Lomonaco Jr

    2006-04-24

    We review the q-deformed spin network approact to Topological Quantum Field Theory and apply these methods to produce unitary representations of the braid groups that are dense in the unitary groups. These methods produce a concise proof that quantum computation can be performed within a single representation of the Artin Braid Group.

  8. Improved Algorithms for Synchronizing Computer Network Clocks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David L. Mills

    1994-01-01

    The Network Time Protocol (NTP) is widely deployed in the Internet to synchronize computer clocks to each other and to international standards via telephone modem, radio and satellite. The protocols and algorithms have evolved over more than a decade to produce the present NTP Version 3 specification and implementa- tions. Most of the estimated deployment of 100,000 NTP servers and

  9. high-performance computing networked embedded systems

    E-print Network

    Kareem, Ahsan

    precise high-performance computing novel networked embedded systems integrated engineering business of embedded systems and the development of large-scale distributed systems which include real-time routing obvious is the fact that they are embedded. You cannot access an embedded system and change its

  10. Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing Bluetooth Networking"

    E-print Network

    Roussos, George

    Applications Data Control Bluetooth Stack" RF Baseband Audio Link Manager L2CAP Data Control Bluetooth Stack12/2/09 1 Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing Bluetooth Networking" George Roussos ! g.roussos@dcs.bbk.ac.uk! Bluetooth Overview" · A cable replacement technology! · Operates in the unlicensed ISM band at 2.4 GHz

  11. COMP 347: Computer Networks Cisco Laboratory 1

    E-print Network

    Hamey, Len

    COMP 347: Computer Networks Cisco Laboratory 1 Introduction to Cisco IOS Objective · Log and thoroughly understand the `Theory' section before proceeding to the lab exercises. Theory Most Cisco routers run on an operating system referred to as IOS. Cisco IOS (originally Internetwork Operating System

  12. Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing Bluetooth Networking

    E-print Network

    Roussos, George

    Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing Bluetooth Networking George Roussos g.roussos@dcs.bbk.ac.uk #12;Bluetooth OverviewBluetooth Overview · A cable replacement technologyA cable replacement technology · Design features: b· robustness · low complexity · low powerp · low cost #12;Bluetooth CharacteristicsBluetooth

  13. Modeling Computations in a Semantic Network

    E-print Network

    Marko A. Rodriguez; Johan Bollen

    2007-05-31

    Semantic network research has seen a resurgence from its early history in the cognitive sciences with the inception of the Semantic Web initiative. The Semantic Web effort has brought forth an array of technologies that support the encoding, storage, and querying of the semantic network data structure at the world stage. Currently, the popular conception of the Semantic Web is that of a data modeling medium where real and conceptual entities are related in semantically meaningful ways. However, new models have emerged that explicitly encode procedural information within the semantic network substrate. With these new technologies, the Semantic Web has evolved from a data modeling medium to a computational medium. This article provides a classification of existing computational modeling efforts and the requirements of supporting technologies that will aid in the further growth of this burgeoning domain.

  14. Using satellite communications for a mobile computer network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyman, Douglas J.

    1993-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: patrol car automation, mobile computer network, network requirements, network design overview, MCN mobile network software, MCN hub operation, mobile satellite software, hub satellite software, the benefits of patrol car automation, the benefits of satellite mobile computing, and national law enforcement satellite.

  15. Advanced Scientific Computing Research Network Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian

    2013-03-08

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 25 years. In October 2012, ESnet and the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) of the DOE SC organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by the ASCR program office. The requirements identified at the review are summarized in the Findings section, and are described in more detail in the body of the report.

  16. Causal Attributions of Success and Failure Made by Undergraduate Students in an Introductory-Level Computer Programming Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawi, N.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to identify the causal attributions of business computing students in an introductory computer programming course, in the computer science department at Notre Dame University, Louaize. Forty-five male and female undergraduates who completed the computer programming course that extended for a 13-week semester…

  17. Who Do You Know? Demonstrating Networking in a Careers in Psychology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segrist, Dan J.; Pawlow, Laura A.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a classroom activity designed to visually depict the ability of networking to increase potential job contacts. We implemented the activity in two sections of a Careers in Psychology course. Use of the activity resulted in significant increases in the number of potential networking contacts generated by…

  18. LAN Configuration and Analysis: Projects for the Data Communications and Networking Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Fang; Brabston, Mary

    2011-01-01

    We implemented two local area network (LAN) projects in our introductory data communications and networking course. The first project required students to develop a LAN from scratch for a small imaginary organization. The second project required student groups to analyze a LAN for a real world small organization. By allowing students to apply what…

  19. Workshop Report on Computational Modeling of Big Networks

    E-print Network

    Workshop Report on Computational Modeling of Big Networks (COMBINE) U.S. Department of Energy a collection of high-performance computing resources and a national high-performance network to link-to-end requirements and workflow patterns. For these networks to be a fully integrated component of the computing

  20. Analytic and simulation methods in computer network design*

    E-print Network

    Kleinrock, Leonard

    Analytic and simulation methods in computer network design* by LEONARD KLEINROCK University of California Los Angeles, California INTRODUCTION The Seventies are here and so are computer networks! The time sharing industry dominated the Sixties and it appears that computer networks will play a similar role

  1. Linear Codes, Target Function Classes, and Network Computing Capacity

    E-print Network

    Franceschetti, Massimo

    Linear Codes, Target Function Classes, and Network Computing Capacity Rathinakumar Appuswamy Submitted: May 6, 2011 Abstract We study the use of linear codes for network computing in single of such bounds [10,11,23]. Network computing, on the other hand, considers a more general problem in which each

  2. Presentation and major design aspects of the CYCLADES computer network

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Louis Pouzin

    1973-01-01

    A computer network is being developed in France, under government sponsorship, to link about twenty heterogeneous computers located in universities, research and D.P. Centers. Goals are to set up a prototype network in order to foster experiment in various areas, such as: data communications, computer interaction, cooperative research, distributed data bases. The network is intended to be both, an object

  3. Computability in Anonymous Networks: Revocable vs. Irrecovable Outputs

    E-print Network

    Computability in Anonymous Networks: Revocable vs. Irrecovable Outputs Yuval Emek1 , Jochen Seidel2. What can be computed in an anonymous network, where nodes are not equipped with unique identifiers computed output value: Two classes of problems solvable in anonymous networks are defined, where

  4. Distributed Computing in Fault-Prone Dynamic Networks Philipp Brandes

    E-print Network

    Distributed Computing in Fault-Prone Dynamic Networks Philipp Brandes Computer Engineering & Department of Computer Science University of Paderborn fmadh@upb.de ABSTRACT Dynamics in networks is caused and Networks Lab (TIK) ETH Zurich pbrandes@ethz.ch Friedhelm Meyer auf der Heide Heinz Nixdorf Institute

  5. Fundamentals of Large Sensor Networks: Connectivity, Capacity, Clocks and Computation

    E-print Network

    1 Fundamentals of Large Sensor Networks: Connectivity, Capacity, Clocks and Computation Nikolaos M and operational issues related to large sensor networks - connectivity, capacity, clocks and function computation needs to study optimal strategies for in-network aggregation of data, in order to reliably compute

  6. The Computational Power of Interactive Recur-rent Neural Networks

    E-print Network

    Siegelmann , Hava T

    1 The Computational Power of Interactive Recur- rent Neural Networks J´er´emie Cabessa1 and Hava T, interactive computation, analog computation, re- current neural networks, interactive Turing machines-weighted recurrent neural networks were shown to be respectively equivalent to and strictly more powerful than

  7. Computer and Network Systems (CNS): Core Programs PROGRAM SOLICITATION

    E-print Network

    Collins, Gary S.

    Computer and Network Systems (CNS): Core Programs PROGRAM SOLICITATION NSF 13-581 REPLACES DOCUMENT General Information Program Title: Computer and Network Systems (CNS): Core Programs Synopsis of Program that develop new knowledge in two core programs: Computer Systems Research (CSR) program; and Networking

  8. SFI WORKSHOP: RESILIENT AND ADAPTIVE DEFENCE OF COMPUTING NETWORKS 2002 1 Genetically Induced Communication Network

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Thomas

    SFI WORKSHOP: RESILIENT AND ADAPTIVE DEFENCE OF COMPUTING NETWORKS 2002 1 Genetically Induced: Resilient and Adaptive Defence of Computing Networks 2002) Abstract--This paper presents the architecture. ­ perform customized computation on packets flowing through them. The network is called an "ac- tive network

  9. A Binary Feedback Scheme for Congestion Avoidance in Computer Networks with a Connectionless Network Layer

    E-print Network

    Jain, Raj

    A Binary Feedback Scheme for Congestion Avoidance in Computer Networks with a Connectionless Avoidance in Computer Networks with a Connectionless Network Layer K. K. Ramakrishnan and Raj Jain the performance of the scheme under transient changes in the net- 1 Introduction Congestion in computer networks

  10. Towards a Theory of In-Network Computation in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-print Network

    Towards a Theory of In-Network Computation in Wireless Sensor Networks Arvind Giridhar and P which may be useful in developing a theory of in-network computation, that aims to elucidate how a wireless sensor network should efficiently perform such distributed computation. We review several existing

  11. Predictors of Enrollment in High School Computer Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, N. Jo; Perry, Katye M.

    Factors affecting the motivation of high school students to learn to use computers were examined in this study. The subjects were 160 students enrolled in a large city high school, 89 females and 71 males who represented five ethnic groups--White, Black, Hispanic, Asian, and American Indian. The majority of subjects had prior computer coursework…

  12. Creating a computer science canon: a course of \\

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Eisenberg

    2003-01-01

    Computer science has a reputation of being a discipline in a perpetual state of accelerated progress-a discipline in which our techniques, our hardware, our software systems, and our literature rarely exhibit a staying power of more than several years. While undeniably exciting, this state of continual intellectual upheaval can leave computer science students (and faculty) with a disturbing sense that

  13. A computer aided teaching course on corrosion of concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ramesht, M.H.; Cottis, R.A. [UMIST, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1996-10-01

    Computers provide a powerful opportunity for the development of teaching materials. They provide a rich interactive environment to stimulate and engage the student. The advent of computers with multimedia capabilities allows the constructor of teaching materials to show the student material from many sources; text, chart, audio, video, animation, simulation, sound or photographs. When these are combined with interactivity, a powerful learning environment is created. There is currently no CAL (Computer Aided Learning) or CBT (Computer Based Training) material available on the subject of corrosion and corrosion protection in concrete structures for civil engineering students. This paper will describe a Computer Aided Learning package intended to introduce students to the environmental degradation of concrete structures.

  14. Instructional Material Development for Computer Applications in Adult Business Education Courses. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fort Wayne Community Schools, IN.

    The goal of this special demonstration project was to develop adult secondary business education courses related to the computer. An additional phase focused on the development of a microcomputer-based program providing the needed computer literacy and applications for its use. An advisory committee identified five areas of instructional need:…

  15. Design and Delivery of Multiple Server-Side Computer Languages Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shouhong; Wang, Hai

    2011-01-01

    Given the emergence of service-oriented architecture, IS students need to be knowledgeable of multiple server-side computer programming languages to be able to meet the needs of the job market. This paper outlines the pedagogy of an innovative course of multiple server-side computer languages for the undergraduate IS majors. The paper discusses…

  16. Computer, Video, and Rapid-Cycling Plant Projects in an Undergraduate Plant Breeding Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaels, T. E.

    1993-01-01

    Studies the perceived effectiveness of four student projects involving videotape production, computer conferencing, microcomputer simulation, and rapid-cycling Brassica breeding for undergraduate plant breeding students in two course offerings in consecutive years. Linking of the computer conferencing and video projects improved the rating of the…

  17. Landuse: A Computer Program for Laboratory Use in Economic Geography Courses, Technical Paper No. 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marble, Duane F.; Anderson, Bruce M.

    This technical report describes a digital computer program on the spatial structure of agricultural production and how it can be used in economic geography courses. Chapters one through four, respectively, (1) examine the use of digital computers in the teaching of college geography, (2) analyze the von Thunen theory which postulates laws that…

  18. 63 2012-13SuggestedCoursePlan COMPUTER SCIENCE (GAMES)

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Chongwu

    Graphics CSCI 486: Serious Game Development CSCI 491AL: Final Game Project CSCI 491BL: Final Game Project63 2012-13SuggestedCoursePlan COMPUTER SCIENCE (GAMES) FIRST YEAR FALL: 16 units SPRING: 18 units & INTERACT. MEDIA (10 UNITS) CTAN 452: Intro to Computer Animation CTIN 488: Game Design Workshop CTIN 489

  19. Recursive algorithms in computer science courses: Fibonacci numbers and binomial coefficients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Stojmenovic; Binomial Coefficients

    2000-01-01

    We observe that the computational inefficiency of branched recursive functions was not appropriately covered in almost all textbooks for computer science courses in the first three years of the curriculum. Fibonacci numbers and binomial coefficients were frequently used as examples of branched recursive functions. However, their exponential time complexity was rarely claimed and never completely proved in the textbooks. Alternative

  20. Comparative Study of Various Computer Tools in Electrical Engineering Courses1

    E-print Network

    Cañizares, Claudio A.

    Comparative Study of Various Computer Tools in Electrical Engineering Courses1 Claudio A. Ca~nizares and Zeno T. Faur University of Waterloo Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering Waterloo, ON : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 13 4.2 EES Modeling of AC DC Recti er Bridge : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 17 5

  1. Towards Student Instrumentation of Computer-Based Algebra Systems in University Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Sepideh; Thomas, Michael O. J.; Hannah, John

    2005-01-01

    There are many perceived benefits of using technology, such as computer algebra systems, in undergraduate mathematics courses. However, attaining these benefits sometimes proves elusive. Some of the key variables are the teaching approach and the student instrumentation of the technology. This paper considers the instrumentation of computer-based…

  2. Effects of types of active learning activity on two junior-level computer engineering courses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Saurabh Bagchi; Mark C. Johnson; Somali Chaterji

    2008-01-01

    In several computer engineering and computer science courses, it has been observed that active learning activities (ALAs) aid the students in better understanding of the technical material. In this paper, we explore the influence of the type of the ALA and the academic quality of the student on the effectiveness of the technique. We perform the study in two junior

  3. Relationships among Learning Styles and Motivation with Computer-Aided Instruction in an Agronomy Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAndrews, Gina M.; Mullen, Russell E.; Chadwick, Scott A.

    2005-01-01

    Multi-media learning tools were developed to enhance student learning for an introductory agronomy course at Iowa State University. During fall 2002, the new interactive computer program, called Computer Interactive Multimedia Program for Learning Enhancement (CIMPLE) was incorporated into the teaching, learning, and assessment processes of the…

  4. Advantages and disadvantages of using various computer tools in electrical engineering courses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. A. Canizares; Zeno T. Faur

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses different computer tools used to help deliver, administer, and teach the material covered in two basic undergraduate courses in electrical engineering. The computer facilities, programs and tutorials developed are discussed; however, the paper concentrates more on analyzing the results of using these tools in the student learning process. The students' marks and the results of several student

  5. Computer Manipulatives in an Ordinary Differential Equations Course: Development, Implementation, and Assessment

    E-print Network

    Miller, Haynes

    equations course. In this paper, we present the rationale for such computer innovations, the philosophy cycle of educational renewal and experimentation. The dĂ?Arbeloff Interactive Mathe- matics Project, d at math.mit.edu/daimp>. In this paper we present the rationale for such computer

  6. Anonymous Transactions in Computer Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolev, Shlomi; Kopeetsky, Marina

    We present schemes for providing anonymous transactions while privacy and anonymity are preserved, providing user anonymous authentication in distributed networks such as the Internet. We first present a practical scheme for anonymous transactions while the transaction resolution is assisted by a Trusted Authority. This practical scheme is extended to a theoretical scheme where a Trusted Authority is not involved in the transaction resolution. Given an authority that generates for each player hard to produce evidence EVID (e. g., problem instance with or without a solution) to each player, the identity of a user U is defined by the ability to prove possession of said evidence. We use Zero-Knowledge proof techniques to repeatedly identify U by providing a proof that U has evidence EVID, without revealing EVID, therefore avoiding identity theft.

  7. Design and implementation of evolutionary computation algorithms for volunteer compute networks

    E-print Network

    Mbagwu, Otitochi (Otitochi E.)

    2014-01-01

    We implemented a distributed evolutionary computation system titled EvoGPJ Star (EGS) and deployed the system onto Boinc, a volunteer computing network (VCN). Evolutionary computation is computationally expensive and VCN ...

  8. Computational Power and Correlation in Quantum Computational Tensor Network

    E-print Network

    Keisuke Fujii; Tomoyuki Morimae

    2012-04-04

    We investigate relations between computational power and correlation in resource states for quantum computational tensor network, which is a general framework for measurement-based quantum computation. We find that if the size of resource states is finite, not all resource states allow correct projective measurements in the correlation space, which is related to non-vanishing two-point correlations in the resource states. On the other hand, for infinite-size resource states, we can always implement correct projective measurements if the resource state can simulate arbitrary single-qubit rotations, since such a resource state exhibits exponentially-decaying two-point correlations. This implies that a many-body state whose two-point correlation cannot be upperbounded by an exponentially-decaying function cannot simulate arbitrary single-qubit rotations.

  9. Spiking network simulation code for petascale computers.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, Susanne; Schmidt, Maximilian; Eppler, Jochen M; Plesser, Hans E; Masumoto, Gen; Igarashi, Jun; Ishii, Shin; Fukai, Tomoki; Morrison, Abigail; Diesmann, Markus; Helias, Moritz

    2014-01-01

    Brain-scale networks exhibit a breathtaking heterogeneity in the dynamical properties and parameters of their constituents. At cellular resolution, the entities of theory are neurons and synapses and over the past decade researchers have learned to manage the heterogeneity of neurons and synapses with efficient data structures. Already early parallel simulation codes stored synapses in a distributed fashion such that a synapse solely consumes memory on the compute node harboring the target neuron. As petaflop computers with some 100,000 nodes become increasingly available for neuroscience, new challenges arise for neuronal network simulation software: Each neuron contacts on the order of 10,000 other neurons and thus has targets only on a fraction of all compute nodes; furthermore, for any given source neuron, at most a single synapse is typically created on any compute node. From the viewpoint of an individual compute node, the heterogeneity in the synaptic target lists thus collapses along two dimensions: the dimension of the types of synapses and the dimension of the number of synapses of a given type. Here we present a data structure taking advantage of this double collapse using metaprogramming techniques. After introducing the relevant scaling scenario for brain-scale simulations, we quantitatively discuss the performance on two supercomputers. We show that the novel architecture scales to the largest petascale supercomputers available today. PMID:25346682

  10. Spiking network simulation code for petascale computers

    PubMed Central

    Kunkel, Susanne; Schmidt, Maximilian; Eppler, Jochen M.; Plesser, Hans E.; Masumoto, Gen; Igarashi, Jun; Ishii, Shin; Fukai, Tomoki; Morrison, Abigail; Diesmann, Markus; Helias, Moritz

    2014-01-01

    Brain-scale networks exhibit a breathtaking heterogeneity in the dynamical properties and parameters of their constituents. At cellular resolution, the entities of theory are neurons and synapses and over the past decade researchers have learned to manage the heterogeneity of neurons and synapses with efficient data structures. Already early parallel simulation codes stored synapses in a distributed fashion such that a synapse solely consumes memory on the compute node harboring the target neuron. As petaflop computers with some 100,000 nodes become increasingly available for neuroscience, new challenges arise for neuronal network simulation software: Each neuron contacts on the order of 10,000 other neurons and thus has targets only on a fraction of all compute nodes; furthermore, for any given source neuron, at most a single synapse is typically created on any compute node. From the viewpoint of an individual compute node, the heterogeneity in the synaptic target lists thus collapses along two dimensions: the dimension of the types of synapses and the dimension of the number of synapses of a given type. Here we present a data structure taking advantage of this double collapse using metaprogramming techniques. After introducing the relevant scaling scenario for brain-scale simulations, we quantitatively discuss the performance on two supercomputers. We show that the novel architecture scales to the largest petascale supercomputers available today. PMID:25346682

  11. Networked Computer Science Technical Reports Library

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The goal of the Networked Computer Science Technical Report Library (NCSTRL, pronounced "ancestral") is to provide access to research papers produced at over 60 computer science departments and laboratories worldwide. Users may browse an institution's collection by author or year of publication, or may search through either a simple or an advanced interface. The site aims to advance the field of CS through resource sharing and by exploring related implementation issues. A word of caution: unless using a singular, unique term, avoid the simple search method since "or" operators are implied. Your best bet for searching multiple terms is the advanced search option.

  12. Networked Computer Science Technical Reports Library

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1995-01-01

    The goal of the Networked Computer Science Technical Report Library (NCSTRL, pronounced "ancestral") is to provide access to research papers produced at over 60 computer science departments and laboratories worldwide. Users may browse an institution's collection by author or year of publication, or may search through either a simple or an advanced interface. The site aims to advance the field of CS through resource sharing and by exploring related implementation issues. A word of caution: unless using a singular, unique term, avoid the simple search method since "or" operators are implied. Your best bet for searching multiple terms is the advanced search option.

  13. Computer Networks teaching by microlearning principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A, Zhamanov; M, Zhamapor

    2013-04-01

    In nowadays there are many kinds of problems in the system of higher education. One of them is: everyday students get very huge amount of information. All of them take very big amount of time for a student to understand lesson and it is very hard for him/her to do everything in time. This paper explains a study of work microlearning application for computer networks. It consists of general introduction and purpose.

  14. Criteria development for upgrading computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Efe, Kemal

    1995-01-01

    Being an infrastructure system, the computer network has a fundamental role in the day to day activities of personnel working at KSC. It is easily appreciated that the lack of 'satisfactory' network performance can have a high 'cost' for KSC. Yet, this seemingly obvious concept is quite difficult to demonstrate. At what point do we say that performance is below the lowest tolerable level? How do we know when the 'cost' of using the system at the current level of degraded performance exceeds the cost of upgrading it? In this research, we consider the cost and performance factors that may have an effect in decision making in regards to upgrading computer networks. Cost factors are detailed in terms of 'direct costs' and 'subjective costs'. Performance factors are examined in terms of 'required performance' and 'offered performance.' Required performance is further examined by presenting a methodology for trend analysis based on applying interpolation methods to observed traffic levels. Offered performance levels are analyzed by deriving simple equations to evaluate network performance. The results are evaluated in the light of recommended upgrade policies currently in use for telephone exchange systems, similarities and differences between the two types of services are discussed.

  15. ELECTRICAL, COMPUTER, AND SYSTEMS ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT ABET COURSE SYLLABUS

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Tong

    . Prerequisites by Topic: 1. Motion of charged particles in a magnetic field 2. Electricity 3. Ohm's Law, KVL, KCL-and-pencil exercises/problems, circuit measurements, and computer work using PSpice and Maple; most completed by teams, perform power factor correction 5. Determine the frequency response of a circuit using the s

  16. A novel interdisciplinary course in gerontechnology for disseminating computational thinking

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hen-I Yang; Peter Martin; Debra Satterfield; Ryan Babbitt; Johnny Wong; Mack Shelley; Carl K. Chang

    2011-01-01

    While specialized knowledge and skills are the hallmark of modern society, the size and complexity of contemporary problems often require cooperative effort to analyze and solve. Therefore, experiences with skills, methodologies, and tools for effective interdisciplinary collaboration and structured problem solving are vital for preparing students for future academic and professional success. Meanwhile, computational systems have permeated much of modern

  17. Belle II Experiment Network and Computing

    E-print Network

    David M. Asner; Eli Dart; Takanori Hara

    2013-08-03

    The Belle experiment, part of a broad-based search for new physics, is a collaboration of approximately 400 physicists from 55 institutions across four continents. The Belle detector is located at the KEKB accelerator in Tsukuba, Japan. The Belle detector was operated at the asymmetric electron-positron collider KEKB from 1999-2010. The detector accumulated more than 1/ab of integrated luminosity corresponding to more than 2 PB of data near 10 GeV center-of-mass energy. Recently, KEK has initiated a $400 million accelerator upgrade to be called SuperKEKB, designed to produce instantaneous and integrated luminosity two orders of magnitude greater than KEKB. The new international collaboration at SuperKEKB is called Belle II. The first data from Belle II/SuperKEKB is expected in 2015. In October 2012, senior members of the Belle II collaboration gathered at PNNL to discuss the computing and networking requirements of the Belle II experiment with ESnet staff and other computing and networking experts. The day-and-a-half-long workshop characterized the instruments and facilities used in the experiment, the process of science for Belle II, and the computing and networking equipment and configuration requirements to realize the full scientific potential of the collaboration's work. The requirements identified at the Belle II Experiment Requirements workshop are summarized in this report.

  18. MTX (Microwave Tokamak Experiment) data acquisition and analysis computer network

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. N. Butner; T. A. Casper; M. D. Brown; M. Drlik; W. H. Meyer; J. M. Moller

    1990-01-01

    For the MTX experiment, we use a network of computers for plasma diagnostic data acquisition and analysis. This multivendor network employs VMS, UNIX, and BASIC based computers connected in a local area Ethernet network. Some of the data is acquired directly into a VAX\\/VMS computer cluster over a fiber-optic serial CAMAC highway. Several HP-Unix workstations and HP-BASIC instrument control computers

  19. Electron Wave Computing from Quantum Resistor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. H.; Shankaranarayanan, G.

    2003-03-01

    A quantum resistor network(QRN) is a man-made interconnected thin conducting wires or paths. The size of the network can be in an atomic scale up to a mesoscopic one as long as the electron coherence is maintained in the entire structure. Landauer-Buttiker formulation governs the electron wave transport between any two points in the network. When such a network is mounted between a high and a low voltage reservoirs, the electron transport suffers from Anderson localization effect. Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect with a threaded flux can further tune the forward transmission behavior of the network. Elementary logic functions can be performed using two unit inputs to obtain a desirable output.But Buttiker symmetry rule further limits the output to one half of the input. A full-adder constructed from two generalized four-terminal AB rings shows a reduction of the output to one-quarter of the input,since this is equivalent to two elementary logic functions. The passive network can be convered into an active one when one uses two threaded fluxes of opposite directions in a loop structure of at leat three treminals. This provides a quantum amplifier in the network through the use of quantum interference when Buttiker symmetry rule no longer holds. Examples of elementary logic functions, a half-adder, a full-adder and a quantum amplifier from QRNs for electron wave computing will be presented. Ref.[1]C.H.Wu and D.Ramamurthy,Phys Rev.B 65,075313 (2002)[2]D.Ramamurhty and C.H.Wu,Phys. Rev.B 66,115307 (2002)

  20. Colorado School of Mines Minor's Computer Use Waiver Form For Mines Computer Account(s) and Network Access

    E-print Network

    For Mines Computer Account(s) and Network Access Student & Parent Program Contact Person and keep the Computer and Network Access Agreement of this document). 2. Colorado School of Mines Computer and Network Access Agreement

  1. 1 Research Group on Computer Networks and Distributed Systems

    E-print Network

    Sola, Rolf Haenni

    design for embedded networked devices Data gathering, either for event recognition or for monitoring1 Research Group on Computer Networks and Distributed Systems 1.1 Personnel Head: Prof. Dr. T for Computer Networks and Distributed Systems (Rechnernetze und Verteilte Systeme, RVS) has been active since

  2. The terminal IMP for the ARPA computer network

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. M. Ornstein; F. E. Heart; W. R. Crowther; H. K. Rising; S. B. Russell; A. Michel

    1972-01-01

    A little over three years ago the Advanced Research Projects Agency of the Department of Defense (ARPA) began implementation of an entirely new venture in computer communications: a network that would allow for the interconnection, via common-carrier circuits, of dissimilar computers at widely separated, ARPA-sponsored research centers. This network, which has come to be known as the ARPA Network, presently

  3. Computational Cognitive Neuroscience Assignment 1: Hopeld networks, Schizophrenia and the

    E-print Network

    Seriès, Peggy

    Computational Cognitive Neuroscience Assignment 1: Hopeld networks, Schizophrenia results; it does, however, result in somewhat faster convergence in the computer model. 1.1 Hopeld network and the Izhikevich Neuron Model Grigorios Sotiropoulos, 0563640 25th February 2010 1 Hopeld Attractor Network

  4. TYMNET - A tutorial survey of a computer communications network

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Schwartz

    1976-01-01

    Describes the special features of TYMNET, a computer communications network developed in 1970 by Tymshare, Inc., of Cupertino, CA. Although originally developed for time-shared purposes, TYMNET has taken on a network function as well, much like the GE network [I]. In addition to providing connection to its own computer systems for interactive processing, remote job entry (RJE), and other user

  5. Technological networks and the spread of computer viruses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Justin Balthrop; Stephanie Forrest; Mark E. J. Newman; Matthew M. Williamson

    2004-01-01

    Computer infections such as viruses and worms spread over networks of con- tacts between computers, with different types of networks being exploited by different types of infections. Here we analyze the structures of several of these networks, exploring their implications for modes of spread and the control of infection. We argue that vaccination strategies that focus on a limited number

  6. Mines Computer and Network Access Agreement For Affiliated Programs (26-Feb-2013) Page 1 of 2 Colorado School of Mines Computer and Network Access Agreement

    E-print Network

    Mines Computer and Network Access Agreement For Affiliated Programs (26-Feb-2013) Page 1 of 2 Colorado School of Mines Computer and Network Access use computer, network and other resources efficiently, ethically and legally

  7. Networking from a network coding perspective Submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer

    E-print Network

    Bruck, Jehoshua (Shuki)

    in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Abstract Network coding generalizes network operation beyondNetworking from a network coding perspective by Tracey Ho Submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor

  8. Measuring Computer Science Knowledge Level of Hungarian Students Specialized in Informatics with Romanian Students Attending a Science Course or a Mathematics-Informatics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiss, Gabor

    2012-01-01

    An analysis of Information Technology knowledge of Hungarian and Romanian students was made with the help of a self developed web based Informatics Test. The goal of this research is an analysis of the Computer Science knowledge level of Hungarian and Romanian students attending a Science course or a Mathematics-Informatics course. Analysed was…

  9. Computational fact checking from knowledge networks

    E-print Network

    Ciampaglia, Giovanni Luca; Rocha, Luis M; Bollen, Johan; Menczer, Filippo; Flammini, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Traditional fact checking by expert journalists cannot keep up with the enormous volume of information that is now generated online. Computational fact checking may significantly enhance our ability to evaluate the veracity of dubious information. Here we show that the complexities of human fact checking can be approximated quite well by finding the shortest path between concept nodes under properly defined semantic proximity metrics on knowledge graphs. Framed as a network problem this approach is feasible with efficient computational techniques. We evaluate this approach by examining tens of thousands of claims related to history, entertainment, geography, and biographical information using a public knowledge graph extracted from Wikipedia. Statements independently known to be true consistently receive higher support via our method than do false ones. These findings represent a significant step toward scalable computational fact-checking methods that may one day mitigate the spread of harmful misinformation...

  10. High-throughput Bayesian network learning using heterogeneous multicore computers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael D. Linderman; Robert Bruggner; Vivek Athalye; Teresa H. Y. Meng; Narges Bani Asadi; Garry P. Nolan

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant intracellular signaling plays an important role in many diseases. The causal structure of signal transduction networks can be modeled as Bayesian Networks (BNs), and computationally learned from experimental data. However, learning the structure of Bayesian Networks (BNs) is an NP-hard problem that, even with fast heuristics, is too time consuming for large, clinically important networks (20--50 nodes). In this

  11. Mobile Computing and Ubiquitous Networking: Concepts, Technologies and Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierre, Samuel

    2001-01-01

    Analyzes concepts, technologies and challenges related to mobile computing and networking. Defines basic concepts of cellular systems. Describes the evolution of wireless technologies that constitute the foundations of mobile computing and ubiquitous networking. Presents characterization and issues of mobile computing. Analyzes economical and…

  12. COMPUTING CONFIDENCE INTERVALS FOR STOCHASTIC SIMULATION USING NEURAL NETWORK METAMODELS

    E-print Network

    Smith, Alice E.

    COMPUTING CONFIDENCE INTERVALS FOR STOCHASTIC SIMULATION USING NEURAL NETWORK METAMODELS Lt. Col variance of expected total cost. These neural network estimates are used to form confidence intervals on Computational Intelligence April 1998 1 Corresponding author. #12;1 COMPUTING CONFIDENCE INTERVALS

  13. COMPUTING CONFIDENCE INTERVALS FOR STOCHASTIC SIMULATION USING NEURAL NETWORK METAMODELS

    E-print Network

    Smith, Alice E.

    COMPUTING CONFIDENCE INTERVALS FOR STOCHASTIC SIMULATION USING NEURAL NETWORK METAMODELS Robert A Issue on Computational Intelligence November 1998 #12;1 COMPUTING CONFIDENCE INTERVALS FOR STOCHASTIC network estimates are used to form confidence intervals, which are compared for coverage to those formed

  14. Email networks and the spread of computer viruses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. E. J. Newman; Stephanie Forrest; Justin Balthrop

    2002-01-01

    Many computer viruses spread via electronic mail, making use of computer users'email address books as a source for email addresses of new victims. These address books form a directed social network of connections between individuals over which the virus spreads. Here we investigate empirically the structure of this network using data drawn from a large computer installation, and discuss the

  15. Optimal program and data locations in computer networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Howard L. Morgan; K. Dan Levin

    1977-01-01

    An optimization procedure for the allocation of program and data files in a computer network is presented. This algorithm takes into account the dependencies between files and programs such as occur in real heterogeneous computer networks. Insights into whether or not to convert programs from one computer to another can also be gained from the model. A search procedure for

  16. Email networks and the spread of computer viruses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. E. Newman; Stephanie Forrest; Justin Balthrop

    2002-01-01

    Many computer viruses spread via electronic mail, making use of computer users' email address books as a source for email addresses of new victims. These address books form a directed social network of connections between individuals over which the virus spreads. Here we investigate empirically the structure of this network using data drawn from a large computer installation, and discuss

  17. Security concerns for cloud computing in aircraft data networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nitha Rachel Suresh; Suresh V Mathew

    2011-01-01

    Introduction of cloud computing into aircraft data networks will help in increasing the opportunity of providing services such as VoIP (Voice Over IP) and VoD (Video On Demand) for passengers. Also cloud computing concept in the aircraft data networks will help to reduce the overall power consumption and maintenance costs. This paper explores the security vulnerabilities in cloud computing and

  18. Signal Processing and Computational Model for Neural Networks Chen, Houjin Yuan, Baozong

    E-print Network

    Byrne, John H.

    Signal Processing and Computational Model for Neural Networks Chen, Houjin Yuan, Baozong Institute processing, Computational model, Computer Simulation; 1. Introduction Neural networks have the ability properties and one computer simulation system for neural networks was designed and implemented. In order

  19. A Short Course in Computational Science and Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevick, David

    2012-05-01

    1. Introduction; 2. Octave programming; 3. Installing and running the Dev-C++ programming environment; 4. Introduction to computer and software architecture; 5. Fundamental concepts; 6. Procedural programming basics; 7. An introduction to object-oriented analysis; 8. C++ object-oriented programming syntax; 9. Arrays and matrices; 10. Input and output stream; 11. References; 12. Pointers and dynamic memory allocation; 13. Memory management; 14. The static keyword, multiple and virtual inheritance, templates and the STL library; 15. Creating a Java development environment; 16. Basic Java programming constructs; 17. Java classes and objects; 18. Advanced Java features; 19. Introductory numerical analysis; 20. Linear algebra; 21. Fourier transforms; 22. Differential equations; 23. Monte-Carlo methods; 24. Parabolic partial differential equation solvers; Index.

  20. MIT OpenCourseWare: Introduction to Computer Science and Programming

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Guttag, John

    2012-05-25

    For those individuals who have yet to experience one of MIT's OpenCourseWare offerings, this is a great place to start. This site provides access to the spring 2011 version of Professor John Guttag's popular "Introduction to Computer Science and Programming." This course is aimed at students with "little or no programming experience," and its goal is to help students feel "justifiably confident of their ability to write small programs that allow them to accomplish useful goals." The materials here include a complete set of lecture videos, resources for each video (such as handouts and slides), recitation videos by the course teaching assistants, and homework problems with sample student solutions. The site also includes self-assessment tools and a Further Study area, which includes collection of links to supplement the course materials.

  1. Computational Neuropsychiatry - Schizophrenia as a Cognitive Brain Network Disorder

    E-print Network

    Dauvermann, Maria R.

    Computational modeling of functional brain networks in fMRI data has advanced the understanding of higher cognitive function. It is hypothesized that functional networks mediating higher cognitive processes are disrupted ...

  2. Computer Communications and Networks ITCS6166/8166 -Fall 2010

    E-print Network

    Wang, Yu

    focus will be placed on the Internet network architecture and protocols. Textbook: James F. Kurose: 0136079679, or James F. Kurose and Keith W. Ross, "Computer Networking: A Top-Down Approach", Fourth Edition

  3. Applications of a computer algebra system for teaching bivariate relationships in statistics courses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank Hassebrock; Rita Snyder

    1997-01-01

    Maple, a computer algebra system, is used in undergraduate psychology courses to promote students’ conceptual learning of\\u000a basic principles associated with bivariate relationships. Maple’s symbolic computation, graphic displays, and animation capabilities\\u000a are used along with other classroom activities to study concepts related to (1) correlation coefficients, scatterplots, and\\u000a regression lines, (2) factors that affect the magnitude of sample correlations, (3)

  4. Learning rules and network repair in spike-timing-based computation networks

    E-print Network

    Brody, Carlos

    Learning rules and network repair in spike-timing-based computation networks J. J. Hopfield allows noise to degrade the function of a network. Ongoing network self-repair is thus necessary. We de patterns of a functioning network. These plasticity rules for self-repair also provide the basis

  5. The Benefits of Combining Computer Technology and Traditional Teaching Methods in Large Enrollment Geocscience Courses

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    James Durbin

    2002-01-01

    This article describes a study in which data on exam performances and attitudes toward the use of technology were collected from large enrollment, entry-level Geoscience courses over a span of seven semesters. The data were examined to determine if the use of computers as a presentation tool and the incorporation of the internet as a means to give students increased exposure to course content (notes) increased exam scores and knowledge of Earth Sciences. It was noted that one of the important points about the Geosciences is their prominent visual component, an aspect that is well-addressed by the use of computers and the internet. The researchers found that most students found web-based notes to be useful and average exam scores improved. Comprehensive final exam scores also improved, suggesting better preparation for exams and more retention of course information.

  6. The academic enhancement program: encouraging students to learn about learning as part of their computing science courses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Diana Cukierman; Donna McGee Thompson

    2009-01-01

    The Academic Enhancement Program (AEP) at Simon Fraser University has been created to support student learning by integrating activities that introduce students to basic learning theory and strategies into core first-year Computing Science (CS) courses. Program activities include two required workshops run specifically for the CS courses, tailored to course topics. The AEP also includes a third \\

  7. Preliminary experiences with a tablet PC based system to support active learning in computer science courses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Beth Simon; Ruth E. Anderson; Crystal Hoyer; Jonathan Su

    2004-01-01

    There has been much research on the benefits of active and collaborative learning and on its use in computer science courses. As classroom technology becomes more prevalent it is natural to develop systems that support the use of these techniques. We have developed such a system as an extension to Classroom Presenter [2], a Tablet PC-based presentation system. In our

  8. A Treatment of Computational Precision, Number Representation, and Large Integers in an Introductory Fortran Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, William H., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Computational precision is sometimes given short shrift in a first programming course. Treating this topic requires discussing integer and floating-point number representations and inaccuracies that may result from their use. An example of a moderately simple programming problem from elementary statistics was examined. It forced students to…

  9. Community College Uses a Video-Game Lab to Lure Students to Computer Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2007-01-01

    A computer lab has become one of the most popular hangouts at Northern Virginia Community College after officials decided to load its PCs with popular video games, install a PlayStation and an Xbox, and declare it "for gamers only." The goal of this lab is to entice students to take game-design and other IT courses. John Min, dean of business…

  10. Success in Institutionalizing Basic Computer Skills Courses at a Community College Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodge, Lucy

    This article outlines the development of basic computer literacy skills courses under the auspices of the Title III Grant awarded to San Jose City College (SJCC) of San Jose, California by the United States Department of Education (Grant no. PO31A980093, Strengthening Institutions, 1998-2003). The grant has been in effect for 3 years, and grant…

  11. Developing and Validating Test Items for First-Year Computer Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vahrenhold, Jan; Paul, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    We report on the development, validation, and implementation of a collection of test items designed to detect misconceptions related to first-year computer science courses. To this end, we reworked the development scheme proposed by Almstrum et al. ("SIGCSE Bulletin" 38(4):132-145, 2006) to include students' artifacts and to…

  12. Development of Online Cognitive and Algorithm Tests as Assessment Tools in Introductory Computer Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avancena, Aimee Theresa; Nishihara, Akinori; Vergara, John Paul

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the online cognitive and algorithm tests, which were developed in order to determine if certain cognitive factors and fundamental algorithms correlate with the performance of students in their introductory computer science course. The tests were implemented among Management Information Systems majors from the Philippines and…

  13. Enhancing Learning in Introductory Computer Science Courses through SCALE: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verginis, I.; Gogoulou, A.; Gouli, E.; Boubouka, M.; Grigoriadou, M.

    2011-01-01

    The work presented in this paper aims to support and promote the learning process in introductory computer science courses through the Web-based, adaptive, activity-oriented learning environment known as Supporting Collaboration and Adaptation in a Learning Environment (SCALE). The environment engages students actively in the learning process and…

  14. Agents and the Semantic Web PhD Course of the Computer

    E-print Network

    Robbiano, Lorenzo

    Agents and the Semantic Web PhD Course of the Computer Science and Engineering Program, DIBRIS, University of Genova (Slide from http://www.urenio.org/2011/11/17/semantic-web-for-smart-cities/) Instructors: According to the seminal work of Berners-Lee, Hendler and Lassila (2001) "The Semantic Web is not a separate

  15. MPRI course 2-27-1, year 20132014 Notes on Computational Aspects of Syntax

    E-print Network

    Schmitz, Sylvain

    MPRI course 2-27-1, year 2013­2014 Notes on Computational Aspects of Syntax Sylvain Schmitz LSV, is focused almost exclusively on syntax, while the sec- ond part, taught this year by Philippe de Groote the Chomsky hierarchy, · a basic command of English and French morphology and syntax, in order to understand

  16. Introducing Creativity in a Design Laboratory for a Freshman Level Electrical and Computer Engineering Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkett, Susan L.; Kotru, Sushma; Lusth, John C.; McCallum, Debra; Dunlap, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Dunlap, The University of Alabama, USA ABSTRACT In the electrical and computer engineering (ECE) curriculum at The University of Alabama, freshmen are introduced to fundamental electrical concepts and units, DC circuit analysis techniques, operational amplifiers, circuit simulation, design, and professional ethics. The two credit course has both…

  17. An Integrated, Cooperative Learning Oriented Freshman Civil Engineering Course: Computer Analysis in Civil Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Frederick L.; Groccia, James E.

    Worcester Polytechnic Institute (Massachusetts) has developed a new freshman course titled "Computer Analysis in Civil Engineering" as part of a curriculum revision project which emphasizes critical thinking, cooperative group learning and problem solving, the integration of knowledge through projects, and student responsibility for learning. The…

  18. THE DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPUTER-BASED TEACHING TOOL FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE COURSES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pin Zeng; Dennis N. Assanis

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the authors introduce the development of a computer-based internal combustion engine teaching tool for the undergraduate and professional training courses. The teaching tool simulates a SI (Spark Ignition) engine running in a testing facility. The physical and mathematical models, as well as the control strategies that govern the engine's operation are embedded within the tool. It works

  19. An Assessment of the "Diploma in Computer Engineering" Course in the Technical Education System in Nepal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basnet, Kul Bahadur; Kim, Jinsoo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the Diploma in Computer Engineering (DCE) courses offered at affiliated schools of the Council for Technical Education and Vocational Training (CTEVT) with a focus on the goals of the curriculum and employment opportunities. Document analysis, questionnaires, focus group discussions and semi-structured…

  20. Assessing Change after a Computer Course for At-Risk Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avitabile, John

    This paper describes the change in student attitudes after taking a computer literacy course which is part of a 6-week pre-college summer session. The summer session is designed for the educationally and financially disadvantages students of the Higher Education Opportunity Program (HEOP) and students from the ACCESS program who do not meet normal…

  1. Calculus and More: Computers, Finite Mathematics, and an Innovative Service Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Kenneth R.

    1989-01-01

    A course for life science and social science students at Hampshire College is a combination of mathematics and computer science. Through actively involving students in manipulations and simulations, their appreciation for the logical and aesthetic properties of mathematical tools and their capacity for the independent work is enhanced. (MLW)

  2. multilevel modeling of morphogenesis Course Computational Biology 2013/2014; Paulien Hogeweg;

    E-print Network

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    18 multilevel modeling of morphogenesis Course Computational Biology 2013/2014; Paulien Hogeweg; Theoretical Biology and Bioinformatics Grp Utrecht University #12;Morphogenesis ss. Last time: Influence inter- play Turing mechanism, growth in FEM-like model TODAY: morphogenesis ss. (cont · Mutual

  3. Computer Simulation of the Alonso Household Location Model in the Microeconomics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, Roger E.

    2005-01-01

    Computer simulation of the Alonso household location model can enrich the intermediate microeconomics course. The model includes decisions on location, land space, and other goods and is a valuable complement to the usual textbook model of household consumption. It has three decision variables, one of which is a "bad," and one good's price is a…

  4. A Survey of Knowledge Management Skills Acquisition in an Online Team-Based Distributed Computing Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Jennifer D. E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates students' perceptions of their acquisition of knowledge management skills, namely thinking and team-building skills, resulting from the integration of various resources and technologies into an entirely team-based, online upper level distributed computing (DC) information systems (IS) course. Results seem to indicate that…

  5. The Development and Implementation of Interactive, Computer-Video Learning Tracks for the Basic Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughey, Jim D.; And Others

    Two institutions of higher learning in Oklahoma have successfully implemented an interactive computer-video system of instruction in their basic communication courses. The system will be made avaliable to other institutions. Four learning principles and their implementations comprise the heart of this system including behavioral objectives,…

  6. Assessing the Impact of a Computer-Based College Algebra Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ye, Ningjun

    2010-01-01

    USM piloted the Math Zone in Spring 2007, a computer-based program in teaching MAT 101 and MAT 099 in order to improve student performance. This research determined the effect of the re-design of MAT 101 on student achievements in comparison to a traditional approach to the same course. Meanwhile, the study investigated possible effects of the…

  7. WebStars: Holistic, Arts-Based College Curriculum in a Computer Applications Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karsten, Selia

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of my qualitative, action study was to gain a better understanding of the effects of an experimental college course in computer applications. This inquiry was made concerning both the teacher's and learners' points of view. A holistic, arts-based approach was used by the researcher/teacher in order to design, develop and facilitate a…

  8. Teaching Advanced Programming Concepts in Introductory Computing Courses: A Constructivism Based Approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kleanthis Thramboulidis

    Teaching object-oriented programming in introductory computer courses is still an area not well understood by instructors and teachers. A new approach, quite different from the one used to teach the procedural paradigm, is required. We have developed and used for several years a teaching approach that is greatly influenced by constructivism, which stresses the importance of prior knowledge on top

  9. Maintaining Pedagogical Integrity of a Computer Mediated Course Delivery in Social Foundations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Shelley; Cobb-Roberts, Deirdre; Shircliffe, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    Transforming a face to face course to a computer mediated format in social foundations (interdisciplinary field in education), while maintaining pedagogical integrity, involves strategic collaboration between instructional technologists and content area experts. This type of planned partnership requires open dialogue and a mutual respect for prior…

  10. Exploring Interactive and Dynamic Simulations Using a Computer Algebra System in an Advanced Placement Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsumoto, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    The article describes the use of Mathematica, a computer algebra system (CAS), in a high school chemistry course. Mathematica was used to generate a graph, where a slider controls the value of parameter(s) in the equation; thus, students can visualize the effect of the parameter(s) on the behavior of the system. Also, Mathematica can show the…

  11. Feedback and its effectiveness in a computer-aided personalized system of instruction course.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Toby L; Pear, Joseph J; Martin, Garry L

    2002-01-01

    In a computer-managed version of Keller's personalized system of instruction, students received frequent feedback from more advanced students within the course. Overall accuracy of student-provided feedback was 87%, and students complied with 61% of the feedback. PMID:12555917

  12. Network Computer Technology. Phase I: Viability and Promise within NASA's Desktop Computing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paluzzi, Peter; Miller, Rosalind; Kurihara, West; Eskey, Megan

    1998-01-01

    Over the past several months, major industry vendors have made a business case for the network computer as a win-win solution toward lowering total cost of ownership. This report provides results from Phase I of the Ames Research Center network computer evaluation project. It identifies factors to be considered for determining cost of ownership; further, it examines where, when, and how network computer technology might fit in NASA's desktop computing architecture.

  13. Some queuing network models of computer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herndon, E. S.

    1980-01-01

    Queuing network models of a computer system operating with a single workload type are presented. Program algorithms are adapted for use on the Texas Instruments SR-52 programmable calculator. By slightly altering the algorithm to process the G and H matrices row by row instead of column by column, six devices and an unlimited job/terminal population could be handled on the SR-52. Techniques are also introduced for handling a simple load dependent server and for studying interactive systems with fixed multiprogramming limits.

  14. Interconnection Networks for Scalable Quantum Computers

    E-print Network

    Nemanja Isailovic; Yatish Patel; Mark Whitney; John Kubiatowicz

    2006-04-07

    We show that the problem of communication in a quantum computer reduces to constructing reliable quantum channels by distributing high-fidelity EPR pairs. We develop analytical models of the latency, bandwidth, error rate and resource utilization of such channels, and show that 100s of qubits must be distributed to accommodate a single data communication. Next, we show that a grid of teleportation nodes forms a good substrate on which to distribute EPR pairs. We also explore the control requirements for such a network. Finally, we propose a specific routing architecture and simulate the communication patterns of the Quantum Fourier Transform to demonstrate the impact of resource contention.

  15. Network coding for distributed quantum computation over cluster and butterfly networks

    E-print Network

    Seiseki Akibue; Mio Murao

    2015-03-26

    To apply network coding for quantum computation, we study the distributed implementation of unitary operations over all separated input and output nodes of quantum networks. We consider a setting of networks where quantum communication between nodes is restricted to sending just a qubit, but classical communication is unrestricted. We analyze which N-qubit unitary operations are implementable over cluster networks by investigating transformations of a given cluster network into quantum circuits. We show that any two-qubit unitary operation is implementable over the butterfly network and the grail network, which are fundamental primitive networks for classical network coding. We also analyze probabilistic implementations of unitary operations over cluster networks.

  16. Distributed Computer Networks in Support of Complex Group Practices

    PubMed Central

    Wess, Bernard P.

    1978-01-01

    The economics of medical computer networks are presented in context with the patient care and administrative goals of medical networks. Design alternatives and network topologies are discussed with an emphasis on medical network design requirements in distributed data base design, telecommunications, satellite systems, and software engineering. The success of the medical computer networking technology is predicated on the ability of medical and data processing professionals to design comprehensive, efficient, and virtually impenetrable security systems to protect data bases, network access and services, and patient confidentiality.

  17. Life-Course Events, Social Networks, and the Emergence of Violence among Female Gang Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleisher, Mark S.; Krienert, Jessie L.

    2004-01-01

    Using data gathered from a multi-year field study, this article identifies specific life-course events shared by gang-affiliated women. Gangs emerge as a cultural adaptation or pro-social community response to poverty and racial isolation. Through the use of a social-network approach, data show that violence dramatically increases in the period…

  18. Continuing Dental Education via an Interactive Video Network: Course Development, Implementation and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Lynn A.; Lohman, Margaret C.; Sharp, Jamie D.; Krenz, T. Scott

    2000-01-01

    Describes the development of a continuing dental education program at the University of Iowa offered via the Iowa Communications Network. Discusses advantages of distance education, including lessening travel time and expense; interactive audio and video technology; participant evaluation; and future possibilities, including offering courses over…

  19. Capstone Course: Wireless Sensor Networks Experiment for WCC: Channel and Antenna Characterization

    E-print Network

    muse Capstone Course: Wireless Sensor Networks Experiment for WCC: Channel and Antenna running, and modify it to produce more useful restuls. 5. Explore the characteristics of wireless running Windows (XP or Vista) · TI eZ430-RF2500 MSP430 Wireless Development Tool · TI's CCS integrated

  20. Capstone Course: Wireless Sensor Networks Experiment ADC: Sensing and Analog-to-Digital Conversion

    E-print Network

    muse Capstone Course: Wireless Sensor Networks Experiment ADC: Sensing and Analog-to-Digital Conversion Objectives 1. Get familiar with the CLIO wireless sensor node development platform. 2. See how Wireless Development Tool with two-row 18-pin female header attached to the bottom and with each of the 18

  1. Culture, Role and Group Work: A Social Network Analysis Perspective on an Online Collaborative Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stepanyan, Karen; Mather, Richard; Dalrymple, Roger

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the patterns of network dynamics within a multicultural online collaborative learning environment. It analyses the interaction of participants (both students and facilitators) within a discussion board that was established as part of a 3-month online collaborative course. The study employs longitudinal probabilistic social…

  2. Thematic Modules in an Asynchronous Learning Network: A Scandinavian Perspective on the Design of Introductory Courses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Urban Nulden

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses an educational philosophy and proposes a framework for structuring introductory courses in higher education. The philosophy is rooted in a Scandinavian tradition of social settings. Two elements are central in the philosophy: First, the notion of a thematic module (TM) which is a unit for studying a limited subject matter or topic. Second, asynchronous learning networks (ALN),

  3. Design of a Competitive and Collaborative Learning Strategy in a Communication Networks Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regueras, L. M.; Verdu, E.; Verdu, M. J.; de Castro, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, an educational methodology based on collaborative and competitive learning is proposed. The suggested approach has been successfully applied to an undergraduate communication networks course, which is part of the core curriculum of the three-year degree in telecommunications engineering at the University of Valladolid in Spain. This…

  4. Normalizing Social Networking in a Beginners' Japanese Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morofushi, Mari; Pasfield-Neofitou, Sarah Ellen

    2014-01-01

    With the spread of the Internet, students now have greater opportunities to use Japanese outside of the classroom. For example, they can interact with other Japanese speakers through instant messaging or social networking, or utilize online dictionaries and translation tools to decipher websites in ways that would be impossible with traditional…

  5. Normalizing social networking in a beginners’ Japanese course

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mari Morofushi; Sarah Ellen Pasfield-Neofitou

    2012-01-01

    With the spread of the Internet, students now have greater opportunities to use Japanese outside of the classroom. For example, they can interact with other Japanese speakers through instant messaging or social networking, or utilize online dictionaries and translation tools to decipher websites in ways that would be impossible with traditional printed materials. One of the best ways to equip

  6. The Use of a PDP-11/20 Computer in a Non-Calculus General Physics Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, David U. L.

    Computer-assisted instruction supplements traditional methods in a non-calculus physics course offered at Seattle Pacific College. Thirty-five science majors enrolled in the first quarter and 32 continued in the second term. The hardware for the course consists of a PDP-11/20 computer and eight teletype terminals; additional peripheral equipment…

  7. Computational Intelligence in Multimedia Networking and Communications: Trends and

    E-print Network

    Guturu, Parthasarathy

    Computational Intelligence in Multimedia Networking and Communications: Trends and Future multimedia researchers in recent times have developed computational intelligence (CI) based methods. From these applications, it appears that the various computa- tional intelligence frameworks

  8. Network-Aware Partitioning of Computation in Diamond

    E-print Network

    Network-Aware Partitioning of Computation in Diamond Alex Nizhner1 Larry Huston2 Peter Steenkiste Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Abstract The Diamond storage architecture enables efficient interactive search efficient use of resources under dynamic conditions, Diamond adaptively partitions computation among

  9. Visualization techniques for computer network defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaver, Justin M.; Steed, Chad A.; Patton, Robert M.; Cui, Xiaohui; Schultz, Matthew

    2011-06-01

    Effective visual analysis of computer network defense (CND) information is challenging due to the volume and complexity of both the raw and analyzed network data. A typical CND is comprised of multiple niche intrusion detection tools, each of which performs network data analysis and produces a unique alerting output. The state-of-the-practice in the situational awareness of CND data is the prevalent use of custom-developed scripts by Information Technology (IT) professionals to retrieve, organize, and understand potential threat events. We propose a new visual analytics framework, called the Oak Ridge Cyber Analytics (ORCA) system, for CND data that allows an operator to interact with all detection tool outputs simultaneously. Aggregated alert events are presented in multiple coordinated views with timeline, cluster, and swarm model analysis displays. These displays are complemented with both supervised and semi-supervised machine learning classifiers. The intent of the visual analytics framework is to improve CND situational awareness, to enable an analyst to quickly navigate and analyze thousands of detected events, and to combine sophisticated data analysis techniques with interactive visualization such that patterns of anomalous activities may be more easily identified and investigated.

  10. Visualization Techniques for Computer Network Defense

    SciTech Connect

    Beaver, Justin M [ORNL; Steed, Chad A [ORNL; Patton, Robert M [ORNL; Cui, Xiaohui [ORNL; Schultz, Matthew A [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Effective visual analysis of computer network defense (CND) information is challenging due to the volume and complexity of both the raw and analyzed network data. A typical CND is comprised of multiple niche intrusion detection tools, each of which performs network data analysis and produces a unique alerting output. The state-of-the-practice in the situational awareness of CND data is the prevalent use of custom-developed scripts by Information Technology (IT) professionals to retrieve, organize, and understand potential threat events. We propose a new visual analytics framework, called the Oak Ridge Cyber Analytics (ORCA) system, for CND data that allows an operator to interact with all detection tool outputs simultaneously. Aggregated alert events are presented in multiple coordinated views with timeline, cluster, and swarm model analysis displays. These displays are complemented with both supervised and semi-supervised machine learning classifiers. The intent of the visual analytics framework is to improve CND situational awareness, to enable an analyst to quickly navigate and analyze thousands of detected events, and to combine sophisticated data analysis techniques with interactive visualization such that patterns of anomalous activities may be more easily identified and investigated.

  11. A complex network approach to cloud computing

    E-print Network

    Travieso, Gonzalo; Bruno, Odemir Martinez; Costa, Luciano da Fontoura

    2015-01-01

    Cloud computing has become an important means to speed up computing. One problem influencing heavily the performance of such systems is the choice of nodes as servers responsible for executing the users' tasks. In this article we report how complex networks can be used to model such a problem. More specifically, we investigate the performance of the processing respectively to cloud systems underlain by Erdos-Renyi and Barabasi-Albert topology containing two servers. Cloud networks involving two communities not necessarily of the same size are also considered in our analysis. The performance of each configuration is quantified in terms of two indices: the cost of communication between the user and the nearest server, and the balance of the distribution of tasks between the two servers. Regarding the latter index, the ER topology provides better performance than the BA case for smaller average degrees and opposite behavior for larger average degrees. With respect to the cost, smaller values are found in the BA ...

  12. Quantum computation over the butterfly network

    SciTech Connect

    Soeda, Akihito; Kinjo, Yoshiyuki; Turner, Peter S. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Murao, Mio [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Institute for Nano Quantum Information Electronics, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2011-07-15

    In order to investigate distributed quantum computation under restricted network resources, we introduce a quantum computation task over the butterfly network where both quantum and classical communications are limited. We consider deterministically performing a two-qubit global unitary operation on two unknown inputs given at different nodes, with outputs at two distinct nodes. By using a particular resource setting introduced by M. Hayashi [Phys. Rev. A 76, 040301(R) (2007)], which is capable of performing a swap operation by adding two maximally entangled qubits (ebits) between the two input nodes, we show that unitary operations can be performed without adding any entanglement resource, if and only if the unitary operations are locally unitary equivalent to controlled unitary operations. Our protocol is optimal in the sense that the unitary operations cannot be implemented if we relax the specifications of any of the channels. We also construct protocols for performing controlled traceless unitary operations with a 1-ebit resource and for performing global Clifford operations with a 2-ebit resource.

  13. Quantum computation over the butterfly network

    E-print Network

    Akihito Soeda; Yoshiyuki Kinjo; Peter S. Turner; Mio Murao

    2011-07-14

    In order to investigate distributed quantum computation under restricted network resources, we introduce a quantum computation task over the butterfly network where both quantum and classical communications are limited. We consider deterministically performing a two-qubit global unitary operation on two unknown inputs given at different nodes, with outputs at two distinct nodes. By using a particular resource setting introduced by M. Hayashi [Phys. Rev. A \\textbf{76}, 040301(R) (2007)], which is capable of performing a swap operation by adding two maximally entangled qubits (ebits) between the two input nodes, we show that unitary operations can be performed without adding any entanglement resource, if and only if the unitary operations are locally unitary equivalent to controlled unitary operations. Our protocol is optimal in the sense that the unitary operations cannot be implemented if we relax the specifications of any of the channels. We also construct protocols for performing controlled traceless unitary operations with a 1-ebit resource and for performing global Clifford operations with a 2-ebit resource.

  14. A Comparison of Student-Teachers' Attitudes toward Computers in On-Line and Traditional Computer Literacy Courses: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurbuz, Tarkan; Yildirim, I. Soner; Ozden, M. Yasar

    This study examined the effect of two computer literacy courses (one was offered online, and the other was offered through traditional methods) at the Middle East Technical University (Turkey). The two courses were compared in terms of their effectiveness on computer attitudes of student-teachers. The study also explored the other factors that…

  15. Computer Networks as Social Networks: Collaborative Work, Telework, and Virtual Community

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barry Wellman; Janet Salaff; Dimitrina Dimitrova; Laura Garton; Milena Gulia; Caroline Haythornthwaite

    1996-01-01

    When computer networks link people as well as machines, they become social networks. Such computer-supported social networks (CSSNs) are becoming im- portant bases of virtual communities, computer-supported cooperative work, and telework. Computer-mediated communication such as electronic mail and com- puterized conferencing is usually text-based and asynchronous. It has limited social presence, and on-line communications are often more uninhibited, cre- ative,

  16. Optimizing brain networks topologies using multi-objective evolutionary computation.

    PubMed

    Santana, Roberto; Bielza, Concha; Larrańaga, Pedro

    2011-03-01

    The analysis of brain network topological features has served to better understand these networks and reveal particular characteristics of their functional behavior. The distribution of brain network motifs is particularly useful for detecting and describing differences between brain networks and random and computationally optimized artificial networks. In this paper we use a multi-objective evolutionary optimization approach to generate optimized artificial networks that have a number of topological features resembling brain networks. The Pareto set approximation of the optimized networks is used to extract network descriptors that are compared to brain and random network descriptors. To analyze the networks, the clustering coefficient, the average path length, the modularity and the betweenness centrality are computed. We argue that the topological complexity of a brain network can be estimated using the number of evaluations needed by an optimization algorithm to output artificial networks of similar complexity. For the analyzed network examples, our results indicate that while original brain networks have a reduced structural motif number and a high functional motif number, they are not optimal with respect to these two topological features. We also investigate the correlation between the structural and functional motif numbers, the average path length and the clustering coefficient in random, optimized and brain networks. PMID:20882369

  17. Computational functions in biochemical reaction networks.

    PubMed Central

    Arkin, A; Ross, J

    1994-01-01

    In prior work we demonstrated the implementation of logic gates, sequential computers (universal Turing machines), and parallel computers by means of the kinetics of chemical reaction mechanisms. In the present article we develop this subject further by first investigating the computational properties of several enzymatic (single and multiple) reaction mechanisms: we show their steady states are analogous to either Boolean or fuzzy logic gates. Nearly perfect digital function is obtained only in the regime in which the enzymes are saturated with their substrates. With these enzymatic gates, we construct combinational chemical networks that execute a given truth-table. The dynamic range of a network's output is strongly affected by "input/output matching" conditions among the internal gate elements. We find a simple mechanism, similar to the interconversion of fructose-6-phosphate between its two bisphosphate forms (fructose-1,6-bisphosphate and fructose-2,6-bisphosphate), that functions analogously to an AND gate. When the simple model is supplanted with one in which the enzyme rate laws are derived from experimental data, the steady state of the mechanism functions as an asymmetric fuzzy aggregation operator with properties akin to a fuzzy AND gate. The qualitative behavior of the mechanism does not change when situated within a large model of glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and the TCA cycle. The mechanism, in this case, switches the pathway's mode from glycolysis to gluconeogenesis in response to chemical signals of low blood glucose (cAMP) and abundant fuel for the TCA cycle (acetyl coenzyme A). Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 PMID:7948674

  18. Communications Training Courses Across the Leopold Leadership Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayden, T.; Gerber, L. R.; Silver, W. L.

    2012-12-01

    For nearly fifteen years, the Leopold Leadership Program has provided science communication training and support to mid-career academic environmental researchers from across North America. There has been an emphasis throughout on effective communication to non-scientific audiences. Increasingly, Leopold fellows have been developing communications courses for their own students, responding to the need for future scientists to be able to communicate well with the public, the media, policy makers and other audiences. At a June 2012 reunion meeting, a group of past fellows and communications trainers conducted a curriculum exchange, sharing experiences and ideas for successful inclusion of communications training in environmental science curricula. This presentation will present case studies from several institutions, including the use of podcasting, web columns, social media, in-person presentation and other presentation styles for connecting general audiences. We will share best practices, challenges and recommendations for curriculum development and institutional acceptance.

  19. Network Patch Cables Demystified: A Super Activity for Computer Networking Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Douglas L.

    2004-01-01

    This article de-mystifies network patch cable secrets so that people can connect their computers and transfer those pesky files--without screaming at the cables. It describes a network cabling activity that can offer students a great hands-on opportunity for working with the tools, techniques, and media used in computer networking. Since the…

  20. Computation of Normal Logic Programs by Fibring Neural Networks

    E-print Network

    Seda, Anthony Karel

    Computation of Normal Logic Programs by Fibring Neural Networks Vladimir Komendantsky1 and Anthony of the integration of fibring neural net- works (a generalization of conventional neural networks) into model by fibring neural networks of semantic immediate consequence operators TP and TP , where TP denotes

  1. A NEURAL NETWORK ARCHITECTURE THAT COMPUTES ITS OWN RELIABILITY

    E-print Network

    Ungar, Lyle H.

    ., 1990). Neural networks have been used for system identification and control by 1 many researchers as predictive models as well as for pattern recognition. Neural networks have been used successfully to modelA NEURAL NETWORK ARCHITECTURE THAT COMPUTES ITS OWN RELIABILITY J. A. LEONARD,'M. A. KRAMER'and L

  2. Time and Location in Sensor Networks Institute for Pervasive Computing

    E-print Network

    is that physical time and location play a crucial role in sen- sor networks. To understand why this is true, let usTime and Location in Sensor Networks Kay R¨omer Institute for Pervasive Computing ETH Zurich roemer@inf.ethz.ch Abstract Due to the close coupling of sensor networks to the real world, physical time and location play

  3. SNAP: A computer program for generating symbolic network functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, P. M.; Alderson, G. E.

    1970-01-01

    The computer program SNAP (symbolic network analysis program) generates symbolic network functions for networks containing R, L, and C type elements and all four types of controlled sources. The program is efficient with respect to program storage and execution time. A discussion of the basic algorithms is presented, together with user's and programmer's guides.

  4. A global security architecture for intrusion detection on computer networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abdoul Karim Ganame; Julien Bourgeois; Renaud Bidou; François Spies

    2008-01-01

    Detecting all kinds of intrusions efficiently requires a global view of the monitored network. Built to increase the security of computer networks, traditional IDS's are unfortunately unable to give a global view of the security of a network. To overcome this situation, we are developing a distributed SOC (Security Operation Center) which is able to detect attacks occurring simultaneously on

  5. A Global Security Architecture for Intrusion Detection on Computer Networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abdoul Karim Ganame; Julien Bourgeois; Renaud Bidou; François Spies

    2007-01-01

    Detecting all kinds of intrusions efficiently requires a global view of the monitored network. Built to increase the security of computer networks, traditional IDS are unfortunately unable to give a global view of the security of a network. To overcome this situation, we are developing a distributed SOC (Security Operation Center) which is able to detect attacks occurring simultaneously on

  6. Computing communities in large networks using random walks (long version)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pascal Pons; Matthieu Latapy

    2005-01-01

    Dense subgraphs of sparse graphs (communities), which appear in most real-world complex networks, play an important role in many contexts. Computing them however is generally expensive. We propose here a measure of similarities between vertices based on random walks which has several important advantages: it captures well the community structure in a network, it can be computed efficiently, and it

  7. A Computational Model of Mitigating Disease Spread in Spatial Networks

    E-print Network

    Buffalo, State University of New York

    progression, forest fires, computer viruses 1 #12;I. INTRODUCTION Networks are encountered in a wideA Computational Model of Mitigating Disease Spread in Spatial Networks Taehyong Kim1 , Kang Li1 model is capable of detecting disease progression to initiate processes mitigating infection

  8. Topological considerations in the design of the ARPA computer network

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Frank; I. T. Frisch; W. Chou

    1970-01-01

    The ARPA Network will provide store-and-forward communication paths between a set of computer centers distributed across the continental United States. The message handling tasks at each node in the network are performed by a special purpose Interface Message Processor (IMP) located at each computer center. The centers will be interconnected through the IMPs by fully duplex telephone lines, of typically

  9. The Utility of Computer Assisted Instruction; An Experimental Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooster, Harold; Lewis, Jinnet F.

    The Lister Hill Experimental Computer Assisted Instruction Network has existed since July 1972. It has connected three university data bases to as many as 80 user institutions. The paper presents a history of the network, compares computer-assisted instruction (CAI) with information storage and retrieval, and summarizes the uses made of the CAI…

  10. Computing Communities in Large Networks Using Random Walks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pascal Pons; Matthieu Latapy

    2005-01-01

    Dense subgraphs of sparse graphs (communities), which appear in most real-world complex networks, play an important role in many con- texts. Computing them however is generally expensive. We propose here a measure of similarity between vertices based on random walks which has several important advantages: it captures well the community structure in a network, it can be computed efficiently, and

  11. Functional requirements of situational awareness in computer network security

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cyril Onwubiko

    2009-01-01

    The underpinning of situational awareness in computer networks is to identify adversaries, estimate impact of attacks, evaluate risks, understand situations and make sound decisions on how to protect valued assets swiftly and accurately. SA also underscores situation assessment in order to make accurate forecast in dynamic and complex environments. In this paper, situational awareness in computer network security is investigated.

  12. Computer-Based Semantic Network in Molecular Biology: A Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callman, Joshua L.; And Others

    This paper analyzes the hardware and software features that would be desirable in a computer-based semantic network system for representing biology knowledge. It then describes in detail a prototype network of molecular biology knowledge that has been developed using Filevision software and a Macintosh computer. The prototype contains about 100…

  13. Electronic peer review and peer grading in computer-science courses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edward F. Gehringer

    2001-01-01

    We have implemented a peer-grading system for review of student assignments over the World-Wide Web and used it in approximately eight computer-science courses. Students prepare their assignments and submit them to our Peer Grader (PG) system. Other students are then assigned to review and grade the assignments. The system allows authors and reviewers to communicate with authors being able to

  14. Reform and Practice in the Course ???The Principle of Computer Organization???

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qifan Yang; Jianping Cai

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces several new guiding ideologies in “the Principle of Computer Organization” course reform, based on the purpose of application-oriented personnel training, namely teaching according to the students aptitude, focusing on students' capacity-building, emphasizing both theories and experiments. In the practice of curriculum teaching, we focus on the training and enhancing of students self-learning ability through group collaborative learning

  15. “Minds and machines” for humanities majors: A liberal arts course in computers and cognition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven Cushing

    1991-01-01

    A new one-semester course is described in which undergraduate students in non-technical majors are shown how traditional philosophical problems of knowledge, cognition, language, and human nature can be fruitfully investigated with computer-related concepts and techniques. A series of simple experiments is used to demonstrate to undergraduates that mental phenomena are real, that they can be studied experimentally, and that they

  16. Teacher's Guide to Using Computer Networks for Written Interaction: Classroom Activities for Collaborative Learning with Networked Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beil, Don, Ed.

    Intended for a broad spectrum of teachers using or considering using computers networks for written interaction, this teacher's guide presents techniques and behaviors that encourage and support learning on a computer classroom environment. The 21 essays that make up the book are written by people involved in the ENFI (Electronic Networks For…

  17. Computer Science Master's Project A Network Packet Analyzer with Database Support

    E-print Network

    Varela, Carlos

    Computer Science Master's Project A Network Packet Analyzer with Database Support BY Chi Yu Chan computer networks. Network packets are units of data traveling in these computer networks, and they carry the fully connected computer networks. For example, in [4] the source-destination information was used

  18. Multidetector computed tomography findings of an asymptomatic levoatrial cardinal vein with an interatrial course.

    PubMed

    Genç, B; Solak, A; Sahin, N; Gür, S; Oztürk, A; Kalayc?o?lu, S

    2013-08-01

    A 57-year-old female patient with a family history of coronary artery disease admitted to our hospital for the coronary check-up. A coronary angiography was performed with ECG-gated 128 slice dual source computed tomography.Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) showed, in addition to the normal coronary arteries, a persistent levoatrial cardinal vein (LCV) draining into vena cava superior. ECG-gated cardiac MDCT is a useful tool showing the origin, course, and drainage site of LCV. PMID:24068692

  19. Evaluation of a Computer-Assisted Instructional Component in a College-Level Nutrition Course

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lyndon B. Carew; Valerie M. Chamberlain; Frances A. Alster

    1997-01-01

    The effectiveness of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) in nutrition education was evaluated by determining if a CAI program designed to reinforce class lectures and available on disks and the university network was associated with higher cognitive achievement test scores. Students’ opinions concerning the helpfulness, advantages, and disadvantages of such a program were also assessed. Our CAI program was available to 243

  20. Interactive knowledge networks for interdisciplinary course navigation within Moodle

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Peter M Thule (Emory University/Atlanta VA Medical Center)

    2012-12-01

    Web-based hypermedia learning environments are widely used in modern education and seem particularly well suited for interdisciplinary learning. Previous work has identified guidance through these complex environments as a crucial problem of their acceptance and efficiency. We reasoned that map-based navigation might provide straightforward and effortless orientation. To achieve this, we developed a clickable and user-oriented concept map-based navigation plugin. This tool is implemented as an extension of Moodle, a widely used learning management system. It visualizes inner and interdisciplinary relations between learning objects and is generated dynamically depending on user set parameters and interactions. This plugin leaves the choice of navigation type to the user and supports direct guidance. Previously developed and evaluated face-to-face interdisciplinary learning materials bridging physiology and physics courses of a medical curriculum were integrated as learning objects, the relations of which were defined by metadata. Learning objects included text pages, self-assessments, videos, animations, and simulations. In a field study, we analyzed the effects of this learning environment on physiology and physics knowledge as well as the transfer ability of third-term medical students. Data were generated from pre- and posttest questionnaires and from tracking student navigation. Use of the hypermedia environment resulted in a significant increase of knowledge and transfer capability. Furthermore, the efficiency of learning was enhanced. We conclude that hypermedia environments based on Moodle and enriched by concept map-based navigation tools can significantly support interdisciplinary learning. Implementation of adaptivity may further strengthen this approach.

  1. Interactive knowledge networks for interdisciplinary course navigation within Moodle.

    PubMed

    Scherl, Andre; Dethleffsen, Kathrin; Meyer, Michael

    2012-12-01

    Web-based hypermedia learning environments are widely used in modern education and seem particularly well suited for interdisciplinary learning. Previous work has identified guidance through these complex environments as a crucial problem of their acceptance and efficiency. We reasoned that map-based navigation might provide straightforward and effortless orientation. To achieve this, we developed a clickable and user-oriented concept map-based navigation plugin. This tool is implemented as an extension of Moodle, a widely used learning management system. It visualizes inner and interdisciplinary relations between learning objects and is generated dynamically depending on user set parameters and interactions. This plugin leaves the choice of navigation type to the user and supports direct guidance. Previously developed and evaluated face-to-face interdisciplinary learning materials bridging physiology and physics courses of a medical curriculum were integrated as learning objects, the relations of which were defined by metadata. Learning objects included text pages, self-assessments, videos, animations, and simulations. In a field study, we analyzed the effects of this learning environment on physiology and physics knowledge as well as the transfer ability of third-term medical students. Data were generated from pre- and posttest questionnaires and from tracking student navigation. Use of the hypermedia environment resulted in a significant increase of knowledge and transfer capability. Furthermore, the efficiency of learning was enhanced. We conclude that hypermedia environments based on Moodle and enriched by concept map-based navigation tools can significantly support interdisciplinary learning. Implementation of adaptivity may further strengthen this approach. PMID:23209009

  2. Computer analysis of general linear networks using digraphs.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclenahan, J. O.; Chan, S.-P.

    1972-01-01

    Investigation of the application of digraphs in analyzing general electronic networks, and development of a computer program based on a particular digraph method developed by Chen. The Chen digraph method is a topological method for solution of networks and serves as a shortcut when hand calculations are required. The advantage offered by this method of analysis is that the results are in symbolic form. It is limited, however, by the size of network that may be handled. Usually hand calculations become too tedious for networks larger than about five nodes, depending on how many elements the network contains. Direct determinant expansion for a five-node network is a very tedious process also.

  3. UNCG General Computing Network VPN Remote Access Overview With the implementation of the General Computing Network (GCN), the Virtual Private Networking

    E-print Network

    Saidak, Filip

    UNCG General Computing Network VPN Remote Access Overview With the implementation of the General Computing Network (GCN), the Virtual Private Networking (VPN) options are changing. There will be two methods for remotely accessing the GCN via VPN. The new access methods are the Cisco AnyConnect VPN Client

  4. Network based concurrent computing on the PVM system

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, G.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Sunderam, V.S. (Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (USA). Dept. of Mathematics and Computer Science)

    1991-06-01

    Concurrent computing environments based on loosely coupled networks have proven effective as resources for multiprocessing. Experiences with and enhancements to PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine) are described in this paper. PVM is a software package that allows the utilization of a heterogeneous network of parallel and serial computers as a single computational resource. This report also describes an interactive graphical interface to PVM, and porting and performance results from production applications. 23 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Theory VI. Computational Materials Sciences Network (CMSN)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z Y

    2008-06-25

    The Computational Materials Sciences Network (CMSN) is a virtual center consisting of scientists interested in working together, across organizational and disciplinary boundaries, to formulate and pursue projects that reflect challenging and relevant computational research in the materials sciences. The projects appropriate for this center involve those problems best pursued through broad cooperative efforts, rather than those key problems best tackled by single investigator groups. CMSN operates similarly to the DOE Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials, coordinated by George Samara at Sandia. As in the Synthesis and Processing Center, the intent of the modest funding for CMSN is to foster partnering and collective activities. All CMSN proposals undergo external peer review and are judged foremost on the quality and timeliness of the science and also on criteria relevant to the objective of the center, especially concerning a strategy for partnering. More details about CMSN can be found on the CMSN webpages at: http://cmpweb.ameslab.gov/ccms/CMSN-homepage.html.

  6. ANU College of Engineering & Computer Science 2014 Course Selection Graduate Diploma of Computing 6706XGDCP

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Xiangyun "Sean"

    (7853) Art and Interaction in New Media COMP8100 * Requirement Elicitation & Analysis Techniques (Not Construction COMP8100 Requirement Elicitation & Analysis Techniques COMP6353 Systems Engineering for Software please see the Master of Computing list. Some of these require significant technical computing background

  7. Computational Drug Target Pathway Discovery: A Bayesian Network Approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seiya Imoto; Yoshinori Tamada; Hiromitsu Araki; Satoru Miyano

    \\u000a Genome-wide transcriptome data together with statistical analysis enable us to reverse-engineer gene networks that can be\\u000a a kind of views useful for understanding dynamic behaviour of biological elements in cells. In this chapter, we elucidate\\u000a statistical models for estimating gene networks based on two types of microarray gene expression data, gene knock-down and\\u000a time-course. In our modeling, nonparametric regression model

  8. A discrete computer network model with expanding dimensions

    E-print Network

    Yuming Shi; Guanrong Chen

    2007-05-07

    Complex networks with expanding dimensions are studied, where the networks may be directed and weighted, and network nodes are varying in discrete time in the sense that some new nodes may be added and some old nodes may be removed from time to time. A model of such networks in computer data transmission is discussed. Each node on the network has fixed dimensionality, while the dimension of the whole network is defined by the total number of nodes. Based on the spectacular properties of data transmission on computer networks, some new concepts of stable and unstable networks differing from the classical Lyapunov stability are defined. In particular, a special unstable network model, called devil network, is introduced and discussed. It is further found that a variety of structures and connection weights affects the network stability substantially. Several criteria on stability, instability, and devil network are established for a rather general class of networks, where some conditions are actually necessary and sufficient. Mathematically, this paper makes a first attempt to rigorously formulate a fundamental issue of modeling discrete linear time-varying systems with expanding dimensions and study their basic stability property.

  9. Routing Techniques Used in Computer Communication Networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MISCHA SCHWARTZ; THOMSS E. STERN

    1980-01-01

    An overview is provided in this paper of the routing procedures used in a number of operating networks, as well as in two commercial network architectures. The networks include TYMNET, ARPANET, and TRANSPAC. The network architectures discussed are the IBM SNA and the DEC DNA. The routing algorithms all tend to fall in the shortest path class. In the introductory

  10. The one-way quantum computer - a non-network model of quantum computation

    E-print Network

    Robert Raussendorf; Daniel E. Browne; Hans J. Briegel

    2001-08-27

    A one-way quantum computer works by only performing a sequence of one-qubit measurements on a particular entangled multi-qubit state, the cluster state. No non-local operations are required in the process of computation. Any quantum logic network can be simulated on the one-way quantum computer. On the other hand, the network model of quantum computation cannot explain all ways of processing quantum information possible with the one-way quantum computer. In this paper, two examples of the non-network character of the one-way quantum computer are given. First, circuits in the Clifford group can be performed in a single time step. Second, the realisation of a particular circuit --the bit-reversal gate-- on the one-way quantum computer has no network interpretation. (Submitted to J. Mod. Opt, Gdansk ESF QIT conference issue.)

  11. Computational Verb Cellular Networks: Part II-One-Dimensional Computational Verb Local

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2009-01-01

    Computational verb cellular networks (CVCNs) are a new kind of cellular computational platform where the local rules are computational verb rules. In a sister paper(60) 2D CVCNs were studied. In this paper, 1D CVCNs with 1D computational verb local rules are studied. The bifurcations of patterns in 1D CVCNs with computational verb local rules consisting of two computational verbs decrease

  12. COMPUTER ENGINEERING TECHNICAL ELECTIVES (d) 12 credits. ECE Courses all ECE prerequisites must be passed with a C or better

    E-print Network

    COMPUTER ENGINEERING TECHNICAL ELECTIVES (d) 12 credits. ECE Courses ­ all ECE prerequisites must Based Systems (ECE451) 4 F ECE554 Computer Architecture (ECE452 or CS470) 3 F ECE555 Robot Motion Software Development Methods (CS253) 3 F, S CS410 Intro to Computer Graphics (CS253, MATH229 or MATH369) 4

  13. 162 Electrical and Computer Engineering 163 Courses and projects that actively involve them in their own education and

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    162 Electrical and Computer Engineering 163 · Courses and projects that actively involve them · A broad education outside of engineering and science that emphasizes the role of electrical and computer of technology Graduate and undergraduate programs in electrical and computer engineering offer concentrations

  14. Using high-performance networks to enable computational aerosciences applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Marjory J.

    1992-01-01

    One component of the U.S. Federal High Performance Computing and Communications Program (HPCCP) is the establishment of a gigabit network to provide a communications infrastructure for researchers across the nation. This gigabit network will provide new services and capabilities, in addition to increased bandwidth, to enable future applications. An understanding of these applications is necessary to guide the development of the gigabit network and other high-performance networks of the future. In this paper we focus on computational aerosciences applications run remotely using the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) facility located at NASA Ames Research Center. We characterize these applications in terms of network-related parameters and relate user experiences that reveal limitations imposed by the current wide-area networking infrastructure. Then we investigate how the development of a nationwide gigabit network would enable users of the NAS facility to work in new, more productive ways.

  15. Perceptions of teaching and learning automata theory in a college-level computer science course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidmann, Phoebe Kay

    This dissertation identifies and describes student and instructor perceptions that contribute to effective teaching and learning of Automata Theory in a competitive college-level Computer Science program. Effective teaching is the ability to create an appropriate learning environment in order to provide effective learning. We define effective learning as the ability of a student to meet instructor set learning objectives, demonstrating this by passing the course, while reporting a good learning experience. We conducted our investigation through a detailed qualitative case study of two sections (118 students) of Automata Theory (CS 341) at The University of Texas at Austin taught by Dr. Lily Quilt. Because Automata Theory has a fixed curriculum in the sense that many curricula and textbooks agree on what Automata Theory contains, differences being depth and amount of material to cover in a single course, a case study would allow for generalizable findings. Automata Theory is especially problematic in a Computer Science curriculum since students are not experienced in abstract thinking before taking this course, fail to understand the relevance of the theory, and prefer classes with more concrete activities such as programming. This creates a special challenge for any instructor of Automata Theory as motivation becomes critical for student learning. Through the use of student surveys, instructor interviews, classroom observation, material and course grade analysis we sought to understand what students perceived, what instructors expected of students, and how those perceptions played out in the classroom in terms of structure and instruction. Our goal was to create suggestions that would lead to a better designed course and thus a higher student success rate in Automata Theory. We created a unique theoretical basis, pedagogical positivism, on which to study college-level courses. Pedagogical positivism states that through examining instructor and student perceptions of teaching and learning, improvements to a course are possible. These improvements can eventually develop a "best practice" instructional environment. This view is not possible under a strictly constructivist learning theory as there is no way to teach a group of individuals in a "best" way. Using this theoretical basis, we examined the gathered data from CS 341. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  16. Network-based concurrent computing on the PVM system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Al Geist; Vaidy S. Sunderam

    1992-01-01

    Concurrent computing environments based on loosely coupled networks have proven effective as resources for multiprocessing. Experiences with and enhancements to PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine) are described in this paper. PVM is a software system that allows the utilization of a heterogeneous net- work of parallel and serial computers as a single computational resource. This report also describes an interactive graphical

  17. Evolving Cellular Automata for Location Management in Mobile Computing Networks

    E-print Network

    Ha, Dong S.

    Evolving Cellular Automata for Location Management in Mobile Computing Networks Riky Subrata problem in mobile computing. There is a need to develop algorithms that could capture this complexity yet for a number of test problems. Index Terms--Cellular automata, genetic algorithms, mobile computing, mobility

  18. Is It Ethical for Patents to Be Issued for the Computer Algorithms that Affect Course Management Systems for Distance Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreau, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the impact of patents for computer algorithms in course management systems. Referring to historical documents and court cases, the positive and negative aspects of software patents are presented. The key argument is the accessibility to algorithms comprising a course management software program such as Blackboard. The…

  19. A Framework for Measuring Student Learning Gains and Engagement in an Introductory Computing Course: A Preliminary Report of Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Billy; Hosack, Bryan; Vogt, Paul

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a framework for measuring student learning gains and engagement in a Computer Science 1 (CS 1) / Information Systems 1 (IS 1) course. The framework is designed for a CS1/IS1 course as it has been traditionally taught over the years as well as when it is taught using a new pedagogical approach with Web services. It enables the…

  20. The Relationship of Student Motivation and Self-Regulated Learning Strategies to Performance in an Undergraduate Computer Literacy Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niemczyk, Mary C.; Savenye, Wilhelmina C.

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship among students' reports about their goal orientation, self-efficacy and self-regulated strategy, use and their academic performance in a Computer Literacy course as indicated by course grade. Also investigated were students' reports about their most preferred and utilized study techniques…

  1. Syntactic Computations in the Language Network: Characterizing Dynamic Network Properties Using Representational Similarity Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Lorraine K.; Cheung, Teresa P. L.; Devereux, Barry J.; Clarke, Alex

    2013-01-01

    The core human capacity of syntactic analysis involves a left hemisphere network involving left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) and posterior middle temporal gyrus (LMTG) and the anatomical connections between them. Here we use magnetoencephalography (MEG) to determine the spatio-temporal properties of syntactic computations in this network. Listeners heard spoken sentences containing a local syntactic ambiguity (e.g., “… landing planes …”), at the offset of which they heard a disambiguating verb and decided whether it was an acceptable/unacceptable continuation of the sentence. We charted the time-course of processing and resolving syntactic ambiguity by measuring MEG responses from the onset of each word in the ambiguous phrase and the disambiguating word. We used representational similarity analysis (RSA) to characterize syntactic information represented in the LIFG and left posterior middle temporal gyrus (LpMTG) over time and to investigate their relationship to each other. Testing a variety of lexico-syntactic and ambiguity models against the MEG data, our results suggest early lexico-syntactic responses in the LpMTG and later effects of ambiguity in the LIFG, pointing to a clear differentiation in the functional roles of these two regions. Our results suggest the LpMTG represents and transmits lexical information to the LIFG, which responds to and resolves the ambiguity. PMID:23730293

  2. Validation of a computer based objective structured clinical examination in the assessment of undergraduate dermatology courses.

    PubMed

    Kaliyadan, Feroze; Khan, Abdul Sattar; Kuruvilla, Joel; Feroze, Kaberi

    2014-01-01

    Many teaching centers have now adopted objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) as an assessment method for undergraduate dermatology courses. A modification of the standard OSCE in dermatology is computer based or electronic OSCE (eOSCE). We attempted to validate the use of a computer-based OSCE in dermatology in a group of fifth year medical students. The scores of the students in the computer-based OSCE showed a strong positive correlation with the scores on the clinical presentation (Pearson's co-efficient - 0.923, P value <0.000, significant at the 0.01 level) and a good correlation with overall scores of the student (Pearson's co-efficient - 0.728, P value <0.000, significant at the 0.01 level), indicating that this is a reliable method for assessment in dermatology. Generally, the students' feedback regarding the methods was positive. PMID:24685849

  3. Gender Effects of Computer Use in a Conceptual Physics Lab Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Domelen, Dave

    2010-11-01

    It's always hard to know what to expect when bringing computers into an educational setting, as things are always changing. Student skills with computers are different today than they were 10 years ago, and 20 years ago almost counts as an alien world. Still, one hopes that some of these changes result in positive trends, such as student attitudes toward the use of computers in the classroom. During the course of the Wandering Interactive Lecture Demonstration Project, we've seen a notable gender gap in some aspects of the previous experience of students, and worried that it might impact their learning. So we administered a number of surveys to see if we were right to be worried.

  4. CSC108H Course Information Sheet Fall 2013 Welcome to CSC108H! This is an Introduction to Computer Programming. By the end of this course, you

    E-print Network

    Toronto, University of

    . In weeks 4­6 and 8­12, there will be online lab exercises worth 2% each, due Fridays at 3:30pm. Late, understand how good style is critical, and be familiar with core computer science topics like algorithms forum, and more. You are responsible for all announcements made in lecture and on the online course

  5. OLLIE: An On-Line Library for Inter-Campus Exchange. Research and Development of a Master Educational Computer Program to be Placed on a Worldwide, Commercial, Computer Time-Sharing Network; Goal Being to Provide Accurate Course Information for Student Transfers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cubbin, Sharon M.

    In researching articulation investigators discovered that 12% of students enrolled in U.S. educational institutions lost an average of 10 credits when transferring--a minimum total annual tuition waste of $270 million. It was determined that an online system was needed to provide academic institutions with information such as course equivalencies,…

  6. A network architecture for heterogeneous mobile computing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric A. Brewer; Randy H. Katz; YATIN CHAWATHE; STEVEN D. GRIBBLE; TODD HODES; Giao Nguyen; MARK STEMM; TOM HENDERSON; ELAN AMIR; H. Balakrishnan; A. Fox; V. N. Padmanabhan; S. Seshan

    1998-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of the BARWAN project, which focused on enabling truly useful mobile networking across an extremely wide variety of real-world networks and mobile devices. We present the overall architecture, summarize key results, and discuss four broad lessons learned along the way. The architecture enables seamless roaming in a single logical overlay network composed of many heterogeneous

  7. Recurrent Neural Networks Neural Computation : Lecture 12

    E-print Network

    Bullinaria, John

    non-linear dynamical system can be approximated to any accuracy by a recurrent neural network Neural Network Architectures 2. State Space Models and Dynamical Systems 3. Backpropagation Through Time association/prediction). The architectures of recurrent neural networks can take many different forms

  8. Rigidity, Computation, and Randomization in Network Localization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tolga Eren; David Kiyoshi Goldenberg; Walter Whiteley; Yang Richard Yang; A. Stephen Morse; Brian D. O. Anderson; Peter N. Belhumeur

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we provide a theoretical foundation for the problem of network localization in which some nodes know their locations and other nodes determine their locations by measuring the distances to their neighbors. We construct grounded graphs to model network localization and apply graph rigidity theory to test the conditions for unique localizability and to construct uniquely localizable networks.

  9. Congestion Avoidance in Computer Networks With a Connectionless Network Layer: Concepts, Goals and Methodology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raj Jain; K. K. Ramakrishnan

    1987-01-01

    Congestion occurs ill a computer uetwork when the resource demandsexceed the capacity. Packets may be lost due to too lnuch queuingin the uetwork. During cougestion, the network throughput lnay dropand the path delay may become very high. A congestion control scheme}mlps the network to recover froln the congestion state. A congestionavoidance scheme allows a network to operate in the region

  10. A Queueing Network Analysis of Computer Communication Networks with Window Flow Control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MARTIN REISER

    1979-01-01

    A computer communication network with window flow control is modeled by a closed multichain queueing network. The severe computational limitation of previous solution algorithms is overcome with a heuristic derived from the recently found mean value analysis. A large numerical example is given.

  11. COMPUTATIONAL TECHNIQUES FOR INFERRING REGULATORY NETWORKS Irene M. Ong

    E-print Network

    Page Jr., C. David

    COMPUTATIONAL TECHNIQUES FOR INFERRING REGULATORY NETWORKS by Irene M. Ong A dissertation submitted) at the UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN­MADISON 2007 #12;c Copyright by Irene M. Ong 2007 All Rights Reserved #12;i To Mom

  12. Computers, Electronic Networking and Education: Some American Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, David

    1991-01-01

    Describes new developments in distributed educational computing at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT, "Athena"), Carnegie Mellon University ("Andrew"), Brown University "Intermedia"), Electronic University Network (California), Western Behavioral Sciences Institute (California), and University of California, Irvine. Topics discussed…

  13. Network Analysis and Visualization for Understanding Social Computing

    E-print Network

    Shneiderman, Ben

    , tables, graphics · Instructions, messages, help · Collaboration & Social Media · Help, tutorialsNetwork Analysis and Visualization for Understanding Social Computing Ben Shneiderman ben, training · Search www.awl.com/DTUI Fifth Edition: March 2009 · Visualization #12;Using Vision to Think

  14. International Financial Networks with Intermediation: Modeling, Analysis, and Computations

    E-print Network

    Nagurney, Anna

    of the various financial agents/sectors in an economy, such as banks, households, insurance companies, etc is typically associated with financial businesses, including banks, savings institutions, investmentInternational Financial Networks with Intermediation: Modeling, Analysis, and Computations Anna

  15. Network: Computation in Neural Systems 2012, 119, Early Online

    E-print Network

    Graham, Bruce

    network models SHARON M. CROOK1,2 , JAMES A. BEDNAR3 , SANDRA BERGER2 , ROBERT CANNON4 , ANDREW P. DAVISON and Mathematics, University of Stirling, Stirling, UK, 11 Institute of Computer Science, University of Rostock

  16. Use of Physical Simulation, Computer Simulation, and a Common Product in a Series of Courses to Illu

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Carlisle, Tom

    Use of Physical & Computer Simulation and a Standard Product in a Series of Courses to Illustrate Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering Technology Principles This presentation will explain the use of Physical Three-Dimensional Simulation and Computer Simulation coupled with a simple, standard product to teach various principles of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering Technology throughout several different courses. This product (a simple model wagon), along with a variety of options, is threaded through several courses, allowing students to keep a common frame of reference, while seeing how the various principles within the courses tie together. Every course has a team oriented lab project which allows the students to build their team work and communication skills. This teaching methodology also allows the use of active, hands-on learning for the purpose of process improvement and leadership development. As the courses progress, the students will experience the transformation of the product assembly process from rudimentary assembly, to the effective use of fixtures and workstation design to reduce operator effort and improve productivity. It culminates with the course on Lean Manufacturing which also introduces the use of production simulation using in-house designed and manufactured equipment that allows us to integrate component manufacturing along with product assembly. The presentation will include video clips of the various course projects and principles, a computer simulation and samples of the products. The use of these concepts presented allows students to experience real life examples in the classroom that closely mimic what they will see in industry.

  17. Master of Science in Computer Networking The Department of Electrical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Master of Science in Computer Networking The Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science offers a Master of Science degree in the area of computer networking. This area has become the demand for networking experts who would design, deploy, support, and maintain computer networks

  18. A LOW-LATENCY OPTICAL NETWORK FOR CLUSTER COMPUTING

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. A. Rosen; Y. Zhou; H. Sethu; A. S. Daryoush; R. N. Lachenmaier

    A low-latency optical network for use in cluster computing applications is described. The network is based on a novel hybrid optical\\/electrical switch that supports both connectionless transfers at higher-level layers of the protocol and connection-oriented transfers to facilitate streaming traffic at lower-level layers in selected hops. The network protocol is based on IEEE 1596-1992 Standard for Scalable Coherent Interface (SCI).

  19. Building a dynamic and computational understanding of personal social networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jason Wiese; Jason I. Hong; John Zimmerman

    2012-01-01

    While individuals' personal social networks are extremely important in their day-to-day lives, computational systems lack meaningful representations of them. We argue that recent trends in computer-mediated communication, the ubiquity of smartphones, usage of online services, and new approaches to real-world social science experimentation have created an opportunity to dynamically generate representations of personal social networks that will be useful in

  20. An interactive network of time-sharing computers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ronald M. Rutledge; Albin L. Vareha; Lee C. Varian; Allan H. Weis; Salomon F. Seroussi; James W. Mayer; Joan F. Jaffe; Mary Anne K. Angell

    1969-01-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of an experimental interactive time-sharing network of computers created as a joint effort by Carnegie-Mellon University (CMU), Princeton University and the Research Division of IBM. The motivation behind the creation, the functional capabilities, and applications of the network are some of the key points addressed. Design philosophy and major implementation considerations are thoroughly

  1. Pricing in Computer Networks: Reshaping the Research Agenda

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Shenker; D. Clark; D. Estrin; S. Herzog

    1995-01-01

    As the Internet makes the transition from research testbed to commercial enter- prise, the topic of pricing in computer networks has suddenly attracted great attention. Much of the discussion in the network design community and the popular press centers on the usage-based vs. fiat pricing debate. The more academic literature has largely fo- cused on devising optimal pricing policies; achieving

  2. Pricing in computer networks: Reshaping the research agenda

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Scott Shenker; David Clark; Deborah Estrin; Shai Herzog

    1996-01-01

    As the internet makes the transition from research testbed to commercial enterprise, the topic of pricing in computer networks has suddenly attracted great attention. Much of the discussion in the network design community and the popular press centers on the usage-based versus flat pricing debate. The more academic literature has largely focused on devising optimal pricing policies; achieving optimal welfare

  3. The Role of Computer Networks in Aerospace Engineering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ann Peterson Bishop

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents selected results from an empirical investigation into the use of computer networks in aersopace engineering. Such networks allow aerospace engineers to communicate with people and access remote resources through electronic mail, file transfer, and remote log-in. The study drew its subjects from private sector, government and academic organizations in the U.S. aerospace industry. Data presented here were

  4. The Role of Computer Networks in Aerospace Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Ann Peterson

    1994-01-01

    Presents selected results from an empirical investigation into the use of computer networks in aerospace engineering based on data from a national mail survey. The need for user-based studies of electronic networking is discussed, and a copy of the questionnaire used in the survey is appended. (Contains 46 references.) (LRW)

  5. Computer Network Security: Best Practices for Alberta School Jurisdictions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton.

    This paper provides a snapshot of the computer network security industry and addresses specific issues related to network security in public education. The following topics are covered: (1) security policy, including reasons for establishing a policy, risk assessment, areas to consider, audit tools; (2) workstations, including physical security,…

  6. Automated selection of computed tomography display parameters using neural networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Di Zhang; Scott Neu; Daniel J. Valentino

    2001-01-01

    A collection of artificial neural networks (ANN's) was trained to identify simple anatomical structures in a set of x-ray computed tomography (CT) images. These neural networks learned to associate a point in an image with the anatomical structure containing the point by using the image pixels located on the horizontal and vertical lines that ran through the point. The neural

  7. An optimal algorithm for mutual exclusion in computer networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Glenn Ricart; Ashok K. Agrawala

    1981-01-01

    An algorithm is proposed that creates mutual exclu-sion in a computer network whose nodes communicate only by messages and do not share memory. It is assumed that there is an error-free underlying communications network in which transit times may vary and messages may not be delivered in the order sent. Nodes are assumed to operate correctly; the consequences of node

  8. Challenges for high-performance networking for exascale computing.

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, Brian W.; Hemmert, K. Scott; Underwood, Keith Douglas (Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, OR); Brightwell, Ronald Brian

    2010-05-01

    Achieving the next three orders of magnitude performance increase to move from petascale to exascale computing will require a significant advancements in several fundamental areas. Recent studies have outlined many of the challenges in hardware and software that will be needed. In this paper, we examine these challenges with respect to high-performance networking. We describe the repercussions of anticipated changes to computing and networking hardware and discuss the impact that alternative parallel programming models will have on the network software stack. We also present some ideas on possible approaches that address some of these challenges.

  9. Neuromorphic computing applications for network intrusion detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Raymond C.; Pino, Robinson E.

    2014-05-01

    What is presented here is a sequence of evolving concepts for network intrusion detection. These concepts start with neuromorphic structures for XOR-based signature matching and conclude with computationally based network intrusion detection system with an autonomous structuring algorithm. There is evidence that neuromorphic computation for network intrusion detection is fractal in nature under certain conditions. Specifically, the neural structure can take fractal form when simple neural structuring is autonomous. A neural structure is fractal by definition when its fractal dimension exceeds the synaptic matrix dimension. The authors introduce the use of fractal dimension of the neuromorphic structure as a factor in the autonomous restructuring feedback loop.

  10. Prospects for Grid-Computing in Future Power Networks Prof. Malcolm Irving1

    E-print Network

    Taylor, Gary

    Prospects for Grid-Computing in Future Power Networks Prof. Malcolm Irving1 , Dr. Gareth Taylor1 was chosen by analogy with the electrical network. The idea is that computational resources should'. 2.2 Grid-computing and distributed computing In the early days of computer networking, various

  11. Self-Assessment and Student Improvement in an Introductory Computer Course at the Community College-Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spicer-Sutton, Jama

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine a student's computer knowledge upon course entry and if there was a difference in college students' improvement scores as measured by the difference in pretest and posttest scores of new or novice users, moderate users, and expert users at the end of a college-level introductory computing class.…

  12. The Use of Modular Computer-Based Lessons in a Modification of the Classical Introductory Course in Organic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stotter, Philip L.; Culp, George H.

    An experimental course in organic chemistry utilized computer-assisted instructional (CAI) techniques. The CAI lessons provided tutorial drill and practice and simulated experiments and reactions. The Conversational Language for Instruction and Computing was used, along with a CDC 6400-6600 system; students scheduled and completed the lessons at…

  13. Ethernet: distributed packet switching for local computer networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert M. Metcalfe

    1976-01-01

    Ethernet is a branching broadcast communication system for carrying digital data packets among locally distributed computing stations. The packet transport mechanism provided by Ethernet has been used to build systems which can be viewed as either local computer networks or loosely coupled multiprocessors. An Ethernet's shared communication facility, its Ether, is a passive broadcast medium with no central control. Coordination

  14. Computing Posterior Probabilities of Structural Features in Bayesian Networks

    E-print Network

    Tian, Jin

    Computing Posterior Probabilities of Structural Features in Bayesian Networks Jin Tian and Ru He) and Koivisto (2006) pre- sented algorithms that can compute the exact marginal posterior probability of a subnet- work, e.g., a single edge, in O(n2n ) time and the posterior probabilities for all n(n-1) po

  15. Time Synchronization in Ad Hoc Networks Department of Computer Science

    E-print Network

    , oil slicks, water pollution, or animal herds. Mobile computing devices equipped with sensors, clocks upon ad hoc networks of mobile computing devices. These devices may be equipped with sensor hardware. For this so­called sensor fusion, temporal relationships (X happened before Y) and real­time issues (X and Y

  16. Secure Cloud Computing with a Virtualized Network Infrastructure

    E-print Network

    Akella, Aditya

    Secure Cloud Computing with a Virtualized Network Infrastructure Fang Hao, T.V. Lakshman, Sarit the rapid development in the field of cloud computing, security is still one of the major obstacles to cloud the rapid development in the field of cloud com- puting, security is still one of the major hurdles to cloud

  17. Linear circuits for neural networks and affective computing.

    PubMed

    Frenger, P

    1999-01-01

    Biological phenomena are often modeled with software on digital computers, even though the events may be analog in nature. The author describes the use of linear circuitry in two areas of biological simulation: artificial neural networks and affective computing. The operational amplifier, with the assistance of some new analog chips and simple digital microcontrollers, is featured prominently in these linear designs. PMID:11143356

  18. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF INDUSTRIAL PROCESSES IN COMPUTER NETWORK ENVIRONMENTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Pawlikowski; G. Ewing; D. McNickle

    In this paper we look at an application of distributed computing power of computer networks in simulation studies of industrial systems modelled by dynamic sto- chastic processes. Stochastic simulation is an invaluable tool for studying such processes but, unfortunately, obtaining the final results with an acceptable level of precision, even in the case of moderately complex sys- tems can be

  19. Function-oriented protocols for the ARPA computer network

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen D. Crocker; John F. Heafner; Robert M. Metcalfe; Jonathan B. Postel

    1972-01-01

    Much has been said about the mechanics of the ARPA Computer Network (ARPANET) and especially about the organization of its communications subnet. Until recently the main effort has gone into the implementation of an ARPANET user-level communications interface. Operating just above the communications subnet in ARPANET HOST Computers, this ARPANET interface is intended to serve as a foundation for the

  20. How K-12 Teachers Are Using Computer Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peha, Jon M.

    1995-01-01

    A Carnegie Mellon University study examined Pittsburgh Public Schools' use of computer networks. Classroom activities included sending work to another party, collaborating on group projects, and exploiting the Internet's remote data sources and processing capabilities. Teachers' computer usage is discussed, along with implementation advice and…

  1. Network-Aware Partitioning of Computation in Diamond

    E-print Network

    Network-Aware Partitioning of Computation in Diamond Alex Nizhner 1 Larry Huston 2 Peter Steenkiste Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Abstract The Diamond storage architecture enables eĆcient interactive searchĆcient use of resources under dynamic conditions, Diamond adaptively partitions computation among the storage

  2. Computational Approaches for Analyzing Information Flow in Biological Networks

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Boris Kholodenko (University College Dublin; Systems Biology Ireland REV)

    2012-04-17

    How do cells perceive their environment and produce appropriate responses? The sensing and coordination of proper responses is coordinated by intricate biochemical networks that integrate signals and compute biological responses with high fidelity and reproducibility. Modern “omics” (proteomics, genomics, lipidomics, and metabolomics) techniques have identified many of the components of these networks, but researchers are now faced with the challenge of unraveling how the components are connected and how they compute. To elucidate these network properties, various mathematical and computational modeling techniques are used because their complexity defeats human intuition. The results indicate that signaling networks show a wide diversity of behaviors encoded in their design, but that they are also very flexible, with cells adapting their networks in response to different contexts by changing connectivities. The remaining challenges include integration of data generated with methods for the analysis of different types of networks (gene regulation, protein modification, and metabolic networks), and generation of coherent network interpretations that are widely accessible and can generate new hypotheses that are experimentally testable and that will push the knowledge frontier in biology and biomedicine.

  3. Computational complexity arising from degree correlations in networks.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Alexei; Weigt, Martin

    2003-02-01

    We apply a Bethe-Peierls approach to statistical-mechanics models defined on random networks of arbitrary degree distribution and arbitrary correlations between the degrees of neighboring vertices. Using the nondeterministic polynomial time hard optimization problem of finding minimal vertex covers on these graphs, we show that such correlations may lead to a qualitatively different solution structure as compared to uncorrelated networks. This results in a higher complexity of the network in a computational sense: Simple heuristic algorithms fail to find a minimal vertex cover in the highly correlated case, whereas uncorrelated networks seem to be simple from the point of view of combinatorial optimization. PMID:12636856

  4. Wireless Networks: New Meaning to Ubiquitous Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drew, Wilfred, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the use of wireless technology in academic libraries. Topics include wireless networks; standards (IEEE 802.11); wired versus wireless; why libraries implement wireless technology; wireless local area networks (WLANs); WLAN security; examples of wireless use at Indiana State University and Morrisville College (New York); and useful…

  5. MTX (Microwave Tokamak Experiment) data acquisition and analysis computer network

    SciTech Connect

    Butner, D.N.; Casper, T.A.; Brown, M.D.; Drlik, M.; Meyer, W.H.; Moller, J.M.

    1990-06-01

    For the MTX experiment, we use a network of computers for plasma diagnostic data acquisition and analysis. This multivendor network employs VMS, UNIX, and BASIC based computers connected in a local area Ethernet network. Some of the data is acquired directly into a VAX/VMS computer cluster over a fiber-optic serial CAMAC highway. Several HP-Unix workstations and HP-BASIC instrument control computers acquire and analyze data for the more data intensive or specialized diagnostics. The VAX/VMS system is used for global analysis of the data and serves as the central data archiving and retrieval manager. Shot synchronization and control of data flow are implemented by task-to-task message passing using our interprocess communication system. The system has been in operation during our initial MTX tokamak and FEL experiments; it has operated reliably with data rates typically in the range of 5 megabytes/shot without limiting the experimental shot rate.

  6. Integrated evolutionary computation neural network quality controller for automated systems

    SciTech Connect

    Patro, S.; Kolarik, W.J. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Dept. of Industrial Engineering

    1999-06-01

    With increasing competition in the global market, more and more stringent quality standards and specifications are being demands at lower costs. Manufacturing applications of computing power are becoming more common. The application of neural networks to identification and control of dynamic processes has been discussed. The limitations of using neural networks for control purposes has been pointed out and a different technique, evolutionary computation, has been discussed. The results of identifying and controlling an unstable, dynamic process using evolutionary computation methods has been presented. A framework for an integrated system, using both neural networks and evolutionary computation, has been proposed to identify the process and then control the product quality, in a dynamic, multivariable system, in real-time.

  7. Computability of analog networks J.V. Tucker

    E-print Network

    Zucker, Jeffery

    Computability of analog networks J.V. Tucker Department of Computer Science, University of Wales, Swansea SA2 8PP, Wales J.V.Tucker@swansea.ac.uk J.I. Zucker* Department of Computing and Software, Mc A is modelled by a function : Ar Ă? C[Ă?, A]p C[Ă?, A]q (p, q > 0, r 0), where C[Ă?, A] is the set of all

  8. Analytical computation of the epidemic threshold on temporal networks

    E-print Network

    Valdano, Eugenio; Poletto, Chiara; Colizza, Vittoria

    2014-01-01

    The time variation of contacts in a networked system may fundamentally alter the properties of spreading processes occurring on it and affect the condition at which epidemics become possible, as encoded in the epidemic threshold parameter. Despite the great interest of the problem for the physics, applied mathematics, and epidemiology communities, its complete theoretical understanding still represents a challenge and is currently limited to the cases where the time-scale separation between the spreading process and the network time-variation holds, or to specific temporal network models. Here we introduce a Markov chain description of the Susceptible-Infectious-Susceptible process on a generic temporal network and we adopt a multi-layer perspective to analytically derive its epidemic threshold. We find that the critical parameter can be computed as the spectral radius of a matrix, analogously to the static networks case, once it encodes the temporal structure and topology of the network. Its application to a...

  9. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING NETWORK: COMPUTATION IN NEURAL SYSTEMS Network: Comput. Neural Syst. 12 (2001) 7587 www.iop.org/Journals/ne PII: S0954-898X(01)20361-3

    E-print Network

    Maass, Wolfgang

    2001-01-01

    INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING NETWORK: COMPUTATION IN NEURAL SYSTEMS Network: Comput. Neural Syst network model to artificial neural networks designed for time series processing. Our numerical results of artificial neural network models of computation. Like brains, neural networks are massively parallel networks

  10. Accepted Manuscript Computability of analog networks

    E-print Network

    Tucker, John V.

    functions are concretely computable then so is . Key words: analog computation, analog computing, analog and communication both process infinite data such as real numbers, wave forms, signals, timed streams of data. Data representations are often made from strings of bits {0, 1}, or of other finite alphabets

  11. Computationally Efficient Neural Network Intrusion Security Awareness

    SciTech Connect

    Todd Vollmer; Milos Manic

    2009-08-01

    An enhanced version of an algorithm to provide anomaly based intrusion detection alerts for cyber security state awareness is detailed. A unique aspect is the training of an error back-propagation neural network with intrusion detection rule features to provide a recognition basis. Network packet details are subsequently provided to the trained network to produce a classification. This leverages rule knowledge sets to produce classifications for anomaly based systems. Several test cases executed on ICMP protocol revealed a 60% identification rate of true positives. This rate matched the previous work, but 70% less memory was used and the run time was reduced to less than 1 second from 37 seconds.

  12. Implementation of neural network-based nonlinear adaptive model predictive control over a service-oriented computer network

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vincent A. Akpan; Ioakeim K. Samaras; George D. Hassapis

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new neural network-based nonlinear adaptive model predictive control algorithm and its implementation over a service-oriented computer network. The computer network is based on the device profile for web services. At each sampling instant, the algorithm identifies a nonlinear process model using a recurrent neural network. On the basis of the identified model, the nonlinear adaptive model

  13. College of Engineering, Boston University Spring 2013 EC541 Computer Communication Networks

    E-print Network

    Goldberg, Bennett

    College of Engineering, Boston University Spring 2013 EC541 Computer Communication Networks of fundamental concepts in computer networking o Queueing and delay models in communication networks o Little references: · S. Keshav, An engineering approach to computer networking, Addison-Wesley 1997 · L. Kleinrock

  14. Identifiability of Flow Distributions from Link Measurements with Applications to Computer Networks

    E-print Network

    Michailidis, George

    Identifiability of Flow Distributions from Link Measurements with Applications to Computer Networks by recent developments in computer networks. In this paper (i) we introduce a number of models for multi Introduction An increasing variety of network data is available from modern computer networks. These data

  15. Phoebus: Network Middleware for Next-Generation Network Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Swany

    2012-06-16

    The Phoebus project investigated algorithms, protocols, and middleware infrastructure to improve end-to-end performance in high speed, dynamic networks. The Phoebus system essentially serves as an adaptation point for networks with disparate capabilities or provisioning. This adaptation can take a variety of forms including acting as a provisioning agent across multiple signaling domains, providing transport protocol adaptation points, and mapping between distributed resource reservation paradigms and the optical network control plane. We have successfully developed the system and demonstrated benefits. The Phoebus system was deployed in Internet2 and in ESnet, as well as in GEANT2, RNP in Brazil and over international links to Korea and Japan. Phoebus is a system that implements a new protocol and associated forwarding infrastructure for improving throughput in high-speed dynamic networks. It was developed to serve the needs of large DOE applications on high-performance networks. The idea underlying the Phoebus model is to embed Phoebus Gateways (PGs) in the network as on-ramps to dynamic circuit networks. The gateways act as protocol translators that allow legacy applications to use dedicated paths with high performance.

  16. Quantization in acquisition and computation networks

    E-print Network

    Sun, John Zheng

    2013-01-01

    In modern systems, it is often desirable to extract relevant information from large amounts of data collected at different spatial locations. Applications include sensor networks, wearable health-monitoring devices and a ...

  17. Networks Cannot Compute Their Diameter in Sublinear Time Preliminary version, please check for updates.

    E-print Network

    Networks Cannot Compute Their Diameter in Sublinear Time Preliminary version, please check}@ethz.ch Computer Engineering and Networks Laboratory (TIK), ETH Zurich, Switzerland Abstract We study the problem of computing the diameter of a network in a distributed way. In the model of distributed computation we

  18. Automotive suspension control through a computer communication network

    Microsoft Academic Search

    U. Ozguner; H. Goktas; H. Chant; J. Winkelman; M. Liubakka; R. Krtolica

    1992-01-01

    Closed-loop stability and performance-related studies performed on a multiplex communication network called Carlink, being considered for automotive applications, are discussed. Tests done on an automotive suspension control model, in which the active control signal is applied through the multiplex network as a real-time hybrid computer\\/hardware-in-the-loop experiment are outlined. The stability of the system is considered using analytical approaches developed by

  19. Topics in in-how networking - Ubiquitous computing in home networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Henning Schulzrinne; Xiaotao Wu; Stylianos Sidiroglou; Stefan Berger

    2003-01-01

    In the past decade, there have been numerous efforts in ubiquitous. computing. For home networks, we believe that ubiquitous computing requires a global-scale system that is securable, administered by, multiple independent nonspecialist administrators, and integrates off-the-shelf hardware and software. In this system every home owner acts as an administrator of the network in the home. We are developing such a

  20. IEEE Network January/February 200228 he events in the area of computer networks during the

    E-print Network

    Boutaba, Raouf

    ; and restricted and authenticated access to resources. 0890-8044/02/$17.00 © 2002 IEEE Projecting AdvancedIEEE Network · January/February 200228 he events in the area of computer networks during the last few years reveal a significant trend toward open architecture nodes, the behavior of which can easily