Science.gov

Sample records for computer oriented energy

  1. Computer Based Library Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machalow, Robert

    This document presents computer-based lessons used to teach basic library skills to college students at York College of the City University of New York. The information for library orientation has been entered on a disk which must be used in conjunction with a word processing program, the Applewriter IIe, and an Apple IIe microcomputer. The…

  2. SOLINS- SOLAR INSOLATION MODEL FOR COMPUTING AVAILABLE SOLAR ENERGY TO A SURFACE OF ARBITRARY ORIENTATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    This computer program, SOLINS, was developed to aid engineers and solar system designers in the accurate modeling of the average hourly solar insolation on a surface of arbitrary orientation. The program can be used to study insolation problems specific to residential and commercial applications where the amount of space available for solar collectors is limited by shadowing problems, energy output requirements, and costs. For tandem rack arrays, SOLINS will accommodate the use of augmentation reflectors built into the support structure to increase insolation values at the collector surface. As the use of flat plate solar collectors becomes more prevalent in the building industry, the engineer and designer must have the capability to conduct extensive sensitivity analyses on the orientation and location of solar collectors. SOLINS should prove to be a valuable aid in this area of engineering. SOLINS uses a modified version of the National Bureau of Standards model to calculate the direct, diffuse, and reflected components of total insolation on a tilted surface with a given azimuthal orientation. The model is based on the work of Liu and Jordan with corrections by Kusuda and Ishii to account for early morning and late afternoon errors. The model uses a parametric description of the average day solar climate to generate monthly average day profiles by hour of the insolation level on the collector surface. The model includes accommodation of user specified ground and landscape reflectivities at the collector site. For roof or ground mounted, tilted arrays, SOLINS will calculate insolation including the effects of shadowing and augmentation reflectors. The user provides SOLINS with data describing the array design, array orientation, the month, the solar climate parameter, the ground reflectance, and printout control specifications. For the specified array and environmental conditions, SOLINS outputs the hourly insolation the array will receive during an average day

  3. Object-oriented numerical computing C++

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanrosendale, John

    1994-01-01

    An object oriented language is one allowing users to create a set of related types and then intermix and manipulate values of these related types. This paper discusses object oriented numerical computing using C++.

  4. "Smart Computing"--Orienting Your Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millis, Paul J.

    This paper discusses how to present new college students with their initial exposure to policy, security, and ethical computing issues. The Office of Policy Development and Education participates in summer orientation to introduce students to proper use of information technology resources at the University of Michigan. This presentation is known…

  5. Object-oriented Tools for Distributed Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Richard M.

    1993-01-01

    Distributed computing systems are proliferating, owing to the availability of powerful, affordable microcomputers and inexpensive communication networks. A critical problem in developing such systems is getting application programs to interact with one another across a computer network. Remote interprogram connectivity is particularly challenging across heterogeneous environments, where applications run on different kinds of computers and operating systems. NetWorks! (trademark) is an innovative software product that provides an object-oriented messaging solution to these problems. This paper describes the design and functionality of NetWorks! and illustrates how it is being used to build complex distributed applications for NASA and in the commercial sector.

  6. A Computer Oriented Problem Solving Unit, Consume. Teacher Guide. Computer Technology Program Environmental Education Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    This is the teacher's guide to accompany the student guide which together comprise one of five computer-oriented environmental/energy education units. This unit explores U.S. energy consumption; is applicable to Mathematics, Social Studies, and Ecology or Science Studies with Mathematics background; and is intended for use in grades 9 through 14.…

  7. Cloudbus Toolkit for Market-Oriented Cloud Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyya, Rajkumar; Pandey, Suraj; Vecchiola, Christian

    This keynote paper: (1) presents the 21st century vision of computing and identifies various IT paradigms promising to deliver computing as a utility; (2) defines the architecture for creating market-oriented Clouds and computing atmosphere by leveraging technologies such as virtual machines; (3) provides thoughts on market-based resource management strategies that encompass both customer-driven service management and computational risk management to sustain SLA-oriented resource allocation; (4) presents the work carried out as part of our new Cloud Computing initiative, called Cloudbus: (i) Aneka, a Platform as a Service software system containing SDK (Software Development Kit) for construction of Cloud applications and deployment on private or public Clouds, in addition to supporting market-oriented resource management; (ii) internetworking of Clouds for dynamic creation of federated computing environments for scaling of elastic applications; (iii) creation of 3rd party Cloud brokering services for building content delivery networks and e-Science applications and their deployment on capabilities of IaaS providers such as Amazon along with Grid mashups; (iv) CloudSim supporting modelling and simulation of Clouds for performance studies; (v) Energy Efficient Resource Allocation Mechanisms and Techniques for creation and management of Green Clouds; and (vi) pathways for future research.

  8. Development of site-oriented Analytics for Grid computing centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washbrook, A.; Crooks, D.; Roy, G.; Skipsey, S.; Qin, G.; Stewart, G. P.; Britton, D.

    2015-12-01

    The field of analytics, the process of analysing data to visualise meaningful patterns and trends, has become increasingly important in scientific computing as the volume and variety of data available to process has significantly increased. There is now ongoing work in the High Energy Physics (HEP) community in this area, for example in the augmentation of systems management at WLCG computing sites. We report on work evaluating the feasibility of distributed site-oriented analytics using the Elasticsearch, Logstash and Kibana software stack and demonstrate functionality by the application of two workflows that give greater insight into site operations.

  9. Object Orientated Methods in Computational Fluid Dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabor, Gavin; Weller, Henry; Jasak, Hrvoje; Fureby, Christer

    1997-11-01

    We outline the aims of the FOAM code, a Finite Volume Computational Fluid Dynamics code written in C++, and discuss the use of Object Orientated Programming (OOP) methods to achieve these aims. The intention when writing this code was to make it as easy as possible to alter the modelling : this was achieved by making the top level syntax of the code as close as possible to conventional mathematical notation for tensors and partial differential equations. Object orientation enables us to define classes for both types of objects, and the operator overloading possible in C++ allows normal symbols to be used for the basic operations. The introduction of features such as automatic dimension checking of equations helps to enforce correct coding of models. We also discuss the use of OOP techniques such as data encapsulation and code reuse. As examples of the flexibility of this approach, we discuss the implementation of turbulence modelling using RAS and LES. The code is used to simulate turbulent flow for a number of test cases, including fully developed channel flow and flow around obstacles. We also demonstrate the use of the code for solving structures calculations and magnetohydrodynamics.

  10. Computational Modeling of Magnetically Actuated Propellant Orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, John I.

    1996-01-01

    sufficient performance to support cryogenic propellant management tasks. In late 1992, NASA MSFC began a new investigation in this technology commencing with the design of the Magnetically-Actuated Propellant Orientation (MAPO) experiment. A mixture of ferrofluid and water is used to simulate the paramagnetic properties of LOX and the experiment is being flown on the KC-135 aircraft to provide a reduced gravity environment. The influence of a 0.4 Tesla ring magnet on flow into and out of a subscale Plexiglas tank is being recorded on video tape. The most efficient approach to evaluating the feasibility of MAPO is to compliment the experimental program with development of a computational tool to model the process of interest. The goal of the present research is to develop such a tool. Once confidence in its fidelity is established by comparison to data from the MAPO experiment, it can be used to assist in the design of future experiments and to study the parameter space of the process. Ultimately, it is hoped that the computational model can serve as a design tool for full-scale spacecraft applications.

  11. Calculus: A Computer Oriented Presentation, Part 1 [and] Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenberg, Warren; Walker, Robert J.

    Parts one and two of a one-year computer-oriented calculus course (without analytic geometry) are presented. The ideas of calculus are introduced and motivated through computer (i.e., algorithmic) concepts. An introduction to computing via algorithms and a simple flow chart language allows the book to be self-contained, except that material on…

  12. Terminal-oriented computer-communication networks.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, M.; Boorstyn, R. R.; Pickholtz, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Four examples of currently operating computer-communication networks are described in this tutorial paper. They include the TYMNET network, the GE Information Services network, the NASDAQ over-the-counter stock-quotation system, and the Computer Sciences Infonet. These networks all use programmable concentrators for combining a multiplicity of terminals. Included in the discussion for each network is a description of the overall network structure, the handling and transmission of messages, communication requirements, routing and reliability consideration where applicable, operating data and design specifications where available, and unique design features in the area of computer communications.

  13. Computer Oriented Exercises on Attitudes and U.S. Gasoline Consumption, Attitude. Student Guide. Computer Technology Program Environmental Education Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    This is the student guide in a set of five computer-oriented environmental/energy education units. Contents of this guide present: (1) the three gasoline consumption-reducing options for which attitudes are to be explored; (2) exercises; and (3) appendices including an energy attitudes survey. (MR)

  14. Computational modeling of magnetically actuated propellant orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, John I.

    1996-01-01

    Unlike terrestrial applications where gravity positions liquid at the 'bottom' of the tank, the location of liquid propellant in spacecraft tanks is uncertain unless specific actions are taken or special features are built into the tank. Some mission events require knowledge of liquid position prior to a particular action: liquid must be positioned over the tank outlet prior to starting the main engines and must be moved away from the tank vent before vapor can be released overboard to reduce pressure. It may also be desirable to positively position liquid to improve propulsion system performance: moving liquid away from the tank walls will dramatically decrease the rate of heat transfer to the propellant, suppressing the boil-off rate, thereby reducing overall mission propellant requirements. The process of moving propellant to a desired position is referred to as propellant orientation or reorientation. Several techniques have been developed to positively position propellant in spacecraft tanks and each technique imposes additional requirements on vehicle design. Propulsive reorientation relies on small auxiliary thrusters to accelerate the tank. The inertia of the liquid causes it to collect in the aft-end of the tank if the acceleration is forward. This technique requires that additional thrusters be added to the vehicle, that additional propellant be carried in the vehicle, and that an additional operational maneuver be executed. Another technique uses Liquid Acquisition Devices (LAD's) to positively position propellants. These devices rely on surface tension to hold the liquid within special geometries (i.e. vanes, wire-mesh channels, start-baskets). While avoiding some of the penalties of propulsive orientation, this technique requires the addition of complicated hardware inside the propellant tank and performance for long duration missions is uncertain. The subject of the present research is an alternate technique for positively positioning liquid within

  15. Steering object-oriented computations with Python

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, T.-Y.B.; Dubois, P.F.; Furnish, G.; Beazley, D.M.

    1996-10-01

    We have described current approaches and future plans for steering C++ application, running Python on parallel platforms, and combination of Tk interface and Python interpreter in steering computations. In addition, there has been significant enhancement in the Gist module. Tk mega widgets has been implemented for a few physics applications. We have also written Python interface to SIJLO, a data storage package used as an interface to a visualization system named MeshTv. Python is being used to control large-scale simulations (molecular dynamics in particular) running on the CM-5 and T3D at LANL as well. A few other code development projects at LLNL are either using or considering Python as their steering shells. In summary, the merits of Python have been appreciated by more and more people in the scientific computation community.

  16. Simulating complex intracellular processes using object-oriented computational modelling.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Colin G; Goldman, Jacki P; Gullick, William J

    2004-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview of computer modelling and simulation in cellular biology, in particular as applied to complex biochemical processes within the cell. This is illustrated by the use of the techniques of object-oriented modelling, where the computer is used to construct abstractions of objects in the domain being modelled, and these objects then interact within the computer to simulate the system and allow emergent properties to be observed. The paper also discusses the role of computer simulation in understanding complexity in biological systems, and the kinds of information which can be obtained about biology via simulation. PMID:15302205

  17. Generic, Type-Safe and Object Oriented Computer Algebra Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kredel, Heinz; Jolly, Raphael

    Advances in computer science, in particular object oriented programming, and software engineering have had little practical impact on computer algebra systems in the last 30 years. The software design of existing systems is still dominated by ad-hoc memory management, weakly typed algorithm libraries and proprietary domain specific interactive expression interpreters. We discuss a modular approach to computer algebra software: usage of state-of-the-art memory management and run-time systems (e.g. JVM) usage of strongly typed, generic, object oriented programming languages (e.g. Java) and usage of general purpose, dynamic interactive expression interpreters (e.g. Python) To illustrate the workability of this approach, we have implemented and studied computer algebra systems in Java and Scala. In this paper we report on the current state of this work by presenting new examples.

  18. Computer Oriented Exercises on Attitudes and U.S. Gasoline Consumption, Attitude. Teacher Guide. Computer Technology Program Environmental Education Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    This is the teacher's guide to accompany the student guide which together comprise one of five computer-oriented environmental/energy education units. This unit is concerned with the attitude of people toward gasoline shortages and different steps the government could take to reduce gasoline consumption. Through the exercises, part of which make…

  19. An Object-Oriented Approach to Writing Computational Electromagnetics Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Martin; Mallasch, Paul G.

    1996-01-01

    Presently, most computer software development in the Computational Electromagnetics (CEM) community employs the structured programming paradigm, particularly using the Fortran language. Other segments of the software community began switching to an Object-Oriented Programming (OOP) paradigm in recent years to help ease design and development of highly complex codes. This paper examines design of a time-domain numerical analysis CEM code using the OOP paradigm, comparing OOP code and structured programming code in terms of software maintenance, portability, flexibility, and speed.

  20. Strategy Generalization across Orientation Tasks: Testing a Computational Cognitive Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunzelmann, Glenn

    2008-01-01

    Humans use their spatial information processing abilities flexibly to facilitate problem solving and decision making in a variety of tasks. This article explores the question of whether a general strategy can be adapted for performing two different spatial orientation tasks by testing the predictions of a computational cognitive model. Human…

  1. Oriented Nanostructures for Energy Conversion and Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jun; Cao, Guozhong H.; Yang, Zhenguo; Wang, Donghai; DuBois, Daniel L.; Zhou, Xiao Dong; Graff, Gordon L.; Pederson, Larry R.; Zhang, Jiguang

    2008-08-28

    Recently the role of nanostructured materials in addressing the challenges in energy and natural resources has attracted wide attention. In particular, oriented nanostructures have demonstrated promising properties for energy harvesting, conversion and storage. The purpose of the paper is to review the synthesis and application of oriented nanostructures in a few key areas of energy technologies, namely photovoltaics, batteries, supercapacitors and thermoelectrics. Although the applications differ from field to field, one of the fundamental challenges is to improve the generation and transport of electrons and ions. We will first briefly review the several major approaches to attain oriented nanostructured films that are applicable for energy applications. We will then discuss how such controlled nanostructures can be used in photovoltaics, batteries, capacitors, thermoelectrics, and other unconventional ways of energy conversion. We will highlight the role of high surface area to maximize the surface activity, and the importance of optimum dimension and architecture, controlled pore channels and alignment of the nanocrystalline phase to optimize the electrons and ion transport. Finally, the paper will discuss the challenges in attaining integrated architectures to achieve the desired performance. Brief background information will be provided for the relevant technologies, but the emphasis is focused mainly on the nanoeffects of mostly inorganic based materials and devices.

  2. A Computer Simulation of the U.S. Energy Crisis, Energy. Teacher Guide. Computer Technology Program Environmental Education Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    This is the teacher's guide to accompany the student guide which together comprise one of five computer-oriented environmental/energy education units. The computer program, ENERGY, at the base of this unit, simulates the pattern of energy consumption in the United States. The total energy demand is determined by energy use in the various sectors…

  3. Computing 3D head orientation from a monocular image sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horprasert, Thanarat; Yacoob, Yaser; Davis, Larry S.

    1997-02-01

    An approach for estimating 3D head orientation in a monocular image sequence is proposed. The approach employs recently developed image-based parameterized tracking for face and face features to locate the area in which a sub- pixel parameterized shape estimation of the eye's boundary is performed. This involves tracking of five points (four at the eye corners and the fifth is the tip of the nose). We describe an approach that relies on the coarse structure of the face to compute orientation relative to the camera plane. Our approach employs projective invariance of the cross-ratios of the eye corners and anthropometric statistics to estimate the head yaw, roll and pitch. Analytical and experimental results are reported.

  4. Reviews of computing technology: Object-oriented technology

    SciTech Connect

    Skeen, D.C.

    1993-03-01

    A useful metaphor in introducing object-oriented concepts is the idea of a computer hardware manufacturer assembling products from an existing stock of electronic parts. In this analogy, think of the parts as pieces of computer software and of the finished products as computer applications. Like its counterpart, the object is capable of performing its specific function in a wide variety of different applications. The advantages to assembling hardware using a set of prebuilt parts are obvious. The design process is greatly simplified in this scenario, since the designer needs only to carry the design down to the chip level, rather than to the transistor level. As a result, the designer is free to develop a more reliable and feature rich product. Also, since the component parts are reused in several different products, the parts can be made more robust and subjected to more rigorous testing than would be economically feasible for a part used in only one piece of equipment. Additionally, maintenance on the resulting systems is simplified because of the part-level consistency from one type of equipment to another. The remainder of this document introduces the techniques used to develop objects, the benefits of the technology, outstanding issues that remain with the technology, industry direction for the technology, and the impact that object-oriented technology is likely to have on the organization. While going through this material, the reader will find it useful to remember the parts analogy and to keep in mind that the overall purpose of object-oriented technology is to create software parts and to construct applications using those parts.

  5. APPLICATION OF OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING TECHNIQUES IN FRONT END COMPUTERS.

    SciTech Connect

    SKELLY,J.F.

    1997-11-03

    The Front End Computer (FEC) environment imposes special demands on software, beyond real time performance and robustness. FEC software must manage a diverse inventory of devices with individualistic timing requirements and hardware interfaces. It must implement network services which export device access to the control system at large, interpreting a uniform network communications protocol into the specific control requirements of the individual devices. Object oriented languages provide programming techniques which neatly address these challenges, and also offer benefits in terms of maintainability and flexibility. Applications are discussed which exhibit the use of inheritance, multiple inheritance and inheritance trees, and polymorphism to address the needs of FEC software.

  6. E-Governance and Service Oriented Computing Architecture Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejasvee, Sanjay; Sarangdevot, S. S.

    2010-11-01

    E-Governance is the effective application of information communication and technology (ICT) in the government processes to accomplish safe and reliable information lifecycle management. Lifecycle of the information involves various processes as capturing, preserving, manipulating and delivering information. E-Governance is meant to transform of governance in better manner to the citizens which is transparent, reliable, participatory, and accountable in point of view. The purpose of this paper is to attempt e-governance model, focus on the Service Oriented Computing Architecture (SOCA) that includes combination of information and services provided by the government, innovation, find out the way of optimal service delivery to citizens and implementation in transparent and liable practice. This paper also try to enhance focus on the E-government Service Manager as a essential or key factors service oriented and computing model that provides a dynamically extensible structural design in which all area or branch can bring in innovative services. The heart of this paper examine is an intangible model that enables E-government communication for trade and business, citizen and government and autonomous bodies.

  7. Strategy generalization across orientation tasks: testing a computational cognitive model.

    PubMed

    Gunzelmann, Glenn

    2008-07-01

    Humans use their spatial information processing abilities flexibly to facilitate problem solving and decision making in a variety of tasks. This article explores the question of whether a general strategy can be adapted for performing two different spatial orientation tasks by testing the predictions of a computational cognitive model. Human performance was measured on an orientation task requiring participants to identify the location of a target either on a map (find-on-map) or within an egocentric view of a space (find-in-scene). A general strategy instantiated in a computational cognitive model of the find-on-map task, based on the results from Gunzelmann and Anderson (2006), was adapted to perform both tasks and used to generate performance predictions for a new study. The qualitative fit of the model to the human data supports the view that participants were able to tailor a general strategy to the requirements of particular spatial tasks. The quantitative differences between the predictions of the model and the performance of human participants in the new experiment expose individual differences in sample populations. The model provides a means of accounting for those differences and a framework for understanding how human spatial abilities are applied to naturalistic spatial tasks that involve reasoning with maps. PMID:21635355

  8. Computer Programming Games and Gender Oriented Cultural Forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlSulaiman, Sarah Abdulmalik

    I present the design and evaluation of two games designed to help elementary and middle school students learn computer programming concepts. The first game was designed to be "gender neutral", aligning with might be described as a consensus opinion on best practices for computational learning environments. The second game, based on the cultural form of dress up dolls was deliberately designed to appeal to females. I recruited 70 participants in an international two-phase study to investigate the relationship between games, gender, attitudes towards computer programming, and learning. My findings suggest that while the two games were equally effective in terms of learning outcomes, I saw differences in motivation between players of the two games. Specifically, participants who reported a preference for female- oriented games were more motivated to learn about computer programming when they played a game that they perceived as designed for females. In addition, I describe how the two games seemed to encourage different types of social activity between players in a classroom setting. Based on these results, I reflect on the strategy of exclusively designing games and activities as "gender neutral", and suggest that employing cultural forms, including gendered ones, may help create a more productive experience for learners.

  9. A Riemannian framework for orientation distribution function computing.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jian; Ghosh, Aurobrata; Jiang, Tianzi; Deriche, Rachid

    2009-01-01

    Compared with Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI), High Angular Resolution Imaging (HARDI) can better explore the complex microstructure of white matter. Orientation Distribution Function (ODF) is used to describe the probability of the fiber direction. Fisher information metric has been constructed for probability density family in Information Geometry theory and it has been successfully applied for tensor computing in DTI. In this paper, we present a state of the art Riemannian framework for ODF computing based on Information Geometry and sparse representation of orthonormal bases. In this Riemannian framework, the exponential map, logarithmic map and geodesic have closed forms. And the weighted Frechet mean exists uniquely on this manifold. We also propose a novel scalar measurement, named Geometric Anisotropy (GA), which is the Riemannian geodesic distance between the ODF and the isotropic ODF. The Renyi entropy H1/2 of the ODF can be computed from the GA. Moreover, we present an Affine-Euclidean framework and a Log-Euclidean framework so that we can work in an Euclidean space. As an application, Lagrange interpolation on ODF field is proposed based on weighted Frechet mean. We validate our methods on synthetic and real data experiments. Compared with existing Riemannian frameworks on ODF, our framework is model-free. The estimation of the parameters, i.e. Riemannian coordinates, is robust and linear. Moreover it should be noted that our theoretical results can be used for any probability density function (PDF) under an orthonormal basis representation. PMID:20426075

  10. An object-oriented approach to energy-economic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, M.A.; Fox, J.A.; Sands, R.D.

    1993-12-01

    In this paper, the authors discuss the experiences in creating an object-oriented economic model of the U.S. energy and agriculture markets. After a discussion of some central concepts, they provide an overview of the model, focusing on the methodology of designing an object-oriented class hierarchy specification based on standard microeconomic production functions. The evolution of the model from the class definition stage to programming it in C++, a standard object-oriented programming language, will be detailed. The authors then discuss the main differences between writing the object-oriented program versus a procedure-oriented program of the same model. Finally, they conclude with a discussion of the advantages and limitations of the object-oriented approach based on the experience in building energy-economic models with procedure-oriented approaches and languages.

  11. Magnetic fusion energy and computers

    SciTech Connect

    Killeen, J.

    1982-01-01

    The application of computers to magnetic fusion energy research is essential. In the last several years the use of computers in the numerical modeling of fusion systems has increased substantially. There are several categories of computer models used to study the physics of magnetically confined plasmas. A comparable number of types of models for engineering studies are also in use. To meet the needs of the fusion program, the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center has been established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A large central computing facility is linked to smaller computer centers at each of the major MFE laboratories by a communication network. In addition to providing cost effective computing services, the NMFECC environment stimulates collaboration and the sharing of computer codes among the various fusion research groups.

  12. User's Guide and Orientation to Canned Computer Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kretke, George L.; Hopkins, Kenneth D.

    This handbook is for the student with little or no previous experience with computer utilization for data processing. Sample problems to be run on the computer are included. It gives: (1) an overview of the sequence of steps from obtaining data to receiving computer output, (2) a guide to common computer packages, (3) an illustration of the use of…

  13. Orientational energy of anisometric particles in liquid-crystalline suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burylov, S. V.; Zakhlevnykh, A. N.

    2013-07-01

    We obtain a general expression for the orientational energy of an individual anisometric particle suspended in uniform nematic liquid crystals when the main axis of the particle rotates with respect to the nematic director. We show that there is a qualitative and quantitative analogy between the internal and external problems for cylindrical volumes of nematic liquid crystals, and on this basis we obtain an estimate of the orientational energy of a particle of cylindrical (rodlike, needlelike, or ellipsoidal) shape. For an ensemble of such particles we propose a modified form of their orientational energy in the nematic matrix. This orientational energy has the usual second-order term, and additional fourth-order term in the scalar product of the nematic director and the vector which characterizes an average direction of the main axes of the particles. As an example we obtain the expression for the free energy density of ferronematics, i.e., colloidal suspensions of needlelike magnetic particles in nematic liquid crystals. Unlike previous models, the free energy density includes the proposed modified form of the particle orientational energy, and also a contribution describing the surface saddle-splay deformations of the liquid crystal matrix.

  14. Breadth-Oriented Outcomes Assessment in Computer Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordes, David; And Others

    Little work has been done regarding the overall assessment of quality of computer science graduates at the undergraduate level. This paper reports on a pilot study at the University of Alabama of a prototype computer science outcomes assessment designed to evaluate the breadth of knowledge of computer science seniors. The instrument evaluated two…

  15. Orientation-dependent binding energy of graphene on palladium

    SciTech Connect

    Kappes, Branden B.; Ebnonnasir, Abbas; Ciobanu, Cristian V.; Kodambaka, Suneel

    2013-02-04

    Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the binding strength of a graphene monolayer on Pd(111) can vary between physisorption and chemisorption depending on its orientation. By studying the interfacial charge transfer, we have identified a specific four-atom carbon cluster that is responsible for the local bonding of graphene to Pd(111). The areal density of such clusters varies with the in-plane orientation of graphene, causing the binding energy to change accordingly. Similar investigations can also apply to other metal substrates and suggests that physical, chemical, and mechanical properties of graphene may be controlled by changing its orientation.

  16. An Introductory Course on Service-Oriented Computing for High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, W. T.; Chen, Yinong; Cheng, Calvin; Sun, Xin; Bitter, Gary; White, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Service-Oriented Computing (SOC) is a new computing paradigm that has been adopted by major computer companies as well as government agencies such as the Department of Defense for mission-critical applications. SOC is being used for developing Web and electronic business applications, as well as robotics, gaming, and scientific applications. Yet,…

  17. Computer Science Majors: Sex Role Orientation, Academic Achievement, and Social Cognitive Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Chris; Garavalia, Linda S.; Fritts, Mary Lou Hines; Olson, Elizabeth A.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the sex role orientations endorsed by 188 male and female students majoring in computer science, a male-dominated college degree program. The relations among sex role orientation and academic achievement and social cognitive factors influential in career decision-making self-efficacy were explored. Findings revealed that…

  18. Emerging energy and environmental applications of vertically-oriented graphenes.

    PubMed

    Bo, Zheng; Mao, Shun; Han, Zhao Jun; Cen, Kefa; Chen, Junhong; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken

    2015-04-21

    Graphene nanosheets arranged perpendicularly to the substrate surface, i.e., vertically-oriented graphenes (VGs), have many unique morphological and structural features that can lead to exciting properties. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition enables the growth of VGs on various substrates using gas, liquid, or solid precursors. Compared with conventional randomly-oriented graphenes, VGs' vertical orientation on the substrate, non-agglomerated morphology, controlled inter-sheet connectivity, as well as sharp and exposed edges make them very promising for a variety of applications. The focus of this tutorial review is on plasma-enabled simple yet efficient synthesis of VGs and their properties that lead to emerging energy and environmental applications, ranging from energy storage, energy conversion, sensing, to green corona discharges for pollution control. PMID:25711336

  19. ICT Oriented toward Nyaya: Community Computing in India's Slums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byker, Erik J.

    2014-01-01

    In many schools across India, access to information and communication technology (ICT) is still a rare privilege. While the Annual Status of Education Report in India (2013) showed a marginal uptick in the amount of computers, the opportunities for children to use those computers have remained stagnant. The lack of access to ICT is especially…

  20. Computer-Oriented Laboratory Exercises for Geology and Oceanography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, William T.

    1969-01-01

    Describes the use of computers equipped with plotters to predict tides using the known period, phase, and amplitude of the major tidal components. Other demonstrations and projects are described. (RR)

  1. Forest value orientations in Australia: an application of computer content analysis.

    PubMed

    Webb, Trevor J; Bengston, David N; Fan, David P

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the expression of three forest value orientations that emerged from an analysis of Australian news media discourse about the management of Australian native forests from August 1, 1997 through December 31, 2004. Computer-coded content analysis was used to measure and track the relative importance of commodity, ecological and moral/spiritual/aesthetic forest value orientations. The number of expressions of these forest value orientations followed major events in forest management and policy, with peaks corresponding to finalization of Regional Forest Agreements and conflicts over forest management. Over the time period analyzed, the relative share of commodity value orientation decreased and the shares of the ecological and moral/spiritual/aesthetic value orientations increased. The shifts in forest value orientations highlight the need for native forests to be managed for multiple values and the need for continued monitoring of forest values. PMID:17846830

  2. Effect of row orientation on energy balance components

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solar irradiance is the primary source of energy that is converted into sensible and latent heat fluxes in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. The orientation of agricultural crop rows relative to the sun’s zenith angle determines the amount of solar irradiance reaching the plant and soil surfaces...

  3. Energy considerations in computational aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brentner, Kenneth S.

    A finite-volume multistage time-stepping Euler code is used to investigate the use of CFD algorithms for the direct calculation of acoustics. The 2D compressible inviscid flow about an accelerating or decelerating circular cylinder is used as a model problem. The time evolution of the energy transfer from the cylinder to the fluid, as the cylinder is moved from rest to some nonnegligible velocity, is clearly seen. By examining the temporal and spatial characteristics of the numerical solution, a distinction can be made between the propagating acoustic energy, the convecting energy associated with the entropy change in the fluid, and the energy contained in the local aerodynamic field. Systematic variation of the cylinder acceleration shows that the radiated acoustic energy depends strongly upon the rate of acceleration or deceleration. The computational grid has a large effect on the ratio of acoustic energy to nonphysical entropy associated energy, while the role of the explicit artificial viscosity seems to be of second order. The entropy term was nearly negligible in all cases the cylinder was started slowly.

  4. Energy considerations in computational aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentner, Kenneth S.

    1993-01-01

    A finite-volume multistage time-stepping Euler code is used to investigate the use of CFD algorithms for the direct calculation of acoustics. The 2D compressible inviscid flow about an accelerating or decelerating circular cylinder is used as a model problem. The time evolution of the energy transfer from the cylinder to the fluid, as the cylinder is moved from rest to some nonnegligible velocity, is clearly seen. By examining the temporal and spatial characteristics of the numerical solution, a distinction can be made between the propagating acoustic energy, the convecting energy associated with the entropy change in the fluid, and the energy contained in the local aerodynamic field. Systematic variation of the cylinder acceleration shows that the radiated acoustic energy depends strongly upon the rate of acceleration or deceleration. The computational grid has a large effect on the ratio of acoustic energy to nonphysical entropy associated energy, while the role of the explicit artificial viscosity seems to be of second order. The entropy term was nearly negligible in all cases the cylinder was started slowly.

  5. Effects of Textual and Animated Orienting Activities and Practice on Learning from Computer-Based Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieber, Lloyd P.; Hannafin, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes study designed to examine the effects of textual and/or computer animated orienting strategies and practice on rule-using and problem-solving skills of elementary school students using computer-assisted instruction. Four different versions of a lesson based on Isaac Newton's Law of Motion are described, and results are analyzed. (28…

  6. An object-oriented environment for computer vision and pattern recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, J.E.

    1992-12-01

    Vision is a flexible and extensible object-oriented programming environment for prototyping solutions to problems requiring computer vision and pattern recognition techniques. Vision integrates signal/image processing, statistical pattern recognition, neural networks, low and mid level computer vision, and graphics into a cohesive framework useful for a wide variety of applications at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  7. Computer-Oriented Calculus Courses Using Finite Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sheldon P.

    The so-called discrete approach in calculus instruction involves introducing topics from the calculus of finite differences and finite sums, both for motivation and as useful tools for applications of the calculus. In particular, it provides an ideal setting in which to incorporate computers into calculus courses. This approach has been…

  8. Accurate calculation of computer-generated holograms using angular-spectrum layer-oriented method.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Cao, Liangcai; Zhang, Hao; Kong, Dezhao; Jin, Guofan

    2015-10-01

    Fast calculation and correct depth cue are crucial issues in the calculation of computer-generated hologram (CGH) for high quality three-dimensional (3-D) display. An angular-spectrum based algorithm for layer-oriented CGH is proposed. Angular spectra from each layer are synthesized as a layer-corresponded sub-hologram based on the fast Fourier transform without paraxial approximation. The proposed method can avoid the huge computational cost of the point-oriented method and yield accurate predictions of the whole diffracted field compared with other layer-oriented methods. CGHs of versatile formats of 3-D digital scenes, including computed tomography and 3-D digital models, are demonstrated with precise depth performance and advanced image quality. PMID:26480062

  9. Computational modeling of orientation tuning dynamics in monkey primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Pugh, M C; Ringach, D L; Shapley, R; Shelley, M J

    2000-01-01

    In the primate visual pathway, orientation tuning of neurons is first observed in the primary visual cortex. The LGN cells that comprise the thalamic input to V1 are not orientation tuned, but some V1 neurons are quite selective. Two main classes of theoretical models have been offered to explain orientation selectivity: feedforward models, in which inputs from spatially aligned LGN cells are summed together by one cortical neuron; and feedback models, in which an initial weak orientation bias due to convergent LGN input is sharpened and amplified by intracortical feedback. Recent data on the dynamics of orientation tuning, obtained by a cross-correlation technique, may help to distinguish between these classes of models. To test this possibility, we simulated the measurement of orientation tuning dynamics on various receptive field models, including a simple Hubel-Wiesel type feedforward model: a linear spatiotemporal filter followed by an integrate-and-fire spike generator. The computational study reveals that simple feedforward models may account for some aspects of the experimental data but fail to explain many salient features of orientation tuning dynamics in V1 cells. A simple feedback model of interacting cells is also considered. This model is successful in explaining the appearance of Mexican-hat orientation profiles, but other features of the data continue to be unexplained. PMID:10798599

  10. Shlaer-Mellor object-oriented analysis and recursive design, an effective modern software development method for development of computing systems for a large physics detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlowski, T.; Carey, T.A.; Maguire, C.F.

    1995-10-01

    After evaluation of several modern object-oriented methods for development of the computing systems for the PHENIX detector at RHIC, we selected the Shlaer-Mellor Object-Oriented Analysis and Recursive Design method as the most appropriate for the needs and development environment of a large nuclear or high energy physics detector. This paper discusses our specific needs and environment, our method selection criteria, and major features and components of the Shlaer-Mellor method.

  11. Implementing an Affordable High-Performance Computing for Teaching-Oriented Computer Science Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abuzaghleh, Omar; Goldschmidt, Kathleen; Elleithy, Yasser; Lee, Jeongkyu

    2013-01-01

    With the advances in computing power, high-performance computing (HPC) platforms have had an impact on not only scientific research in advanced organizations but also computer science curriculum in the educational community. For example, multicore programming and parallel systems are highly desired courses in the computer science major. However,…

  12. Effect of Computer-Aided Perspective Drawings on Spatial Orientation and Perspective Drawing Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurtulus, Aytac

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of computer-aided Perspective Drawings on eighth grade primary school students' achievement in Spatial Orientation and Perspective Drawing. The study made use of pre-test post-test control group experimental design. The study was conducted with thirty 8th grade students attending a primary school…

  13. Some Specifications for a Computer-Oriented First Course in Electrical Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Engineering Education, Washington, DC.

    Reported are specifications for a computer-oriented first course in electrical engineering giving new direction to the development of texts and alternative courses of study. Guidelines for choice of topics, a statement of fundamental concepts, pitfalls to avoid, and some sample course outlines are given. The study of circuits through computer…

  14. Computer Graphics Orientation and Training in a Corporate/Production Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDevitt, Marsha Jean

    This master's thesis provides an overview of a computer graphics production environment and proposes a realistic approach to orientation and on-going training for employees working within a fast-paced production schedule. Problems involved in meeting the training needs of employees are briefly discussed in the first chapter, while the second…

  15. Orientational, kinetic, and magnetic energy of geodynamo, reversals, and asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starchenko, S. V.

    2015-07-01

    Integral laws describing the evolution of the kinetic, magnetic, and orientational energy in the liquid core of the Earth, which are also valid in the interiors of the other terrestrial planets, are derived, simplified, and analyzed. These laws are coarsely approximated by a system of ordinary differential equations with a given energy of the convection. The characteristic velocities, magnetic fields, periods, and scales as the functions of the power of the convection are estimated for the states beyond and close to the reversal or excursion. With the assumed simplifications, the convection power should be close to a certain value in order to enable a relatively short reversal or excursion; significant deviation of the convection energy from this value will render the system into a long-term steady state. Here, two types of steady state are possible: the codirectional state with the magnetic field oriented along the velocity vector, and contradirectional state with the opposing orientations of the magnetic field and velocity. These states are not symmetric with respect to each other since, other factors being equal, the energy support of the convection and the average intensity of the magnetic field are typically higher in the contradirectional rather than codirectional state. The total duration of codirectional states is somewhat shorter than contradirectional states in the case when the convection power grows with time; in the case of a long-decreasing convection power, the situation is opposite. This asymmetry in the duration of steady states is confirmed by the paleomagnetic data on the timescale of the magnetic reversals. The length of the average interval between the reversals is controlled by the turbulent, thermal, electromagnetic, and visco-compositional diffusion. The predominant type of the diffusion can be in many cases identified from the dependence of the reversal frequency on the intensity of the magnetic field based on the paleomagnetic data. The

  16. Computed reconstruction of spatial ammonoid-shell orientation captured from digitized grinding and landmark data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukeneder, Susanne; Lukeneder, Alexander; Weber, Gerhard W.

    2014-03-01

    The internal orientation of fossil mass occurrences can be exploited as useful source of information about their primary depositional conditions. A series of studies, using different kinds of fossils, especially those with elongated shape (e.g., elongated gastropods), deal with their orientation and the subsequent reconstruction of the depositional conditions (e.g., paleocurrents and transport mechanisms). However, disk-shaped fossils like planispiral cephalopods or gastropods were used, up to now, with caution for interpreting paleocurrents. Moreover, most studies just deal with the topmost surface of such mass occurrences, due to the easier accessibility. Within this study, a new method for three-dimensional reconstruction of the internal structure of a fossil mass occurrence and the subsequent calculation of its spatial shell orientation is established. A 234 million-years-old (Carnian, Triassic) monospecific mass occurrence of the ammonoid Kasimlarceltites krystyni from the Taurus Mountains in Turkey, embedded in limestone, is used for this pilot study. Therefore, a 150×45×140 mm3 block of the ammonoid bearing limestone bed has been grinded to 70 slices, with a distance of 2 mm between each slice. By using a semi-automatic region growing algorithm of the 3D-visualization software Amira, ammonoids of a part of this mass occurrence were segmented and a 3D-model reconstructed. Landmarks, trigonometric and vector-based calculations were used to compute the diameters and the spatial orientation of each ammonoid. The spatial shell orientation was characterized by dip and dip-direction and aperture direction of the longitudinal axis, as well as by dip and azimuth of an imaginary sagittal-plane through each ammonoid. The exact spatial shell orientation was determined for a sample of 675 ammonoids, and their statistical orientation analyzed (i.e., NW/SE). The study combines classical orientation analysis with modern 3D-visualization techniques, and establishes a novel

  17. A MAC scheme for vectorized computation of internal flows in surface oriented curvilinear coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tragner, U. K.; Mitra, N. K.; Fiebig, M.

    1986-05-01

    A vectorizable algorithm has been developed for modified marker-and-cell solution in surface oriented coordinates of continuity and Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible flows in two-dimensional channels of arbitrary geometries. Computations have been performed on a CYBER-205 computer. Computed results for flows in a convergent channel compare quite well with exact solutions of Jeffery-Hamel flows at low Reynolds numbers. At a Reynolds number of 5000, a maximum disagreement of 5 percent between computed and exact velocity profile is obtained. Computations have also been performed for flows in a channel with a backward-facing step and in a channel with a 90-deg bend. Computed results show a cerain waviness in wall-drag coefficient at large Reynolds numbers. It is suspected that the waviness has been caused by the use of nonoptimal grids and central differences for spatial derivatives.

  18. Hysteresis model and statistical interpretation of energy losses in non-oriented steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mănescu (Păltânea), Veronica; Păltânea, Gheorghe; Gavrilă, Horia

    2016-04-01

    In this paper the hysteresis energy losses in two non-oriented industrial steels (M400-65A and M800-65A) were determined, by means of an efficient classical Preisach model, which is based on the Pescetti-Biorci method for the identification of the Preisach density. The excess and the total energy losses were also determined, using a statistical framework, based on magnetic object theory. The hysteresis energy losses, in a non-oriented steel alloy, depend on the peak magnetic polarization and they can be computed using a Preisach model, due to the fact that in these materials there is a direct link between the elementary rectangular loops and the discontinuous character of the magnetization process (Barkhausen jumps). To determine the Preisach density it was necessary to measure the normal magnetization curve and the saturation hysteresis cycle. A system of equations was deduced and the Preisach density was calculated for a magnetic polarization of 1.5 T; then the hysteresis cycle was reconstructed. Using the same pattern for the Preisach distribution, it was computed the hysteresis cycle for 1 T. The classical losses were calculated using a well known formula and the excess energy losses were determined by means of the magnetic object theory. The total energy losses were mathematically reconstructed and compared with those, measured experimentally.

  19. Method for Statically Checking an Object-oriented Computer Program Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bierhoff, Kevin M. (Inventor); Aldrich, Jonathan (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method for statically checking an object-oriented computer program module includes the step of identifying objects within a computer program module, at least one of the objects having a plurality of references thereto, possibly from multiple clients. A discipline of permissions is imposed on the objects identified within the computer program module. The permissions enable tracking, from among a discrete set of changeable states, a subset of states each object might be in. A determination is made regarding whether the imposed permissions are violated by a potential reference to any of the identified objects. The results of the determination are output to a user.

  20. Advanced Computing Technologies for Rocket Engine Propulsion Systems: Object-Oriented Design with C++

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekele, Gete

    2002-01-01

    This document explores the use of advanced computer technologies with an emphasis on object-oriented design to be applied in the development of software for a rocket engine to improve vehicle safety and reliability. The primary focus is on phase one of this project, the smart start sequence module. The objectives are: 1) To use current sound software engineering practices, object-orientation; 2) To improve on software development time, maintenance, execution and management; 3) To provide an alternate design choice for control, implementation, and performance.

  1. Computing support for High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, P.; Yelton, J.

    1996-12-01

    This computing proposal (Task S) is submitted separately but in support of the High Energy Experiment (CLEO, Fermilab, CMS) and Theory tasks. The authors have built a very strong computing base at Florida over the past 8 years. In fact, computing has been one of the main contributions to their experimental collaborations, involving not just computing capacity for running Monte Carlos and data reduction, but participation in many computing initiatives, industrial partnerships, computing committees and collaborations. These facts justify the submission of a separate computing proposal.

  2. Computer-assisted selection of coplanar beam orientations in intensity-modulated radiation therapy*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugachev, A.; Xing, L.

    2001-09-01

    In intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the incident beam orientations are often determined by a trial and error search. The conventional beam's-eye view (BEV) tool becomes less helpful in IMRT because it is frequently required that beams go through organs at risk (OARs) in order to achieve a compromise between the dosimetric objectives of the planning target volume (PTV) and the OARs. In this paper, we report a beam's-eye view dosimetrics (BEVD) technique to assist in the selection of beam orientations in IMRT. In our method, each beam portal is divided into a grid of beamlets. A score function is introduced to measure the `goodness' of each beamlet at a given gantry angle. The score is determined by the maximum PTV dose deliverable by the beamlet without exceeding the tolerance doses of the OARs and normal tissue located in the path of the beamlet. The overall score of the gantry angle is given by a sum of the scores of all beamlets. For a given patient, the score function is evaluated for each possible beam orientation. The directions with the highest scores are then selected as the candidates for beam placement. This procedure is similar to the BEV approach used in conventional radiation therapy, except that the evaluation by a human is replaced by a score function to take into account the intensity modulation. This technique allows one to select beam orientations without the excessive computing overhead of computer optimization of beam orientation. It also provides useful insight into the problem of selection of beam orientation and is especially valuable for complicated cases where the PTV is surrounded by several sensitive structures and where it is difficult to select a set of `good' beam orientations. Several two-dimensional (2D) model cases were used to test the proposed technique. The plans obtained using the BEVD-selected beam orientations were compared with the plans obtained using equiangular spaced beams. For all the model cases investigated

  3. Our U.S. Energy Future, Student Guide. Computer Technology Program Environmental Education Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    This is the student guide in a set of five computer-oriented environmental/energy education units. Contents are organized into the following parts or lessons: (1) Introduction to the U.S. Energy Future; (2) Description of the "FUTURE" programs; (3) Effects of "FUTURE" decisions; and (4) Exercises on the U.S. energy future. This guide supplements a…

  4. Magnetic-fusion energy and computers

    SciTech Connect

    Killeen, J.

    1982-01-01

    The application of computers to magnetic fusion energy research is essential. In the last several years the use of computers in the numerical modeling of fusion systems has increased substantially. There are several categories of computer models used to study the physics of magnetically confined plasmas. A comparable number of types of models for engineering studies are also in use. To meet the needs of the fusion program, the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center has been established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A large central computing facility is linked to smaller computer centers at each of the major MFE laboratories by a communication network. In addition to providing cost effective computing services, the NMFECC environment stimulates collaboration and the sharing of computer codes among the various fusion research groups.

  5. Challenges and Opportunities in Using Automatic Differentiation with Object-Oriented Toolkits for Scientific Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Hovland, P; Lee, S; McInnes, L; Norris, B; Smith, B

    2001-04-17

    The increased use of object-oriented toolkits in large-scale scientific simulation presents new opportunities and challenges for the use of automatic (or algorithmic) differentiation (AD) techniques, especially in the context of optimization. Because object-oriented toolkits use well-defined interfaces and data structures, there is potential for simplifying the AD process. Furthermore, derivative computation can be improved by exploiting high-level information about numerical and computational abstractions. However, challenges to the successful use of AD with these toolkits also exist. Among the greatest challenges is balancing the desire to limit the scope of the AD process with the desire to minimize the work required of a user. They discuss their experiences in integrating AD with the PETSc, PVODE, and TAO toolkits and the plans for future research and development in this area.

  6. The Use of Computer Vision Algorithms for Automatic Orientation of Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markiewicz, Jakub Stefan

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents analysis of the orientation of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) data. In the proposed data processing methodology, point clouds are considered as panoramic images enriched by the depth map. Computer vision (CV) algorithms are used for orientation, which are applied for testing the correctness of the detection of tie points and time of computations, and for assessing difficulties in their implementation. The BRISK, FASRT, MSER, SIFT, SURF, ASIFT and CenSurE algorithms are used to search for key-points. The source data are point clouds acquired using a Z+F 5006h terrestrial laser scanner on the ruins of Iłża Castle, Poland. Algorithms allowing combination of the photogrammetric and CV approaches are also presented.

  7. Integrating Clinical Trial Imaging Data Resources Using Service-Oriented Architecture and Grid Computing

    PubMed Central

    Cladé, Thierry; Snyder, Joshua C.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical trials which use imaging typically require data management and workflow integration across several parties. We identify opportunities for all parties involved to realize benefits with a modular interoperability model based on service-oriented architecture and grid computing principles. We discuss middleware products for implementation of this model, and propose caGrid as an ideal candidate due to its healthcare focus; free, open source license; and mature developer tools and support. PMID:20449775

  8. An Architecture and Supporting Environment of Service-Oriented Computing Based-On Context Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tianxiao; Wu, Gang; Huang, Jun

    Service-oriented computing (SOC) is emerging to be an important computing paradigm of the next future. Based on context awareness, this paper proposes an architecture of SOC. A definition of the context in open environments such as Internet is given, which is based on ontology. The paper also proposes a supporting environment for the context-aware SOC, which focus on services on-demand composition and context-awareness evolving. A reference implementation of the supporting environment based on OSGi[11] is given at last.

  9. Computed reconstruction of spatial ammonoid-shell orientation captured from digitized grinding and landmark data☆

    PubMed Central

    Lukeneder, Susanne; Lukeneder, Alexander; Weber, Gerhard W.

    2014-01-01

    The internal orientation of fossil mass occurrences can be exploited as useful source of information about their primary depositional conditions. A series of studies, using different kinds of fossils, especially those with elongated shape (e.g., elongated gastropods), deal with their orientation and the subsequent reconstruction of the depositional conditions (e.g., paleocurrents and transport mechanisms). However, disk-shaped fossils like planispiral cephalopods or gastropods were used, up to now, with caution for interpreting paleocurrents. Moreover, most studies just deal with the topmost surface of such mass occurrences, due to the easier accessibility. Within this study, a new method for three-dimensional reconstruction of the internal structure of a fossil mass occurrence and the subsequent calculation of its spatial shell orientation is established. A 234 million-years-old (Carnian, Triassic) monospecific mass occurrence of the ammonoid Kasimlarceltites krystyni from the Taurus Mountains in Turkey, embedded in limestone, is used for this pilot study. Therefore, a 150×45×140 mm3 block of the ammonoid bearing limestone bed has been grinded to 70 slices, with a distance of 2 mm between each slice. By using a semi-automatic region growing algorithm of the 3D-visualization software Amira, ammonoids of a part of this mass occurrence were segmented and a 3D-model reconstructed. Landmarks, trigonometric and vector-based calculations were used to compute the diameters and the spatial orientation of each ammonoid. The spatial shell orientation was characterized by dip and dip-direction and aperture direction of the longitudinal axis, as well as by dip and azimuth of an imaginary sagittal-plane through each ammonoid. The exact spatial shell orientation was determined for a sample of 675 ammonoids, and their statistical orientation analyzed (i.e., NW/SE). The study combines classical orientation analysis with modern 3D-visualization techniques, and establishes a

  10. Accuracy of magnetic energy computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valori, G.; Démoulin, P.; Pariat, E.; Masson, S.

    2013-05-01

    Context. For magnetically driven events, the magnetic energy of the system is the prime energy reservoir that fuels the dynamical evolution. In the solar context, the free energy (i.e., the energy in excess of the potential field energy) is one of the main indicators used in space weather forecasts to predict the eruptivity of active regions. A trustworthy estimation of the magnetic energy is therefore needed in three-dimensional (3D) models of the solar atmosphere, e.g., in coronal fields reconstructions or numerical simulations. Aims: The expression of the energy of a system as the sum of its potential energy and its free energy (Thomson's theorem) is strictly valid when the magnetic field is exactly solenoidal. For numerical realizations on a discrete grid, this property may be only approximately fulfilled. We show that the imperfect solenoidality induces terms in the energy that can lead to misinterpreting the amount of free energy present in a magnetic configuration. Methods: We consider a decomposition of the energy in solenoidal and nonsolenoidal parts which allows the unambiguous estimation of the nonsolenoidal contribution to the energy. We apply this decomposition to six typical cases broadly used in solar physics. We quantify to what extent the Thomson theorem is not satisfied when approximately solenoidal fields are used. Results: The quantified errors on energy vary from negligible to significant errors, depending on the extent of the nonsolenoidal component of the field. We identify the main source of errors and analyze the implications of adding a variable amount of divergence to various solenoidal fields. Finally, we present pathological unphysical situations where the estimated free energy would appear to be negative, as found in some previous works, and we identify the source of this error to be the presence of a finite divergence. Conclusions: We provide a method of quantifying the effect of a finite divergence in numerical fields, together with

  11. Probability-Based Determination Methods for Service Waiting in Service-Oriented Computing Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Sen; Huang, Shuangxi; Liu, Yang

    Cooperative business processes (CBP)-based service-oriented enterprise networks (SOEN) are emerging with the significant advances of enterprise integration and service-oriented architecture. The performance prediction and optimization for CBP-based SOEN is very complex. To meet these challenges, one of the key points is to try to reduce an abstract service’s waiting number of its physical services. This paper introduces a probability-based determination method (PBDM) of an abstract service’ waiting number, M l , and time span, τ i , for its physical services. The determination of M i and τ i is according to the physical services’ arriving rule and their overall performance’s distribution functions. In PBDM, the arriving probability of the physical services with the best overall performance value is a pre-defined reliability. PBDM has made use of the information of the physical services’ arriving rule and performance distribution functions thoroughly, which will improve the computational efficiency for the scheme design and performance optimization of the collaborative business processes in service-oriented computing environments.

  12. Sharing personal health information via service-oriented computing: a case of long-term care.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yung-Hsiu; Chen, Rong-Rong; Guo, Sophie Huey-Ming; Chiang, Su-Chien; Chang, Her-Kun

    2012-12-01

    Sharing personal health information among healthcare providers is a crucial business process not only for saving limited healthcare resources but also for increasing patient's healthcare quality. Building an effective personal health information sharing process from established healthcare systems is a challenge in terms of coordination different business operations among healthcare providers and restructuring technical details existed in different healthcare information systems. This study responds this challenge with a service-oriented approach and develops a business software application to describe how the challenge can be alleviated from both managerial and technical perspectives. The software application in this study depicts personal health information sharing process among different providers in a long-term care setting. The information sharing scenario is based on an industrial initiative, such as Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) from healthcare domain and the technologies for implementing the scenario are Web Service technologies from Service-oriented computing paradigm. The implementation in this study can inform healthcare researchers and practitioners applying technologies from service-oriented computing to design and develop healthcare collaborative systems to meet the increasing need for personal health information sharing. PMID:22366977

  13. It Takes a Village: Supporting Inquiry- and Equity-Oriented Computer Science Pedagogy through a Professional Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryoo, Jean; Goode, Joanna; Margolis, Jane

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the importance that high school computer science teachers place on a teachers' professional learning community designed around an inquiry- and equity-oriented approach for broadening participation in computing. Using grounded theory to analyze four years of teacher surveys and interviews from the Exploring Computer Science…

  14. An Object-oriented Computer Code for Aircraft Engine Weight Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, Michael T.; Naylor, Bret A.

    2008-01-01

    Reliable engine-weight estimation at the conceptual design stage is critical to the development of new aircraft engines. It helps to identify the best engine concept amongst several candidates. At NASA Glenn (GRC), the Weight Analysis of Turbine Engines (WATE) computer code, originally developed by Boeing Aircraft, has been used to estimate the engine weight of various conceptual engine designs. The code, written in FORTRAN, was originally developed for NASA in 1979. Since then, substantial improvements have been made to the code to improve the weight calculations for most of the engine components. Most recently, to improve the maintainability and extensibility of WATE, the FORTRAN code has been converted into an object-oriented version. The conversion was done within the NASA s NPSS (Numerical Propulsion System Simulation) framework. This enables WATE to interact seamlessly with the thermodynamic cycle model which provides component flow data such as airflows, temperatures, and pressures, etc. that are required for sizing the components and weight calculations. The tighter integration between the NPSS and WATE would greatly enhance system-level analysis and optimization capabilities. It also would facilitate the enhancement of the WATE code for next-generation aircraft and space propulsion systems. In this paper, the architecture of the object-oriented WATE code (or WATE++) is described. Both the FORTRAN and object-oriented versions of the code are employed to compute the dimensions and weight of a 300- passenger aircraft engine (GE90 class). Both versions of the code produce essentially identical results as should be the case. Keywords: NASA, aircraft engine, weight, object-oriented

  15. Metal-Mediated Affinity and Orientation Specificity in a Computationally Designed Protein Homodimer

    SciTech Connect

    Der, Bryan S.; Machius, Mischa; Miley, Michael J.; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Szyperski, Thomas; Kuhlman, Brian

    2015-10-15

    Computationally designing protein-protein interactions with high affinity and desired orientation is a challenging task. Incorporating metal-binding sites at the target interface may be one approach for increasing affinity and specifying the binding mode, thereby improving robustness of designed interactions for use as tools in basic research as well as in applications from biotechnology to medicine. Here we describe a Rosetta-based approach for the rational design of a protein monomer to form a zinc-mediated, symmetric homodimer. Our metal interface design, named MID1 (NESG target ID OR37), forms a tight dimer in the presence of zinc (MID1-zinc) with a dissociation constant <30 nM. Without zinc the dissociation constant is 4 {micro}M. The crystal structure of MID1-zinc shows good overall agreement with the computational model, but only three out of four designed histidines coordinate zinc. However, a histidine-to-glutamate point mutation resulted in four-coordination of zinc, and the resulting metal binding site and dimer orientation closely matches the computational model (C{alpha} rmsd = 1.4 {angstrom}).

  16. The Global Energy Situation on Earth, Student Guide. Computer Technology Program Environmental Education Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    This is the student guide in a set of five computer-oriented environmental/energy education units. Contents of this guide are: (1) Introduction to the unit; (2) The "EARTH" program; (3) Exercises; and (4) Sources of information on the energy crisis. This guide supplements a simulation which allows students to analyze different aspects of energy…

  17. Computing conformational free energy by deactivated morphing.

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.; Lau, A. Y.; Roux, B.; Univ. of Chicago

    2008-10-07

    Despite the significant advances in free-energy computations for biomolecules, there exists no general method to evaluate the free-energy difference between two conformations of a macromolecule that differ significantly from each other. A crucial ingredient of such a method is the ability to find a path between different conformations that allows an efficient computation of the free energy. In this paper, we introduce a method called 'deactivated morphing', in which one conformation is morphed into another after the internal interactions are completely turned off. An important feature of this method is the (shameless) use of nonphysical paths, which makes the method robustly applicable to conformational changes of arbitrary complexity.

  18. Computing in high-energy physics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mount, Richard P.

    2016-05-31

    I present a very personalized journey through more than three decades of computing for experimental high-energy physics, pointing out the enduring lessons that I learned. This is followed by a vision of how the computing environment will evolve in the coming ten years and the technical challenges that this will bring. I then address the scale and cost of high-energy physics software and examine the many current and future challenges, particularly those of management, funding and software-lifecycle management. Lastly, I describe recent developments aimed at improving the overall coherence of high-energy physics software.

  19. VLab: a service oriented architecture for first principles computations of planetary materials properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, C. R.; da Silveira, P.; Wentzcovitch, R. M.; Pierce, M.; Erlebacher, G.

    2007-12-01

    We present an overview of the VLab, a system developed to handle execution of extensive workflows generated by first principles computations of thermoelastic properties of minerals. The multiplicity (102-3) of tasks derives from sampling of parameter space with variables such as pressure, temperature, strain, composition, etc. We review the algorithms of physical importance that define the system's requirements, its underlying service oriented architecture (SOA), and metadata. The system architecture emerges naturally. The SOA is a collection of web-services providing access to distributed computing nodes, controlling workflow execution, monitoring services, and providing data analyses tools, visualization services, data bases, and authentication services. A usage view diagram is described. We also show snapshots taken from the actual operational procedure in VLab. Research supported by NSF/ITR (VLab)

  20. VLab: A Service Oriented Architecture for Distributed First Principles Materials Computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Cesar; da Silveira, Pedro; Wentzcovitch, Renata; Pierce, Marlon; Erlebacher, Gordon

    2008-03-01

    We present an overview of VLab, a system developed to handle execution of extensive workflows generated by first principles computations of thermoelastic properties of minerals. The multiplicity (10^2-3) of tasks derives from sampling of parameter space with variables such as pressure, temperature, strain, composition, etc. We review the algorithms of physical importance that define the system's requirements, its underlying service oriented architecture (SOA), and metadata. The system architecture emerges naturally. The SOA is a collection of web-services providing access to distributed computing nodes, workflow control, and monitoring services, and providing data analysis tools, visualization services, data bases, and authentication services. A usage view diagram is described. We also show snapshots taken from the actual operational procedure in VLab.

  1. Problem-Oriented Simulation Packages and Computational Infrastructure for Numerical Studies of Powerful Gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damyanova, M.; Sabchevski, S.; Zhelyazkov, I.; Vasileva, E.; Balabanova, E.; Dankov, P.; Malinov, P.

    2016-05-01

    Powerful gyrotrons are necessary as sources of strong microwaves for electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) of magnetically confined plasmas in various reactors (most notably ITER) for controlled thermonuclear fusion. Adequate physical models and efficient problem-oriented software packages are essential tools for numerical studies, analysis, optimization and computer-aided design (CAD) of such high-performance gyrotrons operating in a CW mode and delivering output power of the order of 1-2 MW. In this report we present the current status of our simulation tools (physical models, numerical codes, pre- and post-processing programs, etc.) as well as the computational infrastructure on which they are being developed, maintained and executed.

  2. Two-dimensional radiant energy array computers and computing devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, D. H.; Strong, J. P., III (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Two dimensional digital computers and computer devices operate in parallel on rectangular arrays of digital radiant energy optical signal elements which are arranged in ordered rows and columns. Logic gate devices receive two input arrays and provide an output array having digital states dependent only on the digital states of the signal elements of the two input arrays at corresponding row and column positions. The logic devices include an array of photoconductors responsive to at least one of the input arrays for either selectively accelerating electrons to a phosphor output surface, applying potentials to an electroluminescent output layer, exciting an array of discrete radiant energy sources, or exciting a liquid crystal to influence crystal transparency or reflectivity.

  3. An Object-Oriented Network-Centric Software Architecture for Physical Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Richard

    1997-08-01

    Recent developments in object-oriented computer languages and infrastructure such as the Internet, Web browsers, and the like provide an opportunity to define a more productive computational environment for scientific programming that is based more closely on the underlying mathematics describing physics than traditional programming languages such as FORTRAN or C++. In this talk I describe an object-oriented software architecture for representing physical problems that includes classes for such common mathematical objects as geometry, boundary conditions, partial differential and integral equations, discretization and numerical solution methods, etc. In practice, a scientific program written using this architecture looks remarkably like the mathematics used to understand the problem, is typically an order of magnitude smaller than traditional FORTRAN or C++ codes, and hence easier to understand, debug, describe, etc. All objects in this architecture are ``network-enabled,'' which means that components of a software solution to a physical problem can be transparently loaded from anywhere on the Internet or other global network. The architecture is expressed as an ``API,'' or application programmers interface specification, with reference embeddings in Java, Python, and C++. A C++ class library for an early version of this API has been implemented for machines ranging from PC's to the IBM SP2, meaning that phidentical codes run on all architectures.

  4. An Object-Oriented Computer Code for Aircraft Engine Weight Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, Michael T.; Naylor, Bret A.

    2009-01-01

    Reliable engine-weight estimation at the conceptual design stage is critical to the development of new aircraft engines. It helps to identify the best engine concept amongst several candidates. At NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), the Weight Analysis of Turbine Engines (WATE) computer code, originally developed by Boeing Aircraft, has been used to estimate the engine weight of various conceptual engine designs. The code, written in FORTRAN, was originally developed for NASA in 1979. Since then, substantial improvements have been made to the code to improve the weight calculations for most of the engine components. Most recently, to improve the maintainability and extensibility of WATE, the FORTRAN code has been converted into an object-oriented version. The conversion was done within the NASA's NPSS (Numerical Propulsion System Simulation) framework. This enables WATE to interact seamlessly with the thermodynamic cycle model which provides component flow data such as airflows, temperatures, and pressures, etc., that are required for sizing the components and weight calculations. The tighter integration between the NPSS and WATE would greatly enhance system-level analysis and optimization capabilities. It also would facilitate the enhancement of the WATE code for next-generation aircraft and space propulsion systems. In this paper, the architecture of the object-oriented WATE code (or WATE++) is described. Both the FORTRAN and object-oriented versions of the code are employed to compute the dimensions and weight of a 300-passenger aircraft engine (GE90 class). Both versions of the code produce essentially identical results as should be the case.

  5. Computational Study of Low Energy Nuclear Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, Justin; Hira, Ajit; Brownrigg, Clifton; Pacheco, Jose

    2013-04-01

    We continue our interest in the interactions between different nuclear species with a computational study of the scattering of the low-energy nuclei of H through F atoms ( Z<=9 ) from Palladium and other metals. First, a FORTRAN computer program was developed to compute stopping cross sections and scattering angles in Pd and other metals for the small nuclear projectiles, using Monte Carlo calculation. This code allows for different angles of incidence. Next, simulations were done in the energy interval from 10 to 140kev. The computational results thus obtained are compared with relevant experimental data. The data are further analyzed to identify periodic trends in terms of the atomic number of the projectile. Such studies have potential applications in nuclear physics and in nuclear medicine.

  6. A SUGGESTED CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR ELECTRO-MECHANICAL TECHNOLOGY ORIENTED SPECIFICALLY TO THE COMPUTER AND BUSINESS MACHINE FIELDS. INTERIM REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LESCARBEAU, ROLAND F.; AND OTHERS

    A SUGGESTED POST-SECONDARY CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR ELECTRO-MECHANICAL TECHNOLOGY ORIENTED SPECIFICALLY TO THE COMPUTER AND BUSINESS MACHINE FIELDS WAS DEVELOPED BY A GROUP OF COOPERATING INSTITUTIONS, NOW INCORPORATED AS TECHNICAL EDUCATION CONSORTIUM, INCORPORATED. SPECIFIC NEEDS OF THE COMPUTER AND BUSINESS MACHINE INDUSTRY WERE DETERMINED FROM…

  7. Computer simulation allows goal-oriented mechanical ventilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Uttman, Leif; Ögren, Helena; Niklason, Lisbet; Drefeldt, Björn; Jonson, Björn

    2007-01-01

    Introduction To prevent further lung damage in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), it is important to avoid overdistension and cyclic opening and closing of atelectatic alveoli. Previous studies have demonstrated protective effects of using low tidal volume (VT), moderate positive end-expiratory pressure and low airway pressure. Aspiration of dead space (ASPIDS) allows a reduction in VT by eliminating dead space in the tracheal tube and tubing. We hypothesized that, by applying goal-orientated ventilation based on iterative computer simulation, VT can be reduced at high respiratory rate and much further reduced during ASPIDS without compromising gas exchange or causing high airway pressure. Methods ARDS was induced in eight pigs by surfactant perturbation and ventilator-induced lung injury. Ventilator resetting guided by computer simulation was then performed, aiming at minimal VT, plateau pressure 30 cmH2O and isocapnia, first by only increasing respiratory rate and then by using ASPIDS as well. Results VT decreased from 7.2 ± 0.5 ml/kg to 6.6 ± 0.5 ml/kg as respiratory rate increased from 40 to 64 ± 6 breaths/min, and to 4.0 ± 0.4 ml/kg when ASPIDS was used at 80 ± 6 breaths/min. Measured values of arterial carbon dioxide tension were close to predicted values. Without ASPIDS, total positive end-expiratory pressure and plateau pressure were slightly higher than predicted, and with ASPIDS they were lower than predicted. Conclusion In principle, computer simulation may be used in goal-oriented ventilation in ARDS. Further studies are needed to investigate potential benefits and limitations over extended study periods. PMID:17352801

  8. Computing local edge probability in natural scenes from a population of oriented simple cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandra, Chaithanya A.; Mel, Bartlett W.

    2013-01-01

    A key computation in visual cortex is the extraction of object contours, where the first stage of processing is commonly attributed to V1 simple cells. The standard model of a simple cell—an oriented linear filter followed by a divisive normalization—fits a wide variety of physiological data, but is a poor performing local edge detector when applied to natural images. The brain's ability to finely discriminate edges from nonedges therefore likely depends on information encoded by local simple cell populations. To gain insight into the corresponding decoding problem, we used Bayes's rule to calculate edge probability at a given location/orientation in an image based on a surrounding filter population. Beginning with a set of ∼ 100 filters, we culled out a subset that were maximally informative about edges, and minimally correlated to allow factorization of the joint on- and off-edge likelihood functions. Key features of our approach include a new, efficient method for ground-truth edge labeling, an emphasis on achieving filter independence, including a focus on filters in the region orthogonal rather than tangential to an edge, and the use of a customized parametric model to represent the individual filter likelihood functions. The resulting population-based edge detector has zero parameters, calculates edge probability based on a sum of surrounding filter influences, is much more sharply tuned than the underlying linear filters, and effectively captures fine-scale edge structure in natural scenes. Our findings predict nonmonotonic interactions between cells in visual cortex, wherein a cell may for certain stimuli excite and for other stimuli inhibit the same neighboring cell, depending on the two cells' relative offsets in position and orientation, and their relative activation levels. PMID:24381295

  9. A First Course in Computational Physics and Object-Oriented Programming with C++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevick, David

    2005-03-01

    Part I. Basic C++ Programming: 1. Introduction; 2. Installing and running the Dev-C++ programming environment; 3. Introduction to computer and software architecture; 4. Fundamental concepts; 5. Writing a first program; 6. An introduction to object-oriented analysis; 7. C++ object-oriented programming syntax; 8. Control logic and iteration; 9. Basic function properties; 10. Arrays and matrices; 11. Input and output streams; Part II. Numerical Analysis: 12. Numerical error analysis - derivatives; 13. Integration; 14. Root finding procedures; 15. Differential equations; 16. Linear algebra; Part III. Pointers, References and Dynamic Memory Allocation: 17. References; 18. Pointers and dynamic memory allocation; 19. Advanced memory management; 20. The static keyword, multiple and virtual inheritance, templates and the STL library; 21. Program optimization in C++; Part IV. Advanced Numerical Examples: 22. Monte-Carlo methods; 23. Parabolic partial differential equation solvers; Part V. Appendices: Appendix A. Overview of MATLAB; Appendix B. The Borland C++ compiler; Appendix C. The Linux/Windows g++ compiler and profiler; Appendix D. Calling FORTRAN programs from C++; Appendix E. C++ coding standard; References.

  10. Computing free energy hypersurfaces for anisotropic intermolecular associations.

    PubMed

    Strümpfer, Johan; Naidoo, Kevin J

    2010-01-30

    We previously used an adaptive reaction coordinate force biasing method for calculating the free energy of conformation (Naidoo and Brady, J Am Chem Soc 1999, 121, 2244) and chemical reactions (Rajamani et al., J Comput Chem 2003, 24, 1775) amongst others. Here, we describe a generalized version able to produce free energies in multiple dimensions, descriptively named the free energies from adaptive reaction coordinate forces method. To illustrate it, we describe how we calculate a multidimensional intermolecular orientational free energy, which can be used to investigate complex systems such as protein conformation and liquids. This multidimensional intermolecular free energy W(r, theta(1), theta(2), phi) provides a measure of orientationally dependent interactions that are appropriate for applications in systems that inherently have molecular anisotropic features. It is a highly informative free energy volume, which can be used to parameterize key terms such as the Gay-Berne intermolecular potential in coarse grain simulations. To demonstrate the value of the information gained from the W(r, theta(1), theta(2), phi) hypersurfaces we calculated them for TIP3P, TIP4P, and TIP5P dimer water models in vacuum. A comparison with a commonly used one-dimensional distance free energy profile is made to illustrate the significant increase in configurational information. The W(r) plots show little difference between the three models while the W(r, theta(1), theta(2), phi) hypersurfaces reveal the underlying energetic reasons why these potentials reproduce tetrahedrality in the condensed phase so differently from each. PMID:19462397

  11. Statistical energy analysis computer program, user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trudell, R. W.; Yano, L. I.

    1981-01-01

    A high frequency random vibration analysis, (statistical energy analysis (SEA) method) is examined. The SEA method accomplishes high frequency prediction of arbitrary structural configurations. A general SEA computer program is described. A summary of SEA theory, example problems of SEA program application, and complete program listing are presented.

  12. Computational design and optimization of energy materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Maria

    The use of density functional theory (DFT) to understand and improve energy materials for diverse applications - including energy storage, thermal management, catalysis, and photovoltaics - is widespread. The further step of using high throughput DFT calculations to design materials and has led to an acceleration in materials discovery and development. Due to various limitations in DFT, including accuracy and computational cost, however, it is important to leverage effective models and, in some cases, experimental information to aid the design process. In this talk, I will discuss efforts in design and optimization of energy materials using a combination of effective models, DFT, machine learning, and experimental information.

  13. PNNL streamlines energy-guzzling computers

    SciTech Connect

    Beckman, Mary T.; Marquez, Andres

    2008-10-27

    In a room the size of a garage, two rows of six-foot-tall racks holding supercomputer hard drives sit back-to-back. Thin tubes and wires snake off the hard drives, slithering into the corners. Stepping between the rows, a rush of heat whips around you -- the air from fans blowing off processing heat. But walk farther in, between the next racks of hard drives, and the temperature drops noticeably. These drives are being cooled by a non-conducting liquid that runs right over the hardworking processors. The liquid carries the heat away in tubes, saving the air a few degrees. This is the Energy Smart Data Center at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The bigger, faster, and meatier supercomputers get, the more energy they consume. PNNL's Andres Marquez has developed this test bed to learn how to train the behemoths in energy efficiency. The work will help supercomputers perform better as well. Processors have to keep cool or suffer from "thermal throttling," says Marquez. "That's the performance threshold where the computer is too hot to run well. That threshold is an industry secret." The center at EMSL, DOE's national scientific user facility at PNNL, harbors several ways of experimenting with energy usage. For example, the room's air conditioning is isolated from the rest of EMSL -- pipes running beneath the floor carry temperature-controlled water through heat exchangers to cooling towers outside. "We can test whether it's more energy efficient to cool directly on the processing chips or out in the water tower," says Marquez. The hard drives feed energy and temperature data to a network server running specially designed software that controls and monitors the data center. To test the center’s limits, the team runs the processors flat out – not only on carefully controlled test programs in the Energy Smart computers, but also on real world software from other EMSL research, such as regional weather forecasting models. Marquez's group is also developing "power

  14. Activating Teacher Energy Through "Inquiry-Oriented" Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeichner, Kenneth M.

    In an inquiry-oriented teacher education program, prospective teachers are encouraged to examine the origins and consequences of their actions and settings in which they work. Many of the characteristics of the elementary student teaching program at the University of Wisconsin at Madison are similar to this approach. During the students' 15-week…

  15. Grid Computing in High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avery, Paul

    2004-09-01

    Over the next two decades, major high energy physics (HEP) experiments, particularly at the Large Hadron Collider, will face unprecedented challenges to achieving their scientific potential. These challenges arise primarily from the rapidly increasing size and complexity of HEP datasets that will be collected and the enormous computational, storage and networking resources that will be deployed by global collaborations in order to process, distribute and analyze them. Coupling such vast information technology resources to globally distributed collaborations of several thousand physicists requires extremely capable computing infrastructures supporting several key areas: (1) computing (providing sufficient computational and storage resources for all processing, simulation and analysis tasks undertaken by the collaborations); (2) networking (deploying high speed networks to transport data quickly between institutions around the world); (3) software (supporting simple and transparent access to data and software resources, regardless of location); (4) collaboration (providing tools that allow members full and fair access to all collaboration resources and enable distributed teams to work effectively, irrespective of location); and (5) education, training and outreach (providing resources and mechanisms for training students and for communicating important information to the public). It is believed that computing infrastructures based on Data Grids and optical networks can meet these challenges and can offer data intensive enterprises in high energy physics and elsewhere a comprehensive, scalable framework for collaboration and resource sharing. A number of Data Grid projects have been underway since 1999. Interestingly, the most exciting and far ranging of these projects are led by collaborations of high energy physicists, computer scientists and scientists from other disciplines in support of experiments with massive, near-term data needs. I review progress in this

  16. Online object oriented Monte Carlo computational tool for the needs of biomedical optics

    PubMed Central

    Doronin, Alexander; Meglinski, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Conceptual engineering design and optimization of laser-based imaging techniques and optical diagnostic systems used in the field of biomedical optics requires a clear understanding of the light-tissue interaction and peculiarities of localization of the detected optical radiation within the medium. The description of photon migration within the turbid tissue-like media is based on the concept of radiative transfer that forms a basis of Monte Carlo (MC) modeling. An opportunity of direct simulation of influence of structural variations of biological tissues on the probing light makes MC a primary tool for biomedical optics and optical engineering. Due to the diversity of optical modalities utilizing different properties of light and mechanisms of light-tissue interactions a new MC code is typically required to be developed for the particular diagnostic application. In current paper introducing an object oriented concept of MC modeling and utilizing modern web applications we present the generalized online computational tool suitable for the major applications in biophotonics. The computation is supported by NVIDEA CUDA Graphics Processing Unit providing acceleration of modeling up to 340 times. PMID:21991540

  17. Development of a Dynamically Configurable, Object-Oriented Framework for Distributed, Multi-modal Computational Aerospace Systems Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Afjeh, Abdollah A.; Reed, John A.

    2003-01-01

    The following reports are presented on this project:A first year progress report on: Development of a Dynamically Configurable,Object-Oriented Framework for Distributed, Multi-modal Computational Aerospace Systems Simulation; A second year progress report on: Development of a Dynamically Configurable, Object-Oriented Framework for Distributed, Multi-modal Computational Aerospace Systems Simulation; An Extensible, Interchangeable and Sharable Database Model for Improving Multidisciplinary Aircraft Design; Interactive, Secure Web-enabled Aircraft Engine Simulation Using XML Databinding Integration; and Improving the Aircraft Design Process Using Web-based Modeling and Simulation.

  18. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1994-01-01

    Quantum mechanical methods have been used to compute potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions. The reactions studied were among those believed to be important to the NASP and HSR programs and included the recombination of two H atoms with several different third bodies; the reactions in the thermal Zeldovich mechanism; the reactions of H atom with O2, N2, and NO; reactions involved in the thermal De-NO(x) process; and the reaction of CH(squared Pi) with N2 (leading to 'prompt NO'). These potential energy surfaces have been used to compute reaction rate constants and rates of unimolecular decomposition. An additional application was the calculation of transport properties of gases using a semiclassical approximation (and in the case of interactions involving hydrogen inclusion of quantum mechanical effects).

  19. Energy consumption of personal computer workstations

    SciTech Connect

    Szydlowski, R.

    1995-12-01

    An important question for consideration is, {open_quotes}Are office equipment plug loads increasing?{close_quotes} Data taken by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in May 1990 from the Forrestal Building, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) headquarters in Washington, DC, are desegregated by end use including: plug loads, lights, HVAC, large dedicated computers, and elevators. This study was repeated in November 1993, and there was a 3.8%/yr increase in plug loads in a building of approximately 1.75 million sq ft. Subsequent to this measurement, the plug loads were measured continuously by PNL over a 10-month period from November 1993 through September 1994, and the results showed another increase of 3.9%, nearly the same increase as in the previous three years. The energy use of personal computers (PCs) was measured by setting up a mobile outlet module (MOM), a replacement for a strip outlet, with current transformers (CTs) and potential transformers. The MOM was connected to a set of dataloggers, allowing for the monitoring of up to four PCs at a time. The PCs were plugged in through the MOM to a C180 datalogger, the data collected to a laptop, and the individual 24-hour profiles were then reduced to a standard profile. About 200 workstations were studied, including the PC, monitor, printer, modem, external disk drives, and CAD systems with their own peripherals. Also monitored were an additional collection of printers, photocopiers, facsimile machines, and monitor controllers. The end result was a set of profiles for energy use during working hours for five different buildings. There was a wide variation in these profiles from daytime to nighttime, since 16 to 35% of the computers remain on at night. Therefore, the needs for computers left on at night vary, along with the attitudes of people. Another area of energy consumption concern is the type of PC, such as IBM- or Macintosh-compatible, and there are many different kinds of workstations.

  20. The Effect of a Graph-Oriented Computer-Assisted Project-Based Learning Environment on Argumentation Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, P. -S.; Van Dyke, M.; Chen, Y.; Smith, T. J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to explore how seventh graders in a suburban school in the United States developed argumentation skills and science knowledge in a project-based learning environment that incorporated a graph-oriented, computer-assisted application. A total of 54 students (three classes) comprised this treatment…

  1. Orientation of Undergraduates toward Careers in the Computer and Information Sciences: Gender, Self-Efficacy and Social Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosson, Mary Beth; Carroll, John M.; Sinha, Hansa

    2011-01-01

    Researchers have been working to understand the factors that may be contributing to low rates of participation by women and other minorities in the computer and information sciences (CIS). We describe a multivariate investigation of male and female university students' orientation to CIS careers. We focus on the roles of "self-efficacy" and…

  2. Three-dimensional modeling and computational analysis of the human cornea considering distributed collagen fibril orientations.

    PubMed

    Pandolfi, Anna; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2008-12-01

    Experimental tests on human corneas reveal distinguished reinforcing collagen lamellar structures that may be well described by a structural constitutive model considering distributed collagen fibril orientations along the superior-inferior and the nasal-temporal meridians. A proper interplay between the material structure and the geometry guarantees the refractive function and defines the refractive properties of the cornea. We propose a three-dimensional computational model for the human cornea that is able to provide the refractive power by analyzing the structural mechanical response with the nonlinear regime and the effect the intraocular pressure has. For an assigned unloaded geometry we show how the distribution of the von Mises stress at the top surface of the cornea and through the corneal thickness and the refractive power depend on the material properties and the fibril dispersion. We conclude that a model for the human cornea must not disregard the peculiar collagen fibrillar structure, which equips the cornea with the unique biophysical, mechanical, and optical properties. PMID:19045535

  3. Computational fluid dynamics study of swimmer's hand velocity, orientation, and shape: contributions to hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Bilinauskaite, Milda; Mantha, Vishveshwar Rajendra; Rouboa, Abel Ilah; Ziliukas, Pranas; Silva, Antonio Jose

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine the hydrodynamic characteristics of swimmer's scanned hand models for various combinations of both the angle of attack and the sweepback angle and shape and velocity of swimmer's hand, simulating separate underwater arm stroke phases of freestyle (front crawl) swimming. Four realistic 3D models of swimmer's hand corresponding to different combinations of separated/closed fingers positions were used to simulate different underwater front crawl phases. The fluid flow was simulated using FLUENT (ANSYS, PA, USA). Drag force and drag coefficient were calculated using (computational fluid dynamics) CFD in steady state. Results showed that the drag force and coefficient varied at the different flow velocities on all shapes of the hand and variation was observed for different hand positions corresponding to different stroke phases. The models of the hand with thumb adducted and abducted generated the highest drag forces and drag coefficients. The current study suggests that the realistic variation of both the orientation angles influenced higher values of drag, lift, and resultant coefficients and forces. To augment resultant force, which affects swimmer's propulsion, the swimmer should concentrate in effectively optimising achievable hand areas during crucial propulsive phases. PMID:23691493

  4. Towards sustainable infrastructure management: knowledge-based service-oriented computing framework for visual analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatcha, Rashna; Lee, Seok-Won; Murty, Ajeet; Tolone, William; Wang, Xiaoyu; Dou, Wenwen; Chang, Remco; Ribarsky, William; Liu, Wanqiu; Chen, Shen-en; Hauser, Edd

    2009-05-01

    Infrastructure management (and its associated processes) is complex to understand, perform and thus, hard to make efficient and effective informed decisions. The management involves a multi-faceted operation that requires the most robust data fusion, visualization and decision making. In order to protect and build sustainable critical assets, we present our on-going multi-disciplinary large-scale project that establishes the Integrated Remote Sensing and Visualization (IRSV) system with a focus on supporting bridge structure inspection and management. This project involves specific expertise from civil engineers, computer scientists, geographers, and real-world practitioners from industry, local and federal government agencies. IRSV is being designed to accommodate the essential needs from the following aspects: 1) Better understanding and enforcement of complex inspection process that can bridge the gap between evidence gathering and decision making through the implementation of ontological knowledge engineering system; 2) Aggregation, representation and fusion of complex multi-layered heterogeneous data (i.e. infrared imaging, aerial photos and ground-mounted LIDAR etc.) with domain application knowledge to support machine understandable recommendation system; 3) Robust visualization techniques with large-scale analytical and interactive visualizations that support users' decision making; and 4) Integration of these needs through the flexible Service-oriented Architecture (SOA) framework to compose and provide services on-demand. IRSV is expected to serve as a management and data visualization tool for construction deliverable assurance and infrastructure monitoring both periodically (annually, monthly, even daily if needed) as well as after extreme events.

  5. A novel task-oriented optimal design for P300-based brain-computer interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zongtan; Yin, Erwei; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Hu, Dewen

    2014-10-01

    Objective. The number of items of a P300-based brain-computer interface (BCI) should be adjustable in accordance with the requirements of the specific tasks. To address this issue, we propose a novel task-oriented optimal approach aimed at increasing the performance of general P300 BCIs with different numbers of items. Approach. First, we proposed a stimulus presentation with variable dimensions (VD) paradigm as a generalization of the conventional single-character (SC) and row-column (RC) stimulus paradigms. Furthermore, an embedding design approach was employed for any given number of items. Finally, based on the score-P model of each subject, the VD flash pattern was selected by a linear interpolation approach for a certain task. Main results. The results indicate that the optimal BCI design consistently outperforms the conventional approaches, i.e., the SC and RC paradigms. Specifically, there is significant improvement in the practical information transfer rate for a large number of items. Significance. The results suggest that the proposed optimal approach would provide useful guidance in the practical design of general P300-based BCIs. PMID:25080373

  6. A novel task-oriented optimal design for P300-based brain-computer interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zongtan; Yin, Erwei; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Hu, Dewen

    2014-10-01

    Objective. The number of items of a P300-based brain-computer interface (BCI) should be adjustable in accordance with the requirements of the specific tasks. To address this issue, we propose a novel task-oriented optimal approach aimed at increasing the performance of general P300 BCIs with different numbers of items. Approach. First, we proposed a stimulus presentation with variable dimensions (VD) paradigm as a generalization of the conventional single-character (SC) and row-column (RC) stimulus paradigms. Furthermore, an embedding design approach was employed for any given number of items. Finally, based on the score-P model of each subject, the VD flash pattern was selected by a linear interpolation approach for a certain task. Main results. The results indicate that the optimal BCI design consistently outperforms the conventional approaches, i.e., the SC and RC paradigms. Specifically, there is significant improvement in the practical information transfer rate for a large number of items. Significance. The results suggest that the proposed optimal approach would provide useful guidance in the practical design of general P300-based BCIs.

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of Swimmer's Hand Velocity, Orientation, and Shape: Contributions to Hydrodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Bilinauskaite, Milda; Mantha, Vishveshwar Rajendra; Rouboa, Abel Ilah; Ziliukas, Pranas; Silva, Antonio Jose

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine the hydrodynamic characteristics of swimmer's scanned hand models for various combinations of both the angle of attack and the sweepback angle and shape and velocity of swimmer's hand, simulating separate underwater arm stroke phases of freestyle (front crawl) swimming. Four realistic 3D models of swimmer's hand corresponding to different combinations of separated/closed fingers positions were used to simulate different underwater front crawl phases. The fluid flow was simulated using FLUENT (ANSYS, PA, USA). Drag force and drag coefficient were calculated using (computational fluid dynamics) CFD in steady state. Results showed that the drag force and coefficient varied at the different flow velocities on all shapes of the hand and variation was observed for different hand positions corresponding to different stroke phases. The models of the hand with thumb adducted and abducted generated the highest drag forces and drag coefficients. The current study suggests that the realistic variation of both the orientation angles influenced higher values of drag, lift, and resultant coefficients and forces. To augment resultant force, which affects swimmer's propulsion, the swimmer should concentrate in effectively optimising achievable hand areas during crucial propulsive phases. PMID:23691493

  8. Input-output oriented computation algorithms for the control of large flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minto, K. D.

    1989-01-01

    An overview is given of work in progress aimed at developing computational algorithms addressing two important aspects in the control of large flexible space structures; namely, the selection and placement of sensors and actuators, and the resulting multivariable control law design problem. The issue of sensor/actuator set selection is particularly crucial to obtaining a satisfactory control design, as clearly a poor choice will inherently limit the degree to which good control can be achieved. With regard to control law design, the researchers are driven by concerns stemming from the practical issues associated with eventual implementation of multivariable control laws, such as reliability, limit protection, multimode operation, sampling rate selection, processor throughput, etc. Naturally, the burden imposed by dealing with these aspects of the problem can be reduced by ensuring that the complexity of the compensator is minimized. Our approach to these problems is based on extensions to input/output oriented techniques that have proven useful in the design of multivariable control systems for aircraft engines. In particular, researchers are exploring the use of relative gain analysis and the condition number as a means of quantifying the process of sensor/actuator selection and placement for shape control of a large space platform.

  9. Energy consumption of personal computer workstations

    SciTech Connect

    Szydlowski, R.F.; Chvala, W.D. Jr.

    1994-02-01

    The explosive growth of the information age has had a profound effect on the appearance of today`s office. Although the telephone still remains an important part of the information exchange and processing system within an office, other electronic devices are now considered required equipment within this environment. This office automation equipment includes facsimile machines, photocopiers, personal computers, printers, modems, and other peripherals. A recent estimate of the installed base indicated that 42 million personal computers and 7.3 million printers are in place, consuming 18.2 billion kWh/yr-and this installed base is growing (Luhn 1992). From a productivity standpoint, it can be argued that this equipment greatly improves the efficiency of those working in the office. But of primary concern to energy system designers, building managers, and electric utilities is the fact that this equipment requires electric energy. Although the impact of each incremental piece of equipment is small, installation of thousands of devices per building has resulted in office automation equipment becoming the major contributor to electric consumption and demand growth in commercial buildings. Personal computers and associated equipment are the dominant part of office automation equipment. In some cases, this electric demand growth has caused office buildings electric and cooling systems to overload.

  10. Prediction of the orientations of adsorbed protein using an empirical energy function with implicit solvation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu; Welsh, William J; Latour, Robert A

    2005-06-01

    When simulating protein adsorption behavior, decisions must first be made regarding how the protein should be oriented on the surface. To address this problem, we have developed a molecular simulation program that combines an empirical adsorption free energy function with an efficient configurational search method to calculate orientation-dependent adsorption free energies between proteins and functionalized surfaces. The configuration space is searched systematically using a quaternion rotation technique, and the adsorption free energy is evaluated using an empirical energy function with an efficient grid-based calculational method. In this paper, the developed method is applied to analyze the preferred orientations of a model protein, lysozyme, on various functionalized alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces by the generation of contour graphs that relate adsorption free energy to adsorbed orientation, and the results are compared with experimental observations. As anticipated, the adsorbed orientation of lysozyme is predicted to be dependent on the discrete organization of the functional groups presented by the surface. Lysozyme, which is a positively charged protein, is predicted to adsorb on its 'side' on both hydrophobic and negatively charged surfaces. On surfaces with discrete positively charged sites, attractive interaction energies can also be obtained due to the presence of discrete local negative charges present on the lysozyme surface. In this case, 'end-on' orientations are preferred. Additionally, SAM surface models with mixed functionality suggest that the interactions between lysozyme and surfaces could be greatly enhanced if individual surface functional groups are able to access the catalytic cleft region of lysozyme, similar to ligand-receptor interactions. The contour graphs generated by this method can be used to identify low-energy orientations that can then be used as starting points for further simulations to investigate

  11. Orienting the Neighborhood: A Subdivision Energy Analysis Tool; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, C.; Horowitz, S.

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes a new computerized Subdivision Energy Analysis Tool being developed to allow users to interactively design subdivision street layouts while receiving feedback about energy impacts based on user-specified building design variants and availability of roof surfaces for photovoltaic and solar water heating systems.

  12. Computational materials design for energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozolins, Vidvuds

    2013-03-01

    General adoption of sustainable energy technologies depends on the discovery and development of new high-performance materials. For instance, waste heat recovery and electricity generation via the solar thermal route require bulk thermoelectrics with a high figure of merit (ZT) and thermal stability at high-temperatures. Energy recovery applications (e.g., regenerative braking) call for the development of rapidly chargeable systems for electrical energy storage, such as electrochemical supercapacitors. Similarly, use of hydrogen as vehicular fuel depends on the ability to store hydrogen at high volumetric and gravimetric densities, as well as on the ability to extract it at ambient temperatures at sufficiently rapid rates. We will discuss how first-principles computational methods based on quantum mechanics and statistical physics can drive the understanding, improvement and prediction of new energy materials. We will cover prediction and experimental verification of new earth-abundant thermoelectrics, transition metal oxides for electrochemical supercapacitors, and kinetics of mass transport in complex metal hydrides. Research has been supported by the US Department of Energy under grant Nos. DE-SC0001342, DE-SC0001054, DE-FG02-07ER46433, and DE-FC36-08GO18136.

  13. A Crafts-Oriented Approach to Computing in High School: Introducing Computational Concepts, Practices, and Perspectives with Electronic Textiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kafai, Yasmin B.; Lee, Eunkyoung; Searle, Kristin; Fields, Deborah; Kaplan, Eliot; Lui, Debora

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we examine the use of electronic textiles (e-textiles) for introducing key computational concepts and practices while broadening perceptions about computing. The starting point of our work was the design and implementation of a curriculum module using the LilyPad Arduino in a pre-AP high school computer science class. To…

  14. Quantitatively identical orientation-dependent ionization energy and electron affinity of diindenoperylene

    SciTech Connect

    Han, W. N.; Yonezawa, K.; Makino, R.; Kato, K.; Hinderhofer, A.; Ueno, N.; Kera, S.; Murdey, R.; Shiraishi, R.; Yoshida, H.; Sato, N.

    2013-12-16

    Molecular orientation dependences of the ionization energy (IE) and the electron affinity (EA) of diindenoperylene (DIP) films were studied by using ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy and inverse photoemission spectroscopy. The molecular orientation was controlled by preparing the DIP films on graphite and SiO{sub 2} substrates. The threshold IE and EA of DIP thin films were determined to be 5.81 and 3.53 eV for the film of flat-lying DIP orientation, respectively, and 5.38 and 3.13 eV for the film of standing DIP orientation, respectively. The result indicates that the IE and EA for the flat-lying film are larger by 0.4 eV and the frontier orbital states shift away from the vacuum level compared to the standing film. This rigid energy shift is ascribed to a surface-electrostatic potential produced by the intramolecular polar bond (>C{sup −}-H{sup +}) for standing orientation and π-electron tailing to vacuum for flat-lying orientation.

  15. Three energy computed tomography with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Menk, R.H.; Thomlinson, W.; Zhong, Z.; Charvet, A.M.; Arfelli, F. |; Chapman, L.

    1997-09-01

    Preliminary experiments for digital subtraction computed tomography (CT) at the K-edge of iodine (33.1 keV) were carried out at SMERF (Synchrotron Medical Research Facility X17B2) at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. The major goal was to evaluate the availability of this kind of imaging for in vivo neurological studies. Using the transvenous coronary angiography system, CT images of various samples and phantoms were taken simultaneously at two slightly different energies bracketing the K-absorption edge of iodine. The logarithmic subtraction of the two images resulted in the contrast enhancement of iodine filled structures. An additional CT image was taken at 99.57 keV (second harmonic of the fundamental wave). The third energy allowed the calculation of absolute iodine, tissue and bone images by means of a matrix inversion. A spatial resolution of 0.8 LP/mm was measured in single energy images and iodine concentrations down to 0.082 mg/ml in a 1/4 diameter detail were visible in the reconstructed subtraction image.

  16. Excitation energy migration in uniaxially oriented polymer films: A comparison between strongly and weakly organized systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojarski, P.; Synak, A.; Kułak, L.; Baszanowska, E.; Kubicki, A.; Grajek, H.; Szabelski, M.

    2006-04-01

    The mechanism of multistep excitation energy migration in uniaxially oriented polymer films is discussed for strongly and weakly orientating dyes in poly(vinyl alcohol) matrix. The comparison between both types of systems is based on concentration depolarization of fluorescence, Monte-Carlo simulations and linear dichroism data. It is found that the alignment of transition dipole moments of fluorophores in the ordered matrix relative to the direction of polymer stretching exhibits strong effect on the concentration depolarization of fluorescence. In ordered matrices of flavomononucleotide and rhodamine 6G concentration depolarization of fluorescence remains quite strong, whereas for linear carbocyanines it is very weak despite effective energy migration.

  17. An approach for measuring the spatial orientations of a computed-tomography simulation system.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng Chia; Ramaseshan, Ramani

    2014-01-01

    The quality assurance tests for measuring the spatial orientations between tabletop, external patient positioning lasers, couch longitudinal moving direction, and imaging plane in a CT simulation system are a complicated and time-consuming process. We proposed a simple and efficient approach to acquire the angular deviations of spatial orientations between these components. An in-house cross-jig was used in this study. We found a relationship between the orientations of the jig's arms shown on the CT images and the orientations of the components in a CT simulator. We verified this relationship with 16 misalignment orientations of known errors, to simulate all possible deviation situations. Generally, the tabletop and external lasers system are mounted separately in a CT simulation system; the former is on the couch trail, the later is on the wall and ceiling. They are independent to each other and will cause different effects on CT images. We only need two scans to acquire the angular deviations of our system: i) when aligning the cross-jig with tabletop, we can check the orientations between the tabletop, couch longitudinal moving direction, and imaging plane; ii) while aligning the cross-jig with the external axial lasers, we will know the angular deviation between the lasers, couch longitudinal moving direction, and imaging plane. The CT simulator had been carefully examined by performing the QA procedures recommended by the AAPM Task Group 66. The measurements of the spatial orientations using the proposed method agree well with TG 66 recommendations. However, the time taken to perform the QA using our method is considerably shorter than the method described in TG 66--5 minutes versus 30 minutes. The deliberate misalignment orientations tests with known errors were detected successfully by our in-house analysis program. The maximum difference between the known errors and the measured angles is only 0.07°. We determined that the relationship between the

  18. A portable, GUI-based, object-oriented client-server architecture for computer-based patient record (CPR) systems.

    PubMed

    Schleyer, T K

    1995-01-01

    Software applications for computer-based patient records require substantial development investments. Portable, open software architectures are one way to delay or avoid software application obsolescence. The Clinical Management System at Temple University School of Dentistry uses a portable, GUI-based, object-oriented client-server architecture. Two main criteria determined this approach: preservation of investment in software development and a smooth migration path to a Computer-based Patient Record. The application is separated into three layers: graphical user interface, database interface, and application functionality Implementation with generic cross-platform development tools ensures maximum portability. PMID:7662879

  19. It takes a village: supporting inquiry- and equity-oriented computer science pedagogy through a professional learning community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryoo, Jean; Goode, Joanna; Margolis, Jane

    2015-10-01

    This article describes the importance that high school computer science teachers place on a teachers' professional learning community designed around an inquiry- and equity-oriented approach for broadening participation in computing. Using grounded theory to analyze four years of teacher surveys and interviews from the Exploring Computer Science (ECS) program in the Los Angeles Unified School District, this article describes how participating in professional development activities purposefully aimed at fostering a teachers' professional learning community helps ECS teachers make the transition to an inquiry-based classroom culture and break professional isolation. This professional learning community also provides experiences that challenge prevalent deficit notions and stereotypes about which students can or cannot excel in computer science.

  20. Fermilab Central Computing Facility: Energy conservation report and mechanical systems design optimization and cost analysis study

    SciTech Connect

    Krstulovich, S.F.

    1986-11-12

    This report is developed as part of the Fermilab Central Computing Facility Project Title II Design Documentation Update under the provisions of DOE Document 6430.1, Chapter XIII-21, Section 14, paragraph a. As such, it concentrates primarily on HVAC mechanical systems design optimization and cost analysis and should be considered as a supplement to the Title I Design Report date March 1986 wherein energy related issues are discussed pertaining to building envelope and orientation as well as electrical systems design.

  1. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1988-01-01

    The minimum energy path for the addition of a hydrogen atom to N2 is characterized in CASSCF/CCI calculations using the (4s3p2d1f/3s2p1d) basis set, with additional single point calculations at the stationary points of the potential energy surface using the (5s4p3d2f/4s3p2d) basis set. These calculations represent the most extensive set of ab initio calculations completed to date, yielding a zero point corrected barrier for HN2 dissociation of approx. 8.5 kcal mol/1. The lifetime of the HN2 species is estimated from the calculated geometries and energetics using both conventional Transition State Theory and a method which utilizes an Eckart barrier to compute one dimensional quantum mechanical tunneling effects. It is concluded that the lifetime of the HN2 species is very short, greatly limiting its role in both termolecular recombination reactions and combustion processes.

  2. Social Studies: Application Units. Course II, Teachers. Computer-Oriented Curriculum. REACT (Relevant Educational Applications of Computer Technology).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tecnica Education Corp., San Carlos, CA.

    This book is one of a series in Course II of the Relevant Educational Applications of Computer Technology (REACT) Project. It is designed to point out to teachers two of the major applications of computers in the social sciences: simulation and data analysis. The first section contains a variety of simulation units organized under the following…

  3. Computer Simulation for Molecular Orientation of Vanadyl Phthalocyanine in Epitaxial Form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tada, Hirokazu; Mashiko, Shinro

    1995-07-01

    Molecular orientation of vanadyl phthalocyanine (VOPc) adsorbed on KBr and KCl was studied by molecular mechanics simulation. A VOPc molecule with an oxygen atom oriented upward with respect to the substrate surface was found to be more stable than that oriented downward. The central vanadium atom preferred to stay on potassium cations rather than on halogen anions, which is contrary to our expectation. The lattices optimized in this study agree well with the experimental results. In the epitaxial form on KBr and KCl, the angle between the [100] axis of the substrates and the molecular axis passing through two bridge-nitrogen atoms was 39° and 45°, respectively. The dovetail molecular packing was observed on KCl, while some voids existed between molecules in the optimized packing on KBr.

  4. Surface-Energy-Anisotropy-Induced Orientation Effects on RayleighInstabilities in Sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Santala, Melissa; Glaeser, Andreas M.

    2006-01-01

    Arrays of controlled-geometry, semi-infinite pore channels of systematically varied crystallographic orientation were introduced into undoped m-plane (10{bar 1}0) sapphire substrates using microfabrication techniques and ion-beam etching and subsequently internalized by solid-state diffusion bonding. A series of anneals at 1700 C caused the breakup of these channels into discrete pores via Rayleigh instabilities. In all cases, channels broke up with a characteristic wavelength larger than that expected for a material with isotropic surface energy, reflecting stabilization effects due to surface-energy anisotropy. The breakup wavelength and the time required for complete breakup varied significantly with channel orientation. For most orientations, the instability wavelength for channels of radius R was in the range of 13.2R-25R, and complete breakup occurred within 2-10 h. To first order, the anneal times for complete breakup scale with the square of the breakup wavelength. Channels oriented along a <11{bar 2}0> direction had a wavelength of {approx} 139R, and required 468 h for complete breakup. Cross-sectional analysis of channels oriented along a <11{bar 2}0> direction showed the channel to be completely bounded by stable c(0001), r{l_brace}{bar 1}012{r_brace}, and s{l_brace}10{bar 1}1{r_brace} facets.

  5. Group-oriented coordination models for distributed client-server computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Richard M.; Hughes, Craig S.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes group-oriented control models for distributed client-server interactions. These models transparently coordinate requests for services that involve multiple servers, such as queries across distributed databases. Specific capabilities include: decomposing and replicating client requests; dispatching request subtasks or copies to independent, networked servers; and combining server results into a single response for the client. The control models were implemented by combining request broker and process group technologies with an object-oriented communication middleware tool. The models are illustrated in the context of a distributed operations support application for space-based systems.

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics Investigation of Human Aspiration in Low-Velocity Air: Orientation Effects on Mouth-Breathing Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, T. Renée

    2013-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics was used to investigate particle aspiration efficiency in low-moving air typical of occupational settings (0.1–0.4 m s−1). Fluid flow surrounding an inhaling humanoid form and particle trajectories traveling into the mouth were simulated for seven discrete orientations relative to the oncoming wind (0°, 15°, 30°, 60°, 90°, 135° and 180°). Three continuous inhalation velocities (1.81, 4.33, and 12.11 m s−1), representing the mean inhalation velocity associated with sinusoidal at-rest, moderate, and heavy breathing (7.5, 20.8, and 50.3 l min−1, respectively) were simulated. These simulations identified a decrease in aspiration efficiency below the inhalable particulate mass (IPM) criterion of 0.5 for large particles, with no aspiration of particles 100 µm and larger for at-rest breathing and no aspiration of particles 116 µm for moderate breathing, over all freestream velocities and orientations relative to the wind. For particles smaller than 100 µm, orientation-averaged aspiration efficiency exceeded the IPM criterion, with increased aspiration efficiency as freestream velocity decreased. Variability in aspiration efficiencies between velocities was low for small (<22 µm) particles, but increased with increasing particle size over the range of conditions studied. Orientation-averaged simulation estimates of aspiration efficiency agree with the linear form of the proposed linear low-velocity inhalable convention through 100 µm, based on laboratory studies using human mannequins. PMID:23316076

  7. Improving scalability with loop transformations and message aggregation in parallel object-oriented frameworks for scientific computing

    SciTech Connect

    Bassetti, F.; Davis, K.; Quinlan, D.

    1998-09-01

    Application codes reliably achieve performance far less than the advertised capabilities of existing architectures, and this problem is worsening with increasingly-parallel machines. For large-scale numerical applications, stencil operations often impose the great part of the computational cost, and the primary sources of inefficiency are the costs of message passing and poor cache utilization. This paper proposes and demonstrates optimizations for stencil and stencil-like computations for both serial and parallel environments that ameliorate these sources of inefficiency. Achieving scalability, they believe, requires both algorithm design and compile-time support. The optimizations they present are automatable because the stencil-like computations are implemented at a high level of abstraction using object-oriented parallel array class libraries. These optimizations, which are beyond the capabilities of today compilers, may be performed automatically by a preprocessor such as the one they are currently developing.

  8. Computing alignment and orientation of non-linear molecules at room temperatures using random phase wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallush, Shimshon; Fleischer, Sharly; Ultrafast terahertz molecular dynamics Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    Quantum simulation of large open systems is a hard task that demands huge computation and memory costs. The rotational dynamics of non-linear molecules at high-temperature under external fields is such an example. At room temperature, the initial density matrix populates ~ 104 rotational states, and the whole coupled Hilbert space can reach ~ 106 states. Simulation by neither the direct density matrix nor the full basis set of populated wavefunctions is impossible. We employ the random phase wave function method to represent the initial state and compute several time dependent and independent observables such as the orientation and the alignment of the molecules. The error of the method was found to scale as N- 1 / 2, where N is the number of wave function realizations employed. Scaling vs. the temperature was computed for weak and strong fields. As expected, the convergence of the method increase rapidly with the temperature and the field intensity.

  9. Local Orientational Order in Liquids Revealed by Resonant Vibrational Energy Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panman, M. R.; Shaw, D. J.; Ensing, B.; Woutersen, S.

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrate that local orientational ordering in a liquid can be observed in the decay of the vibrational anisotropy caused by resonant transfer of vibrational excitations between its constituent molecules. We show that the functional form of this decay is determined by the (distribution of) angles between the vibrating bonds of the molecules between which energy transfer occurs, and that the initial drop in the decay reflects the average angle between nearest neighbors. We use this effect to observe the difference in local orientational ordering in the two hydrogen-bonded liquids ethanol and N -methylacetamide.

  10. A Time Sequence-Oriented Concept Map Approach to Developing Educational Computer Games for History Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Hui-Chun; Yang, Kai-Hsiang; Chen, Jing-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Concept maps have been recognized as an effective tool for students to organize their knowledge; however, in history courses, it is important for students to learn and organize historical events according to the time of their occurrence. Therefore, in this study, a time sequence-oriented concept map approach is proposed for developing a game-based…

  11. Gestalt Computing and the Study of Content-Oriented User Behavior on the Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandari, Roja

    2013-01-01

    Elementary actions online establish an individual's existence on the web and her/his orientation toward different issues. In this sense, actions truly define a user in spaces like online forums and communities and the aggregate of elementary actions shape the atmosphere of these online spaces. This observation, coupled with the unprecedented scale…

  12. Stress and performance: do service orientation and emotional energy moderate the relationship?

    PubMed

    Smith, Michael R; Rasmussen, Jennifer L; Mills, Maura J; Wefald, Andrew J; Downey, Ronald G

    2012-01-01

    The current study examines the moderating effect of customer service orientation and emotional energy on the stress-performance relationship for 681 U.S. casual dining restaurant employees. Customer service orientation was hypothesized to moderate the stress-performance relationship for Front-of-House (FOH) workers. Emotional energy was hypothesized to moderate stress-performance for Back-of-House (BOH) workers. Contrary to expectations, customer service orientation failed to moderate the effects of stress on performance for FOH employees, but the results supported that customer service orientation is likely a mediator of the relationship. However, the hypothesis was supported for BOH workers; emotional energy was found to moderate stress performance for these employees. This finding suggests that during times of high stress, meaningful, warm, and empathetic relationships are likely to impact BOH workers' ability to maintain performance. These findings have real-world implications in organizational practice, including highlighting the importance of developing positive and meaningful social interactions among workers and facilitating appropriate person-job fits. Doing so is likely to help in alleviating worker stress and is also likely to encourage worker performance. PMID:22122550

  13. Development of a Dynamically Configurable,Object-Oriented Framework for Distributed, Multi-modal Computational Aerospace Systems Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Afjeh, Abdollah A.; Reed, John A.

    2003-01-01

    This research is aimed at developing a neiv and advanced simulation framework that will significantly improve the overall efficiency of aerospace systems design and development. This objective will be accomplished through an innovative integration of object-oriented and Web-based technologies ivith both new and proven simulation methodologies. The basic approach involves Ihree major areas of research: Aerospace system and component representation using a hierarchical object-oriented component model which enables the use of multimodels and enforces component interoperability. Collaborative software environment that streamlines the process of developing, sharing and integrating aerospace design and analysis models. . Development of a distributed infrastructure which enables Web-based exchange of models to simplify the collaborative design process, and to support computationally intensive aerospace design and analysis processes. Research for the first year dealt with the design of the basic architecture and supporting infrastructure, an initial implementation of that design, and a demonstration of its application to an example aircraft engine system simulation.

  14. Computational study to evaluate the birefringence of uniaxially oriented film of cellulose triacetate.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Daichi; Ueda, Kazuyoshi

    2015-01-30

    The intrinsic birefringence of a cellulose triacetate (CTA) film is evaluated using the polarizability of the monomer model of the CTA repeating unit, which is calculated using the density functional theory (DFT). Since the CTA monomer is known to have three rotational isomers, referred to as gg, gt, and tg, the intrinsic birefringence of these isomers is evaluated separately. The calculation indicates that the monomer CTA with gg and gt structures shows a negative intrinsic birefringence, whereas the monomer unit with a tg structure shows a positive intrinsic birefringence. By using these values, a model of the uniaxially elongated CTA film is constructed with a molecular dynamics simulation, and the orientation birefringence of the film model was evaluated. The result indicates that the film has negative orientation birefringence and that its value is in good agreement with experimental results. PMID:25498014

  15. Computational Examination of Orientation-Dependent Morphological Evolution during the Electrodeposition and Electrodissolution of Magnesium

    DOE PAGESBeta

    DeWitt, S.; Hahn, N.; Zavadil, K.; Thornton, K.

    2015-12-30

    Here a new model of electrodeposition and electrodissolution is developed and applied to the evolution of Mg deposits during anode cycling. The model captures Butler-Volmer kinetics, facet evolution, the spatially varying potential in the electrolyte, and the time-dependent electrolyte concentration. The model utilizes a diffuse interface approach, employing the phase field and smoothed boundary methods. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of magnesium deposited on a gold substrate show the formation of faceted deposits, often in the form of hexagonal prisms. Orientation-dependent reaction rate coefficients were parameterized using the experimental SEM images. Three-dimensional simulations of the growth of magnesium deposits yieldmore » deposit morphologies consistent with the experimental results. The simulations predict that the deposits become narrower and taller as the current density increases due to the depletion of the electrolyte concentration near the sides of the deposits. Increasing the distance between the deposits leads to increased depletion of the electrolyte surrounding the deposit. Two models relating the orientation-dependence of the deposition and dissolution reactions are presented. Finally, the morphology of the Mg deposit after one deposition-dissolution cycle is significantly different between the two orientation-dependence models, providing testable predictions that suggest the underlying physical mechanisms governing morphology evolution during deposition and dissolution.« less

  16. Computational Examination of Orientation-Dependent Morphological Evolution during the Electrodeposition and Electrodissolution of Magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, S.; Hahn, N.; Zavadil, K.; Thornton, K.

    2015-12-30

    Here a new model of electrodeposition and electrodissolution is developed and applied to the evolution of Mg deposits during anode cycling. The model captures Butler-Volmer kinetics, facet evolution, the spatially varying potential in the electrolyte, and the time-dependent electrolyte concentration. The model utilizes a diffuse interface approach, employing the phase field and smoothed boundary methods. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of magnesium deposited on a gold substrate show the formation of faceted deposits, often in the form of hexagonal prisms. Orientation-dependent reaction rate coefficients were parameterized using the experimental SEM images. Three-dimensional simulations of the growth of magnesium deposits yield deposit morphologies consistent with the experimental results. The simulations predict that the deposits become narrower and taller as the current density increases due to the depletion of the electrolyte concentration near the sides of the deposits. Increasing the distance between the deposits leads to increased depletion of the electrolyte surrounding the deposit. Two models relating the orientation-dependence of the deposition and dissolution reactions are presented. Finally, the morphology of the Mg deposit after one deposition-dissolution cycle is significantly different between the two orientation-dependence models, providing testable predictions that suggest the underlying physical mechanisms governing morphology evolution during deposition and dissolution.

  17. Studying Computer Science in a Multidisciplinary Degree Programme: Freshman Students' Orientation, Knowledge, and Background

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kautz, Karlheinz; Kofoed, Uffe

    2004-01-01

    Teachers at universities are facing an increasing disparity in students' prior IT knowledge and, at the same time, experience a growing disengagement of the students with regard to involvement in study activities. As computer science teachers in a joint programme in computer science and business administration, we made a number of similar…

  18. Possible Applications of Computer Oriented Problem Solving Methods to Mathematics Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Earl B.; And Others

    This report consists of five separate papers. The first is an extensive review of the "state of the art" in computer simulation and artificial intelligence. This review states that artificial intelligence and computer simulation have accomplished a great deal, with particular attention to findings relevant to psychology. The second paper is an…

  19. Adapting to a Computer-Oriented Society: The Leadership Role of Business and Liberal Arts Faculties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Gorman, David E.

    The need for higher education to take a proactive rather than a reactive stance in dealing with the impact of the computer is considered. The field of computerized video technology is briefly discussed. It is suggested that disparate groups such as the liberal arts and business faculties should cooperate to maximize the use of computer technology.…

  20. Secondary iris recognition method based on local energy-orientation feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Guang; Liu, Yuanning; Zhu, Xiaodong; Dong, Hongxing

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a secondary iris recognition based on local features. The application of the energy-orientation feature (EOF) by two-dimensional Gabor filter to the extraction of the iris goes before the first recognition by the threshold of similarity, which sets the whole iris database into two categories-a correctly recognized class and a class to be recognized. Therefore, the former are accepted and the latter are transformed by histogram to achieve an energy-orientation histogram feature (EOHF), which is followed by a second recognition with the chi-square distance. The experiment has proved that the proposed method, because of its higher correct recognition rate, could be designated as the most efficient and effective among its companion studies in iris recognition algorithms.

  1. Applying analytic hierarchy process to assess healthcare-oriented cloud computing service systems.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wen-Hwa; Qiu, Wan-Li

    2016-01-01

    Numerous differences exist between the healthcare industry and other industries. Difficulties in the business operation of the healthcare industry have continually increased because of the volatility and importance of health care, changes to and requirements of health insurance policies, and the statuses of healthcare providers, which are typically considered not-for-profit organizations. Moreover, because of the financial risks associated with constant changes in healthcare payment methods and constantly evolving information technology, healthcare organizations must continually adjust their business operation objectives; therefore, cloud computing presents both a challenge and an opportunity. As a response to aging populations and the prevalence of the Internet in fast-paced contemporary societies, cloud computing can be used to facilitate the task of balancing the quality and costs of health care. To evaluate cloud computing service systems for use in health care, providing decision makers with a comprehensive assessment method for prioritizing decision-making factors is highly beneficial. Hence, this study applied the analytic hierarchy process, compared items related to cloud computing and health care, executed a questionnaire survey, and then classified the critical factors influencing healthcare cloud computing service systems on the basis of statistical analyses of the questionnaire results. The results indicate that the primary factor affecting the design or implementation of optimal cloud computing healthcare service systems is cost effectiveness, with the secondary factors being practical considerations such as software design and system architecture. PMID:27441149

  2. Time-oriented hierarchical method for computation of principal components using subspace learning algorithm.

    PubMed

    Jankovic, Marko; Ogawa, Hidemitsu

    2004-10-01

    Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Principal Subspace Analysis (PSA) are classic techniques in statistical data analysis, feature extraction and data compression. Given a set of multivariate measurements, PCA and PSA provide a smaller set of "basis vectors" with less redundancy, and a subspace spanned by them, respectively. Artificial neurons and neural networks have been shown to perform PSA and PCA when gradient ascent (descent) learning rules are used, which is related to the constrained maximization (minimization) of statistical objective functions. Due to their low complexity, such algorithms and their implementation in neural networks are potentially useful in cases of tracking slow changes of correlations in the input data or in updating eigenvectors with new samples. In this paper we propose PCA learning algorithm that is fully homogeneous with respect to neurons. The algorithm is obtained by modification of one of the most famous PSA learning algorithms--Subspace Learning Algorithm (SLA). Modification of the algorithm is based on Time-Oriented Hierarchical Method (TOHM). The method uses two distinct time scales. On a faster time scale PSA algorithm is responsible for the "behavior" of all output neurons. On a slower scale, output neurons will compete for fulfillment of their "own interests". On this scale, basis vectors in the principal subspace are rotated toward the principal eigenvectors. At the end of the paper it will be briefly analyzed how (or why) time-oriented hierarchical method can be used for transformation of any of the existing neural network PSA method, into PCA method. PMID:15593379

  3. Bringing Advanced Computational Techniques to Energy Research

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Julie C

    2012-11-17

    Please find attached our final technical report for the BACTER Institute award. BACTER was created as a graduate and postdoctoral training program for the advancement of computational biology applied to questions of relevance to bioenergy research.

  4. Office of Fusion Energy computational review

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.I.; Cohen, R.H.; Byers, J.A.

    1996-03-06

    The LLNL MFE Theory and Computations Program supports computational efforts in the following areas: (1) Magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium and stability; (2) Fluid and kinetic edge plasma simulation and modeling; (3) Kinetic and fluid core turbulent transport simulation; (4) Comprehensive tokamak modeling (CORSICA Project) - transport, MHD equilibrium and stability, edge physics, heating, turbulent transport, etc. and (5) Other: ECRH ray tracing, reflectometry, plasma processing. This report discusses algorithm and codes pertaining to these areas.

  5. An Application of the Market-Oriented Programming to Energy Trading Decision Method in Distributed Energy Management Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakire, Koji; Miyamoto, Toshiyuki; Kumagai, Sadatoshi; Mori, Kazuyuki; Kitamura, Shoichi; Yamamoto, Takaya

    A control of CO2 emissions which is the main factor of global warming is one of the most important problems in the 21st century about preservation of earth environment. Therefore, efficient supply and use of energy are indispensable. We have proposed distributed energy management systems (DEMSs), where we are to obtain optimal plans that minimize both of costs and CO2 emissions through electrical and thermal energy trading. A DEMS consists of the plural entities that seek their own economic profits. In this paper, we propose a trading method that gives competitive equilibrium resource distribution by applying the market-oriented programming (MOP) to DEMSs.

  6. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC): Advancing the frontiers of computational science and technology

    SciTech Connect

    Hules, J.

    1996-11-01

    National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) provides researchers with high-performance computing tools to tackle science`s biggest and most challenging problems. Founded in 1974 by DOE/ER, the Controlled Thermonuclear Research Computer Center was the first unclassified supercomputer center and was the model for those that followed. Over the years the center`s name was changed to the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center and then to NERSC; it was relocated to LBNL. NERSC, one of the largest unclassified scientific computing resources in the world, is the principal provider of general-purpose computing services to DOE/ER programs: Magnetic Fusion Energy, High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Basic Energy Sciences, Health and Environmental Research, and the Office of Computational and Technology Research. NERSC users are a diverse community located throughout US and in several foreign countries. This brochure describes: the NERSC advantage, its computational resources and services, future technologies, scientific resources, and computational science of scale (interdisciplinary research over a decade or longer; examples: combustion in engines, waste management chemistry, global climate change modeling).

  7. The Effectiveness of Instructional Orienting Activities in Computer-Based Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, Richard F.

    Research literature pertaining to the use of instructional organizers is reviewed, and a comparative analysis is made of their effectiveness with computer-based instruction (CBI). One of the earliest forms of instructional organizer is the advance organizer, first proposed by David Ausubel (1960, 1963) which is meant to facilitate the retention of…

  8. Interactive Computer Graphics for Performance-Structure-Oriented CAI. Technical Report No. 73.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigney, Joseph W.; And Others

    Two different uses of interactive graphics in computer-assisted instruction are described. Interactive graphics may be used as substitutes for physical devices and operations. An example is simulation of operating on man/machine interfaces, substituting interactive graphics for controls, indicators, and indications. Interactive graphics may also…

  9. MOUSE (MODULAR ORIENTED UNCERTAINTY SYSTEM): A COMPUTERIZED UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS SYSTEM (FOR MICRO- COMPUTERS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental engineering calculations involving uncertainties; either in the model itself or in the data, are far beyond the capabilities of conventional analysis for any but the simplest of models. There exist a number of general-purpose computer simulation languages, using Mon...

  10. POET (parallel object-oriented environment and toolkit) and frameworks for scientific distributed computing

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, R.; Cheung, A.

    1997-01-01

    Frameworks for parallel computing have recently become popular as a means for preserving parallel algorithms as reusable components. Frameworks for parallel computing in general, and POET in particular, focus on finding ways to orchestrate and facilitate cooperation between components that implement the parallel algorithms. Since performance is a key requirement for POET applications, CORBA or CORBA-like systems are eschewed for a SPMD message-passing architecture common to the world of distributed-parallel computing. Though the system is written in C++ for portability, the behavior of POET is more like a classical framework, such as Smalltalk. POET seeks to be a general platform for scientific parallel algorithm components which can be modified, linked, mixed and matched to a user`s specification. The purpose of this work is to identify a means for parallel code reuse and to make parallel computing more accessible to scientists whose expertise is outside the field of parallel computing. The POET framework provides two things: (1) an object model for parallel components that allows cooperation without being restrictive; (2) services that allow components to access and manage user data and message-passing facilities, etc. This work has evolved through application of a series of real distributed-parallel scientific problems. The paper focuses on what is required for parallel components to cooperate and at the same time remain ``black-boxes`` that users can drop into the frame without having to know the exquisite details of message-passing, data layout, etc. The paper walks through a specific example of a chemically reacting flow application. The example is implemented in POET and the authors identify component cooperation, usability and reusability in an anecdotal fashion.

  11. Energy--What to Do until the Computer Comes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Archie B.

    Drawing from Tallahassee Community College's (TCC's) experiences with energy conservation, this paper offers suggestions for reducing energy costs through computer-controlled systems and other means. After stating the energy problems caused by TCC's multi-zone heating and cooling system, the paper discusses the five-step process by which TCC…

  12. Orientational dependence of the translational energy transfer in the scattering of oriented fluoroform and tert-butyl chloride molecules by a graphite(0001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionov, Stanislav I.; LaVilla, Michael E.; Bernstein, Richard B.

    1990-11-01

    Time-of-flight distributions of beams of hexapole-oriented CHF3 and t-BuCl molecules scattered from a graphite (0001) surface have been measured for parallel vs antiparallel incident orientations of the molecular dipole with respect to the surface normal, over a range of surface temperatures 170≤Ts≤730 K. The observed difference in arrival times, Δtexp, for opposite initial orientations depends strongly on the degree of orientation of the incident molecules. In the analysis of the Δtexp data, we make use of the two-component model, which assumes that the scattered beams are composed of directly scattered and trapped/desorbed molecules. It is shown that in the common case of short residence times for the trapped molecules, the difference in arrival times for the directly scattered molecules, Δtdir, can be ascertained from the measured Δtexp. The magnitudes of the calculated Δtdir correspond to a strong orientation dependence in the translational energy transfer accompanying the direct scattering of CHF3 and t-BuCl by graphite (0001). The final translational energy of directly scattered molecules E' is found to be smaller for the collision of the H ``end'' of fluoroform with the graphite surface; for t-BuCl, E' is smaller for the Cl ``end'' collision. These are the orientations that also give rise to higher trapping probability. In the course of the present study, the residence times of t-BuCl on graphite (0001) have been measured over the surface temperature range 170

  13. Energy measurement using flow computers and chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Beeson, J.

    1995-12-01

    Arkla Pipeline Group (APG), along with most transmission companies, went to electronic flow measurement (EFM) to: (1) Increase resolution and accuracy; (2) Real time correction of flow variables; (3) Increase speed in data retrieval; (4) Reduce capital expenditures; and (5) Reduce operation and maintenance expenditures Prior to EFM, mechanical seven day charts were used which yielded 800 pressure and differential pressure readings. EFM yields 1.2-million readings, a 1500 time improvement in resolution and additional flow representation. The total system accuracy of the EFM system is 0.25 % compared with 2 % for the chart system which gives APG improved accuracy. A typical APG electronic measurement system includes a microprocessor-based flow computer, a telemetry communications package, and a gas chromatograph. Live relative density (specific gravity), BTU, CO{sub 2}, and N{sub 2} are updated from the chromatograph to the flow computer every six minutes which provides accurate MMBTU computations. Because the gas contract length has changed from years to monthly and from a majority of direct sales to transports both Arkla and its customers wanted access to actual volumes on a much more timely basis than is allowed with charts. The new electronic system allows volumes and other system data to be retrieved continuously, if EFM is on Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) or daily if on dial up telephone. Previously because of chart integration, information was not available for four to six weeks. EFM costs much less than the combined costs of telemetry transmitters, pressure and differential pressure chart recorders, and temperature chart recorder which it replaces. APG will install this equipment on smaller volume stations at a customers expense. APG requires backup measurement on metering facilities this size. It could be another APG flow computer or chart recorder, or the other companies flow computer or chart recorder.

  14. Service-Oriented Architecture for NVO and TeraGrid Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, Joseph; Miller, Craig; Williams, Roy; Steenberg, Conrad; Graham, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    The National Virtual Observatory (NVO) Extensible Secure Scalable Service Infrastructure (NESSSI) is a Web service architecture and software framework that enables Web-based astronomical data publishing and processing on grid computers such as the National Science Foundation's TeraGrid. Characteristics of this architecture include the following: (1) Services are created, managed, and upgraded by their developers, who are trusted users of computing platforms on which the services are deployed. (2) Service jobs can be initiated by means of Java or Python client programs run on a command line or with Web portals. (3) Access is granted within a graduated security scheme in which the size of a job that can be initiated depends on the level of authentication of the user.

  15. COMPLEAT (Community-Oriented Model for Planning Least-Cost Energy Alternatives and Technologies): A planning tool for publicly owned electric utilities. [Community-Oriented Model for Planning Least-Cost Energy Alternatives and Technologies (Compleat)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    COMPLEAT takes its name, as an acronym, from Community-Oriented Model for Planning Least-Cost Energy Alternatives and Technologies. It is an electric utility planning model designed for use principally by publicly owned electric utilities and agencies serving such utilities. As a model, COMPLEAT is significantly more full-featured and complex than called out in APPA's original plan and proposal to DOE. The additional complexity grew out of a series of discussions early in the development schedule, in which it became clear to APPA staff and advisors that the simplicity characterizing the original plan, while highly desirable in terms of utility applications, was not achievable if practical utility problems were to be addressed. The project teams settled on Energy 20/20, an existing model developed by Dr. George Backus of Policy Assessment Associates, as the best candidate for the kinds of modifications and extensions that would be required. The remainder of the project effort was devoted to designing specific input data files, output files, and user screens and to writing and testing the compute programs that would properly implement the desired features around Energy 20/20 as a core program. This report presents in outline form, the features and user interface of COMPLEAT.

  16. Delta: An object-oriented finite element code architecture for massively parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Weatherby, J.R.; Schutt, J.A.; Peery, J.S.; Hogan, R.E.

    1996-02-01

    Delta is an object-oriented code architecture based on the finite element method which enables simulation of a wide range of engineering mechanics problems in a parallel processing environment. Written in C{sup ++}, Delta is a natural framework for algorithm development and for research involving coupling of mechanics from different Engineering Science disciplines. To enhance flexibility and encourage code reuse, the architecture provides a clean separation of the major aspects of finite element programming. Spatial discretization, temporal discretization, and the solution of linear and nonlinear systems of equations are each implemented separately, independent from the governing field equations. Other attractive features of the Delta architecture include support for constitutive models with internal variables, reusable ``matrix-free`` equation solvers, and support for region-to-region variations in the governing equations and the active degrees of freedom. A demonstration code built from the Delta architecture has been used in two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations involving dynamic and quasi-static solid mechanics, transient and steady heat transport, and flow in porous media.

  17. Computer simulation of stress-oriented nucleation and growth of {theta}{prime} precipitates in Al-Cu alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.Y.; Chen, L.Q.

    1998-05-01

    Many structural transformations result in several orientation variants whose volume fractions and distributions can be controlled by applied stresses during nucleation, growth or coarsening. Depending on the type of stress and the coupling between the applied stress and the lattice misfit strain, the precipitate variants may be aligned parallel or perpendicular to the stress axis. This paper reports their studies on the effect of applied stresses on nucleation and growth of coherent {theta}{prime} precipitates in Al-Cu alloys using computer simulations based on a diffuse-interface phase-field kinetic model. In this model, the orientational differences among precipitate variants are distinguished by non-conserved structural field variables, whereas the compositional difference between the precipitate and matrix is described by a conserved field variable. The temporal evolution of the spatially dependent field variables is determined by numerically solving the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau (TDGL) equations for the structural variables and the Cahn-Hilliard diffusion equation for composition. Random noises were introduced in both the composition and the structural order parameter fields to simulate the nucleation of {theta}{prime} precipitates. It is demonstrated that although an applied stress affects the microstructural development of a two-phase alloy during both the nucleation and growth stages, it is most effective to apply stresses during the initial nucleation stage for producing anisotropic precipitate alignment.

  18. Determination of dominant fibre orientations in fibre-reinforced high-strength concrete elements based on computed tomography scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicente, Miguel A.; González, Dorys C.; Mínguez, Jesús

    2014-04-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a nondestructive technique, based on absorbing X-rays, that permits the visualisation of the internal structure of materials in micron-range resolution. In this paper, the CT scan is used to determine the position and orientation of the fibres in steel fibre-reinforced high-strength concrete elements. The aim of this paper was to present a numerical procedure, automated through a MATLAB routine specially developed by the authors, which enables, fast and reliable, to obtain the orientation of each and every one of the fibres and their centre of gravity. The procedure shown is directly extrapolated to any type of fibre-reinforced material, only if there is a wide difference between density of fibres and density of matrix. The mathematical basis of this procedure is very simple and robust. The result is a fast algorithm and a routine easy to use. In addition, the validation tests show that the error is almost zero. This algorithm can help the industry to implement the technology of CT in the protocols of product quality control.

  19. An overview of energy efficiency techniques in cluster computing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, Giorgio Luigi; Lassonde, Walter; Khan, Samee Ullah; Min-Allah, Nasro; Madani, Sajjad A.; Li, Juan; Zhang, Limin; Wang, Lizhe; Ghani, Nasir; Kolodziej, Joanna; Li, Hongxiang; Zomaya, Albert Y.; Xu, Cheng-Zhong; Balaji, Pavan; Vishnu, Abhinav; Pinel, Fredric; Pecero, Johnatan E.; Kliazovich, Dzmitry; Bouvry, Pascal

    2011-09-10

    Two major constraints demand more consideration for energy efficiency in cluster computing: (a) operational costs, and (b) system reliability. Increasing energy efficiency in cluster systems will reduce energy consumption, excess heat, lower operational costs, and improve system reliability. Based on the energy-power relationship, and the fact that energy consumption can be reduced with strategic power management, we focus in this survey on the characteristic of two main power management technologies: (a) static power management (SPM) systems that utilize low-power components to save the energy, and (b) dynamic power management (DPM) systems that utilize software and power-scalable components to optimize the energy consumption. We present the current state of the art in both of the SPM and DPM techniques, citing representative examples. The survey is concluded with a brief discussion and some assumptions about the possible future directions that could be explored to improve the energy efficiency in cluster computing.

  20. Region-oriented CT image representation for reducing computing time of Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrut, David; Guigues, Laurent

    2008-04-15

    Purpose. We propose a new method for efficient particle transportation in voxelized geometry for Monte Carlo simulations. We describe its use for calculating dose distribution in CT images for radiation therapy. Material and methods. The proposed approach, based on an implicit volume representation named segmented volume, coupled with an adapted segmentation procedure and a distance map, allows us to minimize the number of boundary crossings, which slows down simulation. The method was implemented with the GEANT4 toolkit and compared to four other methods: One box per voxel, parameterized volumes, octree-based volumes, and nested parameterized volumes. For each representation, we compared dose distribution, time, and memory consumption. Results. The proposed method allows us to decrease computational time by up to a factor of 15, while keeping memory consumption low, and without any modification of the transportation engine. Speeding up is related to the geometry complexity and the number of different materials used. We obtained an optimal number of steps with removal of all unnecessary steps between adjacent voxels sharing a similar material. However, the cost of each step is increased. When the number of steps cannot be decreased enough, due for example, to the large number of material boundaries, such a method is not considered suitable. Conclusion. This feasibility study shows that optimizing the representation of an image in memory potentially increases computing efficiency. We used the GEANT4 toolkit, but we could potentially use other Monte Carlo simulation codes. The method introduces a tradeoff between speed and geometry accuracy, allowing computational time gain. However, simulations with GEANT4 remain slow and further work is needed to speed up the procedure while preserving the desired accuracy.

  1. A computer-oriented system for high-speed recording of operant behavior1

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Herbert; Kinnard, William J.; Watzman, Nathan; Buckley, Joseph P.

    1966-01-01

    A method is described by which large quantities of data, generated at high and variable rates from a large number of test boxes, are recorded on a single eight-channel punched paper tape. The data, which include a record of the occurrence time of each event in 1/10-sec units, are in a compact form, suitable for conversion to standard Hollerith punched card codes and for decoding and summarizing by a large digital computer. Experience with the system has demonstrated a high degree of accuracy and reliability, and low operating cost. PMID:5907829

  2. A Computer Modeling Tool for Comparing Novel ICD Electrode Orientations in Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Jolley, Matthew; Stinstra, Jeroen; Pieper, Steve; MacLeod, Rob; Brooks, Dana H.; Cecchin, Frank; Triedman, John K.

    2009-01-01

    Background ICD implants in children and patients with congenital heart disease are complicated by body size and anatomy. A variety of creative implant techniques have been utilized empirically in these groups on an ad hoc basis. Objective To rationalize ICD placement in special populations, we used subject-specific, image-based finite element models (FEMs) to compare electric fields and expected defibrillation thresholds (DFTs) using standard and novel electrode configurations. Methods FEMs were created by segmenting normal torso CT scans of subjects aged 2, 10, and 29 years and one adult with congenital heart disease into tissue compartments, meshing and assigning tissue conductivities. The FEMs were modified by interactive placement of ICD electrode models in clinically relevant electrode configurations, and metrics of relative defibrillation safety and efficacy calculated. Results Predicted DFTs for standard transvenous configurations were comparable to published results. While transvenous systems generally predicted lower DFTs, a variety of extracardiac orientations were also predicted to be comparably effective in children and adults. Significant trend effects on DFTs were associated with body size and electrode length. In many situations, small alterations in electrode placement and patient anatomy resulted in significant variation of predicted DFT. We also demonstrate patient specific use of this technique for optimization of electrode placement. Conclusions Image-based FEMs allow predictive modeling of defibrillation scenarios, and predict large changes in DFTs with clinically relevant variations of electrode placement. Extracardiac ICDs are predicted to be effective in both children and adults. This approach may aid both ICD development and patient-specific optimization of electrode placement. Further development and validation are needed for clinical or industrial utilization. PMID:18362024

  3. Orientation of bluff body for designing efficient energy harvesters from vortex-induced vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, H. L.; Abdelkefi, A.; Yang, Y.; Wang, L.

    2016-02-01

    The characteristics and performances of four distinct vortex-induced vibrations (VIVs) piezoelectric energy harvesters are experimentally investigated and compared. The difference between these VIV energy harvesters is the installation of the cylindrical bluff body at the tip of cantilever beam with different orientations (bottom, top, horizontal, and vertical). Experiments show that the synchronization regions of the bottom, top, and horizontal configurations are almost the same at low wind speeds (around 1.5 m/s). The vertical configuration has the highest wind speed for synchronization (around 3.5 m/s) with the largest harvested power, which is explained by its highest natural frequency and the smallest coupled damping. The results lead to the conclusion that to design efficient VIV energy harvesters, the bluff body should be aligned with the beam for low wind speeds (<2 m/s) and perpendicular to the beam at high wind speeds (>2 m/s).

  4. Energy-scalable pulsed mid-IR source using orientation-patterned GaAs.

    PubMed

    French, Douglas; Peterson, Rita; Jovanovic, Igor

    2011-02-15

    Coherent mid-IR sources based on orientation-patterned GaAs (OPGaAs) are of significant interest in diverse scientific, medical, and military applications. The generation of long-wavelength mid-IR beams in OPGaAs using optical parametric oscillation exhibits limitations in the obtainable pulse energy and peak power. The master oscillator power amplifier concept is demonstrated in OPGaAs, by which a mid-IR source based on optical parametric oscillation can be scaled to high energy by amplification of the output of the optical parametric oscillator in an optical parametric amplifier (OPA). A fivefold increase in the pulse energy is obtained using this method by amplifying 3.85μm pulses in an OPGaAs OPA pumped by a Th,Ho:YLF Q-switched laser. PMID:21326434

  5. Computational Approaches for Understanding Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Shestov, Alexander A; Barker, Brandon; Gu, Zhenglong; Locasale, Jason W

    2013-01-01

    There has been a surge of interest in understanding the regulation of metabolic networks involved in disease in recent years. Quantitative models are increasingly being used to i nterrogate the metabolic pathways that are contained within this complex disease biology. At the core of this effort is the mathematical modeling of central carbon metabolism involving glycolysis and the citric acid cycle (referred to as energy metabolism). Here we discuss several approaches used to quantitatively model metabolic pathways relating to energy metabolism and discuss their formalisms, successes, and limitations. PMID:23897661

  6. Computer Review Can Cut HVAC Energy Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClure, Charles J. R.

    1974-01-01

    A computerized review of construction bidding documents, usually done by a consulting engineer, can reveal how much money it will cost to operate various alternative types of HVAC equipment over a school's lifetime. The review should include a computerized load calculation, energy systems flow diagram, control system analysis, and a computerized…

  7. Computational physics at the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center

    SciTech Connect

    Mirin, A.A.

    1990-04-01

    The principal roles of the Computational Physics Group are (1) to develop efficient numerical algorithms, programming techniques and applications software for current and future generations of supercomputers, (2) to develop advanced numerical models for the investigation of plasma phenomena and the simulation of contemporary magnetic fusion devices, and (3) to serve as a liaison between the Center and the user community; in particular; to provide NERSC with an application-oriented viewpoint and to provide the user community with expertise on the effective usage of the computers. In addition, many of our computer codes employ state-of the-art algorithms that test the prototypical hardware and software features of the various computers. This document describes the activities of the Computational Physics Group and was prepared with the assistance of the various Group members. The fist part contains overviews on a number of our important projects. The second section lists our important computational models. The third part provides a comprehensive list of our publications.

  8. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective was to obtain accurate potential energy surfaces (PES's) for a number of reactions which are important in the H/N/O combustion process. The interest in this is centered around the design of the SCRAM jet engine for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP), which was envisioned as an air-breathing hydrogen-burning vehicle capable of reaching velocities as large as Mach 25. Preliminary studies indicated that the supersonic flow in the combustor region of the scram jet engine required accurate reaction rate data for reactions in the H/N/O system, some of which was not readily available from experiment. The most important class of combustion reactions from the standpoint of the NASP project are radical recombinaton reactions, since these reactions result in most of the heat release in the combustion process. Theoretical characterizations of the potential energy surfaces for these reactions are presented and discussed.

  9. EQUILIBRIUM AND NONEQUILIBRIUM FOUNDATIONS OF FREE ENERGY COMPUTATIONAL METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    C. JARZYNSKI

    2001-03-01

    Statistical mechanics provides a rigorous framework for the numerical estimation of free energy differences in complex systems such as biomolecules. This paper presents a brief review of the statistical mechanical identities underlying a number of techniques for computing free energy differences. Both equilibrium and nonequilibrium methods are covered.

  10. The Role of Computing in High-Energy Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalf, Michael

    1983-01-01

    Examines present and future applications of computers in high-energy physics. Areas considered include high-energy physics laboratories, accelerators, detectors, networking, off-line analysis, software guidelines, event sizes and volumes, graphics applications, event simulation, theoretical studies, and future trends. (JN)

  11. Computational fluid dynamics investigation of human aspiration in low velocity air: orientation effects on nose-breathing simulations.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kimberly R; Anthony, T Renée

    2014-06-01

    An understanding of how particles are inhaled into the human nose is important for developing samplers that measure biologically relevant estimates of exposure in the workplace. While previous computational mouth-breathing investigations of particle aspiration have been conducted in slow moving air, nose breathing still required exploration. Computational fluid dynamics was used to estimate nasal aspiration efficiency for an inhaling humanoid form in low velocity wind speeds (0.1-0.4 m s(-1)). Breathing was simplified as continuous inhalation through the nose. Fluid flow and particle trajectories were simulated over seven discrete orientations relative to the oncoming wind (0, 15, 30, 60, 90, 135, 180°). Sensitivities of the model simplification and methods were assessed, particularly the placement of the recessed nostril surface and the size of the nose. Simulations identified higher aspiration (13% on average) when compared to published experimental wind tunnel data. Significant differences in aspiration were identified between nose geometry, with the smaller nose aspirating an average of 8.6% more than the larger nose. Differences in fluid flow solution methods accounted for 2% average differences, on the order of methodological uncertainty. Similar trends to mouth-breathing simulations were observed including increasing aspiration efficiency with decreasing freestream velocity and decreasing aspiration with increasing rotation away from the oncoming wind. These models indicate nasal aspiration in slow moving air occurs only for particles <100 µm. PMID:24665111

  12. Computational Fluid Dynamics Investigation of Human Aspiration in Low Velocity Air: Orientation Effects on Nose-Breathing Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kimberly R.; Anthony, T. Renée

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of how particles are inhaled into the human nose is important for developing samplers that measure biologically relevant estimates of exposure in the workplace. While previous computational mouth-breathing investigations of particle aspiration have been conducted in slow moving air, nose breathing still required exploration. Computational fluid dynamics was used to estimate nasal aspiration efficiency for an inhaling humanoid form in low velocity wind speeds (0.1–0.4 m s−1). Breathing was simplified as continuous inhalation through the nose. Fluid flow and particle trajectories were simulated over seven discrete orientations relative to the oncoming wind (0, 15, 30, 60, 90, 135, 180°). Sensitivities of the model simplification and methods were assessed, particularly the placement of the recessed nostril surface and the size of the nose. Simulations identified higher aspiration (13% on average) when compared to published experimental wind tunnel data. Significant differences in aspiration were identified between nose geometry, with the smaller nose aspirating an average of 8.6% more than the larger nose. Differences in fluid flow solution methods accounted for 2% average differences, on the order of methodological uncertainty. Similar trends to mouth-breathing simulations were observed including increasing aspiration efficiency with decreasing freestream velocity and decreasing aspiration with increasing rotation away from the oncoming wind. These models indicate nasal aspiration in slow moving air occurs only for particles <100 µm. PMID:24665111

  13. ms-data-core-api: an open-source, metadata-oriented library for computational proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Uszkoreit, Julian; Sanchez, Aniel; Ternent, Tobias; del Toro, Noemi; Hermjakob, Henning; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Wang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Summary: The ms-data-core-api is a free, open-source library for developing computational proteomics tools and pipelines. The Application Programming Interface, written in Java, enables rapid tool creation by providing a robust, pluggable programming interface and common data model. The data model is based on controlled vocabularies/ontologies and captures the whole range of data types included in common proteomics experimental workflows, going from spectra to peptide/protein identifications to quantitative results. The library contains readers for three of the most used Proteomics Standards Initiative standard file formats: mzML, mzIdentML, and mzTab. In addition to mzML, it also supports other common mass spectra data formats: dta, ms2, mgf, pkl, apl (text-based), mzXML and mzData (XML-based). Also, it can be used to read PRIDE XML, the original format used by the PRIDE database, one of the world-leading proteomics resources. Finally, we present a set of algorithms and tools whose implementation illustrates the simplicity of developing applications using the library. Availability and implementation: The software is freely available at https://github.com/PRIDE-Utilities/ms-data-core-api. Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online Contact: juan@ebi.ac.uk PMID:25910694

  14. Tissue Characterization Using Energy-Selective Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Robert E.; Marshall, William H.; Lewis, Roger

    1981-07-01

    Energy-selective computed tomography has several important properties useful for in-vivo tissue characterization. Most importantly, it produces more information than conventional computed tomography. This information can be considered to be an added dimension which can be used to eliminate the ambiguities in conventional CT data. The noise in energy-selective computed tomography is also two dimensional and an un-correlated coordinate system can be defined which is needed for studying the capabilities of the technique for characterizing tissues. By using the calibration material basis set, the information from energy-selective CT can be extracted with extreme accuracy. Our preliminary experiments indicate that the technique is accurate enough to characterize the difference between gray and white matter. Most conventional systems have difficulty in distinguishing these materials, much less characterizing the reason for their differing attenuation. Thus energy-selective CT has the promise of providing extremely accurate tissue characterization based on its physical properties.

  15. Asymmetric energy flow in liquid alkylbenzenes: A computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, David M.; Pandey, Hari Datt

    2015-10-14

    Ultrafast IR-Raman experiments on substituted benzenes [B. C. Pein et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 117, 10898–10904 (2013)] reveal that energy can flow more efficiently in one direction along a molecule than in others. We carry out a computational study of energy flow in the three alkyl benzenes, toluene, isopropylbenzene, and t-butylbenzene, studied in these experiments, and find an asymmetry in the flow of vibrational energy between the two chemical groups of the molecule due to quantum mechanical vibrational relaxation bottlenecks, which give rise to a preferred direction of energy flow. We compare energy flow computed for all modes of the three alkylbenzenes over the relaxation time into the liquid with energy flow through the subset of modes monitored in the time-resolved Raman experiments and find qualitatively similar results when using the subset compared to all the modes.

  16. High energy charged particle optics computer programs

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, D.C.

    1980-09-01

    The computer programs TRANSPORT and TURTLE are described, with special emphasis on recent developments. TRANSPORT is a general matrix evaluation and fitting program. First and second-order transfer matrix elements, including those contributing to time-of-flight differences can be evaluated. Matrix elements of both orders can be fit, separately or simultaneously. Floor coordinates of the beam line may be calculated and included in any fits. Tables of results of misalignments, including effects of bilinear terms can be produced. Fringe fields and pole face rotation angles of bending magnets may be included and also adjusted automatically during the fitting process to produce rectangular magnets. A great variety of output options are available. TURTLE is a Monte Carlo program used to simulate beam line performance. It includes second-order terms and aperture constraints. Replacable subroutines allow an unliminated variety of input beam distributions, scattering algorithms, variables which can be histogrammed, and aperture shapes. Histograms of beam loss can also be produced. Rectangular zero-gradient bending magnets with proper circular trajectories, sagitta offsets, pole face rotation angles, and aperture constraints can be included. The effect of multiple components of quadrupoles up to 40 poles can be evaluated.

  17. Memory device for two-dimensional radiant energy array computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, D. H.; Strong, J. P., III (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A memory device for two dimensional radiant energy array computers was developed, in which the memory device stores digital information in an input array of radiant energy digital signals that are characterized by ordered rows and columns. The memory device contains a radiant energy logic storing device having a pair of input surface locations for receiving a pair of separate radiant energy digital signal arrays and an output surface location adapted to transmit a radiant energy digital signal array. A regenerative feedback device that couples one of the input surface locations to the output surface location in a manner for causing regenerative feedback is also included

  18. Sink-oriented Dynamic Location Service Protocol for Mobile Sinks with an Energy Efficient Grid-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyeonjae; Park, Kwangjin; Hwang, Dae-Joon; Choo, Hyunseung

    2009-01-01

    Sensor nodes transmit the sensed information to the sink through wireless sensor networks (WSNs). They have limited power, computational capacities and memory. Portable wireless devices are increasing in popularity. Mechanisms that allow information to be efficiently obtained through mobile WSNs are of significant interest. However, a mobile sink introduces many challenges to data dissemination in large WSNs. For example, it is important to efficiently identify the locations of mobile sinks and disseminate information from multi-source nodes to the multi-mobile sinks. In particular, a stationary dissemination path may no longer be effective in mobile sink applications, due to sink mobility. In this paper, we propose a Sink-oriented Dynamic Location Service (SDLS) approach to handle sink mobility. In SDLS, we propose an Eight-Direction Anchor (EDA) system that acts as a location service server. EDA prevents intensive energy consumption at the border sensor nodes and thus provides energy balancing to all the sensor nodes. Then we propose a Location-based Shortest Relay (LSR) that efficiently forwards (or relays) data from a source node to a sink with minimal delay path. Our results demonstrate that SDLS not only provides an efficient and scalable location service, but also reduces the average data communication overhead in scenarios with multiple and moving sinks and sources. PMID:22573964

  19. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Levin, Eugene

    1993-01-01

    A new global potential energy surface (PES) is being generated for O(P-3) + H2 yields OH + H. This surface is being fit using the rotated Morse oscillator method, which was used to fit the previous POL-CI surface. The new surface is expected to be more accurate and also includes a much more complete sampling of bent geometries. A new study has been undertaken of the reaction N + O2 yields NO + O. The new studies have focused on the region of the surface near a possible minimum corresponding to the peroxy form of NOO. A large portion of the PES for this second reaction has been mapped out. Since state to state cross sections for the reaction are important in the chemistry of high temperature air, these studies will probably be extended to permit generation of a new global potential for reaction.

  20. Computational Study of Low Energy Nuclear Scattering from Metal Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, Danelle; Hira, Ajit; Pacheco, Jose; Salazar, Justin

    2014-03-01

    We continue our interest in the interactions between different nuclear species with a computational study of the scattering of the low-energy nuclei of H through F atoms (Z <= 9) from Palladium, Nickel and other metals. First, a FORTRAN computer program was developed to compute stopping cross sections and scattering angles in Pd and other metals for the small nuclear projectiles, using Monte Carlo calculation. This code allows for different angles of incidence. Next, simulations were done in the energy interval from 10 to 140 keV. The computational results thus obtained are compared with relevant experimental data. The data are further analyzed to identify periodic trends in terms of the atomic number of the projectile. Such studies have potential applications in nuclear physics and in nuclear medicine.

  1. Can computed crystal energy landscapes help understand pharmaceutical solids?

    PubMed

    Price, Sarah L; Braun, Doris E; Reutzel-Edens, Susan M

    2016-06-01

    Computational crystal structure prediction (CSP) methods can now be applied to the smaller pharmaceutical molecules currently in drug development. We review the recent uses of computed crystal energy landscapes for pharmaceuticals, concentrating on examples where they have been used in collaboration with industrial-style experimental solid form screening. There is a strong complementarity in aiding experiment to find and characterise practically important solid forms and understanding the nature of the solid form landscape. PMID:27067116

  2. Multiple Energy Computer Tomography (MECT) at the NSLS: Status report

    SciTech Connect

    Dilmanian, F.A.; Wu, X.Y.; Chen, Z.; Ren, B.; Slatkin, D.N.; Chapman, D.; Schleifer, M.; Staicu, F.A.; Thomlinson, W.

    1994-09-01

    Status of the synchrotron-based computed tomography (CT) system Multiple Energy Computed Tomography (MECT) system is described. MECT, that uses monochromatic beams from the X17 superconducting wiggler beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), will be used for imaging the human head and neck. An earlier prototype MECT produced images of phantoms and living rodents. This report summarizes the studies with the prototype, and describes the design, construction, and test results of the Clinical MECT system components.

  3. Complete description of ionization energy and electron affinity in organic solids: Determining contributions from electronic polarization, energy band dispersion, and molecular orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Kazuto; Tsutsumi, Jun'ya; Sato, Naoki

    2015-08-01

    Ionization energy and electron affinity in organic solids are understood in terms of a single molecule perturbed by solid-state effects such as polarization energy, band dispersion, and molecular orientation as primary factors. However, no work has been done to determine the individual contributions experimentally. In this work, the electron affinities of thin films of pentacene and perfluoropentacene with different molecular orientations are determined to a precision of 0.1 eV using low-energy inverse photoemission spectroscopy. Based on the precisely determined electron affinities in the solid state together with the corresponding data of the ionization energies and other energy parameters, we quantitatively evaluate the contribution of these effects. It turns out that the bandwidth as well as the polarization energy contributes to the ionization energy and electron affinity in the solid state while the effect of the surface dipole is at most a few eV and does not vary with the molecular orientation. As a result, we conclude that the molecular orientation dependence of the ionization energy and electron affinity of organic solids originates from the orientation-dependent polarization energy in the film.

  4. Opportunities for discovery: Theory and computation in Basic Energy Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, Bruce; Kirby, Kate; McCurdy, C. William

    2005-01-11

    New scientific frontiers, recent advances in theory, and rapid increases in computational capabilities have created compelling opportunities for theory and computation to advance the scientific mission of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES). The prospects for success in the experimental programs of BES will be enhanced by pursuing these opportunities. This report makes the case for an expanded research program in theory and computation in BES. The Subcommittee on Theory and Computation of the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee was charged with identifying current and emerging challenges and opportunities for theoretical research within the scientific mission of BES, paying particular attention to how computing will be employed to enable that research. A primary purpose of the Subcommittee was to identify those investments that are necessary to ensure that theoretical research will have maximum impact in the areas of importance to BES, and to assure that BES researchers will be able to exploit the entire spectrum of computational tools, including leadership class computing facilities. The Subcommittee s Findings and Recommendations are presented in Section VII of this report.

  5. Computational Analysis of Energy Pooling to Harvest Low-Energy Solar Energy in Organic Photovoltaic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacount, Michael; Shaheen, Sean; Rumbles, Garry; van de Lagemaat, Jao; Hu, Nan; Ostrowski, Dave; Lusk, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Current photovoltaic energy conversions do not typically utilize low energy sunlight absorption, leaving large sections of the solar spectrum untapped. It is possible, though, to absorb such radiation, generating low-energy excitons, and then pool them to create higher energy excitons, which can result in an increase in efficiency. Calculation of the rates at which such upconversion processes occur requires an accounting of all possible molecular quantum electrodynamics (QED) pathways. There are two paths associated with the upconversion. The cooperative mechanism involves a three-body interaction in which low energy excitons are transferred sequentially onto an acceptor molecule. The accretive pathway, requires that an exciton transfer its energy to a second exciton that subsequently transfers its energy to the acceptor molecule. We have computationally modeled both types of molecular QED obtaining rates using a combination of DFT and many-body Green function theory. The simulation platform is exercised by considering upconversion events associated with material composed of a high energy absorbing core of hexabenzocoronene (HBC) and low energy absorbing arms of oligothiophene. In addition, we make estimates for all competing processes in order to judge the relative efficiencies of these two processes.

  6. Computing the Casimir energy using the point-matching method

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, F. C.; Mazzitelli, F. D.; Vazquez, M.; Villar, P. I.

    2009-09-15

    We use a point-matching approach to numerically compute the Casimir interaction energy for a two perfect-conductor waveguide of arbitrary section. We present the method and describe the procedure used to obtain the numerical results. At first, our technique is tested for geometries with known solutions, such as concentric and eccentric cylinders. Then, we apply the point-matching technique to compute the Casimir interaction energy for new geometries such as concentric corrugated cylinders and cylinders inside conductors with focal lines.

  7. Development of problem-oriented software packages for numerical studies and computer-aided design (CAD) of gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damyanova, M.; Sabchevski, S.; Zhelyazkov, I.; Vasileva, E.; Balabanova, E.; Dankov, P.; Malinov, P.

    2016-03-01

    Gyrotrons are the most powerful sources of coherent CW (continuous wave) radiation in the frequency range situated between the long-wavelength edge of the infrared light (far-infrared region) and the microwaves, i.e., in the region of the electromagnetic spectrum which is usually called the THz-gap (or T-gap), since the output power of other devices (e.g., solid-state oscillators) operating in this interval is by several orders of magnitude lower. In the recent years, the unique capabilities of the sub-THz and THz gyrotrons have opened the road to many novel and future prospective applications in various physical studies and advanced high-power terahertz technologies. In this paper, we present the current status and functionality of the problem-oriented software packages (most notably GYROSIM and GYREOSS) used for numerical studies, computer-aided design (CAD) and optimization of gyrotrons for diverse applications. They consist of a hierarchy of codes specialized to modelling and simulation of different subsystems of the gyrotrons (EOS, resonant cavity, etc.) and are based on adequate physical models, efficient numerical methods and algorithms.

  8. Limits of Free Energy Computation for Protein-Ligand Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Merz, Kenneth M.

    2010-01-01

    A detailed error analysis is presented for the computation of protein-ligand interaction energies. In particular, we show that it is probable that even highly accurate computed binding free energies have errors that represent a large percentage of the target free energies of binding. This is due to the observation that the error for computed energies quasi-linearly increases with the increasing number of interactions present in a protein-ligand complex. This principle is expected to hold true for any system that involves an ever increasing number of inter or intra-molecular interactions (e.g. ab initio protein folding). We introduce the concept of best-case scenario errors (BCSerrors) that can be routinely applied to docking and scoring exercises and used to provide errors bars for the computed binding free energies. These BCSerrors form a basis by which one can evaluate the outcome of a docking and scoring exercise. Moreover, the resultant error analysis enables the formation of an hypothesis that defines the best direction to proceed in order to improve scoring functions used in molecular docking studies. PMID:20467461

  9. Orientation dependences of surface morphologies and energies of iron-gallium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Marcio; Wang, Hui; Hu, Jun; Wu, Ruqian; Na, Suok-Min; Chun, Hyunsuk; Flatau, Alison B.

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the surface energies of several low-index surfaces of the D03-type FeGa alloys (Galfenol), using density functional theory (DFT) simulations and contact angle measurements. DFT calculations predict that (1) the Ga-covered (110) surface of Galfenol is more stable in the Ga-rich condition, while Ga-covered (001) surface of Galfenol become more favorable in Ga-poor condition; and (2) a full Ga overlayer tends to form on top of Galfenol surfaces regardless their orientation, both in agreement with the experimental observation. We also studied Ga segregation in the bcc Fe matrix in order to explore the possibility of Ga precipitation away from Fe. It was found that the Fe-Ga separation is unlikely to occur since Ga diffusion toward the surface is effectively self-stopped once the Ga overlayers form on the facets.

  10. View southeast of computer controlled energy monitoring system. System replaced ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View southeast of computer controlled energy monitoring system. System replaced strip chart recorders and other instruments under the direct observation of the load dispatcher. - Thirtieth Street Station, Load Dispatch Center, Thirtieth & Market Streets, Railroad Station, Amtrak (formerly Pennsylvania Railroad Station), Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  11. Applications of dual energy computed tomography in abdominal imaging.

    PubMed

    Lestra, T; Mulé, S; Millet, I; Carsin-Vu, A; Taourel, P; Hoeffel, C

    2016-06-01

    Dual energy computed tomography (CT) is an imaging technique based on data acquisition at two different energy settings. Recent advances in CT have allowed data acquisition and almost simultaneously analysis of two spectra of X-rays at different energy levels resulting in novel developments in the field of abdominal imaging. This technique is widely used in cardiovascular imaging, especially for pulmonary embolism work-up but is now also increasingly developed in the field of abdominal imaging. With dual-energy CT it is possible to obtain virtual unenhanced images from monochromatic reconstructions as well as attenuation maps of different elements, thereby improving detection and characterization of a variety of renal, adrenal, hepatic and pancreatic abnormalities. Also, dual-energy CT can provide information regarding urinary calculi composition. This article reviews and illustrates the different applications of dual-energy CT in routine abdominal imaging. PMID:26993967

  12. Energy efficient hybrid computing systems using spin devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharad, Mrigank

    Emerging spin-devices like magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ's), spin-valves and domain wall magnets (DWM) have opened new avenues for spin-based logic design. This work explored potential computing applications which can exploit such devices for higher energy-efficiency and performance. The proposed applications involve hybrid design schemes, where charge-based devices supplement the spin-devices, to gain large benefits at the system level. As an example, lateral spin valves (LSV) involve switching of nanomagnets using spin-polarized current injection through a metallic channel such as Cu. Such spin-torque based devices possess several interesting properties that can be exploited for ultra-low power computation. Analog characteristic of spin current facilitate non-Boolean computation like majority evaluation that can be used to model a neuron. The magneto-metallic neurons can operate at ultra-low terminal voltage of ˜20mV, thereby resulting in small computation power. Moreover, since nano-magnets inherently act as memory elements, these devices can facilitate integration of logic and memory in interesting ways. The spin based neurons can be integrated with CMOS and other emerging devices leading to different classes of neuromorphic/non-Von-Neumann architectures. The spin-based designs involve `mixed-mode' processing and hence can provide very compact and ultra-low energy solutions for complex computation blocks, both digital as well as analog. Such low-power, hybrid designs can be suitable for various data processing applications like cognitive computing, associative memory, and currentmode on-chip global interconnects. Simulation results for these applications based on device-circuit co-simulation framework predict more than ˜100x improvement in computation energy as compared to state of the art CMOS design, for optimal spin-device parameters.

  13. Requirements for supercomputing in energy research: The transition to massively parallel computing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    This report discusses: The emergence of a practical path to TeraFlop computing and beyond; requirements of energy research programs at DOE; implementation: supercomputer production computing environment on massively parallel computers; and implementation: user transition to massively parallel computing.

  14. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Richard A.; Wasserman, Harvey

    2010-11-24

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the leading scientific computing facility for the Department of Energy's Office of Science, providing high-performance computing (HPC) resources to more than 3,000 researchers working on about 400 projects. NERSC provides large-scale computing resources and, crucially, the support and expertise needed for scientists to make effective use of them. In November 2009, NERSC, DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), and DOE's Office of High Energy Physics (HEP) held a workshop to characterize the HPC resources needed at NERSC to support HEP research through the next three to five years. The effort is part of NERSC's legacy of anticipating users needs and deploying resources to meet those demands. The workshop revealed several key points, in addition to achieving its goal of collecting and characterizing computing requirements. The chief findings: (1) Science teams need access to a significant increase in computational resources to meet their research goals; (2) Research teams need to be able to read, write, transfer, store online, archive, analyze, and share huge volumes of data; (3) Science teams need guidance and support to implement their codes on future architectures; and (4) Projects need predictable, rapid turnaround of their computational jobs to meet mission-critical time constraints. This report expands upon these key points and includes others. It also presents a number of case studies as representative of the research conducted within HEP. Workshop participants were asked to codify their requirements in this case study format, summarizing their science goals, methods of solution, current and three-to-five year computing requirements, and software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel, multi-core environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. The report includes

  15. Publication patterns in HEP computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pia, M. G.; Basaglia, T.; Bell, Z. W.; Dressendorfer, P. V.

    2012-12-01

    An overview of the evolution of computing-oriented publications in high energy physics following the start of operation of LHC. Quantitative analyses are illustrated, which document the production of scholarly papers on computing-related topics by high energy physics experiments and core tools projects, and the citations they receive. Several scientometric indicators are analyzed to characterize the role of computing in high energy physics literature. Distinctive features of software-oriented and hardware-oriented scholarly publications are highlighted. Current patterns and trends are compared to the situation in previous generations’ experiments.

  16. An Atomistic Statistically Effective Energy Function for Computational Protein Design.

    PubMed

    Topham, Christopher M; Barbe, Sophie; André, Isabelle

    2016-08-01

    Shortcomings in the definition of effective free-energy surfaces of proteins are recognized to be a major contributory factor responsible for the low success rates of existing automated methods for computational protein design (CPD). The formulation of an atomistic statistically effective energy function (SEEF) suitable for a wide range of CPD applications and its derivation from structural data extracted from protein domains and protein-ligand complexes are described here. The proposed energy function comprises nonlocal atom-based and local residue-based SEEFs, which are coupled using a novel atom connectivity number factor to scale short-range, pairwise, nonbonded atomic interaction energies and a surface-area-dependent cavity energy term. This energy function was used to derive additional SEEFs describing the unfolded-state ensemble of any given residue sequence based on computed average energies for partially or fully solvent-exposed fragments in regions of irregular structure in native proteins. Relative thermal stabilities of 97 T4 bacteriophage lysozyme mutants were predicted from calculated energy differences for folded and unfolded states with an average unsigned error (AUE) of 0.84 kcal mol(-1) when compared to experiment. To demonstrate the utility of the energy function for CPD, further validation was carried out in tests of its capacity to recover cognate protein sequences and to discriminate native and near-native protein folds, loop conformers, and small-molecule ligand binding poses from non-native benchmark decoys. Experimental ligand binding free energies for a diverse set of 80 protein complexes could be predicted with an AUE of 2.4 kcal mol(-1) using an additional energy term to account for the loss in ligand configurational entropy upon binding. The atomistic SEEF is expected to improve the accuracy of residue-based coarse-grained SEEFs currently used in CPD and to extend the range of applications of extant atom-based protein statistical

  17. Orientation dependences of surface morphologies and energies of iron-gallium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Marcio; Wang, Hui; Hu, Jun; Wu, Ruqian; Na, Suok-Min; Chun, Hyunsuk; Flatau, Alison B.; University of California, Irvine Collaboration; University of Maryland Collaboration

    Magnetostrictive Fe-Ga alloys (Galfenol) are very promising rare-earth free materials for applications in sensors, actuators, energy-harvesters and spintronic devices. Investigation on surface energies of Galfenol based on density functional calculations (DFT) and contact angle measurements may provide fundamental understandings and guidance to further optimize the performance of Galfenol. DFT calculations predict that Ga-covered (110) surface of Galfenol is more stable in Ga-rich condition, while Ga-covered (001) surface of Galfenol surface become more favorable in Ga-poor condition. Moreover, a full Ga overlayer tends to form on top of Gafenol surfaces regardless their orientation, both in agreement with the experimental observation. Further studies on Ga segregation in the Fe bcc matrix demonstrate that the Fe-Ga separation is unlikely to occur since Ga diffusion toward the surface is effectively self-stopped once the Ga overlayers form on the facets. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation through the SUSCHEM-Collaborative Research program (Grant Numbers: DMR-1310494 at UCI and DMR-1310447 at UMD). Work at UCI was also supported by the ONR (Grant Number: N00014-13-1-0445).

  18. Computer simulated building energy consumption for verification of energy conservation measures in network facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plankey, B.

    1981-01-01

    A computer program called ECPVER (Energy Consumption Program - Verification) was developed to simulate all energy loads for any number of buildings. The program computes simulated daily, monthly, and yearly energy consumption which can be compared with actual meter readings for the same time period. Such comparison can lead to validation of the model under a variety of conditions, which allows it to be used to predict future energy saving due to energy conservation measures. Predicted energy saving can then be compared with actual saving to verify the effectiveness of those energy conservation changes. This verification procedure is planned to be an important advancement in the Deep Space Network Energy Project, which seeks to reduce energy cost and consumption at all DSN Deep Space Stations.

  19. Dielectric energy of orientation in dead and living cells of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Fitting of experimental results to a theoretical model.

    PubMed Central

    Asencor, F J; Santamaría, C; Iglesias, F J; Domínguez, A

    1993-01-01

    Using the experimental data obtained with killed cells of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (1), we have formulated a theoretical model that is able to predict cell orientation for microorganisms with ellipsoidal or cylindrical shapes as a function of the frequency of the electric field and of the conductivity of the external medium. In this model, comparison of the difference in potential energy for both orientations parallel-perpendicular with the thermal agitation energy allows one to interpret the intervals where these orientations occur. The model implies that the conductivity of the cytoplasm is slightly higher than that of the external medium. This assumption is easy to understand taking into account that not all the intracytoplasmic material is released to the exterior during cell death. PMID:8324197

  20. Energy consumption program: A computer model simulating energy loads in buildings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoller, F. W.; Lansing, F. L.; Chai, V. W.; Higgins, S.

    1978-01-01

    The JPL energy consumption computer program developed as a useful tool in the on-going building modification studies in the DSN energy conservation project is described. The program simulates building heating and cooling loads and computes thermal and electric energy consumption and cost. The accuracy of computations are not sacrificed, however, since the results lie within + or - 10 percent margin compared to those read from energy meters. The program is carefully structured to reduce both user's time and running cost by asking minimum information from the user and reducing many internal time-consuming computational loops. Many unique features were added to handle two-level electronics control rooms not found in any other program.

  1. Providing a computing environment for a high energy physics workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholls, J.

    1991-03-01

    Although computing facilities have been provided at conferences and workshops remote from the hose institution for some years, the equipment provided has rarely been capable of providing for much more than simple editing and electronic mail over leased lines. This presentation describes the pioneering effort involved by the Computing Department/Division at Fermilab in providing a local computing facility with world-wide networking capability for the Physics at Fermilab in the 1990's workshop held in Breckenridge, Colorado, in August 1989, as well as the enhanced facilities provided for the 1990 Summer Study on High Energy Physics at Snowmass, Colorado, in June/July 1990. Issues discussed include type and sizing of the facilities, advance preparations, shipping, on-site support, as well as an evaluation of the value of the facility to the workshop participants.

  2. Department of Energy: MICS (Mathematical Information, and Computational Sciences Division). High performance computing and communications program

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    This document is intended to serve two purposes. Its first purpose is that of a program status report of the considerable progress that the Department of Energy (DOE) has made since 1993, the time of the last such report (DOE/ER-0536, {open_quotes}The DOE Program in HPCC{close_quotes}), toward achieving the goals of the High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program. The second purpose is that of a summary report of the many research programs administered by the Mathematical, Information, and Computational Sciences (MICS) Division of the Office of Energy Research under the auspices of the HPCC Program and to provide, wherever relevant, easy access to pertinent information about MICS-Division activities via universal resource locators (URLs) on the World Wide Web (WWW). The information pointed to by the URL is updated frequently, and the interested reader is urged to access the WWW for the latest information.

  3. Department of Energy Mathematical, Information, and Computational Sciences Division: High Performance Computing and Communications Program

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    This document is intended to serve two purposes. Its first purpose is that of a program status report of the considerable progress that the Department of Energy (DOE) has made since 1993, the time of the last such report (DOE/ER-0536, The DOE Program in HPCC), toward achieving the goals of the High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program. The second purpose is that of a summary report of the many research programs administered by the Mathematical, Information, and Computational Sciences (MICS) Division of the Office of Energy Research under the auspices of the HPCC Program and to provide, wherever relevant, easy access to pertinent information about MICS-Division activities via universal resource locators (URLs) on the World Wide Web (WWW).

  4. Approximating ground and excited state energies on a quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadfield, Stuart; Papageorgiou, Anargyros

    2015-04-01

    Approximating ground and a fixed number of excited state energies, or equivalently low-order Hamiltonian eigenvalues, is an important but computationally hard problem. Typically, the cost of classical deterministic algorithms grows exponentially with the number of degrees of freedom. Under general conditions, and using a perturbation approach, we provide a quantum algorithm that produces estimates of a constant number of different low-order eigenvalues. The algorithm relies on a set of trial eigenvectors, whose construction depends on the particular Hamiltonian properties. We illustrate our results by considering a special case of the time-independent Schrödinger equation with degrees of freedom. Our algorithm computes estimates of a constant number of different low-order eigenvalues with error and success probability at least , with cost polynomial in and . This extends our earlier results on algorithms for estimating the ground state energy. The technique we present is sufficiently general to apply to problems beyond the application studied in this paper.

  5. Massive affordable computing using ARM processors in high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. W.; Hamilton, A.

    2015-05-01

    High Performance Computing is relevant in many applications around the world, particularly high energy physics. Experiments such as ATLAS, CMS, ALICE and LHCb generate huge amounts of data which need to be stored and analyzed at server farms located on site at CERN and around the world. Apart from the initial cost of setting up an effective server farm the cost of power consumption and cooling are significant. The proposed solution to reduce costs without losing performance is to make use of ARM® processors found in nearly all smartphones and tablet computers. Their low power consumption, low cost and respectable processing speed makes them an interesting choice for future large scale parallel data processing centers. Benchmarks on the CortexTM-A series of ARM® processors including the HPL and PMBW suites will be presented as well as preliminary results from the PROOF benchmark in the context of high energy physics will be analyzed.

  6. Energy Proportionality and Performance in Data Parallel Computing Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jinoh; Chou, Jerry; Rotem, Doron

    2011-02-14

    Energy consumption in datacenters has recently become a major concern due to the rising operational costs andscalability issues. Recent solutions to this problem propose the principle of energy proportionality, i.e., the amount of energy consumedby the server nodes must be proportional to the amount of work performed. For data parallelism and fault tolerancepurposes, most common file systems used in MapReduce-type clusters maintain a set of replicas for each data block. A coveringset is a group of nodes that together contain at least one replica of the data blocks needed for performing computing tasks. In thiswork, we develop and analyze algorithms to maintain energy proportionality by discovering a covering set that minimizesenergy consumption while placing the remaining nodes in lowpower standby mode. Our algorithms can also discover coveringsets in heterogeneous computing environments. In order to allow more data parallelism, we generalize our algorithms so that itcan discover k-covering sets, i.e., a set of nodes that contain at least k replicas of the data blocks. Our experimental results showthat we can achieve substantial energy saving without significant performance loss in diverse cluster configurations and workingenvironments.

  7. IR Spectra and Bond Energies Computed Using DFT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles; Andrews, Lester; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The combination of density functional theory (DFT) frequencies and infrared (IR) intensities and experimental spectra is a very powerful tool in the identification of molecules and ions. The computed and measured isotopic ratios make the identification much more secure than frequencies and intensities alone. This will be illustrated using several examples, such as Mn(CO)n and Mn(CO)n-. The accuracy of DFT metal-ligand bond energies will also be discussed.

  8. Thrifty: An Exascale Architecture for Energy Proportional Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Torrellas, Josep

    2014-12-23

    The objective of this project is to design key aspects of an exascale architecture called Thrifty that addresses the challenges of power/energy efficiency, resiliency, and performance in exascale systems. The project includes work on computer architecture (Josep Torrellas from University of Illinois), compilation (Daniel Quinlan from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory), runtime and applications (Laura Carrington from University of California San Diego), and circuits (Wilfred Pinfold from Intel Corporation).

  9. KEYNOTE: Simulation, computation, and the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, Victor, Dr.

    2006-01-01

    Dr. Victor Reis delivered the keynote talk at the closing session of the conference. The talk was forward looking and focused on the importance of advanced computing for large-scale nuclear energy goals such as Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). Dr. Reis discussed the important connections of GNEP to the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program and the SciDAC research portfolio. In the context of GNEP, Dr. Reis talked about possible fuel leasing configurations, strategies for their implementation, and typical fuel cycle flow sheets. A major portion of the talk addressed lessons learnt from ‘Science Based Stockpile Stewardship’ and the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) initiative and how they can provide guidance for advancing GNEP and SciDAC goals. Dr. Reis’s colorful and informative presentation included international proverbs, quotes and comments, in tune with the international flavor that is part of the GNEP philosophy and plan. He concluded with a positive and motivating outlook for peaceful nuclear energy and its potential to solve global problems. An interview with Dr. Reis, addressing some of the above issues, is the cover story of Issue 2 of the SciDAC Review and available at http://www.scidacreview.org This summary of Dr. Reis’s PowerPoint presentation was prepared by Institute of Physics Publishing, the complete PowerPoint version of Dr. Reis’s talk at SciDAC 2006 is given as a multimedia attachment to this summary.

  10. Crystallographic preferred orientations may develop in nanocrystalline materials on fault planes due to surface energy interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toy, Virginia G.; Mitchell, Thomas M.; Druiventak, Anthony; Wirth, Richard

    2015-09-01

    A layer of substantially noncrystalline material, composed of partially annealed nanopowder with local melt, was experimentally generated by comminution during ˜1.5 mm total slip at ˜2.5 × 10-6 m s-1, Pconf ˜ 0.5 GPa, and 450°C or 600°C, on saw cut surfaces in novaculite. The partially annealed nanopowder comprises angular grains mostly 5-200 nm diameter in a variably dense packing arrangement. A sharp transition from wall rock to partially annealed nanopowder illustrates that the nanopowder effectively localizes shear, consistent with generation of nanoparticles during initial fragmentation, not by progressive grain size reduction. Dislocation densities in nanopowder grains or immediate wall rock are not significantly high, but there are planar plastic defects spaced at 5-200 nm parallel to the host quartz grain's basal plane. We propose these plastic defects developed into through-going fractures to generate nanocrystals. The partially annealed nanopowder has a crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) that we hypothesize developed due to surface energy interactions to maximize coincident site lattices (CSL) during annealing. This mechanism may also have generated CPOs recently described in micro/nanocrystalline calcite fault gouges.

  11. Energy and time determine scaling in biological and computer designs.

    PubMed

    Moses, Melanie; Bezerra, George; Edwards, Benjamin; Brown, James; Forrest, Stephanie

    2016-08-19

    Metabolic rate in animals and power consumption in computers are analogous quantities that scale similarly with size. We analyse vascular systems of mammals and on-chip networks of microprocessors, where natural selection and human engineering, respectively, have produced systems that minimize both energy dissipation and delivery times. Using a simple network model that simultaneously minimizes energy and time, our analysis explains empirically observed trends in the scaling of metabolic rate in mammals and power consumption and performance in microprocessors across several orders of magnitude in size. Just as the evolutionary transitions from unicellular to multicellular animals in biology are associated with shifts in metabolic scaling, our model suggests that the scaling of power and performance will change as computer designs transition to decentralized multi-core and distributed cyber-physical systems. More generally, a single energy-time minimization principle may govern the design of many complex systems that process energy, materials and information.This article is part of the themed issue 'The major synthetic evolutionary transitions'. PMID:27431524

  12. New developments in the multiscale hybrid energy density computational method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Sun; Shanying, Wang; Dianwu, Wang; Chongyu, Wang

    2016-01-01

    Further developments in the hybrid multiscale energy density method are proposed on the basis of our previous papers. The key points are as follows. (i) The theoretical method for the determination of the weight parameter in the energy coupling equation of transition region in multiscale model is given via constructing underdetermined equations. (ii) By applying the developed mathematical method, the weight parameters have been given and used to treat some problems in homogeneous charge density systems, which are directly related with multiscale science. (iii) A theoretical algorithm has also been presented for treating non-homogeneous systems of charge density. The key to the theoretical computational methods is the decomposition of the electrostatic energy in the total energy of density functional theory for probing the spanning characteristic at atomic scale, layer by layer, by which the choice of chemical elements and the defect complex effect can be understood deeply. (iv) The numerical computational program and design have also been presented. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB606402) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51071091).

  13. Preferred orientation in carbon and boron nitride: Does a thermodynamic theory of elastic strain energy get it right. [C; BN

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, K.F. )

    1999-09-01

    We address whether the elastic strain-energy theory (minimizing the Gibbs energy of a stressed crystal) of McKenzie and co-workers [D. R. McKenzie and M. M. M. Bilek, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A [bold 16], 2733 (1998)] adequately explains the preferred orientation observed in carbon and BN films. In the formalism, the Gibbs energy of the cubic materials diamond and cubic boron includes the strain that occurs when the phases form, through specific structural transformations, from graphitic precursors. This treatment violates the requirement of thermodynamics that the Gibbs energy be a path-independent, state function. If the cubic phases are treated using the same (path-independent) formalism applied to the graphitic materials, the crystallographic orientation of lowest Gibbs energy is not that observed experimentally. For graphitic (hexagonal) carbon and BN, an elastic strain approach seems inappropriate because the compressive stresses in energetically deposited films are orders of magnitude higher than the elastic limit of the materials. Furthermore, using the known elastic constants of either ordered or disordered graphitic materials, the theory does not predict the orientation observed by experiment. [copyright] [ital 1999 American Vacuum Society.

  14. Computing at the leading edge: Research in the energy sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Mirin, A.A.; Van Dyke, P.T.

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this publication is to highlight selected scientific challenges that have been undertaken by the DOE Energy Research community. The high quality of the research reflected in these contributions underscores the growing importance both to the Grand Challenge scientific efforts sponsored by DOE and of the related supporting technologies that the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC) and other facilities are able to provide. The continued improvement of the computing resources available to DOE scientists is prerequisite to ensuring their future progress in solving the Grand Challenges. Titles of articles included in this publication include: the numerical tokamak project; static and animated molecular views of a tumorigenic chemical bound to DNA; toward a high-performance climate systems model; modeling molecular processes in the environment; lattice Boltzmann models for flow in porous media; parallel algorithms for modeling superconductors; parallel computing at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory; the advanced combustion modeling environment; adaptive methodologies for computational fluid dynamics; lattice simulations of quantum chromodynamics; simulating high-intensity charged-particle beams for the design of high-power accelerators; electronic structure and phase stability of random alloys.

  15. Energy-resolved computed tomography: first experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.

    2008-10-01

    First experimental results with energy-resolved computed tomography (CT) are reported. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in CT has been improved with x-ray energy weighting for the first time. Further, x-ray energy weighting improved the CNR in material decomposition CT when applied to CT projections prior to dual-energy subtraction. The existing CT systems use an energy (charge) integrating x-ray detector that provides a signal proportional to the energy of the x-ray photon. Thus, the x-ray photons with lower energies are scored less than those with higher energies. This underestimates contribution of lower energy photons that would provide higher contrast. The highest CNR can be achieved if the x-ray photons are scored by a factor that would increase as the x-ray energy decreases. This could be performed by detecting each x-ray photon separately and measuring its energy. The energy selective CT data could then be saved, and any weighting factor could be applied digitally to a detected x-ray photon. The CT system includes a photon counting detector with linear arrays of pixels made from cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) semiconductor. A cylindrical phantom with 10.2 cm diameter made from tissue-equivalent material was used for CT imaging. The phantom included contrast elements representing calcifications, iodine, adipose and glandular tissue. The x-ray tube voltage was 120 kVp. The energy selective CT data were acquired, and used to generate energy-weighted and material-selective CT images. The energy-weighted and material decomposition CT images were generated using a single CT scan at a fixed x-ray tube voltage. For material decomposition the x-ray spectrum was digitally spilt into low- and high-energy parts and dual-energy subtraction was applied. The x-ray energy weighting resulted in CNR improvement of calcifications and iodine by a factor of 1.40 and 1.63, respectively, as compared to conventional charge integrating CT. The x-ray energy weighting was also applied

  16. EDITORIAL: Optical orientation Optical orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SAME ADDRESS *, Yuri; Landwehr, Gottfried

    2008-11-01

    priority of the discovery in the literature, which was partly caused by the existence of the Iron Curtain. I had already enjoyed contact with Boris in the 1980s when the two volumes of Landau Level Spectroscopy were being prepared [2]. He was one of the pioneers of magneto-optics in semiconductors. In the 1950s the band structure of germanium and silicon was investigated by magneto-optical methods, mainly in the United States. No excitonic effects were observed and the band structure parameters were determined without taking account of excitons. However, working with cuprous oxide, which is a direct semiconductor with a relative large energy gap, Zakharchenya and his co-worker Seysan showed that in order to obtain correct band structure parameters, it is necessary to take excitons into account [3]. About 1970 Boris started work on optical orientation. Early work by Hanle in Germany in the 1920s on the depolarization of luminescence in mercury vapour by a transverse magnetic field was not appreciated for a long time. Only in the late 1940s did Kastler and co-workers in Paris begin a systematic study of optical pumping, which led to the award of a Nobel prize. The ideas of optical pumping were first applied by Georges Lampel to solid state physics in 1968. He demonstrated optical orientation of free carriers in silicon. The detection method was nuclear magnetic resonance; optically oriented free electrons dynamically polarized the 29Si nuclei of the host lattice. The first optical detection of spin orientation was demonstrated by with the III-V semiconductor GaSb by Parsons. Due to the various interaction mechanisms of spins with their environment, the effects occurring in semiconductors are naturally more complex than those in atoms. Optical detection is now the preferred method to detect spin alignment in semiconductors. The orientation of spins in crystals pumped with circularly polarized light is deduced from the degree of circular polarization of the recombination

  17. Exascale for Energy: The Role of Exascale Computing in Energy Security

    SciTech Connect

    Authors, Various

    2010-07-15

    How will the United States satisfy energy demand in a tightening global energy marketplace while, at the same time, reducing greenhouse gas emissions? Exascale computing -- expected to be available within the next eight to ten years ? may play a crucial role in answering that question by enabling a paradigm shift from test-based to science-based design and engineering. Computational modeling of complete power generation systems and engines, based on scientific first principles, will accelerate the improvement of existing energy technologies and the development of new transformational technologies by pre-selecting the designs most likely to be successful for experimental validation, rather than relying on trial and error. The predictive understanding of complex engineered systems made possible by computational modeling will also reduce the construction and operations costs, optimize performance, and improve safety. Exascale computing will make possible fundamentally new approaches to quantifying the uncertainty of safety and performance engineering. This report discusses potential contributions of exa-scale modeling in four areas of energy production and distribution: nuclear power, combustion, the electrical grid, and renewable sources of energy, which include hydrogen fuel, bioenergy conversion, photovoltaic solar energy, and wind turbines. Examples of current research are taken from projects funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science at universities and national laboratories, with a special focus on research conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  18. Vertically Oriented Arrays of ReS2 Nanosheets for Electrochemical Energy Storage and Electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian; Li, Lu; Tan, Jiawei; Sun, Hao; Li, Baichang; Idrobo, Juan Carlos; Singh, Chandra Veer; Lu, Toh-Ming; Koratkar, Nikhil

    2016-06-01

    Transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMD) nanolayers show potential as high-performance catalysts in energy conversion and storage devices. Synthetic TMDs produced by chemical-vapor deposition (CVD) methods tend to grow parallel to the growth substrate. Here, we show that with the right precursors and appropriate tuning of the CVD growth conditions, ReS2 nanosheets can be made to orient perpendicular to the growth substrate. This accomplishes two important objectives; first, it drastically increases the wetted or exposed surface area of the ReS2 sheets, and second, it exposes the sharp edges and corners of the ReS2 sheets. We show that these structural features of the vertically grown ReS2 sheets can be exploited to significantly improve their performance as polysulfide immobilizers and electrochemical catalysts in lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries and in hydrogen evolution reactions (HER). After 300 cycles, the specific capacity of the Li-S battery with vertical ReS2 catalyst is retained above 750 mA h g(-1), with only ∼0.063% capacity decay per cycle, much better than the baseline battery (without ReS2), which shows ∼0.184% capacity decay per cycle under the same test conditions. As a HER catalyst, the vertical ReS2 provides very small onset overpotential (<100 mV) and an exceptional exchange-current density (∼67.6 μA/cm(2)), which is vastly superior to the baseline electrode without ReS2. PMID:27187173

  19. Computational predictions of energy materials using density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Anubhav; Shin, Yongwoo; Persson, Kristin A.

    2016-01-01

    In the search for new functional materials, quantum mechanics is an exciting starting point. The fundamental laws that govern the behaviour of electrons have the possibility, at the other end of the scale, to predict the performance of a material for a targeted application. In some cases, this is achievable using density functional theory (DFT). In this Review, we highlight DFT studies predicting energy-related materials that were subsequently confirmed experimentally. The attributes and limitations of DFT for the computational design of materials for lithium-ion batteries, hydrogen production and storage materials, superconductors, photovoltaics and thermoelectric materials are discussed. In the future, we expect that the accuracy of DFT-based methods will continue to improve and that growth in computing power will enable millions of materials to be virtually screened for specific applications. Thus, these examples represent a first glimpse of what may become a routine and integral step in materials discovery.

  20. Dictionary-based image denoising for dual energy computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechlem, Korbinian; Allner, Sebastian; Mei, Kai; Pfeiffer, Franz; Noël, Peter B.

    2016-03-01

    Compared to conventional computed tomography (CT), dual energy CT allows for improved material decomposition by conducting measurements at two distinct energy spectra. Since radiation exposure is a major concern in clinical CT, there is a need for tools to reduce the noise level in images while preserving diagnostic information. One way to achieve this goal is the application of image-based denoising algorithms after an analytical reconstruction has been performed. We have developed a modified dictionary denoising algorithm for dual energy CT aimed at exploiting the high spatial correlation between between images obtained from different energy spectra. Both the low-and high energy image are partitioned into small patches which are subsequently normalized. Combined patches with improved signal-to-noise ratio are formed by a weighted addition of corresponding normalized patches from both images. Assuming that corresponding low-and high energy image patches are related by a linear transformation, the signal in both patches is added coherently while noise is neglected. Conventional dictionary denoising is then performed on the combined patches. Compared to conventional dictionary denoising and bilateral filtering, our algorithm achieved superior performance in terms of qualitative and quantitative image quality measures. We demonstrate, in simulation studies, that this approach can produce 2d-histograms of the high- and low-energy reconstruction which are characterized by significantly improved material features and separation. Moreover, in comparison to other approaches that attempt denoising without simultaneously using both energy signals, superior similarity to the ground truth can be found with our proposed algorithm.

  1. Single-exposure dual-energy computed radiography.

    PubMed

    Stewart, B K; Huang, H K

    1990-01-01

    This paper focuses on analysis and development of a single-exposure dual-energy digital radiographic method using computed radiography (Fuji FCR-101 storage phosphor system). A detector sandwich consisting of storage phosphor imaging plates and an interdetector filter is used. The goal of this process is to provide a simple dual-energy method using typical plane-projection radiographic equipment and techniques. This approach exploits the transparency of the storage phosphor plates, using radiographic information that would be otherwise lost, to provide energy selective information essentially as a by-product of the radiographic examination. In order to effectively make use of the large dynamic range of the storage phosphor imaging plates (10,000:1), a computed radiography image reading mode of fixed analog-to-digital converter gain and variable photomultiplier sensitivity provides image data which can be related to relative incident exposure for export to the decomposition algorithm. Scatter rejection requirements necessitated crossed 12:1 grids for a field size of 36 x 36 cm. Optimal technique parameters obtained from computer simulation through minimization of the aluminum and Plexiglas equivalent image uncertainty under conditions of constant absorbed does resulted as: 100 kVp using a 0.15-mm-thick tin (Sn) interdetector filter for the lung field. This yields a surface exposure of 23 mR and a surface absorbed dose of 0.26 mGy for a 23-cm-thick chest. Clinical application in evaluation of the solitary pulmonary nodule is discussed, along with an image set demonstrating this application. PMID:2233574

  2. Computing model independent perturbations in dark energy and modified gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Battye, Richard A.; Pearson, Jonathan A. E-mail: jonathan.pearson@durham.ac.uk

    2014-03-01

    We present a methodology for computing model independent perturbations in dark energy and modified gravity. This is done from the Lagrangian for perturbations, by showing how field content, symmetries, and physical principles are often sufficient ingredients for closing the set of perturbed fluid equations. The fluid equations close once ''equations of state for perturbations'' are identified: these are linear combinations of fluid and metric perturbations which construct gauge invariant entropy and anisotropic stress perturbations for broad classes of theories. Our main results are the proof of the equation of state for perturbations presented in a previous paper, and the development of the required calculational tools.

  3. PRaVDA: High Energy Physics towards proton Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, T.

    2016-07-01

    Proton radiotherapy is an increasingly popular modality for treating cancers of the head and neck, and in paediatrics. To maximise the potential of proton radiotherapy it is essential to know the distribution, and more importantly the proton stopping powers, of the body tissues between the proton beam and the tumour. A stopping power map could be measured directly, and uncertainties in the treatment vastly reduce, if the patient was imaged with protons instead of conventional x-rays. Here we outline the application of technologies developed for High Energy Physics to provide clinical-quality proton Computed Tomography, in so reducing range uncertainties and enhancing the treatment of cancer.

  4. Electrolytes induce long-range orientational order and free energy changes in the H-bond network of bulk water

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yixing; Okur, Halil I.; Gomopoulos, Nikolaos; Macias-Romero, Carlos; Cremer, Paul S.; Petersen, Poul B.; Tocci, Gabriele; Wilkins, David M.; Liang, Chungwen; Ceriotti, Michele; Roke, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Electrolytes interact with water in many ways: changing dipole orientation, inducing charge transfer, and distorting the hydrogen-bond network in the bulk and at interfaces. Numerous experiments and computations have detected short-range perturbations that extend up to three hydration shells around individual ions. We report a multiscale investigation of the bulk and surface of aqueous electrolyte solutions that extends from the atomic scale (using atomistic modeling) to nanoscopic length scales (using bulk and interfacial femtosecond second harmonic measurements) to the macroscopic scale (using surface tension experiments). Electrolytes induce orientational order at concentrations starting at 10 μM that causes nonspecific changes in the surface tension of dilute electrolyte solutions. Aside from ion-dipole interactions, collective hydrogen-bond interactions are crucial and explain the observed difference of a factor of 6 between light water and heavy water. PMID:27152357

  5. Study of the orientation and energy partition of three-jet events in hadronic Z0 decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Abe, K.; Abt, I.; Akagi, T.; Allen, N. J.; Ash, W. W.; Aston, D.; Baird, K. G.; Baltay, C.; Band, H. R.; Barakat, M. B.; Baranko, G.; Bardon, O.; Barklow, T.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Bazarko, A. O.; Ben-David, R.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bilei, G. M.; Bisello, D.; Blaylock, G.; Bogart, J. R.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G. R.; Brau, J. E.; Breidenbach, M.; Bugg, W. M.; Burke, D.; Burnett, T. H.; Burrows, P. N.; Busza, W.; Calcaterra, A.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calloway, D.; Camanzi, B.; Carpinelli, M.; Cassell, R.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Chou, A.; Church, E.; Cohn, H. O.; Coller, J. A.; Cook, V.; Cotton, R.; Cowan, R. F.; Coyne, D. G.; Crawford, G.; D'oliveira, A.; Damerell, C. J.; Daoudi, M.; de Sangro, R.; de Simone, P.; dell'orso, R.; Dervan, P. J.; Dima, M.; Dong, D. N.; Du, P. Y.; Dubois, R.; Eisenstein, B. I.; Elia, R.; Etzion, E.; Falciai, D.; Fan, C.; Fero, M. J.; Frey, R.; Furuno, K.; Gillman, T.; Gladding, G.; Gonzalez, S.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hart, E. L.; Hasan, A.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasuko, K.; Hedges, S.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Hildreth, M. D.; Huber, J.; Huffer, M. E.; Hughes, E. W.; Hwang, H.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jackson, D. J.; Jacques, P.; Jaros, J.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, J. R.; Johnson, R. A.; Junk, T.; Kajikawa, R.; Kalelkar, M.; Kang, H. J.; Karliner, I.; Kawahara, H.; Kendall, H. W.; Kim, Y.; King, M. E.; King, R.; Kofler, R. R.; Krishna, N. M.; Kroeger, R. S.; Labs, J. F.; Langston, M.; Lath, A.; Lauber, J. A.; Leith, D. W.; Lia, V.; Liu, M. X.; Liu, X.; Loreti, M.; Lu, A.; Lynch, H. L.; Ma, J.; Mancinelli, G.; Manly, S.; Mantovani, G.; Markiewicz, T. W.; Maruyama, T.; Massetti, R.; Masuda, H.; Mazzucato, E.; McKemey, A. K.; Meadows, B. T.; Messner, R.; Mockett, P. M.; Moffeit, K. C.; Mours, B.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Narita, S.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Nussbaum, M.; Ohnishi, Y.; Osborne, L. S.; Panvini, R. S.; Park, H.; Pavel, T. J.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Piemontese, L.; Pieroni, E.; Pitts, K. T.; Plano, R. J.; Prepost, R.; Prescott, C. Y.; Punkar, G. D.; Quigley, J.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Reeves, T. W.; Reidy, J.; Rensing, P. E.; Rizzo, T. G.; Rochester, L. S.; Rowson, P. C.; Russell, J. J.; Saxton, O. H.; Schalk, T.; Schindler, R. H.; Schumm, B. A.; Sen, S.; Serbo, V. V.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, G.; Sherden, D. J.; Shmakov, K. D.; Simopoulos, C.; Sinev, N. B.; Smith, S. R.; Snyder, J. A.; Stamer, P.; Steiner, H.; Steiner, R.; Strauss, M. G.; Su, D.; Suekane, F.; Sugiyama, A.; Suzuki, S.; Swartz, M.; Szumilo, A.; Takahashi, T.; Taylor, F. E.; Torrence, E.; Trandafir, A. I.; Turk, J. D.; Usher, T.; Va'vra, J.; Vannini, C.; Vella, E.; Venuti, J. P.; Verdier, R.; Verdini, P. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Waite, A. P.; Watts, S. J.; Weidemann, A. W.; Weiss, E. R.; Whitaker, J. S.; White, S. L.; Wickens, F. J.; Williams, D. A.; Williams, D. C.; Williams, S. H.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, R. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Woods, M.; Word, G. B.; Wyss, J.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Yamartino, J. M.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S. J.; Young, C. C.; Yuta, H.; Zapalac, G.; Zdarko, R. W.; Zeitlin, C.; Zhou, J.

    1997-03-01

    We have measured the distributions of the jet energies in e+e--->qq¯g events, and of the three orientation angles of the event plane, using hadronic Z0 decays collected in the SLD experiment at SLAC. We find that the data are well described by perturbative QCD incorporating vector gluons. We have also studied models of scalar and tensor gluon production and find them to be incompatible with our data.

  6. Computed Potential Energy Surfaces and Minimum Energy Pathway for Chemical Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Langhoff, S. R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Computed potential energy surfaces are often required for computation of such observables as rate constants as a function of temperature, product branching ratios, and other detailed properties. We have found that computation of the stationary points/reaction pathways using CASSCF/derivative methods, followed by use of the internally contracted CI method with the Dunning correlation consistent basis sets to obtain accurate energetics, gives useful results for a number of chemically important systems. Applications to complex reactions leading to NO and soot formation in hydrocarbon combustion are discussed.

  7. Computational design of RNAs with complex energy landscapes.

    PubMed

    Höner zu Siederdissen, Christian; Hammer, Stefan; Abfalter, Ingrid; Hofacker, Ivo L; Flamm, Christoph; Stadler, Peter F

    2013-12-01

    RNA has become an integral building material in synthetic biology. Dominated by their secondary structures, which can be computed efficiently, RNA molecules are amenable not only to in vitro and in vivo selection, but also to rational, computation-based design. While the inverse folding problem of constructing an RNA sequence with a prescribed ground-state structure has received considerable attention for nearly two decades, there have been few efforts to design RNAs that can switch between distinct prescribed conformations. We introduce a user-friendly tool for designing RNA sequences that fold into multiple target structures. The underlying algorithm makes use of a combination of graph coloring and heuristic local optimization to find sequences whose energy landscapes are dominated by the prescribed conformations. A flexible interface allows the specification of a wide range of design goals. We demonstrate that bi- and tri-stable "switches" can be designed easily with moderate computational effort for the vast majority of compatible combinations of desired target structures. RNAdesign is freely available under the GPL-v3 license. PMID:23818234

  8. Energy Conservation Using Dynamic Voltage Frequency Scaling for Computational Cloud.

    PubMed

    Florence, A Paulin; Shanthi, V; Simon, C B Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Cloud computing is a new technology which supports resource sharing on a "Pay as you go" basis around the world. It provides various services such as SaaS, IaaS, and PaaS. Computation is a part of IaaS and the entire computational requests are to be served efficiently with optimal power utilization in the cloud. Recently, various algorithms are developed to reduce power consumption and even Dynamic Voltage and Frequency Scaling (DVFS) scheme is also used in this perspective. In this paper we have devised methodology which analyzes the behavior of the given cloud request and identifies the associated type of algorithm. Once the type of algorithm is identified, using their asymptotic notations, its time complexity is calculated. Using best fit strategy the appropriate host is identified and the incoming job is allocated to the victimized host. Using the measured time complexity the required clock frequency of the host is measured. According to that CPU frequency is scaled up or down using DVFS scheme, enabling energy to be saved up to 55% of total Watts consumption. PMID:27239551

  9. Energy Conservation Using Dynamic Voltage Frequency Scaling for Computational Cloud

    PubMed Central

    Florence, A. Paulin; Shanthi, V.; Simon, C. B. Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Cloud computing is a new technology which supports resource sharing on a “Pay as you go” basis around the world. It provides various services such as SaaS, IaaS, and PaaS. Computation is a part of IaaS and the entire computational requests are to be served efficiently with optimal power utilization in the cloud. Recently, various algorithms are developed to reduce power consumption and even Dynamic Voltage and Frequency Scaling (DVFS) scheme is also used in this perspective. In this paper we have devised methodology which analyzes the behavior of the given cloud request and identifies the associated type of algorithm. Once the type of algorithm is identified, using their asymptotic notations, its time complexity is calculated. Using best fit strategy the appropriate host is identified and the incoming job is allocated to the victimized host. Using the measured time complexity the required clock frequency of the host is measured. According to that CPU frequency is scaled up or down using DVFS scheme, enabling energy to be saved up to 55% of total Watts consumption. PMID:27239551

  10. Analyzing high energy physics data using database computing: Preliminary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baden, Andrew; Day, Chris; Grossman, Robert; Lifka, Dave; Lusk, Ewing; May, Edward; Price, Larry

    1991-01-01

    A proof of concept system is described for analyzing high energy physics (HEP) data using data base computing. The system is designed to scale up to the size required for HEP experiments at the Superconducting SuperCollider (SSC) lab. These experiments will require collecting and analyzing approximately 10 to 100 million 'events' per year during proton colliding beam collisions. Each 'event' consists of a set of vectors with a total length of approx. one megabyte. This represents an increase of approx. 2 to 3 orders of magnitude in the amount of data accumulated by present HEP experiments. The system is called the HEPDBC System (High Energy Physics Database Computing System). At present, the Mark 0 HEPDBC System is completed, and can produce analysis of HEP experimental data approx. an order of magnitude faster than current production software on data sets of approx. 1 GB. The Mark 1 HEPDBC System is currently undergoing testing and is designed to analyze data sets 10 to 100 times larger.

  11. Computer simulations of glasses: the potential energy landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Zamaan; Alling, Björn; Abrikosov, Igor A.

    2015-07-01

    We review the current state of research on glasses, discussing the theoretical background and computational models employed to describe them. This article focuses on the use of the potential energy landscape (PEL) paradigm to account for the phenomenology of glassy systems, and the way in which it can be applied in simulations and the interpretation of their results. This article provides a broad overview of the rich phenomenology of glasses, followed by a summary of the theoretical frameworks developed to describe this phenomonology. We discuss the background of the PEL in detail, the onerous task of how to generate computer models of glasses, various methods of analysing numerical simulations, and the literature on the most commonly used model systems. Finally, we tackle the problem of how to distinguish a good glass former from a good crystal former from an analysis of the PEL. In summarising the state of the potential energy landscape picture, we develop the foundations for new theoretical methods that allow the ab initio prediction of the glass-forming ability of new materials by analysis of the PEL.

  12. Computer simulations of glasses: the potential energy landscape.

    PubMed

    Raza, Zamaan; Alling, Björn; Abrikosov, Igor A

    2015-07-29

    We review the current state of research on glasses, discussing the theoretical background and computational models employed to describe them. This article focuses on the use of the potential energy landscape (PEL) paradigm to account for the phenomenology of glassy systems, and the way in which it can be applied in simulations and the interpretation of their results. This article provides a broad overview of the rich phenomenology of glasses, followed by a summary of the theoretical frameworks developed to describe this phenomonology. We discuss the background of the PEL in detail, the onerous task of how to generate computer models of glasses, various methods of analysing numerical simulations, and the literature on the most commonly used model systems. Finally, we tackle the problem of how to distinguish a good glass former from a good crystal former from an analysis of the PEL. In summarising the state of the potential energy landscape picture, we develop the foundations for new theoretical methods that allow the ab initio prediction of the glass-forming ability of new materials by analysis of the PEL. PMID:26139691

  13. Computational assessment of several hydrogen-free high energy compounds.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bisheng; Huang, Ming; Long, Xinping; Li, Jinshan; Fan, Guijuan

    2016-01-01

    Tetrazino-tetrazine-tetraoxide (TTTO) is an attractive high energy compound, but unfortunately, it is not yet experimentally synthesized so far. Isomerization of TTTO leads to its five isomers, bond-separation energies were empolyed to compare the global stability of six compounds, it is found that isomer 1 has the highest bond-separation energy (1204.6kJ/mol), compared with TTTO (1151.2kJ/mol); thermodynamic properties of six compounds were theoretically calculated, including standard formation enthalpies (solid and gaseous), standard fusion enthalpies, standard vaporation enthalpies, standard sublimation enthalpies, lattice energies and normal melting points, normal boiling points; their detonation performances were also computed, including detonation heat (Q, cal/g), detonation velocity (D, km/s), detonation pressure (P, GPa) and impact sensitivity (h50, cm), compared with TTTO (Q=1311.01J/g, D=9.228km/s, P=40.556GPa, h50=12.7cm), isomer 5 exhibites better detonation performances (Q=1523.74J/g, D=9.389km/s, P=41.329GPa, h50= 28.4cm). PMID:26705845

  14. Aiding Design of Wave Energy Converters via Computational Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jebeli Aqdam, Hejar; Ahmadi, Babak; Raessi, Mehdi; Tootkaboni, Mazdak

    2015-11-01

    With the increasing interest in renewable energy sources, wave energy converters will continue to gain attention as a viable alternative to current electricity production methods. It is therefore crucial to develop computational tools for the design and analysis of wave energy converters. A successful design requires balance between the design performance and cost. Here an analytical solution is used for the approximate analysis of interactions between a flap-type wave energy converter (WEC) and waves. The method is verified using other flow solvers and experimental test cases. Then the model is used in conjunction with a powerful heuristic optimization engine, Charged System Search (CSS) to explore the WEC design space. CSS is inspired by charged particles behavior. It searches the design space by considering candidate answers as charged particles and moving them based on the Coulomb's laws of electrostatics and Newton's laws of motion to find the global optimum. Finally the impacts of changes in different design parameters on the power takeout of the superior WEC designs are investigated. National Science Foundation, CBET-1236462.

  15. Orientational Coherent Effects of High-Energy Particles in a LiNbO3 Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagli, E.; Guidi, V.; Mazzolari, A.; Bandiera, L.; Germogli, G.; Sytov, A. I.; De Salvador, D.; Argiolas, A.; Bazzan, M.; Carnera, A.; Berra, A.; Bolognini, D.; Lietti, D.; Prest, M.; Vallazza, E.

    2015-07-01

    A bent lithium niobate strip was exposed to a 400 -GeV /c proton beam at the external lines of CERN Super Proton Synchrotron to probe its capabilities versus coherent interactions of the particles with the crystal such as channeling and volume reflection. Lithium niobate (LiNbO3 ) exhibits an interplanar electric field comparable to that of Silicon (Si) and remarkable piezoelectric properties, which could be exploited for the realization of piezo-actuated devices for the control of high-energy particle beams. In contrast to Si and germanium (Ge), LiNbO3 shows an intriguing effect; in spite of a low channeling efficiency (3%), the volume reflection maintains a high deflection efficiency (83%). Such discrepancy was ascribed to the high concentration (1 04 per cm2 ) of dislocations in our sample, which was obtained from a commercial wafer. Indeed, it has been theoretically shown that a channeling efficiency comparable with that of Si or Ge would be attained with a crystal at low defect concentration (less than ten per cm2 ). To better understand the role of dislocations on volume reflection, we have worked out computer simulation via dynecharm++ Monte Carlo code to study the effect of dislocations on volume reflection. The results of the simulations agree with experimental records, demonstrating that volume reflection is more robust than channeling in the presence of dislocations.

  16. Orientational Coherent Effects of High-Energy Particles in a LiNbO3 Crystal.

    PubMed

    Bagli, E; Guidi, V; Mazzolari, A; Bandiera, L; Germogli, G; Sytov, A I; De Salvador, D; Argiolas, A; Bazzan, M; Carnera, A; Berra, A; Bolognini, D; Lietti, D; Prest, M; Vallazza, E

    2015-07-01

    A bent lithium niobate strip was exposed to a 400-GeV/c proton beam at the external lines of CERN Super Proton Synchrotron to probe its capabilities versus coherent interactions of the particles with the crystal such as channeling and volume reflection. Lithium niobate (LiNbO3) exhibits an interplanar electric field comparable to that of Silicon (Si) and remarkable piezoelectric properties, which could be exploited for the realization of piezo-actuated devices for the control of high-energy particle beams. In contrast to Si and germanium (Ge), LiNbO3 shows an intriguing effect; in spite of a low channeling efficiency (3%), the volume reflection maintains a high deflection efficiency (83%). Such discrepancy was ascribed to the high concentration (10(4) per cm2) of dislocations in our sample, which was obtained from a commercial wafer. Indeed, it has been theoretically shown that a channeling efficiency comparable with that of Si or Ge would be attained with a crystal at low defect concentration (less than ten per cm2). To better understand the role of dislocations on volume reflection, we have worked out computer simulation via dynecharm++ Monte Carlo code to study the effect of dislocations on volume reflection. The results of the simulations agree with experimental records, demonstrating that volume reflection is more robust than channeling in the presence of dislocations. PMID:26182106

  17. Computed Potential Energy Surfaces and Minimum Energy Pathways for Chemical Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Langhoff, S. R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Computed potential energy surfaces are often required for computation of such parameters as rate constants as a function of temperature, product branching ratios, and other detailed properties. For some dynamics methods, global potential energy surfaces are required. In this case, it is necessary to obtain the energy at a complete sampling of all the possible arrangements of the nuclei, which are energetically accessible, and then a fitting function must be obtained to interpolate between the computed points. In other cases, characterization of the stationary points and the reaction pathway connecting them is sufficient. These properties may be readily obtained using analytical derivative methods. We have found that computation of the stationary points/reaction pathways using CASSCF/derivative methods, followed by use of the internally contracted CI method to obtain accurate energetics, gives usefull results for a number of chemically important systems. The talk will focus on a number of applications including global potential energy surfaces, H + O2, H + N2, O(3p) + H2, and reaction pathways for complex reactions, including reactions leading to NO and soot formation in hydrocarbon combustion.

  18. Adolescent girls' energy expenditure during dance simulation active computer gaming.

    PubMed

    Fawkner, Samantha G; Niven, Alisa; Thin, Alasdair G; Macdonald, Mhairi J; Oakes, Jemma R

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the energy expended and intensity of physical activity achieved by adolescent girls while playing on a dance simulation game. Twenty adolescent girls were recruited from a local secondary school. Resting oxygen uptake (VO(2)) and heart rate were analysed while sitting quietly and subsequently during approximately 30 min of game play, with 10 min at each of three increasing levels of difficulty. Energy expenditure was predicted from VO(2) at rest and during game play at three levels of play, from which the metabolic equivalents (METS) of game playing were derived. Mean +/- standard deviation energy expenditure for levels 1, 2, and 3 was 3.63 +/- 0.58, 3.65 +/- 0.54, and 4.14 +/- 0.71 kcal . min(-1) respectively, while mean activity for each level of play was at least of moderate intensity (>3 METS). Dance simulation active computer games provide an opportunity for most adolescent girls to exercise at moderate intensity. Therefore, regular playing might contribute to daily physical activity recommendations for good health in this at-risk population. PMID:20013462

  19. Novel clinical applications of dual energy computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kraśnicki, Tomasz; Podgórski, Przemysław; Guziński, Maciej; Czarnecka, Anna; Tupikowski, Krzysztof; Garcarek, Jerzy; Marek Sąsiadek, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Dual energy CT (DECT) was conceived at the very beginning of the computed tomography era. However the first DECT scanner was developed in 2006. Nowadays there are three different types of DECT available: dual-source CT with 80(100) kVp and 140 kVp tubes (Siemens Medical Solution); dual-layer multi-detector scanner with acquisition 120 or 140kVp (Philips Healthcare); CT unit with one rapid kVp switching source and new detector based on gemstone scintillator materials (GE Healthcare). This article describes the physical background and principles of DECT imaging as well as applications of this innovative method in routine clinical practice (renal stone differentiation, pulmonary perfusion, neuroradiology and metallic implant imaging). The particular applications are illustrated by cases from author's material. PMID:23457140

  20. Power/energy use cases for high performance computing.

    SciTech Connect

    Laros, James H.,; Kelly, Suzanne M; Hammond, Steven; Elmore, Ryan; Munch, Kristin

    2013-12-01

    Power and Energy have been identified as a first order challenge for future extreme scale high performance computing (HPC) systems. In practice the breakthroughs will need to be provided by the hardware vendors. But to make the best use of the solutions in an HPC environment, it will likely require periodic tuning by facility operators and software components. This document describes the actions and interactions needed to maximize power resources. It strives to cover the entire operational space in which an HPC system occupies. The descriptions are presented as formal use cases, as documented in the Unified Modeling Language Specification [1]. The document is intended to provide a common understanding to the HPC community of the necessary management and control capabilities. Assuming a common understanding can be achieved, the next step will be to develop a set of Application Programing Interfaces (APIs) to which hardware vendors and software developers could utilize to steer power consumption.

  1. Quantification of Hepatic Steatosis With Dual-Energy Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Artz, Nathan S.; Hines, Catherine D.G.; Brunner, Stephen T.; Agni, Rashmi M.; Kühn, Jens-Peter; Roldan-Alzate, Alejandro; Chen, Guang-Hong; Reeder, Scott B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for fat quantification using tissue triglyceride concentration and histology as references in an animal model of hepatic steatosis. Materials and Methods This animal study was approved by our institution's Research Animal Resource Center. After validation of DECT and MRI using a phantom consisting of different triglyceride concentrations, a leptin-deficient obese mouse model (ob/ob) was used for this study. Twenty mice were divided into 3 groups based on expected levels of hepatic steatosis: low (n = 6), medium (n = 7), and high (n = 7) fat. After MRI at 3 T, a DECT scan was immediately performed. The caudate lobe of the liver was harvested and analyzed for triglyceride concentration using a colorimetric assay. The left lateral lobe was also extracted for histology. Magnetic resonance imaging fat-fraction (FF) and DECT measurements (attenuation, fat density, and effective atomic number) were compared with triglycerides and histology. Results Phantom results demonstrated excellent correlation between triglyceride content and each of the MRI and DECT measurements (r2 ≥ 0.96, P ≤ 0.003). In vivo, however, excellent triglyceride correlation was observed only with attenuation (r2 = 0.89, P < 0.001) and MRI-FF (r2 = 0.92, P < 0.001). Strong correlation existed between attenuation and MRI-FF (r2 = 0.86, P < 0.001). Nonlinear correlation with histology was also excellent for attenuation and MRI-FF. Conclusions Dual-energy computed tomography (CT) data generated by the current Gemstone Spectral Imaging analysis tool do not improve the accuracy of fat quantification in the liver beyond what CT attenuation can already provide. Furthermore, MRI may provide an excellent reference standard for liver fat quantification when validating new CT or DECT methods in human subjects. PMID:22836309

  2. Application of an object-oriented programming paradigm in three-dimensional computer modeling of mechanically active gastrointestinal tissues.

    PubMed

    Rashev, P Z; Mintchev, M P; Bowes, K L

    2000-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a novel three-dimensional (3-D) object-oriented modeling approach incorporating knowledge of the anatomy, electrophysiology, and mechanics of externally stimulated excitable gastrointestinal (GI) tissues and emphasizing the "stimulus-response" principle of extracting the modeling parameters. The modeling method used clusters of class hierarchies representing GI tissues from three perspectives: 1) anatomical; 2) electrophysiological; and 3) mechanical. We elaborated on the first four phases of the object-oriented system development life-cycle: 1) analysis; 2) design; 3) implementation; and 4) testing. Generalized cylinders were used for the implementation of 3-D tissue objects modeling the cecum, the descending colon, and the colonic circular smooth muscle tissue. The model was tested using external neural electrical tissue excitation of the descending colon with virtual implanted electrodes and the stimulating current density distributions over the modeled surfaces were calculated. Finally, the tissue deformations invoked by electrical stimulation were estimated and represented by a mesh-surface visualization technique. PMID:11026595

  3. Direct computation of general chemical energy differences: Application to ionization potentials, excitation, and bond energies

    SciTech Connect

    Beste, Ariana; Harrison, Robert J; Yanai, Takeshi

    2006-01-01

    Chemists are mainly interested in energy differences. In contrast, most quantum chemical methods yield the total energy which is a large number compared to the difference and has therefore to be computed to a higher relative precision than would be necessary for the difference alone. Hence, it is desirable to compute energy differences directly, thereby avoiding the precision problem. Whenever it is possible to find a parameter which transforms smoothly from an initial to a final state, the energy difference can be obtained by integrating the energy derivative with respect to that parameter (c.f., thermodynamic integration or adiabatic connection methods). If the dependence on the parameter is predominantly linear, accurate results can be obtained by single-point integration. In density functional theory (DFT) and Hartree-Fock, we applied the formalism to ionization potentials, excitation energies, and chemical bond breaking. Example calculations for ionization potentials and excitation energies showed that accurate results could be obtained with a linear estimate. For breaking bonds, we introduce a non-geometrical parameter which gradually turns the interaction between two fragments of a molecule on. The interaction changes the potentials used to determine the orbitals as well as constraining the orbitals to be orthogonal.

  4. Direct computation of general chemical energy differences: Application to ionization potentials, excitation, and bond energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beste, A.; Harrison, R. J.; Yanai, T.

    2006-08-01

    Chemists are mainly interested in energy differences. In contrast, most quantum chemical methods yield the total energy which is a large number compared to the difference and has therefore to be computed to a higher relative precision than would be necessary for the difference alone. Hence, it is desirable to compute energy differences directly, thereby avoiding the precision problem. Whenever it is possible to find a parameter which transforms smoothly from an initial to a final state, the energy difference can be obtained by integrating the energy derivative with respect to that parameter (cf. thermodynamic integration or adiabatic connection methods). If the dependence on the parameter is predominantly linear, accurate results can be obtained by single-point integration. In density functional theory and Hartree-Fock, we applied the formalism to ionization potentials, excitation energies, and chemical bond breaking. Example calculations for ionization potentials and excitation energies showed that accurate results could be obtained with a linear estimate. For breaking bonds, we introduce a nongeometrical parameter which gradually turns the interaction between two fragments of a molecule on. The interaction changes the potentials used to determine the orbitals as well as the constraint on the orbitals to be orthogonal.

  5. Orientation dependent size effects in single crystalline anisotropic nanoplates with regard to surface energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assadi, Abbas; Salehi, Manouchehr; Akhlaghi, Mehdi

    2015-07-01

    In this work, size dependent behavior of single crystalline normal and auxetic anisotropic nanoplates is discussed with consideration of material surface stresses via a generalized model. Bending of pressurized nanoplates and their fundamental resonant frequency are discussed for different crystallographic directions and anisotropy degrees. It is explained that the orientation effects are considerable when the nanoplates' edges are pinned but for clamped nanoplates, the anisotropy effect may be ignored. The size effects are the highest when the simply supported nanoplates are parallel to [110] direction but as the anisotropy gets higher, the size effects are reduced. The orientation effect is also discussed for possibility of self-instability occurrence in nanoplates. The results in simpler cases are compared with previous experiments for nanowires but with a correction factor. There are still some open questions for future studies.

  6. Object-oriented design and implementation of CFDLab: a computer-assisted learning tool for fluid dynamics using dual reciprocity boundary element methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, J.

    1999-08-01

    As lecturers, our main concern and goal is to develop more attractive and efficient ways of communicating up-to-date scientific knowledge to our students and facilitate an in-depth understanding of physical phenomena. Computer-based instruction is very promising to help both teachers and learners in their difficult task, which involves complex cognitive psychological processes. This complexity is reflected in high demands on the design and implementation methods used to create computer-assisted learning (CAL) programs. Due to their concepts, flexibility, maintainability and extended library resources, object-oriented modeling techniques are very suitable to produce this type of pedagogical tool. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) enjoys not only a growing importance in today's research, but is also very powerful for teaching and learning fluid dynamics. For this purpose, an educational PC program for university level called 'CFDLab 1.1' for Windows™ was developed with an interactive graphical user interface (GUI) for multitasking and point-and-click operations. It uses the dual reciprocity boundary element method as a versatile numerical scheme, allowing to handle a variety of relevant governing equations in two dimensions on personal computers due to its simple pre- and postprocessing including 2D Laplace, Poisson, diffusion, transient convection-diffusion.

  7. Flux Solitons Studied for Energy-Conserving Reversible Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, Kevin D.; Wustmann, Waltraut

    2015-03-01

    On-chip logic is desired for controlling superconducting qubits. Since qubits are very sensitive to photon field noise, it is desirable to develop an energy-conserving reversible logic, i.e. one which can compute without substantial energy dissipation or applied drive fields. With this goal in mind, simulations on discretized long Josephson junctions (DLJJs) have been performed, where the flux soliton is studied as a potential information carrier. Undriven soliton propagation is studied as a function of discreteness, dissipation, and uncertainty in the junction critical current. The perturbing parameters are low in the simulations such that the solitons fit well to an ideal Sine-Gordon soliton. Surprisingly, using realizable parameters a single flux soliton in a DLJJ is found to travel hundreds of Josephson penetration depths without backscattering in the absence of a driving force. In addition, even with a non-ideal launch, solitons are found to propagate predictably such that they show potential for synchronous routing into reversible logic gates.

  8. Array files for computational chemistry: MP2 energies.

    PubMed

    Ford, Alan R; Janowski, Tomasz; Pulay, Peter

    2007-05-01

    A simple message-passing implementation for distributed disk storage, called array files (AF), is described. It is designed primarily for parallelizing computational chemistry applications but it should be useful for any application that handles large amounts of data stored on disk. AF allows transparent distributed storage and access of large data files. An AF consists of a set of logically related records, i.e., blocks of data. It is assumed that the records have the typical dimension of matrices in quantum chemical calculations, i.e., they range from 0.1 to approximately 32 MB in size. The individual records are not striped over nodes; each record is stored on a single node. As a simple application, second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) energies have been implemented using AF. The AF implementation approaches the efficiency of the hand-coded program. MP2 is relatively simple to parallelize but for more complex applications, such as Coupled Cluster energies, the AF system greatly simplifies the programming effort. PMID:17299726

  9. Exploring the controls of soil biogeochemistry in a restored coastal wetland using object-oriented computer simulations of uptake kinetics and thermodynamic optimization in batch reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payn, R. A.; Helton, A. M.; Poole, G.; Izurieta, C.; Bernhardt, E. S.; Burgin, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Many hypotheses have been proposed to predict patterns of biogeochemical redox reactions based on the availability of electron donors and acceptors and the thermodynamic theory of chemistry. Our objective was to develop a computer model that would allow us to test various alternatives of these hypotheses against data gathered from soil slurry batch reactors, experimental soil perfusion cores, and in situ soil profile observations from the restored Timberlake Wetland in coastal North Carolina, USA. Software requirements to meet this objective included the ability to rapidly develop and compare different hypothetical formulations of kinetic and thermodynamic theory, and the ability to easily change the list of potential biogeochemical reactions used in the optimization scheme. For future work, we also required an object pattern that could easily be coupled with an existing soil hydrologic model. These requirements were met using Network Exchange Objects (NEO), our recently developed object-oriented distributed modeling framework that facilitates simulations of multiple interacting currencies moving through network-based systems. An initial implementation of the object pattern was developed in NEO based on maximizing growth of the microbial community from available dissolved organic carbon. We then used this implementation to build a modeling system for comparing results across multiple simulated batch reactors with varied initial solute concentrations, varied biogeochemical parameters, or varied optimization schemes. Among heterotrophic aerobic and anaerobic reactions, we have found that this model reasonably predicts the use of terminal electron acceptors in simulated batch reactors, where reactions with higher energy yields occur before reactions with lower energy yields. However, among the aerobic reactions, we have also found this model predicts dominance of chemoautotrophs (e.g., nitrifiers) when their electron donor (e.g., ammonium) is abundant, despite the

  10. A primer on the energy efficiency of computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koomey, Jonathan G.

    2015-03-01

    The efficiency of computing at peak output has increased rapidly since the dawn of the computer age. This paper summarizes some of the key factors affecting the efficiency of computing in all usage modes. While there is still great potential for improving the efficiency of computing devices, we will need to alter how we do computing in the next few decades because we are finally approaching the limits of current technologies.