Science.gov

Sample records for computer technology holography

  1. Limits of computational white-light holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, Sebastian; Kozacki, Tomasz; Tompkin, Wayne

    2013-02-01

    Recently, computational holograms are being used in applications, where previously conventional holograms were applied. Compared to conventional holography, computational holography is based on imaging of virtual objects instead of real objects, which renders them somewhat more flexibility. Here, computational holograms are calculated based on the superposition of point sources, which are placed at the mesh vertices of arbitrary 3D models. The computed holograms have full parallax and exhibit a problem in viewing that we have called "ghosting", which is linked to the viewing of computational holograms based on 3D models close to the image plane. Experimental white-light reconstruction of these holograms showed significant blurring, which is explained here based on simulations of the lateral as well as the axial resolution of a point image with respect to the source spectrum and image distance. In accordance with these simulations, an upper limit of the distance to the image plane is determined, which ensures high quality imaging.

  2. Computer-Generated Polarization Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Masato; Mitsuhashi, Yoshinobu

    1983-10-01

    The concept of a computer-generated polarization hologram (CPH) is based on the anisotropic interaction of light with photodichroic crystals. The most unique feature of this technique lies in the realization of phase information recording without the application of the detour phase or the optical path difference effect as used in the conventional technique. Basic principle of information writing and reading scheme using M-centers in alkali halide crystals such as sodium flouride ( NaF ) are descrived, and several technical merits and problems associated with this method are presented. This technique provides a real-time holographic system where accurate recordability and high storage capacity are attainable due to its possibility of recording a calcurated complex amplitude of wavefront only by means of controlling the polarization direction of illuminating beam. We also report on our trially developed automatic hologram making and reading system with the results of its operation experiment, and on discussions concerning the quality of the reconstructed image. We succeeded in completing a full automatic system which is able to make holograms automatically in a short time and in observing a reconstructed image of good quality in real-time.

  3. Holography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, H. Arthur

    Holography is a process which numbers among its many applications the creation of holograms--unique three dimensional photographs that show spatial relations and shifts just as they exist in reality. This book recounts the history of holography, tracing its development from Euclid's theory of light rays through Huygens' theory of wave motion to…

  4. Holography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, H. Arthur

    Holography is a process which numbers among its many applications the creation of holograms--unique three dimensional photographs that show spatial relations and shifts just as they exist in reality. This book recounts the history of holography, tracing its development from Euclid's theory of light rays through Huygens' theory of wave motion to…

  5. Advanced technology development multi-color holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vikram, Chandra S.

    1994-01-01

    Several key aspects of multi-color holography and some non-conventional ways to study the holographic reconstructions are considered. The error analysis of three-color holography is considered in detail with particular example of a typical triglycine sulfate crystal growth situation. For the numerical analysis of the fringe patterns, a new algorithm is introduced with experimental verification using sugar-water solution. The role of the phase difference among component holograms is also critically considered with examples of several two- and three-color situations. The status of experimentation on two-color holography and fabrication of a small breadboard system is also reported. Finally, some successful demonstrations of unconventional ways to study holographic reconstructions are described. These methods are deflectometry and confocal optical processing using some Spacelab III holograms.

  6. Pit Distribution Design for Computer-Generated Waveguide Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Shogo; Imai, Tadayuki; Ueno, Masahiro; Ohtani, Yoshimitsu; Endo, Masahiro; Kurokawa, Yoshiaki; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Toshifumi; Fukuda, Makoto

    2008-02-01

    Multilayered waveguide holography (MWH) is one of a number of page-oriented data multiplexing holographies that will be applied to optical data storage and three-dimensional (3D) moving images. While conventional volumetric holography using photopolymer or photorefractive materials requires page-by-page light exposure for recording, MWH media can be made by employing stamping and laminating technologies that are suitable for mass production. This makes devising an economical mastering technique for replicating holograms a key issue. In this paper, we discuss an approach to pit distribution design that enables us to replace expensive electron beam mastering with economical laser beam mastering. We propose an algorithm that avoids the overlapping of even comparatively large adjacent pits when we employ laser beam mastering. We also compensate for the angular dependence of the diffraction power, which strongly depends on pit shape, by introducing an enhancement profile so that a diffracted image has uniform intensity.

  7. Advanced technology development multi-color holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vikram, Chandra S.

    1993-01-01

    This is the final report of the Multi-color Holography project. The comprehensive study considers some strategic aspects of multi-color holography. First, various methods of available techniques for accurate fringe counting are reviewed. These are heterodyne interferometry, quasi-heterodyne interferometry, and phase-shifting interferometry. Phase-shifting interferometry was found to be the most suitable for multi-color holography. Details of experimentation with a sugar solution are also reported where better than 1/200 of a fringe order measurement capability was established. Rotating plate glass phase shifter was used for the experimentation. The report then describes the possible role of using more than two wavelengths with special reference-to-object beam intensity ratio needs in multicolor holography. Some specific two- and three-color cases are also described in detail. Then some new analysis methods of the reconstructed wavefront are considered. These are deflectometry, speckle metrology, confocal optical signal processing, and phase shifting technique related applications. Finally, design aspects of an experimental breadboard are presented.

  8. Progress in holography

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbeni, J.

    1987-01-01

    This book collects papers on optical technology, particularly holography. Topics include: objective lenses for compact disc players, photorefractive materials for holographic recording, holographic optical elements, characterization measurements of holographic mirrors, and computer-generated holograms.

  9. Emperor's new clothes: holography and computer graphics--a marriage of convenience?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Paul R.

    1994-01-01

    The authors explains his involvement with holography, how computer aided design has achieved a new visual synthesis for him and accessed greater creative possibilities for the two media; and how recent developments in the two fields promote greater accessibility.

  10. Memory, processing, and routing applications of spatial-spectral holography in ultrahigh-speed computing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babbitt, W. Randall

    1998-11-01

    Real-time, wide band information storage and signal processing devices are critical to many computing and communication systems. Optical spatial-spectral holography has the potential to perform real-time storage and continuous signal processing at data rates up to a terahertz, with storage/pattern densities on the order of a terabit per centimeter squared, and with data block sizes/time-bandwidth products well over 10000. These attributes, coupled with spatial selectivity and the ability to process amplitude, phase and frequency modulated signals makes spatial-spectral holography an extremely versatile technology. Applications include time-, frequency-, or code-division multiplexed routing, pattern recognition; multi-dimensional cache memory; high density, high bandwidth database memory, associative memory, and look- up tables; temporal encryption and decryption for secure communications; interior memory for optical networks; real- time address decoder; all optical passive routing of data; header and data stripper and isolator for network packets; true time delays for phase arrays with simultaneous tracking of multiple targets; and dynamic pulse shaping and distortion compensation.

  11. Applied Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, Christopher P.

    These lecture notes briefly review holography, or gauge/gravity duality. They also discuss its application to computing the viscosity of a strongly-coupled fluid, and to describing charge transport in the holographic superconductor.

  12. The application of digital image plane holography technology to identify Chinese herbal medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huaying; Guo, Zhongjia; Liao, Wei; Zhang, Zhihui

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, the imaging technology of digital image plane holography to identify the Chinese herbal medicine is studied. The optical experiment system of digital image plane holography which is the special case of pre-magnification digital holography was built. In the record system, one is an object light by using plane waves which illuminates the object, and the other one is recording hologram by using spherical light wave as reference light. There is a Micro objective lens behind the object. The second phase factor which caus ed by the Micro objective lens can be eliminated by choosing the proper position of the reference point source when digital image plane holography is recorded by spherical light. In this experiment, we use the Lygodium cells and Onion cells as the object. The experiment results with Lygodium cells and Onion cells show that digital image plane holography avoid the process of finding recording distance by using auto-focusing approach, and the phase information of the object can be reconstructed more accurately. The digital image plane holography is applied to the microscopic imaging of cells more effectively, and it is suit to apply for the identify of Chinese Herbal Medicine. And it promotes the application of digital holographic in practice.

  13. The application of digital image plane holography technology to identify Chinese herbal medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huaying; Guo, Zhongjia; Liao, Wei; Zhang, Zhihui

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, the imaging technology of digital image plane holography to identify the Chinese herbal medicine is studied. The optical experiment system of digital image plane holography which is the special case of pre-magnification digital holography was built. In the record system, one is an object light by using plane waves which illuminates the object, and the other one is recording hologram by using spherical light wave as reference light. There is a Micro objective lens behind the object. The second phase factor which caus ed by the Micro objective lens can be eliminated by choosing the proper position of the reference point source when digital image plane holography is recorded by spherical light. In this experiment, we use the Lygodium cells and Onion cells as the object. The experiment results with Lygodium cells and Onion cells show that digital image plane holography avoid the process of finding recording distance by using auto-focusing approach, and the phase information of the object can be reconstructed more accurately. The digital image plane holography is applied to the microscopic imaging of cells more effectively, and it is suit to apply for the identify of Chinese Herbal Medicine. And it promotes the application of digital holographic in practice.

  14. Holography: A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, D. D.

    1973-01-01

    The development of holography and the state of the art in recording and displaying information, microscopy, motion, pictures, and television applications are discussed. In addition to optical holography, information is presented on microwave, acoustic, ultrasonic, and seismic holography. Other subjects include data processing, data storage, pattern recognition, and computer-generated holography. Diagrams of holographic installations are provided. Photographs of typical holographic applications are used to support the theoretical aspects.

  15. High-speed parallel phase-shifting digital holography system using special-purpose computer for image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakue, Takashi; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2015-05-01

    We report a high-speed parallel phase-shifting digital holography system using a special-purpose computer for image reconstruction. Parallel phase-shifting digital holography is a technique capable of single-shot phase-shifting interferometry. This technique records information of multiple phase-shifted holograms required for calculation of phase-shifting interferometry with a single shot by using space-division multiplexing. This technique needs image-reconstruction process for a huge amount of recorded holograms. In particular, it takes a long time to calculate light propagation based on fast Fourier transform in the process and to obtain a motion picture of a dynamically and fast moving object. Then we designed a special-purpose computer for accelerating the image-reconstruction process of parallel phase-shifting digital holography. We developed a special-purpose computer consisting of VC707 evaluation kit (Xilinx Inc.) which is a field programmable gate array board. We also recorded holograms consisting of 128 × 128 pixels at a frame rate of 180,000 frames per second by the constructed parallel phase-shifting digital holography system. By applying the developed computer to the recorded holograms, we confirmed that the designed computer can accelerate the calculation of image-reconstruction process of parallel phase-shifting digital holography ~50 times faster than a CPU.

  16. Computer generated holography using a graphics processing unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Nobuyuki; Ito, Tomoyoshi; Tanaka, Takashi; Shiraki, Atsushi; Sugie, Takashige

    2006-01-01

    We have applied the graphics processing unit (GPU) to computer generated holograms (CGH) to overcome the high computational cost of CGH and have compared the speed of a GPU implementation to a standard CPU implementation. The calculation speed of a GPU (GeForce 6600, nVIDIA) was found to be about 47 times faster than that of a personal computer with a Pentium 4 processor. Our system can realize real-time reconstruction of a 64-point 3-D object at video rate using a liquid-crystal display of resolution 800×600.

  17. Computer generated holography using a graphics processing unit.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Nobuyuki; Ito, Tomoyoshi; Tanaka, Takashi; Shiraki, Atsushi; Sugie, Takashige

    2006-01-23

    We have applied the graphics processing unit (GPU) to computer generated holograms (CGH) to overcome the high computational cost of CGH and have compared the speed of a GPU implementation to a standard CPU implementation. The calculation speed of a GPU (GeForce 6600, nVIDIA) was found to be about 47 times faster than that of a personal computer with a Pentium 4 processor. Our system can realize real-time reconstruction of a 64-point 3-D object at video rate using a liquid-crystal display of resolution 800x600. PMID:19503377

  18. Regular effective hologram regions for computer generated holography.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuhong; Farbiz, Farzam; Solanki, Sanjeev; Liang, Xinan; Pan, Yuechao; Xu, Xuewu

    2009-12-01

    An effective hologram region (EHR) based approach is presented to speed up the computation of computer generated holograms (CGHs). The object space is predivided into subspaces, and an EHR for each subspace is predefined according to the maximum spatial frequency of interference fringes, light diffraction efficiency, and CGH binarization effect. To compute the hologram of an object, the object points are first categorized according to which subspace they are located in, and then their holograms are calculated using the corresponding EHRs. As each EHR usually takes up only a portion of the hologram plate, the CGH computational load is thus reduced. This new approach is highly suitable for large hologram display systems. In addition, when compared to the reconstructed image using the conventional approach, our experimental results show that more noise can be blocked off and the reconstructed image appears sharper without noticeable brightness reduction. PMID:19956291

  19. Image communication scheme based on dynamic visual cryptography and computer generated holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palevicius, Paulius; Ragulskis, Minvydas

    2015-01-01

    Computer generated holograms are often exploited to implement optical encryption schemes. This paper proposes the integration of dynamic visual cryptography (an optical technique based on the interplay of visual cryptography and time-averaging geometric moiré) with Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm. A stochastic moiré grating is used to embed the secret into a single cover image. The secret can be visually decoded by a naked eye if only the amplitude of harmonic oscillations corresponds to an accurately preselected value. The proposed visual image encryption scheme is based on computer generated holography, optical time-averaging moiré and principles of dynamic visual cryptography. Dynamic visual cryptography is used both for the initial encryption of the secret image and for the final decryption. Phase data of the encrypted image are computed by using Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm. The optical image is decrypted using the computationally reconstructed field of amplitudes.

  20. Square-wave retarder for polarization computer-generated holography.

    PubMed

    Noble, H D; Lam, W T; Dallas, W; Chipman, R A; Matsubara, I; Unno, Y; McClain, S C; Khulbe, P; Hansen, D; Milster, T D

    2011-07-10

    An etched calcite square-wave retarder is designed, fabricated, and demonstrated as an illuminator for an interlaced polarization computer-generated hologram (PCGH). The calcite square-wave retarder enables alternating columns of orthogonal linear polarizations to illuminate the interlaced PCGH. Together, these components produce a speckled, tangentially polarized PCGH diffraction pattern with a measured ratio of polarization of 84% and a degree of linear polarization of 0.81. An experimental alignment tolerance analysis is also reported. PMID:21743584

  1. Holography in phase space.

    PubMed

    Testorf, Markus; Lohmann, Adolf W

    2008-02-01

    Holography is reformulated by using the framework of phase-space optics. The Leith-Upatnieks off-axis reference hologram is compared with precursors, namely, single-sideband holography. The phase-space representation of complex amplitudes focuses on similarities between different holographic recording schemes and is particularly useful for investigating the degree of freedom and the space-bandwidth product of optical signals and systems. This allows one to include computer-generated holography and recent developments in digital holography in the discussion. PMID:18239702

  2. The dramatic change from empirical to scientific technology in medicine: computerized imaging, communications and holography.

    PubMed

    Stroke, G W

    1993-06-01

    Perhaps the single most important element in the rapid development of contemporary diagnostic imaging is simply its feasibility that results from the deliberate use of complicated, but powerful, mathematical formulation. Implemented with various types of computers, today mostly digital, in such applications at CT (computerized tomography), MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and others, the underlying principles of the 3-D (three-dimensional) image recording and reconstruction can all be traced back to the principles of "holography". Further improvements in image communications and processing, for example in view of robotized "Imaging-guided Stereotactic Diagnosis and Treatment" in high-field MRI is likely to result from suitable use of "Fuzzy Logic". PMID:8341035

  3. Computed neutron tomography and coded aperture holography from real time neutron images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulcoski, Mark F.

    1986-10-01

    The uses of neutron tomography and holography for nondestructive evaluation applications are developed and investigated. The use of a real time neutron imaging system coupled with a image processing system to obtain neutron tomographs. Experiments utilized a Thomson-CSF neutron camera coupled to a computer based system used for image processing. Experiments included a configuration of a reactor neutron beam port for neutron imaging, development and implementation of a convolution method tomographic algorithm suitable for neutron imaging. Results to date have demonstrated the proof of principle of this neutron tomography system. Coded aperture neutron holography is under investigation using a cadmium Fresnel zone plate as the coded aperture and the real time imaging system as the detection and holographic reconstruction system. Coded aperture imaging utilizes the zone place to encode scattered radiation pattern recorded at the detector is used as input data to a convolution algorithm which reconstructs the scattering source. This technique has not yet been successfully implemented and is still under development.

  4. Computational and visible light experiments for x-ray laser holography

    SciTech Connect

    Brase, J.M.; Yorkey, T.J.; Peters, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    Due to the fact that most biological objects of interest are embedded in a complex three-dimensional, it is difficult to estimate the usefulness of x-ray images of complex objects using usual measures of resolution such as Rayleigh criteria. We are approaching this problem for the design and characterization of x-ray holography systems by developing computational tools for the simulation of x-ray hologram formation and for their computational reconstruction. These efforts are closely coupled with a scaled visible light experimental program which validates both the simulations and the reconstruction techniques. The use of simulations allows us not only to establish resolution limits for complex objects but also to vary the parameter space in a controlled manner to optimize imaging system designs. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Holography: A Transformative Technology for Learning and Human Performance Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazer, Gary W.; Stevens, George H.

    2015-01-01

    Most past and current learning technologies have been one- or two-dimensional in presentation. This may be fine if one is looking at a map or even a fine painting. However, to fully appreciate the detail of a statue or a machine part, it is better to be able to look at it from all sides. Use of holographic images allows an item to be shared with a…

  6. Silhouette method for hidden surface removal in computer holography and its acceleration using the switch-back technique.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Kyoji; Nakamura, Masaki; Nakahara, Sumio

    2014-10-01

    A powerful technique is presented for occlusion processing in computer holography. The technique offers an improvement on the conventional silhouette method, which is a general wave optics-based occlusion processing method. The proposed technique dramatically reduces the computation time required for computer-generated holograms (CGH) of self-occluded objects. Performance measurements show that a full-parallax high-definition CGH composed of billions of pixels and a small CGH intended to be reconstructed in electro-holography can be computed in only 1.7 h and 4.5 s, respectively, without any hardware acceleration. Optical reconstruction of the high-definition CGH shows natural and continuous motion parallax in the self-occluded object. PMID:25322021

  7. Occlusion processing and smooth surface shading for fully computed synthetic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underkoffler, John S.

    1997-04-01

    Computation for synthetic holography typically takes one of two forms: the `stereogram' approach, in which a large number of 2D perspective views are rendered and assembled into a composite fringe pattern; and the `fully computed' approach, in which the physics of light propagation from geometric surfaces and the resulting interference patterns at a recording plane are all simulated. Algorithms implementing the stereogram approach often generate their component perspective views by taking advantage of dedicated graphics hardware, capable of rapid rendering with hidden- surface removal and smooth shading. However, these standard computer graphics schemes for occlusion and shading are inappropriate for fully computed hologram synthesis. We describe an efficient algorithm that starts with a standard- form geometric description of the desired scene and generates a list of simple holographic `primitives' that can be transformed into the final interference pattern by a simple fringe rendering program. The algorithm simultaneously performs the multiple-viewpoint equivalent of hidden surface removal, so that nearer surfaces and objects properly occlude those more distant, and surface shading, so that each object appears solid and exhibits the correct visual behavior in response to lighting in the scene.

  8. The fast scheme for mixed-3D scenes by polygon-based computer-generated holography (CGH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Yan-Ling; Le, Thanh B.; Li, Weina; Jeong, Jong-Rea; Kim, Nam

    2014-02-01

    We proposed a fast scheme for computer-generated holography (CGH) to mix 3D scenes. The objects in the proposed include the real and virtual objects. Make a point cloud model of real object, and then converted to a triangular mesh model. And mix the triangular mesh model with virtual 3D object mesh models. Using the angular spectrum method to generated hologram, and it is convenient to accelerating with GPU.

  9. Calculation reduction method for color digital holography and computer-generated hologram using color space conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Nagahama, Yuki; Kakue, Takashi; Takada, Naoki; Okada, Naohisa; Endo, Yutaka; Hirayama, Ryuji; Hiyama, Daisuke; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2014-02-01

    A calculation reduction method for color digital holography (DH) and computer-generated holograms (CGHs) using color space conversion is reported. Color DH and color CGHs are generally calculated on RGB space. We calculate color DH and CGHs in other color spaces for accelerating the calculation (e.g., YCbCr color space). In YCbCr color space, a RGB image or RGB hologram is converted to the luminance component (Y), blue-difference chroma (Cb), and red-difference chroma (Cr) components. In terms of the human eye, although the negligible difference of the luminance component is well recognized, the difference of the other components is not. In this method, the luminance component is normal sampled and the chroma components are down-sampled. The down-sampling allows us to accelerate the calculation of the color DH and CGHs. We compute diffraction calculations from the components, and then we convert the diffracted results in YCbCr color space to RGB color space. The proposed method, which is possible to accelerate the calculations up to a factor of 3 in theory, accelerates the calculation over two times faster than the ones in RGB color space.

  10. Computer Technology for Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In this age of the computer, more and more business firms are automating their operations for increased efficiency in a great variety of jobs, from simple accounting to managing inventories, from precise machining to analyzing complex structures. In the interest of national productivity, NASA is providing assistance both to longtime computer users and newcomers to automated operations. Through a special technology utilization service, NASA saves industry time and money by making available already developed computer programs which have secondary utility. A computer program is essentially a set of instructions which tells the computer how to produce desired information or effect by drawing upon its stored input. Developing a new program from scratch can be costly and time-consuming. Very often, however, a program developed for one purpose can readily be adapted to a totally different application. To help industry take advantage of existing computer technology, NASA operates the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC)(registered TradeMark),located at the University of Georgia. COSMIC maintains a large library of computer programs developed for NASA, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy and other technology-generating agencies of the government. The Center gets a continual flow of software packages, screens them for adaptability to private sector usage, stores them and informs potential customers of their availability.

  11. Visualization of x-ray computer tomography using computer-generated holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daibo, Masahiro; Tayama, Norio

    1998-09-01

    The theory converted from x-ray projection data to the hologram directly by combining the computer tomography (CT) with the computer generated hologram (CGH), is proposed. The purpose of this study is to offer the theory for realizing the all- electronic and high-speed seeing through 3D visualization system, which is for the application to medical diagnosis and non- destructive testing. First, the CT is expressed using the pseudo- inverse matrix which is obtained by the singular value decomposition. CGH is expressed in the matrix style. Next, `projection to hologram conversion' (PTHC) matrix is calculated by the multiplication of phase matrix of CGH with pseudo-inverse matrix of the CT. Finally, the projection vector is converted to the hologram vector directly, by multiplication of the PTHC matrix with the projection vector. Incorporating holographic analog computation into CT reconstruction, it becomes possible that the calculation amount is drastically reduced. We demonstrate the CT cross section which is reconstituted by He-Ne laser in the 3D space from the real x-ray projection data acquired by x-ray television equipment, using our direct conversion technique.

  12. Thermodynamic holography

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Bo-Bo; Jiang, Zhan-Feng; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-01-01

    The holographic principle states that the information about a volume of a system is encoded on the boundary surface of the volume. Holography appears in many branches of physics, such as optics, electromagnetism, many-body physics, quantum gravity, and string theory. Here we show that holography is also an underlying principle in thermodynamics, a most important foundation of physics. The thermodynamics of a system is fully determined by its partition function. We prove that the partition function of a finite but arbitrarily large system is an analytic function on the complex plane of physical parameters, and therefore the partition function in a region on the complex plane is uniquely determined by its values along the boundary. The thermodynamic holography has applications in studying thermodynamics of nano-scale systems (such as molecule engines, nano-generators and macromolecules) and provides a new approach to many-body physics. PMID:26478214

  13. Thermodynamic holography.

    PubMed

    Wei, Bo-Bo; Jiang, Zhan-Feng; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-01-01

    The holographic principle states that the information about a volume of a system is encoded on the boundary surface of the volume. Holography appears in many branches of physics, such as optics, electromagnetism, many-body physics, quantum gravity, and string theory. Here we show that holography is also an underlying principle in thermodynamics, a most important foundation of physics. The thermodynamics of a system is fully determined by its partition function. We prove that the partition function of a finite but arbitrarily large system is an analytic function on the complex plane of physical parameters, and therefore the partition function in a region on the complex plane is uniquely determined by its values along the boundary. The thermodynamic holography has applications in studying thermodynamics of nano-scale systems (such as molecule engines, nano-generators and macromolecules) and provides a new approach to many-body physics. PMID:26478214

  14. Thermodynamic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Bo-Bo; Jiang, Zhan-Feng; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-10-01

    The holographic principle states that the information about a volume of a system is encoded on the boundary surface of the volume. Holography appears in many branches of physics, such as optics, electromagnetism, many-body physics, quantum gravity, and string theory. Here we show that holography is also an underlying principle in thermodynamics, a most important foundation of physics. The thermodynamics of a system is fully determined by its partition function. We prove that the partition function of a finite but arbitrarily large system is an analytic function on the complex plane of physical parameters, and therefore the partition function in a region on the complex plane is uniquely determined by its values along the boundary. The thermodynamic holography has applications in studying thermodynamics of nano-scale systems (such as molecule engines, nano-generators and macromolecules) and provides a new approach to many-body physics.

  15. Computing technology in the 1980's. [computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, H. S.

    1978-01-01

    Advances in computing technology have been led by consistently improving semiconductor technology. The semiconductor industry has turned out ever faster, smaller, and less expensive devices since transistorized computers were first introduced 20 years ago. For the next decade, there appear to be new advances possible, with the rate of introduction of improved devices at least equal to the historic trends. The implication of these projections is that computers will enter new markets and will truly be pervasive in business, home, and factory as their cost diminishes and their computational power expands to new levels. The computer industry as we know it today will be greatly altered in the next decade, primarily because the raw computer system will give way to computer-based turn-key information and control systems.

  16. Computer Technology in Massachusetts Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, John; Sanders, Jean E., Ed.

    This report focuses on the status and future of computer technology in Massachusetts schools. The report is organized into four major sections. Introductory information is provided in section 1, followed by a framework (section 2) for viewing computer technology. This framework provides information on computer hardware components, computer…

  17. Computer Viruses. Technology Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponder, Tim, Comp.; Ropog, Marty, Comp.; Keating, Joseph, Comp.

    This document provides general information on computer viruses, how to help protect a computer network from them, measures to take if a computer becomes infected. Highlights include the origins of computer viruses; virus contraction; a description of some common virus types (File Virus, Boot Sector/Partition Table Viruses, Trojan Horses, and…

  18. Computer Technology and Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Council on Collegiate Education for Nursing, Atlanta, GA.

    The influences of computer technology on college nursing education programs and health care delivery systems are discussed in eight papers. The use of computers is considered, with attention to clinical care, nursing education and continuing education, administration, and research. Attention is also directed to basic computer terminology, computer…

  19. [Earth Science Technology Office's Computational Technologies Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, James (Technical Monitor); Merkey, Phillip

    2005-01-01

    This grant supported the effort to characterize the problem domain of the Earth Science Technology Office's Computational Technologies Project, to engage the Beowulf Cluster Computing Community as well as the High Performance Computing Research Community so that we can predict the applicability of said technologies to the scientific community represented by the CT project and formulate long term strategies to provide the computational resources necessary to attain the anticipated scientific objectives of the CT project. Specifically, the goal of the evaluation effort is to use the information gathered over the course of the Round-3 investigations to quantify the trends in scientific expectations, the algorithmic requirements and capabilities of high-performance computers to satisfy this anticipated need.

  20. Computer Technology for Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviation/Space, 1982

    1982-01-01

    A special National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) service is contributing to national productivity by providing industry with reusable, low-cost, government-developed computer programs. Located at the University of Georgia, NASA's Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) has developed programs for equipment…

  1. Computers, Technology, and Disability. [Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council on Education, Washington, DC. HEATH Resource Center.

    This paper describes programs and resources that focus on access of postsecondary students with disabilities to computers and other forms of technology. Increased access to technological devices and services is provided to students with disabilities under the Technology-Related Assistance for Individuals with Disabilities Act (Tech Act). Section…

  2. Computer Technology for Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Shell Oil Company used a COSMIC program, called VISCEL to insure the accuracy of the company's new computer code for analyzing polymers, and chemical compounds. Shell reported that there were no other programs available that could provide the necessary calculations. Shell produces chemicals for plastic products used in the manufacture of automobiles, housewares, appliances, film, textiles, electronic equipment and furniture.

  3. Digital holography and quantitative phase contrast imaging using computational shear interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falldorf, Claas; Agour, Mostafa; Bergmann, Ralf B.

    2015-02-01

    In this publication, we give a brief introduction into the field of computational shear interferometry, which allows for determining arbitrary wave fields from a set of shear interferograms. We discuss limitations of the method with respect to the coherence of the underlying wave field and present various numerical methods to recover it from its sheared representations. Finally, we show experimental results on digital holography of objects with rough surfaces using a fiber coupled light-emitting diode and quantitative phase contrast imaging as well as numerical refocusing in differential interference contrast microscopy.

  4. Optimization of the switch-back technique used for fast occlusion-processing in computer holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Sachio; Matsushima, Kyoji; Nakahara, Sumio

    2015-03-01

    A method called the switch-back technique allows us to drastically reduce computation time of occlusion-processing based on the polygon-by-polygon silhouette light-shielding. It is also reported that further reduction of computation time can be achieved by splitting an object to some sub-models along with depth direction. However, computational cost for numerical propagation between the sub-models increases with increasing the number of sub-models. As a result, there is an optimum number of sub-models. In this paper, we propose a technique to predict the optimum number of sub-models by estimating the total computational complexity of the switch-back technique with object splitting.

  5. Technology Trends: Buying a Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strot, Melody; Benno, Mark

    1997-01-01

    Provides guidelines for buying computers for parents of gifted children. Steps for making decisions include deciding who will use the computer, deciding its purposes and what software packages will be used, determining current and future needs, setting a budget, and reviewing needs with salespersons and school-based technology specialists. (CR)

  6. Trusted Computing Technologies, Intel Trusted Execution Technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Guise, Max Joseph; Wendt, Jeremy Daniel

    2011-01-01

    We describe the current state-of-the-art in Trusted Computing Technologies - focusing mainly on Intel's Trusted Execution Technology (TXT). This document is based on existing documentation and tests of two existing TXT-based systems: Intel's Trusted Boot and Invisible Things Lab's Qubes OS. We describe what features are lacking in current implementations, describe what a mature system could provide, and present a list of developments to watch. Critical systems perform operation-critical computations on high importance data. In such systems, the inputs, computation steps, and outputs may be highly sensitive. Sensitive components must be protected from both unauthorized release, and unauthorized alteration: Unauthorized users should not access the sensitive input and sensitive output data, nor be able to alter them; the computation contains intermediate data with the same requirements, and executes algorithms that the unauthorized should not be able to know or alter. Due to various system requirements, such critical systems are frequently built from commercial hardware, employ commercial software, and require network access. These hardware, software, and network system components increase the risk that sensitive input data, computation, and output data may be compromised.

  7. An improved method for computer generation of three-dimensional digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yanlei; Ma, Jianqiang; Chen, Yuhang; Li, Jiawen; Huang, Wenhao; Chu, Jiaru

    2013-12-01

    A novel method is proposed for designing optimized three-dimensional computer-generated holograms (CGHs). A series of spherical wave factors are introduced into the conventional optimal rotation angle (ORA) algorithm to achieve a varying amount of defocus along the optical axis, and the distraction terms are minimized during the iterative process. Both numerical simulation and experimental reconstructions are presented to demonstrate that this method is able to yield excellent multilayer patterns with high uniformity and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This method is significant for applications in laser 3D printing and multilayer data recording.

  8. Digital holography: 30 years later

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaroslavsky, Leonid P.

    2002-06-01

    Digital holography is analysis, synthesis and simulation of wave fields by means of digital computers and processors. Since first publications in digital holography, more than 30 years have passed. From then on, the ideas of digital holography formulated at that time has found quite a number of applications and implementations; but not all of them. Some old dreams such as that of holographic television, display and virtual reality still have not come true and some results and methods were left on the roadside. In the paper, a brief review of digital holography is presented and some 'roadside' subjects such as discrete representation of optical transforms and Monte Carlo methods for synthesis of computer generated display holograms and studying speckle noise in coherent imaging systems are revisited. In particular, it is shown (i) how, by an appropriate selection of a 'virtual' pseudo-random diffuser, one can generate Fourier holograms of 3D objects that can reconstruct their images from different observation directions and (ii) how such distortions in measuring diffusely scattered wave fields for computer reconstruction as limitation of the hologram size, limitation of its dynamic range and quantization affect speckle contrast in reconstructed images.

  9. Incoherent holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramson, Nils H.

    2000-10-01

    Dennis Gabor invented in-line holography in 1947, but at that time the coherent light from a laser did not yet exist and therefore the holograms he produced were of very low quality. When the laser was born in 1960 beautiful 3-D off- center holograms were for the first time produced by Emmett Leith and Juris Upatnieks. However, already as early as 1934 the inventor and artist Hans Weil patented a method to produce simple pictures that appeared floating in space, by scratching a transparent or metallic surface in certain directions. In 1995 William J. Beaty published a method for Hand-Drawn Holograms. Then it became possible for any artist to draw his own 3-D pictures of simple objects and using his ingenious techniques these hand drawn images will mimic many of the qualities of ordinary holograms.

  10. Emerging holography

    SciTech Connect

    Erlich, Joshua; Kribs, Graham D.; Low, Ian

    2006-05-01

    We rederive AdS/CFT predictions for infrared two-point functions by an entirely four-dimensional approach, without reference to holography. This approach, originally due to Migdal in the context of QCD, utilizes an extrapolation from the ultraviolet to the infrared using a Pade approximation of the two-point function. We show that the Pade approximation and AdS/CFT give the same leading order predictions, and we discuss including power corrections such as those due to condensates of gluons and quarks in QCD. At finite order the Pade approximation provides a gauge invariant regularization of a higher dimensional gauge theory in the spirit of deconstructed extra dimensions. The radial direction of anti-de Sitter space emerges naturally in this approach.

  11. Content metamorphosis in synthetic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbiens, Jacques

    2013-02-01

    A synthetic hologram is an optical system made of hundreds of images amalgamated in a structure of holographic cells. Each of these images represents a point of view on a three-dimensional space which makes us consider synthetic holography as a multiple points of view perspective system. In the composition of a computer graphics scene for a synthetic hologram, the field of view of the holographic image can be divided into several viewing zones. We can attribute these divisions to any object or image feature independently and operate different transformations on image content. In computer generated holography, we tend to consider content variations as a continuous animation much like a short movie. However, by composing sequential variations of image features in relation with spatial divisions, we can build new narrative forms distinct from linear cinematographic narration. When observers move freely and change their viewing positions, they travel from one field of view division to another. In synthetic holography, metamorphoses of image content are within the observer's path. In all imaging Medias, the transformation of image features in synchronisation with the observer's position is a rare occurrence. However, this is a predominant characteristic of synthetic holography. This paper describes some of my experimental works in the development of metamorphic holographic images.

  12. Optical Computers and Space Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdeldayem, Hossin A.; Frazier, Donald O.; Penn, Benjamin; Paley, Mark S.; Witherow, William K.; Banks, Curtis; Hicks, Rosilen; Shields, Angela

    1995-01-01

    The rapidly increasing demand for greater speed and efficiency on the information superhighway requires significant improvements over conventional electronic logic circuits. Optical interconnections and optical integrated circuits are strong candidates to provide the way out of the extreme limitations imposed on the growth of speed and complexity of nowadays computations by the conventional electronic logic circuits. The new optical technology has increased the demand for high quality optical materials. NASA's recent involvement in processing optical materials in space has demonstrated that a new and unique class of high quality optical materials are processible in a microgravity environment. Microgravity processing can induce improved orders in these materials and could have a significant impact on the development of optical computers. We will discuss NASA's role in processing these materials and report on some of the associated nonlinear optical properties which are quite useful for optical computers technology.

  13. Center for Advanced Computational Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.

    2000-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Computational Technology (ACT) was established to serve as a focal point for diverse research activities pertaining to application of advanced computational technology to future aerospace systems. These activities include the use of numerical simulations, artificial intelligence methods, multimedia and synthetic environments, and computational intelligence, in the modeling, analysis, sensitivity studies, optimization, design and operation of future aerospace systems. The Center is located at NASA Langley and is an integral part of the School of Engineering and Applied Science of the University of Virginia. The Center has four specific objectives: 1) conduct innovative research on applications of advanced computational technology to aerospace systems; 2) act as pathfinder by demonstrating to the research community what can be done (high-potential, high-risk research); 3) help in identifying future directions of research in support of the aeronautical and space missions of the twenty-first century; and 4) help in the rapid transfer of research results to industry and in broadening awareness among researchers and engineers of the state-of-the-art in applications of advanced computational technology to the analysis, design prototyping and operations of aerospace and other high-performance engineering systems. In addition to research, Center activities include helping in the planning and coordination of the activities of a multi-center team of NASA and JPL researchers who are developing an intelligent synthesis environment for future aerospace systems; organizing workshops and national symposia; as well as writing state-of-the-art monographs and NASA special publications on timely topics.

  14. EDITORIAL: Optical tomography and digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coupland, Jeremy; Lobera, Julia

    2008-07-01

    The articles in this special feature in Measurement Science and Technology concern exciting new developments in the field of digital holography—the process of electronically recording and numerically reconstructing an optical field [1]. Making use of the enormous advances in digital imaging and computer technology, digital holography is presented in a range of applications from fluid flow measurement and structural analysis to medical imaging. The science of digital holography rests on the foundations of optical holography, on the work of Gabor in the late 1940s, and on the development of laser sources in the 1960s, which made his vision a practical reality [2]. Optical holography, however, uses a photosensitive material, both to record a latent image and subsequently to behave as a diffractive optical element with which to reconstruct the incident field. In this way display holograms, using silver halide materials for example, can produce life-size images that are virtually indistinguishable from the object itself [3]. Digital holography, in contrast, separates the steps of recording and reconstruction, and the final image is most often in the form of a 3D computer model. Of course, television cameras have been used from the beginnings of holography to record interferometric images. However, the huge disparity between the resolution of holographic recording materials (more than 3000 cycles/mm) and television cameras (around 50 cycles/mm) was raised as a major concern by early researchers. TV holography, as it was sometimes called, generally recorded low numerical aperture (NA) holograms producing images with characteristically large speckle and was therefore more often referred to as electronic speckle pattern interferomery (ESPI) [4]. It is possible, however, to record large NA holograms on a sensor with restricted resolution by using an objective lens or a diverging reference wave [5]. This is generally referred to as digital holographic microscopy (DHM) since the resolution now places a limit on the size of the object that can be recorded. Some 60 years after the pioneering work of Gabor, digital imaging and associated computer technology offers a step change in capability with which to further exploit holography. Modern image sensors are now available with almost 30 million photosensitive elements, which corresponds to a staggering 100-fold increase compared to standard television images. At the same time personal computers have been optimized for imaging and graphics applications and this allows more sophisticated algorithms to be used in the reconstruction process. Although resolution still falls short of the materials used for optical holography, the ability to process data numerically generally outweighs this drawback and presents us with a host of new opportunities. Faced with the ability to record and process holograms numerically, it is natural to ask the question 'what information is present within recordings of scattered light?'. In fact this question could be posed by anyone using light, or indeed any other wave disturbance, for measurement purposes. For the case of optical holography, Wolf published his answer in 1969 [6], showing that for the case of weak scattering (small perturbations) and plane wave illumination, the amplitude and phase of each plane wave within the scattered field are proportional to those of a periodic variation in the refractive index contrast (i.e. a Bragg grating). This Fourier decomposition of the object was published almost simultaneously by Dandliker and Weiss [7], who also provided a graphical illustration of the technique. These works are the basis of optical tomography and provide us with the link between holographic data and 3D form. Digital holographic reconstruction and optical tomography was the theme of an international workshop [8] held in Loughborough in 2007, and many of the topics debated at the workshop have become the subject of the papers in this issue. In general terms the papers we present describe closely related holographic techniques that address application areas within the field of engineering. The application of digital holography to 3D fluid flow measurement is addressed by several authors. Salah et al demonstrate the simplicity of digital holography with an in-line multiple exposure holographic system using a low-cost laser diode. Soria and Atkinson discuss limitations of low NA holography in fluid velocimetry and demonstrate the potential of a multiple camera, in-line technique which they call Tomographic Digital Holographic Particle Image Velocimetry (Tomo-HPIV). Problems caused by the twin images (real and virtual) of in-line HPIV are described by Ooms et al. It is shown how sign ambiguity can be eliminated and bias errors suppressed by the application of a suitable threshold in piecewise correlation of the reconstructed field. Denis et al explain the problem of twin image removal as a deconvolution process and compare suppression algorithms based on wavelet decomposition. This process can be considered as an inverse problem and the benefits of this approach are discussed with reference to particulate holograms by Gire et al. Of course, the twin image problem can be solved by off-axis holographic geometries which, in effect, add a carrier modulation. Arroyo presents a comparison of carrier modulation strategies that have been presented in the literature and shows circumstances in which the information in each of the real and virtual images can be separated when the sensor resolution is less than that required by the NA of the objective. State-of-the-art digital holographic microscopy (DHM) is presented by Kühn et al. This paper uses an off-axis geometry that simultaneously records images at two wavelengths. The microscope allows the surface profile to be measured from a single recording and sub-nanometre axial resolution is demonstrated. Another interesting application of DHM is addressed by Grilli et al. They report a transmission set-up to investigate poling in a lithium niobate crystal. Developments in the field of optical tomography are covered by the majority of the papers in this issue. The paper by Debailleul et al shows the differences between images reconstructed from a single holographic recording and those synthesized from a series of holograms made with different plane wave illumination. This is optical diffraction tomography (ODT), the original method discussed by Wolf that is characterized by large NA and monochromatic illumination. An alternative strategy is to synthesize the image from holograms made at several wavelengths with low NA optics. This can be done either by sweeping the source or detector response or the reference path in a white light interferometer. These methods are called spectral domain and temporal domain optical coherence tomography (SD-ODT and TD-OCT) respectively. SD-OCT is illustrated in the paper by Potcoava and Kim for biomedical applications. SD- and TD-OCT are compared with confocal microscopy in the paper by Stifter et al. The huge potential of OCT as a diagnostic in polymer and composite materials is apparent from this work. There are clearly many different ways to implement optical tomography, and several established techniques, such as scanning white light interferometry (SWLI) and confocal microscopy, can be considered to be tomographic processes. We present two papers in this issue. The first attempts to bring together the topics of holography, microscopy and tomography within the framework of linear systems theory. It is shown that the images (or interferograms) produced by these instruments can be considered as estimates of refractive index contrast that are obtained using a linear inversion of the scattered field data. It is noted, however, that this is only strictly correct for the case of weak scattering and this is only a crude approximation for many cases of practical interest. The second paper that we present illustrates this for the case of mono-disperse particles in air. Here the number density of the particles is such that multiple scattering is prevalent; however, a priori knowledge of particle size and refractive index allows individual particles to be located accurately. In general, reconstruction can be thought of as a nonlinear optimization process that is used to discover the object which best explains the measured field and is consistent with a priori information. As Gire et al point out in their article, a priori knowledge can also be used to overcome the Nyquist sampling criteria. Although some caution should be exercised (for example, it is not usually possible to decide whether a given solution is unique), it is interesting to note that despite the disparity in resolution, digital holography and computer technology might yet create 3D images of greater clarity than the best optical holograms. References [1] Schnars U and Jueptner W 2005 Digital Holography (Berlin: Springer) ISBN: 978 3 540 21934 7 [2] Gabor D 1948 A new microscopic principle Nature 161 777-8 [3] Bjelkhagen H I 1993 Silver-Halide Recording Materials (Berlin: Springer) ISBN 3 540 58619 9 [4] Leendertz J A 1970 Interferometric displacement measurement on scattering surfaces utilizing speckle effect J. Phys. E: Sci. Instrum. 3 214-8 [5] Marquet P, Rappaz B, Magistretti P J, Cuche E, Emery Y, Colomb T and Depeursinge C 2005 Digital holographic microscopy: a noninvasive contrast imaging technique allowing quantitative visualization of living cells with subwavelength axial accuracy Opt. Lett. 30 468-70 [6] Wolf E 1969 Three-dimensional structure determination of semi-transparent objects from holographic data Opt. Commun. 1 153-6 [7] Dandliker R and Weiss K 1970 Reconstruction of the three-dimensional refractive index from scattered waves Opt. Commun. 1 323-8 [8] Coupland J and Lobera J 2007 International Workshop on Digital Holographic Reconstruction and Optical Tomography for Engineering Applications ISBN 978 0 947974 56 5

  15. Industrial Holography - The Rolls-Royce Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, R. J.; Jones, D. G.

    1987-10-01

    Holographic interferometry has provided the engineer with one of the most powerful and versatile measurement tools of the twentieth century. It seems only natural that such a technique should have found widespread application in the aero-engine industry. The quest for ever more fuel-efficient gas-turbine engines is constantly stretching and extending the frontiers of technology. It creates an increasing need for understanding of the mechanical and aerodynamic behaviour of components under extreme conditions. Holography has recently achieved new importance as a means of providing the data necessary for the development and validation of computer models. Increasingly, design work is being performed by the application of complicated three-dimensional computer models to gas flow prediction and the use of finite-element models for the investigation of mechanical behaviour and stress.

  16. Infinite possibilities: Computational structures technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beam, Sherilee F.

    1994-12-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (or CFD) methods are very familiar to the research community. Even the general public has had some exposure to CFD images, primarily through the news media. However, very little attention has been paid to CST--Computational Structures Technology. Yet, no important design can be completed without it. During the first half of this century, researchers only dreamed of designing and building structures on a computer. Today their dreams have become practical realities as computational methods are used in all phases of design, fabrication and testing of engineering systems. Increasingly complex structures can now be built in even shorter periods of time. Over the past four decades, computer technology has been developing, and early finite element methods have grown from small in-house programs to numerous commercial software programs. When coupled with advanced computing systems, they help engineers make dramatic leaps in designing and testing concepts. The goals of CST include: predicting how a structure will behave under actual operating conditions; designing and complementing other experiments conducted on a structure; investigating microstructural damage or chaotic, unpredictable behavior; helping material developers in improving material systems; and being a useful tool in design systems optimization and sensitivity techniques. Applying CST to a structure problem requires five steps: (1) observe the specific problem; (2) develop a computational model for numerical simulation; (3) develop and assemble software and hardware for running the codes; (4) post-process and interpret the results; and (5) use the model to analyze and design the actual structure. Researchers in both industry and academia continue to make significant contributions to advance this technology with improvements in software, collaborative computing environments and supercomputing systems. As these environments and systems evolve, computational structures technology will evolve. By using CST in the design and operation of future structures systems, engineers will have a better understanding of how a system responds and lasts, more cost-effective methods of designing and testing models, and improved productivity. For informational and educational purposes, a videotape is being produced using both static and dynamic images from research institutions, software and hardware companies, private individuals, and historical photographs and drawings. The extensive number of CST resources indicates its widespread use. Applications run the gamut from simpler university-simulated problems to those requiring solutions on supercomputers. In some cases, an image or an animation will be mapped onto the actual structure to show the relevance of the computer model to the structure. computer image using traditional composition theories or video production requirements, often the image loses some of its original digital quality and impact when transferred to videotape. Although many CST images are currently available, those that are edited into the final project must meet two important criteria: they must complement the narration, and they must be broadcast quality when recorded on videotape.

  17. Infinite possibilities: Computational structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beam, Sherilee F.

    1994-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (or CFD) methods are very familiar to the research community. Even the general public has had some exposure to CFD images, primarily through the news media. However, very little attention has been paid to CST--Computational Structures Technology. Yet, no important design can be completed without it. During the first half of this century, researchers only dreamed of designing and building structures on a computer. Today their dreams have become practical realities as computational methods are used in all phases of design, fabrication and testing of engineering systems. Increasingly complex structures can now be built in even shorter periods of time. Over the past four decades, computer technology has been developing, and early finite element methods have grown from small in-house programs to numerous commercial software programs. When coupled with advanced computing systems, they help engineers make dramatic leaps in designing and testing concepts. The goals of CST include: predicting how a structure will behave under actual operating conditions; designing and complementing other experiments conducted on a structure; investigating microstructural damage or chaotic, unpredictable behavior; helping material developers in improving material systems; and being a useful tool in design systems optimization and sensitivity techniques. Applying CST to a structure problem requires five steps: (1) observe the specific problem; (2) develop a computational model for numerical simulation; (3) develop and assemble software and hardware for running the codes; (4) post-process and interpret the results; and (5) use the model to analyze and design the actual structure. Researchers in both industry and academia continue to make significant contributions to advance this technology with improvements in software, collaborative computing environments and supercomputing systems. As these environments and systems evolve, computational structures technology will evolve. By using CST in the design and operation of future structures systems, engineers will have a better understanding of how a system responds and lasts, more cost-effective methods of designing and testing models, and improved productivity. For informational and educational purposes, a videotape is being produced using both static and dynamic images from research institutions, software and hardware companies, private individuals, and historical photographs and drawings. The extensive number of CST resources indicates its widespread use. Applications run the gamut from simpler university-simulated problems to those requiring solutions on supercomputers. In some cases, an image or an animation will be mapped onto the actual structure to show the relevance of the computer model to the structure. Transferring the digital files to videotape presents a number of problems related to maintaining the quality of the original image, while still producing a broadcast quality videotape. Since researchers normally do not create a computer image using traditional composition theories or video production requirements, often the image loses some of its original digital quality and impact when transferred to videotape. Although many CST images are currently available, those that are edited into the final project must meet two important criteria: they must complement the narration, and they must be broadcast quality when recorded on videotape.

  18. Computer Access. Tech Use Guide: Using Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Exceptional Children, Reston, VA. Center for Special Education Technology.

    One of nine brief guides for special educators on using computer technology, this guide focuses on access including adaptations in input devices, output devices, and computer interfaces. Low technology devices include "no-technology" devices (usually modifications to existing devices), simple switches, and multiple switches. High technology input…

  19. 48 Years with holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Toshihiro

    2014-11-01

    The invention of holography was epoch-making in optics. Although the research on holography has cycled through active and stagnant periods, holography has gradually become a practical technique thanks to researchers' steady efforts. The technique has many attractive features and is used in many fields nowadays. The latest developments in high-definition image sensors and ultrashort pulsed lasers have given rise to a new possibility of holography. I have been engaged in the research and development of holography since I knew it by casual opportunity. In this paper, the research in early stages of holography is briefly described, and some of my basic and applied research in which I have so far engaged are introduced.

  20. Computer technologies and institutional memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Christopher; Lachman, Roy

    1989-01-01

    NASA programs for manned space flight are in their 27th year. Scientists and engineers who worked continuously on the development of aerospace technology during that period are approaching retirement. The resulting loss to the organization will be considerable. Although this problem is general to the NASA community, the problem was explored in terms of the institutional memory and technical expertise of a single individual in the Man-Systems division. The main domain of the expert was spacecraft lighting, which became the subject area for analysis in these studies. The report starts with an analysis of the cumulative expertise and institutional memory of technical employees of organizations such as NASA. A set of solutions to this problem are examined and found inadequate. Two solutions were investigated at length: hypertext and expert systems. Illustrative examples were provided of hypertext and expert system representation of spacecraft lighting. These computer technologies can be used to ameliorate the problem of the loss of invaluable personnel.

  1. Military engine computational structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, Daniel E.

    1992-01-01

    Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology Initiative (IHPTET) goals require a strong analytical base. Effective analysis of composite materials is critical to life analysis and structural optimization. Accurate life prediction for all material systems is critical. User friendly systems are also desirable. Post processing of results is very important. The IHPTET goal is to double turbine engine propulsion capability by the year 2003. Fifty percent of the goal will come from advanced materials and structures, the other 50 percent will come from increasing performance. Computer programs are listed.

  2. Leadership Training in Computer Technology. [Resource Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Rockville, MD.

    This manual contains papers written as part of a project to develop faculty leadership in the infusion of computer technology into graduate-level curricula in communication disorders. Titles and authors are (1) "Computer Technology in the Practice of Special Education: A General Introduction" (M. Budoff); (2)"Computer Technology in the Practice of…

  3. Center for Computational Structures Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Perry, Ferman W.

    1995-01-01

    The Center for Computational Structures Technology (CST) is intended to serve as a focal point for the diverse CST research activities. The CST activities include the use of numerical simulation and artificial intelligence methods in modeling, analysis, sensitivity studies, and optimization of flight-vehicle structures. The Center is located at NASA Langley and is an integral part of the School of Engineering and Applied Science of the University of Virginia. The key elements of the Center are: (1) conducting innovative research on advanced topics of CST; (2) acting as pathfinder by demonstrating to the research community what can be done (high-potential, high-risk research); (3) strong collaboration with NASA scientists and researchers from universities and other government laboratories; and (4) rapid dissemination of CST to industry, through integration of industrial personnel into the ongoing research efforts.

  4. Holography Of Art Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuerker, R. F.

    1980-05-01

    In time, holography will have a major impact on all types of displays. Priceless, one of a kind artifacts can be copied and disseminated for esthetic and education purposes. Additionally, holography interferometry can safely test artifacts for incipient faults or damage, allowing corrective measures to be applied at an early stage.

  5. GPU-based calculations in digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrigal, R.; Acebal, P.; Blaya, S.; Carretero, L.; Fimia, A.; Serrano, F.

    2013-05-01

    In this work we are going to apply GPU (Graphical Processing Units) with CUDA environment for scientific calculations, concretely high cost computations on the field of digital holography. For this, we have studied three typical problems in digital holography such as Fourier transforms, Fresnel reconstruction of the hologram and the calculation of vectorial diffraction integral. In all cases the runtime at different image size and the corresponding accuracy were compared to the obtained by traditional calculation systems. The programs have been carried out on a computer with a graphic card of last generation, Nvidia GTX 680, which is optimized for integer calculations. As a result a large reduction of runtime has been obtained which allows a significant improvement. Concretely, 15 fold shorter times for Fresnel approximation calculations and 600 times for the vectorial diffraction integral. These initial results, open the possibility for applying such kind of calculations in real time digital holography.

  6. Art and Technology: Computers in the Studio?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruby-Baird, Janet

    1997-01-01

    Because the graphic industry demands graduates with computer skills, art students want college programs that include complex computer technologies. However, students can produce good computer art only if they have mastered traditional drawing and design skills. Discusses designing an art curriculum including both technology and traditional course…

  7. Advanced laptop and small personal computer technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Roger L.

    1991-01-01

    Advanced laptop and small personal computer technology is presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following areas of hand carried computers and mobile workstation technology are covered: background, applications, high end products, technology trends, requirements for the Control Center application, and recommendations for the future.

  8. Scalable Optical Architectures for Electronic Holography.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St.-Hilaire, Pierre

    Holography has long been recognized as an effective way to convey the information of complex 3-dimensional structures such as those encountered in medical imaging, computer-aided design and navigation. However, attempts at implementing a real-time holographic display device have been hampered by the enormous space-bandwidth products required by such a task. I present here an approach that alleviates many of the problems encountered in previous attempts at real-time computer generated holography. The basic idea underlying the MIT electronic holography display is the use of an acousto-optic modulator as a dynamic display medium and the synthesis of a large aperture by scanning the image of the modulator. The original implementation of the display is unsuitable for images larger than a few square centimeters, because the necessary optical space -bandwidth product become unmanageable by the electronic and optical subsystems. The goal of this thesis is to demonstrate that large displays can be implemented with available technologies if we break the space bandwidth product in small segments at both the image plane and Fourier plane, i.e. if we take a parallel approach. In the image plane domain the display space-bandwidth product can be increased by simultaneously writing multiple acoustic columns on a single crystal and then optically multiplexing the resulting holograms. I discuss the proper conditions under which the interline crosstalk remains acceptable and introduce a scanning geometry that allows for such a multiple channel operation. The Fourier domain can also be segmented in small domains, each being processed by a different scanning element. I describe the behavior of the image when such a segmentation in implemented and I then derive the conditions under which it can be effected without incurring significant image degradation. I finally describe the implementation of these concepts into a large scale holographic display which includes the use of an array of 6 galvanometric scanners as the horizontal scanning element, two 18-channel acousto-optic Bragg cells working in tandem, and a bank of custom-designed high-bandwidth framebuffers. The application of the concept of parallelism has allowed a six-fold scale-up of the display, which now produces high quality images 150mm times 75 mm in frontal dimensions, with a 30 degrees view zone. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.).

  9. Computer Technology: State of the Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Withington, Frederic G.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the nature of modern general-purpose computer systems, including hardware, semiconductor electronics, microprocessors, computer architecture, input output technology, and system control programs. Seven suggested readings are cited. (FM)

  10. Moral Responsibility and Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Batya

    Noting a recent increase in the number of cases of computer crime and computer piracy, this paper takes up the question, "How can understanding the social context of computing help us--as parents, educators, and members of government and industry--to educate young people to become morally responsible members of an electronic information…

  11. Electron holography at atomic dimensions -- Present state

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, M.; Lichte, H.; Geiger, D.; Lang, G.; Schweda, E.

    1999-04-01

    An electron microscope is a wave optical instrument where the object information is carried by an electron wave. However, an important information, the phase of the electron wave, is lost, because only intensities can be recorded in a conventional electron micrograph. Off-axis electron holography solves this phase problem by encoding amplitude and phase information in an interference pattern, the so-called hologram. After reconstruction, a rather unrestricted wave optical analysis can be performed on a computer. The possibilities as well as the current limitations of off-axis electron holography at atomic dimensions are discussed, and they are illustrated at two applications of structure characterization of {epsilon}-NbN and YBCO-1237. Finally, an electron microscope equipped with a Cs-corrector, a monochromator, and a Moellenstedt biprism is outlined for subangstrom holography.

  12. Holography - Application To Art: Curatorial Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinsmore, Sydney

    1987-06-01

    An exploration of the need to define a specific and critical language to describe the art of holography. Within any discussion of art, critical analysis must maintain an objective openess, particularily when the discourse concerns new media. To apply technological invention to art, new media is often without precedent on which to base criticism and bias. For this reason, holography falls prey to comparative rhetoric and established evaluation of other forms of imaging,as photography emulated the compositional romanticism of painting initially. Isolated and often misunderstood within the context of history, new media vascillates between legitimacy and curiosity in an attempt to create specific parameters to identify perceptual transition.

  13. Electron holography—basics and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichte, Hannes; Lehmann, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Despite the huge progress achieved recently by means of the corrector for aberrations, allowing now a true atomic resolution of 0.1 nm, hence making it an unrivalled tool for nanoscience, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) suffers from a severe drawback: in a conventional electron micrograph only a poor phase contrast can be achieved, i.e. phase structures are virtually invisible. Therefore, conventional TEM is nearly blind for electric and magnetic fields, which are pure phase objects. Since such fields provoked by the atomic structure, e.g. of semiconductors and ferroelectrics, largely determine the solid state properties, hence the importance for high technology applications, substantial object information is missing. Electron holography in TEM offers the solution: by superposition with a coherent reference wave, a hologram is recorded, from which the image wave can be completely reconstructed by amplitude and phase. Now the object is displayed quantitatively in two separate images: one representing the amplitude, the other the phase. From the phase image, electric and magnetic fields can be determined quantitatively in the range from micrometre down to atomic dimensions by all wave optical methods that one can think of, both in real space and in Fourier space. Electron holography is pure wave optics. Therefore, we discuss the basics of coherence and interference, the implementation into a TEM, the path of rays for recording holograms as well as the limits in lateral and signal resolution. We outline the methods of reconstructing the wave by numerical image processing and procedures for extracting the object properties of interest. Furthermore, we present a broad spectrum of applications both at mesoscopic and atomic dimensions. This paper gives an overview of the state of the art pointing at the needs for further development. It is also meant as encouragement for those who refrain from holography, thinking that it can only be performed by specialists in highly specialized laboratories. In fact, a modern TEM built for atomic resolution and equipped with a field emitter or a Schottky emitter, well aligned by a skilled operator, can deliver good holograms. Running commercially available image processing software and mathematics programs on a laptop-computer is sufficient for reconstruction of the amplitude and phase images and extracting desirable object information.

  14. Theory-Guided Technology in Computer Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-Ari, Mordechai

    2001-01-01

    Examines the history of major achievements in computer science as portrayed by winners of the prestigious Turing award and identifies a possibly unique activity called Theory-Guided Technology (TGT). Researchers develop TGT by using theoretical results to create practical technology. Discusses reasons why TGT is practical in computer science and…

  15. College Students' Attitude towards Computer Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Njagi, K. O.; Havice, W. L.

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in the contemporary world, especially in the area of computer technology, have heralded the development and implementation of new and innovative teaching strategies and particularly with the Internet revolution. This study assessed students' attitude towards computer technology. Specifically, the study assessed differences in…

  16. Computer Technology-Infused Learning Enhancement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keengwe, Jared; Anyanwu, Longy O.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine students' perception of instructional integration of computer technology to improve learning. Two key questions were investigated in this study: (a) What is the students' perception of faculty integration of computer technology into classroom instruction? (b) To what extent does the students' perception of…

  17. Prior Computer Experience and Technology Acceptance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varma, Sonali

    2010-01-01

    Prior computer experience with information technology has been identified as a key variable (Lee, Kozar, & Larsen, 2003) that can influence an individual's future use of newer computer technology. The lack of a theory driven approach to measuring prior experience has however led to conceptually different factors being used interchangeably in…

  18. Computer Technology and Education: A Policy Delphi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steier, Lloyd P.

    Realizing the educational potential of computer technology largely depends on developing appropriate policies related to the technology. A Policy Delphi method was used to identify changes in education that are both probable and possible on account of the introduction of computers, and to explore potential patterns for arriving at a desired…

  19. Technologies for Visualization in Computational Aerosciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miceli, Kristina D.; Cooper, D. M. (Technical Monitor)

    1993-01-01

    State-of-the-art research in computational aerosciences produces' complex, time-dependent datasets. Simulations can also be multidisciplinary in nature, coupling two or more physical disciplines such as fluid dynamics, structural dynamics, thermodynamics, and acoustics. Many diverse technologies are necessary for visualizing computational aerosciences simulations. This paper describes these technologies and how they contribute to building effective tools for use by domain scientists. These technologies include data management, distributed environments, advanced user interfaces, rapid prototyping environments, parallel computation, and methods to visualize the scalar and vector fields associated with computational aerosciences datasets.

  20. Center for Computer Sciences and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    Functions of the Center for Computer Sciences and Technology (CCST), a national center for computer research and development for the United States government, are described. CCST provides computer and related services to the National Bureau of Standards of which it is a part and to other government agencies on a cost-reimbursable basis. The Office…

  1. Computer Technology Resources for Literacy Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Council on Aging, Tallahassee.

    This resource booklet was prepared to assist literacy projects and community adult education programs in determining the technology they need to serve more older persons. Section 1 contains the following reprinted articles: "The Human Touch in the Computer Age: Seniors Learn Computer Skills from Schoolkids" (Suzanne Kashuba); "Computer Instruction…

  2. Applications of Computer Technology in Intercollegiate Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Jack, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Focusing on how computers can and should be used in intercollegiate forensics, this journal issue offers the perspectives of a number of forensics instructors. The lead article, "Applications of Computer Technology in Intercollegiate Debate" by Theodore F. Sheckels, Jr., discusses five areas in which forensics educators might use computer…

  3. From Computer Lab to Technology Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherwood, Sandra

    1999-01-01

    Discussion of integrating technology into elementary school classrooms focuses on teacher training that is based on a three-year plan developed at an elementary school in Marathon, New York. Describes the role of a technology teacher who facilitates technology integration by running the computer lab, offering workshops, and developing inservice…

  4. Education & Technology: Reflections on Computing in Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Charles, Ed.; Dwyer, David C., Ed.; Yocam, Keith, Ed.

    This volume examines learning in the age of technology, describes changing practices in technology-rich classrooms, and proposes new ways to support teachers as they incorporate technology into their work. It commemorates the eleventh anniversary of the Apple Classrooms of Tomorrow (ACOT) Project, when Apple Computer, Inc., in partnership with a…

  5. An Introduction to Educational Holography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, R. Scott

    Holograms are capable of taking the two-dimensional ways of envisioning information to another dimension of presentation, representation, and conceptualization. Educational holography is joining display holography, holographic testing of materials, and holographic optical elements as a fourth major field in holography. Holograms are explored as…

  6. Computing, Information and Communications Technology (CICT) Website

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, John; Tu, Eugene (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Computing, Information and Communications Technology Program (CICT) was established in 2001 to ensure NASA's Continuing leadership in emerging technologies. It is a coordinated, Agency-wide effort to develop and deploy key enabling technologies for a broad range of mission-critical tasks. The NASA CICT program is designed to address Agency-specific computing, information, and communications technology requirements beyond the projected capabilities of commercially available solutions. The areas of technical focus have been chosen for their impact on NASA's missions, their national importance, and the technical challenge they provide to the Program. In order to meet its objectives, the CICT Program is organized into the following four technology focused projects: 1) Computing, Networking and Information Systems (CNIS); 2) Intelligent Systems (IS); 3) Space Communications (SC); 4) Information Technology Strategic Research (ITSR).

  7. Computers and Writing. Tech Use Guide: Using Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Bridget

    One of nine brief guides for special educators on using computer technology, this guide focuses on the use of computers to improve skills and attitudes in writing instruction. Pre-writing tools such as group brainstorming, story webs, free-writing, journal entries, and prewriting guides help generate ideas and can be carried out either on or off…

  8. (CICT) Computing, Information, and Communications Technology Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDalsem, William R.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of the Computing, Information, and Communications Technology (CICT) program is to enable NASA's Scientific Research, Space Exploration, and Aerospace Technology Missions with greater mission assurance, for less cost, with increased science return through the development and use of advanced computing, information and communications technologies. This viewgraph presentation includes diagrams of how the political guidance behind CICT is structured. The presentation profiles each part of the NASA Mission in detail, and relates the Mission to the activities of CICT. CICT's Integrated Capability Goal is illustrated, and hypothetical missions which could be enabled by CICT are profiled. CICT technology development is profiled.

  9. Coherence holography and photon-correlation holography: marriage between holography and statistical optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Mitsuo; Wang, Wei; Naik, Dinesh N.

    2011-10-01

    We review two techniques of unconventional holography, coherence holography and photon-correlation holography, which we recently proposed and experimentally demonstrated. We will emphasize the importance of noticing mathematical analogies in optics and physical phenomena, which give insights into the methodology for developing new techniques.

  10. Conductivity of a strange metal: from holography to memory functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    We study the electrical response of a wide class of strange metal phases without quasiparticles at finite temperature and charge density, with explicitly broken translational symmetry, using holography. The low frequency electrical conductivity exhibits a Drude peak, so long as momentum relaxation is slow. The relaxation time and the direct current conductivity are exactly equal to what is computed, independently of holography, via the memory function framework.

  11. Holography In Biomedical Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Bally, G.

    1988-01-01

    Today not only physicists and engineers but also biological and medical scientists are exploring the potentials of holographic methods in their special field of work. Most of the underlying physical principles such as coherence, interference, diffraction and polarization as well as general features of holography e.g. storage and retrieval of amplitude and phase of a wavefront, 3-d-imaging, large field of depth, redundant storage of information, spatial filtering, high-resolving, non-contactive, 3-d form and motion analysis are explained in detail in other contributions to this book. Therefore, this article is confined to the applications of holography in biomedical sciences. Because of the great number of contributions and the variety of applications [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8] in this review the investigations can only be mentioned briefly and the survey has to be confined to some examples. As in all fields of optics and laser metrology, a review of biomedical applications of holography would be incomplete if military developments and their utilization are not mentioned. As will be demonstrated by selected examples the increasing interlacing of science with the military does not stop at domains that traditionally are regarded as exclusively oriented to human welfare like biomedical research [9]. This fact is actually characterized and stressed by the expression "Star Wars Medicine", which becomes increasingly common as popular description for laser applications (including holography) in medicine [10]. Thus, the consequence - even in such highly specialized fields like biomedical applications of holography - have to be discussed.

  12. Ultimate computing. Biomolecular consciousness and nano Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Hameroff, S.R.

    1987-01-01

    The book advances the premise that the cytoskeleton is the cell's nervous system, the biological controller/computer. If indeed cytoskeletal dynamics in the nanoscale (billionth meter, billionth second) are the texture of intracellular information processing, emerging ''NanoTechnologies'' (scanning tunneling microscopy, Feynman machines, von Neumann replicators, etc.) should enable direct monitoring, decoding and interfacing between biological and technological information devices. This in turn could result in important biomedical applications and perhaps a merger of mind and machine: Ultimate Computing.

  13. Computer technology forecast study for general aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seacord, C. L.; Vaughn, D.

    1976-01-01

    A multi-year, multi-faceted program is underway to investigate and develop potential improvements in airframes, engines, and avionics for general aviation aircraft. The objective of this study was to assemble information that will allow the government to assess the trends in computer and computer/operator interface technology that may have application to general aviation in the 1980's and beyond. The current state of the art of computer hardware is assessed, technical developments in computer hardware are predicted, and nonaviation large volume users of computer hardware are identified.

  14. Computer Technology and the Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Allen D.; Klassen, Daniel L.

    1983-01-01

    The citizen of tomorrow needs to understand the role of information in political systems; computer technology and information storage, retrieval, and use; the implications of information systems for individual rights; and the impact of computer crime, databanks, and systems analysis on the social, economic, and political spheres. (QKR)

  15. Implementing Computer Technologies: Teachers' Perceptions and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wozney, Lori; Venkatesh, Vivek; Abrami, Philip

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates personal and setting characteristics, teacher attitudes, and current computer technology practices among 764 elementary and secondary teachers from both private and public school sectors in Quebec. Using expectancy-value theory, the Technology Implementation Questionnaire (TIQ) was developed; it consists of 33 belief items…

  16. Cloud Computing Technologies and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jinzy

    In a nutshell, the existing Internet provides to us content in the forms of videos, emails and information served up in web pages. With Cloud Computing, the next generation of Internet will allow us to "buy" IT services from a web portal, drastic expanding the types of merchandise available beyond those on e-commerce sites such as eBay and Taobao. We would be able to rent from a virtual storefront the basic necessities to build a virtual data center: such as CPU, memory, storage, and add on top of that the middleware necessary: web application servers, databases, enterprise server bus, etc. as the platform(s) to support the applications we would like to either rent from an Independent Software Vendor (ISV) or develop ourselves. Together this is what we call as "IT as a Service," or ITaaS, bundled to us the end users as a virtual data center.

  17. Research on Key Technologies of Cloud Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shufen; Yan, Hongcan; Chen, Xuebin

    With the development of multi-core processors, virtualization, distributed storage, broadband Internet and automatic management, a new type of computing mode named cloud computing is produced. It distributes computation task on the resource pool which consists of massive computers, so the application systems can obtain the computing power, the storage space and software service according to its demand. It can concentrate all the computing resources and manage them automatically by the software without intervene. This makes application offers not to annoy for tedious details and more absorbed in his business. It will be advantageous to innovation and reduce cost. It's the ultimate goal of cloud computing to provide calculation, services and applications as a public facility for the public, So that people can use the computer resources just like using water, electricity, gas and telephone. Currently, the understanding of cloud computing is developing and changing constantly, cloud computing still has no unanimous definition. This paper describes three main service forms of cloud computing: SAAS, PAAS, IAAS, compared the definition of cloud computing which is given by Google, Amazon, IBM and other companies, summarized the basic characteristics of cloud computing, and emphasized on the key technologies such as data storage, data management, virtualization and programming model.

  18. Culture Computing: Interactive Technology to Explore Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheok, Adrian David

    The present day rapid development of media science and digital technology is offering the modern generation more opportunities as well as challenges as the new fundamental literacy. Therefore, to reach the modern generation on issues such as an appreciation of cultures, we have to find common grounds based on digital media technology. In an increasingly hybrid cultural environment, interaction and fusion of cultural factors with the computer technology will be an investigation into the possibilities of providing an experience into the cultures of the world, operating in the environments the modern generation inhabits. Research has created novel merging of traditional cultures and literature with recent media literacy. Three cultural computing systems, Media Me, BlogWall and Confucius Computer, are presented in this chapter. Studies showed that users gave positive feedback to their experience of interacting with cultural computing systems.

  19. Holography and Optical Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imlau, Mirco; Fally, Martin; Burr, Geoffrey W.; Sincerbox, Glenn T.

    The term holography is composed of the Greek words holos (= whole) and graphein (= to record, to write), and thus summarizes the key aspects of its underlying principle: recording the complete wavefront of an object, i.e., its intensity as well as its phase. Interference and diffraction phenomena are employed to record and retrieve the full information, a technique pioneered by Dennis Gabor in 1948. He was honored with the Nobel prize in Physics in 1971, reflecting the general impact of holography on modern physics.

  20. Electron holography of catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Datye, A.K.; Kalakkad, D.S.; Allard, L.F.; Volkl, E.

    1995-12-01

    Electron holography is an emerging technique for catalyst characterization. In conventional high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) image intensities are recorded, but the phase information in the complex image wave is lost. However, it is the phase information which is sensitive at the atomic scale to changes in sample thickness and composition. Electron holography allows us to obtain the amplitude and phase of the electron wave independently from the hologram. This technique is therefore of great interest to map out the structure and morphology of catalytic materials. We will describe applications of this technique to supported metals, oxides and sulfide catalysts.

  1. Haptic Holography/Touching the Ethereal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Haptic Holography, was perhaps, first proposed by workers at MIT in the 90s. The Media Lab, headed up by Dr. Stephen Benton, with published papers by Wendy Plesiak and Ravi Pappuh. -1 Recent developments in both the technology of digital holography and haptics have made it practical to conduct further investigations. Haptic holography is auto-stereoscopic and provides co-axial viewing for the user. Haptic holography may find application in medical & surgical training and as a new form of synthetic reality for artists and designers. At OCAD's PHASE Lab (Prototypes for Holographic Art and Science Explorations) workers are exploring hybrid forms of augmented reality, that combine haptics, interactivity and auto-stereoscopic imagery. Conventional Haptic environments, while presenting a 3D physics environment, typically provide a 2D visual work/play space. Orienteering in such an environment creates an uncertain spatial relationship for the user. Our group creates 3d models from which we create holographic constructs. The same model is used to create the physics environment. The two models are super-imposed. The result: Holograms you can touch.

  2. Use of laser holography for the measurement of teeth and orthodontic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchurajev, Alexandr L.; Sukharev, Michail P.; Veselov, Victor N.; Dvoynikov, Slava

    1994-09-01

    Many attempts to introduce computer technology into the field of dentistry have been actively developed. Process prosthetics demands precise qualitative and quantitative estimations of information in dental topography. Procedures of laser holography and coherent optics permit us to carry out noncontactive topographical recording of the surface form of a subject under investigation. In the present study the precise 3D shape measurement of the abutment and other teeth was attempted by using a He-Ne laser displacement meter and a computer controlled scanning system of model teeth.

  3. Absorbing New Subjects: Holography as an Analog of Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Sean F.

    2006-05-01

    I discuss the early history of holography and explore how perceptions, applications, and forecasts of the subject were shaped by prior experience. I focus on the work of Dennis Gabor (1900 1979) in England,Yury N. Denisyuk (b. 1924) in the Soviet Union, and Emmett N. Leith (1927 2005) and Juris Upatnieks (b. 1936) in the United States. I show that the evolution of holography was simultaneously promoted and constrained by its identification as an analog of photography, an association that influenced its assessment by successive audiences of practitioners, entrepreneurs, and consumers. One consequence is that holography can be seen as an example of a modern technical subject that has been shaped by cultural influences more powerfully than generally appreciated. Conversely, the understanding of this new science and technology in terms of an older one helps to explain why the cultural effects of holography have been more muted than anticipated by forecasters between the 1960s and 1990s.

  4. Synthetic aperture in terahertz in-line digital holography for resolution enhancement.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haochong; Rong, Lu; Wang, Dayong; Li, Weihua; Deng, Qinghua; Li, Bin; Wang, Yunxin; Zhan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xuemin; Wu, Weidong

    2016-01-20

    Terahertz digital holography is a combination of terahertz technology and digital holography. In digital holography, the imaging resolution is the key parameter in determining the detailed quality of a reconstructed wavefront. In this paper, the synthetic aperture method is used in terahertz digital holography and the in-line arrangement is built to perform the detection. The resolved capability of previous terahertz digital holographic systems restricts this technique to meet the requirement of practical detection. In contrast, the experimental resolved power of the present method can reach 125 ?m, which is the best resolution of terahertz digital holography to date. Furthermore, the basic detection of a biological specimen is conducted to show the practical application. In all, the results of the proposed method demonstrate the enhancement of experimental imaging resolution and that the amplitude and phase distributions of the fine structure of samples can be reconstructed by using terahertz digital holography. PMID:26835956

  5. Imaging technique for three-dimensional microstructure by digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huaying; Zhao, Jie; Wang, Guangjun; Zhang, Yizhuo; Wang, Dayong

    2008-03-01

    Digital holography is a whole-field, non-contact, and highly sensitive interferometric imaging and testing technology. It is more suitable for microscopic measurement owing to digitalization and flexibility in holograms recording, storage, reconstruction and transmittance. This paper analyzes the factors which lead to the phase aberrations in the off-axis lensless Fourier transform digital holography firstly. Then a method, which is obtained by borrowing ideas from T. Colomb, is presented to correct the phase aberrations automatically during the numerical reconstruction. This is implemented by multiplying a phase mask directly with the reconstructed wave field. The phase mask is obtained by an iterative procedure computing automatically without the pre-knowledge of the physical parameters, such as the off-set of the reference point source and the recording distance. This method enables one to reconstruct the relative correct and accurate phase-contrast image, even in the presence of the noise, which is needed to be smoothed by a median filter. In order to achieve an accurate phase image, the procedure described here is applied iteratively, starting from the initial values provided by the first evaluation. We present and analyze the simulation results of the phase images based on a special three-dimensional micro object. The results show that for a weak noise the above method is very effective; while for strong noise the common phase-unwrapping method must be applied. This indicates that it is very important to record high quality hologram and to suppress the noise in phase data.

  6. Holography without Fuss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Steve

    1989-01-01

    Outlines what a hologram is, the main types of holography, and how a simple system producing a white light reflection hologram can be set up in a school physics laboratory. Discusses the basic optics of the hologram and procedures and materials for making holograms in school. (YP)

  7. Holography and eternal inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, David A.; Marolf, Donald

    2004-07-01

    We show that eternal inflation is compatible with holography. In particular, we emphasize that if a region is asymptotically de Sitter in the future, holographic arguments by themselves place no bound on the number of past e-foldings. We also comment briefly on holographic restrictions on the production of baby universes.

  8. Model-Trained Neural Networks and Electronic Holography Demonstrated to Detect Damage in Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.; Fite, E. Brian; Mehmed, Oral; Thorp, Scott A.

    1998-01-01

    Detect Damage in Blades Electronic holography can show damaged regions in fan blades at 30 frames/sec. The electronic holograms are transformed by finite-element-model-trained artificial neural networks to visualize the damage. The trained neural networks are linked with video and graphics to visualize the bending-induced strain distribution, which is very sensitive to damage. By contrast, it is very difficult to detect damage by viewing the raw, speckled, characteristic fringe patterns. For neural-network visualization of damage, 2 frames or 2 fields are used, rather than the 12 frames normally used to compute the displacement distribution from electronic holograms. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, finite element models are used to compute displacement and strain distributions for the vibration modes of undamaged and cracked blades. A model of electronic time-averaged holography is used to transform the displacement distributions into finite-element-resolution characteristic fringe patterns. Then, a feedforward neural network is trained with the fringe-pattern/strain-pattern pairs, and the neural network, electronic holography, and video are implemented on a workstation. Now that the neural networks have been tested successfully at 30 frames/sec on undamaged and cracked cantilevers, the electronic holography and neural-network processing are being adapted for onsite damage inspection of twisted fan blades and rotormounted blades. Our conclusion is that model-trained neural nets are effective when they are trained with good models whose application is well understood. This work supports the aeromechanical testing portion of the Advanced Subsonic Technology Project.

  9. Holography in an industrial environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, R. J.; Jones, D. G.

    1988-01-01

    Various applications of holography to mechanical problems are discussed. All major fields where holographic interferometry is applied are considered, including flow visualization, nondestrucive testing, vibration analysis, and holographic contouring, with special attention given to the respective techniques and to the problems encountered and overcome in applying these techniques. The use of high-power pulsed lasers allowed holography to be used routinely in normal component test areas in the industrial environment away from the laboratory. Examples from recent work, including pulsed holography of large vibrating assemblies, holographic vibrometry on rotating components, holographic flow visualization in wind tunnels, and pulsed holography in rotating transonic flows, are presented.

  10. Publishing a School Newspaper Using Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Jeanne; And Others

    By publishing a quarterly school and community newspaper, sixth, seventh, and eighth graders get involved in the writing of many types of articles, proofreading, communication skills, interviewing skills, investigative reporting, photography, artistic and graphic design, and computer technology. As the students work together on each issue of the…

  11. Computer Science & Technology: Local Area Networking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotton, Ira W., Ed.

    The different technologies applicable to computer networks serving limited geographic areas, e.g., a single campus, factory, or office complex, are discussed in a number of short presentations made by active researchers and implementers in this field. Intensive discussion by participants in working sessions is reported for six topics: subnet…

  12. Computer Servicing Technology. Florida Vocational Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of South Florida, Tampa. Dept. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This program guide identifies primary concerns in the organization, operation, and evaluation of a computer servicing technology program. It is designed for local school district and community college administrators, instructors, program advisory committees, and regional coordinating councils. The guide begins with the Dictionary of Occupational…

  13. Women Workers as Users of Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larwood, Laurie

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of expectations, trends, and implications of growth of computer technology and its effect on women workers argues that the experience of women is different from that of men in the nature of jobs in which women are found, their training and education, home-family conflict, and discrimination. The impact on women of increasing…

  14. Computing the Real Costs of School Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaudin, James A.; Sells, Jeffrey A.

    1999-01-01

    Computers and other new technologies are changing how school buildings must be designed. Introduces full range of building designs that high-tech learning necessitates. Tables present unit costs for many infrastructural and network electronics components of advanced telecommunication systems now being installed in schools. A hypothetical case…

  15. Competency Index. [Business/Computer Technologies Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This index allows the user to scan the competencies under each title for the 28 subjects appropriate for use in a competency list for the 12 occupations within the business/computer technologies cluster. Titles of the 28 units are as follows: employability skills; professionalism; teamwork; professional and ethical standards; economic and business…

  16. Business/Computer Technologies. State Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document contains 272 competencies, grouped into 36 units, for tech prep programs in the business/computer technology cluster. The competencies were developed through collaboration of Ohio business, industry, and labor representatives and secondary and associate degree educators. The competencies are rated either "essential" (necessary to…

  17. Evaluation of Advanced Computing Techniques and Technologies: Reconfigurable Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, B. Earl

    2003-01-01

    The focus of this project was to survey the technology of reconfigurable computing determine its level of maturity and suitability for NASA applications. To better understand and assess the effectiveness of the reconfigurable design paradigm that is utilized within the HAL-15 reconfigurable computer system. This system was made available to NASA MSFC for this purpose, from Star Bridge Systems, Inc. To implement on at least one application that would benefit from the performance levels that are possible with reconfigurable hardware. It was originally proposed that experiments in fault tolerance and dynamically reconfigurability would be perform but time constraints mandated that these be pursued as future research.

  18. Preparing Malaysian Vocational and Technology Teachers To Integrate Computer Technology in Teaching Vocational and Technology Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakar, Ab. Rahim bin; Mohamed, Shamsiah

    1998-01-01

    A Malaysian study investigating the preparedness of vocational and technology teachers to integrate computer technology found that teachers were not knowledgeable about computers or computer software and thought they were not skillful in using spreadsheets, word processing, desktop publishing, database management, and programming software. Most…

  19. Holography: science and art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, Pierre M.

    1998-09-01

    Art and science are separated by a very large distance nowadays. Long ago, e.g. in Renaissance, or even earlier, in classic Greece and Rome, or still earlier in Egypt or Mesopotamia, arts and sciences were united. Today they seem to go separate paths: science for the industry, arts for the gallery. Holography is an exception: no art without science, but also no science without art.

  20. Holography at x-ray wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Solem, T.C.; Baldwin, G.C.; Chapline, G.F.

    1981-01-01

    We discuss alternative holographic techniques for imaging microscopic structures with a short-pulse, high intensity, high-quantum-energy laser. We find that Fresnel transform holography using a photoresist for registration of the hologram is most likely to be within the scope of near term technology. Although it has advantages in time gating, using an in-line electron microscope for hologram registration has an unacceptable tradeoff between quantum efficiency and resolution. Fourier transform holography using a reflector to generate the reference beam might be a reasonable alternative using low resolution film, but is necessarily more complicated. We discuss the dependence of the required laser intensity on the resolution sought and on the elastic and absorption cross sections. We conclude that resonant scattering must be used to obtain holograms at reasonable intensities.

  1. Differential fluorescence holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, David C.; Kim, Myung K.

    2015-03-01

    We present a new technique of three-dimensional tracking by way of incoherent digital holography suitable for non-scanning fluorescence microscopy. By acquiring complex holograms of a sample at different times, a difference hologram can be calculated. This result is another complex hologram representing only the information which has changed throughout the volumetric space during the time interval between one hologram and the next. We first demonstrate the advanced capability of self-interference incoherent digital holography combined with difference holography to track three-dimensional changes in a broadband, unfiltered, sunlit scene containing macroscopic continuous objects. This case is particularly remarkable due to the exceptionally short temporal coherence length and excessive build-up of noninterfering source points. We then demonstrate the ease of adaptation to microscopy, successfully converting a standard two-dimensional commercial microscope into a powerful three-dimensional tool. By overcoming these challenges, we show the feasibility and ease at which this technique may be adapted to the versatile, functional imaging of fluorescence microscopy.

  2. Medical applications of holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Bally, Gert

    1991-11-01

    From the various capabilities of holography for image processing and measuring purposes, holographic interferometric techniques have found more extended application in biological and medical research. Due to their special properties the different methods of holographic interferometry are applied to characteristic fields of biomedical investigations where--similar to nondestructive testing--vibration and deformation analysis is of interest. Features of holographic interferometry, such as the possibility of noncontactive, three-dimensional investigations with a large field-of-depth, are used with advantage. The main applications can be found in basic research e.g., in audiology, dentistry, opthalmology, and experimental orthopedics. Because of the great number of investigations and the variety of medical domains in which these investigations were performed this survey is confined to some characteristic examples. As in all fields of optics and laser metrology, a review on biomedical applications of holography would be incomplete if military developments and utilization were not mentioned. As demonstrated by selected examples, the increasing interlacing of science with the military does not stop at domains that traditionally are regarded as exclusively oriented to human welfare--like biomedical research. The term ''Star Wars Medicine'', which becomes an increasingly popular expression for laser applications (including holography) in medicine, characterizes the consequences of this development.

  3. Aesthetic message of holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zec, Peter

    1991-02-01

    Gisele Freund states that every historical epoch has its own artistic modes of expression that reflect the political character. thoughts and tastes of the times ill. At another point she writes that each society creates its own particular modes of expression largely through its life-style and tradition and that these modes in turn reflect the epoch. Every change in society influences the theme and type of artistic representation [2]. If one agrees with Freund's point of view . it becomes necessary to look at holography from a perspective different from those used up to now. We have to ask in which way and using what aesthetic methods and means does holography correspond with the thoughts and tastes of our times or. to put it differently. whether the aesthetic message of the medium is able to influence as well as express the characteristics and trends of the present experience. Above all, it is essential to examine what holography is and how this medium articulates its aesthetic message. This is not intended to be another detailed explanation of the technical principles of the recording and reconstruction of a hologram. which has already been done innumerable times 13]. Of more importance here is the intention to investigate the aesthetic side of the medium.

  4. Digital holography to light field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asundi, Anand; Zuo, Chao

    2014-05-01

    Holography uses wave (physical) optical principles of interference and diffraction to record and display images. Interference allows us to record the amplitude and phase of the optical wave emanating from an object on a film or recording medium and diffraction enables us to see this wave-field, i.e. the amplitude and phase of the object. Visually this corresponds to both perspective and depth information being reconstructed as in the original scene. Digital Holography has enabled quantification of phase which in some applications provides meaningful engineering parameters. There is growing interest in reconstructing this wavefield without interference. Thus the non-interferometric Transport of Intensity Equation (TIE) method is gaining increased research, which uses two or more defocused images to reconstruct the phase. Due to its non-interferometric nature, TIE relaxes the stringent beam-coherence requirements for interferometry, extending its applications to various optical fields with arbitrary spatial and temporal coherence. The alternate school of thought emerges from the computer science community primarily deals with ray optics. In a normal imaging system all rays emerging from an object point into are focused to a conjugate image point. Information of ray direction is lost and thus the perspective and depth information. A light field image is one that has information of both amplitude and direction of rays fanning from any object point and thus provides perspective (or what could be termed as phase) of the object wave as well. It would thus be possible to extract phase as we know it from this albeit for a coherent illumination case.

  5. Technologies for Achieving Field Ubiquitous Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagashima, Akira

    Although the term “ubiquitous” may sound like jargon used in information appliances, ubiquitous computing is an emerging concept in industrial automation. This paper presents the author's visions of field ubiquitous computing, which is based on the novel Internet Protocol IPv6. IPv6-based instrumentation will realize the next generation manufacturing excellence. This paper focuses on the following five key issues: 1. IPv6 standardization; 2. IPv6 interfaces embedded in field devices; 3. Compatibility with FOUNDATION fieldbus; 4. Network securities for field applications; and 5. Wireless technologies to complement IP instrumentation. Furthermore, the principles of digital plant operations and ubiquitous production to support the above key technologies to achieve field ubiquitous systems are discussed.

  6. Reviews of computing technology: Client-server technology

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.M.

    1990-09-01

    One of the most frequently heard terms in the computer industry these days is ``client-server.`` There is much misinformation available on the topic, and competitive pressures on software vendors have led to a great deal of hype with little in the way of supporting products. The purpose of this document is to explain what is meant by client-server applications, why the Advanced Technology and Architecture (ATA) section of the Information Resources Management (IRM) Department sees this emerging technology as key for computer applications during the next ten years, and what ATA sees as the existing standards and products available today. Because of the relative immaturity of existing client-server products, IRM is not yet guidelining any specific client-server products, except those that are components of guidelined data communications products or database management systems.

  7. Reviews of computing technology: Client-server technology

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.M.

    1990-09-01

    One of the most frequently heard terms in the computer industry these days is client-server.'' There is much misinformation available on the topic, and competitive pressures on software vendors have led to a great deal of hype with little in the way of supporting products. The purpose of this document is to explain what is meant by client-server applications, why the Advanced Technology and Architecture (ATA) section of the Information Resources Management (IRM) Department sees this emerging technology as key for computer applications during the next ten years, and what ATA sees as the existing standards and products available today. Because of the relative immaturity of existing client-server products, IRM is not yet guidelining any specific client-server products, except those that are components of guidelined data communications products or database management systems.

  8. Computer Education and Instructional Technology Teacher Trainees' Opinions about Cloud Computing Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karamete, Aysen

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to show the present conditions about the usage of cloud computing in the department of Computer Education and Instructional Technology (CEIT) amongst teacher trainees in School of Necatibey Education, Balikesir University, Turkey. In this study, a questionnaire with open-ended questions was used. 17 CEIT teacher trainees…

  9. Computer Education and Instructional Technology Teacher Trainees' Opinions about Cloud Computing Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karamete, Aysen

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to show the present conditions about the usage of cloud computing in the department of Computer Education and Instructional Technology (CEIT) amongst teacher trainees in School of Necatibey Education, Balikesir University, Turkey. In this study, a questionnaire with open-ended questions was used. 17 CEIT teacher trainees…

  10. Reviews of computing technology: Object-oriented technology

    SciTech Connect

    Skeen, D.C.

    1993-03-01

    A useful metaphor in introducing object-oriented concepts is the idea of a computer hardware manufacturer assembling products from an existing stock of electronic parts. In this analogy, think of the parts as pieces of computer software and of the finished products as computer applications. Like its counterpart, the object is capable of performing its specific function in a wide variety of different applications. The advantages to assembling hardware using a set of prebuilt parts are obvious. The design process is greatly simplified in this scenario, since the designer needs only to carry the design down to the chip level, rather than to the transistor level. As a result, the designer is free to develop a more reliable and feature rich product. Also, since the component parts are reused in several different products, the parts can be made more robust and subjected to more rigorous testing than would be economically feasible for a part used in only one piece of equipment. Additionally, maintenance on the resulting systems is simplified because of the part-level consistency from one type of equipment to another. The remainder of this document introduces the techniques used to develop objects, the benefits of the technology, outstanding issues that remain with the technology, industry direction for the technology, and the impact that object-oriented technology is likely to have on the organization. While going through this material, the reader will find it useful to remember the parts analogy and to keep in mind that the overall purpose of object-oriented technology is to create software parts and to construct applications using those parts.

  11. Grid computing technology for hydrological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecca, G.; Petitdidier, M.; Hluchy, L.; Ivanovic, M.; Kussul, N.; Ray, N.; Thieron, V.

    2011-06-01

    SummaryAdvances in e-Infrastructure promise to revolutionize sensing systems and the way in which data are collected and assimilated, and complex water systems are simulated and visualized. According to the EU Infrastructure 2010 work-programme, data and compute infrastructures and their underlying technologies, either oriented to tackle scientific challenges or complex problem solving in engineering, are expected to converge together into the so-called knowledge infrastructures, leading to a more effective research, education and innovation in the next decade and beyond. Grid technology is recognized as a fundamental component of e-Infrastructures. Nevertheless, this emerging paradigm highlights several topics, including data management, algorithm optimization, security, performance (speed, throughput, bandwidth, etc.), and scientific cooperation and collaboration issues that require further examination to fully exploit it and to better inform future research policies. The paper illustrates the results of six different surface and subsurface hydrology applications that have been deployed on the Grid. All the applications aim to answer to strong requirements from the Civil Society at large, relatively to natural and anthropogenic risks. Grid technology has been successfully tested to improve flood prediction, groundwater resources management and Black Sea hydrological survey, by providing large computing resources. It is also shown that Grid technology facilitates e-cooperation among partners by means of services for authentication and authorization, seamless access to distributed data sources, data protection and access right, and standardization.

  12. Computational Support for Technology- Investment Decisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adumitroaie, Virgil; Hua, Hook; Lincoln, William; Block, Gary; Mrozinski, Joseph; Shelton, Kacie; Weisbin, Charles; Elfes, Alberto; Smith, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    Strategic Assessment of Risk and Technology (START) is a user-friendly computer program that assists human managers in making decisions regarding research-and-development investment portfolios in the presence of uncertainties and of non-technological constraints that include budgetary and time limits, restrictions related to infrastructure, and programmatic and institutional priorities. START facilitates quantitative analysis of technologies, capabilities, missions, scenarios and programs, and thereby enables the selection and scheduling of value-optimal development efforts. START incorporates features that, variously, perform or support a unique combination of functions, most of which are not systematically performed or supported by prior decision- support software. These functions include the following: Optimal portfolio selection using an expected-utility-based assessment of capabilities and technologies; Temporal investment recommendations; Distinctions between enhancing and enabling capabilities; Analysis of partial funding for enhancing capabilities; and Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. START can run on almost any computing hardware, within Linux and related operating systems that include Mac OS X versions 10.3 and later, and can run in Windows under the Cygwin environment. START can be distributed in binary code form. START calls, as external libraries, several open-source software packages. Output is in Excel (.xls) file format.

  13. Magneto-transport from momentum dissipating holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoretti, Andrea; Musso, Daniele

    2015-09-01

    We obtain explicit expressions for the thermoelectric transport coefficients of a strongly coupled, planar medium in the presence of an orthogonal magnetic field and momentum-dissipating processes. The computations are performed within the gauge/gravity framework where the momentum dissipation mechanism is introduced by including a mass term for the bulk graviton. Relying on the structure of the computed transport coefficients and promoting the parameters to become dynamical functions, we propose a holography inspired phenomenology open to a direct comparison with experimental data from the cuprates.

  14. Adaptive Optical Scanning Holography.

    PubMed

    Tsang, P W M; Poon, Ting-Chung; Liu, J-P

    2016-01-01

    Optical Scanning Holography (OSH) is a powerful technique that employs a single-pixel sensor and a row-by-row scanning mechanism to capture the hologram of a wide-view, three-dimensional object. However, the time required to acquire a hologram with OSH is rather lengthy. In this paper, we propose an enhanced framework, which is referred to as Adaptive OSH (AOSH), to shorten the holographic recording process. We have demonstrated that the AOSH method is capable of decreasing the acquisition time by up to an order of magnitude, while preserving the content of the hologram favorably. PMID:26916866

  15. Holography gets smart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Chris; Larbey, Cynthia

    2008-02-01

    At least 6% of world trade, amounting to some 200bn per year, involves counterfeit goods. But this figure would be even higher were it not for the humble hologram. Invented 50 years ago, holograms provide authentication tags to deter copying, and can be found everywhere from credit cards, passports and banknotes to consumer goods, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. Holography also underpins supermarket scanners and CD players; it can even be used to store optical data in 3D. Now, however, holograms are making their mark as powerful yet cheap diagnostic tools, which could in particular have many applications in biomedicine.

  16. Adaptive Optical Scanning Holography

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, P. W. M.; Poon, Ting-Chung; Liu, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    Optical Scanning Holography (OSH) is a powerful technique that employs a single-pixel sensor and a row-by-row scanning mechanism to capture the hologram of a wide-view, three-dimensional object. However, the time required to acquire a hologram with OSH is rather lengthy. In this paper, we propose an enhanced framework, which is referred to as Adaptive OSH (AOSH), to shorten the holographic recording process. We have demonstrated that the AOSH method is capable of decreasing the acquisition time by up to an order of magnitude, while preserving the content of the hologram favorably. PMID:26916866

  17. Future Applications of Electronic Technology to Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Arthur J.; And Others

    Developments in electronic technology that have improved and linked together telecommunication and computers are discussed, as well as their use in instruction, implications of this use, and associated issues. The first section briefly describes the following developments: microcomputers and microprocessors, bubble memory, lasers, holography

  18. JPRS report: Science and technology. Central Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-05-01

    Translated articles cover the following topics: rheology and technology of ceramics and refractories: premises and models; development of fast stable computer image reconstruction methods in digital acoustic holography; automated interpretation of aerospace images; and stochastic model of multibeam radio channel between moving objects.

  19. Future Applications of Electronic Technology to Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Arthur J.; And Others

    Developments in electronic technology that have improved and linked together telecommunication and computers are discussed, as well as their use in instruction, implications of this use, and associated issues. The first section briefly describes the following developments: microcomputers and microprocessors, bubble memory, lasers, holography,…

  20. Improving student retention in computer engineering technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierozinski, Russell Ivan

    The purpose of this research project was to improve student retention in the Computer Engineering Technology program at the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology by reducing the number of dropouts and increasing the graduation rate. This action research project utilized a mixed methods approach of a survey and face-to-face interviews. The participants were male and female, with a large majority ranging from 18 to 21 years of age. The research found that participants recognized their skills and capability, but their capacity to remain in the program was dependent on understanding and meeting the demanding pace and rigour of the program. The participants recognized that curriculum delivery along with instructor-student interaction had an impact on student retention. To be successful in the program, students required support in four domains: academic, learning management, career, and social.

  1. Split-illumination electron holography

    SciTech Connect

    Tanigaki, Toshiaki; Aizawa, Shinji; Suzuki, Takahiro; Park, Hyun Soon; Inada, Yoshikatsu; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Taniyama, Akira; Shindo, Daisuke; Tonomura, Akira

    2012-07-23

    We developed a split-illumination electron holography that uses an electron biprism in the illuminating system and two biprisms (applicable to one biprism) in the imaging system, enabling holographic interference micrographs of regions far from the sample edge to be obtained. Using a condenser biprism, we split an electron wave into two coherent electron waves: one wave is to illuminate an observation area far from the sample edge in the sample plane and the other wave to pass through a vacuum space outside the sample. The split-illumination holography has the potential to greatly expand the breadth of applications of electron holography.

  2. 3D atomic imaging by internal-detector electron holography.

    PubMed

    Uesaka, Akio; Hayashi, Kouichi; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Arai, Shigetoshi

    2011-07-22

    A method of internal-detector electron holography is the time-reversed version of photoelectron holography. Using an energy-dispersive x-ray detector, an electron gun, and a computer-controllable sample stage, we measured a multiple-energy hologram of the atomic arrangement around the Ti atom in SrTiO3 by recording the characteristic Ti K? x-ray spectra for different electron beam angles and wavelengths. A real-space image was obtained by using a fitting-based reconstruction algorithm. 3D atomic images of the elements Sr, Ti, and O in SrTiO3 were clearly visualized. The present work reveals that internal-detector electron holography has great potential for reproducing 3D atomic arrangements, even for light elements. PMID:21867018

  3. When is holography consistent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInnes, Brett; Ong, Yen Chin

    2015-09-01

    Holographic duality relates two radically different kinds of theory: one with gravity, one without. The very existence of such an equivalence imposes strong consistency conditions which are, in the nature of the case, hard to satisfy. Recently a particularly deep condition of this kind, relating the minimum of a probe brane action to a gravitational bulk action (in a Euclidean formulation), has been recognized; and the question arises as to the circumstances under which it, and its Lorentzian counterpart, is satisfied. We discuss the fact that there are physically interesting situations in which one or both versions might, in principle, not be satisfied. These arise in two distinct circumstances: first, when the bulk is not an Einstein manifold and, second, in the presence of angular momentum. Focusing on the application of holography to the quark-gluon plasma (of the various forms arising in the early Universe and in heavy-ion collisions), we find that these potential violations never actually occur. This suggests that the consistency condition is a "law of physics" expressing a particular aspect of holography.

  4. Teaching with Technology: The Classroom Manager. Cost-Conscious Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Rhea; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Teachers discuss how to make the most of technology in the classroom during a tight economy. Ideas include recycling computer printer ribbons, buying replacement batteries for computer power supply packs, upgrading via software, and soliciting donated computer equipment. (SM)

  5. Evaluating Computer Technology Integration in a Centralized School System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eteokleous, N.

    2008-01-01

    The study evaluated the current situation in Cyprus elementary classrooms regarding computer technology integration in an attempt to identify ways of expanding teachers' and students' experiences with computer technology. It examined how Cypriot elementary teachers use computers, and the factors that influence computer integration in their…

  6. Evaluating Computer Technology Integration in a Centralized School System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eteokleous, N.

    2008-01-01

    The study evaluated the current situation in Cyprus elementary classrooms regarding computer technology integration in an attempt to identify ways of expanding teachers' and students' experiences with computer technology. It examined how Cypriot elementary teachers use computers, and the factors that influence computer integration in their…

  7. Active terahertz holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhenwei; Wang, Xinke; Zhang, Yan

    2013-12-01

    We present a novel technology to dynamically control the wave front of the terahertz (THz) beam with photo-generated carriers. The computer generated hologram is projected onto a silicon wafer by a conventional optical spatial light modulator. The photo-generated carriers on the silicon surface will from a hologram to modulate the wave front of the input THz beam. Some special field distributions and vortex beams are generated using this method. This technology is broadband, structure free, tunable, and all-optical controllable. It will provide numerous possible applications in future THz imaging and communication systems.

  8. Multi-field inflation from holography

    SciTech Connect

    Garriga, Jaume; Urakawa, Yuko; Skenderis, Kostas E-mail: K.Skenderis@soton.ac.uk

    2015-01-01

    We initiate the study of multi-field inflation using holography. Bulk light scalar fields correspond to nearly marginal operators in the boundary theory and the dual quantum field theory is a deformation of a CFT by such operators. We compute the power spectra of adiabatic and entropy perturbations in a simple model and find that the adiabatic curvature perturbation is not conserved in the presence of entropy perturbations but becomes conserved when the entropy perturbations are set to zero or the model is effectively a single scalar model, in agreement with expectations from cosmological perturbation theory.

  9. Computer-aided design and computer science technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulton, R. E.; Voigt, S. J.

    1976-01-01

    A description is presented of computer-aided design requirements and the resulting computer science advances needed to support aerospace design. The aerospace design environment is examined, taking into account problems of data handling and aspects of computer hardware and software. The interactive terminal is normally the primary interface between the computer system and the engineering designer. Attention is given to user aids, interactive design, interactive computations, the characteristics of design information, data management requirements, hardware advancements, and computer science developments.

  10. Computer vision research with new imaging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Guangqi; Liu, Fei; Sun, Zhenan

    2015-12-01

    Light field imaging is capable of capturing dense multi-view 2D images in one snapshot, which record both intensity values and directions of rays simultaneously. As an emerging 3D device, the light field camera has been widely used in digital refocusing, depth estimation, stereoscopic display, etc. Traditional multi-view stereo (MVS) methods only perform well on strongly texture surfaces, but the depth map contains numerous holes and large ambiguities on textureless or low-textured regions. In this paper, we exploit the light field imaging technology on 3D face modeling in computer vision. Based on a 3D morphable model, we estimate the pose parameters from facial feature points. Then the depth map is estimated through the epipolar plane images (EPIs) method. At last, the high quality 3D face model is exactly recovered via the fusing strategy. We evaluate the effectiveness and robustness on face images captured by a light field camera with different poses.

  11. Applications of holography; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, January 21-23, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, L.

    1985-01-01

    Among the topics discussed are: holographic displays; industrial applications of holography; dual thermoplastic holography recording; holographic interferometry applied to symmetric aerodynamic models in a wind tunnel; and fringe carrier techniques for unambiguous detection of holographically recorded displacements. Attention is also given to: holographic fringe linearization interferometry (FLI) for defect detection; tunable holographic filtering in dichromated gelatin operating in the near infrared region; holographic honeycomb microlenses; and electron-beam fabrication of computer generated holograms (CGH). Among additional topics discussed are: hologram recording with a photopolymer system; white-light Fourier holography; and white light holograms for credit card applications.

  12. Terahertz digital holography image processing based on MAP algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guang-Hao; Li, Qi

    2015-04-01

    Terahertz digital holography combines the terahertz technology and digital holography technology at present, fully exploits the advantages in both of them. Unfortunately, the quality of terahertz digital holography reconstruction images is gravely harmed by speckle noise which hinders the popularization of this technology. In this paper, the maximum a posterior estimation (MAP) filter is harnessed for the restoration of the digital reconstruction images. The filtering results are compared with images filtered by Wiener Filter and conventional frequency-domain filters from both subjective and objective perspectives. As for objective assessment, we adopted speckle index (SPKI) and edge preserving index (EPI) to quantitate the quality of images. In this paper, Canny edge detector is also used to outline the target in original and reconstruction images, which then act as an important role in the evaluation of filter performance. All the analysis indicate that maximum a posterior estimation filtering algorithm performs superiorly compared with the other two competitors in this paper and has enhanced the terahertz digital holography reconstruction images to a certain degree, allowing for a more accurate boundary identification.

  13. Simple reflection holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toeppen, John

    1990-03-01

    White light reflection holography is a good starting point for the first time holographer. The building of an inexpensive holographic camera offers an approach that has many distinct advantages. Not only can such a device be constructed by the average craftsman at a minimum cost but the monolithic design helps assure good results. The finished images are reasonably bright and easy to view in sunlight. The building of the camera itself is instructional as a design task which considers practical problems and scientific principles. The convenience of the finished device avoids many of the difficulties in setting up a dedicated optics lab. Further, the satisfaction of producing quality holograms is reinforced by a tangible reward for successful efforts. Methods, rather than theory, are the essence of this paper. It is intended that this project is not only an end in itself but that it serves as a basis for an outlook towards practical science.

  14. Computer Graphics. Curriculum Guide for Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craft, Clyde O.

    This curriculum guide for a 1-quarter or 1-semester course in computer graphics is designed to be used with Apple II computers. Some of the topics covered include the following: computer graphics terminology and applications, operating Apple computers, graphics programming in BASIC using various programs and commands, computer graphics painting,…

  15. Attitudes to Technology, Perceived Computer Self-Efficacy and Computer Anxiety as Predictors of Computer Supported Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, Vehbi; Yesilyurt, Etem

    2013-01-01

    There is a large body of research regarding computer supported education, perceptions of computer self-efficacy, computer anxiety and the technological attitudes of teachers and teacher candidates. However, no study has been conducted on the correlation between and effect of computer supported education, perceived computer self-efficacy, computer…

  16. Computer Science and Technology Publications. NBS Publications List 84.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC. Inst. for Computer Sciences and Technology.

    This bibliography lists publications of the Institute for Computer Sciences and Technology of the National Bureau of Standards. Publications are listed by subject in the areas of computer security, computer networking, and automation technology. Sections list publications of: (1) current Federal Information Processing Standards; (2) computer…

  17. Mobile Computing and Ubiquitous Networking: Concepts, Technologies and Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierre, Samuel

    2001-01-01

    Analyzes concepts, technologies and challenges related to mobile computing and networking. Defines basic concepts of cellular systems. Describes the evolution of wireless technologies that constitute the foundations of mobile computing and ubiquitous networking. Presents characterization and issues of mobile computing. Analyzes economical and…

  18. Computer Utilization in Industrial Arts/Technology Education. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut Industrial Arts Association.

    This guide is intended to assist industrial arts/technology education teachers in helping students in grades K-12 understand the impact of computers and computer technology in the world. Discussed in the introductory sections are the ways in which computers have changed the face of business, industry, and education and training; the scope and…

  19. Computer Utilization in Industrial Arts/Technology Education. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut Industrial Arts Association.

    This guide is intended to assist industrial arts/technology education teachers in helping students in grades K-12 understand the impact of computers and computer technology in the world. Discussed in the introductory sections are the ways in which computers have changed the face of business, industry, and education and training; the scope and…

  20. Computing, Information, and Communications Technology (CICT) Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDalsem, William R.

    2003-01-01

    The Computing, Information and Communications Technology (CICT) Program's goal is to enable NASA's Scientific Research, Space Exploration, and Aerospace Technology Missions with greater mission assurance, for less cost, with increased science return through the development and use of advanced computing, information and communication technologies

  1. Cloud Computing. Technology Briefing. Number 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Cloud computing is Internet-based computing in which shared resources, software and information are delivered as a service that computers or mobile devices can access on demand. Cloud computing is already used extensively in education. Free or low-cost cloud-based services are used daily by learners and educators to support learning, social…

  2. Petascale Computing Enabling Technologies Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    de Supinski, B R

    2010-02-14

    The Petascale Computing Enabling Technologies (PCET) project addressed challenges arising from current trends in computer architecture that will lead to large-scale systems with many more nodes, each of which uses multicore chips. These factors will soon lead to systems that have over one million processors. Also, the use of multicore chips will lead to less memory and less memory bandwidth per core. We need fundamentally new algorithmic approaches to cope with these memory constraints and the huge number of processors. Further, correct, efficient code development is difficult even with the number of processors in current systems; more processors will only make it harder. The goal of PCET was to overcome these challenges by developing the computer science and mathematical underpinnings needed to realize the full potential of our future large-scale systems. Our research results will significantly increase the scientific output obtained from LLNL large-scale computing resources by improving application scientist productivity and system utilization. Our successes include scalable mathematical algorithms that adapt to these emerging architecture trends and through code correctness and performance methodologies that automate critical aspects of application development as well as the foundations for application-level fault tolerance techniques. PCET's scope encompassed several research thrusts in computer science and mathematics: code correctness and performance methodologies, scalable mathematics algorithms appropriate for multicore systems, and application-level fault tolerance techniques. Due to funding limitations, we focused primarily on the first three thrusts although our work also lays the foundation for the needed advances in fault tolerance. In the area of scalable mathematics algorithms, our preliminary work established that OpenMP performance of the AMG linear solver benchmark and important individual kernels on Atlas did not match the predictions of our simple initial model. Our investigations demonstrated that a poor default memory allocation mechanism degraded performance. We developed a prototype NUMA library to provide generic mechanisms to overcome these issues, resulting in significantly improved OpenMP performance. After additional testing, we will make this library available to all users, providing a simple means to improve threading on LLNL's production Linux platforms. We also made progress on developing new scalable algorithms that target multicore nodes. We designed and implemented a new AMG interpolation operator with improved convergence properties for very low complexity coarsening schemes. This implementation will also soon be available to LLNL's application teams as part of the hypre library. We presented results for both topics in an invited plenary talk entitled 'Efficient Sparse Linear Solvers for Multi-Core Architectures' at the 2009 HPCMP Institutes Annual Meeting/CREATE Annual All-Hands Meeting. The interpolation work was summarized in a talk entitled 'Improving Interpolation for Aggressive Coarsening' at the 14th Copper Mountain Conference on Multigrid Methods and in a research paper that will appear in Numerical Linear Algebra with Applications. In the area of code correctness, we significantly extended our behavior equivalence class identification mechanism. Specifically, we not only demonstrated it works well at very large scales but we also added the ability to classify MPI tasks not only by function call traces, but also by specific call sites (source code line numbers) being executed by tasks. More importantly, we developed a new technique to determine relative logical execution progress of tasks in the equivalence classes by combining static analysis with our original dynamic approach. We applied this technique to a correctness issue that arose at 4096 tasks during the development of the new AMG interpolation operator discussed above. This scale isat the limit of effectiveness of production tools, but our technique quickly located the erroneous source code, demonstrating the power of

  3. Relationships between Computer Self-Efficacy, Technology, Attitudes and Anxiety: Development of the Computer Technology Use Scale (CTUS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Agatha M.; Munro, Don

    2008-01-01

    Two studies are reported which describe the development and evaluation of a new instrument, the Computer Technology Use Scale (CTUS), comprising three domains: computer self-efficacy, attitudes to technology, and technology related anxiety. Study 1 describes the development of the instrument and explores its factor structure. Study 2 used…

  4. The Steam Engine and the Computer: What Makes Technology Revolutionary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Herbert A.

    1987-01-01

    This discussion of technological revolution focuses on the computer and its uses in education. Contrasts between human traits, such as insight and creativity, and computer capabilities are discussed; the computer as its own instructional device is described; and possible educational changes resulting from computers are addressed. (LRW)

  5. Feasibility of microwave holography for imaging the sea surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, W.

    1972-01-01

    The possibility of imaging the sea surface in three dimensions by means of microwave holography from a low-flying aircraft is considered. Data cover a brief feasibility study and a review of some computer experiments in which it was demonstrated that it is possible to compute three-dimensional images of objects from raw holographic data recorded on magnetic tape. These experiments used synthetic data.

  6. Attitudes Toward Computer Technology Between Nursing and Medical Educators

    PubMed Central

    Harsanyi, Bennie E.; Kelsey, Clyde E.

    1989-01-01

    The results of this descriptive study indicated no significant difference between nursing and medical educators' attitudes toward computer technology. Demographic variables and usages of computer technology in educational and clinical practice environments were not significant. Previous experience with computer technology was significant but negatively correlated; whereas, education regarding computer technology was not. Word processing and record keeping in the education environment, however, were negatively correlated with attitudes. In the clinical environment, diagnosing was positively correlated, but patient assessment and network systems were negatively correlated with attitudes.

  7. Computational technology for high-temperature aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Card, M. F.

    1992-01-01

    The status and some recent developments of computational technology for high-temperature aerospace structures are summarized. Discussion focuses on a number of aspects including: goals of computational technology for high-temperature structures; computational material modeling; life prediction methodology; computational modeling of high-temperature composites; error estimation and adaptive improvement strategies; strategies for solution of fluid flow/thermal/structural problems; and probabilistic methods and stochastic modeling approaches, integrated analysis and design. Recent trends in high-performance computing environment are described and the research areas which have high potential for meeting future technological needs are identified.

  8. TOPICAL REVIEW: Information, computing technology, and quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyes, Robert W.

    2006-05-01

    Information has long been described by physical structures. The spectacularly successful modern computers use silicon transistors to hold and process information. A number of attempts to repeat the success with other kinds of solid-state devices have failed. The reasons for the unique success of silicon transistors are found in the requirements of computing, the properties of transistors, and the variability in devices manufactured in the large quantities needed to build large computing systems. New challenges will be met in building quantum computers to meet the same requirements.

  9. Holography in small bubble chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Lecoq, P.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter reports on an experiment to determine the total charm cross section at different incident momenta using the small, heavy liquid bubble chamber HOBC. Holography in liquid hydrogen is also tested using the holographic lexan bubble chamber HOLEBC with the aim of preparing a future holographic experiment in hydrogen. The high intensity tests show that more than 100 incident tracks per hologram do not cause a dramatic effect on the picture quality. Hydrogen is more favorable than freon as the bubble growth is much slower in hydrogen. An advantage of holography is to have the maximum resolution in the full volume of the bubble chamber, which allows a gain in sensitivity by a factor of 10 compared to classical optics as 100 tracks per hologram look reasonable. Holograms are not more difficult to analyze than classical optics high-resolution pictures. The results show that holography is a very powerful technique which can be used in very high resolution particle physics experiments.

  10. Attitudes to Technology, Perceived Computer Self-Efficacy and Computer Anxiety as Predictors of Computer Supported Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, Vehbi; Yesilyurt, Etem

    2013-01-01

    There is a large body of research regarding computer supported education, perceptions of computer self-efficacy, computer anxiety and the technological attitudes of teachers and teacher candidates. However, no study has been conducted on the correlation between and effect of computer supported education, perceived computer self-efficacy, computer…

  11. Computer generated holograms - An historical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tricoles, G.

    1987-10-01

    The methods and techniques of computer generated holography are described from a historical viewpoint. Topics discussed include computer generated optical filters, a description of the overall scheme of computer generated holography, and types of computer generated holograms, such as detour and nondetour phase holograms. Some applications of computer generated holography are briefly discussed with several different uses grouped into broad categories, such as diagnostic and testing, digital and optical interconnects, high-energy physics, imaging and display, medicine, and optical data processing.

  12. Cognitive Effects with and of Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomon, Gavriel

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the distinction between cognitive effects with computers, whereby an individual's performance is redefined and upgraded during intellectual partnership with the computer, and effects of computers, whereby such partnership leaves durable and generalizable cognitive residues. Suggests two mechanisms for affecting cognition: skill…

  13. Cognitive Effects with and of Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomon, Gavriel

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the distinction between cognitive effects with computers, whereby an individual's performance is redefined and upgraded during intellectual partnership with the computer, and effects of computers, whereby such partnership leaves durable and generalizable cognitive residues. Suggests two mechanisms for affecting cognition: skill…

  14. Electron Holography: phases matter.

    PubMed

    Lichte, Hannes

    2013-06-01

    Essentially, all optics is wave optics, be it with light, X-rays, neutrons or electrons. The information transfer from the object to the image can only be understood in terms of waves given by amplitude and phase. However, phases are difficult to measure: for slowly oscillating waves such as sound or low-frequency electromagnetic waves, phases can be measured directly; for high frequencies this has to be done by heterodyne detection, i.e. superposition with a reference and averaging over time. In optics, this is called interferometry. Because interference is mostly very difficult to achieve, phases have often been considered 'hidden variables' seemingly pulling the strings from backstage, only visible by their action on the image intensity. This was almost the case in conventional Electron Microscopy with the phase differences introduced by an object. However, in the face of the urgent questions from solid state physics and materials science, these phases have to be determined precisely, because they encode the most dominant object properties, such as charge distributions and electromagnetic fields. After more than six decades of very patient advancement, electron interferometry and holography offer unprecedented analytical facilities down to an atomic scale. Akira Tonomura has prominently contributed to the present state. PMID:23620338

  15. Phase-multiplication holography

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, H.D.; Prince, J.M.; Davis, T.J.

    1982-01-25

    This disclosure relates generally to nondestructive testing for identifying structural characteristics of an object by scanned holographic techniques using a known source of radiation, such as electromagnetic or acoustical radiation. It is an object of this invention to provide an apparatus and method for synthetic aperture expansion in holographic imaging applications to construct fringe patterns capable of holographic reproduction where aperture restrictions in nondestructive testing applications would conventionally make such imaging techniques impossible. The apparatus and method result in the production of a sharply defined frontal image of structural characteristics which could not otherwise be imaged because they occur either near the surface of the object or are confined by geometry restricting aperture dimensions available for scanning purposes. The depth of the structural characteristic below the surface of the object can also be determined by the reconstruction parameters which produce the sharpest focus. Lateral resolution is established by simulated reduction in the radiation wavelength and may easily be an order of magnitude less than the electromagnetic wavelength in the material or 2 times the standard depth of penetration. Since the phase multiplication technique is performed on the detected data, the penetration depth available due to the longer wavelength signals applied to the test object remains unchanged. The phase multiplication technique can also be applied to low frequency acoustic holography, resulting in a test which combines excellent penetration of difficult materials with high resolution images.

  16. X-ray absorption holography.

    PubMed

    Kopecky, M; Lausi, A; Busetto, E; Kub, J; Savoia, A

    2002-05-01

    The transmission of monochromatic x rays through a CoO single crystal was measured for different orientations of the sample. The small variations in the linear absorption coefficient were considered as a hologram and the real-space image of the local atomic environment was successfully reconstructed. The holographic signal constituted about 1% of the detected intensity. Besides other benefits, the use of the absorption holography can increase the signal-to-background ratio by more than 1 order compared with the fluorescence holography. PMID:12005695

  17. CICT Computing, Information, and Communications Technology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufenberg, Lawrence; Tu, Eugene (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The CICT Program is part of the NASA Aerospace Technology Enterprise's fundamental technology thrust to develop tools. processes, and technologies that enable new aerospace system capabilities and missions. The CICT Program's four key objectives are: Provide seamless access to NASA resources- including ground-, air-, and space-based distributed information technology resources-so that NASA scientists and engineers can more easily control missions, make new scientific discoveries, and design the next-generation space vehicles, provide high-data delivery from these assets directly to users for missions, develop goal-oriented human-centered systems, and research, develop and evaluate revolutionary technology.

  18. Holography for automotive head-up displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsbottom, Andrew P.; Sergeant, Shirley A.; Sheel, David W.

    1992-05-01

    There is increasing interest in head-up-displays (HUDs) for automotive use. A number of technologies could be employed for the combiner function including plain glass reflection, dielectric enhancement, and holography. This paper will consider the potential role for conformal holography as the combiner element by initially reviewing the system requirements from an optical design view, how these differ significantly from an avionic HUD, and how they relate to material characteristics and process features. This will involve a consideration in some detail of the effects of specified hologram properties and lamination features on the optical performance and image characteristic of a car HUD. In particular, we shall examine such features as hologram efficiency, bandwidth, tuning position, environmental stability, tolerances, and film lamination effects and how these may influence the key optical characteristics of the image, i.e., distortions, blur, brightness, double imaging (separation and contrast) outside world view, etc.. A theoretical model based on Kogelnik coupled wave theory will be used to illustrate the various tradeoffs between hologram properties and process, image features, and display characteristics (bandwidth, polarization, etc.). This analysis will be related to properties of currently available holographic materials with reference to recent experimental work.

  19. Women and Computer Based Technologies: A Feminist Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morritt, Hope

    The use of computer based technologies by professional women in education is examined through a feminist standpoint theory in this paper. The theory is grounded in eight claims which form the basis of the conceptual framework for the study. The experiences of nine women participants with computer based technologies were categorized using three…

  20. The Impact of Computer Technology on the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Anne Wiseman

    1982-01-01

    Computer technology as it affects home and family life is explored. Elements of this technology which are examined include electronic fund transfers (EFT), consumer rights and responsibilities relating to use of EFT, working at home via computer, housing design, costs of computerizing the home, and computerized aids for the handicapped. (CT)

  1. Strengthening Computer Technology Programs. Special Publication Series No. 49.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Floyd L., Comp.

    Three papers present examples of strategies used by developing institutions and historically black colleges to strengthen computer technology programs. "Promoting Industry Support in Developing a Computer Technology Program" (Albert D. Robinson) describes how the Washtenaw Community College (Ann Arbor, Michigan) Electrical/Electronics Department…

  2. Bringing Research, Evaluation, and Planning Together with Modern Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ligon, Glynn

    When a school system chooses to buy into modern computer technology as the way to solve some existing problems and to meet pressing needs, a myriad of new problems and issues are created. However, the new problems are worth solving to allow the system to benefit from the new technology. In other words, the conversion to using the latest computer…

  3. A Developomental Study of Children's Computer-Aptitude and Knowledge about Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Barbara; Ferguson, Elizabeth

    1988-01-01

    A new test of young children's computer aptitude and knowledge about computer technologies was given to kindergarten children and third-grade students. Results are reported. Implications of the research for basic and applied developmental psychology are discussed. (RH)

  4. Cutting Technology Costs with Refurbished Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessoff, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Many district administrators are finding that they can save money on computers by buying preowned ones instead of new ones. The practice has other benefits as well: It allows districts to give more computers to more students who need them, and it also promotes good environmental practices by keeping the machines out of landfills, where they…

  5. Cutting Technology Costs with Refurbished Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessoff, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Many district administrators are finding that they can save money on computers by buying preowned ones instead of new ones. The practice has other benefits as well: It allows districts to give more computers to more students who need them, and it also promotes good environmental practices by keeping the machines out of landfills, where they…

  6. Computers and Autistic Learners: An Evolving Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedbring, Charles

    1985-01-01

    A research and demonstration computer center for severely handicapped autistic children, STEPPE-Lab, which uses computers as an augmentative communication and instructional system, is described. The article first reviews the keyboard, joystick, mouse, and drawing tablet as augmentative devices for helping communication disordered children interact…

  7. Math Attitudes of Computer Education and Instructional Technology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tekerek, Mehmet; Yeniterzi, Betul; Ercan, Orhan

    2011-01-01

    Computer Education and Instructional Technology (CEIT) Departments train computer teachers to fill gap of computer instructor in all grades of schools in Turkey. Additionally graduates can also work as instructional technologist or software developer. The curriculum of CEIT departments includes mathematics courses. The aim of this study is to…

  8. Emerging Uses of Computer Technology in Qualitative Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, D. Randall

    The application of computer technology in qualitative research and evaluation ranges from simple word processing to doing sophisticated data sorting and retrieval. How computer software can be used for qualitative research is discussed. Researchers should consider the use of computers in data analysis in light of their own familiarity and comfort…

  9. Engineering Technologies and the Role of the Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Lester W., Jr.

    This discussion of computers and their place in the field of engineering technology begins with an outline of the historical development and significance of computers, tracing advancements from the first generation of computers, which began to be produced in 1946, to current third-generation models; reviewing the current state of the art in…

  10. Time dependent holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Diptarka

    One of the most important results emerging from string theory is the gauge gravity duality (AdS/CFT correspondence) which tells us that certain problems in particular gravitational backgrounds can be exactly mapped to a particular dual gauge theory a quantum theory very similar to the one explaining the interactions between fundamental subatomic particles. The chief merit of the duality is that a difficult problem in one theory can be mapped to a simpler and solvable problem in the other theory. The duality can be used both ways. Most of the current theoretical framework is suited to study equilibrium systems, or systems where time dependence is at most adiabatic. However in the real world, systems are almost always out of equilibrium. Generically these scenarios are described by quenches, where a parameter of the theory is made time dependent. In this dissertation I describe some of the work done in the context of studying quantum quench using the AdS/CFT correspondence. We recover certain universal scaling type of behavior as the quenching is done through a quantum critical point. Another question that has been explored in the dissertation is time dependence of the gravity theory. Present cosmological observations indicate that our universe is accelerating and is described by a spacetime called de-Sitter(dS). In 2011 there had been a speculation over a possible duality between de-Sitter gravity and a particular field theory (Euclidean SP(N) CFT). However a concrete realization of this proposition was still lacking. Here we explicitly derive the dS/CFT duality using well known methods in field theory. We discovered that the time dimension emerges naturally in the derivation. We also describe further applications and extensions of dS/CFT. KEYWORDS: Holography, AdS/CFT correspondence, Quantum Quench, dS/CFT correspondence, Chaos.

  11. Rainbow holography and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasov, N. G.; Ivanov, Vladimir S.

    1993-09-01

    The general equations of the rainbow holography are deduced. Their analysis makes it possible to offer different methods of the rainbow holographic images production. A new way of using the rainbow holograms as optical elements for effective color illuminating of transparent, specular, and polished objects is proposed. Application fields are the advertising industry, shop windows design, etc.

  12. Ageing, Learning, and Computer Technology in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulton-Lewis, Gillian M.; Buys, Laurie; Lovie-Kitchin, Jan; Barnett, Karen; David, L. Nikki

    2007-01-01

    Learning is an important aspect of active ageing, yet older people are not often included in discussions of the issue. Older people vary in their need, desire, and ability to learn, and this is evident in the context of technology. The focus of the data analysis for this paper was on determining the place of learning and technology in active…

  13. Audit and Evaluation of Computer Security. Computer Science and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruthberg, Zella G.

    This is a collection of consensus reports, each produced at a session of an invitational workshop sponsored by the National Bureau of Standards. The purpose of the workshop was to explore the state-of-the-art and define appropriate subjects for future research in the audit and evaluation of computer security. Leading experts in the audit and…

  14. Planning Computer Lessons. Tech Use Guide: Using Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Exceptional Children, Reston, VA. Center for Special Education Technology.

    This guide offers planning and organizing ideas for effectively using computers in classrooms that include students both with and without disabilities. The guide addresses: developing lesson plans, introducing the lesson in a way that builds motivation, providing guided and independent practice, extending the learning, and choosing software.…

  15. Computer Technology Standards of Learning for Virginia's Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Department of Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The Computer/Technology Standards of Learning identify and define the progressive development of essential knowledge and skills necessary for students to access, evaluate, use, and create information using technology. They provide a framework for technology literacy and demonstrate a progression from physical manipulation skills for the use of…

  16. Reviews of computing technology: Software overview

    SciTech Connect

    Hartshorn, W.R.; Johnson, A.L.

    1994-01-05

    The Savannah River Site Computing Architecture states that the site computing environment will be standards-based, data-driven, and workstation-oriented. Larger server systems deliver needed information to users in a client-server relationship. Goals of the Architecture include utilizing computing resources effectively, maintaining a high level of data integrity, developing a robust infrastructure, and storing data in such a way as to promote accessibility and usability. This document describes the current storage environment at Savannah River Site (SRS) and presents some of the problems that will be faced and strategies that are planned over the next few years.

  17. Mistaking Computers for Technology: Technology Literacy and the Digital Divide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amiel, Tel

    2006-01-01

    No other information and communication technology has swept the globe with greater speed than the Internet, having the potential to promote vast social, economic, and political transformations. As new technologies become available the pattern of adoption and diffusion creates disparities in access and ownership. At the most basic this gap is…

  18. Computer technology: Silicon chips lighten up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivien, Laurent

    2015-12-01

    Microprocessor communications have received a boost from the integration of electronics and photonics in silicon -- a first step towards low power consumption and efficient computing systems. See Letter p.534

  19. Computer Managed Learning for Technology Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, David

    1990-01-01

    Discusses computer-managed learning (CML), which uses a microcomputer to present educational material to students. CML presents content, graphics, and activities, usually in the form of questions to students to allow them to assess their own learning progress. (JOW)

  20. Emerging Trends in Technology Education Computer Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazari, Sunil I.

    1993-01-01

    Graphical User Interface (GUI)--and its variant, pen computing--is rapidly replacing older types of operating environments. Despite its heavier demand for processing power, GUI has many advantages. (SK)

  1. Evolving technologies for Space Station Freedom computer-based workstations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Dean G.; Rudisill, Marianne

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on evolving technologies for Space Station Freedom computer-based workstations are presented. The human-computer computer software environment modules are described. The following topics are addressed: command and control workstation concept; cupola workstation concept; Japanese experiment module RMS workstation concept; remote devices controlled from workstations; orbital maneuvering vehicle free flyer; remote manipulator system; Japanese experiment module exposed facility; Japanese experiment module small fine arm; flight telerobotic servicer; human-computer interaction; and workstation/robotics related activities.

  2. Coded holography for Walsh transform and Haar transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Uri, Joseph

    1993-03-01

    Digital transforms, such as Walsh or Haar transforms for example, are often used to improve the quality of the picture and obtain a better resolution. The mathematical computer procedure of the transform operation can, however, be lengthy and complicated. We suggest use of coded holography with a mask representing the Walsh or Haar transform as a reference beam. Details of the set up and the construction of the mask are discussed and the results are shown.

  3. Application of advanced computational technology to propulsion CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szuch, John R.

    1988-01-01

    The Internal Fluid Mechanics Division of the NASA Lewis Research Center is combining the key elements of computational fluid dynamics, aerothermodynamic experiments, and advanced computational technology to bring internal computational fluid dynamics (ICFM) to a state of practical application for aerospace propulsion system design. This paper presents an overview of efforts underway at NASA Lewis to advance and apply computational technology to ICFM. These efforts include the use of modern, software engineering principles for code development, the development of an AI-based user-interface for large codes, the establishment of a high-performance, data communications network to link ICFM researchers and facilities, and the application of parallel processing to speed up computationally intensive and/or time-critical ICFM problems. A multistage compressor flow physics program is cited as an example of efforts to use advanced computational technology to enhance a current NASA Lewis ICFM research program.

  4. Application of advanced computational technology to propulsion CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szuch, John R.

    1988-01-01

    The Internal Fluid Mechanics Division of the NASA Lewis Research Center is combining the key elements of computational fluid dynamics, aerothermodynamic experiments, and advanced computational technology to bring internal computational fluid dynamics (ICFM) to a state of practical application for aerospace propulsion system design. This paper presents an overview of efforts under way at NASA Lewis to advance and apply computational technology to ICFM. These efforts include the use of modern, software engineering principles for code development, the development of an AI-based user-interface for large codes, the establishment of a high-performance, data communications network to link ICFM researchers and facilities, and the application of parallel processing to speed up computationally intensive and/or time-critical ICFM problems. A multistage compressor flow physics program is cited as an example of efforts to use advanced computational technology to enhance a current NASA Lewis ICFM research program.

  5. Technology for liquid-nitrogen-cooled computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longsworth, Ralph C.; Steyert, William A.

    1987-01-01

    Computers requiring 1 to 400 W of refrigeration at 78 K can use standard commercial Gifford-McMahon-type refrigerators similar to those being produced for cryopumps. The computer elements would be immersed in a liquid-nitrogen bath in which heat transfer between the circuit elements and the bath can carry away 5 W/sq cm. The elements would operate very near the 78-K bath temperature. Vapors from the boiling liquid would be recondensed on the cold refrigerator, located above the bath, and would fall back into the bath. For smaller computers, simple Joule-Thomson refrigerators could be developed. For larger refrigerators, reverse Brayton cycle refrigerators could be developed.

  6. 'Micromanaging de Sitter holography'

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Xi; Horn, Bart; Silverstein, Eva; Torroba, Gonzalo; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Santa Barbara, KITP

    2010-08-26

    We develop tools to engineer de Sitter vacua with semi-holographic duals, using elliptic fibrations and orientifolds to uplift Freund-Rubin compactifications with CFT duals. The dual brane construction is compact and constitutes a microscopic realization of the dS/dS correspondence, realizing d-dimensional de Sitter space as a warped compactification down to (d-1)-dimensional de Sitter gravity coupled to a pair of large-N matter sectors. This provides a parametric microscopic interpretation of the Gibbons-Hawking entropy. We illustrate these ideas with an explicit class of examples in three dimensions, and describe ongoing work on four-dimensional constructions. The Gibbons-Hawking entropy of the de Sitter horizon [1] invites a microscopic interpretation and a holographic formulation of inflating spacetimes. Much progress was made in the analogous problem in black hole physics using special black holes in string theory whose microstates could be reliably counted, such as those analyzed in [2,3]; this led to the AdS/CFT correspondence [4]. In contrast, a microscopic understanding of the entropy of de Sitter space is more difficult for several reasons including its potential dynamical connections to other backgrounds (metastability), the absence of a non-fluctuating timelike boundary, and the absence of supersymmetry. In this paper, we develop a class of de Sitter constructions in string theory, built up from AdS/CFT dual pairs along the lines of [5], which are simple enough to provide a microscopic accounting of the parametric scaling of the Gibbons-Hawking entropy. These models realize microscopically a semi-holographic description of metastable de Sitter space which had been derived macroscopically in [6]. It would also be interesting to connect this to other approaches to de Sitter holography such as [7, 8] and to other manifestations of the de Sitter entropy such as [9]. The construction is somewhat analogous to neutral black branes analyzed in [11]. We will begin in section 2 by explaining the salient features of the holographic duality and of the de Sitter construction which realizes it microscopically. In section 3 we will lay out our methods in more detail, applying them to worked examples of dS{sub 3} in section 4. Finally, section 5 discusses further directions and ongoing work, including dS{sub 4} constructions in progress.

  7. Embedded Data Processor and Portable Computer Technology testbeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alena, Richard; Liu, Yuan-Kwei; Goforth, Andre; Fernquist, Alan R.

    1993-01-01

    Attention is given to current activities in the Embedded Data Processor and Portable Computer Technology testbed configurations that are part of the Advanced Data Systems Architectures Testbed at the Information Sciences Division at NASA Ames Research Center. The Embedded Data Processor Testbed evaluates advanced microprocessors for potential use in mission and payload applications within the Space Station Freedom Program. The Portable Computer Technology (PCT) Testbed integrates and demonstrates advanced portable computing devices and data system architectures. The PCT Testbed uses both commercial and custom-developed devices to demonstrate the feasibility of functional expansion and networking for portable computers in flight missions.

  8. Direct-to-digital holography and holovision

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Clarence E. (Knoxville, TN); Baylor, Larry R. (Knoxville, TN); Hanson, Gregory R. (Clinton, TN); Rasmussen, David A. (Knoxville, TN); Voelkl, Edgar (Oak Ridge, TN); Castracane, James (Albany, NY); Simkulet, Michelle (Latham, NY); Clow, Lawrence (Waterford, NY)

    2000-01-01

    Systems and methods for direct-to-digital holography are described. An apparatus includes a laser; a beamsplitter optically coupled to the laser; a reference beam mirror optically coupled to the beamsplitter; an object optically coupled to the beamsplitter, a focusing lens optically coupled to both the reference beam mirror and the object; and a digital recorder optically coupled to the focusing lens. A reference beam is incident upon the reference beam mirror at a non-normal angle, and the reference beam and an object beam are focused by the focusing lens at a focal plane of the digital recorder to form an image. The systems and methods provide advantages in that computer assisted holographic measurements can be made.

  9. Holography of 3D flat cosmological horizons.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Arjun; Detournay, Stéphane; Fareghbal, Reza; Simón, Joan

    2013-04-01

    We provide a first derivation of the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of 3D flat cosmological horizons in terms of the counting of states in a dual field theory. These horizons appear in the flat limit of nonextremal rotating Banados-Teitleboim-Zanelli black holes and are remnants of the inner horizons. They also satisfy the first law of thermodynamics. We study flat holography as a limit of AdS(3)/CFT(2) to semiclassically compute the density of states in the dual theory, which is given by a contraction of a 2D conformal field theory, exactly reproducing the bulk entropy in the limit of large charges. We comment on how the dual theory reproduces the bulk first law and how cosmological bulk excitations are matched with boundary quantum numbers. PMID:25166977

  10. Technological Imperatives: Using Computers in Academic Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ticku, Ravinder; Phelps, Greg

    Intended for forensic educators and debate teams, this document details how one university debate team, at the University of Iowa, makes use of computer resources on campus to facilitate storage and retrieval of information useful to debaters. The introduction notes the problem of storing and retrieving the amount of information required by debate…

  11. Cloud Computing Technologies Facilitate Earth Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Under a Space Act Agreement, NASA partnered with Seattle-based Amazon Web Services to make the agency's climate and Earth science satellite data publicly available on the company's servers. Users can access the data for free, but they can also pay to use Amazon's computing services to analyze and visualize information using the same software available to NASA researchers.

  12. CACTUS: Calculator and Computer Technology User Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Hartley

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students use computer-based spreadsheets to find out how much grain should be added to a chess board when a grain of rice is put on the first square, the amount is doubled for the next square, and the chess board is covered. (ASK)

  13. Ultra-realistic imaging: a new beginning for display holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.; Brotherton-Ratcliffe, David

    2014-02-01

    Recent improvements in key foundation technologies are set to potentially transform the field of Display Holography. In particular new recording systems, based on recent DPSS and semiconductor lasers combined with novel recording materials and processing, have now demonstrated full-color analogue holograms of both lower noise and higher spectral accuracy. Progress in illumination technology is leading to a further major reduction in display noise and to a significant increase of the clear image depth and brightness of such holograms. So too, recent progress in 1-step Direct-Write Digital Holography (DWDH) now opens the way to the creation of High Virtual Volume Displays (HVV) - large format full-parallax DWDH reflection holograms having fundamentally larger clear image depths. In a certain fashion HVV displays can be thought of as providing a high quality full-color digital equivalent to the large-format laser-illuminated transmission holograms of the sixties and seventies. Back then, the advent of such holograms led to much optimism for display holography in the market. However, problems with laser illumination, their monochromatic analogue nature and image noise are well cited as being responsible for their failure in reality. Is there reason for believing that the latest technology improvements will make the mark this time around? This paper argues that indeed there is.

  14. Surpassing digital holography limits by lensless object scanning holography.

    PubMed

    Micó, Vicente; Ferreira, Carlos; García, Javier

    2012-04-23

    We present lensless object scanning holography (LOSH) as a fully lensless method, capable of improving image quality in reflective digital Fourier holography, by means of an extremely simplified experimental setup. LOSH is based on the recording and digital post-processing of a set of digital lensless holograms and results in a synthetic image with improved resolution, field of view (FOV), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and depth of field (DOF). The superresolution (SR) effect arises from the generation of a synthetic aperture (SA) based on the linear movement of the inspected object. The same scanning principle enlarges the object FOV. SNR enhancement is achieved by speckle suppression and coherent artifacts averaging due to the coherent addition of the multiple partially overlapping bandpass images. And DOF extension is performed by digital refocusing to different object's sections. Experimental results showing an impressive image quality improvement are reported for a one-dimensional reflective resolution test target. PMID:22535027

  15. Remote metrology by comparative digital holography

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbach, Torsten; Osten, Wolfgang; Kopylow, Christoph von; Jueptner, Werner

    2006-02-10

    A method for the remote comparison of objects with regard to their shape or response to a load is presented. The method allows interferometric sensitivity for comparing objects with different microstructure. In contrast to the well-known incoherent techniques based on inverse fringe projection this new approach uses the coherent optical wave field of the master object as a mask for the illumination of the sample object. The coherent mask is created by digital holography to allow instant access to the complete optical information of the master object at any place desired. The mask is reconstructed by a spatial light modulator (SLM). The optical reconstruction of digital holograms with SLM technology allows modification of reconstructed wavefronts with respect to improvement of image quality, the skilled introduction of additional information about the object (augmented reality), and the alignment of the master and test object.

  16. Feasibility study of complex wavefield retrieval in off-axis acoustic holography employing an acousto-optic sensor

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Guillermo López; Weber, Joshua; Sandhu, Jaswinder Singh; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a new method for complex-valued wavefield retrieval in off-axis acoustic holography. The method involves use of an intensity-sensitive acousto-optic (AO) sensor, optimized for use at 3.3 MHz, to record the acoustic hologram and a computational method for reconstruction of the object wavefield. The proposed method may circumvent limitations of conventional implementations of acoustic holography and may facilitate the development of acoustic-holography-based biomedical imaging methods. PMID:21669451

  17. Using Computer Technology To Foster Learning for Understanding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Melle, Elaine; Tomalty, Lewis

    2000-01-01

    Describes how computer technology, specifically the use of a multimedia CD-ROM, was integrated into a microbiology curriculum as part of the transition from focusing on facts to fostering learning for understanding. (Contains 30 references.) (Author/YDS)

  18. Computer Integrated Technology and Its Influence on Engineering Technology Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mao, Leei

    Traditional electronics engineering technology (EET) graduates have a broad and general background in EET, but they encounter difficulty when faced with the modern computerized working environment. The EET curriculum trains students to be broad-spectrum, general electronic technicians rather than specialized ones. EET graduates are competing in…

  19. Restricted access processor - An application of computer security technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmahon, E. M.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a security guard device that is currently being developed by Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC). The methods used to provide assurance that the system meets its security requirements include the system architecture, a system security evaluation, and the application of formal and informal verification techniques. The combination of state-of-the-art technology and the incorporation of new verification procedures results in a demonstration of the feasibility of computer security technology for operational applications.

  20. Full custom VLSI - A technology for high performance computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maki, Gary K.; Whitaker, Sterling R.

    1990-01-01

    Full custom VLSI is presented as a viable technology for addressing the need for the computing capabilities required for the real-time health monitoring of spacecraft systems. This technology presents solutions that cannot be realized with stored program computers or semicustom VLSI; also, it is not dependent on current IC processes. It is argued that, while design time is longer, full custom VLSI produces the fastest and densest VLSI solution and that high density normally also yields low manufacturing costs.

  1. Computers for artificial intelligence a technology assessment and forecast

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.K.

    1986-01-01

    This study reviews the development and current state-of-the-art in computers for artificial intelligence, including LISP machines, AI workstations, professional and engineering workstations, minicomputers, mainframes, and supercomputers. Major computer systems for AI applications are reviewed. The use of personal computers for expert system development is discussed, and AI software for the IBM PC, Texas Instrument Professional Computer, and Apple MacIntosh is presented. Current research aimed at developing a new computer for artificial intelligence is described, and future technological developments are discussed.

  2. Advanced sensor-computer technology for urban runoff monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Byunggu; Behera, Pradeep K.; Ramirez Rochac, Juan F.

    2011-04-01

    The paper presents the project team's advanced sensor-computer sphere technology for real-time and continuous monitoring of wastewater runoff at the sewer discharge outfalls along the receiving water. This research significantly enhances and extends the previously proposed novel sensor-computer technology. This advanced technology offers new computation models for an innovative use of the sensor-computer sphere comprising accelerometer, programmable in-situ computer, solar power, and wireless communication for real-time and online monitoring of runoff quantity. This innovation can enable more effective planning and decision-making in civil infrastructure, natural environment protection, and water pollution related emergencies. The paper presents the following: (i) the sensor-computer sphere technology; (ii) a significant enhancement to the previously proposed discrete runoff quantity model of this technology; (iii) a new continuous runoff quantity model. Our comparative study on the two distinct models is presented. Based on this study, the paper further investigates the following: (1) energy-, memory-, and communication-efficient use of the technology for runoff monitoring; (2) possible sensor extensions for runoff quality monitoring.

  3. Information and Communicative Technology--Computers as Research Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarsani, Mahender Reddy

    2007-01-01

    The emergence of "the electronic age,/electronic cottages/the electronic world" has affected the whole world; particularly the emergence of computers has penetrated everyone's life to a remarkable degree. They are being used in various fields including education. Recent advances, especially in the area of computer technology have…

  4. "Computer" and "Information and Communication Technology": Students' Culture Specific Interpretations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elen, Jan; Clarebout, Geraldine; Sarfo, Frederick Kwaku; Louw, Lambertus Philippus; Poysa-Tarhonen, Johanna; Stassens, Nick

    2010-01-01

    Given the use of information and communication technology (ICT) and computer as synonyms in ICT-integration research on the one hand, and the potential problems in doing so on the other, this contribution tries to gain insight in the understanding of the words computer and ICT in different settings. In five different countries (Belgium, Finland,…

  5. Computer-Integrated Manufacturing Technology. Tech Prep Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakeland Tech Prep Consortium, Kirtland, OH.

    This tech prep competency profile for computer-integrated manufacturing technology begins with definitions for four occupations: manufacturing technician, quality technician, mechanical engineering technician, and computer-assisted design/drafting (CADD) technician. A chart lists competencies by unit and indicates whether entire or partial unit is…

  6. "Computer" and "Information and Communication Technology": Students' Culture Specific Interpretations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elen, Jan; Clarebout, Geraldine; Sarfo, Frederick Kwaku; Louw, Lambertus Philippus; Poysa-Tarhonen, Johanna; Stassens, Nick

    2010-01-01

    Given the use of information and communication technology (ICT) and computer as synonyms in ICT-integration research on the one hand, and the potential problems in doing so on the other, this contribution tries to gain insight in the understanding of the words computer and ICT in different settings. In five different countries (Belgium, Finland,…

  7. The Computer Industry. High Technology Industries: Profiles and Outlooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Trade Administration (DOC), Washington, DC.

    A series of meetings was held to assess future problems in United States high technology, particularly in the fields of robotics, computers, semiconductors, and telecommunications. This report, which focuses on the computer industry, includes a profile of this industry and the papers presented by industry speakers during the meetings. The profile…

  8. Coached, Interactive Computer Simulations: A New Technology for Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hummel, Thomas J.

    This paper provides an overview of a prototype simulation-centered intelligent computer-based training (CBT) system--implemented using expert system technology--which provides: (1) an environment in which trainees can learn and practice complex skills; (2) a computer-based coach or mentor to critique performance, suggest improvements, and provide…

  9. Men's and Women's Attitudes toward Computer Technology: A Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Charles M.; Sormunen, Carolee; Harris, Thomas M.

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 62 business-communication students compared the attitudes of men and women about (1) the value of technology in making users more productive; (2) the impact of computers on people and their work environment; and (3) the relative comfort of men and women when using computers. Results indicated that women were more positive on all three…

  10. Institute for Computer Sciences and Technology. Annual Report FY 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC. Inst. for Computer Sciences and Technology.

    Activities of the Institute for Computer Sciences and Technology (ICST) within the U.S. Department of Commerce during fiscal year 1986 are described in this annual report, which summarizes research and publications by ICST in the following areas: (1) standards and guidelines for computer security, including encryption and message authentication…

  11. Computer Technologies: Attitudes and Self-Efficacy across Undergraduate Disciplines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinzie, Mable B.; And Others

    For individuals to use computer tools for learning effectively, they must feel self-efficacious in using them. For this reason, it is important to examine attitudes and perceptions of competence that are encouraged by undergraduate educational programs. The factor validation of two affective measures related to computer technologies is reported.…

  12. Computer-Integrated Manufacturing Technology. Tech Prep Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakeland Tech Prep Consortium, Kirtland, OH.

    This tech prep competency profile for computer-integrated manufacturing technology begins with definitions for four occupations: manufacturing technician, quality technician, mechanical engineering technician, and computer-assisted design/drafting (CADD) technician. A chart lists competencies by unit and indicates whether entire or partial unit is…

  13. Using Computer Technology To Aid the Disabled Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balajthy, Ernest

    When matched for achievement level and educational objectives, computer technology can be particularly effective with at-risk students. Computer-assisted instructional software is the most widely available type of software. An exciting development pertinent to literacy education is the development of the "electronic book" (also called "interactive…

  14. Coached, Interactive Computer Simulations: A New Technology for Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hummel, Thomas J.

    This paper provides an overview of a prototype simulation-centered intelligent computer-based training (CBT) system--implemented using expert system technology--which provides: (1) an environment in which trainees can learn and practice complex skills; (2) a computer-based coach or mentor to critique performance, suggest improvements, and provide…

  15. Space systems computer-aided design technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, L. B.

    1984-01-01

    The interactive Design and Evaluation of Advanced Spacecraft (IDEAS) system is described, together with planned capability increases in the IDEAS system. The system's disciplines consist of interactive graphics and interactive computing. A single user at an interactive terminal can create, design, analyze, and conduct parametric studies of earth-orbiting satellites, which represents a timely and cost-effective method during the conceptual design phase where various missions and spacecraft options require evaluation. Spacecraft concepts evaluated include microwave radiometer satellites, communication satellite systems, solar-powered lasers, power platforms, and orbiting space stations.

  16. Computational Fluid Dynamics Technology for Hypersonic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2003-01-01

    Several current challenges in computational fluid dynamics and aerothermodynamics for hypersonic vehicle applications are discussed. Example simulations are presented from code validation and code benchmarking efforts to illustrate capabilities and limitations. Opportunities to advance the state-of-art in algorithms, grid generation and adaptation, and code validation are identified. Highlights of diverse efforts to address these challenges are then discussed. One such effort to re-engineer and synthesize the existing analysis capability in LAURA, VULCAN, and FUN3D will provide context for these discussions. The critical (and evolving) role of agile software engineering practice in the capability enhancement process is also noted.

  17. Atom interferometers and atom holography

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Fujio; Mitake, Satoru; Fujita, Jun-ichi; Morinaga, Makoto; Kishimoto, Tetsuo

    1999-06-11

    Various techniques of atom manipulation with a binary hologram are discussed and demonstrated experimentally. An atomic beam of metastable neon in the 1s{sub 3} state and a SiN thin film with holes that expresses the transmission function of the hologram are used to demonstrate this technique. The gray-scale holography of atoms is demonstrated for the first time. Other possibilities of holographic manipulation of atoms are also discussed.

  18. Building Computer Technology Skills in TESOL Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DelliCarpini, Margo

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on an action research study that investigated factors influencing TESOL (teaching English to speakers of other languages) teacher candidates' (TCs) selection and use of technology in the English as a second language (ESL) classroom and the influence of explicit training in context in the use of computer technology for second…

  19. Beyond Computer Literacy: Supporting Youth's Positive Development through Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bers, Marina Umaschi

    2010-01-01

    In a digital era in which technology plays a role in most aspects of a child's life, having the competence and confidence to use computers might be a necessary step, but not a goal in itself. Developing character traits that will serve children to use technology in a safe way to communicate and connect with others, and providing opportunities for…

  20. The Future of Mobile Technology and Mobile Wireless Computing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Jim; Hannan, Mike

    2004-01-01

    It is often stated that mobile wireless computing is going to be the next big technology revolution that will grip the world in the same way mobile telephones did in the 1990s. However, while the technology is rapidly improving, the rate of uptake has been lower than expected. This paper describes some of the reasons for this, and discusses some…

  1. Video and Computer Technologies for Extended-Campus Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagan, Edgar L.; And Others

    This paper discusses video and computer technologies for extended-campus programming (courses and programs at off-campus sites). The first section provides an overview of the distance education program at the University of Kentucky (UK), and highlights the improved access to graduate and professional programs, advances in technology, funding,…

  2. The Federal Government's Role in Advancing Computer Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Information Hotline, 1978

    1978-01-01

    As part of the Federal Data Processing Reorganization Study submitted by the Science and Technology Team, the Federal Government's role in advancing and diffusing computer technology is discussed. Findings and conclusions assess the state-of-the-art in government and in industry, and five recommendations provide directions for government policy…

  3. Promoting Technology-Assisted Active Learning in Computer Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Jinzhu; Hargis, Jace

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes specific active learning strategies for teaching computer science, integrating both instructional technologies and non-technology-based strategies shown to be effective in the literature. The theoretical learning components addressed include an intentional method to help students build metacognitive abilities, as well as…

  4. Factors Influencing Cloud-Computing Technology Adoption in Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hailu, Alemayehu

    2012-01-01

    Adoption of new technology has complicating components both from the selection, as well as decision-making criteria and process. Although new technology such as cloud computing provides great benefits especially to the developing countries, it has challenges that may complicate the selection decision and subsequent adoption process. This study…

  5. The Future of Mobile Technology and Mobile Wireless Computing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Jim; Hannan, Mike

    2004-01-01

    It is often stated that mobile wireless computing is going to be the next big technology revolution that will grip the world in the same way mobile telephones did in the 1990s. However, while the technology is rapidly improving, the rate of uptake has been lower than expected. This paper describes some of the reasons for this, and discusses some…

  6. Factors Influencing Cloud-Computing Technology Adoption in Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hailu, Alemayehu

    2012-01-01

    Adoption of new technology has complicating components both from the selection, as well as decision-making criteria and process. Although new technology such as cloud computing provides great benefits especially to the developing countries, it has challenges that may complicate the selection decision and subsequent adoption process. This study…

  7. Beyond Computer Literacy: Supporting Youth's Positive Development through Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bers, Marina Umaschi

    2010-01-01

    In a digital era in which technology plays a role in most aspects of a child's life, having the competence and confidence to use computers might be a necessary step, but not a goal in itself. Developing character traits that will serve children to use technology in a safe way to communicate and connect with others, and providing opportunities for…

  8. Kindergartners' Conversations in a Computer-Based Technology Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyun, Eunsook; Davis, Genevieve

    2005-01-01

    This qualitative study examined emerging inquiries and dialogue of five- to six-year-old kindergartners (9 boys and 9 girls) taking place around computers as they engaged in a mapping project in a technology-rich classroom in the U.S. Discourse analysis of young children's conversations in a technology-rich classroom shed light on their…

  9. Holography: childrens' window to relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacShane, James E.

    1995-02-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of the concept of natural education. Psychology has discovered that all humans learn intuitively the cultural concepts of time from birth to eight and one-half to ten years of age. Einstein showed us that this must also be the natural time for the development of spatial concepts. The importance of this has been dramatized for me in the past eight years that I have been developing the Laser Arts and Holography Programs and Workshops. I have worked with over 100,000 students kindergarten through eighth grade. I have worked with 175 students age 8 to 10 in three hour and one half workshops specifically on the development of time and space concepts. The concepts developed are based upon the vast amount of psychological evidence related to the natural development of time and space understandings, Dr. Nils Abramson's 'Light in Flight' and subsequent work on the clarification of relativity through holography, and Maria Montessori's method of Scientific Education. The paper also demonstrates the natural method of teaching science to younger students is to teach scientifically. All of the research which has been done in the past 100 years has been used by the educational institutions to try to improve the system. What has not been done is changing the system to how humans learn. Because of the perceived hi-tech nature of the program I am able to dramatize the potential. An outline for a holography curriculum kindergarten through eighth grade is included.

  10. Network Computer Technology. Phase I: Viability and Promise within NASA's Desktop Computing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paluzzi, Peter; Miller, Rosalind; Kurihara, West; Eskey, Megan

    1998-01-01

    Over the past several months, major industry vendors have made a business case for the network computer as a win-win solution toward lowering total cost of ownership. This report provides results from Phase I of the Ames Research Center network computer evaluation project. It identifies factors to be considered for determining cost of ownership; further, it examines where, when, and how network computer technology might fit in NASA's desktop computing architecture.

  11. Computers and terminals as an aid to international technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweeney, W. T.

    1974-01-01

    As technology transfer becomes more popular and proves to be an economical method for companies of all sizes to take advantage of a tremendous amount of new and available technology from sources all over the world, the introduction of computers and terminals into the international technology transfer process is proving to be a successful method for companies to take part in this beneficial approach to new business opportunities.

  12. Multi-wavelength heterodyne holography and interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatagai, Toyohiko

    2013-09-01

    A novel phase-shifting technique, Doppler phase-shifting is introduced to interferometry and holography. Its principle, features and advantages are discussed. The use of multiple wavelengths in this method is also discussed. Their applications such as shape measurement, color holography etc. are presented.

  13. Progress in industrial holography in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smigielski, Paul

    1992-01-01

    Industrial applications of holography in France are briefly reviewed. Particular attention is given to nondestructive testing of helicopter blades at Aerospatiale Central Laboratory, the use of holography at Renault for car-engine vibration study, vibration characterization of turbo-jet engine components at SNECMA, and vibration analysis of plates in an industrial hemodynamic tunnel.

  14. The world's technological capacity to store, communicate, and compute information.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, Martin; López, Priscila

    2011-04-01

    We estimated the world's technological capacity to store, communicate, and compute information, tracking 60 analog and digital technologies during the period from 1986 to 2007. In 2007, humankind was able to store 2.9 × 10(20) optimally compressed bytes, communicate almost 2 × 10(21) bytes, and carry out 6.4 × 10(18) instructions per second on general-purpose computers. General-purpose computing capacity grew at an annual rate of 58%. The world's capacity for bidirectional telecommunication grew at 28% per year, closely followed by the increase in globally stored information (23%). Humankind's capacity for unidirectional information diffusion through broadcasting channels has experienced comparatively modest annual growth (6%). Telecommunication has been dominated by digital technologies since 1990 (99.9% in digital format in 2007), and the majority of our technological memory has been in digital format since the early 2000s (94% digital in 2007). PMID:21310967

  15. Impact of new computing systems on computational mechanics and flight-vehicle structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Storaasli, O. O.; Fulton, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Advances in computer technology which may have an impact on computational mechanics and flight vehicle structures technology were reviewed. The characteristics of supersystems, highly parallel systems, and small systems are summarized. The interrelations of numerical algorithms and software with parallel architectures are discussed. A scenario for future hardware/software environment and engineering analysis systems is presented. Research areas with potential for improving the effectiveness of analysis methods in the new environment are identified.

  16. Managing and directing innovation in the holography business

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gortych, Joseph E.; Abilock, Harold

    2006-02-01

    The intellectual property (IP) space associated with core high-tech innovations, such as holography, tends to rapidly expand in many directions as new applications and improvements to the core technology are realized. Patents soon start to quickly fill regions of the IP space to varying densities, often before any commercial product is available. Complicating matters is the fact that the patents typically range wildly in quality and business value for a host of reasons, not the least of which is that many high-tech companies lack an IP strategy designed to drive their R and D and patenting efforts. IP-savvy high-tech companies are relying more and more on some type of IP space analysis to more fully understand the IP landscape in which they do business. However, after an IP space analysis is performed, it needs to be integrated into a larger IP management system driven by an IP strategy. This paper examines the role of a best-practice IP management system in a high-tech business and how it can be used in conjunction with a holography IP space analysis to strategically manage and direct innovation in the holography business.

  17. The change in critical technologies for computational physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Val

    1990-01-01

    It is noted that the types of technology required for computational physics are changing as the field matures. Emphasis has shifted from computer technology to algorithm technology and, finally, to visual analysis technology as areas of critical research for this field. High-performance graphical workstations tied to a supercommunicator with high-speed communications along with the development of especially tailored visualization software has enabled analysis of highly complex fluid-dynamics simulations. Particular reference is made here to the development of visual analysis tools at NASA's Numerical Aerodynamics Simulation Facility. The next technology which this field requires is one that would eliminate visual clutter by extracting key features of simulations of physics and technology in order to create displays that clearly portray these key features. Research in the tuning of visual displays to human cognitive abilities is proposed. The immediate transfer of technology to all levels of computers, specifically the inclusion of visualization primitives in basic software developments for all work stations and PCs, is recommended.

  18. The microwave holography system for the Sardinia Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, G.; Bolli, P.; Busonera, G.; Pisanu, T.; Poppi, S.; Gaudiomonte, F.; Zacchiroli, G.; Roda, J.; Morsiani, M.; López-Pérez, J. A.

    2012-09-01

    Microwave holography is a well-established technique for mapping surface errors of large reflector antennas, particularly those designed to operate at high frequencies. We present here a holography system based on the interferometric method for mapping the primary reflector surface of the Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT). SRT is a new 64-m-diameter antenna located in Sardinia, Italy, equipped with an active surface and designed to operate up to 115 GHz. The system consists mainly of two radio frequency low-noise coherent channels, designed to receive Ku-band digital TV signals from geostationary satellites. Two commercial prime focus low-noise block converters are installed on the radio telescope under test and on a small reference antenna, respectively. Then the signals are amplified, filtered and downconverted to baseband. An innovative digital back-end based on FPGA technology has been implemented to digitize two 5 MHz-band signals and calculate their cross-correlation in real-time. This is carried out by using a 16-bit resolution ADCs and a FPGA reaching very large amplitude dynamic range and reducing post-processing time. The final holography data analysis is performed by CLIC data reduction software developed within the Institut de Radioastronomie Millimétrique (IRAM, Grenoble, France). The system was successfully tested during several holography measurement campaigns, recently performed at the Medicina 32-m radio telescope. Two 65-by-65 maps, using an on-the-fly raster scan with on-source phase calibration, were performed pointing the radio telescope at 38 degrees elevation towards EUTELSAT 7A satellite. The high SNR (greater than 60 dB) and the good phase stability led to get an accuracy on the surface error maps better than 150 μm RMS.

  19. Understanding and enhancing user acceptance of computer technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, William B.; Morris, Nancy M.

    1986-01-01

    Technology-driven efforts to implement computer technology often encounter problems due to lack of acceptance or begrudging acceptance of the personnel involved. It is argued that individuals' acceptance of automation, in terms of either computerization or computer aiding, is heavily influenced by their perceptions of the impact of the automation on their discretion in performing their jobs. It is suggested that desired levels of discretion reflect needs to feel in control and achieve self-satisfaction in task performance, as well as perceptions of inadequacies of computer technology. Discussion of these factors leads to a structured set of considerations for performing front-end analysis, deciding what to automate, and implementing the resulting changes.

  20. Design of a fault tolerant airborne digital computer. Volume 2: Computational requirements and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratner, R. S.; Shapiro, E. B.; Zeidler, H. M.; Wahlstrom, S. E.; Clark, C. B.; Goldberg, J.

    1973-01-01

    This final report summarizes the work on the design of a fault tolerant digital computer for aircraft. Volume 2 is composed of two parts. Part 1 is concerned with the computational requirements associated with an advanced commercial aircraft. Part 2 reviews the technology that will be available for the implementation of the computer in the 1975-1985 period. With regard to the computation task 26 computations have been categorized according to computational load, memory requirements, criticality, permitted down-time, and the need to save data in order to effect a roll-back. The technology part stresses the impact of large scale integration (LSI) on the realization of logic and memory. Also considered was module interconnection possibilities so as to minimize fault propagation.

  1. Engineering Technology Programs Courses Guide for Computer Aided Design and Computer Aided Manufacturing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This guide describes the requirements for courses in computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) that are part of engineering technology programs conducted in vocational-technical schools in Georgia. The guide is organized in five sections. The first section provides a rationale for occupations in design and in production,…

  2. First Year Preservice Teachers' Attitudes toward Computers from Computer Education and Instructional Technology Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yakin, Ilker, Sumuer, Evren

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to explore the attitudes of first year university students towards computers. The study focuses on preservice teachers (N=46) included 33 male and 12 female from Middle East Technical University, Computer Education and Instructional Technology (CEIT) department. The study is delimited to first grade preservice teachers…

  3. Portable Computer Technology (PCT) Research and Development Program Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castillo, Michael; McGuire, Kenyon; Sorgi, Alan

    1995-01-01

    The subject of this project report, focused on: (1) Design and development of two Advanced Portable Workstation 2 (APW 2) units. These units incorporate advanced technology features such as a low power Pentium processor, a high resolution color display, National Television Standards Committee (NTSC) video handling capabilities, a Personal Computer Memory Card International Association (PCMCIA) interface, and Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) and ethernet interfaces. (2) Use these units to integrate and demonstrate advanced wireless network and portable video capabilities. (3) Qualification of the APW 2 systems for use in specific experiments aboard the Mir Space Station. A major objective of the PCT Phase 2 program was to help guide future choices in computing platforms and techniques for meeting National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) mission objectives. The focus being on the development of optimal configurations of computing hardware, software applications, and network technologies for use on NASA missions.

  4. Four-stage computational technology with adaptive numerical methods for computational aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaydurov, V.; Liu, T.; Zheng, Z.

    2012-10-01

    Computational aerodynamics is a key technology in aircraft design which is ahead of physical experiment and complements it. Of course all three components of computational modeling are actively developed: mathematical models of real aerodynamic processes, numerical algorithms, and high-performance computing. The most impressive progress has been made in the field of computing, though with a considerable complication of computer architecture. Numerical algorithms are developed more conservative. More precisely, they are offered and theoretically justified for more simple mathematical problems. Nevertheless, computational mathematics now has amassed a whole palette of numerical algorithms that can provide acceptable accuracy and interface between modern mathematical models in aerodynamics and high-performance computers. A significant step in this direction was the European Project ADIGMA whose positive experience will be used in International Project TRISTAM for further movement in the field of computational technologies for aerodynamics. This paper gives a general overview of objectives and approaches intended to use and a description of the recommended four-stage computer technology.

  5. Aesthetics and representation in holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kac, Eduardo

    1995-02-01

    Every medium has a code, a set of rules or conventions according to which determined elements are organized into a signifying system. The English language is a code as is perspective in painting and photography. In the first case, the elements are phonemes organized into words and sentences according to a social convention: the syntax of English. In the second case, the elements are dots and lines organized into pictures according to a geometric method. An artist or movement can break the conventions of the medium, as has done Cezanne with painting, Moholy-Nagy with photography and cummings with the English idiom in poetry, and create new elements and rules for combining them. If this is done, the level of predictability (or conventionality) is lowered and unpredictability is increased -- becoming more difficult for the immediate audience to understand it. But once these new rules are learned and the ideas behind them widely understood, the level of unpredictability is lowered and they become new conventions that can be accepted by the audience. Holographic artists exploring the medium -- as opposed to advertisers using holography, who favor a high level of predictability -- are breaking several visual and cultural conventions. As a matter of fact, holography is so new that many questions are left open about the nature of the medium. Therefore, any attempt to clarify the issues raised by holography on a cultural level has a prospective (and not conclusive) tone, concentrating more thoroughly on general points and on the promise of its potentialities than on the records of its historical achievements so far.

  6. Artistic Representation with Pulsed Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, S.

    2013-02-01

    This thesis describes artistic representation through pulsed holography. One of the prevalent practical problems in making holograms is object movement. Any movement of the object or film, including movement caused by acoustic vibration, has the same fatal results. One way of reducing the chance of movement is by ensuring that the exposure is very quick; using a pulsed laser can fulfill this objective. The attractiveness of using pulsed laser is based on the variety of materials or objects that can be recorded (e.g., liquid material or instantaneous scene of a moving object). One of the most interesting points about pulsed holograms is that some reconstructed images present us with completely different views of the real world. For example, the holographic image of liquid material does not appear fluid; it looks like a piece of hard glass that would produce a sharp sound upon tapping. In everyday life, we are unfamiliar with such an instantaneous scene. On the other hand, soft-textured materials such as a feather or wool differ from liquids when observed through holography. Using a pulsed hologram, we can sense the soft touch of the object or material with the help of realistic three-dimensional (3-D) images. The images allow us to realize the sense of touch in a way that resembles touching real objects. I had the opportunity to use a pulsed ruby laser soon after I started to work in the field of holography in 1979. Since then, I have made pulsed holograms of activities, including pouring water, breaking eggs, blowing soap bubbles, and scattering feathers and popcorn. I have also created holographic art with materials and objects, such as silk fiber, fabric, balloons, glass, flowers, and even the human body. Whenever I create art, I like to present the spectator with a new experience in perception. Therefore, I would like to introduce my experimental artwork through those pulsed holograms.

  7. The implementation of AI technologies in computer wargames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiller, John A.

    2004-08-01

    Computer wargames involve the most in-depth analysis of general game theory. The enumerated turns of a game like chess are dwarfed by the exponentially larger possibilities of even a simple computer wargame. Implementing challenging AI is computer wargames is an important goal in both the commercial and military environments. In the commercial marketplace, customers demand a challenging AI opponent when they play a computer wargame and are frustrated by a lack of competence on the part of the AI. In the military environment, challenging AI opponents are important for several reasons. A challenging AI opponent will force the military professional to avoid routine or set-piece approaches to situations and cause them to think much deeper about military situations before taking action. A good AI opponent would also include national characteristics of the opponent being simulated, thus providing the military professional with even more of a challenge in planning and approach. Implementing current AI technologies in computer wargames is a technological challenge. The goal is to join the needs of AI in computer wargames with the solutions of current AI technologies. This talk will address several of those issues, possible solutions, and currently unsolved problems.

  8. Seismic Holography of Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, Charles

    2000-01-01

    The basic goal of the project was to extend holographic seismic imaging techniques developed under a previous NASA contract, and to incorporate phase diagnostics. Phase-sensitive imaging gives us a powerful probe of local thermal and Doppler perturbations in active region subphotospheres, allowing us to map thermal structure and flows associated with "acoustic moats" and "acoustic glories". These remarkable features were discovered during our work, by applying simple acoustic power holography to active regions. Included in the original project statement was an effort to obtain the first seismic images of active regions on the Sun's far surface.

  9. Helicopter mission optimization study. [portable computer technology for flight optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of using low-cost, portable computer technology to help a helicopter pilot optimize flight parameters to minimize fuel consumption and takeoff and landing noise was demonstrated. Eight separate computer programs were developed for use in the helicopter cockpit using a hand-held computer. The programs provide the helicopter pilot with the ability to calculate power required, minimum fuel consumption for both range and endurance, maximum speed and a minimum noise profile for both takeoff and landing. Each program is defined by a maximum of two magnetic cards. The helicopter pilot is required to key in the proper input parameter such as gross weight, outside air temperature or pressure altitude.

  10. High-intensity x-ray holography: an approach to high-resolution snapshot imaging of biological specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Solem, J.C.

    1982-08-01

    The crucial physical and technological issues pertaining to the holographic imaging of biological structures with a short-pulse, high-intensity, high-quantum-energy laser were examined. The limitations of x-ray optics are discussed. Alternative holographic techniques were considered, and it was concluded that far-field Fresnel transform holography (Fraunhofer holography) using a photoresist recording surface is most tractable with near term technology. The hydrodynamic expansion of inhomogeneities within the specimen is discussed. It is shown that expansion is the major source of image blurring. Analytic expressions were derived for the explosion of protein concentrations in an x-ray transparent cytoplasm, compared with numerical calculations, and corrections derived to account for the competitive transport processes by which these inhomogeneities lose energy. It is concluded that for the near term Fresnel transform holography, particularly, far-field or Fraunhofer holography, is more practical than Fourier transform holography. Of the alternative fine grain recording media for use with Fresnel transform holography, a photo-resist is most attractive. For best resolution, exposure times must be limited to a few picoseconds, and this calls for investigation of mechanisms to shutter the laser or gate the recording surface. The best contrast ratio between the nitrogen-bearing polymers (protein and the nucleic acids) and water is between the K-edges of oxygen and nitrogen.

  11. Damage Detection Using Holography and Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews classical approaches to damage detection using laser holography and interferometry. The paper then details the modern uses of electronic holography and neural-net-processed characteristic patterns to detect structural damage. The design of the neural networks and the preparation of the training sets are discussed. The use of a technique to optimize the training sets, called folding, is explained. Then a training procedure is detailed that uses the holography-measured vibration modes of the undamaged structures to impart damage-detection sensitivity to the neural networks. The inspections of an optical strain gauge mounting plate and an International Space Station cold plate are presented as examples.

  12. High-speed 3D imaging by parallel phase-shifting digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awatsuji, Yasuhiro; Xia, Peng; Matoba, Osamu

    2015-07-01

    As a high-speed three-dimensional (3D) imaging technique, parallel phase-shifting digital holography is presented. This technique records a single hologram of an object with an image sensor having a phase-shift array device and reconstructs the instantaneous 3D image of the object with a computer. In this technique, a single hologram in which the multiple holograms required for phase-shifting digital holography are multiplexed by using space-division multiplexing technique pixel by pixel. Also, we present a high-speed parallel phase-shifting digital holography system. The system consists of an interferometer, a continuous-wave laser, and a high-speed polarization imaging camera. Motion pictures of dynamic phenomena at the rate of up to 1,000,000 frames per second have been achieved by the high-speed system.

  13. Computational Structures Technology for Airframes and Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler); Housner, Jerrold M. (Compiler); Starnes, James H., Jr. (Compiler); Hopkins, Dale A. (Compiler); Chamis, Christos C. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    This conference publication contains the presentations and discussions from the joint University of Virginia (UVA)/NASA Workshops. The presentations included NASA Headquarters perspectives on High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), goals and objectives of the UVA Center for Computational Structures Technology (CST), NASA and Air Force CST activities, CST activities for airframes and propulsion systems in industry, and CST activities at Sandia National Laboratory.

  14. Pervasive Computing and Communication Technologies for U-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Young C.

    2014-01-01

    The development of digital information transfer, storage and communication methods influences a significant effect on education. The assimilation of pervasive computing and communication technologies marks another great step forward, with Ubiquitous Learning (U-learning) emerging for next generation learners. In the evolutionary view the 5G (or…

  15. Pervasive Computing and Communication Technologies for U-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Young C.

    2014-01-01

    The development of digital information transfer, storage and communication methods influences a significant effect on education. The assimilation of pervasive computing and communication technologies marks another great step forward, with Ubiquitous Learning (U-learning) emerging for next generation learners. In the evolutionary view the 5G (or…

  16. Beyond Computer Literacy: Technology Integration and Curriculum Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safar, Ammar H.; AlKhezzi, Fahad A.

    2013-01-01

    Personal computers, the Internet, smartphones, and other forms of information and communication technology (ICT) have changed our world, our job, our personal lives, as well as how we manage our knowledge and time effectively and efficiently. Research findings in the past decades have acknowledged and affirmed that the content the ICT medium…

  17. Computer Software for Forestry Technology Curricula. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Roy C.; Scobie, Walter R.

    Since microcomputers are being used more and more frequently in the forest products industry in the Pacific Northwest, Green River Community College conducted a project to search for BASIC language computer programs pertaining to forestry, and when possible, to adapt such software for use in teaching forestry technology. The search for applicable…

  18. Computer integrated manufacturing and technology transfer for improving aerospace productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrington, P. A.; Sica, J.

    1992-03-01

    This paper reviews a cooperative effort, between the Alabama Industial Development Training Institute and the University of Alabama in Huntsville, to implement a prototype computer integrated manufacturing system. The primary use of this system will be to educate Alabama companies on the organizational and technological issues involved in the implementation of advanced manufacturing systems.

  19. COMPUTER MODELING (INDUSTRIAL MULTIMEDIA BRANCH, SUSTAINABLE TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Industrial Multimedia Branch of NRMRL's Sustainable Technology Division maintains a research program in modeling of industrial processes for pollution prevention applications. The purpose of this program is to develop computer software tools for the user community to self-ass...

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL CONSEQUENCES OF TELEMATICS: TELECOMMUNICATION, COMPUTATION, AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current important research needs whose results will be critical to Environmental Protection Agency's mission in the next two to three decades with regard to a major expansion in the use of telematics, i.e. telecommunications, computer, and information technology, are identified. ...

  1. Computer Technology Integration and Student Learning: Barriers and Promise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keengwe, Jared; Onchwari, Grace; Wachira, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Political and institutional support has enabled many institutions of learning to spend millions of dollars to acquire educational computing tools (Ficklen and Muscara, "Am Educ" 25(3):22-29, 2001) that have not been effectively integrated into the curriculum. While access to educational technology tools has remarkably improved in most schools,…

  2. NASA CST aids U.S. industry. [computational structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housner, Jerry M.; Pinson, Larry D.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of NASA's computational structures Technology (CST) research on aerospace vehicle design and operation is discussed. The application of this research to proposed version of a high-speed civil transport, to composite structures in aerospace, to the study of crack growth, and to resolving field problems is addressed.

  3. Computer-Assisted Foreign Language Teaching and Learning: Technological Advances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zou, Bin; Xing, Minjie; Wang, Yuping; Sun, Mingyu; Xiang, Catherine H.

    2013-01-01

    Computer-Assisted Foreign Language Teaching and Learning: Technological Advances highlights new research and an original framework that brings together foreign language teaching, experiments and testing practices that utilize the most recent and widely used e-learning resources. This comprehensive collection of research will offer linguistic…

  4. Computer-Assisted Foreign Language Teaching and Learning: Technological Advances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zou, Bin; Xing, Minjie; Wang, Yuping; Sun, Mingyu; Xiang, Catherine H.

    2013-01-01

    Computer-Assisted Foreign Language Teaching and Learning: Technological Advances highlights new research and an original framework that brings together foreign language teaching, experiments and testing practices that utilize the most recent and widely used e-learning resources. This comprehensive collection of research will offer linguistic…

  5. Computer Technology Integration and Student Learning: Barriers and Promise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keengwe, Jared; Onchwari, Grace; Wachira, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Political and institutional support has enabled many institutions of learning to spend millions of dollars to acquire educational computing tools (Ficklen and Muscara, "Am Educ" 25(3):22-29, 2001) that have not been effectively integrated into the curriculum. While access to educational technology tools has remarkably improved in most schools,…

  6. Providing Assistive Technology Applications as a Service Through Cloud Computing.

    PubMed

    Mulfari, Davide; Celesti, Antonio; Villari, Massimo; Puliafito, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Users with disabilities interact with Personal Computers (PCs) using Assistive Technology (AT) software solutions. Such applications run on a PC that a person with a disability commonly uses. However the configuration of AT applications is not trivial at all, especially whenever the user needs to work on a PC that does not allow him/her to rely on his / her AT tools (e.g., at work, at university, in an Internet point). In this paper, we discuss how cloud computing provides a valid technological solution to enhance such a scenario.With the emergence of cloud computing, many applications are executed on top of virtual machines (VMs). Virtualization allows us to achieve a software implementation of a real computer able to execute a standard operating system and any kind of application. In this paper we propose to build personalized VMs running AT programs and settings. By using the remote desktop technology, our solution enables users to control their customized virtual desktop environment by means of an HTML5-based web interface running on any computer equipped with a browser, whenever they are. PMID:26132225

  7. Resolution factors in edgeline holography.

    PubMed

    Trolinger, J D; Gee, T H

    1971-06-01

    When an in-line Fresnel hologram of an object such as a projectile in flight is made, the reconstruction comprises an image of the outside edge of the object superimposed upon a Fresnel diffraction pattern of the edge and an unmodulated portion of the reconstruction beam. When the reconstructed image is bandpass filtered, the only remaining significant contribution is that of a diffraction pattern which is symmetrical about an edgeline gaussian image of the object. The present paper discusses the application of this type of holography in accurately locating the edge of a large dynamic object, the position of which is not accurately known in any dimension. A theoretical and experimental analysis was performed to study the effects of motion, hologram size, film type, and practical limitations upon the attainable resolution in the reconstructed image. The bandlimiting effect of motion is used to relate the motion effected resolution limit of holography to that of photography. The study shows that an edgeline can be accurately located even at high velocity normal to the edge. PMID:20111113

  8. The Adoption of Grid Computing Technology by Organizations: A Quantitative Study Using Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Udoh, Emmanuel E.

    2010-01-01

    Advances in grid technology have enabled some organizations to harness enormous computational power on demand. However, the prediction of widespread adoption of the grid technology has not materialized despite the obvious grid advantages. This situation has encouraged intense efforts to close the research gap in the grid adoption process. In this…

  9. Overview of European technology in computers, telecommunications, and electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackburn, J. F.

    1990-05-01

    The emergence of the personal computer, the growing use of distributed systems, and the increasing demand for supercomputers and mini-supercomputers are causing a profound impact on the European computer market. An equally profound development in telecommunications is the integration of voice, data, and images in the public network systems - the Integrated Service Digital Network (ISDN). The programs being mounted in Europe to meet the challenges of these technologies are described. The Europe-wide trends and actions with respect to computers, telecommunications, and microelectronics are discussed, and the major European collaborative programs in these fields are described. Specific attention is given to the European Strategic Programme for Research and Development in Information (ESPRIT); Research in Advanced Communications for Europe (RACE); European Research Coordination Agency (Eureka) programs; Joint European Submicron Silicon Initiative (JESSI); and the recently combined programs Basic Research Industrial Technologies in Europe/European Research in Advanced Materials (BRITE/EURAM).

  10. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC): Advancing the frontiers of computational science and technology

    SciTech Connect

    Hules, J.

    1996-11-01

    National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) provides researchers with high-performance computing tools to tackle science`s biggest and most challenging problems. Founded in 1974 by DOE/ER, the Controlled Thermonuclear Research Computer Center was the first unclassified supercomputer center and was the model for those that followed. Over the years the center`s name was changed to the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center and then to NERSC; it was relocated to LBNL. NERSC, one of the largest unclassified scientific computing resources in the world, is the principal provider of general-purpose computing services to DOE/ER programs: Magnetic Fusion Energy, High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Basic Energy Sciences, Health and Environmental Research, and the Office of Computational and Technology Research. NERSC users are a diverse community located throughout US and in several foreign countries. This brochure describes: the NERSC advantage, its computational resources and services, future technologies, scientific resources, and computational science of scale (interdisciplinary research over a decade or longer; examples: combustion in engines, waste management chemistry, global climate change modeling).

  11. Industrial Applications Of Holography In Aerospatiale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Floc'H, C.; Gagnage, B.

    1982-10-01

    AEROSPAT1ALE occupies a leading position in the European aerospace industry. Its industrial potential is exemplified by : - Its 4 divisions : Aircraft, Helicopters, Tactical Missiles and Space and Balistic Systems. - Its 11 factories. - Its 6 subsidiaries. The vitality of the firm can be demonstrated by a few figures : - Turnover (fiscal 1980 without the subsidiaries), 13, 169 millions French Francs. - Exports (in 1980), 48,2%. - Workforce (on 31st December 1980), 38,857 of whom 3,919 were with the subsidiaries. Among Aerospatiale products, we can quote : - Ariane. - Airbus. - Super Puma, Astar, Dauphin. - Tactical Missiles AS 15, AS 30, AM 59. - Satellites Meteostat, Intelsat V and Exosat. Certain projects were carried out in multi-national cooperation. These high-performance, high-reliability products presuppose the implementation of advanced technology. Hence, in order to maintain their standard, we use non-destructive testing thechniques such as X-rays or ultrasonics which have given complete satisfaction in the detection of flaws. However, to reduce the inspection contribution to the cost price of our products, we were led to develop new, large-scale methods, such as acoustic analysis and holographic interferometry. This paper covers the uses of holography in an industrial environment. We shall discuss the technical advantages of the method, illustrated by several examples,and the economical advantages, demonstrated by the practical example of an inspection line. Finally for the enhancement of Aerospatiale's technology (new materials, and holographic inspection) we will go on to outline other fields of activity.

  12. Image enhancement by holography.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroke, G. W.

    1973-01-01

    The speed of the holographic image deblurring method has recently been further enhanced by a new speed in the realization of the powerful holographic image-deblurring filter. The filter makes it possible to carry out the deblurring, in the optical computer used, in times of the order of one second. The experimental achievements using the holographic image-enhancement method are illustrated with examples ranging from out-of-focus or motion-blurred photographs, including 'amateur' photos recorded on Polaroid film, to the sharpening of the best available electron micrographs of viruses. Images recorded with X-rays, notably from rocket-borne photos of the sun, and out-of-focus photographs from cameras in NASA satellites have been similarly deblurred.

  13. Present State Iof Holography In Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Masane; Hayashi, Yuzo; Yamamoto, Y.

    1983-07-01

    In 1948,Dr. Dennis Gabor introduced the theory of holography as "the optical recording of the object wave formed by the resulting interference pattern of two mutually coherent, component light beams." Through the studies of enumerous practical applications, the theory of holography was further advanced to be used in conjunction with the laser beam to better serve a more practical minded industry. Such developments were introduced and engineered by Dr. Emmett Leith and Dr. Juris Upatnieks in 1962.

  14. Criteria for the observation of strong-field photoelectron holography

    SciTech Connect

    Marchenko, T.; Huismans, Y.; Schafer, K. J.; Vrakking, M. J. J.

    2011-11-15

    Photoelectron holography is studied experimentally and computationally using the ionization of ground-state xenon atoms by intense near-infrared radiation. A strong dependence of the occurrence of the holographic pattern on the laser wavelength and intensity is observed, and it is shown that the observation of the hologram requires that the ponderomotive energy U{sub p} is substantially larger than the photon energy. The holographic interference is therefore favored by longer wavelengths and higher laser intensities. Our results indicate that the tunneling regime is not a necessary condition for the observation of the holographic pattern, which can be observed under the conditions formally attributed to the multiphoton regime.

  15. Entanglement entropy in Galilean conformal field theories and flat holography.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Arjun; Basu, Rudranil; Grumiller, Daniel; Riegler, Max

    2015-03-20

    We present the analytical calculation of entanglement entropy for a class of two-dimensional field theories governed by the symmetries of the Galilean conformal algebra, thus providing a rare example of such an exact computation. These field theories are the putative holographic duals to theories of gravity in three-dimensional asymptotically flat spacetimes. We provide a check of our field theory answers by an analysis of geodesics. We also exploit the Chern-Simons formulation of three-dimensional gravity and adapt recent proposals of calculating entanglement entropy by Wilson lines in this context to find an independent confirmation of our results from holography. PMID:25839258

  16. Integral geometry and holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czech, Bart?omiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Sully, James

    2015-10-01

    We present a mathematical framework which underlies the connection between information theory and the bulk spacetime in the AdS3/CFT2 correspondence. A key concept is kinematic space: an auxiliary Lorentzian geometry whose metric is defined in terms of conditional mutual informations and which organizes the entanglement pattern of a CFT state. When the field theory has a holographic dual obeying the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal, kinematic space has a direct geometric meaning: it is the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. Lengths of bulk curves are computed by kinematic volumes, giving a precise entropic interpretation of the length of any bulk curve. We explain how basic geometric concepts — points, distances and angles — are reflected in kinematic space, allowing one to reconstruct a large class of spatial bulk geometries from boundary entanglement entropies. In this way, kinematic space translates between information theoretic and geometric descriptions of a CFT state. As an example, we discuss in detail the static slice of AdS3 whose kinematic space is two-dimensional de Sitter space.

  17. Integral geometry and holography

    SciTech Connect

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Sully, James

    2015-10-27

    We present a mathematical framework which underlies the connection between information theory and the bulk spacetime in the AdS3/CFT2 correspondence. A key concept is kinematic space: an auxiliary Lorentzian geometry whose metric is defined in terms of conditional mutual informations and which organizes the entanglement pattern of a CFT state. When the field theory has a holographic dual obeying the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal, kinematic space has a direct geometric meaning: it is the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. Lengths of bulk curves are computed by kinematic volumes, giving a precise entropic interpretation of the length of any bulk curve. We explain how basic geometric concepts -- points, distances and angles -- are reflected in kinematic space, allowing one to reconstruct a large class of spatial bulk geometries from boundary entanglement entropies. In this way, kinematic space translates between information theoretic and geometric descriptions of a CFT state. As an example, we discuss in detail the static slice of AdS3 whose kinematic space is two-dimensional de Sitter space.

  18. Integral geometry and holography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Sully, James

    2015-10-27

    We present a mathematical framework which underlies the connection between information theory and the bulk spacetime in the AdS3/CFT2 correspondence. A key concept is kinematic space: an auxiliary Lorentzian geometry whose metric is defined in terms of conditional mutual informations and which organizes the entanglement pattern of a CFT state. When the field theory has a holographic dual obeying the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal, kinematic space has a direct geometric meaning: it is the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. Lengths of bulk curves are computed by kinematic volumes, giving a precise entropic interpretation of the length of any bulkmore » curve. We explain how basic geometric concepts -- points, distances and angles -- are reflected in kinematic space, allowing one to reconstruct a large class of spatial bulk geometries from boundary entanglement entropies. In this way, kinematic space translates between information theoretic and geometric descriptions of a CFT state. As an example, we discuss in detail the static slice of AdS3 whose kinematic space is two-dimensional de Sitter space.« less

  19. Quantum decoherence with holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Shih-Hao; Li, Wei; Lin, Feng-Li; Ning, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Quantum decoherence is the loss of a system's purity due to its interaction with the surrounding environment. Via the AdS/CFT correspondence, we study how a system decoheres when its environment is a strongly-coupled theory. In the FeynmanVernon formalism, we compute the influence functional holographically by relating it to the generating function of Schwinger-Keldysh propagators and thereby obtain the dynamics of the system's density matrix. We present two exactly solvable examples: (1) a straight string in a BTZ black hole and (2) a scalar probe in AdS5. We prepare an initial state that mimics Schrödinger's cat and identify different stages of its decoherence process using the time-scaling behaviors of Rényi entropy. We also relate decoherence to local quantum quenches, and by comparing the time evolution behaviors of the Wigner function and Rényi entropy we demonstrate that the relaxation of local quantum excitations leads to the collapse of its wave-function.

  20. Memory System Technologies for Future High-End Computing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    McKee, S A; de Supinski, B R; Mueller, F; Tyson, G S

    2003-05-16

    Our ability to solve Grand Challenge Problems in computing hinges on the development of reliable and efficient High-End Computing systems. Unfortunately, the increasing gap between memory and processor speeds remains one of the major bottlenecks in modern architectures. Uniprocessor nodes still suffer, but symmetric multiprocessor nodes--where access to physical memory is shared among all processors--are among the hardest hit. In the latter case, the memory system must juggle multiple working sets and maintain memory coherence, on top of simply responding to access requests. To illustrate the severity of the current situation, consider two important examples: even the high-performance parallel supercomputers in use at Department of Energy National labs observe single-processor utilization rates as low as 5%, and transaction processing commercial workloads see utilizations of at most about 33%. A wealth of research demonstrates that traditional memory systems are incapable of bridging the processor/memory performance gap, and the problem continues to grow. The success of future High-End Computing platforms therefore depends on our developing hardware and software technologies to dramatically relieve the memory bottleneck. In order to take better advantage of the tremendous computing power of modern microprocessors and future High-End systems, we consider it crucial to develop the hardware for intelligent, adaptable memory systems; the middleware and OS modifications to manage them; and the compiler technology and performance tools to exploit them. Taken together, these will provide the foundations for meeting the requirements of future generations of performance-critical, parallel systems based on either uniprocessor or SMP nodes (including PIM organizations). We feel that such solutions should not be vendor-specific, but should be sufficiently general and adaptable such that the technologies could be leveraged by any commercial vendor of High-End Computing systems. This strategy is likely to have the most impact while maintaining modest costs for adoption of the new technologies.

  1. Computing, information, and communications: Technologies for the 21. Century

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    To meet the challenges of a radically new and technologically demanding century, the Federal Computing, Information, and Communications (CIC) programs are investing in long-term research and development (R and D) to advance computing, information, and communications in the United States. CIC R and D programs help Federal departments and agencies to fulfill their evolving missions, assure the long-term national security, better understand and manage the physical environment, improve health care, help improve the teaching of children, provide tools for lifelong training and distance learning to the workforce, and sustain critical US economic competitiveness. One of the nine committees of the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC), the Committee on Computing, Information, and Communications (CCIC)--through its CIC R and D Subcommittee--coordinates R and D programs conducted by twelve Federal departments and agencies in cooperation with US academia and industry. These R and D programs are organized into five Program Component Areas: (1) HECC--High End Computing and Computation; (2) LSN--Large Scale Networking, including the Next Generation Internet Initiative; (3) HCS--High Confidence Systems; (4) HuCS--Human Centered Systems; and (5) ETHR--Education, Training, and Human Resources. A brief synopsis of FY 1997 accomplishments and FY 1998 goals by PCA is presented. This report, which supplements the President`s Fiscal Year 1998 Budget, describes the interagency CIC programs.

  2. Impact of Charge-Transfer Device Technology on Computer Systems. Computer Science & Technology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warnar, Robert B. J.

    This document assesses the status of charge-transfer device technology as displayed by foreign research and manufacturing facilities for a period up to September 1975. Capabilities and accomplishments of charge-transfer device research facilities in Japan, Canada, Great Britain, The Netherlands, The Federal Republic of Germany, and the United…

  3. Report of the Panel on Computer and Information Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundstrom, Stephen F.; Larsen, Ronald L.

    1984-01-01

    Aircraft have become more and more dependent on computers (information processing) for improved performance and safety. It is clear that this activity will grow, since information processing technology has advanced by a factor of 10 every 5 years for the past 35 years and will continue to do so. Breakthroughs in device technology, from vacuum tubes through transistors to integrated circuits, contribute to this rapid pace. This progress is nearly matched by similar, though not as dramatic, advances in numerical software and algorithms. Progress has not been easy. Many technical and nontechnical challenges were surmounted. The outlook is for continued growth in capability but will require surmounting new challenges. The technology forecast presented in this report has been developed by extrapolating current trends and assessing the possibilities of several high-risk research topics. In the process, critical problem areas that require research and development emphasis have been identified. The outlook assumes a positive perspective; the projected capabilities are possible by the year 2000, and adequate resources will be made available to achieve them. Computer and information technology forecasts and the potential impacts of this technology on aeronautics are identified. Critical issues and technical challenges underlying the achievement of forecasted performance and benefits are addressed.

  4. Cloud computing and patient engagement: leveraging available technology.

    PubMed

    Noblin, Alice; Cortelyou-Ward, Kendall; Servan, Rosa M

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing technology has the potential to transform medical practices and improve patient engagement and quality of care. However, issues such as privacy and security and "fit" can make incorporation of the cloud an intimidating decision for many physicians. This article summarizes the four most common types of clouds and discusses their ideal uses, how they engage patients, and how they improve the quality of care offered. This technology also can be used to meet Meaningful Use requirements 1 and 2; and, if speculation is correct, the cloud will provide the necessary support needed for Meaningful Use 3 as well. PMID:25807597

  5. Reconfigurable Array Interconnection by Photorefractive Volume Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Joseph Earl

    Parallel computing algorithms can be effectively implemented by combining local electronic processing with global optical interconnection. This dissertation describes the development of an optical array interconnection network based on photorefractive volume holography. The approach taken uses the correlation matrix-tensor multiplier (CMTM) algorithm, which optically convolves the phase-encoded input array with a control image holding the interconnection weights. Two-dimensional arrays can be interconnected with complex grey-level weights using binary phase-only spatial light modulators. The CMTM algorithm allows graceful accomodation of limited modulator size by trading off control image bandwidth for output signal to noise ratio. The optical correlation was performed by photorefractive four-wave mixing, storing the interconnection information in a single exposure of the control image. Multiple interconection patterns were prestored as color-multiplexed volume reflection holograms in z-cut LiNbO_3. Fast reconfiguration between interconnection patterns is possible using a wavelength tunable source, decoupling both the modulation and switching speeds from the slow photorefractive response. Experimental results confirmed theoretical predictions that the algorithm works best for densely connected networks, with a large fan-in to each output. Interconnection of up to 4096 inputs and outputs was demonstrated using such dense interconnection patterns. An aggregate average SNR of over 200 was obtained for 1024 inputs and outputs. Finally, a compact packaged optoelectonic processor system using CMTM interconnection is proposed, and its scaling behavior investigated.

  6. Holography And Holometry Applications In Dental Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willenborg, George C.

    1987-06-01

    The earliest reference to holographic applications appeared in the dental literature in 1972 when Wictorin, Bjelkhagen and Abramson described a method to study elastic deformation of defective gold solder joints in simulated fixed bridges. Their paper, published in the Swedish dental literature, offered a concise presentation of the interferometry technique which led to the development of other research applications of holographic interferometry(holometry) in dentistry. In this presentation, the development and application of the interferometry technique in the dental field will be discussed. Various interesting and potentially useful applications of holography have appeared in the dental literature over the past decade. Some of these, which will be discussed, include the use of holograms as a storage medium for dental study models, multiplexing of computer(CT) scan sections to form white light viewable holograms and the potential application of holographic training aids in the teaching of the basic courses of dental anatomy and restorative dentistry. In addition, some unique related applications will be mentioned including a laser reflection method for accurate non-contact measurement of tooth mobility/movement and a technique for contour mapping of occlusal surfaces to measure wear of restorative materials.

  7. Acoustic-emission linear-pulse holography

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, H.D.; Lemon, D.K.; Busse, L.J.

    1982-06-01

    This paper describes Acoustic Emission Linear Pulse Holography which combines the advantages of linear imaging and acoustic emission into a single NDE inspection system. This unique system produces a chronological linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. Conventional linear holographic imaging uses an ultrasonic transducer to transmit energy into the volume being imaged. When the crack or defect reflects that energy, the crack acts as a new source of acoustic waves. To formulate an image of that source, a receiving transducer is scanned over the volume of interest and the phase of the received signals is measured at successive points on the scan. The innovation proposed here is the utilization of the crack generated acoustic emission as the acoustic source and generation of a line image of the crack as it grows. A thirty-two point sampling array is used to construct phase-only linear holograms of simulated acoustic emission sources on large metal plates. The phases are calculated using the pulse time-of-flight (TOF) times from the reference transducer to the array of receivers. Computer reconstruction of the image is accomplished using a one-dimensional FFT algorithm (i.e., backward wave). Experimental results are shown which graphically illustrate the unique acoustic emission images of a single point and a linear crack in a 100 mm x 1220 mm x 1220 mm aluminum plate.

  8. Digital holography system for undergraduate student laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buranasiri, P.; Plaipichit, S.; Yindeesuk, W.; Yoshimori, K.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we discuss the digital holography (DH) experiment in our optical and communication laboratory course for undergraduate students at Physics department, KMITL. The purposes of DH experiment are presenting our students the meaning and advantage of DH and its applications. The Gabor configurations of in-line DH has been set up for recording a number of samples, which were placed on different distances, simultaneously. Then, the images of all objects have been numerical reconstructed by using computer. The students have been learned that all of reconstructed images have been got from only one time recording, while using the conventional recording technique, sharp images of different objects have been gotten from different recording time. The students also have been learned how to use DH technique for investigation some different kinds of samples on their own of interested such as a human hair or a fingerprint. In our future work, our DH system will be developed to be a portable apparatus for easily showing to children in different areas.

  9. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    DOEpatents

    Collins, H.D.; Busse, L.J.; Lemon, D.K.

    1983-10-25

    This device relates to the concept of and means for performing Acoustic Emission Linear Pulse Holography, which combines the advantages of linear holographic imaging and Acoustic Emission into a single non-destructive inspection system. This unique system produces a chronological, linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. The innovation is the concept of utilizing the crack-generated acoustic emission energy to generate a chronological series of images of a growing crack by applying linear, pulse holographic processing to the acoustic emission data. The process is implemented by placing on a structure an array of piezoelectric sensors (typically 16 or 32 of them) near the defect location. A reference sensor is placed between the defect and the array.

  10. Visualizing Breath using Digital Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobson, P. R.; Reid, I. D.; Wilton, J. B.

    2013-02-01

    Artist Jayne Wilton and physicists Peter Hobson and Ivan Reid of Brunel University are collaborating at Brunel University on a project which aims to use a range of techniques to make visible the normally invisible dynamics of the breath and the verbal and non-verbal communication it facilitates. The breath is a source of a wide range of chemical, auditory and physical exchanges with the direct environment. Digital Holography is being investigated to enable a visually stimulating articulation of the physical trajectory of the breath as it leaves the mouth. Initial findings of this research are presented. Real time digital hologram replay allows the audience to move through holographs of breath-born particles.

  11. Diversity in Computing Technologies and Strategies for Dynamic Resource Allocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzoglio, G.; Gutsche, O.

    2015-12-01

    High Energy Physics (HEP) is a very data intensive and trivially parallelizable science discipline. HEP is probing nature at increasingly finer details requiring ever increasing computational resources to process and analyze experimental data. In this paper, we discuss how HEP provisioned resources so far using Grid technologies, how HEP is starting to include new resource providers like commercial Clouds and HPC installations, and how HEP is transparently provisioning resources at these diverse providers.

  12. Vector Field Visual Data Analysis Technologies for Petascale Computational Science

    SciTech Connect

    Garth, Christoph; Deines, Eduard; Joy, Kenneth I.; Bethel, E. Wes; Childs, Hank; Weber, Gunther; Ahern, Sean; Pugmire, Dave; Sanderson, Allen; Johnson, Chris

    2009-11-13

    State-of-the-art computational science simulations generate large-scale vector field data sets. Visualization and analysis is a key aspect of obtaining insight into these data sets and represents an important challenge. This article discusses possibilities and challenges of modern vector field visualization and focuses on methods and techniques developed in the SciDAC Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies (VACET) and deployed in the open-source visualization tool, VisIt.

  13. Children and computers: new technology--old concerns.

    PubMed

    Wartella, E A; Jennings, N

    2000-01-01

    Computer technology has ushered in a new era of mass media, bringing with it great promise and great concerns about the effect on children's development and well-being. Although we tend to see these issues as being new, similar promises and concerns have accompanied each new wave of media technology throughout the past century: films in the early 1900s, radio in the 1920s, and television in the 1940s. With the introduction of each of these technologies, proponents touted the educational benefits for children, while opponents voiced fears about exposure to inappropriate commercial, sexual, and violent content. This article places current studies on children and computers in a historical context, noting the recurrent themes and patterns in media research during the twentieth century. Initial research concerning each innovation has tended to focus on issues of access and the amount of time children were spending with the new medium. As use of the technology became more prevalent, research shifted to issues related to content and its effects on children. Current research on children's use of computers is again following this pattern. But the increased level of interactivity now possible with computer games and with the communication features of the Internet has heightened both the promise of greatly enriched learning and the concerns related to increased risk of harm. As a result, research on the effects of exposure to various types of content has taken on a new sense of urgency. The authors conclude that to help inform and sustain the creation of more quality content for children, further research is needed on the effects of media on children, and new partnerships must be forged between industry, academia, and advocacy groups. PMID:11255707

  14. Establishment of the Center for Biomedical Technology Innovation

    SciTech Connect

    2001-12-15

    The report discussed the following topics: (1) Orthopedic Devices; (2) Hybrid Vector and Method Resulting in Protein Overproduction by Eukaryotic Cells; (3) Surgical Simulator; (4) CBTI (Center for Biomedical Technology Innovation) as an Incubator for Start-up Companies; (5) Voice-activated, computer-assisted surgical robotics; (6) Through transmission ultrasonic 3-D holography for diagnostic imaging; (7) CBTI's Scibermed{trademark} Virtual Institute (SVI); and (8) Laser Oxygenation Tomography.

  15. A virtual computer lab for distance biomedical technology education

    PubMed Central

    Locatis, Craig; Vega, Anibal; Bhagwat, Medha; Liu, Wei-Li; Conde, Jose

    2008-01-01

    Background The National Library of Medicine's National Center for Biotechnology Information offers mini-courses which entail applying concepts in biochemistry and genetics to search genomics databases and other information sources. They are highly interactive and involve use of 3D molecular visualization software that can be computationally taxing. Methods Methods were devised to offer the courses at a distance so as to provide as much functionality of a computer lab as possible, the venue where they are normally taught. The methods, which can be employed with varied videoconferencing technology and desktop sharing software, were used to deliver mini-courses at a distance in pilot applications where students could see demonstrations by the instructor and the instructor could observe and interact with students working at their remote desktops. Results Student ratings of the learning experience and comments to open ended questions were similar to those when the courses are offered face to face. The real time interaction and the instructor's ability to access student desktops from a distance in order to provide individual assistance and feedback were considered invaluable. Conclusion The technologies and methods mimic much of the functionality of computer labs and may be usefully applied in any context where content changes frequently, training needs to be offered on complex computer applications at a distance in real time, and where it is necessary for the instructor to monitor students as they work. PMID:18366629

  16. 25 CFR 502.7 - Electronic, computer or other technologic aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. 502.7... DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.7 Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. (a) Electronic, computer or... applicable Federal communications law. (b) Electronic, computer or other technologic aids include, but...

  17. 25 CFR 502.7 - Electronic, computer or other technologic aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. 502.7... DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.7 Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. (a) Electronic, computer or... applicable Federal communications law. (b) Electronic, computer or other technologic aids include, but...

  18. Reviews of computing technology: Fiber distributed data interface

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.J.

    1991-12-01

    Fiber Distributed Data Interface, more commonly known as FDDI, is the name of the standard that describes a new local area network (LAN) technology for the 90's. This technology is based on fiber optics communications and, at a data transmission rate of 100 million bits per second (mbps), provides a full order of magnitude improvement over previous LAN standards such as Ethernet and Token Ring. FDDI as a standard has been accepted by all major computer manufacturers and is a national standard as defined by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). FDDI will become part of the US Government Open Systems Interconnection Profile (GOSIP) under Version 3 GOSIP and will become an international standard promoted by the International Standards Organization (ISO). It is important to note that there are no competing standards for high performance LAN's so that FDDI acceptance is nearly universal. This technology report describes FDDI as a technology, looks at the applications of this technology, examine the current economics of using it, and describe activities and plans by the Information Resource Management (IRM) department to implement this technology at the Savannah River Site.

  19. Reviews of computing technology: Fiber distributed data interface

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.J.

    1991-12-01

    Fiber Distributed Data Interface, more commonly known as FDDI, is the name of the standard that describes a new local area network (LAN) technology for the 90`s. This technology is based on fiber optics communications and, at a data transmission rate of 100 million bits per second (mbps), provides a full order of magnitude improvement over previous LAN standards such as Ethernet and Token Ring. FDDI as a standard has been accepted by all major computer manufacturers and is a national standard as defined by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). FDDI will become part of the US Government Open Systems Interconnection Profile (GOSIP) under Version 3 GOSIP and will become an international standard promoted by the International Standards Organization (ISO). It is important to note that there are no competing standards for high performance LAN`s so that FDDI acceptance is nearly universal. This technology report describes FDDI as a technology, looks at the applications of this technology, examine the current economics of using it, and describe activities and plans by the Information Resource Management (IRM) department to implement this technology at the Savannah River Site.

  20. Energy and technology review

    SciTech Connect

    Poggio, A.J.

    1988-10-01

    This issue of Energy and Technology Review contains: Neutron Penumbral Imaging of Laser-Fusion Targets--using our new penumbral-imaging diagnostic, we have obtained the first images that can be used to measure directly the deuterium-tritium burn region in laser-driven fusion targets; Computed Tomography for Nondestructive Evaluation--various computed tomography systems and computational techniques are used in nondestructive evaluation; Three-Dimensional Image Analysis for Studying Nuclear Chromatin Structure--we have developed an optic-electronic system for acquiring cross-sectional views of cell nuclei, and computer codes to analyze these images and reconstruct the three-dimensional structures they represent; Imaging in the Nuclear Test Program--advanced techniques produce images of unprecedented detail and resolution from Nevada Test Site data; and Computational X-Ray Holography--visible-light experiments and numerically simulated holograms test our ideas about an x-ray microscope for biological research.

  1. The Influence of Computer Technology Learning Program on Attitudes toward Computers and Self-Esteem among Arab Dropout Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romi, Shlomo; Zoabi, Houssien

    2003-01-01

    Describes a study that examined the attitudes of Arab dropout youth in Israel toward the use of computer technology and the influence of this use on their self-esteem. Results supported the assumptions that exposure to computer technology would change the attitudes of dropout adolescents toward computers to positive ones. (Contains 43 references.)…

  2. Campus Computing, 1998. The Ninth National Survey of Desktop Computing and Information Technology in American Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Kenneth C.

    This report presents findings of a June 1998 survey of computing officials at 1,623 two- and four-year U.S. colleges and universities concerning the use of computer technology. The survey found that computing and information technology (IT) are now core components of the campus environment and classroom experience. However, key aspects of IT…

  3. Ultra wide band 3-D cross section (RCS) holography

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, H.D.; Hall, T.E.

    1992-07-01

    Ultra wide band impulse holography is an exciting new concept for predictive radar cross section (RCS) evaluation employing near-field measurements. Reconstruction of the near-field hologram data maps the target`s scattering areas, and uniquely identifies the ``hot spot`` locations on the target. In addition, the target and calibration sphere`s plane wave angular spectrums are computed (via digital algorithm) and used to generate the target`s far-field RCS values in three dimensions for each frequency component in the impulse. Thin and thick targets are defined in terms of their near-field amplitude variations in range. Range gating and computer holographic techniques are applied to correct these variations. Preliminary experimental results on various targets verify the concept of RCS holography. The unique 3-D presentation (i.e., typically containing 524,288 RCS values for a 1024 {times} 512 sampled aperture for every frequency component) illustrates the efficacy of target recognition in terms of its far-field plane wave angular spectrum image. RCS images can then be viewed at different angles for target recognition, etc.

  4. Ultra wide band 3-D cross section (RCS) holography

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, H.D.; Hall, T.E.

    1992-07-01

    Ultra wide band impulse holography is an exciting new concept for predictive radar cross section (RCS) evaluation employing near-field measurements. Reconstruction of the near-field hologram data maps the target's scattering areas, and uniquely identifies the hot spot'' locations on the target. In addition, the target and calibration sphere's plane wave angular spectrums are computed (via digital algorithm) and used to generate the target's far-field RCS values in three dimensions for each frequency component in the impulse. Thin and thick targets are defined in terms of their near-field amplitude variations in range. Range gating and computer holographic techniques are applied to correct these variations. Preliminary experimental results on various targets verify the concept of RCS holography. The unique 3-D presentation (i.e., typically containing 524,288 RCS values for a 1024 {times} 512 sampled aperture for every frequency component) illustrates the efficacy of target recognition in terms of its far-field plane wave angular spectrum image. RCS images can then be viewed at different angles for target recognition, etc.

  5. In-line digital holography with double knife edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Claudio; Iemmi, Claudio; Campos, Juan

    2015-06-01

    We study and test a new technique for in-line digital holography which avoids the formation of the conjugate images. Inline digital holography is based in a common path configuration. In this case, the hologram is produced by the interference between the reference wave front and the diffracted wave front by an almost transparent object. Twin images are obtained with obscured rings that difficult the determination of the best focusing plane. To avoid the conjugated image, the information of the magnitude and phase of the wave front are needed. In a recent work a new in-line digital holography technique was proposed. In this method the object is illuminated with a collimated wave front. A plane, close to the particles distribution is imaged onto a CCD by means of a convergent lens and at the same time, a knife edge is placed in the focal plane of the lens in order to block half of spatial frequency spectrum. In this way, by means of a numerical processing performed on the Fourier plane, it is possible to eliminate one of the components (real or conjugate) of the reconstructed images nevertheless it is observed a tiny deformation of the resulting hologram image. To compensate this effect, we propose a new configuration in which we implement the knife edge technique on both parts of the spectrum at the same time. Finally in the computer, we process the holograms to build one complete without deformation. This hologram is used to recover the wave front at different planes without the influence of the conjugate image.

  6. Computer technology applications in industrial and organizational psychology.

    PubMed

    Crespin, Timothy R; Austin, James T

    2002-08-01

    This article reviews computer applications developed and utilized by industrial-organizational (I-O) psychologists, both in practice and in research. A primary emphasis is on applications developed for Internet usage, because this "network of networks" changes the way I-O psychologists work. The review focuses on traditional and emerging topics in I-O psychology. The first topic involves information technology applications in measurement, defined broadly across levels of analysis (persons, groups, organizations) and domains (abilities, personality, attitudes). Discussion then focuses on individual learning at work, both in formal training and in coping with continual automation of work. A section on job analysis follows, illustrating the role of computers and the Internet in studying jobs. Shifting focus to the group level of analysis, we briefly review how information technology is being used to understand and support cooperative work. Finally, special emphasis is given to the emerging "third discipline" in I-O psychology research-computational modeling of behavioral events in organizations. Throughout this review, themes of innovation and dissemination underlie a continuum between research and practice. The review concludes by setting a framework for I-O psychology in a computerized and networked world. PMID:12216695

  7. Computational fluid dynamics for propulsion technology: Geometric grid visualization in CFD-based propulsion technology research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziebarth, John P.; Meyer, Doug

    1992-01-01

    The coordination is examined of necessary resources, facilities, and special personnel to provide technical integration activities in the area of computational fluid dynamics applied to propulsion technology. Involved is the coordination of CFD activities between government, industry, and universities. Current geometry modeling, grid generation, and graphical methods are established to use in the analysis of CFD design methodologies.

  8. Foreign and Domestic Accomplishments in Magnetic Bubble Device Technology. Computer Science & Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warnar, Robert B. J.; Calomeris, Peter J.

    This document assesses the status of magnetic bubble technology as displayed by non-U.S. research and manufacturing facilities. Non-U.S. research and U.S. accomplishments are described while both technical and economic factors are addressed. Magnetic bubble devices are discussed whenever their application could impact future computer system…

  9. Computer-Based Learning: The Key 'Technological Multiplier' for Technology Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Angus

    1982-01-01

    The use of computer-based learning (CBL) is discussed. The author examines the appropriate use of the technology; its cost; identifying the best potential applications of CBL; and the use of CBL by major airlines, oil companies, universities, manufacturers, and government. (CT)

  10. Use of Soft Computing Technologies For Rocket Engine Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis C.; Olcmen, Semih; Polites, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The problem to be addressed in this paper is to explore how the use of Soft Computing Technologies (SCT) could be employed to further improve overall engine system reliability and performance. Specifically, this will be presented by enhancing rocket engine control and engine health management (EHM) using SCT coupled with conventional control technologies, and sound software engineering practices used in Marshall s Flight Software Group. The principle goals are to improve software management, software development time and maintenance, processor execution, fault tolerance and mitigation, and nonlinear control in power level transitions. The intent is not to discuss any shortcomings of existing engine control and EHM methodologies, but to provide alternative design choices for control, EHM, implementation, performance, and sustaining engineering. The approaches outlined in this paper will require knowledge in the fields of rocket engine propulsion, software engineering for embedded systems, and soft computing technologies (i.e., neural networks, fuzzy logic, and Bayesian belief networks), much of which is presented in this paper. The first targeted demonstration rocket engine platform is the MC-1 (formerly FASTRAC Engine) which is simulated with hardware and software in the Marshall Avionics & Software Testbed laboratory that

  11. Wavelet image processing applied to optical and digital holography: past achievements and future challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Katharine J.

    2005-08-01

    The link between wavelets and optics goes back to the work of Dennis Gabor who both invented holography and developed Gabor decompositions. Holography involves 3-D images. Gabor decompositions involves 1-D signals. Gabor decompositions are the predecessors of wavelets. Wavelet image processing of holography, both optical holography and digital holography, will be examined with respect to past achievements and future challenges.

  12. Technologies for Large Data Management in Scientific Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, intense usage of computing has been the main strategy of investigations in several scientific research projects. The progress in computing technology has opened unprecedented opportunities for systematic collection of experimental data and the associated analysis that were considered impossible only few years ago. This paper focuses on the strategies in use: it reviews the various components that are necessary for an effective solution that ensures the storage, the long term preservation, and the worldwide distribution of large quantities of data that are necessary in a large scientific research project. The paper also mentions several examples of data management solutions used in High Energy Physics for the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments in Geneva, Switzerland which generate more than 30,000 terabytes of data every year that need to be preserved, analyzed, and made available to a community of several tenth of thousands scientists worldwide.

  13. Using Computer Technology to Foster Learning for Understanding

    PubMed Central

    VAN MELLE, ELAINE; TOMALTY, LEWIS

    2000-01-01

    The literature shows that students typically use either a surface approach to learning, in which the emphasis is on memorization of facts, or a deep approach to learning, in which learning for understanding is the primary focus. This paper describes how computer technology, specifically the use of a multimedia CD-ROM, was integrated into a microbiology curriculum as part of the transition from focusing on facts to fostering learning for understanding. Evaluation of the changes in approaches to learning over the course of the term showed a statistically significant shift in a deep approach to learning, as measured by the Study Process Questionnaire. Additional data collected showed that the use of computer technology supported this shift by providing students with the opportunity to apply what they had learned in class to order tests and interpret the test results in relation to specific patient-focused case studies. The extent of the impact, however, varied among different groups of students in the class. For example, students who were recent high school graduates did not show a statistically significant increase in deep learning scores over the course of the term and did not perform as well in the course. The results also showed that a surface approach to learning was an important aspect of learning for understanding, although only those students who were able to combine a surface with a deep approach to learning were successfully able to learn for understanding. Implications of this finding for the future use of computer technology and learning for understanding are considered. PMID:23653533

  14. Emerging computer technologies and the news media of the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrabel, Debra A.

    1993-01-01

    The media environment of the future may be dramatically different from what exists today. As new computing and communications technologies evolve and synthesize to form a global, integrated communications system of networks, public domain hardware and software, and consumer products, it will be possible for citizens to fulfill most information needs at any time and from any place, to obtain desired information easily and quickly, to obtain information in a variety of forms, and to experience and interact with information in a variety of ways. This system will transform almost every institution, every profession, and every aspect of human life--including the creation, packaging, and distribution of news and information by media organizations. This paper presents one vision of a 21st century global information system and how it might be used by citizens. It surveys some of the technologies now on the market that are paving the way for new media environment.

  15. An easy teaching tool for holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voslion, T.; Escarguel, A.

    2012-11-01

    In the framework of scientific outreach at the Maison des Sciences of Aix-Marseilles University, we created a teaching kit for holography that can be packed into a small case. It includes all the equipment required to produce holograms almost anywhere and has a simple optical assembly and very good vibration tolerance. The fundamental principles of holography and several applications are illustrated through simple experiments: reflection Denisyuk holograms, angular multiplexing, notch filters, holographic interferometry and diffraction holographic gratings. It is possible to use this tool for several purposes: science outreach, teaching for undergraduate and graduate students and continuing education. In this paper, we explain the basis of holography, how the kit works and indicate some applications and results that can be performed and obtained with it.

  16. Computation Directorate and Science& Technology Review Computational Science and Research Featured in 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Alchorn, A L

    2003-04-04

    Thank you for your interest in the activities of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Computation Directorate. This collection of articles from the Laboratory's Science & Technology Review highlights the most significant computational projects, achievements, and contributions during 2002. In 2002, LLNL marked the 50th anniversary of its founding. Scientific advancement in support of our national security mission has always been the core of the Laboratory. So that researchers could better under and predict complex physical phenomena, the Laboratory has pushed the limits of the largest, fastest, most powerful computers in the world. In the late 1950's, Edward Teller--one of the LLNL founders--proposed that the Laboratory commission a Livermore Advanced Research Computer (LARC) built to Livermore's specifications. He tells the story of being in Washington, DC, when John Von Neumann asked to talk about the LARC. He thought Teller wanted too much memory in the machine. (The specifications called for 20-30,000 words.) Teller was too smart to argue with him. Later Teller invited Von Neumann to the Laboratory and showed him one of the design codes being prepared for the LARC. He asked Von Neumann for suggestions on fitting the code into 10,000 words of memory, and flattered him about ''Labbies'' not being smart enough to figure it out. Von Neumann dropped his objections, and the LARC arrived with 30,000 words of memory. Memory, and how close memory is to the processor, is still of interest to us today. Livermore's first supercomputer was the Remington-Rand Univac-1. It had 5600 vacuum tubes and was 2 meters wide by 4 meters long. This machine was commonly referred to as a 1 KFlop machine [E+3]. Skip ahead 50 years. The ASCI White machine at the Laboratory today, produced by IBM, is rated at a peak performance of 12.3 TFlops or E+13. We've improved computer processing power by 10 orders of magnitude in 50 years, and I do not believe there's any reason to think we won't improve another 10 orders of magnitude in the next 50 years. For years I have heard talk of hitting the physical limits of Moore's Law, but new technologies will take us into the next phase of computer processing power such as 3-D chips, molecular computing, quantum computing, and more. Big computers are icons or symbols of the culture and larger infrastructure that exists at LLNL to guide scientific discovery and engineering development. We have dealt with balance issues for 50 years and will continue to do so in our quest for a digital proxy of the properties of matter at extremely high temperatures and pressures. I believe that the next big computational win will be the merger of high-performance computing with information management. We already create terabytes--soon to be petabytes--of data. Efficiently storing, finding, visualizing and extracting data and turning that into knowledge which aids decision-making and scientific discovery is an exciting challenge. In the meantime, please enjoy this retrospective on computational physics, computer science, advanced software technologies, and applied mathematics performed by programs and researchers at LLNL during 2002. It offers a glimpse into the stimulating world of computational science in support of the national missions and homeland defense.

  17. Teaching holography workshops to beginners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Tung H.; Aumiller, Riley W.; Ro, Raymond J.; Blyth, Jeff

    2002-06-01

    This paper is useful for teaching holography workshops in classrooms as well as in makeshift locations such as museums, businesses, and homes. The target audience is very general, young children to adults of any profession, al of whom have no prior experience in making holograms. A typical number of participants is twenty-five, but can vary depending on space and personnel availability. A central original contribution of this paper is the discovery of a new chemical processing regime for the Slavich PFG-03M holographic plates. These silver halide plates have the highest resolution of its kind and some of the world's best holograms have been recorded on it for several decades. Due to its low sensitivity and long developing time, this material has been excluded form use in workshops. Our new processing regime JARB has the following advantages: It (1) increases the sensitivity of PFG-03M emulsion ten-fold without sacrificing resolution; (2) hardens the emulsion during processing without significant shrinkage; (3) has a ten- to twenty-second development time; (4) is quick drying using squeegee and warm air; and (5) allows the finished hologram to be viewable with laser or incandescent light. Other advantages of JARB are (1) low toxicity, (2) low volatility, (3) non-staining, (4) low cost, and (5) long shelf life.

  18. Recent advances in digital holography [invited].

    PubMed

    Osten, Wolfgang; Faridian, Ahmad; Gao, Peng; Körner, Klaus; Naik, Dinesh; Pedrini, Giancarlo; Singh, Alok Kumar; Takeda, Mitsuo; Wilke, Marc

    2014-09-20

    This article presents an overview of recent advances in the field of digital holography, ranging from holographic techniques designed to increase the resolution of microscopic images, holographic imaging using incoherent illumination, phase retrieval with incoherent illumination, imaging of occluded objects, and the holographic recording of depth-extended objects using a frequency-comb laser, to the design of an infrastructure for remote laboratories for digital-holographic microscopy and metrology. The paper refers to current trends in digital holography and explains them using new results that were recently achieved at the Institute for Applied Optics of the University Stuttgart. PMID:25322137

  19. Systems analysis for DSN microwave antenna holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochblatt, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    Proposed systems for Deep Space Network (DSN) microwave antenna holography are analyzed. Microwave holography, as applied to antennas, is a technique which utilizes the Fourier Transform relation between the complex far-field radiation pattern of an antenna and the complex aperture field distribution to provide a methodology for the analysis and evaluation of antenna performance. Resulting aperture phase and amplitude distribution data are used to precisely characterize various crucial performance parameters, including panel alignment, subreflector position, antenna aperture illumination, directivity at various frequencies, and gravity deformation. Microwave holographic analysis provides diagnostic capacity as well as being a powerful tool for evaluating antenna design specifications and their corresponding theoretical models.

  20. Characteristic of femtosecond laser pulsed digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Bing-Chuan; Wang, Xiao-Lei; Guo, Wen-Gang; Song, Li-Pei

    2015-08-01

    Digital holography can be applied to ultrafast detection when a femtosecond laser pulse is used. In this paper, the interference process of two femtosecond laser pulses is studied and the recording process of the femtosecond laser pulsed digital hologram is simulated. Holograms at different recording angles are generated by integrating the instantaneous interference field. By analyzing the distribution of the reconstructed phase error, the characteristics of femtosecond laser pulsed digital holography are discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61275133).

  1. X-ray holography with high resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Jianwen; Zhu Peiping; Xiao Tiqiao; Xu Zhizhan

    1995-05-01

    Some primary factors having effects on the resolution in x-ray holography are discussed. The factors in recording x-ray holograms are the x-ray coherent scattering by the specimen, the recording method and the coherence of the x-ray beam. There are two factors in reconstruction of the hologram. One is that the resolution of the detector may be lower than the spatial frequencies of fringes in x-ray holograms. The other is aberrations. Consequently, some conditions of x-ray holography with high resolution are given.

  2. Accelerating technology development through integrated computation and experimentation

    SciTech Connect

    Shekhawat, Dushyant; Srivastava, Rameshwar

    2013-01-01

    This special section of Energy & Fuels comprises a selection of papers presented at the topical conference “Accelerating Technology Development through Integrated Computation and Experimentation”, sponsored and organized by the United States Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) as part of the 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) Annual Meeting held in Pittsburgh, PA, Oct 28−Nov 2, 2012. That topical conference focused on the latest research and development efforts in five main areas related to fossil energy, with each area focusing on the utilization of both experimental and computational approaches: (1) gas separations (membranes, sorbents, and solvents for CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} production), (2) CO{sub 2} utilization (enhanced oil recovery, chemical production, mineralization, etc.), (3) carbon sequestration (flow in natural systems), (4) advanced power cycles (oxy-combustion, chemical looping, gasification, etc.), and (5) fuel processing (H{sub 2} production for fuel cells).

  3. Holography Applied To Inspection And Mensuration In An Industrial Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozer, B. A.; Glanville, R.; Gordon, A. L.; Little, M. J.; Webster, J. M.; Wright, D. G.

    1985-06-01

    The three dimensional imaging capability combined with enormous information storage capacity and the related very high resolution of images when they are correctly reconstructed, combine to make holography an inspection tool of immense power and utility in capital intensive industries. This paper describes work, in the U.K. electricity generating industry, aimed at enabling high grade holograms to be routinely recorded in a wide range of industrial situations where high speed acquisition of visual data is desirable. Specific applications to be described are holography of nuclear reactor cores, and of irradiated fuel elements for inspection after withdrawal from the reactor. Accurate reconstruction of images and precise, three dimensional measurement of reconstructed images in a laboratory environment is then undertaken with computer controlled micromanipulator equipment traversing a television camera within the real image. Measurements of a metre long fuel element to within 0.1 mm have been demonstrated and resolutions of 50 1.p./mm have been obtained on the reconstructed object. The paper describes the engineering required for in-reactor inspection where the pulsed ruby laser used to record the holograms is routinely alignec to a 15 m beam relay and remote holographic head. The requirements for accurate 3-dimensional reconstruction and hologrammetry are described and plans for automated measurement and inspection using image enhancement techniques are discussed.

  4. Performance Evaluation of Emerging High Performance Computing Technologies using WRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newby, G. B.; Morton, D.

    2008-12-01

    The Arctic Region Supercomputing Center (ARSC) has evaluated multicore processors and other emerging processor technologies for a variety of high performance computing applications in the earth and space sciences, especially climate and weather applications. A flagship effort has been to assess dual core processor nodes on ARSC's Midnight supercomputer, in which two-socket systems were compared to eight-socket systems. Midnight is utilized for ARSC's twice-daily weather research and forecasting (WRF) model runs, available at weather.arsc.edu. Among other findings on Midnight, it was found that the Hypertransport system for interconnecting Opteron processors, memory, and other subsystems does not scale as well on eight-socket (sixteen processor) systems as well as two-socket (four processor) systems. A fundamental limitation is the cache snooping operation performed whenever a computational thread accesses main memory. This increases memory latency as the number of processor sockets increases. This is particularly noticeable on applications such as WRF that are primarily CPU-bound, versus applications that are bound by input/output or communication. The new Cray XT5 supercomputer at ARSC features quad core processors, and will host a variety of scaling experiments for WRF, CCSM4, and other models. Early results will be presented, including a series of WRF runs for Alaska with grid resolutions under 2km. ARSC will discuss a set of standardized test cases for the Alaska domain, similar to existing test cases for CONUS. These test cases will provide different configuration sizes and resolutions, suitable for single processors up to thousands. Beyond multi-core Opteron-based supercomputers, ARSC has examined WRF and other applications on additional emerging technologies. One such technology is the graphics processing unit, or GPU. The 9800-series nVidia GPU was evaluated with the cuBLAS software library. While in-socket GPUs might be forthcoming in the future, current generations of GPUs lack a sufficient balance of computational resources to replace the general-purpose microprocessor found in most traditional supercomputer architectures. ARSC has also worked with the Cell Broadband Engine in a small Playstation3 cluster, as well as a 24-processor system based on IBM's QS22 blades. The QS22 system, called Quasar, features the PowerXCell 8i processor found in the RoadRunner system, along with an InfiniBand network and high performance storage. Quasar overcomes the limitations of the small memory and relatively slow network of the PS3 systems. The presentation will include system-level benchmarks on Quasar, as well as evaluation of the WRF test cases. Another technology evaluation focused on Sun's UltraSPARC T2+ processor, which ARSC evaluated in a two-way system. Each T2+ provides eight processor cores, each of which provides eight threads, for a total of 128 threads in a single system. WRF scalability was good up to the number of cores, but multiple threads per core did not scale as well. Throughout the discussion, practical findings from ARSC will be summarized. While multicore general-purpose microprocessors are anticipated to remain important for large computers running earth and space science applications, the role of other potentially disruptive technologies is less certain. Limitations of current and future technologies will be discussed. class="ab'>

  5. Implementation of Parallel Computing Technology to Vortex Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dacles-Mariani, Jennifer

    1999-01-01

    Mainframe supercomputers such as the Cray C90 was invaluable in obtaining large scale computations using several millions of grid points to resolve salient features of a tip vortex flow over a lifting wing. However, real flight configurations require tracking not only of the flow over several lifting wings but its growth and decay in the near- and intermediate- wake regions, not to mention the interaction of these vortices with each other. Resolving and tracking the evolution and interaction of these vortices shed from complex bodies is computationally intensive. Parallel computing technology is an attractive option in solving these flows. In planetary science vortical flows are also important in studying how planets and protoplanets form when cosmic dust and gases become gravitationally unstable and eventually form planets or protoplanets. The current paradigm for the formation of planetary systems maintains that the planets accreted from the nebula of gas and dust left over from the formation of the Sun. Traditional theory also indicate that such a preplanetary nebula took the form of flattened disk. The coagulation of dust led to the settling of aggregates toward the midplane of the disk, where they grew further into asteroid-like planetesimals. Some of the issues still remaining in this process are the onset of gravitational instability, the role of turbulence in the damping of particles and radial effects. In this study the focus will be with the role of turbulence and the radial effects.

  6. Intellectual property licensing issues in the holography business

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gortych, Joseph E.

    2006-02-01

    Increasingly, many high-tech companies are acquiring or transferring "leases" to the innovations used to make products. In legal parlance, these innovations-which may include new manufacturing methods, applications, devices or improvements-are considered "intellectual property" (IP), and the "leases" are referred to as "licenses." The holography business, like many other high-tech businesses, has evolved over many decades and consists of many densely packed IP subspaces. However, the IP space is constantly expanding through the development of new innovations and applications, such as security and storage applications, and new materials. Additionally, like most IP, the quality and business value of holographic IP ranges widely, which makes for a challenging IP licensing environment. This paper addresses IP licensing issues in the holography business, including some basics about the forms of IP and the basic types of IP licenses, the role of an IP space analysis in licensing activities, best-practice management of licensing activities, and how IP is properly scrutinized to assess licensing potential. The concept of the patent pool is discussed in connection with security holograms as well as other technologies.

  7. Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling based terahertz holography image denoising.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guanghao; Li, Qi

    2015-05-10

    Terahertz digital holography has attracted much attention in recent years. This technology combines the strong transmittance of terahertz and the unique features of digital holography. Nonetheless, the low clearness of the images captured has hampered the popularization of this imaging technique. In this paper, we perform a digital image denoising technique on our multiframe superposed images. The noise suppression model is concluded as Bayesian least squares estimation and is solved with Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling. In this algorithm, a weighted mean filter with a Gaussian kernel is first applied to the noisy image, and then by nonlinear contrast transform, the contrast of the image is restored to the former level. By randomly walking on the preprocessed image, the MCMC-based filter keeps collecting samples, assigning them weights by similarity assessment, and constructs multiple sample sequences. Finally, these sequences are used to estimate the value of each pixel. Our algorithm shares some good qualities with nonlocal means filtering and the algorithm based on conditional sampling proposed by Wong et al. [Opt. Express18, 8338 (2010)10.1364/OE.18.008338OPEXFF1094-4087], such as good uniformity, and, moreover, reveals better performance in structure preservation, as shown in numerical comparison using the structural similarity index measurement and the peak signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:25967487

  8. Campus Computing, 1996. The Seventh National Survey of Desktop Computing and Information Technology in American Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Kenneth C.

    This report presents the findings of a June, 1996, survey of computing officials at 660 two- and four-year colleges and universities across the United States concerning the use of computer technology on college campuses. The survey found that instructional integration and user support emerged as the two most important information technology (IT)…

  9. Fluidic technology: adding control, computation, and sensing capability to microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drzewiecki, Tadeusz M.; Macia, Narciso F.

    2003-04-01

    This paper presents an overview of fluidic technology - a technology that provides an additional dimension to conventional microfluidic technology by adding sensing, computation (both analog and digital) and control. The US Army Diamond Ordnance Fuze Labs officially recognized fluidics as a comprehensive technology comparable to electronics with its announcement in 1959. Because fluidic elements have very few or no moving parts the technology provides significant operational advantages in harsh environments (EMI, radiation, high temperature and vibration). It also offers advantages when dealing with fluid variables (flow, pressure, density, viscosity, etc.) by eliminating the need for interfaces. With the elimination of the inertia and friction associated with moving parts there are even greater advantages as a result of higher speed of operation. Where mechanical and micromechanical devices may be limited to only hundreds of hertz true microfluidic systems can operate at tens of thousands of hertz. We discuss the fundamental principles of jet deflection amplification and vortex modulation and present circuit building blocks such as the laminar proportional amplifier, vortex valve, oscillators, and positive-feedback digital components. However, most importantly, we present and discuss three specific applications illustrating the power of fluidics in microfluidics and MEMS. These are: a gas analyzer-on-a-chip, capable of simultaneous analysis of multiple gas mixtures with clinical accuracies; an intermittent oxygen delivery system that provides supplemental oxygen to ambulatory patients through a nasal cannula; and, an array of vortex microvalves capable of controlling propellants for micropropulsion systems or for the temporal and spatial modulation of fuel for the optimal control of gas turbine combustors. A sampling of other fluidic in microfluidic application are mentioned to include pressure and acoustic amplification (a kosher public address system is referenced), active noise cancellation for aircraft engines and passenger compartments, optical-pneumatic transduction in optical fiber missile controls and natural gas processing, angular rate sensing, and microcytometry for cellular processing. Fluidics may be the enabling technology for many as yet undeveloped applications, particularly when recent advances micro-fabrication are taken advantage of.

  10. Synthetic optical holography for rapid nanoimaging

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, M.; Carney, P. S.; Hillenbrand, R.

    2014-01-01

    Holography has paved the way for phase imaging in a variety of wide-field techniques, including electron, X-ray and optical microscopy. In scanning optical microscopy, however, the serial fashion of image acquisition seems to challenge a direct implementation of traditional holography. Here we introduce synthetic optical holography (SOH) for quantitative phase-resolved imaging in scanning optical microscopy. It uniquely combines fast phase imaging, technical simplicity and simultaneous operation at visible and infrared frequencies with a single reference arm. We demonstrate SOH with a scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscope (s-SNOM) where it enables reliable quantitative phase-resolved near-field imaging with unprecedented speed. We apply these capabilities to nanoscale, non-invasive and rapid screening of grain boundaries in CVD-grown graphene, by recording 65 kilopixel near-field images in 26?s and 2.3 megapixel images in 13?min. Beyond s-SNOM, the SOH concept could boost the implementation of holography in other scanning imaging applications such as confocal microscopy. PMID:24651276

  11. Reviews of computing technology: A review of compound document architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, B.J.

    1991-10-01

    This review of computing technology will define, describe, and give examples of various approaches to document management through the use of compound document architectures. Experts agree that only 10% of business information exists in machine readable form, but much of what is stored is not in useful form. As a result, the average business document is copied over a dozen times during its life and duplicate copies are stored in numerous locations. The goal of compound document architectures is to provide an information support environment where rapid access to the correct information in the proper format is simplified. A compound document architecture provides structure to seemingly unstructured electronic documents, and standardizes the methods for interchange and access of entire or partial documents by authors and users.

  12. The Utah Educational Technology Initiative Year Two Evaluation: Program Implementation, Computer Acquisition and Placement, and Computer Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mergendoller, John R.; And Others

    This evaluation report describes program implementation, computer acquisition and placement, and computer use during the second year (1991-92) of the Utah Educational Technology Initiative (ETI). In addition, it discusses the various ways computers are used in Utah schools and reports the opinions and experiences of ETI coordinators in the 12…

  13. Elicitation of natural language representations of uncertainty using computer technology

    SciTech Connect

    Tonn, B.; Goeltz, R.; Travis, C.; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN )

    1989-01-01

    Knowledge elicitation is an important aspect of risk analysis. Knowledge about risks must be accurately elicited from experts for use in risk assessments. Knowledge and perceptions of risks must also be accurately elicited from the public in order to intelligently perform policy analysis and develop and implement programs. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is developing computer technology to effectively and efficiently elicit knowledge from experts and the public. This paper discusses software developed to elicit natural language representations of uncertainty. The software is written in Common Lisp and resides on VAX Computers System and Symbolics Lisp machines. The software has three goals, to determine preferences for using natural language terms for representing uncertainty; likelihood rankings of the terms; and how likelihood estimates are combined to form new terms. The first two goals relate to providing useful results for those interested in risk communication. The third relates to providing cognitive data to further our understanding of people's decision making under uncertainty. The software is used to elicit natural language terms used to express the likelihood of various agents causing cancer in humans and cancer resulting in various maladies, and the likelihood of everyday events. 6 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Review of Enabling Technologies to Facilitate Secure Compute Customization

    SciTech Connect

    Aderholdt, Ferrol; Caldwell, Blake A; Hicks, Susan Elaine; Koch, Scott M; Naughton, III, Thomas J; Pelfrey, Daniel S; Pogge, James R; Scott, Stephen L; Shipman, Galen M; Sorrillo, Lawrence

    2014-12-01

    High performance computing environments are often used for a wide variety of workloads ranging from simulation, data transformation and analysis, and complex workflows to name just a few. These systems may process data for a variety of users, often requiring strong separation between job allocations. There are many challenges to establishing these secure enclaves within the shared infrastructure of high-performance computing (HPC) environments. The isolation mechanisms in the system software are the basic building blocks for enabling secure compute enclaves. There are a variety of approaches and the focus of this report is to review the different virtualization technologies that facilitate the creation of secure compute enclaves. The report reviews current operating system (OS) protection mechanisms and modern virtualization technologies to better understand the performance/isolation properties. We also examine the feasibility of running ``virtualized'' computing resources as non-privileged users, and providing controlled administrative permissions for standard users running within a virtualized context. Our examination includes technologies such as Linux containers (LXC [32], Docker [15]) and full virtualization (KVM [26], Xen [5]). We categorize these different approaches to virtualization into two broad groups: OS-level virtualization and system-level virtualization. The OS-level virtualization uses containers to allow a single OS kernel to be partitioned to create Virtual Environments (VE), e.g., LXC. The resources within the host's kernel are only virtualized in the sense of separate namespaces. In contrast, system-level virtualization uses hypervisors to manage multiple OS kernels and virtualize the physical resources (hardware) to create Virtual Machines (VM), e.g., Xen, KVM. This terminology of VE and VM, detailed in Section 2, is used throughout the report to distinguish between the two different approaches to providing virtualized execution environments. As part of our technology review we analyzed several current virtualization solutions to assess their vulnerabilities. This included a review of common vulnerabilities and exposures (CVEs) for Xen, KVM, LXC and Docker to gauge their susceptibility to different attacks. The complete details are provided in Section 5 on page 33. Based on this review we concluded that system-level virtualization solutions have many more vulnerabilities than OS level virtualization solutions. As such, security mechanisms like sVirt (Section 3.3) should be considered when using system-level virtualization solutions in order to protect the host against exploits. The majority of vulnerabilities related to KVM, LXC, and Docker are in specific regions of the system. Therefore, future "zero day attacks" are likely to be in the same regions, which suggests that protecting these areas can simplify the protection of the host and maintain the isolation between users. The evaluations of virtualization technologies done thus far are discussed in Section 4. This includes experiments with 'user' namespaces in VEs, which provides the ability to isolate user privileges and allow a user to run with different UIDs within the container while mapping them to non-privileged UIDs in the host. We have identified Linux namespaces as a promising mechanism to isolate shared resources, while maintaining good performance. In Section 4.1 we describe our tests with LXC as a non-root user and leveraging namespaces to control UID/GID mappings and support controlled sharing of parallel file-systems. We highlight several of these namespace capabilities in Section 6.2.3. The other evaluations that were performed during this initial phase of work provide baseline performance data for comparing VEs and VMs to purely native execution. In Section 4.2 we performed tests using the High-Performance Computing Conjugate Gradient (HPCCG) benchmark to establish baseline performance for a scientific application when run on the Native (host) machine in contrast with execution under Docker and KVM. Our tests verified prior studies showing roughly 2-4% overheads in application execution time & MFlops when running in hypervisor-base environments (VMs) as compared to near native performance with VEs. For more details, see Figures 4.5 (page 28), 4.6 (page 28), and 4.7 (page 29). Additionally, in Section 4.3 we include network measurements for TCP bandwidth performance over the 10GigE interface in our testbed. The Native and Docker based tests achieved >= ~9Gbits/sec, while the KVM configuration only achieved 2.5Gbits/sec (Table 4.6 on page 32). This may be a configuration issue with our KVM installation, and is a point for further testing as we refine the network settings in the testbed. The initial network tests were done using a bridged networking configuration. The report outline is as follows: - Section 1 introduces the report and clarifies the scope of the proj...

  15. Electron holography applied to the study of ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Voelkl, E.; Allard, L.F.; Nolan, T.A.

    1993-09-01

    The experimental setup of a transmission electron microscope for electron holography is shown. Using a model system of small gold particles on amorphous germanium, capabilities of electron holography are demonstrated. These include nanodiffraction, energy filtering, correction of aberrations and separate display of image amplitude and phase. The method of electron holography is then applied to the characterization of a grain boundary in a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic.

  16. High-Resolution UV Holography Lens for Particle Size Distribution Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, Morris Kaufman; Capelle, Gene; Grover, Mike; Sorenson, Dan; Pazuchanics, Pete

    2010-01-01

    A high-resolution UV holography relay lens, shown in Figure 1, has been developed for measuring particle size distributions down to 0.5 ?m in a 12-mm-diameter by 5-mm-thick volume. This work has been selected by an independent judging panel and editors of R&D Magazine as a recipient of a 2009 R&D 100 Award. This award recognizes the 100 most technologically significant products introduced during the past year.

  17. The Diffusion of Computer-Based Technology in K-12 Schools: Teachers' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colandrea, John Louis

    2012-01-01

    Because computer technology represents a major financial outlay for school districts and is an efficient method of preparing and delivering lessons, studying the process of teacher adoption of computer use is beneficial and adds to the current body of knowledge. Because the teacher is the ultimate user of computer technology for lesson preparation…

  18. Factors Contributing to Teachers' Use of Computer Technology in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilakjani, Abbas Pourhosein

    2013-01-01

    There are many factors for teachers to use computer technology in their classrooms. The goal of this study is to identify some of the important factors contributing the teachers' use of computer technology. The first goal of this paper is to discuss computer self-efficacy. The second goal is to explain teaching experience. The third goal is to…

  19. A Detailed Analysis over Some Important Issues towards Using Computer Technology into the EFL Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilakjani, Abbas Pourhosein

    2014-01-01

    Computer technology has changed the ways we work, learn, interact and spend our leisure time. Computer technology has changed every aspect of our daily life--how and where we get our news, how we order goods and services, and how we communicate. This study investigates some of the significant issues concerning the use of computer technology…

  20. The Technology Refresh Program: Affording State-of-the Art Personal Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiwak, Rand

    2000-01-01

    Describes the Florida Community College Technology Refresh Program in which 28 Florida community colleges refresh their personal computer technology on a three-year cyclical basis through negotiation of a contract with Dell Computer Corporation. Discusses the contract highlights (such as a 22.5 percent discount on personal computers and on-site…

  1. The Diffusion of Computer-Based Technology in K-12 Schools: Teachers' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colandrea, John Louis

    2012-01-01

    Because computer technology represents a major financial outlay for school districts and is an efficient method of preparing and delivering lessons, studying the process of teacher adoption of computer use is beneficial and adds to the current body of knowledge. Because the teacher is the ultimate user of computer technology for lesson preparation…

  2. The Technology Refresh Program: Affording State-of-the Art Personal Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiwak, Rand

    2000-01-01

    Describes the Florida Community College Technology Refresh Program in which 28 Florida community colleges refresh their personal computer technology on a three-year cyclical basis through negotiation of a contract with Dell Computer Corporation. Discusses the contract highlights (such as a 22.5 percent discount on personal computers and on-site…

  3. Computer architectures for computational physics work done by Computational Research and Technology Branch and Advanced Computational Concepts Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Slides are reproduced that describe the importance of having high performance number crunching and graphics capability. They also indicate the types of research and development underway at Ames Research Center to ensure that, in the near term, Ames is a smart buyer and user, and in the long-term that Ames knows the best possible solutions for number crunching and graphics needs. The drivers for this research are real computational physics applications of interest to Ames and NASA. They are concerned with how to map the applications, and how to maximize the physics learned from the results of the calculations. The computer graphics activities are aimed at getting maximum information from the three-dimensional calculations by using the real time manipulation of three-dimensional data on the Silicon Graphics workstation. Work is underway on new algorithms that will permit the display of experimental results that are sparse and random, the same way that the dense and regular computed results are displayed.

  4. Technological Metaphors and Moral Education: The Hacker Ethic and the Computational Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warnick, Bryan R.

    2004-01-01

    This essay is an attempt to understand how technological metaphors, particularly computer metaphors, are relevant to moral education. After discussing various types of technological metaphors, it is argued that technological metaphors enter moral thought through their "functional descriptions." The computer metaphor is then explored by turning to…

  5. Comparing Computer Usage of Students in Education Programs to Technology Education Majors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Aaron C.; Wiebe, Eric N.

    2001-01-01

    A study of 54 technology education majors and 35 other education majors found the following: 84% of technology and 91% of other majors owned computers; there was little difference in computer use by major or class level; technology majors used drafting and presentation graphics significantly more; and differences were more related to age than to…

  6. Three-dimensional information encryption and anticounterfeiting using digital holography.

    PubMed

    Shiu, Min-Tzung; Chew, Yang-Kun; Chan, Huang-Tian; Wong, Xin-Yu; Chang, Chi-Ching

    2015-01-01

    In this work, arbitrary micro phase-step digital holography with optical interferometry and digital image processing is utilized to obtain information about an image of a three-dimensional object and encrypting keys. Then, a computer-generated hologram is used for the purpose of holographic encryption. All information about the keys is required to perform the decryption, comprising the amplitude and phase distribution of the encrypting key, the distance of image reconstruction, zero-order term elimination, and twin-image term suppression. In addition to using identifiable information on different image planes and linear superposition processing hidden within the encrypted information, not only can we convey an important message, but we can also achieve anticounterfeiting. This approach retains the strictness of traditional holographic encryption and the convenience of digital holographic processing without image distortion. Therefore, this method provides better solutions to earlier methods for the security of the transmission of holographic information. PMID:25967026

  7. Prototype Space Technology Hall of Fame exhibit at Technology 2003: Analysis of data from computer-based questionaire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewell, Robert N.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Space Foundation displayed its prototype Space Technology Hall of Fame exhibit design at the Technology 2003 conference in Anaheim, CA, December 7-9, 1993. In order to sample public opinion on space technology in general and the exhibit in particular, a computer-based survey was set up as a part of the display. The data collected was analyzed.

  8. Application of computational technologies to ribozyme biotechnology products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christoffersen, Ralph E.; McSwiggen, James; Konings, Danielle

    1994-07-01

    Ribozymes are RNA molecules that act enzymatically to cleave other RNA molecules. The cleavage reaction requires the binding of ribozyme to specific sites on the target RNA through (mostly) Watson-Crick base-pairing interactions. Association of ribozyme with target completes a three-dimensional ribozyme/target complex which results in cleavage of the target RNA. We are employing both computational and experimental approaches to identify sites on target RNA molecules that are open to ribozyme attack and to determine which ribozymes are most active against those sites. Two types of computational technologies are available for aiding in the identification of target sites and design of active ribozymes. First, DNA/RNA sequence analysis software is employed to identify sequence motifs necessary for ribozyme cleavage and to look for sequence conservation between different sources of the target organism so that ribozymes with the broadest possible target range can be designed. Second, RNA folding algorithms are employed to predict the secondary structure of both ribozyme and target RNA in an attempt to identify combinations of ribozyme and target site that will successfully associate prior to ribozyme cleavage. The RNA folding algorithms utilize a set of thermodynamic parameters obtained from measurements on short RNA duplexes; while these rules give reasonable predictions of secondary structure for a small set of highly structured RNAs, they remain largely untested for predicting the structure of messenger RNAs. This paper outlines the current status of designing ribozymes that fold correctly and of locating target sites that are sufficiently unfolded to allow ribozyme cleavage.

  9. Computer vision challenges and technologies for agile manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molley, Perry A.

    1996-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, a Department of Energy laboratory, is responsible for maintaining the safety, security, reliability, and availability of the nuclear weapons stockpile for the United States. Because of the changing national and global political climates and inevitable budget cuts, Sandia is changing the methods and processes it has traditionally used in the product realization cycle for weapon components. Because of the increasing age of the nuclear stockpile, it is certain that the reliability of these weapons will degrade with time unless eventual action is taken to repair, requalify, or renew them. Furthermore, due to the downsizing of the DOE weapons production sites and loss of technical personnel, the new product realization process is being focused on developing and deploying advanced automation technologies in order to maintain the capability for producing new components. The goal of Sandia's technology development program is to create a product realization environment that is cost effective, has improved quality and reduced cycle time for small lot sizes. The new environment will rely less on the expertise of humans and more on intelligent systems and automation to perform the production processes. The systems will be robust in order to provide maximum flexibility and responsiveness for rapidly changing component or product mixes. An integrated enterprise will allow ready access to and use of information for effective and efficient product and process design. Concurrent engineering methods will allow a speedup of the product realization cycle, reduce costs, and dramatically lessen the dependency on creating and testing physical prototypes. Virtual manufacturing will allow production processes to be designed, integrated, and programed off-line before a piece of hardware ever moves. The overriding goal is to be able to build a large variety of new weapons parts on short notice. Many of these technologies that are being developed are also applicable to commercial production processes and applications. Computer vision will play a critical role in the new agile production environment for automation of processes such as inspection, assembly, welding, material dispensing and other process control tasks. Although there are many academic and commercial solutions that have been developed, none have had widespread adoption considering the huge potential number of applications that could benefit from this technology. The reason for this slow adoption is that the advantages of computer vision for automation can be a double-edged sword. The benefits can be lost if the vision system requires an inordinate amount of time for reprogramming by a skilled operator to account for different parts, changes in lighting conditions, background clutter, changes in optics, etc. Commercially available solutions typically require an operator to manually program the vision system with features used for the recognition. In a recent survey, we asked a number of commercial manufacturers and machine vision companies the question, 'What prevents machine vision systems from being more useful in factories?' The number one (and unanimous) response was that vision systems require too much skill to set up and program to be cost effective.

  10. Ultrasonic Imaging of Subsurface Objects Using Photorefractive Dynamic Holography

    SciTech Connect

    Deason, Vance Albert; Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Watson, Scott Marshall

    2001-07-01

    The INEEL has developed a photorefractive ultrasonic imaging technology that records both phase and amplitude of ultrasonic waves on the surface of solids. Phase locked dynamic holography provides full field images of these waves scattered from subsurface defects in solids, and these data are compared with theoretical predictions. Laser light reflected by a vibrating surface is imaged into a photorefractive material where it is mixed in a heterodyne technique with a reference wave. This demodulates the data and provides an image of the ultrasonic waves in either 2 wave or 4 wave mixing mode. These data images are recorded at video frame rates and show phase locked traveling or resonant acoustic waves. This technique can be used over a broad range of ultrasonic frequencies. Acoustic frequencies from 2 kHz to 10 MHz have been imaged, and a point measuring (non-imaging) version of the system has measured picometer amplitudes at 1 GHz.

  11. Terahertz digital holography image denoising using stationary wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Shan-Shan; Li, Qi; Chen, Guanghao

    2015-04-01

    Terahertz (THz) holography is a frontier technology in terahertz imaging field. However, reconstructed images of holograms are inherently affected by speckle noise, on account of the coherent nature of light scattering. Stationary wavelet transform (SWT) is an effective tool in speckle noise removal. In this paper, two algorithms for despeckling SAR images are implemented to THz images based on SWT, which are threshold estimation and smoothing operation respectively. Denoised images are then quantitatively assessed by speckle index. Experimental results show that the stationary wavelet transform has superior denoising performance and image detail preservation to discrete wavelet transform. In terms of the threshold estimation, high levels of decomposing are needed for better denoising result. The smoothing operation combined with stationary wavelet transform manifests the optimal denoising effect at single decomposition level, with 5×5 average filtering.

  12. Optimizing alcohol production from whey using computer technology.

    PubMed

    Zertuche, L; Zall, R R

    1985-04-01

    This study was undertaken with the major goal of optimizing the ethanol production from whey using computer technology. To reach this goal, a mathematical model that would describe the fermentation and that could be used for the optimization was developed. Kluyveromyces fragilis was the microorganism used to ferment the lactose in the whey into ethanol. Preliminary studies showed that K. fragilis produced about 90% of the theoretical ethanol yield when grown in whey-complemented media. However, when this yeast is grown in nonsupplemented whey media, it does not produce more than 32% of that yield. Comparative batch fermentations of lactose and whey-complemented media showed that whey possibly contains enhancing components for yeast growth and ethanol production. To obtain the mathematical model, the one-to-one effect of the process variables (lactose and yeast extract concentrations, air flowrate, pH, and dilution rate) on the ethanol production were first investigated. Experiments on the pH effect showed that a decrease in pH from 7 to 4 produced an increase in ethanol concentration from 16.5 to 26.5 g/L (50 g/L initial lactose). The results obtained from modeling of the continuous fermentation using the previously listed variables showed that air flowrate, pH, and dilution rate were the process variables that most influence the production of ethanol. PMID:18553706

  13. Optimizing alcohol production from whey using computer technology. [Kluyveromyces fragilis

    SciTech Connect

    Zertuche, L.; Zall, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    This study was undertaken with the major goal of optimizing the ethanol production from whey using computer technology. To reach this goal, a mathematical model that would describe the fermentation and that could be used for the optimization was developed. Kluyveromyces fragilis was the microorganism used to ferment the lactose in the whey into ethanol. Preliminary studies showed that K. fragilis produced about 90% of the theoretical ethanol yield when grown in whey-complemented media. However, when this yeast is grown in nonsupplemented whey media, it does not produce more than 32% of that yield. Comparative batch fermentations of lactose and whey-complemented media showed that whey possibly contains enhancing components for yeast growth and ethanol production. To obtain the mathematical model, the one-to-one effect of the process variables (lactose and yeast extract concentrations, air flow rate, pH, and dilution rate) on the ethanol production were first investigated. Experiments on the pH effect showed that a decrease in pH from 7 to 4 produced an increase in ethanol concentration from 16.5 to 26.5 g/L (50 g/L initial lactose). The results obtained from modeling of the continuous fermentation using the previously listed variables showed that air flow rate, pH, and dilution rate were the process variables that most influence the production of ethanol.

  14. Roles of Computer Technology in the Mathematics Education of the Gifted.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grandgenett, Neal

    1991-01-01

    This article reviews technological advances in educational computer use and discusses applications for computers as tools, tutors, and tutees in mathematics education of gifted students. Computer-assisted instruction, artificial intelligence, multimedia, numeric processing, computer-aided design, LOGO, robotics, and hypercard software packages are…

  15. Technology in the Classroom: Computers and Instruction in Vermont's Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyjek, Phil; Gilbert, Allen; Graham, Christine; Marsters, David; Reposa, Judi; Romond, Bill; Soule, Chuck; Tuscany, Bonnie.

    This guide on technology gives parents and community members an understanding of how information technology is an essential part of children's education in Vermont's schools. The first section provides an overview of technology, including: using technology to collect, share, and analyze information in ways that were impossible ten years ago:…

  16. Reviews of computing technology: Fiber distributed data interface

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.J.

    1992-04-01

    This technology report describes Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) as a technology, looks at the applications of this technology, examines the current economics of using it, and describe activities and plans by the Information Resource Management Department to implement this technology at the Savannah River Site.

  17. Reviews of computing technology: Fiber distributed data interface. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.J.

    1992-04-01

    This technology report describes Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) as a technology, looks at the applications of this technology, examines the current economics of using it, and describe activities and plans by the Information Resource Management Department to implement this technology at the Savannah River Site.

  18. Trajectory and velocity measurement of a particle in spray by digital holography

    SciTech Connect

    Lue Qieni; Chen Yiliang; Yuan Rui; Ge Baozhen; Gao Yan; Zhang Yimo

    2009-12-20

    We present a method for the trajectory and the velocity measurement of a particle in spray by digital holography. Based on multiple exposure digital in-line holography, a sequence of digital holograms of a dynamic spray particle field at different times are recorded with a CW laser and a high-speed CCD. The time evolution of the serial positions of particles, i.e., the motion trajectories of the particles, is obtained by numerically reconstructing the synthetic hologram of a sequence of digital holograms. The center coordinate (x,y) of each particle image can be extracted using a Hough transform and subpixel precision computing, and the velocity of an individual particle can also be obtained, which is then applied to measuring the velocity of diesel spray and alcohol spray. The research shows that the method presented in this paper for measuring spray field is feasible.

  19. Harmonic holography: a new holographic principle.

    PubMed

    Pu, Ye; Centurion, Martin; Psaltis, Demetri

    2008-02-01

    The process of second harmonic generation (SHG) has a unique property of forming a sharp optical contrast between noncentrosymmetric crystalline materials and other types of material, which is a highly valuable asset for contrast microscopy. The coherent signal obtained through SHG also allows for the recording of holograms at high spatial and temporal resolution, enabling whole-field four-dimensional microscopy for highly dynamic microsystems and nanosystems. Here we describe a new holographic principle, harmonic holography (H(2)), which records holograms between independently generated second harmonic signals and reference. We experimentally demonstrate this technique with digital holographic recording of second harmonic signals upconverted from an ensemble of second harmonic generating nanocrystal clusters under femtosecond laser excitation. Our results show that harmonic holography is uniquely suited for ultrafast four-dimensional contrast microscopy. PMID:18239691

  20. Imaging nanoparticles in cells by nanomechanical holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetard, Laurene; Passian, Ali; Venmar, Katherine T.; Lynch, Rachel M.; Voy, Brynn H.; Shekhawat, Gajendra; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Thundat, Thomas

    2008-08-01

    Nanomaterials have potential medical applications, for example in the area of drug delivery, and their possible adverse effects and cytotoxicity are curently receiving attention. Inhalation of nanoparticles is of great concern, because nanoparticles can be easily aerosolized. Imaging techniques that can visualize local populations of nanoparticles at nanometre resolution within the structures of cells are therefore important. Here we show that cells obtained from mice exposed to single-walled carbon nanohorns can be probed using a scanning probe microscopy technique called scanning near field ultrasonic holography. The nanohorns were observed inside the cells, and this was further confirmed using micro Raman spectroscopy. Scanning near field ultrasonic holography is a useful technique for probing the interactions of engineered nanomaterials in biological systems, which will greatly benefit areas in drug delivery and nanotoxicology.

  1. Imaging nanoparticles in cells by nanomechanical holography

    SciTech Connect

    Tetard, Laurene; Passian, Ali; Venmar, Katherine T; Lynch, Rachel M; Voy, Brynn H; Shekhawat, Gajendra; Dravid, Vinayak; Thundat, Thomas George

    2008-06-01

    Nanomaterials have potential medical applications, for example in the area of drug delivery, and their possible adverse effects and cytotoxicity are curently receiving attention1,2. Inhalation of nanoparticles is of great concern, because nanoparticles can be easily aerosolized. Imaging techniques that can visualize local populations of nanoparticles at nanometre resolution within the structures of cells are therefore important3. Here we show that cells obtained from mice exposed to single-walled carbon nanohorns can be probed using a scanning probe microscopy technique called scanning near field ultrasonic holography. The nanohorns were observed inside the cells, and this was further confirmed using micro Raman spectroscopy. Scanning near field ultrasonic holography is a useful technique for probing the interactions of engineered nanomaterials in biological systems, which will greatly benefit areas in drug delivery and nanotoxicology.

  2. Applications Of Holography In Automotive Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawiuczyk, Ramuald

    1983-10-01

    This report provides a brief summary of works concerning the applications of optical holography in automative industry carried out in Central Laboratory of Optics in Warsaw, during the last ten years period. These works cover applications of holographic interferometry for nondestructive testing of engine valves, holographic investigations of pneumatic tires, double-pulse interferometry of driving gear, and holographic registration of oil mist. Holography is widelly used in different areas of modern technique [1-4] and its applications in automative industry are well known [5-7] . Those investigations have a great influence on safety aspects of automative systems, so, it is clear that currently they arouse a great interest. As a result, some investigations in this area have been stazoted out in Poland. Partially, these investigations have been carried on in Central Laboratory of Optics in cooperation with different research laboratories. Some results, obtained during last ten years period are presented in this report.

  3. Applications of optical holography to applied mechanics.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aprahamian, R.

    1972-01-01

    This paper provides a brief summary of applications of optical holography and holographic interferometry to applied solid mechanics. Basic equations commonly used in fringe interpretation are described and used to reduce the data contained on holographic interferograms. A comparison of data obtained holographically with analytical prediction is given wherever possible. Applications contained herein include front surface physics, study of bomb breakup, transverse wave propagation, study of mode shapes of panels at elevated temperatures, nondestructive testing, and vibration analysis.

  4. Holography and noncommutative yang-mills theory

    PubMed

    Li; Wu

    2000-03-01

    In this Letter a recently proposed gravity dual of noncommutative Yang-Mills theory is derived from the relations between closed string moduli and open string moduli recently suggested by Seiberg and Witten. The only new input one needs is a simple form of the running string tension as a function of energy. This derivation provides convincing evidence that string theory integrates with the holographical principle and demonstrates a direct link between noncommutative Yang-Mills theory and holography. PMID:11017215

  5. Computers and Classrooms: The Status of Technology in U.S. Schools. Policy Information Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coley, Richard; Cradler, John; Engel, Penelope K.

    The purpose of this report is to provide a "snapshot" of the status of technology use in United States schools. The report focuses on the following: school access to technology; student use of computers; evaluating the impact of educational technology; connecting teachers and technology; assessing the content and quality of courseware; and the…

  6. Social Studies: Application Units. Course II, Teachers. Computer-Oriented Curriculum. REACT (Relevant Educational Applications of Computer Technology).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tecnica Education Corp., San Carlos, CA.

    This book is one of a series in Course II of the Relevant Educational Applications of Computer Technology (REACT) Project. It is designed to point out to teachers two of the major applications of computers in the social sciences: simulation and data analysis. The first section contains a variety of simulation units organized under the following…

  7. Campus Computing, 2001: The 12th National Survey of Computing and Information Technology in American Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Kenneth C.

    The 2001 Campus Computing Survey, the 12th such survey, is the largest continuing study of the role of computing and information technology in U.S. higher education today. The survey results in this report summarize data from 590 two- and four-year, public and private colleges across the United States, representing a 38.4% response rate. The focus…

  8. Electron holography of devices with epitaxial layers

    SciTech Connect

    Gribelyuk, M. A. Ontalus, V.; Baumann, F. H.; Zhu, Z.; Holt, J. R.

    2014-11-07

    Applicability of electron holography to deep submicron Si devices with epitaxial layers is limited due to lack of the mean inner potential data and effects of the sample tilt. The mean inner potential V{sub 0} = 12.75 V of the intrinsic epitaxial SiGe was measured by electron holography in devices with Ge content C{sub Ge} = 18%. Nanobeam electron diffraction analysis performed on the same device structure showed that SiGe is strain-free in [220] direction. Our results showed good correlation with simulations of the mean inner potential of the strain-free SiGe using density function theory. A new method is proposed in this paper to correct electron holography data for the overlap of potentials of Si and the epitaxial layer, which is caused by the sample tilt. The method was applied to the analysis of the dopant diffusion in p-Field-effect Transistor devices with the identical gate length L = 30 nm, which had alternative SiGe geometry in the source and drain regions and was subjected to different thermal processing. Results have helped to understand electrical data acquired from the same devices in terms of dopant diffusion.

  9. Seeing Ourselves in the Computer: How We Relate to Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Punyashloke; Nicholson, Michael D.; Wojcikiewicz, Steven K.

    2001-01-01

    Suggests it is not difficult to imbue computers with human personalities. Discusses the work of Rodolphe Topffer (1799-1846), an artist, designer, and amateur psychologist. Concludes that responding socially to computers has significant implications for media literacy. (SG)

  10. Computer Literacy and Social Stratification. Interactive Technology Laboratory Report #9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehan, Hugh

    As schools acquire and use computers for educational purposes, two major questions arise: (1) whether students from different strata of society will obtain equal access to computers, and (2) whether students from different strata of society will be taught similar or different uses of the computer. To explore the relationship between the…

  11. Computer Enhanced Collaborative Learning: A New Technology for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jernstedt, G. Christian

    1983-01-01

    Briefly traces development of contributions of individualized and humanistic instruction to the learning process, discussing computer enhanced collaborative learning, a synergetic combination of computer and person. Indicates that impact of computers in education at present is principally in saving teacher/student time and in raising…

  12. Fascinating Technology: Computer Games as an Issue for Religious Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scholtz, Christopher P.

    2005-01-01

    Computer games as an important part of youth culture can, from a certain perspective, be highly relevant for religious education. I will review the role of computer games, and then give a brief overview, suggesting a specific phenomenological approach for research on computer games and religious education. After presenting one example of such…

  13. Making Advanced Computer Science Topics More Accessible through Interactive Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shao, Kun; Maher, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Teaching advanced technical concepts in a computer science program to students of different technical backgrounds presents many challenges. The purpose of this paper is to present a detailed experimental pedagogy in teaching advanced computer science topics, such as computer networking, telecommunications and data structures using…

  14. Making Advanced Computer Science Topics More Accessible through Interactive Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shao, Kun; Maher, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Teaching advanced technical concepts in a computer science program to students of different technical backgrounds presents many challenges. The purpose of this paper is to present a detailed experimental pedagogy in teaching advanced computer science topics, such as computer networking, telecommunications and data structures using…

  15. Computer Programmed Milling Machine Operations. High-Technology Training Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Dennis

    This learning module for a high school metals and manufacturing course is designed to introduce the concept of computer-assisted machining (CAM). Through it, students learn how to set up and put data into the controller to machine a part. They also become familiar with computer-aided manufacturing and learn the advantages of computer numerical…

  16. Educational Technology Classics: The Computer versus the Clock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slack, Charles W.

    2010-01-01

    It is no accident that the first use of computers in school systems was to arrange schedules for students and teachers. The proper use of the computer in the classroom is as a replacement for the clock and its strict temporal schedule. By conveying information through self-instructional content, the computer can schedule work for pupils in…

  17. Cloud Computing: A Free Technology Option to Promote Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegle, Del

    2010-01-01

    In a time of budget cuts and limited funding, purchasing and installing the latest software on classroom computers can be prohibitive for schools. Many educators are unaware that a variety of free software options exist, and some of them do not actually require installing software on the user's computer. One such option is cloud computing. This…

  18. Guest Editoria Holography A Dedication To Dennis Gabor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyant, James C.; Chen, Chungte T.; Reynolds, George O.

    1980-10-01

    We thought it was time to bring the readers of Optical Engineering up to date on the new developments in holography, as was done exactly five years ago with the September/October 1975 special issue. The seeds for this special issue were sown during the 1978 Gordon Conference on Coherent Optics and Holography held at the Miramar Hotel in Santa Barbara, California. The conference clearly demonstrated, through the discussion of many interesting research and development applications, that holography is alive and well. For example, artists have discovered holography as a new medium and there is a museum for displaying new holographic developments and inventions. In addition to the opening of the New York museum where artists and patrons are thoroughly enjoying holography, the past five years have witnessed the publication of the Handbook of Optical Holography, continuing issues of the Acoustical Holography proceedings, the gathering of scientists to exchange ideas at three Gordon Conferences in 1976, 1978, and 1980, and the SPIE conference on holography held in Los Angeles in February 1980.

  19. Laser Holography. High Tech with High Potential for Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlegel, Ronald D.

    1986-01-01

    This article discusses the procedure, historical development, and applications of holography, and discusses the feasibility and value of implementing a unit or course of study of laser holography into an existing photography laboratory and curriculum. An equipment and supplies list, giving supplies and cost, is included. (CT)

  20. Underwater digital holography for studies of marine plankton.

    PubMed

    Sun, H; Benzie, P W; Burns, N; Hendry, D C; Player, M A; Watson, J

    2008-05-28

    Conventional and digital holographies are proving to be increasingly important for studies of marine zooplankton and other underwater biological applications. This paper reports on the use of a subsea digital holographic camera (eHoloCam) for the analysis and identification of marine organisms and other subsea particles. Unlike recording on a photographic film, a digital hologram (e-hologram) is recorded on an electronic sensor and reconstructed numerically in a computer by simulating the propagation of the optical field in space. By comparison with other imaging techniques, an e-hologram has several advantages such as three-dimensional spatial reconstruction, non-intrusive and non-destructive interrogation of the recording sampling volume and the ability to record holographic videos. The basis of much work in optics lies in Maxwell's electromagnetic theory and holography is no exception: we report here on two of the numerical reconstruction algorithms we have used to reconstruct holograms obtained using eHoloCam and how their starting point lies in Maxwell's equations. Derivation of the angular spectrum algorithm for plane waves is provided as an exact method for the in-line numerical reconstruction of digital holograms. The Fresnel numerical reconstruction algorithm is derived from the angular spectrum method. In-line holograms are numerically processed before and after reconstruction to remove periodic noise from captured images and to increase image contrast. The ability of the Fresnel integration reconstruction algorithm to extend the reconstructed volume beyond the recording sensor dimensions is also shown with a 50% extension of the reconstruction area. Finally, we present some images obtained from recent deployments of eHoloCam in the North Sea and Faeroes Channel. PMID:18222904

  1. Three-dimensional Gravity, Holography and Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkari, Nima

    Gauge/gravity dualities and the matrix model provide us with exploratory frameworks for the study of quantum gravity (QG) in the presence of a cosmological constant that is negative or zero, respectively. Currently, in all the known examples instring theory, the gravity theory contains complicated matter fields and interactions. However, the idea of describing theories of quantum gravity in terms of dual non-gravitational theories, i.e. holography, has proven to go well beyond these examples. Motivated by holography, in the course of this thesis we explore simple models of quantum gravity with the goal of obtaining insight into non-perturbative QG, in particular the physics of black holes. We consider three-dimensional gravity with a negative cosmological constant. Weuse Ricci flow techniques to study flows between the potential vacua of topologically massive gravity and show that for large values of the Chern-Simons coupling anti-de Sitter space is the ground state. Moreover, we study spontaneous symmetry-breaking in vacua of theories of gravity coupled to scalars and gauge fields and find examples of discrete symmetry-breaking phases with exotic thermodynamic properties. We study three-dimensional gravity with a positive cosmological constant as a theory of quantum cosmology. We compute the full non-perturbative Euclidean partition function of de Sitter gravity by evaluating the gravity path integral on physically relevant Euclidean continuations of the static patch. The partition function diverges in a non-regularizable way and we interpret this as a hint that the theory does not exist at a quantum level. As we show however, the inclusion of the simplest form of interaction, the Chern-Simons term, removes the undesirable divergences.

  2. Applications of holography to condensed matter physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Simon F.

    2012-10-01

    Holography is one of the key insights to emerge from string theory. It connects quantum gravity to field theory, and thereby provides a non-perturbative formulation of string theory. This has enabled progress on a range of theoretical issues, from the quantum description of spacetime to the calculation of scattering amplitudes in supersymmetric field theories. There have been important insights into both the field theories and the spacetime picture. More recently, applied holography has been the subject of intense and rapid development. The idea here is to use the spacetime description to address questions about strongly coupled field theory relevant to application areas such as finite-temperature QCD and condensed matter physics; the focus in this special issue is on the latter. This involves the study of field theory at finite temperature and with chemical potentials for appropriate charges, described in spacetime by charged black hole solutions. The use of holography to study these systems requires a significant extrapolation, from the field theories where classical gravitational calculations in the bulk are a useful approximation to the experimentally relevant theories. Nonetheless, the approach has had some striking qualitative successes, including the construction of holographic versions of superconducting or superfluid phase transitions, the identification of Fermi liquids with a variety of thermal behaviours, and the construction of a map between a class of gravity solutions and the hydrodynamic regime in the field theory. The use of holography provides a qualitatively new perspective on these aspects of strong coupling dynamics. In addition to insight into the behaviour of the strongly coupled field theories, this work has led to new insights into the bulk dynamics and a deeper understanding of holography. The purpose of this focus issue is to strengthen the connections between this direction and other gravitational research and to make the gravity community more aware of these developments. The issue is made up of original research contributions at the forefront of this area, giving a sense of the range of activity and presenting significant new contributions. Simon F RossGuest Editor

  3. Desktop Technology for Newspapers: Use of the Computer Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Howard Alan

    This work considers desktop publishing technology as a way used to paginate newspapers electronically, tracing the technology's development from the beginning of desktop publishing in the mid-1980s to the 1990s. The work emphasizes how desktop publishing technology is and can be used by weekly newspapers. It reports on a Pennsylvania weekly…

  4. The Dialogic Classroom: Teachers Integrating Computer Technology, Pedagogy, and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galin, Jeffrey R., Ed.; Latchaw, Joan, Ed.

    The 12 essays collected in this book suggest both practical and theoretical approaches to teaching through networked technologies. Moving beyond technology for its own sake, the book articulates a pedagogy which makes its own productive uses of emergent technologies, both inside and outside the classroom. The book models for students one possible…

  5. Holography and Art - Using rainbow hologram in my works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Duck Hee

    2013-02-01

    Holography can be understood as one of the more sophisticated subjects within the realm of modern art. Even after several years of study and application, understanding Holography simply does not get any easier. For that reason, instead of trying to discuss both the technical and the artistic aspects of holography, the emphasis will strictly be on the latter. Just like any other paradigm or medium capable of fascinating the human hearts, holography has changed the way I encounter the world. Changed perception of the world brought me feelings of child-like delight. Among the various subdivisions of holography, I hold Rainbow Hologram exceptionally close to my heart. Not only is it related to my previous works but its bright, crisp and various color movements are also depicted wonderfully in 3-dimension. I would like to share my fascination with rainbow hologram with you.

  6. Effect of Physical Education Teachers' Computer Literacy on Technology Use in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kretschmann, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Teachers' computer literacy has been identified as a factor that determines their technology use in class. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between physical education (PE) teachers' computer literacy and their technology use in PE. The study group consisted of 57 high school level in-service PE teachers. A survey was used…

  7. A Quantitative Exploration of Preservice Teachers' Intent to Use Computer-based Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Kioh; Jain, Sachin; Westhoff, Guy; Rezabek, Landra

    2008-01-01

    Based on Bandura's (1977) social learning theory, the purpose of this study is to identify the relationship of preservice teachers' perceptions of faculty modeling of computer-based technology and preservice teachers' intent of using computer-based technology in educational settings. There were 92 participants in this study; they were enrolled in…

  8. Beginnings: Introducing Computer Technology to Students in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McErlain, Eileen; Squibb, Kevin

    In the areas of audiology and speech science, computer technology has moved to the forefront in both the clinical and laboratory settings. It is imperative that students in both speech-language pathology and audiology acquire fundamental skills with all aspects of computer technology in order to maintain professional marketability. A survey of 75…

  9. The Role of Computer Technology in Teaching Reading and Writing: Preschool Teachers' Beliefs and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ihmeideh, Fathi

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated preschool teachers' beliefs and practices regarding the use of computer technology in teaching reading and writing in Jordan. The researcher developed a questionnaire consisting of two scales--Teachers' Beliefs Scale (TB Scale) and Teachers' Practices Scale (TP Scale)--to examine the role of computer technology in teaching…

  10. An Exploratory Study of the Implementation of Computer Technology in an American Islamic Private School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saleem, Mohammed M.

    2009-01-01

    This exploratory study of the implementation of computer technology in an American Islamic private school leveraged the case study methodology and ethnographic methods informed by symbolic interactionism and the framework of the Muslim Diaspora. The study focused on describing the implementation of computer technology and identifying the…

  11. Speech Technology in Computer-Assisted Language Learning: Strengths and Limitations of a New CALL Paradigm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehsani, Farzad; Knodt, Eva

    1998-01-01

    Investigates suitability of deploying speech technology in computer-based systems that can be used to teach foreign language skills. In reviewing the current state of speech recognition and speech processing technology and by examining a number of voice-interactive computer-assisted language learning applications, suggests how to create robust…

  12. A Meta-Analysis of Effectiveness Studies on Computer Technology-Supported Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grgurovic, Maja; Chapelle, Carol A.; Shelley, Mack C.

    2013-01-01

    With the aim of summarizing years of research comparing pedagogies for second/foreign language teaching supported with computer technology and pedagogy not-supported by computer technology, a meta-analysis was conducted of empirical research investigating language outcomes. Thirty-seven studies yielding 52 effect sizes were included, following a…

  13. Effect of Physical Education Teachers' Computer Literacy on Technology Use in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kretschmann, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Teachers' computer literacy has been identified as a factor that determines their technology use in class. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between physical education (PE) teachers' computer literacy and their technology use in PE. The study group consisted of 57 high school level in-service PE teachers. A survey was used…

  14. University Students and Ethics of Computer Technology Usage: Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iyadat, Waleed; Iyadat, Yousef; Ashour, Rateb; Khasawneh, Samer

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine the level of students' awareness about computer technology ethics at the Hashemite University in Jordan. A total of 180 university students participated in the study by completing the questionnaire designed by the researchers, named the Computer Technology Ethics Questionnaire (CTEQ). Results…

  15. The Role of Computer Technology in Teaching Reading and Writing: Preschool Teachers' Beliefs and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ihmeideh, Fathi

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated preschool teachers' beliefs and practices regarding the use of computer technology in teaching reading and writing in Jordan. The researcher developed a questionnaire consisting of two scales--Teachers' Beliefs Scale (TB Scale) and Teachers' Practices Scale (TP Scale)--to examine the role of computer technology in teaching…

  16. Tech-Prep Competency Profiles within the Business/Computer Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for educators throughout Ohio who are involved in planning and/or delivering tech prep programs within the business/computer technologies cluster, discusses and presents tech prep competency profiles (TCPs) for 12 business/computer technology occupations. The first part of the document contains the following:…

  17. University Students and Ethics of Computer Technology Usage: Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iyadat, Waleed; Iyadat, Yousef; Ashour, Rateb; Khasawneh, Samer

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine the level of students' awareness about computer technology ethics at the Hashemite University in Jordan. A total of 180 university students participated in the study by completing the questionnaire designed by the researchers, named the Computer Technology Ethics Questionnaire (CTEQ). Results…

  18. Beliefs and Perceived Needs of Science Teachers toward the Uses of Computing Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinnis, J. Randy; And Others

    The objective of this study was to gather information about and assess the accessibility, use, and perceived needs toward computing technologies of elementary, middle school and high school science teachers in two large rural school districts. A questionnaire of over 500 items, Survey of Usages of Computing Technologies in Science and Mathematics…

  19. A Meta-Analysis of Effectiveness Studies on Computer Technology-Supported Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grgurovic, Maja; Chapelle, Carol A.; Shelley, Mack C.

    2013-01-01

    With the aim of summarizing years of research comparing pedagogies for second/foreign language teaching supported with computer technology and pedagogy not-supported by computer technology, a meta-analysis was conducted of empirical research investigating language outcomes. Thirty-seven studies yielding 52 effect sizes were included, following a…

  20. The Relationship between Teachers' Computer Self-Efficacy and Technology Integration in a School District's Bring Your Own Technology Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Ashley F.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed methods program evaluation study was to investigate the ways in which one public school district and its teachers implemented a Bring Your Own Technology (BYOT) initiative. This study also measured teachers' computer self-efficacy, as measured by Cassidy and Eachus' (2002) Computer User Self-Efficacy Scale, and…

  1. Predicting Cloud Computing Technology Adoption by Organizations: An Empirical Integration of Technology Acceptance Model and Theory of Planned Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekufu, ThankGod K.

    2012-01-01

    Organizations are finding it difficult in today's economy to implement the vast information technology infrastructure required to effectively conduct their business operations. Despite the fact that some of these organizations are leveraging on the computational powers and the cost-saving benefits of computing on the Internet cloud, others…

  2. Predicting Cloud Computing Technology Adoption by Organizations: An Empirical Integration of Technology Acceptance Model and Theory of Planned Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekufu, ThankGod K.

    2012-01-01

    Organizations are finding it difficult in today's economy to implement the vast information technology infrastructure required to effectively conduct their business operations. Despite the fact that some of these organizations are leveraging on the computational powers and the cost-saving benefits of computing on the Internet cloud, others…

  3. Integration of Old and New Technology: Computers, Photography, and Video Technology in an Even Start Family Literacy Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landerholm, Elizabeth

    1999-01-01

    McCosh Even Start, a federally funded family-literacy project located in a Chicago school, used older donated Apple computers, video technology, and photography to develop literacy and also to evaluate parents' and children's literacy progress. Older and newer technologies were successfully combined. (MLH)

  4. Security enhanced optical one-time password authentication method by using digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Sang Keun; Jeon, Seok Hee; Jeong, Jong Rae

    2015-03-01

    We propose a new optical one-time password(OTP) authentication method by using digital holography, which enhances security strength in the cryptosystem compared to the conventional electronic OTP method. In this paper, a challenge-response optical OTP authentication based on two-factor authentication is presented by 2-step quadrature phase-shifting digital holography using orthogonal polarization, and two-way authentication is also performed using the challenge-response handshake in both directions. The ID (identification), PW (password) and OTP information are encrypted with a shared key by applying phase-shifting digital holography, and these encrypted information are verified each other by the shared key. Because the encrypted digital holograms which are transmitted to the other party are expressed as random distribution, it guards against a replay attack and results in higher security level. Optically, encrypted digital hologram in our method is Fourier transform hologram and is recorded on CCD with 256 gray-level quantized intensities. The proposed method has an advantage that it does not need a time-synchronized OTP and can be applied to various security services. Computer experiments show that the proposed method is suitable for high secure OTP authentication.

  5. Acoustic Holography of the Solar Convection Zone with SOHO-MDI Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, Charles

    2005-01-01

    The original grant with the title stated above was NAG5-10984, awarded to the Solar Physics Research Corporation (SPRC) in July, 2001, and was to be a three-year project. The basic theme of the project was the development and application of computational seismic holography for imaging, diagnostics, and monitoring of magnetic anomalies beneath active regions, in the deep solar interior, and on the Sun's far surface. The project was roughly separated into the following five tasks: (1) A holographic survey of active regions. (2) p-Mode absorption diagnostics of magnetic regions. (3) Acoustic modeling of the shallow subphotospheres of active regions and the quiet-Sun supergranulation based on phase-correlation seismic holography. (4) Seismic holography of the deep convection zone. (5) Improvements in holographic imaging of the far surface of the Sun. Following the death of Karen Harvey, President of SPRC, during the first year, the grant was transferred to Northwest Research Associates as NAG5-12901. Substantial but progress had been made on most of the above tasks in the first year under NAG5-10984, but none were completed. This work was continued under NAG5-12901.

  6. The application of computer-aided technologies in automotive styling design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ze-feng; Zhang, Ji; Zheng, Ying

    2012-04-01

    In automotive industry, outline design is its life and creative design is its soul indeed. Computer-aided technology has been widely used in the automotive industry and more and more attention has been paid. This paper chiefly introduce the application of computer-aided technologies including CAD, CAM and CAE, analyses the process of automotive structural design and describe the development tendency of computer-aided design.

  7. Towards a 'siliconeural computer': technological successes and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Mark A; Shipston, Mike J; Murray, Alan F

    2015-07-28

    Electronic signals govern the function of both nervous systems and computers, albeit in different ways. As such, hybridizing both systems to create an iono-electric brain-computer interface is a realistic goal; and one that promises exciting advances in both heterotic computing and neuroprosthetics capable of circumventing devastating neuropathology. 'Neural networks' were, in the 1980s, viewed naively as a potential panacea for all computational problems that did not fit well with conventional computing. The field bifurcated during the 1990s into a highly successful and much more realistic machine learning community and an equally pragmatic, biologically oriented 'neuromorphic computing' community. Algorithms found in nature that use the non-synchronous, spiking nature of neuronal signals have been found to be (i) implementable efficiently in silicon and (ii) computationally useful. As a result, interest has grown in techniques that could create mixed 'siliconeural' computers. Here, we discuss potential approaches and focus on one particular platform using parylene-patterned silicon dioxide. PMID:26078350

  8. Science and Technology Resources on the Internet: Computer Security.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinkus, Jane F.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses issues related to computer security, including confidentiality, integrity, and authentication or availability; and presents a selected list of Web sites that cover the basic issues of computer security under subject headings that include ethics, privacy, kids, antivirus, policies, cryptography, operating system security, and biometrics.…

  9. Science and Technology Resources on the Internet: Computer Security.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinkus, Jane F.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses issues related to computer security, including confidentiality, integrity, and authentication or availability; and presents a selected list of Web sites that cover the basic issues of computer security under subject headings that include ethics, privacy, kids, antivirus, policies, cryptography, operating system security, and biometrics.…

  10. Technology in practice – GP computer use by age.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Joan; Pollack, Allan; Gordon, Julie; Miller, Graeme

    2014-12-01

    Since 2005, more than 95% of general practitioners (GPs) have had access to computers in their clinical work. We have analysed the most recent 2 years of BEACH data (April 2012-March 2014) to determine whether GP age affects clinical computer use. PMID:25705729

  11. Internet and Computer Technology Hazards: Perspectives for Family Counselling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oravec, Jo Ann

    2000-01-01

    Explores the social construction of the various computer hazards that households are encountering, such as computer addiction and children's access to on-line pornography. Discusses these issues in terms of constructivist counseling perspectives that are sensitive to cultural and environmental contexts. Outlines specific strategies for countering…

  12. Internet and Computer Technology Hazards: Perspectives for Family Counselling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oravec, Jo Ann

    2000-01-01

    Explores the social construction of the various computer hazards that households are encountering, such as computer addiction and children's access to on-line pornography. Discusses these issues in terms of constructivist counseling perspectives that are sensitive to cultural and environmental contexts. Outlines specific strategies for countering…

  13. Computer Modeling and Visualization in Design Technology: An Instructional Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guidera, Stan

    2002-01-01

    Design visualization can increase awareness of issues related to perceptual and psychological aspects of design that computer-assisted design and computer modeling may not allow. A pilot university course developed core skills in modeling and simulation using visualization. Students were consistently able to meet course objectives. (Contains 16…

  14. Understanding Pre-Service Teachers' Computer Attitudes: Applying and Extending the Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teo, T.; Lee, C. B.; Chai, C. S.

    2008-01-01

    Computers are increasingly widespread, influencing many aspects of our social and work lives. As we move into a technology-based society, it is important that classroom experiences with computers are made available for all students. The purpose of this study is to examine pre-service teachers' attitudes towards computers. This study extends the…

  15. Examining the Relationship between Technological, Organizational, and Environmental Factors and Cloud Computing Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tweel, Abdeneaser

    2012-01-01

    High uncertainties related to cloud computing adoption may hinder IT managers from making solid decisions about adopting cloud computing. The problem addressed in this study was the lack of understanding of the relationship between factors related to the adoption of cloud computing and IT managers' interest in adopting this technology. In…

  16. AHaH computing with thermodynamic RAM: bridging the technology stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugent, Alex

    2014-05-01

    We introduce the motivations behind AHaH computing, an emerging new form of adaptive computing with many applications in machine learning. We then present a technology stack or specification describing the multiple levels of abstraction and specialization needed to support AHaH computing.

  17. Computer Attitude of Teaching Faculty: Implications for Technology-Based Performance in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larbi-Apau, Josephine A.; Moseley, James L.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the validity of Selwyn's computer attitude scale (CAS) and its implication for technology-based performance of randomly sampled (n = 167) multidiscipline teaching faculty in higher education in Ghana. Considered, computer attitude is a critical function of computer attitude and potential performance. Composed of four…

  18. Computer-Related Assistive Technology: Satisfaction and Experiences among Users with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Mary; Nieuwenhuijsen, Els R.; Epstein, Marcy J.

    2008-01-01

    Many people with disabilities use assistive technology devices (ATDs) for computer access. The specific focus of this exploratory study was (a) to assess the experiences, opinions, and satisfaction levels of 24 individuals with disabilities using computer-related ATDs; (b) to investigate their awareness of health risk factors related to computer…

  19. Shipboard Instruction and Training Management with Computer Technology: A Pilot Application.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dollard, John A.; And Others

    To determine if computer technology could improve shipboard instruction and training, an Automated Shipboard Instruction and Management System (ASIMS) was used for computer managed instruction (CMI) about the USS GRIDLEY during 1975-76. ASIMS comprised a NOVA 1200 minicomputer with support peripherals, a Computer Integrated Instruction (CII)…

  20. Examining the Relationship between Technological, Organizational, and Environmental Factors and Cloud Computing Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tweel, Abdeneaser

    2012-01-01

    High uncertainties related to cloud computing adoption may hinder IT managers from making solid decisions about adopting cloud computing. The problem addressed in this study was the lack of understanding of the relationship between factors related to the adoption of cloud computing and IT managers' interest in adopting this technology. In…

  1. Models of Educational Computing @ Home: New Frontiers for Research on Technology in Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kafai, Yasmin B.; Fishman, Barry J.; Bruckman, Amy S.; Rockman, Saul

    2002-01-01

    Discusses models of home educational computing that are linked to learning in school and recommends the need for research that addresses the home as a computer-based learning environment. Topics include a history of research on educational computing at home; technological infrastructure, including software and compatibility; Internet access;…

  2. Examining the Psychological Impact of Computer Technology: An Updated Cross-Cultural Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcoulides, George A.; Stocker, Yvonne-Olivia; Marcoulides, Laura D.

    2004-01-01

    The Computer Anxiety Scale (CAS) is a measure of perceptions by individuals of their anxiety in different situations toward computers. The CAS was developed a number of years ago before computer technology became such an integral part of life. Covariance modeling techniques were used to examine whether the originally proposed construct of computer…

  3. Experimental imaging research on continuous-wave terahertz in-line digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haochong; Wang, Dayong; Rong, Lu; Wang, Yunxin

    2014-09-01

    The terahertz (THz) imaging is an advanced technique on the basis of the unique characteristics of terahertz radiation. Due to its noncontact, non-invasive and high-resolution capabilities, it has already shown great application prospects in biomedical observation, sample measurement, and quality control. The continuous-wave terahertz in-line digital holography is a combination of terahertz technology and in-line digital holography of which the source is a continuous-wave terahertz laser. Over the past decade, many researchers used different terahertz sources and detectors to undertake experiments. In this paper, the pre-process of the hologram is accomplished after the holograms' recording process because of the negative pixels in the pyroelectric detector and the air vibration caused by the chopper inside the camera. To improve the quality of images, the phase retrieval algorithm is applied to eliminate the twin images. In the experiment, the pin which terahertz wave can't penetrate and the TPX slice carved letters "THz" are chosen for the samples. The amplitude and phase images of samples are obtained and the twin image and noise in the reconstructed images are suppressed. The results validate the feasibility of the terahertz in-line digital holographic imaging technique. This work also shows the terahertz in-line digital holography technique's prospects in materials science and biological samples' detection.

  4. Research of the automatic imaging focusing measurement for off-axis Fresnel digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xun; Nie, Liang; Wang, Fang; Jiang, Xu

    2008-09-01

    Digital holography technology, which adopt CCD digital camera to record holograph, can get amplitude and phase information of the sample tested respectively through processing the image. Re-focus of the sample image can be realized by calculating complex amplitude information obtained. However, digital holograph reproduction system can't offer any criterion which determine whether reproduction image achieve fixed-focus state when reproduction image stands in the optimum position. Digital holography reproduction process need add an exterior criterion function, which implement automatic focus as normal imaging system. Aimed to digital imaging automatic focusing problem of off-axis Fresnel holography, image gradient energy method, image Laplace energy method, image shade of gray variance method are compared from two points of theory and practice view, and present the advanced measurement method based on spectrum band-stop filter. Experiment shows that the algorithm has some adaptability, especially image Laplace energy method based on spectrum band-stop filter has non-skewness, monotonicity, unimodality, kurtosis and robust.

  5. The Relationship Between Perceived Stress and Computer Technology Attitude: an Application on Health Sciences Students

    PubMed Central

    Ozyurek, Pakize; Oztasan, Nuray; Kilic, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study is to define attitudes of students in health sciences towards perceived personal stress and computer technologies, and to present the relationship between stress and computer technology attitudes. Methods: In this scope, this study has a descriptive nature and thus a questionnaire has been applied on 764 students from Afyon Kocatepe University Health Sciences High School, Turkey for data gathering. Descriptive statistics, independent samples, t test, one way ANOVA, and regression analysis have been used for data analysis. Findings: In the study, it is seen that female (=3,78) have a more positive attitude towards computer technology than male students (=3,62). according to the results of regression analysis of the study, the regression model between computer technology attitude (CTA) and perceived stress (PS) has been found meaningful (F=16,291; p<0,005). There was a negative relationship between computer technology attitude and perceived stress (when computer technology altitude increases, perceived stress decreases), and an increase of one unit in computer attitude results in 0.275 decrease in perceived stress. Conclusions: it can be concluded that correct and proper use of computer technologies can be accepted as a component of overcoming stress methods. PMID:25870489

  6. STEM-Based Computational Modeling for Technology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Aaron C.; Ernst, Jeremy V.

    2008-01-01

    According to professionals in education, change is an ever-present and evolving process. With transformation in education at both state and national levels, technology education must determine a position in this climate of change. This paper reflects the views on the future of technology education based on an ongoing research project. The purpose…

  7. Critical Engagement with Technology in the Computer Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salvo, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    Proposes a model for critically engaging technology in technical communication graduate curricula. Suggests that technical communicators have an ethical as well as intellectual responsibility to engage the interface between technology and culture. Describes one example, a graduate class in information architecture, as a model for engaging the…

  8. Use of Computer Speech Technologies To Enhance Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrell, Joe

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the design of an innovative learning system that uses new technologies for the man-machine interface, incorporating a combination of Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) and Text To Speech (TTS) synthesis. Highlights include using speech technologies to mimic the attributes of the ideal tutor and design features. (AEF)

  9. Critical Engagement with Technology in the Computer Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salvo, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    Proposes a model for critically engaging technology in technical communication graduate curricula. Suggests that technical communicators have an ethical as well as intellectual responsibility to engage the interface between technology and culture. Describes one example, a graduate class in information architecture, as a model for engaging the…

  10. The Technology Fix: The Promise and Reality of Computers in Our Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pflaum, William D.

    2004-01-01

    During the technology boom of the 1980s and 1990s, computers seemed set to revolutionize education. Do any of these promises sound familiar? (1) Technology would help all students learn better, thanks to multimedia programs capable of adapting to individual needs, learning styles, and skill levels; (2) Technology would transform the teacher's role…

  11. A Computer-Assisted Approach for Conducting Information Technology Applied Instructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Hui-Chun; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Tsai, Pei Jin; Yang, Tzu-Chi

    2009-01-01

    The growing popularity of computer and network technologies has attracted researchers to investigate the strategies and the effects of information technology applied instructions. Previous research has not only demonstrated the benefits of applying information technologies to the learning process, but has also revealed the difficulty of applying…

  12. Finding a Balance: Computer Software, Intellectual Property and the Challenge of Technological Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    This report, prepared by the Office of Technological Assessment (OTA) in response to a request from the House Committee on the Judiciary, examines the rapid and complex technological changes and trends in computer software technologies and their possible effects on the nation's intellectual property system. The three policy issues identified are:…

  13. Finding a Balance: Computer Software, Intellectual Property and the Challenge of Technological Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    This report, prepared by the Office of Technological Assessment (OTA) in response to a request from the House Committee on the Judiciary, examines the rapid and complex technological changes and trends in computer software technologies and their possible effects on the nation's intellectual property system. The three policy issues identified are:…

  14. A Computer-Assisted Approach for Conducting Information Technology Applied Instructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Hui-Chun; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Tsai, Pei Jin; Yang, Tzu-Chi

    2009-01-01

    The growing popularity of computer and network technologies has attracted researchers to investigate the strategies and the effects of information technology applied instructions. Previous research has not only demonstrated the benefits of applying information technologies to the learning process, but has also revealed the difficulty of applying…

  15. Evaluation of computer-based ultrasonic inservice inspection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, R.V. Jr.; Angel, L.J.; Doctor, S.R.; Park, W.R.; Schuster, G.J.; Taylor, T.T.

    1994-03-01

    This report presents the principles, practices, terminology, and technology of computer-based ultrasonic testing for inservice inspection (UT/ISI) of nuclear power plants, with extensive use of drawings, diagrams, and LTT images. The presentation is technical but assumes limited specific knowledge of ultrasonics or computers. The report is divided into 9 sections covering conventional LTT, computer-based LTT, and evaluation methodology. Conventional LTT topics include coordinate axes, scanning, instrument operation, RF and video signals, and A-, B-, and C-scans. Computer-based topics include sampling, digitization, signal analysis, image presentation, SAFI, ultrasonic holography, transducer arrays, and data interpretation. An evaluation methodology for computer-based LTT/ISI systems is presented, including questions, detailed procedures, and test block designs. Brief evaluations of several computer-based LTT/ISI systems are given; supplementary volumes will provide detailed evaluations of selected systems.

  16. Computer simulation of laser beam welding for technological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopota, Vitaliy A.; Sukhov, Yuri T.; Turichin, Gleb A.

    1997-04-01

    The article describes a computer model of laser welding with a deep penetration base on unification of solution heat-mass transfer problem and the problem of irradiation propagation in cavity in approximation of geometrical optics.

  17. Radiotherapy Monte Carlo simulation using cloud computing technology.

    PubMed

    Poole, C M; Cornelius, I; Trapp, J V; Langton, C M

    2012-12-01

    Cloud computing allows for vast computational resources to be leveraged quickly and easily in bursts as and when required. Here we describe a technique that allows for Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculations to be performed using GEANT4 and executed in the cloud, with relative simulation cost and completion time evaluated as a function of machine count. As expected, simulation completion time decreases as 1/n for n parallel machines, and relative simulation cost is found to be optimal where n is a factor of the total simulation time in hours. Using the technique, we demonstrate the potential usefulness of cloud computing as a solution for rapid Monte Carlo simulation for radiotherapy dose calculation without the need for dedicated local computer hardware as a proof of principal. PMID:23188699

  18. Ethereal presences in holography and photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, M.; Byrne, Kay

    2007-02-01

    This paper examines the concept of the 'Presence of Absence' in post-mortem photography and holography, drawing upon both historical and lesser-known images as reference. To create a photographic negative one needs the presence of light to expose the light sensitive surface, be it glass, a polished plate or plastic. A hologram may also be created when a coherent light source, for example from a Laser, travels through a light sensitive material and falls upon the subject to be recorded. A holograph however, retains the optical qualities of both phase and amplitude, the memory of light. Both mediums recall, as it were, 'now absent moments', and confronts us with what is 'not there' as much as 'what is'. This paper examines the exploration of absence and presence in post-mortem photography and holography and it's a richly visceral visual language. A photonic syntax can interpret death as an elegant yet horrific aesthetic, the photograph may be beautify screened and yet obscene in its content. In essence one can be a voyeur, experiencing a mere visual whisper of the true nature of the subject. Our Victorian forefathers explored postmortem photography as an object of mourning, and at the close of the nineteenth century when Jack the Ripper had the inhabitants of White Chapel in a grip of fear, photography made its mark as a documentation of violent crime. Today, within contemporary photography, death is now presented within the confines of the 'Art Gallery', as a sensual, and at times, sensationalised art form. In exploring post-mortem imagery, both in holography and conventional photography, absence presents an aspect of death as startling in its unanimated form and detailed in its finite examination of mortality.

  19. AEDS Proceedings: The Tomorrow in New Technology; Frontiers in Administrative Computing; Adventures in Instructional Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Educational Data Systems, Washington, DC.

    The 122 papers in this collection were presented in 15 sessions of the 20th annual convention of the Association for Educational Data Systems which was held in Orlando, Florida, May 10-14, 1982. Individual papers covered a wide variety of topics, including computer assisted instruction, computer managed instruction, computer literacy,…

  20. Spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory technologies for normally off computing (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, K. Yuasa, S.; Fujita, S.; Ito, J.; Yoda, H.; Suzuki, Y.; Nakatani, Y.; Miyazaki, T.

    2014-05-07

    Most parts of present computer systems are made of volatile devices, and the power to supply them to avoid information loss causes huge energy losses. We can eliminate this meaningless energy loss by utilizing the non-volatile function of advanced spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory (STT-MRAM) technology and create a new type of computer, i.e., normally off computers. Critical tasks to achieve normally off computers are implementations of STT-MRAM technologies in the main memory and low-level cache memories. STT-MRAM technology for applications to the main memory has been successfully developed by using perpendicular STT-MRAMs, and faster STT-MRAM technologies for applications to the cache memory are now being developed. The present status of STT-MRAMs and challenges that remain for normally off computers are discussed.

  1. Spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory technologies for normally off computing (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, K.; Fujita, S.; Ito, J.; Yuasa, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Nakatani, Y.; Miyazaki, T.; Yoda, H.

    2014-05-01

    Most parts of present computer systems are made of volatile devices, and the power to supply them to avoid information loss causes huge energy losses. We can eliminate this meaningless energy loss by utilizing the non-volatile function of advanced spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory (STT-MRAM) technology and create a new type of computer, i.e., normally off computers. Critical tasks to achieve normally off computers are implementations of STT-MRAM technologies in the main memory and low-level cache memories. STT-MRAM technology for applications to the main memory has been successfully developed by using perpendicular STT-MRAMs, and faster STT-MRAM technologies for applications to the cache memory are now being developed. The present status of STT-MRAMs and challenges that remain for normally off computers are discussed.

  2. Three-dimensional nonlinear acoustical holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Yaying

    Nearfield Acoustical Holography (NAH) is an acoustic field visualization technique that can be used to reconstruct three-dimensional (3-D) acoustic fields by projecting two-dimensional (2-D) data measured on a hologram surface. However, linear NAH algorithms developed and improved by many researchers can result in significant reconstruction errors when they are applied to reconstruct 3-D acoustic fields that are radiated from a high-level noise source and include significant nonlinear components. Here, planar, nonlinear acoustical holography procedures are developed that can be used to reconstruct 3-D, nonlinear acoustic fields radiated from a high-level noise source based on 2-D acoustic pressure data measured on a hologram surface. The first nonlinear acoustic holography procedure is derived for reconstructing steady-state acoustic pressure fields by applying perturbation and renormalization methods to nonlinear, dissipative, pressure-based Westervelt Wave Equation (WWE). The nonlinear acoustic pressure fields radiated from a high-level pulsating sphere and an infinite-size, vibrating panel are used to validate this procedure. Although the WWE-based algorithm is successfully validated by those two numerical simulations, it still has several limitations: (1) Only the fundamental frequency and its second harmonic nonlinear components can be reconstructed; (2) the application of this algorithm is limited to mono-frequency source cases; (3) the effects of bent wave rays caused by transverse particle velocities are not included; (4) only acoustic pressure fields can be reconstructed. In order to address the limitations of the steady-state, WWE-based procedure, a transient, planar, nonlinear acoustic holography algorithm is developed that can be used to reconstruct 3-D nonlinear acoustic pressure and particle velocity fields. This procedure is based on Kuznetsov Wave Equation (KWE) that is directly solved by using temporal and spatial Fourier Transforms. When compared to the WWE-based procedure, the KWE-based procedure can be applied to multi-frequency source cases where each frequency component can contain both linear and nonlinear components. The effects of nonlinear bent wave rays can be also considered by using this algorithm. The KWE-based procedure is validated by conducting an experiment with a compression driver and four numerical simulations. The numerical and experimental results show that holographically-projected acoustic fields match well with directly-calculated and directly-measured fields.

  3. Phase-shift binary digital holography.

    PubMed

    Horisaki, Ryoichi; Tahara, Tatsuki

    2014-11-15

    We propose phase-shift digital holography (DH) with a one-bit image sensor. In this method, the propagating complex field from an object is binarized by a one-bit sensor using a phase-shifter. The complex field on the hologram plane is then calculated with the one-bit image data. The object field is recovered via Fresnel back-propagation of the calculated hologram and filtering to suppress some artifacts caused by the binarization. The concept was demonstrated in preliminary experiments by using a synthetically binarized hologram with single-shot and multi-shot phase-shift DH. PMID:25490472

  4. Polarization holography for vortex retarders recording.

    PubMed

    Piron, Pierre; Blain, Pascal; Habraken, Serge; Mawet, Dimitri

    2013-10-01

    We present an original static recording method for vortex retarders (VRs) made from liquid crystal polymers (LCPs) using the superimposition of several polarized beams. VRs are birefringent plates characterized by a rotation of their fast axis about their center. The new method is based on polarization holography and photo-orientable LCP. Combining several polarized beams induces the polarization patterns required for the recording process of VRs without mechanical action. A mathematical description of the method, the outcomes of the numerical simulations, and the first experimental results are presented. PMID:24085221

  5. "Kunstwerk" in the age of holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öhlmann, Dietmar; Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    In 2007 one auction shocked collectors and artists: Two art works of Rudie Berkhout were offered for one thousand dollars on eBay. The closing down of museums for holography in Cologne, New York and Washington DC paid a big price of respect for true art. Benjamin's vision about "Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction" found a new expression in abuse and ignorance. Beautiful sculptures of Art are reduced to "Holograms" like Rudie's "Cairo Aspect" placed in a rummage sale, covered by fingerprints of ignorance.

  6. Phase-space foundations of electron holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubk, A.; Röder, F.

    2015-09-01

    We present a unified formalism for describing various forms of electron holography in quantum mechanical phase space including their extensions to quantum-state reconstructions. The phase-space perspective allows for taking into account partial coherence as well as the quantum mechanical detection process typically hampering the unique reconstruction of a wave function. We elaborate on the limitations imposed by the electron optical elements of the transmission electron microscope as well as the scattering at the target. The results provide the basis for vastly extending the scope of electron holographic techniques towards analyzing partially coherent signals such as inelastically scattered electrons or electron pulses used in ultrafast transmission electron microscopy.

  7. Teachers' Organization of Participation Structures for Teaching Science with Computer Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Karthigeyan

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes a qualitative study that investigated the nature of the participation structures and how the participation structures were organized by four science teachers when they constructed and communicated science content in their classrooms with computer technology. Participation structures focus on the activity structures and processes in social settings like classrooms thereby providing glimpses into the complex dynamics of teacher-students interactions, configurations, and conventions during collective meaning making and knowledge creation. Data included observations, interviews, and focus group interviews. Analysis revealed that the dominant participation structure evident within participants' instruction with computer technology was (Teacher) initiation-(Student and Teacher) response sequences-(Teacher) evaluate participation structure. Three key events characterized the how participants organized this participation structure in their classrooms: setting the stage for interactive instruction, the joint activity, and maintaining accountability. Implications include the following: (1) teacher educators need to tap into the knowledge base that underscores science teachers' learning to teach philosophies when computer technology is used in instruction. (2) Teacher educators need to emphasize the essential idea that learning and cognition is not situated within the computer technology but within the pedagogical practices, specifically the participation structures. (3) The pedagogical practices developed with the integration or with the use of computer technology underscored by the teachers' own knowledge of classroom contexts and curriculum needs to be the focus for how students learn science content with computer technology instead of just focusing on how computer technology solely supports students learning of science content.

  8. Budgeting for Computer Technology in the Small College Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Axford, H. William

    1978-01-01

    Addresses the need for liberal arts colleges and the use of available technology/automation to help secure their survival. Some factors to be considered in planning and budgeting for automation are discussed. (Author/MBR)

  9. In the Clouds: The Implications of Cloud Computing for Higher Education Information Technology Governance and Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dulaney, Malik H.

    2013-01-01

    Emerging technologies challenge the management of information technology in organizations. Paradigm changing technologies, such as cloud computing, have the ability to reverse the norms in organizational management, decision making, and information technology governance. This study explores the effects of cloud computing on information technology…

  10. Electron holography for fields in solids: problems and progress.

    PubMed

    Lichte, Hannes; Börrnert, Felix; Lenk, Andreas; Lubk, Axel; Röder, Falk; Sickmann, Jan; Sturm, Sebastian; Vogel, Karin; Wolf, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Electron holography initially was invented by Dennis Gabor for solving the problems raised by the aberrations of electron lenses in Transmission Electron Microscopy. Nowadays, after hardware correction of aberrations allows true atomic resolution of the structure, for comprehensive understanding of solids, determination of electric and magnetic nanofields is the most challenging task. Since fields are phase objects in the TEM, electron holography is the unrivaled method of choice. After more than 40 years of experimental realization and steady improvement, holography is increasingly contributing to these highly sophisticated and essential questions in materials science, as well to the understanding of electron waves and their interaction with matter. PMID:23831133

  11. Attitudes of Female Faculty toward the Use of Computer Technologies and the Barriers that Limit Their Use of Technologies in Girls' Colleges in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almuqayteeb, Taghreed Abdulaziz

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine female faculty members' use of computer technologies, their attitudes toward computers, the factors that best predict their attitudes toward computers, and the barriers that limit their use of computer technologies in girls' colleges in Dammam and Jubail, Saudi Arabia. Also, this study examined how female…

  12. A Study to Compare Curriculum of Computer Information Systems and Computer Education and Instructional Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavus, Nadire

    2008-01-01

    Today, developments of information and communication technologies have been developing very fast all over the world. These new technologies were taking an important place in education like other sciences. For this reason, education was developing parallel to new developments on the new technologies. Departments which cover curriculum of new…

  13. Progress in hypersonic combustion technology with computation and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Griffin Y.; Kumar, Ajay; Erdos, John I.

    1990-01-01

    Design of successful airbreathing engines for operation at near-orbital speeds presents significant challenges in all the disciplines involved, including propulsion. This paper presents a discussion of the important physics of hypersonic combustion and an assessment of the state of the art of ground simulations with pulse facilities and with computational techniques. Recent examples of experimental and computational simulations are presented and discussed. The need for continued application of these tools to establish the credibility and fidelity of engineering design methods for practical hypersonic combustors is emphasized along with the critical need for improved diagnostic methods for hypervelocity reacting flows.

  14. The impact of new computer technology on accelerator control

    SciTech Connect

    Theil, E.; Jacobson, V.; Paxson, V.

    1987-04-01

    This paper describes some recent developments in computing and stresses their application in accelerator control systems. Among the advances that promise to have a significant impact are (1) low cost scientific workstations; (2) the use of ''windows'', pointing devices and menus in a multi-tasking operating system; (3) high resolution large-screen graphics monitors; (4) new kinds of high bandwidth local area networks. The relevant features are related to a general accelerator control system. For example, this paper examines the implications of a computing environment which permits and encourages graphical manipulation of system components, rather than traditional access through the writing of programs or ''canned'' access via touch panels.

  15. Light-Front Holography and Novel Effects in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.

    2008-12-18

    The correspondence between theories in anti-de Sitter space and conformal field theories in physical space-time leads to an analytic, semiclassical model for strongly-coupled QCD. Light-front holography allows hadronic amplitudes in the AdS fifth dimension to be mapped to frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in physical space-time, thus providing a relativistic description of hadrons at the amplitude level. We identify the AdS coordinate z with an invariant light-front coordinate {zeta} which separates the dynamics of quark and gluon binding from the kinematics of constituent spin and internal orbital angular momentum. The result is a single-variable light-front Schroedinger equation for QCD which determines the eigenspectrum and the light-front wavefunctions of hadrons for general spin and orbital angular momentum. The mapping of electromagnetic and gravitational form factors in AdS space to their corresponding expressions in light-front theory confirms this correspondence. Some novel features of QCD are discussed, including the consequences of confinement for quark and gluon condensates and the behavior of the QCD coupling in the infrared. The distinction between static structure functions such as the probability distributions computed from the square of the light-front wavefunctions versus dynamical structure functions which include the effects of rescattering is emphasized. A new method for computing the hadronization of quark and gluon jets at the amplitude level, an event amplitude generator, is outlined.

  16. Geometrically induced metastability and holography

    SciTech Connect

    Aganagic, Mina; Aganagic, Mina; Beem, Christopher; Seo, Jihye; Vafa, Cumrun

    2006-10-23

    We construct metastable configurations of branes and anti-branes wrapping 2-spheres inside local Calabi-Yau manifolds and study their large N duals. These duals are Calabi-Yau manifolds in which the wrapped 2-spheres have been replaced by 3-spheres with flux through them, and supersymmetry is spontaneously broken. The geometry of the non-supersymmetric vacuum is exactly calculable to all orders of the't Hooft parameter, and to the leading order in 1/N. The computation utilizes the same matrix model techniques that were used in the supersymmetric context. This provides a novel mechanism for breaking supersymmetry in the context of flux compactifications.

  17. On locality, holography and unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skvortsov, Evgeny; Taronna, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    We study the functional class and locality problems in the context of higher-spin theories and Vasiliev's equations. A locality criterion that is sufficient to make higher-spin theories well-defined as field theories on Anti-de-Sitter space is proposed. This criterion identifies admissible pseudo-local field redefinitions which preserve AdS/CFT correlation functions as we check in the 3d example. Implications of this analysis for known higher-spin theories are discussed. We also check that the cubic coupling coefficients previously fixed in 3d at the action level give the correct CFT correlation functions upon computing the corresponding Witten diagrams.

  18. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    DOEpatents

    Collins, H. Dale; Busse, Lawrence J.; Lemon, Douglas K.

    1985-01-01

    Defects in a structure are imaged as they propagate, using their emitted acoustic energy as a monitored source. Short bursts of acoustic energy propagate through the structure to a discrete element receiver array. A reference timing transducer located between the array and the inspection zone initiates a series of time-of-flight measurements. A resulting series of time-of-flight measurements are then treated as aperture data and are transferred to a computer for reconstruction of a synthetic linear holographic image. The images can be displayed and stored as a record of defect growth.

  19. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, H. D.; Busse, L. J.; Lemon, D. K.

    1985-07-30

    Defects in a structure are imaged as they propagate, using their emitted acoustic energy as a monitored source. Short bursts of acoustic energy propagate through the structure to a discrete element receiver array. A reference timing transducer located between the array and the inspection zone initiates a series of time-of-flight measurements. A resulting series of time-of-flight measurements are then treated as aperture data and are transferred to a computer for reconstruction of a synthetic linear holographic image. The images can be displayed and stored as a record of defect growth.

  20. Educational Technology Research Journals: Computers & Education, 2002-2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rackham, David D.; Hyatt, Frederick R.; Macfarlane, David C.; Nisse, Tony; Woodfield, Wendy; West, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the journal "Computers & Education" to discover research trends in the articles published during 2002-2011. Research articles were analyzed to determine trends in the research methods and types of articles published, as well as the key topics published, top authors, and some of the most-cited…

  1. Effects of Educational Beliefs on Attitudes towards Using Computer Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onen, Aysem Seda

    2012-01-01

    This study, aiming to determine the relationship between pre-service teachers' beliefs about education and their attitudes towards utilizing computers and internet, is a descriptive study in scanning model. The sampling of the study consisted of 270 pre-service teachers. The potential relationship between the beliefs of pre-service teachers about…

  2. Adults' Uses of Computer Technology: Associations with Literacy Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, M. Cecil; Smith, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined data from a large, nationally representative sample--the National Assessment of Adult Literacy (NCES, 2007)--to examine how computer use and Internet-based literacy practices (use of e-mail, searching for information on the Internet, and Internet chatting) were related to prose, document, and quantitative literacy…

  3. Educational Technology Research Journals: Computers & Education, 2002-2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rackham, David D.; Hyatt, Frederick R.; Macfarlane, David C.; Nisse, Tony; Woodfield, Wendy; West, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the journal "Computers & Education" to discover research trends in the articles published during 2002-2011. Research articles were analyzed to determine trends in the research methods and types of articles published, as well as the key topics published, top authors, and some of the most-cited…

  4. Business and Technology Concepts--Business Computations. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield. Dept. of Adult, Vocational and Technical Education.

    This Illinois State Board of Education teacher's guide on business computations is for students enrolled in the 9th or 10th grade. The course provides a foundation in arithmetic skills and their applications to common business problems for the senior high school vocational business courses. The curriculum guide includes teacher and student…

  5. Faculty Concerns as Gateways to Teacher Competency with Computer Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Nancy I.

    Faculty concerns about integrating computers in teacher education courses were studied for 26 members of the education faculty at a northwest university. Faculty members responded to the Stages of Concern about an Innovation Questionnaire and discussed their concerns in interviews. The Concerns-Based Adoption Model, which provided the conceptual…

  6. SAMGrid experiences with the Condor technology in Run II computing

    SciTech Connect

    Baranovski, A.; Loebel-Carpenter, L.; Garzoglio, G.; Herber, R.; Illingworth, R.; Kennedy, R.; Kreymer, A.; Kumar, A.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A.; Merritt, W.; Terekhov, I.; Trumbo, J.; Veseli, S.; White, S.; St. Denis, R.; Jain, S.; Nishandar, A.; /Texas U., Arlington

    2004-12-01

    SAMGrid is a globally distributed system for data handling and job management, developed at Fermilab for the D0 and CDF experiments in Run II. The Condor system is being developed at the University of Wisconsin for management of distributed resources, computational and otherwise. We briefly review the SAMGrid architecture and its interaction with Condor, which was presented earlier. We then present our experiences using the system in production, which have two distinct aspects. At the global level, we deployed Condor-G, the Grid-extended Condor, for the resource brokering and global scheduling of our jobs. At the heart of the system is Condor's Matchmaking Service. As a more recent work at the computing element level, we have been benefiting from the large computing cluster at the University of Wisconsin campus. The architecture of the computing facility and the philosophy of Condor's resource management have prompted us to improve the application infrastructure for D0 and CDF, in aspects such as parting with the shared file system or reliance on resources being dedicated. As a result, we have increased productivity and made our applications more portable and Grid-ready. Our fruitful collaboration with the Condor team has been made possible by the Particle Physics Data Grid.

  7. COMPUTER MODEL TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computer-based mathematical models for urban water resources planning, management and design are widely used by engineers and planners in both the public and private sectors. In the United States, the majority of the users are in the private (consulting) sector, yet most of the m...

  8. Computer-Integrated Manufacturing Technology. Tech Prep Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakeland Tech Prep Consortium, Kirtland, OH.

    This tech prep competency profile covers these occupations: manufacturing technician, computer-assisted design and drafting (CADD) technician, quality technician, and mechanical technician. Section 1 provides occupation definitions. Section 2 lists development committee members. Section 3 provides the leveling codes---abbreviations for grade level…

  9. Technology Allows Engineers to Make Solid Objects from Computer Designs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, David L.

    1992-01-01

    Computer operators using the technique of three-dimensional printing or rapid prototyping may soon be able to sculpt an object on the screen and within minutes, have a paper, plastic, or ceramic version of the object in hand. The process uses the principle that physical objects can be created in layers. (MSE)

  10. Computer Technology Can Enhance Presentation of Pharmacological Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riffee, William H.

    1991-01-01

    The use of liquid crystal display (LCD) techniques for projection of computer monitor images onto a large screen for classroom viewing is discussed and illustrated with a pharmacology class presentation on drug/neurotransmitter-receptor interactions. The method is seen as a way of bringing a new dynamic to visual instruction. (MSE)

  11. Future of computing technology in physics - the potentials and pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Brenner, A.E.

    1984-02-01

    The impact of the developments of modern digital computers is discussed, especially with respect to physics research in the future. The effects of large data processing capability and increasing rates at which data can be acquired and processed are considered. (GHT)

  12. Managing Technostress: Optimizing the Use of Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brod, Craig

    1982-01-01

    Afraid of change, many employees refuse to join the computer revolution. The author states that only understanding and proper training can break down such resistance. The term "technostress" is described and the importance of employee self-assessment is examined. (CT)

  13. Grant Writing for Middle School Educators Using Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, James E., II; Mupinga, Davison M.; Higgins, Chad

    2001-01-01

    Argues that middle school educators can enhance the quality of education in the classroom by obtaining grants for special projects. Discusses the grant proposal writing process, successful grant writing strategies, and ways to integrate computers into grant writing. Outlines web site resources for grant writing. (SR)

  14. Introductory overview of holography and speckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, David E.

    1990-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a nonmathematical overview of holographic and speckle interferometry. This provides information necessary for those participants with little or no background in these areas to understand the application papers in the Holography Speckle session of ICALEO''89. Holography A hologram is an optical device which is capable of producing threedimensional images. The word hologram stems from the Greek root holos which means whole complete or entire and the word gram which means message. Thus a hologram is a complete record of a scene or object. The first hologram was produced by Dennis Gabor in 1948. In 1971 he won the Nobel Prize for his work. Leith and Upatnieks produced the first holograms using a laser in the early 1960''s. In conventional photography the light reflected from a scene is focused by a camera lens onto a photographic emulsion. The variation in irradiance of the light reaching the emulsion is related only to the amplitude of the electric field due to the light. To produce three-dimensional images a hologram records information about both the amplitude and phase of light reflected from a scene or object. Production Hologram Figure 1 is a sketch of a system which can be used to produce optical holograms. A laser operating in the TEM mode is used as a light source. A continuous wave or a pulsed laser can be

  15. Nonrelativistic Holography — a Group-Theoretical Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrev, V. K.

    2014-01-01

    We give a review of some group-theoretical results related to nonrelativistic holography. Our main playgrounds are the Schrödinger equation and the Schrödinger algebra. We first recall the interpretation of nonrelativistic holography as equivalence between representations of the Schrödinger algebra describing bulk fields and boundary fields. One important result is the explicit construction of the boundary-to-bulk operators in the framework of representation theory, and that these operators and the bulk-to-boundary operators are intertwining operators. Further, we recall the fact that there is a hierarchy of equations on the boundary, invariant with respect to Schrödinger algebra. We also review the explicit construction of an analogous hierarchy of invariant equations in the bulk, and that the two hierarchies are equivalent via the bulk-to-boundary intertwining operators. The derivation of these hierarchies uses a mechanism introduced first for semisimple Lie groups and adapted to the nonsemisimple Schrödinger algebra. These require development of the representation theory of the Schrödinger algebra which is reviewed in some detail. We also recall the q-deformation of the Schrödinger algebra. Finally, the realization of the Schrödinger algebra via difference operators is reviewed.

  16. High-resolution imaging using endoscopic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.

    1990-08-01

    Endoscopic holography or endoholography combines the features of endoscopy and holography. The purpose of endoholographic imaging is to provide the physician with a unique means of extending diagnosis by providing a life-like record of tissue. Endoholographic recording will provide means for microscopic examination of tissue and in some cases may obviate the need to excise specimens for biopsy. In this method holograms which have the unique properties of three-dimensionality large focal depth and high resolution are made with a newly designed endoscope. The endoscope uses a single-mode optical fiber for illumination and single-beam reflection holograms are recorded in close contact with the tissue at the distal end of the endoscope. The holograms are viewed under a microscope. By using the proper combinations of dyes for staining specific tissue types with various wavelengths of laser illumination increased contrast on the cellular level can be obtained. Using dyes such as rose bengal in combination with the 514. 5 nm line of an argon ion laser and trypan blue or methylene blue with the 647. 1 nm line of a krypton ion laser holograms of the stained colon of a dog showed the architecture of the colon''s columnar epithelial cells. It is hoped through chronological study using this method in-vivo an increased understanding of the etiology and pathology of diseases such as Crohn''s diseases colitis proctitis and several different forms of cancer will help to their control. 1.

  17. Electron holography of P-N junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, B.G.; Joy, D.C.; Allard, L.F.; Voelkl, E.

    1996-12-31

    A wide holographic field of view (up to 15 {mu}m in the Hitachi-HF2000) is achieved in a TEM by switching off the objective lens and imaging the sample by the first intermediate lens. Fig. 1 shows the corresponding ray diagram for low magnification image plane off-axis holography. A coherent electron beam modulated by the sample in its amplitude and its phase is superimposed on a plane reference wave by a negatively biased Moellenstedt-type biprism. Our holograms are acquired utilizing a Hitachi HF-2000 field emission electron microscope at 200 kV. Essential for holography are a field emission gun and an electron biprism. At low magnification, the excitation of each lens must be appropriately adjusted by the free lens control mode of the microscope. The holograms are acquired by a 1024 by 1024 slow-scan CCD-camera and processed by the {open_quotes}Holoworks{close_quotes} software. The hologram fringes indicate positively and negatively charged areas in a sample by the direction of the fringe bending. Thus we directly recognize p and n regions of a semiconductor by the fringe bending of the interference fringes.

  18. Nearfield acoustic holography: Review and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perezmatzumoto, A. E.; Fahy, F. J.; Elliott, S. J.

    1989-07-01

    The development of the Nearfield Acoustic Holography technique (NAH) for planar arrays is reported. A critical review shows that this technique represents an improvement over standard Acoustic Holography (AH) only for reconstructions of sources radiating at low frequencies. The possible reasons for a bad source reconstruction in NAH are investigated. The sensitive parameters for producing this distortion in a given system are detected. It is shown that the aliasing of the signal requires a formal approach or research. This formal approach is necessary for generalizing the technique, and for avoiding the subjectivity in choosing a good reconstruction. The results lead to the conclusion that prior knowledge of the source under study is required, making NAH a case-by-case method. The choosing of the true solution appears to be a time consuming technique from just a mathematical approach, or a highly subjective technique if there is not a formal approach. At the present state of development, NAH can only work in some cases. A system for industrial applications does not seem a real possibility at the present time.

  19. Massively parallel X-ray holography

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, John C.H; Marchesini, Stefano; Boutet, Sebastien; Sakdinawat, Anne E.; Bogan, Michael J.; Bajt, Sasa; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N.; Frank, Matthias; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Szöke, Abraham; Cui, Congwu; Shapiro, David A.; Howells, MAlcolm R.; Shaevitz, Joshua W; Lee, Joanna Y.; Hajdu, Janos; Seibert, Marvin M.

    2008-08-01

    Advances in the development of free-electron lasers offer the realistic prospect of nanoscale imaging on the timescale of atomic motions. We identify X-ray Fourier-transform holography1,2,3 as a promising but, so far, inefficient scheme to do this. We show that a uniformly redundant array4 placed next to the sample, multiplies the efficiency of X-ray Fourier transform holography by more than three orders of magnitude, approaching that of a perfect lens, and provides holographic images with both amplitude- and phase-contrast information. The experiments reported here demonstrate this concept by imaging a nano-fabricated object at a synchrotron source, and a bacterial cell with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser, where illumination by a single 15-fs pulse was successfully used in producing the holographic image. As X-ray lasers move to shorter wavelengths we expect to obtain higher spatial resolution ultrafast movies of transient states of matter

  20. The Computer Catalog: A Democratic or Authoritarian Technology?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Judith A.

    1988-01-01

    Discussion of consequences of library automation argues that technology should be used to augment access to information. Online public access catalogs are considered in this context, along with several related issues such as system incompatibility, invasion of privacy, barriers to database access and manipulation, and user fees, which contribute…