Science.gov

Sample records for computer technology holography

  1. Haptic holography : an early computational plastic

    E-print Network

    Plesniak, Wendy J. (Wendy Jean)

    2001-01-01

    This dissertation introduces haptic holography, a combination of computational modeling and multimodal spatial display, as an early computationalplastic In this work, we combine various holographic displays with a force ...

  2. Holography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, H. Arthur

    Holography is a process which numbers among its many applications the creation of holograms--unique three dimensional photographs that show spatial relations and shifts just as they exist in reality. This book recounts the history of holography, tracing its development from Euclid's theory of light rays through Huygens' theory of wave motion to…

  3. Advanced technology development multi-color holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vikram, Chandra S.

    1994-01-01

    Several key aspects of multi-color holography and some non-conventional ways to study the holographic reconstructions are considered. The error analysis of three-color holography is considered in detail with particular example of a typical triglycine sulfate crystal growth situation. For the numerical analysis of the fringe patterns, a new algorithm is introduced with experimental verification using sugar-water solution. The role of the phase difference among component holograms is also critically considered with examples of several two- and three-color situations. The status of experimentation on two-color holography and fabrication of a small breadboard system is also reported. Finally, some successful demonstrations of unconventional ways to study holographic reconstructions are described. These methods are deflectometry and confocal optical processing using some Spacelab III holograms.

  4. Advanced technology development multi-color holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vikram, Chandra S.

    1993-01-01

    This is the final report of the Multi-color Holography project. The comprehensive study considers some strategic aspects of multi-color holography. First, various methods of available techniques for accurate fringe counting are reviewed. These are heterodyne interferometry, quasi-heterodyne interferometry, and phase-shifting interferometry. Phase-shifting interferometry was found to be the most suitable for multi-color holography. Details of experimentation with a sugar solution are also reported where better than 1/200 of a fringe order measurement capability was established. Rotating plate glass phase shifter was used for the experimentation. The report then describes the possible role of using more than two wavelengths with special reference-to-object beam intensity ratio needs in multicolor holography. Some specific two- and three-color cases are also described in detail. Then some new analysis methods of the reconstructed wavefront are considered. These are deflectometry, speckle metrology, confocal optical signal processing, and phase shifting technique related applications. Finally, design aspects of an experimental breadboard are presented.

  5. Pit Distribution Design for Computer-Generated Waveguide Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Shogo; Imai, Tadayuki; Ueno, Masahiro; Ohtani, Yoshimitsu; Endo, Masahiro; Kurokawa, Yoshiaki; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Toshifumi; Fukuda, Makoto

    2008-02-01

    Multilayered waveguide holography (MWH) is one of a number of page-oriented data multiplexing holographies that will be applied to optical data storage and three-dimensional (3D) moving images. While conventional volumetric holography using photopolymer or photorefractive materials requires page-by-page light exposure for recording, MWH media can be made by employing stamping and laminating technologies that are suitable for mass production. This makes devising an economical mastering technique for replicating holograms a key issue. In this paper, we discuss an approach to pit distribution design that enables us to replace expensive electron beam mastering with economical laser beam mastering. We propose an algorithm that avoids the overlapping of even comparatively large adjacent pits when we employ laser beam mastering. We also compensate for the angular dependence of the diffraction power, which strongly depends on pit shape, by introducing an enhancement profile so that a diffracted image has uniform intensity.

  6. Complementary computer generated holography for aesthetic watermarking.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Christophe; Lemonnier, Olivier; Laulagnet, Fabien; Fargeix, Alain; Tissot, Florent; Armand, Marie Françoise

    2012-02-27

    We present herein an original solution for the watermarking of holograms in binary graphic arts without unaesthetic diffractive effect. It is based on the Babinet principle of complementary diffractive structures adapted to Lohmann-type computer generated holograms. We introduce the concept and demonstrate its interest for anti-counterfeiting applications with the decoding of a hidden data matrix. A process of thermal lithography is used for the manufacturing of binary graphic arts containing complementary computer generated holograms. PMID:22418361

  7. Image quality improvement of polygon computer generated holography.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiao-Ning; Chen, Ding-Chen; Ding, Yi-Cong; Chen, Yi-Gui; Jiang, Shao-Ji; Dong, Jian-Wen

    2015-07-27

    Quality of holographic reconstruction image is seriously affected by undesirable messy fringes in polygon-based computer generated holography. Here, several methods have been proposed to improve the image quality, including a modified encoding method based on spatial-domain Fraunhofer diffraction and a specific LED light source. Fast Fourier transform is applied to the basic element of polygon and fringe-invisible reconstruction is achieved after introducing initial random phase. Furthermore, we find that the image with satisfactory fidelity and sharp edge can be reconstructed by either a LED with moderate coherence level or a modulator with small pixel pitch. Satisfactory image quality without obvious speckle noise is observed under the illumination of bandpass-filter-aided LED. The experimental results are consistent well with the correlation analysis on the acceptable viewing angle and the coherence length of the light source. PMID:26367569

  8. The application of digital image plane holography technology to identify Chinese herbal medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huaying; Guo, Zhongjia; Liao, Wei; Zhang, Zhihui

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, the imaging technology of digital image plane holography to identify the Chinese herbal medicine is studied. The optical experiment system of digital image plane holography which is the special case of pre-magnification digital holography was built. In the record system, one is an object light by using plane waves which illuminates the object, and the other one is recording hologram by using spherical light wave as reference light. There is a Micro objective lens behind the object. The second phase factor which caus ed by the Micro objective lens can be eliminated by choosing the proper position of the reference point source when digital image plane holography is recorded by spherical light. In this experiment, we use the Lygodium cells and Onion cells as the object. The experiment results with Lygodium cells and Onion cells show that digital image plane holography avoid the process of finding recording distance by using auto-focusing approach, and the phase information of the object can be reconstructed more accurately. The digital image plane holography is applied to the microscopic imaging of cells more effectively, and it is suit to apply for the identify of Chinese Herbal Medicine. And it promotes the application of digital holographic in practice.

  9. The application of digital image plane holography technology to identify Chinese herbal medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huaying; Guo, Zhongjia; Liao, Wei; Zhang, Zhihui

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, the imaging technology of digital image plane holography to identify the Chinese herbal medicine is studied. The optical experiment system of digital image plane holography which is the special case of pre-magnification digital holography was built. In the record system, one is an object light by using plane waves which illuminates the object, and the other one is recording hologram by using spherical light wave as reference light. There is a Micro objective lens behind the object. The second phase factor which caus ed by the Micro objective lens can be eliminated by choosing the proper position of the reference point source when digital image plane holography is recorded by spherical light. In this experiment, we use the Lygodium cells and Onion cells as the object. The experiment results with Lygodium cells and Onion cells show that digital image plane holography avoid the process of finding recording distance by using auto-focusing approach, and the phase information of the object can be reconstructed more accurately. The digital image plane holography is applied to the microscopic imaging of cells more effectively, and it is suit to apply for the identify of Chinese Herbal Medicine. And it promotes the application of digital holographic in practice.

  10. Computer-controlled active phase stabilization for electronic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrebabetzky, Frank

    1996-07-01

    Electronic Holography or ESPI (electronic speckle pattern interferometry) is widely used for deformation analysis of complex, 3D surfaces. The sensitivity is well below 1 micron and deformations can be observed in real time. Any of those methods require either a constant phase between the interfering beams or a defined phase oscillation about a stable mean value or another controlled phase variation. The use of active control loops enhances the degree of phase constance, facilitates the defined variation of phase and permits a considerable reduction of cost for passive stabilizing installations, thus permitting the operation of an ESPI camera in an industrial production environment. By the use of a computer as active controller, autocalibration becomes feasible, a variety of stabilization parameters and algorithms can be tested easily, parameter optimization can be automized and phase perturbations can be recorded. User- guidance for failure diagnosis enhances further the user friendliness of the system. All this has been accomplished without any special or high-performance equipment, which allowed a relatively cheap realization. With an interferometer and photodiode amplifier as phase detector, a PC with a multi-I/O board and a piezo-mounted mirror with a simple, self-built driver as phase actuator, phase stabilization up to the kHz regime was demonstrated, limited by the mechanical resonances of the optical setup. The complete software has been developed by the author, using Oberon as language, operating system and development system.

  11. Applied Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, Christopher P.

    These lecture notes briefly review holography, or gauge/gravity duality. They also discuss its application to computing the viscosity of a strongly-coupled fluid, and to describing charge transport in the holographic superconductor.

  12. Holography: A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, D. D.

    1973-01-01

    The development of holography and the state of the art in recording and displaying information, microscopy, motion, pictures, and television applications are discussed. In addition to optical holography, information is presented on microwave, acoustic, ultrasonic, and seismic holography. Other subjects include data processing, data storage, pattern recognition, and computer-generated holography. Diagrams of holographic installations are provided. Photographs of typical holographic applications are used to support the theoretical aspects.

  13. Gray tone image watermarking with complementary computer generated holography.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Christophe; Laulagnet, Fabien; Lemonnier, Olivier

    2013-07-01

    We present herein an original approach for the watermarking of holograms in gray tone images for use in microscopic halftone image archiving. Our concept is based on the principle of complementary holography presented in a previous contribution. The efficiency of the concept is evaluated theoretically and experimentally. We demonstrate the interest of elliptical diffraction patterns as an alternative to the usual rectangular diffraction patterns and confirm the subsidiary role of the hologram amplitude in the hologram recovery process. PMID:23842332

  14. High-speed parallel phase-shifting digital holography system using special-purpose computer for image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakue, Takashi; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2015-05-01

    We report a high-speed parallel phase-shifting digital holography system using a special-purpose computer for image reconstruction. Parallel phase-shifting digital holography is a technique capable of single-shot phase-shifting interferometry. This technique records information of multiple phase-shifted holograms required for calculation of phase-shifting interferometry with a single shot by using space-division multiplexing. This technique needs image-reconstruction process for a huge amount of recorded holograms. In particular, it takes a long time to calculate light propagation based on fast Fourier transform in the process and to obtain a motion picture of a dynamically and fast moving object. Then we designed a special-purpose computer for accelerating the image-reconstruction process of parallel phase-shifting digital holography. We developed a special-purpose computer consisting of VC707 evaluation kit (Xilinx Inc.) which is a field programmable gate array board. We also recorded holograms consisting of 128 × 128 pixels at a frame rate of 180,000 frames per second by the constructed parallel phase-shifting digital holography system. By applying the developed computer to the recorded holograms, we confirmed that the designed computer can accelerate the calculation of image-reconstruction process of parallel phase-shifting digital holography ~50 times faster than a CPU.

  15. Holography in phase space.

    PubMed

    Testorf, Markus; Lohmann, Adolf W

    2008-02-01

    Holography is reformulated by using the framework of phase-space optics. The Leith-Upatnieks off-axis reference hologram is compared with precursors, namely, single-sideband holography. The phase-space representation of complex amplitudes focuses on similarities between different holographic recording schemes and is particularly useful for investigating the degree of freedom and the space-bandwidth product of optical signals and systems. This allows one to include computer-generated holography and recent developments in digital holography in the discussion. PMID:18239702

  16. Applications of digital holography to measurements and optical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Xinzhu; Yu, Chongxiu; Yu, Miao; Hsu, Dashsiung

    2011-09-01

    With recent advances in high-speed computer and video capture technology, holographic films used in classical holography can be replaced with charged-coupled devices (CCD) and complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors to record and numerically reconstruct a hologram, which is now known as digital holography. Digital holography introduces something new to optical science. Wet chemical processing and other time-consuming procedures can be removed, so numerical recording and reconstruction can be realized in almost real time. It allows us to characterize the phase of a light field as well the intensity, and so the whole wave field can be measured and stored in a computer. Digital holography is expanding applications of holography and becoming a scientific and technological tool. Its use has now increased for measuring amplitude and the phase of object waves, displacement and three dimensional shape, particle distributions and motions, characterization of the refractive index and biological tissues, and vibration analysis, etc. Here, basic principles of digital holography for optical measurement and characterization are described. Taking into consideration the rapid advance in CCD and CMOS sensors as the background, the state-of-the-art applications of digital holography to optical measurement and characterization are presented.

  17. Regular effective hologram regions for computer generated holography.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuhong; Farbiz, Farzam; Solanki, Sanjeev; Liang, Xinan; Pan, Yuechao; Xu, Xuewu

    2009-12-01

    An effective hologram region (EHR) based approach is presented to speed up the computation of computer generated holograms (CGHs). The object space is predivided into subspaces, and an EHR for each subspace is predefined according to the maximum spatial frequency of interference fringes, light diffraction efficiency, and CGH binarization effect. To compute the hologram of an object, the object points are first categorized according to which subspace they are located in, and then their holograms are calculated using the corresponding EHRs. As each EHR usually takes up only a portion of the hologram plate, the CGH computational load is thus reduced. This new approach is highly suitable for large hologram display systems. In addition, when compared to the reconstructed image using the conventional approach, our experimental results show that more noise can be blocked off and the reconstructed image appears sharper without noticeable brightness reduction. PMID:19956291

  18. Computational and visible light experiments for x-ray laser holography

    SciTech Connect

    Brase, J.M.; Yorkey, T.J.; Peters, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    Due to the fact that most biological objects of interest are embedded in a complex three-dimensional, it is difficult to estimate the usefulness of x-ray images of complex objects using usual measures of resolution such as Rayleigh criteria. We are approaching this problem for the design and characterization of x-ray holography systems by developing computational tools for the simulation of x-ray hologram formation and for their computational reconstruction. These efforts are closely coupled with a scaled visible light experimental program which validates both the simulations and the reconstruction techniques. The use of simulations allows us not only to establish resolution limits for complex objects but also to vary the parameter space in a controlled manner to optimize imaging system designs. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  19. EDITORIAL: Optical tomography and digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coupland, Jeremy; Lobera, Julia

    2008-07-01

    The articles in this special feature in Measurement Science and Technology concern exciting new developments in the field of digital holography—the process of electronically recording and numerically reconstructing an optical field [1]. Making use of the enormous advances in digital imaging and computer technology, digital holography is presented in a range of applications from fluid flow measurement and structural analysis to medical imaging. The science of digital holography rests on the foundations of optical holography, on the work of Gabor in the late 1940s, and on the development of laser sources in the 1960s, which made his vision a practical reality [2]. Optical holography, however, uses a photosensitive material, both to record a latent image and subsequently to behave as a diffractive optical element with which to reconstruct the incident field. In this way display holograms, using silver halide materials for example, can produce life-size images that are virtually indistinguishable from the object itself [3]. Digital holography, in contrast, separates the steps of recording and reconstruction, and the final image is most often in the form of a 3D computer model. Of course, television cameras have been used from the beginnings of holography to record interferometric images. However, the huge disparity between the resolution of holographic recording materials (more than 3000 cycles/mm) and television cameras (around 50 cycles/mm) was raised as a major concern by early researchers. TV holography, as it was sometimes called, generally recorded low numerical aperture (NA) holograms producing images with characteristically large speckle and was therefore more often referred to as electronic speckle pattern interferomery (ESPI) [4]. It is possible, however, to record large NA holograms on a sensor with restricted resolution by using an objective lens or a diverging reference wave [5]. This is generally referred to as digital holographic microscopy (DHM) since the resolution now places a limit on the size of the object that can be recorded. Some 60 years after the pioneering work of Gabor, digital imaging and associated computer technology offers a step change in capability with which to further exploit holography. Modern image sensors are now available with almost 30 million photosensitive elements, which corresponds to a staggering 100-fold increase compared to standard television images. At the same time personal computers have been optimized for imaging and graphics applications and this allows more sophisticated algorithms to be used in the reconstruction process. Although resolution still falls short of the materials used for optical holography, the ability to process data numerically generally outweighs this drawback and presents us with a host of new opportunities. Faced with the ability to record and process holograms numerically, it is natural to ask the question 'what information is present within recordings of scattered light?'. In fact this question could be posed by anyone using light, or indeed any other wave disturbance, for measurement purposes. For the case of optical holography, Wolf published his answer in 1969 [6], showing that for the case of weak scattering (small perturbations) and plane wave illumination, the amplitude and phase of each plane wave within the scattered field are proportional to those of a periodic variation in the refractive index contrast (i.e. a Bragg grating). This Fourier decomposition of the object was published almost simultaneously by Dandliker and Weiss [7], who also provided a graphical illustration of the technique. These works are the basis of optical tomography and provide us with the link between holographic data and 3D form. Digital holographic reconstruction and optical tomography was the theme of an international workshop [8] held in Loughborough in 2007, and many of the topics debated at the workshop have become the subject of the papers in this issue. In general terms the papers we present describe closely related holographic techniques that address applicat

  20. Calculation reduction method for color digital holography and computer-generated hologram using color space conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Nagahama, Yuki; Kakue, Takashi; Takada, Naoki; Okada, Naohisa; Endo, Yutaka; Hirayama, Ryuji; Hiyama, Daisuke; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2014-02-01

    A calculation reduction method for color digital holography (DH) and computer-generated holograms (CGHs) using color space conversion is reported. Color DH and color CGHs are generally calculated on RGB space. We calculate color DH and CGHs in other color spaces for accelerating the calculation (e.g., YCbCr color space). In YCbCr color space, a RGB image or RGB hologram is converted to the luminance component (Y), blue-difference chroma (Cb), and red-difference chroma (Cr) components. In terms of the human eye, although the negligible difference of the luminance component is well recognized, the difference of the other components is not. In this method, the luminance component is normal sampled and the chroma components are down-sampled. The down-sampling allows us to accelerate the calculation of the color DH and CGHs. We compute diffraction calculations from the components, and then we convert the diffracted results in YCbCr color space to RGB color space. The proposed method, which is possible to accelerate the calculations up to a factor of 3 in theory, accelerates the calculation over two times faster than the ones in RGB color space.

  1. Computer Technology for Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In this age of the computer, more and more business firms are automating their operations for increased efficiency in a great variety of jobs, from simple accounting to managing inventories, from precise machining to analyzing complex structures. In the interest of national productivity, NASA is providing assistance both to longtime computer users and newcomers to automated operations. Through a special technology utilization service, NASA saves industry time and money by making available already developed computer programs which have secondary utility. A computer program is essentially a set of instructions which tells the computer how to produce desired information or effect by drawing upon its stored input. Developing a new program from scratch can be costly and time-consuming. Very often, however, a program developed for one purpose can readily be adapted to a totally different application. To help industry take advantage of existing computer technology, NASA operates the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC)(registered TradeMark),located at the University of Georgia. COSMIC maintains a large library of computer programs developed for NASA, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy and other technology-generating agencies of the government. The Center gets a continual flow of software packages, screens them for adaptability to private sector usage, stores them and informs potential customers of their availability.

  2. Visualization of x-ray computer tomography using computer-generated holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daibo, Masahiro; Tayama, Norio

    1998-09-01

    The theory converted from x-ray projection data to the hologram directly by combining the computer tomography (CT) with the computer generated hologram (CGH), is proposed. The purpose of this study is to offer the theory for realizing the all- electronic and high-speed seeing through 3D visualization system, which is for the application to medical diagnosis and non- destructive testing. First, the CT is expressed using the pseudo- inverse matrix which is obtained by the singular value decomposition. CGH is expressed in the matrix style. Next, `projection to hologram conversion' (PTHC) matrix is calculated by the multiplication of phase matrix of CGH with pseudo-inverse matrix of the CT. Finally, the projection vector is converted to the hologram vector directly, by multiplication of the PTHC matrix with the projection vector. Incorporating holographic analog computation into CT reconstruction, it becomes possible that the calculation amount is drastically reduced. We demonstrate the CT cross section which is reconstituted by He-Ne laser in the 3D space from the real x-ray projection data acquired by x-ray television equipment, using our direct conversion technique.

  3. Thermodynamic holography

    E-print Network

    Bo-Bo Wei; Zhan-Feng Jiang; Ren-Bao Liu

    2014-11-24

    The holographic principle states that the information about a volume of a system is encoded on the boundary surface of the volume. Holography appears in many branches of physics, such as optics, electromagnetism, many-body physics, quantum gravity, and string theory. Here we show that holography is also an underlying principle in thermodynamics, a most important foundation of physics. The thermodynamics of a system is fully determined by its partition function. We prove that the partition function of a physical system is an analytic function of all the physical parameters, and therefore its values in any area on the complex plane of a physical parameter are uniquely determined by its values along the boundary. The thermodynamic holography has applications in studying thermodynamics of nano-scale systems (such as molecule engines, nano-generators and macromolecules) and provides a new approach to many-body physics.

  4. Thermodynamic holography.

    PubMed

    Wei, Bo-Bo; Jiang, Zhan-Feng; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-01-01

    The holographic principle states that the information about a volume of a system is encoded on the boundary surface of the volume. Holography appears in many branches of physics, such as optics, electromagnetism, many-body physics, quantum gravity, and string theory. Here we show that holography is also an underlying principle in thermodynamics, a most important foundation of physics. The thermodynamics of a system is fully determined by its partition function. We prove that the partition function of a finite but arbitrarily large system is an analytic function on the complex plane of physical parameters, and therefore the partition function in a region on the complex plane is uniquely determined by its values along the boundary. The thermodynamic holography has applications in studying thermodynamics of nano-scale systems (such as molecule engines, nano-generators and macromolecules) and provides a new approach to many-body physics. PMID:26478214

  5. Thermodynamic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Bo-Bo; Jiang, Zhan-Feng; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-10-01

    The holographic principle states that the information about a volume of a system is encoded on the boundary surface of the volume. Holography appears in many branches of physics, such as optics, electromagnetism, many-body physics, quantum gravity, and string theory. Here we show that holography is also an underlying principle in thermodynamics, a most important foundation of physics. The thermodynamics of a system is fully determined by its partition function. We prove that the partition function of a finite but arbitrarily large system is an analytic function on the complex plane of physical parameters, and therefore the partition function in a region on the complex plane is uniquely determined by its values along the boundary. The thermodynamic holography has applications in studying thermodynamics of nano-scale systems (such as molecule engines, nano-generators and macromolecules) and provides a new approach to many-body physics.

  6. Thermodynamic holography

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Bo-Bo; Jiang, Zhan-Feng; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-01-01

    The holographic principle states that the information about a volume of a system is encoded on the boundary surface of the volume. Holography appears in many branches of physics, such as optics, electromagnetism, many-body physics, quantum gravity, and string theory. Here we show that holography is also an underlying principle in thermodynamics, a most important foundation of physics. The thermodynamics of a system is fully determined by its partition function. We prove that the partition function of a finite but arbitrarily large system is an analytic function on the complex plane of physical parameters, and therefore the partition function in a region on the complex plane is uniquely determined by its values along the boundary. The thermodynamic holography has applications in studying thermodynamics of nano-scale systems (such as molecule engines, nano-generators and macromolecules) and provides a new approach to many-body physics. PMID:26478214

  7. [Earth Science Technology Office's Computational Technologies Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, James (Technical Monitor); Merkey, Phillip

    2005-01-01

    This grant supported the effort to characterize the problem domain of the Earth Science Technology Office's Computational Technologies Project, to engage the Beowulf Cluster Computing Community as well as the High Performance Computing Research Community so that we can predict the applicability of said technologies to the scientific community represented by the CT project and formulate long term strategies to provide the computational resources necessary to attain the anticipated scientific objectives of the CT project. Specifically, the goal of the evaluation effort is to use the information gathered over the course of the Round-3 investigations to quantify the trends in scientific expectations, the algorithmic requirements and capabilities of high-performance computers to satisfy this anticipated need.

  8. Computer Viruses. Technology Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponder, Tim, Comp.; Ropog, Marty, Comp.; Keating, Joseph, Comp.

    This document provides general information on computer viruses, how to help protect a computer network from them, measures to take if a computer becomes infected. Highlights include the origins of computer viruses; virus contraction; a description of some common virus types (File Virus, Boot Sector/Partition Table Viruses, Trojan Horses, and…

  9. Computers, Technology, and Disability. [Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council on Education, Washington, DC. HEATH Resource Center.

    This paper describes programs and resources that focus on access of postsecondary students with disabilities to computers and other forms of technology. Increased access to technological devices and services is provided to students with disabilities under the Technology-Related Assistance for Individuals with Disabilities Act (Tech Act). Section…

  10. Computer Technology for Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviation/Space, 1982

    1982-01-01

    A special National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) service is contributing to national productivity by providing industry with reusable, low-cost, government-developed computer programs. Located at the University of Georgia, NASA's Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) has developed programs for equipment…

  11. Children and Computers: New Technology--

    E-print Network

    Cassell, Justine

    31 Children and Computers: New Technology-- Old Concerns Ellen A.Wartella Nancy Jennings Abstract concerns about the effect on children's development and well- being. Although we tend to see these issues. With the introduction of each of these technologies, proponents touted the educational benefits for children, while

  12. Computer Technology for Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Shell Oil Company used a COSMIC program, called VISCEL to insure the accuracy of the company's new computer code for analyzing polymers, and chemical compounds. Shell reported that there were no other programs available that could provide the necessary calculations. Shell produces chemicals for plastic products used in the manufacture of automobiles, housewares, appliances, film, textiles, electronic equipment and furniture.

  13. Trusted Computing Technologies, Intel Trusted Execution Technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Guise, Max Joseph; Wendt, Jeremy Daniel

    2011-01-01

    We describe the current state-of-the-art in Trusted Computing Technologies - focusing mainly on Intel's Trusted Execution Technology (TXT). This document is based on existing documentation and tests of two existing TXT-based systems: Intel's Trusted Boot and Invisible Things Lab's Qubes OS. We describe what features are lacking in current implementations, describe what a mature system could provide, and present a list of developments to watch. Critical systems perform operation-critical computations on high importance data. In such systems, the inputs, computation steps, and outputs may be highly sensitive. Sensitive components must be protected from both unauthorized release, and unauthorized alteration: Unauthorized users should not access the sensitive input and sensitive output data, nor be able to alter them; the computation contains intermediate data with the same requirements, and executes algorithms that the unauthorized should not be able to know or alter. Due to various system requirements, such critical systems are frequently built from commercial hardware, employ commercial software, and require network access. These hardware, software, and network system components increase the risk that sensitive input data, computation, and output data may be compromised.

  14. Computed tomography: A versatile technology

    SciTech Connect

    Armistead, R.A.; Stanley, J.H.

    1997-02-01

    Improvements in the speed and accuracy of computed tomography (CT) systems, together with new developments in software, are changing the ways CT technology supports manufacturing operations. In addition to providing quantitative nondestructive inspection at the end of the manufacturing line, CT images are now also being compiled for reverse engineering and first-article characterization and certification. The enhanced performance of a state-of-the-art CT system makes it an effective complement to other digital data-based manufacturing technologies such as computer-aided design (CAD), computer-aided manufacturing (CAM), and computer-aided engineering (CAE). Furthermore, CT capabilities may be combined with those of rapid prototyping such as stereolithography, selective laser sintering, and direct metal deposition, to support the rapid, cost-efficient production of parts in small lots. This article describes how the system works, how it is used for inspection, and how it may assist with reverse engineering.

  15. Virtual integral holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venolia, Dan S.; Williams, Lance

    1990-08-01

    A range of stereoscopic display technologies exist which are no more intrusive, to the user, than a pair of spectacles. Combining such a display system with sensors for the position and orientation of the user's point-of-view results in a greatly enhanced depiction of three-dimensional data. As the point of view changes, the stereo display channels are updated in real time. The face of a monitor or display screen becomes a window on a three-dimensional scene. Motion parallax naturally conveys the placement and relative depth of objects in the field of view. Most of the advantages of "head-mounted display" technology are achieved with a less cumbersome system. To derive the full benefits of stereo combined with motion parallax, both stereo channels must be updated in real time. This may limit the size and complexity of data bases which can be viewed on processors of modest resources, and restrict the use of additional three-dimensional cues, such as texture mapping, depth cueing, and hidden surface elimination. Effective use of "full 3D" may still be undertaken in a non-interactive mode. Integral composite holograms have often been advanced as a powerful 3D visualization tool. Such a hologram is typically produced from a film recording of an object on a turntable, or a computer animation of an object rotating about one axis. The individual frames of film are multiplexed, in a composite hologram, in such a way as to be indexed by viewing angle. The composite may be produced as a cylinder transparency, which provides a stereo view of the object as if enclosed within the cylinder, which can be viewed from any angle. No vertical parallax is usually provided (this would require increasing the dimensionality of the multiplexing scheme), but the three dimensional image is highly resolved and easy to view and interpret. Even a modest processor can duplicate the effect of such a precomputed display, provided sufficient memory and bus bandwidth. This paper describes the components of a stereo display system with user point-of-view tracking for interactive 3D, and a digital realization of integral composite display which we term virtual integral holography. The primary drawbacks of holographic display - film processing turnaround time, and the difficulties of displaying scenes in full color -are obviated, and motion parallax cues provide easy 3D interpretation even for users who cannot see in stereo.

  16. Optical Computers and Space Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdeldayem, Hossin A.; Frazier, Donald O.; Penn, Benjamin; Paley, Mark S.; Witherow, William K.; Banks, Curtis; Hicks, Rosilen; Shields, Angela

    1995-01-01

    The rapidly increasing demand for greater speed and efficiency on the information superhighway requires significant improvements over conventional electronic logic circuits. Optical interconnections and optical integrated circuits are strong candidates to provide the way out of the extreme limitations imposed on the growth of speed and complexity of nowadays computations by the conventional electronic logic circuits. The new optical technology has increased the demand for high quality optical materials. NASA's recent involvement in processing optical materials in space has demonstrated that a new and unique class of high quality optical materials are processible in a microgravity environment. Microgravity processing can induce improved orders in these materials and could have a significant impact on the development of optical computers. We will discuss NASA's role in processing these materials and report on some of the associated nonlinear optical properties which are quite useful for optical computers technology.

  17. An improved method for computer generation of three-dimensional digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yanlei; Ma, Jianqiang; Chen, Yuhang; Li, Jiawen; Huang, Wenhao; Chu, Jiaru

    2013-12-01

    A novel method is proposed for designing optimized three-dimensional computer-generated holograms (CGHs). A series of spherical wave factors are introduced into the conventional optimal rotation angle (ORA) algorithm to achieve a varying amount of defocus along the optical axis, and the distraction terms are minimized during the iterative process. Both numerical simulation and experimental reconstructions are presented to demonstrate that this method is able to yield excellent multilayer patterns with high uniformity and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This method is significant for applications in laser 3D printing and multilayer data recording.

  18. Center for Advanced Computational Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.

    2000-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Computational Technology (ACT) was established to serve as a focal point for diverse research activities pertaining to application of advanced computational technology to future aerospace systems. These activities include the use of numerical simulations, artificial intelligence methods, multimedia and synthetic environments, and computational intelligence, in the modeling, analysis, sensitivity studies, optimization, design and operation of future aerospace systems. The Center is located at NASA Langley and is an integral part of the School of Engineering and Applied Science of the University of Virginia. The Center has four specific objectives: 1) conduct innovative research on applications of advanced computational technology to aerospace systems; 2) act as pathfinder by demonstrating to the research community what can be done (high-potential, high-risk research); 3) help in identifying future directions of research in support of the aeronautical and space missions of the twenty-first century; and 4) help in the rapid transfer of research results to industry and in broadening awareness among researchers and engineers of the state-of-the-art in applications of advanced computational technology to the analysis, design prototyping and operations of aerospace and other high-performance engineering systems. In addition to research, Center activities include helping in the planning and coordination of the activities of a multi-center team of NASA and JPL researchers who are developing an intelligent synthesis environment for future aerospace systems; organizing workshops and national symposia; as well as writing state-of-the-art monographs and NASA special publications on timely topics.

  19. Infinite possibilities: Computational structures technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beam, Sherilee F.

    1994-12-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (or CFD) methods are very familiar to the research community. Even the general public has had some exposure to CFD images, primarily through the news media. However, very little attention has been paid to CST--Computational Structures Technology. Yet, no important design can be completed without it. During the first half of this century, researchers only dreamed of designing and building structures on a computer. Today their dreams have become practical realities as computational methods are used in all phases of design, fabrication and testing of engineering systems. Increasingly complex structures can now be built in even shorter periods of time. Over the past four decades, computer technology has been developing, and early finite element methods have grown from small in-house programs to numerous commercial software programs. When coupled with advanced computing systems, they help engineers make dramatic leaps in designing and testing concepts. The goals of CST include: predicting how a structure will behave under actual operating conditions; designing and complementing other experiments conducted on a structure; investigating microstructural damage or chaotic, unpredictable behavior; helping material developers in improving material systems; and being a useful tool in design systems optimization and sensitivity techniques. Applying CST to a structure problem requires five steps: (1) observe the specific problem; (2) develop a computational model for numerical simulation; (3) develop and assemble software and hardware for running the codes; (4) post-process and interpret the results; and (5) use the model to analyze and design the actual structure. Researchers in both industry and academia continue to make significant contributions to advance this technology with improvements in software, collaborative computing environments and supercomputing systems. As these environments and systems evolve, computational structures technology will evolve. By using CST in the design and operation of future structures systems, engineers will have a better understanding of how a system responds and lasts, more cost-effective methods of designing and testing models, and improved productivity. For informational and educational purposes, a videotape is being produced using both static and dynamic images from research institutions, software and hardware companies, private individuals, and historical photographs and drawings. The extensive number of CST resources indicates its widespread use. Applications run the gamut from simpler university-simulated problems to those requiring solutions on supercomputers. In some cases, an image or an animation will be mapped onto the actual structure to show the relevance of the computer model to the structure. computer image using traditional composition theories or video production requirements, often the image loses some of its original digital quality and impact when transferred to videotape. Although many CST images are currently available, those that are edited into the final project must meet two important criteria: they must complement the narration, and they must be broadcast quality when recorded on videotape.

  20. Infinite possibilities: Computational structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beam, Sherilee F.

    1994-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (or CFD) methods are very familiar to the research community. Even the general public has had some exposure to CFD images, primarily through the news media. However, very little attention has been paid to CST--Computational Structures Technology. Yet, no important design can be completed without it. During the first half of this century, researchers only dreamed of designing and building structures on a computer. Today their dreams have become practical realities as computational methods are used in all phases of design, fabrication and testing of engineering systems. Increasingly complex structures can now be built in even shorter periods of time. Over the past four decades, computer technology has been developing, and early finite element methods have grown from small in-house programs to numerous commercial software programs. When coupled with advanced computing systems, they help engineers make dramatic leaps in designing and testing concepts. The goals of CST include: predicting how a structure will behave under actual operating conditions; designing and complementing other experiments conducted on a structure; investigating microstructural damage or chaotic, unpredictable behavior; helping material developers in improving material systems; and being a useful tool in design systems optimization and sensitivity techniques. Applying CST to a structure problem requires five steps: (1) observe the specific problem; (2) develop a computational model for numerical simulation; (3) develop and assemble software and hardware for running the codes; (4) post-process and interpret the results; and (5) use the model to analyze and design the actual structure. Researchers in both industry and academia continue to make significant contributions to advance this technology with improvements in software, collaborative computing environments and supercomputing systems. As these environments and systems evolve, computational structures technology will evolve. By using CST in the design and operation of future structures systems, engineers will have a better understanding of how a system responds and lasts, more cost-effective methods of designing and testing models, and improved productivity. For informational and educational purposes, a videotape is being produced using both static and dynamic images from research institutions, software and hardware companies, private individuals, and historical photographs and drawings. The extensive number of CST resources indicates its widespread use. Applications run the gamut from simpler university-simulated problems to those requiring solutions on supercomputers. In some cases, an image or an animation will be mapped onto the actual structure to show the relevance of the computer model to the structure. Transferring the digital files to videotape presents a number of problems related to maintaining the quality of the original image, while still producing a broadcast quality videotape. Since researchers normally do not create a computer image using traditional composition theories or video production requirements, often the image loses some of its original digital quality and impact when transferred to videotape. Although many CST images are currently available, those that are edited into the final project must meet two important criteria: they must complement the narration, and they must be broadcast quality when recorded on videotape.

  1. Computer technologies and institutional memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Christopher; Lachman, Roy

    1989-01-01

    NASA programs for manned space flight are in their 27th year. Scientists and engineers who worked continuously on the development of aerospace technology during that period are approaching retirement. The resulting loss to the organization will be considerable. Although this problem is general to the NASA community, the problem was explored in terms of the institutional memory and technical expertise of a single individual in the Man-Systems division. The main domain of the expert was spacecraft lighting, which became the subject area for analysis in these studies. The report starts with an analysis of the cumulative expertise and institutional memory of technical employees of organizations such as NASA. A set of solutions to this problem are examined and found inadequate. Two solutions were investigated at length: hypertext and expert systems. Illustrative examples were provided of hypertext and expert system representation of spacecraft lighting. These computer technologies can be used to ameliorate the problem of the loss of invaluable personnel.

  2. Electroholographic display unit for three-dimensional display by use of special-purpose computational chip for holography and reflective LCD panel.

    PubMed

    Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Shiraki, Atsushi; Masuda, Nobuyuki; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2005-05-30

    We developed an electroholography unit, which consists of a special-purpose computational chip for holography and a reflective liquid-crystal display (LCD) panel, for a three-dimensional (3D) display. The special-purpose chip can compute a computer-generated hologram of 800x600 grids in size from a 3D object consisting of approximately 400 points in approximately 0.15 seconds. The pixel pitch and resolution of the LCD panel are 12 mum and 800x600 grids, respectively. We implemented the special purpose chip and LCD panel on a printed circuit board of approximately 28cmx13cm in size. After the calculation, the computer-generated hologram produced by the special-purpose chip is displayed on the LCD panel. When we illuminate a reference light to the LCD panel, we can observe a 3D animation of approximately 3cmx3cmx3cm in size. In the present paper, we report the electroholographic display unit together with a simple 3D display system. PMID:19495333

  3. Advanced laptop and small personal computer technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Roger L.

    1991-01-01

    Advanced laptop and small personal computer technology is presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following areas of hand carried computers and mobile workstation technology are covered: background, applications, high end products, technology trends, requirements for the Control Center application, and recommendations for the future.

  4. Computing with RFID: Drivers, Technology and Implications

    E-print Network

    Roussos, George

    in that it is the first practical technology to tightly couple physical entities and digital information. In this surveyComputing with RFID: Drivers, Technology and Implications George Roussos School of Computer Science then discuss rfid and supporting network technologies, and identify their novel features and capabilities. We

  5. Top-quality security optical elements: from holography towards 500.000 dpi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kota?ka, Libor; T?thal, Tomas; Kola?ík, Vladimir

    2005-09-01

    Invented in late 1940s, holography has played a very important role in many technical applications. While the 60s and 70s belonged to, say, a classical period of the holography and diffractive optics (optical elements, lenses, beam splitters), the last two decades have shown an enormous expansion of various mainly synthetically designed and created holographic elements. Ever since its invention, holograms have also attracted our attention, because of their true three-dimension perception of a depicted object and related optical features. These phenomena caused, the holograms have become very well and easily publicly recognized, but still very difficult to falsify. Holography based optically variable microstructures and related advanced anti-counterfeit measures are thus ones of the leading features in security elements used for the protection against falsification of valuables, documents (banknotes, visa, passports, ID cards, tax stamps, etc.), serving for the protection of interests and many others. Our talk deals with the survey of currently exploited technologies to produce several protective optical elements. A special attention will be paid to the synthetically developed special optical elements by means of the unique technology - the electron beam lithography, what is one of the world's most advanced technologies used for the protection against falsification. The computer-synthesized security elements are recorded with an incredible resolution of up to 500.000 dpi and are specially developed for the security of the most important state valuables and documents. Finally, we shall discuss some technological possibilities for its future development.

  6. Center for Computational Structures Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Perry, Ferman W.

    1995-01-01

    The Center for Computational Structures Technology (CST) is intended to serve as a focal point for the diverse CST research activities. The CST activities include the use of numerical simulation and artificial intelligence methods in modeling, analysis, sensitivity studies, and optimization of flight-vehicle structures. The Center is located at NASA Langley and is an integral part of the School of Engineering and Applied Science of the University of Virginia. The key elements of the Center are: (1) conducting innovative research on advanced topics of CST; (2) acting as pathfinder by demonstrating to the research community what can be done (high-potential, high-risk research); (3) strong collaboration with NASA scientists and researchers from universities and other government laboratories; and (4) rapid dissemination of CST to industry, through integration of industrial personnel into the ongoing research efforts.

  7. Electron holography—basics and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichte, Hannes; Lehmann, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Despite the huge progress achieved recently by means of the corrector for aberrations, allowing now a true atomic resolution of 0.1 nm, hence making it an unrivalled tool for nanoscience, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) suffers from a severe drawback: in a conventional electron micrograph only a poor phase contrast can be achieved, i.e. phase structures are virtually invisible. Therefore, conventional TEM is nearly blind for electric and magnetic fields, which are pure phase objects. Since such fields provoked by the atomic structure, e.g. of semiconductors and ferroelectrics, largely determine the solid state properties, hence the importance for high technology applications, substantial object information is missing. Electron holography in TEM offers the solution: by superposition with a coherent reference wave, a hologram is recorded, from which the image wave can be completely reconstructed by amplitude and phase. Now the object is displayed quantitatively in two separate images: one representing the amplitude, the other the phase. From the phase image, electric and magnetic fields can be determined quantitatively in the range from micrometre down to atomic dimensions by all wave optical methods that one can think of, both in real space and in Fourier space. Electron holography is pure wave optics. Therefore, we discuss the basics of coherence and interference, the implementation into a TEM, the path of rays for recording holograms as well as the limits in lateral and signal resolution. We outline the methods of reconstructing the wave by numerical image processing and procedures for extracting the object properties of interest. Furthermore, we present a broad spectrum of applications both at mesoscopic and atomic dimensions. This paper gives an overview of the state of the art pointing at the needs for further development. It is also meant as encouragement for those who refrain from holography, thinking that it can only be performed by specialists in highly specialized laboratories. In fact, a modern TEM built for atomic resolution and equipped with a field emitter or a Schottky emitter, well aligned by a skilled operator, can deliver good holograms. Running commercially available image processing software and mathematics programs on a laptop-computer is sufficient for reconstruction of the amplitude and phase images and extracting desirable object information.

  8. Computer Technology-infused Learning Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keengwe, Jared; Anyanwu, Longy O.

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine students' perception of instructional integration of computer technology to improve learning. Two key questions were investigated in this study: (a) What is the students' perception of faculty integration of computer technology into classroom instruction? (b) To what extent does the students' perception of faculty integration of computer technology, students' computer proficiency levels for personal activities, and students' computer proficiency levels for instructional activities predict the students' perception of the effect of computer technology to improve learning? A survey questionnaire with a likert-type rating scale was used to collect data to answer the research questions. Descriptive statistics as well as a multiple regression technique were used to analyze data obtained in the study. A statistically significant relationship was found between the three predictor variables and the students' perception of the effect of computer technology to improve learning.

  9. Computer Technology: State of the Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Withington, Frederic G.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the nature of modern general-purpose computer systems, including hardware, semiconductor electronics, microprocessors, computer architecture, input output technology, and system control programs. Seven suggested readings are cited. (FM)

  10. Disruptive technology business models in cloud computing

    E-print Network

    Krikos, Alexis Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Cloud computing, a term whose origins have been in existence for more than a decade, has come into fruition due to technological capabilities and marketplace demands. Cloud computing can be defined as a scalable and flexible ...

  11. Digital photography and computer technology : a promising field of innovation 1 Digital photography and computer technology

    E-print Network

    Donsez, Didier

    Digital photography and computer technology : a promising field of innovation 1 Digital photography: (+33) 320 43 42 56 {vcord,lecomte}@lifl.fr #12;Digital photography and computer technology : a promising field of innovation 2 Digital photography and computer technology : a promising field

  12. Underwater holography: past and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, John

    2006-05-01

    Holography is a well-known optical technique which can provide valuable information on the location and distribution of small particles in three-dimensional space. For several years now, we have utilised holography for high-precision subsea inspection and measurement. One specific application which spurred much of our work was the need for high-precision inspection and analysis of plankton sizes, distribution and species identification. To this end we have developed a subsea holographic camera (HoloMar) for recording of plankton and other marine organisms in situ in their natural environment. This camera is unique in that it is able to record simultaneous in-line and off-axis holograms to cover a range of size of marine organisms from a few microns to tens of millimetres and at concentrations from a few particles per cubic centimetre to dense aggregates. Holograms of aquatic systems of up to 50000 cm 3 volume (off-axis) and 9500 cm 3 (in-line), have been recorded in situ, using a pulsed laser (Q-switched, frequency-doubled Nd-YAG, 532 nm). The use of a pulsed laser effectively "freezes" the scene at a given instant. Although the recording of the holograms takes place in water, replay of the image is carried out in the laboratory in air, using the projected (real) image mode of reconstruction. By precision translation of a computer-controlled video-camera through the replayed image volume and performing "optical sectioning" on the image, individual organisms can be isolated and their size, shape and relative location precisely determined. Image processing algorithms, will allow optimisation of the holographic image together with automated identification of individual species and enumeration of concentrations. The local interactions between different organisms and particles can be observed, recorded and quantitatively determined. Following initial laboratory and observation tank testing, the holo-camera was deployed in a sea loch in the West of Scotland to a depth of 100 m and over 300 holograms recorded. However, the HoloMar camera is physically large and heavy and difficult to deploy. It is also based on the use of photographic emulsions to record the holograms. To overcome some of these difficulties we are now developing a new holographic camera (eHoloCam) based on digital holography. In digital or "eHolography", a hologram is directly electronically recorded onto a CCD or CMOS sensor and then numerically reconstructed by simulation of the optical hologram reconstruction. The immediate advantages of this new camera are compactness, ease-of-use and speed of response, but at the expense of restricted off-axis recording angles and reduced recording volume. In this paper we describe both approaches, the use of holography for analysis of marine organisms and the results obtained in the field. We also describe recent work, using both photo and digital holography, to study the behaviour of sediments in river estuaries and outline future applications of underwater holography.

  13. A real-time color holography system for live scene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kenji; Mishina, Tomoyuki; Oi, Ryutaro; Senoh, Takanori; Okui, Makoto

    2009-02-01

    We are studying electronic holography and have developed a real-time color holographic movie system which includes three functional blocks, capture block, processing block, and display block. We will introduce the system and its technology in this paper. The first block, capture block, uses integral photography (IP) technology to capture color 3-D objects in real time. This block mainly consists of a lens array with approximately 120(W)x67(H) convex lenses and a video camera with 1920(W)x1080(H) pixels to capture IP images. In addition to that, the optical system to reduce the crosstalk between elemental images is mounted. The second block, processing block, consists of two general personal computers to generate holograms from IP images in real time. Three half-zone-plated holograms for red, green and blue (RGB) channels are generated for each frame by using Fast Fourier Transform. The last block, display block, mainly consists of three liquid crystal displays for displaying the holograms and three laser sources for RGB to reconstruct the color 3-D objects. This block is a single-sideband holography display, which cuts off conjugate and carrier images from primary images. All blocks work in real time, i.e., in 30 frames per second.

  14. College Students' Attitude towards Computer Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Njagi, K. O.; Havice, W. L.

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in the contemporary world, especially in the area of computer technology, have heralded the development and implementation of new and innovative teaching strategies and particularly with the Internet revolution. This study assessed students' attitude towards computer technology. Specifically, the study assessed differences in…

  15. Theory-Guided Technology in Computer Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-Ari, Mordechai

    2001-01-01

    Examines the history of major achievements in computer science as portrayed by winners of the prestigious Turing award and identifies a possibly unique activity called Theory-Guided Technology (TGT). Researchers develop TGT by using theoretical results to create practical technology. Discusses reasons why TGT is practical in computer science and…

  16. Prior Computer Experience and Technology Acceptance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varma, Sonali

    2010-01-01

    Prior computer experience with information technology has been identified as a key variable (Lee, Kozar, & Larsen, 2003) that can influence an individual's future use of newer computer technology. The lack of a theory driven approach to measuring prior experience has however led to conceptually different factors being used interchangeably in…

  17. Computer Technology-Infused Learning Enhancement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keengwe, Jared; Anyanwu, Longy O.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine students' perception of instructional integration of computer technology to improve learning. Two key questions were investigated in this study: (a) What is the students' perception of faculty integration of computer technology into classroom instruction? (b) To what extent does the students' perception of…

  18. Animated holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burney, Michael H.

    1998-09-01

    An all electronic process for the capture, storage and display of holograms is discussed. Utilizing this process, live, real time holograms with images projected in front of the display have been achieved. Also using this process, a 20 second animated hologram captured from a real object was created and viewed with an accompanying music soundtrack. The process also has the ability to create content from real objects or convert from other technologies. Additionally the display portion of the process was engineered into a portable unit.

  19. Conductivity of a strange metal: from holography to memory functions

    E-print Network

    Andrew Lucas

    2015-03-15

    We study the electrical response of a wide class of strange metal phases without quasiparticles at finite temperature and charge density, with explicitly broken translational symmetry, using holography. The low frequency electrical conductivity exhibits a Drude peak, so long as momentum relaxation is slow. The relaxation time and the direct current conductivity are exactly equal to what is computed, independently of holography, via the memory function framework.

  20. From Computer Lab to Technology Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherwood, Sandra

    1999-01-01

    Discussion of integrating technology into elementary school classrooms focuses on teacher training that is based on a three-year plan developed at an elementary school in Marathon, New York. Describes the role of a technology teacher who facilitates technology integration by running the computer lab, offering workshops, and developing inservice…

  1. An Introduction to Educational Holography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, R. Scott

    Holograms are capable of taking the two-dimensional ways of envisioning information to another dimension of presentation, representation, and conceptualization. Educational holography is joining display holography, holographic testing of materials, and holographic optical elements as a fourth major field in holography. Holograms are explored as…

  2. Moral Responsibility and Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Batya

    Noting a recent increase in the number of cases of computer crime and computer piracy, this paper takes up the question, "How can understanding the social context of computing help us--as parents, educators, and members of government and industry--to educate young people to become morally responsible members of an electronic information…

  3. Study of key technology of ghost imaging via compressive sensing for a phase object based on phase-shifting digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leihong, Zhang; Dong, Liang; Bei, Li; Zilan, Pan; Dawei, Zhang; Xiuhua, Ma

    2015-07-01

    In this article, the algorithm of compressing sensing is used to improve the imaging resolution and realize ghost imaging via compressive sensing for a phase object based on the theoretical analysis of the lensless Fourier imaging of the algorithm of ghost imaging based on phase-shifting digital holography. The algorithm of ghost imaging via compressive sensing based on phase-shifting digital holography uses the bucket detector to measure the total light intensity of the interference and the four-step phase-shifting method is used to obtain the total light intensity of differential interference light. The experimental platform is built based on the software simulation, and the experimental results show that the algorithm of ghost imaging via compressive sensing based on phase-shifting digital holography can obtain the high-resolution phase distribution figure of the phase object. With the same sampling times, the phase clarity of the phase distribution figure obtained by the algorithm of ghost imaging via compressive sensing based on phase-shifting digital holography is higher than that obtained by the algorithm of ghost imaging based on phase-shift digital holography. In this article, this study further extends the application range of ghost imaging and obtains the phase distribution of the phase object.

  4. Coherence holography and photon-correlation holography: marriage between holography and statistical optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Mitsuo; Wang, Wei; Naik, Dinesh N.

    2011-10-01

    We review two techniques of unconventional holography, coherence holography and photon-correlation holography, which we recently proposed and experimentally demonstrated. We will emphasize the importance of noticing mathematical analogies in optics and physical phenomena, which give insights into the methodology for developing new techniques.

  5. Computing, Information and Communications Technology (CICT) Website

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, John; Tu, Eugene (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Computing, Information and Communications Technology Program (CICT) was established in 2001 to ensure NASA's Continuing leadership in emerging technologies. It is a coordinated, Agency-wide effort to develop and deploy key enabling technologies for a broad range of mission-critical tasks. The NASA CICT program is designed to address Agency-specific computing, information, and communications technology requirements beyond the projected capabilities of commercially available solutions. The areas of technical focus have been chosen for their impact on NASA's missions, their national importance, and the technical challenge they provide to the Program. In order to meet its objectives, the CICT Program is organized into the following four technology focused projects: 1) Computing, Networking and Information Systems (CNIS); 2) Intelligent Systems (IS); 3) Space Communications (SC); 4) Information Technology Strategic Research (ITSR).

  6. (CICT) Computing, Information, and Communications Technology Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDalsem, William R.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of the Computing, Information, and Communications Technology (CICT) program is to enable NASA's Scientific Research, Space Exploration, and Aerospace Technology Missions with greater mission assurance, for less cost, with increased science return through the development and use of advanced computing, information and communications technologies. This viewgraph presentation includes diagrams of how the political guidance behind CICT is structured. The presentation profiles each part of the NASA Mission in detail, and relates the Mission to the activities of CICT. CICT's Integrated Capability Goal is illustrated, and hypothetical missions which could be enabled by CICT are profiled. CICT technology development is profiled.

  7. Haptic Holography/Touching the Ethereal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Haptic Holography, was perhaps, first proposed by workers at MIT in the 90s. The Media Lab, headed up by Dr. Stephen Benton, with published papers by Wendy Plesiak and Ravi Pappuh. -1 Recent developments in both the technology of digital holography and haptics have made it practical to conduct further investigations. Haptic holography is auto-stereoscopic and provides co-axial viewing for the user. Haptic holography may find application in medical & surgical training and as a new form of synthetic reality for artists and designers. At OCAD's PHASE Lab (Prototypes for Holographic Art and Science Explorations) workers are exploring hybrid forms of augmented reality, that combine haptics, interactivity and auto-stereoscopic imagery. Conventional Haptic environments, while presenting a 3D physics environment, typically provide a 2D visual work/play space. Orienteering in such an environment creates an uncertain spatial relationship for the user. Our group creates 3d models from which we create holographic constructs. The same model is used to create the physics environment. The two models are super-imposed. The result: Holograms you can touch.

  8. Roadmap: Technical and Applied Studies Computer Technology Applied Computer Security and Forensics Technology-

    E-print Network

    Khan, Javed I.

    Roadmap: Technical and Applied Studies ­ Computer Technology Applied Computer Security and Forensics Technology- Bachelor of Technical and Applied Studies RE-BTAS-TAS-CTAC Regional College Catalog Semester Five [15 Credits] ! COMT 36318 Survey of Information Security Internet Fraud and Computer

  9. Technology computer aided design characterization needs and requirements

    E-print Network

    Florida, University of

    Technology computer aided design characterization needs and requirements Mark E. Law Department 1995; accepted 2 August 1995 Technology computer aided design TCAD promises predictive calculations on the characterization community? © 1996 American Vacuum Society. I. INTRODUCTION Technology computer aided design TCAD

  10. Ultimate computing. Biomolecular consciousness and nano Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Hameroff, S.R.

    1987-01-01

    The book advances the premise that the cytoskeleton is the cell's nervous system, the biological controller/computer. If indeed cytoskeletal dynamics in the nanoscale (billionth meter, billionth second) are the texture of intracellular information processing, emerging ''NanoTechnologies'' (scanning tunneling microscopy, Feynman machines, von Neumann replicators, etc.) should enable direct monitoring, decoding and interfacing between biological and technological information devices. This in turn could result in important biomedical applications and perhaps a merger of mind and machine: Ultimate Computing.

  11. Beyond Computation: Information Technology, Organizational

    E-print Network

    technologies, such as the telegraph, the steam engine and the electric motor, illustrate a pattern of information that can be digitized--numbers, text, video, music, speech, programs, and engineer- ing drawings

  12. OFFICE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY COMPUTER SECURITY POLICY

    E-print Network

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    Manual, Chapter 14: Data and Information Security, Section 4, Information Security Plans ­ Physical%20-%20DATA%20AND%20INFORMATION%20SECURITY.pdf. CONTACTS Refer to the Office of Information TechnologyOFFICE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY COMPUTER SECURITY POLICY RESPONsmLE ADMINISTRATOR: RESPONsm

  13. Computer technology forecast study for general aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seacord, C. L.; Vaughn, D.

    1976-01-01

    A multi-year, multi-faceted program is underway to investigate and develop potential improvements in airframes, engines, and avionics for general aviation aircraft. The objective of this study was to assemble information that will allow the government to assess the trends in computer and computer/operator interface technology that may have application to general aviation in the 1980's and beyond. The current state of the art of computer hardware is assessed, technical developments in computer hardware are predicted, and nonaviation large volume users of computer hardware are identified.

  14. Gabrielle Allen Center for Computation & Technology

    E-print Network

    Allen, Gabrielle

    1 Gabrielle Allen Center for Computation & Technology Dept Computer Science Louisiana State hours before landfall Category 3 landfall (Peak Winds : 120 mph ) on 24th Sep, 2:40 am CDT, Texas) including wave height, period, direction of propagation, water level, surge, near surface current speed

  15. Development of a Novel Breast Cancer Detector based on Improved Holography Concave Grating Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhong; Liu, Guodong; Zeng, Lvming; Huang, Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer can be detected by B-mode ultrasonic imaging, X-mammography, CT imaging, and MRI. But some drawbacks existed in these methods, their applications was limited in some certain. So, a novel high resolution breast cancer detector (BCD) is developed in this paper. Meanwhile, an improved holography concave grating imaging spectrometer (HCGIS) is designed. In this HCGIS, the holography concave grating is used as the diffraction grating. Additionally, CCD with combined image acquisition (IAQ) card and the 3D scan platform are used as the spectral image acquisition component. This BCD consists of the light source unit, light-path unit, check cavity, splitting-light unit, spectrum acquisition and imaging unit, signal processing unit, computer and data analysis software unit, etc. Experimental results show that the spectral range of the novel BCD can reach 300-1000 nm, its wavelength resolution can reach 1nm, and this system uses the back-split-light technology and the splitting-light structure of holography concave grating. Compared with the other instruments of breast cancer detection, this BCD has many advantages, such as, compacter volume, simpler algorithm, faster processing speed, higher accuracy, cheaper cost and higher resolution, etc. Therefore, this BCD will have the potential values in the detection of breast disease.

  16. Real-time visualization and analysis of airflow field by use of digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Jianglei; Wu, Bingjing; Chen, Xin; Liu, Junjiang; Wang, Jun; Zhao, Jianlin

    2013-04-01

    The measurement and analysis of airflow field is very important in fluid dynamics. For airflow, smoke particles can be added to visually observe the turbulence phenomena by particle tracking technology, but the effect of smoke particles to follow the high speed airflow will reduce the measurement accuracy. In recent years, with the advantage of non-contact, nondestructive, fast and full-field measurement, digital holography has been widely applied in many fields, such as deformation and vibration analysis, particle characterization, refractive index measurement, and so on. In this paper, we present a method to measure the airflow field by use of digital holography. A small wind tunnel model made of acrylic glass is built to control the velocity and direction of airflow. Different shapes of samples such as aircraft wing and cylinder are placed in the wind tunnel model to produce different forms of flow field. With a Mach-Zehnder interferometer setup, a series of digital holograms carrying the information of airflow filed distributions in different states are recorded by CCD camera and corresponding holographic images are numerically reconstructed from the holograms by computer. Then we can conveniently obtain the velocity or pressure information of the airflow deduced from the quantitative phase information of holographic images and visually display the airflow filed and its evolution in the form of a movie. The theory and experiment results show that digital holography is a robust and feasible approach for real-time visualization and analysis of airflow field.

  17. Future Applications of Electronic Technology to Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Arthur J.; And Others

    Developments in electronic technology that have improved and linked together telecommunication and computers are discussed, as well as their use in instruction, implications of this use, and associated issues. The first section briefly describes the following developments: microcomputers and microprocessors, bubble memory, lasers, holography

  18. Holography without Fuss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Steve

    1989-01-01

    Outlines what a hologram is, the main types of holography, and how a simple system producing a white light reflection hologram can be set up in a school physics laboratory. Discusses the basic optics of the hologram and procedures and materials for making holograms in school. (YP)

  19. Preparing Malaysian Vocational and Technology Teachers To Integrate Computer Technology in Teaching Vocational and Technology Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakar, Ab. Rahim bin; Mohamed, Shamsiah

    1998-01-01

    A Malaysian study investigating the preparedness of vocational and technology teachers to integrate computer technology found that teachers were not knowledgeable about computers or computer software and thought they were not skillful in using spreadsheets, word processing, desktop publishing, database management, and programming software. Most…

  20. Cloud Computing Technologies and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jinzy

    In a nutshell, the existing Internet provides to us content in the forms of videos, emails and information served up in web pages. With Cloud Computing, the next generation of Internet will allow us to "buy" IT services from a web portal, drastic expanding the types of merchandise available beyond those on e-commerce sites such as eBay and Taobao. We would be able to rent from a virtual storefront the basic necessities to build a virtual data center: such as CPU, memory, storage, and add on top of that the middleware necessary: web application servers, databases, enterprise server bus, etc. as the platform(s) to support the applications we would like to either rent from an Independent Software Vendor (ISV) or develop ourselves. Together this is what we call as "IT as a Service," or ITaaS, bundled to us the end users as a virtual data center.

  1. Holography at x-ray wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Solem, T.C.; Baldwin, G.C.; Chapline, G.F.

    1981-01-01

    We discuss alternative holographic techniques for imaging microscopic structures with a short-pulse, high intensity, high-quantum-energy laser. We find that Fresnel transform holography using a photoresist for registration of the hologram is most likely to be within the scope of near term technology. Although it has advantages in time gating, using an in-line electron microscope for hologram registration has an unacceptable tradeoff between quantum efficiency and resolution. Fourier transform holography using a reflector to generate the reference beam might be a reasonable alternative using low resolution film, but is necessarily more complicated. We discuss the dependence of the required laser intensity on the resolution sought and on the elastic and absorption cross sections. We conclude that resonant scattering must be used to obtain holograms at reasonable intensities.

  2. Infrared holography using a microbolometer array.

    PubMed

    George, Nicholas; Khare, Kedar; Chi, Wanli

    2008-02-01

    We describe a series of experiments to demonstrate holography at far-infrared wavelengths using an uncooled microbolometer array. Simple interference patterns and Fresnel zone holograms are recorded with a 10 W cw CO(2) laser illumination in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer setup. A sparse-sampling method is used to sample the hologram at a rate dependent on the bandwidth of the object wavefront rather than the carrier frequency. The samples are then used to reconstruct the complex object wavefront in the hologram plane, which is Fresnel backpropagated for image reconstruction. Uncooled microbolometer arrays are most commonly used in passive mode to image the thermal-blackbody radiation. Their technology has matured to include the wavelength range of far-infrared to submillimeter radiation. The use of microbolometers with active illumination for holography, as described in this paper, suggests their interesting future applications. PMID:18239701

  3. Computer Technology Program, Faculty of Science and Technology RFID Technology and Applications Research Unit, Faculty of Science and Technology

    E-print Network

    Kovintavewat, Piya

    1 Computer Technology Program, Faculty of Science and Technology 2 RFID Technology and Applications Research Unit, Faculty of Science and Technology 3 Business Computer Program, Faculty of Management Science, are essential information for customers to ensure the safety of the meat they purchased. Thailand exports

  4. Ultrarealistic imaging: the future of display holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.; Brotherton-Ratcliffe, David

    2014-11-01

    Ultrarealistic imaging is the science of producing images that faithfully recreate the light field surrounding an object, such that the unaided eye of a human observer cannot distinguish the difference between the original and the image. Recent technology improvements are now set to transform the fields of both analog and digital display holography, permitting both techniques to operate in the ultrarealistic regime. In particular, ultrarealistic analog holograms have now heralded the serious use of holography in such areas as museum display and cultural heritage protection. These full-color holograms are characterized by a substantially lower noise and a greater spectral fidelity. New recording systems, based on recent diode-pumped solid-state and semiconductor lasers combined with recording materials and processing, have been behind these improvements. Progress in illumination technology, however, has also led to a major reduction in display noise and to a significant increase in the clear image depth and brightness of holograms. Recent progress in one-step direct-write digital holography (DWDH) is now also opening the way to the creation of a new type of ultrarealistic display: the high virtual volume display. This is a large format full-parallax DWDH reflection hologram having a fundamentally larger clear image depth.

  5. CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Computer Science Department

    E-print Network

    Teclinoloyy Code 6.2.An Exapple 7. Utility Programs Written in Rlap 7.1 CIF to CIF 7-2Stick to CIF #12;List from 1 RLAP is en optimized CIF 2.0 file[MEAO 801 Gith user extensions for cell name2 and ports3CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Computer Science Department Silicon Structures Project SSP File

  6. Women Workers as Users of Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larwood, Laurie

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of expectations, trends, and implications of growth of computer technology and its effect on women workers argues that the experience of women is different from that of men in the nature of jobs in which women are found, their training and education, home-family conflict, and discrimination. The impact on women of increasing…

  7. Business/Computer Technologies. State Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document contains 272 competencies, grouped into 36 units, for tech prep programs in the business/computer technology cluster. The competencies were developed through collaboration of Ohio business, industry, and labor representatives and secondary and associate degree educators. The competencies are rated either "essential" (necessary to…

  8. Competency Index. [Business/Computer Technologies Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This index allows the user to scan the competencies under each title for the 28 subjects appropriate for use in a competency list for the 12 occupations within the business/computer technologies cluster. Titles of the 28 units are as follows: employability skills; professionalism; teamwork; professional and ethical standards; economic and business…

  9. Instructional Technology in Computer Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenny, Frederick J.

    2004-01-01

    The Web, the Internet, the intranet and associated resources, campus computer labs, smart classrooms, course management systems, and a plethora of software packages all offer opportunities for every classroom instructor to enrich in-class and out-of-class activities. Why should an instructor consider the integration of technology into their…

  10. Computer technology forecasting at the National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Peskin, A M

    1980-01-01

    The DOE Office of ADP Management organized a group of scientists and computer professionals, mostly from their own national laboratories, to prepare an annually updated technology forecast to accompany the Department's five-year ADP Plan. The activities of the task force were originally reported in an informal presentation made at the ACM Conference in 1978. This presentation represents an update of that report. It also deals with the process of applying the results obtained at a particular computing center, Brookhaven National Laboratory. Computer technology forecasting is a difficult and hazardous endeavor, but it can reap considerable advantage. The forecast performed on an industry-wide basis can be applied to the particular needs of a given installation, and thus give installation managers considerable guidance in planning. A beneficial side effect of this process is that it forces installation managers, who might otherwise tend to preoccupy themselves with immediate problems, to focus on longer term goals and means to their ends. (RWR)

  11. Thermal worldline holography

    E-print Network

    Dennis D. Dietrich

    2015-09-14

    For a quantum field theory over four-dimensional Minkowski space at zero temperature worldline holography states, that it can be expressed as a field theory of its sources over five-dimensional AdS space to all orders in its elementary fields, the fifth dimension being Schwinger's proper time of the worldline formalism. For the finite temperatures studied here worldline holography yields either a thermal AdS space or an AdS black hole as five-dimensional manifolds. Comparing the values of the five-dimensional action for the two alternatives, the AdS black hole is preferred, if there are more bosonic elementary degrees of freedom; and the thermal AdS space is preferred, if there are more fermionic ones. If the dominance of bosons versus fermions changes with temperature, a transition between the two spaces takes place.

  12. Electron Holography of Magnetic Materials

    E-print Network

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    3 Electron Holography of Magnetic Materials Takeshi Kasama1, Rafal E. Dunin-Borkowski2 and Marco Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) involves the use of high-energy (60-3000 keV) electrons that have passed of the most powerful techniques for providing this information is electron holography, which was originally

  13. Holography: science and art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, Pierre M.

    1998-09-01

    Art and science are separated by a very large distance nowadays. Long ago, e.g. in Renaissance, or even earlier, in classic Greece and Rome, or still earlier in Egypt or Mesopotamia, arts and sciences were united. Today they seem to go separate paths: science for the industry, arts for the gallery. Holography is an exception: no art without science, but also no science without art.

  14. Holography in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchkevich, V. M.; Semenov, Y. P.; Gurevich, S. B.

    1985-03-01

    The principles and merits of holographic methods are reviewed and the utilization of holography in experiments conducted onboard the Salyut 6 and 7 space stations is discussed. A short history of the development of the spaceborne holographic apparatus is given. The objects of the experiments included the dissolution of NaCl under weightless conditions; observation of station window microdefects; analysis of electrophoresis processes; and studies directed towards determining the quality of holographic results.

  15. Computer Technology and Counseling Psychology: Regression Toward the Machine?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, James P., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The current use of computer technology in counseling psychology is explored and the potential negative impact of computer technology is discussed in terms of the misuse of computer applications, dependence on technology, and restriction of the counseling process. Factors contributing to inappropriate use of technology are also discussed along with…

  16. Differential fluorescence holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, David C.; Kim, Myung K.

    2015-03-01

    We present a new technique of three-dimensional tracking by way of incoherent digital holography suitable for non-scanning fluorescence microscopy. By acquiring complex holograms of a sample at different times, a difference hologram can be calculated. This result is another complex hologram representing only the information which has changed throughout the volumetric space during the time interval between one hologram and the next. We first demonstrate the advanced capability of self-interference incoherent digital holography combined with difference holography to track three-dimensional changes in a broadband, unfiltered, sunlit scene containing macroscopic continuous objects. This case is particularly remarkable due to the exceptionally short temporal coherence length and excessive build-up of noninterfering source points. We then demonstrate the ease of adaptation to microscopy, successfully converting a standard two-dimensional commercial microscope into a powerful three-dimensional tool. By overcoming these challenges, we show the feasibility and ease at which this technique may be adapted to the versatile, functional imaging of fluorescence microscopy.

  17. Reviews of computing technology: Client-server technology

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.M.

    1990-09-01

    One of the most frequently heard terms in the computer industry these days is client-server.'' There is much misinformation available on the topic, and competitive pressures on software vendors have led to a great deal of hype with little in the way of supporting products. The purpose of this document is to explain what is meant by client-server applications, why the Advanced Technology and Architecture (ATA) section of the Information Resources Management (IRM) Department sees this emerging technology as key for computer applications during the next ten years, and what ATA sees as the existing standards and products available today. Because of the relative immaturity of existing client-server products, IRM is not yet guidelining any specific client-server products, except those that are components of guidelined data communications products or database management systems.

  18. Reviews of computing technology: Client-server technology

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.M.

    1990-09-01

    One of the most frequently heard terms in the computer industry these days is ``client-server.`` There is much misinformation available on the topic, and competitive pressures on software vendors have led to a great deal of hype with little in the way of supporting products. The purpose of this document is to explain what is meant by client-server applications, why the Advanced Technology and Architecture (ATA) section of the Information Resources Management (IRM) Department sees this emerging technology as key for computer applications during the next ten years, and what ATA sees as the existing standards and products available today. Because of the relative immaturity of existing client-server products, IRM is not yet guidelining any specific client-server products, except those that are components of guidelined data communications products or database management systems.

  19. Maximizing a transport platform through computer technology.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Timothy L

    2003-01-01

    One of the most recent innovations coalescing computer technology and medical care is the further development of integrated medical component technology coupled with a computer subsystem. One such example is the self-contained patient transport system known as the Life Support for Trauma and Transport (LSTAT(tm)). The LSTAT creates a new transport platform that integrates the most current medical monitoring and therapeutic capabilities with computer processing capacity, creating the first "smart litter". The LSTAT is built around a computer system that is network capable and acts as the data hub for multiple medical devices and utilities, including data, power, and oxygen systems. The system logs patient and device data in a simultaneous, time-synchronized, continuous format, allowing electronic transmission, storage, and electronic documentation. The third-generation LSTAT includes an oxygen system, ventilator, clinical point-of-care blood analyzer, suction, defibrillator, infusion pump, and physiologic monitor, as well as on-board power and oxygen systems. The developers of LSTAT and other developers have the ability to further expand integrative component technology by developing and integrating clinical decision support systems. PMID:12802947

  20. Reviews of computing technology: Object-oriented technology

    SciTech Connect

    Skeen, D.C.

    1993-03-01

    A useful metaphor in introducing object-oriented concepts is the idea of a computer hardware manufacturer assembling products from an existing stock of electronic parts. In this analogy, think of the parts as pieces of computer software and of the finished products as computer applications. Like its counterpart, the object is capable of performing its specific function in a wide variety of different applications. The advantages to assembling hardware using a set of prebuilt parts are obvious. The design process is greatly simplified in this scenario, since the designer needs only to carry the design down to the chip level, rather than to the transistor level. As a result, the designer is free to develop a more reliable and feature rich product. Also, since the component parts are reused in several different products, the parts can be made more robust and subjected to more rigorous testing than would be economically feasible for a part used in only one piece of equipment. Additionally, maintenance on the resulting systems is simplified because of the part-level consistency from one type of equipment to another. The remainder of this document introduces the techniques used to develop objects, the benefits of the technology, outstanding issues that remain with the technology, industry direction for the technology, and the impact that object-oriented technology is likely to have on the organization. While going through this material, the reader will find it useful to remember the parts analogy and to keep in mind that the overall purpose of object-oriented technology is to create software parts and to construct applications using those parts.

  1. Computer Education and Instructional Technology Teacher Trainees' Opinions about Cloud Computing Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karamete, Aysen

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to show the present conditions about the usage of cloud computing in the department of Computer Education and Instructional Technology (CEIT) amongst teacher trainees in School of Necatibey Education, Balikesir University, Turkey. In this study, a questionnaire with open-ended questions was used. 17 CEIT teacher trainees…

  2. Technologies for Achieving Field Ubiquitous Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagashima, Akira

    Although the term “ubiquitous” may sound like jargon used in information appliances, ubiquitous computing is an emerging concept in industrial automation. This paper presents the author's visions of field ubiquitous computing, which is based on the novel Internet Protocol IPv6. IPv6-based instrumentation will realize the next generation manufacturing excellence. This paper focuses on the following five key issues: 1. IPv6 standardization; 2. IPv6 interfaces embedded in field devices; 3. Compatibility with FOUNDATION fieldbus; 4. Network securities for field applications; and 5. Wireless technologies to complement IP instrumentation. Furthermore, the principles of digital plant operations and ubiquitous production to support the above key technologies to achieve field ubiquitous systems are discussed.

  3. OTF and PSF of circular-grating optical scanning holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Wanguo; Zhao, Dazun; Xie, Jinghui; Zhao, Yeling

    1998-08-01

    The recording of the hologram in the optical scanning holography (OSH) proposed by T.C. Poon is a process in which a Fresnel zone plate (FZP) is used to scan the object, but since the spacing between two adjacent rings of FZP at the center portion is greater than that at the edge portion, the resolution capability of the system, which can resolve the edge portion of the FZP, is not fully exploited. The fact that a circular grating (CG) has uniform spacings everywhere, enlightens us to suggest the CG optical scanning holography. It has been found that the optical transfer function of the system equals the Fourier transform of the intensity transmissivity of the projecting circular grating, and the point spread function of the system equals to a (delta) function. Also given in this paper are the principles of the CG optical scanning holography and the computer simulations.

  4. 3D atomic imaging by internal-detector electron holography.

    PubMed

    Uesaka, Akio; Hayashi, Kouichi; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Arai, Shigetoshi

    2011-07-22

    A method of internal-detector electron holography is the time-reversed version of photoelectron holography. Using an energy-dispersive x-ray detector, an electron gun, and a computer-controllable sample stage, we measured a multiple-energy hologram of the atomic arrangement around the Ti atom in SrTiO3 by recording the characteristic Ti K? x-ray spectra for different electron beam angles and wavelengths. A real-space image was obtained by using a fitting-based reconstruction algorithm. 3D atomic images of the elements Sr, Ti, and O in SrTiO3 were clearly visualized. The present work reveals that internal-detector electron holography has great potential for reproducing 3D atomic arrangements, even for light elements. PMID:21867018

  5. Optical generation of non-diffracting beams via photorefractive holography

    E-print Network

    Vieira, Tarcio A; Gesualdi, Marcos R R; Zamboni-Rached, Michel

    2015-01-01

    This work presents, for the first time the optical generation of non-diffracting beams via photorefractive holography. Optical generation of non-diffracting beams using conventional optics components is difficult and, in some instances, unfeasible, as it is wave fields given by superposition of non-diffracting beams. It is known that computer generated holograms and spatial light modulators (SLMs) successfully generate such beams. With photorefractive holography technique, the hologram of a non-diffracting beam is constructed (recorded) and reconstructed (reading) optically in a nonlinear photorefractive medium. The experimental realization of a non-diffracting beam was made in a photorefractive holography setup using a photorefractive Bi12SiO20 (BSO) crystal as the holographic recording medium, where the non-diffracting beams, the Bessel beam arrays and superposition of co-propagating Bessel beams (Frozen Waves) were obtained experimentally. The experimental results are in agreement with the theoretically pr...

  6. Computational Support for Technology- Investment Decisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adumitroaie, Virgil; Hua, Hook; Lincoln, William; Block, Gary; Mrozinski, Joseph; Shelton, Kacie; Weisbin, Charles; Elfes, Alberto; Smith, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    Strategic Assessment of Risk and Technology (START) is a user-friendly computer program that assists human managers in making decisions regarding research-and-development investment portfolios in the presence of uncertainties and of non-technological constraints that include budgetary and time limits, restrictions related to infrastructure, and programmatic and institutional priorities. START facilitates quantitative analysis of technologies, capabilities, missions, scenarios and programs, and thereby enables the selection and scheduling of value-optimal development efforts. START incorporates features that, variously, perform or support a unique combination of functions, most of which are not systematically performed or supported by prior decision- support software. These functions include the following: Optimal portfolio selection using an expected-utility-based assessment of capabilities and technologies; Temporal investment recommendations; Distinctions between enhancing and enabling capabilities; Analysis of partial funding for enhancing capabilities; and Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. START can run on almost any computing hardware, within Linux and related operating systems that include Mac OS X versions 10.3 and later, and can run in Windows under the Cygwin environment. START can be distributed in binary code form. START calls, as external libraries, several open-source software packages. Output is in Excel (.xls) file format.

  7. Femtosecond spectral holography

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, A.M.; Leaird, D.E.; Reitze, D.H.; Paek, E.G. )

    1992-10-01

    Storage, recall, and processing of shaped femtosecond waveforms are achieved by performing spectral holography within a femtosecond pulse shaping apparatus. Time reversal, as well as correlation and convolution, of femtosecond temporal signals is demonstrated. Applications of this technique to matched filtering, dispersion compensation, encryption and decoding, and femtosecond waveform synthesis are also discussed. The work extends the powerful principles of holographic signal processing, which have been used extensively for pattern recognition and filtering of two-dimensional spatial signals, to the femtosecond time domain. 44 refs.

  8. Dyonic Stars for Holography

    E-print Network

    Daniel Carney; Mohammad Edalati

    2015-01-27

    We construct back-reacted asymptotically AdS_4 backgrounds with both electric and magnetic charge, at finite temperature and chemical potential. The system consists of a condensed bulk Dirac field hovering over a charged black brane. We give a detailed microscopic treatment of the bulk fermions, from which we derive the usual fluid approximations describing the condensate. In the context of holography, such a gravitational solution is dual to a (2+1)-dimensional CFT with a U(1) current, at finite density and strong coupling, subjected to a transverse magnetic field.

  9. HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Department of Computer Science and Engineering

    E-print Network

    HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Department of Computer Science and Engineering Laboratory of Software Technology Ville Karavirta Facilitating Algorithm Animation Creation and Adoption in Education of Science in Technology. Espoo, December 7, 2007 Supervisor: Professor Lauri Malmi Instructor: Docent Ari

  10. Terahertz digital holography image processing based on MAP algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guang-Hao; Li, Qi

    2015-04-01

    Terahertz digital holography combines the terahertz technology and digital holography technology at present, fully exploits the advantages in both of them. Unfortunately, the quality of terahertz digital holography reconstruction images is gravely harmed by speckle noise which hinders the popularization of this technology. In this paper, the maximum a posterior estimation (MAP) filter is harnessed for the restoration of the digital reconstruction images. The filtering results are compared with images filtered by Wiener Filter and conventional frequency-domain filters from both subjective and objective perspectives. As for objective assessment, we adopted speckle index (SPKI) and edge preserving index (EPI) to quantitate the quality of images. In this paper, Canny edge detector is also used to outline the target in original and reconstruction images, which then act as an important role in the evaluation of filter performance. All the analysis indicate that maximum a posterior estimation filtering algorithm performs superiorly compared with the other two competitors in this paper and has enhanced the terahertz digital holography reconstruction images to a certain degree, allowing for a more accurate boundary identification.

  11. Evaluating Computer Technology Integration in a Centralized School System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eteokleous, N.

    2008-01-01

    The study evaluated the current situation in Cyprus elementary classrooms regarding computer technology integration in an attempt to identify ways of expanding teachers' and students' experiences with computer technology. It examined how Cypriot elementary teachers use computers, and the factors that influence computer integration in their…

  12. GPU accelerated holography for multimode fiber applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plöschner, Martin; ?ižmár, TomáÅ.¡

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a compact GPU accelerated digital holography system for beam-shaping applications at the end of multimode fibre. The complete control of phase and amplitude on phase-only SLM is achieved through GPU implemented Gerchberg-Saxton and Yang-Gu algorithms. The GPU implementation is two orders of magnitude faster than the CPU implementation which allows video-rate image control at the distal end of the fiber virtually free of interference effects. We discuss the implementation of the algorithms and possible applications of the technology for structured illumination imaging at the end of multimode fibre

  13. Intraoperative brain tumor resection cavity characterization with conoscopic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Amber L.; Burgner, Jessica; Chen, Ishita; Pheiffer, Thomas S.; Sun, Kay; Thompson, Reid C.; Webster, Robert J., III; Miga, Michael I.

    2012-02-01

    Brain shift compromises the accuracy of neurosurgical image-guided interventions if not corrected by either intraoperative imaging or computational modeling. The latter requires intraoperative sparse measurements for constraining and driving model-based compensation strategies. Conoscopic holography, an interferometric technique that measures the distance of a laser light illuminated surface point from a fixed laser source, was recently proposed for non-contact surface data acquisition in image-guided surgery and is used here for validation of our modeling strategies. In this contribution, we use this inexpensive, hand-held conoscopic holography device for intraoperative validation of our computational modeling approach to correcting for brain shift. Laser range scan, instrument swabbing, and conoscopic holography data sets were collected from two patients undergoing brain tumor resection therapy at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. The results of our study indicate that conoscopic holography is a promising method for surface acquisition since it requires no contact with delicate tissues and can characterize the extents of structures within confined spaces. We demonstrate that for two clinical cases, the acquired conoprobe points align with our model-updated images better than the uncorrected images lending further evidence that computational modeling approaches improve the accuracy of image-guided surgical interventions in the presence of soft tissue deformations.

  14. Active terahertz holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhenwei; Wang, Xinke; Zhang, Yan

    2013-12-01

    We present a novel technology to dynamically control the wave front of the terahertz (THz) beam with photo-generated carriers. The computer generated hologram is projected onto a silicon wafer by a conventional optical spatial light modulator. The photo-generated carriers on the silicon surface will from a hologram to modulate the wave front of the input THz beam. Some special field distributions and vortex beams are generated using this method. This technology is broadband, structure free, tunable, and all-optical controllable. It will provide numerous possible applications in future THz imaging and communication systems.

  15. Roadmap: Computer Technology -Internet/Multimedia Technology -Associate of Applied Business

    E-print Network

    Khan, Javed I.

    3 COMT 11000 Introduction to Computer Systems (3) or COMT 11004 Survey of Information Technology (3Roadmap: Computer Technology - Internet/Multimedia Technology - Associate of Applied Business RE Introduction to Operating Systems and Networking Technology 3 ! COMT 11006 Introduction to Web Site Technology

  16. Multi-field inflation from holography

    SciTech Connect

    Garriga, Jaume; Urakawa, Yuko; Skenderis, Kostas E-mail: K.Skenderis@soton.ac.uk

    2015-01-01

    We initiate the study of multi-field inflation using holography. Bulk light scalar fields correspond to nearly marginal operators in the boundary theory and the dual quantum field theory is a deformation of a CFT by such operators. We compute the power spectra of adiabatic and entropy perturbations in a simple model and find that the adiabatic curvature perturbation is not conserved in the presence of entropy perturbations but becomes conserved when the entropy perturbations are set to zero or the model is effectively a single scalar model, in agreement with expectations from cosmological perturbation theory.

  17. Art of color holography: pioneers in change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Martin J.; Bjelkhagen, Hans I.

    2000-10-01

    The possibility to easily record full color holograms, (simply color holograms) has opened new possibilities for art holographers. This paper includes details concerning preparation of subject matter and its practical suitability for color holographic recordings from practical working sessions at ARTCAPI Atelier de Recherche Technique et de Creation Artistique en Physique et en Informatique in France. Martin Richardson as invited artist and Hans Bjelkhagen as scientist holographer describe color holography to a wider public audience through artistic display. Both directly recorded true color images and computer-generated images based on the ZEBRA printing technique are to be presented.

  18. Holography and strongly correlated systems

    E-print Network

    Iqbal, Nabil

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis we apply techniques arising from string theory - gauge-gravity/duality, or holography - to problems associated with strongly coupled quantum field theories under extreme conditions such as finite temperature ...

  19. Improving student retention in computer engineering technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierozinski, Russell Ivan

    The purpose of this research project was to improve student retention in the Computer Engineering Technology program at the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology by reducing the number of dropouts and increasing the graduation rate. This action research project utilized a mixed methods approach of a survey and face-to-face interviews. The participants were male and female, with a large majority ranging from 18 to 21 years of age. The research found that participants recognized their skills and capability, but their capacity to remain in the program was dependent on understanding and meeting the demanding pace and rigour of the program. The participants recognized that curriculum delivery along with instructor-student interaction had an impact on student retention. To be successful in the program, students required support in four domains: academic, learning management, career, and social.

  20. Holography of Little Inflation

    E-print Network

    Brett McInnes

    2015-03-18

    For several crucial microseconds of its early history, the Universe consisted of a Quark-Gluon Plasma. As it cooled during this era, it traced out a trajectory in the quark matter phase diagram. The form taken by this trajectory is not known with certainty, but is of great importance: it determines, for example, whether the cosmic plasma passed through a first-order phase change during the transition to the hadron era, as has recently been suggested by advocates of the "Little Inflation" model. Just before this transition, the plasma was strongly coupled and therefore can be studied by holographic techniques. We show that holography imposes a strong constraint (taking the form of a bound on the baryonic chemical potential relative to the temperature) on the domain through which the cosmic plasma could pass as it cooled, with important consequences for Little Inflation. In fact, we find that holography applied to Little Inflation implies that the cosmic plasma must have passed quite close to the quark matter critical point, and might therefore have been affected by the associated fluctuation phenomena.

  1. Stückelberg Formulation of Holography

    E-print Network

    Gia Dvali; Cesar Gomez; Nico Wintergerst

    2015-11-11

    We suggest that holography can be formulated in terms of the information capacity of the St\\"uckelberg degrees of freedom that maintain gauge invariance of the theory in the presence of an information boundary. These St\\"uckelbergs act as qubits that account for a certain fraction of quantum information. Their information capacity is measured by the ratio of the inverse St\\"uckelberg energy gap to the size of the system. Systems with the smallest gap are maximally holographic. For massless gauge systems this information measure is universally equal to the inverse coupling evaluated at the systems' length scale. In this language it becomes very transparent why the St\\"uckelberg information capacity of black holes saturates the Bekenstein bound and accounts for the entire information of the system. The physical reason is that the strength of quantum interaction is bounded from below by the gravitational coupling, which scales as area. Observing the striking similarity between the scalings of the energy gap of the boundary St\\"uckelberg modes and the Bogoliubov modes of critical many-body systems, we establish a connection between holography and quantum criticality through the correspondence between these modes.

  2. When is holography consistent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInnes, Brett; Ong, Yen Chin

    2015-09-01

    Holographic duality relates two radically different kinds of theory: one with gravity, one without. The very existence of such an equivalence imposes strong consistency conditions which are, in the nature of the case, hard to satisfy. Recently a particularly deep condition of this kind, relating the minimum of a probe brane action to a gravitational bulk action (in a Euclidean formulation), has been recognized; and the question arises as to the circumstances under which it, and its Lorentzian counterpart, is satisfied. We discuss the fact that there are physically interesting situations in which one or both versions might, in principle, not be satisfied. These arise in two distinct circumstances: first, when the bulk is not an Einstein manifold and, second, in the presence of angular momentum. Focusing on the application of holography to the quark-gluon plasma (of the various forms arising in the early Universe and in heavy-ion collisions), we find that these potential violations never actually occur. This suggests that the consistency condition is a "law of physics" expressing a particular aspect of holography.

  3. Educational Technology -- Computer-Related and People-Related.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Launor F.

    Two aspects of educational technology are considered. The first involves the development of educational technology highly dependent on computer equipment, and the development of a computer assisted instruction language called Programmed Language for Interactive Teaching (PLANIT). The second aspect involves the development of educational technology…

  4. Computing, Information, and Communications Technology (CICT) Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDalsem, William R.

    2003-01-01

    The Computing, Information and Communications Technology (CICT) Program's goal is to enable NASA's Scientific Research, Space Exploration, and Aerospace Technology Missions with greater mission assurance, for less cost, with increased science return through the development and use of advanced computing, information and communication technologies

  5. Computer Utilization in Industrial Arts/Technology Education. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut Industrial Arts Association.

    This guide is intended to assist industrial arts/technology education teachers in helping students in grades K-12 understand the impact of computers and computer technology in the world. Discussed in the introductory sections are the ways in which computers have changed the face of business, industry, and education and training; the scope and…

  6. Mobile Computing and Ubiquitous Networking: Concepts, Technologies and Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierre, Samuel

    2001-01-01

    Analyzes concepts, technologies and challenges related to mobile computing and networking. Defines basic concepts of cellular systems. Describes the evolution of wireless technologies that constitute the foundations of mobile computing and ubiquitous networking. Presents characterization and issues of mobile computing. Analyzes economical and…

  7. A Brief History of Human Computer Interaction Technology

    E-print Network

    A Brief History of Human Computer Interaction Technology Brad A. Myers December, 1996 CMU­CS­96 development of major advances in human­ computer interaction technology, emphasizing the pivotal role,'' edited by Brad Myers, Jim Hollan, Isabel Cruz, ACM Computing Surveys, 28(4), December 1996 This research

  8. Roadmap: Computer Technology -General Technology -Associate of Applied Business RE-AAB-COMT-GTEC

    E-print Network

    Khan, Javed I.

    KAD COMT 11000 Introduction to Computer Systems (3) or COMT 11004 Survey of Information Technology (3Roadmap: Computer Technology - General Technology - Associate of Applied Business RE Introduction to Operating Systems and Networking Technology 3 COMM 15000 Introduction to Human Communication 3

  9. Search Technology Internet Start-Ups Business Computing Companies

    E-print Network

    Oyet, Alwell

    engineer at Google, uses statistical analysis of data to help improve the company's search engine#12;Search Technology Internet Start-Ups Business Computing Companies Inside Technology Bits Blog.com Technology WORLD U.S. N.Y. / REGION BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY SCIENCE HEALTH SPORTS OPINION ARTS STYLE TRAVEL JOBS

  10. Trinidad Carnival : improving design through computation and digital technology

    E-print Network

    Noel, Vernelle A. A. (Vernelle Aletia)

    2013-01-01

    This thesis explores the integration of computation and digital technology to support design in the Trinidad Carnival. I argue that computation can contribute to design in the Trinidad Carnival by (1) addressing the dying ...

  11. The Steam Engine and the Computer: What Makes Technology Revolutionary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Herbert A.

    1987-01-01

    This discussion of technological revolution focuses on the computer and its uses in education. Contrasts between human traits, such as insight and creativity, and computer capabilities are discussed; the computer as its own instructional device is described; and possible educational changes resulting from computers are addressed. (LRW)

  12. Attitudes to Technology, Perceived Computer Self-Efficacy and Computer Anxiety as Predictors of Computer Supported Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, Vehbi; Yesilyurt, Etem

    2013-01-01

    There is a large body of research regarding computer supported education, perceptions of computer self-efficacy, computer anxiety and the technological attitudes of teachers and teacher candidates. However, no study has been conducted on the correlation between and effect of computer supported education, perceived computer self-efficacy, computer…

  13. Roadmap: Computer Technology -Application Development Technology -Associate of Applied Business RE-AAB-COMT-APDT

    E-print Network

    Khan, Javed I.

    ) or COMT 11004 Survey of Information Technology (3) or COMT 21007 Internet Ethics and Policies (3) 3 COMMRoadmap: Computer Technology - Application Development Technology - Associate of Applied Business to Operating Systems and Networking Technology 3 ! COMT 11006 Introduction to Web Site Technology 3 ! COMT

  14. Computer-aided design and computer science technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulton, R. E.; Voigt, S. J.

    1976-01-01

    A description is presented of computer-aided design requirements and the resulting computer science advances needed to support aerospace design. The aerospace design environment is examined, taking into account problems of data handling and aspects of computer hardware and software. The interactive terminal is normally the primary interface between the computer system and the engineering designer. Attention is given to user aids, interactive design, interactive computations, the characteristics of design information, data management requirements, hardware advancements, and computer science developments.

  15. X-ray absorption holography.

    PubMed

    Kopecky, M; Lausi, A; Busetto, E; Kub, J; Savoia, A

    2002-05-01

    The transmission of monochromatic x rays through a CoO single crystal was measured for different orientations of the sample. The small variations in the linear absorption coefficient were considered as a hologram and the real-space image of the local atomic environment was successfully reconstructed. The holographic signal constituted about 1% of the detected intensity. Besides other benefits, the use of the absorption holography can increase the signal-to-background ratio by more than 1 order compared with the fluorescence holography. PMID:12005695

  16. Petascale Computing Enabling Technologies Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    de Supinski, B R

    2010-02-14

    The Petascale Computing Enabling Technologies (PCET) project addressed challenges arising from current trends in computer architecture that will lead to large-scale systems with many more nodes, each of which uses multicore chips. These factors will soon lead to systems that have over one million processors. Also, the use of multicore chips will lead to less memory and less memory bandwidth per core. We need fundamentally new algorithmic approaches to cope with these memory constraints and the huge number of processors. Further, correct, efficient code development is difficult even with the number of processors in current systems; more processors will only make it harder. The goal of PCET was to overcome these challenges by developing the computer science and mathematical underpinnings needed to realize the full potential of our future large-scale systems. Our research results will significantly increase the scientific output obtained from LLNL large-scale computing resources by improving application scientist productivity and system utilization. Our successes include scalable mathematical algorithms that adapt to these emerging architecture trends and through code correctness and performance methodologies that automate critical aspects of application development as well as the foundations for application-level fault tolerance techniques. PCET's scope encompassed several research thrusts in computer science and mathematics: code correctness and performance methodologies, scalable mathematics algorithms appropriate for multicore systems, and application-level fault tolerance techniques. Due to funding limitations, we focused primarily on the first three thrusts although our work also lays the foundation for the needed advances in fault tolerance. In the area of scalable mathematics algorithms, our preliminary work established that OpenMP performance of the AMG linear solver benchmark and important individual kernels on Atlas did not match the predictions of our simple initial model. Our investigations demonstrated that a poor default memory allocation mechanism degraded performance. We developed a prototype NUMA library to provide generic mechanisms to overcome these issues, resulting in significantly improved OpenMP performance. After additional testing, we will make this library available to all users, providing a simple means to improve threading on LLNL's production Linux platforms. We also made progress on developing new scalable algorithms that target multicore nodes. We designed and implemented a new AMG interpolation operator with improved convergence properties for very low complexity coarsening schemes. This implementation will also soon be available to LLNL's application teams as part of the hypre library. We presented results for both topics in an invited plenary talk entitled 'Efficient Sparse Linear Solvers for Multi-Core Architectures' at the 2009 HPCMP Institutes Annual Meeting/CREATE Annual All-Hands Meeting. The interpolation work was summarized in a talk entitled 'Improving Interpolation for Aggressive Coarsening' at the 14th Copper Mountain Conference on Multigrid Methods and in a research paper that will appear in Numerical Linear Algebra with Applications. In the area of code correctness, we significantly extended our behavior equivalence class identification mechanism. Specifically, we not only demonstrated it works well at very large scales but we also added the ability to classify MPI tasks not only by function call traces, but also by specific call sites (source code line numbers) being executed by tasks. More importantly, we developed a new technique to determine relative logical execution progress of tasks in the equivalence classes by combining static analysis with our original dynamic approach. We applied this technique to a correctness issue that arose at 4096 tasks during the development of the new AMG interpolation operator discussed above. This scale isat the limit of effectiveness of production tools, but our technique quickly located the erroneous source code, demonstrating the power of

  17. EINDHOVEN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Department of Mathematics and Computer Science

    E-print Network

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    EINDHOVEN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Department of Mathematics and Computer Science CASA-Report 10-45 July 2010 An efficient, second order method for the approximation of the Basset history force by M and Applications Department of Mathematics and Computer Science Eindhoven University of Technology P.O. Box 513

  18. The Impact of Computer Technology on the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Anne Wiseman

    1982-01-01

    Computer technology as it affects home and family life is explored. Elements of this technology which are examined include electronic fund transfers (EFT), consumer rights and responsibilities relating to use of EFT, working at home via computer, housing design, costs of computerizing the home, and computerized aids for the handicapped. (CT)

  19. Phase-multiplication holography

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, H.D.; Prince, J.M.; Davis, T.J.

    1982-01-25

    This disclosure relates generally to nondestructive testing for identifying structural characteristics of an object by scanned holographic techniques using a known source of radiation, such as electromagnetic or acoustical radiation. It is an object of this invention to provide an apparatus and method for synthetic aperture expansion in holographic imaging applications to construct fringe patterns capable of holographic reproduction where aperture restrictions in nondestructive testing applications would conventionally make such imaging techniques impossible. The apparatus and method result in the production of a sharply defined frontal image of structural characteristics which could not otherwise be imaged because they occur either near the surface of the object or are confined by geometry restricting aperture dimensions available for scanning purposes. The depth of the structural characteristic below the surface of the object can also be determined by the reconstruction parameters which produce the sharpest focus. Lateral resolution is established by simulated reduction in the radiation wavelength and may easily be an order of magnitude less than the electromagnetic wavelength in the material or 2 times the standard depth of penetration. Since the phase multiplication technique is performed on the detected data, the penetration depth available due to the longer wavelength signals applied to the test object remains unchanged. The phase multiplication technique can also be applied to low frequency acoustic holography, resulting in a test which combines excellent penetration of difficult materials with high resolution images.

  20. Cloud Computing. Technology Briefing. Number 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Cloud computing is Internet-based computing in which shared resources, software and information are delivered as a service that computers or mobile devices can access on demand. Cloud computing is already used extensively in education. Free or low-cost cloud-based services are used daily by learners and educators to support learning, social…

  1. andTECHNOLOGY/ The National Computer Security Center (NCSC) and the National Computer

    E-print Network

    & Technology Grumann Data Systems Mellon National Bank National Computer Security Center Grumann Data SystemsandTECHNOLOGY/ CENTER Hotef D.C. I #12;Welcome! The National Computer Security Center (NCSC Computer Security Conference. We believe that the Conference will stimulate a vital and dynamic exchange

  2. Advanced computing technologies and opportunities in nuclear science and engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, D.P.; Karlovsky, S.R.; Rudsinski, L.E.

    1993-03-01

    The development and utilization of advanced computing and communications technologies are accelerating rapidly, particularly under the influence of the recently initiated Federal High Performance Computing and Communications Program. The nuclear power industry has traditionally been on the forefront of such advanced computing technologies. This paper will illustrate several of the developments and future opportunities for utilization of these technologies for addressing grand challenges of the nuclear power industry. The specific capabilities of evolving scientific workstations, network based computing and parallel processing will be illustrated.

  3. Ultra-realistic imaging: a new beginning for display holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.; Brotherton-Ratcliffe, David

    2014-02-01

    Recent improvements in key foundation technologies are set to potentially transform the field of Display Holography. In particular new recording systems, based on recent DPSS and semiconductor lasers combined with novel recording materials and processing, have now demonstrated full-color analogue holograms of both lower noise and higher spectral accuracy. Progress in illumination technology is leading to a further major reduction in display noise and to a significant increase of the clear image depth and brightness of such holograms. So too, recent progress in 1-step Direct-Write Digital Holography (DWDH) now opens the way to the creation of High Virtual Volume Displays (HVV) - large format full-parallax DWDH reflection holograms having fundamentally larger clear image depths. In a certain fashion HVV displays can be thought of as providing a high quality full-color digital equivalent to the large-format laser-illuminated transmission holograms of the sixties and seventies. Back then, the advent of such holograms led to much optimism for display holography in the market. However, problems with laser illumination, their monochromatic analogue nature and image noise are well cited as being responsible for their failure in reality. Is there reason for believing that the latest technology improvements will make the mark this time around? This paper argues that indeed there is.

  4. HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Department of Computer Science and Engineering

    E-print Network

    HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Department of Computer Science and Engineering Laboratory submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Technology;HELSINKI UNIVERSITY ABSTRACT OF THE OF TECHNOLOGY MASTER'S THESIS Department of Automation and Systems

  5. Rainbow holography and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasov, N. G.; Ivanov, Vladimir S.

    1993-09-01

    The general equations of the rainbow holography are deduced. Their analysis makes it possible to offer different methods of the rainbow holographic images production. A new way of using the rainbow holograms as optical elements for effective color illuminating of transparent, specular, and polished objects is proposed. Application fields are the advertising industry, shop windows design, etc.

  6. Holography applications in recent China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Dahsiung

    2000-10-01

    Reports on recent developments on holography applications in China are given in this paper, including the development of anti-counterfeiting Holograms from 1986-2000, China issued Banknotes in 1999 with holograms and OVIs, the developments in Machine Readable Holograms in China, the developments in Anti-counterfeiting Information Networks in China.

  7. Electron Holography of Nanostructured Materials

    E-print Network

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    CHAPTER 5 Electron Holography of Nanostructured Materials RAFAL E DUNIN-BORKOWSKI,*a TAKESHI KASAMAb AND RICHARD J HARRISONc a Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Gru¨nberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Ju¨lich D-52425, Ju¨lich, Germany; b Center for Electron

  8. Computer Simulation Technology and Demonstration S. Schafrik & M. Karmis

    E-print Network

    Computer Simulation Technology and Demonstration S. Schafrik & M. Karmis Virginia Center for Coal constraints. A user- friendly visual simulation computer tool for the Windows environment is demonstrated INTRODUCTION Imitating the operations of real-life systems or proc- esses is the main purpose of computer

  9. Engineering Technologies and the Role of the Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Lester W., Jr.

    This discussion of computers and their place in the field of engineering technology begins with an outline of the historical development and significance of computers, tracing advancements from the first generation of computers, which began to be produced in 1946, to current third-generation models; reviewing the current state of the art in…

  10. Technology and society: ideological implications of information and computer technologies in the Soviet Union

    SciTech Connect

    Weigle, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    This study examines the impact of technology on the USSR's social system from the perspective of Soviet ideological development. The analysis of information and computer technologies within this framework de-emphasizes both modernization theories and those that assume unchallenged Communist Party control over technological development. Previous studies have examined the level of Soviet technological achievements and the gap between this level and those in the West, many referring to ideological boundaries of Soviet technological development without, however, systematically analyzing the resulting implications for the Soviet ideology of Marxism-Leninism. This study develops a framework for analyzing the impact of new technologies in the USSR in the fields of technology, ideology, and the scientific and technological revolution. On the basis of this framework, examination turns to the relevant Soviet theoretical and technical literature and debates among Soviety elites, concluding that the introduction of information and computer technologies and the organization of computer networks has exacerbated tensions in Soviety Marxism-Leninism.

  11. CICT Computing, Information, and Communications Technology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufenberg, Lawrence; Tu, Eugene (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The CICT Program is part of the NASA Aerospace Technology Enterprise's fundamental technology thrust to develop tools. processes, and technologies that enable new aerospace system capabilities and missions. The CICT Program's four key objectives are: Provide seamless access to NASA resources- including ground-, air-, and space-based distributed information technology resources-so that NASA scientists and engineers can more easily control missions, make new scientific discoveries, and design the next-generation space vehicles, provide high-data delivery from these assets directly to users for missions, develop goal-oriented human-centered systems, and research, develop and evaluate revolutionary technology.

  12. Computers--Teaching, Technology, and Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cocco, Anthony M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Includes "Managing Personality Types in the Computer Classroom" (Cocco); "External I/O Input/Output with a PC" (Fryda); "The Future of CAD/CAM Computer-Assisted Design/Computer-Assisted Manufacturing Software" (Fulton); and "Teaching Quality Assurance--A Laboratory Approach" (Wojslaw). (SK)

  13. Cognitive Effects with and of Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomon, Gavriel

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the distinction between cognitive effects with computers, whereby an individual's performance is redefined and upgraded during intellectual partnership with the computer, and effects of computers, whereby such partnership leaves durable and generalizable cognitive residues. Suggests two mechanisms for affecting cognition: skill…

  14. Remote metrology by comparative digital holography

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbach, Torsten; Osten, Wolfgang; Kopylow, Christoph von; Jueptner, Werner

    2006-02-10

    A method for the remote comparison of objects with regard to their shape or response to a load is presented. The method allows interferometric sensitivity for comparing objects with different microstructure. In contrast to the well-known incoherent techniques based on inverse fringe projection this new approach uses the coherent optical wave field of the master object as a mask for the illumination of the sample object. The coherent mask is created by digital holography to allow instant access to the complete optical information of the master object at any place desired. The mask is reconstructed by a spatial light modulator (SLM). The optical reconstruction of digital holograms with SLM technology allows modification of reconstructed wavefronts with respect to improvement of image quality, the skilled introduction of additional information about the object (augmented reality), and the alignment of the master and test object.

  15. Technology-Independent Design of Neurocomputers: The Universal Field Computer1

    E-print Network

    MacLennan, Bruce

    Technology-Independent Design of Neurocomputers: The Universal Field Computer1 Bruce J. Mac of massively parallel computers (including neurocomputers), optical computers, molecular computation, and, we

  16. CLOUD COMPUTING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM An eleven-week in-depth program in the principles, methods, and technologies of Cloud Computing

    E-print Network

    Schaefer, Marcus

    CLOUD COMPUTING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM An eleven-week in-depth program in the principles, methods, and technologies of Cloud Computing DePaul University's Cloud Computing Technologies Program provides a broad understanding of the different leading Cloud Computing technologies. The program is designed to quickly educate

  17. Evolving technologies for Space Station Freedom computer-based workstations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Dean G.; Rudisill, Marianne

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on evolving technologies for Space Station Freedom computer-based workstations are presented. The human-computer computer software environment modules are described. The following topics are addressed: command and control workstation concept; cupola workstation concept; Japanese experiment module RMS workstation concept; remote devices controlled from workstations; orbital maneuvering vehicle free flyer; remote manipulator system; Japanese experiment module exposed facility; Japanese experiment module small fine arm; flight telerobotic servicer; human-computer interaction; and workstation/robotics related activities.

  18. High Performance Computing Technologies Jack Dongarra

    E-print Network

    Dongarra, Jack

    ffl Performance Evaluation -- Linpack Benchmark, Top500 -- ParkBench 3 Computational Science ffl HPC­Stokes) with 3D Grid around the Earth 6 variables 8 ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ! ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? : temperature

  19. Embedded Data Processor and Portable Computer Technology testbeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alena, Richard; Liu, Yuan-Kwei; Goforth, Andre; Fernquist, Alan R.

    1993-01-01

    Attention is given to current activities in the Embedded Data Processor and Portable Computer Technology testbed configurations that are part of the Advanced Data Systems Architectures Testbed at the Information Sciences Division at NASA Ames Research Center. The Embedded Data Processor Testbed evaluates advanced microprocessors for potential use in mission and payload applications within the Space Station Freedom Program. The Portable Computer Technology (PCT) Testbed integrates and demonstrates advanced portable computing devices and data system architectures. The PCT Testbed uses both commercial and custom-developed devices to demonstrate the feasibility of functional expansion and networking for portable computers in flight missions.

  20. Surpassing digital holography limits by lensless object scanning holography.

    PubMed

    Micó, Vicente; Ferreira, Carlos; García, Javier

    2012-04-23

    We present lensless object scanning holography (LOSH) as a fully lensless method, capable of improving image quality in reflective digital Fourier holography, by means of an extremely simplified experimental setup. LOSH is based on the recording and digital post-processing of a set of digital lensless holograms and results in a synthetic image with improved resolution, field of view (FOV), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and depth of field (DOF). The superresolution (SR) effect arises from the generation of a synthetic aperture (SA) based on the linear movement of the inspected object. The same scanning principle enlarges the object FOV. SNR enhancement is achieved by speckle suppression and coherent artifacts averaging due to the coherent addition of the multiple partially overlapping bandpass images. And DOF extension is performed by digital refocusing to different object's sections. Experimental results showing an impressive image quality improvement are reported for a one-dimensional reflective resolution test target. PMID:22535027

  1. Computers and Autistic Learners: An Evolving Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedbring, Charles

    1985-01-01

    A research and demonstration computer center for severely handicapped autistic children, STEPPE-Lab, which uses computers as an augmentative communication and instructional system, is described. The article first reviews the keyboard, joystick, mouse, and drawing tablet as augmentative devices for helping communication disordered children interact…

  2. Cutting Technology Costs with Refurbished Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessoff, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Many district administrators are finding that they can save money on computers by buying preowned ones instead of new ones. The practice has other benefits as well: It allows districts to give more computers to more students who need them, and it also promotes good environmental practices by keeping the machines out of landfills, where they…

  3. 'Micromanaging de Sitter holography'

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Xi; Horn, Bart; Silverstein, Eva; Torroba, Gonzalo; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Santa Barbara, KITP

    2010-08-26

    We develop tools to engineer de Sitter vacua with semi-holographic duals, using elliptic fibrations and orientifolds to uplift Freund-Rubin compactifications with CFT duals. The dual brane construction is compact and constitutes a microscopic realization of the dS/dS correspondence, realizing d-dimensional de Sitter space as a warped compactification down to (d-1)-dimensional de Sitter gravity coupled to a pair of large-N matter sectors. This provides a parametric microscopic interpretation of the Gibbons-Hawking entropy. We illustrate these ideas with an explicit class of examples in three dimensions, and describe ongoing work on four-dimensional constructions. The Gibbons-Hawking entropy of the de Sitter horizon [1] invites a microscopic interpretation and a holographic formulation of inflating spacetimes. Much progress was made in the analogous problem in black hole physics using special black holes in string theory whose microstates could be reliably counted, such as those analyzed in [2,3]; this led to the AdS/CFT correspondence [4]. In contrast, a microscopic understanding of the entropy of de Sitter space is more difficult for several reasons including its potential dynamical connections to other backgrounds (metastability), the absence of a non-fluctuating timelike boundary, and the absence of supersymmetry. In this paper, we develop a class of de Sitter constructions in string theory, built up from AdS/CFT dual pairs along the lines of [5], which are simple enough to provide a microscopic accounting of the parametric scaling of the Gibbons-Hawking entropy. These models realize microscopically a semi-holographic description of metastable de Sitter space which had been derived macroscopically in [6]. It would also be interesting to connect this to other approaches to de Sitter holography such as [7, 8] and to other manifestations of the de Sitter entropy such as [9]. The construction is somewhat analogous to neutral black branes analyzed in [11]. We will begin in section 2 by explaining the salient features of the holographic duality and of the de Sitter construction which realizes it microscopically. In section 3 we will lay out our methods in more detail, applying them to worked examples of dS{sub 3} in section 4. Finally, section 5 discusses further directions and ongoing work, including dS{sub 4} constructions in progress.

  4. 25 CFR 502.7 - Electronic, computer or other technologic aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 false Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. 502.7...THIS CHAPTER § 502.7 Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. (a) Electronic, computer or other technologic aid means any...

  5. 25 CFR 502.7 - Electronic, computer or other technologic aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 false Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. 502.7...THIS CHAPTER § 502.7 Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. (a) Electronic, computer or other technologic aid means any...

  6. 25 CFR 502.7 - Electronic, computer or other technologic aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 false Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. 502.7...THIS CHAPTER § 502.7 Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. (a) Electronic, computer or other technologic aid means any...

  7. 25 CFR 502.7 - Electronic, computer or other technologic aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 false Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. 502.7...THIS CHAPTER § 502.7 Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. (a) Electronic, computer or other technologic aid means any...

  8. 25 CFR 502.7 - Electronic, computer or other technologic aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 false Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. 502.7...THIS CHAPTER § 502.7 Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. (a) Electronic, computer or other technologic aid means any...

  9. Using Computer Technology To Foster Learning for Understanding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Melle, Elaine; Tomalty, Lewis

    2000-01-01

    Describes how computer technology, specifically the use of a multimedia CD-ROM, was integrated into a microbiology curriculum as part of the transition from focusing on facts to fostering learning for understanding. (Contains 30 references.) (Author/YDS)

  10. The Principal and the Pauper: Administrator Training in Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isherwood, Geoffrey B.

    1985-01-01

    Describes principals' responsibilities in overseeing educational technology. Outlines computer knowledge and skills principals should possess about hardware, software, word processing, data bases, spreadsheets, integrated software, and school applications (scheduling, grading, recording attendance, budgeting, maintaining inventories, etc.).…

  11. Reviews of computing technology: Software overview

    SciTech Connect

    Hartshorn, W.R.; Johnson, A.L.

    1994-01-05

    The Savannah River Site Computing Architecture states that the site computing environment will be standards-based, data-driven, and workstation-oriented. Larger server systems deliver needed information to users in a client-server relationship. Goals of the Architecture include utilizing computing resources effectively, maintaining a high level of data integrity, developing a robust infrastructure, and storing data in such a way as to promote accessibility and usability. This document describes the current storage environment at Savannah River Site (SRS) and presents some of the problems that will be faced and strategies that are planned over the next few years.

  12. High Performance Computing Technologies Jack Dongarra

    E-print Network

    Dongarra, Jack

    Benchmark, Top500 ParkBench 3 Computational Science HPC o ered a new way to do science: Experiment TheoryD Grid around the Earth 6 variables 8 : temperature pressure humidity 3 ,wind velocity 1 Kilometer

  13. Emerging Trends in Technology Education Computer Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazari, Sunil I.

    1993-01-01

    Graphical User Interface (GUI)--and its variant, pen computing--is rapidly replacing older types of operating environments. Despite its heavier demand for processing power, GUI has many advantages. (SK)

  14. Factors Influencing Cloud-Computing Technology Adoption in Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hailu, Alemayehu

    2012-01-01

    Adoption of new technology has complicating components both from the selection, as well as decision-making criteria and process. Although new technology such as cloud computing provides great benefits especially to the developing countries, it has challenges that may complicate the selection decision and subsequent adoption process. This study…

  15. Nurses and health information technology: working with and around computers.

    PubMed

    Peace, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Information technology is nearly ubiquitous in health care settings. Nurses need basic computer skills and information literacy to effectively practice nursing. In addition, nurses must be prepared not only to work around complex health information technology, but also to communicate with individuals who can address the underlying problems. PMID:22128698

  16. The Future of Mobile Technology and Mobile Wireless Computing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Jim; Hannan, Mike

    2004-01-01

    It is often stated that mobile wireless computing is going to be the next big technology revolution that will grip the world in the same way mobile telephones did in the 1990s. However, while the technology is rapidly improving, the rate of uptake has been lower than expected. This paper describes some of the reasons for this, and discusses some…

  17. Beyond Computer Literacy: Supporting Youth's Positive Development through Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bers, Marina Umaschi

    2010-01-01

    In a digital era in which technology plays a role in most aspects of a child's life, having the competence and confidence to use computers might be a necessary step, but not a goal in itself. Developing character traits that will serve children to use technology in a safe way to communicate and connect with others, and providing opportunities for…

  18. Video and Computer Technologies for Extended-Campus Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagan, Edgar L.; And Others

    This paper discusses video and computer technologies for extended-campus programming (courses and programs at off-campus sites). The first section provides an overview of the distance education program at the University of Kentucky (UK), and highlights the improved access to graduate and professional programs, advances in technology, funding,…

  19. Intel Science and Technology Center for Secure Computing

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    's lives by vastly expanding the volume, quality and accessibility of information, simplifying this knowledge to further improve people's lives. Misuse of computer technology by adversaries may severely limit these benefits by threatening the safe use of technology in increasingly critical aspects of our lives. The Intel

  20. School of Computer Science and Information Technology University of Nottingham

    E-print Network

    Aickelin, Uwe

    School of Computer Science and Information Technology University of Nottingham Jubilee CampusK.Burke {jpl,uxa,ekb}@ cs.nott.ac.uk SchoolofCom puterScienceandInform ationTechnology The survey papersgive an overview ofthe area:Bradley and M artin,1990;Ernstetal.,2004a and 2004b. Em

  1. Multicolor Holography With Phase Shifting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vikram, Chandra S.

    1996-01-01

    Prototype apparatus constructed to test feasibility of two-color holographic interferometric scheme in which data for reconstructing holographic wavefront obtained with help of phase-shifting technique. Provides two sets of data needed to solve equations for effects of temperature and concentration. Concept extended to holography at three or more wavelengths to measure three or more phenomena associated with significant variations in index of refraction

  2. Schrodinger Holography for z<2

    E-print Network

    Tomas Andrade; Cynthia Keeler; Alex Peach; Simon F. Ross

    2014-11-19

    We investigate holography for asymptotically Schrodinger spacetimes, using a frame formalism. Our dictionary is based on the anisotropic scaling symmetry. We consider z <2, where the holographic dictionary is cleaner; we make some comments on z=2. We propose a definition of asymptotically locally Schrodinger spacetime where the leading components of the frame fields provide suitable geometric boundary data. We show that an asymptotic expansion exists for generic boundary data satisfying our boundary conditions for z<2.

  3. Atom interferometers and atom holography

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Fujio; Mitake, Satoru; Fujita, Jun-ichi; Morinaga, Makoto; Kishimoto, Tetsuo

    1999-06-11

    Various techniques of atom manipulation with a binary hologram are discussed and demonstrated experimentally. An atomic beam of metastable neon in the 1s{sub 3} state and a SiN thin film with holes that expresses the transmission function of the hologram are used to demonstrate this technique. The gray-scale holography of atoms is demonstrated for the first time. Other possibilities of holographic manipulation of atoms are also discussed.

  4. Strategic Planning for Computer-Based Educational Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozeman, William C.

    1984-01-01

    Offers educational practitioners direction for the development of a master plan for the implementation and application of computer-based educational technology by briefly examining computers in education, discussing organizational change from a theoretical perspective, and presenting an overview of the planning strategy known as the planning and…

  5. Computer-Integrated Manufacturing Technology. Tech Prep Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakeland Tech Prep Consortium, Kirtland, OH.

    This tech prep competency profile for computer-integrated manufacturing technology begins with definitions for four occupations: manufacturing technician, quality technician, mechanical engineering technician, and computer-assisted design/drafting (CADD) technician. A chart lists competencies by unit and indicates whether entire or partial unit is…

  6. "Computer" and "Information and Communication Technology": Students' Culture Specific Interpretations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elen, Jan; Clarebout, Geraldine; Sarfo, Frederick Kwaku; Louw, Lambertus Philippus; Poysa-Tarhonen, Johanna; Stassens, Nick

    2010-01-01

    Given the use of information and communication technology (ICT) and computer as synonyms in ICT-integration research on the one hand, and the potential problems in doing so on the other, this contribution tries to gain insight in the understanding of the words computer and ICT in different settings. In five different countries (Belgium, Finland,…

  7. The Computer Industry. High Technology Industries: Profiles and Outlooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Trade Administration (DOC), Washington, DC.

    A series of meetings was held to assess future problems in United States high technology, particularly in the fields of robotics, computers, semiconductors, and telecommunications. This report, which focuses on the computer industry, includes a profile of this industry and the papers presented by industry speakers during the meetings. The profile…

  8. Coached, Interactive Computer Simulations: A New Technology for Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hummel, Thomas J.

    This paper provides an overview of a prototype simulation-centered intelligent computer-based training (CBT) system--implemented using expert system technology--which provides: (1) an environment in which trainees can learn and practice complex skills; (2) a computer-based coach or mentor to critique performance, suggest improvements, and provide…

  9. Institute for Computer Sciences and Technology. Annual Report FY 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC. Inst. for Computer Sciences and Technology.

    Activities of the Institute for Computer Sciences and Technology (ICST) within the U.S. Department of Commerce during fiscal year 1986 are described in this annual report, which summarizes research and publications by ICST in the following areas: (1) standards and guidelines for computer security, including encryption and message authentication…

  10. Using Computer Technology To Bridge School and Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Jie-Qi; Dym, Warren

    2003-01-01

    The new technology coordinator at a Chicago elementary school in a low-income Latino community created a computer course for parents and a neighborhood computer club. The course and club created a means for collaboration between the school and community and for parent involvement in their children's education. (MLF)

  11. School of Computer Science and Information Technology University of Nottingham

    E-print Network

    McCollum, Barry

    School of Computer Science and Information Technology University of Nottingham Jubilee Campus NOTTINGHAM NG8 1BB, UK Computer Science Technical Report No. NOTTCS-TR-2006-4 A Survey of Search://www.yandy.com #12;A Survey of Search Methodologies and Automated Approaches for Examination Timetabling R. Qu1 , E

  12. Computers and terminals as an aid to international technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweeney, W. T.

    1974-01-01

    As technology transfer becomes more popular and proves to be an economical method for companies of all sizes to take advantage of a tremendous amount of new and available technology from sources all over the world, the introduction of computers and terminals into the international technology transfer process is proving to be a successful method for companies to take part in this beneficial approach to new business opportunities.

  13. Holography: childrens' window to relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacShane, James E.

    1995-02-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of the concept of natural education. Psychology has discovered that all humans learn intuitively the cultural concepts of time from birth to eight and one-half to ten years of age. Einstein showed us that this must also be the natural time for the development of spatial concepts. The importance of this has been dramatized for me in the past eight years that I have been developing the Laser Arts and Holography Programs and Workshops. I have worked with over 100,000 students kindergarten through eighth grade. I have worked with 175 students age 8 to 10 in three hour and one half workshops specifically on the development of time and space concepts. The concepts developed are based upon the vast amount of psychological evidence related to the natural development of time and space understandings, Dr. Nils Abramson's 'Light in Flight' and subsequent work on the clarification of relativity through holography, and Maria Montessori's method of Scientific Education. The paper also demonstrates the natural method of teaching science to younger students is to teach scientifically. All of the research which has been done in the past 100 years has been used by the educational institutions to try to improve the system. What has not been done is changing the system to how humans learn. Because of the perceived hi-tech nature of the program I am able to dramatize the potential. An outline for a holography curriculum kindergarten through eighth grade is included.

  14. High-intensity x-ray holography: an approach to high-resolution snapshot imaging of biological specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Solem, J.C.

    1982-08-01

    The crucial physical and technological issues pertaining to the holographic imaging of biological structures with a short-pulse, high-intensity, high-quantum-energy laser were examined. The limitations of x-ray optics are discussed. Alternative holographic techniques were considered, and it was concluded that far-field Fresnel transform holography (Fraunhofer holography) using a photoresist recording surface is most tractable with near term technology. The hydrodynamic expansion of inhomogeneities within the specimen is discussed. It is shown that expansion is the major source of image blurring. Analytic expressions were derived for the explosion of protein concentrations in an x-ray transparent cytoplasm, compared with numerical calculations, and corrections derived to account for the competitive transport processes by which these inhomogeneities lose energy. It is concluded that for the near term Fresnel transform holography, particularly, far-field or Fraunhofer holography, is more practical than Fourier transform holography. Of the alternative fine grain recording media for use with Fresnel transform holography, a photo-resist is most attractive. For best resolution, exposure times must be limited to a few picoseconds, and this calls for investigation of mechanisms to shutter the laser or gate the recording surface. The best contrast ratio between the nitrogen-bearing polymers (protein and the nucleic acids) and water is between the K-edges of oxygen and nitrogen.

  15. Some Notes on Quantum Information Theory and Emerging Computing Technologies

    E-print Network

    Alexander Yu. Vlasov

    2015-03-24

    It is considered an interdependence of the theory of quantum computing and some perspective information technologies. A couple of illustrative and useful examples are discussed. The reversible computing from very beginning had the serious impact on the design of quantum computers and it is revisited first. Some applications of ternary circuits are also quite instructive and it may be useful in the quantum information theory.

  16. The microwave holography system for the Sardinia Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, G.; Bolli, P.; Busonera, G.; Pisanu, T.; Poppi, S.; Gaudiomonte, F.; Zacchiroli, G.; Roda, J.; Morsiani, M.; López-Pérez, J. A.

    2012-09-01

    Microwave holography is a well-established technique for mapping surface errors of large reflector antennas, particularly those designed to operate at high frequencies. We present here a holography system based on the interferometric method for mapping the primary reflector surface of the Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT). SRT is a new 64-m-diameter antenna located in Sardinia, Italy, equipped with an active surface and designed to operate up to 115 GHz. The system consists mainly of two radio frequency low-noise coherent channels, designed to receive Ku-band digital TV signals from geostationary satellites. Two commercial prime focus low-noise block converters are installed on the radio telescope under test and on a small reference antenna, respectively. Then the signals are amplified, filtered and downconverted to baseband. An innovative digital back-end based on FPGA technology has been implemented to digitize two 5 MHz-band signals and calculate their cross-correlation in real-time. This is carried out by using a 16-bit resolution ADCs and a FPGA reaching very large amplitude dynamic range and reducing post-processing time. The final holography data analysis is performed by CLIC data reduction software developed within the Institut de Radioastronomie Millimétrique (IRAM, Grenoble, France). The system was successfully tested during several holography measurement campaigns, recently performed at the Medicina 32-m radio telescope. Two 65-by-65 maps, using an on-the-fly raster scan with on-source phase calibration, were performed pointing the radio telescope at 38 degrees elevation towards EUTELSAT 7A satellite. The high SNR (greater than 60 dB) and the good phase stability led to get an accuracy on the surface error maps better than 150 ?m RMS.

  17. Establishment of the Center for Biomedical Technology Innovation

    SciTech Connect

    2001-12-15

    The report discussed the following topics: (1) Orthopedic Devices; (2) Hybrid Vector and Method Resulting in Protein Overproduction by Eukaryotic Cells; (3) Surgical Simulator; (4) CBTI (Center for Biomedical Technology Innovation) as an Incubator for Start-up Companies; (5) Voice-activated, computer-assisted surgical robotics; (6) Through transmission ultrasonic 3-D holography for diagnostic imaging; (7) CBTI's Scibermed{trademark} Virtual Institute (SVI); and (8) Laser Oxygenation Tomography.

  18. Technology for liquid-nitrogen-cooled computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longsworth, Ralph C.; Steyert, William A.

    1987-01-01

    Computers requiring 1 to 400 W of refrigeration at 78 K can use standard commercial Gifford-McMahon-type refrigerators similar to those being produced for cryopumps. The computer elements would be immersed in a liquid-nitrogen bath in which heat transfer between the circuit elements and the bath can carry away 5 W/sq cm. The elements would operate very near the 78-K bath temperature. Vapors from the boiling liquid would be recondensed on the cold refrigerator, located above the bath, and would fall back into the bath. For smaller computers, simple Joule-Thomson refrigerators could be developed. For larger refrigerators, reverse Brayton cycle refrigerators could be developed.

  19. Audit and Evaluation of Computer Security. Computer Science and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruthberg, Zella G.

    This is a collection of consensus reports, each produced at a session of an invitational workshop sponsored by the National Bureau of Standards. The purpose of the workshop was to explore the state-of-the-art and define appropriate subjects for future research in the audit and evaluation of computer security. Leading experts in the audit and…

  20. Planning Computer Lessons. Tech Use Guide: Using Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Exceptional Children, Reston, VA. Center for Special Education Technology.

    This guide offers planning and organizing ideas for effectively using computers in classrooms that include students both with and without disabilities. The guide addresses: developing lesson plans, introducing the lesson in a way that builds motivation, providing guided and independent practice, extending the learning, and choosing software.…

  1. CACTUS: Calculator and Computer Technology User Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Hartley

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students use computer-based spreadsheets to find out how much grain should be added to a chess board when a grain of rice is put on the first square, the amount is doubled for the next square, and the chess board is covered. (ASK)

  2. Center for Computation & Technology at LSU

    E-print Network

    Allen, Gabrielle

    : University of Cardiff, UK · PhD Computational Astrophysics #12;5 1995: Albert Einstein Institute, Germany using them! #12;12 · Exploring Einstein's General Relativity Want to develop theoretical lab to probe information about Universe ­ A last major test of Einstein's theory: do they exist? · Eddington

  3. Cloud Computing Technologies Facilitate Earth Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Under a Space Act Agreement, NASA partnered with Seattle-based Amazon Web Services to make the agency's climate and Earth science satellite data publicly available on the company's servers. Users can access the data for free, but they can also pay to use Amazon's computing services to analyze and visualize information using the same software available to NASA researchers.

  4. Gabrielle Allen Center for Computation & Technology

    E-print Network

    Allen, Gabrielle

    University gallen@cct.lsu.edu Representing the SURA Coastal Ocean Observing and Prediction Program (SCOOP) NSF DynaCode Urgent Computing for Hurricane Forecasts CNS-0540374 #12;2 #12;SURA Coastal Ocean Observing and Prediction (SCOOP) · Integrating data from regional observing systems for realtime coastal

  5. Energy and technology review

    SciTech Connect

    Poggio, A.J.

    1988-10-01

    This issue of Energy and Technology Review contains: Neutron Penumbral Imaging of Laser-Fusion Targets--using our new penumbral-imaging diagnostic, we have obtained the first images that can be used to measure directly the deuterium-tritium burn region in laser-driven fusion targets; Computed Tomography for Nondestructive Evaluation--various computed tomography systems and computational techniques are used in nondestructive evaluation; Three-Dimensional Image Analysis for Studying Nuclear Chromatin Structure--we have developed an optic-electronic system for acquiring cross-sectional views of cell nuclei, and computer codes to analyze these images and reconstruct the three-dimensional structures they represent; Imaging in the Nuclear Test Program--advanced techniques produce images of unprecedented detail and resolution from Nevada Test Site data; and Computational X-Ray Holography--visible-light experiments and numerically simulated holograms test our ideas about an x-ray microscope for biological research.

  6. Network Computer Technology. Phase I: Viability and Promise within NASA's Desktop Computing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paluzzi, Peter; Miller, Rosalind; Kurihara, West; Eskey, Megan

    1998-01-01

    Over the past several months, major industry vendors have made a business case for the network computer as a win-win solution toward lowering total cost of ownership. This report provides results from Phase I of the Ames Research Center network computer evaluation project. It identifies factors to be considered for determining cost of ownership; further, it examines where, when, and how network computer technology might fit in NASA's desktop computing architecture.

  7. Space systems computer-aided design technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, L. B.

    1984-01-01

    The interactive Design and Evaluation of Advanced Spacecraft (IDEAS) system is described, together with planned capability increases in the IDEAS system. The system's disciplines consist of interactive graphics and interactive computing. A single user at an interactive terminal can create, design, analyze, and conduct parametric studies of earth-orbiting satellites, which represents a timely and cost-effective method during the conceptual design phase where various missions and spacecraft options require evaluation. Spacecraft concepts evaluated include microwave radiometer satellites, communication satellite systems, solar-powered lasers, power platforms, and orbiting space stations.

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics Technology for Hypersonic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2003-01-01

    Several current challenges in computational fluid dynamics and aerothermodynamics for hypersonic vehicle applications are discussed. Example simulations are presented from code validation and code benchmarking efforts to illustrate capabilities and limitations. Opportunities to advance the state-of-art in algorithms, grid generation and adaptation, and code validation are identified. Highlights of diverse efforts to address these challenges are then discussed. One such effort to re-engineer and synthesize the existing analysis capability in LAURA, VULCAN, and FUN3D will provide context for these discussions. The critical (and evolving) role of agile software engineering practice in the capability enhancement process is also noted.

  9. High-resolution synthetic-aperture digital holography with digital phase and pupil

    E-print Network

    Fienup, James R.

    lenses in the system, with digital holographic aperture synthesis by using a computational imaging. Hecht, J. Colineau, and J. C. Lehureau, "Short-range synthetic aperture imaging at 633 nm by digitalHigh-resolution synthetic-aperture digital holography with digital phase and pupil correction Abbie

  10. LUND INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Department of Computer Science Solutions, Database Technology Examination

    E-print Network

    1(3) LUND INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Department of Computer Science Solutions, Database TechnologyPeriod > CourseInstance teacherComments studentComments > Survey email Teacher pNbr email StudentInstances and Surveys could be combined. hasAnswered isn't necessary (can instead check if the student has an entry

  11. Impact of new computing systems on computational mechanics and flight-vehicle structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Storaasli, O. O.; Fulton, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Advances in computer technology which may have an impact on computational mechanics and flight vehicle structures technology were reviewed. The characteristics of supersystems, highly parallel systems, and small systems are summarized. The interrelations of numerical algorithms and software with parallel architectures are discussed. A scenario for future hardware/software environment and engineering analysis systems is presented. Research areas with potential for improving the effectiveness of analysis methods in the new environment are identified.

  12. Damage Detection Using Holography and Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews classical approaches to damage detection using laser holography and interferometry. The paper then details the modern uses of electronic holography and neural-net-processed characteristic patterns to detect structural damage. The design of the neural networks and the preparation of the training sets are discussed. The use of a technique to optimize the training sets, called folding, is explained. Then a training procedure is detailed that uses the holography-measured vibration modes of the undamaged structures to impart damage-detection sensitivity to the neural networks. The inspections of an optical strain gauge mounting plate and an International Space Station cold plate are presented as examples.

  13. Portable Computer Technology (PCT) Research and Development Program Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castillo, Michael; McGuire, Kenyon; Sorgi, Alan

    1995-01-01

    The subject of this project report, focused on: (1) Design and development of two Advanced Portable Workstation 2 (APW 2) units. These units incorporate advanced technology features such as a low power Pentium processor, a high resolution color display, National Television Standards Committee (NTSC) video handling capabilities, a Personal Computer Memory Card International Association (PCMCIA) interface, and Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) and ethernet interfaces. (2) Use these units to integrate and demonstrate advanced wireless network and portable video capabilities. (3) Qualification of the APW 2 systems for use in specific experiments aboard the Mir Space Station. A major objective of the PCT Phase 2 program was to help guide future choices in computing platforms and techniques for meeting National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) mission objectives. The focus being on the development of optimal configurations of computing hardware, software applications, and network technologies for use on NASA missions.

  14. Implications of Computer Technology. Harvard University Program on Technology and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taviss, Irene; Burbank, Judith

    Lengthy abstracts of a small number of selected books and articles on the implications of computer technology are presented, preceded by a brief state-of-the-art survey which traces the impact of computers on the structure of economic and political organizations and socio-cultural patterns. A summary statement introduces each of the three abstract…

  15. Artistic Representation with Pulsed Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, S.

    2013-02-01

    This thesis describes artistic representation through pulsed holography. One of the prevalent practical problems in making holograms is object movement. Any movement of the object or film, including movement caused by acoustic vibration, has the same fatal results. One way of reducing the chance of movement is by ensuring that the exposure is very quick; using a pulsed laser can fulfill this objective. The attractiveness of using pulsed laser is based on the variety of materials or objects that can be recorded (e.g., liquid material or instantaneous scene of a moving object). One of the most interesting points about pulsed holograms is that some reconstructed images present us with completely different views of the real world. For example, the holographic image of liquid material does not appear fluid; it looks like a piece of hard glass that would produce a sharp sound upon tapping. In everyday life, we are unfamiliar with such an instantaneous scene. On the other hand, soft-textured materials such as a feather or wool differ from liquids when observed through holography. Using a pulsed hologram, we can sense the soft touch of the object or material with the help of realistic three-dimensional (3-D) images. The images allow us to realize the sense of touch in a way that resembles touching real objects. I had the opportunity to use a pulsed ruby laser soon after I started to work in the field of holography in 1979. Since then, I have made pulsed holograms of activities, including pouring water, breaking eggs, blowing soap bubbles, and scattering feathers and popcorn. I have also created holographic art with materials and objects, such as silk fiber, fabric, balloons, glass, flowers, and even the human body. Whenever I create art, I like to present the spectator with a new experience in perception. Therefore, I would like to introduce my experimental artwork through those pulsed holograms.

  16. Aesthetics and representation in holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kac, Eduardo

    1995-02-01

    Every medium has a code, a set of rules or conventions according to which determined elements are organized into a signifying system. The English language is a code as is perspective in painting and photography. In the first case, the elements are phonemes organized into words and sentences according to a social convention: the syntax of English. In the second case, the elements are dots and lines organized into pictures according to a geometric method. An artist or movement can break the conventions of the medium, as has done Cezanne with painting, Moholy-Nagy with photography and cummings with the English idiom in poetry, and create new elements and rules for combining them. If this is done, the level of predictability (or conventionality) is lowered and unpredictability is increased -- becoming more difficult for the immediate audience to understand it. But once these new rules are learned and the ideas behind them widely understood, the level of unpredictability is lowered and they become new conventions that can be accepted by the audience. Holographic artists exploring the medium -- as opposed to advertisers using holography, who favor a high level of predictability -- are breaking several visual and cultural conventions. As a matter of fact, holography is so new that many questions are left open about the nature of the medium. Therefore, any attempt to clarify the issues raised by holography on a cultural level has a prospective (and not conclusive) tone, concentrating more thoroughly on general points and on the promise of its potentialities than on the records of its historical achievements so far.

  17. Seismic Holography of Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, Charles

    2000-01-01

    The basic goal of the project was to extend holographic seismic imaging techniques developed under a previous NASA contract, and to incorporate phase diagnostics. Phase-sensitive imaging gives us a powerful probe of local thermal and Doppler perturbations in active region subphotospheres, allowing us to map thermal structure and flows associated with "acoustic moats" and "acoustic glories". These remarkable features were discovered during our work, by applying simple acoustic power holography to active regions. Included in the original project statement was an effort to obtain the first seismic images of active regions on the Sun's far surface.

  18. Design of a fault tolerant airborne digital computer. Volume 2: Computational requirements and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratner, R. S.; Shapiro, E. B.; Zeidler, H. M.; Wahlstrom, S. E.; Clark, C. B.; Goldberg, J.

    1973-01-01

    This final report summarizes the work on the design of a fault tolerant digital computer for aircraft. Volume 2 is composed of two parts. Part 1 is concerned with the computational requirements associated with an advanced commercial aircraft. Part 2 reviews the technology that will be available for the implementation of the computer in the 1975-1985 period. With regard to the computation task 26 computations have been categorized according to computational load, memory requirements, criticality, permitted down-time, and the need to save data in order to effect a roll-back. The technology part stresses the impact of large scale integration (LSI) on the realization of logic and memory. Also considered was module interconnection possibilities so as to minimize fault propagation.

  19. Helicopter mission optimization study. [portable computer technology for flight optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of using low-cost, portable computer technology to help a helicopter pilot optimize flight parameters to minimize fuel consumption and takeoff and landing noise was demonstrated. Eight separate computer programs were developed for use in the helicopter cockpit using a hand-held computer. The programs provide the helicopter pilot with the ability to calculate power required, minimum fuel consumption for both range and endurance, maximum speed and a minimum noise profile for both takeoff and landing. Each program is defined by a maximum of two magnetic cards. The helicopter pilot is required to key in the proper input parameter such as gross weight, outside air temperature or pressure altitude.

  20. Criteria for the observation of strong-field photoelectron holography

    SciTech Connect

    Marchenko, T.; Huismans, Y.; Schafer, K. J.; Vrakking, M. J. J.

    2011-11-15

    Photoelectron holography is studied experimentally and computationally using the ionization of ground-state xenon atoms by intense near-infrared radiation. A strong dependence of the occurrence of the holographic pattern on the laser wavelength and intensity is observed, and it is shown that the observation of the hologram requires that the ponderomotive energy U{sub p} is substantially larger than the photon energy. The holographic interference is therefore favored by longer wavelengths and higher laser intensities. Our results indicate that the tunneling regime is not a necessary condition for the observation of the holographic pattern, which can be observed under the conditions formally attributed to the multiphoton regime.

  1. Entanglement entropy in Galilean conformal field theories and flat holography.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Arjun; Basu, Rudranil; Grumiller, Daniel; Riegler, Max

    2015-03-20

    We present the analytical calculation of entanglement entropy for a class of two-dimensional field theories governed by the symmetries of the Galilean conformal algebra, thus providing a rare example of such an exact computation. These field theories are the putative holographic duals to theories of gravity in three-dimensional asymptotically flat spacetimes. We provide a check of our field theory answers by an analysis of geodesics. We also exploit the Chern-Simons formulation of three-dimensional gravity and adapt recent proposals of calculating entanglement entropy by Wilson lines in this context to find an independent confirmation of our results from holography. PMID:25839258

  2. Digital spatially incoherent Fresnel holography Joseph Rosen*

    E-print Network

    Rosen, Joseph

    such as outdoor and astronomical holography1 and fluorescence holographic micro- scopy.2 The oldest methods holographic photography based on correlation without movement between objects and FZPs. However, their process

  3. Adult Literacy, Computer Technology, and the Hearing Impaired.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askov, Eunice N.; And Others

    This paper looks at computer technology's current and potential role in developing literacy in hearing impaired (HI) adults. First, the paper considers findings of adult literacy research including the national impact of illiteracy, functional literacy, communication and thinking skills, the whole language approach, the process approach to…

  4. Computer Technology Integration and Student Learning: Barriers and Promise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keengwe, Jared; Onchwari, Grace; Wachira, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Political and institutional support has enabled many institutions of learning to spend millions of dollars to acquire educational computing tools (Ficklen and Muscara, "Am Educ" 25(3):22-29, 2001) that have not been effectively integrated into the curriculum. While access to educational technology tools has remarkably improved in most schools,…

  5. Beyond Computer Literacy: Technology Integration and Curriculum Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safar, Ammar H.; AlKhezzi, Fahad A.

    2013-01-01

    Personal computers, the Internet, smartphones, and other forms of information and communication technology (ICT) have changed our world, our job, our personal lives, as well as how we manage our knowledge and time effectively and efficiently. Research findings in the past decades have acknowledged and affirmed that the content the ICT medium…

  6. Computational Structures Technology for Airframes and Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (compiler); Housner, Jerrold M. (compiler); Starnes, James H., Jr. (compiler); Hopkins, Dale A. (compiler); Chamis, Christos C. (compiler)

    1992-01-01

    This conference publication contains the presentations and discussions from the joint University of Virginia (UVA)/NASA Workshops. The presentations included NASA Headquarters perspectives on High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), goals and objectives of the UVA Center for Computational Structures Technology (CST), NASA and Air Force CST activities, CST activities for airframes and propulsion systems in industry, and CST activities at Sandia National Laboratory.

  7. Computer-Assisted Foreign Language Teaching and Learning: Technological Advances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zou, Bin; Xing, Minjie; Wang, Yuping; Sun, Mingyu; Xiang, Catherine H.

    2013-01-01

    Computer-Assisted Foreign Language Teaching and Learning: Technological Advances highlights new research and an original framework that brings together foreign language teaching, experiments and testing practices that utilize the most recent and widely used e-learning resources. This comprehensive collection of research will offer linguistic…

  8. The Voice as Computer Interface: A Look at Tomorrow's Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, Holley R.

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of voice as the communications device for computer-human interaction focuses on voice recognition systems for use within a library environment. Voice technologies are described, including voice response and voice recognition; examples of voice systems in use in libraries are examined; and further possibilities, including use with…

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL CONSEQUENCES OF TELEMATICS: TELECOMMUNICATION, COMPUTATION, AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current important research needs whose results will be critical to Environmental Protection Agency's mission in the next two to three decades with regard to a major expansion in the use of telematics, i.e. telecommunications, computer, and information technology, are identified. ...

  10. Computer integrated manufacturing and technology transfer for improving aerospace productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrington, P. A.; Sica, J.

    1992-03-01

    This paper reviews a cooperative effort, between the Alabama Industial Development Training Institute and the University of Alabama in Huntsville, to implement a prototype computer integrated manufacturing system. The primary use of this system will be to educate Alabama companies on the organizational and technological issues involved in the implementation of advanced manufacturing systems.

  11. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: Opportunities & Challenges for Computing Technology

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Richard

    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: Opportunities & Challenges for Computing Technology Brian M. Landry-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a condition in which a person responds to a traumatic event, such as war, a car have a significant detrimental impact on the lives of those affected by PTSD as well as their friends

  12. Introduction to CAD/Computers. High-Technology Training Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockerby, Hugh

    This learning module for an eighth-grade introductory technology course is designed to help teachers introduce students to computer-assisted design (CAD) in a communications unit on graphics. The module contains a module objective and five specific objectives, a content outline, suggested instructor methodology, student activities, a list of six…

  13. Opportunities for Computing Technologies to Support Healthy Sleep Behaviors

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Richard

    to help doctors detect and diagnose a number of sleep disorders, such as insomnia, sleep apnea, or delayedOpportunities for Computing Technologies to Support Healthy Sleep Behaviors Eun Kyoung Choe1 Getting the right amount of quality sleep is a key aspect of good health, along with a healthy diet

  14. NASA CST aids U.S. industry. [computational structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housner, Jerry M.; Pinson, Larry D.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of NASA's computational structures Technology (CST) research on aerospace vehicle design and operation is discussed. The application of this research to proposed version of a high-speed civil transport, to composite structures in aerospace, to the study of crack growth, and to resolving field problems is addressed.

  15. Pervasive Computing and Communication Technologies for U-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Young C.

    2014-01-01

    The development of digital information transfer, storage and communication methods influences a significant effect on education. The assimilation of pervasive computing and communication technologies marks another great step forward, with Ubiquitous Learning (U-learning) emerging for next generation learners. In the evolutionary view the 5G (or…

  16. Stevens Institute of Technology BS in Computer Science

    E-print Network

    Mordohai, Philippos

    Stevens Institute of Technology BS in Computer Science Plan for Continuous Improvement June 2014 are contacted and asked to fill out a survey. The survey is intentionally kept very simple to encourage survey is at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/2WCGNPF. The survey is summarized as follows: Purpose

  17. Providing Assistive Technology Applications as a Service Through Cloud Computing.

    PubMed

    Mulfari, Davide; Celesti, Antonio; Villari, Massimo; Puliafito, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Users with disabilities interact with Personal Computers (PCs) using Assistive Technology (AT) software solutions. Such applications run on a PC that a person with a disability commonly uses. However the configuration of AT applications is not trivial at all, especially whenever the user needs to work on a PC that does not allow him/her to rely on his / her AT tools (e.g., at work, at university, in an Internet point). In this paper, we discuss how cloud computing provides a valid technological solution to enhance such a scenario.With the emergence of cloud computing, many applications are executed on top of virtual machines (VMs). Virtualization allows us to achieve a software implementation of a real computer able to execute a standard operating system and any kind of application. In this paper we propose to build personalized VMs running AT programs and settings. By using the remote desktop technology, our solution enables users to control their customized virtual desktop environment by means of an HTML5-based web interface running on any computer equipped with a browser, whenever they are. PMID:26132225

  18. Horizontal-parallax-only electronic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, T.-C.; Akin, T.; Indebetouw, G.; Kim, T.

    2005-04-01

    The principle of optical scanning holography (OSH) is proposed to acquire horizontal-parallax-only (HPO) holographic information electronically. We first briefly summarize the results of OSH and then discuss how HPO-electronic holographic information can be acquired using OSH. Finally we provide simulations to illustrate and clarify the proposed idea. Although many ideas of HPO-holography have been proposed and studied, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first proposed electronic technique to acquire HPO-holographic information.

  19. Aging and Holography

    E-print Network

    Juan I. Jottar; Robert G. Leigh; Djordje Minic; Leopoldo A. Pando Zayas

    2010-08-11

    Aging phenomena are examples of `non-equilibrium criticality' and can be exemplified by systems with Galilean and scaling symmetries but no time translation invariance. We realize aging holographically using a deformation of a non-relativistic version of gauge/gravity duality. Correlation functions of scalar operators are computed using holographic real-time techniques, and agree with field theory expectations. At least in this setup, general aging phenomena are reproduced holographically by complexifying the bulk space-time geometry, even in Lorentzian signature.

  20. Computer Technology in Eastern European Countries and the Former Soviet Union: An Interpretative Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jankowska, Maria Anna

    1993-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography of 44 information sources on computer technology in Eastern Europe. Topics addressed include the history of computer technology in former Soviet Bloc countries; computer use in the economic, military, and educational sectors; information technology and its effect on society; and technology transfer and East-West…

  1. 25 CFR 502.7 - Electronic, computer or other technologic aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. 502.7... DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.7 Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. (a) Electronic, computer or... applicable Federal communications law. (b) Electronic, computer or other technologic aids include, but...

  2. 25 CFR 502.7 - Electronic, computer or other technologic aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. 502.7... DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.7 Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. (a) Electronic, computer or... applicable Federal communications law. (b) Electronic, computer or other technologic aids include, but...

  3. 25 CFR 502.7 - Electronic, computer or other technologic aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. 502.7... DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.7 Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. (a) Electronic, computer or... applicable Federal communications law. (b) Electronic, computer or other technologic aids include, but...

  4. 25 CFR 502.7 - Electronic, computer or other technologic aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. 502.7... DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.7 Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. (a) Electronic, computer or... applicable Federal communications law. (b) Electronic, computer or other technologic aids include, but...

  5. 25 CFR 502.7 - Electronic, computer or other technologic aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. 502.7... DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.7 Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. (a) Electronic, computer or... applicable Federal communications law. (b) Electronic, computer or other technologic aids include, but...

  6. Acoustic-emission linear-pulse holography

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, H.D.; Lemon, D.K.; Busse, L.J.

    1982-06-01

    This paper describes Acoustic Emission Linear Pulse Holography which combines the advantages of linear imaging and acoustic emission into a single NDE inspection system. This unique system produces a chronological linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. Conventional linear holographic imaging uses an ultrasonic transducer to transmit energy into the volume being imaged. When the crack or defect reflects that energy, the crack acts as a new source of acoustic waves. To formulate an image of that source, a receiving transducer is scanned over the volume of interest and the phase of the received signals is measured at successive points on the scan. The innovation proposed here is the utilization of the crack generated acoustic emission as the acoustic source and generation of a line image of the crack as it grows. A thirty-two point sampling array is used to construct phase-only linear holograms of simulated acoustic emission sources on large metal plates. The phases are calculated using the pulse time-of-flight (TOF) times from the reference transducer to the array of receivers. Computer reconstruction of the image is accomplished using a one-dimensional FFT algorithm (i.e., backward wave). Experimental results are shown which graphically illustrate the unique acoustic emission images of a single point and a linear crack in a 100 mm x 1220 mm x 1220 mm aluminum plate.

  7. Reconfigurable Array Interconnection by Photorefractive Volume Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Joseph Earl

    Parallel computing algorithms can be effectively implemented by combining local electronic processing with global optical interconnection. This dissertation describes the development of an optical array interconnection network based on photorefractive volume holography. The approach taken uses the correlation matrix-tensor multiplier (CMTM) algorithm, which optically convolves the phase-encoded input array with a control image holding the interconnection weights. Two-dimensional arrays can be interconnected with complex grey-level weights using binary phase-only spatial light modulators. The CMTM algorithm allows graceful accomodation of limited modulator size by trading off control image bandwidth for output signal to noise ratio. The optical correlation was performed by photorefractive four-wave mixing, storing the interconnection information in a single exposure of the control image. Multiple interconection patterns were prestored as color-multiplexed volume reflection holograms in z-cut LiNbO_3. Fast reconfiguration between interconnection patterns is possible using a wavelength tunable source, decoupling both the modulation and switching speeds from the slow photorefractive response. Experimental results confirmed theoretical predictions that the algorithm works best for densely connected networks, with a large fan-in to each output. Interconnection of up to 4096 inputs and outputs was demonstrated using such dense interconnection patterns. An aggregate average SNR of over 200 was obtained for 1024 inputs and outputs. Finally, a compact packaged optoelectonic processor system using CMTM interconnection is proposed, and its scaling behavior investigated.

  8. Fermi arcs from holography

    E-print Network

    David Vegh

    2010-07-01

    In this paper, we find mechanisms for the generation of Fermi arcs using the gauge/gravity correspondence. The gravity background is taken to be a charged black hole with vector hair in asymptotically AdS4 spacetime. The response function of fermion probes exhibits a p-wave gap in the dual superconductor. We couple the fermions to a charged rank-two antisymmetric field. Assuming that its spatial components condense, a novel type of open Fermi surface is produced. We derive an analytical formula for the Green's function and study its unique properties. The results are confirmed by separate numerical computations. In the Appendix, we study the effect of a neutral scalar field on the fermionic spectral functions. A suitable interaction term shifts the original spin-up / spin-down Fermi momenta in opposite directions and thus the two nodal points of the p-wave gap extend into Fermi pockets.

  9. Fermi arcs from holography

    E-print Network

    Vegh, David

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we find mechanisms for the generation of Fermi arcs using the gauge/gravity correspondence. The gravity background is taken to be a charged black hole with vector hair in asymptotically AdS4 spacetime. The response function of fermion probes exhibits a p-wave gap in the dual superconductor. We couple the fermions to a charged rank-two antisymmetric field. Assuming that its spatial components condense, a novel type of open Fermi surface is produced. We derive an analytical formula for the Green's function and study its unique properties. The results are confirmed by separate numerical computations. In the Appendix, we study the effect of a neutral scalar field on the fermionic spectral functions. A suitable interaction term shifts the original spin-up / spin-down Fermi momenta in opposite directions and thus the two nodal points of the p-wave gap extend into Fermi pockets.

  10. Integral Geometry and Holography

    E-print Network

    Czech, Bartlomiej; McCandlish, Samuel; Sully, James

    2015-01-01

    We present a mathematical framework which underlies the connection between information theory and the bulk spacetime in the AdS$_3$/CFT$_2$ correspondence. A key concept is kinematic space: an auxiliary Lorentzian geometry whose metric is defined in terms of conditional mutual informations and which organizes the entanglement pattern of a CFT state. When the field theory has a holographic dual obeying the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal, kinematic space has a direct geometric meaning: it is the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. Lengths of bulk curves are computed by kinematic volumes, giving a precise entropic interpretation of the length of any bulk curve. We explain how basic geometric concepts -- points, distances and angles -- are reflected in kinematic space, allowing one to reconstruct a large class of spatial bulk geometries from boundary entanglement entropies. In this way, kinematic space translates between information theoretic and geometric descriptions of a CFT state. As an example, we...

  11. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC): Advancing the frontiers of computational science and technology

    SciTech Connect

    Hules, J.

    1996-11-01

    National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) provides researchers with high-performance computing tools to tackle science`s biggest and most challenging problems. Founded in 1974 by DOE/ER, the Controlled Thermonuclear Research Computer Center was the first unclassified supercomputer center and was the model for those that followed. Over the years the center`s name was changed to the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center and then to NERSC; it was relocated to LBNL. NERSC, one of the largest unclassified scientific computing resources in the world, is the principal provider of general-purpose computing services to DOE/ER programs: Magnetic Fusion Energy, High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Basic Energy Sciences, Health and Environmental Research, and the Office of Computational and Technology Research. NERSC users are a diverse community located throughout US and in several foreign countries. This brochure describes: the NERSC advantage, its computational resources and services, future technologies, scientific resources, and computational science of scale (interdisciplinary research over a decade or longer; examples: combustion in engines, waste management chemistry, global climate change modeling).

  12. Computing, information, and communications: Technologies for the 21. Century

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    To meet the challenges of a radically new and technologically demanding century, the Federal Computing, Information, and Communications (CIC) programs are investing in long-term research and development (R and D) to advance computing, information, and communications in the United States. CIC R and D programs help Federal departments and agencies to fulfill their evolving missions, assure the long-term national security, better understand and manage the physical environment, improve health care, help improve the teaching of children, provide tools for lifelong training and distance learning to the workforce, and sustain critical US economic competitiveness. One of the nine committees of the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC), the Committee on Computing, Information, and Communications (CCIC)--through its CIC R and D Subcommittee--coordinates R and D programs conducted by twelve Federal departments and agencies in cooperation with US academia and industry. These R and D programs are organized into five Program Component Areas: (1) HECC--High End Computing and Computation; (2) LSN--Large Scale Networking, including the Next Generation Internet Initiative; (3) HCS--High Confidence Systems; (4) HuCS--Human Centered Systems; and (5) ETHR--Education, Training, and Human Resources. A brief synopsis of FY 1997 accomplishments and FY 1998 goals by PCA is presented. This report, which supplements the President`s Fiscal Year 1998 Budget, describes the interagency CIC programs.

  13. Precision holography for non-conformal branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanitscheider, Ingmar; Skenderis, Kostas; Taylor, Marika

    2008-09-01

    We set up precision holography for the non-conformal branes preserving 16 supersymmetries. The near-horizon limit of all such p-brane solutions with p <= 4, including the case of fundamental string solutions, is conformal to AdSp+2 × S8-p with a linear dilaton. We develop holographic renormalization for all these cases. In particular, we obtain the most general asymptotic solutions with appropriate Dirichlet boundary conditions, find the corresponding counterterms and compute the holographic 1-point functions, all in complete generality and at the full non-linear level. The result for the stress energy tensor properly defines the notion of mass for backgrounds with such asymptotics. The analysis is done both in the original formulation of the method and also using a radial Hamiltonian analysis. The latter formulation exhibits most clearly the existence of an underlying generalized conformal structure. In the cases of Dp-branes, the corresponding dual boundary theory, the maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory SYMp+1, indeed exhibits the generalized conformal structure found at strong coupling. We compute the holographic 2-point functions of the stress energy tensor and gluon operator and show they satisfy the expected Ward identities and the constraints of generalized conformal structure. The holographic results are also manifestly compatible with the M-theory uplift, with the asymptotic solutions, counterterms, one and two point functions etc. of the IIA F1 and D4 appropriately descending from those of M2 and M5 branes, respectively. We present a few applications including the computation of condensates in Witten's model of holographic YM{}4 theory.

  14. Cloud computing and patient engagement: leveraging available technology.

    PubMed

    Noblin, Alice; Cortelyou-Ward, Kendall; Servan, Rosa M

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing technology has the potential to transform medical practices and improve patient engagement and quality of care. However, issues such as privacy and security and "fit" can make incorporation of the cloud an intimidating decision for many physicians. This article summarizes the four most common types of clouds and discusses their ideal uses, how they engage patients, and how they improve the quality of care offered. This technology also can be used to meet Meaningful Use requirements 1 and 2; and, if speculation is correct, the cloud will provide the necessary support needed for Meaningful Use 3 as well. PMID:25807597

  15. Integral geometry and holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czech, Bart?omiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Sully, James

    2015-10-01

    We present a mathematical framework which underlies the connection between information theory and the bulk spacetime in the AdS3/CFT2 correspondence. A key concept is kinematic space: an auxiliary Lorentzian geometry whose metric is defined in terms of conditional mutual informations and which organizes the entanglement pattern of a CFT state. When the field theory has a holographic dual obeying the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal, kinematic space has a direct geometric meaning: it is the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. Lengths of bulk curves are computed by kinematic volumes, giving a precise entropic interpretation of the length of any bulk curve. We explain how basic geometric concepts — points, distances and angles — are reflected in kinematic space, allowing one to reconstruct a large class of spatial bulk geometries from boundary entanglement entropies. In this way, kinematic space translates between information theoretic and geometric descriptions of a CFT state. As an example, we discuss in detail the static slice of AdS3 whose kinematic space is two-dimensional de Sitter space.

  16. Integral geometry and holography

    SciTech Connect

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Sully, James

    2015-10-27

    We present a mathematical framework which underlies the connection between information theory and the bulk spacetime in the AdS3/CFT2 correspondence. A key concept is kinematic space: an auxiliary Lorentzian geometry whose metric is defined in terms of conditional mutual informations and which organizes the entanglement pattern of a CFT state. When the field theory has a holographic dual obeying the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal, kinematic space has a direct geometric meaning: it is the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. Lengths of bulk curves are computed by kinematic volumes, giving a precise entropic interpretation of the length of any bulk curve. We explain how basic geometric concepts — points, distances and angles — are reflected in kinematic space, allowing one to reconstruct a large class of spatial bulk geometries from boundary entanglement entropies. In this way, kinematic space translates between information theoretic and geometric descriptions of a CFT state. As an example, we discuss in detail the static slice of AdS3 whose kinematic space is two-dimensional de Sitter space.

  17. Skyrmions, instantons and holography

    E-print Network

    Paul Sutcliffe

    2010-09-21

    Some time ago, Atiyah and Manton observed that computing the holonomy of Yang-Mills instantons yields good approximations to static Skyrmion solutions of the Skyrme model. This paper provides an extension and explanation of this result, by proving that instanton holonomies produce exact solutions of a BPS Skyrme model, in which the Skyrme field is coupled to a tower of vector mesons. Neglecting any (or indeed all) of the vector mesons breaks the scale invariance and removes the BPS property of the Skyrmions. However, it is shown that a truncation of the BPS Skyrme theory, in which only the first vector meson is included, already moves the Skyrme model significantly closer to the BPS system. A theory that is close to a BPS system is required to reproduce the experimental data on binding energies of nuclei. A zero-mode quantization of the Skyrmion is performed in the truncated BPS theory and the results are compared to the physical properties of the nucleon. The approach is an analogue in five-dimensional Minkowski spacetime of a recent holographic construction of a Skyrme model by Sakai and Sugimoto, based on a string theory derivation of a Yang-Mills-Chern-Simons theory in a curved five-dimensional spacetime.

  18. Integral Geometry and Holography

    E-print Network

    Bartlomiej Czech; Lampros Lamprou; Samuel McCandlish; James Sully

    2015-05-20

    We present a mathematical framework which underlies the connection between information theory and the bulk spacetime in the AdS$_3$/CFT$_2$ correspondence. A key concept is kinematic space: an auxiliary Lorentzian geometry whose metric is defined in terms of conditional mutual informations and which organizes the entanglement pattern of a CFT state. When the field theory has a holographic dual obeying the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal, kinematic space has a direct geometric meaning: it is the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. Lengths of bulk curves are computed by kinematic volumes, giving a precise entropic interpretation of the length of any bulk curve. We explain how basic geometric concepts -- points, distances and angles -- are reflected in kinematic space, allowing one to reconstruct a large class of spatial bulk geometries from boundary entanglement entropies. In this way, kinematic space translates between information theoretic and geometric descriptions of a CFT state. As an example, we discuss in detail the static slice of AdS$_3$ whose kinematic space is two-dimensional de Sitter space.

  19. Quantum decoherence with holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Shih-Hao; Li, Wei; Lin, Feng-Li; Ning, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Quantum decoherence is the loss of a system's purity due to its interaction with the surrounding environment. Via the AdS/CFT correspondence, we study how a system decoheres when its environment is a strongly-coupled theory. In the FeynmanVernon formalism, we compute the influence functional holographically by relating it to the generating function of Schwinger-Keldysh propagators and thereby obtain the dynamics of the system's density matrix. We present two exactly solvable examples: (1) a straight string in a BTZ black hole and (2) a scalar probe in AdS5. We prepare an initial state that mimics Schrödinger's cat and identify different stages of its decoherence process using the time-scaling behaviors of Rényi entropy. We also relate decoherence to local quantum quenches, and by comparing the time evolution behaviors of the Wigner function and Rényi entropy we demonstrate that the relaxation of local quantum excitations leads to the collapse of its wave-function.

  20. Computer Vision Technology for Applications to Assist Blind Dr. Ying-Li Tian, Associate Professor

    E-print Network

    Zhu, Zhigang

    Computer Vision Technology for Applications to Assist Blind People Dr. Ying-Li Tian, Associate in computer vision, digital cameras, and portable computers make it possible to develop practical computer for applying computer vision technologies to assist people who are visually impaired including indoor

  1. Genetic Algorithm Modeling with GPU Parallel Computing Technology

    E-print Network

    Cavuoti, Stefano; Brescia, Massimo; Pescapé, Antonio; Longo, Giuseppe; Ventre, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    We present a multi-purpose genetic algorithm, designed and implemented with GPGPU / CUDA parallel computing technology. The model was derived from a multi-core CPU serial implementation, named GAME, already scientifically successfully tested and validated on astrophysical massive data classification problems, through a web application resource (DAMEWARE), specialized in data mining based on Machine Learning paradigms. Since genetic algorithms are inherently parallel, the GPGPU computing paradigm has provided an exploit of the internal training features of the model, permitting a strong optimization in terms of processing performances and scalability.

  2. Properties of Confinement in Holography

    E-print Network

    Giataganas, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    We review certain properties of confinement with added focus on the ones we study with holography. Then we discuss observables whose unique behavior can indicate the presence of confinement. Using mainly the Wilson loop in the gauge/gravity formalism, we study two main features of the QCD string: the string tension dependence on the temperature while in the confining phase, and the logarithmic broadening of the flux tube between the heavy static charges that turns out to be a generic property of all confining theories. Finally, we review the k-string bound state and we show that for a wide class of generic theories the k-string observables can be expressed in terms of the single meson bound state observables.

  3. Schrödinger Holography with $z=2$

    E-print Network

    Tomas Andrade; Cynthia Keeler; Alex Peach; Simon F. Ross

    2015-01-08

    We investigate holography for asymptotically Schr\\"odinger spacetimes, using a frame formalism based on the anisotropic scaling symmetry. We build on our previous work on $z<2$ to propose a dictionary for $z=2$. For $z=2$, the scaling symmetry does not act on the additional null direction, which implies that in our dictionary it does not correspond to one of the field theory directions. This is significantly different from previous analyses based on viewing Schr\\"odinger as a deformation of AdS. We study this dictionary in the linearised theory and in an asymptotic expansion. We show that a solution exists in an asymptotic expansion for arbitrary sources for the relevant operators in the stress energy complex.

  4. Properties of Confinement in Holography

    E-print Network

    Dimitrios Giataganas

    2015-05-26

    We review certain properties of confinement with added focus on the ones we study with holography. Then we discuss observables whose unique behavior can indicate the presence of confinement. Using mainly the Wilson loop in the gauge/gravity formalism, we study two main features of the QCD string: the string tension dependence on the temperature while in the confining phase, and the logarithmic broadening of the flux tube between the heavy static charges that turns out to be a generic property of all confining theories. Finally, we review the k-string bound state and we show that for a wide class of generic theories the k-string observables can be expressed in terms of the single meson bound state observables.

  5. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    DOEpatents

    Collins, H.D.; Busse, L.J.; Lemon, D.K.

    1983-10-25

    This device relates to the concept of and means for performing Acoustic Emission Linear Pulse Holography, which combines the advantages of linear holographic imaging and Acoustic Emission into a single non-destructive inspection system. This unique system produces a chronological, linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. The innovation is the concept of utilizing the crack-generated acoustic emission energy to generate a chronological series of images of a growing crack by applying linear, pulse holographic processing to the acoustic emission data. The process is implemented by placing on a structure an array of piezoelectric sensors (typically 16 or 32 of them) near the defect location. A reference sensor is placed between the defect and the array.

  6. Ultra wide band 3-D cross section (RCS) holography

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, H.D.; Hall, T.E.

    1992-07-01

    Ultra wide band impulse holography is an exciting new concept for predictive radar cross section (RCS) evaluation employing near-field measurements. Reconstruction of the near-field hologram data maps the target's scattering areas, and uniquely identifies the hot spot'' locations on the target. In addition, the target and calibration sphere's plane wave angular spectrums are computed (via digital algorithm) and used to generate the target's far-field RCS values in three dimensions for each frequency component in the impulse. Thin and thick targets are defined in terms of their near-field amplitude variations in range. Range gating and computer holographic techniques are applied to correct these variations. Preliminary experimental results on various targets verify the concept of RCS holography. The unique 3-D presentation (i.e., typically containing 524,288 RCS values for a 1024 {times} 512 sampled aperture for every frequency component) illustrates the efficacy of target recognition in terms of its far-field plane wave angular spectrum image. RCS images can then be viewed at different angles for target recognition, etc.

  7. Ultra wide band 3-D cross section (RCS) holography

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, H.D.; Hall, T.E.

    1992-07-01

    Ultra wide band impulse holography is an exciting new concept for predictive radar cross section (RCS) evaluation employing near-field measurements. Reconstruction of the near-field hologram data maps the target`s scattering areas, and uniquely identifies the ``hot spot`` locations on the target. In addition, the target and calibration sphere`s plane wave angular spectrums are computed (via digital algorithm) and used to generate the target`s far-field RCS values in three dimensions for each frequency component in the impulse. Thin and thick targets are defined in terms of their near-field amplitude variations in range. Range gating and computer holographic techniques are applied to correct these variations. Preliminary experimental results on various targets verify the concept of RCS holography. The unique 3-D presentation (i.e., typically containing 524,288 RCS values for a 1024 {times} 512 sampled aperture for every frequency component) illustrates the efficacy of target recognition in terms of its far-field plane wave angular spectrum image. RCS images can then be viewed at different angles for target recognition, etc.

  8. Microstructure measurement of digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jicheng; Tian, Ailing; Wang, Hongjun; Zhu, Xueliang; Wang, Chunhui; Liu, Bingcai; Asundi, Anand

    2015-02-01

    Miniaturization is a development trend of electronics, machinery and information systems, while micro structure brought a large amount of new development for industrial and research applications, whereas, slow measuring speed and two-dimensional results of traditional micro measurement could not meet our needs, it's urgent to find a matching testing techniques with more sensitivity, more effectiveness and better to have a real-time three-dimensional display. Digital holography applied to the measurement of micro structure, it made up for the lacking of traditional micro structure measure systems of too much time consuming, poor immunity, easily damaging samples with its simple structure, high accuracy, non contact features and three-dimensional reproduction. This paper analyzed the key factors of digital holographic recording and reproducing process.In order to solve the low quality of holograms captured by traditional recording system, holograms and pre-processing algorithm was combined for real-time, by observing the holograms and delicate adjusting the system, to ensure that the collected holograms with full use of CCD width while convenient for subsequent processing. In the processing of reproduction,the influence of spectrum choice, reconstruction wavelength and algorithms and unwrapping algorithm was been studied, and finally obtained an accurate three-dimensional topography of the object. The improved rerecording system and reconstruction algorithm mentioned above solved the low holography quality, much noise and not clear shortcomings of the reconstructed image. Experiment on a raster, compared with traditional system and algorithm results, results showed that the recording system and determine algorithms can reproduce the three-dimensional topography of the object with high precision and has a broader applicability.

  9. In-line digital holography with double knife edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Claudio; Iemmi, Claudio; Campos, Juan

    2015-06-01

    We study and test a new technique for in-line digital holography which avoids the formation of the conjugate images. Inline digital holography is based in a common path configuration. In this case, the hologram is produced by the interference between the reference wave front and the diffracted wave front by an almost transparent object. Twin images are obtained with obscured rings that difficult the determination of the best focusing plane. To avoid the conjugated image, the information of the magnitude and phase of the wave front are needed. In a recent work a new in-line digital holography technique was proposed. In this method the object is illuminated with a collimated wave front. A plane, close to the particles distribution is imaged onto a CCD by means of a convergent lens and at the same time, a knife edge is placed in the focal plane of the lens in order to block half of spatial frequency spectrum. In this way, by means of a numerical processing performed on the Fourier plane, it is possible to eliminate one of the components (real or conjugate) of the reconstructed images nevertheless it is observed a tiny deformation of the resulting hologram image. To compensate this effect, we propose a new configuration in which we implement the knife edge technique on both parts of the spectrum at the same time. Finally in the computer, we process the holograms to build one complete without deformation. This hologram is used to recover the wave front at different planes without the influence of the conjugate image.

  10. Vector Field Visual Data Analysis Technologies for Petascale Computational Science

    SciTech Connect

    Garth, Christoph; Deines, Eduard; Joy, Kenneth I.; Bethel, E. Wes; Childs, Hank; Weber, Gunther; Ahern, Sean; Pugmire, Dave; Sanderson, Allen; Johnson, Chris

    2009-11-13

    State-of-the-art computational science simulations generate large-scale vector field data sets. Visualization and analysis is a key aspect of obtaining insight into these data sets and represents an important challenge. This article discusses possibilities and challenges of modern vector field visualization and focuses on methods and techniques developed in the SciDAC Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies (VACET) and deployed in the open-source visualization tool, VisIt.

  11. EINDHOVEN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Department of Mathematics and Computer Science

    E-print Network

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    symmetric corrugated pipes by P.I. Rosen Esquivel, J.H.M. ten Thije Boonkkamp, J.A.M. Dam, R.M.M. Mattheij of Technology Eindhoven, The Netherlands Email: tenthije@win.tue.nl Jacques A.M. Dam Stork FDO Inoteq Amsterdam, The Netherlands Email: jacques.dam@stork.com Robert M.M. Mattheij CASA Department of Mathematics and Computer

  12. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science

    E-print Network

    Lynch, Nancy

    46 = 81 23 3.522 (d) The student buys one ice cream cone every time she goes from 6-2 to 6-1 or from 6-3 to 6-1, and buys no more than 2 ice cream cones. Let us denote vi(j) as the conditionalMassachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science 6

  13. Reviews of computing technology: Fiber distributed data interface

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.J.

    1991-12-01

    Fiber Distributed Data Interface, more commonly known as FDDI, is the name of the standard that describes a new local area network (LAN) technology for the 90's. This technology is based on fiber optics communications and, at a data transmission rate of 100 million bits per second (mbps), provides a full order of magnitude improvement over previous LAN standards such as Ethernet and Token Ring. FDDI as a standard has been accepted by all major computer manufacturers and is a national standard as defined by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). FDDI will become part of the US Government Open Systems Interconnection Profile (GOSIP) under Version 3 GOSIP and will become an international standard promoted by the International Standards Organization (ISO). It is important to note that there are no competing standards for high performance LAN's so that FDDI acceptance is nearly universal. This technology report describes FDDI as a technology, looks at the applications of this technology, examine the current economics of using it, and describe activities and plans by the Information Resource Management (IRM) department to implement this technology at the Savannah River Site.

  14. Reviews of computing technology: Fiber distributed data interface

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.J.

    1991-12-01

    Fiber Distributed Data Interface, more commonly known as FDDI, is the name of the standard that describes a new local area network (LAN) technology for the 90`s. This technology is based on fiber optics communications and, at a data transmission rate of 100 million bits per second (mbps), provides a full order of magnitude improvement over previous LAN standards such as Ethernet and Token Ring. FDDI as a standard has been accepted by all major computer manufacturers and is a national standard as defined by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). FDDI will become part of the US Government Open Systems Interconnection Profile (GOSIP) under Version 3 GOSIP and will become an international standard promoted by the International Standards Organization (ISO). It is important to note that there are no competing standards for high performance LAN`s so that FDDI acceptance is nearly universal. This technology report describes FDDI as a technology, looks at the applications of this technology, examine the current economics of using it, and describe activities and plans by the Information Resource Management (IRM) department to implement this technology at the Savannah River Site.

  15. Computational fluid dynamics for propulsion technology: Geometric grid visualization in CFD-based propulsion technology research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziebarth, John P.; Meyer, Doug

    1992-01-01

    The coordination is examined of necessary resources, facilities, and special personnel to provide technical integration activities in the area of computational fluid dynamics applied to propulsion technology. Involved is the coordination of CFD activities between government, industry, and universities. Current geometry modeling, grid generation, and graphical methods are established to use in the analysis of CFD design methodologies.

  16. Copyright in Computer-Readable Works: Policy Impacts of Technological Change. Computer Science and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltman, Roy G.

    The findings, recommendations, and conclusions of a policy-oriented, multi-disciplinary study of copyright in computer-readable works are reported. The foundations of copyright are examined for basic principles, and the theory of public goods is applied to develop the rationale for copyright protection. The judicial history of copyright in the…

  17. Exploring de Sitter Space and Holography

    E-print Network

    Vijay Balasubramanian; Jan de Boer; Djordje Minic

    2002-09-11

    We explore aspects of the physics of de Sitter (dS) space that are relevant to holography with a positive cosmological constant. First we display a nonlocal map that commutes with the de Sitter isometries, transforms the bulk-boundary propagator and solutions of free wave equations in de Sitter onto the same quantities in Euclidean anti-de Sitter (EAdS), and takes the two boundaries of dS to the single EAdS boundary via an antipodal identification. Second we compute the action of scalar fields on dS as a functional of boundary data. Third, we display a family of solutions to 3d gravity with a positive cosmological constant in which the equal time sections are arbitrary genus Riemann surfaces, and compute the action of these spaces as a functional of boundary data from the Einstein gravity and Chern-Simons gravity points of view. These studies suggest that if de Sitter space is dual to a Euclidean conformal field theory (CFT), this theory should involve two disjoint, but possibly entangled factors. We argue that these CFTs would be of a novel form, with unusual hermiticity conditions relating left movers and right movers. After exploring these conditions in a toy model, we combine our observations to propose that a holographic dual description of de Sitter space would involve a pure entangled state in a product of two of our unconventional CFTs associated with the de Sitter boundaries. This state can be constructed to preserve the de Sitter symmetries and and its decomposition in a basis appropriate to antipodal inertial observers would lead to the thermal properties of static patch.

  18. A Detailed Analysis over Some Important Issues towards Using Computer Technology into the EFL Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilakjani, Abbas Pourhosein

    2014-01-01

    Computer technology has changed the ways we work, learn, interact and spend our leisure time. Computer technology has changed every aspect of our daily life--how and where we get our news, how we order goods and services, and how we communicate. This study investigates some of the significant issues concerning the use of computer technology…

  19. C.I.S. MASTER OF COMPUTER & INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY PLAN OF STUDYC.I.S. MASTER OF COMPUTER & INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY PLAN OF STUDY NAME: DATE

    E-print Network

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    C.I.S. MASTER OF COMPUTER & INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY PLAN OF STUDYC.I.S. MASTER OF COMPUTER/INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE CIT 594/PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES & TECHNIQUES II CIT 595/DIGITAL SYSTEM ORGANIZATION & DESIGN CIT 596/THEORY OF COMPUTATION *Note here if previous academic work is being used to meet

  20. Use of Soft Computing Technologies For Rocket Engine Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis C.; Olcmen, Semih; Polites, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The problem to be addressed in this paper is to explore how the use of Soft Computing Technologies (SCT) could be employed to further improve overall engine system reliability and performance. Specifically, this will be presented by enhancing rocket engine control and engine health management (EHM) using SCT coupled with conventional control technologies, and sound software engineering practices used in Marshall s Flight Software Group. The principle goals are to improve software management, software development time and maintenance, processor execution, fault tolerance and mitigation, and nonlinear control in power level transitions. The intent is not to discuss any shortcomings of existing engine control and EHM methodologies, but to provide alternative design choices for control, EHM, implementation, performance, and sustaining engineering. The approaches outlined in this paper will require knowledge in the fields of rocket engine propulsion, software engineering for embedded systems, and soft computing technologies (i.e., neural networks, fuzzy logic, and Bayesian belief networks), much of which is presented in this paper. The first targeted demonstration rocket engine platform is the MC-1 (formerly FASTRAC Engine) which is simulated with hardware and software in the Marshall Avionics & Software Testbed laboratory that

  1. Recent advances in digital holography [invited].

    PubMed

    Osten, Wolfgang; Faridian, Ahmad; Gao, Peng; Körner, Klaus; Naik, Dinesh; Pedrini, Giancarlo; Singh, Alok Kumar; Takeda, Mitsuo; Wilke, Marc

    2014-09-20

    This article presents an overview of recent advances in the field of digital holography, ranging from holographic techniques designed to increase the resolution of microscopic images, holographic imaging using incoherent illumination, phase retrieval with incoherent illumination, imaging of occluded objects, and the holographic recording of depth-extended objects using a frequency-comb laser, to the design of an infrastructure for remote laboratories for digital-holographic microscopy and metrology. The paper refers to current trends in digital holography and explains them using new results that were recently achieved at the Institute for Applied Optics of the University Stuttgart. PMID:25322137

  2. Synthesis aperture femtosecond-pulsed digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Linwei; Sun, Meiyu; Chen, Jiannong; Yu, Yongjiang; Zhou, Changhe

    2013-09-01

    A new aperture-synthesis approach in femtosecond-pulse digital holography for obtaining a high-resolution and a whole field of view of the reconstructed image is proposed. The subholograms are recorded only by delay scanning holograms that have different delay times between the object and reference beams. In addition, by using image processing techniques, the synthesis aperture digital hologram can be superposed accurately. Analysis and experimental results show that the walk-off in femtosecond off-axis digital holography caused by low coherent can be well eliminated. The resolution and the field of view of the reconstructed image can be improved effectively.

  3. Characteristic of femtosecond laser pulsed digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Bing-Chuan; Wang, Xiao-Lei; Guo, Wen-Gang; Song, Li-Pei

    2015-08-01

    Digital holography can be applied to ultrafast detection when a femtosecond laser pulse is used. In this paper, the interference process of two femtosecond laser pulses is studied and the recording process of the femtosecond laser pulsed digital hologram is simulated. Holograms at different recording angles are generated by integrating the instantaneous interference field. By analyzing the distribution of the reconstructed phase error, the characteristics of femtosecond laser pulsed digital holography are discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61275133).

  4. Towards Quantitative Mapping of Three-Dimensional and Weak Electrostatic Potentials and Magnetic Fields using Electron Holography

    E-print Network

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    and either phase-shifting electron holography or cumulative hologram acquisition to achieve sub-2/1000-radian-dimensional objects from any projection direction, with numerical discretization performed in real space to avoid artifacts generated by discretization in Fourier space without a significant increase in computation time

  5. Emerging computer technologies and the news media of the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrabel, Debra A.

    1993-01-01

    The media environment of the future may be dramatically different from what exists today. As new computing and communications technologies evolve and synthesize to form a global, integrated communications system of networks, public domain hardware and software, and consumer products, it will be possible for citizens to fulfill most information needs at any time and from any place, to obtain desired information easily and quickly, to obtain information in a variety of forms, and to experience and interact with information in a variety of ways. This system will transform almost every institution, every profession, and every aspect of human life--including the creation, packaging, and distribution of news and information by media organizations. This paper presents one vision of a 21st century global information system and how it might be used by citizens. It surveys some of the technologies now on the market that are paving the way for new media environment.

  6. Technologies for Large Data Management in Scientific Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, intense usage of computing has been the main strategy of investigations in several scientific research projects. The progress in computing technology has opened unprecedented opportunities for systematic collection of experimental data and the associated analysis that were considered impossible only few years ago. This paper focuses on the strategies in use: it reviews the various components that are necessary for an effective solution that ensures the storage, the long term preservation, and the worldwide distribution of large quantities of data that are necessary in a large scientific research project. The paper also mentions several examples of data management solutions used in High Energy Physics for the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments in Geneva, Switzerland which generate more than 30,000 terabytes of data every year that need to be preserved, analyzed, and made available to a community of several tenth of thousands scientists worldwide.

  7. High performance battery and its computer simulation technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Kiyonami; Kanari, Katsuhiko; Nozaki, Ken; Masuda, Toshihisa; Onda, Kazuo; Kamimoto, Masayuki

    1991-08-01

    The current status of advanced high-performance batteries and their simulation technology is reviewed in a systematic manner. In particular, attention is given to the energy, power density, efficiency, life, and capacity requirements; battery evaluations; and computer simulation studies. Results of evaluation studies are reported for some typical batteries, and it is suggested that the lithium secondary battery is particularly promising for high-density power systems. Results of simulations are presented for different types of batteries, including lead-acid, sodium-sulfur, lithium-iron sulfate, lithium, and zinc-bromine cells. Various battery applications are discussed, including electric vehicle propulsion.

  8. Magnetic Critical Solutions in Holography

    E-print Network

    N. Angelinos

    2015-01-19

    The AdS/CFT correspondence is a realization of the holographic principle in the context of string theory. It is a map between a quantum field theory and a string theory living in one or more extra dimensions. Holography provides new tools to study strongly-coupled quantum field theories. It has important applications in quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and condensed matter (CM) systems, which are usually complicated and strongly coupled. Quantum critical CM theories have scaling symmetries and can be connected to higher-dimensional scale invariant space-times. The Effective Holographic Theory paradigm may be used to describe the low-energy (IR) holographic dynamics of quantum critical systems by the Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton (EMD) theory. We find the magnetic critical scaling solutions of an EMD theory containing an extra parity-odd term $F\\wedge F$. Previous studies in the absence of magnetic fields have shown the existence of quantum critical lines separated by quantum critical points. We find this is also true in the presence of a magnetic field. The critical solutions are characterized by the triplet of critical exponents ($\\theta,z,\\zeta$), the first two describing the geometry, while the latter describes the charge density.

  9. DSS-24 microwave holography measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochblatt, D. J.; Withington, P. M.; Jackson, H. J.

    1995-01-01

    The JPL DSN Microwave Antenna Holography System (MAHST) was applied to the newly constructed DSS-24 34-m beam-waveguide antenna at Goldstone, California. The application of MAHST measurements and corrections at DSS 24 provided the critical RF performance necessary to not only meet the project requirements and goals, but to surpass them. A performance increase of 0.35 dB at X-band (8.45 GHz) and 4.9 dB at Ka-band (32 GHz) was provided by MAHST, resulting in peak efficiencies of 75.25 percent at X-band and 60.6 percent at Ka-band (measured from the Cassegrain focus at f1). The MAHST enabled setting the main reflector panels of DSS 24 to 0.25-mm rms, making DSS 24 the highest precision antenna in the NASA/JPL DSN. The precision of the DSS-24 antenna (diameter/rms) is 1.36 x 10(exp 5), and its gain limit is at 95 GHz.

  10. High-Resolution UV Holography Lens for Particle Size Distribution Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, Morris Kaufman; Capelle, Gene; Grover, Mike; Sorenson, Dan; Pazuchanics, Pete

    2010-01-01

    A high-resolution UV holography relay lens, shown in Figure 1, has been developed for measuring particle size distributions down to 0.5 ?m in a 12-mm-diameter by 5-mm-thick volume. This work has been selected by an independent judging panel and editors of R&D Magazine as a recipient of a 2009 R&D 100 Award. This award recognizes the 100 most technologically significant products introduced during the past year.

  11. Review of Enabling Technologies to Facilitate Secure Compute Customization

    SciTech Connect

    Aderholdt, Ferrol; Caldwell, Blake A; Hicks, Susan Elaine; Koch, Scott M; Naughton, III, Thomas J; Pelfrey, Daniel S; Pogge, James R; Scott, Stephen L; Shipman, Galen M; Sorrillo, Lawrence

    2014-12-01

    High performance computing environments are often used for a wide variety of workloads ranging from simulation, data transformation and analysis, and complex workflows to name just a few. These systems may process data for a variety of users, often requiring strong separation between job allocations. There are many challenges to establishing these secure enclaves within the shared infrastructure of high-performance computing (HPC) environments. The isolation mechanisms in the system software are the basic building blocks for enabling secure compute enclaves. There are a variety of approaches and the focus of this report is to review the different virtualization technologies that facilitate the creation of secure compute enclaves. The report reviews current operating system (OS) protection mechanisms and modern virtualization technologies to better understand the performance/isolation properties. We also examine the feasibility of running ``virtualized'' computing resources as non-privileged users, and providing controlled administrative permissions for standard users running within a virtualized context. Our examination includes technologies such as Linux containers (LXC [32], Docker [15]) and full virtualization (KVM [26], Xen [5]). We categorize these different approaches to virtualization into two broad groups: OS-level virtualization and system-level virtualization. The OS-level virtualization uses containers to allow a single OS kernel to be partitioned to create Virtual Environments (VE), e.g., LXC. The resources within the host's kernel are only virtualized in the sense of separate namespaces. In contrast, system-level virtualization uses hypervisors to manage multiple OS kernels and virtualize the physical resources (hardware) to create Virtual Machines (VM), e.g., Xen, KVM. This terminology of VE and VM, detailed in Section 2, is used throughout the report to distinguish between the two different approaches to providing virtualized execution environments. As part of our technology review we analyzed several current virtualization solutions to assess their vulnerabilities. This included a review of common vulnerabilities and exposures (CVEs) for Xen, KVM, LXC and Docker to gauge their susceptibility to different attacks. The complete details are provided in Section 5 on page 33. Based on this review we concluded that system-level virtualization solutions have many more vulnerabilities than OS level virtualization solutions. As such, security mechanisms like sVirt (Section 3.3) should be considered when using system-level virtualization solutions in order to protect the host against exploits. The majority of vulnerabilities related to KVM, LXC, and Docker are in specific regions of the system. Therefore, future "zero day attacks" are likely to be in the same regions, which suggests that protecting these areas can simplify the protection of the host and maintain the isolation between users. The evaluations of virtualization technologies done thus far are discussed in Section 4. This includes experiments with 'user' namespaces in VEs, which provides the ability to isolate user privileges and allow a user to run with different UIDs within the container while mapping them to non-privileged UIDs in the host. We have identified Linux namespaces as a promising mechanism to isolate shared resources, while maintaining good performance. In Section 4.1 we describe our tests with LXC as a non-root user and leveraging namespaces to control UID/GID mappings and support controlled sharing of parallel file-systems. We highlight several of these namespace capabilities in Section 6.2.3. The other evaluations that were performed during this initial phase of work provide baseline performance data for comparing VEs and VMs to purely native execution. In Section 4.2 we performed tests using the High-Performance Computing Conjugate Gradient (HPCCG) benchmark to establish baseline performance for a scientific application when run on the Native (host) machine in contrast with execution under Docker and KVM. Our tests verified prior studie

  12. Performance Evaluation of Emerging High Performance Computing Technologies using WRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newby, G. B.; Morton, D.

    2008-12-01

    The Arctic Region Supercomputing Center (ARSC) has evaluated multicore processors and other emerging processor technologies for a variety of high performance computing applications in the earth and space sciences, especially climate and weather applications. A flagship effort has been to assess dual core processor nodes on ARSC's Midnight supercomputer, in which two-socket systems were compared to eight-socket systems. Midnight is utilized for ARSC's twice-daily weather research and forecasting (WRF) model runs, available at weather.arsc.edu. Among other findings on Midnight, it was found that the Hypertransport system for interconnecting Opteron processors, memory, and other subsystems does not scale as well on eight-socket (sixteen processor) systems as well as two-socket (four processor) systems. A fundamental limitation is the cache snooping operation performed whenever a computational thread accesses main memory. This increases memory latency as the number of processor sockets increases. This is particularly noticeable on applications such as WRF that are primarily CPU-bound, versus applications that are bound by input/output or communication. The new Cray XT5 supercomputer at ARSC features quad core processors, and will host a variety of scaling experiments for WRF, CCSM4, and other models. Early results will be presented, including a series of WRF runs for Alaska with grid resolutions under 2km. ARSC will discuss a set of standardized test cases for the Alaska domain, similar to existing test cases for CONUS. These test cases will provide different configuration sizes and resolutions, suitable for single processors up to thousands. Beyond multi-core Opteron-based supercomputers, ARSC has examined WRF and other applications on additional emerging technologies. One such technology is the graphics processing unit, or GPU. The 9800-series nVidia GPU was evaluated with the cuBLAS software library. While in-socket GPUs might be forthcoming in the future, current generations of GPUs lack a sufficient balance of computational resources to replace the general-purpose microprocessor found in most traditional supercomputer architectures. ARSC has also worked with the Cell Broadband Engine in a small Playstation3 cluster, as well as a 24-processor system based on IBM's QS22 blades. The QS22 system, called Quasar, features the PowerXCell 8i processor found in the RoadRunner system, along with an InfiniBand network and high performance storage. Quasar overcomes the limitations of the small memory and relatively slow network of the PS3 systems. The presentation will include system-level benchmarks on Quasar, as well as evaluation of the WRF test cases. Another technology evaluation focused on Sun's UltraSPARC T2+ processor, which ARSC evaluated in a two-way system. Each T2+ provides eight processor cores, each of which provides eight threads, for a total of 128 threads in a single system. WRF scalability was good up to the number of cores, but multiple threads per core did not scale as well. Throughout the discussion, practical findings from ARSC will be summarized. While multicore general-purpose microprocessors are anticipated to remain important for large computers running earth and space science applications, the role of other potentially disruptive technologies is less certain. Limitations of current and future technologies will be discussed. class="ab'>

  13. Synthetic optical holography for rapid nanoimaging

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, M.; Carney, P. S.; Hillenbrand, R.

    2014-01-01

    Holography has paved the way for phase imaging in a variety of wide-field techniques, including electron, X-ray and optical microscopy. In scanning optical microscopy, however, the serial fashion of image acquisition seems to challenge a direct implementation of traditional holography. Here we introduce synthetic optical holography (SOH) for quantitative phase-resolved imaging in scanning optical microscopy. It uniquely combines fast phase imaging, technical simplicity and simultaneous operation at visible and infrared frequencies with a single reference arm. We demonstrate SOH with a scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscope (s-SNOM) where it enables reliable quantitative phase-resolved near-field imaging with unprecedented speed. We apply these capabilities to nanoscale, non-invasive and rapid screening of grain boundaries in CVD-grown graphene, by recording 65 kilopixel near-field images in 26?s and 2.3 megapixel images in 13?min. Beyond s-SNOM, the SOH concept could boost the implementation of holography in other scanning imaging applications such as confocal microscopy. PMID:24651276

  14. Scalable Database Access Technologies for ATLAS Distributed Computing

    E-print Network

    A. Vaniachine; for the ATLAS Collaboration

    2009-10-02

    ATLAS event data processing requires access to non-event data (detector conditions, calibrations, etc.) stored in relational databases. The database-resident data are crucial for the event data reconstruction processing steps and often required for user analysis. A main focus of ATLAS database operations is on the worldwide distribution of the Conditions DB data, which are necessary for every ATLAS data processing job. Since Conditions DB access is critical for operations with real data, we have developed the system where a different technology can be used as a redundant backup. Redundant database operations infrastructure fully satisfies the requirements of ATLAS reprocessing, which has been proven on a scale of one billion database queries during two reprocessing campaigns of 0.5 PB of single-beam and cosmics data on the Grid. To collect experience and provide input for a best choice of technologies, several promising options for efficient database access in user analysis were evaluated successfully. We present ATLAS experience with scalable database access technologies and describe our approach for prevention of database access bottlenecks in a Grid computing environment.

  15. Implementation of Parallel Computing Technology to Vortex Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dacles-Mariani, Jennifer

    1999-01-01

    Mainframe supercomputers such as the Cray C90 was invaluable in obtaining large scale computations using several millions of grid points to resolve salient features of a tip vortex flow over a lifting wing. However, real flight configurations require tracking not only of the flow over several lifting wings but its growth and decay in the near- and intermediate- wake regions, not to mention the interaction of these vortices with each other. Resolving and tracking the evolution and interaction of these vortices shed from complex bodies is computationally intensive. Parallel computing technology is an attractive option in solving these flows. In planetary science vortical flows are also important in studying how planets and protoplanets form when cosmic dust and gases become gravitationally unstable and eventually form planets or protoplanets. The current paradigm for the formation of planetary systems maintains that the planets accreted from the nebula of gas and dust left over from the formation of the Sun. Traditional theory also indicate that such a preplanetary nebula took the form of flattened disk. The coagulation of dust led to the settling of aggregates toward the midplane of the disk, where they grew further into asteroid-like planetesimals. Some of the issues still remaining in this process are the onset of gravitational instability, the role of turbulence in the damping of particles and radial effects. In this study the focus will be with the role of turbulence and the radial effects.

  16. Computation Directorate and Science& Technology Review Computational Science and Research Featured in 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Alchorn, A L

    2003-04-04

    Thank you for your interest in the activities of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Computation Directorate. This collection of articles from the Laboratory's Science & Technology Review highlights the most significant computational projects, achievements, and contributions during 2002. In 2002, LLNL marked the 50th anniversary of its founding. Scientific advancement in support of our national security mission has always been the core of the Laboratory. So that researchers could better under and predict complex physical phenomena, the Laboratory has pushed the limits of the largest, fastest, most powerful computers in the world. In the late 1950's, Edward Teller--one of the LLNL founders--proposed that the Laboratory commission a Livermore Advanced Research Computer (LARC) built to Livermore's specifications. He tells the story of being in Washington, DC, when John Von Neumann asked to talk about the LARC. He thought Teller wanted too much memory in the machine. (The specifications called for 20-30,000 words.) Teller was too smart to argue with him. Later Teller invited Von Neumann to the Laboratory and showed him one of the design codes being prepared for the LARC. He asked Von Neumann for suggestions on fitting the code into 10,000 words of memory, and flattered him about ''Labbies'' not being smart enough to figure it out. Von Neumann dropped his objections, and the LARC arrived with 30,000 words of memory. Memory, and how close memory is to the processor, is still of interest to us today. Livermore's first supercomputer was the Remington-Rand Univac-1. It had 5600 vacuum tubes and was 2 meters wide by 4 meters long. This machine was commonly referred to as a 1 KFlop machine [E+3]. Skip ahead 50 years. The ASCI White machine at the Laboratory today, produced by IBM, is rated at a peak performance of 12.3 TFlops or E+13. We've improved computer processing power by 10 orders of magnitude in 50 years, and I do not believe there's any reason to think we won't improve another 10 orders of magnitude in the next 50 years. For years I have heard talk of hitting the physical limits of Moore's Law, but new technologies will take us into the next phase of computer processing power such as 3-D chips, molecular computing, quantum computing, and more. Big computers are icons or symbols of the culture and larger infrastructure that exists at LLNL to guide scientific discovery and engineering development. We have dealt with balance issues for 50 years and will continue to do so in our quest for a digital proxy of the properties of matter at extremely high temperatures and pressures. I believe that the next big computational win will be the merger of high-performance computing with information management. We already create terabytes--soon to be petabytes--of data. Efficiently storing, finding, visualizing and extracting data and turning that into knowledge which aids decision-making and scientific discovery is an exciting challenge. In the meantime, please enjoy this retrospective on computational physics, computer science, advanced software technologies, and applied mathematics performed by programs and researchers at LLNL during 2002. It offers a glimpse into the stimulating world of computational science in support of the national missions and homeland defense.

  17. Electron holography applied to the study of ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Voelkl, E.; Allard, L.F.; Nolan, T.A.

    1993-09-01

    The experimental setup of a transmission electron microscope for electron holography is shown. Using a model system of small gold particles on amorphous germanium, capabilities of electron holography are demonstrated. These include nanodiffraction, energy filtering, correction of aberrations and separate display of image amplitude and phase. The method of electron holography is then applied to the characterization of a grain boundary in a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic.

  18. Technological Metaphors and Moral Education: The Hacker Ethic and the Computational Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warnick, Bryan R.

    2004-01-01

    This essay is an attempt to understand how technological metaphors, particularly computer metaphors, are relevant to moral education. After discussing various types of technological metaphors, it is argued that technological metaphors enter moral thought through their "functional descriptions." The computer metaphor is then explored by turning to…

  19. Factors Contributing to Teachers' Use of Computer Technology in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilakjani, Abbas Pourhosein

    2013-01-01

    There are many factors for teachers to use computer technology in their classrooms. The goal of this study is to identify some of the important factors contributing the teachers' use of computer technology. The first goal of this paper is to discuss computer self-efficacy. The second goal is to explain teaching experience. The third goal is to…

  20. The Diffusion of Computer-Based Technology in K-12 Schools: Teachers' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colandrea, John Louis

    2012-01-01

    Because computer technology represents a major financial outlay for school districts and is an efficient method of preparing and delivering lessons, studying the process of teacher adoption of computer use is beneficial and adds to the current body of knowledge. Because the teacher is the ultimate user of computer technology for lesson preparation…

  1. Ultrasonic Imaging of Subsurface Objects Using Photorefractive Dynamic Holography

    SciTech Connect

    Deason, Vance Albert; Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Watson, Scott Marshall

    2001-07-01

    The INEEL has developed a photorefractive ultrasonic imaging technology that records both phase and amplitude of ultrasonic waves on the surface of solids. Phase locked dynamic holography provides full field images of these waves scattered from subsurface defects in solids, and these data are compared with theoretical predictions. Laser light reflected by a vibrating surface is imaged into a photorefractive material where it is mixed in a heterodyne technique with a reference wave. This demodulates the data and provides an image of the ultrasonic waves in either 2 wave or 4 wave mixing mode. These data images are recorded at video frame rates and show phase locked traveling or resonant acoustic waves. This technique can be used over a broad range of ultrasonic frequencies. Acoustic frequencies from 2 kHz to 10 MHz have been imaged, and a point measuring (non-imaging) version of the system has measured picometer amplitudes at 1 GHz.

  2. Three-dimensional information encryption and anticounterfeiting using digital holography.

    PubMed

    Shiu, Min-Tzung; Chew, Yang-Kun; Chan, Huang-Tian; Wong, Xin-Yu; Chang, Chi-Ching

    2015-01-01

    In this work, arbitrary micro phase-step digital holography with optical interferometry and digital image processing is utilized to obtain information about an image of a three-dimensional object and encrypting keys. Then, a computer-generated hologram is used for the purpose of holographic encryption. All information about the keys is required to perform the decryption, comprising the amplitude and phase distribution of the encrypting key, the distance of image reconstruction, zero-order term elimination, and twin-image term suppression. In addition to using identifiable information on different image planes and linear superposition processing hidden within the encrypted information, not only can we convey an important message, but we can also achieve anticounterfeiting. This approach retains the strictness of traditional holographic encryption and the convenience of digital holographic processing without image distortion. Therefore, this method provides better solutions to earlier methods for the security of the transmission of holographic information. PMID:25967026

  3. Holography and the Coleman-Mermin-Wagner theorem

    SciTech Connect

    Anninos, Dionysios; Hartnoll, Sean A.; Iqbal, Nabil

    2010-09-15

    In 2+1 dimensions at finite temperature, spontaneous symmetry breaking of global symmetries is precluded by large thermal fluctuations of the order parameter. The holographic correspondence implies that analogous effects must also occur in 3+1 dimensional theories with gauged symmetries in certain curved spacetimes with horizon. By performing a one loop computation in the background of a holographic superconductor, we show that bulk quantum fluctuations wash out the classical order parameter at sufficiently large distance scales. The low temperature phase is seen to exhibit algebraic long-range order. Beyond the specific example we study, holography suggests that IR singular quantum fluctuations of the fields and geometry will play an interesting role for many 3+1 dimensional asymptotically anti-de Sitter spacetimes with planar horizon.

  4. Some system implications of a Josephson computer technology

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, M.J.

    1981-04-01

    The Josephson technology as now understood is projected onto a current computer mainframe, the IBM 3033, to estimate its effect. This is a hypothetical projection and should not be taken in any way to represent a planned product. A three cycle critical case path is identified. Then an experimental 2.5 micron Josephson current injection logic circuit family and cache memory design are configured into a functionally equivalent Josephson package. Propagation distances in the hypothetical package are estimated to be 6% of those in the comparison mainframe estimated cycle time is 4 ns yielding an internal performance improvement by a factor of greater than 14. The Josephson version of the IBM 3033 would entail a more than 99% reduction in regulated power.

  5. Application Specific Performance Technology for Productive Parallel Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Allen D. Malony; Sameer Shende

    2008-10-01

    Our accomplishments over the last three years of the DOE pro ject â??Application-Specific Perfor- mance Technology for Productive Parallel Computingâ? (DOE Agreement: DE-FG02-05ER25680) are described below. The pro ject will have met all of its ob jectives by the time of its completion at the end of September, 2008. Two extensive yearly progress reports were produced in in March 2006 and 2007 and were previously submitted to the DOE Oï¬?ce of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (OASCR). Following an overview of the ob jectives of the pro ject, we summarize for each of the pro ject areas the achievements in the first two years, and then describe in some more detail the pro ject accomplishments this past year. At the end, we discuss the relationship of the proposed renewal application to the work done on the current pro ject.

  6. Software Holography: Interferometric Data Analysis for the Challenges of Next Generation Observatories

    E-print Network

    Miguel F. Morales; Michael Matejek

    2008-10-28

    Next generation radio observatories such as the MWA, LWA, LOFAR, CARMA and SKA provide a number of challenges for interferometric data analysis. These challenges include heterogeneous arrays, direction-dependent instrumental gain, and refractive and scintillating atmospheric conditions. From the analysis perspective, this means that calibration solutions can not be described using a single complex gain per antenna. In this paper we use the optimal map-making formalism developed for CMB analyses to extend traditional interferometric radio analysis techniques--removing the assumption of a single complex gain per antenna and allowing more complete descriptions of the instrumental and atmospheric conditions. Due to the similarity with holographic mapping of radio antenna surfaces, we call this extended analysis approach software holography. The resulting analysis algorithms are computationally efficient, unbiased, and optimally sensitive. We show how software holography can be used to solve some of the challenges of next generation observations, and how more familiar analysis techniques can be derived as limiting cases.

  7. Promoting Physical Activity through Hand-Held Computer Technology

    PubMed Central

    King, Abby C.; Ahn, David K.; Oliveira, Brian M.; Atienza, Audie A.; Castro, Cynthia M.; Gardner, Christopher D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Efforts to achieve population-wide increases in walking and similar moderate-intensity physical activities potentially can be enhanced through relevant applications of state-of-the-art interactive communication technologies. Yet few systematic efforts to evaluate the efficacy of hand-held computers and similar devices for enhancing physical activity levels have occurred. The purpose of this first-generation study was to evaluate the efficacy of a hand-held computer (i.e., personal digital assistant [PDA]) for increasing moderate intensity or more vigorous (MOD+) physical activity levels over 8 weeks in mid-life and older adults relative to a standard information control arm. Design Randomized, controlled 8-week experiment. Data were collected in 2005 and analyzed in 2006-2007. Setting/Participants Community-based study of 37 healthy, initially underactive adults aged 50 years and older who were randomized and completed the 8-week study (intervention=19, control=18). Intervention Participants received an instructional session and a PDA programmed to monitor their physical activity levels twice per day and provide daily and weekly individualized feedback, goal setting, and support. Controls received standard, age-appropriate written physical activity educational materials. Main Outcome Measure Physical activity was assessed via the Community Healthy Activities Model Program for Seniors (CHAMPS) questionnaire at baseline and 8 weeks. Results Relative to controls, intervention participants reported significantly greater 8-week mean estimated caloric expenditure levels and minutes per week in MOD+ activity (p<0.04). Satisfaction with the PDA was reasonably high in this largely PDA-naive sample. Conclusions Results from this first-generation study indicate that hand-held computers may be effective tools for increasing initial physical activity levels among underactive adults. PMID:18201644

  8. Computers and Classrooms: The Status of Technology in U.S. Schools. Policy Information Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coley, Richard; Cradler, John; Engel, Penelope K.

    The purpose of this report is to provide a "snapshot" of the status of technology use in United States schools. The report focuses on the following: school access to technology; student use of computers; evaluating the impact of educational technology; connecting teachers and technology; assessing the content and quality of courseware; and the…

  9. Proposal for a Science, Technology and Society Course Universal Computation and the Information Age

    E-print Network

    O'Donnell, Tom

    Proposal for a Science, Technology and Society Course Universal Computation and the Information AgeMay2003 1 Description "Universality1 " and the entire age of programmable machine computation was born . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (734)-651-0077 The University of Michigan

  10. Computational Linguistics for Metadata Building: Aggregating Text Processing Technologies for Enhanced Image Access

    E-print Network

    Murphy, Robert F.

    applies text mining using computational linguistic techniques to automatically extract, categorizeComputational Linguistics for Metadata Building: Aggregating Text Processing Technologies difficult. Studies indicate that current cataloging practices are insufficient for accommodating this volume

  11. Roles of Computer Technology in the Mathematics Education of the Gifted.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grandgenett, Neal

    1991-01-01

    This article reviews technological advances in educational computer use and discusses applications for computers as tools, tutors, and tutees in mathematics education of gifted students. Computer-assisted instruction, artificial intelligence, multimedia, numeric processing, computer-aided design, LOGO, robotics, and hypercard software packages are…

  12. Recent applications of TV holography and shearography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Mohan, Nandigana K.; Saldner, Henrik O.; Molin, Nils-Erik

    1996-07-01

    TV holography is used to measure the components of the deformation vector, whereas TV shearography is used to obtain the derivatives of the displacement components. In this paper, we highlight a novel approach to split the CCD into two parts which enables to extract entirely different information from a single experimental configuration. A holo-shearography configuration provides simultaneous measurement of out-of-plane displacement and its slope change in real time. Similarly a holo-comparative configuration multiplexes an out-of-plane displacement configuration and a comparative interferometric configuration. Few experimental results using both these configurations are presented. In addition TV holography is implemented for vibration studies on an Indian classical musical instrument--Veena. The preliminary studies on a model veena are demonstrated.

  13. Imaging nanoparticles in cells by nanomechanical holography

    SciTech Connect

    Tetard, Laurene; Passian, Ali; Venmar, Katherine T; Lynch, Rachel M; Voy, Brynn H; Shekhawat, Gajendra; Dravid, Vinayak; Thundat, Thomas George

    2008-06-01

    Nanomaterials have potential medical applications, for example in the area of drug delivery, and their possible adverse effects and cytotoxicity are curently receiving attention1,2. Inhalation of nanoparticles is of great concern, because nanoparticles can be easily aerosolized. Imaging techniques that can visualize local populations of nanoparticles at nanometre resolution within the structures of cells are therefore important3. Here we show that cells obtained from mice exposed to single-walled carbon nanohorns can be probed using a scanning probe microscopy technique called scanning near field ultrasonic holography. The nanohorns were observed inside the cells, and this was further confirmed using micro Raman spectroscopy. Scanning near field ultrasonic holography is a useful technique for probing the interactions of engineered nanomaterials in biological systems, which will greatly benefit areas in drug delivery and nanotoxicology.

  14. Applications Of Holography In Automotive Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawiuczyk, Ramuald

    1983-10-01

    This report provides a brief summary of works concerning the applications of optical holography in automative industry carried out in Central Laboratory of Optics in Warsaw, during the last ten years period. These works cover applications of holographic interferometry for nondestructive testing of engine valves, holographic investigations of pneumatic tires, double-pulse interferometry of driving gear, and holographic registration of oil mist. Holography is widelly used in different areas of modern technique [1-4] and its applications in automative industry are well known [5-7] . Those investigations have a great influence on safety aspects of automative systems, so, it is clear that currently they arouse a great interest. As a result, some investigations in this area have been stazoted out in Poland. Partially, these investigations have been carried on in Central Laboratory of Optics in cooperation with different research laboratories. Some results, obtained during last ten years period are presented in this report.

  15. Negative magnetoresistivity in chiral fluids and holography

    E-print Network

    Landsteiner, Karl; Sun, Ya-Wen

    2014-01-01

    In four dimensions Weyl fermions possess a chiral anomaly which leads to several special features in the transport phenomena, such as the negative longitudinal magnetoresistivity. In this paper, we study its inverse, the longitudinal magnetoconductivity, in the case of a chiral anomalous system with a background magnetic field B using the linear response method in the hydrodynamic limit and from holography. Our hydrodynamic results show that in general we need to have energy, momentum and charge dissipations to get a finite DC longitudinal magnetoconductivity due to the existence of the chiral anomaly. Applying the formula that we get from hydrodynamics to the holographic system in the probe limit, we find that the result in the hydrodynamic regime matches that calculated from holography via Kubo formula. The holographic result shows that in an intermediate regime of B there is naturally a negative magnetoresistivity which decreases as 1/B. At small B direct calculations in the holographic system suggest that...

  16. Holography and noncommutative yang-mills theory

    PubMed

    Li; Wu

    2000-03-01

    In this Letter a recently proposed gravity dual of noncommutative Yang-Mills theory is derived from the relations between closed string moduli and open string moduli recently suggested by Seiberg and Witten. The only new input one needs is a simple form of the running string tension as a function of energy. This derivation provides convincing evidence that string theory integrates with the holographical principle and demonstrates a direct link between noncommutative Yang-Mills theory and holography. PMID:11017215

  17. Computer vision challenges and technologies for agile manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molley, Perry A.

    1996-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, a Department of Energy laboratory, is responsible for maintaining the safety, security, reliability, and availability of the nuclear weapons stockpile for the United States. Because of the changing national and global political climates and inevitable budget cuts, Sandia is changing the methods and processes it has traditionally used in the product realization cycle for weapon components. Because of the increasing age of the nuclear stockpile, it is certain that the reliability of these weapons will degrade with time unless eventual action is taken to repair, requalify, or renew them. Furthermore, due to the downsizing of the DOE weapons production sites and loss of technical personnel, the new product realization process is being focused on developing and deploying advanced automation technologies in order to maintain the capability for producing new components. The goal of Sandia's technology development program is to create a product realization environment that is cost effective, has improved quality and reduced cycle time for small lot sizes. The new environment will rely less on the expertise of humans and more on intelligent systems and automation to perform the production processes. The systems will be robust in order to provide maximum flexibility and responsiveness for rapidly changing component or product mixes. An integrated enterprise will allow ready access to and use of information for effective and efficient product and process design. Concurrent engineering methods will allow a speedup of the product realization cycle, reduce costs, and dramatically lessen the dependency on creating and testing physical prototypes. Virtual manufacturing will allow production processes to be designed, integrated, and programed off-line before a piece of hardware ever moves. The overriding goal is to be able to build a large variety of new weapons parts on short notice. Many of these technologies that are being developed are also applicable to commercial production processes and applications. Computer vision will play a critical role in the new agile production environment for automation of processes such as inspection, assembly, welding, material dispensing and other process control tasks. Although there are many academic and commercial solutions that have been developed, none have had widespread adoption considering the huge potential number of applications that could benefit from this technology. The reason for this slow adoption is that the advantages of computer vision for automation can be a double-edged sword. The benefits can be lost if the vision system requires an inordinate amount of time for reprogramming by a skilled operator to account for different parts, changes in lighting conditions, background clutter, changes in optics, etc. Commercially available solutions typically require an operator to manually program the vision system with features used for the recognition. In a recent survey, we asked a number of commercial manufacturers and machine vision companies the question, 'What prevents machine vision systems from being more useful in factories?' The number one (and unanimous) response was that vision systems require too much skill to set up and program to be cost effective.

  18. Underwater digital holography for studies of marine plankton.

    PubMed

    Sun, H; Benzie, P W; Burns, N; Hendry, D C; Player, M A; Watson, J

    2008-05-28

    Conventional and digital holographies are proving to be increasingly important for studies of marine zooplankton and other underwater biological applications. This paper reports on the use of a subsea digital holographic camera (eHoloCam) for the analysis and identification of marine organisms and other subsea particles. Unlike recording on a photographic film, a digital hologram (e-hologram) is recorded on an electronic sensor and reconstructed numerically in a computer by simulating the propagation of the optical field in space. By comparison with other imaging techniques, an e-hologram has several advantages such as three-dimensional spatial reconstruction, non-intrusive and non-destructive interrogation of the recording sampling volume and the ability to record holographic videos. The basis of much work in optics lies in Maxwell's electromagnetic theory and holography is no exception: we report here on two of the numerical reconstruction algorithms we have used to reconstruct holograms obtained using eHoloCam and how their starting point lies in Maxwell's equations. Derivation of the angular spectrum algorithm for plane waves is provided as an exact method for the in-line numerical reconstruction of digital holograms. The Fresnel numerical reconstruction algorithm is derived from the angular spectrum method. In-line holograms are numerically processed before and after reconstruction to remove periodic noise from captured images and to increase image contrast. The ability of the Fresnel integration reconstruction algorithm to extend the reconstructed volume beyond the recording sensor dimensions is also shown with a 50% extension of the reconstruction area. Finally, we present some images obtained from recent deployments of eHoloCam in the North Sea and Faeroes Channel. PMID:18222904

  19. Electron holography of devices with epitaxial layers

    SciTech Connect

    Gribelyuk, M. A. Ontalus, V.; Baumann, F. H.; Zhu, Z.; Holt, J. R.

    2014-11-07

    Applicability of electron holography to deep submicron Si devices with epitaxial layers is limited due to lack of the mean inner potential data and effects of the sample tilt. The mean inner potential V{sub 0}?=?12.75?V of the intrinsic epitaxial SiGe was measured by electron holography in devices with Ge content C{sub Ge}?=?18%. Nanobeam electron diffraction analysis performed on the same device structure showed that SiGe is strain-free in [220] direction. Our results showed good correlation with simulations of the mean inner potential of the strain-free SiGe using density function theory. A new method is proposed in this paper to correct electron holography data for the overlap of potentials of Si and the epitaxial layer, which is caused by the sample tilt. The method was applied to the analysis of the dopant diffusion in p-Field-effect Transistor devices with the identical gate length L?=?30?nm, which had alternative SiGe geometry in the source and drain regions and was subjected to different thermal processing. Results have helped to understand electrical data acquired from the same devices in terms of dopant diffusion.

  20. Negative magnetoresistivity in chiral fluids and holography

    E-print Network

    Karl Landsteiner; Yan Liu; Ya-Wen Sun

    2015-03-03

    In four dimensions Weyl fermions possess a chiral anomaly which leads to several special features in the transport phenomena, such as the negative longitudinal magnetoresistivity. In this paper, we study its inverse, the longitudinal magnetoconductivity, in the case of a chiral anomalous system with a background magnetic field B using the linear response method in the hydrodynamic limit and from holography. Our hydrodynamic results show that in general we need to have energy, momentum and charge dissipations to get a finite DC longitudinal magnetoconductivity due to the existence of the chiral anomaly. Applying the formula that we get from hydrodynamics to the holographic system in the probe limit, we find that the result in the hydrodynamic regime matches that calculated from holography via Kubo formula. The holographic result shows that in an intermediate regime of B there is naturally a negative magnetoresistivity which decreases as 1/B. At small B direct calculations in the holographic system suggest that holography provides a new explanation for the small B positive magnetoresistivity behavior seen in experiment, i.e. the small B behavior comes from the quantum critical conductivity being affected by the chiral anomaly.

  1. Acoustic Holography of the Solar Convection Zone with SOHO-MDI Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, Charles

    2005-01-01

    The original grant with the title stated above was NAG5-10984, awarded to the Solar Physics Research Corporation (SPRC) in July, 2001, and was to be a three-year project. The basic theme of the project was the development and application of computational seismic holography for imaging, diagnostics, and monitoring of magnetic anomalies beneath active regions, in the deep solar interior, and on the Sun's far surface. The project was roughly separated into the following five tasks: (1) A holographic survey of active regions. (2) p-Mode absorption diagnostics of magnetic regions. (3) Acoustic modeling of the shallow subphotospheres of active regions and the quiet-Sun supergranulation based on phase-correlation seismic holography. (4) Seismic holography of the deep convection zone. (5) Improvements in holographic imaging of the far surface of the Sun. Following the death of Karen Harvey, President of SPRC, during the first year, the grant was transferred to Northwest Research Associates as NAG5-12901. Substantial but progress had been made on most of the above tasks in the first year under NAG5-10984, but none were completed. This work was continued under NAG5-12901.

  2. Reviews of computing technology: Fiber distributed data interface

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.J.

    1992-04-01

    This technology report describes Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) as a technology, looks at the applications of this technology, examines the current economics of using it, and describe activities and plans by the Information Resource Management Department to implement this technology at the Savannah River Site.

  3. Reviews of computing technology: Fiber distributed data interface. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.J.

    1992-04-01

    This technology report describes Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) as a technology, looks at the applications of this technology, examines the current economics of using it, and describe activities and plans by the Information Resource Management Department to implement this technology at the Savannah River Site.

  4. Predicting Cloud Computing Technology Adoption by Organizations: An Empirical Integration of Technology Acceptance Model and Theory of Planned Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekufu, ThankGod K.

    2012-01-01

    Organizations are finding it difficult in today's economy to implement the vast information technology infrastructure required to effectively conduct their business operations. Despite the fact that some of these organizations are leveraging on the computational powers and the cost-saving benefits of computing on the Internet cloud, others…

  5. Optimizing alcohol production from whey using computer technology. [Kluyveromyces fragilis

    SciTech Connect

    Zertuche, L.; Zall, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    This study was undertaken with the major goal of optimizing the ethanol production from whey using computer technology. To reach this goal, a mathematical model that would describe the fermentation and that could be used for the optimization was developed. Kluyveromyces fragilis was the microorganism used to ferment the lactose in the whey into ethanol. Preliminary studies showed that K. fragilis produced about 90% of the theoretical ethanol yield when grown in whey-complemented media. However, when this yeast is grown in nonsupplemented whey media, it does not produce more than 32% of that yield. Comparative batch fermentations of lactose and whey-complemented media showed that whey possibly contains enhancing components for yeast growth and ethanol production. To obtain the mathematical model, the one-to-one effect of the process variables (lactose and yeast extract concentrations, air flow rate, pH, and dilution rate) on the ethanol production were first investigated. Experiments on the pH effect showed that a decrease in pH from 7 to 4 produced an increase in ethanol concentration from 16.5 to 26.5 g/L (50 g/L initial lactose). The results obtained from modeling of the continuous fermentation using the previously listed variables showed that air flow rate, pH, and dilution rate were the process variables that most influence the production of ethanol.

  6. The Role of Computer Technology in Teaching Reading and Writing: Preschool Teachers' Beliefs and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ihmeideh, Fathi

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated preschool teachers' beliefs and practices regarding the use of computer technology in teaching reading and writing in Jordan. The researcher developed a questionnaire consisting of two scales--Teachers' Beliefs Scale (TB Scale) and Teachers' Practices Scale (TP Scale)--to examine the role of computer technology in teaching…

  7. A Meta-Analysis of Effectiveness Studies on Computer Technology-Supported Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grgurovic, Maja; Chapelle, Carol A.; Shelley, Mack C.

    2013-01-01

    With the aim of summarizing years of research comparing pedagogies for second/foreign language teaching supported with computer technology and pedagogy not-supported by computer technology, a meta-analysis was conducted of empirical research investigating language outcomes. Thirty-seven studies yielding 52 effect sizes were included, following a…

  8. A Quantitative Exploration of Preservice Teachers' Intent to Use Computer-based Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Kioh; Jain, Sachin; Westhoff, Guy; Rezabek, Landra

    2008-01-01

    Based on Bandura's (1977) social learning theory, the purpose of this study is to identify the relationship of preservice teachers' perceptions of faculty modeling of computer-based technology and preservice teachers' intent of using computer-based technology in educational settings. There were 92 participants in this study; they were enrolled in…

  9. Tech-Prep Competency Profiles within the Business/Computer Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for educators throughout Ohio who are involved in planning and/or delivering tech prep programs within the business/computer technologies cluster, discusses and presents tech prep competency profiles (TCPs) for 12 business/computer technology occupations. The first part of the document contains the following:…

  10. Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop III Agenda National Institute of Standards and Technology

    E-print Network

    Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop III Agenda National Institute of Standards and Technology 100, Information Technology Laboratory, Cita M. Furlani 9:10 ­ 9:30 Keynote Session: A Global View of Cloud of IT and Telecommunications Industries, World Economic Forum USA 9:30 ­ 10:20 Cloud Computing: Adopters' Long-term View, Panel

  11. University Students and Ethics of Computer Technology Usage: Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iyadat, Waleed; Iyadat, Yousef; Ashour, Rateb; Khasawneh, Samer

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine the level of students' awareness about computer technology ethics at the Hashemite University in Jordan. A total of 180 university students participated in the study by completing the questionnaire designed by the researchers, named the Computer Technology Ethics Questionnaire (CTEQ). Results…

  12. An Exploratory Study of the Implementation of Computer Technology in an American Islamic Private School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saleem, Mohammed M.

    2009-01-01

    This exploratory study of the implementation of computer technology in an American Islamic private school leveraged the case study methodology and ethnographic methods informed by symbolic interactionism and the framework of the Muslim Diaspora. The study focused on describing the implementation of computer technology and identifying the…

  13. Evaluation of computer-based ultrasonic inservice inspection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, R.V. Jr.; Angel, L.J.; Doctor, S.R.; Park, W.R.; Schuster, G.J.; Taylor, T.T.

    1994-03-01

    This report presents the principles, practices, terminology, and technology of computer-based ultrasonic testing for inservice inspection (UT/ISI) of nuclear power plants, with extensive use of drawings, diagrams, and LTT images. The presentation is technical but assumes limited specific knowledge of ultrasonics or computers. The report is divided into 9 sections covering conventional LTT, computer-based LTT, and evaluation methodology. Conventional LTT topics include coordinate axes, scanning, instrument operation, RF and video signals, and A-, B-, and C-scans. Computer-based topics include sampling, digitization, signal analysis, image presentation, SAFI, ultrasonic holography, transducer arrays, and data interpretation. An evaluation methodology for computer-based LTT/ISI systems is presented, including questions, detailed procedures, and test block designs. Brief evaluations of several computer-based LTT/ISI systems are given; supplementary volumes will provide detailed evaluations of selected systems.

  14. Social Studies: Application Units. Course II, Teachers. Computer-Oriented Curriculum. REACT (Relevant Educational Applications of Computer Technology).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tecnica Education Corp., San Carlos, CA.

    This book is one of a series in Course II of the Relevant Educational Applications of Computer Technology (REACT) Project. It is designed to point out to teachers two of the major applications of computers in the social sciences: simulation and data analysis. The first section contains a variety of simulation units organized under the following…

  15. Campus Computing, 2001: The 12th National Survey of Computing and Information Technology in American Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Kenneth C.

    The 2001 Campus Computing Survey, the 12th such survey, is the largest continuing study of the role of computing and information technology in U.S. higher education today. The survey results in this report summarize data from 590 two- and four-year, public and private colleges across the United States, representing a 38.4% response rate. The focus…

  16. In the Clouds: The Implications of Cloud Computing for Higher Education Information Technology Governance and Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dulaney, Malik H.

    2013-01-01

    Emerging technologies challenge the management of information technology in organizations. Paradigm changing technologies, such as cloud computing, have the ability to reverse the norms in organizational management, decision making, and information technology governance. This study explores the effects of cloud computing on information technology…

  17. Technology in Spiritual Formation: An Exploratory Study of Computer Mediated Religious Communications

    E-print Network

    Hayes, Gillian R.

    Technology in Spiritual Formation: An Exploratory Study of Computer Mediated Religious of Technology 85 Fifth Street NW Atlanta Georgia 30308 {spwyche, gillian, beki}@cc.gatech.edu *Georgia Gwinnett report findings from a study of American Christian ministers' uses of technologies in religious practices

  18. Roadmap: Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technology -Computer -Associate of Applied Science RE-AAS-EEET-CMPR

    E-print Network

    Khan, Javed I.

    Roadmap: Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technology - Computer - Associate of Applied Science RE ! Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technology 2 3 COMM 15000 Introduction to Human Communication 3 KAD PHY+ at time of admission. 2. Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technology (3 credit hours) Choose from

  19. Boon or Bust? Access to Electronic Publishing by Individuals Using Adaptive Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berliss, Jane

    1994-01-01

    Explores how people with disabilities use computer technology, as well as the issues involved in using this technology to access electronically published materials. Topics discussed include definitions of disability; uses of adaptive technology; the physical environment; documentation, training, and support; problems in accessing electronic media;…

  20. A Computer-Assisted Approach for Conducting Information Technology Applied Instructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Hui-Chun; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Tsai, Pei Jin; Yang, Tzu-Chi

    2009-01-01

    The growing popularity of computer and network technologies has attracted researchers to investigate the strategies and the effects of information technology applied instructions. Previous research has not only demonstrated the benefits of applying information technologies to the learning process, but has also revealed the difficulty of applying…

  1. The Technology Fix: The Promise and Reality of Computers in Our Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pflaum, William D.

    2004-01-01

    During the technology boom of the 1980s and 1990s, computers seemed set to revolutionize education. Do any of these promises sound familiar? (1) Technology would help all students learn better, thanks to multimedia programs capable of adapting to individual needs, learning styles, and skill levels; (2) Technology would transform the teacher's role…

  2. The Relationship Between Perceived Stress and Computer Technology Attitude: an Application on Health Sciences Students

    PubMed Central

    Ozyurek, Pakize; Oztasan, Nuray; Kilic, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study is to define attitudes of students in health sciences towards perceived personal stress and computer technologies, and to present the relationship between stress and computer technology attitudes. Methods: In this scope, this study has a descriptive nature and thus a questionnaire has been applied on 764 students from Afyon Kocatepe University Health Sciences High School, Turkey for data gathering. Descriptive statistics, independent samples, t test, one way ANOVA, and regression analysis have been used for data analysis. Findings: In the study, it is seen that female (=3,78) have a more positive attitude towards computer technology than male students (=3,62). according to the results of regression analysis of the study, the regression model between computer technology attitude (CTA) and perceived stress (PS) has been found meaningful (F=16,291; p<0,005). There was a negative relationship between computer technology attitude and perceived stress (when computer technology altitude increases, perceived stress decreases), and an increase of one unit in computer attitude results in 0.275 decrease in perceived stress. Conclusions: it can be concluded that correct and proper use of computer technologies can be accepted as a component of overcoming stress methods. PMID:25870489

  3. Electric amateurs: literary encounters with computing technologies 1987-2001 

    E-print Network

    Butchard, Dorothy Keziah

    2015-07-02

    This thesis considers the portrayal of uncertain or amateur encounters with new technologies in the late twentieth century. Focusing on fictional responses to the incipient technological and cultural changes wrought by ...

  4. Understanding the Critics of Educational Technology: Gender Inequities and Computers 1983-1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangione, Melissa

    Although many view computers purely as technological tools to be utilized in the classroom and workplace, attention has been drawn to the social differences computers perpetuate, including those of race, class, and gender. This paper focuses on gender and computing by examining recent analyses in regards to content, form, and usage concerns. The…

  5. Computer Attitude of Teaching Faculty: Implications for Technology-Based Performance in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larbi-Apau, Josephine A.; Moseley, James L.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the validity of Selwyn's computer attitude scale (CAS) and its implication for technology-based performance of randomly sampled (n = 167) multidiscipline teaching faculty in higher education in Ghana. Considered, computer attitude is a critical function of computer attitude and potential performance. Composed of four…

  6. Examining the Relationship between Technological, Organizational, and Environmental Factors and Cloud Computing Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tweel, Abdeneaser

    2012-01-01

    High uncertainties related to cloud computing adoption may hinder IT managers from making solid decisions about adopting cloud computing. The problem addressed in this study was the lack of understanding of the relationship between factors related to the adoption of cloud computing and IT managers' interest in adopting this technology. In…

  7. Computer-Related Assistive Technology: Satisfaction and Experiences among Users with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Mary; Nieuwenhuijsen, Els R.; Epstein, Marcy J.

    2008-01-01

    Many people with disabilities use assistive technology devices (ATDs) for computer access. The specific focus of this exploratory study was (a) to assess the experiences, opinions, and satisfaction levels of 24 individuals with disabilities using computer-related ATDs; (b) to investigate their awareness of health risk factors related to computer…

  8. USING OLPC LAPTOP TECHNOLOGY AS A COMPUTER SCIENCE CASE STUDY TEACHING TOOL*

    E-print Network

    Buchele, Suzanne Fox

    in a computer organization or architecture class. The Geode processor is x86 compatible, with 64 kbyte level 1USING OLPC LAPTOP TECHNOLOGY AS A COMPUTER SCIENCE CASE STUDY TEACHING TOOL* Suzanne Fox Buchele@southwestern.edu ABSTRACT The One Laptop Per Child project has succeeded in developing a novel computer that is tailored

  9. Desktop Technology for Newspapers: Use of the Computer Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Howard Alan

    This work considers desktop publishing technology as a way used to paginate newspapers electronically, tracing the technology's development from the beginning of desktop publishing in the mid-1980s to the 1990s. The work emphasizes how desktop publishing technology is and can be used by weekly newspapers. It reports on a Pennsylvania weekly…

  10. Hindawi Publishing Corporation International Journal of Computer Games Technology

    E-print Network

    , the In-game Graphical Insertion Technology (IGIT), which permits the addition of web-based applications using the In-game Graphical Insertion Technology (IGIT) and that proposes an architecture that combines for the delivery of user-generated live video. IGIT is an innovative technology that permits replacing game

  11. The Dialogic Classroom: Teachers Integrating Computer Technology, Pedagogy, and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galin, Jeffrey R., Ed.; Latchaw, Joan, Ed.

    The 12 essays collected in this book suggest both practical and theoretical approaches to teaching through networked technologies. Moving beyond technology for its own sake, the book articulates a pedagogy which makes its own productive uses of emergent technologies, both inside and outside the classroom. The book models for students one possible…

  12. Making Advanced Computer Science Topics More Accessible through Interactive Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shao, Kun; Maher, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Teaching advanced technical concepts in a computer science program to students of different technical backgrounds presents many challenges. The purpose of this paper is to present a detailed experimental pedagogy in teaching advanced computer science topics, such as computer networking, telecommunications and data structures using…

  13. Computer Programmed Milling Machine Operations. High-Technology Training Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Dennis

    This learning module for a high school metals and manufacturing course is designed to introduce the concept of computer-assisted machining (CAM). Through it, students learn how to set up and put data into the controller to machine a part. They also become familiar with computer-aided manufacturing and learn the advantages of computer numerical…

  14. Computer Enhanced Collaborative Learning: A New Technology for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jernstedt, G. Christian

    1983-01-01

    Briefly traces development of contributions of individualized and humanistic instruction to the learning process, discussing computer enhanced collaborative learning, a synergetic combination of computer and person. Indicates that impact of computers in education at present is principally in saving teacher/student time and in raising…

  15. Cloud Computing: A Free Technology Option to Promote Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegle, Del

    2010-01-01

    In a time of budget cuts and limited funding, purchasing and installing the latest software on classroom computers can be prohibitive for schools. Many educators are unaware that a variety of free software options exist, and some of them do not actually require installing software on the user's computer. One such option is cloud computing. This…

  16. Educational Technology Classics: The Computer versus the Clock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slack, Charles W.

    2010-01-01

    It is no accident that the first use of computers in school systems was to arrange schedules for students and teachers. The proper use of the computer in the classroom is as a replacement for the clock and its strict temporal schedule. By conveying information through self-instructional content, the computer can schedule work for pupils in…

  17. Fascinating Technology: Computer Games as an Issue for Religious Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scholtz, Christopher P.

    2005-01-01

    Computer games as an important part of youth culture can, from a certain perspective, be highly relevant for religious education. I will review the role of computer games, and then give a brief overview, suggesting a specific phenomenological approach for research on computer games and religious education. After presenting one example of such…

  18. Computer architectures for computational physics work done by Computational Research and Technology Branch and Advanced Computational Concepts Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Slides are reproduced that describe the importance of having high performance number crunching and graphics capability. They also indicate the types of research and development underway at Ames Research Center to ensure that, in the near term, Ames is a smart buyer and user, and in the long-term that Ames knows the best possible solutions for number crunching and graphics needs. The drivers for this research are real computational physics applications of interest to Ames and NASA. They are concerned with how to map the applications, and how to maximize the physics learned from the results of the calculations. The computer graphics activities are aimed at getting maximum information from the three-dimensional calculations by using the real time manipulation of three-dimensional data on the Silicon Graphics workstation. Work is underway on new algorithms that will permit the display of experimental results that are sparse and random, the same way that the dense and regular computed results are displayed.

  19. Spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory technologies for normally off computing (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, K. Yuasa, S.; Fujita, S.; Ito, J.; Yoda, H.; Suzuki, Y.; Nakatani, Y.; Miyazaki, T.

    2014-05-07

    Most parts of present computer systems are made of volatile devices, and the power to supply them to avoid information loss causes huge energy losses. We can eliminate this meaningless energy loss by utilizing the non-volatile function of advanced spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory (STT-MRAM) technology and create a new type of computer, i.e., normally off computers. Critical tasks to achieve normally off computers are implementations of STT-MRAM technologies in the main memory and low-level cache memories. STT-MRAM technology for applications to the main memory has been successfully developed by using perpendicular STT-MRAMs, and faster STT-MRAM technologies for applications to the cache memory are now being developed. The present status of STT-MRAMs and challenges that remain for normally off computers are discussed.

  20. Electron holography for fields in solids: problems and progress.

    PubMed

    Lichte, Hannes; Börrnert, Felix; Lenk, Andreas; Lubk, Axel; Röder, Falk; Sickmann, Jan; Sturm, Sebastian; Vogel, Karin; Wolf, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Electron holography initially was invented by Dennis Gabor for solving the problems raised by the aberrations of electron lenses in Transmission Electron Microscopy. Nowadays, after hardware correction of aberrations allows true atomic resolution of the structure, for comprehensive understanding of solids, determination of electric and magnetic nanofields is the most challenging task. Since fields are phase objects in the TEM, electron holography is the unrivaled method of choice. After more than 40 years of experimental realization and steady improvement, holography is increasingly contributing to these highly sophisticated and essential questions in materials science, as well to the understanding of electron waves and their interaction with matter. PMID:23831133

  1. Ethereal presences in holography and photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, M.; Byrne, Kay

    2007-02-01

    This paper examines the concept of the 'Presence of Absence' in post-mortem photography and holography, drawing upon both historical and lesser-known images as reference. To create a photographic negative one needs the presence of light to expose the light sensitive surface, be it glass, a polished plate or plastic. A hologram may also be created when a coherent light source, for example from a Laser, travels through a light sensitive material and falls upon the subject to be recorded. A holograph however, retains the optical qualities of both phase and amplitude, the memory of light. Both mediums recall, as it were, 'now absent moments', and confronts us with what is 'not there' as much as 'what is'. This paper examines the exploration of absence and presence in post-mortem photography and holography and it's a richly visceral visual language. A photonic syntax can interpret death as an elegant yet horrific aesthetic, the photograph may be beautify screened and yet obscene in its content. In essence one can be a voyeur, experiencing a mere visual whisper of the true nature of the subject. Our Victorian forefathers explored postmortem photography as an object of mourning, and at the close of the nineteenth century when Jack the Ripper had the inhabitants of White Chapel in a grip of fear, photography made its mark as a documentation of violent crime. Today, within contemporary photography, death is now presented within the confines of the 'Art Gallery', as a sensual, and at times, sensationalised art form. In exploring post-mortem imagery, both in holography and conventional photography, absence presents an aspect of death as startling in its unanimated form and detailed in its finite examination of mortality.

  2. Strain field measurement by transverse digital holography.

    PubMed

    Stetson, Karl A

    2015-07-01

    The technique generally referred to as speckle correlation interferometry may be described as transverse digital holography when phase stepping is applied, because phase stepping allows complete maps to be obtained of the transverse displacement of an object surface. This paper describes the analysis of these maps to obtain surface strain by fitting data to flat surfaces for least square error within sections of the map. Examples are shown for measuring rotation, thermal contraction, and strains around the tip of a notch. Only uniaxial strain is measured; however, the possibility for biaxial measurement is considered. PMID:26193153

  3. Three-dimensional nonlinear acoustical holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Yaying

    Nearfield Acoustical Holography (NAH) is an acoustic field visualization technique that can be used to reconstruct three-dimensional (3-D) acoustic fields by projecting two-dimensional (2-D) data measured on a hologram surface. However, linear NAH algorithms developed and improved by many researchers can result in significant reconstruction errors when they are applied to reconstruct 3-D acoustic fields that are radiated from a high-level noise source and include significant nonlinear components. Here, planar, nonlinear acoustical holography procedures are developed that can be used to reconstruct 3-D, nonlinear acoustic fields radiated from a high-level noise source based on 2-D acoustic pressure data measured on a hologram surface. The first nonlinear acoustic holography procedure is derived for reconstructing steady-state acoustic pressure fields by applying perturbation and renormalization methods to nonlinear, dissipative, pressure-based Westervelt Wave Equation (WWE). The nonlinear acoustic pressure fields radiated from a high-level pulsating sphere and an infinite-size, vibrating panel are used to validate this procedure. Although the WWE-based algorithm is successfully validated by those two numerical simulations, it still has several limitations: (1) Only the fundamental frequency and its second harmonic nonlinear components can be reconstructed; (2) the application of this algorithm is limited to mono-frequency source cases; (3) the effects of bent wave rays caused by transverse particle velocities are not included; (4) only acoustic pressure fields can be reconstructed. In order to address the limitations of the steady-state, WWE-based procedure, a transient, planar, nonlinear acoustic holography algorithm is developed that can be used to reconstruct 3-D nonlinear acoustic pressure and particle velocity fields. This procedure is based on Kuznetsov Wave Equation (KWE) that is directly solved by using temporal and spatial Fourier Transforms. When compared to the WWE-based procedure, the KWE-based procedure can be applied to multi-frequency source cases where each frequency component can contain both linear and nonlinear components. The effects of nonlinear bent wave rays can be also considered by using this algorithm. The KWE-based procedure is validated by conducting an experiment with a compression driver and four numerical simulations. The numerical and experimental results show that holographically-projected acoustic fields match well with directly-calculated and directly-measured fields.

  4. Holography, Probe Branes and Isoperimetric Inequalities

    E-print Network

    Frank Ferrari; Antonin Rovai

    2015-04-06

    In many instances of holographic correspondences between a d dimensional boundary theory and a d+1 dimensional bulk, a direct argument in the boundary theory implies that there must exist a simple and precise relation between the Euclidean on-shell action of a (d-1)-brane probing the bulk geometry and the Euclidean gravitational bulk action. This relation is crucial for the consistency of holography, yet it is non-trivial from the bulk perspective. In particular, we show that it relies on a nice isoperimetric inequality that must be satisfied in a large class of Poincar\\'e-Einstein spaces. Remarkably, this inequality follows from theorems by Lee and Wang.

  5. "Kunstwerk" in the age of holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öhlmann, Dietmar; Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    In 2007 one auction shocked collectors and artists: Two art works of Rudie Berkhout were offered for one thousand dollars on eBay. The closing down of museums for holography in Cologne, New York and Washington DC paid a big price of respect for true art. Benjamin's vision about "Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction" found a new expression in abuse and ignorance. Beautiful sculptures of Art are reduced to "Holograms" like Rudie's "Cairo Aspect" placed in a rummage sale, covered by fingerprints of ignorance.

  6. Phase-space foundations of electron holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubk, A.; Röder, F.

    2015-09-01

    We present a unified formalism for describing various forms of electron holography in quantum mechanical phase space including their extensions to quantum-state reconstructions. The phase-space perspective allows for taking into account partial coherence as well as the quantum mechanical detection process typically hampering the unique reconstruction of a wave function. We elaborate on the limitations imposed by the electron optical elements of the transmission electron microscope as well as the scattering at the target. The results provide the basis for vastly extending the scope of electron holographic techniques towards analyzing partially coherent signals such as inelastically scattered electrons or electron pulses used in ultrafast transmission electron microscopy.

  7. X-ray holography of biological specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Solem, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    The author reviews the reasons for x-ray imaging of biological specimens and the techniques presently being used for x-ray microscopy. The author points out the advantages of x-ray holography and the difficulties of obtaining the requisite coherence with conventional sources. The author discusses the problems of radiation damage and the remarkable fact that short pulse x-ray sources circumvent these problems and obtain high-resolution images of specimens in the living state. Finally, the author reviews some of the efforts underway to develop high-intensity coherent x-ray sources for the laboratory. 14 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  8. Measurement of the thickness of side-polished fiber based on digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Ma, Jie; Chen, Zhe; Zhong, Jin-gang; Zhong, Yong-chun

    2015-08-01

    A novel method to measure the remaining cladding thickness of side-polished fiber (SPF) was demonstrated by using the digital holography technology. By using angular spectrum method and accurate least-squares phase unwrapping method, the phase distribution of SPF could be reconstructed. Based on the reconstructed phase distribution, the remaining cladding thickness of SPF could be directly measured. It can reduce the errors due to fiber's asymmetries and edge diffraction. This method could also be used to measure other special optical fibers such as photonic crystal fiber and nano-fiber.

  9. Computer-Based Technology and Learning: Evolving Uses and Expectations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdez, Gilbert; McNabb, Mary; Foertsch, Mary; Anderson, Mary; Hawkes, Mark; Raack, Lenaya

    To understand the value and impact of technology, one must recognize that there have been three distinct phases in technology uses and expectations: Print Automation, Expansion of Learning Opportunities, and Data-Driven Virtual Learning. This report takes an in-depth look at these three phases and, for each, addresses two important and highly…

  10. STEM-Based Computational Modeling for Technology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Aaron C.; Ernst, Jeremy V.

    2008-01-01

    According to professionals in education, change is an ever-present and evolving process. With transformation in education at both state and national levels, technology education must determine a position in this climate of change. This paper reflects the views on the future of technology education based on an ongoing research project. The purpose…

  11. NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY/ NATIONAL COMPUTER SECURITY CENTER

    E-print Network

    National Bank Virgil Gibson GrumannData Systems Dennis Gilbert National Institute of Standards and Technology Irene Gilbert National Institute of Standards and Technology Captain James Goldston, USAF AFCSC Dr. Carl Landwehr Robert lau Dr. Theodore M.P. lee Steven B. lipner Teresa lunt Dr. William V

  12. Science and Technology Resources on the Internet: Computer Security.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinkus, Jane F.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses issues related to computer security, including confidentiality, integrity, and authentication or availability; and presents a selected list of Web sites that cover the basic issues of computer security under subject headings that include ethics, privacy, kids, antivirus, policies, cryptography, operating system security, and biometrics.…

  13. Interact, play, explore -by means of interactive computer game technologies!

    E-print Network

    for the student union + 59 basic semester ticket Teaching Language: German and English - possible to study of our new master´s program in computer science, which acknowledges the growing impact of interactive games engineering requires profound knowledge of the foundations of computer science, good programming

  14. EINDHOVEN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Department of Mathematics and Computer Science

    E-print Network

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    for Analysis, Scientific computing and Applications Department of Mathematics and Computer Science Eindhoven duration of several minutes. A particular situation requiring numerical simulation is that a damaging event we will assume that only one level of refinement is performed. MIXED ADAMS-BDF TIME INTEGRATION

  15. Towards a 'siliconeural computer': technological successes and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Mark A; Shipston, Mike J; Murray, Alan F

    2015-07-28

    Electronic signals govern the function of both nervous systems and computers, albeit in different ways. As such, hybridizing both systems to create an iono-electric brain-computer interface is a realistic goal; and one that promises exciting advances in both heterotic computing and neuroprosthetics capable of circumventing devastating neuropathology. 'Neural networks' were, in the 1980s, viewed naively as a potential panacea for all computational problems that did not fit well with conventional computing. The field bifurcated during the 1990s into a highly successful and much more realistic machine learning community and an equally pragmatic, biologically oriented 'neuromorphic computing' community. Algorithms found in nature that use the non-synchronous, spiking nature of neuronal signals have been found to be (i) implementable efficiently in silicon and (ii) computationally useful. As a result, interest has grown in techniques that could create mixed 'siliconeural' computers. Here, we discuss potential approaches and focus on one particular platform using parylene-patterned silicon dioxide. PMID:26078350

  16. Phase retrieval without unwrapping by single-shot dual-wavelength digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Junwei; Yao, Baoli; Zhou, Meiling; Guo, Rongli; Lei, Ming; Yang, Yanlong; Dan, Dan; Yan, Shaohui; Peng, Tong

    2014-12-01

    A phase retrieval method by using single-shot dual-wavelength digital holography is proposed. Each single wavelength hologram is extracted from the color CCD recorded hologram at one exposure, and the unwrapped phase image of object can be reconstructed directly. Different from the traditional multiple wavelength phase unwrapping techniques, any single complex wave-fronts at different wavelengths have no need to be calculated any more. Thus, the phase retrieval is computationally fast and straightforward, and the limitations on the total optical path difference are significantly relaxed. The practicability of the proposed method is demonstrated by both simulated and experimental results.

  17. Instructor and Student Classroom Interactions during Technology Skills Instruction for Facilitating Preservice Teachers' Computer Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koh, Joyce H. L.; Frick, Theodore W.

    2009-01-01

    Technology skills instruction is an important component of educational technology courses, which has been shown to raise pre-service teachers' computer self-efficacy. Computer self-efficacy, in turn, is positively related to their self-efficacy for technology integration. Studies of undergraduate technology skills instruction found that classroom…

  18. Simultaneous observation of forward-backward attosecond photoelectron holography

    E-print Network

    Du, Hongchuan; Wang, Huiqiao; Yue, Shengjun; Hu, Bitao

    2015-01-01

    Photoelectron angular momentum distribution of He+ driven by a few-cycle laser is investigated numerically. We simultaneously observe two dominant interference patterns with one shot of lasers by solving the 3D time-dependent Schrodinger equation (TDSE). The analysis of a semiclassical model identi?es these two interference patterns as two kinds of photoelectron holography. The interference pattern with Pz > 0 is a kind of forward rescattering holography, which comes from the interference between direct (reference) and rescattered (signal) forward electrons ionized in the same quarter-cycle. The interference pattern with Pz < 0 is a kind of backward rescattering holography, which comes from the interference between direct electron ionized in the third quarter- cycle and rescattered backward electron ionized in the ?rst quarter-cycle. Moreover, we propose a method to distinguish this backward rescattering holography and intracycle interference patterns of direct electrons. This is an important step for dyna...

  19. ELECTRON HOLOGRAPHY OF NANOMAGNETS IN ROCKS AND BACTERIA

    E-print Network

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    ELECTRON HOLOGRAPHY OF NANOMAGNETS IN ROCKS AND BACTERIA Rafal E. Dunin-Borkowski1 , Richard J-reversed thermo-remanent magnetization. #12;Magnetotactic bacteria provide the simplest example of the use

  20. Study on the use of VLSI ASIC technology for generic power system computer relay architectures 

    E-print Network

    Faulkner, Kenneth Ray

    1994-01-01

    This thesis discusses the feasibility of improving power system computer relay devices using Very Large Scale Integration technology. It outlines the functionality that is required of this equipment A high-level design that attempts to use dedicated...

  1. High-resolution imaging using endoscopic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.

    1990-08-01

    Endoscopic holography or endoholography combines the features of endoscopy and holography. The purpose of endoholographic imaging is to provide the physician with a unique means of extending diagnosis by providing a life-like record of tissue. Endoholographic recording will provide means for microscopic examination of tissue and in some cases may obviate the need to excise specimens for biopsy. In this method holograms which have the unique properties of three-dimensionality large focal depth and high resolution are made with a newly designed endoscope. The endoscope uses a single-mode optical fiber for illumination and single-beam reflection holograms are recorded in close contact with the tissue at the distal end of the endoscope. The holograms are viewed under a microscope. By using the proper combinations of dyes for staining specific tissue types with various wavelengths of laser illumination increased contrast on the cellular level can be obtained. Using dyes such as rose bengal in combination with the 514. 5 nm line of an argon ion laser and trypan blue or methylene blue with the 647. 1 nm line of a krypton ion laser holograms of the stained colon of a dog showed the architecture of the colon''s columnar epithelial cells. It is hoped through chronological study using this method in-vivo an increased understanding of the etiology and pathology of diseases such as Crohn''s diseases colitis proctitis and several different forms of cancer will help to their control. 1.

  2. Nonrelativistic Holography — a Group-Theoretical Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrev, V. K.

    2014-01-01

    We give a review of some group-theoretical results related to nonrelativistic holography. Our main playgrounds are the Schrödinger equation and the Schrödinger algebra. We first recall the interpretation of nonrelativistic holography as equivalence between representations of the Schrödinger algebra describing bulk fields and boundary fields. One important result is the explicit construction of the boundary-to-bulk operators in the framework of representation theory, and that these operators and the bulk-to-boundary operators are intertwining operators. Further, we recall the fact that there is a hierarchy of equations on the boundary, invariant with respect to Schrödinger algebra. We also review the explicit construction of an analogous hierarchy of invariant equations in the bulk, and that the two hierarchies are equivalent via the bulk-to-boundary intertwining operators. The derivation of these hierarchies uses a mechanism introduced first for semisimple Lie groups and adapted to the nonsemisimple Schrödinger algebra. These require development of the representation theory of the Schrödinger algebra which is reviewed in some detail. We also recall the q-deformation of the Schrödinger algebra. Finally, the realization of the Schrödinger algebra via difference operators is reviewed.

  3. Particle and flow field holography: A critical survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trolinger, James D.

    1987-01-01

    A brief background is provided for the fields of particle and flow visualization holography. A summary of methods currently in use is given, followed by a discussion of more recent and unique applications. The problem of data reduction is discussed. A state of the art summary is then provided with a prognosis of the future of the field. Particle and flow visualization holography are characterized as powerful tools currently in wide use and with significant untapped potential.

  4. NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY/ NATIONAL COMPUTER SECURITY CENTER

    E-print Network

    Systems Dennis Gilbert National Institute ofStandards and Technology Irene Gilbert National Institute of Steven B. lipner Teresa lunt Dr. William V. Maconachy Sally Meglathery Dr. Jonathan Millen Warren Monroe

  5. The Intel Science and Technology Center for Secure Computing

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Security Threats Stuxnet: "...a novel way to use comuters to sabotage an enemy's lifeline infrastructure Personal data and confidential data used in the cloud or on collaborator's computer systems? Systems when

  6. Scalable trap technology for quantum computing with ions

    E-print Network

    Eltony, Amira M. (Amira Madeleine)

    2015-01-01

    Quantum computers employ quantum mechanical effects, such as superposition and entanglement, to process information in a distinctive way, with advantages for simulation and for new, and in some cases more-efficient algorithms. ...

  7. The Intel Science and Technology Center for Social Computing

    E-print Network

    Dourish,Paul

    , and cloud computing, while providing tools to understand and build on the history of earlier systems-collar worker sitting at her desk using a PC, or the college student wedded to their smartphone as the conduit

  8. Mindstuff--1 Mindstuff: Educational Technology Beyond the Computer

    E-print Network

    Eisenberg, Michael A.

    . Indeed--to take yet another marvelous turn of phrase from the book--these notions have become "objects that computers might play in the intellectual and emotional lives of children. Immediately following the passage

  9. Computer information systems & technology majors get a broad IT

    E-print Network

    Sibille, Etienne

    Auditor Internet Developer Operations Manager Communications Specialist Internet Marketing Analyst Scheduler/Planner Data Security Analyst Market Research Analyst Purchasing Agent/Manager Distribution PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS: Internet Society www.isoc.org Independent Computer Consultants Association www

  10. Radiotherapy Monte Carlo simulation using cloud computing technology.

    PubMed

    Poole, C M; Cornelius, I; Trapp, J V; Langton, C M

    2012-12-01

    Cloud computing allows for vast computational resources to be leveraged quickly and easily in bursts as and when required. Here we describe a technique that allows for Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculations to be performed using GEANT4 and executed in the cloud, with relative simulation cost and completion time evaluated as a function of machine count. As expected, simulation completion time decreases as 1/n for n parallel machines, and relative simulation cost is found to be optimal where n is a factor of the total simulation time in hours. Using the technique, we demonstrate the potential usefulness of cloud computing as a solution for rapid Monte Carlo simulation for radiotherapy dose calculation without the need for dedicated local computer hardware as a proof of principal. PMID:23188699

  11. Neural-net Processed Electronic Holography for Rotating Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    2003-01-01

    This report presents the results of an R&D effort to apply neural-net processed electronic holography to NDE of rotors. Electronic holography was used to generate characteristic patterns or mode shapes of vibrating rotors and rotor components. Artificial neural networks were trained to identify damage-induced changes in the characteristic patterns. The development and optimization of a neural-net training method were the most significant contributions of this work, and the training method and its optimization are discussed in detail. A second positive result was the assembly and testing of a fiber-optic holocamera. A major disappointment was the inadequacy of the high-speed-holography hardware selected for this effort, but the use of scaled holograms to match the low effective resolution of an image intensifier was one interesting attempt to compensate. This report also discusses in some detail the physics and environmental requirements for rotor electronic holography. The major conclusions were that neural-net and electronic-holography inspections of stationary components in the laboratory and the field are quite practical and worthy of continuing development, but that electronic holography of moving rotors is still an expensive high-risk endeavor.

  12. Curriculums in Industrial Technology. Plastics Technology. Industrial Maintenance. Computer Numerical Control. Teacher's Manuals and Student Learning Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Paso Community Coll., TX.

    Curriculum guides are provided for plastics technology, industrial maintenance, and computer numerical control. Each curriculum is divided into a number of courses. For each course these instructor materials are presented in the official course outline: course description, course objectives, unit titles, texts and materials, instructor resources,…

  13. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, H. D.; Busse, L. J.; Lemon, D. K.

    1985-07-30

    Defects in a structure are imaged as they propagate, using their emitted acoustic energy as a monitored source. Short bursts of acoustic energy propagate through the structure to a discrete element receiver array. A reference timing transducer located between the array and the inspection zone initiates a series of time-of-flight measurements. A resulting series of time-of-flight measurements are then treated as aperture data and are transferred to a computer for reconstruction of a synthetic linear holographic image. The images can be displayed and stored as a record of defect growth.

  14. On locality, holography and unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skvortsov, Evgeny; Taronna, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    We study the functional class and locality problems in the context of higher-spin theories and Vasiliev's equations. A locality criterion that is sufficient to make higher-spin theories well-defined as field theories on Anti-de-Sitter space is proposed. This criterion identifies admissible pseudo-local field redefinitions which preserve AdS/CFT correlation functions as we check in the 3d example. Implications of this analysis for known higher-spin theories are discussed. We also check that the cubic coupling coefficients previously fixed in 3d at the action level give the correct CFT correlation functions upon computing the corresponding Witten diagrams.

  15. Geometrically induced metastability and holography

    SciTech Connect

    Aganagic, Mina; Aganagic, Mina; Beem, Christopher; Seo, Jihye; Vafa, Cumrun

    2006-10-23

    We construct metastable configurations of branes and anti-branes wrapping 2-spheres inside local Calabi-Yau manifolds and study their large N duals. These duals are Calabi-Yau manifolds in which the wrapped 2-spheres have been replaced by 3-spheres with flux through them, and supersymmetry is spontaneously broken. The geometry of the non-supersymmetric vacuum is exactly calculable to all orders of the't Hooft parameter, and to the leading order in 1/N. The computation utilizes the same matrix model techniques that were used in the supersymmetric context. This provides a novel mechanism for breaking supersymmetry in the context of flux compactifications.

  16. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    DOEpatents

    Collins, H. Dale (Richland, WA); Busse, Lawrence J. (Richland, WA); Lemon, Douglas K. (West Richland, WA)

    1985-01-01

    Defects in a structure are imaged as they propagate, using their emitted acoustic energy as a monitored source. Short bursts of acoustic energy propagate through the structure to a discrete element receiver array. A reference timing transducer located between the array and the inspection zone initiates a series of time-of-flight measurements. A resulting series of time-of-flight measurements are then treated as aperture data and are transferred to a computer for reconstruction of a synthetic linear holographic image. The images can be displayed and stored as a record of defect growth.

  17. Electron Holography Characterization of Shallow Junction Fabricated By Diffusion-less Process for Sub-30 nm Gate-Length MOSFETs

    SciTech Connect

    Ikarashi, Nobuyuki; Toda, Akio; Uejima, Kazuya; Fukai, Toshinori; Hane, Masami; Ikezawa, Takeo

    2008-11-03

    Cross-sectional electron holography was used for two-dimensional potential mapping of source/drain extensions (SDEs) in scaled MOSFETs fabricated using state-of-the-art junction formation technology. First, we show that specimen-preparation artifacts, which have prevented detailed examinations of scaled SDEs, are significantly reduced by using low-energy backside Ar{sup +} milling. Next, we demonstrate that electron holography clearly reveals very shallow (10-nm-deep) SDE junction profiles. We also show that the experimental examinations, in conjunction with doping-process simulations, allow examinations of how dopant distribution, such as junction depth and abruptness, affect the potential distribution in planar-bulk MOSFETs approaching the scaling limit.

  18. Computing Technology for Learning--In Need of a Radical New Conception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beynon, Meurig

    2007-01-01

    Many have had high expectations for the impact of computer-based technology on educational practice. By and large, these expectations have not been realised. It has become evident that innovative technology alone does not necessarily guarantee progress--nor perhaps even significant change--in educational practice. This has led educational…

  19. International Conference on Pervasive Computing Technologies for Healthcare Innsbruck, Austria, 29th

    E-print Network

    Widya, Ing

    of wireless communication technologies of different quality. We analyze the needs of three mobile healthcare1st International Conference on Pervasive Computing Technologies for Healthcare Innsbruck, Austria. Index Terms--Vital sign, representation, flexibility, M-health I. INTRODUCTION obile healthcare (M

  20. The Impact of Iranian Teachers Cultural Values on Computer Technology Acceptance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadeghi, Karim; Saribagloo, Javad Amani; Aghdam, Samad Hanifepour; Mahmoudi, Hojjat

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted with the aim of testing the technology acceptance model and the impact of Hofstede cultural values (masculinity/femininity, uncertainty avoidance, individualism/collectivism, and power distance) on computer technology acceptance among teachers at Urmia city (Iran) using the structural equation modeling approach. From among…

  1. A Survey of Computer Use in Associate Degree Programs in Engineering Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Pearley

    As part of its annual program review process, the Department of Engineering Technology at the Community College of Allegheny County, in Pennsylvania, conducted a study of computer usage in community college engineering technology programs across the nation. Specifically, the study sought to determine the types of software, Internet access, average…

  2. Present Place and the Future of Computing and Technology on the College Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, James L.

    Serious budgetary and administrative questions concerning educational computing and technology confront liberal arts college administrators. What will be the impact of microcomputers and other technologies on a liberal arts education? Since monies are less and less apt to come from outside grants, especially for non-innovative institutions, and…

  3. What is Environmental Informatics? The use of computers, digital technology, and

    E-print Network

    Virginia Tech

    What is Environmental Informatics? The use of computers, digital technology, and modeling to solve systems plus modern technology to compile and analyze information and make decisions to sustain, repair" and references the potential touted by a McKinsey Global Institute study that predicts, "By 2018, the United

  4. Student Perceived Effectiveness of Computer Technology Use in Post-Secondary Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowerison, Gretchen; Sclater, Jennifer; Schmid, Richard F.; Abrami, Philip C.

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the amount of computer technology used in post-secondary education courses, students' perceived effectiveness of technology use, and global course evaluations. Survey data were collected from 922 students in 51 courses at both the graduate and undergraduate levels. The survey consisted of 65 items…

  5. An Evaluation of Computer-Managed Education Technology at New York City Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chitayat, Linda

    The Computer-Managed Education Technology (COMET) program was designed to improve group instruction through the use of technological aids in the classroom. Specific objectives included: (1) improving feedback on student comprehension during a class period; (2) facilitating the administration and grading of homework and quizzes; (3) providing for…

  6. Heavy Section Steel Technology HSST eLib Computational Structural Fracture Mechanics Team

    E-print Network

    Heavy Section Steel Technology ­ HSST eLib Computational Structural Fracture Mechanics Team the reports generated by the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) program (JCN B0119) from the early 1970's welcome the opportunity to discuss your potential applications and ways that the Heavy-Section Steel

  7. Community Colleges in the Information Age: Gains Associated with Students' Use of Computer Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Bodi; Horn, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Computer literacy is increasingly important in higher education, and many educational technology experts propose a more prominent integration of technology into pedagogy. Empirical evidence is needed to support these theories. This study examined community college students planning to transfer to 4-year universities and estimated the relationship…

  8. Science-Technology Coupling: The Case of Mathematical Logic and Computer Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner-Dobler, Roland

    1997-01-01

    In the history of science, there have often been periods of sudden rapprochements between pure science and technology-oriented branches of science. Mathematical logic as pure science and computer science as technology-oriented science have experienced such a rapprochement, which is studied in this article in a bibliometric manner. (Author)

  9. Factors Impacting Adult Learner Achievement in a Technology Certificate Program on Computer Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delialioglu, Omer; Cakir, Hasan; Bichelmeyer, Barbara A.; Dennis, Alan R.; Duffy, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the factors impacting the achievement of adult learners in a technology certificate program on computer networks. We studied 2442 participants in 256 institutions. The participants were older than age 18 and were enrolled in the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) technology training program as "non-degree" or…

  10. Investigation of Pre-Service Physical Education Teachers' Attitudes Towards Computer Technologies (Case of Turkey)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Can, Suleyman

    2015-01-01

    Elicitation of pre-service physical education teachers' attitudes towards computer technologies seems to be of great importance to satisfy the conditions to be met for the conscious and effective use of the technologies required by the age to be used in educational settings. In this respect, the purpose of the present study is to investigate…

  11. EMERGING AIR QUALITY MODELING TECHNOLOGY FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING AND COMMUNICATION ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To demonstrate applications of the HPCC technologies in air quality models, we organized the Specialty Evening Session 1, "Emerging Air Quality Modeling Technologies for High Performance Computing and Communication Environment" as a part of the Twenty First NATO/CCMS Internationa...

  12. An update to experimental models for validating computer technology Marvin V. Zelkowitz

    E-print Network

    Zelkowitz, Marvin V.

    Experimentation Technology evaluation a b s t r a c t In 1998 a survey was published on the extent to whichAn update to experimental models for validating computer technology Marvin V. Zelkowitz Department software engineering papers validate the claims made in those papers. The survey looked at publications

  13. Space-Bounded Communication Complexity Submitted to the Department of Computer Science and Technology

    E-print Network

    Tang, Pingzhong

    Space-Bounded Communication Complexity by Hao Song Submitted to the Department of Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Department of Computer Science and Technology April 19, 2014 Certified by by . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shiqiang Yang Chairman, Department Committee on Graduate Theses #12;2 #12;Space-Bounded Communication

  14. Journal of X-Ray Science and Technology 15 (2007) 235270 235 Scheme of computed tomography

    E-print Network

    Wang, Ge

    2007-01-01

    reported the first x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner in 1973, with which the internal structureJournal of X-Ray Science and Technology 15 (2007) 235­270 235 IOS Press Scheme of computed. Shapes of the x-ray beams and their projections on the detection plane (array). (a) A 2D parallel

  15. The Effects of Computer-Assisted Feedback Strategies in Technology Education: A Comparison of Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Ruifang Hope; Strickland, Jane

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of computer-assisted feedback strategies that have been utilized by university students in a technology education curriculum. Specifically, the study examined the effectiveness of the computer-assisted feedback strategy "Knowledge of Response feedback" (KOR), and the "Knowledge of Correct Responses feedback"…

  16. Scaling the Digital Divide: Home Computer Technology and Student Achievement. Working Paper 48

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vigdor, Jacob L.; Ladd, Helen F.

    2010-01-01

    Does differential access to computer technology at home compound the educational disparities between rich and poor? Would a program of government provision of computers to early secondary school students reduce these disparities? The authors use administrative data on North Carolina public school students to corroborate earlier surveys that…

  17. Scaling the Digital Divide: Home Computer Technology and Student Achievement. NBER Working Paper No. 16078

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vigdor, Jacob L.; Ladd, Helen F.

    2010-01-01

    Does differential access to computer technology at home compound the educational disparities between rich and poor? Would a program of government provision of computers to early secondary school students reduce these disparities? We use administrative data on North Carolina public school students to corroborate earlier surveys that document broad…

  18. Is Computational Materials Science Richard LeSar, Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National

    E-print Network

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    Is Computational Materials Science Overrated? Richard LeSar, Materials Science and Technology of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering, Universityof California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA, and Materials Computational materials science is one of the fastest growing disciplines in materials science. With an ever

  19. Reading Teachers' Beliefs and Utilization of Computer and Technology: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remetio, Jessica Espinas

    2014-01-01

    Many researchers believe that computers have the ability to help improve the reading skills of students. In an effort to improve the poor reading scores of students on state tests, as well as improve students' overall academic performance, computers and other technologies have been installed in Frozen Bay School classrooms. As the success of these…

  20. Preventing Phishing Attacks Using Trusted Computing Technology Adil Alsaid and Chris J. Mitchell

    E-print Network

    Mitchell, Chris

    Preventing Phishing Attacks Using Trusted Computing Technology Adil Alsaid and Chris J. Mitchell. Certain attacks rely on this fact, such as web spoofing and phishing attacks. In this paper the issue computing platforms is proposed. The proposed approach makes a class of phishing attacks ineffective

  1. Proceedings of the International Multiconference on Computer Science and Information Technology pp. 353357

    E-print Network

    Proceedings of the International Multiconference on Computer Science and Information Technology pp. 353­357 ISBN 978-83-60810-14-9 ISSN 1896-7094 Definition Extraction: Improving Balanced Random Forests Lukasz Degórski Institute of Computer Science Polish Academy of Sciences ul. J. K. Ordona 21 01

  2. Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop IV Agenda National Institute of Standards and Technology

    E-print Network

    Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop IV Agenda National Institute of Standards and Technology 100 Information Officer 9:30 10:40 Panel: Cloud Without Borders: International Perspectives Chair Policy, Department of State 1. Yeong Ro Lee, National Standards Coordinator for Cloud Computing

  3. Embodying Computational Thinking: Initial Design of an Emerging Technological Learning Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daily, Shaundra B.; Leonard, Alison E.; Jörg, Sophie; Babu, Sabarish; Gundersen, Kara; Parmar, Dhaval

    2015-01-01

    This emerging technology report describes virtual environment interactions an approach for blending movement and computer programming as an embodied way to support girls in building computational thinking skills. The authors seek to understand how body syntonicity might enable young learners to bootstrap their intuitive knowledge in order to…

  4. Intelligence Sixth-generation Computer Technology Series. John Wiley, New York, pp. 211229.

    E-print Network

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    Intelligence Sixth-generation Computer Technology Series. John Wiley, New York, pp. 211., Sycara, K., 1998. Bayesian learning in negotiation. International Journal of Human-Computer Studies. 48-dimensional utility function. In: Proceed- ing of the IASTED International Conference, Artificial Intelligence

  5. Landau Levels, Anisotropy and Holography

    E-print Network

    Sarah Harrison

    2013-06-13

    We analyze properties of field theories dual to extremal black branes in (4+1) dimensions with anisotropic near-horizon geometries. Such gravity solutions were recently shown to fall into nine classes which align with the Bianchi classification of real three-dimensional Lie algebras. As a warmup we compute constraints on critical exponents from energy conditions in the bulk and scalar two point functions for a general type I metric, which has translation invariance but broken rotations. We also comment on the divergent nature of tidal forces in general Bianchi-type metrics. Then we come to our main focus: extremal branes whose near-horizon isometries are those of the Heisenberg algebra (type II). We find hyperscaling-violating solutions with type II isometries in (4+1)-dimensions. We show that scale invariant (4+1)-dimensional type II metrics are related by Kaluza-Klein reduction to more symmetric $AdS_2\\times R^2$ and (3+1)-dimensional hyperscaling-violating spacetimes. These solutions generically have $\\theta \\leq 0$. We discuss how one can obtain flows from UV CFTs to Bianchi-type spacetimes in the IR via the Higgs mechanism, as well as potential inhomogeneous instabilities of type II. Finally, we compute two-point functions of massive and massless scalar operators in the dual field theory and find that they exhibit the behavior of a theory with Landau levels.

  6. Digital Holography of Intracellular Dynamics to Probe Tissue Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, Daniel; An, Ran; Turek, John; Nolte, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Digital holography provides improved capabilities for imaging through dense tissue. Using a short-coherence source, the digital hologram recorded from backscattered light performs laser ranging that maintains fidelity of information acquired from depths much greater than possible by traditional imaging techniques. Biodynamic Imaging (BDI) is a developing technology for live-tissue imaging of up to a millimeter in depth that uses the hologram intensity fluctuations as label-free image contrast and can study tissue behavior in native microenvironments. In this paper BDI is used investigate the change in adhesion-dependent tissue response in 3D cultures. The results show that increasing density of cellular adhesions slows motion inside tissue and alters the response to cytoskeletal drugs. A clear signature of membrane fluctuations was observed in mid frequencies (0.1 – 1 Hz) that was enhanced by the application of cytochalasin-D that degrades the actin cortex inside the cell membrane. This enhancement feature is only observed in tissues that have formed adhesions, because cell pellets initially do not show this signature, but develop this signature only after incubation enables adhesions to form. PMID:25967027

  7. Digital holography of intracellular dynamics to probe tissue physiology.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Daniel; An, Ran; Turek, John; Nolte, David D

    2015-01-01

    Digital holography provides improved capabilities for imaging through dense tissue. Using a short-coherence source, the digital hologram recorded from backscattered light performs laser ranging that maintains fidelity of information acquired from depths much greater than possible by traditional imaging techniques. Biodynamic imaging (BDI) is a developing technology for live-tissue imaging of up to a millimeter in depth that uses the hologram intensity fluctuations as label-free image contrast and can study tissue behavior in native microenvironments. In this paper BDI is used to investigate the change in adhesion-dependent tissue response in 3D cultures. The results show that increasing density of cellular adhesions slows motion inside tissue and alters the response to cytoskeletal drugs. A clear signature of membrane fluctuations was observed in mid-frequencies (0.1-1 Hz) and was enhanced by the application of cytochalasin-D that degrades the actin cortex inside the cell membrane. This enhancement feature is only observed in tissues that have formed adhesions, because cell pellets initially do not show this signature, but develop this signature only after incubation enables adhesions to form. PMID:25967027

  8. An application of interactive computer graphics technology to the design of dispersal mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, B. J.; Welch, B. H.

    1977-01-01

    Interactive computer graphics technology is combined with a general purpose mechanisms computer code to study the operational behavior of three guided bomb dispersal mechanism designs. These studies illustrate the use of computer graphics techniques to discover operational anomalies, to assess the effectiveness of design improvements, to reduce the time and cost of the modeling effort, and to provide the mechanism designer with a visual understanding of the physical operation of such systems.

  9. Refocusing criterion via sparsity measurements in digital holography.

    PubMed

    Memmolo, Pasquale; Paturzo, Melania; Javidi, Bahram; Netti, Paolo A; Ferraro, Pietro

    2014-08-15

    Several automatic approaches have been proposed in the past to compute the refocus distance in digital holography (DH). However most of them are based on a maximization or minimization of a suitable amplitude image contrast measure, regarded as a function of the reconstruction distance parameter. Here we show that, by using the sparsity measure coefficient regarded as a refocusing criterion in the holographic reconstruction, it is possible to recover the focus plane and, at the same time, establish the degree of sparsity of digital holograms, when samples of the diffraction Fresnel propagation integral are used as a sparse signal representation. We employ a sparsity measurement coefficient known as Gini's index thus showing for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, its application in DH, as an effective refocusing criterion. Demonstration is provided for different holographic configurations (i.e., lens and lensless apparatus) and for completely different objects (i.e., a thin pure phase microscopic object as an in vitro cell, and macroscopic puppets) preparation. PMID:25121857

  10. ELECTRON HOLOGRAPHY OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS - RECENT THEORETICAL ADVANCES.

    SciTech Connect

    BELEGGIA,M.; POZZI, G.; TONOMURA, A.

    2007-01-01

    It has been shown in this work that the Fourier space approach can be fruitfully applied to the calculation of the fields and the associated electron optical phase shift of several magnetic and electrostatic structures, like superconducting vortices in conventional and high-T{sub c} superconductors, reverse biased p-n junctions, magnetic domains and nanoparticles. In all these cases, this novel approach has led to unexpected but extremely interesting results, very often expressed in analytical form, which allow the quantitative and reliable interpretation of the experimental data collected by means of electron holography or of more conventional Lorentz microscopy techniques. Moreover, it is worth recalling that whenever long-range electromagnetic fields are involved, a physical model of the object under investigation is necessary in order to take into account correctly the perturbation of the reference wave induced by the tail of the field protruding into the vacuum. For these reasons, we believe that the Fourier space approach for phase computations we have introduced and discussed in this chapter will represent an invaluable tool for the investigation of electromagnetic fields at the meso- and nano-scale.

  11. Educational and Recreational Uses of Computer Technology: Computer Instruction and Video Games.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Condry, John; Keith, Douglas

    1983-01-01

    Explores some of the issues raised by the introduction of computers into society and, in particular, questions concerning the impact, both direct and indirect, of the availability of computers on the young. (CMG)

  12. The impact of new computer technology on accelerator control

    SciTech Connect

    Theil, E.; Jacobson, V.; Paxson, V.

    1987-04-01

    This paper describes some recent developments in computing and stresses their application in accelerator control systems. Among the advances that promise to have a significant impact are (1) low cost scientific workstations; (2) the use of ''windows'', pointing devices and menus in a multi-tasking operating system; (3) high resolution large-screen graphics monitors; (4) new kinds of high bandwidth local area networks. The relevant features are related to a general accelerator control system. For example, this paper examines the implications of a computing environment which permits and encourages graphical manipulation of system components, rather than traditional access through the writing of programs or ''canned'' access via touch panels.

  13. Who's wired and who's not: children's access to and use of computer technology.

    PubMed

    Becker, H J

    2000-01-01

    As computer technology becomes increasingly prevalent throughout society, concerns have been raised about an emerging "digital divide" between those children who are benefitting and those who are being left behind. This article presents results from new analyses of national survey data describing children's differential access to computers in school and at home, and the varying conditions that affect how children experience computers. For example, responses from a nationwide survey of teachers suggest that, as of 1998, more than 75% of students had access to computers at school. In fact, those teaching lower-income students reported weekly use of computers more often than those teaching higher-income students. But the nature of children's experiences using computers in school varied greatly by subject and teacher objectives, and the data suggest that lower-income students use computers more often for repetitive practice, whereas higher-income students use computers more often for more sophisticated, intellectually complex applications. Differences between low-income and high-income children's access to home computers were far less subtle. Survey data indicate that only about 22% of children in families with annual incomes of less than $20,000 had access to a home computer, compared to 91% of those in families with annual incomes of more than $75,000. And among children with access, those in low-income families were reported to use the computer less than those in high-income families, perhaps because most low-income families with computers lacked a connection to the Internet. The two most predictive factors of children's use of home computers were the child's age and the computer's capabilities. The author concludes that home access to computers will be a continued area of inequality in American society, and that schools must play a critical role in ensuring equal opportunity for less-advantaged children to access the benefits of the more intellectually powerful uses of computer technology. PMID:11255709

  14. When holography meets coherent diffraction imaging.

    PubMed

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2012-12-17

    The phase problem is inherent to crystallographic, astronomical and optical imaging where only the intensity of the scattered signal is detected and the phase information is lost and must somehow be recovered to reconstruct the object's structure. Modern imaging techniques at the molecular scale rely on utilizing novel coherent light sources like X-ray free electron lasers for the ultimate goal of visualizing such objects as individual biomolecules rather than crystals. Here, unlike in the case of crystals where structures can be solved by model building and phase refinement, the phase distribution of the wave scattered by an individual molecule must directly be recovered. There are two well-known solutions to the phase problem: holography and coherent diffraction imaging (CDI). Both techniques have their pros and cons. In holography, the reconstruction of the scattered complex-valued object wave is directly provided by a well-defined reference wave that must cover the entire detector area which often is an experimental challenge. CDI provides the highest possible, only wavelength limited, resolution, but the phase recovery is an iterative process which requires some pre-defined information about the object and whose outcome is not always uniquely-defined. Moreover, the diffraction patterns must be recorded under oversampling conditions, a pre-requisite to be able to solve the phase problem. Here, we report how holography and CDI can be merged into one superior technique: holographic coherent diffraction imaging (HCDI). An inline hologram can be recorded by employing a modified CDI experimental scheme. We demonstrate that the amplitude of the Fourier transform of an inline hologram is related to the complex-valued visibility, thus providing information on both, the amplitude and the phase of the scattered wave in the plane of the diffraction pattern. With the phase information available, the condition of oversampling the diffraction patterns can be relaxed, and the phase problem can be solved in a fast and unambiguous manner. We demonstrate the reconstruction of various diffraction patterns of objects recorded with visible light as well as with low-energy electrons. Although we have demonstrated our HCDI method using laser light and low-energy electrons, it can also be applied to any other coherent radiation such as X-rays or high-energy electrons. PMID:23263128

  15. Simultaneous Conoscopic Holography and Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Harry F.; Kaiser, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    A new instrument was developed for chemical characterization of surfaces that combines the analytical power of Raman spectroscopy with the three-dimensional topographic information provided by conoscopic holography. The figure schematically depicts the proposed hybrid instrument. The output of the conoscopic holographic portion of the instrument is a topographical map of the surface; the output of the Raman portion of the instrument is hyperspectral Raman data, from which the chemical and/or biological composition of the surface would be deduced. By virtue of the basic principles of design and operation of the instrument, the hyperspectral image data would be inherently spatially registered with the topographical data. In conoscopic holography, the object and reference beams of classical holography are replaced by the ordinary and extraordinary components generated by a single beam traveling through a birefringent, uniaxial crystal. In the basic conoscopic configuration, a laser light is projected onto a specimen and the resulting illuminated spot becomes a point source of diffuse light that propagates in every direction. The laser beam is rasterscanned in two dimensions (x and y) perpendicular to the beam axis (z), and at each x,y location, the pattern of interference between the ordinary and extraordinary rays is recorded. The recorded interferogram constitutes the conoscopic hologram. Of particular significance for the proposed instrument is that the conoscopic hologram contains information on the z coordinate (height) of the illuminated surface spot. Hence, a topographical map of the specimen is constructed point-by-point by rastering the laser beam in the x and y directions and correlating the x and y coordinates with the z information obtained from the interferograms. Conoscopic imaging is an established method, and conoscopic laboratory instruments for surface metrology are commercially available. In Raman spectroscopy of a surface, one measures the spectrum of laser light scattered inelastically from a laser-illuminated spot on the surface. The wavelengths of the inelastically scattered light differ from that of the incident laser beam by amounts that correspond to the energies of molecular vibrations. The resulting vibrational spectrum can be used to identify the molecules. Raman spectroscopy is a standard laboratory technique for identifying mineralogical, biological, and other specific chemical compositions.

  16. EINDHOVEN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Department of Mathematics and Computer Science

    E-print Network

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    industry, printing, design of drug delivery; see e.g. Nordbotten and Celia, 2012; Rosenholm, Sahlgren for Complex Molecular Systems Eindhoven University of Technology 5600 MB, PO Box 513, Eindhoven an interacting particle system for colloids. A detailed discussion of the main principles of aggregation

  17. EINDHOVEN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Department of Mathematics and Computer Science

    E-print Network

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    A) variation in the light output of white phosphor-converted LEDs is a common problem in LED lighting. 1 Introduction LED is a rising technology in the field of lighting. In the past, LEDs were only allow the use of LEDs for lighting applications [2]. Additionally, LED lighting benefits from low

  18. NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY! NATIONAL COMPUTER SECURITY CENTER

    E-print Network

    L. Dain Gary Carnegie Mellon University William Geer AFCSC Virgil Gibson Grumann Data Systems Dennis Gilbert National Institute of Standards and Technology Irene Gilbert National Institute of Frank Mayer Dr. Catherine Meadows Sally Meglathery William H. Murray Noel Nazario Dr. Peter Neumann Nick

  19. Educational Computing in the Schools: Technology, Communication, and Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Jay, Ed.

    This book is a collection of articles that examine critical issues of technology, teaching, and learning in three areas: access, communication, and literacy. Following an Introduction by Jay Blanchard, articles are presented in three sections: Access and Opportunity; Online Communication; and Literacy. The articles include: "An Exploration of…

  20. High End Computing Technologies for Earth Science Applications: Trends, Challenges, and Innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, John (Technical Monitor); Biswas, Rupak; Yan, Jerry C.; Brooks, Walter F.; Sterling, Thomas L.

    2003-01-01

    Earth science applications of the future will stress the capabilities of even the highest performance supercomputers in the areas of raw compute power, mass storage management, and software environments. These NASA mission critical problems demand usable multi-petaflops and exabyte-scale systems to fully realize their science goals. With an exciting vision of the technologies needed, NASA has established a comprehensive program of advanced research in computer architecture, software tools, and device technology to ensure that, in partnership with US industry, it can meet these demanding requirements with reliable, cost effective, and usable ultra-scale systems. NASA will exploit, explore, and influence emerging high end computing architectures and technologies to accelerate the next generation of engineering, operations, and discovery processes for NASA Enterprises. This article captures this vision and describes the concepts, accomplishments, and the potential payoff of the key thrusts that will help meet the computational challenges in Earth science applications.

  1. Technology transfer of brain-computer interfaces as assistive technology: barriers and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Nijboer, F

    2015-02-01

    This paper provides an analysis of perspectives from different stakeholders on the state-of-the-art of BCI. Three barriers for technology transfer of BCIs as access technologies are identified. First, BCIs are developed with a narrow focus on creating a reliable technology, while a broader focus on creating a usable technology is needed. Second, the potential target group, which could benefit from BCIs as access technologies is expected to be very small. Development costs are therefore high, while reimbursements are expected to be low, which challenges the commercial viability. Third, potential target users should be much more included in the design process of BCIs to ensure that the end-products meet technical, ethical, legal and social requirements. These three issues need to be urgently addressed so that target users may benefit from this promising technology. PMID:25595535

  2. Mobile computing and ubiquitous networking: concepts, technologies and challenges

    E-print Network

    Engineering, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, C.P. 6079, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montreal, Que, Canada H3C 3A7 protocols, wireless/mobile communication systems, distributed computing and Internet (Danneels, 1998; www as the operational radio frequency band (2000 MHz range) for the standard. IP Internet Protocol IS Interim Standard

  3. Computer-Integrated Manufacturing Technology. Tech Prep Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakeland Tech Prep Consortium, Kirtland, OH.

    This tech prep competency profile covers these occupations: manufacturing technician, computer-assisted design and drafting (CADD) technician, quality technician, and mechanical technician. Section 1 provides occupation definitions. Section 2 lists development committee members. Section 3 provides the leveling codes---abbreviations for grade level…

  4. Business and Technology Concepts--Business Computations. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield. Dept. of Adult, Vocational and Technical Education.

    This Illinois State Board of Education teacher's guide on business computations is for students enrolled in the 9th or 10th grade. The course provides a foundation in arithmetic skills and their applications to common business problems for the senior high school vocational business courses. The curriculum guide includes teacher and student…

  5. Computational Physics Kigali Institute of Science and Technology

    E-print Network

    Feldman, David P.

    are for you, not the computer. Put comments in your matlab code so that you can understand what it does of this lab is for you to gain additional experience with matlab. The best way to learn matlab is to try it out, experiment, and to keep practicing. If you already have some experience with matlab, please help

  6. Future of computing technology in physics - the potentials and pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Brenner, A.E.

    1984-02-01

    The impact of the developments of modern digital computers is discussed, especially with respect to physics research in the future. The effects of large data processing capability and increasing rates at which data can be acquired and processed are considered. (GHT)

  7. Search Technology Internet Start-Ups Business Computing Companies

    E-print Network

    Freire, Juliana

    » Cellphones, Cameras, Computers and more Personal Tech » Advertise on NYTimes.com Exploring a `Deep Web engines. The challenges that the major search engines face in penetrating this so-called Deep Web go.kosmix.com), a Deep Web search start-up whose investors include Jeffrey P. Bezos, chief executive of Amazon

  8. Effects of Educational Beliefs on Attitudes towards Using Computer Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onen, Aysem Seda

    2012-01-01

    This study, aiming to determine the relationship between pre-service teachers' beliefs about education and their attitudes towards utilizing computers and internet, is a descriptive study in scanning model. The sampling of the study consisted of 270 pre-service teachers. The potential relationship between the beliefs of pre-service teachers about…

  9. Technology Allows Engineers to Make Solid Objects from Computer Designs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, David L.

    1992-01-01

    Computer operators using the technique of three-dimensional printing or rapid prototyping may soon be able to sculpt an object on the screen and within minutes, have a paper, plastic, or ceramic version of the object in hand. The process uses the principle that physical objects can be created in layers. (MSE)

  10. Adults' Uses of Computer Technology: Associations with Literacy Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, M. Cecil; Smith, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined data from a large, nationally representative sample--the National Assessment of Adult Literacy (NCES, 2007)--to examine how computer use and Internet-based literacy practices (use of e-mail, searching for information on the Internet, and Internet chatting) were related to prose, document, and quantitative literacy…

  11. Educational Technology Research Journals: Computers & Education, 2002-2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rackham, David D.; Hyatt, Frederick R.; Macfarlane, David C.; Nisse, Tony; Woodfield, Wendy; West, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the journal "Computers & Education" to discover research trends in the articles published during 2002-2011. Research articles were analyzed to determine trends in the research methods and types of articles published, as well as the key topics published, top authors, and some of the most-cited…

  12. Computing in the Real World. Teaching with Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Denise

    1993-01-01

    Discusses three computer programs which students can use to develop practical skills: (1) "The Little Shoppers Kit," which teaches children about shopping, grocery stores, and nutrition; (2) "UltraKey," a typing skills program for elementary school students; and (3) "All the Right Type," a typing program for grades 4 through 12. (MDM)

  13. EINDHOVEN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Department of Mathematics and Computer Science

    E-print Network

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    in the density of the materials. These are propagated as shock waves. Previous computational research has given insight into this shock loading for the case of homogeneous materials. Shock-wave propagation through cases is investigated; reflection-transmission patterns of shock- waves through layered materials

  14. EINDHOVEN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Department of Mathematics and Computer Science

    E-print Network

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    is to define and compute two macroscopic corrosion indicators: typical pH drop and gypsum profiles the content of the main sulfatation reaction (corrosion) product--the gypsum--and point out numerically a persistent kink in gypsum's concentration profile. Fi- nally, we illustrate numerically the position

  15. COMPUTER MODEL TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computer-based mathematical models for urban water resources planning, management and design are widely used by engineers and planners in both the public and private sectors. In the United States, the majority of the users are in the private (consulting) sector, yet most of the m...

  16. A 35 Year Computing Technology Forecast For The Academy

    E-print Network

    Massey, Bart

    structures. 2.1 Moore's Law and the Desktop Moore's Law [11] is due to electronics pioneer and Intel founder to maintain this growth rate: software developers use Moore's Law to predict what computing power their software will be able to use when completed. Hardware developers use Moore's Law to gauge where

  17. EINDHOVEN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Department of Mathematics and Computer Science

    E-print Network

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    -02 February 2014 Homogenization and dimension reduction of filtration combustion in heterogeneous thin layers OF FILTRATION COMBUSTION IN HETEROGENEOUS THIN LAYERS Tasnim Fatima1 Department of Mathematics and Computer-diffusion-convection system posed in an -periodic -thin layer made of a two-component (solid-air) composite material

  18. Dresden University of Technology Institute for Theoretical Computer Science

    E-print Network

    Baader, Franz

    Theory LTCS­Report On Language Equations with One-sided Concatenation Franz Baader Alexander Okhotin LTCS with One-sided Concatenation Franz Baader Institute for Theoretical Computer Science, TU Dresden, D-01062 Dresden, Germany baader@tcs.inf.tu-dresden.de Alexander Okhotin Department of Mathematics University

  19. Dresden University of Technology Institute for Theoretical Computer Science

    E-print Network

    Baader, Franz

    Franz Baader Alexander Okhotin LTCS-Report 12-01 A short version of this report has also appeared Franz Baader Institute for Theoretical Computer Science, TU Dresden, D-01062 Dresden, Germany baader@tcs.inf.tu-dresden.de Alexander Okhotin Department of Mathematics University of Turku, FIN-20014 Turku, Finland alexander

  20. Dresden University of Technology Institute for Theoretical Computer Science

    E-print Network

    Baader, Franz

    Theory LTCS{Report On Language Equations with One-sided Concatenation Franz Baader Alexander Okhotin LTCS with One-sided Concatenation Franz Baader Institute for Theoretical Computer Science, TU Dresden, D-01062 Dresden, Germany baader@tcs.inf.tu-dresden.de Alexander Okhotin Department of Mathematics University

  1. Dynamical meson melting in holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Takaaki; Kinoshita, Shunichiro; Murata, Keiju; Tanahashi, Norihiro

    2014-04-01

    We discuss mesons in thermalizing gluon backgrounds in the = 2 super-symmetric QCD using the gravity dual. We numerically compute the dynamics of a probe D7-brane in the Vaidya-AdS geometry that corresponds to a D3-brane background thermalizing from zero to finite temperatures by energy injection. In static backgrounds, it has been known that there are two kinds of brane embeddings where the brane intersects the black hole or not. They correspond to the phases with melted or stable mesons. In our dynamical setup, we obtain three cases depending on final temperatures and injection time scales. The brane stays outside of the black hole horizon when the final temperature is low, while it intersects the horizon and settles down to the static equilibrium state when the final temperature is high. Between these two cases, we find the overeager case where the brane dynamically intersects the horizon although the final temperature is not high enough for a static brane to intersect the horizon. The interpretation of this phenomenon in the dual field theory is meson melting due to non-thermal effects caused by rapid energy injection. In addition, we comment on the late time evolution of the brane and a possibility of its reconnection.

  2. Topological Entanglement Entropy and Holography

    E-print Network

    Ari Pakman; Andrei Parnachev

    2008-05-30

    We study the entanglement entropy in confining theories with gravity duals using the holographic prescription of Ryu and Takayanagi. The entanglement entropy between a region and its complement is proportional to the minimal area of a bulk hypersurface ending on their border. We consider a disk in 2+1 dimensions and a ball in 3+1 dimensions and find in both cases two types of bulk hypersurfaces with different topology, similar to the case of the slab geometry considered by Klebanov, Kutasov and Murugan. Depending on the value of the radius, one or the other type of hypersurfaces dominates the calculation of entanglement entropy. In 2+1 dimensions a useful measure of topological order of the ground state is the topological entanglement entropy, which is defined to be the constant term in the entanglement entropy of a disk in the limit of large radius. We compute this quantity and find that it vanishes for confining gauge theory, in accord with our expectations. In 3+1 dimensions the analogous quantity is shown to be generically nonzero and cutoff-dependent.

  3. Topological entanglement entropy and holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakman, Ari; Parnachev, Andrei

    2008-07-01

    We study the entanglement entropy in confining theories with gravity duals using the holographic prescription of Ryu and Takayanagi. The entanglement entropy between a region and its complement is proportional to the minimal area of a bulk hypersurface ending on their border. We consider a disk in 2+1 dimensions and a ball in 3+1 dimensions and find in both cases two types of bulk hypersurfaces with different topology, similar to the case of the slab geometry considered by Klebanov, Kutasov and Murugan. Depending on the value of the radius, one or the other type of hypersurfaces dominates the calculation of entanglement entropy. In 2+1 dimensions a useful measure of topological order of the ground state is the topological entanglement entropy, which is defined to be the constant term in the entanglement entropy of a disk in the limit of large radius. We compute this quantity and find that it vanishes for confining gauge theory, in accord with our expectations. In 3+1 dimensions the analogous quantity is shown to be generically nonzero and cutoff-dependent.

  4. Topological Entanglement Entropy and Holography

    E-print Network

    Pakman, Ari

    2008-01-01

    We study the entanglement entropy in confining theories with gravity duals using the holographic prescription of Ryu and Takayanagi. The entanglement entropy between a region and its complement is proportional to the minimal area of a bulk hypersurface ending on their border. We consider a disk in 2+1 dimensions and a ball in 3+1 dimensions and find in both cases two types of bulk hypersurfaces with different topology, similar to the case of the slab geometry considered by Klebanov, Kutasov and Murugan. Depending on the value of the radius, one or the other type of hypersurfaces dominates the calculation of entanglement entropy. In 2+1 dimensions a useful measure of topological order of the ground state is the topological entanglement entropy, which is defined to be the constant term in the entanglement entropy of a disk in the limit of large radius. We compute this quantity and find that it vanishes for confining gauge theory, in accord with our expectations. In 3+1 dimensions the analogous quantity is shown...

  5. Computer Technology/Special Education/Rehabilitation: Proceedings of the Conference (2nd, Northridge, California, October 16-18, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Harry J., Ed.

    The following 25 papers (with their authors) are presented from a conference on computer technology in special education and rehabilitation: "Computers for Business--Computers for Life" (I. Keith Austin); "Rehabilitation and the Computer: How to Find What You Need" (Thomas Backer); "Computer Access Alternatives for Visually Impaired People in…

  6. Study of clarinet reeds using digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetson, Karl A.

    2014-11-01

    A study of clarinet reeds demonstrates the capabilities of digital holography for identification and measurement of vibration modes, measurement of static displacement and creep, and measurement of shape profile. Three types of synthetic reeds were examined together with a number of cane reeds both wet and dry. It is shown that the synthetic reeds have fundamental vibration mode frequencies that are lower than those of natural cane reeds. The fundamental modes of cane reeds all lie above the range of notes played by the instrument whereas those of synthetic reeds do not. Examination of static displacements due to steady air flow showed creep effects due to inelasticity. Finally, projected fringes were used to measure the reed profile.

  7. Sparsity promoting automatic focusing in digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memmolo, Pasquale; Paturzo, Melania; Javidi, Bahram; Netti, Paolo Antonio; Ferraro, Pietro

    2015-05-01

    Sparsity properties of digital holograms have been investigated for application in compressive holography, permitting the discovery of the sparsest reconstruction plane in which the recovery of digital holograms is suitable. Recent approaches for denoising and phase retrieval are also proposed exploiting the sparsity properties of digital holograms. Thus it can be shown a strong correlation between holograms sparsity and focal plane detection, making a sparsity measure coefficient as a candidate to be used for focus plane calculation. Here we implement different sparsity metrics, that are able to measure a degree of sparsity of reconstructed digital hologram and we investigate their relation with the automatic focusing criterions, highlighting the possibility to use a sparsity measure as refocusing metric as well as the contrary, i.e. using image contrast coefficients as sparsity measures. Our analysis will be reported for digital holograms recorded in both lensless and microscope configuration and for both amplitude and pure-phase objects.

  8. Quantum probabilities for inflation from holography

    SciTech Connect

    Hartle, James B.; Hawking, S.W.; Hertog, Thomas E-mail: S.W.Hawking@damtp.cam.ac.uk

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of the universe is determined by its quantum state. The wave function of the universe obeys the constraints of general relativity and in particular the Wheeler-DeWitt equation (WDWE). For non-zero ?, we show that solutions of the WDWE at large volume have two domains in which geometries and fields are asymptotically real. In one the histories are Euclidean asymptotically anti-de Sitter, in the other they are Lorentzian asymptotically classical de Sitter. Further, the universal complex semiclassical asymptotic structure of solutions of the WDWE implies that the leading order in h-bar quantum probabilities for classical, asymptotically de Sitter histories can be obtained from the action of asymptotically anti-de Sitter configurations. This leads to a promising, universal connection between quantum cosmology and holography.

  9. Pulsed holography for hypervelocity impact diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, J.A.; Hansche, B.D.; Konrad, C.H.; Sweatt, W.C. ); Gosling, S.M.; Hickman, R.J. )

    1992-01-01

    Pulsed holography is being developed to meet two principal objectives. The first objective is to quantify the three dimensional characteristics of hypervelocity impact events, and the second is to provide a diagnostic with the ability to capture high fidelity information for the validation of sophisticated three-dimensional hydrocodes. The holographic system uses a Q-switched, seeded, frequency-doubled Nd-YAG laser which produces 5 ns, 750 mJ, coherent pulses at 532 nm. Holographic images have been captured of the back-surface debris bubble from 4 km/s perforating impacts and crater ejecta from 2 km/s non-perforating impacts. A prototype holographic reconstruction and image analysis system has been assembled that provides the ability to measure the structure and individual particles produced in a hypervelocity impact event. The estimated image resolution of this system is 10 to 20 {mu}m; however, this level of performance has not yet been demonstrated.

  10. Pulsed holography for hypervelocity impact diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, J.A.; Hansche, B.D.; Konrad, C.H.; Sweatt, W.C.; Gosling, S.M.; Hickman, R.J.

    1992-09-01

    Pulsed holography is being developed to meet two principal objectives. The first objective is to quantify the three dimensional characteristics of hypervelocity impact events, and the second is to provide a diagnostic with the ability to capture high fidelity information for the validation of sophisticated three-dimensional hydrocodes. The holographic system uses a Q-switched, seeded, frequency-doubled Nd-YAG laser which produces 5 ns, 750 mJ, coherent pulses at 532 nm. Holographic images have been captured of the back-surface debris bubble from 4 km/s perforating impacts and crater ejecta from 2 km/s non-perforating impacts. A prototype holographic reconstruction and image analysis system has been assembled that provides the ability to measure the structure and individual particles produced in a hypervelocity impact event. The estimated image resolution of this system is 10 to 20 {mu}m; however, this level of performance has not yet been demonstrated.

  11. 3D endoscopic pulsed digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saucedo Anaya, T.; Mendoza Santoyo, F.; Pedrini, G.; Osten, W.

    2006-06-01

    A rigid endoscope is used in pulsed digital holography to simultaneously evaluate the three orthogonal displacement components from hidden areas of a harmonically vibrating metallic cylinder. The cylinder is illuminated from three different illuminating directions. The optical path for each illumination direction is matched to its corresponding reference beam, but also in such a way that each object-reference beam pair optical path is mismatched such that they are incoherent and can be stored in a single CCD frame. As is typical in these types of interferometric arrangements, two digital holograms are needed in order to compare two different states of the cylinder. Each hologram is Fourier transformed and due to the incoherence introduced three separate spectra are readily identified, each belonging to a object-reference beam pair. On comparing by subtraction the phase obtained from the two pulsed digital holograms it is possible to gather quantitative 3D results from harmonic displacements.

  12. Parallel, distributed and GPU computing technologies in single-particle electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schmeisser, Martin; Heisen, Burkhard C.; Luettich, Mario; Busche, Boris; Hauer, Florian; Koske, Tobias; Knauber, Karl-Heinz; Stark, Holger

    2009-01-01

    Most known methods for the determination of the structure of macromolecular complexes are limited or at least restricted at some point by their computational demands. Recent developments in information technology such as multicore, parallel and GPU processing can be used to overcome these limitations. In particular, graphics processing units (GPUs), which were originally developed for rendering real-time effects in computer games, are now ubiquitous and provide unprecedented computational power for scientific applications. Each parallel-processing paradigm alone can improve overall performance; the increased computational performance obtained by combining all paradigms, unleashing the full power of today’s technology, makes certain applications feasible that were previously virtually impossible. In this article, state-of-the-art paradigms are introduced, the tools and infrastructure needed to apply these paradigms are presented and a state-of-the-art infrastructure and solution strategy for moving scientific applications to the next generation of computer hardware is outlined. PMID:19564686

  13. NASA Scientists Push the Limits of Computer Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA research Dr. Donald Frazier uses a blue laser shining through a quartz window into a special mix of chemicals to generate a polymer film on the inside quartz surface. As the chemicals respond to the laser light, they adhere to the glass surface, forming opticl films. Dr. Frazier and Dr. Mark S. Paley developed the process in the Space Sciences Laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. Working aboard the Space Shuttle, a science team led by Dr. Frazier formed thin-films potentially useful in optical computers with fewer impurities than those formed on Earth. Patterns of these films can be traced onto the quartz surface. In the optical computers on the future, these films could replace electronic circuits and wires, making the systems more efficient and cost-effective, as well as lighter and more compact. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

  14. NASA Scientists Push the Limits of Computer Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA researcher Dr. Donald Frazier uses a blue laser shining through a quartz window into a special mix of chemicals to generate a polymer film on the inside quartz surface. As the chemicals respond to the laser light, they adhere to the glass surface, forming optical films. Dr. Frazier and Dr. Mark S. Paley developed the process in the Space Sciences Laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. Working aboard the Space Shuttle, a science team led by Dr. Frazier formed thin-films potentially useful in optical computers with fewer impurities than those formed on Earth. Patterns of these films can be traced onto the quartz surface. In the optical computers of the future, thee films could replace electronic circuits and wires, making the systems more efficient and cost-effective, as well as lighter and more compact. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

  15. NASA Scientists Push the Limits of Computer Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Donald Frazier,NASA researcher, uses a blue laser shining through a quarts window into a special mix of chemicals to generate a polymer film on the inside quartz surface. As the chemicals respond to the laser light, they adhere to the glass surface, forming optical films. Dr. Frazier and Dr. Mark S. Paley developed the process in the Space Sciences Laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. Working aboard the Space Shuttle, a science team led by Dr. Frazier formed thin films potentially useful in optical computers with fewer impurities than those formed on Earth. Patterns of these films can be traced onto the quartz surface. In the optical computers of the future, these films could replace electronic circuits and wires, making the systems more efficient and cost-effective, as well as lighter and more compact. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center.

  16. EINDHOVEN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Department of Mathematics and Computer Science

    E-print Network

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    in the liquid interact with stress waves in the pipe walls. Such interaction takes also place at unrestrained pipe velocity, zu , and axial pipe stress, z , are 1 0 f V P t z + = , (1) #12;2 1 2 2 ( ) 0zV R P-14 May 2009 Exact computation of the axial vibration of two coupled liquid-filled pipes by A

  17. Use of computer and cellular phone technology by older rural adults.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Tara Renee; Treiber, Frank; Jenkins, Carolyn; Mercier, Angela

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the use of computer and cellular phone technology among older adults living in the rural Appalachian region of North Carolina. A 21-item questionnaire on access to and use of computer and cellular phone technology was administered to 43 older adults, using dichotomous and frequency-rated questions. The sample was recruited from two rural senior centers in the Appalachian region of North Carolina. Forty percent of the participants earned $20 000 or less annually. The majority owned a cellular phone (79.9%), and nearly half had a desktop computer (44.2%). High-speed Internet coverage was the most frequent type (42%) of in-home coverage. This study provides insights into the needs and challenges of older rural Appalachians with regard to technology. Computer technology may be more accessible and have fewer barriers by older adults than other forms of technology. Future research should explore the levels of computer literacy of older adults. PMID:24949713

  18. Practical holography; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 21, 22, 1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Tung H.; Ludman, Jacques E.

    1986-01-01

    Practical holographic applications for industrial, educational and artistic uses are considered, including pulsed holographic art practices, holograms as training and job performance aids, holographic lighting for energy efficient greenhouses, and phase measurement with image holography. Papers are also presented on fiber optics in holography, special effects techniques for integral holograms, artistic holography in Japan, and automated holographic mass production. Other topics include processing for reflection holography, real-time moire holography, a holographic wavelength demultiplexer for optical fiber communications, and a lensless holographic line scanner.

  19. COLLEGE OF SCIENCE IST COMPUTER INFORMATION AND TECHNOLOGY REQUIREMENTS A 2.0 GPA is required for graduation.

    E-print Network

    Sanyal, Suman

    Major-Computer Forensics Area of Emphasis IST 363 Network Administration 3 IST 464 Network Sec ____________ 3 IST 463 Digital Forensics Practicum 3 Computer and Information Technology Major-Game DevelopmentCOLLEGE OF SCIENCE ­ IST ­ COMPUTER INFORMATION AND TECHNOLOGY REQUIREMENTS Name Date A 2.0 GPA

  20. From computer images to video presentation: Enhancing technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beam, Sherilee F.

    1994-01-01

    With NASA placing increased emphasis on transferring technology to outside industry, NASA researchers need to evaluate many aspects of their efforts in this regard. Often it may seem like too much self-promotion to many researchers. However, industry's use of video presentations in sales, advertising, public relations and training should be considered. Today, the most typical presentation at NASA is through the use of vu-graphs (overhead transparencies) which can be effective for text or static presentations. For full blown color and sound presentations, however, the best method is videotape. In fact, it is frequently more convenient due to its portability and the availability of viewing equipment. This talk describes techniques for creating a video presentation through the use of a combined researcher and video professional team.

  1. Cogeneration technology alternatives study. Volume 6: Computer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The potential technical capabilities of energy conversion systems in the 1985 - 2000 time period were defined with emphasis on systems using coal, coal-derived fuels or alternate fuels. Industrial process data developed for the large energy consuming industries serve as a framework for the cogeneration applications. Ground rules for the study were established and other necessary equipment (balance-of-plant) was defined. This combination of technical information, energy conversion system data ground rules, industrial process information and balance-of-plant characteristics was analyzed to evaluate energy consumption, capital and operating costs and emissions. Data in the form of computer printouts developed for 3000 energy conversion system-industrial process combinations are presented.

  2. Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on technology, on advances in such areas as aeronautics, electronics, physics, the space sciences, as well as computers and the attendant progress in medicine, robotics, and artificial intelligence. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books,…

  3. Biophysics of the Eye in Computer Vision: Methods and Advanced Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammoud, Riad I.; Hansen, Dan Witzner

    The eyes have it! This chapter describes cutting-edge computer vision methods employed in advanced vision sensing technologies for medical, safety, and security applications, where the human eye represents the object of interest for both the imager and the computer. A camera receives light from the real eye to form a sequence of digital images of it. As the eye scans the environment, or focuses on particular objects in the scene, the computer simultaneously localizes the eye position, tracks its movement over time, and infers measures such as the attention level, and the gaze direction in real time and fully automatic. The main focus of this chapter is on computer vision and pattern recognition algorithms for eye appearance variability modeling, automatic eye detection, and robust eye position tracking. This chapter offers good readings and solid methodologies to build the two fundamental low-level building blocks of a vision-based eye tracking technology.

  4. The Challenges and Benefits of Using Computer Technology for Communication and Teaching in the Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairley, J. P.; Hinds, J. J.

    2003-12-01

    The advent of the World Wide Web in the early 1990s not only revolutionized the exchange of ideas and information within the scientific community, but also provided educators with a new array of teaching, informational, and promotional tools. Use of computer graphics and animation to explain concepts and processes can stimulate classroom participation and student interest in the geosciences, which has historically attracted students with strong spatial and visualization skills. In today's job market, graduates are expected to have knowledge of computers and the ability to use them for acquiring, processing, and visually analyzing data. Furthermore, in addition to promoting visibility and communication within the scientific community, computer graphics and the Internet can be informative and educational for the general public. Although computer skills are crucial for earth science students and educators, many pitfalls exist in implementing computer technology and web-based resources into research and classroom activities. Learning to use these new tools effectively requires a significant time commitment and careful attention to the source and reliability of the data presented. Furthermore, educators have a responsibility to ensure that students and the public understand the assumptions and limitations of the materials presented, rather than allowing them to be overwhelmed by "gee-whiz" aspects of the technology. We present three examples of computer technology in the earth sciences classroom: 1) a computer animation of water table response to well pumping, 2) a 3-D fly-through animation of a fault controlled valley, and 3) a virtual field trip for an introductory geology class. These examples demonstrate some of the challenges and benefits of these new tools, and encourage educators to expand the responsible use of computer technology for teaching and communicating scientific results to the general public.

  5. Proceedings of the 1993 Conference on Intelligent Computer-Aided Training and Virtual Environment Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, Patricia R.; Loftin, R. Bowen

    1993-01-01

    The volume 2 proceedings from the 1993 Conference on Intelligent Computer-Aided Training and Virtual Environment Technology are presented. Topics discussed include intelligent computer assisted training (ICAT) systems architectures, ICAT educational and medical applications, virtual environment (VE) training and assessment, human factors engineering and VE, ICAT theory and natural language processing, ICAT military applications, VE engineering applications, ICAT knowledge acquisition processes and applications, and ICAT aerospace applications.

  6. Combining Brain–Computer Interfaces and Assistive Technologies: State-of-the-Art and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Millán, J. d. R.; Rupp, R.; Müller-Putz, G. R.; Murray-Smith, R.; Giugliemma, C.; Tangermann, M.; Vidaurre, C.; Cincotti, F.; Kübler, A.; Leeb, R.; Neuper, C.; Müller, K.-R.; Mattia, D.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, new research has brought the field of electroencephalogram (EEG)-based brain–computer interfacing (BCI) out of its infancy and into a phase of relative maturity through many demonstrated prototypes such as brain-controlled wheelchairs, keyboards, and computer games. With this proof-of-concept phase in the past, the time is now ripe to focus on the development of practical BCI technologies that can be brought out of the lab and into real-world applications. In particular, we focus on the prospect of improving the lives of countless disabled individuals through a combination of BCI technology with existing assistive technologies (AT). In pursuit of more practical BCIs for use outside of the lab, in this paper, we identify four application areas where disabled individuals could greatly benefit from advancements in BCI technology, namely, “Communication and Control”, “Motor Substitution”, “Entertainment”, and “Motor Recovery”. We review the current state of the art and possible future developments, while discussing the main research issues in these four areas. In particular, we expect the most progress in the development of technologies such as hybrid BCI architectures, user–machine adaptation algorithms, the exploitation of users’ mental states for BCI reliability and confidence measures, the incorporation of principles in human–computer interaction (HCI) to improve BCI usability, and the development of novel BCI technology including better EEG devices. PMID:20877434

  7. Exploring Secondary Agriscience Teachers' and Students' Use, Attitude Toward, Knowledge and Perceptions of Computers and Technology Tools 

    E-print Network

    Miller, Kimberley Ann

    2012-07-16

    with the increasing availability of computers to students, it is important to continually investigate how secondary agriscience teachers' and students' use and view computer technology, both personally and educationally, in order to effectively utilize this advancing...

  8. General theoretical formulation of image formation in digital Fresnel holography.

    PubMed

    Picart, Pascal; Leval, Julien

    2008-07-01

    We present a detailed analysis of image formation in digital Fresnel holography. The mathematical modeling is developed on the basis of Fourier optics, making possible the understanding of the different influences of each of the physical effects invoked in digital holography. Particularly, it is demonstrated that spatial resolution in the reconstructed plane can be written as a convolution product of functions that describe these influences. The analysis leads to a thorough investigation of the effect of the width of the sensor, the surface of pixels, the numerical focusing, and the aberrations of the reference wave, as well as to an explicit formulation of the Shannon theorem for digital holography. Experimental illustrations confirm the proposed theoretical analysis. PMID:18594633

  9. Compressive Fresnel digital holography using Fresnelet based sparse representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Prakash; Alex, Zachariah C.; Nelleri, Anith

    2015-04-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) in digital holography requires only very less number of pixel level detections in hologram plane for accurate image reconstruction and this is achieved by exploiting the sparsity of the object wave. When the input object fields are non-sparse in spatial domain, CS demands a suitable sparsification method like wavelet decomposition. The Fresnelet, a suitable wavelet basis for processing Fresnel digital holograms is an efficient sparsifier for the complex Fresnel field obtained by the Fresnel transform of the object field and minimizes the mutual coherence between sensing and sparsifying matrices involved in CS. The paper demonstrates the merits of Fresnelet based sparsification in compressive digital Fresnel holography over conventional method of sparsifying the input object field. The phase shifting digital Fresnel holography (PSDH) is used to retrieve the complex Fresnel field for the chosen problem. The results are presented from a numerical experiment to show the proof of the concept.

  10. Compressive coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering holography.

    PubMed

    Cocking, Alexander; Mehta, Nikhil; Shi, Kebin; Liu, Zhiwen

    2015-09-21

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) holography captures both the amplitude and the phase of the anti-Stokes field generated from a sample and can thus perform single-shot, chemically selective three-dimensional imaging. We present compressive CARS holography, a numerical technique based on the concept of compressive sensing, to improve the quality of reconstructed images by leveraging sparsity in the source distribution and reducing the out-of-focus background noise. In particular, we use the two-step iterative shrinkage threshold (TwIST) algorithm with an l1 norm regularizer to iteratively retrieve images from an off axis CARS digital hologram. It is shown that the use of compressive CARS holography enhances the CARS holographic imaging technique by reducing noise and thereby effectively emulating a higher axial resolution using only a single shot hologram. PMID:26406699

  11. Use of Computer-Assisted Technologies (CAT) to Enhance Social, Communicative, and Language Development in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploog, Bertram O.; Scharf, Alexa; Nelson, DeShawn; Brooks, Patricia J.

    2013-01-01

    Major advances in multimedia computer technology over the past decades have made sophisticated computer games readily available to the public. This, combined with the observation that most children, including those with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), show an affinity to computers, has led researchers to recognize the potential of computer…

  12. Critical Issues Forum: A multidisciplinary educational program integrating computer technology

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, R.J.; Robertson, B.; Jacobs, D.

    1998-09-01

    The Critical Issues Forum (CIF) funded by the US Department of Energy is a collaborative effort between the Science Education Team of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and New Mexico high schools to improve science education throughout the state of New Mexico as well as nationally. By creating an education relationship between the LANL with its unique scientific resources and New Mexico high schools, students and teachers participate in programs that increase not only their science content knowledge but also their critical thinking and problem-solving skills. The CIF program focuses on current, globally oriented topics crucial to the security of not only the US but to that of all nations. The CIF is an academic-year program that involves both teachers and students in the process of seeking solutions for real world concerns. Built around issues tied to LANL`s mission, participating students and teachers are asked to critically investigate and examine the interactions among the political, social, economic, and scientific domains while considering diversity issues that include geopolitical entities and cultural and ethnic groupings. Participants are expected to collaborate through telecommunications during the research phase and participate in a culminating multimedia activity, where they produce and deliver recommendations for the current issues being studied. The CIF was evaluated and found to be an effective approach for teacher professional training, especially in the development of skills for critical thinking and questioning. The CIF contributed to students` ability to integrate diverse disciplinary content about science-related topics and supported teachers in facilitating the understanding of their students using the CIF approach. Networking technology in CIF has been used as an information repository, resource delivery mechanism, and communication medium.

  13. Roadmap: Computer Technology -Network Technology -Associate of Applied Business RE-AAB-COMT-NWTC

    E-print Network

    Khan, Javed I.

    (3) or COMT 11004 Survey of Information Technology (3) or COMT 21007 Internet Ethics and Policies (3 Troubleshooting (3) or COMT 21110 Internetworking (3) or COMT 21200 Ethical Hacking (3) 3 Business Electives 2 3 Ethical Hacking (3) 3 COMT Elective 3 Kent Core Requirement 3 Kent Core Requirement 3 Graduation

  14. Thirteenth Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion and Launch Vehicle Technology. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. W. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    This conference publication includes various abstracts and presentations given at the 13th Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion and Launch Vehicle Technology held at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center April 25-27 1995. The purpose of the workshop was to discuss experimental and computational fluid dynamic activities in rocket propulsion and launch vehicles. The workshop was an open meeting for government, industry, and academia. A broad number of topics were discussed including computational fluid dynamic methodology, liquid and solid rocket propulsion, turbomachinery, combustion, heat transfer, and grid generation.

  15. Plasmonic holography: obtaining wide angle, broadband, and high efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuer, Jacob; Yifat, Yuval; Eitan-Wiener, Michal; Iluz, Zeev; Hanein, Yael; Boag, Amir

    2015-08-01

    We develop a new approach for obtaining wide-angle, broadband and efficient reflection holography by utilizing coupled dipole-patch nano-antenna cells to impose an arbitrary phase profile on of the reflected light. The holograms were projected at angles of 45° and 20° with respect to the impinging light with efficiencies ranging between 40%-50% over an optical bandwidth exceeding 180nm. Excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions was found at a wide spectral range. The demonstration of such reflectarrays opens new avenues towards expanding the limits of large angle holography.

  16. High Temperature Measurements Of Martensitic transformations Using Digital Holography

    SciTech Connect

    Thiesing, Benjamin; Mann, Christopher J; Dryepondt, Sebastien N

    2013-01-01

    During thermal cycling of nickel-aluminum-platinum (NiAlPt) and single crystal Fe-15Cr-15Ni alloys, the structural changes associated with the martensite to austenite phase transformation were measured using dual-wavelength digital holography. Real-time in-situ measurements reveal the formation of striations within the NiPtAl alloy at 70 C and the FeCrNi alloy at 520 C. The results demonstrate that digital holography is an effective technique for acquiring non-contact, high precision information of the surface evolution of alloys at high temperatures.

  17. Grid computing and collaboration technology in support of fusion energy sciencesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schissel, D. P.

    2005-05-01

    Science research in general and magnetic fusion research in particular continue to grow in size and complexity resulting in a concurrent growth in collaborations between experimental sites and laboratories worldwide. The simultaneous increase in wide area network speeds has made it practical to envision distributed working environments that are as productive as traditionally collocated work. In computing power, it has become reasonable to decouple production and consumption resulting in the ability to construct computing grids in a similar manner as the electrical power grid. Grid computing, the secure integration of computer systems over high speed networks to provide on-demand access to data analysis capabilities and related functions, is being deployed as an alternative to traditional resource sharing among institutions. For human interaction, advanced collaborative environments are being researched and deployed to have distributed group work that is as productive as traditional meetings. The DOE Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program initiative has sponsored several collaboratory projects, including the National Fusion Collaboratory Project, to utilize recent advances in grid computing and advanced collaborative environments to further research in several specific scientific domains. For fusion, the collaborative technology being deployed is being used in present day research and is also scalable to future research, in particular, to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor experiment that will require extensive collaboration capability worldwide. This paper briefly reviews the concepts of grid computing and advanced collaborative environments and gives specific examples of how these technologies are being used in fusion research today.

  18. Managing the technological edge: the UNESCO International Computation Centre and the limits to the transfer of computer technology, 1946-61.

    PubMed

    Nofre, David

    2014-07-01

    The spread of the modern computer is assumed to have been a smooth process of technology transfer. This view relies on an assessment of the open circulation of knowledge ensured by the US and British governments in the early post-war years. This article presents new historical evidence that question this view. At the centre of the article lies the ill-fated establishment of the UNESCO International Computation Centre. The project was initially conceived in 1946 to provide advanced computation capabilities to scientists of all nations. It soon became a prize sought by Western European countries like The Netherlands and Italy seeking to speed up their own national research programs. Nonetheless, as the article explains, the US government's limitations on the research function of the future centre resulted in the withdrawal of European support for the project. These limitations illustrate the extent to which US foreign science policy could operate as (stealth) industrial policy to secure a competitive technological advantage and the prospects of US manufacturers in a future European market. PMID:24908797

  19. Overall Application of Computer Technology to the Education and Research Programs of Air University. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Richard H.; And Others

    A study was conducted to determine the applicability of computer technology to the education and research activities of Air University. Twenty-five units of the University were studied in depth. The information thus collected provided the data required for analysis. Data analysis indicated the set of functional education and research activities…

  20. An Investigation of the Relationships among Technology Experiences, Communication Apprehension, Writing Apprehension and Computer Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDowell, Earl E.; Schuelke, L. David

    This study explored the relationships among communication technologies, communication apprehension, writing apprehension, and computer anxiety. Participants were 130 students from a variety of undergraduate oral communication classes in a large midwestern university who completed a modified form, 10 items, of McCroskey's Personal Report of…