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Sample records for computerized clinical decision

  1. Developing and implementing computerized protocols for standardization of clinical decisions.

    PubMed

    Morris, A H

    2000-03-01

    Humans have only a limited ability to incorporate information in decision making. In certain situations, the mismatch between this limitation and the availability of extensive information contributes to the varying performance and high error rate of clinical decision makers. Variation in clinical practice is due in part to clinicians' poor compliance with guidelines and recommended therapies. The use of decision-support tools is a response to both the information revolution and poor compliance. Computerized protocols used to deliver decision support can be configured to contain much more detail than textual guidelines or paper-based flow diagrams. Such protocols can generate patient-specific instructions for therapy that can be carried out with little interclinician variability; however, clinicians must be willing to modify personal styles of clinical management. Protocols need not be perfect. Several defensible and reasonable approaches are available for clinical problems. However, one of these reasonable approaches must be chosen and incorporated into the protocol to promote consistent clinical decisions. This reasoning is the basis of an explicit method of decision support that allows the rigorous evaluation of interventions, including use of the protocols themselves. Computerized protocols for mechanical ventilation and management of intravenous fluid and hemodynamic factors in patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome provide case studies for this discussion. PMID:10691588

  2. Reducing inappropriate ESR testing with computerized clinical decision support

    PubMed Central

    Gottheil, Stephanie; Khemani, Ekta; Copley, Katherine; Keeney, Michael; Kinney, Jeff; Chin-Yee, Ian; Gob, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory test overutilization increases health care costs, leads to unwarranted investigations, and may have a negative impact on health outcomes. The American Society of Clinical Pathology, in its Choosing Wisely Campaign, advocates that inflammation be investigated with C-reactive protein (CRP) instead of Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR). London Health Sciences Centre (LHSC), a tertiary care hospital organization in Ontario, Canada, set a goal to reduce inappropriate ESR orders by 50%. After developing appropriateness criteria for ESR, we used a series of PDSA cycles to reduce inappropriate ESR ordering and analyzed our results with an interrupted time series design. Our intervention began with an educational bulletin and moved to city-wide implementation of computerized Clinical Decision Support (CDS). After implementation, ESR orders decreased by 40% from 386 orders per week to 241 orders per week. Our results are supported by previous literature on the effectiveness of CDS in reducing overutilization and suggest that provider habit is a significant contributor to inappropriate ordering. PMID:27096092

  3. Improving Emergency Department Triage Classification with Computerized Clinical Decision Support at a Pediatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunisch, Joseph Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background: The Emergency Severity Index (ESI) is an emergency department (ED) triage classification system based on estimated patient-specific resource utilization. Rules for a computerized clinical decision support (CDS) system based on a patient's chief complaint were developed and tested using a stochastic model for predicting ESI scores.…

  4. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Nurse-Focused Computerized Clinical Decision Support on Urinary Catheter Practice Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Robin Lynn Neal

    2012-01-01

    A growing national emphasis has been placed on health information technology (HIT) with robust computerized clinical decision support (CCDS) integration into health care delivery. Catheter-associated urinary tract infection is the most frequent health care-associated infection in the United States and is associated with high cost, high volumes and…

  5. Determinants of Success for Computerized Clinical Decision Support Systems Integrated into CPOE Systems: a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Niès, Julie; Colombet, Isabelle; Degoulet, Patrice; Durieux, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    We carried out a systematic review of published trials to identify the methodological characteristics of studies and technical characteristics of computerized clinical decision support systems (CCDSSs) associated with efficacy for the main outcome of the study. Four characteristics of the content of decision support and the way in which the user is provided with assistance seem to be associated with the success of CCDSSs: a) System-initiated interventions, b) Assistance without user control over output, c) Systems in which data are automatically retrieved from the electronic medical record and d) Systems providing corollary actions in CPOE. Major differences in outcome reporting between studies could be reduced by the use of dedicated tools to standardize methodological reporting. PMID:17238410

  6. Patient-oriented Computerized Clinical Guidelines for Mobile Decision Support in Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rigla, Mercedes; Martínez-Sarriegui, Iñaki; Shalom, Erez; Peleg, Mor; Broens, Tom; Pons, Belén; Caballero-Ruíz, Estefanía; Gómez, Enrique J.; Hernando, M. Elena

    2014-01-01

    The risks associated with gestational diabetes (GD) can be reduced with an active treatment able to improve glycemic control. Advances in mobile health can provide new patient-centric models for GD to create personalized health care services, increase patient independence and improve patients’ self-management capabilities, and potentially improve their treatment compliance. In these models, decision-support functions play an essential role. The telemedicine system MobiGuide provides personalized medical decision support for GD patients that is based on computerized clinical guidelines and adapted to a mobile environment. The patient’s access to the system is supported by a smartphone-based application that enhances the efficiency and ease of use of the system. We formalized the GD guideline into a computer-interpretable guideline (CIG). We identified several workflows that provide decision-support functionalities to patients and 4 types of personalized advice to be delivered through a mobile application at home, which is a preliminary step to providing decision-support tools in a telemedicine system: (1) therapy, to help patients to comply with medical prescriptions; (2) monitoring, to help patients to comply with monitoring instructions; (3) clinical assessment, to inform patients about their health conditions; and (4) upcoming events, to deal with patients’ personal context or special events. The whole process to specify patient-oriented decision support functionalities ensures that it is based on the knowledge contained in the GD clinical guideline and thus follows evidence-based recommendations but at the same time is patient-oriented, which could enhance clinical outcomes and patients’ acceptance of the whole system. PMID:24876573

  7. Recommended practices for computerized clinical decision support and knowledge management in community settings: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to identify recommended practices for computerized clinical decision support (CDS) development and implementation and for knowledge management (KM) processes in ambulatory clinics and community hospitals using commercial or locally developed systems in the U.S. Methods Guided by the Multiple Perspectives Framework, the authors conducted ethnographic field studies at two community hospitals and five ambulatory clinic organizations across the U.S. Using a Rapid Assessment Process, a multidisciplinary research team: gathered preliminary assessment data; conducted on-site interviews, observations, and field surveys; analyzed data using both template and grounded methods; and developed universal themes. A panel of experts produced recommended practices. Results The team identified ten themes related to CDS and KM. These include: 1) workflow; 2) knowledge management; 3) data as a foundation for CDS; 4) user computer interaction; 5) measurement and metrics; 6) governance; 7) translation for collaboration; 8) the meaning of CDS; 9) roles of special, essential people; and 10) communication, training, and support. Experts developed recommendations about each theme. The original Multiple Perspectives framework was modified to make explicit a new theoretical construct, that of Translational Interaction. Conclusions These ten themes represent areas that need attention if a clinic or community hospital plans to implement and successfully utilize CDS. In addition, they have implications for workforce education, research, and national-level policy development. The Translational Interaction construct could guide future applied informatics research endeavors. PMID:22333210

  8. Computerized clinical decision support systems for chronic disease management: A decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The use of computerized clinical decision support systems (CCDSSs) may improve chronic disease management, which requires recurrent visits to multiple health professionals, ongoing disease and treatment monitoring, and patient behavior modification. The objective of this review was to determine if CCDSSs improve the processes of chronic care (such as diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of disease) and associated patient outcomes (such as effects on biomarkers and clinical exacerbations). Methods We conducted a decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Ovid's EBM Reviews database, Inspec, and reference lists for potentially eligible articles published up to January 2010. We included randomized controlled trials that compared the use of CCDSSs to usual practice or non-CCDSS controls. Trials were eligible if at least one component of the CCDSS was designed to support chronic disease management. We considered studies 'positive' if they showed a statistically significant improvement in at least 50% of relevant outcomes. Results Of 55 included trials, 87% (n = 48) measured system impact on the process of care and 52% (n = 25) of those demonstrated statistically significant improvements. Sixty-five percent (36/55) of trials measured impact on, typically, non-major (surrogate) patient outcomes, and 31% (n = 11) of those demonstrated benefits. Factors of interest to decision makers, such as cost, user satisfaction, system interface and feature sets, unique design and deployment characteristics, and effects on user workflow were rarely investigated or reported. Conclusions A small majority (just over half) of CCDSSs improved care processes in chronic disease management and some improved patient health. Policy makers, healthcare administrators, and practitioners should be aware that the evidence of CCDSS effectiveness is limited, especially with respect to the small number and size of studies measuring patient outcomes. PMID:21824386

  9. Medication-related clinical decision support in computerized provider order entry systems: a review.

    PubMed

    Kuperman, Gilad J; Bobb, Anne; Payne, Thomas H; Avery, Anthony J; Gandhi, Tejal K; Burns, Gerard; Classen, David C; Bates, David W

    2007-01-01

    While medications can improve patients' health, the process of prescribing them is complex and error prone, and medication errors cause many preventable injuries. Computer provider order entry (CPOE) with clinical decision support (CDS), can improve patient safety and lower medication-related costs. To realize the medication-related benefits of CDS within CPOE, one must overcome significant challenges. Healthcare organizations implementing CPOE must understand what classes of CDS their CPOE systems can support, assure that clinical knowledge underlying their CDS systems is reasonable, and appropriately represent electronic patient data. These issues often influence to what extent an institution will succeed with its CPOE implementation and achieve its desired goals. Medication-related decision support is probably best introduced into healthcare organizations in two stages, basic and advanced. Basic decision support includes drug-allergy checking, basic dosing guidance, formulary decision support, duplicate therapy checking, and drug-drug interaction checking. Advanced decision support includes dosing support for renal insufficiency and geriatric patients, guidance for medication-related laboratory testing, drug-pregnancy checking, and drug-disease contraindication checking. In this paper, the authors outline some of the challenges associated with both basic and advanced decision support and discuss how those challenges might be addressed. The authors conclude with summary recommendations for delivering effective medication-related clinical decision support addressed to healthcare organizations, application and knowledge base vendors, policy makers, and researchers. PMID:17068355

  10. Early Experiences from a guideline-based computerized clinical decision support for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Valladares, Carlos; Corbal, Iago; Anani, Nadim; Koch, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) affects 1-2% of the population. Twenty percent of all strokes are caused by AF. In this study, we represented the clinical knowledge in the European Society of Cardiology guideline using Guideline Definition Language (GDL), a format that binds openEHR archetypes, rule languages, and reference terminologies together. The computerized guidelines are applied to electronic health record (EHR) data retrospectively in order to identify possible gaps between current clinical practice and optimal care recommended by the evidence-based guidelines. Treatment compliance is checked in two patient groups: one received treatment from a cardiologist who is responsible for AF treatment in the region (n=514) and the other was a much larger patient group from the whole region (n=8130). The compliance checking shows the cardiologist group has substantially higher percentage of compliant treatment compared with that of the general population group. Based on this important finding, we are now implementing at-point-of-care clinical decision support reusing the same computerized guideline knowledge in GDL format in order to increase the guideline adherence of the treatment. PMID:23920553

  11. Usability Evaluation of Pharmacogenomics Clinical Decision Support Aids and Clinical Knowledge Resources in a Computerized Provider Order Entry System: A Mixed Methods Approach

    PubMed Central

    Devine, Emily Beth; Lee, Chia-Ju; Overby, Casey L.; Abernethy, Neil; McCune, Jeannine; Smith, Joe W.; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Pharmacogenomics (PGx) is positioned to have a widespread impact on the practice of medicine, yet physician acceptance is low. The presentation of context-specific PGx information, in the form of clinical decision support (CDS) alerts embedded in a computerized provider order entry (CPOE) system, can aid uptake. Usability evaluations can inform optimal design, which, in turn, can spur adoption. Objectives The study objectives were to: 1) evaluate an early prototype, commercial CPOE system with PGx-CDS alerts in a simulated environment, 2) identify potential improvements to the system user interface, and 3) understand the contexts under which PGx knowledge embedded in an electronic health record is useful to prescribers. Methods Using a mixed methods approach, we presented seven cardiologists and three oncologists with five hypothetical clinical case scenarios. Each scenario featured a drug for which a gene encoding drug metabolizing enzyme required consideration of dosage adjustment. We used Morae® to capture comments and on-screen movements as participants prescribed each drug. In addition to PGx-CDS alerts, ‘Infobutton®’ and ‘Evidence’ icons provided participants with clinical knowledge resources to aid decision-making. Results Nine themes emerged. Five suggested minor improvements to the CPOE user interface; two suggested presenting PGx information through PGx-CDS alerts using an ‘Infobutton’ or ‘Evidence’ icon. The remaining themes were strong recommendations to provide succinct, relevant guidelines and dosing recommendations of phenotypic information from credible and trustworthy sources; any more information was overwhelming. Participants’ median rating of PGx-CDS system usability was 2 on a Likert scale ranging from 1 (strongly agree) to 7 (strongly disagree). Conclusions Usability evaluation results suggest that participants considered PGx information important for improving prescribing decisions; and that they would incorporate PGx-CDS when information is presented in relevant and useful ways. PMID:24874987

  12. Feasibility of integrating a clinical decision support tool into an existing computerized physician order entry system to increase seasonal influenza vaccination in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Venkat, Arvind; Chan-Tompkins, Noreen H; Hegde, Gajanan G; Chuirazzi, David M; Hunter, Roger; Szczesiul, Jillian M

    2010-08-23

    While emergency department (ED) seasonal influenza vaccination programs are feasible, reported implementation barriers include added staffing requirements to identify eligible patients and getting busy ED personnel to order and provide vaccination. We present a prospective, observational trial of integrating a clinical decision support tool into an existing ED computerized physician order entry (CPOE) system to increase ED seasonal influenza vaccination without added staffing resources, the operational barriers identified to program implementation, the revenue generated and data on opportunities for future quality improvement. Compared to the comparable pre-protocol period, ED influenza vaccination rose by 17.5% with a resultant profit margin of 34.5%. PMID:20620167

  13. Computerized Clinical Simulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinecker, Lynn

    1985-01-01

    Describes technique involved in designing a clinical simulation problem for the allied health field of respiratory therapy; discusses the structure, content, and scoring categories of the simulation; and provides a sample program which illustrates a programming technique in BASIC, including a program listing and a sample flowchart. (MBR)

  14. Barriers to implementation of a computerized decision support system for depression: an observational report on lessons learned in "real world" clinical settings

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite wide promotion, clinical practice guidelines have had limited effect in changing physician behavior. Effective implementation strategies to date have included: multifaceted interventions involving audit and feedback, local consensus processes, marketing; reminder systems, either manual or computerized; and interactive educational meetings. In addition, there is now growing evidence that contextual factors affecting implementation must be addressed such as organizational support (leadership procedures and resources) for the change and strategies to implement and maintain new systems. Methods To examine the feasibility and effectiveness of implementation of a computerized decision support system for depression (CDSS-D) in routine public mental health care in Texas, fifteen study clinicians (thirteen physicians and two advanced nurse practitioners) participated across five sites, accruing over 300 outpatient visits on 168 patients. Results Issues regarding computer literacy and hardware/software requirements were identified as initial barriers. Clinicians also reported concerns about negative impact on workflow and the potential need for duplication during the transition from paper to electronic systems of medical record keeping. Conclusion The following narrative report based on observations obtained during the initial testing and use of a CDSS-D in clinical settings further emphasizes the importance of taking into account organizational factors when planning implementation of evidence-based guidelines or decision support within a system. PMID:19159458

  15. Cassel Psych Center Computerized Biofeedback Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.

    1982-01-01

    Describes Cassel Psych Center, a computerized biofeedback clinic, where the "well" patient is a major concern, and where biofeedback instruments are used with computers to form a Computerized-Biofeedback Clinical Support System. The Center's activities are designed to parallel the services of the pathologist in a medical setting. (PAS)

  16. Computerized clinical decision support for the early recognition and management of acute kidney injury: a qualitative evaluation of end-user experience

    PubMed Central

    Kanagasundaram, Nigel S.; Bevan, Mark T.; Sims, Andrew J.; Heed, Andrew; Price, David A.; Sheerin, Neil S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the efficacy of computerized clinical decision support (CCDS) for acute kidney injury (AKI) remains unclear, the wider literature includes examples of limited acceptability and equivocal benefit. Our single-centre study aimed to identify factors promoting or inhibiting use of in-patient AKI CCDS. Methods Targeting medical users, CCDS triggered with a serum creatinine rise of ≥25 μmol/L/day and linked to guidance and test ordering. User experience was evaluated through retrospective interviews, conducted and analysed according to Normalization Process Theory. Initial pilot ward experience allowed tool refinement. Assessments continued following CCDS activation across all adult, non-critical care wards. Results Thematic saturation was achieved with 24 interviews. The alert was accepted as a potentially useful prompt to early clinical re-assessment by many trainees. Senior staff were more sceptical, tending to view it as a hindrance. ‘Pop-ups’ and mandated engagement before alert dismissal were universally unpopular due to workflow disruption. Users were driven to close out of the alert as soon as possible to review historical creatinines and to continue with the intended workflow. Conclusions Our study revealed themes similar to those previously described in non-AKI settings. Systems intruding on workflow, particularly involving complex interactions, may be unsustainable even if there has been a positive impact on care. The optimal balance between intrusion and clinical benefit of AKI CCDS requires further evaluation. PMID:26798462

  17. Associations between the concurrent use of clinical decision support and computerized provider order entry and the rates of appropriate prescribing at discharge

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, M.E.; Marken, P.A.; Simon, S.D.; Hackman, J.L.; Schaefer, R.S.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Electronic health record systems used in conjunction with clinical decision support (CDS) or computerized provider order entry (CPOE) have shown potential in improving quality of care, yet less is known about the effects of combination use of CDS and CPOE on prescribing rates at discharge. Objectives This study investigates the effectiveness of combination use of CDS and CPOE on appropriate drug prescribing rates at discharge for AMI or HF patients. Methods Combination use of CDS and CPOE is defined as hospitals self-reporting full implementation across all hospital units of CDS reminders, CDS guidelines, and CPOE. Appropriate prescribing rates of aspirin, ACEI/ARBs, or beta blockers are defined using quality measures from Hospital Compare. Multivariate linear regressions are used to test for differences in mean appropriate prescribing rates between hospitals reporting combination use of CDS and CPOE, compared to those reporting the singular use of one or the other, or the absence of both. Covariates include hospital size, region, and ownership status. Results Approximately 10% of the sample reported full implementation of both CDS and CPOE, while 7% and 17% reported full use of only CPOE or only CDS, respectively. Hospitals reporting full use of CDS only reported between 0.2% (95% CI 0.04 – 1.0) and 1.6% (95% CI 0.6 – 2.6) higher appropriate prescribing rates compared to hospitals reporting use of neither system. Rates of prescribing by hospitals reporting full use of both CPOE and CDS did not significantly differ from the control group. Conclusions Although associations found between full implementation of CDS and appropriate prescribing rates suggest that clinical decision tools are sufficient compared to basic EHR systems in improving prescribing at discharge, the modest differences raise doubt about the clinical relevance of the findings. Future studies need to continue investigating the causal nature and clinical relevance of these associations. PMID:23646071

  18. Evaluation of medium-term consequences of implementing commercial computerized physician order entry and clinical decision support prescribing systems in two ‘early adopter’ hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Cresswell, Kathrin M; Bates, David W; Williams, Robin; Morrison, Zoe; Slee, Ann; Coleman, Jamie; Robertson, Ann; Sheikh, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Objective To understand the medium-term consequences of implementing commercially procured computerized physician order entry (CPOE) and clinical decision support (CDS) systems in ‘early adopter’ hospitals. Materials and methods In-depth, qualitative case study in two hospitals using a CPOE or a CDS system for at least 2 years. Both hospitals had implemented commercially available systems. Hospital A had implemented a CPOE system (with basic decision support), whereas hospital B invested additional resources in a CDS system that facilitated order entry but which was integrated with electronic health records and offered more advanced CDS. We used a combination of documentary analysis of the implementation plans, audiorecorded semistructured interviews with system users, and observations of strategic meetings and systems usage. Results We collected 11 documents, conducted 43 interviews, and conducted a total of 21.5 h of observations. We identified three major themes: (1) impacts on individual users, including greater legibility of prescriptions, but also some accounts of increased workloads; (2) the introduction of perceived new safety risks related to accessibility and usability of hardware and software, with users expressing concerns that some problems such as duplicate prescribing were more likely to occur; and (3) realizing organizational benefits through secondary uses of data. Conclusions We identified little difference in the medium-term consequences of a CPOE and a CDS system. It is important that future studies investigate the medium- and longer-term consequences of CPOE and CDS systems in a wider range of hospitals. PMID:24431334

  19. Clinical chemistry equipment: a computerized system for cost evaluation.

    PubMed

    Morrison, J I; Tydeman, J; Cassidy, P A; Hardwick, D F

    1983-01-01

    A computerized decision-support system has been developed and implemented to assist in the economic evaluation of alternative clinical chemistry equipment configurations. The capabilities, structure, and relative merits of the system are discussed. This decision-support system is now being used extensively by hospitals in British Columbia. An alternative equipment configuration, identified with the aid of the system, resulted in one hospital alone saving an annual $200,000 in consumables and reagents costs. Further development of computerized economic evaluation systems is encouraged. PMID:10310356

  20. Designing computerized decision support that works for clinicians and families.

    PubMed

    Fiks, Alexander G

    2011-03-01

    Evidence-based decision-making is central to the practice of pediatrics. Clinical trials and other biomedical research provide a foundation for this process, and practice guidelines, drawing from their results, inform the optimal management of an increasing number of childhood health problems. However, many clinicians fail to adhere to guidelines. Clinical decision support delivered using health information technology, often in the form of electronic health records, provides a tool to deliver evidence-based information to the point of care and has the potential to overcome barriers to evidence-based practice. An increasing literature now informs how these systems should be designed and implemented to most effectively improve outcomes in pediatrics. Through the examples of computerized physician order entry, as well as the impact of alerts at the point of care on immunization rates, the delivery of evidence-based asthma care, and the follow-up of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, the following review addresses strategies for success in using these tools. The following review argues that, as decision support evolves, the clinician should no longer be the sole target of information and alerts. Through the Internet and other technologies, families are increasingly seeking health information and gathering input to guide health decisions. By enlisting clinical decision support systems to deliver evidence-based information to both clinicians and families, help families express their preferences and goals, and connect families to the medical home, clinical decision support may ultimately be most effective in improving outcomes. PMID:21315295

  1. Designing Computerized Decision Support That Works for Clinicians and Families

    PubMed Central

    Fiks, Alexander G.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence-based decision-making is central to the practice of pediatrics. Clinical trials and other biomedical research provide a foundation for this process, and practice guidelines, drawing from their results, inform the optimal management of an increasing number of childhood health problems. However, many clinicians fail to adhere to guidelines. Clinical decision support delivered using health information technology, often in the form of electronic health records, provides a tool to deliver evidence-based information to the point of care and has the potential to overcome barriers to evidence-based practice. An increasing literature now informs how these systems should be designed and implemented to most effectively improve outcomes in pediatrics. Through the examples of computerized physician order entry, as well as the impact of alerts at the point of care on immunization rates, the delivery of evidence-based asthma care, and the follow-up of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, the following review addresses strategies for success in using these tools. The following review argues that, as decision support evolves, the clinician should no longer be the sole target of information and alerts. Through the Internet and other technologies, families are increasingly seeking health information and gathering input to guide health decisions. By enlisting clinical decision support systems to deliver evidence-based information to both clinicians and families, help families express their preferences and goals, and connect families to the medical home, clinical decision support may ultimately be most effective in improving outcomes. PMID:21315295

  2. Clinical applications of computerized thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anbar, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Computerized or digital, thermography is a rapidly growing diagnostic imaging modality. It has superseded contact thermography and analog imaging thermography which do not allow effective quantization. Medical applications of digital thermography can be classified in two groups: static and dynamic imaging. They can also be classified into macro thermography (resolution greater than 1 mm) and micro thermography (resolution less than 100 microns). Both modalities allow a thermal resolution of 0.1 C. The diagnostic power of images produced by any of these modalities can be augmented by the use of digital image enhancement and image recognition procedures. Computerized thermography has been applied in neurology, cardiovascular and plastic surgery, rehabilitation and sports medicine, psychiatry, dermatology and ophthalmology. Examples of these applications are shown and their scope and limitations are discussed.

  3. Computerized decision support in adult and pediatric critical care

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Cydni N; Bratton, Susan L; Hirshberg, Eliotte L

    2013-01-01

    Computerized decision support (CDS) is the most advanced form of clinical decision support available and has evolved with innovative technologies to provide meaningful assistance to medical professionals. Critical care clinicians are in unique environments where vast amounts of data are collected on individual patients, and where expedient and accurate decisions are paramount to the delivery of quality healthcare. Many CDS tools are in use today among adult and pediatric intensive care units as diagnostic aides, safety alerts, computerized protocols, and automated recommendations for management. Some CDS use have significantly decreased adverse events and improved costs when carefully implemented and properly operated. CDS tools integrated into electronic health records are also valuable to researchers providing rapid identification of eligible patients, streamlining data-gathering and analysis, and providing cohorts for study of rare and chronic diseases through data-warehousing. Although the need for human judgment in the daily care of critically ill patients has limited the study and realization of meaningful improvements in overall patient outcomes, CDS tools continue to evolve and integrate into the daily workflow of clinicians, and will likely provide advancements over time. Through novel technologies, CDS tools have vast potential for progression and will significantly impact the field of critical care and clinical research in the future. PMID:24701413

  4. Computerized decision support in adult and pediatric critical care.

    PubMed

    Williams, Cydni N; Bratton, Susan L; Hirshberg, Eliotte L

    2013-11-01

    Computerized decision support (CDS) is the most advanced form of clinical decision support available and has evolved with innovative technologies to provide meaningful assistance to medical professionals. Critical care clinicians are in unique environments where vast amounts of data are collected on individual patients, and where expedient and accurate decisions are paramount to the delivery of quality healthcare. Many CDS tools are in use today among adult and pediatric intensive care units as diagnostic aides, safety alerts, computerized protocols, and automated recommendations for management. Some CDS use have significantly decreased adverse events and improved costs when carefully implemented and properly operated. CDS tools integrated into electronic health records are also valuable to researchers providing rapid identification of eligible patients, streamlining data-gathering and analysis, and providing cohorts for study of rare and chronic diseases through data-warehousing. Although the need for human judgment in the daily care of critically ill patients has limited the study and realization of meaningful improvements in overall patient outcomes, CDS tools continue to evolve and integrate into the daily workflow of clinicians, and will likely provide advancements over time. Through novel technologies, CDS tools have vast potential for progression and will significantly impact the field of critical care and clinical research in the future. PMID:24701413

  5. Cost effective computerized decision support: tracking caregiver acceptance at the point of care.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, C. J.; Metcalf, S.; Zhang, X.; Kinder, A. T.; Greenway, L.; Morris, A. H.

    1995-01-01

    We implemented a computerized decision support tool to standardize the administration of supplemental oxygen (O2) therapy in the acute care (non-ICU) hospital setting. Caregiver acceptance of the computerizeds oxygen therapy protocol (COTP) instructions was measured to determine the clinical performance of the computerized decision support tool. 49.6% of instructions generated were followed by the clinical caregiver, and 16.8% of instructions generated were explicitly acknowledged by the user through the COTP computer interface. Despite this low caregiver response rate, significant favorable changes in the administration of oxygen were observed. This paper is focused on the issues of general importance the caregiver response rate raises for the implementation and clinical use of computerized decision support tools, including: (1) limitations of the user interface and (2) inherent difficulty in changing long-standing practice patterns. PMID:8563404

  6. Computerization of the safeguards analysis decision process

    SciTech Connect

    Ehinger, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    Safeguards regulations are evolving to meet new demands for timeliness and sensitivity in detecting the loss or unauthorized use of sensitive nuclear materials. The opportunities to meet new rules, particularly in bulk processing plants, involve developing techniques which use modern, computerized process control and information systems. Using these computerized systems in the safeguards analysis involves all the challenges of the man-machine interface experienced in the typical process control application and adds new dimensions to accuracy requirements, data analysis, and alarm resolution in the regulatory environment. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Mammography and computerized decision systems: a review.

    PubMed

    Roque, Antnio C; Andr, Tlio C S S

    2002-12-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems in mammography have been developed and investigated for several years and recently they have left the research stage to enter the clinical stage. The purpose of this article is to review the present situation of mammography for breast cancer detection and the role played by CAD systems. Results from the recent literature show that CAD systems have the potential to improve the sensitivities of radiologists in the detection of malignant clustered microcalcifications and masses, while keeping specificities at acceptable levels. This leads to the conclusion that CAD systems can be incorporated into clinical practice as a double reading option to radiologists. However, some issues have yet to be tackled for CAD systems to gain better acceptance and more widespread use worldwide. PMID:12594083

  8. Computerized Clinical Simulation Testing: Its Use for Competence Assessment in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bersky, Anna K.; Yocom, Carolyn J.

    1994-01-01

    Computerized Clinical Simulation Testing is an uncued, dynamic, interactive test that permits examinees to simulate the clinical decision-making skills used in the nursing management of client needs. It has the potential for helping boards of nursing to make more valid assessments about who is competent to practice nursing. (JOW)

  9. Physicians’ use of computerized clinical decision supports to improve medication management in the elderly – the Seniors Medication Alert and Review Technology intervention

    PubMed Central

    Alagiakrishnan, Kannayiram; Wilson, Patricia; Sadowski, Cheryl A; Rolfson, Darryl; Ballermann, Mark; Ausford, Allen; Vermeer, Karla; Mohindra, Kunal; Romney, Jacques; Hayward, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    Background Elderly people (aged 65 years or more) are at increased risk of polypharmacy (five or more medications), inappropriate medication use, and associated increased health care costs. The use of clinical decision support (CDS) within an electronic medical record (EMR) could improve medication safety. Methods Participatory action research methods were applied to preproduction design and development and postproduction optimization of an EMR-embedded CDS implementation of the Beers’ Criteria for medication management and the Cockcroft–Gault formula for estimating glomerular filtration rates (GFR). The “Seniors Medication Alert and Review Technologies” (SMART) intervention was used in primary care and geriatrics specialty clinics. Passive (chart messages) and active (order-entry alerts) prompts exposed potentially inappropriate medications, decreased GFR, and the possible need for medication adjustments. Physician reactions were assessed using surveys, EMR simulations, focus groups, and semi-structured interviews. EMR audit data were used to identify eligible patient encounters, the frequency of CDS events, how alerts were managed, and when evidence links were followed. Results Analysis of subjective data revealed that most clinicians agreed that CDS appeared at appropriate times during patient care. Although managing alerts incurred a modest time burden, most also agreed that workflow was not disrupted. Prevalent concerns related to clinician accountability and potential liability. Approximately 36% of eligible encounters triggered at least one SMART alert, with GFR alert, and most frequent medication warnings were with hypnotics and anticholinergics. Approximately 25% of alerts were overridden and ~15% elicited an evidence check. Conclusion While most SMART alerts validated clinician choices, they were received as valuable reminders for evidence-informed care and education. Data from this study may aid other attempts to implement Beers’ Criteria in ambulatory care EMRs. PMID:26869776

  10. Clinical decision support for atypical orders: detection and warning of atypical medication orders submitted to a computerized provider order entry system

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Allie D; Mulherin, David P; Flynn, Allen J; Stevenson, James G; Zimmerman, Christopher R; Chaffee, Bruce W

    2014-01-01

    The specificity of medication-related alerts must be improved to overcome the pernicious effects of alert fatigue. A systematic comparison of new drug orders to historical orders could improve alert specificity and relevance. Using historical order data from a computerized provider order entry system, we alerted physicians to atypical orders during the prescribing of five medications: calcium, clopidogrel, heparin, magnesium, and potassium. The percentage of atypical orders placed for these five medications decreased during the 92?days the alerts were active when compared to the same period in the previous year (from 0.81% to 0.53%; p=0.015). Some atypical orders were appropriate. Fifty of the 68 atypical order alerts were over-ridden (74%). However, the over-ride rate is misleading because 28 of the atypical medication orders (41%) were changed. Atypical order alerts were relatively few, identified problems with frequencies as well as doses, and had a higher specificity than dose check alerts. PMID:24253195

  11. Using Computerized Clinical Nursing Data Bases for Nursing Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nail, Lillian M.; Lange, Linda L.

    1996-01-01

    Addresses the recognition of differences between clinical and research data in using computerized clinical nursing databases and the issues of privacy and confidentiality for patients whose records are involved. Describes procedures for assessing the quality and usability of these data for nursing research. (SK)

  12. Clinical Decision Making.

    PubMed

    2016-01-30

    Critically Appraised Topics (CATs) are a standardised, succinct summary of research evidence organised around a clinical question, using a form of evidence synthesis based on the principles of evidence-based medicine (EBM) and evidence-based veterinary medicine (EBVM). Access to CATs enables clinicians to incorporate evidence from the scientific literature into clinical practice and they have been used to teach EBVM at the University of Bristol's School of Veterinary Sciences since 2011. Similar to BestBETs for vets (VR, April 4, 2015, vol 176, p360), CATs will also be regularly published in the Clinical Decision Making section of Veterinary Record. PMID:26823311

  13. A Computerized Clinical Support System and Psychological Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.

    1978-01-01

    Advocating "holistic" medicine, this article details the benefits to be derived from using a computerized clinical support system in a psychological laboratory focusing on internal healing where the client/patient becomes a committed partner utilizing biofeedback equipment, gaming, and simulation to achieve self-understanding and self-control. (JC)

  14. Shared clinical decision making

    PubMed Central

    AlHaqwi, Ali I.; AlDrees, Turki M.; AlRumayyan, Ahmad; AlFarhan, Ali I.; Alotaibi, Sultan S.; AlKhashan, Hesham I.; Badri, Motasim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine preferences of patients regarding their involvement in the clinical decision making process and the related factors in Saudi Arabia. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in a major family practice center in King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, between March and May 2012. Multivariate multinomial regression models were fitted to identify factors associated with patients preferences. Results: The study included 236 participants. The most preferred decision-making style was shared decision-making (57%), followed by paternalistic (28%), and informed consumerism (14%). The preference for shared clinical decision making was significantly higher among male patients and those with higher level of education, whereas paternalism was significantly higher among older patients and those with chronic health conditions, and consumerism was significantly higher in younger age groups. In multivariate multinomial regression analysis, compared with the shared group, the consumerism group were more likely to be female [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) =2.87, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31-6.27, p=0.008] and non-dyslipidemic (AOR=2.90, 95% CI: 1.03-8.09, p=0.04), and the paternalism group were more likely to be older (AOR=1.03, 95% CI: 1.01-1.05, p=0.04), and female (AOR=2.47, 95% CI: 1.32-4.06, p=0.008). Conclusion: Preferences of patients for involvement in the clinical decision-making varied considerably. In our setting, underlying factors that influence these preferences identified in this study should be considered and tailored individually to achieve optimal treatment outcomes. PMID:26620990

  15. Clinical decision support systems.

    PubMed

    Beeler, Patrick Emanuel; Bates, David Westfall; Hug, Balthasar Luzius

    2014-01-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) systems link patient data with an electronic knowledge base in order to improve decision-making and computerised physician order entry (CPOE) is a requirement to set up electronic CDS. The medical informatics literature suggests categorising CDS tools into medication dosing support, order facilitators, point-of-care alerts and reminders, relevant information display, expert systems and workflow support. To date, CDS has particularly been recognised for improving processes. CDS successfully fostered prevention of deep-vein thrombosis, improved adherence to guidelines, increased the use of vaccinations, and decreased the rate of serious medication errors. However, CDS may introduce errors, and therefore the term "e-iatrogenesis" has been proposed to address unintended consequences. At least two studies reported severe treatment delays due to CPOE and CDS. In addition, the phenomenon of "alert fatigue" - arising from a high number of CDS alerts of low clinical significance - may facilitate overriding of potentially critical notifications. The implementation of CDS needs to be carefully planned, CDS interventions should be thoroughly examined in pilot wards only, and then stepwise introduced. A crucial feature of CPOE in combination with CDS is speed, since time consumption has been found to be a major factor determining failure. In the near future, the specificity of alerts will be improved, notifications will be prioritised and offer detailed advice, customisation of CDS will play an increasing role, and finally, CDS is heading for patient-centred decision support. The most important research question remains whether CDS is able to improve patient outcomes beyond processes. PMID:25668157

  16. [Computerized system validation of clinical researches].

    PubMed

    Yan, Charles; Chen, Feng; Xia, Jia-lai; Zheng, Qing-shan; Liu, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Validation is a documented process that provides a high degree of assurance. The computer system does exactly and consistently what it is designed to do in a controlled manner throughout the life. The validation process begins with the system proposal/requirements definition, and continues application and maintenance until system retirement and retention of the e-records based on regulatory rules. The objective to do so is to clearly specify that each application of information technology fulfills its purpose. The computer system validation (CSV) is essential in clinical studies according to the GCP standard, meeting product's pre-determined attributes of the specifications, quality, safety and traceability. This paper describes how to perform the validation process and determine relevant stakeholders within an organization in the light of validation SOPs. Although a specific accountability in the implementation of the validation process might be outsourced, the ultimate responsibility of the CSV remains on the shoulder of the business process owner-sponsor. In order to show that the compliance of the system validation has been properly attained, it is essential to set up comprehensive validation procedures and maintain adequate documentations as well as training records. Quality of the system validation should be controlled using both QC and QA means. PMID:26911028

  17. Computerized Aid Improves Safety Decision Process for Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Nancy; Eden, Karen B.; Bloom, Tina; Perrin, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    A computerized safety decision aid was developed and tested with Spanish or English-speaking abused women in shelters or domestic violence (DV) support groups (n = 90). The decision aid provides feedback about risk for lethal violence, options for safety, assistance with setting priorities for safety, and a safety plan personalized to the user.…

  18. How clinical decisions are made

    PubMed Central

    Bate, Louise; Hutchinson, Andrew; Underhill, Jonathan; Maskrey, Neal

    2012-01-01

    There is much variation in the implementation of the best available evidence into clinical practice. These gaps between evidence and practice are often a result of multiple individual decisions. When making a decision, there is so much potentially relevant information available, it is impossible to know or process it all (so called ‘bounded rationality’). Usually, a limited amount of information is selected to reach a sufficiently satisfactory decision, a process known as satisficing. There are two key processes used in decision making: System 1 and System 2. System 1 involves fast, intuitive decisions; System 2 is a deliberate analytical approach, used to locate information which is not instantly recalled. Human beings unconsciously use System 1 processing whenever possible because it is quicker and requires less effort than System 2. In clinical practice, gaps between evidence and practice can occur when a clinician develops a pattern of knowledge, which is then relied on for decisions using System 1 processing, without the activation of a System 2 check against the best available evidence from high quality research. The processing of information and decision making may be influenced by a number of cognitive biases, of which the decision maker may be unaware. Interventions to encourage appropriate use of System 1 and System 2 processing have been shown to improve clinical decision making. Increased understanding of decision making processes and common sources of error should help clinical decision makers to minimize avoidable mistakes and increase the proportion of decisions that are better. PMID:22738381

  19. A strategy for development of computerized critical care decision support systems.

    PubMed

    East, T D; Morris, A H; Wallace, C J; Clemmer, T P; Orme, J F; Weaver, L K; Henderson, S; Sittig, D F

    It is not enough to merely manage medical information. It is difficult to justify the cost of hospital information systems (HIS) or intensive care unit (ICU) patient data management systems (PDMS) on this basis alone. The real benefit of an integrated HIS or PDMS is in decision support. Although there are a variety of HIS and ICU PDMS systems available there are few that provide ICU decision support. The HELP system at the LDS Hospital is an example of a HIS which provides decision support on many different levels. In the ICU there are decision support tools for antibiotic therapy, nutritional management, and management of mechanical ventilation. Computer protocols for the management of mechanical ventilation (respiratory evaluation, ventilation, oxygenation, weaning and extubation) in patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome ((ARDS) have already been developed and clinically validated at the LDS Hospital. These protocols utilize the bedside intensive care unit (ICU) computer terminal to prompt the clinical care team with therapeutic and diagnostic suggestions. The protocols (in paper flow diagram and computerized form) have been used for over 40,000 hours in more than 125 adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patients. The protocols controlled care for 94% of the time. The remainder of the time patient care was not protocol controlled was a result of the patient being in states not covered by current protocol logic (e.g. hemodynamic instability, or transport for X-Ray studies). 52 of these ARDS patients met extra corporal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) criteria. The survival of the ECMO criteria ARDS patients was 41%, four times that expected (9%) from historical data (p less than 0.0002).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1820416

  20. Adaptive Decision Aiding in Computer-Assisted Instruction: Adaptive Computerized Training System (ACTS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopf-Weichel, Rosemarie; And Others

    This report describes results of the first year of a three-year program to develop and evaluate a new Adaptive Computerized Training System (ACTS) for electronics maintenance training. (ACTS incorporates an adaptive computer program that learns the student's diagnostic and decision value structure, compares it to that of an expert, and adapts the

  1. Computerized Evaluation of Clinical Experiences in the Training of Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niland-Weiss, J.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The Physician Assistant Program at the University of Southern California School of Medicine in Los Angeles established a computerized database in 1980 to evaluate the clinical experiences of its students. The design of the patient data system, the computerization process, the implementation of the program, and its applications are discussed.…

  2. What can Natural Language Processing do for Clinical Decision Support?

    PubMed Central

    Demner-Fushman, Dina; Chapman, Wendy W.; McDonald, Clement J.

    2009-01-01

    Computerized Clinical Decision Support (CDS) aims to aid decision making of health care providers and the public by providing easily accessible health-related information at the point and time it is needed. Natural Language Processing (NLP) is instrumental in using free-text information to drive CDS, representing clinical knowledge and CDS interventions in standardized formats, and leveraging clinical narrative. The early innovative NLP research of clinical narrative was followed by a period of stable research conducted at the major clinical centers and a shift of mainstream interest to biomedical NLP. This review primarily focuses on the recently renewed interest in development of fundamental NLP methods and advances in the NLP systems for CDS. The current solutions to challenges posed by distinct sublanguages, intended user groups, and support goals are discussed. PMID:19683066

  3. Computerized Tool to Manage Dental Anxiety: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Tellez, M; Potter, C M; Kinner, D G; Jensen, D; Waldron, E; Heimberg, R G; Myers Virtue, S; Zhao, H; Ismail, A I

    2015-09-01

    Anxiety regarding dental and physical health is a common and potentially distressing problem, for both patients and health care providers. Anxiety has been identified as a barrier to regular dental visits and as an important target for enhancement of oral health-related quality of life. The study aimed to develop and evaluate a computerized cognitive-behavioral therapy dental anxiety intervention that could be easily implemented in dental health care settings. A cognitive-behavioral protocol based on psychoeducation, exposure to feared dental procedures, and cognitive restructuring was developed. A randomized controlled trial was conducted (N = 151) to test its efficacy. Consenting adult dental patients who met inclusion criteria (e.g., high dental anxiety) were randomized to 1 of 2 groups: immediate treatment (n = 74) or a wait-list control (n = 77). Analyses of covariance based on intention-to-treat analyses were used to compare the 2 groups on dental anxiety, fear, avoidance, and overall severity of dental phobia. Baseline scores on these outcomes were entered into the analyses as covariates. Groups were equivalent at baseline but differed at 1-mo follow-up. Both groups showed improvement in outcomes, but analyses of covariance demonstrated significant differences in dental anxiety, fear, avoidance, and overall severity of dental phobia in favor of immediate treatment at the follow-up assessment. Of the patients who met diagnostic criteria for phobia at baseline, fewer patients in the immediate treatment group continued to meet criteria for dental phobia at follow-up as compared with the wait-list group. A new computer-based tool seems to be efficacious in reducing dental anxiety and fear/avoidance of dental procedures. Examination of its effectiveness when administered in dental offices under less controlled conditions is warranted (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02081365). PMID:26202996

  4. Redesign of a computerized clinical reminder for colorectal cancer screening: a human-computer interaction evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Based on barriers to the use of computerized clinical decision support (CDS) learned in an earlier field study, we prototyped design enhancements to the Veterans Health Administration's (VHA's) colorectal cancer (CRC) screening clinical reminder to compare against the VHA's current CRC reminder. Methods In a controlled simulation experiment, 12 primary care providers (PCPs) used prototypes of the current and redesigned CRC screening reminder in a within-subject comparison. Quantitative measurements were based on a usability survey, workload assessment instrument, and workflow integration survey. We also collected qualitative data on both designs. Results Design enhancements to the VHA's existing CRC screening clinical reminder positively impacted aspects of usability and workflow integration but not workload. The qualitative analysis revealed broad support across participants for the design enhancements with specific suggestions for improving the reminder further. Conclusions This study demonstrates the value of a human-computer interaction evaluation in informing the redesign of information tools to foster uptake, integration into workflow, and use in clinical practice. PMID:22126324

  5. The medication minefield: using computerized decision support systems to reduce preventable adverse drug events and hospitalizations.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Richard; Kogan, Polina; Collins, Arlen

    2014-01-01

    Preventable adverse drug events (ADEs) are a source of avoidable hospitalizations, morbidity and mortality, especially among those older than 65 years. Computerized decision support systems (CDSSs) can identify and address ADEs, but relatively little has been written about the effectiveness of such system in the community setting. This article will review some important studies on the causes of medication-related admissions in the ambulatory setting, where a lack of communication among prescribers creates a virtual minefield of medication risk. Some preliminary data will show how the application of CDSSs can affect the outcomes of care, including a reduction in preventable admissions and readmissions. PMID:24887524

  6. Clinical Decision Support for Early Recognition of Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Amland, Robert C; Hahn-Cover, Kristin E

    2016-03-01

    Sepsis is an inflammatory response triggered by infection, with a high in-hospital mortality rate. Early recognition and treatment can reverse the inflammatory response, with evidence of improved patient outcomes. One challenge clinicians face is identifying the inflammatory syndrome against the background of the patient's infectious illness and comorbidities. An approach to this problem is implementation of computerized early warning tools for sepsis. This multicenter retrospective study sought to determine clinimetric performance of a cloud-based computerized sepsis clinical decision support system (CDS), understand the epidemiology of sepsis, and identify opportunities for quality improvement. Data encompassed 6200 adult hospitalizations from 2012 through 2013. Of 13% patients screened-in, 51% were already suspected to have an infection when the system activated. This study focused on a patient cohort screened-in before infection was suspected; median time from arrival to CDS activation was 3.5 hours, and system activation to diagnostic collect was another 8.6 hours. PMID:25385815

  7. The Adolescent Health Review: Test of a Computerized Screening Tool in School-Based Clinics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Patricia A.; Beebe, Timothy J.; Funk, Eunkyung; Rancome, Jeanne

    2003-01-01

    Implemented a computerized screening instrument, the Adolescent Health Review, in urban school-based clinics to test the viability of a stand-alone screening process and its acceptance by patients and providers, examining the relationship between health risks and the stated purpose for the clinic visit. Patients and providers readily accepted the…

  8. Computerized Neuropsychological Assessment in Aging: Testing Efficacy and Clinical Ecology of Different Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Della Rosa, Pasquale Anthony; Catricalà, Eleonora; Castiglioni, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    Digital technologies have opened new opportunities for psychological testing, allowing new computerized testing tools to be developed and/or paper and pencil testing tools to be translated to new computerized devices. The question that rises is whether these implementations may introduce some technology-specific effects to be considered in neuropsychological evaluations. Two core aspects have been investigated in this work: the efficacy of tests and the clinical ecology of their administration (the ability to measure real-world test performance), specifically (1) the testing efficacy of a computerized test when response to stimuli is measured using a touch-screen compared to a conventional mouse-control response device; (2) the testing efficacy of a computerized test with respect to different input modalities (visual versus verbal); and (3) the ecology of two computerized assessment modalities (touch-screen and mouse-control), including preference measurements of participants. Our results suggest that (1) touch-screen devices are suitable for administering experimental tasks requiring precise timings for detection, (2) intrinsic nature of neuropsychological tests should always be respected in terms of stimuli presentation when translated to new digitalized environment, and (3) touch-screen devices result in ecological instruments being proposed for the computerized administration of neuropsychological tests with a high level of preference from elderly people. PMID:25147578

  9. Standardization of clinical decision making for the conduct of credible clinical research in complicated medical environments.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, A. H.; East, T. D.; Wallace, C. J.; Franklin, M.; Heerman, L.; Kinder, T.; Sailor, M.; Carlson, D.; Bradshaw, R.

    1996-01-01

    The likelihood that past experience will produce correct guides to current practice depends on the signal-to-noise ratio for the clinical problem of interest. If the signal-to-noise ratio is high, the decision will be sound and patient benefit likely to occur. If the signal-to-noise ratio is low, as is commonly the case with difficult clinical decisions, then personal experience and the best intentions will not assure sound clinical decisions. When the probability of benefit cannot be quantified, clinicians in complex settings are in danger of being misled by data and experience. Quantifiable probabilities established by group experiment or observation will be necessary for clinical decisions that can be expected to confer benefit on the patient. Explicit methods are necessary for interventions that can be replicated in experiments or in practice. Computerized protocols force the articulation of explicit clinical care methods and standardize clinical decision making. We have developed explicit, rule-based protocols, implemented them in our hospital, exported them to other hospitals, and successfully achieved a rigorous experimental environment in the clinical ICU. Exportation of such explicit methods may narrow the gap between efficacy (university hospital) and effectiveness (community hospital) research results. PMID:8947700

  10. Differentiation of Calcium Oxalate Monohydrate and Calcium Oxalate Dihydrate Stones Using Quantitative Morphological Information from Micro-Computerized and Clinical Computerized Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xinhui; Qu, Mingliang; Wang, Jia; Trevathan, James; Vrtiska, Terri; Williams, James C.; Krambeck, Amy; Lieske, John; McCollough, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We differentiated calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dihydrate kidney stones using micro and clinical computerized tomography images. Materials and Methods A total of 22 calcium oxalate monohydrate and 15 calcium oxalate dihydrate human kidney stones were scanned using a commercial micro-computerized tomography scanner with a pixel size of 7 to 23 μm. Under an institutional review board approved protocol, image data on 10 calcium oxalate monohydrate and 9 calcium oxalate dihydrate stones greater than 5 mm were retrieved from a total of 80 patients who underwent clinical dual energy computerized tomography for clinical indications and had stones available for infrared spectroscopic compositional analysis. Micro and clinical computerized tomography images were processed using in-house software, which quantified stone surface morphology with curvature based calculations. A shape index was generated as a quantitative shape metric to differentiate calcium oxalate monohydrate from calcium oxalate dihydrate stones. Statistical tests were used to test the performance of the shape index. Results On micro-computerized tomography images the shape index of calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dihydrate stones significantly differed (ROC curve AUC 0.92, p <0.0001). At the optimal cutoff sensitivity was 0.93 and specificity was 0.91. On clinical computerized tomography images a significant morphological difference was also detected (p = 0.007). AUC, sensitivity and specificity were 0.90, 1 and 0.73, respectively. Conclusions On micro and clinical computerized tomography images a morphological difference was detectable in calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dihydrate stones larger than 5 mm. The shape index is a highly promising method that can distinguish calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dihydrate stones with reasonable accuracy. PMID:23142201

  11. Computerized provider order entry in the clinical laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Jason M.; Dighe, Anand S.

    2011-01-01

    Clinicians have traditionally ordered laboratory tests using paper-based orders and requisitions. However, paper orders are becoming increasingly incompatible with the complexities, challenges, and resource constraints of our modern healthcare systems and are being replaced by electronic order entry systems. Electronic systems that allow direct provider input of diagnostic testing or medication orders into a computer system are known as Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE) systems. Adoption of laboratory CPOE systems may offer institutions many benefits, including reduced test turnaround time, improved test utilization, and better adherence to practice guidelines. In this review, we outline the functionality of various CPOE implementations, review the reported benefits, and discuss strategies for using CPOE to improve the test ordering process. Further, we discuss barriers to the implementation of CPOE systems that have prevented their more widespread adoption. PMID:21886891

  12. Methodology to Establish Associations between Data and Clinical Assessment for Computerized Nursing Process in Intensive Care Units.

    PubMed

    Couto Carvalho Barra, Daniela; Marcon Dal Sasso, Grace Teresinha; Paese, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Combining the Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in the Nursing Process (NP) is a way to support their development in health contexts. The alliance between ICT and the NP integrates and organizes a logical structure of data and clinical information supporting nurses in decision-making. This manuscript describes the methodology used to articulate data and information cynical of Computerized Nursing Process (CNP), according to ICNP® 2.0, associating detailed clinical assessment of each human system to their diagnoses, interventions, and patient outcomes. This is a methodological study and technological production conducted in 2010, and is developed in three stages. It was possible to restructure the CNP from the associations between the data and clinical information of all human systems (cardiovascular, neurological, respiratory, renal, gastrointestinal, cutaneous, musculoskeletal, female/male and biopsychosocial) to their diagnoses, interventions, and results of Nursing. PMID:26262243

  13. Towards computerizing intensive care sedation guidelines: design of a rule-based architecture for automated execution of clinical guidelines

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Computerized ICUs rely on software services to convey the medical condition of their patients as well as assisting the staff in taking treatment decisions. Such services are useful for following clinical guidelines quickly and accurately. However, the development of services is often time-consuming and error-prone. Consequently, many care-related activities are still conducted based on manually constructed guidelines. These are often ambiguous, which leads to unnecessary variations in treatments and costs. The goal of this paper is to present a semi-automatic verification and translation framework capable of turning manually constructed diagrams into ready-to-use programs. This framework combines the strengths of the manual and service-oriented approaches while decreasing their disadvantages. The aim is to close the gap in communication between the IT and the medical domain. This leads to a less time-consuming and error-prone development phase and a shorter clinical evaluation phase. Methods A framework is proposed that semi-automatically translates a clinical guideline, expressed as an XML-based flow chart, into a Drools Rule Flow by employing semantic technologies such as ontologies and SWRL. An overview of the architecture is given and all the technology choices are thoroughly motivated. Finally, it is shown how this framework can be integrated into a service-oriented architecture (SOA). Results The applicability of the Drools Rule language to express clinical guidelines is evaluated by translating an example guideline, namely the sedation protocol used for the anaesthetization of patients, to a Drools Rule Flow and executing and deploying this Rule-based application as a part of a SOA. The results show that the performance of Drools is comparable to other technologies such as Web Services and increases with the number of decision nodes present in the Rule Flow. Most delays are introduced by loading the Rule Flows. Conclusions The framework is an effective solution for computerizing clinical guidelines as it allows for quick development, evaluation and human-readable visualization of the Rules and has a good performance. By monitoring the parameters of the patient to automatically detect exceptional situations and problems and by notifying the medical staff of tasks that need to be performed, the computerized sedation guideline improves the execution of the guideline. PMID:20082700

  14. Clinical and Management Requirements for Computerized Mental Health Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Levinton, Paula H.; Dunning, Tessa F.E.

    1980-01-01

    Information requirements of mental health providers are sufficiently different from those of other health care managers to warrant a different approach to the development of management information systems (MIS). Advances in computer technology and increased demands for fiscal accountability have led to developing integrated mental health information systems (MHIS) that support clinical and management requirements. In a study made to define a set of generic information requirements of mental health providers that can be supported by an MHIS, it was found that basic data needs can be defined and classified in functional terms: clinical, management, and consultation/education requirements. A basic set of data to support these needs was defined: demographic, financial, clinical, programmatic, and service delivery data.

  15. [Computerized tomography findings and the clinical course in infratentorial trauma].

    PubMed

    Eppinger, B; Schumacher, M

    1988-12-01

    Clinical examination of severe brain injuries often suggests involvement of the brain stem and pontine structures not only via functional but also via structural lesions. Computer tomographic evidence of infratentorial trauma, however appears comparably rarely. 32 of 436 brain injured patients examined by CT showed traumatic infratentorial lesions. We examined these patients with regard to the distribution of structural damage, place of primary impact of force, incidence of skull fractures and accompanying supratentorial injuries, initial clinical status and clinical outcome. All but 2 patients were primarily unconscious. The lethal outcome in 7 patients was presumably due to the traumatic involvement of supratentorial structures. Patients with mainly infratentorial lesions--even with large epidural haematoma--showed a good recovery and fair rehabilitative outcome if the operation was performed immediately. PMID:2907250

  16. Effectiveness of computerized decision support systems linked to electronic health records: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Moja, Lorenzo; Kwag, Koren H; Lytras, Theodore; Bertizzolo, Lorenzo; Brandt, Linn; Pecoraro, Valentina; Rigon, Giulio; Vaona, Alberto; Ruggiero, Francesca; Mangia, Massimo; Iorio, Alfonso; Kunnamo, Ilkka; Bonovas, Stefanos

    2014-12-01

    We systematically reviewed randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effectiveness of computerized decision support systems (CDSSs) featuring rule- or algorithm-based software integrated with electronic health records (EHRs) and evidence-based knowledge. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Cochrane Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects. Information on system design, capabilities, acquisition, implementation context, and effects on mortality, morbidity, and economic outcomes were extracted. Twenty-eight RCTs were included. CDSS use did not affect mortality (16 trials, 37395 patients; 2282 deaths; risk ratio [RR] = 0.96; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.85, 1.08; I(2) = 41%). A statistically significant effect was evident in the prevention of morbidity, any disease (9 RCTs; 13868 patients; RR = 0.82; 95% CI = 0.68, 0.99; I(2) = 64%), but selective outcome reporting or publication bias cannot be excluded. We observed differences for costs and health service utilization, although these were often small in magnitude. Across clinical settings, new generation CDSSs integrated with EHRs do not affect mortality and might moderately improve morbidity outcomes. PMID:25322302

  17. Effectiveness of Computerized Decision Support Systems Linked to Electronic Health Records: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kwag, Koren H.; Lytras, Theodore; Bertizzolo, Lorenzo; Brandt, Linn; Pecoraro, Valentina; Rigon, Giulio; Vaona, Alberto; Ruggiero, Francesca; Mangia, Massimo; Iorio, Alfonso; Kunnamo, Ilkka; Bonovas, Stefanos

    2014-01-01

    We systematically reviewed randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effectiveness of computerized decision support systems (CDSSs) featuring rule- or algorithm-based software integrated with electronic health records (EHRs) and evidence-based knowledge. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Cochrane Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects. Information on system design, capabilities, acquisition, implementation context, and effects on mortality, morbidity, and economic outcomes were extracted. Twenty-eight RCTs were included. CDSS use did not affect mortality (16 trials, 37395 patients; 2282 deaths; risk ratio [RR] = 0.96; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.85, 1.08; I2 = 41%). A statistically significant effect was evident in the prevention of morbidity, any disease (9 RCTs; 13868 patients; RR = 0.82; 95% CI = 0.68, 0.99; I2 = 64%), but selective outcome reporting or publication bias cannot be excluded. We observed differences for costs and health service utilization, although these were often small in magnitude. Across clinical settings, new generation CDSSs integrated with EHRs do not affect mortality and might moderately improve morbidity outcomes. PMID:25322302

  18. Assessing cardiovascular drug safety for clinical decision-making.

    PubMed

    Woosley, Raymond L; Romero, Klaus

    2013-06-01

    Optimal therapeutic decision-making requires integration of patient-specific and therapy-specific information at the point of care, particularly when treating patients with complex cardiovascular conditions. The formidable task for the prescriber is to synthesize information about all therapeutic options and match the best treatment with the characteristics of the individual patient. Computerized decision support systems have been developed with the goal of integrating such information and presenting the acceptable therapeutic options on the basis of their effectiveness, often with limited consideration of their safety for a specific patient. Assessing the safety of therapies relative to each patient is difficult, and sometimes impossible, because the evidence required to make such an assessment is either imperfect or does not exist. In addition, many of the alerts sent to prescribers by decision-support systems are not perceived as credible, and 'alert fatigue' causes warnings to be ignored putting patients at risk of harm. The CredibleMeds.org and BrugadaDrugs.org websites are prototypes for evidence-based sources of safety information that rank drugs for their risk of a specific form of drug toxicity-in these cases, drug-induced arrhythmias. Broad incorporation of this type of information in electronic prescribing algorithms and clinical decision support could speed the evolution of safe personalized medicine. PMID:23591268

  19. Clinical Decision Making of Rural Novice Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seright, Teresa J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop substantive theory regarding decision making by the novice nurse in a rural hospital setting. Interviews were guided by the following research questions: What cues were used by novice rural registered nurses in order to make clinical decisions? What were the sources of feedback which influenced subsequent…

  20. A Prelude to Modeling the Expert: A Generalizability Study of Expert Ratings of Performance on Computerized Clinical Simulations.

    PubMed

    Kreiter, Clarence D.; Gordon, Joel A.; Elliott, Scott T.; Ferguson, Kristi J.

    1999-01-01

    Context: The University of Iowa College of Medicine has developed a series of computer-based clinical simulations and successfully integrated them into the clinical clerkship curriculum. The computerized patient simulations provide a high degree of realism in simulating a clinical encounter. In an effort to improve the validity of our clinical skills assessment, we have initiated testing research utilizing these simulations. Because of the high costs associated with employing expert raters for performance scoring, automated scoring was deemed essential.Purpose: This study is designed to address the preliminary research questions related to utilizing the simulations for performance assessment and developing a psychometrically sound automated scoring mechanism. Specifically, it addresses issues of reliability in relation to rater and simulation characteristics, and provides essential data required for designing a sound methodology to obtain ratings for modeling.Design: The judgements of 3 expert clinician/raters, grading the responses of 69 third-year medical students, to 2 computerized simulations, are analyzed in a generalizabilty study. A random effects (persons by raters) ANOVA was performed to estimate variance components for modeling. A case facet was added to the anlaysis to provide data regarding performance assessment characteristics. Estimation of the magnitude of each variance component represents the outcome of the generalizability study. Variance estimates are used in the decision study phase of the research.Results: Only moderate levels of inter-rater reliability were obtained. Four or more raters were indicated to obtain adequate reliability. A high level of task/simulation specificity was found. Three or more simulations were indicated for performance assessment. Suggestions for improving ratings were offered. PMID:12386483

  1. Clinical Decision Support for Early Recognition of Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Amland, Robert C.; Hahn-Cover, Kristin E.

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is an inflammatory response triggered by infection, with a high in-hospital mortality rate. Early recognition and treatment can reverse the inflammatory response, with evidence of improved patient outcomes. One challenge clinicians face is identifying the inflammatory syndrome against the background of the patient’s infectious illness and comorbidities. An approach to this problem is implementation of computerized early warning tools for sepsis. This multicenter retrospective study sought to determine clinimetric performance of a cloud-based computerized sepsis clinical decision support system (CDS), understand the epidemiology of sepsis, and identify opportunities for quality improvement. Data encompassed 6200 adult hospitalizations from 2012 through 2013. Of 13% patients screened-in, 51% were already suspected to have an infection when the system activated. This study focused on a patient cohort screened-in before infection was suspected; median time from arrival to CDS activation was 3.5 hours, and system activation to diagnostic collect was another 8.6 hours. PMID:25385815

  2. Classifying clinical decision making: a unifying approach.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, C D; Adams, A

    2000-10-01

    This is the first of two linked papers exploring decision making in nursing which integrate research evidence from different clinical and academic disciplines. Currently there are many decision-making theories, each with their own distinctive concepts and terminology, and there is a tendency for separate disciplines to view their own decision-making processes as unique. Identifying good nursing decisions and where improvements can be made is therefore problematic, and this can undermine clinical and organizational effectiveness, as well as nurses' professional status. Within the unifying framework of psychological classification, the overall aim of the two papers is to clarify and compare terms, concepts and processes identified in a diversity of decision-making theories, and to demonstrate their underlying similarities. It is argued that the range of explanations used across disciplines can usefully be re-conceptualized as classification behaviour. This paper explores problems arising from multiple theories of decision making being applied to separate clinical disciplines. Attention is given to detrimental effects on nursing practice within the context of multidisciplinary health-care organizations and the changing role of nurses. The different theories are outlined and difficulties in applying them to nursing decisions highlighted. An alternative approach based on a general model of classification is then presented in detail to introduce its terminology and the unifying framework for interpreting all types of decisions. The classification model is used to provide the context for relating alternative philosophical approaches and to define decision-making activities common to all clinical domains. This may benefit nurses by improving multidisciplinary collaboration and weakening clinical elitism. PMID:11095239

  3. Coronary care nurses' clinical decision making.

    PubMed

    Corcoran-Perry, S A; Narayan, S M; Cochrane, S

    1999-03-01

    Increasing acuity of hospitalized persons with cardiac disease places great demands on nurses' decision-making abilities. Yet nursing lags in knowledge-based system development because of limited understanding about how nurses use knowledge to make decisions. The two research questions for this study were: how do the lines of reasoning used by experienced coronary care nurses compare with those used by new coronary care nurses in a representative sample of hypothetical patient cases, and are the predominant lines of reasoning used by coronary care nurses in hypothetical situations similar to those used for comparable situations in clinical practice? Line of reasoning was defined as a set of arguments in which knowledge is embedded within decision-making processes that lead to a conclusion. Sixteen subjects (eight experienced and eight new nurses) from coronary care and coronary step-down units in a large, private, teaching hospital in Minnesota, USA, were asked to think aloud while making clinical decisions about six hypothetical cases and comparable actual case. One finding was that most subjects in both groups used multiple lines of reasoning per case; but they used only one predominantly. This finding highlighted the non-linear nature of clinical decision making. Subjects used 25 predominant lines of reasoning, with intergroup differences on six of them. Where there were differences, experienced nurses used lines of reasoning of lower quality than did new subjects. The type variability in lines of reasoning suggested that multiple pathways should be incorporated into knowledge-system design. One implication of the variability in subjects' line of reasoning quality is that nurses at all levels of expertise are fallible and could benefit from decision support. The finding that subjects tended to use similar lines of reasoning for comparable hypothetical and actual cases was modest validation of subjects' performance on hypothetical cases as representing their decision making in practice. Consequently, there was support for using simulations and case studies in teaching and studying clinical decision making. PMID:10894652

  4. Development of the Computerized Model of Performance-Based Measurement System to Measure Nurses' Clinical Competence.

    PubMed

    Liou, Shwu-Ru; Liu, Hsiu-Chen; Tsai, Shu-Ling; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Yu, Wei-Chieh; Chu, Tsui-Ping

    2016-04-01

    Critical thinking skills and clinical competence are for providing quality patient care. The purpose of this study is to develop the Computerized Model of Performance-Based Measurement system based on the Clinical Reasoning Model. The system can evaluate and identify learning needs for clinical competency and be used as a learning tool to increase clinical competency by using computers. The system includes 10 high-risk, high-volume clinical case scenarios coupled with questions testing clinical reasoning, interpersonal, and technical skills. Questions were sequenced to reflect patients' changing condition and arranged by following the process of collecting and managing information, diagnosing and differentiating urgency of problems, and solving problems. The content validity and known-groups validity was established. The Kuder-Richardson Formula 20 was 0.90 and test-retest reliability was supported (r = 0.78). Nursing educators can use the system to understand students' needs for achieving clinical competence, and therefore, educational plans can be made to better prepare students and facilitate their smooth transition to a future clinical environment. Clinical nurses can use the system to evaluate their performance-based abilities and weakness in clinical reasoning. Appropriate training programs can be designed and implemented to practically promote nurses' clinical competence and quality of patient care. PMID:26829522

  5. The Effect of Level of Patient Acuity, Critical Care Experience, and ACLS Certification on Clinical Decision Making: Implications for Computer Decision Support Systems

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Suzanne Bakken

    1990-01-01

    This study examined the effect of patient acuity, critical care experience, and ACLS certification on clinical decision making. Each subject (N=68) completed two computerized clinical simulations. Ventricular tachycardia (VT) represented the high acuity situation and atrial flutter (AF) the lower acuity situation. Clinical decision making was measured by proficiency score, patient outcome (cure/die), and amount of data collected. In the AF simulation, proficiency scores were higher (p=.000), more dysrhythmias were cured (p<.005), and more data were collected (p=.040) than in the VT simulation. Experienced and inexperienced nurses did not differ on proficiency score, however, inexperienced nurses collected more data (p=.048) and cured fewer atrial flutter simulations (p=.04). ACLS certified nurses had higher proficiency scores (p=.033) and collected less data (p=.048). Clinical decision making on two simulations was affected by patient acuity, critical care experience, and ACLS certification. These findings have implications for the design and implementation of clinical decision support systems.

  6. A Hierarchical Computer Network: An Alternative Approach to Clinical Laboratory Computerization in a Large Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Robert E.; Steinbach, Glen L.; Dayhoff, Ruth E.

    1980-01-01

    Computerized data handling is recognized as an essential aspect of the modern clinical laboratory in medium and large sized hospitals. However, most currently installed proprietary or “turnkey” systems are often hardware/software-constrained and based on outmoded design concepts which seriously limit the use of the laboratory computer system as an effective patient care, research, and management tool. These short-comings are particularly serious in the large university teaching hospital. Recent improvements in the price/performance ratio for computer hardware, the availability of specialized high-level applications-oriented languages, and advances in data communications have permitted development of powerful computer networks which are economically feasible in the large hospital setting. An operational three-tiered hierarchical network for clinical laboratory data processing is described. The integration of the clinical laboratory data processing function into overall institutional information processing, details of the computer system configuration, and the benefits realized are discussed.

  7. Entrustment Decision Making in Clinical Training.

    PubMed

    Ten Cate, Olle; Hart, Danielle; Ankel, Felix; Busari, Jamiu; Englander, Robert; Glasgow, Nicholas; Holmboe, Eric; Iobst, William; Lovell, Elise; Snell, Linda S; Touchie, Claire; Van Melle, Elaine; Wycliffe-Jones, Keith

    2016-02-01

    The decision to trust a medical trainee with the critical responsibility to care for a patient is fundamental to clinical training. When carefully and deliberately made, such decisions can serve as significant stimuli for learning and also shape the assessment of trainees. Holding back entrustment decisions too much may hamper the trainee's development toward unsupervised practice. When carelessly made, however, they jeopardize patient safety. Entrustment decision-making processes, therefore, deserve careful analysis.Members (including the authors) of the International Competency-Based Medical Education Collaborative conducted a content analysis of the entrustment decision-making process in health care training during a two-day summit in September 2013 and subsequently reviewed the pertinent literature to arrive at a description of the critical features of this process, which informs this article.The authors discuss theoretical backgrounds and terminology of trust and entrustment in the clinical workplace. The competency-based movement and the introduction of entrustable professional activities force educators to rethink the grounds for assessment in the workplace. Anticipating a decision to grant autonomy at a designated level of supervision appears to align better with health care practice than do most current assessment practices. The authors distinguish different modes of trust and entrustment decisions and elaborate five categories, each with related factors, that determine when decisions to trust trainees are made: the trainee, supervisor, situation, task, and the relationship between trainee and supervisor. The authors' aim in this article is to lay a theoretical foundation for a new approach to workplace training and assessment. PMID:26630606

  8. Modelling and Decision Support of Clinical Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Roland; Lux, Thomas

    The German health care market is under a rapid rate of change, forcing especially hospitals to provide high-quality services at low costs. Appropriate measures for more effective and efficient service provision are process orientation and decision support by information technology of clinical pathway of a patient. The essential requirements are adequate modelling of clinical pathways as well as usage of adequate systems, which are capable of assisting the complete path of a patient within a hospital, and preferably also outside of it, in a digital way. To fulfil these specifications the authors present a suitable concept, which meets the challenges of well-structured clinical pathways as well as rather poorly structured diagnostic and therapeutic decisions, by interplay of process-oriented and knowledge-based hospital information systems.

  9. Clinical Decision Support Systems for Ambulatory Care

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Stephen C.

    1984-01-01

    This conference serves to further the state of the art in the application of computers to medical care via a forum for the intercommunication of ideas. Papers discuss the experiences of diverse research projects. It is the purpose of this article to review the major developments in ambulatory care decision support. From this vantage point, the major impediments to broad applicability of information systems are discussed. The DUCHESS Medical Information Management System is then described as a step towards overcoming these obstacles. Two distinct but often overlapping issues are the representation of the data and its subsequent manipulation: records vs. knowledge. The complexity of the medical record requires state-of-the-art computer science. Clinical decision support requires flexible means for representing medical knowledge and the ability to input “rules.” Artificial intelligence has provided tools for simulating the decision making processes. A sample of the major systems are contrasted and compared. In the realm of medical records COSTAR, TMR, SCAMP, HELP, and STOR are considered. In clinical decision support CADEUCUS, REGENSTRIEF, PKC, and DUCHESS are reviewed.

  10. [From biomarkers to clinical decision support].

    PubMed

    Antal, Péter; Reiter, József; Mátyus, Péter

    2015-12-20

    The rapidly accumulating, heterogeneous, numerous biomedical data and the increasing knowledge represent both the key areas and the major bottleneck in the complete realization of personalized medicine. Traditional clinical aims as well as decision-making processes in drug research need systems-based integration of data and their analyses, which require a wide range of new mathematical approaches and application of information technologies. In the world of biomarkers, all such tasks correspond to three types of biomarkers, namely, endpoint, target and diagnostic biomarkers, which together form a complex network. To decipher the networks, probabilistic graphical models are introduced. Briefly, the authors illustrate their use for exploration and visualization of direct dependencies among biomarkers. Finally, construction of decision networks and their application to structural and quantitative optimization of biomarkers are discussed to provide a novel type of supporting tools for clinical practice. PMID:26654544

  11. A Computerized Bedside Clinical Information System for an Intensive Care Unit Teaching Service

    PubMed Central

    Burridge, Philip W.; Skakun, Ernest N.

    1983-01-01

    The CLINICAL REFERENCE LIBRARY, a subsystem of the Hewlett Packard 5600A Patient Data Management System, contains 20 information modules. Topics range from airway management and nutritional support to aspiration pneumonia and septic shock. The user is able to flip rapidly back and forth through any module or from one module to another, much as one would flip through a book. Using a classical non-randomized, pre-test-post-test, control-experimental research paradigm, medical students and residents exposed to the system “acquired” more knowledge than their counterparts who used conventional teaching methods (p<0.05). Medical students and nurses accessed the system for continuing medical education whereas residents used the system for problem-solving. Nurses had strong negative views about the use and feasibility of computerized patient data management.

  12. Nurses' Clinical Decision Making on Adopting a Wound Clinical Decision Support System.

    PubMed

    Khong, Peck Chui Betty; Hoi, Shu Yin; Holroyd, Eleanor; Wang, Wenru

    2015-07-01

    Healthcare information technology systems are considered the ideal tool to inculcate evidence-based nursing practices. The wound clinical decision support system was built locally to support nurses to manage pressure ulcer wounds in their daily practice. However, its adoption rate is not optimal. The study's objective was to discover the concepts that informed the RNs' decisions to adopt the wound clinical decision support system as an evidence-based technology in their nursing practice. This was an exploratory, descriptive, and qualitative design using face-to-face interviews, individual interviews, and active participatory observation. A purposive, theoretical sample of 14 RNs was recruited from one of the largest public tertiary hospitals in Singapore after obtaining ethics approval. After consenting, the nurses were interviewed and observed separately. Recruitment stopped when data saturation was reached. All transcribed interview data underwent a concurrent thematic analysis, whereas observational data were content analyzed independently and subsequently triangulated with the interview data. Eight emerging themes were identified, namely, use of the wound clinical decision support system, beliefs in the wound clinical decision support system, influences of the workplace culture, extent of the benefits, professional control over nursing practices, use of knowledge, gut feelings, and emotions (fear, doubt, and frustration). These themes represented the nurses' mental outlook as they made decisions on adopting the wound clinical decision support system in light of the complexities of their roles and workloads. This research has provided insight on the nurses' thoughts regarding their decision to interact with the computer environment in a Singapore context. It captured the nurses' complex thoughts when deciding whether to adopt or reject information technology as they practice in a clinical setting. PMID:26066306

  13. Subjective measures and clinical decision making.

    PubMed

    Delitto, A

    1989-07-01

    I have attempted to use Feinstein's model of clinimetric indexes and his criteria as a focus for further development of measures that in physical therapy are currently considered "soft" or "subjective". I feel this development will enhance the body of knowledge by objectifying a portion of clinical assessment (eg, the patient's complaints, "subjective" portion of the POMR's SOAP format) that is in tremendous need of quantification. By making these "soft" data "hard," I feel we will enhance the decision-making power of clinicians. PMID:2740448

  14. Ethical implications of standardization of ICU care with computerized protocols.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, A. H.; East, T. D.; Wallace, C. J.; Orme, J.; Clemmer, T.; Weaver, L.; Thomas, F.; Dean, N.; Pearl, J.; Rasmusson, B.

    1994-01-01

    Ethical issues related to the use of computerized protocols to control mechanical ventilation of patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) are identical to the ethical issues surrounding the use of any therapy or intervention. Four ethical principles must be considered: nonmaleficence, beneficence, autonomy, and distributed justice. The major ethical challenges to computerized protocol use as a specific application of clinical decision support tools are found within the principles of nonmaleficence and of beneficence. The absence of credible outcome data on which ARDS patient survival probabilities with different therapeutic options could be based is a constraint common to most ICU clinical decision making. Clinicians are thus deprived of the knowledge necessary to define benefit and are limited to beneficent intention in clinical decisions. Computerized protocol controlled decision making for the clinical management of mechanical ventilation for ARDS patients is ethically defensible. It is as well supported as most ICU therapy options. PMID:7949979

  15. The Computerized Medical Record as a Tool for Clinical Governance in Australian Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Christine; Hall, Sally; Travaglia, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    Background Computerized medical records (CMR) are used in most Australian general practices. Although CMRs have the capacity to amalgamate and provide data to the clinician about their standard of care, there is little research on the way in which they may be used to support clinical governance: the process of ensuring quality and accountability that incorporates the obligation that patients are treated according to best evidence. Objective The objective of this study was to explore the capability, capacity, and acceptability of CMRs to support clinical governance. Methods We conducted a realist review of the role of seven CMR systems in implementing clinical governance, developing a four-level maturity model for the CMR. We took Australian primary care as the context, CMR to be the mechanism, and looked at outcomes for individual patients, localities, and for the population in terms of known evidence-based surrogates or true outcome measures. Results The lack of standardization of CMRs makes national and international benchmarking challenging. The use of the CMR was largely at level two of our maturity model, indicating a relatively simple system in which most of the process takes place outside of the CMR, and which has little capacity to support benchmarking, practice comparisons, and population-level activities. Although national standards for coding and projects for record access are proposed, they are not operationalized. Conclusions The current CMR systems can support clinical governance activities; however, unless the standardization and data quality issues are addressed, it will not be possible for current systems to work at higher levels. PMID:23939340

  16. User Centered Clinical Decision Support Tools

    PubMed Central

    Sofianou, A.; Kannry, J.; Mann, D.M.; McGinn, T.G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Dissemination and adoption of clinical decision support (CDS) tools is a major initiative of the Affordable Care Act’s Meaningful Use program. Adoption of CDS tools is multipronged with personal, organizational, and clinical settings factoring into the successful utilization rates. Specifically, the diffusion of innovation theory implies that ‘early adopters’ are more inclined to use CDS tools and younger physicians tend to be ranked in this category. Objective This study examined the differences in adoption of CDS tools across providers’ training level. Participants From November 2010 to 2011, 168 residents and attendings from an academic medical institution were enrolled into a randomized controlled trial. Intervention The intervention arm had access to the CDS tool through the electronic health record (EHR) system during strep and pneumonia patient visits. Main Measures The EHR system recorded details on how intervention arm interacted with the CDS tool including acceptance of the initial CDS alert, completion of risk-score calculators and the signing of medication order sets. Using the EHR data, the study performed bivariate tests and general estimating equation (GEE) modeling to examine the differences in adoption of the CDS tool across residents and attendings. Key Results The completion rates of the CDS calculator and medication order sets were higher amongst first year residents compared to all other training levels. Attendings were the less likely to accept the initial step of the CDS tool (29.3%) or complete the medication order sets (22.4%) that guided their prescription decisions, resulting in attendings ordering more antibiotics (37.1%) during an CDS encounter compared to residents. Conclusion There is variation in adoption of CDS tools across training levels. Attendings tended to accept the tool less but ordered more medications. CDS tools should be tailored to clinicians’ training levels. PMID:25589914

  17. Computerizing the Budget Office: An On-Line Decision Support System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Glenn R.; Peterson, William R.

    The implementation process and resource requirements of the University of Connecticut Budget Office's online decision support system are described. Successes and failures of shifting to a fully interactive budget review and development process are also reviewed. Special attention is given to the personnel problems and analytical challenges…

  18. Computerizing the Budget Office: An On-Line Decision Support System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Glenn R.; Peterson, William R.

    The implementation process and resource requirements of the University of Connecticut Budget Office's online decision support system are described. Successes and failures of shifting to a fully interactive budget review and development process are also reviewed. Special attention is given to the personnel problems and analytical challenges

  19. Decision support tools for clinical trial design.

    PubMed

    Modgil, S; Hammond, P

    2003-02-01

    Many published clinical trials are poorly designed, suggesting that the protocol was incomplete, disorganised, or contained errors. This fact motivated the development of a suite of decision support tools for the design of randomised controlled clinical trials. In this paper we describe these tools, discussing both underlying theoretical issues and usage of the tools. The core tool--Design-a-Trial (DaT)--critiques data entered so as to guide design of a scientifically and ethically sound trial. DaT outputs a text protocol describing the trial, and a corresponding symbolic representation. Linked to DaT is a tool for authoring plans that form part of the trial. A key feature of this tool is the provision of macros for describing commonly occurring plan constructs. We describe another linked tool which generates solutions to Prolog queries requesting advice on how a plan should be revised so as to comply with safety and efficacy requirements. The user is able to navigate a path through the solution search space by interacting with natural language representations of the Prolog sub-goals. This provides the flexibility to generate useful and informative partial solutions, symbolic and textual, for inclusion in the symbolic plan representation and protocol document, respectively. PMID:12636978

  20. Outpatient diabetes clinical decision support: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, P J; Sperl-Hillen, J M; Fazio, C J; Averbeck, B M; Rank, B H; Margolis, K L

    2016-06-01

    Outpatient clinical decision support systems have had an inconsistent impact on key aspects of diabetes care. A principal barrier to success has been low use rates in many settings. Here, we identify key aspects of clinical decision support system design, content and implementation that are related to sustained high use rates and positive impacts on glucose, blood pressure and lipid management. Current diabetes clinical decision support systems may be improved by prioritizing care recommendations, improving communication of treatment-relevant information to patients, using such systems for care coordination and case management and integrating patient-reported information and data from remote devices into clinical decision algorithms and interfaces. PMID:27194173

  1. Computerized Neuropsychological Assessment Devices: Joint Position Paper of the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology and the National Academy of Neuropsychology†

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Russell M.; Iverson, Grant L.; Cernich, Alison N.; Binder, Laurence M.; Ruff, Ronald M.; Naugle, Richard I.

    2012-01-01

    This joint position paper of the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology and the National Academy of Neuropsychology sets forth our position on appropriate standards and conventions for computerized neuropsychological assessment devices (CNADs). In this paper, we first define CNADs and distinguish them from examiner-administered neuropsychological instruments. We then set forth position statements on eight key issues relevant to the development and use of CNADs in the healthcare setting. These statements address (a) device marketing and performance claims made by developers of CNADs; (b) issues involved in appropriate end-users for administration and interpretation of CNADs; (c) technical (hardware/software/firmware) issues; (d) privacy, data security, identity verification, and testing environment; (e) psychometric development issues, especially reliability, and validity; (f) cultural, experiential, and disability factors affecting examinee interaction with CNADs; (g) use of computerized testing and reporting services; and (h) the need for checks on response validity and effort in the CNAD environment. This paper is intended to provide guidance for test developers and users of CNADs that will promote accurate and appropriate use of computerized tests in a way that maximizes clinical utility and minimizes risks of misuse. The positions taken in this paper are put forth with an eye toward balancing the need to make validated CNADs accessible to otherwise underserved patients with the need to ensure that such tests are developed and utilized competently, appropriately, and with due concern for patient welfare and quality of care. PMID:22382386

  2. Computerized Neuropsychological Assessment Devices: Joint Position Paper of the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology and the National Academy of Neuropsychology†

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Russell M.; Iverson, Grant L.; Cernich, Alison N.; Binder, Laurence M.; Ruff, Ronald M.; Naugle, Richard I.

    2013-01-01

    This joint position paper of the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology and the National Academy of Neuropsychology sets forth our position on appropriate standards and conventions for computerized neuropsychological assessment devices (CNADs). In this paper, we first define CNADs and distinguish them from examiner-administered neuropsychological instruments. We then set forth position statements on eight key issues relevant to the development and use of CNADs in the healthcare setting. These statements address (a) device marketing and performance claims made by developers of CNADs; (b) issues involved in appropriate end-users for administration and interpretation of CNADs; (c) technical (hardware/software/firmware) issues; (d) privacy, data security, identity verification, and testing environment; (e) psychometric development issues, especially reliability and validity; (f) cultural, experiential, and disability factors affecting examinee interaction with CNADs; (g) use of computerized testing and reporting services; and (h) the need for checks on response validity and effort in the CNAD environment. This paper is intended to provide guidance for test developers and users of CNADs that will promote accurate and appropriate use of computerized tests in a way that maximizes clinical utility and minimizes risks of misuse. The positions taken in this paper are put forth with an eye toward balancing the need to make validated CNADs accessible to otherwise underserved patients with the need to ensure that such tests are developed and utilized competently, appropriately, and with due concern for patient welfare and quality of care. PMID:22394228

  3. Computerized neuropsychological assessment devices: joint position paper of the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology and the National Academy of Neuropsychology.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Russell M; Iverson, Grant L; Cernich, Alison N; Binder, Laurence M; Ruff, Ronald M; Naugle, Richard I

    2012-05-01

    This joint position paper of the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology and the National Academy of Neuropsychology sets forth our position on appropriate standards and conventions for computerized neuropsychological assessment devices (CNADs). In this paper, we first define CNADs and distinguish them from examiner-administered neuropsychological instruments. We then set forth position statements on eight key issues relevant to the development and use of CNADs in the healthcare setting. These statements address (a) device marketing and performance claims made by developers of CNADs; (b) issues involved in appropriate end-users for administration and interpretation of CNADs; (c) technical (hardware/software/firmware) issues; (d) privacy, data security, identity verification, and testing environment; (e) psychometric development issues, especially reliability, and validity; (f) cultural, experiential, and disability factors affecting examinee interaction with CNADs; (g) use of computerized testing and reporting services; and (h) the need for checks on response validity and effort in the CNAD environment. This paper is intended to provide guidance for test developers and users of CNADs that will promote accurate and appropriate use of computerized tests in a way that maximizes clinical utility and minimizes risks of misuse. The positions taken in this paper are put forth with an eye toward balancing the need to make validated CNADs accessible to otherwise underserved patients with the need to ensure that such tests are developed and utilized competently, appropriately, and with due concern for patient welfare and quality of care. PMID:22382386

  4. Computerized neuropsychological assessment devices: joint position paper of the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology and the National Academy of Neuropsychology.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Russell M; Iverson, Grant L; Cernich, Alison N; Binder, Laurence M; Ruff, Ronald M; Naugle, Richard I

    2012-01-01

    This joint position paper of the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology and the National Academy of Neuropsychology sets forth our position on appropriate standards and conventions for computerized neuropsychological assessment devices (CNADs). In this paper, we first define CNADs and distinguish them from examiner-administered neuropsychological instruments. We then set forth position statements on eight key issues relevant to the development and use of CNADs in the healthcare setting. These statements address (a) device marketing and performance claims made by developers of CNADs; (b) issues involved in appropriate end-users for administration and interpretation of CNADs; (c) technical (hardware/software/firmware) issues; (d) privacy, data security, identity verification, and testing environment; (e) psychometric development issues, especially reliability and validity; (f) cultural, experiential, and disability factors affecting examinee interaction with CNADs; (g) use of computerized testing and reporting services; and (h) the need for checks on response validity and effort in the CNAD environment. This paper is intended to provide guidance for test developers and users of CNADs that will promote accurate and appropriate use of computerized tests in a way that maximizes clinical utility and minimizes risks of misuse. The positions taken in this paper are put forth with an eye toward balancing the need to make validated CNADs accessible to otherwise underserved patients with the need to ensure that such tests are developed and utilized competently, appropriately, and with due concern for patient welfare and quality of care. PMID:22394228

  5. Clinical decision support: progress and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Wendy F; Bloomrosen, Meryl; Detmer, Don E

    2010-01-01

    In 2005, the American Medical Informatics Association undertook a set of activities relating to clinical decision support (CDS), with support from the office of the national coordinator and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. They culminated in the release of the roadmap for national action on CDS in 2006. This article assesses progress toward the short-term goals within the roadmap, and recommends activities to continue to improve CDS adoption throughout the United States. The report finds that considerable progress has been made in the past four years, although significant work remains. Healthcare quality organizations are increasingly recognizing the role of health information technology in improving care, multi-site CDS demonstration projects are under way, and there are growing incentives for adoption. Specific recommendations include: (1) designating a national entity to coordinate CDS work and collaboration; (2) developing approaches to monitor and track CDS adoption and use; (3) defining and funding a CDS research agenda; and (4) updating the CDS ‘critical path’. PMID:20819850

  6. Electronic information and clinical decision support for prescribing: state of play in Australian general practice

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Jane; Moxey, Annette J; Newby, David A; Gillies, Malcolm B; Williamson, Margaret; Pearson, Sallie-Anne

    2011-01-01

    Background. Investments in eHealth worldwide have been mirrored in Australia, with >90% of general practices computerized. Recent eHealth incentives promote the use of up to date electronic information sources relevant to general practice with flexibility in mode of access. Objective. To determine GPs’ access to and use of electronic information sources and computerized clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) for prescribing. Methods. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 experienced GPs and nine GP trainees in New South Wales, Australia in 2008. A thematic analysis of interview transcripts was undertaken. Results. Information needs varied with clinical experience, and people resources (specialists, GP peers and supervisors for trainees) were often preferred over written formats. Experienced GPs used a small number of electronic resources and accessed them infrequently. Familiarity from training and early clinical practice and easy access were dominant influences on resource use. Practice time constraints meant relevant information needed to be readily accessible during consultations, requiring integration or direct access from prescribing software. Quality of electronic resource content was assumed and cost a barrier for some GPs. Conclusions. The current Australian practice incentives do not prescribe which information resources GPs should use. Without integration into practice computing systems, uptake and routine use seem unlikely. CDSS developments must recognize the time pressures of practice, preference for integration and cost concerns. Minimum standards are required to ensure that high-quality information resources are integrated and regularly updated. Without standards, the anticipated benefits of computerization on patient safety and health outcomes will be uncertain. PMID:21109619

  7. Four Factors of Clinical Decision Making: A Teaching Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leist, James C.; Konen, Joseph C.

    1996-01-01

    Four factors of clinical decision making identified by medical students include quality of care, cost, ethics, and legal concerns. This paper argues that physicians have two responsibilities in the clinical decision-making model: to be the primary advocate for quality health care and to ensure balance among the four factors, working in partnership…

  8. A Multisite, Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial of Computerized Cognitive Remediation Therapy for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Gomar, Jesús J.; Valls, Elia; Radua, Joaquim; Mareca, Celia; Tristany, Josep; del Olmo, Francisco; Rebolleda-Gil, Carlos; Jañez-Álvarez, María; de Álvaro, Francisco J.; Ovejero, María R.; Llorente, Ana; Teixidó, Cristina; Donaire, Ana M.; García-Laredo, Eduardo; Lazcanoiturburu, Andrea; Granell, Luis; Mozo, Cristina de Pablo; Pérez-Hernández, Mónica; Moreno-Alcázar, Ana; Pomarol-Clotet, Edith; McKenna, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of cognitive remediation therapy (CRT) for the neuropsychological deficits seen in schizophrenia is supported by meta-analysis. However, a recent methodologically rigorous trial had negative findings. In this study, 130 chronic schizophrenic patients were randomly assigned to computerized CRT, an active computerized control condition (CC) or treatment as usual (TAU). Primary outcome measures were 2 ecologically valid batteries of executive function and memory, rated under blind conditions; other executive and memory tests and a measure of overall cognitive function were also employed. Carer ratings of executive and memory failures in daily life were obtained before and after treatment. Computerized CRT was found to produce improvement on the training tasks, but this did not transfer to gains on the primary outcome measures and most other neuropsychological tests in comparison to either CC or TAU conditions. Nor did the intervention result in benefits on carer ratings of daily life cognitive failures. According to this study, computerized CRT is not effective in schizophrenia. The use of both active and passive CCs suggests that nature of the control group is not an important factor influencing results. PMID:26006264

  9. A Multisite, Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial of Computerized Cognitive Remediation Therapy for Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Gomar, Jesús J; Valls, Elia; Radua, Joaquim; Mareca, Celia; Tristany, Josep; del Olmo, Francisco; Rebolleda-Gil, Carlos; Jañez-Álvarez, María; de Álvaro, Francisco J; Ovejero, María R; Llorente, Ana; Teixidó, Cristina; Donaire, Ana M; García-Laredo, Eduardo; Lazcanoiturburu, Andrea; Granell, Luis; Mozo, Cristina de Pablo; Pérez-Hernández, Mónica; Moreno-Alcázar, Ana; Pomarol-Clotet, Edith; McKenna, Peter J

    2015-11-01

    The effectiveness of cognitive remediation therapy (CRT) for the neuropsychological deficits seen in schizophrenia is supported by meta-analysis. However, a recent methodologically rigorous trial had negative findings. In this study, 130 chronic schizophrenic patients were randomly assigned to computerized CRT, an active computerized control condition (CC) or treatment as usual (TAU). Primary outcome measures were 2 ecologically valid batteries of executive function and memory, rated under blind conditions; other executive and memory tests and a measure of overall cognitive function were also employed. Carer ratings of executive and memory failures in daily life were obtained before and after treatment. Computerized CRT was found to produce improvement on the training tasks, but this did not transfer to gains on the primary outcome measures and most other neuropsychological tests in comparison to either CC or TAU conditions. Nor did the intervention result in benefits on carer ratings of daily life cognitive failures. According to this study, computerized CRT is not effective in schizophrenia. The use of both active and passive CCs suggests that nature of the control group is not an important factor influencing results. PMID:26006264

  10. Evaluation of a Computerized Decision Support Intervention to Decrease Use of Anti-Pseudomonal Carbapenems in Penicillin Allergic Patients.

    PubMed

    Caplinger, Christina; Smith, Garret; Remington, Richard; Madaras-Kelly, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Allergies to β-lactam antibiotics are commonly documented in hospitalized patients; however, true allergy is uncommon. Cross-reactivity rates for advanced generation cephalosporins and carbapenems are low; particularly for patients without a history of symptoms consistent with type 1 hypersensitivity. We observed that providers preferentially prescribed antipseudomonal carbapenems (APC) over advanced generation cephalosporins for patients with β-lactam allergy history, including those with low risk for antimicrobial-resistant infections. Information was inserted into the computerized decision support system (CDSS) to aid clinicians in assessing β-lactam cross-reactivity risk and selecting appropriate therapy. A retrospective evaluation was conducted in a small hospital to assess the impact of the CDSS changes in APC prescribing. Inpatients (n = 68) who received at least one APC dose during hospitalization over a 13 month pre-intervention period were compared to inpatients who received an APC during the 15 month post-intervention period (n = 59) for documented APC indications and β-lactam allergy history. APC initiations were measured and corrected per 1000 patient-days; interrupted time-series analysis was performed to assess changes in use before and after implementation. Aggregate monthly APC initiations decreased from 7.01 to 6.14 per 1000 patient-days after the implementation (p = 0.03). Post-intervention APC initiations for patients with low-risk β-lactam histories decreased from 92% to 83% (p = 0.17). No adverse events were observed in patients with low-risk β-lactam histories. The intervention was associated with a reduction in APC initiations. PMID:27025522

  11. Evaluation of a Computerized Decision Support Intervention to Decrease Use of Anti-Pseudomonal Carbapenems in Penicillin Allergic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Caplinger, Christina; Smith, Garret; Remington, Richard; Madaras-Kelly, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Allergies to β-lactam antibiotics are commonly documented in hospitalized patients; however, true allergy is uncommon. Cross-reactivity rates for advanced generation cephalosporins and carbapenems are low; particularly for patients without a history of symptoms consistent with type 1 hypersensitivity. We observed that providers preferentially prescribed antipseudomonal carbapenems (APC) over advanced generation cephalosporins for patients with β-lactam allergy history, including those with low risk for antimicrobial-resistant infections. Information was inserted into the computerized decision support system (CDSS) to aid clinicians in assessing β-lactam cross-reactivity risk and selecting appropriate therapy. A retrospective evaluation was conducted in a small hospital to assess the impact of the CDSS changes in APC prescribing. Inpatients (n = 68) who received at least one APC dose during hospitalization over a 13 month pre-intervention period were compared to inpatients who received an APC during the 15 month post-intervention period (n = 59) for documented APC indications and β-lactam allergy history. APC initiations were measured and corrected per 1000 patient-days; interrupted time-series analysis was performed to assess changes in use before and after implementation. Aggregate monthly APC initiations decreased from 7.01 to 6.14 per 1000 patient-days after the implementation (p = 0.03). Post-intervention APC initiations for patients with low-risk β-lactam histories decreased from 92% to 83% (p = 0.17). No adverse events were observed in patients with low-risk β-lactam histories. The intervention was associated with a reduction in APC initiations. PMID:27025522

  12. Investigation of Data Representation Issues in Computerizing Clinical Practice Guidelines in China

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qing; Yang, Zhe; Yang, Peng; Xu, Yongyong

    2014-01-01

    Objectives From the point of view of clinical data representation, this study attempted to identify obstacles in translating clinical narrative guidelines into computer interpretable format and integrating the guidelines with data in Electronic Health Records in China. Methods Based on SAGE and K4CARE formulism, a Chinese clinical practice guideline for hypertension was modeled in Protégé by building an ontology that had three components: flowchart, node, and vMR. Meanwhile, data items imperative in Electronic Health Records for patients with hypertension were reviewed and compared with those from the ontology so as to identify conflicts and gaps between. Results A set of flowcharts was built. A flowchart comprises three kinds of node: State, Decision, and Act, each has a set of attributes, including data input/output that exports data items, which then were specified following ClinicalStatement of HL7 vMR. A total of 140 data items were extracted from the ontology. In modeling the guideline, some narratives were found too inexplicit to formulate, and encoding data was quite difficult. Additionally, it was found in the healthcare records that there were 8 data items left out, and 10 data items defined differently compared to the extracted data items. Conclusions The obstacles in modeling a clinical guideline and integrating with data in Electronic Health Records include narrative ambiguity of the guideline, gaps and inconsistencies in representing some data items between the guideline and the patient' records, and unavailability of a unified medical coding system. Therefore, collaborations among various participants in developing guidelines and Electronic Health Record specifications is needed in China. PMID:25152838

  13. Clinical decision support for imaging in the era of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Hanna M; Mills, Angela M; Khorasani, Ramin; Langlotz, Curtis P

    2012-12-01

    Imaging clinical decision support (CDS) systems provide evidence for or against imaging procedures ordered within a computerized physician order entry system at the time of the image order. Depending on the pertinent clinical history provided by the ordering clinician, CDS systems can optimize imaging by educating providers on appropriate image order entry and by alerting providers to the results of prior, potentially relevant imaging procedures, thereby reducing redundant imaging. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) has expedited the adoption of computerized physician order entry and CDS systems in health care through the creation of financial incentives and penalties to promote the "meaningful use" of health IT. Meaningful use represents the latest logical next step in a long chain of legislation promoting the areas of appropriate imaging utilization, accurate reporting, and IT. It is uncertain if large-scale implementation of imaging CDS will lead to improved health care quality, as seen in smaller settings, or to improved patient outcomes. However, imaging CDS enables the correlation of existing imaging evidence with outcome measures, including morbidity, mortality, and short-term imaging-relevant management outcomes (eg, biopsy, chemotherapy). The purposes of this article are to review the legislative sequence relevant to imaging CDS and to give guidance to radiology practices focused on quality and financial performance improvement during this time of accelerating regulatory change. PMID:23206649

  14. From clinical pathways to CPOE: challenges and opportunities in standardization and computerization of postoperative orders for total joint replacement.

    PubMed

    Vikoren, Thomas H; Musser, R Clayton; Tcheng, James E; Nunley, James A

    2006-01-01

    Clinical pathways, or caremaps, have become key tools for hospitals to streamline patient care. They are most applicable in situations where a high degree of predictability regarding treatment and/or diagnostic intervention is expected. Perceived advantages include cost savings, more uniform nursing care, and improved patient satisfaction. Total joint replacement is an ideal indication for implementation of clinical pathways. At the authors' institution, despite the adoption of a clinical pathway for these procedures, postoperative orders continue to be handwritten DE NOVO adding variability that may be detrimental to patient safety. This article describes the authoring and implementation of a computerized order process for the care of postoperative total joints patients using a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:17313930

  15. Effect of teaching decision analysis on student nurses' clinical intervention decision making.

    PubMed

    Shamian, J

    1991-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of teaching decision analysis on nursing students' ability to prioritize clinical interventions given the probabilities for the decision situation. Sixty-eight university nursing students were randomly assigned to one of two groups. The 37 nursing students in the experimental group received a 4-hour didactic and interactive teaching session on decision analysis. The 31 nursing students in the control group also received a 4-hour interactive session on a nondecision analysis topic. A posttest experimental design was selected to minimize testing bias. Three clinical case studies were developed, tested, and utilized for data collection. Subjects in the experimental group selected clinical decisions that were in accordance with clinical decisions made by experts more often and more consistently than did subjects in the control group (p less than .0001). PMID:2017582

  16. Effectiveness and Safety of a Clinical Decision Rule to Reduce Repeat Ionized Calcium Testing: A Pre/Post Test Intervention.

    PubMed

    Salman, Momina; Pike, Donna Comins; Wu, Rong; Oncken, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act authorizes the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to reimburse hospitals that demonstrate meaningful use of certified electronic health record technology. We sought to demonstrate meaningful use by developing and implementing one clinical decision support rule in the computerized physician order entry system that targets clinician-ordered repeat ionized calcium measurement at the University of Connecticut Health Center. The rule consists of a pop-up computer reminder that is triggered by ordering a second ionized calcium test within 72 hours after an initial normal test, with no clear indication for repeat testing. We implemented the rule on December 14, 2010, and have reviewed all data collected through December 2014. We found that the number of repeat tests decreased from 46% to 14% with no significant increase in the number of serious adverse events. We conclude that computerized reminders can decrease unnecessary repeat testing in the inpatient setting. PMID:26882784

  17. Integrating Clinical Decision Support into EMR and PHR: a Case Study Using Anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Chackery, Dave-Gregory; Keshavjee, Karim; Mirza, Kashif; Ghany, Ahmad; Holbrook, Anne M

    2015-01-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) for atrial fibrillation is expected to ease the implementation of often-complex guidelines for atrial fibrillation and anticoagulation. Most clinical decision support systems (CDSS) for anticoagulation are stand-alone systems that do not integrate with electronic medical records (EMR). We have developed an architecture that consists of a computerized CDS that can integrate with multiple EMRs and multiple patient health records (PHRs). The design process revealed some significant issues that were resolved through systematic business/clinical analysis and creative clinical design in the diagnostic and treatment domains. Key issues identified and resolved include: 1) how to correctly allocate existing patients into various CDSS states (e.g., MAINTENANCE, HOLD, DISCONTINUE, etc), 2) identify when a patient becomes eligible for CDSS guidance over time, 3) how the CDSS maintains information about the patient's anticoagulation state and 4) how to transform vague human-readable concepts to explicit computable concepts. The management of anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation is no easy task and we believe our architecture will improve patient care at all levels and ultimately better balance the reduction of stroke risk while minimizing harms from major bleeding. In addition, the architecture presented is scalable to other treatment guidelines and is scalable to multiple EMRs and PHRs, making it suitable for use in a platform approach. PMID:25676955

  18. Clinical inferences and decisions--III. Utility assessment and the Bayesian decision model.

    PubMed

    Aspinall, P A; Hill, A R

    1984-01-01

    It is accepted that errors of misclassifications, however small, can occur in clinical decisions but it cannot be assumed that the importance associated with false positive errors is the same as that for false negatives. The relative importance of these two types of error is frequently implied by a decision maker in the different weighting factors or utilities he assigns to the alternative consequences of his decisions. Formal procedures are available by which it is possible to make explicit in numerical form the value or worth of the outcome of a decision process. The two principal methods are described for generating utilities as associated with clinical decisions. The concept and application of utility is then expanded from a unidimensional to a multidimensional problem where, for example, one variable may be state of health and another monetary assets. When combined with the principles of subjective probability and test criterion selection outlined in Parts I and II of this series, the consequent use of utilities completes the framework upon which the general Bayesian model of clinical decision making is based. The five main stages in this general decision making model are described and applications of the model are illustrated with clinical examples from the field of ophthalmology. These include examples for unidimensional and multidimensional problems which are worked through in detail to illustrate both the principles and methodology involved in a rationalized normative model of clinical decision making behaviour. PMID:6472855

  19. Standardized Glycemic Management with a Computerized Workflow and Decision Support System for Hospitalized Patients with Type 2 Diabetes on Different Wards

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Katharina M.; Höll, Bernhard; Aberer, Felix; Donsa, Klaus; Augustin, Thomas; Schaupp, Lukas; Spat, Stephan; Beck, Peter; Fruhwald, Friedrich M.; Schnedl, Christian; Rosenkranz, Alexander R.; Lumenta, David B.; Kamolz, Lars-Peter; Plank, Johannes; Pieber, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: This study investigated the efficacy, safety, and usability of standardized glycemic management by a computerized decision support system for non-critically ill hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes on four different wards. Materials and Methods: In this open, noncontrolled intervention study, glycemic management of 99 patients with type 2 diabetes (62% acute admissions; 41 females; age, 67±11 years; hemoglobin A1c, 65±21 mmol/mol; body mass index, 30.4±6.5 kg/m2) on clinical wards (Cardiology, Endocrinology, Nephrology, Plastic Surgery) of a tertiary-care hospital was guided by GlucoTab® (Joanneum Research GmbH [Graz, Austria] and Medical University of Graz [Graz, Austria]), a mobile decision support system providing automated workflow support and suggestions for insulin dosing to nurses and physicians. Results: Adherence to insulin dosing suggestions was high (96.5% bolus, 96.7% basal). The primary outcome measure, percentage of blood glucose (BG) measurements in the range of 70–140 mg/dL, occurred in 50.2±22.2% of all measurements. The overall mean BG level was 154±35 mg/dL. BG measurements in the ranges of 60–70 mg/dL, 40–60 mg/dL, and <40 mg/dL occurred in 1.4%, 0.5%, and 0.0% of all measurements, respectively. A regression analysis showed that acute admission to the Cardiology Ward (+30 mg/dL) and preexisting home insulin therapy (+26 mg/dL) had the strongest impact on mean BG. Acute admission to other wards had minor effects (+4 mg/dL). Ninety-one percent of the healthcare professionals felt confident with GlucoTab, and 89% believed in its practicality and 80% in its ability to prevent medication errors. Conclusions: An efficacious, safe, and user-accepted implementation of GlucoTab was demonstrated. However, for optimized personalized patient care, further algorithm modifications are required. PMID:26355756

  20. Advancing clinical decision support using lessons from outside of healthcare: an interdisciplinary systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Greater use of computerized decision support (DS) systems could address continuing safety and quality problems in healthcare, but the healthcare field has struggled to implement DS technology. This study surveys DS experience across multiple non-healthcare disciplines for new insights that are generalizable to healthcare provider decisions. In particular, it sought design principles and lessons learned from the other disciplines that could inform efforts to accelerate the adoption of clinical decision support (CDS). Methods Our systematic review drew broadly from non-healthcare databases in the basic sciences, social sciences, humanities, engineering, business, and defense: PsychINFO, BusinessSource Premier, Social Sciences Abstracts, Web of Science, and Defense Technical Information Center. Because our interest was in DS that could apply to clinical decisions, we selected articles that (1) provided a review, overview, discussion of lessons learned, or an evaluation of design or implementation aspects of DS within a non-healthcare discipline and (2) involved an element of human judgment at the individual level, as opposed to decisions that can be fully automated or that are made at the organizational level. Results Clinical decisions share some similarities with decisions made by military commanders, business managers, and other leaders: they involve assessing new situations and choosing courses of action with major consequences, under time pressure, and with incomplete information. We identified seven high-level DS system design features from the non-healthcare literature that could be applied to CDS: providing broad, system-level perspectives; customizing interfaces to specific users and roles; making the DS reasoning transparent; presenting data effectively; generating multiple scenarios covering disparate outcomes (e.g., effective; effective with side effects; ineffective); allowing for contingent adaptations; and facilitating collaboration. The article provides examples of each feature. The DS literature also emphasizes the importance of organizational culture and training in implementation success. The literature contrasts “rational-analytic” vs. “naturalistic-intuitive” decision-making styles, but the best approach is often a balanced approach that combines both styles. It is also important for DS systems to enable exploration of multiple assumptions, and incorporation of new information in response to changing circumstances. Conclusions Complex, high-level decision-making has common features across disciplines as seemingly disparate as defense, business, and healthcare. National efforts to advance the health information technology agenda through broader CDS adoption could benefit by applying the DS principles identified in this review. PMID:22900537

  1. Programmable Calculators and Minicomputers in Agriculture. A Symposium Exploring Computerized Decision-Making Aids and Their Extension to the Farm Level. Proceedings of a Symposium (Hot Springs, Arkansas, February 6-7, 1980)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentley, Ernest, Ed.

    Ten papers presented at a symposium discuss the array of computerized decision-making aids currently available to farmers and ways to speed up the rate of adoption of computers by agriculturalists. Topics presented include the development of software for agricultural decision-making; the role of programmable calculators and minicomputers in…

  2. Computerized Vocational Information System (CVIS): Evaluation Manual. A Futuristic Concept of Vocational and Educational Decision-Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, JoAnn, Ed.

    Designed to assist Computerized Vocational Information System (CVIS) users in evaluating projects in local secondary school sites, the handbook provides users with a variety of variables or viewpoints from which to assess the CVIS system. Four different approaches are presented to CVIS evaluation: the analysis of use patterns; the reaction of…

  3. Decision making in asthma exacerbation: a clinical judgement analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, John; Shields, Mike; Patterson, Chris; Kee, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Background Clinical decisions which impact directly on patient safety and quality of care are made during acute asthma attacks by individual doctors based on their knowledge and experience. Decisions include administration of systemic corticosteroids (CS) and oral antibiotics, and admission to hospital. Clinical judgement analysis provides a methodology for comparing decisions between practitioners with different training and experience, and improving decision making. Methods Stepwise linear regression was used to select clinical cues based on visual analogue scale assessments of the propensity of 62 clinicians to prescribe a short course of oral CS (decision 1), a course of antibiotics (decision 2), and/or admit to hospital (decision 3) for 60 paper patients. Results When compared by specialty, paediatricians' models for decision 1 were more likely to include level of alertness as a cue (54% vs 16%); for decision 2 they were more likely to include presence of crepitations (49% vs 16%) and less likely to include inhaled CS (8% vs 40%), respiratory rate (0% vs 24%) and air entry (70% vs 100%). When compared to other grades, the models derived for decision 3 by consultants/general practitioners were more likely to include wheeze severity as a cue (39% vs 6%). Conclusions Clinicians differed in their use of individual cues and the number included in their models. Patient safety and quality of care will benefit from clarification of decision?making strategies as general learning points during medical training, in the development of guidelines and care pathways, and by clinicians developing self?awareness of their own preferences. PMID:17428817

  4. Cognitive Elements in Clinical Decision-Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunphy, Bruce C.; Cantwell, Robert; Bourke, Sid; Fleming, Mark; Smith, Bruce; Joseph, K. S.; Dunphy, Stacey L

    2010-01-01

    Physician cognition, metacognition and affect may have an impact upon the quality of clinical reasoning. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between measures of physician metacognition and affect and patient outcomes in obstetric practice. Reflective coping (RC), proactive coping, need for cognition (NFC), tolerance for

  5. Cognitive Elements in Clinical Decision-Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunphy, Bruce C.; Cantwell, Robert; Bourke, Sid; Fleming, Mark; Smith, Bruce; Joseph, K. S.; Dunphy, Stacey L

    2010-01-01

    Physician cognition, metacognition and affect may have an impact upon the quality of clinical reasoning. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between measures of physician metacognition and affect and patient outcomes in obstetric practice. Reflective coping (RC), proactive coping, need for cognition (NFC), tolerance for…

  6. Reducing Diagnostic Error with Computer-Based Clinical Decision Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenes, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Information technology approaches to delivering diagnostic clinical decision support (CDS) are the subject of the papers to follow in the proceedings. These will address the history of CDS and present day approaches (Miller), evaluation of diagnostic CDS methods (Friedman), and the role of clinical documentation in supporting diagnostic decision…

  7. Syncope: risk stratification and clinical decision making.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Suzanne Y G; Hoek, Amber E; Mollink, Susan M; Huff, J Stephen

    2014-04-01

    Syncope is a common occurrence in the emergency department, accounting for approximately 1% to 3% of presentations. Syncope is best defined as a brief loss of consciousness and postural tone followed by spontaneous and complete recovery. The spectrum of etiologies ranges from benign to life threatening, and a structured approach to evaluating these patients is key to providing care that is thorough, yet cost-effective. This issue reviews the most relevant evidence for managing and risk stratifying the syncope patient, beginning with a focused history, physical examination, electrocardiogram, and tailored diagnostic testing. Several risk stratification decision rules are compared for performance in various scenarios, including how age and associated comorbidities may predict short-term and long-term adverse events. An algorithm for structured, evidence-based care of the syncope patient is included to ensure that patients requiring hospitalization are managed appropriately and those with benign causes are discharged safely. PMID:25105200

  8. DecisionNET: database/network support for clinical decision analysts.

    PubMed

    Cohen, B J; Goldberg, H S; Pauker, S G

    1992-12-17

    DecisionNET is a proposed remote database/wide-area computer network that should cultivate quantitative approaches to medicine by providing rapid access to medical facts, literature citations, decision models, and commentary of specific use to those involved with quantitative clinical decision making. Increasing accessibility to data and providing a forum for exchange of ideas should prove to be a significant asset to clinicians, either as modelers or as clients. Further work will address specific database implementation, development of a query engine, and coordination of the communications infrastructure. DecisionNET provides a unique model for the growth and maintenance of other medical knowledge bases. PMID:1309081

  9. Clinical Decision Support Tools: The Evolution of a Revolution.

    PubMed

    Mould, D R; D'Haens, G; Upton, R N

    2016-04-01

    Dashboard systems for clinical decision support integrate data from multiple sources. These systems, the newest in a long line of dose calculators and other decision support tools, utilize Bayesian approaches to fully individualize dosing using information gathered through therapeutic drug monitoring. In the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease patients with infliximab, dashboards may reduce therapeutic failures and treatment costs. The history and future development of modern Bayesian dashboard systems is described. PMID:26785109

  10. A Comparison of Content-Balancing Procedures for Estimating Multiple Clinical Domains in Computerized Adaptive Testing: Relative Precision, Validity, and Detection of Persons with Misfitting Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Barth B.; Dennis, Michael L.; Conrad, Kendon J.

    2010-01-01

    This simulation study sought to compare four different computerized adaptive testing (CAT) content-balancing procedures designed for use in a multidimensional assessment with respect to measurement precision, symptom severity classification, validity of clinical diagnostic recommendations, and sensitivity to atypical responding. The four

  11. Improving Congestive Heart Failure Care with a Clinical Decision Unit.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Jo Ellen; Short, Nancy; Williams, Tracy E; Yandell, Ben; Bowers, Margaret T

    2015-01-01

    Evidence supporting the development of Clinical Decision Units (CDUs) to impact congestive heart failure readmission rates comes from several categories of the literature. In this study, a pre-post design with comparison group was used to evaluate the impact of the CDU. Early changes in clinical and financial outcome indicators are encouraging. Nurse leaders seek ways to improve clinical outcomes while managing the current financially challenging environment. Implementation of a CDU provides many opportunities for nurse leaders to positively impact clinical care and financial performance within their institutions. PMID:26625578

  12. The role of emotions in clinical reasoning and decision making.

    PubMed

    Marcum, James A

    2013-10-01

    What role, if any, should emotions play in clinical reasoning and decision making? Traditionally, emotions have been excluded from clinical reasoning and decision making, but with recent advances in cognitive neuropsychology they are now considered an important component of them. Today, cognition is thought to be a set of complex processes relying on multiple types of intelligences. The role of mathematical logic (hypothetico-deductive thinking) or verbal linguistic intelligence in cognition, for example, is well documented and accepted; however, the role of emotional intelligence has received less attention-especially because its nature and function are not well understood. In this paper, I argue for the inclusion of emotions in clinical reasoning and decision making. To that end, developments in contemporary cognitive neuropsychology are initially examined and analyzed, followed by a review of the medical literature discussing the role of emotions in clinical practice. Next, a published clinical case is reconstructed and used to illustrate the recognition and regulation of emotions played during a series of clinical consultations, which resulted in a positive medical outcome. The paper's main thesis is that emotions, particularly in terms of emotional intelligence as a practical form of intelligence, afford clinical practitioners a robust cognitive resource for providing quality medical care. PMID:23975905

  13. Hip Arthroplasty Pseudotumors: Pathogenesis, Imaging, and Clinical Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Derik L; Morrison, James J

    2016-01-01

    Pseudotumors are a complication of hip arthroplasty. The goal of this article is to review the clinical presentation, pathogenesis, histology, and the role of diagnostic imaging in clinical decision making for treatment, and surveillance of pseudotumors. We will discuss the multimodal imaging appearances, differential diagnosis, associated complications, treatment, and prognosis of pseudotumors, as an aid to the assessment of orthopedic prostheses at the hip. PMID:27195183

  14. The Relationship Between the Clinical Orientation of Substance Abuse Professionals and Their Clinical Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toriello, Paul J.; Leierer, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the relationship between the clinical orientations of substance abuse professionals (SAPs) and their clinical decisions. Cluster analysis grouped a sample of 245 SAPs on two clinical orientations that differed in their relative endorsement of traditional versus contemporary substance abuse counseling processes…

  15. Using Clinical Decision Support Software in Health Insurance Company

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, R.; Kumlander, Deniss

    This paper proposes the idea to use Clinical Decision Support software in Health Insurance Company as a tool to reduce the expenses related to Medication Errors. As a prove that this class of software will help insurance companies reducing the expenses, the research was conducted in eight hospitals in United Arab Emirates to analyze the amount of preventable common Medication Errors in drug prescription.

  16. Embedding measurement within existing computerized data systems: scaling clinical laboratory and medical records heart failure data to predict ICU admission.

    PubMed

    Fisher, William P; Burton, Elizabeth C

    2010-01-01

    This study employs existing data sources to develop a new measure of intensive care unit (ICU) admission risk for heart failure patients. Outcome measures were constructed from laboratory, accounting, and medical record data for 973 adult inpatients with primary or secondary heart failure. Several scoring interpretations of the laboratory indicators were evaluated relative to their measurement and predictive properties. Cases were restricted to tests within first lab draw that included at least 15 indicators. After optimizing the original clinical observations, a satisfactory heart failure severity scale was calibrated on a 0-1000 continuum. Patients with unadjusted CHF severity measures of 550 or less were 2.7 times more likely to be admitted to the ICU than those with higher measures. Patients with low HF severity measures (550 or less) adjusted for demographic and diagnostic risk factors are about six times more likely to be admitted to the ICU than those with higher adjusted measures. A nomogram facilitates routine clinical application. Existing computerized data systems could be programmed to automatically structure clinical laboratory reports using the results of studies like this one to reduce data volume with no loss of information, make laboratory results more meaningful to clinical end users, improve the quality of care, reduce errors and unneeded tests, prevent unnecessary ICU admissions, lower costs, and improve patient satisfaction. Existing data typically examined piecemeal form a coherent scale measuring heart failure severity sensitive to increased likelihood of ICU admission. Marked improvements in ROC curves were found for the aggregate measures relative to individual clinical indicators. PMID:20847475

  17. The relationship between patient data and pooled clinical management decisions.

    PubMed

    Ludbrook, G I; O'Loughlin, E J; Corcoran, T B; Grant, C

    2013-01-01

    A strong relationship between patient data and preoperative clinical decisions could potentially be used to support clinical decisions in preoperative management. The aim of this exploratory study was to determine the relationship between key patient data and pooled clinical opinions on management. In a previous study, panels of anaesthetists compared the quality of computer-assisted patient health assessments with outpatient consultations and made decisions on the need for preoperative tests, no preoperative outpatient assessment, possible postoperative intensive care unit/high dependency unit requirements and aspiration prophylaxis. In the current study, the relationship between patient data and these decisions was examined using binomial logistic regression analysis. Backward stepwise regression was used to identify independent predictors of each decision (at P >0.15), which were then incorporated into a predictive model. The number of factors related to each decision varied: blood picture (four factors), biochemistry (six factors), coagulation studies (three factors), electrocardiography (eight factors), chest X-ray (seven factors), preoperative outpatient assessment (17 factors), intensive care unit requirement (eight factors) and aspiration prophylaxis (one factor). The factor types also varied, but included surgical complexity, age, gender, number of medications or comorbidities, body mass index, hypertension, central nervous system condition, heart disease, sleep apnoea, smoking, persistent pain and stroke. Models based on these relationships usually demonstrated good sensitivity and specificity, with receiver operating characteristics in the following areas under curve: blood picture (0.75), biochemistry (0.86), coagulation studies (0.71), electrocardiography (0.90), chest X-ray (0.85), outpatient assessment (0.85), postoperative intensive care unit requirement (0.88) and aspiration prophylaxis (0.85). These initial results suggest modelling of patient data may have utility supporting clinicians' preoperative decisions. PMID:23362892

  18. Adoption of Clinical Decision Support in Multimorbidity: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Arguello Casteleiro, Mercedes; Ainsworth, John; Buchan, Iain

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with multiple conditions have complex needs and are increasing in number as populations age. This multimorbidity is one of the greatest challenges facing health care. Having more than 1 condition generates (1) interactions between pathologies, (2) duplication of tests, (3) difficulties in adhering to often conflicting clinical practice guidelines, (4) obstacles in the continuity of care, (5) confusing self-management information, and (6) medication errors. In this context, clinical decision support (CDS) systems need to be able to handle realistic complexity and minimize iatrogenic risks. Objective The aim of this review was to identify to what extent CDS is adopted in multimorbidity. Methods This review followed PRISMA guidance and adopted a multidisciplinary approach. Scopus and PubMed searches were performed by combining terms from 3 different thesauri containing synonyms for (1) multimorbidity and comorbidity, (2) polypharmacy, and (3) CDS. The relevant articles were identified by examining the titles and abstracts. The full text of selected/relevant articles was analyzed in-depth. For articles appropriate for this review, data were collected on clinical tasks, diseases, decision maker, methods, data input context, user interface considerations, and evaluation of effectiveness. Results A total of 50 articles were selected for the full in-depth analysis and 20 studies were included in the final review. Medication (n=10) and clinical guidance (n=8) were the predominant clinical tasks. Four studies focused on merging concurrent clinical practice guidelines. A total of 17 articles reported their CDS systems were knowledge-based. Most articles reviewed considered patients’ clinical records (n=19), clinical practice guidelines (n=12), and clinicians’ knowledge (n=10) as contextual input data. The most frequent diseases mentioned were cardiovascular (n=9) and diabetes mellitus (n=5). In all, 12 articles mentioned generalist doctor(s) as the decision maker(s). For articles reviewed, there were no studies referring to the active involvement of the patient in the decision-making process or to patient self-management. None of the articles reviewed adopted mobile technologies. There were no rigorous evaluations of usability or effectiveness of the CDS systems reported. Conclusions This review shows that multimorbidity is underinvestigated in the informatics of supporting clinical decisions. CDS interventions that systematize clinical practice guidelines without considering the interactions of different conditions and care processes may lead to unhelpful or harmful clinical actions. To improve patient safety in multimorbidity, there is a need for more evidence about how both conditions and care processes interact. The data needed to build this evidence base exist in many electronic health record systems and are underused. PMID:25785897

  19. Efficiency of Clinical Decision Support Systems Improves with Experience.

    PubMed

    Meulendijk, Michiel C; Spruit, Marco R; Willeboordse, Floor; Numans, Mattijs E; Brinkkemper, Sjaak; Knol, Wilma; Jansen, Paul A F; Askari, Marjan

    2016-04-01

    Efficiency, or the resources spent while performing a specific task, is widely regarded as one the determinants of usability. In this study, the authors hypothesize that having a group of users perform a similar task over a prolonged period of time will lead to improvements in efficiency of that task. This study was performed in the domain of decision-supported medication reviews. Data was gathered during a randomized controlled trial. Three expert teams consisting of an independent physician and an independent pharmacist conducted 150 computerized medication reviews on patients in 13 general practices located in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Results were analyzed with a linear mixed model. A fixed effects test on the linear mixed model showed a significant difference in the time required to conduct medication reviews over time; F(31.145) = 14.043, p < .001. The average time in minutes required to conduct medication reviews up to the first quartile was M = 20.42 (SD = 9.00), while the time from the third quartile up was M = 9.81 (SD = 6.13). This leads the authors to conclude that the amount of time users needed to perform similar tasks decreased significantly as they gained experience over time. PMID:26791992

  20. Enablers, Barriers, and the Influence of Organizational Environmental Factors on Computerized Clinical Documentation Training Developed and Delivered by Nursing Informaticists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulhanek, Brenda J.

    2010-01-01

    Within the past decade, the introduction of computerized medical records into the business and practice of health care has created a need for effective training. The implementation of computerized medical records into a health care organization has been often associated with increased costs and decreased productivity. Although existing human

  1. Enablers, Barriers, and the Influence of Organizational Environmental Factors on Computerized Clinical Documentation Training Developed and Delivered by Nursing Informaticists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulhanek, Brenda J.

    2010-01-01

    Within the past decade, the introduction of computerized medical records into the business and practice of health care has created a need for effective training. The implementation of computerized medical records into a health care organization has been often associated with increased costs and decreased productivity. Although existing human…

  2. Use of Clinical Decision Support to Improve the Quality of Care Provided to Older Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Groshaus, H.; Boscan, A.; Khandwala, F.; Holroyd-Leduc, J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Frail older inpatients are at risk of unintended adverse events while in hospital, particularly falls, functional decline, delirium and incontinence. Objective The aim of this pragmatic trial was to pilot and evaluate a multi-component knowledge translation intervention that incorporated a nurse-initiated computerized clinical decision support tool to reduce harms in the care of older medical inpatients. Methods A stepped wedge trial design was conducted on six medical units at two hospitals in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. The primary quantitative outcome was the rate of order set use. Secondary outcomes included the number of falls, the average number of days in hospital, and the total number of consults ordered for each of orthopedics, geriatrics, psychiatry and physiotherapy. Qualitative analysis included interviews with nurses to explore barriers and facilitators around the implementation of the electronic decision support tool. Results The estimated mean rate of order set use over a 2 week period was 3.1 (95% CI 1.9–5.3) sets higher after the intervention than before. The estimated odds of a fall happening on a unit over a 2-week period was 9.3 (p = 0.065) times higher before than after the intervention. There was no significant effect of the intervention on length of hospital stay (p = 0.67) or consults to related clinical services (all p <0.2). Interviews with front-line nurses and nurse managers/educators revealed that the order set is not being regularly ordered because its content is perceived as part of good nursing care and due to the high workload on these busy medical units. Conclusions Although not statistically significant, a reduction in the number of falls as a result of the intervention was noted. Frontline users’ engagement is crucial for the successful implementation of any decision support tool. New strategies of implementation will be evaluated before broad dissemination of this knowledge translation intervention. PMID:23616902

  3. Personalized decision support system based on clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Douali, Nassim; De Roo, Jos; Sweetman, Pauline; Papageorgiou, Elpiniki I; Dollon, Jullien; Jaulent, Marie-Christine

    2015-01-01

    Personalized medicine is a broad and rapidly advancing field of health care that is informed by each person's unique clinical, genetic, genomic, and environmental information. Health care that embraces personalized medicine is an integrated, coordinated, evidence based approach to individualizing patient care across the continuum. It is very important to make the right treatment decision but before that to obtain a good diagnosis. There are several clinical forms of disease whose symptoms vary depending on the age and etiology. In this study, we investigated and evaluated a model framework, for personalized diagnostic decisions, based on Case Based Fuzzy Cognitive Map (CBFCM, a cognitive process applying the main features of fuzzy logic and neural processors to situations involving imprecision and uncertain descriptions, in a similar way to intuitive human reasoning. We explored the use of this method for modelling clinical practice guidelines. PMID:25980889

  4. Dynamic Clinical Data Mining: Search Engine-Based Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Zimolzak, Andrew J; Stone, David J

    2014-01-01

    The research world is undergoing a transformation into one in which data, on massive levels, is freely shared. In the clinical world, the capture of data on a consistent basis has only recently begun. We propose an operational vision for a digitally based care system that incorporates data-based clinical decision making. The system would aggregate individual patient electronic medical data in the course of care; query a universal, de-identified clinical database using modified search engine technology in real time; identify prior cases of sufficient similarity as to be instructive to the case at hand; and populate the individual patient's electronic medical record with pertinent decision support material such as suggested interventions and prognosis, based on prior outcomes. Every individual's course, including subsequent outcomes, would then further populate the population database to create a feedback loop to benefit the care of future patients. PMID:25600664

  5. Computerized algorithms and pediatricians' management of common problems in a community clinic.

    PubMed

    Margolis, C Z; Warshawsky, S S; Goldman, L; Dagan, O; Wirtschafter, D; Pliskin, J S

    1992-04-01

    In 1987, a microcomputer clinical algorithm (CA) system for constructing and using CAs for patient care was designed and implemented for six common primary care pediatrics problems. Six community clinic pediatricians agreed to use the system for several months. Length of patient's visit, completeness of data collection, antibiotic use, and appropriateness of clinical plan were measured before the computers were introduced (without CAs) and after the computers were introduced (both with and without CAs). All performance measures improved after the introduction of CAs. However, CA implementation had to be discontinued after five weeks because the CAs were too tedious for the physicians to follow during routine care. The authors conclude that CAs cannot be successfully sustained with physicians for common problems, even though their design and use can significantly improve the process of care. PMID:1558607

  6. Clinical Decision Support Alert Appropriateness: A Review and Proposal for Improvement

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Allison B.; Thomas, Eric J.; Krousel-Wood, Marie; Sittig, Dean F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Many healthcare providers are adopting clinical decision support (CDS) systems to improve patient safety and meet meaningful use requirements. Computerized alerts that prompt clinicians about drug-allergy, drug-drug, and drug-disease warnings or provide dosing guidance are most commonly implemented. Alert overrides, which occur when clinicians do not follow the guidance presented by the alert, can hinder improved patient outcomes. Methods We present a review of CDS alerts and describe a proposal to develop novel methods for evaluating and improving CDS alerts that builds upon traditional informatics approaches. Our proposal incorporates previously described models for predicting alert overrides that utilize retrospective chart review to determine which alerts are clinically relevant and which overrides are justifiable. Results Despite increasing implementations of CDS alerts, detailed evaluations rarely occur because of the extensive labor involved in manual chart reviews to determine alert and response appropriateness. Further, most studies have solely evaluated alert overrides that are appropriate or justifiable. Our proposal expands the use of web-based monitoring tools with an interactive dashboard for evaluating CDS alert and response appropriateness that incorporates the predictive models. The dashboard provides 2 views, an alert detail view and a patient detail view, to provide a full history of alerts and help put the patient's events in context. Conclusion The proposed research introduces several innovations to address the challenges and gaps in alert evaluations. This research can transform alert evaluation processes across healthcare settings, leading to improved CDS, reduced alert fatigue, and increased patient safety. PMID:24940129

  7. CEDRIC: A Computerized Chronic Disease Management System for Urban, Safety Net Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Ogunyemi, Omolola; Mukherjee, Sukrit; Ani, Chizobam; Hindman, David; George, Sheba; Ilapakurthi, Ramarao; Verma, Mary; Dayrit, Melvin

    2011-01-01

    To meet the challenge of improving health care quality in urban, medically underserved areas of the US that have a predominance of chronic diseases such as diabetes, we have developed a new information system called CEDRIC for managing chronic diseases. CEDRIC was developed in collaboration with clinicians at an urban safety net clinic, using a community-participatory partnered research approach, with a view to addressing the particular needs of urban clinics with a high physician turnover and large uninsured/underinsured patient population. The pilot implementation focuses on diabetes management. In this paper, we describe the system’s architecture and features. PMID:20841679

  8. Ethical decision-making challenges in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Beverly P

    2003-01-01

    Today's health care environment requires professionals to pay increasing attention to efficiencies and functional outcomes. Today's patients are hospitalized for short stays, and those needing rehabilitation often have multiple diagnoses and goals. Cost effective strategies support fast paced occupational therapy programs and professionals who are adept multi-task specialists and problem solvers. Practitioners have multiple resources and strategies for clinical reasoning and decision-making; however, ethical decision-making requires use of additional resources and strategies. This paper provides strategies to examine everyday ethical problems and dilemmas, including application of The American Occupational Therapy's Code of Ethics, to support ethical decision-making in practice settings (American Occupational Therapy Association, 2000a). PMID:23930704

  9. Creating Shareable Clinical Decision Support Rules for a Pharmacogenomics Clinical Guideline Using Structured Knowledge Representation

    PubMed Central

    Linan, Margaret K.; Sottara, Davide; Freimuth, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacogenomics (PGx) guidelines contain drug-gene relationships, therapeutic and clinical recommendations from which clinical decision support (CDS) rules can be extracted, rendered and then delivered through clinical decision support systems (CDSS) to provide clinicians with just-in-time information at the point of care. Several tools exist that can be used to generate CDS rules that are based on computer interpretable guidelines (CIG), but none have been previously applied to the PGx domain. We utilized the Unified Modeling Language (UML), the Health Level 7 virtual medical record (HL7 vMR) model, and standard terminologies to represent the semantics and decision logic derived from a PGx guideline, which were then mapped to the Health eDecisions (HeD) schema. The modeling and extraction processes developed here demonstrate how structured knowledge representations can be used to support the creation of shareable CDS rules from PGx guidelines. PMID:26958298

  10. An Intelligent Computerized Stretch Reflex Measurement System For Clinical And Investigative Neurology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, P. M.; Chutkow, J. G.; Riggs, M. T.; Cristiano, V. D.

    1987-05-01

    We describe the design of a reliable, user-friendly preprototype system for quantifying the tendon stretch reflexes in humans and large mammals. A hand-held, instrumented reflex gun, the impactor of which contains a single force sensor, interfaces with a computer. The resulting test system can deliver sequences of reproducible stimuli at graded intensities and adjustable durations to a muscle's tendon ("tendon taps"), measure the impacting force of each tap, and record the subsequent reflex muscle contraction from the same tendon -- all automatically. The parameters of the reflex muscle contraction include latency; mechanical threshold; and peak time, peak magnitude, and settling time. The results of clinical tests presented in this paper illustrate the system's potential usefulness in detecting neurologic dysfunction affecting the tendon stretch reflexes, in documenting the course of neurologic illnesses and their response to therapy, and in clinical and laboratory neurologic research.

  11. The Impact of Computerized Provider Order Entry Systems on Inpatient Clinical Workflow: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Niazkhani, Zahra; Pirnejad, Habibollah; Berg, Marc; Aarts, Jos

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have shown the importance of workflow issues in the implementation of CPOE systems and patient safety practices. To understand the impact of CPOE on clinical workflow, we developed a conceptual framework and conducted a literature search for CPOE evaluations between 1990 and June 2007. Fifty-one publications were identified that disclosed mixed effects of CPOE systems. Among the frequently reported workflow advantages were the legible orders, remote accessibility of the systems, and the shorter order turnaround times. Among the frequently reported disadvantages were the time-consuming and problematic user-system interactions, and the enforcement of a predefined relationship between clinical tasks and between providers. Regarding the diversity of findings in the literature, we conclude that more multi-method research is needed to explore CPOE's multidimensional and collective impact on especially collaborative workflow. PMID:19390113

  12. [The computerized clinical record: merely an academic discussion or an essential technology?].

    PubMed

    Gouveia-Oliveira, A

    1994-01-01

    The publication of the results of a study on improving patient records, recently completed by the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, in the United States, where it was concluded that the Computer-Based Patient Record (CPR) was an essential technology for health care, witnesses the importance and expectations that patients, physicians and other health care professionals, hospital administrators and health systems managers, place on forms of management of clinical information that are more accurate, complete and efficient than what is possible with current methods. A large amount of work is in order, to develop standards for sharing clinical data between clinical information systems and for representing medical terminology and knowledge, to create legislation regarding data protection in CPR, and for the preparation of health care professionals for the information and technological demands of the future. Recent developments in database integration, and the experience of several CPR systems developed at academic institutions, have led to the progressive delineation of the architecture of modern CPR systems. PMID:7992648

  13. A Decision Making Model Utilizing a Complex Clinical Data Set

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Tennyson; Lanese, Richard

    1982-01-01

    Throat cultures were performed and tabulations made of 16 clinical variables for 1817 consecutive patients with upper respiratory illnesses. Analysis of the data was performed with respect to the probability of a positive culture for B hemolytic streptococcus by the Automatic Interactive Detector (AID) and multiple logistic regression methods. The results were utilized to determine which patients should have a throat culture as a basis for treatment decisions.

  14. IBM’s Health Analytics and Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Sun, J.; Knoop, S.; Shabo, A.; Carmeli, B.; Sow, D.; Syed-Mahmood, T.; Rapp, W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives This survey explores the role of big data and health analytics developed by IBM in supporting the transformation of healthcare by augmenting evidence-based decision-making. Methods Some problems in healthcare and strategies for change are described. It is argued that change requires better decisions, which, in turn, require better use of the many kinds of healthcare information. Analytic resources that address each of the information challenges are described. Examples of the role of each of the resources are given. Results There are powerful analytic tools that utilize the various kinds of big data in healthcare to help clinicians make more personalized, evidenced-based decisions. Such resources can extract relevant information and provide insights that clinicians can use to make evidence-supported decisions. There are early suggestions that these resources have clinical value. As with all analytic tools, they are limited by the amount and quality of data. Conclusion Big data is an inevitable part of the future of healthcare. There is a compelling need to manage and use big data to make better decisions to support the transformation of healthcare to the personalized, evidence-supported model of the future. Cognitive computing resources are necessary to manage the challenges in employing big data in healthcare. Such tools have been and are being developed. The analytic resources, themselves, do not drive, but support healthcare transformation. PMID:25123736

  15. Neural networks and psychiatry: candidate applications in clinical decision making.

    PubMed

    Florio, T; Einfeld, S; Levy, F

    1994-12-01

    Neural networks comprise a fundamentally new type of computer system inspired by the functioning of neurons in the brain. Such networks are good at solving problems that involve pattern recognition and categorisation. An important difference between a neural network and a traditional computer system is that in developing an application, a neural network is not programmed; instead, it is trained to solve a particular type of problem. This ability to learn to solve a problem makes neural networks adaptable to solving a wide variety of problems, some of which have proved intractable using a traditional computing approach. Neural networks are particularly suited to tasks involving the categorisation of patterns of information, such as is required in diagnosis and clinical decision making. In the last three years reports of applications involving neural networks have begun to appear in the medical literature, and these are described in this paper. However, a comprehensive search of the literature has shown that there have not as yet been reports of any applications in psychiatry. This paper discusses the nature of clinical decision making, outlines the sorts of problems in psychiatry which neural networks applications might be developed to address, and gives examples of candidate applications in clinical decision making. PMID:7794209

  16. Cancer diagnostics: decision criteria for marker utilization in the clinic.

    PubMed

    Taube, Sheila E; Jacobson, James W; Lively, Tracy G

    2005-01-01

    A new diagnostic tool must pass three major tests before it is adopted for routine clinical use. First, the tool must be robust and reproducible; second, the clinical value of the tool must be proven, i.e. the tool should reliably trigger a clinical decision that results in patient benefit; and, third, the clinical community has to be convinced of the need for this tool and the benefits it affords. Another factor that can influence the adoption of new tools relates to the cost and the vagaries of insurance reimbursement. The Cancer Diagnosis Program (CDP) of the US National Cancer Institute (NCI) launched the Program for the Assessment of Clinical Cancer Tests (PACCT) in 2000 to develop a process for moving the results of new technologies and new understanding of cancer biology more efficiently and effectively into clinical practice. PACCT has developed an algorithm that incorporates the iterative nature of assay development into an evaluation process that includes developers and end users. The effective introduction of new tests into clinical practice has been hampered by a series of common problems that are best described using examples of successes and failures. The successful application of the PACCT algorithm is described in the discussion of the recent development of the OncotypeDX assay and plan for a prospective trial of this assay by the NCI-supported Clinical Trials Cooperative Groups. The assay uses reverse transcription (RT)-PCR evaluation of a set of 16 genes that were shown to strongly associate with the risk of recurrence of breast cancer in women who presented with early stage disease (hormone responsive, and no involvement of the auxiliary lymph nodes). The test is highly reproducible. It provides information to aid the physician and patient in making important clinical decisions, including the aggressiveness of the therapy that should be recommended. A trial is planned to test whether OncotypeDX can be used as a standalone trigger for specific treatment decisions. The problems that have been encountered and have delayed the development of other diagnostic tools are exemplified in the development of tests for human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2) overexpression, for predictors of response to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors, and for the detection of residual disease following chemotherapy. PMID:16336001

  17. Web-based health services and clinical decision support.

    PubMed

    Jegelevicius, Darius; Marozas, Vaidotas; Lukosevicius, Arunas; Patasius, Martynas

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was the development of a Web-based e-health service for comprehensive assistance and clinical decision support. The service structure consists of a Web server, a PHP-based Web interface linked to a clinical SQL database, Java applets for interactive manipulation and visualization of signals and a Matlab server linked with signal and data processing algorithms implemented by Matlab programs. The service ensures diagnostic signal- and image analysis-sbased clinical decision support. By using the discussed methodology, a pilot service for pathology specialists for automatic calculation of the proliferation index has been developed. Physicians use a simple Web interface for uploading the pictures under investigation to the server; subsequently a Java applet interface is used for outlining the region of interest and, after processing on the server, the requested proliferation index value is calculated. There is also an "expert corner", where experts can submit their index estimates and comments on particular images, which is especially important for system developers. These expert evaluations are used for optimization and verification of automatic analysis algorithms. Decision support trials have been conducted for ECG and ophthalmology ultrasonic investigations of intraocular tumor differentiation. Data mining algorithms have been applied and decision support trees constructed. These services are under implementation by a Web-based system too. The study has shown that the Web-based structure ensures more effective, flexible and accessible services compared with standalone programs and is very convenient for biomedical engineers and physicians, especially in the development phase. PMID:15718591

  18. DYNAMICALLY EVOLVING CLINICAL PRACTICES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PREDICTING MEDICAL DECISIONS.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jonathan H; Goldstein, Mary K; Asch, Steven M; Altman, Russ B

    2016-01-01

    Automatically data-mining clinical practice patterns from electronic health records (EHR) can enable prediction of future practices as a form of clinical decision support (CDS). Our objective is to determine the stability of learned clinical practice patterns over time and what implication this has when using varying longitudinal historical data sources towards predicting future decisions. We trained an association rule engine for clinical orders (e.g., labs, imaging, medications) using structured inpatient data from a tertiary academic hospital. Comparing top order associations per admission diagnosis from training data in 2009 vs. 2012, we find practice variability from unstable diagnoses with rank biased overlap (RBO)<0.35 (e.g., pneumonia) to stable admissions for planned procedures (e.g., chemotherapy, surgery) with comparatively high RBO>0.6. Predicting admission orders for future (2013) patients with associations trained on recent (2012) vs. older (2009) data improved accuracy evaluated by area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC-AUC) 0.89 to 0.92, precision at ten (positive predictive value of the top ten predictions against actual orders) 30% to 37%, and weighted recall (sensitivity) at ten 2.4% to 13%, (P<10-10). Training with more longitudinal data (2009-2012) was no better than only using recent (2012) data. Secular trends in practice patterns likely explain why smaller but more recent training data is more accurate at predicting future practices. PMID:26776186

  19. DYNAMICALLY EVOLVING CLINICAL PRACTICES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PREDICTING MEDICAL DECISIONS

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, JONATHAN H; GOLDSTEIN, MARY K; ASCH, STEVEN M; ALTMAN, RUSS B

    2015-01-01

    Automatically data-mining clinical practice patterns from electronic health records (EHR) can enable prediction of future practices as a form of clinical decision support (CDS). Our objective is to determine the stability of learned clinical practice patterns over time and what implication this has when using varying longitudinal historical data sources towards predicting future decisions. We trained an association rule engine for clinical orders (e.g., labs, imaging, medications) using structured inpatient data from a tertiary academic hospital. Comparing top order associations per admission diagnosis from training data in 2009 vs. 2012, we find practice variability from unstable diagnoses with rank biased overlap (RBO)<0.35 (e.g., pneumonia) to stable admissions for planned procedures (e.g., chemotherapy, surgery) with comparatively high RBO>0.6. Predicting admission orders for future (2013) patients with associations trained on recent (2012) vs. older (2009) data improved accuracy evaluated by area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC-AUC) 0.89 to 0.92, precision at ten (positive predictive value of the top ten predictions against actual orders) 30% to 37%, and weighted recall (sensitivity) at ten 2.4% to 13%, (P<10−10). Training with more longitudinal data (2009-2012) was no better than only using recent (2012) data. Secular trends in practice patterns likely explain why smaller but more recent training data is more accurate at predicting future practices. PMID:26776186

  20. Computerized radiographic mass detection--part II: Decision support by featured database visualization and modular neural networks.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Wang, Y; Liu, K J; Lo, S C; Freedman, M T

    2001-04-01

    Based on the enhanced segmentation of suspicious mass areas, further development of computer-assisted mass detection may be decomposed into three distinctive machine learning tasks: 1) construction of the featured knowledge database; 2) mapping of the classified and/or unclassified data points in the database; and 3) development of an intelligent user interface. A decision support system may then be constructed as a complementary machine observer that should enhance the radiologists performance in mass detection. We adopt a mathematical feature extraction procedure to construct the featured knowledge database from all the suspicious mass sites localized by the enhanced segmentation. The optimal mapping of the data points is then obtained by learning the generalized normal mixtures and decision boundaries, where a is developed to carry out both soft and hard clustering. A visual explanation of the decision making is further invented as a decision support, based on an interactive visualization hierarchy through the probabilistic principal component projections of the knowledge database and the localized optimal displays of the retrieved raw data. A prototype system is developed and pilot tested to demonstrate the applicability of this framework to mammographic mass detection. PMID:11370897

  1. Utilizing computerized entertainment education in the development of decision aids for lower literate and naïve computer users.

    PubMed

    Jibaja-Weiss, Maria L; Volk, Robert J

    2007-01-01

    Decision aids have been developed by using various delivery methods, including interactive computer programs. Such programs, however, still rely heavily on written information, health and digital literacy, and reading ease. We describe an approach to overcome these potential barriers for low-literate, underserved populations by making design considerations for poor readers and naïve computer users and by using concepts from entertainment education to engage the user and to contextualize the content for the user. The system design goals are to make the program both didactic and entertaining and the navigation and graphical user interface as simple as possible. One entertainment education strategy, the soap opera, is linked seamlessly to interactive learning modules to enhance the content of the soap opera episodes. The edutainment decision aid model (EDAM) guides developers through the design process. Although designing patient decision aids that are educational, entertaining, and targeted toward poor readers and those with limited computer skills is a complex task, it is a promising strategy for aiding this population. Entertainment education may be a highly effective approach to promoting informed decision making for patients with low health literacy. PMID:17934944

  2. Computerized Drug Information Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Smith, Daniel R.

    1972-01-01

    To compare computerized services in chemistry, pharmacology, toxicology, and clinical medicine of pharmaceutical interest, equivalent profiles were run on magnetic tape files of CA-Condensates," CBAC," Excerpta Medica," MEDLARS" and Ringdoc." The results are tabulated for overlap of services, relative speed of citing references, and unique…

  3. Integrating a Computerized Clinical Laboratory Information System into a Global Hospital Information System

    PubMed Central

    Rappoport, Arthur E.

    1981-01-01

    We have developed Laboratory (LIS) and Hospital (HIS) Information Systems in a distributed, shared satellite-host configuration. The LIS processes data on-line from 25 electronic analytical instruments from two geographically separated hospital units connected on-line to a laboratory computer (LDM). Manual test results are entered by CRTs or punch cards. Free Text is entered by CRT or CMC/ST. Machine readable specimen identification is accomplished by OCR or mini-punch card readers attached to the test instruments. The LDM transmits all test data to the HIS for storage in patients' files. The HIS is an IBM 4341 and serves both hospital units through 8100's. It performs all administrative tasks. The LIS is the Technicon 7000R system. A communication system, DIVOTS (Data Voice Output Telephone System) is based on an IBM S/7 processor coupled to the 4341 and uses Touch-Tone, Audio-Response technology. It provides test order entry and result inquiry functions between nursing stations, clinics and physicians' offices to and from the laboratory and other departments. HIS prints all interim and daily updated, reformatted, cumulative patient summary reports which are sent to the wards.

  4. A Clinical Decision Support System for Breast Cancer Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Ana S.; Alves, Pedro; Jarman, Ian H.; Etchells, Terence A.; Fonseca, José M.; Lisboa, Paulo J. G.

    This paper proposes a Web clinical decision support system for clinical oncologists and for breast cancer patients making prognostic assessments, using the particular characteristics of the individual patient. This system comprises three different prognostic modelling methodologies: the clinically widely used Nottingham prognostic index (NPI); the Cox regression modelling and a partial logistic artificial neural network with automatic relevance determination (PLANN-ARD). All three models yield a different prognostic index that can be analysed together in order to obtain a more accurate prognostic assessment of the patient. Missing data is incorporated in the mentioned models, a common issue in medical data that was overcome using multiple imputation techniques. Risk group assignments are also provided through a methodology based on regression trees, where Boolean rules can be obtained expressed with patient characteristics.

  5. Clinical Decision Making—A Functional Medicine Perspective

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    As 21st century health care moves from a disease-based approach to a more patient-centric system that can address biochemical individuality to improve health and function, clinical decision making becomes more complex. Accentuating the problem is the lack of a clear standard for this more complex functional medicine approach. While there is relatively broad agreement in Western medicine for what constitutes competent assessment of disease and identification of related treatment approaches, the complex functional medicine model posits multiple and individualized diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, most or many of which have reasonable underlying science and principles, but which have not been rigorously tested in a research or clinical setting. This has led to non-rigorous thinking and sometimes to uncritical acceptance of both poorly documented diagnostic procedures and ineffective therapies, resulting in less than optimal clinical care. PMID:24278827

  6. Clinical decision making-a functional medicine perspective.

    PubMed

    Pizzorno, Joseph E

    2012-09-01

    As 21st century health care moves from a disease-based approach to a more patient-centric system that can address biochemical individuality to improve health and function, clinical decision making becomes more complex. Accentuating the problem is the lack of a clear standard for this more complex functional medicine approach. While there is relatively broad agreement in Western medicine for what constitutes competent assessment of disease and identification of related treatment approaches, the complex functional medicine model posits multiple and individualized diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, most or many of which have reasonable underlying science and principles, but which have not been rigorously tested in a research or clinical setting. This has led to non-rigorous thinking and sometimes to uncritical acceptance of both poorly documented diagnostic procedures and ineffective therapies, resulting in less than optimal clinical care. PMID:24278827

  7. A highly scalable, interoperable clinical decision support service

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Howard S; Paterno, Marilyn D; Rocha, Beatriz H; Schaeffer, Molly; Wright, Adam; Erickson, Jessica L; Middleton, Blackford

    2014-01-01

    Objective To create a clinical decision support (CDS) system that is shareable across healthcare delivery systems and settings over large geographic regions. Materials and methods The enterprise clinical rules service (ECRS) realizes nine design principles through a series of enterprise java beans and leverages off-the-shelf rules management systems in order to provide consistent, maintainable, and scalable decision support in a variety of settings. Results The ECRS is deployed at Partners HealthCare System (PHS) and is in use for a series of trials by members of the CDS consortium, including internally developed systems at PHS, the Regenstrief Institute, and vendor-based systems deployed at locations in Oregon and New Jersey. Performance measures indicate that the ECRS provides sub-second response time when measured apart from services required to retrieve data and assemble the continuity of care document used as input. Discussion We consider related work, design decisions, comparisons with emerging national standards, and discuss uses and limitations of the ECRS. Conclusions ECRS design, implementation, and use in CDS consortium trials indicate that it provides the flexibility and modularity needed for broad use and performs adequately. Future work will investigate additional CDS patterns, alternative methods of data passing, and further optimizations in ECRS performance. PMID:23828174

  8. ‘Too much, too late’: mixed methods multi-channel video recording study of computerized decision support systems and GP prescribing

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, James; Thomson, Fionagh; Milne, Heather; Buckingham, Susan; Sheikh, Aziz; Fernando, Bernard; Cresswell, Kathrin; Williams, Robin; Pinnock, Hilary

    2013-01-01

    Objective Computerized decision support systems (CDSS) are commonly deployed to support prescribing, although over-riding of alerts by prescribers remains a concern. We aimed to understand how general practitioners (GPs) interact with prescribing CDSS in order to inform deliberation on how better to support prescribing decisions in primary care. Materials and methods Quantitative and qualitative analysis of interactions between GPs, patients, and computer systems using multi-channel video recordings of 112 primary care consultations with eight GPs in three UK practices. Results 132 prescriptions were issued in the course of 73 of the consultations, of which 81 (61%) attracted at least one alert. Of the total of 117 alerts, only three resulted in the GP checking, but not altering, the prescription. CDSS provided information and safety alerts at the point of generating a prescription. This was ‘too much, too late’ as the majority of the ‘work’ of prescribing occurred prior to using the computer. By the time an alert appeared, the GP had formulated the problem(s), potentially spent several minutes considering, explaining, negotiating, and reaching agreement with the patient about the proposed treatment, and had possibly given instructions and printed an information leaflet. Discussion CDSS alerts do not coincide with the prescribing workflow throughout the whole GP consultation. Current systems interrupt to correct decisions that have already been taken, rather than assisting formulation of the management plan. Conclusions CDSS are likely to be more acceptable and effective if the prescribing support is provided much earlier in the process of generating a prescription. PMID:23470696

  9. Modeling decision support rule interactions in a clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Sordo, Margarita; Rocha, Beatriz H; Morales, Alfredo A; Maviglia, Saverio M; Oglio, Elisa Dell'Oglio; Fairbanks, Amanda; Aroy, Teal; Dubois, David; Bouyer-Ferullo, Sharon; Rocha, Roberto A

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, rule interactions are handled at implementation time through rule task properties that control the order in which rules are executed. By doing so, knowledge about the behavior and interactions of decision rules is not captured at modeling time. We argue that this is important knowledge that should be integrated in the modeling phase. In this project, we build upon current work on a conceptual schema to represent clinical knowledge for decision support in the form of if then rules. This schema currently captures provenance of the clinical content, context where such content is actionable (i.e. constraints) and the logic of the rule itself. For this project, we borrowed concepts from both the Semantic Web (i.e., Ontologies) and Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS), to explore a conceptual approach for modeling rule interactions in an enterprise-wide clinical setting. We expect that a more comprehensive modeling will facilitate knowledge authoring, editing and update; foster consistency in rules implementation and maintenance; and develop authoritative knowledge repositories to promote quality, safety and efficacy of healthcare. PMID:23920690

  10. Is it the time to rethink clinical decision-making strategies? From a single clinical outcome evaluation to a Clinical Multi-criteria Decision Assessment (CMDA).

    PubMed

    Migliore, Alberto; Integlia, Davide; Bizzi, Emanuele; Piaggio, Tomaso

    2015-10-01

    There are plenty of different clinical, organizational and economic parameters to consider in order having a complete assessment of the total impact of a pharmaceutical treatment. In the attempt to follow, a holistic approach aimed to provide an evaluation embracing all clinical parameters in order to choose the best treatments, it is necessary to compare and weight multiple criteria. Therefore, a change is required: we need to move from a decision-making context based on the assessment of one single criteria towards a transparent and systematic framework enabling decision makers to assess all relevant parameters simultaneously in order to choose the best treatment to use. In order to apply the MCDA methodology to clinical decision making the best pharmaceutical treatment (or medical devices) to use to treat a specific pathology, we suggest a specific application of the Multiple Criteria Decision Analysis for the purpose, like a Clinical Multi-criteria Decision Assessment CMDA. In CMDA, results from both meta-analysis and observational studies are used by a clinical consensus after attributing weights to specific domains and related parameters. The decision will result from a related comparison of all consequences (i.e., efficacy, safety, adherence, administration route) existing behind the choice to use a specific pharmacological treatment. The match will yield a score (in absolute value) that link each parameter with a specific intervention, and then a final score for each treatment. The higher is the final score; the most appropriate is the intervention to treat disease considering all criteria (domain an parameters). The results will allow the physician to evaluate the best clinical treatment for his patients considering at the same time all relevant criteria such as clinical effectiveness for all parameters and administration route. The use of CMDA model will yield a clear and complete indication of the best pharmaceutical treatment to use for patients, helping physicians to choose drugs with a complete set of information, imputed in the model. PMID:26190311

  11. Agreement of Decision Analyses and Subsequent Clinical Studies in Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bress, Joshua N.; Hulgan, Todd; Lyon, Jennifer A.; Johnston, Cecilia P.; Lehmann, Harold; Sterling, Timothy R.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Decision analysis techniques can compare management strategies when there are insufficient data from clinical studies to guide decision-making. We compared the outcomes of decision analyses and subsequent clinical studies in the infectious disease literature to assess the validity of the conclusions of the decision analyses. Methods: A search strategy to identify decision analyses in infectious diseases topics published from 1990-2005 was developed and performed using PubMed. Abstracts of all identified articles were reviewed and infectious diseases-related decision analyses were retained. Subsequent clinical trials and observational studies that corresponded to these decision analyses were identified using pre-specified search strategies. Clinical studies were considered a match for the decision analysis if they assessed the same patient population, intervention, and outcome. Agreement or disagreement between the conclusions of the decision analysis and clinical study were determined by author review. Results: The initial PubMed search yielded 318 references. Forty decision analyses pertaining to 29 infectious diseases topics were identified. Of the 40, 16 (40%) from 13 infectious diseases topics had matching clinical studies. In 12/16 (75%), conclusions of at least one clinical study agreed with those of the decision analysis. Three of the four decision analyses in which conclusions disagreed were from the same topic (management of febrile children). Conclusions: There was substantial agreement between the conclusions of decision analyses and clinical studies in infectious diseases, supporting the validity of decision analysis and its utility in guiding management decisions. PMID:17466659

  12. A novel approach to the determination of clinical decision thresholds.

    PubMed

    Ebell, Mark H; Locatelli, Isabella; Senn, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    Our objective was to determine the test and treatment thresholds for common acute primary care conditions. We presented 200 clinicians with a series of web-based clinical vignettes, describing patients with possible influenza, acute coronary syndrome (ACS), pneumonia, deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and urinary tract infection (UTI). We randomly varied the probability of disease and asked whether the clinician wanted to rule out disease, order tests or rule in disease. By randomly varying the probability, we obtained clinical decisions across a broad range of disease probabilities that we used to create threshold curves. For influenza, the test (4.5% vs 32%, p<0.001) and treatment (55% vs 68%, p=0.11) thresholds were lower for US compared with Swiss physicians. US physicians had somewhat higher test (3.8% vs 0.7%, p=0.107) and treatment (76% vs 58%, p=0.005) thresholds for ACS than Swiss physicians. For both groups, the range between test and treatment thresholds was greater for ACS than for influenza (which is sensible, given the consequences of incorrect diagnosis). For pneumonia, US physicians had a trend towards higher test thresholds and lower treatment thresholds (48% vs 64%, p=0.076) than Swiss physicians. The DVT and UTI scenarios did not provide easily interpretable data, perhaps due to poor wording of the vignettes. We have developed a novel approach for determining decision thresholds. We found important differences in thresholds for US and Swiss physicians that may be a function of differences in healthcare systems. Our results can also guide development of clinical decision rules and guidelines. PMID:25736042

  13. Impact of Dysphagia Severity on Clinical Decision Making via Telerehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Clare L.; Theodoros, Deborah G.; Russell, Trevor G.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Recent research supports the proposal that valid and reliable clinical swallow examinations (CSEs) can be conducted via telerehabilitation. However, no studies have explored whether dysphagia severity has an impact on the success of the session or its outcomes. The current study examined how dysphagia severity impacted on either (a) clinical decision making for safety of oral intake or (b) clinician perceptions of CSEs conducted via telerehabilitation. Subjects and Methods: One hundred patients (25 nondysphagics and 25 mild, 25 moderate, and 25 severe dysphagics) were assessed using a telehealth system and methodology reported in prior research. For each assessment, the online and face-to-face (FTF) clinicians simultaneously completed a structured CSE. On session completion, the online clinician indicated level of agreement with two statements regarding the level of rapport and ability to competently assess the patient. Results: In each of the four groups, acceptable levels of agreement were observed between raters for the three primary outcomes (decisions regarding oral/nonoral intake and safe food and fluids) as well as over 90% of the CSE items. Clinicians agreed they could develop good rapport with the majority of patients in all groups. However, for a small but significant (p<0.5) proportion of patents in the severe dysphagic group, clinicians disagreed they were able to satisfactorily and competently assess to the best of their abilities using the telerehabilitation system. Conclusions: Clinical decisions made during and as an outcome of the total CSE were found to be comparable to those made in the FTF environment regardless of dysphagia severity. Clinicians noted some difficulty assessing patients with greater complexity, which occurred in greater numbers in the group with severe dysphagia. PMID:24443927

  14. Evaluation of RxNorm for Medication Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Freimuth, Robert R.; Wix, Kelly; Zhu, Qian; Siska, Mark; Chute, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the potential use of RxNorm to provide standardized representations of generic drug name and route of administration to facilitate management of drug lists for clinical decision support (CDS) rules. We found a clear representation of generic drug name but not route of administration. We identified several issues related to data quality, including erroneous or missing defined relationships, and the use of different concept hierarchies to represent the same drug. More importantly, we found extensive semantic precoordination of orthogonal concepts related to route and dose form, which would complicate the use of RxNorm for drug-based CDS. This study demonstrated that while RxNorm is a valuable resource for the standardization of medications used in clinical practice, additional work is required to enhance the terminology so that it can support expanded use cases, such as managing drug lists for CDS. PMID:25954360

  15. Clinical Decision Support for Colon and Rectal Surgery: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Allison B.; Melton, Genevieve B.; Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) has been shown to improve clinical processes, promote patient safety, and reduce costs in healthcare settings, and it is now a requirement for clinicians as part of the Meaningful Use Regulation. However, most evidence for CDS has been evaluated primarily in internal medicine care settings, and colon and rectal surgery (CRS) has unique needs with CDS that are not frequently described in the literature. The authors reviewed published literature in informatics and medical journals, combined with expert opinion to define CDS, describe the evidence for CDS, outline the implementation process for CDS, and present applications of CDS in CRS.CDS functionalities such as order sets, documentation templates, and order facilitation aids are most often described in the literature and most likely to be beneficial in CRS. Further research is necessary to identify and better evaluate additional CDS systems in the setting of CRS. PMID:24436644

  16. Biostatistics in clinical decision making for cardiothoracic radiologists.

    PubMed

    Zurakowski, David; Johnson, Victor M; Lee, Edward Y

    2013-11-01

    Cardiothoracic radiologists are intuitively aware of sensitivity and specificity as they pertain to diagnostic tests involving clinical information. However, many cardiothoracic radiologists are unfamiliar with odds ratios, likelihood ratios, predictive values, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, which provide more information about the performance of a test. Our article will first review the fundamental concepts of sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and likelihood ratios. The ROC curve methodology will be covered with an emphasis on creating a look-up table, a straightforward table that communicates important information to the clinician to aid in diagnosis. The article reviews sensitivity and specificity, as well as predictive values, logistic regression, and ROC curves, using conceptual principles without unnecessary mathematical rigor. We will apply principles of sensitivity and specificity to continuous measurements by constructing ROC curves in order to tie together key ideas in diagnostic decision making. Three clinical examples are presented to illustrate these fundamental statistical concepts: predictors of pulmonary embolism in children, use of dobutamine-cardiac magnetic resonance imaging to identify impaired ventricular function in patients who have suffered a myocardial infarction, and diagnostic accuracy of 64-multidetector row computed tomography to identify occluded vessels in adult patients with suspected coronary artery disease. In addition, a glossary is provided at the end of the article with key terms important in diagnostic imaging. An understanding of the concepts presented will assist cardiothoracic radiologists in critically discerning the usefulness of diagnostic tests and how these statistics can be applied to make judgments and decisions that are essential to clinical practice. PMID:23358369

  17. Quality and Safety in Health Care, Part IX: Computerized Provider Order Entry.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay A; Harolds, Laura Beth

    2016-04-01

    One of the most important technologic advances to reduce medication errors is computerized provider order entry linked with clinical decision support. These systems also have the potential to improve the adherence of clinicians to best practices, decrease the turnaround time for laboratory tests and radiology examinations, speed transmission of prescriptions to the pharmacy, decrease medication costs, and increase the frequency of vaccinations. PMID:26859206

  18. Clinical decision support for perioperative information management systems.

    PubMed

    Wanderer, Jonathan P; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M

    2013-12-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) systems are being used to optimize the increasingly complex care that our health care system delivers. These systems have become increasingly important in the delivery of perioperative care for patients undergoing cardiac, thoracic, and vascular procedures. The adoption of perioperative information management systems (PIMS) has allowed these technologies to enter the operating room and support the clinical work flow of anesthesiologists and operational processes. Constructing effective CDS systems necessitates an understanding of operative work flow and technical considerations as well as achieving integration with existing information systems. In this review, we describe published examples of CDS for PIMS, including support for cardiopulmonary bypass separation physiological alarms, β-blocker guideline adherence, enhanced revenue capture for arterial line placement, and detection of hemodynamic monitoring gaps. Although these and other areas are amenable to CDS systems, the challenges of latency and data reliability represent fundamental limitations on the potential application of these tools to specific types of clinical issues. Ultimately, we expect that CDS will remain an important tool in our efforts to optimize the quality of care delivered. PMID:23690340

  19. Methodologic standards for interpreting clinical decision rules in emergency medicine: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Green, Steven M; Schriger, David L; Yealy, Donald M

    2014-09-01

    Clinical decision rules are increasingly prominent in medicine, particularly in emergency care. The quality, use, and impact of current published decision rules widely vary, requiring clinicians to be critical consumers. We present an approach to assist in the appraisal of clinical decision rules and in judging when to use such rules. PMID:24530108

  20. A clinical decision support system prototype for cardiovascular intensive care.

    PubMed

    Lau, F

    1994-08-01

    This paper describes the development and validation of a decision-support system prototype that can help manage hypovolemic hypotension in the Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit (CVICU). The prototype uses physiologic pattern-matching, therapeutic protocols, computational drug-dosage response modeling and expert reasoning heuristics in its selection of intervention strategies and choices. As part of model testing, the prototype simulated real-time operation by processing historical physiologic and intervention data on a patient sequentially, generating alerts on questionable data, critiques of interventions instituted and recommendations on preferred interventions. Bench-testing with 399 interventions from 13 historical cases showed therapies for bleeding and fluid replacement proposed by the prototype were significantly more consistent (p < 0.0001) than those instituted by the staff when compared against expert critiques (80% versus 44%). This study has demonstrated the feasibility of formalizing hemodynamic management of CVICU patients in a manner that may be implemented and evaluated in a clinical setting. PMID:7829934

  1. Can patient decision aids help people make good decisions about participating in clinical trials? A study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Brehaut, Jamie C; Lott, Alison; Fergusson, Dean A; Shojania, Kaveh G; Kimmelman, Jonathan; Saginur, Raphael

    2008-01-01

    Background Evidence shows that the standard process for obtaining informed consent in clinical trials can be inadequate, with study participants frequently not understanding even basic information fundamental to giving informed consent. Patient decision aids are effective decision support tools originally designed to help patients make difficult treatment or screening decisions. We propose that incorporating decision aids into the informed consent process will improve the extent to which participants make decisions that are informed and consistent with their preferences. A mixed methods study will test this proposal. Methods Phase one of this project will involve assessment of a stratified random sample of 50 consent documents from recently completed investigator-initiated clinical trials, according to existing standards for supporting good decision making. Phase two will involve interviews of a purposive sample of 50 trial participants (10 participants from each of five different clinical areas) about their experience of the informed consent process, and how it could be improved. In phase three, we will convert consent forms for two completed clinical trials into decision aids and pilot test these new tools using a user-centered design approach, an iterative development process commonly employed in computer usability literature. In phase four, we will conduct a pilot observational study comparing the new tools to standard consent forms, with potential recruits to two hypothetical clinical trials. Outcomes will include knowledge of key aspects of the decision, knowledge of the probabilities of different outcomes, decisional conflict, the hypothetical participation decision, and qualitative impressions of the experience. Discussion This work will provide initial evidence about whether a patient decision aid can improve the informed consent process. The larger goal of this work is to examine whether study recruitment can be improved from (barely) informed consent based on disclosure-oriented documents, towards a process of high-quality participant decision-making. PMID:18651981

  2. A Four-Phase Model of the Evolution of Clinical Decision Support Architectures

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F.

    2008-01-01

    Background A large body of evidence over many years suggests that clinical decision support systems can be helpful in improving both clinical outcomes and adherence to evidence-based guidelines. However, to this day, clinical decision support systems are not widely used outside of a small number of sites. One reason why decision support systems are not widely used is the relative difficulty of integrating such systems into clinical workflows and computer systems. Purpose To review and synthesize the history of clinical decision support systems, and to propose a model of various architectures for integrating clinical decision support systems with clinical systems. Methods The authors conducted an extensive review of the clinical decision support literature since 1959, sequenced the systems and developed a model. Results The model developed consists of four phases: standalone decision support systems, decision support integrated into clinical systems, standards for sharing clinical decision support content and service models for decision support. These four phases have not heretofore been identified, but they track remarkably well with the chronological history of clinical decision support, and show evolving and increasingly sophisticated attempts to ease integrating decision support systems into clinical workflows and other clinical systems. Conclusions Each of the four evolutionary approaches to decision support architecture has unique advantages and disadvantages. A key lesson was that there were common limitations that almost all the approaches faced, and no single approach has been able to entirely surmount: 1) fixed knowledge representation systems inherently circumscribe the type of knowledge that can be represented in them, 2) there are serious terminological issues, 3) patient data may be spread across several sources with no single source having a complete view of the patient, and 4) major difficulties exist in transferring successful interventions from one site to another. PMID:18353713

  3. Reducing diagnostic errors in primary care. A systematic meta-review of computerized diagnostic decision support systems by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Nurek, Martine; Kostopoulou, Olga; Delaney, Brendan C; Esmail, Aneez

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Computerized diagnostic decision support systems (CDDSS) have the potential to support the cognitive task of diagnosis, which is one of the areas where general practitioners have greatest difficulty and which accounts for a significant proportion of adverse events recorded in the primary care setting. Objective: To determine the extent to which CDDSS may meet the requirements of supporting the cognitive task of diagnosis, and the currently perceived barriers that prevent the integration of CDDSS with electronic health record (EHR) systems. Methods: We conducted a meta-review of existing systematic reviews published in English, searching MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO and Web of Knowledge for articles on the features and effectiveness of CDDSS for medical diagnosis published since 2004. Eligibility criteria included systematic reviews where individual clinicians were primary end users. Outcomes we were interested in were the effectiveness and identification of specific features of CDDSS on diagnostic performance. Results: We identified 1970 studies and excluded 1938 because they did not fit our inclusion criteria. A total of 45 articles were identified and 12 were found suitable for meta-review. Extraction of high-level requirements identified that a more standardized computable approach is needed to knowledge representation, one that can be readily updated as new knowledge is gained. In addition, a deep integration with the EHR is needed in order to trigger at appropriate points in cognitive workflow. Conclusion: Developing a CDDSS that is able to utilize dynamic vocabulary tools to quickly capture and code relevant diagnostic findings, and coupling these with individualized diagnostic suggestions based on the best-available evidence has the potential to improve diagnostic accuracy, but requires evaluation. PMID:26339829

  4. A Scalable Architecture for Rule Engine Based Clinical Decision Support Systems.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Soumi; Banerjee, Ansuman; Banerjee, Nilanjan

    2015-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support systems (CDSS) have reached a fair level of sophistication and have emerged as the popular system of choice for their aid in clinical decision making. These decision support systems are based on rule engines navigate through a repertoire of clinical rules and multitudes of facts to assist a clinical expert to decide on the set of actuations in response to a medical situation. In this paper, we present the design of a scalable architecture for a rule engine based clinical decision system. PMID:26262249

  5. Non-clinical influences on clinical decision-making: a major challenge to evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Hajjaj, F M; Salek, M S; Basra, M K A; Finlay, A Y

    2010-05-01

    This article reviews an aspect of daily clinical practice which is of critical importance in virtually every clinical consultation, but which is seldom formally considered. Non-clinical influences on clinical decision-making profoundly affect medical decisions. These influences include patient-related factors such as socioeconomic status, quality of life and patient's expectations and wishes, physician-related factors such as personal characteristics and interaction with their professional community, and features of clinical practice such as private versus public practice as well as local management policies. This review brings together the different strands of knowledge concerning non-clinical influences on clinical decision-making. This aspect of decision-making may be the biggest obstacle to the reality of practising evidence-based medicine. It needs to be understood in order to develop clinical strategies that will facilitate the practice of evidence-based medicine. PMID:20436026

  6. Non-clinical influences on clinical decision-making: a major challenge to evidence-based practice

    PubMed Central

    Hajjaj, FM; Salek, MS; Basra, MKA; Finlay, AY

    2010-01-01

    Summary This article reviews an aspect of daily clinical practice which is of critical importance in virtually every clinical consultation, but which is seldom formally considered. Non-clinical influences on clinical decision-making profoundly affect medical decisions. These influences include patient-related factors such as socioeconomic status, quality of life and patient's expectations and wishes, physician-related factors such as personal characteristics and interaction with their professional community, and features of clinical practice such as private versus public practice as well as local management policies. This review brings together the different strands of knowledge concerning non-clinical influences on clinical decision-making. This aspect of decision-making may be the biggest obstacle to the reality of practising evidence-based medicine. It needs to be understood in order to develop clinical strategies that will facilitate the practice of evidence-based medicine. PMID:20436026

  7. Changes in diagnostic decision-making after a computerized decision support consultation based on perceptions of need and helpfulness: a preliminary report.

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, F. M.; Friedman, C. P.; Elstein, A. S.; Miller, J. G.; Murphy, G. C.; Heckerling, P.; Fine, P.; Miller, T.; Sisson, J.; Barlas, S.; Capitano, A.; Ng, M.; Franz, T.

    1997-01-01

    We examined the degree to which attending physicians, residents, and medical students' stated desire for a consultation on difficult-to-diagnose patient cases is related to changes in their diagnostic judgments after a computer consultation, and whether, in fact, their perceptions of the usefulness of these consultations are related to these changes. The decision support system (DSS) used in this study was ILIAD (v4.2). Preliminary findings based on 16 subjects' (6 general internists, 4 second-year residents in internal medicine, and 6 fourth-year medical students) workup of 136 patient cases indicated no significant main effects for 1) level of experience, 2) whether or not subjects indicated they would seek a diagnostic consultation before using the DSS, or 3) whether or not they found the DSS consultation in fact to be helpful in arriving at a diagnosis (p > .49 in all instances). Nor were there any significant interactions. Findings were similar using subjects or cases as the unit of analysis. It is possible that what may appear to be counter-intuitive, and perhaps irrational, may not necessarily be so. We are currently examining potential explanatory hypotheses in our ongoing current, larger study. PMID:9357629

  8. Clinical Decision Support Improves Initial Dosing and Monitoring of Tobramycin and Amikacin

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Zachary L.; Nelsen, Cori L.; Waitman, Lemuel R.; McCoy, Jacob A.; Peterson, Josh F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Clinical decision support (CDS) systems could be valuable tools in reducing aminoglycoside prescribing errors. We evaluated the impact of CDS on initial dosing, interval, and pharmacokinetic outcomes of amikacin and tobramycin therapy. Methods A complex CDS advisor to provide guidance on initial dosing and monitoring, using both traditional and extended interval dosing strategies, was integrated into computerized provider order entry (CPOE) and compared to a control group which featured close pharmacy monitoring of all aminoglycoside orders. A random sample of 118 patients from an academic, tertiary care medical center prescribed amikacin and tobramycin prior to advisor implementation was compared to 98 patients admitted following advisor implementation. Primary outcome was an initial dose within 10% of a dose calculated to be adherent to published dose guidelines. Secondary outcomes were a guideline-adherent interval, trough and peak concentrations in goal range, and incidence of nephrotoxicity. Results Of 216 patients studied, 97 were prescribed amikacin and 119 were prescribed tobramycin. The primary outcome of initial dosing consistent with guideline-based care increased from 40% in the pre-advisor arm to 80% in the post-advisor arm (p<0.001), with a number needed to treat of 3 patients to prevent one incorrect dose. Correct initial interval based on renal function also increased from 63% to 87% (p<0.001). The changes in initial dosing and interval resulted in an increase of trough concentrations in the goal range from 59% pre-advisor to 89% post-advisor implementation (p=0.0004). There was no significant difference in peak concentrations in goal range or incidence of nephrotoxicity (25% vs. 17%, p=0.2). Conclusion An advisor for aminoglycoside dosing and monitoring integrated into CPOE significantly improves initial dosing, selection of interval, and trough concentrations at goal compared to unassisted physician dosing. PMID:21411805

  9. Development of a clinical decision model for thyroid nodules

    PubMed Central

    Stojadinovic, Alexander; Peoples, George E; Libutti, Steven K; Henry, Leonard R; Eberhardt, John; Howard, Robin S; Gur, David; Elster, Eric A; Nissan, Aviram

    2009-01-01

    Background Thyroid nodules represent a common problem brought to medical attention. Four to seven percent of the United States adult population (10–18 million people) has a palpable thyroid nodule, however the majority (>95%) of thyroid nodules are benign. While, fine needle aspiration remains the most cost effective and accurate diagnostic tool for thyroid nodules in current practice, over 20% of patients undergoing FNA of a thyroid nodule have indeterminate cytology (follicular neoplasm) with associated malignancy risk prevalence of 20–30%. These patients require thyroid lobectomy/isthmusectomy purely for the purpose of attaining a definitive diagnosis. Given that the majority (70–80%) of these patients have benign surgical pathology, thyroidectomy in these patients is conducted principally with diagnostic intent. Clinical models predictive of malignancy risk are needed to support treatment decisions in patients with thyroid nodules in order to reduce morbidity associated with unnecessary diagnostic surgery. Methods Data were analyzed from a completed prospective cohort trial conducted over a 4-year period involving 216 patients with thyroid nodules undergoing ultrasound (US), electrical impedance scanning (EIS) and fine needle aspiration cytology (FNA) prior to thyroidectomy. A Bayesian model was designed to predict malignancy in thyroid nodules based on multivariate dependence relationships between independent covariates. Ten-fold cross-validation was performed to estimate classifier error wherein the data set was randomized into ten separate and unique train and test sets consisting of a training set (90% of records) and a test set (10% of records). A receiver-operating-characteristics (ROC) curve of these predictions and area under the curve (AUC) were calculated to determine model robustness for predicting malignancy in thyroid nodules. Results Thyroid nodule size, FNA cytology, US and EIS characteristics were highly predictive of malignancy. Cross validation of the model created with Bayesian Network Analysis effectively predicted malignancy [AUC = 0.88 (95%CI: 0.82–0.94)] in thyroid nodules. The positive and negative predictive values of the model are 83% (95%CI: 76%–91%) and 79% (95%CI: 72%–86%), respectively. Conclusion An integrated predictive decision model using Bayesian inference incorporating readily obtainable thyroid nodule measures is clinically relevant, as it effectively predicts malignancy in thyroid nodules. This model warrants further validation testing in prospective clinical trials. PMID:19664278

  10. Improving Clinical Decisions on T2DM Patients Integrating Clinical, Administrative and Environmental Data.

    PubMed

    Segagni, Daniele; Sacchi, Lucia; Dagliati, Arianna; Tibollo, Valentina; Leporati, Paola; De Cata, Pasqale; Chiovato, Luca; Bellazzi, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    This work describes an integrated informatics system developed to collect and display clinically relevant data that can inform physicians and researchers about Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) patient clinical pathways and therapy adherence. The software we developed takes data coming from the electronic medical record (EMR) of the IRCCS Fondazione Maugeri (FSM) hospital of Pavia, Italy, and combines the data with administrative, pharmacy drugs (purchased from the local healthcare agency (ASL) of the Pavia area), and open environmental data of the same region. By using different use cases, we explain the importance of gathering and displaying the data types through a single informatics tool: the use of the tool as a calculator of risk factors and indicators to improve current detection of T2DM, a generator of clinical pathways and patients' behaviors from the point of view of the hospital care management, and a decision support tool for follow-up visits. The results of the performed data analysis report how the use of the dashboard displays meaningful clinical decisions in treating complex chronic diseases and might improve health outcomes. PMID:26262138

  11. Clinical decision support implemented with academic detailing improves prescribing of key renally cleared drugs in the hospital setting

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Christopher J; Cheney, Philip C; Govis, Stephen M; Belcher, Thomas W; Walsh, Scott A; Adams, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    Objective Lack of dose adjustment for renally cleared drugs in the presence of poor renal function is a common problem in the hospital setting. The absence of a clinical decision support system (CDSS) from direct clinician workflows such as computerized provider order entry (CPOE) hinders the uptake of CDSS. This study implemented CDSS in an environment independent of CPOE, introduced to prescribers via academic detailing, to address the dosing of renally cleared drugs. Design GFR+ was designed to automatically calculate and update renal function, doses of key drugs adjusted for renal function, and highlight clinically significant decreases in renal function. Prescribers were made aware of GFR+, its navigation, and surrounding clinical issues, using academic detailing. Measurement The rate of dosing conformity and management for key renally cleared drugs in hospitalized patients, before and after GFR+ implementation. Results Improvements were seen in dosing conformity for enoxaparin (from 68% to 86%, p=0.03), gentamicin (63–87%, p=0.01), and vancomycin (47–77%, p=0.07), as well as the appropriate use of gentamicin therapeutic drug monitoring (70–90%, p=0.02). During episodes of acute renal impairment, renally cleared drugs were held on 38% of instances in the pre-intervention period compared with 62% post-intervention (p=0.01). Conclusion Clinical decision support implemented with academic detailing improved dosing conformity and management of key renally cleared drugs in a hospitalized population. Academic detailing should be strongly considered to facilitate the introduction of CDSS systems that cannot be placed directly into the clinician workflow. PMID:20442149

  12. Attitude of Iranian physicians and nurses toward a clinical decision support system for pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Agharezaei, Zhila; Bahaadinbeigy, Kambiz; Tofighi, Shahram; Agharezaei, Laleh; Nemati, Ali

    2014-07-01

    This research project sought to design and implement a computerized clinical decision support system (CDSS) that was able to identify patients who were at risk of pulmonary embolism (PE) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT), as well as produce reminders for prophylactic action for these diseases. The main purpose of the CDSS was to attempt to reduce the morbidity and mortality caused by embolism and thrombosis in patients admitted to hospitals. After implementation of this system in one of the large educational hospitals of Iran, a standard questionnaire was used, and interviews were conducted with physicians and nurses to evaluate the performance of the designed system for reducing the incidence of pulmonary embolism and thrombosis. From physicians and nurses' point of view, a system which assists the medical staff in making better decisions regarding patient care, and also reminds pulmonary embolism and thrombosis preventive procedures with timely warnings, can influence patient care quality improvement and lead to the improved performance of the medical staff in preventing the incidence of pulmonary embolism and thrombosis. PMID:24768080

  13. Clinical decision-making in early breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Balch, C M; Singletary, S E; Bland, K I

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This in-depth review of the multidisciplinary approach to early breast cancer treatment (in situ, stage I and II) will update the surgeon about the indications, risks, and benefits of breast surgery, radiation therapy, adjuvant chemotherapy and hormonal therapy, and the importance of breast reconstructive surgery. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Breast cancer will occur in one of eight women in the United States during their lifetime and is the second leading cause of death in women from cancer. The practice of multidisciplinary breast cancer treatment has become the standard of care for the majority of breast cancer patients. If the surgeon is to retain the primary coordinating role in breast cancer management, then he or she must fully understand all modalities of oncology therapy and know how to deploy them to benefit individual patients. CONCLUSIONS: This article provides a framework for making clinical decisions about the appropriate combination and sequence of treatment for various presentations of early breast cancer. Images Figure 4. PMID:8383953

  14. Does Clinical Decision Support Reduce Unwarranted Variation in Yield of CT Pulmonary Angiogram?

    PubMed Central

    Prevedello, Luciano M.; Raja, Ali S.; Ip, Ivan K.; Sodickson, Aaron; Khorasani, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The study objective was to determine whether previously documented effects of clinical decision support on computed tomography for pulmonary embolism in the emergency department (ie, decreased use and increased yield) are due to a decrease in unwarranted variation. We evaluated clinical decision support effect on intra- and inter-physician variability in the yield of pulmonary embolism computed tomography (PE-CT) in this setting. METHODS The study was performed in an academic adult medical center emergency department with 60,000 annual visits. We enrolled all patients who had PE-CT performed 18 months pre- and post-clinical decision support implementation. Intra- and inter-physician variability in yield (% PE-CT positive for acute pulmonary embolism) were assessed. Yield variability was measured using logistic regression accounting for patient characteristics. RESULTS A total of 1542 PE-CT scans were performed before clinical decision support, and 1349 PE-CT scans were performed after clinical decision support. Use of PE-CT decreased from 26.5 to 24.3 computed tomography scans/1000 patient visits after clinical decision support (P < .02); yield increased from 9.2% to 12.6% (P < .01). Crude inter-physician variability in yield ranged from 2.6% to 20.5% before clinical decision support and from 0% to 38.1% after clinical decision support. After controlling for patient characteristics, the post-clinical decision support period showed significant inter-physician variability (P < .04). Intra-physician variability was significant in 3 of the 25 physicians (P < .04), all with increased yield post-clinical decision support. CONCLUSIONS Overall PE-CT yield increased after clinical decision support implementation despite significant heterogeneity among physicians. Increased inter-physician variability in yield after clinical decision support was not explained by patient characteristics alone and may be due to variable physician acceptance of clinical decision support. Clinical decision support alone is unlikely to eliminate unwarranted variability, and additional strategies and interventions may be needed to help optimize acceptance of clinical decision support to maximize returns on national investments in health information technology. PMID:24157288

  15. Development of a clinical event monitor for use with the Veterans Affairs Computerized Patient Record System and other data sources.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, T. H.; Savarino, J.

    1998-01-01

    We are developing an event monitor to operate with the Veterans Affairs Computerized Patient Record System (CPRS). The event monitor is designed to receive messages when important patient events such as posting of new results, patient movement, and orders occur. Our design separates the event monitor from CPRS itself, using communication via a network connection to receive HL7 messages, to access other data needed to run rules, and to communicate with providers by message display, electronic mail and other mechanisms. Results from operation of the event monitor using patient data in our test account show that a wide variety of data can be accessed by the event monitor with acceptable response times. Images Figure 1 PMID:9929199

  16. An Analysis of a Computerized System for Managing Curriculum Decisions and Tracking Student Progress in a Home-Based Pre-School Education Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutz, John E.; And Others

    The degree of success of the computerized Child-Based Information System (CBIS) was analyzed in two areas--presenting, delivering, and managing a developmental curriculum; and recording, filing, and monitoring child tracking data, including requirements for Individualized Education Plans (IEP's). Preschool handicapped and high-risk children and…

  17. Coverage and predictors of vaccination against 2012/13 seasonal influenza in Madrid, Spain: analysis of population-based computerized immunization registries and clinical records.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Esteban-Vasallo, María D; Rodríguez-Rieiro, Cristina; Hernandez-Barrera, Valentín; Domínguez-Berjón, M A Felicitas; Carrasco Garrido, Pilar; Lopez de Andres, Ana; Cameno Heras, Moises; Iniesta Fornies, Domingo; Astray-Mochales, Jenaro

    2014-01-01

    We aim to determine 2012-13 seasonal influenza vaccination coverage. Data were analyzed by age group and by coexistence of concomitant chronic conditions. Factors associated with vaccine uptake were identified. We also analyze a possible trend in vaccine uptake in post pandemic seasons. We used computerized immunization registries and clinical records of the entire population of the Autonomous Community of Madrid, Spain (6,284,128 persons) as data source. A total of 871,631 individuals were vaccinated (13.87%). Coverage for people aged ≥ 65 years was 56.57%. Global coverage in people with a chronic condition was 15.7% in children and 18.69% in adults aged 15-59 years. The variables significantly associated with a higher likelihood of being vaccinated in the 2012-13 campaign for the age groups studied were higher age, being Spanish-born, higher number of doses of seasonal vaccine received in previous campaigns, uptake of pandemic vaccination, and having a chronic condition. We conclude that vaccination coverage in persons aged<60 years with chronic conditions is less than acceptable. The very low coverage among children with chronic conditions calls for urgent interventions. Among those aged ≥60 years, uptake is higher but still far from optimal and seems to be descending in post-pandemic campaigns. For those aged ≥65 years the mean percentage of decrease from the 2009/10 to the actual campaign has been 12%. Computerized clinical and immunization registers are useful tools for providing rapid and detailed information about influenza vaccination coverage in the population. PMID:24280728

  18. System-Agnostic Clinical Decision Support Services: Benefits and Challenges for Scalable Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Kensaku; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Orton, Charles; Lobach, David F

    2010-01-01

    System-agnostic clinical decision support (CDS) services provide patient evaluation capabilities that are independent of specific CDS systems and system implementation contexts. While such system-agnostic CDS services hold great potential for facilitating the widespread implementation of CDS systems, little has been described regarding the benefits and challenges of their use. In this manuscript, the authors address this need by describing potential benefits and challenges of using a system-agnostic CDS service. This analysis is based on the authors’ formal assessments of, and practical experiences with, various approaches to developing, implementing, and maintaining CDS capabilities. In particular, the analysis draws on the authors’ experience developing and leveraging a system-agnostic CDS Web service known as SEBASTIAN. A primary potential benefit of using a system-agnostic CDS service is the relative ease and flexibility with which the service can be leveraged to implement CDS capabilities across applications and care settings. Other important potential benefits include facilitation of centralized knowledge management and knowledge sharing; the potential to support multiple underlying knowledge representations and knowledge resources through a common service interface; improved simplicity and componentization; easier testing and validation; and the enabling of distributed CDS system development. Conversely, important potential challenges include the increased effort required to develop knowledge resources capable of being used in many contexts and the critical need to standardize the service interface. Despite these challenges, our experiences to date indicate that the benefits of using a system-agnostic CDS service generally outweigh the challenges of using this approach to implementing and maintaining CDS systems. PMID:21603281

  19. The cognitive processes underpinning clinical decision in triage assessment: a theoretical conundrum?

    PubMed

    Noon, Amy J

    2014-01-01

    High quality clinical decision-making (CDM) has been highlighted as a priority across the nursing profession. Triage nurses, in the Accident and Emergency (A&E) department, work in considerable levels of uncertainty and require essential skills including: critical thinking, evaluation and decision-making. The content of this paper aims to promote awareness of how triage nurses make judgements and decisions in emergency situations. By exploring relevant literature on clinical judgement and decision-making theory, this paper demonstrates the importance of high quality decision-making skills underpinning the triage nurse's role. Having an awareness of how judgements and decisions are made is argued as essential, in a time where traditional nurse boundaries and responsibilities are never more challenged. It is hoped that the paper not only raises this awareness in general but also, in particular, engages the triage nurse to look more critically at how they make their own decisions in their everyday practice. PMID:23685041

  20. EBMPracticeNet: A Bilingual National Electronic Point-Of-Care Project for Retrieval of Evidence-Based Clinical Guideline Information and Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Belgium, the construction of a national electronic point-of-care information service, EBMPracticeNet, was initiated in 2011 to optimize quality of care by promoting evidence-based decision-making. The collaboration of the government, health care providers, evidence-based medicine (EBM) partners, and vendors of electronic health records (EHR) is unique to this project. All Belgian health care professionals get free access to an up-to-date database of validated Belgian and nearly 1000 international guidelines, incorporated in a portal that also provides EBM information from other sources than guidelines, including computerized clinical decision support that is integrated in the EHRs. Objective The objective of this paper was to describe the development strategy, the overall content, and the management of EBMPracticeNet which may be of relevance to other health organizations creating national or regional electronic point-of-care information services. Methods Several candidate providers of comprehensive guideline solutions were evaluated and one database was selected. Translation of the guidelines to Dutch and French was done with translation software, post-editing by translators and medical proofreading. A strategy is determined to adapt the guideline content to the Belgian context. Acceptance of the computerized clinical decision support tool has been tested and a randomized controlled trial is planned to evaluate the effect on process and patient outcomes. Results Currently, EBMPracticeNet is in "work in progress" state. Reference is made to the results of a pilot study and to further planned research including a randomized controlled trial. Conclusions The collaboration of government, health care providers, EBM partners, and vendors of EHRs is unique. The potential value of the project is great. The link between all the EHRs from different vendors and a national database held on a single platform that is controlled by all EBM organizations in Belgium are the strengths of EBMPracticeNet. PMID:23842038

  1. Clinical application of computerized evaluation and re-education biofeedback prototype for sensorimotor control of the hand in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hemianaesthesia patients usually exhibit awkward and inefficient finger movements of the affected hands. Conventionally, most interventions emphasize the improvement of motor deficits, but rarely address sensory capability and sensorimotor control following stroke. Thus it is critical for stroke patients with sensory problems to incorporate appropriate strategies for dealing with sensory impairment, into traditional hand function rehabilitation programs. In this study, we used a custom-designed computerized evaluation and re-education biofeedback (CERB) prototype to analyze hand grasp performances, and monitor the training effects on hand coordination for stroke patients with sensory disturbance and without motor deficiency. Methods The CERB prototype was constructed to detect momentary pinch force modulation for 14 sub-acute and chronic stroke patients with sensory deficiency and 14 healthy controls. The other ten chronic stroke patients (ranges of stroke period: 6–60 months) were recruited to investigate the effects of 4-weeks computerized biofeedback treatments on the hand control ability. The biofeedback procedures provide visual and auditory cues to the participants when the interactive force of hand-to-object exceeded the target latitude in a pinch-up-holding task to trigger optimal motor strategy. Follow-up measurements were conducted one month after training. The hand sensibility, grip forces and results of hand functional tests were recorded and analyzed. Results The affected hands of the 14 predominant sensory stroke patients exhibited statistically significant elevation in the magnitude of peak pinch force (p = 0.033) in pinching and lifting-up tasks, and poor results for hand function tests (p = 0.005) than sound hands did. In addition, the sound hands of patients were less efficient in force modulation (p = 0.009) than the hands of healthy subjects were. Training with the biofeedback system produced significant improvements in grip force modulation (p = 0.020) and better performances in the subtests of pin insertion (p = 0.019), and lifting of lightweight objects (p = 0.005). Conclusions The CERB prototype can provide momentary and interactive information for quantitative assessing and re-educating force modulation appropriately for stroke patients with sensory deficits. Furthermore, the patients could transfer the learned strategy to improve hand function. PMID:22571177

  2. A Representation for Gaining Insight into Clinical Decision Models

    PubMed Central

    Jimison, Holly B.

    1988-01-01

    For many medical domains uncertainty and patient preferences are important components of decision making. Decision theory is useful as a representation for such medical models in computer decision aids, but the methodology has typically had poor performance in the areas of explanation and user interface. The additional representation of probabilities and utilities as random variables serves to provide a framework for graphical and text insight into complicated decision models. The approach allows for efficient customization of a generic model that describes the general patient population of interest to a patient- specific model. Monte Carlo simulation is used to calculate the expected value of information and sensitivity for each model variable, thus providing a metric for deciding what to emphasize in the graphics and text summary. The computer-generated explanation includes variables that are sensitive with respect to the decision or that deviate significantly from what is typically observed. These techniques serve to keep the assessment and explanation of the patient's decision model concise, allowing the user to focus on the most important aspects for that patient.

  3. Transient ischaemic attack clinic: an evaluation of diagnoses and clinical decision making.

    PubMed

    Lee, Will; Frayne, Judith

    2015-04-01

    The diagnosis of transient ischaemic attack (TIA) is based largely on the patient's symptom recall and clinical judgement. This decision-making process is highly subjective and the inter-observer reliability of TIA diagnosis is at best moderate, even among neurologists. The aim of this study is to examine the presenting features and final diagnoses of referrals to a TIA clinic and to evaluate characteristics that favoured the diagnosis of TIA over other TIA "mimics". Consecutive new referrals to a tertiary metropolitan hospital TIA clinic over a 9month period were examined. Characteristics between TIA and non-TIA diagnoses were compared and analysed. Eighty-two patients were recruited. Eighteen (22%) were given a final diagnosis of TIA or stroke. Major alternative diagnoses included migraine (n=17, 21%), presyncope/syncope (n=13, 16%) and anxiety (n=7, 9%). Four (5%) patients had unclassifiable symptoms with no clear final diagnosis. Mean age was 67±a standard deviation of 17years and patients diagnosed with TIA/stroke were on average older than those with non-TIA diagnoses (77±10 versus 64±17years, p=0.003). A diagnosis of TIA/stroke was favoured in the presence of moderate to severe weakness (p=0.032), dysphasia (p=0.037) or dysarthria (p=0.005). Unclassifiable symptoms (for example, palpitations, confusion, headache) were reported in 27 patients (33%) and their presence favoured non-TIA diagnoses (p=0.0003). TIA constituted a minority of the referrals to our clinic. Accurate clinical diagnosis of TIA facilitates early stroke prevention and avoids unnecessary investigations and prescriptions. Attempts to improve diagnostic accuracy of TIA should target improving the education and awareness of frontline medical practitioners. PMID:25669115

  4. Usability of clinical decision support system as a facilitator for learning the assistive technology adaptation process.

    PubMed

    Danial-Saad, Alexandra; Kuflik, Tsvi; Weiss, Patrice L Tamar; Schreuer, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usability of Ontology Supported Computerized Assistive Technology Recommender (OSCAR), a Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) for the assistive technology adaptation process, its impact on learning the matching process, and to determine the relationship between its usability and learnability. Two groups of expert and novice clinicians (total, n = 26) took part in this study. Each group filled out system usability scale (SUS) to evaluate OSCAR's usability. The novice group completed a learning questionnaire to assess OSCAR's effect on their ability to learn the matching process. Both groups rated OSCAR's usability as "very good", (M [SUS] = 80.7, SD = 11.6, median = 83.7) by the novices, and (M [SUS] = 81.2, SD = 6.8, median = 81.2) by the experts. The Mann-Whitney results indicated that no significant differences were found between the expert and novice groups in terms of OSCAR's usability. A significant positive correlation existed between the usability of OSCAR and the ability to learn the adaptation process (rs = 0.46, p = 0.04). Usability is an important factor in the acceptance of a system. The successful application of user-centered design principles during the development of OSCAR may serve as a case study that models the significant elements to be considered, theoretically and practically in developing other systems. Implications for Rehabilitation Creating a CDSS with a focus on its usability is an important factor for its acceptance by its users. Successful usability outcomes can impact the learning process of the subject matter in general, and the AT prescription process in particular. The successful application of User-Centered Design principles during the development of OSCAR may serve as a case study that models the significant elements to be considered, theoretically and practically. The study emphasizes the importance of close collaboration between the developers and the end users. PMID:26203588

  5. Implementation of workflow engine technology to deliver basic clinical decision support functionality

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Workflow engine technology represents a new class of software with the ability to graphically model step-based knowledge. We present application of this novel technology to the domain of clinical decision support. Successful implementation of decision support within an electronic health record (EHR) remains an unsolved research challenge. Previous research efforts were mostly based on healthcare-specific representation standards and execution engines and did not reach wide adoption. We focus on two challenges in decision support systems: the ability to test decision logic on retrospective data prior prospective deployment and the challenge of user-friendly representation of clinical logic. Results We present our implementation of a workflow engine technology that addresses the two above-described challenges in delivering clinical decision support. Our system is based on a cross-industry standard of XML (extensible markup language) process definition language (XPDL). The core components of the system are a workflow editor for modeling clinical scenarios and a workflow engine for execution of those scenarios. We demonstrate, with an open-source and publicly available workflow suite, that clinical decision support logic can be executed on retrospective data. The same flowchart-based representation can also function in a prospective mode where the system can be integrated with an EHR system and respond to real-time clinical events. We limit the scope of our implementation to decision support content generation (which can be EHR system vendor independent). We do not focus on supporting complex decision support content delivery mechanisms due to lack of standardization of EHR systems in this area. We present results of our evaluation of the flowchart-based graphical notation as well as architectural evaluation of our implementation using an established evaluation framework for clinical decision support architecture. Conclusions We describe an implementation of a free workflow technology software suite (available at http://code.google.com/p/healthflow) and its application in the domain of clinical decision support. Our implementation seamlessly supports clinical logic testing on retrospective data and offers a user-friendly knowledge representation paradigm. With the presented software implementation, we demonstrate that workflow engine technology can provide a decision support platform which evaluates well against an established clinical decision support architecture evaluation framework. Due to cross-industry usage of workflow engine technology, we can expect significant future functionality enhancements that will further improve the technology's capacity to serve as a clinical decision support platform. PMID:21477364

  6. Clinical Verification of A Clinical Decision Support System for Ventilator Weaning

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Weaning is typically regarded as a process of discontinuing mechanical ventilation in the daily practice of an intensive care unit (ICU). Among the ICU patients, 39%-40% need mechanical ventilator for sustaining their lives. The predictive rate of successful weaning achieved only 35-60% for decisions made by physicians. Clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) are promising in enhancing diagnostic performance and improve healthcare quality in clinical setting. To our knowledge, a prospective study has never been conducted to verify the effectiveness of the CDSS in ventilator weaning before. In this study, the CDSS capable of predicting weaning outcome and reducing duration of ventilator support for patients has been verified. Methods A total of 380 patients admitted to the respiratory care center of the hospital were randomly assigned to either control or study group. In the control group, patients were weaned with traditional weaning method, while in the study group, patients were weaned with CDSS monitored by physicians. After excluding the patients who transferred to other hospitals, refused further treatments, or expired the admission period, data of 168 and 144 patients in the study and control groups, respectively, were used for analysis. Results The results show that a sensitivity of 87.7% has been achieved, which is significantly higher (p<0.01) than the weaning determined by physicians (sensitivity: 61.4%). Furthermore, the days using mechanical ventilator for the study group (38.41 ± 3.35) is significantly (p<0.001) shorter than the control group (43.69 ± 14.89), with a decrease of 5.2 days in average, resulting in a saving of healthcare cost of NT$45,000 (US$1,500) per patient in the current Taiwanese National Health Insurance setting. Conclusions The CDSS is demonstrated to be effective in identifying the earliest time of ventilator weaning for patients to resume and sustain spontaneous breathing, thereby avoiding unnecessary prolonged ventilator use and decreasing healthcare cost. PMID:24565021

  7. The Clinical Intuition Exploration Guide: A Decision-Making Tool for Counselors and Supervisors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffrey, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Clinical intuition is a common experience among counselors, yet many do not know what to do with intuition when it occurs. This article reviews the role intuition plays in clinical work and presents the research-based Clinical Intuition Exploration Guide to help counselors navigate the decision-making process. The guide consists of self-reflection…

  8. Decision support for clinical trial eligibility determination in breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Ohno-Machado, L.; Wang, S. J.; Mar, P.; Boxwala, A. A.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a system for clinical trial eligibility determination where patients or primary care providers can enter clinical information about a patient and obtain a ranked list of clinical trials for which the patient is likely to be eligible. We used clinical trial eligibility information from the National Cancer Institute's Physician Data Query (PDQ) database. We translated each free-text eligibility criterion into a machine executable statement using a derivation of the Arden Syntax. Clinical trial protocols were then structured as collections of these eligibility criteria using XML. The application compares the entered patient information against each of the eligibility criteria and returns a numerical score. Results are displayed in order of likelihood of match. We have tested our system using all phase II and III clinical trials for treatment of metastatic breast cancer found in the PDQ database. Preliminary results are encouraging. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:10566377

  9. Mental Workload as a Key Factor in Clinical Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Aidan

    2013-01-01

    The decision making process is central to the practice of a clinician and has traditionally been described in terms of the hypothetico-deductive model. More recently, models adapted from cognitive psychology, such as the dual process and script theories have proved useful in explaining patterns of practice not consistent with purely cognitive…

  10. Hodgkin lymphoma patients in first remission: routine positron emission tomography/computerized tomography imaging is not superior to clinical follow-up for patients with no residual mass.

    PubMed

    Dann, Eldad J; Berkahn, Leanne; Mashiach, Tatiana; Frumer, Michael; Agur, Ariel; McDiarmid, Bridgett; Bar-Shalom, Rachel; Paltiel, Ora; Goldschmidt, Neta

    2014-03-01

    There is no consensus regarding optimal follow-up mode for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients that achieve complete remission following chemotherapy or combined chemo- and radiation therapy. Several studies demonstrated high sensitivity of positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT) in detecting disease progression; however, these techniques are currently not recommended for routine follow-up. This retrospective study conducted in two Israeli (N = 291) and one New Zealand academic centres (N = 77), compared a group of HL patients, followed-up with routine imaging every 6 months during the first 2 years after achieving remission, once in the third year, with additional dedicated studies performed due to symptoms or physical findings (Group I) to a group of patients without residual masses who underwent clinically-based surveillance with dedicated imaging upon relapse suspicion (Group II). Five-year overall survival (OS) was 94% and median time to relapse was 8·6 months for both modes. Relapse rates in Groups I and II were 13% and 9%, respectively. During the first 3 years of follow-up, 47·5 and 4·7 studies were performed per detected relapse in Groups I and II, respectively. The current study demonstrated no benefit in either progression-free survival (PFS) or OS in HL patients followed by routine imaging versus clinical follow-up. The cost was 10 times higher for routine imaging. PMID:24313286

  11. An Examination of Accelerated and Basic Baccalaureate Nursing Students' Perceptions of Clinical Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumwiede, Kelly A.

    2010-01-01

    Developing decision-making skills is essential in education in order to be a competent nurse. The purpose of this study was to examine and compare the perceptions of clinical decision-making skills of students enrolled in accelerated and basic baccalaureate nursing programs. A comparative descriptive research design was used for this study.…

  12. Factors Predicting Oncology Care Providers' Behavioral Intention to Adopt Clinical Decision Support Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfenden, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlation study was to examine the predictors of user behavioral intention on the decision of oncology care providers to adopt or reject the clinical decision support system. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) formed the foundation of the research model and survey instrument. The…

  13. SANDS: A Service-Oriented Architecture for Clinical Decision Support in a National Health Information Network

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we describe and evaluate a new distributed architecture for clinical decision support called SANDS (Service-oriented Architecture for NHIN Decision Support), which leverages current health information exchange efforts and is based on the principles of a service-oriented architecture. The architecture allows disparate clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems to be seamlessly integrated over a network according to a set of interfaces and protocols described in this paper. The architecture described is fully defined and developed, and six use cases have been developed and tested using a prototype electronic health record which links to one of the existing prototype National Health Information Networks (NHIN): drug interaction checking, syndromic surveillance, diagnostic decision support, inappropriate prescribing in older adults, information at the point of care and a simple personal health record. Some of these use cases utilize existing decision support systems, which are either commercially or freely available at present, and developed outside of the SANDS project, while other use cases are based on decision support systems developed specifically for the project. Open source code for many of these components is available, and an open source reference parser is also available for comparison and testing of other clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems that wish to implement the SANDS architecture. PMID:18434256

  14. Hip fractures and dementia: clinical decisions for the future

    PubMed Central

    Waran, Eswaran; William, Leeroy

    2016-01-01

    Severe dementia is a life-limiting condition; hip fractures are more common in patients who have dementia. This study outlines the case of a 92-year-old female with severe dementia who sustained a hip fracture. Despite having a terminal diagnosis (severe dementia and hip fracture) and poor premorbid quality of life, she had a life-prolonging surgery. The report outlines issues around treatment options in such circumstances, informed consent and substitute decision-making. The authors propose a ‘goals of care’ approach to manage patients in whom the best treatment is unclear, during their attendance to the emergency department. It is suggested that utilization of such a model may help with substitute decision-making and true informed consent. PMID:26949537

  15. Clinical data warehousing for evidence based decision making.

    PubMed

    Narra, Lekha; Sahama, Tony; Stapleton, Peta

    2015-01-01

    Large volumes of heterogeneous health data silos pose a big challenge when exploring for information to allow for evidence based decision making and ensuring quality outcomes. In this paper, we present a proof of concept for adopting data warehousing technology to aggregate and analyse disparate health data in order to understand the impact various lifestyle factors on obesity. We present a practical model for data warehousing with detailed explanation which can be adopted similarly for studying various other health issues. PMID:25991160

  16. Comparing aggregate estimates of derived thresholds for clinical decisions.

    PubMed

    Young, M J; Eisenberg, J M; Williams, S V; Hershey, J C

    1986-02-01

    Thresholds for medical decision making are the probabilities of disease at which clinicians choose to initiate testing or therapy. A descriptive analysis of clinicians' decision making can derive their test and test-treatment thresholds and has the potential to explain variations in test utilization. A previously described method summarizes thresholds for a group of clinicians by determining the range of probability which includes the maximum number of clinicians' individual thresholds. However, there is no statistical procedure to compare the summary measure of thresholds that is derived from the distribution of clinicians' thresholds. We describe two alternative methods of developing a summary measure of the thresholds for a group of clinicians. These alternative methods enable the analyst to apply standard statistical tests when analyzing the decision-making behavior of groups of clinicians. For the "Unweighted Mean of the Midpoints" method, confidence limits of means and standard t-tests can be used to compare different groups. For the "Weighted Mean of the Midpoints" method, a weighted standard error of the mean can be calculated to determine confidence intervals, and a weighted t-test or weighted regression can be used to compare weighted means of the midpoints of threshold ranges. PMID:3949540

  17. Decision analysis in clinical cardiology: When is coronary angiography required in aortic stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Georgeson, S.; Meyer, K.B.; Pauker, S.G. )

    1990-03-15

    Decision analysis offers a reproducible, explicit approach to complex clinical decisions. It consists of developing a model, typically a decision tree, that separates choices from chances and that specifies and assigns relative values to outcomes. Sensitivity analysis allows exploration of alternative assumptions. Cost-effectiveness analysis shows the relation between dollars spent and improved health outcomes achieved. In a tutorial format, this approach is applied to the decision whether to perform coronary angiography in a patient who requires aortic valve replacement for critical aortic stenosis.

  18. Visual cluster analysis in support of clinical decision intelligence.

    PubMed

    Gotz, David; Sun, Jimeng; Cao, Nan; Ebadollahi, Shahram

    2011-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) contain a wealth of information about patients. In addition to providing efficient and accurate records for individual patients, large databases of EHRs contain valuable information about overall patient populations. While statistical insights describing an overall population are beneficial, they are often not specific enough to use as the basis for individualized patient-centric decisions. To address this challenge, we describe an approach based on patient similarity which analyzes an EHR database to extract a cohort of patient records most similar to a specific target patient. Clusters of similar patients are then visualized to allow interactive visual refinement by human experts. Statistics are then extracted from the refined patient clusters and displayed to users. The statistical insights taken from these refined clusters provide personalized guidance for complex decisions. This paper focuses on the cluster refinement stage where an expert user must interactively (a) judge the quality and contents of automatically generated similar patient clusters, and (b) refine the clusters based on his/her expertise. We describe the DICON visualization tool which allows users to interactively view and refine multidimensional similar patient clusters. We also present results from a preliminary evaluation where two medical doctors provided feedback on our approach. PMID:22195102

  19. Visual Cluster Analysis in Support of Clinical Decision Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Gotz, David; Sun, Jimeng; Cao, Nan; Ebadollahi, Shahram

    2011-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) contain a wealth of information about patients. In addition to providing efficient and accurate records for individual patients, large databases of EHRs contain valuable information about overall patient populations. While statistical insights describing an overall population are beneficial, they are often not specific enough to use as the basis for individualized patient-centric decisions. To address this challenge, we describe an approach based on patient similarity which analyzes an EHR database to extract a cohort of patient records most similar to a specific target patient. Clusters of similar patients are then visualized to allow interactive visual refinement by human experts. Statistics are then extracted from the refined patient clusters and displayed to users. The statistical insights taken from these refined clusters provide personalized guidance for complex decisions. This paper focuses on the cluster refinement stage where an expert user must interactively (a) judge the quality and contents of automatically generated similar patient clusters, and (b) refine the clusters based on his/her expertise. We describe the DICON visualization tool which allows users to interactively view and refine multidimensional similar patient clusters. We also present results from a preliminary evaluation where two medical doctors provided feedback on our approach. PMID:22195102

  20. Shared decision making: examining key elements and barriers to adoption into routine clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Lgar, France; Witteman, Holly O

    2013-02-01

    For many patients, the time spent meeting with their physician-the clinical encounter-is the most opportune moment for them to become engaged in their own health through the process of shared decision making. In the United States shared decision making is being promoted for its potential to improve the health of populations and individual patients, while also helping control care costs. In this overview we describe the three essential elements of shared decision making: recognizing and acknowledging that a decision is required; knowing and understanding the best available evidence; and incorporating the patient's values and preferences into the decision. To achieve the promise of shared decision making, more physicians need training in the approach, and more practices need to be reorganized around the principles of patient engagement. Additional research is also needed to identify the interventions that are most effective. PMID:23381520

  1. Social, Organizational, and Contextual Characteristics of Clinical Decision Support Systems for Intensive Insulin Therapy: A Literature Review and Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Campion, Thomas R.; Waitman, Lemuel R.; May, Addison K.; Ozdas, Asli; Lorenzi, Nancy M.; Gadd, Cynthia S.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Evaluations of computerized clinical decision support systems (CDSS) typically focus on clinical performance changes and do not include social, organizational, and contextual characteristics explaining use and effectiveness. Studies of CDSS for intensive insulin therapy (IIT) are no exception, and the literature lacks an understanding of effective computer-based IIT implementation and operation. Results: This paper presents (1) a literature review of computer-based IIT evaluations through the lens of institutional theory, a discipline from sociology and organization studies, to demonstrate the inconsistent reporting of workflow and care process execution and (2) a single-site case study to illustrate how computer-based IIT requires substantial organizational change and creates additional complexity with unintended consequences including error. Discussion: Computer-based IIT requires organizational commitment and attention to site-specific technology, workflow, and care processes to achieve intensive insulin therapy goals. The complex interaction between clinicians, blood glucose testing devices, and CDSS may contribute to workflow inefficiency and error. Evaluations rarely focus on the perspective of nurses, the primary users of computer-based IIT whose knowledge can potentially lead to process and care improvements. Conclusion: This paper addresses a gap in the literature concerning the social, organizational, and contextual characteristics of CDSS in general and for intensive insulin therapy specifically. Additionally, this paper identifies areas for future research to define optimal computer-based IIT process execution: the frequency and effect of manual data entry error of blood glucose values, the frequency and effect of nurse overrides of CDSS insulin dosing recommendations, and comprehensive ethnographic study of CDSS for IIT. PMID:19815452

  2. A Three-Question Framework to Facilitate Clinical Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibold, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Context: Highly developed critical thinking and the ability to discriminate among many possible therapeutic interventions is a core behavior for the practicing athletic trainer. However, while athletic training students receive a great deal of clinically applicable information, many are not explicitly trained in efficient methods for channeling

  3. A Three-Question Framework to Facilitate Clinical Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibold, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Context: Highly developed critical thinking and the ability to discriminate among many possible therapeutic interventions is a core behavior for the practicing athletic trainer. However, while athletic training students receive a great deal of clinically applicable information, many are not explicitly trained in efficient methods for channeling…

  4. Computer Decision Support to Improve Autism Screening and Care in Community Pediatric Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Nerissa S.; Sturm, Lynne A.; Carroll, Aaron E.; Downs, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    An autism module was added to an existing computer decision support system (CDSS) to facilitate adherence to recommended guidelines for screening for autism spectrum disorders in primary care pediatric clinics. User satisfaction was assessed by survey and informal feedback at monthly meetings between clinical staff and the software team. To assess

  5. Computer Decision Support to Improve Autism Screening and Care in Community Pediatric Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Nerissa S.; Sturm, Lynne A.; Carroll, Aaron E.; Downs, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    An autism module was added to an existing computer decision support system (CDSS) to facilitate adherence to recommended guidelines for screening for autism spectrum disorders in primary care pediatric clinics. User satisfaction was assessed by survey and informal feedback at monthly meetings between clinical staff and the software team. To assess…

  6. Clinical decision-making and therapeutic approaches in osteopathy - a qualitative grounded theory study.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Oliver P; Petty, Nicola J; Moore, Ann P

    2014-02-01

    There is limited understanding of how osteopaths make decisions in relation to clinical practice. The aim of this research was to construct an explanatory theory of the clinical decision-making and therapeutic approaches of experienced osteopaths in the UK. Twelve UK registered osteopaths participated in this constructivist grounded theory qualitative study. Purposive and theoretical sampling was used to select participants. Data was collected using semi-structured interviews which were audio-recorded and transcribed. As the study approached theoretical sufficiency, participants were observed and video-recorded during a patient appointment, which was followed by a video-prompted interview. Constant comparative analysis was used to analyse and code data. Data analysis resulted in the construction of three qualitatively different therapeutic approaches which characterised participants and their clinical practice, termed; Treater, Communicator and Educator. Participants' therapeutic approach influenced their approach to clinical decision-making, the level of patient involvement, their interaction with patients, and therapeutic goals. Participants' overall conception of practice lay on a continuum ranging from technical rationality to professional artistry, and contributed to their therapeutic approach. A range of factors were identified which influenced participants' conception of practice. The findings indicate that there is variation in osteopaths' therapeutic approaches to practice and clinical decision-making, which are influenced by their overall conception of practice. This study provides the first explanatory theory of the clinical decision-making and therapeutic approaches of osteopaths. PMID:23932101

  7. Prospective computerized simulation of breast cancer: comparison of computer predictions with nine sets of biological and clinical data.

    PubMed

    Retsky, M W; Wardwell, R H; Swartzendruber, D E; Headley, D L

    1987-09-15

    A computer program which accepts clinically relevant information can be used to predict breast cancer growth, response to chemotherapy, and disease-free survival. The computer output is patient individualized because the program is highly iterative and simulates up to 2500 patients with exactly the same clinical presentation. Computer predictions have been compared to a broad spectrum of breast cancer data, and a high degree of correlation has been established. There are numerous significant clinical implications which can be derived from the computer model. Among these are the following. (a) Breast cancer tumors do not grow continuously but may have up to five growth plateaus each lasting from a small fraction of a year up to approximately 8 yr. (b) Adjuvant chemotherapy, such as 6-mo treatment with cyclophosphamide-methotrexate-5-fluorouracil, does not eradicate tumors but just reduces the number of viable cells by a factor of 10 to 100 and sets the eventual growth back by several years. This may partially explain why the age-adjusted death rate from breast cancer has not changed in the past 50 yr. (c) The computer model challenges the underlying principles in support of short-term intensive adjuvant chemotherapy, namely Gompertzian kinetics and genetically acquired tumor resistance to drugs. (d) The computer model questions the evidence opposing long-term maintenance chemotherapy protocols and suggests that maintenance protocols should be reexamined. PMID:2441859

  8. Dental patient preferences and choice in clinical decision-making.

    PubMed

    Fukai, Kakuhiro; Yoshino, Koichi; Ohyama, Atsushi; Takaesu, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    In economics, the concept of utility refers to the strength of customer preference. In health care assessment, the visual analogue scale (VAS), the standard gamble, and the time trade-off are used to measure health state utilities. These utility measurements play a key role in promoting shared decision-making in dental care. Individual preference, however, is complex and dynamic. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between patient preference and educational intervention in the field of dental health. The data were collected by distributing questionnaires to employees of two companies in Japan. Participants were aged 18-65 years and consisted of 111 males and 93 females (204 in total). One company (Group A) had a dental program of annual check-ups and health education in the workplace, while the other company (Group B) had no such program. Statistical analyses were performed with the t-test and Chi-square test. The questionnaire items were designed to determine: (1) oral health-related quality of life, (2) dental health state utilities (using VAS), and (3) time trade-off for regular dental check-ups. The percentage of respondents in both groups who were satisfied with chewing function, appearance of teeth, and social function ranged from 23.1 to 42.4%. There were no significant differences between groups A and B in the VAS of decayed, filled, and missing teeth. The VAS of gum bleeding was 42.8 in Group A and 51.3 in Group B (p<0.05). The percentage of persons having a regular dental check-up every three months was 34.1 and 31.3% in Groups A and B respectively. These results suggest that low preference results from lack of opportunity or utilization of dental care in the worksite. Ascertaining the factors involved in patient preference may have significant potential benefits in shared decision-making. PMID:22790334

  9. Comparative evaluation of different medication safety measures for the emergency department: physicians’ usage and acceptance of training, poster, checklist and computerized decision support

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although usage and acceptance are important factors for a successful implementation of clinical decision support systems for medication, most studies only concentrate on their design and outcome. Our objective was to comparatively investigate a set of traditional medication safety measures such as medication safety training for physicians, paper-based posters and checklists concerning potential medication problems versus the additional benefit of a computer-assisted medication check. We concentrated on usage, acceptance and suitability of such interventions in a busy emergency department (ED) of a 749 bed acute tertiary care hospital. Methods A retrospective, qualitative evaluation study was conducted using a field observation and a questionnaire-based survey. Six physicians were observed while treating 20 patient cases; the questionnaire, based on the Technology Acceptance Model 2 (TAM2), has been answered by nine ED physicians. Results During field observations, we did not observe direct use of any of the implemented interventions for medication safety (paper-based and electronic). Questionnaire results indicated that the electronic medication safety check was the most frequently used intervention, followed by checklist and posters. However, despite their positive attitude, physicians most often stated that they use the interventions in only up to ten percent for subjectively “critical” orders. Main reasons behind the low usage were deficits in ease-of-use and fit to the workflow. The intention to use the interventions was rather high after overcoming these barriers. Conclusions Methodologically, the study contributes to Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) research in an ED setting and confirms TAM2 as a helpful diagnostic tool in identifying barriers for a successful implementation of medication safety interventions. In our case, identified barriers explaining the low utilization of the implemented medication safety interventions - despite their positive reception - include deficits in accessibility, briefing for the physicians about the interventions, ease-of-use and compatibility to the working environment. PMID:23890121

  10. Cholinesterase inhibitors: applying pharmacokinetics to clinical decision making.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Gomolin IH; Smith C; Jeitner TM

    2011-08-01

    BACKGROUND: Cholinesterase inhibitors are indicated for the treatment of Alzheimer-type dementia. There are few direct comparative studies of adverse effects or studies to suggest clinical superiority of one inhibitor over the others.OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to relate pharmacokinetic differences among the agents to potential clinical considerations.METHODS: Population pharmacokinetics were obtained from US Food and Drug Administration-approved label information and published literature. Plasma concentration-time profiles were derived from these parameters using noncompartmental pharmacokinetic modeling.RESULTS: Plasma concentration profiles differed significantly among different agents and between different formulations of the same agent.CONCLUSIONS: The initial choice among the various cholinesterase inhibitors requires consideration to adherence and cost. Consideration to differences in pharmacokinetics among these drugs provides a better understanding for the clinical practice of dose titration, identification and management of drug-related side effects, and lapses in therapy. Pharmacokinetic considerations among the various agents and formulations provide the clinician with options to enhance therapy when these agents are chosen for treatment of patients with Alzheimer-type dementia.

  11. A controlled time-series trial of clinical reminders: using computerized firm systems to make quality improvement research a routine part of mainstream practice.

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, H. I.; Neighbor, W. E.; Cheadle, A. D.; Ramsey, S. D.; Diehr, P.; Gore, E.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the feasibility of conducting unobtrusive interventional research in community practice settings by integrating firm-system techniques with time-series analysis of relational-repository data. STUDY SETTING: A satellite teaching clinic divided into two similar, but geographically separated, primary care group practices called firms. One firm was selected by chance to receive the study intervention. Forty-two providers and 2,655 patients participated. STUDY DESIGN: A nonrandomized controlled trial of computer-generated preventive reminders. Net effects were determined by quantitatively combining population-level data from parallel experimental and control interrupted time series extending over two-month baseline and intervention periods. DATA COLLECTION: Mean rates at which mammography, colorectal cancer screening, and cholesterol testing were performed on patients due to receive each maneuver at clinic visits were the trial's outcome measures. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mammography performance increased on the experimental firm by 154 percent (0.24 versus 0.61, p = .03). No effect on fecal occult blood testing was observed. Cholesterol ordering decreased on both the experimental (0.18 versus 0.1 1, p = .02) and control firms (0.13 versus 0.07, p = .03) coincident with national guidelines retreating from recommending screening for young adults. A traditional uncontrolled interrupted time-series design would have incorrectly attributed the experimental-firm decrease to the introduction of reminders. The combined analysis properly indicated that no net prompting effect had occurred, as the difference between firms in cholesterol testing remained stochastically stable over time (0.05 versus 0.04, p = .75). A logistic-regression analysis applied to individual-level data produced equivalent findings. The trial incurred no supplementary data collection costs. CONCLUSIONS: The apparent validity and practicability of our reminder implementation study should encourage others to develop computerized firm systems capable of conducting controlled time-series trials. Images Fig. 1 PMID:10737451

  12. Characterization of mesophilic Aeromonas from clinical specimens by computerized analysis of SDS-PAGE protein profiles and by enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Arzese, A; Pipan, C; Piersimoni, C; Scalise, G; Morbiducci, V; Botta, G A

    1993-10-01

    Mesophilic Aeromonas (Aeromonas hydrophila, Aeromonas sobria, Aeromonas caviae) have recently been considered important aetiological agents of human diseases, mainly gastrointestinal infections. Although several findings have pointed out the significance of this group of microorganisms as enteric pathogens and suggested the presence of virulence factors, epidemiological and clinical studies are limited by the difficulty of correctly identifying mesophilic Aeromonas at the species level. SDS-PAGE of radiolabelled total protein profiles and bacterial enzymatic activities were used to type 31 clinical isolates (6 A. hydrophila, 7 A. sobria and 18 A. caviae) from patients with gastroenteritis and from healthy controls. Analysis of SDS-PAGE protein patterns, reinforced by the UPGMA-grouping system (AMBIS software) provided a good characterization of A. caviae strains as a homogeneous group of microorganisms, possessing significant differences from the other two species of mesophilic Aeromonas, in good agreement with biochemical and enzymatic tests. Data obtained in analyzing A. sobria protein profiles clearly showed two groups, with a correlation coefficient (CC) = 0.70, which in our experience is a doubtful value for assigning two strains to the same species. Strains biochemically identified as A. hydrophila showed a CC = 0.64, which is equally not acceptable for species assignment. Inter-species comparison highlighted this heterogeneity, showing two mixed subgroups, both containing strains that were assigned to A. sobria and A. hydrophila species on the basis of biochemical features.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8264423

  13. C2-fractures: part II. A morphometrical analysis of computerized atlantoaxial motion, anatomical alignment and related clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Frank; Forstner, Rosemarie; Zenner, Juliane; Resch, Herbert; Tauber, Mark; Lederer, Stefan; Auffarth, Alexander; Hitzl, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge on the outcome of C2-fractures is founded on heterogenous samples with cross-sectional outcome assessment focusing on union rates, complications and technical concerns related to surgical treatment. Reproducible clinical and functional outcome assessments are scant. Validated generic and disease specific outcome measures were rarely applied. Therefore, the aim of the current study is to investigate the radiographic, functional and clinical outcome of a patient sample with C2-fractures. Out of a consecutive series of 121 patients with C2 fractures, 44 met strict inclusion criteria and 35 patients with C2-fractures treated either nonsurgically or surgically with motion-preserving techniques were surveyed. Outcome analysis included validated measures (SF-36, NPDI, CSOQ), and a functional CT-scanning protocol for the evaluation of C1–2 rotation and alignment. Mean follow-up was 64 months and mean age of patients was 52 years. Classification of C2-fractures at injury was performed using a detailed morphological description: 24 patients had odontoid fractures type II or III, 18 patients had fracture patterns involving the vertebral body and 11 included a dislocated or a burst lateral mass fracture. Thirty-one percent of patients were treated with a halo, 34% with a Philadelphia collar and 34% had anterior odontoid screw fixation. At follow-up mean atlantoaxial rotation in left and right head position was 20.2° and 20.6°, respectively. According to the classification system of posttreatment C2-alignment established by our group in part I of the C2-fracture study project, mean malunion score was 2.8 points. In 49% of patients the fractures healed in anatomical shape or with mild malalignment. In 51% fractures healed with moderate or severe malalignment. Self-rated outcome was excellent or good in 65% of patients and moderate or poor in 35%. The raw data of varying nuances allow for comparison in future benchmark studies and metaanalysis. Detailed investigation of C2-fracture morphology, posttreatment C2-alignment and atlantoaxial rotation allowed a unique outcome analysis that focused on the identification of risk factors for poor outcome and the interdependencies of outcome variables that should be addressed in studies on C2-fractures. We recognized that reduced rotation of C1–2 per se was not a concern for the patients. However, patients with worse clinical outcomes had reduced total neck rotation and rotation C1–2. In turn, C2-fractures, especially fractures affecting the lateral mass that healed with atlantoaxial deformity and malunion, had higher incidence of atlantoaxial degeneration and osteoarthritis. Patients with increased severity of C2-malunion and new onset atlantoaxial arthritis had worse clinical outcomes and significantly reduced rotation C1–2. The current study offers detailed insight into the radiographical, functional and clinical outcome of C2-fractures. It significantly adds to the understanding of C2-fractures. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00586-009-0901-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:19224254

  14. Clinical Decision Support for Nurses: A Fall Risk and Prevention Example.

    PubMed

    Lytle, Kathryn S; Short, Nancy M; Richesson, Rachel L; Horvath, Monica M

    2015-12-01

    Clinical decision support tools in electronic health records have demonstrated improvement with process measures and clinician performance, predominantly for providers. Clinical decision support tools could improve patient fall risk identification and prevention plans, a common concern for nursing. This quality-improvement project used clinical decision support to improve the rate of nurse compliance with documented fall risk assessments and, for patients at high risk, fall prevention plans of care in 16 adult inpatient units. Preintervention and postintervention data were compared using quarterly audits, retrospective chart review, safety reports, and falls and falls-with-injury rates. Documentation of fall risk assessments on the 16 units improved significantly according to quarterly audit data (P = .05), whereas documentation of the plans of care did not. Retrospective chart review on two units indicated improvement for admission fall risk assessment (P = .05) and a decrease in the documentation of the shift plan of care (P = .01); one unit had a statistically significant decrease in documentation of plans of care on admission (P = .00). Examination of safety reports for patients who fell showed all patients before and after clinical decision support had fall risk assessments documented. Falls and falls with injury did not change significantly before and after clinical decision support intervention. PMID:26571334

  15. Nursing Research Using Computerized Data Bases

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Kathleen A.

    1981-01-01

    Because of the implementation of large computerized information systems, the analyses of patient care data important to clinical nursing research is possible. Simultaneously, the heralding of computer technology in clinical practice areas has necessitated new research ideas to be pursued. This paper will describe a taxonomy of research data available on hospital information systems that may be used for clinical nursing research.

  16. Development and Testing of a Computerized Decision Support System to Facilitate Brief Tobacco Cessation Treatment in the Pediatric Emergency Department: Proposal and Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Dexheimer, Judith W; Khoury, Jane C; Miller, Julie A; Gordon, Judith S

    2016-01-01

    Background Tobacco smoke exposure (TSE) is unequivocally harmful to children's health, yet up to 48% of children who visit the pediatric emergency department (PED) and urgent care setting are exposed to tobacco smoke. The incorporation of clinical decision support systems (CDSS) into the electronic health records (EHR) of PED patients may improve the rates of screening and brief TSE intervention of caregivers and result in decreased TSE in children. Objective We propose a study that will be the first to develop and evaluate the integration of a CDSS for Registered Nurses (RNs) into the EHR of pediatric patients to facilitate the identification of caregivers who smoke and the delivery of TSE interventions to caregivers in the urgent care setting. Methods We will conduct a two-phase project to develop, refine, and integrate an evidence-based CDSS into the pediatric urgent care setting. RNs will provide input on program content, function, and design. In Phase I, we will develop a CDSS with prompts to: (1) ASK about child TSE and caregiver smoking, (2) use a software program, Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap), to ADVISE caregivers to reduce their child's TSE via total smoking home and car bans and quitting smoking, and (3) ASSESS their interest in quitting and ASSIST caregivers to quit by directly connecting them to their choice of free cessation resources (eg, Quitline, SmokefreeTXT, or SmokefreeGOV) during the urgent care visit. We will create reports to provide feedback to RNs on their TSE counseling behaviors. In Phase II, we will conduct a 3-month feasibility trial to test the results of implementing our CDSS on changes in RNs’ TSE-related behaviors, and child and caregiver outcomes. Results This trial is currently underway with funding support from the National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute. We have completed Phase I. The CDSS has been developed with input from our advisory panel and RNs, and pilot tested. We are nearing completion of Phase II, in which we are conducting the feasibility trial, analyzing data, and disseminating results. Conclusions This project will develop, iteratively refine, integrate, and pilot test the use of an innovative CDSS to prompt RNs to provide TSE reduction and smoking cessation counseling to caregivers who smoke. If successful, this approach will create a sustainable and disseminable model for prompting pediatric practitioners to apply tobacco-related guideline recommendations. This systems-based approach has the potential to reach at least 12 million smokers a year and significantly reduce TSE-related pediatric illnesses and related costs. PMID:27098215

  17. Multi-criteria clinical decision support: A primer on the use of multiple criteria decision making methods to promote evidence-based, patient-centered healthcare.

    PubMed

    Dolan, James G

    2010-01-01

    Current models of healthcare quality recommend that patient management decisions be evidence-based and patient-centered. Evidence-based decisions require a thorough understanding of current information regarding the natural history of disease and the anticipated outcomes of different management options. Patient-centered decisions incorporate patient preferences, values, and unique personal circumstances into the decision making process and actively involve both patients along with health care providers as much as possible. Fundamentally, therefore, evidence-based, patient-centered decisions are multi-dimensional and typically involve multiple decision makers.Advances in the decision sciences have led to the development of a number of multiple criteria decision making methods. These multi-criteria methods are designed to help people make better choices when faced with complex decisions involving several dimensions. They are especially helpful when there is a need to combine "hard data" with subjective preferences, to make trade-offs between desired outcomes, and to involve multiple decision makers. Evidence-based, patient-centered clinical decision making has all of these characteristics. This close match suggests that clinical decision support systems based on multi-criteria decision making techniques have the potential to enable patients and providers to carry out the tasks required to implement evidence-based, patient-centered care effectively and efficiently in clinical settings.The goal of this paper is to give readers a general introduction to the range of multi-criteria methods available and show how they could be used to support clinical decision-making. Methods discussed include the balance sheet, the even swap method, ordinal ranking methods, direct weighting methods, multi-attribute decision analysis, and the analytic hierarchy process (AHP). PMID:21394218

  18. Quantitative ultrasound texture analysis for clinical decision making support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jie Ying; Beland, Michael; Konrad, Joseph; Tuomi, Adam; Glidden, David; Grand, David; Merck, Derek

    2015-03-01

    We propose a general ultrasound (US) texture-analysis and machine-learning framework for detecting the presence of disease that is suitable for clinical application across clinicians, disease types, devices, and operators. Its stages are image selection, image filtering, ROI selection, feature parameterization, and classification. Each stage is modular and can be replaced with alternate methods. Thus, this framework is adaptable to a wide range of tasks. Our two preliminary clinical targets are hepatic steatosis and adenomyosis diagnosis. For steatosis, we collected US images from 288 patients and their pathology-determined values of steatosis (%) from biopsies. Two radiologists independently reviewed all images and identified the region of interest (ROI) most representative of the hepatic echotexture for each patient. To parameterize the images into comparable quantities, we filter the US images at multiple scales for various texture responses. For each response, we collect a histogram of pixel features within the ROI, and parameterize it as a Gaussian function using its mean, standard deviation, kurtosis, and skew to create a 36-feature vector. Our algorithm uses a support vector machine (SVM) for classification. Using a threshold of 10%, we achieved 72.81% overall accuracy, 76.18% sensitivity, and 65.96% specificity in identifying steatosis with leave-ten-out cross-validation (p<0.0001). Extending this framework to adenomyosis, we identified 38 patients with MR-confirmed findings of adenomyosis and previous US studies and 50 controls. A single rater picked the best US-image and ROI for each case. Using the same processing pipeline, we obtained 76.14% accuracy, 86.00% sensitivity, and 63.16% specificity with leave-one-out cross-validation (p<0.0001).

  19. Integrated risk assessment and feedback reporting for clinical decision making in a Medicare Risk plan.

    PubMed

    Schraeder, C; Britt, T; Shelton, P

    2000-10-01

    The challenge of tapping into the rich resource of population-based, aggregated data to inform and guide clinical processes remains one of the largely unrealized potentials of managed care. This article describes a multifaceted approach of using health-related data to support providers in clinical decision making as an adjunct to case management and primary care delivery. The goal is to provide data that can be used for clinical decision making that is population based, yet individualized for specific patient care situations. Information reporting holds great potential in the clinical care of patients because it can be used to identify persons who could benefit from early detection, intervention, or treatment. It has been suggested that one of the keys to success in managed Medicare is the timely use of information that is detailed, comprehensive, and real-time describing key parameters of clinical encounters. PMID:11067092

  20. Optimal Data Systems: The future of clinical predictions and decision support

    PubMed Central

    Celi, Leo Anthony; Csete, Marie; Stone, David

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review The purpose of the review is to describe the evolving concept and role of data as it relates to clinical predictions and decision-making. Recent Findings Critical care medicine is, as an especially data rich specialty, becoming acutely cognizant both of its historic deficits in data utilization but also of its enormous potential for capturing, mining, and leveraging such data into well designed decision support modalities as well as the formulation of robust best practices. Summary Modern electronic medical records create an opportunity to design complete and functional data systems that can support clinical care to a degree never seen before. Such systems are often referred to as ‘data-driven’ but a better term is ‘optimal data systems’. Here we discuss basic features of an optimal data system and its benefits, including the potential to transform clinical prediction and decision support. PMID:25137399

  1. Identifying ultrasound and clinical features of breast cancer molecular subtypes by ensemble decision.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Li, Jing; Xiao, Yun; Cui, Hao; Du, Guoqing; Wang, Ying; Li, Ziyao; Wu, Tong; Li, Xia; Tian, Jiawei

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is molecularly heterogeneous and categorized into four molecular subtypes: Luminal-A, Luminal-B, HER2-amplified and Triple-negative. In this study, we aimed to apply an ensemble decision approach to identify the ultrasound and clinical features related to the molecular subtypes. We collected ultrasound and clinical features from 1,000 breast cancer patients and performed immunohistochemistry on these samples. We used the ensemble decision approach to select unique features and to construct decision models. The decision model for Luminal-A subtype was constructed based on the presence of an echogenic halo and post-acoustic shadowing or indifference. The decision model for Luminal-B subtype was constructed based on the absence of an echogenic halo and vascularity. The decision model for HER2-amplified subtype was constructed based on the presence of post-acoustic enhancement, calcification, vascularity and advanced age. The model for Triple-negative subtype followed two rules. One was based on irregular shape, lobulate margin contour, the absence of calcification and hypovascularity, whereas the other was based on oval shape, hypovascularity and micro-lobulate margin contour. The accuracies of the models were 83.8%, 77.4%, 87.9% and 92.7%, respectively. We identified specific features of each molecular subtype and expanded the scope of ultrasound for making diagnoses using these decision models. PMID:26046791

  2. A service oriented approach for guidelines-based clinical decision support using BPMN.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Loya, Salvador; Aziz, Ayesha; Chatwin, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based medical practice requires that clinical guidelines need to be documented in such a way that they represent a clinical workflow in its most accessible form. In order to optimize clinical processes to improve clinical outcomes, we propose a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) based approach for implementing clinical guidelines that can be accessed from an Electronic Health Record (EHR) application with a Web Services enabled communication mechanism with the Enterprise Service Bus. We have used Business Process Modelling Notation (BPMN) for modelling and presenting the clinical pathway in the form of a workflow. The aim of this study is to produce spontaneous alerts in the healthcare workflow in the diagnosis of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). The use of BPMN as a tool to automate clinical guidelines has not been previously employed for providing Clinical Decision Support (CDS). PMID:25160142

  3. Development and evaluation of learning module on clinical decision-making in Prosthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Saee; Lambade, Dipti; Chahande, Jayashree

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Best practice strategies for helping students learn the reasoning skills of problem solving and critical thinking (CT) remain a source of conjecture, particularly with regard to CT. The dental education literature is fundamentally devoid of research on the cognitive components of clinical decision-making. Aim: This study was aimed to develop and evaluate the impact of blended learning module on clinical decision-making skills of dental graduates for planning prosthodontics rehabilitation. Methodology: An interactive teaching module consisting of didactic lectures on clinical decision-making and a computer-assisted case-based treatment planning software was developed Its impact on cognitive knowledge gain in clinical decision-making was evaluated using an assessment involving problem-based multiple choice questions and paper-based case scenarios. Results: Mean test scores were: Pretest (17 ± 1), posttest 1 (21 ± 2) and posttest 2 (43 ± 3). Comparison of mean scores was done with one-way ANOVA test. There was overall significant difference in between mean scores at all the three points (P < 0.001). A pair-wise comparison of mean scores was done with Bonferroni test. The mean difference is significant at the 0.05 level. The pair-wise comparison shows that posttest 2 score is significantly higher than posttest 1 and posttest 1 is significantly higher than pretest that is, pretest 2 > posttest 1 > pretest. Conclusion: Blended teaching methods employing didactic lectures on the clinical decision-making as well as computer assisted case-based learning can be used to improve quality of clinical decision-making in prosthodontic rehabilitation for dental graduates. PMID:26929504

  4. Sensitivity of a Clinical Decision Rule and Early Computed Tomography in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Dustin G.; Kene, Mamata V.; Udaltsova, Natalia; Vinson, David R.; Ballard, Dustin W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Application of a clinical decision rule for subarachnoid hemorrhage, in combination with cranial computed tomography (CT) performed within six hours of ictus (early cranial CT), may be able to reasonably exclude a diagnosis of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). This study’s objective was to examine the sensitivity of both early cranial CT and a previously validated clinical decision rule among emergency department (ED) patients with aSAH and a normal mental status. Methods Patients were evaluated in the 21 EDs of an integrated health delivery system between January 2007 and June 2013. We identified by chart review a retrospective cohort of patients diagnosed with aSAH in the setting of a normal mental status and performance of early cranial CT. Variables comprising the SAH clinical decision rule (age ≥40, presence of neck pain or stiffness, headache onset with exertion, loss of consciousness at headache onset) were abstracted from the chart and assessed for inter-rater reliability. Results One hundred fifty-five patients with aSAH met study inclusion criteria. The sensitivity of early cranial CT was 95.5% (95% CI [90.9–98.2]). The sensitivity of the SAH clinical decision rule was also 95.5% (95% CI [90.9–98.2]). Since all false negative cases for each diagnostic modality were mutually independent, the combined use of both early cranial CT and the clinical decision rule improved sensitivity to 100% (95% CI [97.6–100.0]). Conclusion Neither early cranial CT nor the SAH clinical decision rule demonstrated ideal sensitivity for aSAH in this retrospective cohort. However, the combination of both strategies might optimize sensitivity for this life-threatening disease. PMID:26587089

  5. Integrating decision support, based on the Arden Syntax, in a clinical laboratory environment.

    PubMed

    Johansson, B; Bergqvist, Y

    1993-01-01

    A clinical decision support system prototype have been developed in the clinical laboratory environment. The knowledge base consists of Medical Logic Modules, written in the Arden Syntax, and the work describes how these modules can be written, evoked and executed in a system, that is integrated with a laboratory information system, and facilitate real time validation of laboratory data. Tools and methods for building a decision support system are described and design aspects, such as database access, system validation and platform independence, are discussed. PMID:8130502

  6. Decision theory in medicine: a review and critique.

    PubMed

    Albert, D A

    1978-01-01

    Decision theory's role in medicine will lie between the extremes of naive optimism ("a Rosetta stone") and unmitigated pessimism ("a computerized Ouija board"). Its application to public health policy, research, and administrative problem-solving is established; experience offers some guidelines for more limited use in clinical practice. PMID:100721

  7. Ethically-based clinical decision-making in physical therapy: process and issues.

    PubMed

    Finch, Elspeth; Geddes, E Lynne; Larin, Hélène

    2005-01-01

    The identification and consideration of relevant ethical issues in clinical decision-making, and the education of health care professionals (HCPs) in these skills are key factors in providing quality health care. This qualitative study explores the way in which physical therapists (PTs) integrate ethical issues into clinical practice decisions and identifies ethical themes used by PTs. A purposive sample of eight PTs was asked to describe a recent ethically-based clinical decision. Transcribed interviews were coded and themes identified related to the following categories: 1) the integration of ethical issues in the clinical decision-making process, 2) patient welfare, 3) professional ethos of the PT, and 4) health care economics and business practices. Participants readily described clinical situations involving ethical issues but rarely identified specific conflicting ethical issues in their description. Ethical dilemmas were more frequently resolved when there were fewer emotional sequelae associated with the dilemma, and the PT had a clear understanding of professional ethos, valued patient autonomy, and explored a variety of alternative actions before implementing one. HCP students need to develop a clear professional ethos and an increased understanding of the economic factors that will present ethical issues in practice. PMID:16389696

  8. Enhancing decision making about participation in cancer clinical trials: development of a question prompt list

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Richard F.; Shuk, Elyse; Leighl, Natasha; Butow, Phyllis; Ostroff, Jamie; Edgerson, Shawna; Tattersall, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Slow accrual to cancer clinical trials impedes the progress of effective new cancer treatments. Poor physician–patient communication has been identified as a key contributor to low trial accrual. Question prompt lists (QPLs) have demonstrated a significant promise in facilitating communication in general, surgical, and palliative oncology settings. These simple patient interventions have not been tested in the oncology clinical trial setting. We aimed to develop a targeted QPL for clinical trials (QPL-CT). Method Lung, breast, and prostate cancer patients who either had (trial experienced) or had not (trial naive) participated in a clinical trial were invited to join focus groups to help develop and explore the acceptability of a QPL-CT. Focus groups were audio-recorded and transcribed. A research team, including a qualitative data expert, analyzed these data to explore patients’ decision-making processes and views about the utility of the QPL-CT prompt to aid in trial decision making. Results Decision making was influenced by the outcome of patients’ comparative assessment of perceived risks versus benefits of a trial, and the level of trust patients had in their doctors’ recommendation about the trial. Severity of a patient’s disease influenced trial decision making only for trial-naive patients. Conclusion Although patients were likely to prefer a paternalistic decision-making style, they expressed valuation of the QPL as an aid to decision making. QPL-CT utility extended beyond the actual consultation to include roles both before and after the clinical trial discussion. PMID:20593202

  9. On implementing clinical decision support: achieving scalability and maintainability by combining business rules and ontologies.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Vipul; Morales, Alfredo; Hongsermeier, Tonya

    2006-01-01

    We present an approach and architecture for implementing scalable and maintainable clinical decision support at the Partners HealthCare System. The architecture integrates a business rules engine that executes declarative if-then rules stored in a rule-base referencing objects and methods in a business object model. The rules engine executes object methods by invoking services implemented on the clinical data repository. Specialized inferences that support classification of data and instances into classes are identified and an approach to implement these inferences using an OWL based ontology engine is presented. Alternative representations of these specialized inferences as if-then rules or OWL axioms are explored and their impact on the scalability and maintenance of the system is presented. Architectural alternatives for integration of clinical decision support functionality with the invoking application and the underlying clinical data repository; and their associated trade-offs are discussed and presented. PMID:17238374

  10. Constructing a clinical decision-making framework for image-guided radiotherapy using a Bayesian Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargrave, C.; Moores, M.; Deegan, T.; Gibbs, A.; Poulsen, M.; Harden, F.; Mengersen, K.

    2014-03-01

    A decision-making framework for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) is being developed using a Bayesian Network (BN) to graphically describe, and probabilistically quantify, the many interacting factors that are involved in this complex clinical process. Outputs of the BN will provide decision-support for radiation therapists to assist them to make correct inferences relating to the likelihood of treatment delivery accuracy for a given image-guided set-up correction. The framework is being developed as a dynamic object-oriented BN, allowing for complex modelling with specific subregions, as well as representation of the sequential decision-making and belief updating associated with IGRT. A prototype graphic structure for the BN was developed by analysing IGRT practices at a local radiotherapy department and incorporating results obtained from a literature review. Clinical stakeholders reviewed the BN to validate its structure. The BN consists of a sub-network for evaluating the accuracy of IGRT practices and technology. The directed acyclic graph (DAG) contains nodes and directional arcs representing the causal relationship between the many interacting factors such as tumour site and its associated critical organs, technology and technique, and inter-user variability. The BN was extended to support on-line and off-line decision-making with respect to treatment plan compliance. Following conceptualisation of the framework, the BN will be quantified. It is anticipated that the finalised decision-making framework will provide a foundation to develop better decision-support strategies and automated correction algorithms for IGRT.

  11. Telemonitoring in heart failure patients with clinical decision support to optimize medication doses based on guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kropf, Martin; Modre-Osprian, Robert; Hayn, Dieter; Fruhwald, Friedrich; Schreier, Günter

    2014-01-01

    The European Society of Cardiology guidelines for heart failure management are based on strong evidence that adherence to optimal medication is beneficial for heart failure patients. Telemonitoring with integrated clinical decision support enables physicians to adapt medication dose based on up to date vital parameters and reduces the number of hospital visits needed solely for up-titration of heart failure medication. Although keeping track of weight and blood pressure changes is recommended during unstable phases, e.g. post-discharge and during up-titration of medication, guidelines are rather vague regarding telehealth aspects. In this paper, we focus on the evaluation of a clinical decision support system for adaption of heart failure medication and for detecting early deteriorations through monitoring of blood pressure, heart rate and weight changes. This clinical decision support system is currently used in INTENSE-HF, a large scale telemonitoring trial with heart failure patients. The aim of this paper was to apply the decision support algorithm to an existing telemonitoring dataset, to assess the ability of the decision support concept to adhere to the guidelines and to discuss its limitations and potential improvements. PMID:25570663

  12. Mobile clinical decision support systems and applications: a literature and commercial review.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pérez, Borja; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; López-Coronado, Miguel; Sainz-de-Abajo, Beatriz; Robles, Montserrat; García-Gómez, Juan Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The latest advances in eHealth and mHealth have propitiated the rapidly creation and expansion of mobile applications for health care. One of these types of applications are the clinical decision support systems, which nowadays are being implemented in mobile apps to facilitate the access to health care professionals in their daily clinical decisions. The aim of this paper is twofold. Firstly, to make a review of the current systems available in the literature and in commercial stores. Secondly, to analyze a sample of applications in order to obtain some conclusions and recommendations. Two reviews have been done: a literature review on Scopus, IEEE Xplore, Web of Knowledge and PubMed and a commercial review on Google play and the App Store. Five applications from each review have been selected to develop an in-depth analysis and to obtain more information about the mobile clinical decision support systems. Ninety-two relevant papers and 192 commercial apps were found. Forty-four papers were focused only on mobile clinical decision support systems. One hundred seventy-one apps were available on Google play and 21 on the App Store. The apps are designed for general medicine and 37 different specialties, with some features common in all of them despite of the different medical fields objective. The number of mobile clinical decision support applications and their inclusion in clinical practices has risen in the last years. However, developers must be careful with their interface or the easiness of use, which can impoverish the experience of the users. PMID:24399281

  13. Clinical decision making for discharge planning in a changing psychiatric environment.

    PubMed

    Tuzman, L; Cohen, A

    1992-11-01

    This article reviews the clinical decision-making process involved in planning for continuity of care following discharge from inpatient psychiatric services. The decision-making frame of reference requires the identification of the players in the process, parameters of their roles, performance expectations, and boundaries of rights and obligations; clear definition of objectives; collection of data and analysis of its relevancy; and study of possible alternatives, with evaluations of their consequences. The authors present an approach to clinical decision making that includes an analysis of modalities and practice skills and a critical review of practice in a psychiatric setting that emphasizes the role of the family; the importance of continuity of care; and the need to engage the patient, family, and care systems within briefer time frames. PMID:1478556

  14. Paying more wisely: effects of payment reforms on evidence-based clinical decision-making.

    PubMed

    Lake, Timothy K; Rich, Eugene C; Valenzano, Christal Stone; Maxfield, Myles M

    2013-05-01

    This article reviews the recent research, policy and conceptual literature on the effects of payment policy reforms on evidence-based clinical decision-making by physicians at the point-of-care. Payment reforms include recalibration of existing fee structures in fee-for-service, pay-for-quality, episode-based bundled payment and global payments. The advantages and disadvantages of these reforms are considered in terms of their effects on the use of evidence in clinical decisions made by physicians and their patients related to the diagnosis, testing, treatment and management of disease. The article concludes with a recommended pathway forward for improving current payment incentives to better support evidence-based decision-making. PMID:24236624

  15. Building a normative decision support system for clinical and operational risk management in hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Cornalba, Chiara; Bellazzi, Roberto G; Bellazzi, Riccardo

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a decision support system for risk management in hemodialysis (HD) departments. The proposed system exploits a domain ontology to formalize the problem as a Bayesian network. It also relies on a software tool, able to automatically collect HD data, to learn the network conditional probabilities. By merging prior knowledge and the available data, the system allows to estimate risk profiles both for patients and HD departments. The risk management process is completed by an influence diagram that enables scenario analysis to choose the optimal decisions that mitigate a patient's risk. The methods and design of the decision support tool are described in detail, and the derived decision model is presented. Examples and case studies are also shown. The tool is one of the few examples of normative system explicitly conceived to manage operational and clinical risks in health care environments. PMID:18779083

  16. The Value of Intelligent Multimedia Simulation for Teaching Clinical Decision-Making Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Bernard M.; Callear, David

    2001-01-01

    Examines advantages and disadvantages of multimedia simulation in nursing education. Provides an example of a modular design with an integrated intelligent agent and knowledge base for teaching clinical decision making. Concludes that this approach overcomes some of the problems of intelligent tutoring systems. Contains 40 references. (SK)

  17. Students' Stereotypes of Patients as Barriers to Clinical Decision-Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Shirley M.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    At the Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine, a study was designed that graphically illustrated to beginning students that unconscious sociocultural stereotypes may influence clinical decision-making. Students were shown a videotape depicting five simulated patients, each with the same physical complaint. (Author/MLW)

  18. Data-Based Clinical Decision Making in the Treatment of an Adolescent with Severe Conduct Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nangle, Douglas W.; Carr, Rebecca E.; Hansen, David J.

    1999-01-01

    This case study illustrates the contributions of continuous data monitoring to clinical decision making in the treatment of an adolescent with severe conduct problems. Use of a comprehensive point system that required monitoring and graphing and frequent review provided the client and parents with visual feedback of progress. An additional…

  19. The Contribution of Polysyllabic Words in Clinical Decision Making about Children's Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Deborah G. H.; van Doorn, Jan; McLeod, Sharynne

    2008-01-01

    Poor polysyllabic word (PSW) production seems to mark paediatric speech impairment as well as impairment in language, literacy and phonological processing. As impairment in these domains may only manifest in PSWs, PSW production may provide unique information that is often excluded from clinical decision making because insufficient PSWs are…

  20. How School Social Workers Use Consultation to Aid Clinical Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Kimberly A.

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study of school social workers who practice with youths identified as seriously emotionally disturbed offers guidelines for the use of information gleaned through consultation in clinical decision making. School social workers engage in regular consultation with professionals in the school setting, the community, the family, and…

  1. Knowledge of risk factors and the periodontal disease-systemic link in dental students' clinical decisions.

    PubMed

    Friesen, Lynn Roosa; Walker, Mary P; Kisling, Rebecca E; Liu, Ying; Williams, Karen B

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluated second-, third-, and fourth-year dental students' ability to identify systemic conditions associated with periodontal disease, risk factors most important for referral, and medications with an effect on the periodontium and their ability to apply this knowledge to make clinical decisions regarding treatment and referral of periodontal patients. A twenty-one question survey was administered at one U.S. dental school in the spring semester of 2012 to elicit the students' knowledge and confidence regarding clinical reasoning. The response rate was 86 percent. Periodontal risk factors were accurately selected by at least 50 percent of students in all three classes; these were poorly controlled diabetes, ≥6 mm pockets posteriorly, and lack of response to previous non-surgical therapy. Confidence in knowledge, knowledge of risk factors, and knowledge of medications with an effect on the periodontium improved with training and were predictive of better referral decision making. The greatest impact of training was seen on the students' ability to make correct decisions about referral and treatment for seven clinical scenarios. Although the study found a large increase in the students' abilities from the second through fourth years, the mean of 4.6 (out of 7) for the fourth-year students shows that, on average, those students missed correct treatment or referral on more than two of seven clinical cases. These results suggest that dental curricula should emphasize more critical decision making with respect to referral and treatment criteria in managing the periodontal patient. PMID:25179920

  2. The impact of goal-directed transvaginal ultrasonography on clinical decision-making for emergency physicians.

    PubMed

    Sayrac, Neslihan; Bektas, Firat; Soyuncu, Secgin; Sayrac, Vefa

    2015-07-01

    The aim of study was to determine the impact of "goal-directed transvaginal ultrasonography" (TVUSG) on real-time clinical decision making of attending emergency physicians evaluating their level of certainty for preliminary diagnosis, admission, surgery, treatment, additional laboratory, and discharge in patients presenting with acute pelvic pain to the emergency department (ED). This prospective cross-sectional clinical study was conducted on sexually active female patients older than 18 years who presented with acute pelvic pain in the ED. The level of certainty of clinical decision making as mentioned above was measured by a visual analogue scale from 0 to 100 mm with 100 mm being most certain before and after TVUSG. Statistical analysis was performed on 88 patients. The mean age was 31.7 ±8.3 years with a median of 30 years. Among clinical decisions, there was a significant difference between pre-TVUSG and post-TVUSG certainty of the decision to perform preliminary diagnoses derived from patient's history and physical examination but not in the other outcomes (treatment, admission, surgery, and discharge). (P = .05). Of the patients included in the study, 11 (12.5%) were admitted to hospital, and 2 (2.3%) of them were operated on. The remaining 75 (85.2%) patients were discharged from the ED; of the patients that had been discharged, 18 (20.5%) patients later consulted another physician, and no further pathology could be discovered. In conclusion, US performed by attending emergency physicians may affect the certainty of their decisions in patients presenting with acute pelvic pain. This effect statistically significantly on the decision to determine preliminary diagnosis. PMID:25963680

  3. Innovations in Computerized Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drasgow, Fritz, Ed.; Olson-Buchanan, Julie B., Ed.

    Chapters in this book present the challenges and dilemmas faced by researchers as they created new computerized assessments, focusing on issues addressed in developing, scoring, and administering the assessments. Chapters are: (1) "Beyond Bells and Whistles; An Introduction to Computerized Assessment" (Julie B. Olson-Buchanan and Fritz Drasgow);…

  4. Risk-Taking Behavior in a Computerized Driving Task: Brain Activation Correlates of Decision-Making, Outcome, and Peer Influence in Male Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Vorobyev, Victor; Kwon, Myoung Soo; Moe, Dagfinn; Parkkola, Riitta; Hämäläinen, Heikki

    2015-01-01

    Increased propensity for risky behavior in adolescents, particularly in peer groups, is thought to reflect maturational imbalance between reward processing and cognitive control systems that affect decision-making. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate brain functional correlates of risk-taking behavior and effects of peer influence in 18–19-year-old male adolescents. The subjects were divided into low and high risk-taking groups using either personality tests or risk-taking rates in a simulated driving task. The fMRI data were analyzed for decision-making (whether to take a risk at intersections) and outcome (pass or crash) phases, and for the influence of peer competition. Personality test-based groups showed no difference in the amount of risk-taking (similarly increased during peer competition) and brain activation. When groups were defined by actual task performance, risk-taking activated two areas in the left medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) significantly more in low than in high risk-takers. In the entire sample, risky decision-specific activation was found in the anterior and dorsal cingulate, superior parietal cortex, basal ganglia (including the nucleus accumbens), midbrain, thalamus, and hypothalamus. Peer competition increased outcome-related activation in the right caudate head and cerebellar vermis in the entire sample. Our results suggest that the activation of the medial (rather than lateral) PFC and striatum is most specific to risk-taking behavior of male adolescents in a simulated driving situation, and reflect a stronger conflict and thus increased cognitive effort to take risks in low risk-takers, and reward anticipation for risky decisions, respectively. The activation of the caudate nucleus, particularly for the positive outcome (pass) during peer competition, further suggests enhanced reward processing of risk-taking under peer influence. PMID:26052943

  5. Risk-Taking Behavior in a Computerized Driving Task: Brain Activation Correlates of Decision-Making, Outcome, and Peer Influence in Male Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Vorobyev, Victor; Kwon, Myoung Soo; Moe, Dagfinn; Parkkola, Riitta; Hmlinen, Heikki

    2015-01-01

    Increased propensity for risky behavior in adolescents, particularly in peer groups, is thought to reflect maturational imbalance between reward processing and cognitive control systems that affect decision-making. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate brain functional correlates of risk-taking behavior and effects of peer influence in 18-19-year-old male adolescents. The subjects were divided into low and high risk-taking groups using either personality tests or risk-taking rates in a simulated driving task. The fMRI data were analyzed for decision-making (whether to take a risk at intersections) and outcome (pass or crash) phases, and for the influence of peer competition. Personality test-based groups showed no difference in the amount of risk-taking (similarly increased during peer competition) and brain activation. When groups were defined by actual task performance, risk-taking activated two areas in the left medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) significantly more in low than in high risk-takers. In the entire sample, risky decision-specific activation was found in the anterior and dorsal cingulate, superior parietal cortex, basal ganglia (including the nucleus accumbens), midbrain, thalamus, and hypothalamus. Peer competition increased outcome-related activation in the right caudate head and cerebellar vermis in the entire sample. Our results suggest that the activation of the medial (rather than lateral) PFC and striatum is most specific to risk-taking behavior of male adolescents in a simulated driving situation, and reflect a stronger conflict and thus increased cognitive effort to take risks in low risk-takers, and reward anticipation for risky decisions, respectively. The activation of the caudate nucleus, particularly for the positive outcome (pass) during peer competition, further suggests enhanced reward processing of risk-taking under peer influence. PMID:26052943

  6. Electronic Clinical Decision Support for Management of Depression in Primary Care: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying Xia; Grimes, Angela; Diamond, James J.; Lieberman, Michael I.; Klinkman, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the utility of an electronic clinical decision support tool for management of depression in primary care. Method: This prospective study was conducted in a national network of ambulatory practices over a 1-year period (October 2007–October 2008). A clinical decision support tool was embedded into the electronic health record of 19 primary care practices with 119 providers. The main components included (1) the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), with 9 questions paralleling the 9 DSM-IV criteria for the diagnosis of major depressive disorder; (2) a suicide assessment form; and (3) brief patient and provider education. Use of each component was tracked in the electronic health record. Providers completed baseline and postintervention surveys regarding their depression management practices and their perceptions of the clinical decision support tool. Results: According to electronic health record tracking, the PHQ-9 form was used in 45.6% of the 16,052 adult patients with depression and in 73.7% of the 1,422 patients with new depression. The suicide assessment form was used in 62.0% of patients with possible suicidality. Education modules were rarely used. From before to after the study, providers reported increased use of standardized tools for depression diagnosis (47% to 80%, P < .001) and monitoring (27% to 85%, P < .001). The majority of providers reported often using the PHQ-9 and suicide forms and felt them to be very helpful in patient care, with 85% planning to continue their use after the study. Conclusions: The electronic health record–based clinical decision support tool was extensively used and perceived as very helpful for assessment of patients’ symptoms but not for provider education. These findings can help guide national efforts incorporating clinical decision support for quality improvement. PMID:22690364

  7. Medication order entry and clinical decision support: current nursing informatics issues.

    PubMed

    Gideon, Amy C; DiPersio, David M

    2015-06-01

    The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act has greatly increased the acceptance of electronic health record technology by providing incentives and punishment standards. A key criterion of the HITECH Act, meaningful use, has vendors clamoring to design clinical decision support (CDS) systems that fulfill this objective. Users should be aware that more emphasis may be placed on achieving the goals for compliance than on working out details that are clinically meaningful. Nurses can play a crucial rule in collaboratively supporting CDS initiative changes that make patient care more effective and efficient. PMID:25999073

  8. Neighborhood graph and learning discriminative distance functions for clinical decision support.

    PubMed

    Tsymbal, Alexey; Zhou, Shaohua Kevin; Huber, Martin

    2009-01-01

    There are two essential reasons for the slow progress in the acceptance of clinical case retrieval and similarity search-based decision support systems; the especial complexity of clinical data making it difficult to define a meaningful and effective distance function on them and the lack of transparency and explanation ability in many existing clinical case retrieval decision support systems. In this paper, we try to address these two problems by introducing a novel technique for visualizing inter-patient similarity based on a node-link representation with neighborhood graphs and by considering two techniques for learning discriminative distance function that help to combine the power of strong "black box" learners with the transparency of case retrieval and nearest neighbor classification. PMID:19964399

  9. Workshop on using natural language processing applications for enhancing clinical decision making: an executive summary

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Vinay M; Rodgers, Mary; Conroy, Richard; Luo, James; Zhou, Ruixia; Seto, Belinda

    2014-01-01

    In April 2012, the National Institutes of Health organized a two-day workshop entitled ‘Natural Language Processing: State of the Art, Future Directions and Applications for Enhancing Clinical Decision-Making’ (NLP-CDS). This report is a summary of the discussions during the second day of the workshop. Collectively, the workshop presenters and participants emphasized the need for unstructured clinical notes to be included in the decision making workflow and the need for individualized longitudinal data tracking. The workshop also discussed the need to: (1) combine evidence-based literature and patient records with machine-learning and prediction models; (2) provide trusted and reproducible clinical advice; (3) prioritize evidence and test results; and (4) engage healthcare professionals, caregivers, and patients. The overall consensus of the NLP-CDS workshop was that there are promising opportunities for NLP and CDS to deliver cognitive support for healthcare professionals, caregivers, and patients. PMID:23921193

  10. A Set of Preliminary Standards Recommended for Achieving a National Repository of Clinical Decision Support Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Sittig, Dean F.; Wright, Adam; Ash, Joan S.; Middleton, Blackford

    2009-01-01

    We are investigating the development, implementation and evaluation of clinical decision support (CDS) projects to advance our understanding of how best to incorporate these interventions into the delivery of healthcare. Our overall goal is to explore how the translation of clinical knowledge into CDS and its incorporation into practice can be routinely achieved to improve the quality of healthcare delivered in the U.S.A. Toward this end, we have developed a 7-step model that provides a framework for clinical decision support-related standards that are necessary if we wish to achieve these goals. We believe that if all commercially available EHR systems had the features and functions described in these recommendations, many more healthcare organizations could begin to develop and implement the basic CDS features that are necessary to radically transform the quality, safety, and cost of the current healthcare system. PMID:20351928

  11. The problematic of decision-sharing: deconstructing 'cholesterol' in a clinical encounter.

    PubMed

    Gwyn, Richard; Elwyn, Glyn; Edwards, Adrian; Mooney, Annabelle

    2003-09-01

    Shared decision-making is increasingly advocated as a means of interacting with patients but there is also a widely accepted view that many factors will militate against this ideal. While some patients may not wish to take on the responsibility of decision-making, it is also evident that many find it difficult to assimilate probabilities about future events and overestimate the likelihood of some outcomes, especially when terms such as 'stroke', 'bleeding' and 'heart attack' are used in consultation and bring with them emotional connotations and reactions. Under such circumstances, should clinicians portray risks as best they can, in the hope that even a marginally improved understanding will be an improvement on unilateral professional decision-making? Or, conversely, should they 'guide' the decision process, acting in a way that is known as 'professional agency'? Developing some perspectives put forward in recent work by the authors and applying it to a distinct clinical context, this paper will provide (i) a discourse analytic exploration of a single extended example from clinical practice employing aspects of Bakhtin's theory of dialogism, and (ii) a discussion and summary of what we can learn from this analysis in the context of shared decision-making and risk communication. PMID:12940797

  12. The applications of biomarkers in early clinical drug development to improve decision-making processes.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, J

    2007-01-01

    Selecting and evaluating biomarkers in drug discovery and early drug development can substantially shorten clinical development time or the time to reach a critical decision point in exploratory drug development. Critical decisions such as candidate selection, early proof of concept/principle, dose ranging, development risks, and patient stratification are based on the appropriate measurements of biomarkers that are biologically and/or clinically validated. The use of biomarkers helps to streamline clinical development by determining whether the drug is reaching and affecting the molecular target in humans, delivering findings that are comparable to preclinical data, and by providing a measurable endpoint that predicts desired or undesired clinical effects and will increase the success rate in the confirmatory stage of clinical development. Appropriateness of biomarkers depends on the stage of development, development strategy, and the nature of the medical indication. Even if a biomarker fails in the validation process there may be still a benefit of having used it. More knowledge about pathophysiology of the disease and the drug has been obtained. Different levels of validation exist at different development phases. Biomarkers are perhaps most useful in the early phase of clinical development when measurement of clinical endpoints may be too time-consuming or cumbersome to provide timely proof of concept or dose-ranging information. Examples of biomarkers are illustrated for the development of new drugs in variant cardiovascular, pulmonary, and CNS diseases. PMID:17117713

  13. Consensus Recommendations for Systematic Evaluation of Drug-Drug Interaction Evidence for Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Scheife, Richard T.; Hines, Lisa E.; Boyce, Richard D.; Chung, Sophie P.; Momper, Jeremiah; Sommer, Christine D.; Abernethy, Darrell R.; Horn, John; Sklar, Stephen J.; Wong, Samantha K.; Jones, Gretchen; Brown, Mary; Grizzle, Amy J.; Comes, Susan; Wilkins, Tricia Lee; Borst, Clarissa; Wittie, Michael A.; Rich, Alissa; Malone, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Healthcare organizations, compendia, and drug knowledgebase vendors use varying methods to evaluate and synthesize evidence on drug-drug interactions (DDIs). This situation has a negative effect on electronic prescribing and medication information systems that warn clinicians of potentially harmful medication combinations. Objective To provide recommendations for systematic evaluation of evidence from the scientific literature, drug product labeling, and regulatory documents with respect to DDIs for clinical decision support. Methods A conference series was conducted to develop a structured process to improve the quality of DDI alerting systems. Three expert workgroups were assembled to address the goals of the conference. The Evidence Workgroup consisted of 15 individuals with expertise in pharmacology, drug information, biomedical informatics, and clinical decision support. Workgroup members met via webinar from January 2013 to February 2014. Two in-person meetings were conducted in May and September 2013 to reach consensus on recommendations. Results We developed expert-consensus answers to three key questions: 1) What is the best approach to evaluate DDI evidence?; 2) What evidence is required for a DDI to be applicable to an entire class of drugs?; and 3) How should a structured evaluation process be vetted and validated? Conclusion Evidence-based decision support for DDIs requires consistent application of transparent and systematic methods to evaluate the evidence. Drug information systems that implement these recommendations should be able to provide higher quality information about DDIs in drug compendia and clinical decision support tools. PMID:25556085

  14. Assessing an Adolescent's Capacity for Autonomous Decision-Making in Clinical Care.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Pierre-André; Blum, Robert Wm; Benaroyo, Lazare; Zermatten, Jean; Baltag, Valentina

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide policy guidance on how to assess the capacity of minor adolescents for autonomous decision-making without a third party authorization, in the field of clinical care. In June 2014, a two-day meeting gathered 20 professionals from all continents, working in the field of adolescent medicine, neurosciences, developmental and clinical psychology, sociology, ethics, and law. Formal presentations and discussions were based on a literature search and the participants' experience. The assessment of adolescent decision-making capacity includes the following: (1) a review of the legal context consistent with the principles of the Convention on the Rights of the Child; (2) an empathetic relationship between the adolescent and the health care professional/team; (3) the respect of the adolescent's developmental stage and capacities; (4) the inclusion, if relevant, of relatives, peers, teachers, or social and mental health providers with the adolescent's consent; (5) the control of coercion and other social forces that influence decision-making; and (6) a deliberative stepwise appraisal of the adolescent's decision-making process. This stepwise approach, already used among adults with psychiatric disorders, includes understanding the different facets of the given situation, reasoning on the involved issues, appreciating the outcomes linked with the decision(s), and expressing a choice. Contextual and psychosocial factors play pivotal roles in the assessment of adolescents' decision-making capacity. The evaluation must be guided by a well-established procedure, and health professionals should be trained accordingly. These proposals are the first to have been developed by a multicultural, multidisciplinary expert panel. PMID:26281798

  15. Reward-Related Decision Making in Older Adults: Relationship to Clinical Presentation of Depression

    PubMed Central

    McGovern, Amanda R.; Alexopoulos, George S.; Yuen, Genevieve S.; Morimoto, Sarah Shizuko; Gunning, Faith M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Impairment in reward processes has been found in individuals with depression and in the aging population. The purpose of this study was twofold: 1. To use an affective neuroscience probe to identify abnormalities in reward-related decision making in late-life depression. 2. To examine the relationship of reward-related decision making abnormalities in depressed, older adults to the clinical expression of apathy in depression. We hypothesized that relative to elderly, healthy subjects, depressed, elderly patients would exhibit impaired decision making and that apathetic, depressed patients would show greater impairment in decision making than non-apathetic, depressed patients. Methods We used the Iowa Gambling Task to examine reward-related decision making in 60 non-demented, elderly patients with non-psychotic major depression and 36 elderly, psychiatrically healthy participants. Apathy was quantified using the Apathy Evaluation Scale. Of those with major depression, 18 individuals reported clinically significant apathy whereas 42 participants did not have apathy. Results Older adults with depression and healthy comparison participants did not differ in their performance on the IGT. However, apathetic, depressed older adults adopted an advantageous strategy and selected cards from the conservative decks compared to non-apathetic, depressed older adults. Non-apathetic, depressed patients showed a failure to adopt a conservative strategy and persisted in making risky decisions throughout the task. Conclusions This study indicates that apathy in older, depressed adults is associated with a conservative response style on a behavioral probe of the systems involved in reward-related decision making. This conservative response style may be the result of reduced sensitivity to rewards in apathetic individuals. PMID:25306937

  16. Decision support system supporting clinical reasoning process - an evaluation study in dementia care.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Helena

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a case study is presented in which an early prototype of a decision-support system was integrated in the process of investigating patients with suspected dementia and evaluated. The aims were to capture and model the complex target activity for the purpose of knowledge acquisition and formalization, and qualitatively evaluate the system's compliance with reasoning and work processes as part of the development of a decision-support system for the domain. The results show that contextual factors such as local routines in clinical practice motivate further development of the support integrated in the system for establishing preliminary diagnoses in the investigation process. PMID:18487750

  17. A Database Approach for Stabilizing Clinical Decisions in the Setting of Chronic Illness

    PubMed Central

    Starmer, C. Frank; Lee, Kerry L.; Harrell, Frank E.; Rosati, Robert A.

    1979-01-01

    Stabilizing clinical decisions can be aided by incorporating outcome data into treatment decisions. Feedback of outcome data can be managed manually for acute illnesses. When the time between intervention and outcome becomes long as in chronic disease, the feedback loop is compromized. A computer aided system has been developed to enhance the perception of intervention - outcome pairs. The system acts as a time-lapse photographic process, matching the course of slowly changing events to our sensory inputs. Several examples demonstrating the use of this tool are presented.

  18. The ‘CaP Calculator’: an online decision support tool for clinically localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Matthew S.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; D’Amico, Anthony V.; Kattan, Michael W.; Sanda, Martin G.; Nguyen, Paul L.; Smith, Matthew R.; Carroll, Peter R.; Zietman, Anthony L.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To design a decision-support tool to facilitate evidence-based treatment decisions in clinically localized prostate cancer, as individualized risk assessment and shared decision-making can decrease distress and decisional regret in patients with prostate cancer, but current individual models vary or only predict one outcome of interest. METHODS We searched Medline for previous reports and identified peer-reviewed articles providing pretreatment predictive models that estimated pathological stage and treatment outcomes in men with biopsy-confirmed, clinical T1-3 prostate cancer. Each model was entered into a spreadsheet to provide calculated estimates of extracapsular extension (ECE), seminal vesicle invasion (SVI), and lymph node involvement (LNI). Estimates of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) outcome after radical prostatectomy (RP) or radiotherapy (RT), and clinical outcomes after RT, were also entered. The data are available at http://www.capcalculator.org. RESULTS Entering a patient’s 2002 clinical T stage, Gleason score and pretreatment PSA level, and details from core biopsy findings, into the CaP Calculator provides estimates from predictive models of pathological extent of disease, four models for ECE, four for SVI and eight for LNI. The 5-year estimates of PSA relapse-free survival after RT and 10-year estimates after RP were available. A printout can be generated with individualized results for clinicians to review with each patient. CONCLUSIONS The CaP Calculator is a free, online ‘clearing house’ of several predictive models for prostate cancer, available in an accessible, user-friendly format. With further development and testing with patients, the CaP Calculator might be a useful decision-support tool to help doctors promote evidence-based shared decision-making in prostate cancer. PMID:20346051

  19. Improving Decision Making about Genetic Testing in the Clinic: An Overview of Effective Knowledge Translation Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Légaré, France; Robitaille, Hubert; Gane, Claire; Hébert, Jessica; Labrecque, Michel; Rousseau, François

    2016-01-01

    Background Knowledge translation (KT) interventions are attempts to change behavior in keeping with scientific evidence. While genetic tests are increasingly available to healthcare consumers in the clinic, evidence about their benefits is unclear and decisions about genetic testing are thus difficult for all parties. Objective We sought to identify KT interventions that involved decisions about genetic testing in the clinical context and to assess their effectiveness for improving decision making in terms of behavior change, increased knowledge and wellbeing. Methods We searched for trials assessing KT interventions in the context of genetic testing up to March 2014 in all systematic reviews (n = 153) published by two Cochrane review groups: Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) and Consumers and Communication. Results We retrieved 2473 unique trials of which we retained only 28 (1%). Two EPOC reviews yielded two trials of KT interventions: audit and feedback (n = 1) and educational outreach (n = 1). Both targeted health professionals and the KT intervention they assessed was found to be effective. Four Consumers and Communication reviews yielded 26 trials: decision aids (n = 15), communication of DNA-based disease risk estimates (n = 7), personalized risk communication (n = 3) and mobile phone messaging (n = 1). Among these, 25 trials targeted only health consumers or patients and the KT interventions were found to be effective in four trials, partly effective in seven, and ineffective in four. Lastly, only one trial targeted both physicians and patients and was found to be effective. Conclusions More research on the effectiveness of KT interventions regarding genetic testing in the clinical context may contribute to patients making informed value-based decisions and drawing the maximum benefit from clinical applications of genetic and genomic innovations. PMID:26938633

  20. Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) for preventive management of COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of information and communication technologies to manage chronic diseases allows the application of integrated care pathways, and the optimization and standardization of care processes. Decision support tools can assist in the adherence to best-practice medicine in critical decision points during the execution of a care pathway. Objectives The objectives are to design, develop, and assess a clinical decision support system (CDSS) offering a suite of services for the early detection and assessment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which can be easily integrated into a healthcare providers' work-flow. Methods The software architecture model for the CDSS, interoperable clinical-knowledge representation, and inference engine were designed and implemented to form a base CDSS framework. The CDSS functionalities were iteratively developed through requirement-adjustment/development/validation cycles using enterprise-grade software-engineering methodologies and technologies. Within each cycle, clinical-knowledge acquisition was performed by a health-informatics engineer and a clinical-expert team. Results A suite of decision-support web services for (i) COPD early detection and diagnosis, (ii) spirometry quality-control support, (iii) patient stratification, was deployed in a secured environment on-line. The CDSS diagnostic performance was assessed using a validation set of 323 cases with 90% specificity, and 96% sensitivity. Web services were integrated in existing health information system platforms. Conclusions Specialized decision support can be offered as a complementary service to existing policies of integrated care for chronic-disease management. The CDSS was able to issue recommendations that have a high degree of accuracy to support COPD case-finding. Integration into healthcare providers' work-flow can be achieved seamlessly through the use of a modular design and service-oriented architecture that connect to existing health information systems. PMID:25471545

  1. Clinical Decision Support for Whole Genome Sequence Information Leveraging a Service-Oriented Architecture: a Prototype

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Brandon M.; Rodriguez-Loya, Salvador; Eilbeck, Karen; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2014-01-01

    Whole genome sequence (WGS) information could soon be routinely available to clinicians to support the personalized care of their patients. At such time, clinical decision support (CDS) integrated into the clinical workflow will likely be necessary to support genome-guided clinical care. Nevertheless, developing CDS capabilities for WGS information presents many unique challenges that need to be overcome for such approaches to be effective. In this manuscript, we describe the development of a prototype CDS system that is capable of providing genome-guided CDS at the point of care and within the clinical workflow. To demonstrate the functionality of this prototype, we implemented a clinical scenario of a hypothetical patient at high risk for Lynch Syndrome based on his genomic information. We demonstrate that this system can effectively use service-oriented architecture principles and standards-based components to deliver point of care CDS for WGS information in real-time. PMID:25954430

  2. Risks, dangers and competing clinical decisions on venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in hospital care.

    PubMed

    Boiko, Olga; Sheaff, Rod; Child, Susan; Gericke, Christian A

    2014-07-01

    Drawing on wider sociologies of risk, this article examines the complexity of clinical risks and their management, focusing on risk management systems, expert decision-making and safety standards in health care. At the time of this study preventing venous thromboembolism (VTE) among in-patients was one of the top priorities for hospital safety in the English National Health Service (NHS). An analysis of 50 interviews examining hospital professionals' perceptions about VTE risks and prophylaxis illuminates how National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines influenced clinical decision-making in four hospitals in one NHS region. We examine four themes: the identification of new risks, the institutionalisation and management of risk, the relationship between risk and danger and the tensions between risk management systems and expert decision-making. The implementation of NICE guidelines for VTE prevention extended managerial control over risk management but some irreducible clinical dangers remained that were beyond the scope of the new VTE risk management systems. Linking sociologies of risk with the realities of hospital risk management reveals the capacity of these theories to illuminate both the possibilities and the limits of managerialism in health care. PMID:24635764

  3. The Use of Intuition in Homeopathic Clinical Decision Making: An Interpretative Phenomenological Study

    PubMed Central

    Brien, Sarah; Dibb, Bridget; Burch, Alex

    2011-01-01

    While intuition plays a role in clinical decision making within conventional medicine, little is understood about its use in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The aim of this qualitative study was to investigate intuition from the perspective of homeopathic practitioners; its' manifestation, how it was recognized, its origins and when it was used within daily clinical practice. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with clinically experienced non-National Health Service (NHS) UK homeopathic practitioners. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to analyze the data. Homeopaths reported many similarities with conventional medical practitioner regarding the nature, perceived origin and manifestation of their intuitions in clinical practice. Intuition was used in two key aspects of the consultation: (i) to enhance the practitioner-patient relationship, these were generally trusted; and (ii) intuitions relating to the prescribing decision. Homeopaths were cautious about these latter intuitions, testing any intuitive thoughts through deductive reasoning before accepting them. Their reluctance is not surprising given the consequences for patient care, but we propose this also reflects homeopaths' sensitivity to the academic and medical mistrust of both homeopathy and intuition. This study is the first to explore the use of intuition in decision making in any form of complementary medicine. The similarities with conventional practitioners may provide confidence in validating intuition as a legitimate part of the decision making process for these specific practitioners. Further work is needed to elucidate if these findings reflect intuitive use in clinical practice of other CAM practitioners in both private and NHS (i.e., time limited) settings. PMID:19773389

  4. Designing a Clinical Framework to Guide Gross Motor Intervention Decisions for Infants and Young Children with Hypotonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darrah, Johanna; O'Donnell, Maureen; Lam, Joyce; Story, Maureen; Wickenheiser, Diane; Xu, Kaishou; Jin, Xiaokun

    2013-01-01

    Clinical practice frameworks are a valuable component of clinical education, promoting informed clinical decision making based on the best available evidence and/or clinical experience. They encourage standardized intervention approaches and evaluation of practice. Based on an international project to support the development of an enhanced service…

  5. Effects of a computerized cardiac teletriage decision support system on nurse performance: results of a controlled human factors experiment using a mid-fidelity prototype.

    PubMed

    Somoza, Kirsten Carroll; Momtahan, Kathryn; Lindgaard, Gitte

    2007-01-01

    A gap exists in cardiac care between known best practices and the actual level of care administered. To help bridge this gap, a proof of concept interface for a PDA-based decision support system (DSS) was designed for cardiac care nurses engaged in teletriage. This interface was developed through a user-centered design process. Quality of assessment, quality of recommendations, and number of questions asked were measured. Cardiac floor nurses' assessment quality performance, but not their recommendation quality performance, improved with the DSS. Nurses asked more questions with the DSS than without it, and these additional questions were predominantly classifiable as essential or beneficial to a good assessment. The average participant satisfaction score with the DSS was above neutral. PMID:17911686

  6. A Windows-based tool for the study of clinical decision-making.

    PubMed

    Mackel, J V; Farris, H; Mittman, B S; Wilkes, M; Kanouse, D E

    1995-01-01

    Studies of health-provider decision-making, and of their practice patterns, play a central role in efforts to improve the quality and effectiveness of care and in decreasing costs of healthcare delivery systems. Researchers from a variety of disciplines have studied a broad range of clinical conditions, using a number of methodological approaches and measurement tools, including self-report, written clinical vignettes, simulated clinical encounters using actors as patients and analysis of medical records and administrative data. Although these provide information about the outcomes of clinical decisions, they provide little or no information about the process of the decision. Most clinicians agree that the decision process is as important as the outcome, and indeed it is not unusual to have an exemplary process but a poor outcome. Process information is therefore a crucial dimension of care evaluation. In this paper, we describe a new software product that was originally used to measure diagnostic reasoning in the basic medical science of immunology; subsequently adapted to measure key steps in the clinical decision-making process. This Windows-based software is user-friendly, inexpensive, and requires only commonly available hardware for its operation. It is very flexible, permitting the creation of unlimited numbers and types of clinical scenarios, with diagnostic and/or management approaches. Being clinically "real-world," the scenarios are familiar to the user, who is therefore likely to respond in a "real-world" fashion, with the consequent improved accuracy of data. In addition, a wide range of users may be accommodated. The clinical activities of physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and any other clinical providers may be measured and analyzed by the system. Non-clinical providers, such as managers and administrators, could also be assessed. The system has three major modes. In the Authoring Mode, the author creates a menu, which is common to a number of linked scenarios. For example, the menu for physicians might include the History, Physical examination, Laboratory tests, Radiology, Consultations, etc. The actual details of each related clinical case may then be varied. There is virtually unlimited flexibility in the design of the menu and the clinical details, depending on the needs of the author, and the type of information desired. Both diagnostic and management scenarios are easily constructed. The cost for each individual step may be assigned, using any scoring scale desired. Actual dollar costs, or a suitable point score, are equally possible. Once the menu and associated scenarios are generated, the candidate is asked to solve the clinical problem in the User Mode. The candidate obtains information by "mouse-clicking," so it is not necessary to be a computer expert to use the system. Eventually, the candidate is presented with a short vignette outlining the desired solution, which may include the authors comments, sources for further information, etc. In the Data Collection and Analysis Mode, the candidate proceeds to solve the scenario, the software captures and stores each individual information request i.e., each step in the candidates reasoning process. Thus, the reasoning process can be examined, including timing and order and types of information used; this may be done both for individual candidates, and also for groups. A "gold standard" reasoning may be predetermined by the author for comparison purposes. The software has already been used to teach immunology to medical students, and is currently being expanded to train gynecology surgeons in the use of Clinical Practice Guidelines. The software has potential applications in many aspects of the healthcare field. For educators, it could serve in traditional exit examinations for the clinical disciplines, both undergraduate and postgraduate. (abstract truncated) PMID:8591547

  7. Clinical Decision Support using a Terminology Server to improve Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Jimenez, Alba; Moreno-Conde, Alberto; Martínez-García, Alicia; Marín-León, Ignacio; Medrano-Ortega, Francisco Javier; Parra-Calderón, Carlos L

    2015-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) are software applications that support clinicians in making healthcare decisions providing relevant information for individual patients about their specific conditions. The lack of integration between CDSS and Electronic Health Record (EHR) has been identified as a significant barrier to CDSS development and adoption. Andalusia Healthcare Public System (AHPS) provides an interoperable health information infrastructure based on a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) that eases CDSS implementation. This paper details the deployment of a CDSS jointly with the deployment of a Terminology Server (TS) within the AHPS infrastructure. It also explains a case study about the application of decision support to thromboembolism patients and its potential impact on improving patient safety. We will apply the inSPECt tool proposal to evaluate the appropriateness of alerts in this scenario. PMID:25991120

  8. Lung Cancer Assistant: a hybrid clinical decision support application for lung cancer care.

    PubMed

    Sesen, M Berkan; Peake, Michael D; Banares-Alcantara, Rene; Tse, Donald; Kadir, Timor; Stanley, Roz; Gleeson, Fergus; Brady, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings are becoming the model of care for cancer patients worldwide. While MDTs have improved the quality of cancer care, the meetings impose substantial time pressure on the members, who generally attend several such MDTs. We describe Lung Cancer Assistant (LCA), a clinical decision support (CDS) prototype designed to assist the experts in the treatment selection decisions in the lung cancer MDTs. A novel feature of LCA is its ability to provide rule-based and probabilistic decision support within a single platform. The guideline-based CDS is based on clinical guideline rules, while the probabilistic CDS is based on a Bayesian network trained on the English Lung Cancer Audit Database (LUCADA). We assess rule-based and probabilistic recommendations based on their concordances with the treatments recorded in LUCADA. Our results reveal that the guideline rule-based recommendations perform well in simulating the recorded treatments with exact and partial concordance rates of 0.57 and 0.79, respectively. On the other hand, the exact and partial concordance rates achieved with probabilistic results are relatively poorer with 0.27 and 0.76. However, probabilistic decision support fulfils a complementary role in providing accurate survival estimations. Compared to recorded treatments, both CDS approaches promote higher resection rates and multimodality treatments. PMID:24990290

  9. THE IMPACT OF RACISM ON CLINICIAN COGNITION, BEHAVIOR, AND CLINICAL DECISION MAKING

    PubMed Central

    van Ryn, Michelle; Burgess, Diana J.; Dovidio, John F.; Phelan, Sean M.; Saha, Somnath; Malat, Jennifer; Griffin, Joan M.; Fu, Steven S.; Perry, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    Over the past two decades, thousands of studies have demonstrated that Blacks receive lower quality medical care than Whites, independent of disease status, setting, insurance, and other clinically relevant factors. Despite this, there has been little progress towards eradicating these inequities. Almost a decade ago we proposed a conceptual model identifying mechanisms through which clinicians behavior, cognition, and decision making might be influenced by implicit racial biases and explicit racial stereotypes, and thereby contribute to racial inequities in care. Empirical evidence has supported many of these hypothesized mechanisms, demonstrating that White medical care clinicians: (1) hold negative implicit racial biases and explicit racial stereotypes, (2) have implicit racial biases that persist independently of and in contrast to their explicit (conscious) racial attitudes, and (3) can be influenced by racial bias in their clinical decision making and behavior during encounters with Black patients. This paper applies evidence from several disciplines to further specify our original model and elaborate on the ways racism can interact with cognitive biases to affect clinicians behavior and decisions and in turn, patient behavior and decisions. We then highlight avenues for intervention and make specific recommendations to medical care and grant-making organizations. PMID:24761152

  10. THE IMPACT OF RACISM ON CLINICIAN COGNITION, BEHAVIOR, AND CLINICAL DECISION MAKING.

    PubMed

    van Ryn, Michelle; Burgess, Diana J; Dovidio, John F; Phelan, Sean M; Saha, Somnath; Malat, Jennifer; Griffin, Joan M; Fu, Steven S; Perry, Sylvia

    2011-04-01

    Over the past two decades, thousands of studies have demonstrated that Blacks receive lower quality medical care than Whites, independent of disease status, setting, insurance, and other clinically relevant factors. Despite this, there has been little progress towards eradicating these inequities. Almost a decade ago we proposed a conceptual model identifying mechanisms through which clinicians' behavior, cognition, and decision making might be influenced by implicit racial biases and explicit racial stereotypes, and thereby contribute to racial inequities in care. Empirical evidence has supported many of these hypothesized mechanisms, demonstrating that White medical care clinicians: (1) hold negative implicit racial biases and explicit racial stereotypes, (2) have implicit racial biases that persist independently of and in contrast to their explicit (conscious) racial attitudes, and (3) can be influenced by racial bias in their clinical decision making and behavior during encounters with Black patients. This paper applies evidence from several disciplines to further specify our original model and elaborate on the ways racism can interact with cognitive biases to affect clinicians' behavior and decisions and in turn, patient behavior and decisions. We then highlight avenues for intervention and make specific recommendations to medical care and grant-making organizations. PMID:24761152

  11. Lung Cancer Assistant: a hybrid clinical decision support application for lung cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Sesen, M. Berkan; Peake, Michael D.; Banares-Alcantara, Rene; Tse, Donald; Kadir, Timor; Stanley, Roz; Gleeson, Fergus; Brady, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings are becoming the model of care for cancer patients worldwide. While MDTs have improved the quality of cancer care, the meetings impose substantial time pressure on the members, who generally attend several such MDTs. We describe Lung Cancer Assistant (LCA), a clinical decision support (CDS) prototype designed to assist the experts in the treatment selection decisions in the lung cancer MDTs. A novel feature of LCA is its ability to provide rule-based and probabilistic decision support within a single platform. The guideline-based CDS is based on clinical guideline rules, while the probabilistic CDS is based on a Bayesian network trained on the English Lung Cancer Audit Database (LUCADA). We assess rule-based and probabilistic recommendations based on their concordances with the treatments recorded in LUCADA. Our results reveal that the guideline rule-based recommendations perform well in simulating the recorded treatments with exact and partial concordance rates of 0.57 and 0.79, respectively. On the other hand, the exact and partial concordance rates achieved with probabilistic results are relatively poorer with 0.27 and 0.76. However, probabilistic decision support fulfils a complementary role in providing accurate survival estimations. Compared to recorded treatments, both CDS approaches promote higher resection rates and multimodality treatments. PMID:24990290

  12. Diagnostic testing and treatment under ambiguity: Using decision analysis to inform clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Manski, Charles F.

    2013-01-01

    Partial knowledge of patient health status and treatment response is a pervasive concern in medical decision making. Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) make recommendations intended to optimize patient care, but optimization typically is infeasible with partial knowledge. Decision analysis shows that a clinician’s objective, knowledge, and decision criterion should jointly determine the care he prescribes. To demonstrate, this paper studies a common scenario regarding diagnostic testing and treatment. A patient presents to a clinician, who obtains initial evidence on health status. The clinician can prescribe a treatment immediately or he can order a test yielding further evidence that may be useful in predicting treatment response. In the latter case, he prescribes a treatment after observation of the test result. I analyze this scenario in three steps. The first poses a welfare function and characterizes optimal care. The second describes partial knowledge of response to testing and treatment that might realistically be available. The third considers decision criteria. I conclude with reconsideration of clinical practice guidelines. PMID:23341625

  13. A legal framework to enable sharing of Clinical Decision Support knowledge and services across institutional boundaries.

    PubMed

    Hongsermeier, Tonya; Maviglia, Saverio; Tsurikova, Lana; Bogaty, Dan; Rocha, Roberto A; Goldberg, Howard; Meltzer, Seth; Middleton, Blackford

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the CDS Consortium (CDSC) is to assess, define, demonstrate, and evaluate best practices for knowledge management and clinical decision support in healthcare information technology at scale - across multiple ambulatory care settings and Electronic Health Record technology platforms. In the course of the CDSC research effort, it became evident that a sound legal foundation was required for knowledge sharing and clinical decision support services in order to address data sharing, intellectual property, accountability, and liability concerns. This paper outlines the framework utilized for developing agreements in support of sharing, accessing, and publishing content via the CDSC Knowledge Management Portal as well as an agreement in support of deployment and consumption of CDSC developed web services in the context of a research project under IRB oversight. PMID:22195151

  14. A Legal Framework to Enable Sharing of Clinical Decision Support Knowledge and Services across Institutional Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Hongsermeier, Tonya; Maviglia, Saverio; Tsurikova, Lana; Bogaty, Dan; Rocha, Roberto A.; Goldberg, Howard; Meltzer, Seth; Middleton, Blackford

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the CDS Consortium (CDSC) is to assess, define, demonstrate, and evaluate best practices for knowledge management and clinical decision support in healthcare information technology at scale across multiple ambulatory care settings and Electronic Health Record technology platforms. In the course of the CDSC research effort, it became evident that a sound legal foundation was required for knowledge sharing and clinical decision support services in order to address data sharing, intellectual property, accountability, and liability concerns. This paper outlines the framework utilized for developing agreements in support of sharing, accessing, and publishing content via the CDSC Knowledge Management Portal as well as an agreement in support of deployment and consumption of CDSC developed web services in the context of a research project under IRB oversight. PMID:22195151

  15. The perils of meta-regression to identify clinical decision support system success factors

    PubMed Central

    Fillmore, Christopher L.; Rommel, Casey A.; Welch, Brandon M.; Zhang, Mingyuan; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2016-01-01

    Clinical decision support interventions are typically heterogeneous in nature, making it difficult to identify why some interventions succeed while others do not. One approach to identify factors important to the success of health information systems is the use of meta-regression techniques, in which potential explanatory factors are correlated with the outcome of interest. This approach, however, can result in misleading conclusions due to several issues. In this manuscript, we present a cautionary case study in the context of clinical decision support systems to illustrate the limitations of this type of analysis. We then discuss implications and recommendations for future work aimed at identifying success factors of medical informatics interventions. In particular, we identify the need for head-to-head trials in which the importance of system features is directly evaluated in a prospective manner. PMID:25998518

  16. A descriptive analysis of a nursing home clinical information system with decision support.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Gregory L

    2008-01-01

    Clinical information systems are absent in most nursing homes. Therefore, the vast numbers of elderly people who reside in the facilities are not reaping the benefits that these systems are thought to have, including better management of chronic conditions, greater efficiencies, and improved access to information. It is important for early adopters of nursing home information systems to share experiences to foster implementation of other systems and improve design and evaluation of these systems. The purpose of this study is to describe the activity of clinical decision support alerts and associated triggers during an analysis of an information system implemented in three nursing homes. The proportion of triggers used for each active alert in each alert category is described across resident diagnoses within the nursing home decision support system during six months of data collection. PMID:18784850

  17. Computerized Construction Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moucka, Jan; Piskova, Vera

    1971-01-01

    Two Czechoslovakian architects describe how they scheduled construction projects on a statewide scale by computerizing the priority for projects, the resource capacity, the time coordination, and the construction schedules. (Author)

  18. Computerized Fleet Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cataldo, John J.

    1985-01-01

    The Computerized Fleet Maintenance (CFM) program of a New York school district has major component areas of garage operation, vehicle replacement, and fuel consumption. CFM detects high expenditures and provides the rationale for bus replacement. (MLF)

  19. Computerized Interactive Harness Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billitti, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Computerized interactive harness engineering program inexpensive, interactive system for learning and using engineering approach to interconnection systems. Basically data-base system that stores information as files of individual connectors and handles wiring information in circuit groups stored as records.

  20. Symptomatic peripheral arterial disease: the value of a validated questionnaire and a clinical decision rule

    PubMed Central

    Bendermacher, Bianca LW; Teijink, Joep AW; Willigendael, Edith M; Bartelink, Marie-Louise; Büller, Harry R; Peters, Ron JG; Boiten, Jelis; Langenberg, Machteld; Prins, Martin H

    2006-01-01

    Background If a validated questionnaire, when applied to patients reporting with symptoms of intermittent claudication, could adequately discriminate between those with and without peripheral arterial disease, GPs could avoid the diagnostic measurement of the ankle brachial index. Aim To investigate the Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire (ECQ) in general practice and to develop a clinical decision rule based on risk factors to enable GPs to easily assess the likelihood of peripheral arterial disease. Design of study An observational study. Setting General practice in The Netherlands. Method This observational study included patients of ≥55 years visiting their GP for symptoms suggestive of intermittent claudication or with one risk factor. The ECQ and the ankle brachial index were performed. The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease, defined as an ankle brachial index <0.9, was related to risk factors using logistic regression analyses, on which a clinical decision rule was developed and related to the presence of peripheral arterial disease. Results Of the 4790 included patients visiting their GP with symptoms suggestive of intermittent claudication, 4527 were eligible for analyses. The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in this group was 48.3%. The sensitivity of the ECQ was only 56.2%. The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in a clinical decision rule that included age, male sex, smoking, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and a positive ECQ, increased from 14% in the lowest to 76% in the highest category. Conclusion This study indicates that the ECQ alone has an inadequate diagnostic value in detecting patients with peripheral arterial disease. The ankle brachial index should be performed to diagnose peripheral arterial disease in patients with complaints suggestive of intermittent claudication, although our clinical decision rule could help to differentiate between extremely high and lower prevalence of peripheral arterial disease. PMID:17132381

  1. A programmable rules engine to provide clinical decision support using HTML forms.

    PubMed

    Heusinkveld, J; Geissbuhler, A; Sheshelidze, D; Miller, R

    1999-01-01

    The authors have developed a simple method for specifying rules to be applied to information on HTML forms. This approach allows clinical experts, who lack the programming expertise needed to write CGI scripts, to construct and maintain domain-specific knowledge and ordering capabilities within WizOrder, the order-entry and decision support system used at Vanderbilt Hospital. The clinical knowledge base maintainers use HTML editors to create forms and spreadsheet programs for rule entry. A test environment has been developed which uses Netscape to display forms; the production environment displays forms using an embedded browser. PMID:10566470

  2. Discriminative distance functions and the patient neighborhood graph for clinical decision support.

    PubMed

    Tsymbal, Alexey; Huber, Martin; Zhou, Shaohua Kevin

    2010-01-01

    There are two essential reasons for the slow progress in the acceptance of clinical similarity search-based decision support systems (DSSs); the especial complexity of biomedical data making it difficult to define a meaningful and effective distance function and the lack of transparency and explanation ability in many existing DSSs. In this chapter, we address these two problems by introducing a novel technique for visualizing patient similarity with neighborhood graphs and by considering two techniques for learning discriminative distance functions. We present an experimental study and discuss our implementation of similarity visualization within a clinical DSS. PMID:20865536

  3. Interoperability of clinical decision-support systems and electronic health records using archetypes: a case study in clinical trial eligibility.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Mar; Maldonado, Jose A; Martínez-Salvador, Begoña; Boscá, Diego; Robles, Montserrat

    2013-08-01

    Clinical decision-support systems (CDSSs) comprise systems as diverse as sophisticated platforms to store and manage clinical data, tools to alert clinicians of problematic situations, or decision-making tools to assist clinicians. Irrespective of the kind of decision-support task CDSSs should be smoothly integrated within the clinical information system, interacting with other components, in particular with the electronic health record (EHR). However, despite decades of developments, most CDSSs lack interoperability features. We deal with the interoperability problem of CDSSs and EHRs by exploiting the dual-model methodology. This methodology distinguishes a reference model and archetypes. A reference model is represented by a stable and small object-oriented model that describes the generic properties of health record information. For their part, archetypes are reusable and domain-specific definitions of clinical concepts in the form of structured and constrained combinations of the entities of the reference model. We rely on archetypes to make the CDSS compatible with EHRs from different institutions. Concretely, we use archetypes for modelling the clinical concepts that the CDSS requires, in conjunction with a series of knowledge-intensive mappings relating the archetypes to the data sources (EHR and/or other archetypes) they depend on. We introduce a comprehensive approach, including a set of tools as well as methodological guidelines, to deal with the interoperability of CDSSs and EHRs based on archetypes. Archetypes are used to build a conceptual layer of the kind of a virtual health record (VHR) over the EHR whose contents need to be integrated and used in the CDSS, associating them with structural and terminology-based semantics. Subsequently, the archetypes are mapped to the EHR by means of an expressive mapping language and specific-purpose tools. We also describe a case study where the tools and methodology have been employed in a CDSS to support patient recruitment in the framework of a clinical trial for colorectal cancer screening. The utilisation of archetypes not only has proved satisfactory to achieve interoperability between CDSSs and EHRs but also offers various advantages, in particular from a data model perspective. First, the VHR/data models we work with are of a high level of abstraction and can incorporate semantic descriptions. Second, archetypes can potentially deal with different EHR architectures, due to their deliberate independence of the reference model. Third, the archetype instances we obtain are valid instances of the underlying reference model, which would enable e.g. feeding back the EHR with data derived by abstraction mechanisms. Lastly, the medical and technical validity of archetype models would be assured, since in principle clinicians should be the main actors in their development. PMID:23707417

  4. Ending the technology paradox: healthcare management technologies for clinical decision making.

    PubMed

    Karys, A

    1998-01-01

    As this article has shown, advances are beginning to put an end to the technology paradox that has hindered the industry's efforts to manage care better. Whereas in the past the management side of the healthcare industry has been slow to adopt new technologies, recent years have seen an explosion in the development and use of new tools for managing care. Most of these tools have traditionally focused on managing the administrative and financial aspects of providing care; however, that has also begun to change. Software systems incorporating clinical decision support criteria permit healthcare professionals to make clinical decision-making part of the care management process conveniently and efficiently. Clinical decision support criteria are also helping to change the focus of managed care. At the beginning of the managed care era, insurers and managed care companies concentrated primarily on reigning in costs, in many cases by restricting the types and duration of care provided to their members. Although these restrictions succeeded in conserving resources, they also helped foster an uneasy atmosphere between payers and providers, many of whom felt that their clinical judgment was too often overruled by the "bean counters." At the same time, many healthcare consumers grew to distrust both managed care professionals and providers, feeling that medical decisions were often made for the wrong reasons. However, as managed care companies have acknowledged that the most efficient way to provide care is to provide appropriate care, the focus has begun to move toward the clinical side of healthcare. Although healthcare organizations are still relying on financial management tools, they are also looking for systems that can make the clinical decision-making process more efficient and effective. The end result is that the healthcare industry is able to assure the best, most appropriate treatment while conserving resources. With the constant stream of new technologies into the healthcare management arena, healthcare professionals will have access to new tools to make the management process even more efficient. The healthcare industry's technology paradox will soon be a thing of the past. PMID:10338784

  5. Influence of Patients’ Socioeconomic Status on Clinical Management Decisions: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Bernheim, Susannah M.; Ross, Joseph S.; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Bradley, Elizabeth H.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE Little is known about how patients’ socioeconomic status (SES) influences physicians’ clinical management decisions, although this information may have important implications for understanding inequities in health care quality. We investigated physician perspectives on how patients’ SES influences care. METHODS The study consisted of in-depth semistructured interviews with primary care physicians in Connecticut. Investigators coded interviews line by line and refined the coding structure and interview guide based on successive interviews. Recurrent themes emerged through iterative analysis of codes and tagged quotations. RESULTS We interviewed 18 physicians from varied practice settings, 6 female, 9 from minority racial backgrounds, and 3 of Hispanic ethnicity. Four themes emerged from our interviews: (1) physicians held conflicting views about the effect of patient SES on clinical management, (2) physicians believed that changes in clinical management based on the patient’s SES were made in the patient’s interest, (3) physicians varied in the degree to which they thought changes in clinical management influenced patient outcomes, and (4) physicians faced personal and financial strains when caring for patients of low SES. CONCLUSIONS Physicians indicated that patient SES did affect their clinical management decisions. As a result, physicians commonly undertook changes to their management plan in an effort to enhance patient outcomes, but they experienced numerous strains when trying to balance what they believed was feasible for the patient with what they perceived as established standards of care. PMID:18195315

  6. Privacy-preserving clinical decision support system using Gaussian kernel-based classification.

    PubMed

    Rahulamathavan, Yogachandran; Veluru, Suresh; Phan, Raphael C-W; Chambers, Jonathon A; Rajarajan, Muttukrishnan

    2014-01-01

    A clinical decision support system forms a critical capability to link health observations with health knowledge to influence choices by clinicians for improved healthcare. Recent trends toward remote outsourcing can be exploited to provide efficient and accurate clinical decision support in healthcare. In this scenario, clinicians can use the health knowledge located in remote servers via the Internet to diagnose their patients. However, the fact that these servers are third party and therefore potentially not fully trusted raises possible privacy concerns. In this paper, we propose a novel privacy-preserving protocol for a clinical decision support system where the patients' data always remain in an encrypted form during the diagnosis process. Hence, the server involved in the diagnosis process is not able to learn any extra knowledge about the patient's data and results. Our experimental results on popular medical datasets from UCI-database demonstrate that the accuracy of the proposed protocol is up to 97.21% and the privacy of patient data is not compromised. PMID:24403404

  7. A collaborative teaching strategy for enhancing learning of evidence-based clinical decision-making.

    PubMed

    Scott, P J; Altenburger, P A; Kean, J

    2011-01-01

    The educational literature cites a lack of student motivation to learn how to use research evidence in clinical decision-making because the students do not observe clinicians using evidence. This lack of motivation presents a challenge to educators as they seek to instill the value of evidence-based clinical decision-making (EBCD) in students. One problem is that students in entry-level programs do not have the experience needed to know what to look for, and secondly, clinical decision-making is contextually based in a patient problem. Our approach offers one solution to bridging the gap between classroom teaching and real-world implementation of EBCD through a three-phase collaborative approach. Occupational and physical therapy students are partnered with clinicians to find and appraise evidence to answer the real-world questions posed by these therapists. This paper describes the implementation of the partnership, teaching/learning outcomes, logistics, and implications for clinicians. We found this approach increased student motivation and greatly enhanced the learning experience. Future directions include implementing a framework which allows for the assessment of the strategy on the facility and creates opportunities to integrate the use of EBCD in all aspects of facility practice. PMID:21927777

  8. Health technology assessment review: Computerized glucose regulation in the intensive care unit - how to create artificial control

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Current care guidelines recommend glucose control (GC) in critically ill patients. To achieve GC, many ICUs have implemented a (nurse-based) protocol on paper. However, such protocols are often complex, time-consuming, and can cause iatrogenic hypoglycemia. Computerized glucose regulation protocols may improve patient safety, efficiency, and nurse compliance. Such computerized clinical decision support systems (Cuss) use more complex logic to provide an insulin infusion rate based on previous blood glucose levels and other parameters. A computerized CDSS for glucose control has the potential to reduce overall workload, reduce the chance of human cognitive failure, and improve glucose control. Several computer-assisted glucose regulation programs have been published recently. In order of increasing complexity, the three main types of algorithms used are computerized flowcharts, Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID), and Model Predictive Control (MPC). PID is essentially a closed-loop feedback system, whereas MPC models the behavior of glucose and insulin in ICU patients. Although the best approach has not yet been determined, it should be noted that PID controllers are generally thought to be more robust than MPC systems. The computerized Cuss that are most likely to emerge are those that are fully a part of the routine workflow, use patient-specific characteristics and apply variable sampling intervals. PMID:19849827

  9. Formative Evaluation of Clinician Experience with Integrating Family History-Based Clinical Decision Support into Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Doerr, Megan; Edelman, Emily; Gabitzsch, Emily; Eng, Charis; Teng, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Family health history is a leading predictor of disease risk. Nonetheless, it is underutilized to guide care and, therefore, is ripe for health information technology intervention. To fill the family health history practice gap, Cleveland Clinic has developed a family health history collection and clinical decision support tool, MyFamily. This report describes the impact and process of implementing MyFamily into primary care, cancer survivorship and cancer genetics clinics. Ten providers participated in semi-structured interviews that were analyzed to identify opportunities for process improvement. Participants universally noted positive effects on patient care, including increases in quality, personalization of care and patient engagement. The impact on clinical workflow varied by practice setting, with differences observed in the ease of integration and the use of specific report elements. Tension between the length of the report and desired detail was appreciated. Barriers and facilitators to the process of implementation were noted, dominated by the theme of increased integration with the electronic medical record. These results fed real-time improvement cycles to reinforce clinician use. This model will be applied in future institutional efforts to integrate clinical genomic applications into practice and may be useful for other institutions considering the implementation of tools for personalizing medical management. PMID:25563219

  10. [Visual presentation of psychiatric clinical decision-making by "graphic assessment sheet for diagnoses and treatments"].

    PubMed

    Ota, Toshio; Yoshida, Sumiko; Tsunashima, Sousuke; Totsuka, Takao; Watanabe, Takafumi; Toyoshima, Ryoichi

    2011-01-01

    Psychiatrists often have to treat patients even when the clinical information is insufficient to make a definite diagnosis. This is the case especially when we are treating first-visit outpatients or inpatients who have just been admitted. One of the causes of information insufficiency is a delay in obtaining clinical information on the patient, and another is a lack of characteristic manifestations of the disease because of an immature developmental stage. Even in such situations, however, clinicians have to make reasonable judgements using the information that is available at that time. The framework for making judgements on such occasions, or "the framework of decision-making under imperfect-information conditions", is becoming more and more important in psychiatric clinical practice in Japan for the following reasons. First, team members in charge of a patient became very heterogeneous in terms of their career and motivation after the start of the new post-graduate clinical training system in Japan several years ago, resulting in a higher risk of miscommunication. Secondly, the need for precise explanation to patients and their families has become crucial in recent years as the result of various social changes. Ota T, one of the authors, once put forward the framework of decision-making under imperfect-information conditions on the basis of Bayesian statistics. In the present paper, in consideration of the above background, we devised a sheet for visualizing the above framework so that relevant staff could share the clinical decision-making process. Specifically, we visually arranged on a sheet of paper the components and variables of the framework, so that the staff could communicate with each other explicitly and precisely about the estimated probability of each possible disease, merits and demerits of each treatment option, etc. We employed the sheet on treating patients in our acute psychiatric ward, 2 of whom are presented in the paper. Discussions were made on the usefulness, limitations, and remaining problems. PMID:21882540

  11. Reproductive Ethics in Commercial Surrogacy: Decision-Making in IVF Clinics in New Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Tanderup, Malene; Reddy, Sunita; Patel, Tulsi; Nielsen, Birgitte Bruun

    2015-09-01

    As a neo-liberal economy, India has become one of the new health tourism destinations, with commercial gestational surrogacy as an expanding market. Yet the Indian Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) Bill has been pending for five years, and the guidelines issued by the Indian Council of Medical Research are somewhat vague and contradictory, resulting in self-regulated practices of fertility clinics. This paper broadly looks at clinical ethics in reproduction in the practice of surrogacy and decision-making in various procedures. Through empirical research in New Delhi, the capital of India, from December 2011 to November 2012, issues of decision-making on embryo transfer, fetal reduction, and mode of delivery were identified. Interviews were carried out with doctors in eighteen ART clinics, agents from four agencies, and fourteen surrogates. In aiming to fulfil the commissioning parents' demands, doctors were willing to go to the greatest extent possible in their medical practice. Autonomy and decision-making regarding choice of the number of embryos to transfer and the mode of delivery lay neither with commissioning parents nor surrogate mothers but mostly with doctors. In order to ensure higher success rates, surrogates faced the risk of multiple pregnancy and fetal reduction with little information regarding the risks involved. In the globalized market of commercial surrogacy in India, and with clinics compromising on ethics, there is an urgent need for formulation of regulative law for the clinical practice and maintenance of principles of reproductive ethics in order to ensure that the interests of surrogate mothers are safeguarded. PMID:26133889

  12. Clinical Recommendations in Medical Practice: A Proposed Framework to Reduce Bias and Improve the Quality of Medical Decisions.

    PubMed

    Alfandre, David

    2016-01-01

    Patients rely on, benefit from, and are strongly influenced by physicians' recommendations. In spite of the centrality and importance of physicians' recommendations to clinical care, there is only a scant literature describing the conceptual process of forming a clinical recommendation, and no discrete professional standards for making individual clinical recommendations. Evidence-based medicine and shared decision making together are intended to improve medical decision making, but there has been limited attention to how a recommendation is discretely formulated from either of those processes or how patients' preferences ought to be considered and how much weight they should hold. Moreover, physicians' bias has been reported to strongly influence how a recommendation is derived, thereby undermining the quality of healthcare decisions and patients' trust. To demonstrate a potential for improving the quality of decisions, this article proposes a conceptual framework for how physicians should reach a clinical recommendation and apply the process in practice. For preference-sensitive clinical decisions-that is, clinical decisions when patients' values and preferences are relevant-the process for reaching a recommendation should be transparent to patients and should be based solely on the medical evidence and patients' values and preferences. When patients' preferences for care do not prioritize health, physicians decide whether their recommendation will prioritize a welfare-enhancing versus an autonomy-enhancing approach. When there are gaps in understanding how physicians derive their clinical recommendations and how to further improve the quality of the decisions, the author calls for further empiric research. PMID:27045301

  13. Enabling health care decisionmaking through clinical decision support and knowledge management.

    PubMed Central

    Lobach, David; Sanders, Gillian D; Bright, Tiffani J; Wong, Anthony; Dhurjati, Ravi; Bristow, Erin; Bastian, Lori; Coeytaux, Remy; Samsa, Gregory; Hasselblad, Vic; Williams, John W; Wing, Liz; Musty, Michael; Kendrick, Amy S

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To catalogue study designs used to assess the clinical effectiveness of CDSSs and KMSs, to identify features that impact the success of CDSSs/KMSs, to document the impact of CDSSs/KMSs on outcomes, and to identify knowledge types that can be integrated into CDSSs/KMSs. DATA SOURCES MEDLINE(®), CINAHL(®), PsycINFO(®), and Web of Science(®). REVIEW METHODS We included studies published in English from January 1976 through December 2010. After screening titles and abstracts, full-text versions of articles were reviewed by two independent reviewers. Included articles were abstracted to evidence tables by two reviewers. Meta-analyses were performed for seven domains in which sufficient studies with common outcomes were included. RESULTS We identified 15,176 articles, from which 323 articles describing 311 unique studies including 160 reports on 148 randomized control trials (RCTs) were selected for inclusion. RCTs comprised 47.5 percent of the comparative studies on CDSSs/KMSs. Both commercially and locally developed CDSSs effectively improved health care process measures related to performing preventive services (n = 25; OR 1.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.27 to 1.58), ordering clinical studies (n = 20; OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.47 to 2.00), and prescribing therapies (n = 46; OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.35 to 1.82). Fourteen CDSS/KMS features were assessed for correlation with success of CDSSs/KMSs across all endpoints. Meta-analyses identified six new success features: Integration with charting or order entry system. Promotion of action rather than inaction. No need for additional clinician data entry. Justification of decision support via research evidence. Local user involvement. Provision of decision support results to patients as well as providers. Three previously identified success features were confirmed: Automatic provision of decision support as part of clinician workflow. Provision of decision support at time and location of decisionmaking. Provision of a recommendation, not just an assessment. Only 29 (19.6%) RCTs assessed the impact of CDSSs on clinical outcomes, 22 (14.9%) assessed costs, and 3 assessed KMSs on any outcomes. The primary source of knowledge used in CDSSs was derived from structured care protocols. CONCLUSIONS Strong evidence shows that CDSSs/KMSs are effective in improving health care process measures across diverse settings using both commercially and locally developed systems. Evidence for the effectiveness of CDSSs on clinical outcomes and costs and KMSs on any outcomes is minimal. Nine features of CDSSs/KMSs that correlate with a successful impact of clinical decision support have been newly identified or confirmed. PMID:23126650

  14. Impact of clinical and health services research projects on decision-making: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This article reports on the impact assessment experience of a funding program of non-commercial clinical and health services research. The aim was to assess the level of implementation of results from a subgroup of research projects (on respiratory diseases), and to detect barriers (or facilitators) in the translation of new knowledge to informed decision-making. Methods A qualitative study was performed. The sample consisted of six projects on respiratory diseases funded by the Agency for Health Quality and Assessment of Catalonia between 1996 and 2004. Semi-structured interviews to key informants including researchers and healthcare decision-makers were carried out. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed on an individual (key informant) and group (project) basis. In addition, the differences between achieved and expected impacts were described. Results Twenty-three semi-structured interviews were conducted. Most participants indicated changes in health services or clinical practice had resulted from research. The channels used to transfer new knowledge were mainly conventional ones, but also in less explicit ways, such as with the involvement of local scientific societies, or via debates and discussions with colleagues and local leaders. The barriers and facilitators identified were mostly organizational (in research management, and clinical and healthcare practice), although there were also some related to the nature of the research as well as personal factors. Both the expected and achieved impacts enabled the identification of the gaps between what is expected and what is truly achieved. Conclusions In this study and according to key informants, the impact of these research projects on decision-making can be direct (the application of a finding or innovation) or indirect, contributing to a more complex change in clinical practice and healthcare organization, both having other contextual factors. The channels used to transfer this new knowledge to clinical practice are complex. Local scientific societies and the relationships between researchers and decision-makers can play a very important role. Specifically, the relationships between managers and research teams and the mutual knowledge of their activity have shown to be effective in applying research funding to practice and decision-making. Finally the facilitating factors and barriers identified by the respondents are closely related to the idiosyncrasy of the human relations between the different stakeholders involved. PMID:23663364

  15. Professional autonomy in 21st century healthcare: nurses' accounts of clinical decision-making.

    PubMed

    Traynor, Michael; Boland, Maggie; Buus, Niels

    2010-10-01

    Autonomy in decision-making has traditionally been described as a feature of professional work, however the work of healthcare professionals has been seen as steadily encroached upon by State and managerialist forces. Nursing has faced particular problems in establishing itself as a credible profession for reasons including history, gender and a traditional subservience to medicine. This paper reports on a focus group study of UK nurses participating in post-qualifying professional development in 2008. Three groups of nurses in different specialist areas comprised a total of 26 participants. The study uses accounts of decision-making to gain insight into contemporary professional nursing. The study also aims to explore the usefulness of a theory of professional work set out by Jamous and Peloille (1970). The analysis draws on notions of interpretive repertoires and elements of narrative analysis. We identified two interpretive repertoires: 'clinical judgement' which was used to describe the different grounds for making judgements; and 'decision-making' which was used to describe organisational circumstances influencing decision-making. Jamous and Peloille's theory proved useful for interpreting instances where the nurses collectively withdrew from the potential dangers of too extreme claims for technicality or indeterminacy in their work. However, their theory did not explain the full range of accounts of decision-making that were given. Taken at face value, the accounts from the participants depict nurses as sometimes practising in indirect ways in order to have influence in the clinical and bureaucratic setting. However, a focus on language use and in particular, interpretive repertoires, has enabled us to suggest that despite an overall picture of severely limited autonomy, nurses in the groups reproduced stories of the successful accomplishment of moral and influential action. PMID:20797814

  16. A Framework for Usable and Effective Clinical Decision Support: Experience from the iCPR Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kannry, Joseph; McCullagh, Lauren; Kushniruk, Andre; Mann, Devin; Edonyabo, Daniel; McGinn, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The promise of Clinical Decision Support (CDS) has always been to transform patient care and improve patient outcomes through the delivery of timely and appropriate recommendations that are patient specific and, more often than not, are appropriately actionable. However, the users of CDS—providers—are frequently bombarded with inappropriate and inapplicable CDS that often are not informational, not integrated into the workflow, not patient specific, and that may present out of date and irrelevant recommendations. Methods: The integrated clinical prediction rule (iCPR) project was a randomized clinical trial (RCT) conducted to determine if a novel form of CDS, i.e., clinical prediction rules (CPRs), could be efficiently integrated into workflow and result in changes in outcomes (e.g., antibiotic ordering) when embedded within a commercial electronic health record (EHR). We use the lessons learned from the iCPR project to illustrate a framework for constructing usable, useful, and effective actionable CDS while employing off-the-shelf functionality in a production system. Innovations that make up the framework combine the following: (1) active and actionable decision support, (2) multiple rounds of usability testing with iterative development for user acceptance, (3) numerous context sensitive triggers, (4) dedicated training and support for users of the CDS tool for user adoption, and (5) support from clinical and administrative leadership. We define “context sensitive triggers” as being workflow events (i.e., context) that result in a CDS intervention. Discussion: Success of the framework can be measured by CDS adoption (i.e., intervention is being used), acceptance (compliance with recommendations), and clinical outcomes (where appropriate). This framework may have broader implications for the deployment of Health Information Technology (HIT). Results and Conclusion: iCPR was well adopted(57.4% of users) and accepted (42.7% of users). Usability testing identified and fixed many issues before the iCPR RCT. The level of leadership support and clinical guidance for iCPR was key in establishing a culture of acceptance for both the tool and its recommendations contributing to adoption and acceptance. The dedicated training and support lead to the majority of the residents reporting a high level of comfort with both iCPR tools strep pharyngitis (64.4 percent) and pneumonia (62.7 percent) as well as a high likelihood of using the tools in the future. A surprising framework addition resulted from usability testing: context sensitive triggers. PMID:26290888

  17. Patient exposure in the basic science classroom enhances differential diagnosis formation and clinical decision-making.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Justin G; Grande, Joseph P

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The authors proposed that introducing real patients into a pathology classroom early in medical education would help integrate fundamental principles and disease pathology with clinical presentation and medical history. Methods. Three patients with different pathologies described their history and presentation without revealing their diagnosis. Students were required to submit a differential diagnosis in writing, and then were able to ask questions to arrive at the correct diagnosis. Students were surveyed on the efficacy of patient-based learning. Results. Average student scores on the differential diagnosis assignments significantly improved 32% during the course. From the survey, 72% of students felt that patient encounters should be included in the pathology course next year. Seventy-four percent felt that the differential diagnosis assignments helped them develop clinical decision-making skills. Seventy-three percent felt that the experience helped them know what questions to ask patients. Eighty-six percent felt that they obtained a better understanding of patients' social and emotional challenges. Discussion. Having students work through the process of differential diagnosis formulation when encountering a real patient and their clinical presentation improved clinical decision-making skills and integrated fundamental concepts with disease pathology during a basic science pathology course. PMID:25755935

  18. Computerized Grading of Anatomy Laboratory Practical Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krippendorf, Beth B.; Bolender, David L.; Kolesari, Gary L.

    2008-01-01

    At the Medical College of Wisconsin, a procedure was developed to allow computerized grading and grade reporting of laboratory practical examinations in the Clinical Human Anatomy course. At the start of the course, first year medical students were given four Lists of Structures. On these lists, numbered items were arranged alphabetically; the…

  19. Structured representation for core elements of common clinical decision support interventions to facilitate knowledge sharing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Hongsermeier, Tonya; Boxwala, Aziz; Lewis, Janet; Kawamoto, Kensaku; Maviglia, Saverio; Gentile, Douglas; Teich, Jonathan M; Rocha, Roberto; Bell, Douglas; Middleton, Blackford

    2013-01-01

    At present, there are no widely accepted, standard approaches for representing computer-based clinical decision support (CDS) intervention types and their structural components. This study aimed to identify key requirements for the representation of five widely utilized CDS intervention types: alerts and reminders, order sets, infobuttons, documentation templates/forms, and relevant data presentation. An XML schema was proposed for representing these interventions and their core structural elements (e.g., general metadata, applicable clinical scenarios, CDS inputs, CDS outputs, and CDS logic) in a shareable manner. The schema was validated by building CDS artifacts for 22 different interventions, targeted toward guidelines and clinical conditions called for in the 2011 Meaningful Use criteria. Custom style sheets were developed to render the XML files in human-readable form. The CDS knowledge artifacts were shared via a public web portal. Our experience also identifies gaps in existing standards and informs future development of standards for CDS knowledge representation and sharing. PMID:23920543

  20. ASSESSMENT OF UPPER EXTREMITY IMPAIRMENT, FUNCTION, AND ACTIVITY FOLLOWING STROKE: FOUNDATIONS FOR CLINICAL DECISION MAKING

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Catherine E.; Bland, Marghuretta D.; Bailey, Ryan R.; Schaefer, Sydney Y.; Birkenmeier, Rebecca L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive approach for assessing the upper extremity (UE) after stroke. First, common upper extremity impairments and how to assess them are briefly discussed. While multiple UE impairments are typically present after stroke, the severity of one impairment, paresis, is the primary determinant of UE functional loss. Second, UE function is operationally defined and a number of clinical measures are discussed. It is important to consider how impairment and loss of function affect UE activity outside of the clinical environment. Thus, this review also identifies accelerometry as an objective method for assessing UE activity in daily life. Finally, the role that each of these levels of assessment should play in clinical decision making is discussed in order to optimize the provision of stroke rehabilitation services. PMID:22975740

  1. Use of electronic health records and clinical decision support systems for antimicrobial stewardship.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Graeme N; Van Schooneveld, Trevor C; Kullar, Ravina; Schulz, Lucas T; Duong, Phu; Postelnick, Michael

    2014-10-15

    Electronic health records (EHRs) and clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) have the potential to enhance antimicrobial stewardship. Numerous EHRs and CDSSs are available and have the potential to enable all clinicians and antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) to more efficiently review pharmacy, microbiology, and clinical data. Literature evaluating the impact of EHRs and CDSSs on patient outcomes is lacking, although EHRs with integrated CDSSs have demonstrated improvements in clinical and economic outcomes. Both technologies can be used to enhance existing ASPs and their implementation of core ASP strategies. Resolution of administrative, legal, and technical issues will enhance the acceptance and impact of these systems. EHR systems will increase in value when manufacturers include integrated ASP tools and CDSSs that do not require extensive commitment of information technology resources. Further research is needed to determine the true impact of current systems on ASP and the ultimate goal of improved patient outcomes through optimized antimicrobial use. PMID:25261539

  2. The Utilization of a Clinical Decision Support System to Manage Adult Type 2 Diabetes: A Correlational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faught, I. Charie

    2012-01-01

    While the Institute of Medicine (2001) has promoted health information technology to improve the process of care such as compliance with clinical practice guidelines and quicker access to clinical information, diagnostic tests, and treatment results, very little was known about how a clinical decision support system can contribute to diabetes

  3. The Utilization of a Clinical Decision Support System to Manage Adult Type 2 Diabetes: A Correlational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faught, I. Charie

    2012-01-01

    While the Institute of Medicine (2001) has promoted health information technology to improve the process of care such as compliance with clinical practice guidelines and quicker access to clinical information, diagnostic tests, and treatment results, very little was known about how a clinical decision support system can contribute to diabetes…

  4. Implementation of a clinical decision support system using a service model: results of a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Borbolla, Damian; Otero, Carlos; Lobach, David F; Kawamoto, Kensaku; Gomez Saldaño, Ana M; Staccia, Gustavo; Lopez, Gastón; Figar, Silvana; Luna, Daniel; Bernaldo de Quiros, Fernan Gonzalez

    2010-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that the quality of health care is inadequate, and healthcare organizations are increasingly turning to clinical decision support systems (CDSS) to address this problem. In implementing CDSS, a highly promising architectural approach is the use of decision support services. However, there are few reported examples of successful implementations of operational CDSS using this approach. Here, we describe how Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires evaluated the feasibility of using the SEBASTIAN clinical decision support Web service to implement a CDSS integrated with its electronic medical record system. The feasibility study consisted of three stages: first, end-user acceptability testing of the proposed CDSS through focus groups; second, the design and implementation of the system through integration of SEBASTIAN and the authoring of new rules; and finally, validation of system performance and accuracy. Through this study, we found that it is feasible to implement CDSS using a service-based approach. The CDSS is now under evaluation in a randomized controlled trial. The processes and lessons learned from this initiative are discussed. PMID:20841799

  5. Cancer Multidisciplinary Team Meetings: Evidence, Challenges, and the Role of Clinical Decision Support Technology

    PubMed Central

    Patkar, Vivek; Acosta, Dionisio; Davidson, Tim; Jones, Alison; Fox, John; Keshtgar, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Multidisciplinary team (MDT) model in cancer care was introduced and endorsed to ensure that care delivery is consistent with the best available evidence. Over the last few years, regular MDT meetings have become a standard practice in oncology and gained the status of the key decision-making forum for patient management. Despite the fact that cancer MDT meetings are well accepted by clinicians, concerns are raised over the paucity of good-quality evidence on their overall impact. There are also concerns over lack of the appropriate support for this important but overburdened decision-making platform. The growing acceptance by clinical community of the health information technology in recent years has created new opportunities and possibilities of using advanced clinical decision support (CDS) systems to realise full potential of cancer MDT meetings. In this paper, we present targeted summary of the available evidence on the impact of cancer MDT meetings, discuss the reported challenges, and explore the role that a CDS technology could play in addressing some of these challenges. PMID:22295234

  6. [Human body meridian spatial decision support system for clinical treatment and teaching of acupuncture and moxibustion].

    PubMed

    Wu, Dehua

    2016-01-01

    The spatial position and distribution of human body meridian are expressed limitedly in the decision support system (DSS) of acupuncture and moxibustion at present, which leads to the failure to give the effective quantitative analysis on the spatial range and the difficulty for the decision-maker to provide a realistic spatial decision environment. Focusing on the limit spatial expression in DSS of acupuncture and moxibustion, it was proposed that on the basis of the geographic information system, in association of DSS technology, the design idea was developed on the human body meridian spatial DSS. With the 4-layer service-oriented architecture adopted, the data center integrated development platform was taken as the system development environment. The hierarchical organization was done for the spatial data of human body meridian via the directory tree. The structured query language (SQL) server was used to achieve the unified management of spatial data and attribute data. The technologies of architecture, configuration and plug-in development model were integrated to achieve the data inquiry, buffer analysis and program evaluation of the human body meridian spatial DSS. The research results show that the human body meridian spatial DSS could reflect realistically the spatial characteristics of the spatial position and distribution of human body meridian and met the constantly changeable demand of users. It has the powerful spatial analysis function and assists with the scientific decision in clinical treatment and teaching of acupuncture and moxibustion. It is the new attempt to the informatization research of human body meridian. PMID:26946752

  7. Towards a web services infrastructure for perinatal, obstetrical, and neonatal clinical decision support.

    PubMed

    Frize, M; Catley, C; Walker, C R; Petriu, D C; Yang, L

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a unifying infrastructure for clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) and medical data relating to the perinatal life cycle. The diverse CDSSs designed for deployment within the perinatal life cycle to improve care, such as Artificial Neural Networks and Case-Based Reasoners, are integrated using the eXtended Markup Language (XML) and are subsequently offered as a secure web service. These web services are accessible from anywhere within the hospital information system and from remote authorized sites. The goal of such an infrastructure is to provide integrated CDSS processing in a complex distributed environment, in order to support real-time physician decision-making. This design provides a novel web services infrastructure implementation and offers a strong case study for deploying and evaluating the web services paradigm within a health care environment. PMID:17270996

  8. A Critical Review of the Theoretical Frameworks and the Conceptual Factors in the Adoption of Clinical Decision Support Systems.

    PubMed

    Khong, Peck Chui Betty; Holroyd, Eleanor; Wang, Wenru

    2015-12-01

    The clinical decision support system is utilized to translate knowledge into evidence-based practice in clinical settings. Many studies have been conducted to understand users' adoption of the clinical decision support system. A critical review was conducted to understand the theoretical or conceptual frameworks used to inform the studies on the adoption of the clinical decision support system. The review identified 15 theoretical and conceptual frameworks using multiple hybrids of theories and concepts. The Technology Acceptance Model was the most frequently used baseline framework combined with frameworks such as the diffusion of innovation, social theory, longitudinal theory, and so on. The results from these articles yielded multiple concepts influencing the adoption of the clinical decision support system. These concepts can be recategorized into nine major concepts, namely, the information system, person (user or patient), social, organization, perceived benefits, emotions, trustability, relevance (fitness), and professionalism. None of the studies found all the nine concepts. That said, most of them have identified the information system, organization, and person concepts as three of its concepts affecting the use of the clinical decision support system. Within each of the concepts, its subconcepts were noted to be very varied. Yet each of these subconcepts has significantly contributed toward the different facets of the concepts. A pluralistic framework was built using the concepts and subconcepts to provide an overall framework construct for future study on the adoption of the clinical decision support system. PMID:26535769

  9. Who Can Afford a Computerized Bookstore? Almost Anyone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Charles

    1982-01-01

    The decision to computerize operations in the DeAnza Community College bookstore was followed by a number of decisions about financing options (purchase, lease/purchase, lease, timesharing). A timesharing agreement was reached with a local bank, with no capital outlay and at a cost equivalent to an accountant's position. (MSE)

  10. Comparison of Computer-based Clinical Decision Support Systems and Content for Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, M.; Wright, A.; Burton, M.; Fraser, G.; Krall, M.; Maviglia, S.; Mohammed-Rajput, N.; Simonaitis, L.; Sonnenberg, F.; Middleton, B.

    2011-01-01

    Background Computer-based clinical decision support (CDS) systems have been shown to improve quality of care and workflow efficiency, and health care reform legislation relies on electronic health records and CDS systems to improve the cost and quality of health care in the United States; however, the heterogeneity of CDS content and infrastructure of CDS systems across sites is not well known. Objective We aimed to determine the scope of CDS content in diabetes care at six sites, assess the capabilities of CDS in use at these sites, characterize the scope of CDS infrastructure at these sites, and determine how the sites use CDS beyond individual patient care in order to identify characteristics of CDS systems and content that have been successfully implemented in diabetes care. Methods We compared CDS systems in six collaborating sites of the Clinical Decision Support Consortium. We gathered CDS content on care for patients with diabetes mellitus and surveyed institutions on characteristics of their site, the infrastructure of CDS at these sites, and the capabilities of CDS at these sites. Results The approach to CDS and the characteristics of CDS content varied among sites. Some commonalities included providing customizability by role or user, applying sophisticated exclusion criteria, and using CDS automatically at the time of decision-making. Many messages were actionable recommendations. Most sites had monitoring rules (e.g. assessing hemoglobin A1c), but few had rules to diagnose diabetes or suggest specific treatments. All sites had numerous prevention rules including reminders for providing eye examinations, influenza vaccines, lipid screenings, nephropathy screenings, and pneumococcal vaccines. Conclusion Computer-based CDS systems vary widely across sites in content and scope, but both institution-created and purchased systems had many similar features and functionality, such as integration of alerts and reminders into the decision-making workflow of the provider and providing messages that are actionable recommendations. PMID:23616877

  11. A Clinical Decision Support System for the Diagnosis, Fracture Risks and Treatment of Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Halldorsson, Bjarni V.; Bjornsson, Aron Hjalti; Gudmundsson, Haukur Tyr; Birgisson, Elvar Orn; Ludviksson, Bjorn Runar

    2015-01-01

    Expanding medical knowledge increases the potential risk of medical errors in clinical practice. We present, OPAD, a clinical decision support system in the field of the medical care of osteoporosis. We utilize clinical information from international guidelines and experts in the field of osteoporosis. Physicians are provided with user interface to insert standard patient data, from which OPAD provides instant diagnostic comments, 10-year risk of fragility fracture, treatment options for the given case, and when to offer a follow-up DXA-evaluation. Thus, the medical decision making is standardized according to the best expert knowledge at any given time. OPAD was evaluated in a set of 308 randomly selected individuals. OPAD's ten-year fracture risk computation is nearly identical to FRAX (r = 0.988). In 58% of cases OPAD recommended DXA evaluation at the present time. Following a DXA measurement in all individuals, 71% of those that were recommended to have DXA at the present time received recommendation for further investigation or specific treatment by the OPAD. In only 5.9% of individuals in which DXA was not recommended, the result of the BMD measurement changed the recommendations given by OPAD. PMID:25815042

  12. A study of diverse clinical decision support rule authoring environments and requirements for integration

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Efficient rule authoring tools are critical to allow clinical Knowledge Engineers (KEs), Software Engineers (SEs), and Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) to convert medical knowledge into machine executable clinical decision support rules. The goal of this analysis was to identify the critical success factors and challenges of a fully functioning Rule Authoring Environment (RAE) in order to define requirements for a scalable, comprehensive tool to manage enterprise level rules. Methods The authors evaluated RAEs in active use across Partners Healthcare, including enterprise wide, ambulatory only, and system specific tools, with a focus on rule editors for reminder and medication rules. We conducted meetings with users of these RAEs to discuss their general experience and perceived advantages and limitations of these tools. Results While the overall rule authoring process is similar across the 10 separate RAEs, the system capabilities and architecture vary widely. Most current RAEs limit the ability of the clinical decision support (CDS) interventions to be standardized, sharable, interoperable, and extensible. No existing system meets all requirements defined by knowledge management users. Conclusions A successful, scalable, integrated rule authoring environment will need to support a number of key requirements and functions in the areas of knowledge representation, metadata, terminology, authoring collaboration, user interface, integration with electronic health record (EHR) systems, testing, and reporting. PMID:23145874

  13. Development and impact of computerised decision support systems for clinical management of depression: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Triñanes, Yolanda; Atienza, Gerardo; Louro-González, Arturo; de-las-Heras-Liñero, Elena; Alvarez-Ariza, María; Palao, Diego J

    2015-01-01

    One of the proposals for improving clinical practice is to introduce computerised decision support systems (CDSS) and integrate these with electronic medical records. Accordingly, this study sought to systematically review evidence on the effectiveness of CDSS in the management of depression. A search was performed in Medline, EMBASE and PsycInfo, in order to do this. The quality of quantitative studies was assessed using the SIGN method, and qualitative studies using the CASPe checklist. Seven studies were identified (3 randomised clinical trials, 3 non-randomised trials, and one qualitative study). The CDSS assessed incorporated content drawn from guidelines and other evidence-based products. In general, the CDSS had a positive impact on different aspects, such as the screening and diagnosis, treatment, improvement in depressive symptoms and quality of life, and referral of patients. The use of CDSS could thus serve to optimise care of depression in various scenarios by providing recommendations based on the best evidence available and facilitating decision-making in clinical practice. PMID:25500093

  14. Pharmacists’ Perceptions of the Influence of Interactions with the Pharmaceutical Industry on Clinical Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Tejani, Aaron M; Loewen, Peter; Bachand, Richard; Harder, Curtis K

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is a paucity of literature examining the perceptions of Canadian pharmacists toward drug promotion by the pharmaceutical industry and pharmacist–industry interactions. Objectives: To determine whether hospital pharmacists perceive their interactions with the pharmaceutical industry as influencing their clinical decision-making or that of their colleagues and whether hospital pharmacists perceive that interactions with the pharmaceutical industry create a conflict of interest. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of the complete sample of hospital pharmacists practising in 3 large health authorities in a single Canadian province was conducted from February to April 2010. Results: A total of 224 responses were received from the approximately 480 pharmacists in the target health authorities (response rate approximately 47%). Fifty-eight percent of respondents (127/218) did not believe that information received at industry-sponsored events influenced their clinical decision-making. Most (142/163 [87%]) disagreed that small gifts influenced their clinical decision-making, whereas responses were divided for large gifts. Respondents were also divided on the issue of whether their interactions created conflicts of interest, with most of those who had received gifts agreeing that large gifts would create a conflict of interest (134/163 [82%]) whereas small gifts would not (100/163 [61%]). There were positive correlations between respondents’ beliefs about their own susceptibility to influence from sponsored events or receipt of small or large gifts and the susceptibility of others, but 22% of respondents (28/127) expressed a different perception about sponsored events, all believing themselves to be less influenced than their colleagues. Only 6% (4/64) of those who received large gifts and 4% (5/142) of those who received small gifts and felt they were not influenced by these gifts reported that it was likely others would be influenced by the receipt of such gifts. Conclusions: Most hospital pharmacists who responded to this survey had attended industry-sponsored events, and the majority felt that it did not influence their clinical decision-making, despite recognition that the information received is unbalanced. Respondents were divided on the notion of whether these interactions led to conflicts of interest. Respondents generally felt that large and small gifts had different effects on influence and conflict of interest. PMID:26478583

  15. Implementation of a Clinical Decision Support Alert for the Management of Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Revolinski, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infections are common in hospitalized patients and can result in significant morbidity and mortality. It is imperative to optimize the management of C. difficile infections to help minimize disease complications. Antimicrobial stewardship techniques including guidelines, order sets and other clinical decision support functionalities may be utilized to assist with therapy optimization. We implemented a novel alert within our electronic medical record to direct providers to the C. difficile order set in order to assist with initiating therapy consistent with institutional guideline recommendations. The alert succeeded in significantly increasing order set utilization, but guideline compliance was unchanged. PMID:27025646

  16. Performance of online drug information databases as clinical decision support tools in infectious disease medication management.

    PubMed

    Polen, Hyla H; Zapantis, Antonia; Clauson, Kevin A; Clauson, Kevin Alan; Jebrock, Jennifer; Paris, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Infectious disease (ID) medication management is complex and clinical decision support tools (CDSTs) can provide valuable assistance. This study evaluated scope and completeness of ID drug information found in online databases by evaluating their ability to answer 147 question/answer pairs. Scope scores produced highest rankings (%) for: Micromedex (82.3), Lexi-Comp/American Hospital Formulary Service (81.0), and Medscape Drug Reference (81.0); lowest includes: Epocrates Online Premium (47.0), Johns Hopkins ABX Guide (45.6), and PEPID PDC (40.8). PMID:18999059

  17. Assessing the impact of user interface to the usability of a clinical decision support system.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ying Jui; Tsai, Chirh Yun; Yeh, Min Li; Li, Yu Chuan

    2003-01-01

    In a clinical decision support system (CDSS), the outcome of the system is related to the user interface directly. A successful CDSS should offer an efficient user interface to clinicians in order to get the most proper consultation results. This study is to assess the impact of user interface to the usability of CDSS. Two different types of input user interfaces were integrated into a well-established CDSS, namely, keyword-based interface and menu-based interface. The operating time of each interface was assessed, and the efficiency of the interfaces, effectiveness of the systems, and enjoyment of the users were also evaluated for degree of usability. PMID:14728313

  18. Clinical decision making in response to performance validity test failure in a psychiatric setting.

    PubMed

    Marcopulos, Bernice A; Caillouet, Beth A; Bailey, Christopher M; Tussey, Chriscelyn; Kent, Julie-Ann; Frederick, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the clinical utility of a performance validity test (PVT) for screening consecutive referrals (N = 436) to a neuropsychology service at a state psychiatric hospital treating both civilly committed and forensic patients. We created a contingency table with Test of Memory Malingering (TOMM) pass/fail (355/81) and secondary gain present/absent (181/255) to examine pass rates associated with patient demographic, clinical and forensic status characteristics. Of the 81 failed PVTs, 48 had secondary gain defined as active criminal legal charges; 33 failed PVTs with no secondary gain. These individuals tended to be older, female, Caucasian, and civilly committed compared with the group with secondary gain who failed. From estimations of TOMM False Positive Rate and True Positive Rate we estimated base rates of neurocognitive malingering for our clinical population using the Test Validation Summary (TVS; Frederick & Bowden, 2009 ). Although PVT failure is clearly more common in a group with secondary gain (31%), there were a number of false positives (11%). Clinical ratings of patients without gain who failed suggested cognitive deficits, behavioral issues, and inattention. Low scores on PVTs in the absence of secondary gain provide useful information on test engagement and can inform clinical decisions about testing. PMID:24678658

  19. Interleukin 28B Polymorphisms and Hepatitis C—Translating the Association into Clinical Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Col Pankaj

    2011-01-01

    Host genetic factors have long been suspected to play a role in predicting outcome and treatment response in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. This was confirmed recently by three landmark genome-wide association studies (GWAS) published in 2009, which identified single nucleotide polymorphisms near the interleukin (IL) 28B region that were more common in responders to treatment. There has subsequently been rapidly increasing data regarding the significance of the IL28B polymorphism not only in response to therapy but also in spontaneous clearance of acute HCV infection. This clinical association of Il28B genotype with HCV may lead to personalized HCV therapy, where the clinician may tailor the duration and type of therapy for an individual patient. This review summarizes the available data on the impact of IL28B polymorphisms on HCV infection and discusses the possible approach to translate this association into clinical decision making for the treatment of HCV infection. PMID:25755307

  20. Clinician Perspectives on the Quality of Patient Data Used for Clinical Decision Support: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, James L.; Ash, Joan S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Clinical decision support (CDS), defined broadly as patient-specific information and knowledge provided at the point of care, depends on a foundation of high quality electronic patient data. Little is known about how clinicians perceive the quality and value of data used to support CDS within an electronic health record (EHR) environment. Methods: During a three-year research study, we collected ethnographic data from ten diverse organizations, including community hospitals, academic medical centers and ambulatory clinics. Results: An in-depth analysis of the theme “data as a foundation for CDS” yielded a descriptive framework incorporating five subthemes related to data quality: completeness, accessibility, context specificity, accuracy, and reliability. Conclusion: We identified several multi-dimensional models that might be used to conceptualize data quality characteristics for future research. These results could provide new insights to system designers and implementers on the importance clinicians place on specific data quality characteristics regarding electronic patient data for CDS. PMID:23304409

  1. Multidisciplinary Modelling of Symptoms and Signs with Archetypes and SNOMED-CT for Clinical Decision Support.

    PubMed

    Marco-Ruiz, Luis; Maldonado, J Alberto; Karlsen, Randi; Bellika, Johan G

    2015-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) help to improve health care and reduce costs. However, the lack of knowledge management and modelling hampers their maintenance and reuse. Current EHR standards and terminologies can allow the semantic representation of the data and knowledge of CDSS systems boosting their interoperability, reuse and maintenance. This paper presents the modelling process of respiratory conditions' symptoms and signs by a multidisciplinary team of clinicians and information architects with the help of openEHR, SNOMED and clinical information modelling tools for a CDSS. The information model of the CDSS was defined by means of an archetype and the knowledge model was implemented by means of an SNOMED-CT based ontology. PMID:25991115

  2. The role of noninvasive imaging in coronary artery disease detection, prognosis, and clinical decision making.

    PubMed

    Dowsley, Taylor; Al-Mallah, Mouaz; Ananthasubramaniam, Karthik; Dwivedi, Girish; McArdle, Brian; Chow, Benjamin J W

    2013-03-01

    A vast array of noninvasive imaging modalities is available for the evaluation of the presence and severity of coronary artery disease (CAD). Choosing the right test can be challenging but is critical for proper patient diagnosis and management. Presently available imaging tests for CAD include: (1) nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging procedures (single-photon emission tomography) and positron emission tomography, (2) stress echocardiography, (3) computed tomography coronary angiography, and (4) cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Exercise treadmill testing electrocardiography is another alternative that we will discuss briefly. Selection of the most appropriate imaging modality requires knowledge of the clinical question being addressed, patient characteristics (pretest probability and prevalence of disease), the strengths, limitations, risks, costs, and availability of each procedure. To assist with test selection, we review the relevant literature in detail to consider the relative merits of cardiac imaging modalities for: (1) detection of CAD, (2) risk stratification and prognostication, and (3) guiding clinical decision making. PMID:23357601

  3. Regulatory Framework for Clinical Decision Support Software: Present Uncertainty and Prospective Proposition.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y Tony; Thompson, Bradley Merrill

    2015-07-01

    US regulators have been slow to provide meaningful guidance to industry participants on the issue of clinical decision support (CDS) software. It is crucial that regulators soon clarify the differences between regulated medical devices and unregulated health management software that nevertheless has the potential to affect patient care. Future CDS regulation in the United States should aim to reduce ambiguity by establishing detailed and simple criteria for manufacturers to use in deciding if a CDS product will be regulated. Clear standards will help ensure the safety of CDS that is brought to market. In addition, clarification will facilitate technological innovation, delivering clinical benefits to needy patients. To this end, the regulatory framework implemented in the United States with respect to CDS should consider the "substantial dependence" standard. PMID:25776925

  4. Usability Testing of a Complex Clinical Decision Support Tool in the Emergency Department: Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    McCullagh, Lauren; Khan, Sundas; Schachter, Andy; Pardo, Salvatore; McGinn, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background As the electronic health record (EHR) becomes the preferred documentation tool across medical practices, health care organizations are pushing for clinical decision support systems (CDSS) to help bring clinical decision support (CDS) tools to the forefront of patient-physician interactions. A CDSS is integrated into the EHR and allows physicians to easily utilize CDS tools. However, often CDSS are integrated into the EHR without an initial phase of usability testing, resulting in poor adoption rates. Usability testing is important because it evaluates a CDSS by testing it on actual users. This paper outlines the usability phase of a study, which will test the impact of integration of the Wells CDSS for pulmonary embolism (PE) diagnosis into a large urban emergency department, where workflow is often chaotic and high stakes decisions are frequently made. We hypothesize that conducting usability testing prior to integration of the Wells score into an emergency room EHR will result in increased adoption rates by physicians. Objective The objective of the study was to conduct usability testing for the integration of the Wells clinical prediction rule into a tertiary care center’s emergency department EHR. Methods We conducted usability testing of a CDS tool in the emergency department EHR. The CDS tool consisted of the Wells rule for PE in the form of a calculator and was triggered off computed tomography (CT) orders or patients’ chief complaint. The study was conducted at a tertiary hospital in Queens, New York. There were seven residents that were recruited and participated in two phases of usability testing. The usability testing employed a “think aloud” method and “near-live” clinical simulation, where care providers interacted with standardized patients enacting a clinical scenario. Both phases were audiotaped, video-taped, and had screen-capture software activated for onscreen recordings. Results Phase I: Data from the “think-aloud” phase of the study showed an overall positive outlook on the Wells tool in assessing a patient for a PE diagnosis. Subjects described the tool as “well-organized” and “better than clinical judgment”. Changes were made to improve tool placement into the EHR to make it optimal for decision-making, auto-populating boxes, and minimizing click fatigue. Phase II: After incorporating the changes noted in Phase 1, the participants noted tool improvements. There was less toggling between screens, they had all the clinical information required to complete the tool, and were able to complete the patient visit efficiently. However, an optimal location for triggering the tool remained controversial. Conclusions This study successfully combined “think-aloud” protocol analysis with “near-live” clinical simulations in a usability evaluation of a CDS tool that will be implemented into the emergency room environment. Both methods proved useful in the assessment of the CDS tool and allowed us to refine tool usability and workflow. PMID:27025540

  5. Best Practices in Clinical Decision Support: the Case of Preventive Care Reminders.

    PubMed

    Wright, Adam; Phansalkar, Shobha; Bloomrosen, Meryl; Jenders, Robert A; Bobb, Anne M; Halamka, John D; Kuperman, Gilad; Payne, Thomas H; Teasdale, Sheila; Vaida, Allen J; Bates, David W

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence demonstrates that clinical decision support (CDS) is a powerful tool for improving healthcare quality and ensuring patient safety. However, implementing and maintaining effective decision support interventions presents multiple technical and organizational challenges. PURPOSE: To identify best practices for CDS, using the domain of preventive care reminders as an example. METHODS: We assembled a panel of experts in CDS and held a series of facilitated online and in-person discussions. We analyzed the results of these discussions using a grounded theory method to elicit themes and best practices. RESULTS: Eight best practice themes were identified as important: deliver CDS in the most appropriate ways, develop effective governance structures, consider use of incentives, be aware of workflow, keep content current, monitor and evaluate impact, maintain high quality data, and consider sharing content. Keys themes within each of these areas were also described. CONCLUSION: Successful implementation of CDS requires consideration of both technical and socio-technical factors. The themes identified in this study provide guidance on crucial factors that need consideration when CDS is implemented across healthcare settings. These best practice themes may be useful for developers, implementers, and users of decision support. PMID:21991299

  6. Supporting physicians in taking decisions in clinical guidelines: the GLARE "what if" facility.

    PubMed Central

    Terenziani, Paolo; Montani, Stefania; Bottrighi, Alesio; Torchio, Mauro; Molino, Gianpaolo

    2002-01-01

    GLARE (GuideLine Acquisition, Representation and Execution) is a domain-independent system for the acquisition, representation and execution of clinical guidelines. GLARE is unique in its approach to supporting the decision-making process of users/physicians faced with various alternatives in the guidelines. In many cases, the best alternative cannot be determined on the basis of "local information" alone (i.e., by considering just the selection criteria associated with the decision at hand), but must also take into account information stemming from relevant alternative pathways. Exploitation of "global information" available in the various pathways is made possible by GLARE through the "what if" facility, a form of hypothetical reasoning which allows users to gather relevant decision parameters (e.g., costs, resources, times) from selected parts of the guideline in a semi-automatic fashion. In particular, the extremely complex task of coping with temporal information involves the extension and adaptation of various techniques developed by the Artificial Intelligence (AI) community. PMID:12463929

  7. Data collection and information presentation for optimal decision making by clinical managers--the Autocontrol Project.

    PubMed

    Grant, A M; Richard, Y; Deland, E; Després, N; de Lorenzi, F; Dagenais, A; Buteau, M

    1997-01-01

    The Autocontrol methodology has been developed in order to support the optimisation of decision-making and the use of resources in the context of a clinical unit. The theoretical basis relates to quality assurance and information systems and is influenced by management and cognitive research in the health domain. The methodology uses population rather than individual decision making and because of its dynamic feedback design promises to have rapid and profound effect on practice. Most importantly the health care professional is the principle user of the Autocontrol system. In this methodology we distinguish three types of evidence necessary for practice change: practice based or internal evidence, best evidence derived from the literature or external evidence concerning the practice in question, and process based evidence on how to optimise the process of practice change. The software used by the system is of the executive decision support type which facilitates interrogation of large databases. The Autocontrol system is designed to interrogate the data of the patient medical record however the latter often lacks data on concomitant resource use and this must be supplemented. This paper reviews the Autocontrol methodology and gives examples from current studies. PMID:9357733

  8. The Nijmegen Decision Tool for Chronic Low Back Pain. Development of a Clinical Decision Tool for Secondary or Tertiary Spine Care Specialists

    PubMed Central

    van Hooff, Miranda L.; van Loon, Jan; van Limbeek, Jacques; de Kleuver, Marinus

    2014-01-01

    Background In Western Europe, low back pain has the greatest burden of all diseases. When back pain persists, different medical specialists are involved and a lack of consensus exists among these specialists for medical decision-making in Chronic Low Back Pain (CLBP). Objective To develop a decision tool for secondary or tertiary spine care specialists to decide which patients with CLBP should be seen by a spine surgeon or by other non-surgical medical specialists. Methods A Delphi study was performed to identify indicators predicting the outcome of interventions. In the preparatory stage evidence from international guidelines and literature were summarized. Eligible studies were reviews and longitudinal studies. Inclusion criteria: surgical or non-surgical interventions and persistence of complaints, CLBP-patients aged 18–65 years, reported baseline measures of predictive indicators, and one or more reported outcomes had to assess functional status, quality of life, pain intensity, employment status or a composite score. Subsequently, a three-round Delphi procedure, to reach consensus on candidate indicators, was performed among a multidisciplinary panel of 29 CLBP-professionals (>five years CLBP-experience). The pre-set threshold for general agreement was ≥70%. The final indicator set was used to develop a clinical decision tool. Results A draft list with 53 candidate indicators (38 with conclusive evidence and 15 with inconclusive evidence) was included for the Delphi study. Consensus was reached to include 47 indicators. A first version of the decision tool was developed, consisting of a web-based screening questionnaire and a provisional decision algorithm. Conclusions This is the first clinical decision tool based on current scientific evidence and formal multidisciplinary consensus that helps referring the patient for consultation to a spine surgeon or a non-surgical spine care specialist. We expect that this tool considerably helps in clinical decision-making spine care, thereby improving efficient use of scarce sources and the outcomes of spinal interventions. PMID:25133645

  9. Factors influencing alert acceptance: a novel approach for predicting the success of clinical decision support

    PubMed Central

    Seidling, Hanna M; Phansalkar, Shobha; Seger, Diane L; Paterno, Marilyn D; Shaykevich, Shimon; Haefeli, Walter E

    2011-01-01

    Background Clinical decision support systems can prevent knowledge-based prescription errors and improve patient outcomes. The clinical effectiveness of these systems, however, is substantially limited by poor user acceptance of presented warnings. To enhance alert acceptance it may be useful to quantify the impact of potential modulators of acceptance. Methods We built a logistic regression model to predict alert acceptance of drug–drug interaction (DDI) alerts in three different settings. Ten variables from the clinical and human factors literature were evaluated as potential modulators of provider alert acceptance. ORs were calculated for the impact of knowledge quality, alert display, textual information, prioritization, setting, patient age, dose-dependent toxicity, alert frequency, alert level, and required acknowledgment on acceptance of the DDI alert. Results 50 788 DDI alerts were analyzed. Providers accepted only 1.4% of non-interruptive alerts. For interruptive alerts, user acceptance positively correlated with frequency of the alert (OR 1.30, 95% CI 1.23 to 1.38), quality of display (4.75, 3.87 to 5.84), and alert level (1.74, 1.63 to 1.86). Alert acceptance was higher in inpatients (2.63, 2.32 to 2.97) and for drugs with dose-dependent toxicity (1.13, 1.07 to 1.21). The textual information influenced the mode of reaction and providers were more likely to modify the prescription if the message contained detailed advice on how to manage the DDI. Conclusion We evaluated potential modulators of alert acceptance by assessing content and human factors issues, and quantified the impact of a number of specific factors which influence alert acceptance. This information may help improve clinical decision support systems design. PMID:21571746

  10. Paying for treatments? Influences on negotiating clinical need and decision-making for dental implant treatment

    PubMed Central

    Exley, Catherine E; Rousseau, Nikki S; Steele, Jimmy; Finch, Tracy; Field, James; Donaldson, Cam; Thomason, J Mark; May, Carl R; Ellis, Janice S

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to examine how clinicians and patients negotiate clinical need and treatment decisions within a context of finite resources. Dental implant treatment is an effective treatment for missing teeth, but is only available via the NHS in some specific clinical circumstances. The majority of people who receive this treatment therefore pay privately, often at substantial cost to themselves. People are used to paying towards dental treatment costs. However, dental implant treatment is much more expensive than existing treatments – such as removable dentures. We know very little about how dentists make decisions about whether to offer such treatments, or what patients consider when deciding whether or not to pay for them. Methods/Design Mixed methods will be employed to provide insight and understanding into how clinical need is determined, and what influences people's decision making processes when deciding whether or not to pursue a dental implant treatment. Phase 1 will use a structured scoping questionnaire with all the General dental practitioners (GDPs) in three Primary Care Trust areas (n = 300) to provide base-line data about existing practice in relation to dental implant treatment, and to provide data to develop a systematic sampling procedure for Phase 2. Phases 2 (GDPs) and 3 (patients) use qualitative focused one to one interviews with a sample of these practitioners (up to 30) and their patients (up to 60) to examine their views and experiences of decision making in relation to dental implant treatment. Purposive sampling for phases 2 and 3 will be carried out to ensure participants represent a range of socio-economic circumstances, and choices made. Discussion Most dental implant treatment is conducted in primary care. Very little information was available prior to this study about the quantity and type of treatment carried out privately. It became apparent during phase 2 that ISOD treatment was an unusual treatment in primary care. We thus extended our sample criteria for Phase 3 to include people who had had other implant supported restorations, although not single tooth replacements. PMID:19138389

  11. Decisions in complex clinical situations: Prevalence and factors associated in general public.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Martinez, Maria D; Luna, Aurelio; Perez-Carceles, Maria D

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have focused on advanced directives. However, the type of treatment that citizens would choose in critical health situations and whether their decision varies with their sociodemographic characteristics and their experiences of life both within and outside the family context, are unknown. This study analyzes the factors associated with choosing or refusing life support treatment in hypothetical situations of differing clinical complexity. This transversal descriptive study was carried out by questionnaires given to 1051 participants from primary care centres. The Life Support Preferences Questionnaire (LSPQ) used to assess preferences of life-sustaining treatment, describes six scenarios with different prognoses. Analysis of the sociodemographic characteristics and life experiences of the subjects led to the following findings. In situations of very severe prognosis, treatment is mostly rejected. When there is chance of recovery, treatment is mostly accepted, especially in the least aggressive cases and when deciding for another person. A greater propensity to reject treatment was observed among subjects over 55 years, those in poor health and those who had observed a terminal illness in a family member. Practising Catholics are more likely to accept treatment in all medical situations described. Preferences for life support treatment are linked to sociodemographic characteristics and life experiences of patients. Physicians should bear in mind these characteristics when confronted with critical clinical situations, involving difficult decisions. PMID:26952384

  12. Using statistical process control to make data-based clinical decisions.

    PubMed Central

    Pfadt, A; Wheeler, D J

    1995-01-01

    Applied behavior analysis is based on an investigation of variability due to interrelationships among antecedents, behavior, and consequences. This permits testable hypotheses about the causes of behavior as well as for the course of treatment to be evaluated empirically. Such information provides corrective feedback for making data-based clinical decisions. This paper considers how a different approach to the analysis of variability based on the writings of Walter Shewart and W. Edwards Deming in the area of industrial quality control helps to achieve similar objectives. Statistical process control (SPC) was developed to implement a process of continual product improvement while achieving compliance with production standards and other requirements for promoting customer satisfaction. SPC involves the use of simple statistical tools, such as histograms and control charts, as well as problem-solving techniques, such as flow charts, cause-and-effect diagrams, and Pareto charts, to implement Deming's management philosophy. These data-analytic procedures can be incorporated into a human service organization to help to achieve its stated objectives in a manner that leads to continuous improvement in the functioning of the clients who are its customers. Examples are provided to illustrate how SPC procedures can be used to analyze behavioral data. Issues related to the application of these tools for making data-based clinical decisions and for creating an organizational climate that promotes their routine use in applied settings are also considered. PMID:7592154

  13. Computerizing on a Shoestring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boehmer, M. Clare

    1982-01-01

    Focuses on the computerization of the Gibault High School Library in Waterloo, Illinois, discussing the development of microcomputer programs to expand services in the area of library skills instruction and search strategy methods. Hardware, software, finances, personnel, and planning considerations are noted. (EJS)

  14. Computerized Fleet Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cataldo, John J.

    The computerization of school bus maintenance records by the Niskayuna (New York) Central School District enabled the district's transportation department to engage in management practices resulting in significant savings. The district obtains computer analyses of the work performed on all vehicles, including time spent, parts, labor, costs,

  15. Adaptive Computerized Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Roger D.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes an artificially intelligent multimedia computerized instruction system capable of developing a conceptual image of what a student is learning while the student is learning it. It focuses on principles of learning and adaptive behavioral control systems theory upon which the system is designed and demonstrates multiple user modes.…

  16. Computerized Fleet Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cataldo, John J.

    The computerization of school bus maintenance records by the Niskayuna (New York) Central School District enabled the district's transportation department to engage in management practices resulting in significant savings. The district obtains computer analyses of the work performed on all vehicles, including time spent, parts, labor, costs,…

  17. Adaptive Computerized Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Roger D.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes an artificially intelligent multimedia computerized instruction system capable of developing a conceptual image of what a student is learning while the student is learning it. It focuses on principles of learning and adaptive behavioral control systems theory upon which the system is designed and demonstrates multiple user modes.

  18. Computerized Budget Monitoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Julian U.; Rowe, Joe N.

    1989-01-01

    This article discusses the importance of budget monitoring in fiscal management; describes ways in which computerized budget monitoring increases accuracy, efficiency, and flexibility; outlines steps in the budget process; and presents sample reports, generated using the Lotus 1-2-3 spreadsheet and graphics program. (IAH)

  19. Clinical decision aids for chest pain in the emergency department: identifying low-risk patients

    PubMed Central

    Alley, William; Mahler, Simon A

    2015-01-01

    Chest pain is one of the most common presenting complaints in the emergency department, though only a small minority of patients are subsequently diagnosed with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). However, missing the diagnosis has potential for significant morbidity and mortality. ACS presentations can be atypical, and their workups are often prolonged and costly. In order to risk-stratify patients and better direct the workup and care given, many decision aids have been developed. While each may have merit in certain clinical settings, the most useful aid in the emergency department is one that finds all cases of ACS while also identifying a substantial subset of patients at low risk who can be discharged without stress testing or coronary angiography. This review describes several of the chest pain decision aids developed and studied through the recent past, starting with the thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) risk score and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) scores, which were developed as prognostic aids for patients already diagnosed with ACS, then subsequently validated in the undifferentiated chest pain population. Asia-Pacific Evaluation of Chest Pain Trial (ASPECT); Accelerated Diagnostic Protocol to Assess Patients With Chest Pain Symptoms Using Contemporary Troponins (ADAPT); North American Chest Pain Rule (NACPR); and History, Electrocardiogram, Age, Risk factors, Troponin (HEART) score have been developed exclusively for use in the undifferentiated chest pain population as well, with improved performance compared to their predecessors. This review describes the relative merits and limitations of these decision aids so that providers can determine which tool fits the needs of their clinical practice setting. PMID:27147894

  20. A Mathematical Model for Interpretable Clinical Decision Support with Applications in Gynecology

    PubMed Central

    Van Belle, Vanya M. C. A.; Van Calster, Ben; Timmerman, Dirk; Bourne, Tom; Bottomley, Cecilia; Valentin, Lil; Neven, Patrick; Van Huffel, Sabine; Suykens, Johan A. K.; Boyd, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Background Over time, methods for the development of clinical decision support (CDS) systems have evolved from interpretable and easy-to-use scoring systems to very complex and non-interpretable mathematical models. In order to accomplish effective decision support, CDS systems should provide information on how the model arrives at a certain decision. To address the issue of incompatibility between performance, interpretability and applicability of CDS systems, this paper proposes an innovative model structure, automatically leading to interpretable and easily applicable models. The resulting models can be used to guide clinicians when deciding upon the appropriate treatment, estimating patient-specific risks and to improve communication with patients. Methods and Findings We propose the interval coded scoring (ICS) system, which imposes that the effect of each variable on the estimated risk is constant within consecutive intervals. The number and position of the intervals are automatically obtained by solving an optimization problem, which additionally performs variable selection. The resulting model can be visualised by means of appealing scoring tables and color bars. ICS models can be used within software packages, in smartphone applications, or on paper, which is particularly useful for bedside medicine and home-monitoring. The ICS approach is illustrated on two gynecological problems: diagnosis of malignancy of ovarian tumors using a dataset containing 3,511 patients, and prediction of first trimester viability of pregnancies using a dataset of 1,435 women. Comparison of the performance of the ICS approach with a range of prediction models proposed in the literature illustrates the ability of ICS to combine optimal performance with the interpretability of simple scoring systems. Conclusions The ICS approach can improve patient-clinician communication and will provide additional insights in the importance and influence of available variables. Future challenges include extensions of the proposed methodology towards automated detection of interaction effects, multi-class decision support systems, prognosis and high-dimensional data. PMID:22479598

  1. Integration and Evaluation of Clinical Decision Support Systems for Diagnosis Idopathics Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF)

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Youngmoon; Jeon, Sungwan

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to develop clinical decision support systems (CDSS) that are integrated with hospital information systems for the differential diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Methods The integrated CDSS were validated and evaluated by physicians. Knowledge modeling for diagnosing IPF was performed by knowledge working groups, composed of radiologists and respiratory specialists. In order to develop the model for CDSS diagnosis, the clinical cases were collected from 290 cases from Seoul National University Hospital and Sevrance Hospital of Yonsei University. For the evaluation of integrated CDSS, interviews were conducted with respiratory specialists and radiologist 2 weeks after applying CDSSs in clinical settings. The CDSS was integrated with the computer vision system (CVS) and diffuse parenchymal lung diseases (DPLD), CDSS developed in our previous project. Results Eighteen cases diagnosed as IPF were applied to the collection of diagnostic knowledge and the refined knowledge, the former diagnosed 1 case (6%) and the latter diagnosed 14 cases (78%). Therefore, the refined knowledge performed better than collected knowledge. The validation results of integrated CDSSs showed that 81 cases (74.3%) were diagnosed correctly. Conclusions There were 109 cases of IPF diagnosed and initiated on treatment. The significance of this study is in developing integrated CDSS with PACS by acquiring and redefining the knowledge needed for IPF diagnosis. In addition, it is significant for the integration of CDSS to verification and clinical evaluation. PMID:21818445

  2. A Proposed Clinical Decision Support Architecture Capable of Supporting Whole Genome Sequence Information

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Brandon M.; Rodriguez Loya, Salvador; Eilbeck, Karen; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2014-01-01

    Whole genome sequence (WGS) information may soon be widely available to help clinicians personalize the care and treatment of patients. However, considerable barriers exist, which may hinder the effective utilization of WGS information in a routine clinical care setting. Clinical decision support (CDS) offers a potential solution to overcome such barriers and to facilitate the effective use of WGS information in the clinic. However, genomic information is complex and will require significant considerations when developing CDS capabilities. As such, this manuscript lays out a conceptual framework for a CDS architecture designed to deliver WGS-guided CDS within the clinical workflow. To handle the complexity and breadth of WGS information, the proposed CDS framework leverages service-oriented capabilities and orchestrates the interaction of several independently-managed components. These independently-managed components include the genome variant knowledge base, the genome database, the CDS knowledge base, a CDS controller and the electronic health record (EHR). A key design feature is that genome data can be stored separately from the EHR. This paper describes in detail: (1) each component of the architecture; (2) the interaction of the components; and (3) how the architecture attempts to overcome the challenges associated with WGS information. We believe that service-oriented CDS capabilities will be essential to using WGS information for personalized medicine. PMID:25411644

  3. Lung cancer patients' decisions about clinical trials and the theory of planned behavior.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Pratt, Christie L; Bryant-George, Kathy; Caraway, Vicki D; Paternoster, Bonnie; Roldan, Tere; Shaffer, Andrea; Shimizu, Cynthia O; Vaughn, Elizabeth J; Williams, Charles; Bepler, Gerold

    2011-12-01

    The theory of planned behavior explores the relationship between behavior, beliefs, attitudes, and intentions presupposing that behavioral intention is influenced by a person's attitude about the behavior and beliefs about whether individuals, who are important to them, approve or disapprove of the behavior (subjective norm). An added dimension to the theory is the idea of perceived behavioral control, or the belief that one has control over performing the behavior. The theory of planned behavior suggests that people may make greater efforts to perform a behavior if they feel they have a high level of control over it. In this examination of data, we explored the application of the theory of planned behavior to patient's decisions about participating in a clinic trial. Twelve respondents in this study had previously participated in a clinical trial for lung cancer and nine respondents had declined a clinical trial for lung cancer. The data were analyzed with regard to the four constructs associated with the theory of planned behavior: behavioral intention, attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control. Results indicate that the theory of planned behavior may be a useful tool to examine psychosocial needs in relation to behavioral intention of clinical trial participation. PMID:20949381

  4. Myocardial strain imaging: how useful is it in clinical decision making?

    PubMed Central

    Smiseth, Otto A.; Torp, Hans; Opdahl, Anders; Haugaa, Kristina H.; Urheim, Stig

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial strain is a principle for quantification of left ventricular (LV) function which is now feasible with speckle-tracking echocardiography. The best evaluated strain parameter is global longitudinal strain (GLS) which is more sensitive than left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) as a measure of systolic function, and may be used to identify sub-clinical LV dysfunction in cardiomyopathies. Furthermore, GLS is recommended as routine measurement in patients undergoing chemotherapy to detect reduction in LV function prior to fall in LVEF. Intersegmental variability in timing of peak myocardial strain has been proposed as predictor of risk of ventricular arrhythmias. Strain imaging may be applied to guide placement of the LV pacing lead in patients receiving cardiac resynchronization therapy. Strain may also be used to diagnose myocardial ischaemia, but the technology is not sufficiently standardized to be recommended as a general tool for this purpose. Peak systolic left atrial strain is a promising supplementary index of LV filling pressure. The strain imaging methodology is still undergoing development, and further clinical trials are needed to determine if clinical decisions based on strain imaging result in better outcome. With this important limitation in mind, strain may be applied clinically as a supplementary diagnostic method. PMID:26508168

  5. Esophageal perforation: diagnostic work-up and clinical decision-making in the first 24 hours.

    PubMed

    Søreide, Jon Arne; Viste, Asgaut

    2011-01-01

    Esophageal perforation is a rare and potentially life-threatening condition. Early clinical suspicion and imaging is important for case management to achieve a good outcome. However, recent studies continue to report high morbidity and mortality greater than 20% from esophageal perforation. At least half of the perforations are iatrogenic, mostly related to endoscopic instrumentation used in the upper gastrointestinal tract, while about a third are spontaneous perforations. Surgical treatment remains an important option for many patients, but a non-operative approach, with or without use of an endoscopic stent or placement of internal or external drains, should be considered when the clinical situation allows for a less invasive approach. The rarity of this emergency makes it difficult for a physician to obtain extensive individual clinical experience; it is also challenging to obtain firm scientific evidence that informs patient management and clinical decision-making. Improved attention to non-specific symptoms and signs and early diagnosis based on imaging may translate into better outcomes for this group of patients, many of whom are elderly with significant comorbidity. PMID:22035338

  6. A clinical decision support system with an integrated EMR for diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kunhimangalam, Reeda; Ovallath, Sujith; Joseph, Paul K

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence of peripheral neuropathy in general population is ever increasing. The diagnosis and classification of peripheral neuropathies is often difficult as it involves careful clinical and electro-diagnostic examination by an expert neurologist. In developing countries a large percentage of the disease remains undiagnosed due to lack of adequate number of experts. In this study a novel clinical decision support system has been developed using a fuzzy expert system. The study was done to provide a solution to the demand of systems that can improve health care by accurate diagnosis in limited time, in the absence of specialists. It employs a graphical user interface and a fuzzy logic controller with rule viewer for identification of the type of peripheral neuropathy. An integrated medical records database is also developed for the storage and retrieval of the data. The system consists of 24 input fields, which includes the clinical values of the diagnostic test and the clinical symptoms. The output field is the disease diagnosis, whether it is Motor (Demyelinating/Axonopathy) neuropathy, sensory (Demyelinating/Axonopathy) neuropathy, mixed type or a normal case. The results obtained were compared with the expert's opinion and the system showed 93.27 % accuracy. The study aims at showing that Fuzzy Expert Systems may prove useful in providing diagnostic and predictive medical opinions. It enables the clinicians to arrive at a better diagnosis as it keeps the expert knowledge in an intelligent system to be used efficiently and effectively. PMID:24692180

  7. Myocardial strain imaging: how useful is it in clinical decision making?

    PubMed

    Smiseth, Otto A; Torp, Hans; Opdahl, Anders; Haugaa, Kristina H; Urheim, Stig

    2016-04-14

    Myocardial strain is a principle for quantification of left ventricular (LV) function which is now feasible with speckle-tracking echocardiography. The best evaluated strain parameter is global longitudinal strain (GLS) which is more sensitive than left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) as a measure of systolic function, and may be used to identify sub-clinical LV dysfunction in cardiomyopathies. Furthermore, GLS is recommended as routine measurement in patients undergoing chemotherapy to detect reduction in LV function prior to fall in LVEF. Intersegmental variability in timing of peak myocardial strain has been proposed as predictor of risk of ventricular arrhythmias. Strain imaging may be applied to guide placement of the LV pacing lead in patients receiving cardiac resynchronization therapy. Strain may also be used to diagnose myocardial ischaemia, but the technology is not sufficiently standardized to be recommended as a general tool for this purpose. Peak systolic left atrial strain is a promising supplementary index of LV filling pressure. The strain imaging methodology is still undergoing development, and further clinical trials are needed to determine if clinical decisions based on strain imaging result in better outcome. With this important limitation in mind, strain may be applied clinically as a supplementary diagnostic method. PMID:26508168

  8. Design, Development, and Initial Evaluation of a Terminology for Clinical Decision Support and Electronic Clinical Quality Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yanhua; Staes, Catherine J; Shields, David E; Kandula, Vijay; Welch, Brandon M; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2015-01-01

    When coupled with a common information model, a common terminology for clinical decision support (CDS) and electronic clinical quality measurement (eCQM) could greatly facilitate the distributed development and sharing of CDS and eCQM knowledge resources. To enable such scalable knowledge authoring and sharing, we systematically developed an extensible and standards-based terminology for CDS and eCQM in the context of the HL7 Virtual Medical Record (vMR) information model. The development of this terminology entailed three steps: (1) systematic, physician-curated concept identification from sources such as the Health Information Technology Standards Panel (HITSP) and the SNOMED-CT CORE problem list; (2) concept de-duplication leveraging the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) MetaMap and Metathesaurus; and (3) systematic concept naming using standard terminologies and heuristic algorithms. This process generated 3,046 concepts spanning 68 domains. Evaluation against representative CDS and eCQM resources revealed approximately 50–70% concept coverage, indicating the need for continued expansion of the terminology. PMID:26958220

  9. Design, Development, and Initial Evaluation of a Terminology for Clinical Decision Support and Electronic Clinical Quality Measurement.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yanhua; Staes, Catherine J; Shields, David E; Kandula, Vijay; Welch, Brandon M; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2015-01-01

    When coupled with a common information model, a common terminology for clinical decision support (CDS) and electronic clinical quality measurement (eCQM) could greatly facilitate the distributed development and sharing of CDS and eCQM knowledge resources. To enable such scalable knowledge authoring and sharing, we systematically developed an extensible and standards-based terminology for CDS and eCQM in the context of the HL7 Virtual Medical Record (vMR) information model. The development of this terminology entailed three steps: (1) systematic, physician-curated concept identification from sources such as the Health Information Technology Standards Panel (HITSP) and the SNOMED-CT CORE problem list; (2) concept de-duplication leveraging the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) MetaMap and Metathesaurus; and (3) systematic concept naming using standard terminologies and heuristic algorithms. This process generated 3,046 concepts spanning 68 domains. Evaluation against representative CDS and eCQM resources revealed approximately 50-70% concept coverage, indicating the need for continued expansion of the terminology. PMID:26958220

  10. Preliminary Development of a Clinical Decision Rule for Acute Aortic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Lovy, Andrew J; Bellin, Eran; Levsky, Jeffrey M; Esses, David; Haramati, Linda B

    2014-01-01

    Objective Patients with suspected acute aortic syndromes (AAS) often undergo CT with negative results. We sought clinical and diagnostic criteria to identify low risk patients, an initial step in developing a clinical decision rule. Methods We retrospectively identified all adults presenting to our Emergency Department (ED) from 1/1/2006- 8/1/2010 who underwent CT angiography for suspected AAS without prior trauma or AAS. 1,465 patients met inclusion criteria; a retrospective case-controlled review (ratio 1:4) was conducted. Cases were diagnosed with aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer or ruptured aneurysm. Results 2.7% (40/1,465) of patients who underwent CT had an AAS, 2 additional cases were diagnosed after admission [ED miss rate 5% (2/42)]. Patients with AAS were significantly older than controls (66 vs 59 yrs; p=.008). Risk factors included abnormal chest radiograph [sensitivity 79% (26/33), specificity 82% (113/137)] and acute chest pain [sensitivity 83% (29/35), specificity 71% (111/157)]. None of the 19 patients with resolved pain upon ED presentation had AAS. These data support a two-step rule: first screen for ongoing pain; if present, screen for acute chest pain or an abnormal chest radiograph. This approach achieves a 54% (84/155) reduction in CT usage with a sensitivity for AAS of 96% (95% CI: 89%-100%), negative predictive value of 99.8% (99.4%-100%) and a false negative rate of 1.7% (1/84). Conclusions Our results demonstrate a need to safely identify patients at low risk for AAS who can forgo CT. We developed a preliminary two-step clinical decision rule, which requires validation. PMID:24055476

  11. Improving the care of children with urinary tract infection: use of a clinical decision proforma.

    PubMed

    Leach, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common and important clinical problem in children. Follow up imaging is indicated in some cases to reduce the risk of long-term harm from UTI and sometimes to help guide acute management. Overuse of imaging may be harmful due to radiation exposure, as well as increasing demand on services and budgets. On the other hand under-use of imaging may leave children vulnerable to renal damage and long-term morbidity. Accepted standards propose an imaging strategy specific to age and type of UTI. The complexity of the guideline makes compliance with the standards challenging. The aim of this project was to assess current practice for imaging of children with UTI managed at The Royal Oldham Hospital and to improve compliance with accepted standards through the use of a proforma to aid clinical decision making, supported by an education programme. A retrospective audit was performed over a 6 month period both prior to and after the intervention. The baseline audit found 57.7% of children treated for UTI (n=26) had imaging compliant with the accepted standards, which improved to 75.9% (n=29) on post-measurement. The percentage of inappropriate investigations reduced from 52.4% to 10.5%. The percentage of missed investigations reduced from 35.0% to 32.0%. The proforma was used and filed in 40% of cases where practice was in line with accepted standards. It was not used in any of the cases where practice deviated. In conclusion, a clear clinical decision aid, supported by an education programme, can significantly improve compliance with accepted standards for imaging of children with UTI. This may also be transferable to other scenarios where guidelines exist but have reduced efficacy due to complexity and/or lack of understanding. PMID:26734327

  12. Improving the care of children with urinary tract infection: use of a clinical decision proforma

    PubMed Central

    Leach, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common and important clinical problem in children. Follow up imaging is indicated in some cases to reduce the risk of long-term harm from UTI and sometimes to help guide acute management. Overuse of imaging may be harmful due to radiation exposure, as well as increasing demand on services and budgets. On the other hand under-use of imaging may leave children vulnerable to renal damage and long-term morbidity. Accepted standards propose an imaging strategy specific to age and type of UTI. The complexity of the guideline makes compliance with the standards challenging. The aim of this project was to assess current practice for imaging of children with UTI managed at The Royal Oldham Hospital and to improve compliance with accepted standards through the use of a proforma to aid clinical decision making, supported by an education programme. A retrospective audit was performed over a 6 month period both prior to and after the intervention. The baseline audit found 57.7% of children treated for UTI (n=26) had imaging compliant with the accepted standards, which improved to 75.9% (n=29) on post-measurement. The percentage of inappropriate investigations reduced from 52.4% to 10.5%. The percentage of missed investigations reduced from 35.0% to 32.0%. The proforma was used and filed in 40% of cases where practice was in line with accepted standards. It was not used in any of the cases where practice deviated. In conclusion, a clear clinical decision aid, supported by an education programme, can significantly improve compliance with accepted standards for imaging of children with UTI. This may also be transferable to other scenarios where guidelines exist but have reduced efficacy due to complexity and/or lack of understanding. PMID:26734327

  13. Referring periodontal patients: clinical decision making by dental and dental hygiene students.

    PubMed

    Williams, Karen B; Burgardt, Grayson J; Rapley, John W; Bray, Kimberly K; Cobb, Charles M

    2014-03-01

    Referral of periodontal patients requires development of a complex set of decision making skills. This study was conducted to determine criteria used by dental and dental hygiene students regarding the referral of periodontal patients for specialty care. Using mixed methods, a thirteen-item survey was developed to elicit the students' perceptions of their knowledge, confidence regarding managing patients, and clinical reasoning related to periodontal patients. The instrument was administered during the summer prior to (T1) and at the end of the students' final year (T2) of training. Seventy-nine dental students (81 percent of total class) and thirty dental hygiene students (83 percent of total class) completed T1. At T2, forty-two dental (44 percent of total class) and twenty-six dental hygiene students (87 percent of total class) completed the questionnaire. While 90 percent of dental and 96 percent of dental hygiene respondents reported a willingness to refer patients with active disease to specialists, only 40 percent of dental and 36 percent of dental hygiene respondents reported confidence in diagnosing, treating, and appropriately referring such patients. The students' ability to recognize critical disease and risk factors influencing referral was good; however, clinical application of that knowledge indicated a gap between knowledge and applied reasoning. The students' attitudes about the importance of periodontal disease and their perceived competence to identify critical disease risk factors were not significantly related (p>0.05) to correct clinical decisions in the case scenarios. The study concludes that dental and dental hygiene curricula should emphasize both the acquisition and application of knowledge regarding criteria for referral of periodontal patients. PMID:24609346

  14. A patient-driven adaptive prediction technique to improve personalized risk estimation for clinical decision support

    PubMed Central

    Boxwala, Aziz A; El-Kareh, Robert; Kim, Jihoon; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2012-01-01

    Objective Competing tools are available online to assess the risk of developing certain conditions of interest, such as cardiovascular disease. While predictive models have been developed and validated on data from cohort studies, little attention has been paid to ensure the reliability of such predictions for individuals, which is critical for care decisions. The goal was to develop a patient-driven adaptive prediction technique to improve personalized risk estimation for clinical decision support. Material and methods A data-driven approach was proposed that utilizes individualized confidence intervals (CIs) to select the most appropriate model from a pool of candidates to assess the individual patient's clinical condition. The method does not require access to the training dataset. This approach was compared with other strategies: the BEST model (the ideal model, which can only be achieved by access to data or knowledge of which population is most similar to the individual), CROSS model, and RANDOM model selection. Results When evaluated on clinical datasets, the approach significantly outperformed the CROSS model selection strategy in terms of discrimination (p<1e14) and calibration (p<0.006). The method outperformed the RANDOM model selection strategy in terms of discrimination (p<1e12), but the improvement did not achieve significance for calibration (p=0.1375). Limitations The CI may not always offer enough information to rank the reliability of predictions, and this evaluation was done using aggregation. If a particular individual is very different from those represented in a training set of existing models, the CI may be somewhat misleading. Conclusion This approach has the potential to offer more reliable predictions than those offered by other heuristics for disease risk estimation of individual patients. PMID:22493049

  15. Optimization of the decision-making process for the selection of therapeutics to undergo clinical testing for spinal cord injury in the North American Clinical Trials Network.

    PubMed

    Guest, James; Harrop, James S; Aarabi, Bizhan; Grossman, Robert G; Fawcett, James W; Fehlings, Michael G; Tator, Charles H

    2012-09-01

    The North American Clinical Trials Network (NACTN) includes 9 clinical centers funded by the US Department of Defense and the Christopher Reeve Paralysis Foundation. Its purpose is to accelerate clinical testing of promising therapeutics in spinal cord injury (SCI) through the development of a robust interactive infrastructure. This structure includes key committees that serve to provide longitudinal guidance to the Network. These committees include the Executive, Data Management, and Neurological Outcome Assessments Committees, and the Therapeutic Selection Committee (TSC), which is the subject of this manuscript. The NACTN brings unique elements to the SCI field. The Network's stability is not restricted to a single clinical trial. Network members have diverse expertise and include experts in clinical care, clinical trial design and methodology, pharmacology, preclinical and clinical research, and advanced rehabilitation techniques. Frequent systematic communication is assigned a high value, as is democratic process, fairness and efficiency of decision making, and resource allocation. This article focuses on how decision making occurs within the TSC to rank alternative therapeutics according to 2 main variables: quality of the preclinical data set, and fit with the Network's aims and capabilities. This selection process is important because if the Network's resources are committed to a therapeutic, alternatives cannot be pursued. A proposed methodology includes a multicriteria decision analysis that uses a Multi-Attribute Global Inference of Quality matrix to quantify the process. To rank therapeutics, the TSC uses a series of consensus steps designed to reduce individual and group bias and limit subjectivity. Given the difficulties encountered by industry in completing clinical trials in SCI, stable collaborative not-for-profit consortia, such as the NACTN, may be essential to clinical progress in SCI. The evolution of the NACTN also offers substantial opportunity to refine decision making and group dynamics. Making the best possible decisions concerning therapeutics selection for trial testing is a cornerstone of the Network's function. PMID:22985376

  16. icuARM-An ICU Clinical Decision Support System Using Association Rule Mining

    PubMed Central

    Chanani, Nikhil; Venugopalan, Janani; Maher, Kevin; Wang, May Dongmei

    2013-01-01

    The rapid development of biomedical monitoring technologies has enabled modern intensive care units (ICUs) to gather vast amounts of multimodal measurement data about their patients. However, processing large volumes of complex data in real-time has become a big challenge. Together with ICU physicians, we have designed and developed an ICU clinical decision support system icuARM based on associate rule mining (ARM), and a publicly available research database MIMIC-II (Multi-parameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II) that contains more than 40,000 ICU records for 30,000+patients. icuARM is constructed with multiple association rules and an easy-to-use graphical user interface (GUI) for care providers to perform real-time data and information mining in the ICU setting. To validate icuARM, we have investigated the associations between patients' conditions such as comorbidities, demographics, and medications and their ICU outcomes such as ICU length of stay. Coagulopathy surfaced as the most dangerous co-morbidity that leads to the highest possibility (54.1%) of prolonged ICU stay. In addition, women who are older than 50 years have the highest possibility (38.8%) of prolonged ICU stay. For clinical conditions treatable with multiple drugs, icuARM suggests that medication choice can be optimized based on patient-specific characteristics. Overall, icuARM can provide valuable insights for ICU physicians to tailor a patient's treatment based on his or her clinical status in real time. PMID:27170860

  17. Using clinical decision support as a means of implementing a universal postpartum depression screening program.

    PubMed

    Loudon, Holly; Nentin, Farida; Silverman, Michael E

    2016-06-01

    A major barrier to the diagnosis of postpartum depression (PPD) includes symptom detection. The lack of awareness and understanding of PPD among new mothers, the variability in clinical presentation, and the various diagnostic strategies can increase this further. The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of adding clinical decision support (CDS) to the electronic health record (EHR) as a means of implementing a universal standardized PPD screening program within a large, at high risk, population. All women returning to the Mount Sinai Hospital OB/GYN Ambulatory Practice for postpartum care between 2010 and 2013 were presented with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) in response to a CDS "hard stop" built into the EHR. Of the 2102 women who presented for postpartum care, 2092 women (99.5 %) were screened for PPD in response to a CDS hard stop module. Screens were missing on ten records (0.5 %) secondary to refusal, language barrier, or lack of clarity in the EHR. Technology is becoming increasingly important in addressing the challenges faced by health care providers. While the identification of PPD has become the recent focus of public health concerns secondary to the significant social burden, numerous barriers to screening still exist within the clinical setting. The utility of adding CDS in the form of a hard stop, requiring clinicians to enter a standardized PPD mood assessment score to the patient EHR, offers a sufficient way to address a primary barrier to PPD symptom identification at the practitioner level. PMID:26669601

  18. Proceedings of Joint International Symposium on the role of noninvasive imaging modalities in clinical decision making of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Mena, I.G.; Strauss, H.W.

    1986-01-01

    This report contains ten papers on the use of noninvasive imaging in clinical diagnosis and decision making. Topics include a cost analysis of magnetic resonance imaging in medical technology, diagnostic uses of MRI in chronic coronary artery disease, clinical applications of cine computed tomography, the use of PET as a clinical tool, and the use of echocardiography in coronary artery disease. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base. (TEM)

  19. Autonomy, religion and clinical decisions: findings from a national physician survey

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, R E; Curlin, F A

    2010-01-01

    Background Patient autonomy has been promoted as the most important principle to guide difficult clinical decisions. To examine whether practising physicians indeed value patient autonomy above other considerations, physicians were asked to weight patient autonomy against three other criteria that often influence doctors’ decisions. Associations between physicians’ religious characteristics and their weighting of the criteria were also examined. Methods Mailed survey in 2007 of a stratified random sample of 1000 US primary care physicians, selected from the American Medical Association masterfile. Physicians were asked how much weight should be given to the following: (1) the patient’s expressed wishes and values, (2) the physician’s own judgment about what is in the patient’s best interest, (3) standards and recommendations from professional medical bodies and (4) moral guidelines from religious traditions. Results Response rate 51% (446/879). Half of physicians (55%) gave the patient’s expressed wishes and values “the highest possible weight”. In comparative analysis, 40% gave patient wishes more weight than the other three factors, and 13% ranked patient wishes behind some other factor. Religious doctors tended to give less weight to the patient’s expressed wishes. For example, 47% of doctors with high intrinsic religious motivation gave patient wishes the “highest possible weight”, versus 67% of those with low (OR 0.5; 95% CI 0.3 to 0.8). Conclusions Doctors believe patient wishes and values are important, but other considerations are often equally or more important. This suggests that patient autonomy does not guide physicians’ decisions as much as is often recommended in the ethics literature. PMID:19332575

  20. Defining the optimal treatment for clinical stage I nonseminomatous germ cell testicular cancer using decision analysis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Carvell T; Fu, Alex Z; Gilligan, Timothy D; Wells, Brian J; Klein, Eric A; Kattan, Michael W; Stephenson, Andrew J

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE There is equipoise regarding the optimal treatment of clinical stage (CS) I nonseminomatous germ cell testicular cancer (NSGCT). Formal mechanisms that enable patients to consider cancer outcomes, treatment-related morbidity, and personal preferences are needed to facilitate decision making between retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (RPLND), primary chemotherapy, and surveillance. METHODS Decision analysis was performed using a Markov model that incorporated likelihoods of survival, treatment-related morbidity, and utilities for seven undesired post-treatment health states to estimate the quality-adjusted survival (QAS) for each treatment option. Utilities were obtained from 24 hypothetical NSGCT patients using a visual analog (rating) scale and standard gamble. Results Overall, QAS associated with each treatment was high and differences in QAS were small. Surveillance was the preferred intervention for patients with a risk of relapse less than 33% and 37% using the rating scale and standard-gamble method of utility assessment, respectively. Active treatment was favored over surveillance for patients with relapse risk on surveillance greater than 33% and 37% by the rating scale (RPLND preferred) and standard-gamble methods (primary chemotherapy preferred), respectively. Substantial differences in average utilities were seen depending on the method used. By the rating scale, patients substantially devalued life in six of seven undesired health states but they were surprisingly tolerant of treatment-related morbidity using standard gamble. CONCLUSION A decision model has been developed for CS I NSGCT that estimates QAS for RPLND, primary chemotherapy, and surveillance by considering cancer outcomes, morbidity, and patient preferences. Surveillance was the preferred intervention for all except those patients at high risk for relapse. PMID:19917846

  1. Implementing a decision-theoretic design in clinical trials: why and how?

    PubMed

    Palmer, Christopher R; Shahumyan, Harutyun

    2007-11-30

    This paper addresses two main questions: first, why should Bayesian and other innovative, data-dependent design models be put into practice and, secondly, given the past dearth of actual applications, how might one example of such a design be implemented in a genuine example trial? Clinical trials amalgamate theory, practice and ethics, but this last point has become relegated to the background, rather than taking often a more appropriate primary role. Trial practice has evolved but has its roots in R. A. Fisher's randomized agricultural field trials of the 1920s. Reasons for, and consequences of, this are discussed from an ethical standpoint, drawing on an under-used dichotomy introduced by French authors Lellouch and Schwartz (Int. Statist. Rev. 1971; 39:27-36). Plenty of ethically motivated designs for trials, including Bayesian designs have been proposed, but have found little application thus far. One reason for this is a lack of awareness of such alternative designs among trialists, while another reason is a lack of user-friendly software to allow study simulations. To encourage implementation, a new C++ program called 'Daniel' is introduced, offering much potential to assist the design of today's randomized controlled trials. Daniel evaluates a particular decision-theoretic method suitable for coping with either two or three Bernoulli response treatments with input features allowing user-specified choices of: patient horizon (number to be treated before and after the comparative stages of the trial); an arbitrary fixed trial truncation size (to allow ready comparison with traditional designs or to cope with practical constraints); anticipated success rates and a measure of their uncertainty (a matter ignored in standard power calculations); and clinically relevant, and irrelevant, differences in treatment effect sizes. Error probabilities and expected trial durations can be thoroughly explored via simulation, it being better by far to harm 'computer patients' instead of real ones. Suppose the objective in a clinical trial is to select between two treatments using a maximum horizon of 500 patients, when the truly superior treatment is expected to yield a 40 per cent success rate, but is believed to really range between 20 and 60 per cent. Simulation studies show that to detect a clinically relevant, absolute difference of 10 per cent between treatments, simulation studies show the decision-theoretic procedure would treat a mean 68 pairs of patients (SD 37) before correctly identifying the better treatment 96.7 per cent of the time, an error rate of 3.3 per cent. Having made a recommendation based on these patients, the remaining, on average 364 individuals, could either be given the indicated treatment, knowing its choice is optimal for the chosen horizon, or, alternatively, they could be entered into another, separate clinical trial. For comparison, a fixed sample size trial, with standard 5 per cent level of significance and 80 per cent power to detect a 10 per cent difference, requires treating over 700 patients in two groups, with the half allocated to inferior treatment considerably outnumbering the 68 expected under the decision-theoretic design, and the overall number simply too high for realistic application. In brief, the keys to answering the above 'why?' and 'how?' questions are ethics and software, respectively. Wider implications, both pros and cons, of implementing the particular method described will be discussed, with the overall conclusion that, where appropriate, clinical trials are now ready to undergo modernization from the agricultural age to the information age. PMID:17582801

  2. Computerized Psychiatric Diagnostic Interview

    PubMed Central

    Zetin, Mark; Warren, Stacey; Lanssens, Ed; Tominaga, Doris

    1987-01-01

    A computerized psychiatric diagnostic interview was developed and administered to 121 adult acute psychiatric inpatients. Data on the 100 completers was evaluated for sensitivity and specificity of the computer diagnostic evaluation relative to the hospital discharge diagnosis and revealed sensitivity greater than 70% for major depression, alcohol/substance abuse, adjustment disorder, bipolar/mania, dependent personaltiy disorder, and histrionic personality disorder. Specificity was greater than 70% for schizophrania, alcohol/substance abuse, and borderline personality disorder. Meen interview time was 51 minutes. Eighty-two percent of patients evaluated the computerized interview as interesting and 78% rated it as thorough. The mouse input, large screen letters, and user-friendliness of the Macintosh computer make this ideal for patient-computer interaction.

  3. Using brain-based cognitive measures to support clinical decisions in ADHD.

    PubMed

    Williams, Leanne M; Hermens, Daniel F; Thein, Thida; Clark, C Richard; Cooper, Nicholas J; Clarke, Simon D; Lamb, Chris; Gordon, Evian; Kohn, Michael R

    2010-02-01

    Measures of cognition support diagnostic and treatment decisions in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. We used an integrative neuroscience framework to assess cognition and associated brain-function correlates in large attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and healthy groups. Matched groups of 175 attention deficit hyperactivity disorder children/adolescents and 175 healthy control subjects were assessed clinically, with the touch screen-based cognitive assessment battery "IntegNeuro" (Brain Resource Ltd., Sydney, Australia) and the "LabNeuro" (Brain Resource Ltd., Sydney, Australia) platform for psychophysiologic recordings of brain function and body arousal. IntegNeuro continuous performance task measures of sustained attention classified 68% of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder patients with 76% specificity, consistent with previous reports. Our additional cognitive measures of impulsivity, intrusive errors, inhibition, and response variability improved sensitivity to 88%, and specificity to 91%. Positive predictive power was 96%, and negative predictive power, 88%. These metrics were stable across attention deficit hyperactivity disorder subtypes and age. Consistent with their brain-based validity, cognitive measures were correlated with corresponding brain-function and body-arousal measures. We propose a combination of candidate cognitive "markers" that define a signature for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: "sustained attention," "impulsivity," "inhibition," "intrusions," and "response variability." These markers offer a frame of reference to support diagnostic and treatment decisions, and an objective benchmark for monitoring outcomes of interventions. PMID:20117748

  4. Antecedents of ethical decision-making: intercollegiate sporting environments as clinical education and practice settings.

    PubMed

    Caswell, Shane V; Ambegaonkar, Jatin P; Caswell, Amanda M; Gould, Trenton E

    2009-01-01

    Unique among allied health care professions, athletic training is predominately practiced amid competitive intercollegiate sports. Competitive sporting environments have been suggested to adversely impact morality, ethical decision-making (EDM), and behavior. The purposes of this study were to (1) investigate the effect of institutional National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) participation level on preferred ethical ideologies and EDM, (2) determine the relationship between professional status (athletic training student [ATS] or certified athletic trainer [ATC]) and ethical ideology preferences and EDM, and (3) examine whether preferred ethical ideology is related to differences in EDM. A nationally representative sample of 610 ATSs and ATCs from 30 athletic training education programs, stratified by NCAA division level, participated in the study. All participants completed a demographic survey, the Ethics Position Questionnaire, and the Dilemmas in Athletic Training Questionnaire. No significant relationships were noted between NCAA participation level and respondents' ethical ideology preferences. However, ATSs and ATCs demonstrated significant preferences for specific ethical ideologies, with students adopting the subjectivist ideology more than expected and the exceptionist ideology less than expected and ATCs adopting the exceptionist ideology more than expected and the situationist ideology less than expected. In contrast to some previous research, our results suggest that competitive sporting environments do not affect ATSs' and ATCs' ethical ideology and EDM abilities at the collegiate level. These findings serve as a baseline for future research examining the ethical ideologies and ethical decision-making levels of athletic training practitioners and other allied health professionals across clinical settings. PMID:19361022

  5. An Image Feature-based Approach to Automatically Find Images for Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, R. Joe; De, Soumya; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Antani, Sameer; Thoma, George R.

    2010-01-01

    The illustrations in biomedical publications often provide useful information in aiding clinicians’ decisions when full text searching is performed to find evidence in support of a clinical decision. In this research, image analysis and classification techniques are explored to automatically extract information for differentiating specific modalities to characterize illustrations in biomedical publications, which may assist in the evidence finding process. Global, histogram-based, and texture image illustration features were compared to basis function luminance histogram correlation features for modality-based discrimination over a set of 742 manually annotated images by modality (radiological, photo, etc.) selected from 2004-2005 issues of the British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. Using a mean shifting supervised clustering technique, automatic modality-based discrimination results as high as 95.57% were obtained using the basis function features. These results compared favorably to other feature categories examined. The experimental results show that image-based features, particularly correlation-based features, can provide useful modality discrimination information. PMID:21144707

  6. Recurrent Neural Networks in Computer-Based Clinical Decision Support for Laryngopathies: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Szkoła, Jarosław; Pancerz, Krzysztof; Warchoł, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of this paper is to give the basis for creating a computer-based clinical decision support (CDS) system for laryngopathies. One of approaches which can be used in the proposed CDS is based on the speech signal analysis using recurrent neural networks (RNNs). RNNs can be used for pattern recognition in time series data due to their ability of memorizing some information from the past. The Elman networks (ENs) are a classical representative of RNNs. To improve learning ability of ENs, we may modify and combine them with another kind of RNNs, namely, with the Jordan networks. The modified Elman-Jordan networks (EJNs) manifest a faster and more exact achievement of the target pattern. Validation experiments were carried out on speech signals of patients from the control group and with two kinds of laryngopathies. PMID:22007195

  7. Service oriented architecture for clinical decision support: a systematic review and future directions.

    PubMed

    Loya, Salvador Rodriguez; Kawamoto, Kensaku; Chatwin, Chris; Huser, Vojtech

    2014-12-01

    The use of a service-oriented architecture (SOA) has been identified as a promising approach for improving health care by facilitating reliable clinical decision support (CDS). A review of the literature through October 2013 identified 44 articles on this topic. The review suggests that SOA related technologies such as Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN) and Service Component Architecture (SCA) have not been generally adopted to impact health IT systems' performance for better care solutions. Additionally, technologies such as Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) and architectural approaches like Service Choreography have not been generally exploited among researchers and developers. Based on the experience of other industries and our observation of the evolution of SOA, we found that the greater use of these approaches have the potential to significantly impact SOA implementations for CDS. PMID:25325996

  8. Mechanical versus clinical data combination in selection and admissions decisions: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kuncel, Nathan R; Klieger, David M; Connelly, Brian S; Ones, Deniz S

    2013-11-01

    In employee selection and academic admission decisions, holistic (clinical) data combination methods continue to be relied upon and preferred by practitioners in our field. This meta-analysis examined and compared the relative predictive power of mechanical methods versus holistic methods in predicting multiple work (advancement, supervisory ratings of performance, and training performance) and academic (grade point average) criteria. There was consistent and substantial loss of validity when data were combined holistically-even by experts who are knowledgeable about the jobs and organizations in question-across multiple criteria in work and academic settings. In predicting job performance, the difference between the validity of mechanical and holistic data combination methods translated into an improvement in prediction of more than 50%. Implications for evidence-based practice are discussed. PMID:24041118

  9. COPD biomarkers as tools for decision making in early clinical drug development.

    PubMed

    Taib, Ziad; Jauhiainen, Alexandra

    2016-05-01

    In this perspective article, we discuss, from a statistician's perspective, how biomarkers can be useful in decision making in drug development with emphasis on early clinical development (Phase I and II) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We illustrate with examples of how biomarkers can affect the very choice of treatment strategy: for example, targeting patients in early versus late phases of the disease or patients with particular extrapulmonary manifestations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We also illustrate the use of biomarkers for establishing proof of mechanism in Phase I trials and how surrogate biomarkers can be used as end points in Phase II leading to shorter and more efficient proof-of-principle and dose-finding trials. PMID:27128658

  10. Migrating toward a Next-Generation Clinical Decision Support Application: The BJC HealthCare Experience

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Noirot, Laura A.; Heard, Kevin M.; Reichley, Richard M.; Dunagan, Wm. Claiborne; Bailey, Thomas C.

    2007-01-01

    The next-generation model outlined in the AMIA Roadmap for National Action on Clinical Decision Support (CDS) is aimed to optimize the effectiveness of CDS interventions, and to achieve widespread adoption. BJC HealthCare re-engineered its existing CDS system in alignment with the AMIA roadmap and plans to use it for guidance on further enhancements. We present our experience and discuss an incremental approach to migrate towards the next generation of CDS applications from the viewpoint of a healthcare institution. Specifically, a CDS rule engine service with a standards-based rule representation format was built to simplify maintenance and deployment. Rules were separated from execution code and made customizable for multi-facility deployment. Those changes resulted in system improvements in the short term while aligning with long-term strategic objectives. PMID:18693855

  11. Computerized leak training

    SciTech Connect

    Parella, C.; Monroe, A.

    1985-11-01

    Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation's computerized leak detection training system is discussed. The system is able to simulate gas leak situations by means of a computer. The training setup includes actual visual display via slides of houses represented on a plotting board; computer with plotter board in front that simulates an area and various leakage situations; a typical handheld CGI; and a control pad for the computer. The training system has filled a valuable need in the area of emergency training.

  12. Cardiac 123I-MIBG Imaging for Clinical Decision Making: 22-Year Experience in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Nakata, Tomoaki

    2015-06-01

    Cardiac neuroimaging with (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine ((123)I-MIBG) has been officially used in clinical practice in Japan since 1992. The nuclear cardiology guidelines of the Japanese Circulation Society, revised in 2010, recommended cardiac (123)I-MIBG imaging for the management of heart failure (HF) patients, particularly for the assessment of HF severity and prognosis of HF patients. Consensus in North American and European countries regarding incorporation into clinical practice, however, has not been established yet. This article summarizes 22 y of clinical applications in Japan of (123)I-MIBG imaging in the field of cardiology; these applications are reflected in cardiology guidelines, including recent methodologic advances. A standardized cardiac (123)I-MIBG parameter, the heart-to-mediastinum ratio (HMR), is the basis for clinical decision making and enables common use of parameters beyond differences in institutions and studies. Several clinical studies unanimously demonstrated its potent independent roles in prognosis evaluation and risk stratification irrespective of HF etiologies. An HMR of less than 1.6-1.8 and an accelerated washout rate are recognized as high-risk indicators of pump failure death, sudden cardiac death, and fatal arrhythmias and have independent and incremental prognostic values together with known clinical variables, such as left ventricular ejection fraction and brain natriuretic peptide. Another possible use of this imaging technique is the selection of therapeutic strategy, such as pharmacologic treatment and nonpharmacologic treatment with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator or cardiac resynchronization device; however, this possibility remains to be investigated. Recent multiple-cohort database analyses definitively demonstrated that patients who were at low risk for lethal events and who were defined by an HMR of greater than 2.0 on (123)I-MIBG studies had a good long-term prognosis. Future investigations of cardiac (123)I-MIBG imaging will contribute to better risk stratification of low-risk and high-risk populations, to the establishment of cost-effective use of this imaging technique for the management of HF patients, and to worldwide acceptance of this imaging technique in clinical cardiology practice. PMID:26033897

  13. Clinical prediction models to inform individualized decision-making in subfertile couples: a stratified medicine approach.

    PubMed

    McLernon, D J; te Velde, E R; Steyerberg, E W; Mol, B W J; Bhattacharya, S

    2014-09-01

    Infertility is defined as failure to conceive after 1 year of unprotected intercourse. This dichotomization into fertile versus infertile, based on lack of conception over 12-month period, is fundamentally flawed. Time to conception is strongly influenced by factors such as female age and whilst a minority of couples have absolute infertility (sterility), many are able to conceive without intervention but may take longer to do so, reflecting the degree of subfertility. This natural variability in time to conception means that subfertility reflects a prognosis rather than a diagnosis. Current clinical prediction models in fertility only provide individualized estimates of the probability of either treatment-independent pregnancy or treatment-dependent pregnancy, but do not take account of both. Together, prognostic factors which are able to predict natural pregnancy and predictive factors of response to treatment would be required to estimate the absolute increase in pregnancy chances with treatment. This stratified medicine approach would be appropriate for facilitating personalized decision-making concerning whether or not to treat subfertile patients. Published models are thus far of little value for decisions regarding when to initiate treatment in patients who undergo a period of, ultimately unsuccessful, expectant management. We submit that a dynamic prediction approach, which estimates the change in subfertility prognosis over the course of follow-up, would be ideally suited to inform when the commencement of treatment would be most beneficial in those undergoing expectant management. Further research needs to be undertaken to identify treatment predictive factors and to identify or create databases to allow these approaches to be explored. In the interim, the most feasible approach is to use a combination of previously published clinical prediction models. PMID:25061025

  14. Comparison of Decision-Assist and Clinical Judgment of Experts for Prediction of Lifesaving Interventions.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Colin F; Gao, Cheng; Hu, Peter F; Anazodo, Amechi; Chen, Hegang; Dinardo, Theresa; Imle, P Cristina; Hartsky, Lauren; Stephens, Christopher; Menaker, Jay; Fouche, Yvette; Murdock, Karen; Galvagno, Samuel; Alcorta, Richard; Shackelford, Stacy

    2015-03-01

    Early recognition of hemorrhage during the initial resuscitation of injured patients is associated with improved survival in both civilian and military casualties. We tested a transfusion and lifesaving intervention (LSI) prediction algorithm in comparison with clinical judgment of expert trauma care providers. We collected 15 min of pulse oximeter photopletysmograph waveforms and extracted features to predict LSIs. We compared this with clinical judgment of LSIs by individual categories of prehospital providers, nurses, and physicians and a combined judgment of all three providers using the Area Under Receiver Operating Curve (AUROC). We obtained clinical judgment of need for LSI from 405 expert clinicians in135 trauma patients. The pulse oximeter algorithm predicted transfusion within 6 h (AUROC, 0.92; P < 0.003) more accurately than either physicians or prehospital providers and as accurately as nurses (AUROC, 0.76; P = 0.07). For prediction of surgical procedures, the algorithm was as accurate as the three categories of clinicians. For prediction of fluid bolus, the diagnostic algorithm (AUROC, 0.9) was significantly more accurate than prehospital providers (AUROC, 0.62; P = 0.02) and nurses (AUROC, 0.57; P = 0.04) and as accurate as physicians (AUROC, 0.71; P = 0.06). Prediction of intubation by the algorithm (AUROC, 0.92) was as accurate as each of the three categories of clinicians. The algorithm was more accurate (P < 0.03) for blood and fluid prediction than the combined clinical judgment of all three providers but no different from the clinicians in the prediction of surgery (P = 0.7) or intubation (P = 0.8). Automated analysis of 15 min of pulse oximeter waveforms predicts the need for LSIs during initial trauma resuscitation as accurately as judgment of expert trauma clinicians. For prediction of emergency transfusion and fluid bolus, pulse oximetry features were more accurate than these experts. Such automated decision support could assist resuscitation decisions, trauma team, and operating room and blood bank preparations. PMID:25394243

  15. Computerized tomography calibrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Herbert P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A set of interchangeable pieces comprising a computerized tomography calibrator, and a method of use thereof, permits focusing of a computerized tomographic (CT) system. The interchangeable pieces include a plurality of nestable, generally planar mother rings, adapted for the receipt of planar inserts of predetermined sizes, and of predetermined material densities. The inserts further define openings therein for receipt of plural sub-inserts. All pieces are of known sizes and densities, permitting the assembling of different configurations of materials of known sizes and combinations of densities, for calibration (i.e., focusing) of a computerized tomographic system through variation of operating variables thereof. Rather than serving as a phanton, which is intended to be representative of a particular workpiece to be tested, the set of interchangeable pieces permits simple and easy standardized calibration of a CT system. The calibrator and its related method of use further includes use of air or of particular fluids for filling various openings, as part of a selected configuration of the set of pieces.

  16. Patient involvement in decision-making: a cross-sectional study in a Malaysian primary care clinic

    PubMed Central

    Ambigapathy, Ranjini; Ng, Chirk Jenn

    2016-01-01

    Objective Shared decision-making has been advocated as a useful model for patient management. In developing Asian countries such as Malaysia, there is a common belief that patients prefer a passive role in clinical consultation. As such, the objective of this study was to determine Malaysian patients’ role preference in decision-making and the associated factors. Design A cross-sectional study. Setting Study was conducted at an urban primary care clinic in Malaysia in 2012. Participants Patients aged >21 years were chosen using systematic random sampling. Methods Consenting patients answered a self-administered questionnaire, which included demographic data and their preferred and actual role before and after consultation. Doctors were asked to determine patients’ role preference. The Control Preference Scale was used to assess patients’ role preference. Primary outcome Prevalence of patients’ preferred role in decision-making. Secondary outcomes (1) Actual role played by the patient in decision-making. (2) Sociodemographic factors associated with patients’ preferred role in decision-making. (3) Doctors’ perception of patients’ involvement in decision-making. Results The response rate was 95.1% (470/494). Shared decision-making was preferred by 51.9% of patients, followed by passive (26.3%) and active (21.8%) roles in decision-making. Higher household income was significantly associated with autonomous role preference (p=0.018). Doctors’ perception did not concur with patients’ preferred role. Among patients whom doctors perceived to prefer a passive role, 73.5% preferred an autonomous role (p=0.900, κ=0.006). Conclusions The majority of patients attending the primary care clinic preferred and played an autonomous role in decision-making. Doctors underestimated patients’ preference to play an autonomous role. PMID:26729393

  17. The 2013 symposium on pathology data integration and clinical decision support and the current state of field

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Jason M.; Dighe, Anand S.; Arnaout, Ramy; Balis, Ulysses J.; Black-Schaffer, W. Stephen; Carter, Alexis B.; Henricks, Walter H.; Higgins, John M.; Jackson, Brian R.; Kim, JiYeon; Klepeis, Veronica E.; Le, Long P.; Louis, David N.; Mandelker, Diana; Mermel, Craig H.; Michaelson, James S.; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Platt, Mihae E.; Quinn, Andrew M.; Rao, Luigi; Shirts, Brian H.; Gilbertson, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pathologists and informaticians are becoming increasingly interested in electronic clinical decision support for pathology, laboratory medicine and clinical diagnosis. Improved decision support may optimize laboratory test selection, improve test result interpretation and permit the extraction of enhanced diagnostic information from existing laboratory data. Nonetheless, the field of pathology decision support is still developing. To facilitate the exchange of ideas and preliminary studies, we convened a symposium entitled: Pathology data integration and clinical decision support. Methods: The symposium was held at the Massachusetts General Hospital, on May 10, 2013. Participants were selected to represent diverse backgrounds and interests and were from nine different institutions in eight different states. Results: The day included 16 plenary talks and three panel discussions, together covering four broad areas. Summaries of each presentation are included in this manuscript. Conclusions: A number of recurrent themes emerged from the symposium. Among the most pervasive was the dichotomy between diagnostic data and diagnostic information, including the opportunities that laboratories may have to use electronic systems and algorithms to convert the data they generate into more useful information. Differences between human talents and computer abilities were described; well-designed symbioses between humans and computers may ultimately optimize diagnosis. Another key theme related to the unique needs and challenges in providing decision support for genomics and other emerging diagnostic modalities. Finally, many talks relayed how the barriers to bringing decision support toward reality are primarily personnel, political, infrastructural and administrative challenges rather than technological limitations. PMID:24672737

  18. Privacy-Preserving Patient-Centric Clinical Decision Support System on Naïve Bayesian Classification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ximeng; Lu, Rongxing; Ma, Jianfeng; Chen, Le; Qin, Baodong

    2016-03-01

    Clinical decision support system, which uses advanced data mining techniques to help clinician make proper decisions, has received considerable attention recently. The advantages of clinical decision support system include not only improving diagnosis accuracy but also reducing diagnosis time. Specifically, with large amounts of clinical data generated everyday, naïve Bayesian classification can be utilized to excavate valuable information to improve a clinical decision support system. Although the clinical decision support system is quite promising, the flourish of the system still faces many challenges including information security and privacy concerns. In this paper, we propose a new privacy-preserving patient-centric clinical decision support system, which helps clinician complementary to diagnose the risk of patients' disease in a privacy-preserving way. In the proposed system, the past patients' historical data are stored in cloud and can be used to train the naïve Bayesian classifier without leaking any individual patient medical data, and then the trained classifier can be applied to compute the disease risk for new coming patients and also allow these patients to retrieve the top- k disease names according to their own preferences. Specifically, to protect the privacy of past patients' historical data, a new cryptographic tool called additive homomorphic proxy aggregation scheme is designed. Moreover, to leverage the leakage of naïve Bayesian classifier, we introduce a privacy-preserving top- k disease names retrieval protocol in our system. Detailed privacy analysis ensures that patient's information is private and will not be leaked out during the disease diagnosis phase. In addition, performance evaluation via extensive simulations also demonstrates that our system can efficiently calculate patient's disease risk with high accuracy in a privacy-preserving way. PMID:26960216

  19. Clinical Decision Support for the Classification of Diabetic Retinopathy: A Comparison of Manual and Automated Results.

    PubMed

    Mitsch, Christoph; Fehre, Karsten; Prager, Sonja; Scholda, Christoph; Kriechbaum, Katharina; Wrba, Thomas; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    The management of diabetic retinopathy, a frequent ophthalmological manifestation of diabetes mellitus, consists of regular examinations and a standardized, manual classification of disease severity, which is used to recommend re-examination intervals. To evaluate the feasibility and safety of implementing automated, guideline-based diabetic retinopathy (DR) grading into clinical routine by applying established clinical decision support (CDS) technology. We compared manual with automated classification that was generated using medical documentation and an Arden server with a specific medical logic module. Of 7169 included eyes, 47% (n=3373) showed inter-method classification agreement, specifically 29.4% in mild DR, 38.3% in moderate DR, 27.6% in severe DR, and 65.7% in proliferative DR. We demonstrate that the implementation of a CDS system for automated disease severity classification in diabetic retinopathy is feasible but also that, due to the highly individual nature of medical documentation, certain important criteria for the used electronic health record system need to be met in order to achieve reliable results. PMID:27139380

  20. Integrating pharmacogenetic information and clinical decision support into the electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Goldspiel, Barry R; Flegel, Willy A; DiPatrizio, Gary; Sissung, Tristan; Adams, Sharon D; Penzak, Scott R; Biesecker, Leslie G; Fleisher, Thomas A; Patel, Jharana J; Herion, David; Figg, William D; Lertora, Juan J L; McKeeby, Jon W

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics (PG) examines gene variations for drug disposition, response, or toxicity. At the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (NIH CC), a multidepartment Pharmacogenetics Testing Implementation Committee (PGTIC) was established to develop clinical decision support (CDS) algorithms for abacavir, carbamazepine, and allopurinol, medications for which human leukocyte antigen (HLA) variants predict severe hypersensitivity reactions. Providing PG CDS in the electronic health record (EHR) during order entry could prevent adverse drug events. Medical Logic Module (MLM) programming was used to implement PG CDS in our EHR. The MLM checks to see if an HLA sequence-based gene test is ordered. A message regarding test status (result present, absent, pending, or test not ordered) is displayed on the order form, and the MLM determines if the prescriber can place the order, place it but require an over-ride reason, or be blocked from placing the order. Since implementation, more than 725 medication orders have been placed for over 230 patients by 154 different prescribers for the three drugs included in our PG program. Prescribers commonly used an over-ride reason when placing the order mainly because patients had been receiving the drug without reaction before implementation of the CDS program. Successful incorporation of PG CDS into the NIH CC EHR required a coordinated, interdisciplinary effort to ensure smooth activation and a positive effect on patient care. Prescribers have adapted to using the CDS and have ordered PG testing as a direct result of the implementation. PMID:24302286

  1. Evaluating acceptance and user experience of a guideline-based clinical decision support system execution platform.

    PubMed

    Buenestado, David; Elorz, Javier; Pérez-Yarza, Eduardo G; Iruetaguena, Ander; Segundo, Unai; Barrena, Raúl; Pikatza, Juan M

    2013-04-01

    This study aims to determine what the initial disposition of physicians towards the use of Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) based on Computerised Clinical Guidelines and Protocols (CCGP) is; and whether their prolonged utilisation has a positive effect on their intention to adopt them in the future. For a period of 3 months, 8 volunteer paediatricians monitored each up to 10 asthmatic patients using two CCGPs deployed in the-GuidesMed CDSS. A Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) questionnaire was supplied to them before and after using the system. Results from both questionnaires are analysed searching for significant improvements in opinion between them. An additional survey was performed to analyse the usability of the system. It was found that initial disposition of physicians towards e-GuidesMed is good. Improvement between the pre and post iterations of the TAM questionnaire has been found to be statistically significant. Nonetheless, slightly lower values in the Compatibility and Habit variables show that participants perceive possible difficulties to integrate e-GuidesMed into their daily routine. The variable Facilitators shows the highest correlation with the Intention to Use. Usability of the system has also been rated very high and, in this regard, no fundamental flaw has been detected. Initial views towards e-GuidesMed are positive, and become reinforced after continued utilisation of the system. In order to achieve an effective implementation, it becomes essential to facilitate conditions to integrate the system into the physician's daily routine. PMID:23377779

  2. The Morningside Initiative: Collaborative Development of a Knowledge Repository to Accelerate Adoption of Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Greenes, Robert; Bloomrosen, Meryl; Brown-Connolly, Nancy E.; Curtis, Clayton; Detmer, Don E; Enberg, Robert; Fridsma, Douglas; Fry, Emory; Goldstein, Mary K; Haug, Peter; Hulse, Nathan; Hongsermeier, Tonya; Maviglia, Saverio; Robbins, Craig W; Shah, Hemant

    2010-01-01

    The Morningside Initiative is a public-private activity that has evolved from an August, 2007, meeting at the Morningside Inn, in Frederick, MD, sponsored by the Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center (TATRC) of the US Army Medical Research Materiel Command. Participants were subject matter experts in clinical decision support (CDS) and included representatives from the Department of Defense, Veterans Health Administration, Kaiser Permanente, Partners Healthcare System, Henry Ford Health System, Arizona State University, and the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA). The Morningside Initiative was convened in response to the AMIA Roadmap for National Action on Clinical Decision Support and on the basis of other considerations and experiences of the participants. Its formation was the unanimous recommendation of participants at the 2007 meeting which called for creating a shared repository of executable knowledge for diverse health care organizations and practices, as well as health care system vendors. The rationale is based on the recognition that sharing of clinical knowledge needed for CDS across organizations is currently virtually non-existent, and that, given the considerable investment needed for creating, maintaining and updating authoritative knowledge, which only larger organizations have been able to undertake, this is an impediment to widespread adoption and use of CDS. The Morningside Initiative intends to develop and refine (1) an organizational framework, (2) a technical approach, and (3) CDS content acquisition and management processes for sharing CDS knowledge content, tools, and experience that will scale with growing numbers of participants and can be expanded in scope of content and capabilities. Intermountain Healthcare joined the initial set of participants shortly after its formation. The efforts of the Morningside Initiative are intended to serve as the basis for a series of next steps in a national agenda for CDS. It is based on the belief that sharing of knowledge can be highly effective as is the case in other competitive domains such as genomics. Participants in the Morningside Initiative believe that a coordinated effort between the private and public sectors is needed to accomplish this goal and that a small number of highly visible and respected health care organizations in the public and private sector can lead by example. Ultimately, a future collaborative knowledge sharing organization must have a sustainable long-term business model for financial support. PMID:21603282

  3. [Adequacy of clinical interventions in patients with advanced and complex disease. Proposal of a decision making algorithm].

    PubMed

    Ameneiros-Lago, E; Carballada-Rico, C; Garrido-Sanjuán, J A; García Martínez, A

    2015-01-01

    Decision making in the patient with chronic advanced disease is especially complex. Health professionals are obliged to prevent avoidable suffering and not to add any more damage to that of the disease itself. The adequacy of the clinical interventions consists of only offering those diagnostic and therapeutic procedures appropriate to the clinical situation of the patient and to perform only those allowed by the patient or representative. In this article, the use of an algorithm is proposed that should serve to help health professionals in this decision making process. PMID:25666087

  4. The Need for Clinical Decision Support Integrated with the Electronic Health Record for the Clinical Application of Whole Genome Sequencing Information

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Brandon M.; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2013-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing (WGS) is rapidly approaching widespread clinical application. Technology advancements over the past decade, since the first human genome was decoded, have made it feasible to use WGS for clinical care. Future advancements will likely drive down the price to the point wherein WGS is routinely available for care. However, were this to happen today, most of the genetic information available to guide clinical care would go unused due to the complexity of genetics, limited physician proficiency in genetics, and lack of genetics professionals in the clinical workforce. Furthermore, these limitations are unlikely to change in the future. As such, the use of clinical decision support (CDS) to guide genome-guided clinical decision-making is imperative. In this manuscript, we describe the barriers to widespread clinical application of WGS information, describe how CDS can be an important tool for overcoming these barriers, and provide clinical examples of how genome-enabled CDS can be used in the clinical setting. PMID:25411643

  5. Cost-Effectiveness of an Electronic Medical Record Based Clinical Decision Support System

    PubMed Central

    Gilmer, Todd P; O'Connor, Patrick J; Sperl-Hillen, JoAnn M; Rush, William A; Johnson, Paul E; Amundson, Gerald H; Asche, Stephen E; Ekstrom, Heidi L

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objective Medical groups have invested billions of dollars in electronic medical records (EMRs), but few studies have examined the cost-effectiveness of EMR-based clinical decision support (CDS). This study examined the cost-effectiveness of EMR-based CDS for adults with diabetes from the perspective of the health care system. Data Sources/Setting Clinical outcome and cost data from a randomized clinical trial of EMR-based CDS were used as inputs into a diabetes simulation model. The simulation cohort included 1,092 patients with diabetes with A1c above goal at baseline. Study Design The United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study Outcomes Model, a validated simulation model of diabetes, was used to evaluate remaining life years, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and health care costs over patient lifetimes (40-year time horizon) from the health system perspective. Principal Findings Patients in the intervention group had significantly lowered A1c (0.26 percent, p = .014) relative to patients in the control arm. Intervention costs were $120 (SE = 45) per patient in the first year and $76 (SE = 45) per patient in the following years. In the base case analysis, EMR-based CDS increased lifetime QALYs by 0.04 (SE = 0.01) and increased lifetime costs by $112 (SE = 660), resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $3,017 per QALY. The cost-effectiveness of EMR-based CDS persisted in one-way, two-way, and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Conclusions Widespread adoption of sophisticated EMR-based CDS has the potential to modestly improve the quality of care for patients with chronic conditions without substantially increasing costs to the health care system. PMID:22578085

  6. Supporting clinical decision making during deep brain stimulation surgery by means of a stochastic dynamical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamintziou, Sofia D.; Tsirogiannis, George L.; Stathis, Pantelis G.; Tagaris, George A.; Boviatsis, Efstathios J.; Sakas, Damianos E.; Nikita, Konstantina S.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. During deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery for the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), microelectrode recording (MER) in conjunction with functional stimulation techniques are commonly applied for accurate electrode implantation. However, the development of automatic methods for clinical decision making has to date been characterized by the absence of a robust single-biomarker approach. Moreover, it has only been restricted to the framework of MER without encompassing intraoperative macrostimulation. Here, we propose an integrated series of novel single-biomarker approaches applicable to the entire electrophysiological procedure by means of a stochastic dynamical model. Approach. The methods are applied to MER data pertinent to ten DBS procedures. Considering the presence of measurement noise, we initially employ a multivariate phase synchronization index for automatic delineation of the functional boundaries of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and determination of the acceptable MER trajectories. By introducing the index into a nonlinear stochastic model, appropriately fitted to pre-selected MERs, we simulate the neuronal response to periodic stimuli (130 Hz), and examine the Lyapunov exponent as an indirect indicator of the clinical effectiveness yielded by stimulation at the corresponding sites. Main results. Compared with the gold-standard dataset of annotations made intraoperatively by clinical experts, the STN detection methodology demonstrates a false negative rate of 4.8% and a false positive rate of 0%, across all trajectories. Site eligibility for implantation of the DBS electrode, as implicitly determined through the Lyapunov exponent of the proposed stochastic model, displays a sensitivity of 71.43%. Significance. The suggested comprehensive method exhibits remarkable performance in automatically determining both the acceptable MER trajectories and the optimal stimulation sites, thereby having the potential to accelerate precise target finalization during DBS surgery for PD.

  7. Clinical benefits of a multivariable prediction model for bladder cancer: a decision analytic approach

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Andrew J; Cronin, Angel M; Kattan, Michael W; Gonen, Mithat; Scardino, Peter T; Milowsky, Matthew I.; Dalbagni, Guido; Bochner, Bernard H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Multivariable prediction models have been shown to predict cancer outcomes more accurately than cancer stage. The effects on clinical management are unclear. We aimed to determine whether a published multivariable prediction model for bladder cancer (“bladder nomogram”) improves medical decision making, using referral for adjuvant chemotherapy as a model. Methods We analyzed data from an international cohort study of 4462 patients undergoing cystectomy without chemotherapy 1969 – 2004. The number of patients eligible for chemotherapy was determined using pathologic stage criteria (lymph node positive or stage pT3 or pT4), and for three cut-offs on the bladder nomogram (10%, 25% and 70% risk of recurrence with surgery alone). The number of recurrences was calculated by applying a relative risk reduction to eligible patients' baseline risk. Clinical net benefit was then calculated by combining recurrences and treatments, weighting the latter by a factor related to drug tolerability. Results A nomogram cut-off outperformed pathologic stage for chemotherapy for every scenario of drug effectiveness and tolerability. For a drug with a relative risk of 0.80, where clinicians would treat no more than 20 patients to prevent one recurrence, use of the nomogram was equivalent to a strategy that resulted in 60 fewer chemotherapy treatments per 1000 patients without any increase in recurrence rates. Conclusions Referring cystectomy patients to adjuvant chemotherapy on the basis of a multivariable model is likely to lead to better patient outcomes than the use of pathological stage. Further research is warranted to evaluate the clinical effects of multivariable prediction models. PMID:19823979

  8. Comparison of residents’ approaches to clinical decisions before and after the implementation of Evidence Based Medicine course

    PubMed Central

    KARIMIAN, ZAHRA; KOJURI, JAVAD; SAGHEB, MOHAMMAD MAHDI; MAHBOUDI, ALI; SABER, MAHBOOBEH; AMINI, MITRA; DEHGHANI, MOHAMMAD REZA

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: It has been found that the decision-making process in medicine is affected, to a large extent, by one’s experience, individual mentality, previous models, and common habitual approaches, in addition to scientific principles. Evidence-based medicine is an approach attempting to reinforce scientific, systematic and critical thinking in physicians and provide the ground for optimal decision making. In this connection, the purpose of the present study is to find out to what extent the education of evidence based medicine affects clinical decision making. Methods: The present quasi-experimental study was carried out on 110 clinical residents, who started their education in September, 2012 and finally 62 residents filled out the questionnaires. The instrument used was a researcher-made questionnaire containing items on four decision-making approaches. The questionnaire was used both as a pre-test and a post-test to assess the residents’ viewpoints on decision making approaches. The validity of the questionnaire was determined using medical education and clinical professionals’ viewpoints, and the reliability was calculated through Chronbach alpha; it was found to be 0.93. The results were analyzed by paired t-test using SPSS, version 14. Results: The results demonstrated that evidence-based medicine workshop significantly affected the residents’ decision-making approaches (p<0.001). The pre-test showed that principles-based, reference-based and routine model-based approaches were more preferred before the program (p<0.001). However, after the implementation of the program, the dominant approaches used by the residents in their decision making were evidence-based ones.  Conclusion: To develop the evidence-based approach, it is necessary for educational programs to continue steadily and goal-orientedly. In addition, the equipment infrastructure such as the Internet, access to data bases, scientific data, and clinical guides should develop more in the medical departments. PMID:25512942

  9. The influence of the law on clinical decisions affecting life and death.

    PubMed

    Havard, J D

    1983-07-01

    The purpose of this lecture is to review the justification for legal interference in physicians' clinical decisions and the consequences of that interference to patients. Discussion covers contraception, abortion, negligence, and defensive medicine. Contraception is normally interpreted as the prevention or inhibition of fertilization or of implantation of the fertilized ovum in the uterus. The extra corporeal or in vitro fertilization program has raised the question of the legal and ethical status of the fertilized ovum before implantation. This is turn has raised questions about contraceptive devices or procedures whose purpose it is to prevent the implantation of a fertilized ovum, of which the IUd is the most common in use in the UK. Congressman Doonan of California moved to amend the US Constitution to provide that "life begins when a sperm cell fertilizes an egg." It may be assumed that this amendment is designed to prevent unacceptable experiments on spare embryos, but the consequences to family planning could be enormous unless some exception is included in favor of IUDs inserted for purposes of contraception. This leads to the issue of abortion and a reminder that until the 19th century it was not regarded as a crime in English common law to abort a fetus before "quickening" had occurred, as this was the point at which the embryo was regarded as having been animated. The Offenses Against the Person Act of 1861 established the current criminal offense of induced abortion to which the Abortion Act of 1967 now provides a defense. Recent developments in life support mechanisms have created difficulties over the extent to which such measures should be employed in the management of children born with life threatening abnormalities. A draft bill has been introduced requiring doctors to take all possible steps to feed defective neonates with life threatening abnormalities who are experiencing serious feeding problems. This means that these infants would have to be force fed irrespective of their prospects of survival and suffering which this will cause them and their parents. Clinical decisions have been most seriously affected by recent developments in the law of negligence. 1 of the main reasons for this has been the unsatisfactory way in which the adversary system of law ldeals with expert evidence. Attempts have been made to provide courts of law in the UK an agreed statement on expert medical matters, there is a long way to go before reaching the position achieved in many civil law countries on the continent of Europe where the experts recognized by the court hammer out an agreed upon opinion through scientific discourse and without the restrictions of evidentiary rules which are aimed more at the establishment of facts than the validity of scientific opinion. Those who attack the medical profession as being paternalistic and authoritative in making clinical decisions involving life and death fail to realize that the easy way out for the medical profession is to treat every case, however hopeless, with the full technology available, disregarding the patient's and family's interests, the costs in resources, and ignoring the stark reality of the problem. PMID:6633202

  10. Study protocol: a dissemination trial of computerized psychological treatment for depression and alcohol/other drug use comorbidity in an Australian clinical service

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The rise of the internet and related technologies has significant implications for the treatment of complex health problems, including the combination of depression and alcohol/other drug (AOD) misuse. To date, no research exists to test the real world uptake of internet and computer-delivered treatment programs in clinical practice. This study is important, as it is the first to examine the adoption of the SHADE treatment program, a DVD-based psychological treatment for depression and AOD use comorbidity, by clinicians working in a publicly-funded AOD clinical service. The study protocol that follows describes the methodology of this dissemination trial. Methods/design 19 clinicians within an AOD service on the Central Coast of New South Wales, Australia, will be recruited to the trial. Consenting clinicians will participate in a baseline focus group discussion designed to explore their experiences and perceived barriers to adopting innovation in their clinical practice. Computer comfort and openness to innovation will also be assessed. Throughout the trial, current, new and wait-list clients will be referred to the research program via the clinical service, which will involve clients completing a baseline and 15-week follow-up clinical assessment with independent research assistants, comprising a range of mental health and AOD measures. Clinicians will also complete session checklists following each clinical session with a client, outlining the extent to which the SHADE computer program was used. Therapeutic alliance will be measured at intake and discharge from both the clinician and client perspectives. Discussion This study will provide comprehensive data on the factors associated with the adoption of an innovative, computer-delivered evidence-based treatment program, SHADE, by clinicians working in an AOD service. The results will contribute to the development of a model of dissemination of SHADE, which could be applied to a range of technological innovations. Clinical trials registry Australian Clinical Trial Registration Number: ACTRN12611000382976. PMID:22770390

  11. Computerized procedures system

    DOEpatents

    Lipner, Melvin H.; Mundy, Roger A.; Franusich, Michael D.

    2010-10-12

    An online data driven computerized procedures system that guides an operator through a complex process facility's operating procedures. The system monitors plant data, processes the data and then, based upon this processing, presents the status of the current procedure step and/or substep to the operator. The system supports multiple users and a single procedure definition supports several interface formats that can be tailored to the individual user. Layered security controls access privileges and revisions are version controlled. The procedures run on a server that is platform independent of the user workstations that the server interfaces with and the user interface supports diverse procedural views.

  12. Item Selection Criteria with Practical Constraints for Computerized Classification Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Chuan-Ju

    2011-01-01

    This study compares four item selection criteria for a two-category computerized classification testing: (1) Fisher information (FI), (2) Kullback-Leibler information (KLI), (3) weighted log-odds ratio (WLOR), and (4) mutual information (MI), with respect to the efficiency and accuracy of classification decision using the sequential probability…

  13. Depression and Anxiety During Pregnancy: Evaluating the Literature in Support of Clinical Risk-Benefit Decision-Making.

    PubMed

    Dalke, Katharine Baratz; Wenzel, Amy; Kim, Deborah R

    2016-06-01

    Depression and anxiety during pregnancy are common, and patients and providers are faced with complex decisions regarding various treatment modalities. A structured discussion of the risks and benefits of options with the patient and her support team is recommended to facilitate the decision-making process. This clinically focused review, with emphasis on the last 3 years of published study data, evaluates the major risk categories of medication treatments, namely pregnancy loss, physical malformations, growth impairment, behavioral teratogenicity, and neonatal toxicity. Nonpharmacological treatment options, including neuromodulation and psychotherapy, are also briefly reviewed. Specific recommendations, drawn from the literature and the authors' clinical experience, are also offered to help guide the clinician in decision-making. PMID:27091646

  14. Assessment of Competence in Clinical Reasoning and Decision-Making under Uncertainty: The Script Concordance Test Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramaekers, Stephan; Kremer, Wim; Pilot, Albert; van Beukelen, Peter; van Keulen, Hanno

    2010-01-01

    Real-life, complex problems often require that decisions are made despite limited information or insufficient time to explore all relevant aspects. Incorporating authentic uncertainties into an assessment, however, poses problems in establishing results and analysing their methodological qualities. This study aims at developing a test on clinical

  15. An Exploration of the Relationship between Clinical Decision-Making Ability and Educational Preparation among New Graduate Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blount, Kamilah V.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the impact of accelerated nursing direct entry master's programs on the development of clinical decision-making skills of new graduate nurses that completed the Performance Based Development System (PBDS) assessment during the study period of 2008-2012 at a healthcare organization. Healthcare today is practiced in a…

  16. Computerized Numerical Control Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reneau, Fred; And Others

    This guide is intended for use in a course in programming and operating a computerized numerical control system. Addressed in the course are various aspects of programming and planning, setting up, and operating machines with computerized numerical control, including selecting manual or computer-assigned programs and matching them with…

  17. A clinical decision support system for femoral peripheral arterial disease treatment.

    PubMed

    Yurtkuran, Alkın; Tok, Mustafa; Emel, Erdal

    2013-01-01

    One of the major challenges of providing reliable healthcare services is to diagnose and treat diseases in an accurate and timely manner. Recently, many researchers have successfully used artificial neural networks as a diagnostic assessment tool. In this study, the validation of such an assessment tool has been developed for treatment of the femoral peripheral arterial disease using a radial basis function neural network (RBFNN). A data set for training the RBFNN has been prepared by analyzing records of patients who had been treated by the thoracic and cardiovascular surgery clinic of a university hospital. The data set includes 186 patient records having 16 characteristic features associated with a binary treatment decision, namely, being a medical or a surgical one. K-means clustering algorithm has been used to determine the parameters of radial basis functions and the number of hidden nodes of the RBFNN is determined experimentally. For performance evaluation, the proposed RBFNN was compared to three different multilayer perceptron models having Pareto optimal hidden layer combinations using various performance indicators. Results of comparison indicate that the RBFNN can be used as an effective assessment tool for femoral peripheral arterial disease treatment. PMID:24382983

  18. Molecular profiling of liver tumors: classification and clinical translation for decision making.

    PubMed

    Pinyol, Roser; Nault, Jean Charles; Quetglas, Iris M; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Llovet, Josep M

    2014-11-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a complex disease with a dismal prognosis. Consequently, a translational approach is required to personalized clinical decision making to improve survival of HCC patients. Molecular signatures from cirrhotic livers and single nucleotide polymorphism have been linked with HCC occurrence. Identification of high-risk populations will be useful to design chemopreventive trials. In addition, molecular signatures derived from tumor and nontumor samples are associated with early tumor recurrence due to metastasis and late tumor recurrence due to de novo carcinogenesis after curative treatment, respectively. Identification of patients with a high risk of relapse will guide adjuvant randomized trials. The genetic landscape drawn by next-generation sequencing has highlighted the genomic diversity of HCC. Genetic drivers recurrently mutated belong to different signaling pathways including telomere maintenance, cell-cycle regulators, chromatin remodeling, Wnt/b-catenin, RAS/RAF/MAPK kinase, and AKT/mTOR pathway. These cancer genes will be ideally targeted by biotherapies as a paradigm of stratified medicine adapted to tumor biology. PMID:25369299

  19. Dose coefficients and derived guidance and clinical decision levels for contaminated wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, Luiz; Toohey, Richard E

    2009-01-01

    The NCRP Wound Model describing the retention of selected radionuclides at the site of a contaminated wound and their uptake into the transfer compartment has been combined with the ICRP element-specific systemic models for those radionuclides to derive dose coefficients for intakes via contaminated wounds. Those coefficients have been used to generate derived guidance levels (i.e., the activity in a wound that would result in an effective dose of 20 or 50 mSv, or in some cases, a committed organ equivalent dose of 500 mSv), and clinical decision levels (i.e., activity levels that would indicate the need for consideration of medical intervention to remove activity from the wound site or administration of decorporation therapy or both), typically set at 5 times the derived guidance levels. Data are provided for the radionuclides commonly encountered at nuclear power plants and nuclear weapons, fuel fabrication or recycling, waste disposal, medical and research facilities. These include: {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 131}I, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 192}Ir, {sup 210}Po, {sup 226,228}Ra, {sup 228,232}Th, {sup 235,238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238,239}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 242,244}Cm, and {sup 252}Cf.

  20. Clinical Decision Support System to Enhance Quality Control of Spirometry Using Information and Communication Technologies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We recently demonstrated that quality of spirometry in primary care could markedly improve with remote offline support from specialized professionals. It is hypothesized that implementation of automatic online assessment of quality of spirometry using information and communication technologies may significantly enhance the potential for extensive deployment of a high quality spirometry program in integrated care settings. Objective The objective of the study was to elaborate and validate a Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) for automatic online quality assessment of spirometry. Methods The CDSS was done through a three step process including: (1) identification of optimal sampling frequency; (2) iterations to build-up an initial version using the 24 standard spirometry curves recommended by the American Thoracic Society; and (3) iterations to refine the CDSS using 270 curves from 90 patients. In each of these steps the results were checked against one expert. Finally, 778 spirometry curves from 291 patients were analyzed for validation purposes. Results The CDSS generated appropriate online classification and certification in 685/778 (88.1%) of spirometry testing, with 96% sensitivity and 95% specificity. Conclusions Consequently, only 93/778 (11.9%) of spirometry testing required offline remote classification by an expert, indicating a potential positive role of the CDSS in the deployment of a high quality spirometry program in an integrated care setting. PMID:25600957

  1. Current Status and Future Prospects for Electronic Point-of-Care Clinical Decision Support in Diabetes Care

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Patrick J.; Desai, Jay; Butler, John; Kharbanda, Elyse; Sperl-Hillen, JoAnn M.

    2013-01-01

    Early efforts to use point-of-care clinical decision support (CDS) were limited to the use of prompts and reminders, which improved test ordering but not intermediate outcomes of care such as glucose, blood pressure, or lipid levels. More sophisticated diabetes CDS tools are now available that use electronic medical record data to provide patient-specific advice on medication use based on previous treatment, distance from goal, and other clinical data. These tools have shown modest but significant improvement in glucose and blood pressure control. Promising next-generation developments will include prioritizing clinical actions that have maximum benefit to a given patient at the point of care and developing effective methods to communicate CDS information to patients to better incorporate patient preferences in care decisions. PMID:23225213

  2. Emerging medical informatics with case-based reasoning for aiding clinical decision in multi-agent system.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ying; Colloc, Joël; Jacquet-Andrieu, Armelle; Lei, Kai

    2015-08-01

    This research aims to depict the methodological steps and tools about the combined operation of case-based reasoning (CBR) and multi-agent system (MAS) to expose the ontological application in the field of clinical decision support. The multi-agent architecture works for the consideration of the whole cycle of clinical decision-making adaptable to many medical aspects such as the diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, therapeutic monitoring of gastric cancer. In the multi-agent architecture, the ontological agent type employs the domain knowledge to ease the extraction of similar clinical cases and provide treatment suggestions to patients and physicians. Ontological agent is used for the extension of domain hierarchy and the interpretation of input requests. Case-based reasoning memorizes and restores experience data for solving similar problems, with the help of matching approach and defined interfaces of ontologies. A typical case is developed to illustrate the implementation of the knowledge acquisition and restitution of medical experts. PMID:26133480

  3. Cost-Effectiveness of Clinical Decision Support System in Improving Maternal Health Care in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Dalaba, Maxwell Ayindenaba; Akweongo, Patricia; Aborigo, Raymond Akawire; Saronga, Happiness Pius; Williams, John; Blank, Antje; Kaltschmidt, Jens; Sauerborn, Rainer; Loukanova, Svetla

    2015-01-01

    Objective This paper investigated the cost-effectiveness of a computer-assisted Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) in the identification of maternal complications in Ghana. Methods A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed in a before- and after-intervention study. Analysis was conducted from the provider’s perspective. The intervention area was the Kassena- Nankana district where computer-assisted CDSS was used by midwives in maternal care in six selected health centres. Six selected health centers in the Builsa district served as the non-intervention group, where the normal Ghana Health Service activities were being carried out. Results Computer-assisted CDSS increased the detection of pregnancy complications during antenatal care (ANC) in the intervention health centres (before-intervention= 9 /1,000 ANC attendance; after-intervention= 12/1,000 ANC attendance; P-value=0.010). In the intervention health centres, there was a decrease in the number of complications during labour by 1.1%, though the difference was not statistically significant (before-intervention =107/1,000 labour clients; after-intervention= 96/1,000 labour clients; P-value=0.305). Also, at the intervention health centres, the average cost per pregnancy complication detected during ANC (cost –effectiveness ratio) decreased from US$17,017.58 (before-intervention) to US$15,207.5 (after-intervention). Incremental cost –effectiveness ratio (ICER) was estimated at US$1,142. Considering only additional costs (cost of computer-assisted CDSS), cost per pregnancy complication detected was US$285. Conclusions Computer –assisted CDSS has the potential to identify complications during pregnancy and marginal reduction in labour complications. Implementing computer-assisted CDSS is more costly but more effective in the detection of pregnancy complications compared to routine maternal care, hence making the decision to implement CDSS very complex. Policy makers should however be guided by whether the additional benefit is worth the additional cost. PMID:25974093

  4. Instruments to assess the perception of physicians in the decision-making process of specific clinical encounters: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Légaré, France; Moher, David; Elwyn, Glyn; LeBlanc, Annie; Gravel, Karine

    2007-01-01

    Background The measurement of processes and outcomes that reflect the complexity of the decision-making process within specific clinical encounters is an important area of research to pursue. A systematic review was conducted to identify instruments that assess the perception physicians have of the decision-making process within specific clinical encounters. Methods For every year available up until April 2007, PubMed, PsycINFO, Current Contents, Dissertation Abstracts and Sociological Abstracts were searched for original studies in English or French. Reference lists from retrieved studies were also consulted. Studies were included if they reported a self-administered instrument evaluating physicians' perceptions of the decision-making process within specific clinical encounters, contained sufficient description to permit critical appraisal and presented quantitative results based on administering the instrument. Two individuals independently assessed the eligibility of the instruments and abstracted information on their conceptual underpinnings, main evaluation domain, development, format, reliability, validity and responsiveness. They also assessed the quality of the studies that reported on the development of the instruments with a modified version of STARD. Results Out of 3431 records identified and screened for evaluation, 26 potentially relevant instruments were assessed; 11 met the inclusion criteria. Five instruments were published before 1995. Among those published after 1995, five offered a corresponding patient version. Overall, the main evaluation domains were: satisfaction with the clinical encounter (n = 2), mutual understanding between health professional and patient (n = 2), mental workload (n = 1), frustration with the clinical encounter (n = 1), nurse-physician collaboration (n = 1), perceptions of communication competence (n = 2), degree of comfort with a decision (n = 1) and information on medication (n = 1). For most instruments (n = 10), some reliability and validity criteria were reported in French or English. Overall, the mean number of items on the modified version of STARD was 12.4 (range: 2 to 18). Conclusion This systematic review provides a critical appraisal and repository of instruments that assess the perception physicians have of the decision-making process within specific clinical encounters. More research is needed to pursue the validation of the existing instruments and the development of patient versions. This will help researchers capture the complexity of the decision-making process within specific clinical encounters. PMID:17937801

  5. Types of Unintended Consequences Related to Computerized Provider Order Entry

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Emily M.; Sittig, Dean F.; Ash, Joan S.; Guappone, Kenneth P.; Dykstra, Richard H.

    2006-01-01

    Objective To identify types of clinical unintended adverse consequences resulting from computerized provider order entry (CPOE) implementation. Design An expert panel provided initial examples of adverse unintended consequences of CPOE. The authors, using qualitative methods, gathered and analyzed additional examples from five successful CPOE sites. Methods Using a card sort method, the authors developed a categorization scheme for the 79 unintended consequences initially identified and then iteratively modified the scheme to categorize 245 additional adverse consequences resulting from fieldwork. Because the focus centered on consequences requiring prevention or remedial action, the authors did not further analyze reported unintended beneficial (positive) consequences. Results Unintended adverse consequences (UACs) fell into nine major categories (in order of decreasing frequency): 1) more/new work for clinicians; 2) unfavorable workflow issues; 3) never ending system demands; 4) problems related to paper persistence; 5) untoward changes in communication patterns and practices; 6) negative emotions; 7) generation of new kinds of errors; 8) unexpected changes in the power structure; and 9) overdependence on the technology. Clinical decision support features introduced many of these unintended consequences. Conclusion Identifying and understanding the types and in some instances the causes of unintended adverse consequences associated with CPOE will enable system developers and implementers to better manage implementation and maintenance of future CPOE projects. PMID:16799128

  6. Computerizing natural history collections.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, Mary E

    2013-09-01

    Computers are ubiquitous in the life sciences and are associated with many of the practical and conceptual changes that characterize biology's twentieth-century transformation. Yet comparatively little has been written about how scientists use computers. Despite this relative lack of scholarly attention, the claim that computers revolutionized the life sciences by making the impossible possible is widespread, and relatively unchallenged. How did the introduction of computers into research programs shape scientific practice? The Museum of Vertebrate Zoology (MVZ) at the University of California, Berkeley provides a tractable way into this under-examined question because it is possible to follow the computerization of data in the context of long-term research programs. PMID:23664113

  7. Computerized training management system

    DOEpatents

    Rice, Harold B.; McNair, Robert C.; White, Kenneth; Maugeri, Terry

    1998-08-04

    A Computerized Training Management System (CTMS) for providing a procedurally defined process that is employed to develop accreditable performance based training programs for job classifications that are sensitive to documented regulations and technical information. CTMS is a database that links information needed to maintain a five-phase approach to training-analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation independent of training program design. CTMS is designed using R-Base.RTM., an-SQL compliant software platform. Information is logically entered and linked in CTMS. Each task is linked directly to a performance objective, which, in turn, is linked directly to a learning objective; then, each enabling objective is linked to its respective test items. In addition, tasks, performance objectives, enabling objectives, and test items are linked to their associated reference documents. CTMS keeps all information up to date since it automatically sorts, files and links all data; CTMS includes key word and reference document searches.

  8. Computerized training management system

    DOEpatents

    Rice, H.B.; McNair, R.C.; White, K.; Maugeri, T.

    1998-08-04

    A Computerized Training Management System (CTMS) is disclosed for providing a procedurally defined process that is employed to develop accreditable performance based training programs for job classifications that are sensitive to documented regulations and technical information. CTMS is a database that links information needed to maintain a five-phase approach to training-analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation independent of training program design. CTMS is designed using R-Base{trademark}, an-SQL compliant software platform. Information is logically entered and linked in CTMS. Each task is linked directly to a performance objective, which, in turn, is linked directly to a learning objective; then, each enabling objective is linked to its respective test items. In addition, tasks, performance objectives, enabling objectives, and test items are linked to their associated reference documents. CTMS keeps all information up to date since it automatically sorts, files and links all data; CTMS includes key word and reference document searches. 18 figs.

  9. Enabling Cross-Platform Clinical Decision Support through Web-Based Decision Support in Commercial Electronic Health Record Systems: Proposal and Evaluation of Initial Prototype Implementations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingyuan; Velasco, Ferdinand T.; Musser, R. Clayton; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2013-01-01

    Enabling clinical decision support (CDS) across multiple electronic health record (EHR) systems has been a desired but largely unattained aim of clinical informatics, especially in commercial EHR systems. A potential opportunity for enabling such scalable CDS is to leverage vendor-supported, Web-based CDS development platforms along with vendor-supported application programming interfaces (APIs). Here, we propose a potential staged approach for enabling such scalable CDS, starting with the use of custom EHR APIs and moving towards standardized EHR APIs to facilitate interoperability. We analyzed three commercial EHR systems for their capabilities to support the proposed approach, and we implemented prototypes in all three systems. Based on these analyses and prototype implementations, we conclude that the approach proposed is feasible, already supported by several major commercial EHR vendors, and potentially capable of enabling cross-platform CDS at scale. PMID:24551426

  10. Enabling cross-platform clinical decision support through Web-based decision support in commercial electronic health record systems: proposal and evaluation of initial prototype implementations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingyuan; Velasco, Ferdinand T; Musser, R Clayton; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2013-01-01

    Enabling clinical decision support (CDS) across multiple electronic health record (EHR) systems has been a desired but largely unattained aim of clinical informatics, especially in commercial EHR systems. A potential opportunity for enabling such scalable CDS is to leverage vendor-supported, Web-based CDS development platforms along with vendor-supported application programming interfaces (APIs). Here, we propose a potential staged approach for enabling such scalable CDS, starting with the use of custom EHR APIs and moving towards standardized EHR APIs to facilitate interoperability. We analyzed three commercial EHR systems for their capabilities to support the proposed approach, and we implemented prototypes in all three systems. Based on these analyses and prototype implementations, we conclude that the approach proposed is feasible, already supported by several major commercial EHR vendors, and potentially capable of enabling cross-platform CDS at scale. PMID:24551426

  11. Radiation Treatment in Older Patients: A Framework for Clinical Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Grace L.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2014-01-01

    In older patients, radiation treatment plays a vital role in curative and palliative cancer therapy. Radiation treatment recommendations should be informed by a comprehensive, personalized risk-benefit assessment that evaluates treatment efficacy and toxicity. We review several clinical factors that distinctly affect efficacy and toxicity of radiation treatment in older patients. First, locoregional tumor behavior may be more indolent in older patients for some disease sites but more aggressive for other sites. Assessment of expected locoregional relapse risk informs the magnitude and timeframe of expected radiation treatment benefits. Second, assessment of the competing cancer versus noncancer mortality and morbidity risks contextualizes cancer treatment priorities holistically within patients' entire spectrum and time course of health needs. Third, assessment of functional reserve helps predict patients' acute treatment tolerance, differentiating those patients who are unlikely to benefit from treatment or who are at high risk for treatment complications. Potential radiation treatment options include immediate curative treatment, delayed curative treatment, and no treatment, with additional consideration given to altered radiation target, dose, or sequencing with chemotherapy and/or surgery. Finally, when cure is not feasible, palliative radiation therapy remains valuable for managing symptoms and achieving meaningful quality-of-life improvements. Our proposed decision-making framework integrates these factors to help radiation oncologists formulate strategic treatment recommendations within a multidisciplinary context. Future research is still needed to identify how advanced technologies can be judiciously applied in curative and palliative settings to enhance risk-benefit profiles of radiation treatment in older patients and more accurately quantify treatment efficacy in this group. PMID:25071132

  12. The ethics of forgoing life-sustaining treatment: theoretical considerations and clinical decision making

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Withholding or withdrawing a life-sustaining treatment tends to be very challenging for health care providers, patients, and their family members alike. When a patient’s life seems to be nearing its end, it is generally felt that the morally best approach is to try a new intervention, continue all treatments, attempt an experimental course of action, in short, do something. In contrast to this common practice, the authors argue that in most instances, the morally safer route is actually to forgo life-sustaining treatments, particularly when their likelihood to effectuate a truly beneficial outcome has become small relative to the odds of harming the patient. The ethical analysis proceeds in three stages. First, the difference between neglectful omission and passive acquiescence is explained. Next, the two necessary conditions for any medical treatment, i.e., that it is medically indicated and that consent is obtained, are applied to life-sustaining interventions. Finally, the difference between withholding and withdrawing a life-sustaining treatment is discussed. In the second part of the paper the authors show how these theoretical-ethical considerations can guide clinical-ethical decision making. A case vignette is presented about a patient who cannot be weaned off the ventilator post-surgery. The ethical analysis of this case proceeds through three stages. First, it is shown that and why withdrawal of the ventilator in this case does not equate assistance in suicide or euthanasia. Next, the question is raised whether continued ventilation can be justified medically, or has become futile. Finally, the need for the health care team to obtain consent for the continuation of the ventilation is discussed. PMID:24618004

  13. An Arden-Syntax-based clinical decision support framework for medical guidelines--Lyme borreliosis as an example.

    PubMed

    Seitinger, Alexander; Fehre, Karsten; Adlassnig, Klaus-Peter; Rappelsberger, Andrea; Wurm, Elisabeth; Aberer, Elisabeth; Binder, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Medicine is evolving at a very fast pace. The overwhelming quantity of new data compels the practician to be consistently informed about the most recent scientific advances. While medical guidelines have proven to be an acceptable tool for bringing new medical knowledge into clinical practice and also support medical personnel, reading them may be rather time-consuming. Clinical decision support systems have been developed to simplify this process. However, the implementation or adaptation of such systems for individual guidelines involves substantial effort. This paper introduces a clinical decision support platform that uses Arden Syntax to implement medical guidelines using client-server architecture. It provides a means of implementing different guidelines without the need for adapting the system's source code. To implement a prototype, three Lyme borreliosis guidelines were aggregated and a knowledge base created. The prototype employs transfer objects to represent any text-based medical guideline. As part of the implementation, we show how Fuzzy Arden Syntax can improve the overall usability of a clinical decision support system. PMID:24825694

  14. A 2014 Medical Informatics Perspective on Clinical Decision Support Systems: Do We Hit The Ceiling of Effectiveness?

    PubMed Central

    Lamy, J.-B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective To summarize recent research and propose a selection of best papers published in 2013 in the field of computer-based decision support in health care. Method Two literature reviews were performed by the two section editors from bibliographic databases with a focus on clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) and computer provider order entry in order to select a list of candidate best papers to be peer-reviewed by external reviewers. Results The full review process highlighted three papers, illustrating current trends in the domain of clinical decision support. The first trend is the development of theoretical approaches for CDSSs, and is exemplified by a paper proposing the integration of family histories and pedigrees in a CDSS. The second trend is illustrated by well-designed CDSSs, showing good theoretical performances and acceptance, while failing to show a clinical impact. An example is given with a paper reporting on scorecards aiming to reduce adverse drug events. The third trend is represented by research works that try to understand the limits of CDSS use, for instance by analyzing interactions between general practitioners, patients, and a CDSS. Conclusions CDSSs can achieve good theoretical results in terms of sensibility and specificity, as well as a good acceptance, but evaluations often fail to demonstrate a clinical impact. Future research is needed to better understand the causes of this observation and imagine new effective solutions for CDSS implementation. PMID:25123737

  15. Clinical Trial Decision Making in Pediatric Sickle Cell Disease: A Qualitative Study of Perceived Benefits and Barriers to Participation.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Chavis A; Chavez, Veronica; Mondestin, Valerie; Deatrick, Janet; Li, Yimei; Barakat, Lamia P

    2015-08-01

    Clinical trial research forms the foundation for advancing treatments; yet, children with sickle cell disease (SCD) are currently underrepresented. This qualitative study examines decision-making processes of youth with SCD and their caregivers regarding enrollment in clinical trial research. A subsample of participants from a study of clinical trial decision making among youth with health disparity conditions, 23 caregivers and 29 children/teens/young adults with SCD (age, 10 to 29 y), indicated whether or not they would participate in hypothetical medical and psychosocial clinical trials and prioritized barriers and benefits to participation via card sort and semistructured interviews. Audio recordings were transcribed and coded for themes. Participants reported that concerns of potential harm most affected their decision. Secondary factors were potential benefit, manageable study demands, and trust in the medical staff. Caregivers weighed potential harm more heavily than their children. Young children were more likely to endorse potential benefit. Overall, participants stated they would be willing to participate in research if the potential benefit outweighs potential harm and unmanageable study demands. To optimize recruitment, results suggest addressing potential harm first while highlighting potential benefits, creating manageable study demands, and endorsing the future benefits of research to the sickle cell community. PMID:25072368

  16. Effort-Based Decision-Making Paradigms for Clinical Trials in Schizophrenia: Part 2—External Validity and Correlates.

    PubMed

    Horan, William P; Reddy, L Felice; Barch, Deanna M; Buchanan, Robert W; Dunayevich, Eduardo; Gold, James M; Marder, Steven R; Wynn, Jonathan K; Young, Jared W; Green, Michael F

    2015-09-01

    Effort-based decision making has strong conceptual links to the motivational disturbances that define a key subdomain of negative symptoms. However, the extent to which effort-based decision-making performance relates to negative symptoms, and other clinical and functionally important variables has yet to be systematically investigated. In 94 clinically stable outpatients with schizophrenia, we examined the external validity of 5 effort-based paradigms, including the Effort Expenditure for Rewards, Balloon Effort, Grip Strength Effort, Deck Choice Effort, and Perceptual Effort tasks. These tasks covered 3 types of effort: physical, cognitive, and perceptual. Correlations between effort related performance and 6 classes of variables were examined, including: (1) negative symptoms, (2) clinically rated motivation and community role functioning, (3) self-reported motivational traits, (4) neurocognition, (5) other psychiatric symptoms and clinical/demographic characteristics, and (6) subjective valuation of monetary rewards. Effort paradigms showed small to medium relationships to clinical ratings of negative symptoms, motivation, and functioning, with the pattern more consistent for some measures than others. They also showed small to medium relations with neurocognitive functioning, but were generally unrelated to other psychiatric symptoms, self-reported traits, antipsychotic medications, side effects, and subjective valuation of money. There were relatively strong interrelationships among the effort measures. In conjunction with findings from a companion psychometric article, all the paradigms warrant further consideration and development, and 2 show the strongest potential for clinical trial use at this juncture. PMID:26209546

  17. Improving allergy alerting in a computerized physician order entry system.

    PubMed Central

    Abookire, S. A.; Teich, J. M.; Sandige, H.; Paterno, M. D.; Martin, M. T.; Kuperman, G. J.; Bates, D. W.

    2000-01-01

    Computerized physician order entry has been shown to reduce the frequency of serious medication errors. Decision support tools such as alerting functions for patient medication allergy are a key part of these applications. However, optimal performance requires iterative refinement. As systems become increasingly complex, mechanisms to monitor their performance become increasingly critical. We analyzed trend data obtained over a five-year period that showed decreasing compliance to allergy alert functions within computerized order entry. Many medication-allergy pairs were being consistently overridden. Renewal policies affecting reordering narcotics also contributed heavily to this trend. Each factor revealed a system-wide trend that could result in suggestions for policy or software change. Monitoring trends such as these is very important to maintain software correctness and ensure user trust in alerting systems, so users remain responsive to computerized alerts. PMID:11080034

  18. Clinical decisions in patients with diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors. A statement of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine.

    PubMed

    Gmez-Huelgas, R; Prez-Jimnez, F; Serrano-Ros, M; Gonzlez-Santos, P; Romn, P; Camafort, M; Conthe, P; Garca-Alegra, J; Guijarro, R; Lpez-Miranda, J; Tirado-Miranda, R; Valdivielso, P

    2014-05-01

    Although the mortality associated to cardiovascular diseases (CVD) has been reduced in the last decades, CVD remains the main cause of mortality in Spain and they are associated with an important morbidity and a huge economic burden. The increasing prevalence of obesity and diabetes could be slowing down the mortality reduction in Spain. Clinicians have often difficulty making clinical decisions due to the multiple clinical guidelines available. Moreover, in the current context of economic crisis it is critical to promote an efficient use of diagnostic and therapeutic proceedings to ensure the viability of public health care systems. The Spanish Society of Internal Medicine (SEMI) has coordinated a consensus document to answer questions of daily practice with the aim of facilitating physicians' decision-making in the management of diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors from a cost-efficiency point of view. PMID:24602600

  19. Mentoring in the Clinical Setting to Improve Student Decision-Making Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stick-Mueller, Misty; Boesch, Ron; Silverman, Steven; Carpenter, Scott; Illingworth, Robert; Countryman, James

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The physician-intern relationship can be difficult to develop. A new chiropractic intern in a teaching clinic undergoes a major transition from classroom to clinical practice and must learn to turn classroom knowledge into clinical application. The ability to start formulating clinical techniques and apply them on a patient is…

  20. “Do Not Resuscitate” Decisions in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. A Secondary Analysis of Clinical Trial Data

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Renda Soylemez; Walkey, Allan J.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Factors and outcomes associated with end-of-life decision-making among patients during clinical trials in the intensive care unit are unclear. Objectives: We sought to determine patterns and outcomes of Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) decisions among critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) enrolled in a clinical trial. Methods: We performed a secondary analysis of data from the ARDS Network Fluid and Catheter Treatment Trial (FACTT), collected between 2000 and 2005. We calculated mortality outcomes stratified by code status, and compared baseline characteristics of patients who became DNR during the trial with participants who remained full code. Measurements and Main Results: Among 809 FACTT participants with a code status recorded, 232 (28.7%) elected DNR status. Specifically, 37 (15.9%) chose to withhold cardiopulmonary resuscitation alone, 44 (19.0%) elected to withhold some life support measures in addition to cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and 151 (65.1%) had life support withdrawn. Admission severity of illness as measured by APACHE III score was strongly associated with election of DNR status (odds ratio, 2.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.85–2.62; P < 0.0001). Almost all (97.0%; 225 of 232) patients who selected DNR status died, and 79% (225 of 284) of patients who died during the trial were DNR. Among patients who chose DNR status but did not elect withdrawal of life support, 91% (74 of 81) died. Conclusions: The vast majority of deaths among clinical trial patients with ARDS were preceded by a DNR order. Unlike other studies of end-of-life decision-making in the intensive care unit, nearly all patients who became DNR died. The impact of variation of practice in end-of-life decision-making during clinical trials warrants further study. PMID:25386717

  1. Derivation and validation of a clinical decision rule to identify young children with skull fracture following isolated head trauma

    PubMed Central

    Gravel, Jocelyn; Gouin, Serge; Chalut, Dominic; Crevier, Louis; Dcarie, Jean-Claude; Elazhary, Nicolas; Msse, Benot

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is no clear consensus regarding radiologic evaluation of head trauma in young children without traumatic brain injury. We conducted a study to develop and validate a clinical decision rule to identify skull fracture in young children with head trauma and no immediate need for head tomography. Methods: We performed a prospective cohort study in 3 tertiary care emergency departments in the province of Quebec. Participants were children less than 2 years old who had a head trauma and were not at high risk of clinically important traumatic brain injury (Glasgow Coma Scale score < 15, altered level of consciousness or palpable skull fracture). The primary outcome was skull fracture. For each participant, the treating physician completed a standardized report form after physical examination and before radiologic evaluation. The decision to order skull radiography was at the physicians discretion. The clinical decision rule was derived using recursive partitioning. Results: A total of 811 patients (49 with skull fracture) were recruited during the derivation phase. The 2 predictors identified through recursive partitioning were parietal or occipital swelling or hematoma and age less than 2 months. The rule had a sensitivity of 94% (95% confidence interval [CI] 83%99%) and a specificity of 86% (95% CI 84%89%) in the derivation phase. During the validation phase, 856 participants (44 with skull fracture) were recruited. The rule had a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 87% during this phase. Interpretation: The clinical decision rule developed in this study identified about 90% of skull fractures among young children with mild head trauma who had no immediate indication for head tomography. Use of the rule would have reduced the number of radiologic evaluations by about 60%. PMID:26350911

  2. Computerized molecular modeling of carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Computerized molecular modleing continues to increase in capability and applicability to carbohydrates. This chapter covers nomenclature and conformational aspects of carbohydrates, perhaps of greater use to carbohydrate-inexperienced computational chemists. Its comments on various methods and studi...

  3. Adaptation of a Published Risk Model to Point-of-care Clinical Decision Support Tailored to Local Workflow

    PubMed Central

    Sobel, Jeffrey L.; Baker, Craig C.; Levy, David; Cain, Carol H.

    2015-01-01

    Electronic clinical decision support can bring newly published knowledge to the point of care. However, local organizational buy-in, support for team workflows, IT system ease of use and other sociotechnical factors are needed to promote adoption. We successfully implemented a multi-variate cardiac risk stratification model from another institution into ours. We recreated the model and integrated it into our workflow, accessing it from our EHR with patient-specific data and facilitating clinical documentation if the user accepts the model results. Our clinical leaders championed the change and led educational dissemination efforts. We describe the ad-hoc social and technical collaboration needed to build and deploy the tool. The tool complements a clinical initiative within a community of practice, and is correlated with appropriate use of nuclear imaging. PMID:26958255

  4. Design and Development of a Sharable Clinical Decision Support System Based on a Semantic Web Service Framework.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Fan; Gou, Ling; Tian, Yu; Li, Tian-Chang; Zhang, Mao; Li, Jing-Song

    2016-05-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) systems provide clinicians and other health care stakeholders with patient-specific assessments or recommendations to aid in the clinical decision-making process. Despite their demonstrated potential for improving health care quality, the widespread availability of CDS systems has been limited mainly by the difficulty and cost of sharing CDS knowledge among heterogeneous healthcare information systems. The purpose of this study was to design and develop a sharable clinical decision support (S-CDS) system that meets this challenge. The fundamental knowledge base consists of independent and reusable knowledge modules (KMs) to meet core CDS needs, wherein each KM is semantically well defined based on the standard information model, terminologies, and representation formalisms. A semantic web service framework was developed to identify, access, and leverage these KMs across diverse CDS applications and care settings. The S-CDS system has been validated in two distinct client CDS applications. Model-level evaluation results confirmed coherent knowledge representation. Application-level evaluation results reached an overall accuracy of 98.66 % and a completeness of 96.98 %. The evaluation results demonstrated the technical feasibility and application prospect of our approach. Compared with other CDS engineering efforts, our approach facilitates system development and implementation and improves system maintainability, scalability and efficiency, which contribute to the widespread adoption of effective CDS within the healthcare domain. PMID:27002818

  5. Use of conditional rule structure to automate clinical decision support: a comparison of artificial intelligence and deterministic programming techniques.

    PubMed

    Friedman, R H; Frank, A D

    1983-08-01

    A rule-based computer system was developed to perform clinical decision-making support within a medical information system, oncology practice, and clinical research. This rule-based system, which has been programmed using deterministic rules, possesses features of generalizability, modularity of structure, convenience in rule acquisition, explanability, and utility for patient care and teaching, features which have been identified as advantages of artificial intelligence (AI) rule-based systems. Formal rules are primarily represented as conditional statements; common conditions and actions are stored in system dictionaries so that they can be recalled at any time to form new decision rules. Important similarities and differences exist in the structure of this system and clinical computer systems utilizing artificial intelligence (AI) production rule techniques. The non-AI rule-based system possesses advantages in cost and ease of implementation. The degree to which significant medical decision problems can be solved by this technique remains uncertain as does whether the more complex AI methodologies will be required. PMID:6352165

  6. Computerized international geothermal information systems

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, S.L.; Lawrence, J.D.; Lepman, S.R.

    1980-03-01

    The computerized international geothermal energy information system is reviewed. The review covers establishment of the Italy - United States linked data centers by the NATO Committee on Challenges of Modern Society, through a bilateral agreement, and up to the present time. The result of the information exchange project is given as the bibliographic and numerical data available from the data centers. Recommendations for the exchange of computerized geothermal information at the international level are discussed.

  7. Helping patients make better decisions: how to apply behavioral economics in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, Maureen Reni; Spivey, Christy; Daniel, Kathy M

    2014-01-01

    Clinicians are committed to effectively educating patients and helping them to make sound decisions concerning their own health care. However, how do clinicians determine what is effective education? How do they present information clearly and in a manner that patients understand and can use to make informed decisions? Behavioral economics (BE) is a subfield of economics that can assist clinicians to better understand how individuals actually make decisions. BE research can help guide interactions with patients so that information is presented and discussed in a more deliberate and impactful way. We can be more effective providers of care when we understand the factors that influence how our patients make decisions, factors of which we may have been largely unaware. BE research that focuses on health care and medical decision making is becoming more widely known, and what has been reported suggests that BE interventions can be effective in the medical realm. The purpose of this article is to provide clinicians with an overview of BE decision science and derived practice strategies to promote more effective behavior change in patients. PMID:25378915

  8. Helping patients make better decisions: how to apply behavioral economics in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Maureen Reni; Spivey, Christy; Daniel, Kathy M

    2014-01-01

    Clinicians are committed to effectively educating patients and helping them to make sound decisions concerning their own health care. However, how do clinicians determine what is effective education? How do they present information clearly and in a manner that patients understand and can use to make informed decisions? Behavioral economics (BE) is a subfield of economics that can assist clinicians to better understand how individuals actually make decisions. BE research can help guide interactions with patients so that information is presented and discussed in a more deliberate and impactful way. We can be more effective providers of care when we understand the factors that influence how our patients make decisions, factors of which we may have been largely unaware. BE research that focuses on health care and medical decision making is becoming more widely known, and what has been reported suggests that BE interventions can be effective in the medical realm. The purpose of this article is to provide clinicians with an overview of BE decision science and derived practice strategies to promote more effective behavior change in patients. PMID:25378915

  9. Computerized Client assessments: a change in practice.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Lisa; Scott, Peggy

    2007-05-01

    Inconsistencies in home and community care data collection across Canada was the driving force for changing the process of assessment of case-managed clients in British Columbia. Clinicians had been using a paper-based assessment tool but were mandated to implement the RAI-HC and to conduct assessments using a computerized version. This led to a significant change in clinical practice. The authors provide an overview of the transition in the Interior Health Authority, linking phases of the process to Kotter's model of creating major change. PMID:17555162

  10. Evaluation of User Interface and Workflow Design of a Bedside Nursing Clinical Decision Support System

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Michael Juntao; Finley, George Mike; Mills, Christy; Johnson, Ron Kim

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical decision support systems (CDSS) are important tools to improve health care outcomes and reduce preventable medical adverse events. However, the effectiveness and success of CDSS depend on their implementation context and usability in complex health care settings. As a result, usability design and validation, especially in real world clinical settings, are crucial aspects of successful CDSS implementations. Objective Our objective was to develop a novel CDSS to help frontline nurses better manage critical symptom changes in hospitalized patients, hence reducing preventable failure to rescue cases. A robust user interface and implementation strategy that fit into existing workflows was key for the success of the CDSS. Methods Guided by a formal usability evaluation framework, UFuRT (user, function, representation, and task analysis), we developed a high-level specification of the product that captures key usability requirements and is flexible to implement. We interviewed users of the proposed CDSS to identify requirements, listed functions, and operations the system must perform. We then designed visual and workflow representations of the product to perform the operations. The user interface and workflow design were evaluated via heuristic and end user performance evaluation. The heuristic evaluation was done after the first prototype, and its results were incorporated into the product before the end user evaluation was conducted. First, we recruited 4 evaluators with strong domain expertise to study the initial prototype. Heuristic violations were coded and rated for severity. Second, after development of the system, we assembled a panel of nurses, consisting of 3 licensed vocational nurses and 7 registered nurses, to evaluate the user interface and workflow via simulated use cases. We recorded whether each session was successfully completed and its completion time. Each nurse was asked to use the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Task Load Index to self-evaluate the amount of cognitive and physical burden associated with using the device. Results A total of 83 heuristic violations were identified in the studies. The distribution of the heuristic violations and their average severity are reported. The nurse evaluators successfully completed all 30 sessions of the performance evaluations. All nurses were able to use the device after a single training session. On average, the nurses took 111 seconds (SD 30 seconds) to complete the simulated task. The NASA Task Load Index results indicated that the work overhead on the nurses was low. In fact, most of the burden measures were consistent with zero. The only potentially significant burden was temporal demand, which was consistent with the primary use case of the tool. Conclusions The evaluation has shown that our design was functional and met the requirements demanded by the nurses’ tight schedules and heavy workloads. The user interface embedded in the tool provided compelling utility to the nurse with minimal distraction. PMID:23612350

  11. Clinical influences on antibiotic prescribing decisions for lower respiratory tract infection: a nine country qualitative study of variation in care

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Kerenza; Cooper, Lucy; Coenen, Samuel; Little, Paul; Verheij, Theo; Godycki-Cwirko, Maciek; Melbye, Hasse; Krawczyk, Jaroslaw; Borras-Santos, Alicia; Jakobsen, Kristin; Worby, Patricia; Goossens, Herman; Butler, Christopher C

    2012-01-01

    Objectives There is variation in antibiotic prescribing for lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) in primary care that does not benefit patients. This study aims to investigate clinicians' accounts of clinical influences on antibiotic prescribing decisions for LRTI to better understand variation and identify opportunities for improvement. Design Multi country qualitative interview study. Semi-structured interviews using open-ended questions and a patient scenario. Data were subjected to five-stage analytic framework approach (familiarisation, developing a thematic framework from the interview questions and emerging themes, indexing, charting and mapping to search for interpretations), with interviewers commenting on preliminary reports. Setting Primary care. Participants 80 primary care clinicians randomly selected from primary care research networks based in nine European cities. Results Clinicians reported four main individual clinical factors that guided their antibiotic prescribing decision: auscultation, fever, discoloured sputum and breathlessness. These were considered alongside a general impression of the patient derived from building a picture of the illness course, using intuition and familiarity with the patient. Comorbidity and older age were considered main risk factors for poor outcomes. Clinical factors were similar across networks, apart from C reactive protein near patient testing in Troms. Clinicians developed ways to handle diagnostic and management uncertainty through their own clinical routines. Conclusions Clinicians emphasised the importance of auscultation, fever, discoloured sputum and breathlessness, general impression of the illness course, familiarity with the patient, comorbidity, and age in informing their antibiotic prescribing decisions for LRTI. As some of these factors may be overemphasised given the evolving evidence base, greater standardisation of assessment and integration of findings may help reduce unhelpful variation in management. Non-clinical influences will also need to be addressed. PMID:22619265

  12. Clinical factors influencing the decision to transfuse after percutaneous native kidney biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Whittier, William L.; Sayeed, Khaleel; Korbet, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Transfusion of erythrocytes is the most common intervention after a complicated percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB). Anemia is considered to be a leading risk factor for bleeding following a PRB, and based on recent studies of transfusions in hospitalized patients, many institutions are restricting the threshold for erythrocyte transfusion to a lower hemoglobin concentration (Hgb). The purpose of this study is to analyze factors that influence the transfusion decision after a PRB, and to determine whether anemia is truly a risk factor for bleeding or anemic patients are simply more likely to receive a transfusion because of their already lower pre-PRB Hgb. Methods PRB of native kidneys was performed using real-time ultrasound with automated biopsy needles from January 1990 to April 2014. All patients were prospectively followed for bleeding with a 24-h inpatient observation. An intervention for a bleeding complication (BL-I) was defined by undergoing a procedure (cystoscopy, embolization), receiving a blood transfusion (BL-T), death and/or readmission related to the biopsy. To further define the effect of anemia, patients were divided into three pre-PRB Hgb groups: <9.0 g/dL (n = 79), 9.0–11.0 g/dL (n = 266) and >11.0 g/dL (n = 565). Results BL-I occurred in 71/910 (7.8%) of PRBs. The majority of these were BL-T (57/71, 80%; 57/910, 6.3% overall). Patients with BL-I had lower pre-PRB Hgb than those without BL-I (mean ± SD; 10.3 ± 2.0 versus 12.0 ± 2.1 g/dL, P < 0.0001) and a greater change (Δ) in Hgb (2.1 ± 1.6 versus 1.0 ± 0.8 g/dL, P < 0.0001). When compared with higher Hgb, patients with Hgb <9.0 g/dL had more traditional risk factors for bleeding (older age: 49 ± 18 versus 48 ± 18 versus 45 ± 16 years, P = 0.02; female: 72 versus 70 versus 56%, P < 0.0001; higher serum creatinine: 4.0 ± 2.9 versus 2.9 ± 2.6 versus 1.7 ± 1.4 mg/dL, P < 0.0001; higher systolic blood pressure: 138 ± 18 versus 133 ± 19 versus 133 ± 18 mmHg, P = 0.06; higher bleeding time: 7.6 ± 1.8 versus 7.4 ± 2.0 versus 6.7 ± 1.8 min, P < 0.0001). When BL-T was stratified by pre-PRB Hgb, there were more transfusions in those with lower pre-PRB Hgb (24 versus 9 versus 3%, P < 0.0001). However, these patients not only had fewer hematomas (58 versus 83 versus 87%, P = 0.04) but also demonstrated a smaller ΔHgb post-PRB (1.3 ± 1.0 versus 1.8 ± 0.8 versus 3.2 ± 1.6, P < 0.0001) compared with patients with higher pre-PRB Hgb, yet still received a transfusion. Conclusions While patients with lower pre-PRB Hgb have more of the traditional risk factors for a complication after PRB, there was actually less clinically evident bleeding in these patients who were transfused. Although anemia itself has been considered to be a risk factor for a complication in the past, it more accurately represents only a predictor of receiving an erythrocyte transfusion. In the setting of the PRB, the decision for transfusion is influenced more by the severity of anemia at baseline as opposed to clinically evident bleeding. PMID:26798469

  13. Cognitive Workload of Computerized Nursing Process in Intensive Care Units.

    PubMed

    Dal Sasso, Grace Marcon; Barra, Daniela Couto Carvalho

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this work was to measure the cognitive workload to complete printed nursing process versus computerized nursing process from International Classification Practice of Nursing in intensive care units. It is a quantitative, before-and-after quasi-experimental design, with a sample of 30 participants. Workload was assessed using National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task-Load Index. Six cognitive categories were measured. The "temporal demand" was the largest contributor to the cognitive workload, and the role of the nursing process in the "performance" category has excelled that of computerized nursing process. It was concluded that computerized nursing process contributes to lower cognitive workload of nurses for being a support system for decision making based on the International Classification Practice of Nursing. The computerized nursing process as a logical structure of the data, information, diagnoses, interventions and results become a reliable option for health improvement of healthcare, because it can enhance nurse safe decision making, with the intent to reduce damage and adverse events to patients in intensive care. PMID:26061562

  14. Computerizing Your Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Rick

    This paper summarizes information about using computer hardware and software to aid in making purchase decisions that are based on user needs. The two major options in hardware are IBM-compatible machines and the Apple Macintosh line. The three basic software applications include word processing, database management, and spreadsheet applications.…

  15. How do expert mental health nurses make on-the-spot clinical decisions? A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Crook, J A

    2001-02-01

    An increasing number of writers have studied the work of Benner (1984) and Schon (1983) and have explored the concepts of expertise and 'intuitive' or 'tacit' knowledge. Efforts have been made to address the phenomenon of the theory--practice gap. Reborn interest in the craft of the professions is evident. A number of studies about the clinical decision-making process have suggested that clinicians are actually using a form of deductive reasoning known as hypothetico-abductivism whilst reflecting in action. Exploration of expert decision-making by psychiatric nurses requires first that the nature of psychiatric expertise be clearly described. However, literature shows that this is not an easy task. In order to facilitate the development of expertise in novice practitioners, further research is required into the nature of expertise and expert decision-making. Cultivating and recording reflection in action around expert decision-making has revealed greater insights into the gap between theory and practice. It is evident that there is a need for a model that makes sense of the informal theory that is generated through practice. PMID:11879488

  16. A two-stage clinical decision support system for early recognition and stratification of patients with sepsis: an observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Jason J; Greene, Tracy L; Haley, James M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the diagnostic accuracy of a two-stage clinical decision support system for early recognition and stratification of patients with sepsis. Design Observational cohort study employing a two-stage sepsis clinical decision support to recognise and stratify patients with sepsis. The stage one component was comprised of a cloud-based clinical decision support with 24/7 surveillance to detect patients at risk of sepsis. The cloud-based clinical decision support delivered notifications to the patients’ designated nurse, who then electronically contacted a provider. The second stage component comprised a sepsis screening and stratification form integrated into the patient electronic health record, essentially an evidence-based decision aid, used by providers to assess patients at bedside. Setting Urban, 284 acute bed community hospital in the USA; 16,000 hospitalisations annually. Participants Data on 2620 adult patients were collected retrospectively in 2014 after the clinical decision support was implemented. Main outcome measure ‘Suspected infection’ was the established gold standard to assess clinical decision support clinimetric performance. Results A sepsis alert activated on 417 (16%) of 2620 adult patients hospitalised. Applying ‘suspected infection’ as standard, the patient population characteristics showed 72% sensitivity and 73% positive predictive value. A postalert screening conducted by providers at bedside of 417 patients achieved 81% sensitivity and 94% positive predictive value. Providers documented against 89% patients with an alert activated by clinical decision support and completed 75% of bedside screening and stratification of patients with sepsis within one hour from notification. Conclusion A clinical decision support binary alarm system with cross-checking functionality improves early recognition and facilitates stratification of patients with sepsis. PMID:26688744

  17. Modern management of childhood diabetes: a role for computerized devices?

    PubMed

    Chiarelli, F; Di Ricco, L; Catino, M; Sabatino, G; Verrotti, A

    1998-08-01

    Technology is increasingly relevant in everyday life and it can be very interesting to apply it also in the field of diabetes as it can be one way of ensuring better care. In the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial, the intensively treated patients were seen fortnightly in hospital and contacted even more frequently by telephone during the day as well as at night. For these reasons, health reforms are undergoing a radical change in an attempt to reduce the spiraling costs of health care provision. Therefore, it can be useful to use information technology (IT) in diabetes care. The European Federation for Medical Informatics recently established some Special Issues to advance IT initiatives that may be able to address the problem of adjusting the insulin dose and controlling blood glucose (BG) levels, as well as assisting in the provision of modern-day diabetes care. The Special Issues can be classified under the following headings: databases, algorithms, decision support, models and education. It can be useful to develop a prototype computer system that can be applied to different areas of clinical diabetes care; computerized out-patients' clinical databases that store patients' clinical and biochemical data; statistical and graphical analysis programs that help the clinician; dietary analysis programs which examine food composition and dietary exchanges and help devise meal plans; hand-held insulin dosage adjustment computers that advise patients on a day-by-day or even meal-by-meal basis; expert systems and question and answer programs for patients' education, and finally games for children. These systems have the potential to be useful tools in many aspects of diabetes care but their utilization by the vast majority of the health care community has been extremely limited. Nonetheless, computers cannot substitute for the pediatric diabetes team, which remains the major determinant for better care of diabetes in children and adolescents. PMID:9745768

  18. Improving Awareness of Cancer Clinical Trials Among Hispanic Patients and Families: Audience Segmentation Decisions for a Media Intervention

    PubMed Central

    QUINN, GWENDOLYN P.; McINTYRE, JESSICA; GONZALEZ, LUIS E.; ANTONIA, TERESITA MUÑOZ; ANTOLINO, PRADO; WELLS, KRISTEN J.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical trials hold great promise for cancer treatment; yet, Hispanic cancer patients have low rates of clinical trial participation. Lack of awareness and knowledge of clinical trials and language barriers may account for low participation rates. Patient education through audiovisual materials can improve knowledge of and attitudes toward clinical trials among Hispanic populations. In this study, 36 Hispanic cancer patients/survivors and caregivers in Florida and Puerto Rico participated in focus groups to aid in developing a Spanish-language DVD and booklet intervention designed to increase knowledge about clinical trials. Focus group results showed (a) low levels of knowledge about clinical trials, (b) uncertainty about why a physician would expect a patient to make a choice about treatment, and (c) desire for family participation in decision making. Respondents expressed various preferences for aspects of the DVD such as showing extended family in the DVD and physician explanations about key terms. On the basis of these preferences, the authors developed a creative brief for a DVD. The content of the DVD was reviewed by Hispanic community leaders and key stakeholders. A final DVD was created, in Spanish, using Hispanic patients and physicians, which contained the information deemed important from the focus groups and stakeholder interviews. The DVD is complete with companion booklet and currently undergoing a randomized control trial. PMID:23639101

  19. Clinical Decision Support and Perioperative Peripheral Nerve Injury: A Quality Improvement Project.

    PubMed

    Bouyer-Ferullo, Sharon; Androwich, Ida M; Dykes, Patricia C

    2015-06-01

    Decision support at the point of care has been demonstrated to be an effective tool in providing a safe environment and improving patient outcomes. The operating room is typically an area where advanced technology is introduced to nurses on a regular basis. This quality improvement project focused on preventing a peripheral nerve injury, which is an example of a postoperative adverse event that is considered preventable. Injury of a peripheral nerve is the result of compression, hyperextension, flexion, or ischemia surrounding the nerve. The goals for this project were to improve the knowledge of peripheral nerve injury of the operating room nurses, design and implement a peripheral nerve injury assessment screen that could provide decision support within the operating room record, improve the nursing documentation of peripheral nerve injury interventions, and (long term) decrease the incidence of peripheral nerve injury. A decision support screen within the operating room record was designed to supplement the operating room nurse's risk assessment for peripheral nerve injury. The components of this project involved a preliminary and postproject surveys on peripheral nerve injury knowledge, an educational presentation, and a retrospective random review of nursing documentation in the operating room electronic health records. Project results demonstrated a significant increase in nursing documentation of peripheral nerve injury interventions (63%-92%) and a positive attitude toward their exposure to basic decision support (P = .046). Recommendations for future studies and establishing a standardized coding system for peripheral nerve injury identification were identified. PMID:25851559

  20. Patient-reported Outcomes in Randomised Controlled Trials of Prostate Cancer: Methodological Quality and Impact on Clinical Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Efficace, Fabio; Feuerstein, Michael; Fayers, Peter; Cafaro, Valentina; Eastham, James; Pusic, Andrea; Blazeby, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Context Patient-reported outcomes (PRO) data from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are increasingly used to inform patient-centred care as well as clinical and health policy decisions. Objective The main objective of this study was to investigate the methodological quality of PRO assessment in RCTs of prostate cancer (PCa) and to estimate the likely impact of these studies on clinical decision making. Evidence acquisition A systematic literature search of studies was undertaken on main electronic databases to retrieve articles published between January 2004 and March 2012. RCTs were evaluated on a predetermined extraction form, including (1) basic trial demographics and clinical and PRO characteristics; (2) level of PRO reporting based on the recently published recommendations by the International Society for Quality of Life Research; and (3) bias, assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. Studies were systematically analysed to evaluate their relevance for supporting clinical decision making. Evidence synthesis Sixty-five RCTs enrolling a total of 22 071 patients were evaluated, with 31 (48%) in patients with nonmetastatic disease. When a PRO difference between treatments was found, it related in most cases to symptoms only (n = 29, 58%). Although the extent of missing data was generally documented (72% of RCTs), few reported details on statistical handling of this data (18%) and reasons for dropout (35%). Improvements in key methodological aspects over time were found. Thirteen (20%) RCTs were judged as likely to be robust in informing clinical decision making. Higher-quality PRO studies were generally associated with those RCTs that had higher internal validity. Conclusions Including PRO in RCTs of PCa patients is critical for better evaluating the treatment effectiveness of new therapeutic approaches. Marked improvements in PRO quality reporting over time were found, and it is estimated that at least one-fifth of PRO RCTs have provided sufficient details to allow health policy makers and physicians to make critical appraisals of results. Patient summary In this report, we have investigated the methodological quality of PCa trials that have included a PRO assessment. We conclude that including PRO is critical to better evaluating the treatment effectiveness of new therapeutic approaches from the patient's perspective. Also, at least one-fifth of PRO RCTs in PCa have provided sufficient details to allow health policy makers and physicians to make a critical appraisal of results. PMID:24210091

  1. Decision-tree analysis of clinical data to aid diagnostic reasoning for equine laminitis: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Wylie, C E; Shaw, D J; Verheyen, K L P; Newton, J R

    2016-04-23

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to compare the prevalence of selected clinical signs in laminitis cases and non-laminitic but lame controls to evaluate their capability to discriminate laminitis from other causes of lameness. Participating veterinary practitioners completed a checklist of laminitis-associated clinical signs identified by literature review. Cases were defined as horses/ponies with veterinary-diagnosed, clinically apparent laminitis; controls were horses/ponies with any lameness other than laminitis. Associations were tested by logistic regression with adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals, with veterinary practice as an a priori fixed effect. Multivariable analysis using graphical classification tree-based statistical models linked laminitis prevalence with specific combinations of clinical signs. Data were collected for 588 cases and 201 controls. Five clinical signs had a difference in prevalence of greater than +50 per cent: 'reluctance to walk' (OR 4.4), 'short, stilted gait at walk' (OR 9.4), 'difficulty turning' (OR 16.9), 'shifting weight' (OR 17.7) and 'increased digital pulse' (OR 13.2) (all P<0.001). 'Bilateral forelimb lameness' was the best discriminator; 92 per cent of animals with this clinical sign had laminitis (OR 40.5, P<0.001). If, in addition, horses/ponies had an 'increased digital pulse', 99 per cent were identified as laminitis. 'Presence of a flat/convex sole' also significantly enhanced clinical diagnosis discrimination (OR 15.5, P<0.001). This is the first epidemiological laminitis study to use decision-tree analysis, providing the first evidence base for evaluating clinical signs to differentially diagnose laminitis from other causes of lameness. Improved evaluation of the clinical signs displayed by laminitic animals examined by first-opinion practitioners will lead to equine welfare improvements. PMID:26969668

  2. A computerized multichannel platelet aggregometer system.

    PubMed

    Kuzara, D; Zoltan, B J; Greathouse, S L; Jordan, C W; Kohler, C A

    1986-08-01

    Commercially available instrumentation for conducting platelet aggregation studies in clinical and research laboratories consists of one-, two-, or four-channel aggregometers used in conjunction with strip chart recorders. These instruments have limited utility in large-scale drug screening and evaluation of the mode of action of drugs or in the clinical diagnosis of platelet disorders. A new instrument, a computerized multichannel aggregometer system (CMPAS) has been developed to collect, display, and analyze platelet aggregation data. The system is comprised of a 24-channel Born-type aggregometer, interfaced to a Rockwell AIM-65 microcomputer through an analogue-to-digital converter and an Epson dot-matrix printer. Each channel is individually calibrated, and aggregation data can be collected on up to 24 different platelet-rich plasma samples simultaneously. Conversational programs written in BASIC prompt the user for the addition of agonists and inhibitors. The tracings for each channel are displayed simultaneously, and a program automatically analyzes the data to generate the following parameters: baseline optical density, maximum aggregation response, positive and negative slopes, time to peak aggregation, and percentage response. Computerized multichannel aggregometer system data outputs are comparable to data generated by a standard Chronolog aggregometer unit. The advantages of the system include multichannel capability, simultaneous display of all channels allowing relative comparisons between control and experimental groups, and time savings and improved efficiency in conducting and analyzing aggregation experiments. PMID:3755779

  3. Automated Computerized Analysis of Speechin Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Alex S.; Elvevåg, Brita

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review Disturbances in communication are a hallmark of severe mental illnesses. Recent technological advances have paved the way for objectifying communication using automated computerized linguistic and acoustic analysis. We review recent studies applying various computer-based assessments to the natural language produced by adult patients with severe mental illness. Recent Findings Automated computerized methods afford tools with which it is possible to objectively evaluate patients in a reliable, valid and efficient manner that complements human ratings. Crucially, these measures correlate with important clinical measures. The clinical relevance of these novel metrics has been demonstrated by showing their relationship to functional outcome measures, their in vivo link to classic ‘language’ regions in the brain, and, in the case of linguistic analysis, their relationship to candidate genes for severe mental illness. Summary Computer based assessments of natural language afford a framework with which to measure communication disturbances in adults with SMI. Emerging evidence suggests that they can be reliable and valid, and overcome many practical limitations of more traditional assessment methods. The advancement of these technologies offers unprecedented potential for measuring and understanding some of the most crippling symptoms of some of the most debilitating illnesses known to humankind. PMID:24613984

  4. Application of a computerized environmental information system to master and sector planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    A computerized composite mapping system developed as an aid in the land use decision making process is described. Emphasis is placed on consideration of the environment in urban planning. The presence of alluvium, shallow bedrock, surface water, and vegetation growth are among the environmental factors considered. An analysis of the Shady Grove Sector planning is presented as an example of the use of computerized composite mapping for long range planning.

  5. Commentary: moving toward cost-effectiveness in using psychophysiological measures in clinical assessment: validity, decision making, and adding value.

    PubMed

    Youngstrom, Eric A; De Los Reyes, Andres

    2015-01-01

    Psychophysiological measures offer a variety of potential advantages, including more direct assessment of certain processes, as well as provision of information that may contrast with other sources. The role of psychophysiological measures in clinical practice will be best defined when researchers (a) switch to research designs and statistical models that better approximate how clinicians administer assessments and make clinical decisions in practice, (b) systematically compare the validity of psychophysiological measures to incumbent methods for assessing similar criteria, (c) test whether psychophysiological measures show either greater validity or clinically meaningful incremental validity, and (d) factor in fiscal costs as well as the utilities that the client attaches to different assessment outcomes. The statistical methods are now readily available, along with the interpretive models for integrating assessment results into client-centered decision making. These, combined with technology reducing the cost of psychophysiological measurement and improving ease of interpretation, poise the field for a rapid transformation of assessment practice, but only if we let go of old habits of research. PMID:25664769

  6. Single-patient (n-of-1) trials: a pragmatic clinical decision methodology for patient-centered comparative effectiveness research

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Naihua; Kravitz, Richard L.; Schmid, Christopher H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To raise awareness among clinicians and epidemiologists that single-patient (n-of-1) trials are potentially useful for informing personalized treatment decisions for patients with chronic conditions. Study Design and Setting We reviewed the clinical and statistical literature on methods and applications of single-patient trials and then critically evaluated the needs for further methodological developments. Results Existing literature reports application of 2,154 single-patient trials in 108 studies for diverse clinical conditions; various recent commentaries advocate for wider application of such trials in clinical decision making. Preliminary evidence from several recent pilot acceptability studies suggests that single-patient trials have the potential for widespread acceptance by patients and clinicians as an effective modality for increasing the therapeutic precision. Bayesian and adaptive statistical methods hold promise for increasing the informational yield of single-patient trials while reducing participant burden, but are not widely used. Personalized applications of single-patient trials can be enhanced through further development and application of methodologies on adaptive trial design, stopping rules, network meta-analysis, washout methods, and methods for communicating trial findings to patients and clinicians. Conclusions Single-patient trials may be poised to emerge as an important part of the methodological armamentarium for comparative effectiveness research and patient-centered outcomes research. By permitting direct estimation of individual treatment effects, they can facilitate finely graded individualized care, enhance therapeutic precision, improve patient outcomes, and reduce costs. PMID:23849149

  7. Application of best practice approaches for designing decision support tools: The preparatory education about clinical trials (PRE-ACT) study

    PubMed Central

    Fleisher, Linda; Ruggieri, Dominique G.; Miller, Suzanne M.; Manne, Sharon; Albrecht, Terrance; Buzaglo, Joanne; Collins, Michael A.; Katz, Michael; Kinzy, Tyler G.; Liu, Tasnuva; Manning, Cheri; Charap, Ellen Specker; Millard, Jennifer; Miller, Dawn M.; Poole, David; Raivitch, Stephanie; Roach, Nancy; Ross, Eric A.; Meropol, Neal J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This article describes the rigorous development process and initial feedback of the PRE-ACT (Preparatory Education About Clinical Trials) web-based- intervention designed to improve preparation for decision making in cancer clinical trials. Methods The multi-step process included stakeholder input, formative research, user testing and feedback. Diverse teams (researchers, advocates and developers) participated including content refinement, identification of actors, and development of video scripts. Patient feedback was provided in the final production period and through a vanguard group (N = 100) from the randomized trial. Results Patients/advocates confirmed barriers to cancer clinical trial participation, including lack of awareness and knowledge, fear of side effects, logistical concerns, and mistrust. Patients indicated they liked the tools user-friendly nature, the organized and comprehensive presentation of the subject matter, and the clarity of the videos. Conclusion The development process serves as an example of operationalizing best practice approaches and highlights the value of a multi-disciplinary team to develop a theory-based, sophisticated tool that patients found useful in their decision making process. Practice implications Best practice approaches can be addressed and are important to ensure evidence-based tools that are of value to patients and supports the usefulness of a process map in the development of e-health tools. PMID:24813474

  8. A Clinical Decision Support System for Integrating Tuberculosis and HIV Care in Kenya: A Human-Centered Design Approach

    PubMed Central

    Catalani, Caricia; Green, Eric; Owiti, Philip; Keny, Aggrey; Diero, Lameck; Yeung, Ada; Israelski, Dennis; Biondich, Paul

    2014-01-01

    With the aim of integrating HIV and tuberculosis care in rural Kenya, a team of researchers, clinicians, and technologists used the human-centered design approach to facilitate design, development, and deployment processes of new patient-specific TB clinical decision support system for medical providers. In Kenya, approximately 1.6 million people are living with HIV and have a 20-times higher risk of dying of tuberculosis. Although tuberculosis prevention and treatment medication is widely available, proven to save lives, and prioritized by the World Health Organization, ensuring that it reaches the most vulnerable communities remains challenging. Human-centered design, used in the fields of industrial design and information technology for decades, is an approach to improving the effectiveness and impact of innovations that has been scarcely used in the health field. Using this approach, our team followed a 3-step process, involving mixed methods assessment to (1) understand the situation through the collection and analysis of site observation sessions and key informant interviews; (2) develop a new clinical decision support system through iterative prototyping, end-user engagement, and usability testing; and, (3) implement and evaluate the system across 24 clinics in rural West Kenya. Through the application of this approach, we found that human-centered design facilitated the process of digital innovation in a complex and resource-constrained context. PMID:25170939

  9. Construction of a Clinical Decision Support System for Undergoing Surgery Based on Domain Ontology and Rules Reasoning

    PubMed Central

    Bau, Cho-Tsan; Huang, Chung-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To construct a clinical decision support system (CDSS) for undergoing surgery based on domain ontology and rules reasoning in the setting of hospitalized diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: The ontology was created with a modified ontology development method, including specification and conceptualization, formalization, implementation, and evaluation and maintenance. The Protégé–Web Ontology Language editor was used to implement the ontology. Embedded clinical knowledge was elicited to complement the domain ontology with formal concept analysis. The decision rules were translated into JENA format, which JENA can use to infer recommendations based on patient clinical situations. Results: The ontology includes 31 classes and 13 properties, plus 38 JENA rules that were built to generate recommendations. The evaluation studies confirmed the correctness of the ontology, acceptance of recommendations, satisfaction with the system, and usefulness of the ontology for glycemic management of diabetic patients undergoing surgery, especially for domain experts. Conclusions: The contribution of this research is to set up an evidence-based hybrid ontology and an evaluation method for CDSS. The system can help clinicians to achieve inpatient glycemic control in diabetic patients undergoing surgery while avoiding hypoglycemia. PMID:24730353

  10. Attitudes of Oncologists, Oncology Nurses, and Patients from a Women's Clinic Regarding Medical Decision Making for Older and Younger Breast Cancer Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beisecker, Analee E.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Administered Beisecker Locus of Authority in Decision Making: Breast Cancer survey to 67 oncologists, 94 oncology nurses, and 288 patients from women's clinic. All groups believed that physicians should have dominant role in decision making. Nurses felt that patients should have more input than patients or physicians felt they should. Physicians…

  11. Confidence and Information Access in Clinical Decision-Making: An Examination of the Cognitive Processes that affect the Information-seeking Behavior of Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Uy, Raymonde Charles; Sarmiento, Raymond Francis; Gavino, Alex; Fontelo, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Clinical decision-making involves the interplay between cognitive processes and physicians’ perceptions of confidence in the context of their information-seeking behavior. The objectives of the study are: to examine how these concepts interact, to determine whether physician confidence, defined in relation to information need, affects clinical decision-making, and if information access improves decision accuracy. We analyzed previously collected data about resident physicians’ perceptions of information need from a study comparing abstracts and full-text articles in clinical decision accuracy. We found that there is a significant relation between confidence and accuracy (φ=0.164, p<0.01). We also found various differences in the alignment of confidence and accuracy, demonstrating the concepts of underconfidence and overconfidence across years of clinical experience. Access to online literature also has a significant effect on accuracy (p<0.001). These results highlight possible CDSS strategies to reduce medical errors. PMID:25954424

  12. A COMPUTERIZED OPERATOR SUPPORT SYSTEM PROTOTYPE

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas A. Ulrich; Roger Lew; Ronald L. Boring; Ken Thomas

    2015-03-01

    A computerized operator support system (COSS) is proposed for use in nuclear power plants to assist control room operators in addressing time-critical plant upsets. A COSS is a collection of technologies to assist operators in monitoring overall plant performance and making timely, informed decisions on appropriate control actions for the projected plant condition. A prototype COSS was developed in order to demonstrate the concept and provide a test bed for further research. The prototype is based on four underlying elements consisting of a digital alarm system, computer-based procedures, piping and instrumentation diagram system representations, and a recommender module for mitigation actions. The initial version of the prototype is now operational at the Idaho National Laboratory using the Human System Simulation Laboratory.

  13. Implementation of virtual medical record object model for a standards-based clinical decision support rule engine.

    PubMed

    Huang, Christine; Noirot, Laura A; Heard, Kevin M; Reichley, Richard M; Dunagan, Wm Claiborne; Bailey, Thomas C

    2006-01-01

    The Virtual Medical Record (vMR) is a structured data model for representing individual patient informations. Our implementation of vMR is based on HL7 Reference Information Model (RIM) v2.13 from which a minimum set of objects and attributes are selected to meet the requirement of a clinical decision support (CDS) rule engine. Our success of mapping local patient data to the vMR model and building a vMR adaptor middle layer demonstrate the feasibility and advantages of implementing a vMR in a portable CDS solution. PMID:17238577

  14. What Factors Influence Parental Decisions to Participate in Clinical Research: Consenters versus Non-consenters

    PubMed Central

    Hoberman, Alejandro; Shaikh, Nader; Bhatnagar, Sonika; Haralam, Mary Ann; Kearney, Diana H.; Colborn, D. Kathleen; Kienholz, Michelle L.; Wang, Li; Bunker, Clareann H.; Keren, Ron; Carpenter, Myra A.; Greenfield, Saul P.; Pohl, Hans G.; Mathews, Ranjiv; Moxey-Mims, Marva; Chesney, Russell W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine factors associated with parental consent for their child’s participation in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting 7 Children’s Hospitals participating in a randomized trial evaluating management of children with vesicoureteral reflux; July 2008 to May 2011. Participants Parents asked to provide consent for their child’s participation in the trial were invited to complete an anonymous online survey about factors influencing their decision. 120 (44%) of the 271 invited, completed the survey: 58 of 125 (46%) had provided and 62 of 144 (43%) had declined consent. Outcome Measures 60-question survey examining: child, parent, and study characteristics; parental perception of the study; understanding of design; external influences; and decision-making process. Results Having graduated from college and private health insurance were associated with lower likelihood of providing consent. Parents who perceived the trial as having low degree of risk, resulting in greater benefit to their child and other children, causing little interference with standard care or exhibiting potential for enhanced care or who perceived the researcher as professional were significantly more likely to consent to participate. Higher levels of understanding of randomization process, blinding, and right to withdraw were significantly associated with consent to participate. Conclusions Parents who declined consent had a relatively higher socioeconomic status, had more anxiety about their decision and found it harder to make their decision compared with consenting parents, who had higher levels of trust and altruism, perceived the potential for enhanced care, reflected better understanding of randomization, and exhibited low decisional uncertainty. PMID:23546617

  15. Shared Surgical Decision Making and Youth Resilience Correlates of Satisfaction With Clinical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kapp-Simon, Kathleen A; Edwards, Todd; Ruta, Caroline; Bellucci, Claudia Crilly; Aspirnall, Cassandra L; Strauss, Ronald P; Topolski, Tari D; Rumsey, Nichola J; Patrick, Donald L

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with youth satisfaction with surgical procedures performed to address oral cleft or craniofacial conditions (CFCs). It was hypothesized that youth mental health, participation in decision making, perceived consequences of living with a CFC, and coping strategies would be associated with satisfaction with past surgeries. A total of 203 youth between the ages of 11 and 18 years (mean age = 14.5, standard deviation = 2.0, 61% male participants, 78% oral cleft) completed a series of questionnaires measuring depression, self-esteem, participation in decision making, condition severity, negative and positive consequences of having a CFC, coping, and satisfaction with past surgeries. Multiple regression analysis using boot-strapping techniques found that youth participation in decision making, youth perception of positive consequences of having a CFC, and coping accounted for 32% of the variance in satisfaction with past surgeries (P < 0.001). Youth age, sex, and assessment of condition severity were not significantly associated with satisfaction with surgical outcome. Depression, self-esteem, and negative consequences of having a CFC were not associated with satisfaction with past surgeries. Youth should be actively involved in the decision for craniofacial surgery. Youth who were more satisfied with their surgical outcomes also viewed themselves as having gained from the experience of living with a CFC. They felt that having a CFC made them stronger people and they believed that they were more accepting of others and more in touch with others' feelings because of what they had been through. PMID:26114527

  16. Design, implementation and evaluation of a clinical decision support system to prevent adverse drug events.

    PubMed

    Del Fiol, G; Rocha, B H; Nohama, P

    2000-01-01

    Adverse drug events are known to be a major health problem worldwide. It is estimated that the annual costs related to these events in the United States are greater than the total costs with cardiovascular disease care. Decision support systems that assist drug ordering have demonstrated to be a powerful tool to prevent prescription errors and adverse drug events. On the other hand, some issues related to the development, implementation, configuration, and evaluation of these decision support systems still need further research. This paper presents the development and evaluation of a decision support system prototype that helps with the prevention of adverse drug events by detecting drug-drug interactions in drug orders. The structure of the system tries to solve some of the problems described by the literature, such as integration with hospital information systems, adaptability to local needs, and knowledge base maintenance. The proposed model has shown to be an effective method for representing drug-drug interactions. The prototype was evaluated by a retrospective study using a dataset with 37.237 prescriptions. The system was able to detect 10.044 (27.0%) orders containing one or more drug-drug interactions. Among these interactions, 6.4% had high severity. In a future study, it is intended to apply the developed system in a real-time on-line environment, evaluating the benefits achieved in terms of improvement in medical practice and patient outcomes. PMID:11187651

  17. Recommendations for Standardizing Glucose Reporting and Analysis to Optimize Clinical Decision Making in Diabetes: The Ambulatory Glucose Profile

    PubMed Central

    Bergenstal, Richard M.; Ahmann, Andrew J.; Bailey, Timothy; Beck, Roy W.; Bissen, Joan; Buckingham, Bruce; Deeb, Larry; Dolin, Robert H.; Garg, Satish K.; Goland, Robin; Hirsch, Irl B.; Klonoff, David C.; Kruger, Davida F.; Matfin, Glenn; Mazze, Roger S.; Olson, Beth A.; Parkin, Christopher; Peters, Anne; Powers, Margaret A.; Rodriguez, Henry; Southerland, Phil; Strock, Ellie S.; Tamborlane, William; Wesley, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Underutilization of glucose data and lack of easy and standardized glucose data collection, analysis, visualization, and guided clinical decision making are key contributors to poor glycemic control among individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus. An expert panel of diabetes specialists, facilitated by the International Diabetes Center and sponsored by the Helmsley Charitable Trust, met in 2012 to discuss recommendations for standardizing the analysis and presentation of glucose monitoring data, with the initial focus on data derived from continuous glucose monitoring systems. The panel members were introduced to a universal software report, the Ambulatory Glucose Profile, and asked to provide feedback on its content and functionality, both as a research tool and in clinical settings. This article provides a summary of the topics and issues discussed during the meeting and presents recommendations from the expert panel regarding the need to standardize glucose profile summary metrics and the value of a uniform glucose report to aid clinicians, researchers, and patients. PMID:23567014

  18. Comparative outcome studies of clinical decision support software: limitations to the practice of evidence-based system acquisition.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, Gaurav Jay; Amber, Kyle T; Goodman, Kenneth W

    2015-04-01

    Clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) assist clinicians with patient diagnosis and treatment. However, inadequate attention has been paid to the process of selecting and buying systems. The diversity of CDSSs, coupled with research obstacles, marketplace limitations, and legal impediments, has thwarted comparative outcome studies and reduced the availability of reliable information and advice for purchasers. We review these limitations and recommend several comparative studies, which were conducted in phases; studies conducted in phases and focused on limited outcomes of safety, efficacy, and implementation in varied clinical settings. Additionally, we recommend the increased availability of guidance tools to assist purchasers with evidence-based purchases. Transparency is necessary in purchasers' reporting of system defects and vendors' disclosure of marketing conflicts of interest to support methodologically sound studies. Taken together, these measures can foster the evolution of evidence-based tools that, in turn, will enable and empower system purchasers to make wise choices and improve the care of patients. PMID:25665704

  19. Recommendations for standardizing glucose reporting and analysis to optimize clinical decision making in diabetes: the ambulatory glucose profile.

    PubMed

    Bergenstal, Richard M; Ahmann, Andrew J; Bailey, Timothy; Beck, Roy W; Bissen, Joan; Buckingham, Bruce; Deeb, Larry; Dolin, Robert H; Garg, Satish K; Goland, Robin; Hirsch, Irl B; Klonoff, David C; Kruger, Davida F; Matfin, Glenn; Mazze, Roger S; Olson, Beth A; Parkin, Christopher; Peters, Anne; Powers, Margaret A; Rodriguez, Henry; Southerland, Phil; Strock, Ellie S; Tamborlane, William; Wesley, David M

    2013-01-01

    Underutilization of glucose data and lack of easy and standardized glucose data collection, analysis, visualization, and guided clinical decision making are key contributors to poor glycemic control among individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus. An expert panel of diabetes specialists, facilitated by the International Diabetes Center and sponsored by the Helmsley Charitable Trust, met in 2012 to discuss recommendations for standardizing the analysis and presentation of glucose monitoring data, with the initial focus on data derived from continuous glucose monitoring systems. The panel members were introduced to a universal software report, the Ambulatory Glucose Profile, and asked to provide feedback on its content and functionality, both as a research tool and in clinical settings. This article provides a summary of the topics and issues discussed during the meeting and presents recommendations from the expert panel regarding the need to standardize glucose profile summary metrics and the value of a uniform glucose report to aid clinicians, researchers, and patients. PMID:23567014

  20. Arkansas' Curriculum Guide. Competency Based Computerized Accounting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock. Div. of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    This guide contains the essential parts of a total curriculum for a one-year secondary-level course in computerized accounting. Addressed in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: the complete accounting cycle, computer operations for accounting, computerized accounting and general ledgers, computerized accounts payable,…

  1. Arkansas' Curriculum Guide. Competency Based Computerized Accounting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock. Div. of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    This guide contains the essential parts of a total curriculum for a one-year secondary-level course in computerized accounting. Addressed in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: the complete accounting cycle, computer operations for accounting, computerized accounting and general ledgers, computerized accounts payable,

  2. Equity Issues in High Stakes Computerized Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Rosemary E.

    This paper discusses equity issues that may arise from the widespread use of high stakes computerized testing. The literature relevant to computerized testing is examined from the perspective of equity concerns from within the framework of research and from the perspective of possible uses of computerized testing if equity issues are considered…

  3. Development and psychometric properties of a five-language multiperspective instrument to assess clinical decision making style in the treatment of people with severe mental illness (CDMS)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate psychometric properties of the Clinical Decision Making Style (CDMS) scale which measures general preferences for decision making as well as preferences regarding the provision of information to the patient from the perspectives of people with severe mental illness and staff. Methods A participatory approach was chosen for instrument development which followed 10 sequential steps proposed in a current guideline of good practice for the translation and cultural adaptation of measures. Following item analysis, reliability, validity, and long-term stability of the CDMS were examined using Spearman correlations in a sample of 588 people with severe mental illness and 213 mental health professionals in 6 European countries (Germany, UK, Italy, Denmark, Hungary, and Switzerland). Results In both patient and staff versions, the two CDMS subscales Participation in Decision Making and Information reliably measure distinct characteristics of decision making. Validity could be demonstrated to some extent, but needs further investigation. Conclusions Together with two other five-language patient- and staff-rated measures developed in the CEDAR study (ISRCTN75841675) Clinical Decision Making in Routine Care and Clinical Decision Making Involvement and Satisfaction the CDMS allows empirical investigation of the complex relation between clinical decision making and outcome in the treatment of people with severe mental illness across Europe. PMID:23379280

  4. Using Computational Modeling to Assess the Impact of Clinical Decision Support on Cancer Screening within Community Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Timothy Jay; Morgan, Geoffrey P.; Jones, Josette; McDaniel, Anna M.; Weaver, Michael; Weiner, Bryan; Haggstrom, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Our conceptual model demonstrates our goal to investigate the impact of clinical decision support (CDS) utilization on cancer screening improvement strategies in the community health care (CHC) setting. We employed a dual modeling technique using both statistical and computational modeling to evaluate impact. Our statistical model used the Spearman’s Rho test to evaluate the strength of relationship between our proximal outcome measures (CDS utilization) against our distal outcome measure (provider self-reported cancer screening improvement). Our computational model relied on network evolution theory and made use of a tool called Construct-TM to model the use of CDS measured by the rate of organizational learning. We employed the use of previously collected survey data from community health centers Cancer Health Disparities Collaborative (HDCC). Our intent is to demonstrate the added valued gained by using a computational modeling tool in conjunction with a statistical analysis when evaluating the impact a health information technology, in the form of CDS, on health care quality process outcomes such as facility-level screening improvement. Significant simulated disparities in organizational learning over time were observed between community health centers beginning the simulation with high and low clinical decision support capability. PMID:24953241

  5. Cognitive elements in clinical decision-making: toward a cognitive model for medical education and understanding clinical reasoning.

    PubMed

    Dunphy, Bruce C; Cantwell, Robert; Bourke, Sid; Fleming, Mark; Smith, Bruce; Joseph, K S; Dunphy, Stacey L

    2010-05-01

    Physician cognition, metacognition and affect may have an impact upon the quality of clinical reasoning. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between measures of physician metacognition and affect and patient outcomes in obstetric practice. Reflective coping (RC), proactive coping, need for cognition (NFC), tolerance for ambiguity, state-trait anxiety and metacognitive awareness were assessed for obstetricians (n = 12) who provided intra-partum care to 4,149 women. Outcome measures included delivery mode and intrapartum asphyxia. Analysis was carried out using logistic regression and tree-based classification. Obstetricians with high RC scores were more likely to perform a caesarean section (OR 1.59, p < 0.0001), less likely undertake a mid-forceps or low forceps delivery (OR 0.41, p < 0.0001; OR 0.49, p < 0.0001), and more likely to supervise a spontaneous vaginal delivery (OR 1.17, p = 0.08). Obstetricians with high NFC scores were more likely to perform a caesarean section (OR 1.53, p = 0.03), more likely to undertake a vacuum delivery (OR 5.8, p = 0.001), less likely undertake a mid-forceps delivery (OR 0.45, p = 0.02) and less likely to supervise a spontaneous vaginal delivery (OR 0.47, p < 0.0001). Obstetricians high in trait anxiety were more likely to perform a mid forceps delivery (OR 2.49, p = 0.01) or a vacuum delivery (OR 5.08, p = 0.003), and less likely to supervise a spontaneous vaginal delivery (OR 0.38, p < 0.0001). NFC was negatively associated (OR 0.10, p < 0.001) and trait anxiety was positively associated with intrapartum asphyxia (p < 0.05, rho = 0.582). In summary, physician cognitive processes and affect have a significant impact on patient outcomes, particularly in situations where there is a higher level of clinical unpredictability. PMID:19763856

  6. Computerized Legal Research. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Michael

    A project was undertaken to develop a curriculum for a course in computerized legal education that could be used at Highline Community College in Midway, Washington. As part of the curriculum development effort, project staff reviewed relevant literature, visited colleagues at the University of Washington and the University of Puget Sound Law…

  7. Student Perceptions of Computerized Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pino-Silva, Juan

    2008-01-01

    The challenge to test small groups by means of microcomputers demands appropriate software design and sound test design. To comply with this demand, students' beliefs or perceptions on the advantages and disadvantages of a computerized test were tapped. Overall, self-reported advantages outnumbered disadvantages to a significant degree. This was…

  8. Total Library Computerization for Windows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Combs, Joseph, Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Presents a general review of features of version 2.1 of Total Library Computerization (TLC) for Windows from On Point, Inc. Includes information about pricing, hardware and operating systems, modules/functions available, user interface, security, on-line catalog functions, circulation, cataloging, and documentation and online help. A table…

  9. Computerized Proof Techniques for Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Christopher J.; Tefera, Akalu; Zeleke, Aklilu

    2012-01-01

    The use of computer algebra systems such as Maple and Mathematica is becoming increasingly important and widespread in mathematics learning, teaching and research. In this article, we present computerized proof techniques of Gosper, Wilf-Zeilberger and Zeilberger that can be used for enhancing the teaching and learning of topics in discrete…

  10. Computerizing Information Services in Iraq.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacso, Peter; Razzaq, Faik Abdul S.

    1986-01-01

    Review of background and justification of computerization project initiated to automate information work covers design concepts; implementation; and major characteristics of databases (local versions of BIOSIS and INSPEC, union catalog of monographs from Library of Congress/MARC records, union catalog of serials from International Serials Data…

  11. Decision tree-based method for integrating gene expression, demographic, and clinical data to determine disease endotypes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Complex diseases are often difficult to diagnose, treat and study due to the multi-factorial nature of the underlying etiology. Large data sets are now widely available that can be used to define novel, mechanistically distinct disease subtypes (endotypes) in a completely data-driven manner. However, significant challenges exist with regard to how to segregate individuals into suitable subtypes of the disease and understand the distinct biological mechanisms of each when the goal is to maximize the discovery potential of these data sets. Results A multi-step decision tree-based method is described for defining endotypes based on gene expression, clinical covariates, and disease indicators using childhood asthma as a case study. We attempted to use alternative approaches such as the Student’s t-test, single data domain clustering and the Modk-prototypes algorithm, which incorporates multiple data domains into a single analysis and none performed as well as the novel multi-step decision tree method. This new method gave the best segregation of asthmatics and non-asthmatics, and it provides easy access to all genes and clinical covariates that distinguish the groups. Conclusions The multi-step decision tree method described here will lead to better understanding of complex disease in general by allowing purely data-driven disease endotypes to facilitate the discovery of new mechanisms underlying these diseases. This application should be considered a complement to ongoing efforts to better define and diagnose known endotypes. When coupled with existing methods developed to determine the genetics of gene expression, these methods provide a mechanism for linking genetics and exposomics data and thereby accounting for both major determinants of disease. PMID:24188919

  12. Clinical, pathological and molecular prognostic factors in prostate cancer decision-making process.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, Dario; Palermo, Giuseppe; Totaro, Angelo; Bassi, Pier Francesco; Pinto, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common urologic neoplasm and the second leading cause of cancer-related death among men in many developed countries. Given the highly heterogeneous behaviour of the disease, there is a great need for prognostic factors, in order to stratify the clinical risk and give the best treatment options to the patient. Clinical factors, such as prostate-specific antigen value and derivatives, and pathological factors, such as stage and Gleason grading, are well kown prognostic factors. Nomograms can provide useful prediction in each clinical sceario. The field of molecular biomarkers is briskly evolving towards personalized medicine. TMPRSS2-ERG fusion, deletion of PTEN ed and gene panels are some of the more extensively explored molecular features in prostate cancer outcome prediction. In the near future, circulating tumour cells, exosomes and microRNAs could give us further, not invasive important tools. PMID:26917215

  13. An HL7-CDA wrapper for facilitating semantic interoperability to rule-based Clinical Decision Support Systems.

    PubMed

    Sáez, Carlos; Bresó, Adrián; Vicente, Javier; Robles, Montserrat; García-Gómez, Juan Miguel

    2013-03-01

    The success of Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) greatly depends on its capability of being integrated in Health Information Systems (HIS). Several proposals have been published up to date to permit CDSS gathering patient data from HIS. Some base the CDSS data input on the HL7 reference model, however, they are tailored to specific CDSS or clinical guidelines technologies, or do not focus on standardizing the CDSS resultant knowledge. We propose a solution for facilitating semantic interoperability to rule-based CDSS focusing on standardized input and output documents conforming an HL7-CDA wrapper. We define the HL7-CDA restrictions in a HL7-CDA implementation guide. Patient data and rule inference results are mapped respectively to and from the CDSS by means of a binding method based on an XML binding file. As an independent clinical document, the results of a CDSS can present clinical and legal validity. The proposed solution is being applied in a CDSS for providing patient-specific recommendations for the care management of outpatients with diabetes mellitus. PMID:23199936

  14. Targeting and Structuring Information Resource Use: A Path toward Informed Clinical Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangrulkar, Rajesh S.

    2004-01-01

    A core skill for all physicians to master is that of information manager. Despite a rapidly expanding set of electronic and print-based information resources, clinicians continue to answer their clinical queries predominantly through informal or formal consultation. Even as new tools are brought to market, the majority of them present information

  15. Calibrating for Comorbidity: Clinical Decision-Making in Youth Depression and Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Brian C.; Merson, Rachel A.; Zandberg, Laurie J.; Areizaga, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Comorbidity in clinical youth populations is more the rule than the exception, yet few established guidelines exist to help practicing clinicians manage complex diagnostic profiles. The current paper reviews efforts within the treatment development literature to handle comorbidity in depressed and anxious children and adolescents, including…

  16. Should I Pack My Umbrella? Clinical versus Statistical Prediction of Mental Health Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aegisdottir, Stefania; Spengler, Paul M.; White, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    In this rejoinder, the authors respond to the insightful commentary of Strohmer and Arm, Chwalisz, and Hilton, Harris, and Rice about the meta-analysis on statistical versus clinical prediction techniques for mental health judgments. The authors address issues including the availability of statistical prediction techniques for real-life psychology

  17. Targeting and Structuring Information Resource Use: A Path toward Informed Clinical Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangrulkar, Rajesh S.

    2004-01-01

    A core skill for all physicians to master is that of information manager. Despite a rapidly expanding set of electronic and print-based information resources, clinicians continue to answer their clinical queries predominantly through informal or formal consultation. Even as new tools are brought to market, the majority of them present information…

  18. Should I Pack My Umbrella? Clinical versus Statistical Prediction of Mental Health Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aegisdottir, Stefania; Spengler, Paul M.; White, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    In this rejoinder, the authors respond to the insightful commentary of Strohmer and Arm, Chwalisz, and Hilton, Harris, and Rice about the meta-analysis on statistical versus clinical prediction techniques for mental health judgments. The authors address issues including the availability of statistical prediction techniques for real-life psychology…

  19. Calibrating for Comorbidity: Clinical Decision-Making in Youth Depression and Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Brian C.; Merson, Rachel A.; Zandberg, Laurie J.; Areizaga, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Comorbidity in clinical youth populations is more the rule than the exception, yet few established guidelines exist to help practicing clinicians manage complex diagnostic profiles. The current paper reviews efforts within the treatment development literature to handle comorbidity in depressed and anxious children and adolescents, including

  20. Clinical Decision Making and Outcome in Routine Care for People with Severe Mental Illness (CEDAR): Study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A considerable amount of research has been conducted on clinical decision making (CDM) in short-term physical conditions. However, there is a lack of knowledge on CDM and its outcome in long-term illnesses, especially in care for people with severe mental illness. Methods/Design The study entitled "Clinical decision making and outcome in routine care for people with severe mental illness" (CEDAR) is carried out in six European countries (Denmark, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Switzerland and UK). First, CEDAR establishes a methodology to assess CDM in people with severe mental illness. Specific instruments are developed (and psychometric properties established) to measure CDM style, key elements of CDM in routine care, as well as CDM involvement and satisfaction from patient and therapist perspectives. Second, these instruments are being put to use in a multi-national prospective observational study (bimonthly assessments during a one-year observation period; N = 560). This study investigates the immediate, short- and long-term effect of CDM on crucial dimensions of clinical outcome (symptom level, quality of life, needs) by taking into account significant variables moderating the relationship between CDM and outcome. Discussion The results of this study will make possible to delineate quality indicators of CDM, as well as to specify prime areas for further improvement. Ingredients of best practice in CDM in the routine care for people with severe mental illness will be extracted and recommendations formulated. With its explicit focus on the patient role in CDM, CEDAR will also contribute to strengthening the service user perspective. This project will substantially add to improving the practice of CDM in mental health care across Europe. Trial register ISRCTN75841675. PMID:21062508

  1. Economic comparison of common treatment protocols and J5 vaccination for clinical mastitis in dairy herds using optimized culling decisions.

    PubMed

    Kessels, J A; Cha, E; Johnson, S K; Welcome, F L; Kristensen, A R; Gröhn, Y T

    2016-05-01

    This study used an existing dynamic optimization model to compare costs of common treatment protocols and J5 vaccination for clinical mastitis in US dairy herds. Clinical mastitis is an infection of the mammary gland causing major economic losses in dairy herds due to reduced milk production, reduced conception, and increased risk of mortality and culling for infected cows. Treatment protocols were developed to reflect common practices in dairy herds. These included targeted therapy following pathogen identification, and therapy without pathogen identification using a broad-spectrum antimicrobial or treating with the cheapest treatment option. The cost-benefit of J5 vaccination was also estimated. Effects of treatment were accounted for as changes in treatment costs, milk loss due to mastitis, milk discarded due to treatment, and mortality. Following ineffective treatments, secondary decisions included extending the current treatment, alternative treatment, discontinuing treatment, and pathogen identification followed by recommended treatment. Average net returns for treatment protocols and vaccination were generated using an existing dynamic programming model. This model incorporates cow and pathogen characteristics to optimize management decisions to treat, inseminate, or cull cows. Of the treatment protocols where 100% of cows received recommended treatment, pathogen-specific identification followed by recommended therapy yielded the highest average net returns per cow per year. Out of all treatment scenarios, the highest net returns were achieved with selecting the cheapest treatment option and discontinuing treatment, or alternate treatment with a similar spectrum therapy; however, this may not account for the full consequences of giving nonrecommended therapies to cows with clinical mastitis. Vaccination increased average net returns in all scenarios. PMID:26947301

  2. Diagnostic thinking and information used in clinical decision-making: a qualitative study of expert and student dental clinicians

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It is uncertain whether the range and frequency of Diagnostic Thinking Processes (DTP) and pieces of information (concepts) involved in dental restorative treatment planning are different between students and expert clinicians. Methods We video-recorded dental visits with one standardized patient. Clinicians were subsequently interviewed and their cognitive strategies explored using guide questions; interviews were also recorded. Both visit and interview were content-analyzed, following the Gale and Marsden model for clinical decision-making. Limited tests used to contrast data were t, ?2, and Fisher's. Scott's ? was used to determine inter-coder reliability. Results Fifteen dentists and 17 senior dental students participated in visits lasting 32.0 minutes ( 12.9) among experts, and 29.9 7.1 among students; contact time with patient was 26.4 13.9 minutes (experts), and 22.2 7.5 (students). The time elapsed between the first and the last instances of the clinician looking in the mouth was similar between experts and students. Ninety eight types of pieces of information were used in combinations with 12 DTPs. The main differences found in DTP utilization had dentists conducting diagnostic interpretations of findings with sufficient certainty to be considered definitive twice as often as students. Students resorted more often to more general or clarifying enquiry in their search for information than dentists. Conclusions Differences in diagnostic strategies and concepts existed within clearly delimited types of cognitive processes; such processes were largely compatible with the analytic and (in particular) non-analytic approaches to clinical decision-making identified in the medical field. Because we were focused on a clinical presentation primarily made up of non-emergency treatment needs, use of other DTPs and concepts might occur when clinicians evaluate emergency treatment needs, complex rehabilitative cases, and/or medically compromised patients. PMID:20465826

  3. Impact of a Clinical Decision Model for Febrile Children at Risk for Serious Bacterial Infections at the Emergency Department: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    de Vos-Kerkhof, Evelien; Nijman, Ruud G.; Vergouwe, Yvonne; Polinder, Suzanne; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; van der Lei, Johan; Moll, Henriëtte A.; Oostenbrink, Rianne

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the impact of a clinical decision model for febrile children at risk for serious bacterial infections (SBI) attending the emergency department (ED). Methods Randomized controlled trial with 439 febrile children, aged 1 month-16 years, attending the pediatric ED of a Dutch university hospital during 2010-2012. Febrile children were randomly assigned to the intervention (clinical decision model; n=219) or the control group (usual care; n=220). The clinical decision model included clinical symptoms, vital signs, and C-reactive protein and provided high/low-risks for “pneumonia” and “other SBI”. Nurses were guided by the intervention to initiate additional tests for high-risk children. The clinical decision model was evaluated by 1) area-under-the-receiver-operating-characteristic-curve (AUC) to indicate discriminative ability and 2) feasibility, to measure nurses’ compliance to model recommendations. Primary patient outcome was defined as correct SBI diagnoses. Secondary process outcomes were defined as length of stay; diagnostic tests; antibiotic treatment; hospital admission; revisits and medical costs. Results The decision model had good discriminative ability for both pneumonia (n=33; AUC 0.83 (95% CI 0.75-0.90)) and other SBI (n=22; AUC 0.81 (95% CI 0.72-0.90)). Compliance to model recommendations was high (86%). No differences in correct SBI determination were observed. Application of the clinical decision model resulted in less full-blood-counts (14% vs. 22%, p-value<0.05) and more urine-dipstick testing (71% vs. 61%, p-value<0.05). Conclusions In contrast to our expectations no substantial impact on patient outcome was perceived. The clinical decision model preserved, however, good discriminatory ability to detect SBI, achieved good compliance among nurses and resulted in a more standardized diagnostic approach towards febrile children, with less full blood-counts and more rightfully urine-dipstick testing. Trial Registration Nederlands Trial Register NTR2381 PMID:26024532

  4. Clinical decision making: from theory to practice. The individual vs society. Resolving the conflict.

    PubMed

    Eddy, D M

    1991-05-01

    Eddy argues for reform of the American health care system. In seeking health coverage, he explains, there are two positions: the first, that of society, seeks to allocate services efficiently; the second, that of the patient, seeks to optimize individual patients' care. Using his illustration of breast cancer coverage from a previous JAMA article (1991 Mar 20; 265 (11): 1446+), Eddy contends that a tradition of decision-making from the second position is the root of pre