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Sample records for computerized clinical decision

  1. Computerized Clinical Decision Support: Contributions from 2014

    PubMed Central

    Koutkias, V.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective To summarize recent research and propose a selection of best papers published in 2014 in the field of computerized clinical decision support for the Decision Support section of the IMIA yearbook. Method A literature review was performed by searching two bibliographic databases for papers related to clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) and computerized provider order entry systems in order to select a list of candidate best papers to be then peer-reviewed by external reviewers. A consensus meeting between the two section editors and the editorial team was finally organized to conclude on the selection of best papers. Results Among the 1,254 returned papers published in 2014, the full review process selected four best papers. The first one is an experimental contribution to a better understanding of unintended uses of CDSSs. The second paper describes the effective use of previously collected data to tailor and adapt a CDSS. The third paper presents an innovative application that uses pharmacogenomic information to support personalized medicine. The fourth paper reports on the long-term effect of the routine use of a CDSS for antibiotic therapy. Conclusions As health information technologies spread more and more meaningfully, CDSSs are improving to answer users’ needs more accurately. The exploitation of previously collected data and the use of genomic data for decision support has started to materialize. However, more work is still needed to address issues related to the correct usage of such technologies, and to assess their effective impact in the long term. PMID:26293858

  2. Developing and implementing computerized protocols for standardization of clinical decisions.

    PubMed

    Morris, A H

    2000-03-01

    Humans have only a limited ability to incorporate information in decision making. In certain situations, the mismatch between this limitation and the availability of extensive information contributes to the varying performance and high error rate of clinical decision makers. Variation in clinical practice is due in part to clinicians' poor compliance with guidelines and recommended therapies. The use of decision-support tools is a response to both the information revolution and poor compliance. Computerized protocols used to deliver decision support can be configured to contain much more detail than textual guidelines or paper-based flow diagrams. Such protocols can generate patient-specific instructions for therapy that can be carried out with little interclinician variability; however, clinicians must be willing to modify personal styles of clinical management. Protocols need not be perfect. Several defensible and reasonable approaches are available for clinical problems. However, one of these reasonable approaches must be chosen and incorporated into the protocol to promote consistent clinical decisions. This reasoning is the basis of an explicit method of decision support that allows the rigorous evaluation of interventions, including use of the protocols themselves. Computerized protocols for mechanical ventilation and management of intravenous fluid and hemodynamic factors in patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome provide case studies for this discussion. PMID:10691588

  3. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Nurse-Focused Computerized Clinical Decision Support on Urinary Catheter Practice Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Robin Lynn Neal

    2012-01-01

    A growing national emphasis has been placed on health information technology (HIT) with robust computerized clinical decision support (CCDS) integration into health care delivery. Catheter-associated urinary tract infection is the most frequent health care-associated infection in the United States and is associated with high cost, high volumes and…

  4. Improving Emergency Department Triage Classification with Computerized Clinical Decision Support at a Pediatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunisch, Joseph Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background: The Emergency Severity Index (ESI) is an emergency department (ED) triage classification system based on estimated patient-specific resource utilization. Rules for a computerized clinical decision support (CDS) system based on a patient's chief complaint were developed and tested using a stochastic model for predicting ESI scores.…

  5. Improving Emergency Department Triage Classification with Computerized Clinical Decision Support at a Pediatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunisch, Joseph Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background: The Emergency Severity Index (ESI) is an emergency department (ED) triage classification system based on estimated patient-specific resource utilization. Rules for a computerized clinical decision support (CDS) system based on a patient's chief complaint were developed and tested using a stochastic model for predicting ESI scores.…

  6. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Nurse-Focused Computerized Clinical Decision Support on Urinary Catheter Practice Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Robin Lynn Neal

    2012-01-01

    A growing national emphasis has been placed on health information technology (HIT) with robust computerized clinical decision support (CCDS) integration into health care delivery. Catheter-associated urinary tract infection is the most frequent health care-associated infection in the United States and is associated with high cost, high volumes and…

  7. Patient-oriented Computerized Clinical Guidelines for Mobile Decision Support in Gestational Diabetes.

    PubMed

    García-Sáez, Gema; Rigla, Mercedes; Martínez-Sarriegui, Iñaki; Shalom, Erez; Peleg, Mor; Broens, Tom; Pons, Belén; Caballero-Ruíz, Estefanía; Gómez, Enrique J; Hernando, M Elena

    2014-03-01

    The risks associated with gestational diabetes (GD) can be reduced with an active treatment able to improve glycemic control. Advances in mobile health can provide new patient-centric models for GD to create personalized health care services, increase patient independence and improve patients' self-management capabilities, and potentially improve their treatment compliance. In these models, decision-support functions play an essential role. The telemedicine system MobiGuide provides personalized medical decision support for GD patients that is based on computerized clinical guidelines and adapted to a mobile environment. The patient's access to the system is supported by a smartphone-based application that enhances the efficiency and ease of use of the system. We formalized the GD guideline into a computer-interpretable guideline (CIG). We identified several workflows that provide decision-support functionalities to patients and 4 types of personalized advice to be delivered through a mobile application at home, which is a preliminary step to providing decision-support tools in a telemedicine system: (1) therapy, to help patients to comply with medical prescriptions; (2) monitoring, to help patients to comply with monitoring instructions; (3) clinical assessment, to inform patients about their health conditions; and (4) upcoming events, to deal with patients' personal context or special events. The whole process to specify patient-oriented decision support functionalities ensures that it is based on the knowledge contained in the GD clinical guideline and thus follows evidence-based recommendations but at the same time is patient-oriented, which could enhance clinical outcomes and patients' acceptance of the whole system. PMID:24876573

  8. Patient-oriented Computerized Clinical Guidelines for Mobile Decision Support in Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rigla, Mercedes; Martínez-Sarriegui, Iñaki; Shalom, Erez; Peleg, Mor; Broens, Tom; Pons, Belén; Caballero-Ruíz, Estefanía; Gómez, Enrique J.; Hernando, M. Elena

    2014-01-01

    The risks associated with gestational diabetes (GD) can be reduced with an active treatment able to improve glycemic control. Advances in mobile health can provide new patient-centric models for GD to create personalized health care services, increase patient independence and improve patients’ self-management capabilities, and potentially improve their treatment compliance. In these models, decision-support functions play an essential role. The telemedicine system MobiGuide provides personalized medical decision support for GD patients that is based on computerized clinical guidelines and adapted to a mobile environment. The patient’s access to the system is supported by a smartphone-based application that enhances the efficiency and ease of use of the system. We formalized the GD guideline into a computer-interpretable guideline (CIG). We identified several workflows that provide decision-support functionalities to patients and 4 types of personalized advice to be delivered through a mobile application at home, which is a preliminary step to providing decision-support tools in a telemedicine system: (1) therapy, to help patients to comply with medical prescriptions; (2) monitoring, to help patients to comply with monitoring instructions; (3) clinical assessment, to inform patients about their health conditions; and (4) upcoming events, to deal with patients’ personal context or special events. The whole process to specify patient-oriented decision support functionalities ensures that it is based on the knowledge contained in the GD clinical guideline and thus follows evidence-based recommendations but at the same time is patient-oriented, which could enhance clinical outcomes and patients’ acceptance of the whole system. PMID:24876573

  9. Recommended practices for computerized clinical decision support and knowledge management in community settings: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to identify recommended practices for computerized clinical decision support (CDS) development and implementation and for knowledge management (KM) processes in ambulatory clinics and community hospitals using commercial or locally developed systems in the U.S. Methods Guided by the Multiple Perspectives Framework, the authors conducted ethnographic field studies at two community hospitals and five ambulatory clinic organizations across the U.S. Using a Rapid Assessment Process, a multidisciplinary research team: gathered preliminary assessment data; conducted on-site interviews, observations, and field surveys; analyzed data using both template and grounded methods; and developed universal themes. A panel of experts produced recommended practices. Results The team identified ten themes related to CDS and KM. These include: 1) workflow; 2) knowledge management; 3) data as a foundation for CDS; 4) user computer interaction; 5) measurement and metrics; 6) governance; 7) translation for collaboration; 8) the meaning of CDS; 9) roles of special, essential people; and 10) communication, training, and support. Experts developed recommendations about each theme. The original Multiple Perspectives framework was modified to make explicit a new theoretical construct, that of Translational Interaction. Conclusions These ten themes represent areas that need attention if a clinic or community hospital plans to implement and successfully utilize CDS. In addition, they have implications for workforce education, research, and national-level policy development. The Translational Interaction construct could guide future applied informatics research endeavors. PMID:22333210

  10. Computerized clinical decision support systems for drug prescribing and management: A decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Computerized clinical decision support systems (CCDSSs) for drug therapy management are designed to promote safe and effective medication use. Evidence documenting the effectiveness of CCDSSs for improving drug therapy is necessary for informed adoption decisions. The objective of this review was to systematically review randomized controlled trials assessing the effects of CCDSSs for drug therapy management on process of care and patient outcomes. We also sought to identify system and study characteristics that predicted benefit. Methods We conducted a decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review. We updated our earlier reviews (1998, 2005) by searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, EBM Reviews, Inspec, and other databases, and consulting reference lists through January 2010. Authors of 82% of included studies confirmed or supplemented extracted data. We included only randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effect on process of care or patient outcomes of a CCDSS for drug therapy management compared to care provided without a CCDSS. A study was considered to have a positive effect (i.e., CCDSS showed improvement) if at least 50% of the relevant study outcomes were statistically significantly positive. Results Sixty-five studies met our inclusion criteria, including 41 new studies since our previous review. Methodological quality was generally high and unchanged with time. CCDSSs improved process of care performance in 37 of the 59 studies assessing this type of outcome (64%, 57% of all studies). Twenty-nine trials assessed patient outcomes, of which six trials (21%, 9% of all trials) reported improvements. Conclusions CCDSSs inconsistently improved process of care measures and seldomly improved patient outcomes. Lack of clear patient benefit and lack of data on harms and costs preclude a recommendation to adopt CCDSSs for drug therapy management. PMID:21824383

  11. Early Experiences from a guideline-based computerized clinical decision support for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Valladares, Carlos; Corbal, Iago; Anani, Nadim; Koch, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) affects 1-2% of the population. Twenty percent of all strokes are caused by AF. In this study, we represented the clinical knowledge in the European Society of Cardiology guideline using Guideline Definition Language (GDL), a format that binds openEHR archetypes, rule languages, and reference terminologies together. The computerized guidelines are applied to electronic health record (EHR) data retrospectively in order to identify possible gaps between current clinical practice and optimal care recommended by the evidence-based guidelines. Treatment compliance is checked in two patient groups: one received treatment from a cardiologist who is responsible for AF treatment in the region (n=514) and the other was a much larger patient group from the whole region (n=8130). The compliance checking shows the cardiologist group has substantially higher percentage of compliant treatment compared with that of the general population group. Based on this important finding, we are now implementing at-point-of-care clinical decision support reusing the same computerized guideline knowledge in GDL format in order to increase the guideline adherence of the treatment. PMID:23920553

  12. A Pragmatic Approach to Implementing Best Practices for Clinical Decision Support Systems in Computerized Provider Order Entry Systems

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Peter A.; Bates, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Incorporation of clinical decision support (CDS) capabilities is required to realize the greatest benefits from computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems. Discussions at a conference on CDS in CPOE held in San Francisco, California, June 21–22, 2005 produced several papers in this issue of JAMIA. The first paper reviews CDS for electronic prescribing within CPOE systems; 1 the second describes current controversies regarding creation, maintenance, and uses of CPOE order sets for CDS; 2 and the third presents issues related to certification as a potential means of validating CPOE systems for widespread use. 3 This manuscript summarizes all of the discussions at the meeting and provides a pragmatically oriented view of how to implement CPOE with CDS. PMID:17068354

  13. Computerized clinical decision support systems for acute care management: A decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review of effects on process of care and patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Acute medical care often demands timely, accurate decisions in complex situations. Computerized clinical decision support systems (CCDSSs) have many features that could help. However, as for any medical intervention, claims that CCDSSs improve care processes and patient outcomes need to be rigorously assessed. The objective of this review was to systematically review the effects of CCDSSs on process of care and patient outcomes for acute medical care. Methods We conducted a decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews databases (Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, DARE, ACP Journal Club, and others), and the Inspec bibliographic database were searched to January 2010, in all languages, for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of CCDSSs in all clinical areas. We included RCTs that evaluated the effect on process of care or patient outcomes of a CCDSS used for acute medical care compared with care provided without a CCDSS. A study was considered to have a positive effect (i.e., CCDSS showed improvement) if at least 50% of the relevant study outcomes were statistically significantly positive. Results Thirty-six studies met our inclusion criteria for acute medical care. The CCDSS improved process of care in 63% (22/35) of studies, including 64% (9/14) of medication dosing assistants, 82% (9/11) of management assistants using alerts/reminders, 38% (3/8) of management assistants using guidelines/algorithms, and 67% (2/3) of diagnostic assistants. Twenty studies evaluated patient outcomes, of which three (15%) reported improvements, all of which were medication dosing assistants. Conclusion The majority of CCDSSs demonstrated improvements in process of care, but patient outcomes were less likely to be evaluated and far less likely to show positive results. PMID:21824385

  14. Usability Evaluation of Pharmacogenomics Clinical Decision Support Aids and Clinical Knowledge Resources in a Computerized Provider Order Entry System: A Mixed Methods Approach

    PubMed Central

    Devine, Emily Beth; Lee, Chia-Ju; Overby, Casey L.; Abernethy, Neil; McCune, Jeannine; Smith, Joe W.; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Pharmacogenomics (PGx) is positioned to have a widespread impact on the practice of medicine, yet physician acceptance is low. The presentation of context-specific PGx information, in the form of clinical decision support (CDS) alerts embedded in a computerized provider order entry (CPOE) system, can aid uptake. Usability evaluations can inform optimal design, which, in turn, can spur adoption. Objectives The study objectives were to: 1) evaluate an early prototype, commercial CPOE system with PGx-CDS alerts in a simulated environment, 2) identify potential improvements to the system user interface, and 3) understand the contexts under which PGx knowledge embedded in an electronic health record is useful to prescribers. Methods Using a mixed methods approach, we presented seven cardiologists and three oncologists with five hypothetical clinical case scenarios. Each scenario featured a drug for which a gene encoding drug metabolizing enzyme required consideration of dosage adjustment. We used Morae® to capture comments and on-screen movements as participants prescribed each drug. In addition to PGx-CDS alerts, ‘Infobutton®’ and ‘Evidence’ icons provided participants with clinical knowledge resources to aid decision-making. Results Nine themes emerged. Five suggested minor improvements to the CPOE user interface; two suggested presenting PGx information through PGx-CDS alerts using an ‘Infobutton’ or ‘Evidence’ icon. The remaining themes were strong recommendations to provide succinct, relevant guidelines and dosing recommendations of phenotypic information from credible and trustworthy sources; any more information was overwhelming. Participants’ median rating of PGx-CDS system usability was 2 on a Likert scale ranging from 1 (strongly agree) to 7 (strongly disagree). Conclusions Usability evaluation results suggest that participants considered PGx information important for improving prescribing decisions; and that they would incorporate PGx-CDS when information is presented in relevant and useful ways. PMID:24874987

  15. Computerized Clinical Simulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinecker, Lynn

    1985-01-01

    Describes technique involved in designing a clinical simulation problem for the allied health field of respiratory therapy; discusses the structure, content, and scoring categories of the simulation; and provides a sample program which illustrates a programming technique in BASIC, including a program listing and a sample flowchart. (MBR)

  16. Computerized clinical decision support systems for primary preventive care: A decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review of effects on process of care and patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Computerized clinical decision support systems (CCDSSs) are claimed to improve processes and outcomes of primary preventive care (PPC), but their effects, safety, and acceptance must be confirmed. We updated our previous systematic reviews of CCDSSs and integrated a knowledge translation approach in the process. The objective was to review randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of CCDSSs for PPC on process of care, patient outcomes, harms, and costs. Methods We conducted a decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Ovid's EBM Reviews Database, Inspec, and other databases, as well as reference lists through January 2010. We contacted authors to confirm data or provide additional information. We included RCTs that assessed the effect of a CCDSS for PPC on process of care and patient outcomes compared to care provided without a CCDSS. A study was considered to have a positive effect (i.e., CCDSS showed improvement) if at least 50% of the relevant study outcomes were statistically significantly positive. Results We added 17 new RCTs to our 2005 review for a total of 41 studies. RCT quality improved over time. CCDSSs improved process of care in 25 of 40 (63%) RCTs. Cumulative scientifically strong evidence supports the effectiveness of CCDSSs for screening and management of dyslipidaemia in primary care. There is mixed evidence for effectiveness in screening for cancer and mental health conditions, multiple preventive care activities, vaccination, and other preventive care interventions. Fourteen (34%) trials assessed patient outcomes, and four (29%) reported improvements with the CCDSS. Most trials were not powered to evaluate patient-important outcomes. CCDSS costs and adverse events were reported in only six (15%) and two (5%) trials, respectively. Information on study duration was often missing, limiting our ability to assess sustainability of CCDSS effects. Conclusions Evidence supports the effectiveness of CCDSSs for screening and treatment of dyslipidaemia in primary care with less consistent evidence for CCDSSs used in screening for cancer and mental health-related conditions, vaccinations, and other preventive care. CCDSS effects on patient outcomes, safety, costs of care, and provider satisfaction remain poorly supported. PMID:21824381

  17. Barriers to implementation of a computerized decision support system for depression: an observational report on lessons learned in "real world" clinical settings

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite wide promotion, clinical practice guidelines have had limited effect in changing physician behavior. Effective implementation strategies to date have included: multifaceted interventions involving audit and feedback, local consensus processes, marketing; reminder systems, either manual or computerized; and interactive educational meetings. In addition, there is now growing evidence that contextual factors affecting implementation must be addressed such as organizational support (leadership procedures and resources) for the change and strategies to implement and maintain new systems. Methods To examine the feasibility and effectiveness of implementation of a computerized decision support system for depression (CDSS-D) in routine public mental health care in Texas, fifteen study clinicians (thirteen physicians and two advanced nurse practitioners) participated across five sites, accruing over 300 outpatient visits on 168 patients. Results Issues regarding computer literacy and hardware/software requirements were identified as initial barriers. Clinicians also reported concerns about negative impact on workflow and the potential need for duplication during the transition from paper to electronic systems of medical record keeping. Conclusion The following narrative report based on observations obtained during the initial testing and use of a CDSS-D in clinical settings further emphasizes the importance of taking into account organizational factors when planning implementation of evidence-based guidelines or decision support within a system. PMID:19159458

  18. Computerized clinical decision support for the early recognition and management of acute kidney injury: a qualitative evaluation of end-user experience

    PubMed Central

    Kanagasundaram, Nigel S.; Bevan, Mark T.; Sims, Andrew J.; Heed, Andrew; Price, David A.; Sheerin, Neil S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the efficacy of computerized clinical decision support (CCDS) for acute kidney injury (AKI) remains unclear, the wider literature includes examples of limited acceptability and equivocal benefit. Our single-centre study aimed to identify factors promoting or inhibiting use of in-patient AKI CCDS. Methods Targeting medical users, CCDS triggered with a serum creatinine rise of ≥25 μmol/L/day and linked to guidance and test ordering. User experience was evaluated through retrospective interviews, conducted and analysed according to Normalization Process Theory. Initial pilot ward experience allowed tool refinement. Assessments continued following CCDS activation across all adult, non-critical care wards. Results Thematic saturation was achieved with 24 interviews. The alert was accepted as a potentially useful prompt to early clinical re-assessment by many trainees. Senior staff were more sceptical, tending to view it as a hindrance. ‘Pop-ups’ and mandated engagement before alert dismissal were universally unpopular due to workflow disruption. Users were driven to close out of the alert as soon as possible to review historical creatinines and to continue with the intended workflow. Conclusions Our study revealed themes similar to those previously described in non-AKI settings. Systems intruding on workflow, particularly involving complex interactions, may be unsustainable even if there has been a positive impact on care. The optimal balance between intrusion and clinical benefit of AKI CCDS requires further evaluation. PMID:26798462

  19. Evaluation of medium-term consequences of implementing commercial computerized physician order entry and clinical decision support prescribing systems in two ‘early adopter’ hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Cresswell, Kathrin M; Bates, David W; Williams, Robin; Morrison, Zoe; Slee, Ann; Coleman, Jamie; Robertson, Ann; Sheikh, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Objective To understand the medium-term consequences of implementing commercially procured computerized physician order entry (CPOE) and clinical decision support (CDS) systems in ‘early adopter’ hospitals. Materials and methods In-depth, qualitative case study in two hospitals using a CPOE or a CDS system for at least 2 years. Both hospitals had implemented commercially available systems. Hospital A had implemented a CPOE system (with basic decision support), whereas hospital B invested additional resources in a CDS system that facilitated order entry but which was integrated with electronic health records and offered more advanced CDS. We used a combination of documentary analysis of the implementation plans, audiorecorded semistructured interviews with system users, and observations of strategic meetings and systems usage. Results We collected 11 documents, conducted 43 interviews, and conducted a total of 21.5 h of observations. We identified three major themes: (1) impacts on individual users, including greater legibility of prescriptions, but also some accounts of increased workloads; (2) the introduction of perceived new safety risks related to accessibility and usability of hardware and software, with users expressing concerns that some problems such as duplicate prescribing were more likely to occur; and (3) realizing organizational benefits through secondary uses of data. Conclusions We identified little difference in the medium-term consequences of a CPOE and a CDS system. It is important that future studies investigate the medium- and longer-term consequences of CPOE and CDS systems in a wider range of hospitals. PMID:24431334

  20. Clinical chemistry equipment: a computerized system for cost evaluation.

    PubMed

    Morrison, J I; Tydeman, J; Cassidy, P A; Hardwick, D F

    1983-01-01

    A computerized decision-support system has been developed and implemented to assist in the economic evaluation of alternative clinical chemistry equipment configurations. The capabilities, structure, and relative merits of the system are discussed. This decision-support system is now being used extensively by hospitals in British Columbia. An alternative equipment configuration, identified with the aid of the system, resulted in one hospital alone saving an annual $200,000 in consumables and reagents costs. Further development of computerized economic evaluation systems is encouraged. PMID:10310356

  1. Designing computerized decision support that works for clinicians and families.

    PubMed

    Fiks, Alexander G

    2011-03-01

    Evidence-based decision-making is central to the practice of pediatrics. Clinical trials and other biomedical research provide a foundation for this process, and practice guidelines, drawing from their results, inform the optimal management of an increasing number of childhood health problems. However, many clinicians fail to adhere to guidelines. Clinical decision support delivered using health information technology, often in the form of electronic health records, provides a tool to deliver evidence-based information to the point of care and has the potential to overcome barriers to evidence-based practice. An increasing literature now informs how these systems should be designed and implemented to most effectively improve outcomes in pediatrics. Through the examples of computerized physician order entry, as well as the impact of alerts at the point of care on immunization rates, the delivery of evidence-based asthma care, and the follow-up of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, the following review addresses strategies for success in using these tools. The following review argues that, as decision support evolves, the clinician should no longer be the sole target of information and alerts. Through the Internet and other technologies, families are increasingly seeking health information and gathering input to guide health decisions. By enlisting clinical decision support systems to deliver evidence-based information to both clinicians and families, help families express their preferences and goals, and connect families to the medical home, clinical decision support may ultimately be most effective in improving outcomes. PMID:21315295

  2. Designing Computerized Decision Support That Works for Clinicians and Families

    PubMed Central

    Fiks, Alexander G.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence-based decision-making is central to the practice of pediatrics. Clinical trials and other biomedical research provide a foundation for this process, and practice guidelines, drawing from their results, inform the optimal management of an increasing number of childhood health problems. However, many clinicians fail to adhere to guidelines. Clinical decision support delivered using health information technology, often in the form of electronic health records, provides a tool to deliver evidence-based information to the point of care and has the potential to overcome barriers to evidence-based practice. An increasing literature now informs how these systems should be designed and implemented to most effectively improve outcomes in pediatrics. Through the examples of computerized physician order entry, as well as the impact of alerts at the point of care on immunization rates, the delivery of evidence-based asthma care, and the follow-up of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, the following review addresses strategies for success in using these tools. The following review argues that, as decision support evolves, the clinician should no longer be the sole target of information and alerts. Through the Internet and other technologies, families are increasingly seeking health information and gathering input to guide health decisions. By enlisting clinical decision support systems to deliver evidence-based information to both clinicians and families, help families express their preferences and goals, and connect families to the medical home, clinical decision support may ultimately be most effective in improving outcomes. PMID:21315295

  3. Clinical applications of computerized thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anbar, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Computerized or digital, thermography is a rapidly growing diagnostic imaging modality. It has superseded contact thermography and analog imaging thermography which do not allow effective quantization. Medical applications of digital thermography can be classified in two groups: static and dynamic imaging. They can also be classified into macro thermography (resolution greater than 1 mm) and micro thermography (resolution less than 100 microns). Both modalities allow a thermal resolution of 0.1 C. The diagnostic power of images produced by any of these modalities can be augmented by the use of digital image enhancement and image recognition procedures. Computerized thermography has been applied in neurology, cardiovascular and plastic surgery, rehabilitation and sports medicine, psychiatry, dermatology and ophthalmology. Examples of these applications are shown and their scope and limitations are discussed.

  4. Computerized decision support in adult and pediatric critical care

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Cydni N; Bratton, Susan L; Hirshberg, Eliotte L

    2013-01-01

    Computerized decision support (CDS) is the most advanced form of clinical decision support available and has evolved with innovative technologies to provide meaningful assistance to medical professionals. Critical care clinicians are in unique environments where vast amounts of data are collected on individual patients, and where expedient and accurate decisions are paramount to the delivery of quality healthcare. Many CDS tools are in use today among adult and pediatric intensive care units as diagnostic aides, safety alerts, computerized protocols, and automated recommendations for management. Some CDS use have significantly decreased adverse events and improved costs when carefully implemented and properly operated. CDS tools integrated into electronic health records are also valuable to researchers providing rapid identification of eligible patients, streamlining data-gathering and analysis, and providing cohorts for study of rare and chronic diseases through data-warehousing. Although the need for human judgment in the daily care of critically ill patients has limited the study and realization of meaningful improvements in overall patient outcomes, CDS tools continue to evolve and integrate into the daily workflow of clinicians, and will likely provide advancements over time. Through novel technologies, CDS tools have vast potential for progression and will significantly impact the field of critical care and clinical research in the future. PMID:24701413

  5. Evaluating Clinical Decision Support Systems: Monitoring CPOE Order Check Override Rates in the Department of Veterans Affairs' Computerized Patient Record System

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Ping; Payne, Thomas H.; Nichol, W. Paul; Hoey, Patricia J.; Anderson, Curtis L.; Gennari, John H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To measure critical order check override rates in VA Puget Sound Health Care System's computerized practitioner order entry (CPOE) system and to compare 2006 results to a similar 2001 study. Design Analysis of ordering and order check data gathered by a post-hoc logging program. Use of Pearson's chi-square contingency table test comparing results from this study and the earlier study. Measurements Factors measured were total number of orders, frequency of order check types, frequency of order check overrides by order check type and comparisons of these results with previous results. Results A total of 37,040 orders generated 908 (2.5%) critical order checks. Drug-drug critical alert override rate was 74/85 (87%) in 2006 compared to 95/108 (88%) in 2001 (X 2=0.04, df=1, p=0.85). The drug-allergy override rate was 341/420 (81%) compared to 72/105 (69%) in 2001 (X 2=7.97, df=1, p=0.005). In 2001, 0.25% (105/42,621) orders generated a drug-allergy order check compared to 1.13% (420/37,040) in 2006 (X 2=238.45, df=1, p<0.0001). Conclusion Override rates of critical drug-drug and drug-allergy order checks remain high at VA Puget Sound Health Care System including significant increases in drug-allergy order checks. We recommend that monitoring override rates be regular practice in clinical computing systems and conclude that qualitative research should be carried out to better understand how physicians interact with decision support at the point of ordering. PMID:18579840

  6. Usability and impact of a computerized clinical decision support intervention designed to reduce urinary catheter utilization and catheter-associated urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, Charles A.; Epps, Mika; Hanish, Asaf; Fishman, Neil O.; French, Benjamin; Umscheid, Craig A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the usability and effectiveness of a computerized clinical decision support (CDS) intervention aimed at reducing the duration of urinary tract catheterizations. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Academic healthcare system. Patients All adult patients admitted from March 2009 through May 2012. Intervention A CDS intervention was integrated into a commercial electronic health record. Providers were prompted at order entry to specify the indication for urinary catheter insertion. Based on the indication chosen, providers were alerted to reassess the need for the urinary catheter if it was not removed within the recommended time. Three time periods were examined: baseline, after implementation of the first intervention (stock reminder), and after a second iteration (homegrown reminder). The primary endpoint was the usability of the intervention as measured by the proportion of reminders through which providers submitted a remove urinary catheter order. Secondary endpoints were the urinary catheter utilization ratio and the rate of hospital-acquired CAUTIs. Results The first intervention displayed limited usability with 2% of reminders resulting in a remove order. Usability improved to 15% with the revised reminder. The catheter utilization ratio declined over the three time periods (0.22, 0.20 and 0.19, respectively, p-value <0.001), as did CAUTI per 1,000 patient days (0.84, 0.70, 0.51, respectively, p-value <0.001). Conclusions A urinary catheter removal reminder system was successfully integrated within a healthcare system’s EHR. The usability of the reminder was highly dependent on its user interface, with a homegrown version of the reminder resulting in higher impact than a stock reminder. PMID:25111923

  7. Computerized Mastery Testing Using Fuzzy Set Decision Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Du, Yi; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A new computerized mastery test is described that builds on the Lewis and Sheehan procedure (sequential testlets) (1990), but uses fuzzy set decision theory to determine stopping rules and the Rasch model to calibrate items and estimate abilities. Differences between fuzzy set and Bayesian methods are illustrated through an example. (SLD)

  8. Clinical decision support foundations.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Malcolm; Liaw, Siaw Teng

    2010-01-01

    This chapter gives an educational overview of: * The elements of a clinical decision; * The elements of decision making: prior probability, evidence (likelihood), posterior probability, actions, utility (value); * A framework for decision making, and support, encompassing validity, utility, importance and certainty; and * The required elements of a clinical decision support system. * The role of knowledge management in the construction and maintenance of clinical decision support. PMID:20407168

  9. A Computerized Decision Support System for Depression in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Kurian, Benji T.; Trivedi, Madhukar H.; Grannemann, Bruce D.; Claassen, Cynthia A.; Daly, Ella J.; Sunderajan, Prabha

    2009-01-01

    Objective: In 2004, results from The Texas Medication Algorithm Project (TMAP) showed better clinical outcomes for patients whose physicians adhered to a paper-and-pencil algorithm compared to patients who received standard clinical treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD). However, implementation of and fidelity to the treatment algorithm among various providers was observed to be inadequate. A computerized decision support system (CDSS) for the implementation of the TMAP algorithm for depression has since been developed to improve fidelity and adherence to the algorithm. Method: This was a 2-group, parallel design, clinical trial (one patient group receiving MDD treatment from physicians using the CDSS and the other patient group receiving usual care) conducted at 2 separate primary care clinics in Texas from March 2005 through June 2006. Fifty-five patients with MDD (DSM-IV criteria) with no significant difference in disease characteristics were enrolled, 32 of whom were treated by physicians using CDSS and 23 were treated by physicians using usual care. The study's objective was to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of implementing a CDSS to assist physicians acutely treating patients with MDD compared to usual care in primary care. Primary efficacy outcomes for depression symptom severity were based on the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS17) evaluated by an independent rater. Results: Patients treated by physicians employing CDSS had significantly greater symptom reduction, based on the HDRS17, than patients treated with usual care (P < .001). Conclusions: The CDSS algorithm, utilizing measurement-based care, was superior to usual care for patients with MDD in primary care settings. Larger randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm these findings. Trial Registration: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00551083 PMID:19750065

  10. Mammography and computerized decision systems: a review.

    PubMed

    Roque, Antônio C; André, Túlio C S S

    2002-12-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems in mammography have been developed and investigated for several years and recently they have left the research stage to enter the clinical stage. The purpose of this article is to review the present situation of mammography for breast cancer detection and the role played by CAD systems. Results from the recent literature show that CAD systems have the potential to improve the sensitivities of radiologists in the detection of malignant clustered microcalcifications and masses, while keeping specificities at acceptable levels. This leads to the conclusion that CAD systems can be incorporated into clinical practice as a double reading option to radiologists. However, some issues have yet to be tackled for CAD systems to gain better acceptance and more widespread use worldwide. PMID:12594083

  11. Computerized Clinical Simulation Testing: Its Use for Competence Assessment in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bersky, Anna K.; Yocom, Carolyn J.

    1994-01-01

    Computerized Clinical Simulation Testing is an uncued, dynamic, interactive test that permits examinees to simulate the clinical decision-making skills used in the nursing management of client needs. It has the potential for helping boards of nursing to make more valid assessments about who is competent to practice nursing. (JOW)

  12. Physicians’ use of computerized clinical decision supports to improve medication management in the elderly – the Seniors Medication Alert and Review Technology intervention

    PubMed Central

    Alagiakrishnan, Kannayiram; Wilson, Patricia; Sadowski, Cheryl A; Rolfson, Darryl; Ballermann, Mark; Ausford, Allen; Vermeer, Karla; Mohindra, Kunal; Romney, Jacques; Hayward, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    Background Elderly people (aged 65 years or more) are at increased risk of polypharmacy (five or more medications), inappropriate medication use, and associated increased health care costs. The use of clinical decision support (CDS) within an electronic medical record (EMR) could improve medication safety. Methods Participatory action research methods were applied to preproduction design and development and postproduction optimization of an EMR-embedded CDS implementation of the Beers’ Criteria for medication management and the Cockcroft–Gault formula for estimating glomerular filtration rates (GFR). The “Seniors Medication Alert and Review Technologies” (SMART) intervention was used in primary care and geriatrics specialty clinics. Passive (chart messages) and active (order-entry alerts) prompts exposed potentially inappropriate medications, decreased GFR, and the possible need for medication adjustments. Physician reactions were assessed using surveys, EMR simulations, focus groups, and semi-structured interviews. EMR audit data were used to identify eligible patient encounters, the frequency of CDS events, how alerts were managed, and when evidence links were followed. Results Analysis of subjective data revealed that most clinicians agreed that CDS appeared at appropriate times during patient care. Although managing alerts incurred a modest time burden, most also agreed that workflow was not disrupted. Prevalent concerns related to clinician accountability and potential liability. Approximately 36% of eligible encounters triggered at least one SMART alert, with GFR alert, and most frequent medication warnings were with hypnotics and anticholinergics. Approximately 25% of alerts were overridden and ~15% elicited an evidence check. Conclusion While most SMART alerts validated clinician choices, they were received as valuable reminders for evidence-informed care and education. Data from this study may aid other attempts to implement Beers’ Criteria in ambulatory care EMRs. PMID:26869776

  13. Clinical decision support for atypical orders: detection and warning of atypical medication orders submitted to a computerized provider order entry system

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Allie D; Mulherin, David P; Flynn, Allen J; Stevenson, James G; Zimmerman, Christopher R; Chaffee, Bruce W

    2014-01-01

    The specificity of medication-related alerts must be improved to overcome the pernicious effects of alert fatigue. A systematic comparison of new drug orders to historical orders could improve alert specificity and relevance. Using historical order data from a computerized provider order entry system, we alerted physicians to atypical orders during the prescribing of five medications: calcium, clopidogrel, heparin, magnesium, and potassium. The percentage of atypical orders placed for these five medications decreased during the 92?days the alerts were active when compared to the same period in the previous year (from 0.81% to 0.53%; p=0.015). Some atypical orders were appropriate. Fifty of the 68 atypical order alerts were over-ridden (74%). However, the over-ride rate is misleading because 28 of the atypical medication orders (41%) were changed. Atypical order alerts were relatively few, identified problems with frequencies as well as doses, and had a higher specificity than dose check alerts. PMID:24253195

  14. The effectiveness of computerized clinical guidelines in the process of care: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Clinical practice guidelines have been developed aiming to improve the quality of care. The implementation of the computerized clinical guidelines (CCG) has been supported by the development of computerized clinical decision support systems. This systematic review assesses the impact of CCG on the process of care compared with non-computerized clinical guidelines. Methods Specific features of CCG were studied through an extensive search of scientific literature, querying electronic databases: Pubmed/Medline, Embase and Cochrane Controlled Trials Register. A multivariable logistic regression was carried out to evaluate the association of CCG's features with positive effect on the process of care. Results Forty-five articles were selected. The logistic model showed that Automatic provision of recommendation in electronic version as part of clinician workflow (Odds Ratio [OR]= 17.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.6-193.7) and Publication Year (OR = 6.7; 95%CI: 1.3-34.3) were statistically significant predictors. Conclusions From the research that has been carried out, we can conclude that after implementation of CCG significant improvements in process of care are shown. Our findings also suggest clinicians, managers and other health care decision makers which features of CCG might improve the structure of computerized system. PMID:20047686

  15. The clinical decision analysis using decision tree

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jong-Myon

    2014-01-01

    The clinical decision analysis (CDA) has used to overcome complexity and uncertainty in medical problems. The CDA is a tool allowing decision-makers to apply evidence-based medicine to make objective clinical decisions when faced with complex situations. The usefulness and limitation including six steps in conducting CDA were reviewed. The application of CDA results should be done under shared decision with patients’ value. PMID:25358466

  16. Clinical Decision Making.

    PubMed

    2016-01-30

    Critically Appraised Topics (CATs) are a standardised, succinct summary of research evidence organised around a clinical question, using a form of evidence synthesis based on the principles of evidence-based medicine (EBM) and evidence-based veterinary medicine (EBVM). Access to CATs enables clinicians to incorporate evidence from the scientific literature into clinical practice and they have been used to teach EBVM at the University of Bristol's School of Veterinary Sciences since 2011. Similar to BestBETs for vets (VR, April 4, 2015, vol 176, p360), CATs will also be regularly published in the Clinical Decision Making section of Veterinary Record. PMID:26823311

  17. Evaluation of a Computerized Contraceptive Decision Aid for Adolescent Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chewning, Betty; Mosena, Pat; Wilson, Dale; Erdman, Harold; Potthoff, Sandra; Murphy, Anita; Kuhnen, Kathleen Kennedy

    1999-01-01

    Discusses a computer-based contraceptive decision aid used with adolescent female family planning clinic patients (N=949). Results show improved short-term knowledge of and confidence in oral contraceptive (OC) efficacy. Higher OC knowledge after one year and fewer pregnancies were seen in one group. Findings suggest the usefulness of informatics…

  18. Shared clinical decision making

    PubMed Central

    AlHaqwi, Ali I.; AlDrees, Turki M.; AlRumayyan, Ahmad; AlFarhan, Ali I.; Alotaibi, Sultan S.; AlKhashan, Hesham I.; Badri, Motasim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine preferences of patients regarding their involvement in the clinical decision making process and the related factors in Saudi Arabia. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in a major family practice center in King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, between March and May 2012. Multivariate multinomial regression models were fitted to identify factors associated with patients preferences. Results: The study included 236 participants. The most preferred decision-making style was shared decision-making (57%), followed by paternalistic (28%), and informed consumerism (14%). The preference for shared clinical decision making was significantly higher among male patients and those with higher level of education, whereas paternalism was significantly higher among older patients and those with chronic health conditions, and consumerism was significantly higher in younger age groups. In multivariate multinomial regression analysis, compared with the shared group, the consumerism group were more likely to be female [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) =2.87, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31-6.27, p=0.008] and non-dyslipidemic (AOR=2.90, 95% CI: 1.03-8.09, p=0.04), and the paternalism group were more likely to be older (AOR=1.03, 95% CI: 1.01-1.05, p=0.04), and female (AOR=2.47, 95% CI: 1.32-4.06, p=0.008). Conclusion: Preferences of patients for involvement in the clinical decision-making varied considerably. In our setting, underlying factors that influence these preferences identified in this study should be considered and tailored individually to achieve optimal treatment outcomes. PMID:26620990

  19. [Computerized system validation of clinical researches].

    PubMed

    Yan, Charles; Chen, Feng; Xia, Jia-lai; Zheng, Qing-shan; Liu, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Validation is a documented process that provides a high degree of assurance. The computer system does exactly and consistently what it is designed to do in a controlled manner throughout the life. The validation process begins with the system proposal/requirements definition, and continues application and maintenance until system retirement and retention of the e-records based on regulatory rules. The objective to do so is to clearly specify that each application of information technology fulfills its purpose. The computer system validation (CSV) is essential in clinical studies according to the GCP standard, meeting product's pre-determined attributes of the specifications, quality, safety and traceability. This paper describes how to perform the validation process and determine relevant stakeholders within an organization in the light of validation SOPs. Although a specific accountability in the implementation of the validation process might be outsourced, the ultimate responsibility of the CSV remains on the shoulder of the business process owner-sponsor. In order to show that the compliance of the system validation has been properly attained, it is essential to set up comprehensive validation procedures and maintain adequate documentations as well as training records. Quality of the system validation should be controlled using both QC and QA means. PMID:26911028

  20. A computerized data management system for the clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Spraberry, M N; Fretz, P; Gascho, T; Foft, J W

    1976-06-01

    This report describes the computerized clinical laboratory data management system developed at the University of Alabama Hospitals Clinical Laboratory. The system uses the computer's data management capabilities to assist the laboratory in handling patient and laboratory data associated with the total processing of laboratory requisitions from their receipt to the production of a patient's cumulative test results. It supports all sections of the laboratory including the blood bank. It primary objectives are to reduce the clereical workload, reduce errors, decrease turn-around-time, and produce a patient's cumulative summary test results. PMID:937376

  1. Computerized Aid Improves Safety Decision Process for Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Nancy; Eden, Karen B.; Bloom, Tina; Perrin, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    A computerized safety decision aid was developed and tested with Spanish or English-speaking abused women in shelters or domestic violence (DV) support groups (n = 90). The decision aid provides feedback about risk for lethal violence, options for safety, assistance with setting priorities for safety, and a safety plan personalized to the user.…

  2. Computerized Aid Improves Safety Decision Process for Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Nancy; Eden, Karen B.; Bloom, Tina; Perrin, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    A computerized safety decision aid was developed and tested with Spanish or English-speaking abused women in shelters or domestic violence (DV) support groups (n = 90). The decision aid provides feedback about risk for lethal violence, options for safety, assistance with setting priorities for safety, and a safety plan personalized to the user.…

  3. Clinical Decision Analysis Using Microcomputers

    PubMed Central

    Wong, John B.; Moskowitz, Alan J.; Pauker, Stephen G.

    1986-01-01

    Many difficult medical decisions involve uncertainty. Decision analysis—an explicit, normative and analytic approach to making decisions under uncertainty—provides a probabilistic framework for exploring difficult problems in nondeterministic domains. As the methodology has advanced, clinical decision analysis has been applied to increasingly complex medical problems and disseminated widely in the medical literature. Unfortunately, this approach imposes a heavy computational burden on analysts. Microcomputer-based decision-support software can ease this burden. PMID:3027993

  4. How clinical decisions are made

    PubMed Central

    Bate, Louise; Hutchinson, Andrew; Underhill, Jonathan; Maskrey, Neal

    2012-01-01

    There is much variation in the implementation of the best available evidence into clinical practice. These gaps between evidence and practice are often a result of multiple individual decisions. When making a decision, there is so much potentially relevant information available, it is impossible to know or process it all (so called ‘bounded rationality’). Usually, a limited amount of information is selected to reach a sufficiently satisfactory decision, a process known as satisficing. There are two key processes used in decision making: System 1 and System 2. System 1 involves fast, intuitive decisions; System 2 is a deliberate analytical approach, used to locate information which is not instantly recalled. Human beings unconsciously use System 1 processing whenever possible because it is quicker and requires less effort than System 2. In clinical practice, gaps between evidence and practice can occur when a clinician develops a pattern of knowledge, which is then relied on for decisions using System 1 processing, without the activation of a System 2 check against the best available evidence from high quality research. The processing of information and decision making may be influenced by a number of cognitive biases, of which the decision maker may be unaware. Interventions to encourage appropriate use of System 1 and System 2 processing have been shown to improve clinical decision making. Increased understanding of decision making processes and common sources of error should help clinical decision makers to minimize avoidable mistakes and increase the proportion of decisions that are better. PMID:22738381

  5. A strategy for development of computerized critical care decision support systems.

    PubMed

    East, T D; Morris, A H; Wallace, C J; Clemmer, T P; Orme, J F; Weaver, L K; Henderson, S; Sittig, D F

    It is not enough to merely manage medical information. It is difficult to justify the cost of hospital information systems (HIS) or intensive care unit (ICU) patient data management systems (PDMS) on this basis alone. The real benefit of an integrated HIS or PDMS is in decision support. Although there are a variety of HIS and ICU PDMS systems available there are few that provide ICU decision support. The HELP system at the LDS Hospital is an example of a HIS which provides decision support on many different levels. In the ICU there are decision support tools for antibiotic therapy, nutritional management, and management of mechanical ventilation. Computer protocols for the management of mechanical ventilation (respiratory evaluation, ventilation, oxygenation, weaning and extubation) in patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome ((ARDS) have already been developed and clinically validated at the LDS Hospital. These protocols utilize the bedside intensive care unit (ICU) computer terminal to prompt the clinical care team with therapeutic and diagnostic suggestions. The protocols (in paper flow diagram and computerized form) have been used for over 40,000 hours in more than 125 adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patients. The protocols controlled care for 94% of the time. The remainder of the time patient care was not protocol controlled was a result of the patient being in states not covered by current protocol logic (e.g. hemodynamic instability, or transport for X-Ray studies). 52 of these ARDS patients met extra corporal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) criteria. The survival of the ECMO criteria ARDS patients was 41%, four times that expected (9%) from historical data (p less than 0.0002).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1820416

  6. Adaptive Decision Aiding in Computer-Assisted Instruction: Adaptive Computerized Training System (ACTS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopf-Weichel, Rosemarie; And Others

    This report describes results of the first year of a three-year program to develop and evaluate a new Adaptive Computerized Training System (ACTS) for electronics maintenance training. (ACTS incorporates an adaptive computer program that learns the student's diagnostic and decision value structure, compares it to that of an expert, and adapts the…

  7. Computerized dental injection fear treatment: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Heaton, L J; Leroux, B G; Ruff, P A; Coldwell, S E

    2013-07-01

    One in four adults reports a clinically significant fear of dental injections, leading many to avoid dental care. While systematic desensitization is the most common therapeutic method for treating specific phobias such as fear of dental injections, lack of access to trained therapists, as well as dentists' lack of training and time in providing such a therapy, means that most fearful individuals are not able to receive the therapy needed to be able to receive necessary dental treatment. Computer Assisted Relaxation Learning (CARL) is a self-paced computerized treatment based on systematic desensitization for dental injection fear. This multicenter, block-randomized, dentist-blind, parallel-group study conducted in 8 sites in the United States compared CARL with an informational pamphlet in reducing fear of dental injections. Participants completing CARL reported significantly greater reduction in self-reported general and injection-specific dental anxiety measures compared with control individuals (p < .001). Twice as many CARL participants (35.3%) as controls (17.6%) opted to receive a dental injection after the intervention, although this was not statistically significant. CARL, therefore, led to significant changes in self-reported fear in study participants, but no significant differences in the proportion of participants having a dental injection. PMID:23690352

  8. Testing and validation of computerized decision support systems.

    PubMed Central

    Sailors, R. M.; East, T. D.; Wallace, C. J.; Carlson, D. A.; Franklin, M. A.; Heermann, L. K.; Kinder, A. T.; Bradshaw, R. L.; Randolph, A. G.; Morris, A. H.

    1996-01-01

    Systematic, through testing of decision support systems (DSSs) prior to release to general users is a critical aspect of high quality software design. Omission of this step may lead to the dangerous, and potentially fatal, condition of relying on a system with outputs of uncertain quality. Thorough testing requires a great deal of effort and is a difficult job because tools necessary to facilitate testing are not well developed. Testing is a job ill-suited to humans because it requires tireless attention to a large number of details. For these reasons, the majority of DSSs available are probably not well tested prior to release. We have successfully implemented a software design and testing plan which has helped us meet our goal of continuously improving the quality of our DSS software prior to release. While requiring large amounts of effort, we feel that the process of documenting and standardizing our testing methods are important steps toward meeting recognized national and international quality standards. Our testing methodology includes both functional and structural testing and requires input from all levels of development. Our system does not focus solely on meeting design requirements but also addresses the robustness of the system and the completeness of testing. PMID:8947663

  9. What can Natural Language Processing do for Clinical Decision Support?

    PubMed Central

    Demner-Fushman, Dina; Chapman, Wendy W.; McDonald, Clement J.

    2009-01-01

    Computerized Clinical Decision Support (CDS) aims to aid decision making of health care providers and the public by providing easily accessible health-related information at the point and time it is needed. Natural Language Processing (NLP) is instrumental in using free-text information to drive CDS, representing clinical knowledge and CDS interventions in standardized formats, and leveraging clinical narrative. The early innovative NLP research of clinical narrative was followed by a period of stable research conducted at the major clinical centers and a shift of mainstream interest to biomedical NLP. This review primarily focuses on the recently renewed interest in development of fundamental NLP methods and advances in the NLP systems for CDS. The current solutions to challenges posed by distinct sublanguages, intended user groups, and support goals are discussed. PMID:19683066

  10. Efficacy of computerized decision support for mechanical ventilation: results of a prospective multi-center randomized trial.

    PubMed Central

    East, T. D.; Heermann, L. K.; Bradshaw, R. L.; Lugo, A.; Sailors, R. M.; Ershler, L.; Wallace, C. J.; Morris, A. H.; McKinley, B.; Marquez, A.; Tonnesen, A.; Parmley, L.; Shoemaker, W.; Meade, P.; Thaut, P.; Hill, T.; Young, M.; Baughman, J.; Olterman, M.; Gooder, V.; Quinn, B.; Summer, W.; Valentine, V.; Carlson, J.; Steinberg, K.

    1999-01-01

    200 adult respiratory distress syndrome patients were included in a prospective multicenter randomized trial to determine the efficacy of computerized decision support. The study was done in 10 medical centers across the United States. There was no significant difference in survival between the two treatment groups (mean 2 = 0.49 p = 0.49) or in ICU length of stay between the two treatment groups when controlling for survival (F(1df) = 0.88, p = 0.37.) There was a significant reduction in morbidity as measured by multi-organ dysfunction score in the protocol group (F(1df) = 4.1, p = 0.04) as well as significantly lower incidence and severity of overdistension lung injury (F(1df) = 45.2, p < 0.001). We rejected the null hypothesis. Efficacy was best for the protocol group. Protocols were used for 32,055 hours (15 staff person years, 3.7 patient years or 1335 patient days). Protocols were active 96% of the time. 38,546 instructions were generated. 94% were followed. This study indicates that care using a computerized decision support system for ventilator management can be effectively transferred to many different clinical settings and significantly improve patient morbidity. PMID:10566359

  11. Computerized Tool to Manage Dental Anxiety: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Tellez, M; Potter, C M; Kinner, D G; Jensen, D; Waldron, E; Heimberg, R G; Myers Virtue, S; Zhao, H; Ismail, A I

    2015-09-01

    Anxiety regarding dental and physical health is a common and potentially distressing problem, for both patients and health care providers. Anxiety has been identified as a barrier to regular dental visits and as an important target for enhancement of oral health-related quality of life. The study aimed to develop and evaluate a computerized cognitive-behavioral therapy dental anxiety intervention that could be easily implemented in dental health care settings. A cognitive-behavioral protocol based on psychoeducation, exposure to feared dental procedures, and cognitive restructuring was developed. A randomized controlled trial was conducted (N = 151) to test its efficacy. Consenting adult dental patients who met inclusion criteria (e.g., high dental anxiety) were randomized to 1 of 2 groups: immediate treatment (n = 74) or a wait-list control (n = 77). Analyses of covariance based on intention-to-treat analyses were used to compare the 2 groups on dental anxiety, fear, avoidance, and overall severity of dental phobia. Baseline scores on these outcomes were entered into the analyses as covariates. Groups were equivalent at baseline but differed at 1-mo follow-up. Both groups showed improvement in outcomes, but analyses of covariance demonstrated significant differences in dental anxiety, fear, avoidance, and overall severity of dental phobia in favor of immediate treatment at the follow-up assessment. Of the patients who met diagnostic criteria for phobia at baseline, fewer patients in the immediate treatment group continued to meet criteria for dental phobia at follow-up as compared with the wait-list group. A new computer-based tool seems to be efficacious in reducing dental anxiety and fear/avoidance of dental procedures. Examination of its effectiveness when administered in dental offices under less controlled conditions is warranted (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02081365). PMID:26202996

  12. Computerized decision support for concurrent utilization review using the HELP system.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, B D; Gardner, R M; Hedrick, G; Gould, P

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Development and evaluation of computerized concurrent utilization review (UR) support taking advantage of a clinically rich computerized patient database. DESIGN: The Automated Support System for Utilization Review (ASSURE) applies the Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (AEP) Day of Care criteria to computerized patient data in the HELP hospital information system. This paper reports the development, verification, and validation of ASSURE. MEASUREMENTS: Implementation correctness was verified by measuring agreement with a nurse reviewer, using separate sample sets for all 20 criteria for a total of 560 current inpatients. Usefulness in detecting inappropriate days of care was validated by two nurse reviewers who were crossed with manual and computer-assisted review methods in a blocked design for 168 current inpatients. Agreement with reviewers, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were measured. RESULTS: Agreement was very good for satisfaction of criteria, and good for appropriateness of day of care. A patient day identified by ASSURE as potentially inappropriate would be twice as likely to be judged inappropriate by a reviewer as a randomly selected patient day. Review of the 10% of patient days identified as potentially inappropriate by ASSURE would identify approximately 21% of the inappropriate days of care. CONCLUSION: ASSURE is a clinically useful tool for screening adult acute care patients for inappropriate days of care, and promises to make a major contribution to reducing health care costs. The prognosis for successful routine clinical use is good. PMID:7719820

  13. Redesign of a computerized clinical reminder for colorectal cancer screening: a human-computer interaction evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Based on barriers to the use of computerized clinical decision support (CDS) learned in an earlier field study, we prototyped design enhancements to the Veterans Health Administration's (VHA's) colorectal cancer (CRC) screening clinical reminder to compare against the VHA's current CRC reminder. Methods In a controlled simulation experiment, 12 primary care providers (PCPs) used prototypes of the current and redesigned CRC screening reminder in a within-subject comparison. Quantitative measurements were based on a usability survey, workload assessment instrument, and workflow integration survey. We also collected qualitative data on both designs. Results Design enhancements to the VHA's existing CRC screening clinical reminder positively impacted aspects of usability and workflow integration but not workload. The qualitative analysis revealed broad support across participants for the design enhancements with specific suggestions for improving the reminder further. Conclusions This study demonstrates the value of a human-computer interaction evaluation in informing the redesign of information tools to foster uptake, integration into workflow, and use in clinical practice. PMID:22126324

  14. Clinical Decision Support for Early Recognition of Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Amland, Robert C; Hahn-Cover, Kristin E

    2016-03-01

    Sepsis is an inflammatory response triggered by infection, with a high in-hospital mortality rate. Early recognition and treatment can reverse the inflammatory response, with evidence of improved patient outcomes. One challenge clinicians face is identifying the inflammatory syndrome against the background of the patient's infectious illness and comorbidities. An approach to this problem is implementation of computerized early warning tools for sepsis. This multicenter retrospective study sought to determine clinimetric performance of a cloud-based computerized sepsis clinical decision support system (CDS), understand the epidemiology of sepsis, and identify opportunities for quality improvement. Data encompassed 6200 adult hospitalizations from 2012 through 2013. Of 13% patients screened-in, 51% were already suspected to have an infection when the system activated. This study focused on a patient cohort screened-in before infection was suspected; median time from arrival to CDS activation was 3.5 hours, and system activation to diagnostic collect was another 8.6 hours. PMID:25385815

  15. Computerized Neuropsychological Assessment in Aging: Testing Efficacy and Clinical Ecology of Different Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Della Rosa, Pasquale Anthony; Catricalà, Eleonora; Castiglioni, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    Digital technologies have opened new opportunities for psychological testing, allowing new computerized testing tools to be developed and/or paper and pencil testing tools to be translated to new computerized devices. The question that rises is whether these implementations may introduce some technology-specific effects to be considered in neuropsychological evaluations. Two core aspects have been investigated in this work: the efficacy of tests and the clinical ecology of their administration (the ability to measure real-world test performance), specifically (1) the testing efficacy of a computerized test when response to stimuli is measured using a touch-screen compared to a conventional mouse-control response device; (2) the testing efficacy of a computerized test with respect to different input modalities (visual versus verbal); and (3) the ecology of two computerized assessment modalities (touch-screen and mouse-control), including preference measurements of participants. Our results suggest that (1) touch-screen devices are suitable for administering experimental tasks requiring precise timings for detection, (2) intrinsic nature of neuropsychological tests should always be respected in terms of stimuli presentation when translated to new digitalized environment, and (3) touch-screen devices result in ecological instruments being proposed for the computerized administration of neuropsychological tests with a high level of preference from elderly people. PMID:25147578

  16. Computerized neuropsychological assessment in aging: testing efficacy and clinical ecology of different interfaces.

    PubMed

    Canini, Matteo; Battista, Petronilla; Della Rosa, Pasquale Anthony; Catricalà, Eleonora; Salvatore, Christian; Gilardi, Maria Carla; Castiglioni, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    Digital technologies have opened new opportunities for psychological testing, allowing new computerized testing tools to be developed and/or paper and pencil testing tools to be translated to new computerized devices. The question that rises is whether these implementations may introduce some technology-specific effects to be considered in neuropsychological evaluations. Two core aspects have been investigated in this work: the efficacy of tests and the clinical ecology of their administration (the ability to measure real-world test performance), specifically (1) the testing efficacy of a computerized test when response to stimuli is measured using a touch-screen compared to a conventional mouse-control response device; (2) the testing efficacy of a computerized test with respect to different input modalities (visual versus verbal); and (3) the ecology of two computerized assessment modalities (touch-screen and mouse-control), including preference measurements of participants. Our results suggest that (1) touch-screen devices are suitable for administering experimental tasks requiring precise timings for detection, (2) intrinsic nature of neuropsychological tests should always be respected in terms of stimuli presentation when translated to new digitalized environment, and (3) touch-screen devices result in ecological instruments being proposed for the computerized administration of neuropsychological tests with a high level of preference from elderly people. PMID:25147578

  17. Some Unintended Consequences of Clinical Decision Support Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ash, Joan S.; Sittig, Dean F.; Campbell, Emily M.; Guappone, Kenneth P.; Dykstra, Richard H.

    2007-01-01

    Clinical decision support systems (CDS) coupled with computerized physician/provider order entry (CPOE) can improve the quality of patient care and the efficiency of hospital operations. However, they can also produce unintended consequences. Using qualitative methods, a multidisciplinary team gathered and analyzed data about the unintended consequences of CPOE, identifying nine types, and found that CDS-generated unintended consequences appeared among all types. Further analysis of 47 CDS examples uncovered three themes related to CDS content: elimination or shifting of human roles; difficulty in keeping content current; and inappropriate content. Three additional themes related to CDS presentation were found: rigidity of the system; alert fatigue; and potential for errors. Management of CDS must include careful selection and maintenance of content and prudent decision making about human computer interaction opportunities. PMID:18693791

  18. Towards computerizing intensive care sedation guidelines: design of a rule-based architecture for automated execution of clinical guidelines

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Computerized ICUs rely on software services to convey the medical condition of their patients as well as assisting the staff in taking treatment decisions. Such services are useful for following clinical guidelines quickly and accurately. However, the development of services is often time-consuming and error-prone. Consequently, many care-related activities are still conducted based on manually constructed guidelines. These are often ambiguous, which leads to unnecessary variations in treatments and costs. The goal of this paper is to present a semi-automatic verification and translation framework capable of turning manually constructed diagrams into ready-to-use programs. This framework combines the strengths of the manual and service-oriented approaches while decreasing their disadvantages. The aim is to close the gap in communication between the IT and the medical domain. This leads to a less time-consuming and error-prone development phase and a shorter clinical evaluation phase. Methods A framework is proposed that semi-automatically translates a clinical guideline, expressed as an XML-based flow chart, into a Drools Rule Flow by employing semantic technologies such as ontologies and SWRL. An overview of the architecture is given and all the technology choices are thoroughly motivated. Finally, it is shown how this framework can be integrated into a service-oriented architecture (SOA). Results The applicability of the Drools Rule language to express clinical guidelines is evaluated by translating an example guideline, namely the sedation protocol used for the anaesthetization of patients, to a Drools Rule Flow and executing and deploying this Rule-based application as a part of a SOA. The results show that the performance of Drools is comparable to other technologies such as Web Services and increases with the number of decision nodes present in the Rule Flow. Most delays are introduced by loading the Rule Flows. Conclusions The framework is an effective solution for computerizing clinical guidelines as it allows for quick development, evaluation and human-readable visualization of the Rules and has a good performance. By monitoring the parameters of the patient to automatically detect exceptional situations and problems and by notifying the medical staff of tasks that need to be performed, the computerized sedation guideline improves the execution of the guideline. PMID:20082700

  19. Effectiveness of Computerized Decision Support Systems Linked to Electronic Health Records: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kwag, Koren H.; Lytras, Theodore; Bertizzolo, Lorenzo; Brandt, Linn; Pecoraro, Valentina; Rigon, Giulio; Vaona, Alberto; Ruggiero, Francesca; Mangia, Massimo; Iorio, Alfonso; Kunnamo, Ilkka; Bonovas, Stefanos

    2014-01-01

    We systematically reviewed randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effectiveness of computerized decision support systems (CDSSs) featuring rule- or algorithm-based software integrated with electronic health records (EHRs) and evidence-based knowledge. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Cochrane Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects. Information on system design, capabilities, acquisition, implementation context, and effects on mortality, morbidity, and economic outcomes were extracted. Twenty-eight RCTs were included. CDSS use did not affect mortality (16 trials, 37395 patients; 2282 deaths; risk ratio [RR] = 0.96; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.85, 1.08; I2 = 41%). A statistically significant effect was evident in the prevention of morbidity, any disease (9 RCTs; 13868 patients; RR = 0.82; 95% CI = 0.68, 0.99; I2 = 64%), but selective outcome reporting or publication bias cannot be excluded. We observed differences for costs and health service utilization, although these were often small in magnitude. Across clinical settings, new generation CDSSs integrated with EHRs do not affect mortality and might moderately improve morbidity outcomes. PMID:25322302

  20. Effectiveness of computerized decision support systems linked to electronic health records: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Moja, Lorenzo; Kwag, Koren H; Lytras, Theodore; Bertizzolo, Lorenzo; Brandt, Linn; Pecoraro, Valentina; Rigon, Giulio; Vaona, Alberto; Ruggiero, Francesca; Mangia, Massimo; Iorio, Alfonso; Kunnamo, Ilkka; Bonovas, Stefanos

    2014-12-01

    We systematically reviewed randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effectiveness of computerized decision support systems (CDSSs) featuring rule- or algorithm-based software integrated with electronic health records (EHRs) and evidence-based knowledge. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Cochrane Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects. Information on system design, capabilities, acquisition, implementation context, and effects on mortality, morbidity, and economic outcomes were extracted. Twenty-eight RCTs were included. CDSS use did not affect mortality (16 trials, 37395 patients; 2282 deaths; risk ratio [RR] = 0.96; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.85, 1.08; I(2) = 41%). A statistically significant effect was evident in the prevention of morbidity, any disease (9 RCTs; 13868 patients; RR = 0.82; 95% CI = 0.68, 0.99; I(2) = 64%), but selective outcome reporting or publication bias cannot be excluded. We observed differences for costs and health service utilization, although these were often small in magnitude. Across clinical settings, new generation CDSSs integrated with EHRs do not affect mortality and might moderately improve morbidity outcomes. PMID:25322302

  1. Computerized Tomography Scans in Severe Asthma: Utility and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Carolina; Gupta, Sumit; Hartley, Ruth; Brightling, Christopher E

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of Review Asthma is a global burden, affecting 5% of the general adult population, of whom approximately 5-10% suffer from severe asthma. Severe asthma is a complex heterogeneous disease entity, with high morbidity and mortality. Increasingly novel techniques in computerised tomography are being used to understand the pathophysiology of severe asthma. The utility and clinical implications of these CT techniques are the focus of this review. Recent Findings Novel qualitative and quantitative CT imaging techniques have enabled us to study the large airway architecture in detail, assess the small airway structure, and perform functional analysis of regional ventilation. Summary Despite advances in CT imaging techniques, there is an urgent need for both proof-of-concept studies, large cross-sectional and longitudinal clinical trials in severe asthma to validate and clinically correlate imaging derived measures. This will extend our current understanding of the pathophysiology of severe asthma, and unravel the structure-function relationship, with the potential to discover novel severe asthma phenotypes, predict mortality, morbidity, and response to existing and novel pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies. PMID:22112997

  2. Clinical Decision Making of Rural Novice Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seright, Teresa J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop substantive theory regarding decision making by the novice nurse in a rural hospital setting. Interviews were guided by the following research questions: What cues were used by novice rural registered nurses in order to make clinical decisions? What were the sources of feedback which influenced subsequent…

  3. Clinical Decision Making of Rural Novice Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seright, Teresa J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop substantive theory regarding decision making by the novice nurse in a rural hospital setting. Interviews were guided by the following research questions: What cues were used by novice rural registered nurses in order to make clinical decisions? What were the sources of feedback which influenced subsequent…

  4. Clinical Decision Support for Early Recognition of Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Amland, Robert C.; Hahn-Cover, Kristin E.

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is an inflammatory response triggered by infection, with a high in-hospital mortality rate. Early recognition and treatment can reverse the inflammatory response, with evidence of improved patient outcomes. One challenge clinicians face is identifying the inflammatory syndrome against the background of the patient’s infectious illness and comorbidities. An approach to this problem is implementation of computerized early warning tools for sepsis. This multicenter retrospective study sought to determine clinimetric performance of a cloud-based computerized sepsis clinical decision support system (CDS), understand the epidemiology of sepsis, and identify opportunities for quality improvement. Data encompassed 6200 adult hospitalizations from 2012 through 2013. Of 13% patients screened-in, 51% were already suspected to have an infection when the system activated. This study focused on a patient cohort screened-in before infection was suspected; median time from arrival to CDS activation was 3.5 hours, and system activation to diagnostic collect was another 8.6 hours. PMID:25385815

  5. A Prelude to Modeling the Expert: A Generalizability Study of Expert Ratings of Performance on Computerized Clinical Simulations.

    PubMed

    Kreiter, Clarence D.; Gordon, Joel A.; Elliott, Scott T.; Ferguson, Kristi J.

    1999-01-01

    Context: The University of Iowa College of Medicine has developed a series of computer-based clinical simulations and successfully integrated them into the clinical clerkship curriculum. The computerized patient simulations provide a high degree of realism in simulating a clinical encounter. In an effort to improve the validity of our clinical skills assessment, we have initiated testing research utilizing these simulations. Because of the high costs associated with employing expert raters for performance scoring, automated scoring was deemed essential.Purpose: This study is designed to address the preliminary research questions related to utilizing the simulations for performance assessment and developing a psychometrically sound automated scoring mechanism. Specifically, it addresses issues of reliability in relation to rater and simulation characteristics, and provides essential data required for designing a sound methodology to obtain ratings for modeling.Design: The judgements of 3 expert clinician/raters, grading the responses of 69 third-year medical students, to 2 computerized simulations, are analyzed in a generalizabilty study. A random effects (persons by raters) ANOVA was performed to estimate variance components for modeling. A case facet was added to the anlaysis to provide data regarding performance assessment characteristics. Estimation of the magnitude of each variance component represents the outcome of the generalizability study. Variance estimates are used in the decision study phase of the research.Results: Only moderate levels of inter-rater reliability were obtained. Four or more raters were indicated to obtain adequate reliability. A high level of task/simulation specificity was found. Three or more simulations were indicated for performance assessment. Suggestions for improving ratings were offered. PMID:12386483

  6. Classifying clinical decision making: a unifying approach.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, C D; Adams, A

    2000-10-01

    This is the first of two linked papers exploring decision making in nursing which integrate research evidence from different clinical and academic disciplines. Currently there are many decision-making theories, each with their own distinctive concepts and terminology, and there is a tendency for separate disciplines to view their own decision-making processes as unique. Identifying good nursing decisions and where improvements can be made is therefore problematic, and this can undermine clinical and organizational effectiveness, as well as nurses' professional status. Within the unifying framework of psychological classification, the overall aim of the two papers is to clarify and compare terms, concepts and processes identified in a diversity of decision-making theories, and to demonstrate their underlying similarities. It is argued that the range of explanations used across disciplines can usefully be re-conceptualized as classification behaviour. This paper explores problems arising from multiple theories of decision making being applied to separate clinical disciplines. Attention is given to detrimental effects on nursing practice within the context of multidisciplinary health-care organizations and the changing role of nurses. The different theories are outlined and difficulties in applying them to nursing decisions highlighted. An alternative approach based on a general model of classification is then presented in detail to introduce its terminology and the unifying framework for interpreting all types of decisions. The classification model is used to provide the context for relating alternative philosophical approaches and to define decision-making activities common to all clinical domains. This may benefit nurses by improving multidisciplinary collaboration and weakening clinical elitism. PMID:11095239

  7. Clinical decision making: how surgeons do it.

    PubMed

    Crebbin, Wendy; Beasley, Spencer W; Watters, David A K

    2013-06-01

    Clinical decision making is a core competency of surgical practice. It involves two distinct types of mental process best considered as the ends of a continuum, ranging from intuitive and subconscious to analytical and conscious. In practice, individual decisions are usually reached by a combination of each, according to the complexity of the situation and the experience/expertise of the surgeon. An expert moves effortlessly along this continuum, according to need, able to apply learned rules or algorithms to specific presentations, choosing these as a result of either pattern recognition or analytical thinking. The expert recognizes and responds quickly to any mismatch between what is observed and what was expected, coping with gaps in information and making decisions even where critical data may be uncertain or unknown. Even for experts, the cognitive processes involved are difficult to articulate as they tend to be very complex. However, if surgeons are to assist trainees in developing their decision-making skills, the processes need to be identified and defined, and the competency needs to be measurable. This paper examines the processes of clinical decision making in three contexts: making a decision about how to manage a patient; preparing for an operative procedure; and reviewing progress during an operative procedure. The models represented here are an exploration of the complexity of the processes, designed to assist surgeons understand how expert clinical decision making occurs and to highlight the challenge of teaching these skills to surgical trainees. PMID:23638720

  8. A Hierarchical Computer Network: An Alternative Approach to Clinical Laboratory Computerization in a Large Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Robert E.; Steinbach, Glen L.; Dayhoff, Ruth E.

    1980-01-01

    Computerized data handling is recognized as an essential aspect of the modern clinical laboratory in medium and large sized hospitals. However, most currently installed proprietary or “turnkey” systems are often hardware/software-constrained and based on outmoded design concepts which seriously limit the use of the laboratory computer system as an effective patient care, research, and management tool. These short-comings are particularly serious in the large university teaching hospital. Recent improvements in the price/performance ratio for computer hardware, the availability of specialized high-level applications-oriented languages, and advances in data communications have permitted development of powerful computer networks which are economically feasible in the large hospital setting. An operational three-tiered hierarchical network for clinical laboratory data processing is described. The integration of the clinical laboratory data processing function into overall institutional information processing, details of the computer system configuration, and the benefits realized are discussed.

  9. Entrustment Decision Making in Clinical Training.

    PubMed

    Ten Cate, Olle; Hart, Danielle; Ankel, Felix; Busari, Jamiu; Englander, Robert; Glasgow, Nicholas; Holmboe, Eric; Iobst, William; Lovell, Elise; Snell, Linda S; Touchie, Claire; Van Melle, Elaine; Wycliffe-Jones, Keith

    2016-02-01

    The decision to trust a medical trainee with the critical responsibility to care for a patient is fundamental to clinical training. When carefully and deliberately made, such decisions can serve as significant stimuli for learning and also shape the assessment of trainees. Holding back entrustment decisions too much may hamper the trainee's development toward unsupervised practice. When carelessly made, however, they jeopardize patient safety. Entrustment decision-making processes, therefore, deserve careful analysis.Members (including the authors) of the International Competency-Based Medical Education Collaborative conducted a content analysis of the entrustment decision-making process in health care training during a two-day summit in September 2013 and subsequently reviewed the pertinent literature to arrive at a description of the critical features of this process, which informs this article.The authors discuss theoretical backgrounds and terminology of trust and entrustment in the clinical workplace. The competency-based movement and the introduction of entrustable professional activities force educators to rethink the grounds for assessment in the workplace. Anticipating a decision to grant autonomy at a designated level of supervision appears to align better with health care practice than do most current assessment practices. The authors distinguish different modes of trust and entrustment decisions and elaborate five categories, each with related factors, that determine when decisions to trust trainees are made: the trainee, supervisor, situation, task, and the relationship between trainee and supervisor. The authors' aim in this article is to lay a theoretical foundation for a new approach to workplace training and assessment. PMID:26630606

  10. Implementation of practice guidelines in a clinical setting using a computerized knowledge base (Iliad).

    PubMed

    Bouhaddou, O; Frucci, L; Cofrin, K; Larsen, D; Warner, H; Huber, P; Sorenson, D; Turner, C; Warner, H

    1993-01-01

    We present the implementation of the indications for surgery for three surgical operations--cholecystectomy, cataract extraction, and knee arthroscopy--in a medical expert system, called Iliad. This implementation operates in the preauthorization service of IHC Health Plans (an insurance company in Salt Lake City) as a basis for reimbursement of services. Patient data collection forms, derived from Iliad knowledge base, were used by 13 participating surgeons to document the objective patient observations that justify the surgery and, then were faxed to IHC where a trained nurse input the data in Iliad. Iliad's decisions and reports on any deviations from guidelines are communicated back to the care provider. The study evaluates the impact of the computerized implementation on process, as measured by a questionnaire, and on outcome as measured by rate of approvals, documentation level, rate of requests, and average cost. The prospective implementation of the computerized guidelines has performed reliably, has been perceived as a preferred alternative to the old preauthorization system, and, most importantly, has enhanced significantly the level of documentation permitting evaluation and determination of appropriateness before surgery. PMID:8130473

  11. Modelling and Decision Support of Clinical Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Roland; Lux, Thomas

    The German health care market is under a rapid rate of change, forcing especially hospitals to provide high-quality services at low costs. Appropriate measures for more effective and efficient service provision are process orientation and decision support by information technology of clinical pathway of a patient. The essential requirements are adequate modelling of clinical pathways as well as usage of adequate systems, which are capable of assisting the complete path of a patient within a hospital, and preferably also outside of it, in a digital way. To fulfil these specifications the authors present a suitable concept, which meets the challenges of well-structured clinical pathways as well as rather poorly structured diagnostic and therapeutic decisions, by interplay of process-oriented and knowledge-based hospital information systems.

  12. A centralized, computerized, and relational data base for student clinical placements.

    PubMed

    Lears, M K; Olsen, S J; Morrison, C; Vessey, J A

    1998-01-01

    Quality clinical experiences are a critical component of advanced practice nursing (APN) curricula. Historically, nursing instructors coordinated both the didactic and clinical components of a course. Increasingly, course coordinators organize the didactic component, and external preceptors working in the clinical setting function as practicum teachers. Both scenarios involve labor-intensive processes, and neither facilitate the scheduling of clinical experiences that build on progressive learning across the student's curriculum. A centralized, computerized, relational data base for efficient management of APN preceptors and students across the curriculum was designed. One master's-prepared clinical coordinator maintains the data base and performs all related functions. This system offers numerous benefits to students, preceptors, ] faculty, and nursing school, including balanced and progressively complex clinical learning experiences for students from competent preceptors: consistent interface with students and preceptors; faculty relief from time-consuming tasks; rapid generation of a variety of tables, rosters, and reports; consistent tracking of preceptor evaluations; timely acknowledgment of preceptor assistance; and efficient communication among students, preceptors, faculty, and school administration. PMID:9549212

  13. Clinical Decision Support Systems for Ambulatory Care

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Stephen C.

    1984-01-01

    This conference serves to further the state of the art in the application of computers to medical care via a forum for the intercommunication of ideas. Papers discuss the experiences of diverse research projects. It is the purpose of this article to review the major developments in ambulatory care decision support. From this vantage point, the major impediments to broad applicability of information systems are discussed. The DUCHESS Medical Information Management System is then described as a step towards overcoming these obstacles. Two distinct but often overlapping issues are the representation of the data and its subsequent manipulation: records vs. knowledge. The complexity of the medical record requires state-of-the-art computer science. Clinical decision support requires flexible means for representing medical knowledge and the ability to input “rules.” Artificial intelligence has provided tools for simulating the decision making processes. A sample of the major systems are contrasted and compared. In the realm of medical records COSTAR, TMR, SCAMP, HELP, and STOR are considered. In clinical decision support CADEUCUS, REGENSTRIEF, PKC, and DUCHESS are reviewed.

  14. Clinical decision making, risk and occupational therapy.

    PubMed

    Reich, S.; Eastwood, C.; Tilling, K.; Hopper, A.

    1998-01-01

    Little is known about the processes involved in risk taking, and complex decision making of the type encountered on acute medical wards in general hospitals. The purpose of the present study was to examine certain of these processes in the context of decisions to discharge elderly inpatients from hospital. Vignettes of hypothetical frail and disabled elderly in-patients were presented to student and qualified occupational therapists (OTs). All the vignettes represented high risk discharges and each of the patients expressed the desire to return to their own home. The additional diagnosis of early dementia was manipulated within and between vignettes. Subjects were asked to decide on the appropriateness of discharging each patient to (a) home and (b) a residential or nursing home. In addition, subjects completed a short demographic questionnaire which also probed aspects of their knowledge about elderly people. Results indicated that qualified OTs were less likely to overrule patients' wishes by favouring discharge of patients to residential or nursing home, and more likely to favour discharge to patients' own homes than student OTs. There was no overall main effect of dementia on subjects' decisions. In addition to clinical experience, certain areas of knowledge about elderly people were significantly associated with different approaches to risk taking in response to the vignettes. Undergraduate syllabi may need to be modified to incorporate more information about elderly people, the prevalence of different diseases, and direct experience of clinical decision making in the context of uncertain and risky situations. PMID:11560576

  15. [From biomarkers to clinical decision support].

    PubMed

    Antal, Péter; Reiter, József; Mátyus, Péter

    2015-12-20

    The rapidly accumulating, heterogeneous, numerous biomedical data and the increasing knowledge represent both the key areas and the major bottleneck in the complete realization of personalized medicine. Traditional clinical aims as well as decision-making processes in drug research need systems-based integration of data and their analyses, which require a wide range of new mathematical approaches and application of information technologies. In the world of biomarkers, all such tasks correspond to three types of biomarkers, namely, endpoint, target and diagnostic biomarkers, which together form a complex network. To decipher the networks, probabilistic graphical models are introduced. Briefly, the authors illustrate their use for exploration and visualization of direct dependencies among biomarkers. Finally, construction of decision networks and their application to structural and quantitative optimization of biomarkers are discussed to provide a novel type of supporting tools for clinical practice. PMID:26654544

  16. Nurses' Clinical Decision Making on Adopting a Wound Clinical Decision Support System.

    PubMed

    Khong, Peck Chui Betty; Hoi, Shu Yin; Holroyd, Eleanor; Wang, Wenru

    2015-07-01

    Healthcare information technology systems are considered the ideal tool to inculcate evidence-based nursing practices. The wound clinical decision support system was built locally to support nurses to manage pressure ulcer wounds in their daily practice. However, its adoption rate is not optimal. The study's objective was to discover the concepts that informed the RNs' decisions to adopt the wound clinical decision support system as an evidence-based technology in their nursing practice. This was an exploratory, descriptive, and qualitative design using face-to-face interviews, individual interviews, and active participatory observation. A purposive, theoretical sample of 14 RNs was recruited from one of the largest public tertiary hospitals in Singapore after obtaining ethics approval. After consenting, the nurses were interviewed and observed separately. Recruitment stopped when data saturation was reached. All transcribed interview data underwent a concurrent thematic analysis, whereas observational data were content analyzed independently and subsequently triangulated with the interview data. Eight emerging themes were identified, namely, use of the wound clinical decision support system, beliefs in the wound clinical decision support system, influences of the workplace culture, extent of the benefits, professional control over nursing practices, use of knowledge, gut feelings, and emotions (fear, doubt, and frustration). These themes represented the nurses' mental outlook as they made decisions on adopting the wound clinical decision support system in light of the complexities of their roles and workloads. This research has provided insight on the nurses' thoughts regarding their decision to interact with the computer environment in a Singapore context. It captured the nurses' complex thoughts when deciding whether to adopt or reject information technology as they practice in a clinical setting. PMID:26066306

  17. Driving and dementia: a clinical decision pathway

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Kirsty; Monaghan, Sophie; O'Brien, John; Teodorczuk, Andrew; Mosimann, Urs; Taylor, John-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to develop a pathway to bring together current UK legislation, good clinical practice and appropriate management strategies that could be applied across a range of healthcare settings. Methods The pathway was constructed by a multidisciplinary clinical team based in a busy Memory Assessment Service. A process of successive iteration was used to develop the pathway, with input and refinement provided via survey and small group meetings with individuals from a wide range of regional clinical networks and diverse clinical backgrounds as well as discussion with mobility centres and Forum of Mobility Centres, UK. Results We present a succinct clinical pathway for patients with dementia, which provides a decision-making framework for how health professionals across a range of disciplines deal with patients with dementia who drive. Conclusions By integrating the latest guidance from diverse roles within older people's health services and key experts in the field, the resulting pathway reflects up-to-date policy and encompasses differing perspectives and good practice. It is potentially a generalisable pathway that can be easily adaptable for use internationally, by replacing UK legislation for local regulations. A limitation of this pathway is that it does not address the concern of mild cognitive impairment and how this condition relates to driving safety. © 2014 The Authors. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24865643

  18. Implementing computerized adaptive tests in routine clinical practice: experience implementing CATs.

    PubMed

    Hart, Dennis L; Deutscher, Daniel; Werneke, Mark W; Holder, Judy; Wang, Ying-Chih

    2010-01-01

    This paper traces the development, testing and use of CATs in outpatient rehabilitation from the perspective of one proprietary international medical rehabilitation database management company, Focus On Therapeutic Outcomes, Inc. (FOTO). Between the FOTO data in the United States and Maccabi Healthcare Services data in Israel, over 1.5 million CATs have been administered. Using findings from published studies and results of internal public relations surveys, we discuss (1) reasons for CAT development, (2) how the CATs were received by clinicians and patients in the United States and Israel, (3) results of psychometric property assessments of CAT estimated measures of functional status in routine clinical practice, (4) clinical interpretation of CAT functional status measures, and (5) future development directions. Results of scientific studies and business history provide confidence that CATs are pertinent and valuable to clinicians, patients and payers, and suggest CATs will be prominent in the development of future integrated computerized electronic medical record systems with electronic outcomes data collection. PMID:20847476

  19. FDDI information management system for centralizing interactive, computerized multimedia clinical experiences in pediatric rheumatology/Immunology.

    PubMed

    Rouhani, R; Cronenberger, H; Stein, L; Hannum, W; Reed, A M; Wilhelm, C; Hsiao, H

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the design, authoring, and development of interactive, computerized, multimedia clinical simulations in pediatric rheumatology/immunology and related musculoskeletal diseases, the development and implementation of a high speed information management system for their centralized storage and distribution, and analytical methods for evaluating the total system's educational impact on medical students and pediatric residents. An FDDI fiber optic network with client/server/host architecture is the core. The server houses digitized audio, still-image video clips and text files. A host station houses the DB2/2 database containing case-associated labels and information. Cases can be accessed from any workstation via a customized interface in AVA/2 written specifically for this application. OS/2 Presentation Manager controls, written in C, are incorporated into the interface. This interface allows SQL searches and retrievals of cases and case materials. In addition to providing user-directed clinical experiences, this centralized information management system provides designated faculty with the ability to add audio notes and visual pointers to image files. Users may browse through case materials, mark selected ones and download them for utilization in lectures or for editing and converting into 35mm slides. PMID:8591407

  20. The Computerized Medical Record as a Tool for Clinical Governance in Australian Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Christine; Hall, Sally; Travaglia, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    Background Computerized medical records (CMR) are used in most Australian general practices. Although CMRs have the capacity to amalgamate and provide data to the clinician about their standard of care, there is little research on the way in which they may be used to support clinical governance: the process of ensuring quality and accountability that incorporates the obligation that patients are treated according to best evidence. Objective The objective of this study was to explore the capability, capacity, and acceptability of CMRs to support clinical governance. Methods We conducted a realist review of the role of seven CMR systems in implementing clinical governance, developing a four-level maturity model for the CMR. We took Australian primary care as the context, CMR to be the mechanism, and looked at outcomes for individual patients, localities, and for the population in terms of known evidence-based surrogates or true outcome measures. Results The lack of standardization of CMRs makes national and international benchmarking challenging. The use of the CMR was largely at level two of our maturity model, indicating a relatively simple system in which most of the process takes place outside of the CMR, and which has little capacity to support benchmarking, practice comparisons, and population-level activities. Although national standards for coding and projects for record access are proposed, they are not operationalized. Conclusions The current CMR systems can support clinical governance activities; however, unless the standardization and data quality issues are addressed, it will not be possible for current systems to work at higher levels. PMID:23939340

  1. Clinical Decision Support: Effectiveness in Improving Quality Processes and Clinical Outcomes and Factors That May Influence Success

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Elizabeth V.

    2014-01-01

    The use of electronic health records has skyrocketed following the 2009 HITECH Act, which provides financial incentives to health care providers for the “meaningful use” of electronic medical record systems. An important component of the “Meaningful Use” legislation is the integration of Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) into the computerized record, providing up-to-date medical knowledge and evidence-based guidance to the physician at the point of care. As reimbursement is increasingly tied to process and clinical outcomes, CDSS will be integral to future medical practice. Studies of CDSS indicate improvement in preventive services, appropriate care, and clinical and cost outcomes with strong evidence for CDSS effectiveness in process measures. Increasing provider adherence to CDSS recommendations is essential in improving CDSS effectiveness, and factors that influence adherence are currently under study. PMID:24910564

  2. Engineering of a clinical decision support framework for the point of care use.

    PubMed

    Wilk, Szymon; Michalowski, Wojtek; O'Sullivan, Dympna; Farion, Ken; Matwin, Stan

    2008-01-01

    Computerized decision support for use at the point of care has to be comprehensive. It means that clinical information stored in electronic health records needs to be integrated with various forms of clinical knowledge (elicited from experts, discovered from data or summarized in systematic reviews of clinical trials). In order to provide such comprehensive support we created the MET-A3Support framework for constructing clinical applications aimed at various medical conditions. We employed the multiagent system paradigm and the O-MaSE methodology to define an engineering process involving three main activities: requirements engineering, analysis and design. Then we applied the process to build MET-A3Support. The paper describes the engineering process and its results, including models representing selected elements of our framework. PMID:18999068

  3. User Centered Clinical Decision Support Tools

    PubMed Central

    Sofianou, A.; Kannry, J.; Mann, D.M.; McGinn, T.G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Dissemination and adoption of clinical decision support (CDS) tools is a major initiative of the Affordable Care Act’s Meaningful Use program. Adoption of CDS tools is multipronged with personal, organizational, and clinical settings factoring into the successful utilization rates. Specifically, the diffusion of innovation theory implies that ‘early adopters’ are more inclined to use CDS tools and younger physicians tend to be ranked in this category. Objective This study examined the differences in adoption of CDS tools across providers’ training level. Participants From November 2010 to 2011, 168 residents and attendings from an academic medical institution were enrolled into a randomized controlled trial. Intervention The intervention arm had access to the CDS tool through the electronic health record (EHR) system during strep and pneumonia patient visits. Main Measures The EHR system recorded details on how intervention arm interacted with the CDS tool including acceptance of the initial CDS alert, completion of risk-score calculators and the signing of medication order sets. Using the EHR data, the study performed bivariate tests and general estimating equation (GEE) modeling to examine the differences in adoption of the CDS tool across residents and attendings. Key Results The completion rates of the CDS calculator and medication order sets were higher amongst first year residents compared to all other training levels. Attendings were the less likely to accept the initial step of the CDS tool (29.3%) or complete the medication order sets (22.4%) that guided their prescription decisions, resulting in attendings ordering more antibiotics (37.1%) during an CDS encounter compared to residents. Conclusion There is variation in adoption of CDS tools across training levels. Attendings tended to accept the tool less but ordered more medications. CDS tools should be tailored to clinicians’ training levels. PMID:25589914

  4. Computerizing the Budget Office: An On-Line Decision Support System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Glenn R.; Peterson, William R.

    The implementation process and resource requirements of the University of Connecticut Budget Office's online decision support system are described. Successes and failures of shifting to a fully interactive budget review and development process are also reviewed. Special attention is given to the personnel problems and analytical challenges…

  5. Decision support tools for clinical trial design.

    PubMed

    Modgil, S; Hammond, P

    2003-02-01

    Many published clinical trials are poorly designed, suggesting that the protocol was incomplete, disorganised, or contained errors. This fact motivated the development of a suite of decision support tools for the design of randomised controlled clinical trials. In this paper we describe these tools, discussing both underlying theoretical issues and usage of the tools. The core tool--Design-a-Trial (DaT)--critiques data entered so as to guide design of a scientifically and ethically sound trial. DaT outputs a text protocol describing the trial, and a corresponding symbolic representation. Linked to DaT is a tool for authoring plans that form part of the trial. A key feature of this tool is the provision of macros for describing commonly occurring plan constructs. We describe another linked tool which generates solutions to Prolog queries requesting advice on how a plan should be revised so as to comply with safety and efficacy requirements. The user is able to navigate a path through the solution search space by interacting with natural language representations of the Prolog sub-goals. This provides the flexibility to generate useful and informative partial solutions, symbolic and textual, for inclusion in the symbolic plan representation and protocol document, respectively. PMID:12636978

  6. CADMIUM II: acquisition and representation of radiological knowledge for computerized decision support in mammography.

    PubMed Central

    Alberdi, E.; Taylor, P.; Lee, R.; Fox, J.; Sordo, M.; Todd-Pokropek, A.

    2000-01-01

    CADMIUM II is a system for the interpretation of mammograms. A novel aspect of the system is that it combines symbolic reasoning with image processing, in contrast with most other approaches, which use only image processing and rely on artificial neural networks (ANNs) to classify mammograms. A problem of ANNs is that the advice they give cannot be traced back to communicable diagnostic inferences. Our approach is to provide advice based on explicit knowledge about the diagnostic process. To this end, we have conducted a knowledge elicitation study which looked at the descriptors used by expert radiologists when making diagnostic decisions about mammograms. The analysis of the radiologists' reports yielded a set of salient diagnostic features. These were used to inform the advice provided by the symbolic decision making component of CADMIUM II. PMID:11079834

  7. Designing an automated clinical decision support system to match clinical practice guidelines for opioid therapy for chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Opioid prescribing for chronic pain is common and controversial, but recommended clinical practices are followed inconsistently in many clinical settings. Strategies for increasing adherence to clinical practice guideline recommendations are needed to increase effectiveness and reduce negative consequences of opioid prescribing in chronic pain patients. Methods Here we describe the process and outcomes of a project to operationalize the 2003 VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guideline for Opioid Therapy for Chronic Non-Cancer Pain into a computerized decision support system (DSS) to encourage good opioid prescribing practices during primary care visits. We based the DSS on the existing ATHENA-DSS. We used an iterative process of design, testing, and revision of the DSS by a diverse team including guideline authors, medical informatics experts, clinical content experts, and end-users to convert the written clinical practice guideline into a computable algorithm to generate patient-specific recommendations for care based upon existing information in the electronic medical record (EMR), and a set of clinical tools. Results The iterative revision process identified numerous and varied problems with the initially designed system despite diverse expert participation in the design process. The process of operationalizing the guideline identified areas in which the guideline was vague, left decisions to clinical judgment, or required clarification of detail to insure safe clinical implementation. The revisions led to workable solutions to problems, defined the limits of the DSS and its utility in clinical practice, improved integration into clinical workflow, and improved the clarity and accuracy of system recommendations and tools. Conclusions Use of this iterative process led to development of a multifunctional DSS that met the approval of the clinical practice guideline authors, content experts, and clinicians involved in testing. The process and experiences described provide a model for development of other DSSs that translate written guidelines into actionable, real-time clinical recommendations. PMID:20385018

  8. Parkinson's disease, cognition and aging. Clinical, neuropsychological, electrophysiological and cranial computerized tomographic assessment.

    PubMed

    Elwan, O H; Baradah, O H; Madkour, O; Elwan, H; Hassan, A A; Elwan, F; Mahfouz, M; Ali, A; Fahmy, M

    1996-11-01

    Forty-three patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and thirty-seven normal volunteers were subjected to clinical, neuropsychological, neurophysiological (P300 component of the event-related potentials ERP) and radiological (cranial computerized tomographic scanning CCT) evaluation. Intentional memory was more impaired in PD than in normal controls, more so in the demented group of patients, and was related to enlargement of third ventricular size in CCT. While intentional memory was age related in PD patients, perception was age-related in normal controls. Neither global nor specific cognitive functions were related to duration, severity of parkinsonian motor disability, or depression. However, depression in PD was significantly related to parkinsonian motor disability. P300 latency was more prolonged in PD patients than normal controls. P300 parameters of PD patients were not influenced by age, cognitive functions, duration or severity of motor disability, or depression. The reaction time was the only P300 parameter that was age-related in normal controls. Subcortical atrophy as indicated by CCT was more marked in PD and correlated with age in both patients and controls. Subcortical atrophy was significantly related to cognitive functions in PD but not in normal controls. It was concluded that cognitive impairment in PD could be attributed to complex cognitive changes rather than age. It is a disease process, though not directly related to parkinsonian motor disability or depression. PD differed from normal aging as regards the effect of age on the specific cognitive functions, where in PD patients, age was related to intentional memory, yet in normal controls, it was related to perception. Intentional memory deterioration was found to be specific of PD, being related to subcortical atrophy as well as being more pronounced in the demented group of patients. PMID:8981300

  9. Incorporation of clinical data into a computerized method for the assessment of mammographic breast lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Zhimin; Giger, Maryellen L.

    2000-06-01

    We previously developed a computerized method to classify mammographic masses as benign or malignant. In this method, mammographic features that are similar to the ones used by radiologists are automatically extracted to characterize a mass lesion. These features are then merged by an artificial neural network (ANN), which yields an estimated likelihood of malignancy for each mass. The performance of the method was evaluated on an independent database consisting of 110 cases (60 benign and 50 malignant cases). The method achieved an Az of 0.91 from round-robin analysis in the task of differentiating between benign and malignant masses using the computer-extracted features only. As the most important clinical risk factor for breast cancer, age achieved a performance level (Az equals 0.79) similar to that (Az equals 0.77 and 0.80) of the computer-extracted spiculation features, which are the most important indicators for malignancy of a mass, in differentiating between the malignant and benign cases. In this study, age is included as an additional input feature to the ANN. The performance of the scheme (Az equals 0.93) is improved when age is included. However, the improvement is not found to be statistically significant. Our results indicated that age may be a strong feature in predicting malignancy of a mass. For this database, however, the inclusion of age may not have a strong impact on the determination of the likelihood for a mammographic mass lesion when the major mammographic characteristics (e.g., spiculation) of a mass are accurately extracted and analyzed along with other features using an artificial neural network.

  10. Computerized Neuropsychological Assessment Devices: Joint Position Paper of the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology and the National Academy of Neuropsychology†

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Russell M.; Iverson, Grant L.; Cernich, Alison N.; Binder, Laurence M.; Ruff, Ronald M.; Naugle, Richard I.

    2012-01-01

    This joint position paper of the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology and the National Academy of Neuropsychology sets forth our position on appropriate standards and conventions for computerized neuropsychological assessment devices (CNADs). In this paper, we first define CNADs and distinguish them from examiner-administered neuropsychological instruments. We then set forth position statements on eight key issues relevant to the development and use of CNADs in the healthcare setting. These statements address (a) device marketing and performance claims made by developers of CNADs; (b) issues involved in appropriate end-users for administration and interpretation of CNADs; (c) technical (hardware/software/firmware) issues; (d) privacy, data security, identity verification, and testing environment; (e) psychometric development issues, especially reliability, and validity; (f) cultural, experiential, and disability factors affecting examinee interaction with CNADs; (g) use of computerized testing and reporting services; and (h) the need for checks on response validity and effort in the CNAD environment. This paper is intended to provide guidance for test developers and users of CNADs that will promote accurate and appropriate use of computerized tests in a way that maximizes clinical utility and minimizes risks of misuse. The positions taken in this paper are put forth with an eye toward balancing the need to make validated CNADs accessible to otherwise underserved patients with the need to ensure that such tests are developed and utilized competently, appropriately, and with due concern for patient welfare and quality of care. PMID:22382386

  11. Computerized Neuropsychological Assessment Devices: Joint Position Paper of the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology and the National Academy of Neuropsychology†

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Russell M.; Iverson, Grant L.; Cernich, Alison N.; Binder, Laurence M.; Ruff, Ronald M.; Naugle, Richard I.

    2013-01-01

    This joint position paper of the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology and the National Academy of Neuropsychology sets forth our position on appropriate standards and conventions for computerized neuropsychological assessment devices (CNADs). In this paper, we first define CNADs and distinguish them from examiner-administered neuropsychological instruments. We then set forth position statements on eight key issues relevant to the development and use of CNADs in the healthcare setting. These statements address (a) device marketing and performance claims made by developers of CNADs; (b) issues involved in appropriate end-users for administration and interpretation of CNADs; (c) technical (hardware/software/firmware) issues; (d) privacy, data security, identity verification, and testing environment; (e) psychometric development issues, especially reliability and validity; (f) cultural, experiential, and disability factors affecting examinee interaction with CNADs; (g) use of computerized testing and reporting services; and (h) the need for checks on response validity and effort in the CNAD environment. This paper is intended to provide guidance for test developers and users of CNADs that will promote accurate and appropriate use of computerized tests in a way that maximizes clinical utility and minimizes risks of misuse. The positions taken in this paper are put forth with an eye toward balancing the need to make validated CNADs accessible to otherwise underserved patients with the need to ensure that such tests are developed and utilized competently, appropriately, and with due concern for patient welfare and quality of care. PMID:22394228

  12. Electronic information and clinical decision support for prescribing: state of play in Australian general practice

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Jane; Moxey, Annette J; Newby, David A; Gillies, Malcolm B; Williamson, Margaret; Pearson, Sallie-Anne

    2011-01-01

    Background. Investments in eHealth worldwide have been mirrored in Australia, with >90% of general practices computerized. Recent eHealth incentives promote the use of up to date electronic information sources relevant to general practice with flexibility in mode of access. Objective. To determine GPs’ access to and use of electronic information sources and computerized clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) for prescribing. Methods. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 experienced GPs and nine GP trainees in New South Wales, Australia in 2008. A thematic analysis of interview transcripts was undertaken. Results. Information needs varied with clinical experience, and people resources (specialists, GP peers and supervisors for trainees) were often preferred over written formats. Experienced GPs used a small number of electronic resources and accessed them infrequently. Familiarity from training and early clinical practice and easy access were dominant influences on resource use. Practice time constraints meant relevant information needed to be readily accessible during consultations, requiring integration or direct access from prescribing software. Quality of electronic resource content was assumed and cost a barrier for some GPs. Conclusions. The current Australian practice incentives do not prescribe which information resources GPs should use. Without integration into practice computing systems, uptake and routine use seem unlikely. CDSS developments must recognize the time pressures of practice, preference for integration and cost concerns. Minimum standards are required to ensure that high-quality information resources are integrated and regularly updated. Without standards, the anticipated benefits of computerization on patient safety and health outcomes will be uncertain. PMID:21109619

  13. Reducing Diagnostic Error with Computer-Based Clinical Decision Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenes, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Information technology approaches to delivering diagnostic clinical decision support (CDS) are the subject of the papers to follow in the proceedings. These will address the history of CDS and present day approaches (Miller), evaluation of diagnostic CDS methods (Friedman), and the role of clinical documentation in supporting diagnostic decision…

  14. A Multisite, Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial of Computerized Cognitive Remediation Therapy for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Gomar, Jesús J.; Valls, Elia; Radua, Joaquim; Mareca, Celia; Tristany, Josep; del Olmo, Francisco; Rebolleda-Gil, Carlos; Jañez-Álvarez, María; de Álvaro, Francisco J.; Ovejero, María R.; Llorente, Ana; Teixidó, Cristina; Donaire, Ana M.; García-Laredo, Eduardo; Lazcanoiturburu, Andrea; Granell, Luis; Mozo, Cristina de Pablo; Pérez-Hernández, Mónica; Moreno-Alcázar, Ana; Pomarol-Clotet, Edith; McKenna, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of cognitive remediation therapy (CRT) for the neuropsychological deficits seen in schizophrenia is supported by meta-analysis. However, a recent methodologically rigorous trial had negative findings. In this study, 130 chronic schizophrenic patients were randomly assigned to computerized CRT, an active computerized control condition (CC) or treatment as usual (TAU). Primary outcome measures were 2 ecologically valid batteries of executive function and memory, rated under blind conditions; other executive and memory tests and a measure of overall cognitive function were also employed. Carer ratings of executive and memory failures in daily life were obtained before and after treatment. Computerized CRT was found to produce improvement on the training tasks, but this did not transfer to gains on the primary outcome measures and most other neuropsychological tests in comparison to either CC or TAU conditions. Nor did the intervention result in benefits on carer ratings of daily life cognitive failures. According to this study, computerized CRT is not effective in schizophrenia. The use of both active and passive CCs suggests that nature of the control group is not an important factor influencing results. PMID:26006264

  15. A Multisite, Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial of Computerized Cognitive Remediation Therapy for Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Gomar, Jesús J; Valls, Elia; Radua, Joaquim; Mareca, Celia; Tristany, Josep; del Olmo, Francisco; Rebolleda-Gil, Carlos; Jañez-Álvarez, María; de Álvaro, Francisco J; Ovejero, María R; Llorente, Ana; Teixidó, Cristina; Donaire, Ana M; García-Laredo, Eduardo; Lazcanoiturburu, Andrea; Granell, Luis; Mozo, Cristina de Pablo; Pérez-Hernández, Mónica; Moreno-Alcázar, Ana; Pomarol-Clotet, Edith; McKenna, Peter J

    2015-11-01

    The effectiveness of cognitive remediation therapy (CRT) for the neuropsychological deficits seen in schizophrenia is supported by meta-analysis. However, a recent methodologically rigorous trial had negative findings. In this study, 130 chronic schizophrenic patients were randomly assigned to computerized CRT, an active computerized control condition (CC) or treatment as usual (TAU). Primary outcome measures were 2 ecologically valid batteries of executive function and memory, rated under blind conditions; other executive and memory tests and a measure of overall cognitive function were also employed. Carer ratings of executive and memory failures in daily life were obtained before and after treatment. Computerized CRT was found to produce improvement on the training tasks, but this did not transfer to gains on the primary outcome measures and most other neuropsychological tests in comparison to either CC or TAU conditions. Nor did the intervention result in benefits on carer ratings of daily life cognitive failures. According to this study, computerized CRT is not effective in schizophrenia. The use of both active and passive CCs suggests that nature of the control group is not an important factor influencing results. PMID:26006264

  16. Personalizing Drug Selection Using Advanced Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Pestian, John; Spencer, Malik; Matykiewicz, Pawel; Zhang, Kejian; Vinks, Alexander A.; Glauser, Tracy

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the process of developing an advanced pharmacogenetics clinical decision support at one of the United States’ leading pediatric academic medical centers. This system, called CHRISTINE, combines clinical and genetic data to identify the optimal drug therapy when treating patients with epilepsy or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. In the discussion a description of clinical decision support systems is provided, along with an overview of neurocognitive computing and how it is applied in this setting. PMID:19898682

  17. Clinical inferences and decisions--III. Utility assessment and the Bayesian decision model.

    PubMed

    Aspinall, P A; Hill, A R

    1984-01-01

    It is accepted that errors of misclassifications, however small, can occur in clinical decisions but it cannot be assumed that the importance associated with false positive errors is the same as that for false negatives. The relative importance of these two types of error is frequently implied by a decision maker in the different weighting factors or utilities he assigns to the alternative consequences of his decisions. Formal procedures are available by which it is possible to make explicit in numerical form the value or worth of the outcome of a decision process. The two principal methods are described for generating utilities as associated with clinical decisions. The concept and application of utility is then expanded from a unidimensional to a multidimensional problem where, for example, one variable may be state of health and another monetary assets. When combined with the principles of subjective probability and test criterion selection outlined in Parts I and II of this series, the consequent use of utilities completes the framework upon which the general Bayesian model of clinical decision making is based. The five main stages in this general decision making model are described and applications of the model are illustrated with clinical examples from the field of ophthalmology. These include examples for unidimensional and multidimensional problems which are worked through in detail to illustrate both the principles and methodology involved in a rationalized normative model of clinical decision making behaviour. PMID:6472855

  18. Standardized Glycemic Management with a Computerized Workflow and Decision Support System for Hospitalized Patients with Type 2 Diabetes on Different Wards

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Katharina M.; Höll, Bernhard; Aberer, Felix; Donsa, Klaus; Augustin, Thomas; Schaupp, Lukas; Spat, Stephan; Beck, Peter; Fruhwald, Friedrich M.; Schnedl, Christian; Rosenkranz, Alexander R.; Lumenta, David B.; Kamolz, Lars-Peter; Plank, Johannes; Pieber, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: This study investigated the efficacy, safety, and usability of standardized glycemic management by a computerized decision support system for non-critically ill hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes on four different wards. Materials and Methods: In this open, noncontrolled intervention study, glycemic management of 99 patients with type 2 diabetes (62% acute admissions; 41 females; age, 67±11 years; hemoglobin A1c, 65±21 mmol/mol; body mass index, 30.4±6.5 kg/m2) on clinical wards (Cardiology, Endocrinology, Nephrology, Plastic Surgery) of a tertiary-care hospital was guided by GlucoTab® (Joanneum Research GmbH [Graz, Austria] and Medical University of Graz [Graz, Austria]), a mobile decision support system providing automated workflow support and suggestions for insulin dosing to nurses and physicians. Results: Adherence to insulin dosing suggestions was high (96.5% bolus, 96.7% basal). The primary outcome measure, percentage of blood glucose (BG) measurements in the range of 70–140 mg/dL, occurred in 50.2±22.2% of all measurements. The overall mean BG level was 154±35 mg/dL. BG measurements in the ranges of 60–70 mg/dL, 40–60 mg/dL, and <40 mg/dL occurred in 1.4%, 0.5%, and 0.0% of all measurements, respectively. A regression analysis showed that acute admission to the Cardiology Ward (+30 mg/dL) and preexisting home insulin therapy (+26 mg/dL) had the strongest impact on mean BG. Acute admission to other wards had minor effects (+4 mg/dL). Ninety-one percent of the healthcare professionals felt confident with GlucoTab, and 89% believed in its practicality and 80% in its ability to prevent medication errors. Conclusions: An efficacious, safe, and user-accepted implementation of GlucoTab was demonstrated. However, for optimized personalized patient care, further algorithm modifications are required. PMID:26355756

  19. Advancing clinical decision support using lessons from outside of healthcare: an interdisciplinary systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Greater use of computerized decision support (DS) systems could address continuing safety and quality problems in healthcare, but the healthcare field has struggled to implement DS technology. This study surveys DS experience across multiple non-healthcare disciplines for new insights that are generalizable to healthcare provider decisions. In particular, it sought design principles and lessons learned from the other disciplines that could inform efforts to accelerate the adoption of clinical decision support (CDS). Methods Our systematic review drew broadly from non-healthcare databases in the basic sciences, social sciences, humanities, engineering, business, and defense: PsychINFO, BusinessSource Premier, Social Sciences Abstracts, Web of Science, and Defense Technical Information Center. Because our interest was in DS that could apply to clinical decisions, we selected articles that (1) provided a review, overview, discussion of lessons learned, or an evaluation of design or implementation aspects of DS within a non-healthcare discipline and (2) involved an element of human judgment at the individual level, as opposed to decisions that can be fully automated or that are made at the organizational level. Results Clinical decisions share some similarities with decisions made by military commanders, business managers, and other leaders: they involve assessing new situations and choosing courses of action with major consequences, under time pressure, and with incomplete information. We identified seven high-level DS system design features from the non-healthcare literature that could be applied to CDS: providing broad, system-level perspectives; customizing interfaces to specific users and roles; making the DS reasoning transparent; presenting data effectively; generating multiple scenarios covering disparate outcomes (e.g., effective; effective with side effects; ineffective); allowing for contingent adaptations; and facilitating collaboration. The article provides examples of each feature. The DS literature also emphasizes the importance of organizational culture and training in implementation success. The literature contrasts “rational-analytic” vs. “naturalistic-intuitive” decision-making styles, but the best approach is often a balanced approach that combines both styles. It is also important for DS systems to enable exploration of multiple assumptions, and incorporation of new information in response to changing circumstances. Conclusions Complex, high-level decision-making has common features across disciplines as seemingly disparate as defense, business, and healthcare. National efforts to advance the health information technology agenda through broader CDS adoption could benefit by applying the DS principles identified in this review. PMID:22900537

  20. Programmable Calculators and Minicomputers in Agriculture. A Symposium Exploring Computerized Decision-Making Aids and Their Extension to the Farm Level. Proceedings of a Symposium (Hot Springs, Arkansas, February 6-7, 1980)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentley, Ernest, Ed.

    Ten papers presented at a symposium discuss the array of computerized decision-making aids currently available to farmers and ways to speed up the rate of adoption of computers by agriculturalists. Topics presented include the development of software for agricultural decision-making; the role of programmable calculators and minicomputers in…

  1. Decision making in asthma exacerbation: a clinical judgement analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, John; Shields, Mike; Patterson, Chris; Kee, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Background Clinical decisions which impact directly on patient safety and quality of care are made during acute asthma attacks by individual doctors based on their knowledge and experience. Decisions include administration of systemic corticosteroids (CS) and oral antibiotics, and admission to hospital. Clinical judgement analysis provides a methodology for comparing decisions between practitioners with different training and experience, and improving decision making. Methods Stepwise linear regression was used to select clinical cues based on visual analogue scale assessments of the propensity of 62 clinicians to prescribe a short course of oral CS (decision 1), a course of antibiotics (decision 2), and/or admit to hospital (decision 3) for 60 “paper” patients. Results When compared by specialty, paediatricians' models for decision 1 were more likely to include level of alertness as a cue (54% vs 16%); for decision 2 they were more likely to include presence of crepitations (49% vs 16%) and less likely to include inhaled CS (8% vs 40%), respiratory rate (0% vs 24%) and air entry (70% vs 100%). When compared to other grades, the models derived for decision 3 by consultants/general practitioners were more likely to include wheeze severity as a cue (39% vs 6%). Conclusions Clinicians differed in their use of individual cues and the number included in their models. Patient safety and quality of care will benefit from clarification of decision?making strategies as general learning points during medical training, in the development of guidelines and care pathways, and by clinicians developing self?awareness of their own preferences. PMID:17428817

  2. Reducing Diagnostic Error with Computer-Based Clinical Decision Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenes, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Information technology approaches to delivering diagnostic clinical decision support (CDS) are the subject of the papers to follow in the proceedings. These will address the history of CDS and present day approaches (Miller), evaluation of diagnostic CDS methods (Friedman), and the role of clinical documentation in supporting diagnostic decision…

  3. Cognitive Elements in Clinical Decision-Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunphy, Bruce C.; Cantwell, Robert; Bourke, Sid; Fleming, Mark; Smith, Bruce; Joseph, K. S.; Dunphy, Stacey L

    2010-01-01

    Physician cognition, metacognition and affect may have an impact upon the quality of clinical reasoning. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between measures of physician metacognition and affect and patient outcomes in obstetric practice. Reflective coping (RC), proactive coping, need for cognition (NFC), tolerance for…

  4. Cognitive Elements in Clinical Decision-Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunphy, Bruce C.; Cantwell, Robert; Bourke, Sid; Fleming, Mark; Smith, Bruce; Joseph, K. S.; Dunphy, Stacey L

    2010-01-01

    Physician cognition, metacognition and affect may have an impact upon the quality of clinical reasoning. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between measures of physician metacognition and affect and patient outcomes in obstetric practice. Reflective coping (RC), proactive coping, need for cognition (NFC), tolerance for…

  5. Syncope: risk stratification and clinical decision making.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Suzanne Y G; Hoek, Amber E; Mollink, Susan M; Huff, J Stephen

    2014-04-01

    Syncope is a common occurrence in the emergency department, accounting for approximately 1% to 3% of presentations. Syncope is best defined as a brief loss of consciousness and postural tone followed by spontaneous and complete recovery. The spectrum of etiologies ranges from benign to life threatening, and a structured approach to evaluating these patients is key to providing care that is thorough, yet cost-effective. This issue reviews the most relevant evidence for managing and risk stratifying the syncope patient, beginning with a focused history, physical examination, electrocardiogram, and tailored diagnostic testing. Several risk stratification decision rules are compared for performance in various scenarios, including how age and associated comorbidities may predict short-term and long-term adverse events. An algorithm for structured, evidence-based care of the syncope patient is included to ensure that patients requiring hospitalization are managed appropriately and those with benign causes are discharged safely. PMID:25105200

  6. Shared decision making: a model for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Elwyn, Glyn; Frosch, Dominick; Thomson, Richard; Joseph-Williams, Natalie; Lloyd, Amy; Kinnersley, Paul; Cording, Emma; Tomson, Dave; Dodd, Carole; Rollnick, Stephen; Edwards, Adrian; Barry, Michael

    2012-10-01

    The principles of shared decision making are well documented but there is a lack of guidance about how to accomplish the approach in routine clinical practice. Our aim here is to translate existing conceptual descriptions into a three-step model that is practical, easy to remember, and can act as a guide to skill development. Achieving shared decision making depends on building a good relationship in the clinical encounter so that information is shared and patients are supported to deliberate and express their preferences and views during the decision making process. To accomplish these tasks, we propose a model of how to do shared decision making that is based on choice, option and decision talk. The model has three steps: a) introducing choice, b) describing options, often by integrating the use of patient decision support, and c) helping patients explore preferences and make decisions. This model rests on supporting a process of deliberation, and on understanding that decisions should be influenced by exploring and respecting "what matters most" to patients as individuals, and that this exploration in turn depends on them developing informed preferences. PMID:22618581

  7. Organizing literature information for clinical decision support.

    PubMed

    Demner-Fushman, Dina; Hauser, Susan E; Ford, Glenn; Thoma, George R

    2004-01-01

    Answers to clinical questions occurring during healthcare practitioner/patient interaction can be often found in National Library of Medicine's (NLM) databases. The recent advances in wireless handheld computers promise to make them a widely used tool to deliver needed information to the practitioner at the point of service. This paper addresses challenges in organizing and presenting information obtained from NLM's MEDLINE database of indexed citations in a way that will help practitioners reduce literature search time on handheld computers. We study two clustering algorithms and two methods of labeling document clusters. PMID:15360883

  8. Clinical Decision Support Tools: The Evolution of a Revolution.

    PubMed

    Mould, D R; D'Haens, G; Upton, R N

    2016-04-01

    Dashboard systems for clinical decision support integrate data from multiple sources. These systems, the newest in a long line of dose calculators and other decision support tools, utilize Bayesian approaches to fully individualize dosing using information gathered through therapeutic drug monitoring. In the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease patients with infliximab, dashboards may reduce therapeutic failures and treatment costs. The history and future development of modern Bayesian dashboard systems is described. PMID:26785109

  9. Clinical Decision-Making: Applications of the MARI System

    PubMed Central

    Hall, W. Dallas; Camp, Henry N.; Reynolds, Karen D.; Slamecka, Vladimir

    1979-01-01

    The Medical Aggregate Record Inquiry (MARI) system, developed over the past five years, represents empirical decision processes as they occur in the daily practice of medicine. As of this time, MARI provides data on the decision-making practices of physicians relating to 1913 diagnoses, 1150 special diagnostic tests, and 1296 drug therapies on 650 consecutive patients of a major metropolitan hospital, representative of the entire field of Internal Medicine. The MARI software provides for powerful aggregate analyses of the patient records, allowing for the identification and study of clinical decision processes relevant to health care research, practice, education, and administration.

  10. Improving clinical decision support using data mining techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burn-Thornton, Kath E.; Thorpe, Simon I.

    1999-02-01

    Physicians, in their ever-demanding jobs, are looking to decision support systems for aid in clinical diagnosis. However, clinical decision support systems need to be of sufficiently high accuracy that they help, rather than hinder, the physician in his/her diagnosis. Decision support systems with accuracies, of patient state determination, of greater than 80 percent, are generally perceived to be sufficiently accurate to fulfill the role of helping the physician. We have previously shown that data mining techniques have the potential to provide the underpinning technology for clinical decision support systems. In this paper, an extension of the work in reverence 2, we describe how changes in data mining methodologies, for the analysis of 12-lead ECG data, improve the accuracy by which data mining algorithms determine which patients are suffering from heart disease. We show that the accuracy of patient state prediction, for all the algorithms, which we investigated, can be increased by up to 6 percent, using the combination of appropriate test training ratios and 5-fold cross-validation. The use of cross-validation greater than 5-fold, appears to reduce the improvement in algorithm classification accuracy gained by the use of this validation method. The accuracy of 84 percent in patient state predictions, obtained using the algorithm OCI, suggests that this algorithm will be capable of providing the required accuracy for clinical decision support systems.

  11. Using decision analysis to better evaluate pediatric clinical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joshua T; Neumann, Peter J

    2008-01-01

    Although systematic and explicit, existing evidentiary criteria for clinical guidelines tend to use study design as a surrogate for evidence quality. Moreover, they do not independently characterize evidence quality and net benefits and do not systematically evaluate research needs. Decision analysis, which quantifies the range of potential net benefits based on whatever evidence is available, can augment traditional frameworks. It is particularly useful for pediatric research, where randomized controlled trials are often unavailable and infeasible. Policymakers should incorporate decision analysis into comparative effectiveness research and clinical guidelines. PMID:18780939

  12. A Comparison of Content-Balancing Procedures for Estimating Multiple Clinical Domains in Computerized Adaptive Testing: Relative Precision, Validity, and Detection of Persons with Misfitting Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Barth B.; Dennis, Michael L.; Conrad, Kendon J.

    2010-01-01

    This simulation study sought to compare four different computerized adaptive testing (CAT) content-balancing procedures designed for use in a multidimensional assessment with respect to measurement precision, symptom severity classification, validity of clinical diagnostic recommendations, and sensitivity to atypical responding. The four…

  13. The role of emotions in clinical reasoning and decision making.

    PubMed

    Marcum, James A

    2013-10-01

    What role, if any, should emotions play in clinical reasoning and decision making? Traditionally, emotions have been excluded from clinical reasoning and decision making, but with recent advances in cognitive neuropsychology they are now considered an important component of them. Today, cognition is thought to be a set of complex processes relying on multiple types of intelligences. The role of mathematical logic (hypothetico-deductive thinking) or verbal linguistic intelligence in cognition, for example, is well documented and accepted; however, the role of emotional intelligence has received less attention-especially because its nature and function are not well understood. In this paper, I argue for the inclusion of emotions in clinical reasoning and decision making. To that end, developments in contemporary cognitive neuropsychology are initially examined and analyzed, followed by a review of the medical literature discussing the role of emotions in clinical practice. Next, a published clinical case is reconstructed and used to illustrate the recognition and regulation of emotions played during a series of clinical consultations, which resulted in a positive medical outcome. The paper's main thesis is that emotions, particularly in terms of emotional intelligence as a practical form of intelligence, afford clinical practitioners a robust cognitive resource for providing quality medical care. PMID:23975905

  14. Improving Congestive Heart Failure Care with a Clinical Decision Unit.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Jo Ellen; Short, Nancy; Williams, Tracy E; Yandell, Ben; Bowers, Margaret T

    2015-01-01

    Evidence supporting the development of Clinical Decision Units (CDUs) to impact congestive heart failure readmission rates comes from several categories of the literature. In this study, a pre-post design with comparison group was used to evaluate the impact of the CDU. Early changes in clinical and financial outcome indicators are encouraging. Nurse leaders seek ways to improve clinical outcomes while managing the current financially challenging environment. Implementation of a CDU provides many opportunities for nurse leaders to positively impact clinical care and financial performance within their institutions. PMID:26625578

  15. Examining the relationship between clinical decision support and performance measurement.

    PubMed

    Haggstrom, David A; Saleem, Jason J; Militello, Laura G; Arbuckle, Nicole; Flanagan, Mindy; Doebbeling, Bradley N

    2009-01-01

    In concept and practice, clinical decision support (CDS) and performance measurement represent distinct approaches to organizational change, yet these two organizational processes are interrelated. We set out to better understand how the relationship between the two is perceived, as well as how they jointly influence clinical practice. To understand the use of CDS at benchmark institutions, we conducted semistructured interviews with key managers, information technology personnel, and clinical leaders during a qualitative field study. Improved performance was frequently cited as a rationale for the use of clinical reminders. Pay-for-performance efforts also appeared to provide motivation for the use of clinical reminders. Shared performance measures were associated with shared clinical reminders. The close link between clinical reminders and performance measurement causes these tools to have many of the same implementation challenges. PMID:20351854

  16. Computerized Cognition Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motes, Michael A.; Wiegmann, Douglas A.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a software package entitled the "Computerized Cognition Laboratory" that helps integrate the teaching of cognitive psychology and research methods. Allows students to explore short-term memory, long-term memory, and decision making. Can also be used to teach the application of several statistical procedures. (DSK)

  17. The Relationship Between the Clinical Orientation of Substance Abuse Professionals and Their Clinical Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toriello, Paul J.; Leierer, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the relationship between the clinical orientations of substance abuse professionals (SAPs) and their clinical decisions. Cluster analysis grouped a sample of 245 SAPs on two clinical orientations that differed in their relative endorsement of traditional versus contemporary substance abuse counseling processes…

  18. Using Clinical Decision Support Software in Health Insurance Company

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, R.; Kumlander, Deniss

    This paper proposes the idea to use Clinical Decision Support software in Health Insurance Company as a tool to reduce the expenses related to Medication Errors. As a prove that this class of software will help insurance companies reducing the expenses, the research was conducted in eight hospitals in United Arab Emirates to analyze the amount of preventable common Medication Errors in drug prescription.

  19. Making informed capital investment decisions for clinical technology.

    PubMed

    Poplin, Brian

    2011-02-01

    Hospitals can make more-informed decisions related to clinical equipment purchases by using a variety of data sources in planning their investment strategies. Data sources generally fall into three buckets: Data that are internally generated by hospitals. Public data. Industry data that are available for purchase. PMID:21428225

  20. The relationship between patient data and pooled clinical management decisions.

    PubMed

    Ludbrook, G I; O'Loughlin, E J; Corcoran, T B; Grant, C

    2013-01-01

    A strong relationship between patient data and preoperative clinical decisions could potentially be used to support clinical decisions in preoperative management. The aim of this exploratory study was to determine the relationship between key patient data and pooled clinical opinions on management. In a previous study, panels of anaesthetists compared the quality of computer-assisted patient health assessments with outpatient consultations and made decisions on the need for preoperative tests, no preoperative outpatient assessment, possible postoperative intensive care unit/high dependency unit requirements and aspiration prophylaxis. In the current study, the relationship between patient data and these decisions was examined using binomial logistic regression analysis. Backward stepwise regression was used to identify independent predictors of each decision (at P >0.15), which were then incorporated into a predictive model. The number of factors related to each decision varied: blood picture (four factors), biochemistry (six factors), coagulation studies (three factors), electrocardiography (eight factors), chest X-ray (seven factors), preoperative outpatient assessment (17 factors), intensive care unit requirement (eight factors) and aspiration prophylaxis (one factor). The factor types also varied, but included surgical complexity, age, gender, number of medications or comorbidities, body mass index, hypertension, central nervous system condition, heart disease, sleep apnoea, smoking, persistent pain and stroke. Models based on these relationships usually demonstrated good sensitivity and specificity, with receiver operating characteristics in the following areas under curve: blood picture (0.75), biochemistry (0.86), coagulation studies (0.71), electrocardiography (0.90), chest X-ray (0.85), outpatient assessment (0.85), postoperative intensive care unit requirement (0.88) and aspiration prophylaxis (0.85). These initial results suggest modelling of patient data may have utility supporting clinicians' preoperative decisions. PMID:23362892

  1. Adoption of Clinical Decision Support in Multimorbidity: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Arguello Casteleiro, Mercedes; Ainsworth, John; Buchan, Iain

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with multiple conditions have complex needs and are increasing in number as populations age. This multimorbidity is one of the greatest challenges facing health care. Having more than 1 condition generates (1) interactions between pathologies, (2) duplication of tests, (3) difficulties in adhering to often conflicting clinical practice guidelines, (4) obstacles in the continuity of care, (5) confusing self-management information, and (6) medication errors. In this context, clinical decision support (CDS) systems need to be able to handle realistic complexity and minimize iatrogenic risks. Objective The aim of this review was to identify to what extent CDS is adopted in multimorbidity. Methods This review followed PRISMA guidance and adopted a multidisciplinary approach. Scopus and PubMed searches were performed by combining terms from 3 different thesauri containing synonyms for (1) multimorbidity and comorbidity, (2) polypharmacy, and (3) CDS. The relevant articles were identified by examining the titles and abstracts. The full text of selected/relevant articles was analyzed in-depth. For articles appropriate for this review, data were collected on clinical tasks, diseases, decision maker, methods, data input context, user interface considerations, and evaluation of effectiveness. Results A total of 50 articles were selected for the full in-depth analysis and 20 studies were included in the final review. Medication (n=10) and clinical guidance (n=8) were the predominant clinical tasks. Four studies focused on merging concurrent clinical practice guidelines. A total of 17 articles reported their CDS systems were knowledge-based. Most articles reviewed considered patients’ clinical records (n=19), clinical practice guidelines (n=12), and clinicians’ knowledge (n=10) as contextual input data. The most frequent diseases mentioned were cardiovascular (n=9) and diabetes mellitus (n=5). In all, 12 articles mentioned generalist doctor(s) as the decision maker(s). For articles reviewed, there were no studies referring to the active involvement of the patient in the decision-making process or to patient self-management. None of the articles reviewed adopted mobile technologies. There were no rigorous evaluations of usability or effectiveness of the CDS systems reported. Conclusions This review shows that multimorbidity is underinvestigated in the informatics of supporting clinical decisions. CDS interventions that systematize clinical practice guidelines without considering the interactions of different conditions and care processes may lead to unhelpful or harmful clinical actions. To improve patient safety in multimorbidity, there is a need for more evidence about how both conditions and care processes interact. The data needed to build this evidence base exist in many electronic health record systems and are underused. PMID:25785897

  2. Efficiency of Clinical Decision Support Systems Improves with Experience.

    PubMed

    Meulendijk, Michiel C; Spruit, Marco R; Willeboordse, Floor; Numans, Mattijs E; Brinkkemper, Sjaak; Knol, Wilma; Jansen, Paul A F; Askari, Marjan

    2016-04-01

    Efficiency, or the resources spent while performing a specific task, is widely regarded as one the determinants of usability. In this study, the authors hypothesize that having a group of users perform a similar task over a prolonged period of time will lead to improvements in efficiency of that task. This study was performed in the domain of decision-supported medication reviews. Data was gathered during a randomized controlled trial. Three expert teams consisting of an independent physician and an independent pharmacist conducted 150 computerized medication reviews on patients in 13 general practices located in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Results were analyzed with a linear mixed model. A fixed effects test on the linear mixed model showed a significant difference in the time required to conduct medication reviews over time; F(31.145)?=?14.043, p?

  3. Use of Clinical Decision Support to Improve the Quality of Care Provided to Older Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Groshaus, H.; Boscan, A.; Khandwala, F.; Holroyd-Leduc, J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Frail older inpatients are at risk of unintended adverse events while in hospital, particularly falls, functional decline, delirium and incontinence. Objective The aim of this pragmatic trial was to pilot and evaluate a multi-component knowledge translation intervention that incorporated a nurse-initiated computerized clinical decision support tool to reduce harms in the care of older medical inpatients. Methods A stepped wedge trial design was conducted on six medical units at two hospitals in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. The primary quantitative outcome was the rate of order set use. Secondary outcomes included the number of falls, the average number of days in hospital, and the total number of consults ordered for each of orthopedics, geriatrics, psychiatry and physiotherapy. Qualitative analysis included interviews with nurses to explore barriers and facilitators around the implementation of the electronic decision support tool. Results The estimated mean rate of order set use over a 2 week period was 3.1 (95% CI 1.9–5.3) sets higher after the intervention than before. The estimated odds of a fall happening on a unit over a 2-week period was 9.3 (p = 0.065) times higher before than after the intervention. There was no significant effect of the intervention on length of hospital stay (p = 0.67) or consults to related clinical services (all p <0.2). Interviews with front-line nurses and nurse managers/educators revealed that the order set is not being regularly ordered because its content is perceived as part of good nursing care and due to the high workload on these busy medical units. Conclusions Although not statistically significant, a reduction in the number of falls as a result of the intervention was noted. Frontline users’ engagement is crucial for the successful implementation of any decision support tool. New strategies of implementation will be evaluated before broad dissemination of this knowledge translation intervention. PMID:23616902

  4. Dynamic Clinical Data Mining: Search Engine-Based Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Zimolzak, Andrew J; Stone, David J

    2014-01-01

    The research world is undergoing a transformation into one in which data, on massive levels, is freely shared. In the clinical world, the capture of data on a consistent basis has only recently begun. We propose an operational vision for a digitally based care system that incorporates data-based clinical decision making. The system would aggregate individual patient electronic medical data in the course of care; query a universal, de-identified clinical database using modified search engine technology in real time; identify prior cases of sufficient similarity as to be instructive to the case at hand; and populate the individual patient's electronic medical record with pertinent decision support material such as suggested interventions and prognosis, based on prior outcomes. Every individual's course, including subsequent outcomes, would then further populate the population database to create a feedback loop to benefit the care of future patients. PMID:25600664

  5. Enablers, Barriers, and the Influence of Organizational Environmental Factors on Computerized Clinical Documentation Training Developed and Delivered by Nursing Informaticists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulhanek, Brenda J.

    2010-01-01

    Within the past decade, the introduction of computerized medical records into the business and practice of health care has created a need for effective training. The implementation of computerized medical records into a health care organization has been often associated with increased costs and decreased productivity. Although existing human…

  6. Automation in an Addiction Treatment Research Clinic: Computerized Contingency Management, Ecological Momentary Assessment, and a Protocol Workflow System

    PubMed Central

    Vahabzadeh, Massoud; Lin, Jia-Ling; Mezghanni, Mustapha; Epstein, David H.; Preston, Kenzie L.

    2009-01-01

    Issues A challenge in treatment research is the necessity of adhering to protocol and regulatory strictures while maintaining flexibility to meet patients’ treatment needs and accommodate variations among protocols. Another challenge is the acquisition of large amounts of data in an occasionally hectic environment, along with provision of seamless methods for exporting, mining, and querying the data. Approach We have automated several major functions of our outpatient treatment research clinic for studies in drug abuse and dependence. Here we describe three such specialized applications: the Automated Contingency Management (ACM) system for delivery of behavioral interventions, the Transactional Electronic Diary (TED) system for management of behavioral assessments, and the Protocol Workflow System (PWS) for computerized workflow automation and guidance of each participant’s daily clinic activities. These modules are integrated into our larger information system to enable data sharing in real time among authorized staff. Key Findings ACM and TED have each permitted us to conduct research that was not previously possible. In addition, the time to data analysis at the end of each study is substantially shorter. With the implementation of the PWS, we have been able to manage a research clinic with an 80-patient capacity having an annual average of 18,000 patient-visits and 7,300 urine collections with a research staff of five. Finally, automated data management has considerably enhanced our ability to monitor and summarize participant-safety data for research oversight. Implications and conclusion When developed in consultation with end users, automation in treatment-research clinics can enable more efficient operations, better communication among staff, and expansions in research methods. PMID:19320669

  7. Clinical Decision Support Alert Appropriateness: A Review and Proposal for Improvement

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Allison B.; Thomas, Eric J.; Krousel-Wood, Marie; Sittig, Dean F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Many healthcare providers are adopting clinical decision support (CDS) systems to improve patient safety and meet meaningful use requirements. Computerized alerts that prompt clinicians about drug-allergy, drug-drug, and drug-disease warnings or provide dosing guidance are most commonly implemented. Alert overrides, which occur when clinicians do not follow the guidance presented by the alert, can hinder improved patient outcomes. Methods We present a review of CDS alerts and describe a proposal to develop novel methods for evaluating and improving CDS alerts that builds upon traditional informatics approaches. Our proposal incorporates previously described models for predicting alert overrides that utilize retrospective chart review to determine which alerts are clinically relevant and which overrides are justifiable. Results Despite increasing implementations of CDS alerts, detailed evaluations rarely occur because of the extensive labor involved in manual chart reviews to determine alert and response appropriateness. Further, most studies have solely evaluated alert overrides that are appropriate or justifiable. Our proposal expands the use of web-based monitoring tools with an interactive dashboard for evaluating CDS alert and response appropriateness that incorporates the predictive models. The dashboard provides 2 views, an alert detail view and a patient detail view, to provide a full history of alerts and help put the patient's events in context. Conclusion The proposed research introduces several innovations to address the challenges and gaps in alert evaluations. This research can transform alert evaluation processes across healthcare settings, leading to improved CDS, reduced alert fatigue, and increased patient safety. PMID:24940129

  8. Temporal pattern mining for multivariate clinical decision support.

    PubMed

    Saini, Sheetal; Dua, Sumeet

    2013-01-01

    Multivariate temporal data are collections of contiguous data values that reflect complex temporal changes over a given duration. Technological advances have resulted in significant amounts of such data in high-throughput disciplines, including EEG and iEEG data for effective and efficient healthcare informatics, and decision support. Most data analytics and data-mining algorithms are effective in capturing global trends, but fail to capture localized behavioral changes in large temporal data sets. We present a two-step algorithmic methodology to uncover temporal patterns and exploiting them for an efficient and accurate decision support system. This methodology aids the discovery of previously unknown, nontrivial, and potentially useful temporal patterns for enhanced patient-specific clinical decision support with high degrees of sensitivity and specificity. Classification results on multivariate time series iEEG data for epileptic seizure detection also demonstrate the efficacy and accuracy of the technique to uncover interesting and effective domain class-specific temporal patterns. PMID:23921002

  9. Creating Shareable Clinical Decision Support Rules for a Pharmacogenomics Clinical Guideline Using Structured Knowledge Representation

    PubMed Central

    Linan, Margaret K.; Sottara, Davide; Freimuth, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacogenomics (PGx) guidelines contain drug-gene relationships, therapeutic and clinical recommendations from which clinical decision support (CDS) rules can be extracted, rendered and then delivered through clinical decision support systems (CDSS) to provide clinicians with just-in-time information at the point of care. Several tools exist that can be used to generate CDS rules that are based on computer interpretable guidelines (CIG), but none have been previously applied to the PGx domain. We utilized the Unified Modeling Language (UML), the Health Level 7 virtual medical record (HL7 vMR) model, and standard terminologies to represent the semantics and decision logic derived from a PGx guideline, which were then mapped to the Health eDecisions (HeD) schema. The modeling and extraction processes developed here demonstrate how structured knowledge representations can be used to support the creation of shareable CDS rules from PGx guidelines.

  10. A Decision Making Model Utilizing a Complex Clinical Data Set

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Tennyson; Lanese, Richard

    1982-01-01

    Throat cultures were performed and tabulations made of 16 clinical variables for 1817 consecutive patients with upper respiratory illnesses. Analysis of the data was performed with respect to the probability of a positive culture for B hemolytic streptococcus by the Automatic Interactive Detector (AID) and multiple logistic regression methods. The results were utilized to determine which patients should have a throat culture as a basis for treatment decisions.

  11. IBM’s Health Analytics and Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Sun, J.; Knoop, S.; Shabo, A.; Carmeli, B.; Sow, D.; Syed-Mahmood, T.; Rapp, W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives This survey explores the role of big data and health analytics developed by IBM in supporting the transformation of healthcare by augmenting evidence-based decision-making. Methods Some problems in healthcare and strategies for change are described. It is argued that change requires better decisions, which, in turn, require better use of the many kinds of healthcare information. Analytic resources that address each of the information challenges are described. Examples of the role of each of the resources are given. Results There are powerful analytic tools that utilize the various kinds of big data in healthcare to help clinicians make more personalized, evidenced-based decisions. Such resources can extract relevant information and provide insights that clinicians can use to make evidence-supported decisions. There are early suggestions that these resources have clinical value. As with all analytic tools, they are limited by the amount and quality of data. Conclusion Big data is an inevitable part of the future of healthcare. There is a compelling need to manage and use big data to make better decisions to support the transformation of healthcare to the personalized, evidence-supported model of the future. Cognitive computing resources are necessary to manage the challenges in employing big data in healthcare. Such tools have been and are being developed. The analytic resources, themselves, do not drive, but support healthcare transformation. PMID:25123736

  12. An Intelligent Computerized Stretch Reflex Measurement System For Clinical And Investigative Neurology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, P. M.; Chutkow, J. G.; Riggs, M. T.; Cristiano, V. D.

    1987-05-01

    We describe the design of a reliable, user-friendly preprototype system for quantifying the tendon stretch reflexes in humans and large mammals. A hand-held, instrumented reflex gun, the impactor of which contains a single force sensor, interfaces with a computer. The resulting test system can deliver sequences of reproducible stimuli at graded intensities and adjustable durations to a muscle's tendon ("tendon taps"), measure the impacting force of each tap, and record the subsequent reflex muscle contraction from the same tendon -- all automatically. The parameters of the reflex muscle contraction include latency; mechanical threshold; and peak time, peak magnitude, and settling time. The results of clinical tests presented in this paper illustrate the system's potential usefulness in detecting neurologic dysfunction affecting the tendon stretch reflexes, in documenting the course of neurologic illnesses and their response to therapy, and in clinical and laboratory neurologic research.

  13. Clinical decision support tools: analysis of online drug information databases

    PubMed Central

    Clauson, Kevin A; Marsh, Wallace A; Polen, Hyla H; Seamon, Matthew J; Ortiz, Blanca I

    2007-01-01

    Background Online drug information databases are used to assist in enhancing clinical decision support. However, the choice of which online database to consult, purchase or subscribe to is likely made based on subjective elements such as history of use, familiarity, or availability during professional training. The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical decision support tools for drug information by systematically comparing the most commonly used online drug information databases. Methods Five commercially available and two freely available online drug information databases were evaluated according to scope (presence or absence of answer), completeness (the comprehensiveness of the answers), and ease of use. Additionally, a composite score integrating all three criteria was utilized. Fifteen weighted categories comprised of 158 questions were used to conduct the analysis. Descriptive statistics and Chi-square were used to summarize the evaluation components and make comparisons between databases. Scheffe's multiple comparison procedure was used to determine statistically different scope and completeness scores. The composite score was subjected to sensitivity analysis to investigate the effect of the choice of percentages for scope and completeness. Results The rankings for the databases from highest to lowest, based on composite scores were Clinical Pharmacology, Micromedex, Lexi-Comp Online, Facts & Comparisons 4.0, Epocrates Online Premium, RxList.com, and Epocrates Online Free. Differences in scope produced three statistical groupings with Group 1 (best) performers being: Clinical Pharmacology, Micromedex, Facts & Comparisons 4.0, Lexi-Comp Online, Group 2: Epocrates Premium and RxList.com and Group 3: Epocrates Free (p < 0.05). Completeness scores were similarly stratified. Collapsing the databases into two groups by access (subscription or free), showed the subscription databases performed better than the free databases in the measured criteria (p < 0.001). Conclusion Online drug information databases, which belong to clinical decision support, vary in their ability to answer questions across a range of categories. PMID:17346336

  14. Computerized tomographic simulation compared with clinical mark-up in palliative radiotherapy: A prospective study

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, Peiman; Cheung, Fred; Pond, Gregory; Easton, Debbie; Cops, Frederick; Bezjak, Andrea; McLean, Michael; Levin, Wilfred; Billingsley, Susan; Williams, Diane; Wong, Rebecca . E-mail: Rebecca.Wong@rmp.uhn.on.ca

    2006-07-01

    Purpose To evaluate the impact of computed tomographic (CT) planning in comparison to clinical mark-up (CM) for palliative radiation of chest wall metastases. Methods and Materials In patients treated with CM for chest wall bone metastases (without conventional simulation/fluoroscopy), two consecutive planning CT scans were acquired with and without an external marker to delineate the CM treatment field. The two sets of scans were fused for evaluation of clinical tumor volume (CTV) coverage by the CM technique. Under-coverage was defined as the proportion of CTV not covered by the CM 80% isodose. Results Twenty-one treatments (ribs 17, sternum 2, and scapula 2) formed the basis of our study. Due to technical reasons, comparable data between CM and CT plans were available for 19 treatments only. CM resulted in a mean CTV under-coverage of 36%. Eleven sites (58%) had an under-coverage of >20%. Mean volume of normal tissues receiving {>=}80% of the dose was 5.4% in CM and 9.3% in CT plans (p = 0.017). Based on dose-volume histogram comparisons, CT planning resulted in a change of treatment technique from direct apposition to a tangential pair in 7 of 19 cases. Conclusions CT planning demonstrated a 36% under-coverage of CTV with CM of ribs and chest wall metastases.

  15. Web-based health services and clinical decision support.

    PubMed

    Jegelevicius, Darius; Marozas, Vaidotas; Lukosevicius, Arunas; Patasius, Martynas

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was the development of a Web-based e-health service for comprehensive assistance and clinical decision support. The service structure consists of a Web server, a PHP-based Web interface linked to a clinical SQL database, Java applets for interactive manipulation and visualization of signals and a Matlab server linked with signal and data processing algorithms implemented by Matlab programs. The service ensures diagnostic signal- and image analysis-sbased clinical decision support. By using the discussed methodology, a pilot service for pathology specialists for automatic calculation of the proliferation index has been developed. Physicians use a simple Web interface for uploading the pictures under investigation to the server; subsequently a Java applet interface is used for outlining the region of interest and, after processing on the server, the requested proliferation index value is calculated. There is also an "expert corner", where experts can submit their index estimates and comments on particular images, which is especially important for system developers. These expert evaluations are used for optimization and verification of automatic analysis algorithms. Decision support trials have been conducted for ECG and ophthalmology ultrasonic investigations of intraocular tumor differentiation. Data mining algorithms have been applied and decision support trees constructed. These services are under implementation by a Web-based system too. The study has shown that the Web-based structure ensures more effective, flexible and accessible services compared with standalone programs and is very convenient for biomedical engineers and physicians, especially in the development phase. PMID:15718591

  16. DYNAMICALLY EVOLVING CLINICAL PRACTICES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PREDICTING MEDICAL DECISIONS

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, JONATHAN H; GOLDSTEIN, MARY K; ASCH, STEVEN M; ALTMAN, RUSS B

    2015-01-01

    Automatically data-mining clinical practice patterns from electronic health records (EHR) can enable prediction of future practices as a form of clinical decision support (CDS). Our objective is to determine the stability of learned clinical practice patterns over time and what implication this has when using varying longitudinal historical data sources towards predicting future decisions. We trained an association rule engine for clinical orders (e.g., labs, imaging, medications) using structured inpatient data from a tertiary academic hospital. Comparing top order associations per admission diagnosis from training data in 2009 vs. 2012, we find practice variability from unstable diagnoses with rank biased overlap (RBO)<0.35 (e.g., pneumonia) to stable admissions for planned procedures (e.g., chemotherapy, surgery) with comparatively high RBO>0.6. Predicting admission orders for future (2013) patients with associations trained on recent (2012) vs. older (2009) data improved accuracy evaluated by area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC-AUC) 0.89 to 0.92, precision at ten (positive predictive value of the top ten predictions against actual orders) 30% to 37%, and weighted recall (sensitivity) at ten 2.4% to 13%, (P<10−10). Training with more longitudinal data (2009-2012) was no better than only using recent (2012) data. Secular trends in practice patterns likely explain why smaller but more recent training data is more accurate at predicting future practices. PMID:26776186

  17. DYNAMICALLY EVOLVING CLINICAL PRACTICES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PREDICTING MEDICAL DECISIONS.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jonathan H; Goldstein, Mary K; Asch, Steven M; Altman, Russ B

    2016-01-01

    Automatically data-mining clinical practice patterns from electronic health records (EHR) can enable prediction of future practices as a form of clinical decision support (CDS). Our objective is to determine the stability of learned clinical practice patterns over time and what implication this has when using varying longitudinal historical data sources towards predicting future decisions. We trained an association rule engine for clinical orders (e.g., labs, imaging, medications) using structured inpatient data from a tertiary academic hospital. Comparing top order associations per admission diagnosis from training data in 2009 vs. 2012, we find practice variability from unstable diagnoses with rank biased overlap (RBO)<0.35 (e.g., pneumonia) to stable admissions for planned procedures (e.g., chemotherapy, surgery) with comparatively high RBO>0.6. Predicting admission orders for future (2013) patients with associations trained on recent (2012) vs. older (2009) data improved accuracy evaluated by area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC-AUC) 0.89 to 0.92, precision at ten (positive predictive value of the top ten predictions against actual orders) 30% to 37%, and weighted recall (sensitivity) at ten 2.4% to 13%, (P<10-10). Training with more longitudinal data (2009-2012) was no better than only using recent (2012) data. Secular trends in practice patterns likely explain why smaller but more recent training data is more accurate at predicting future practices. PMID:26776186

  18. Utilizing computerized entertainment education in the development of decision aids for lower literate and naïve computer users.

    PubMed

    Jibaja-Weiss, Maria L; Volk, Robert J

    2007-01-01

    Decision aids have been developed by using various delivery methods, including interactive computer programs. Such programs, however, still rely heavily on written information, health and digital literacy, and reading ease. We describe an approach to overcome these potential barriers for low-literate, underserved populations by making design considerations for poor readers and naïve computer users and by using concepts from entertainment education to engage the user and to contextualize the content for the user. The system design goals are to make the program both didactic and entertaining and the navigation and graphical user interface as simple as possible. One entertainment education strategy, the soap opera, is linked seamlessly to interactive learning modules to enhance the content of the soap opera episodes. The edutainment decision aid model (EDAM) guides developers through the design process. Although designing patient decision aids that are educational, entertaining, and targeted toward poor readers and those with limited computer skills is a complex task, it is a promising strategy for aiding this population. Entertainment education may be a highly effective approach to promoting informed decision making for patients with low health literacy. PMID:17934944

  19. A Clinical Decision Support System for Breast Cancer Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Ana S.; Alves, Pedro; Jarman, Ian H.; Etchells, Terence A.; Fonseca, José M.; Lisboa, Paulo J. G.

    This paper proposes a Web clinical decision support system for clinical oncologists and for breast cancer patients making prognostic assessments, using the particular characteristics of the individual patient. This system comprises three different prognostic modelling methodologies: the clinically widely used Nottingham prognostic index (NPI); the Cox regression modelling and a partial logistic artificial neural network with automatic relevance determination (PLANN-ARD). All three models yield a different prognostic index that can be analysed together in order to obtain a more accurate prognostic assessment of the patient. Missing data is incorporated in the mentioned models, a common issue in medical data that was overcome using multiple imputation techniques. Risk group assignments are also provided through a methodology based on regression trees, where Boolean rules can be obtained expressed with patient characteristics.

  20. A highly scalable, interoperable clinical decision support service

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Howard S; Paterno, Marilyn D; Rocha, Beatriz H; Schaeffer, Molly; Wright, Adam; Erickson, Jessica L; Middleton, Blackford

    2014-01-01

    Objective To create a clinical decision support (CDS) system that is shareable across healthcare delivery systems and settings over large geographic regions. Materials and methods The enterprise clinical rules service (ECRS) realizes nine design principles through a series of enterprise java beans and leverages off-the-shelf rules management systems in order to provide consistent, maintainable, and scalable decision support in a variety of settings. Results The ECRS is deployed at Partners HealthCare System (PHS) and is in use for a series of trials by members of the CDS consortium, including internally developed systems at PHS, the Regenstrief Institute, and vendor-based systems deployed at locations in Oregon and New Jersey. Performance measures indicate that the ECRS provides sub-second response time when measured apart from services required to retrieve data and assemble the continuity of care document used as input. Discussion We consider related work, design decisions, comparisons with emerging national standards, and discuss uses and limitations of the ECRS. Conclusions ECRS design, implementation, and use in CDS consortium trials indicate that it provides the flexibility and modularity needed for broad use and performs adequately. Future work will investigate additional CDS patterns, alternative methods of data passing, and further optimizations in ECRS performance. PMID:23828174

  1. Computerized Drug Information Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Smith, Daniel R.

    1972-01-01

    To compare computerized services in chemistry, pharmacology, toxicology, and clinical medicine of pharmaceutical interest, equivalent profiles were run on magnetic tape files of CA-Condensates," CBAC," Excerpta Medica," MEDLARS" and Ringdoc." The results are tabulated for overlap of services, relative speed of citing references, and unique…

  2. ‘Too much, too late’: mixed methods multi-channel video recording study of computerized decision support systems and GP prescribing

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, James; Thomson, Fionagh; Milne, Heather; Buckingham, Susan; Sheikh, Aziz; Fernando, Bernard; Cresswell, Kathrin; Williams, Robin; Pinnock, Hilary

    2013-01-01

    Objective Computerized decision support systems (CDSS) are commonly deployed to support prescribing, although over-riding of alerts by prescribers remains a concern. We aimed to understand how general practitioners (GPs) interact with prescribing CDSS in order to inform deliberation on how better to support prescribing decisions in primary care. Materials and methods Quantitative and qualitative analysis of interactions between GPs, patients, and computer systems using multi-channel video recordings of 112 primary care consultations with eight GPs in three UK practices. Results 132 prescriptions were issued in the course of 73 of the consultations, of which 81 (61%) attracted at least one alert. Of the total of 117 alerts, only three resulted in the GP checking, but not altering, the prescription. CDSS provided information and safety alerts at the point of generating a prescription. This was ‘too much, too late’ as the majority of the ‘work’ of prescribing occurred prior to using the computer. By the time an alert appeared, the GP had formulated the problem(s), potentially spent several minutes considering, explaining, negotiating, and reaching agreement with the patient about the proposed treatment, and had possibly given instructions and printed an information leaflet. Discussion CDSS alerts do not coincide with the prescribing workflow throughout the whole GP consultation. Current systems interrupt to correct decisions that have already been taken, rather than assisting formulation of the management plan. Conclusions CDSS are likely to be more acceptable and effective if the prescribing support is provided much earlier in the process of generating a prescription. PMID:23470696

  3. Is it the time to rethink clinical decision-making strategies? From a single clinical outcome evaluation to a Clinical Multi-criteria Decision Assessment (CMDA).

    PubMed

    Migliore, Alberto; Integlia, Davide; Bizzi, Emanuele; Piaggio, Tomaso

    2015-10-01

    There are plenty of different clinical, organizational and economic parameters to consider in order having a complete assessment of the total impact of a pharmaceutical treatment. In the attempt to follow, a holistic approach aimed to provide an evaluation embracing all clinical parameters in order to choose the best treatments, it is necessary to compare and weight multiple criteria. Therefore, a change is required: we need to move from a decision-making context based on the assessment of one single criteria towards a transparent and systematic framework enabling decision makers to assess all relevant parameters simultaneously in order to choose the best treatment to use. In order to apply the MCDA methodology to clinical decision making the best pharmaceutical treatment (or medical devices) to use to treat a specific pathology, we suggest a specific application of the Multiple Criteria Decision Analysis for the purpose, like a Clinical Multi-criteria Decision Assessment CMDA. In CMDA, results from both meta-analysis and observational studies are used by a clinical consensus after attributing weights to specific domains and related parameters. The decision will result from a related comparison of all consequences (i.e., efficacy, safety, adherence, administration route) existing behind the choice to use a specific pharmacological treatment. The match will yield a score (in absolute value) that link each parameter with a specific intervention, and then a final score for each treatment. The higher is the final score; the most appropriate is the intervention to treat disease considering all criteria (domain an parameters). The results will allow the physician to evaluate the best clinical treatment for his patients considering at the same time all relevant criteria such as clinical effectiveness for all parameters and administration route. The use of CMDA model will yield a clear and complete indication of the best pharmaceutical treatment to use for patients, helping physicians to choose drugs with a complete set of information, imputed in the model. PMID:26190311

  4. Clinical genomics information management software linking cancer genome sequence and clinical decisions.

    PubMed

    Watt, Stuart; Jiao, Wei; Brown, Andrew M K; Petrocelli, Teresa; Tran, Ben; Zhang, Tong; McPherson, John D; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Bedard, Philippe L; Onetto, Nicole; Hudson, Thomas J; Dancey, Janet; Siu, Lillian L; Stein, Lincoln; Ferretti, Vincent

    2013-09-01

    Using sequencing information to guide clinical decision-making requires coordination of a diverse set of people and activities. In clinical genomics, the process typically includes sample acquisition, template preparation, genome data generation, analysis to identify and confirm variant alleles, interpretation of clinical significance, and reporting to clinicians. We describe a software application developed within a clinical genomics study, to support this entire process. The software application tracks patients, samples, genomic results, decisions and reports across the cohort, monitors progress and sends reminders, and works alongside an electronic data capture system for the trial's clinical and genomic data. It incorporates systems to read, store, analyze and consolidate sequencing results from multiple technologies, and provides a curated knowledge base of tumor mutation frequency (from the COSMIC database) annotated with clinical significance and drug sensitivity to generate reports for clinicians. By supporting the entire process, the application provides deep support for clinical decision making, enabling the generation of relevant guidance in reports for verification by an expert panel prior to forwarding to the treating physician. PMID:23603536

  5. A novel approach to the determination of clinical decision thresholds.

    PubMed

    Ebell, Mark H; Locatelli, Isabella; Senn, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    Our objective was to determine the test and treatment thresholds for common acute primary care conditions. We presented 200 clinicians with a series of web-based clinical vignettes, describing patients with possible influenza, acute coronary syndrome (ACS), pneumonia, deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and urinary tract infection (UTI). We randomly varied the probability of disease and asked whether the clinician wanted to rule out disease, order tests or rule in disease. By randomly varying the probability, we obtained clinical decisions across a broad range of disease probabilities that we used to create threshold curves. For influenza, the test (4.5% vs 32%, p<0.001) and treatment (55% vs 68%, p=0.11) thresholds were lower for US compared with Swiss physicians. US physicians had somewhat higher test (3.8% vs 0.7%, p=0.107) and treatment (76% vs 58%, p=0.005) thresholds for ACS than Swiss physicians. For both groups, the range between test and treatment thresholds was greater for ACS than for influenza (which is sensible, given the consequences of incorrect diagnosis). For pneumonia, US physicians had a trend towards higher test thresholds and lower treatment thresholds (48% vs 64%, p=0.076) than Swiss physicians. The DVT and UTI scenarios did not provide easily interpretable data, perhaps due to poor wording of the vignettes. We have developed a novel approach for determining decision thresholds. We found important differences in thresholds for US and Swiss physicians that may be a function of differences in healthcare systems. Our results can also guide development of clinical decision rules and guidelines. PMID:25736042

  6. Evaluation of RxNorm for Medication Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Freimuth, Robert R.; Wix, Kelly; Zhu, Qian; Siska, Mark; Chute, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the potential use of RxNorm to provide standardized representations of generic drug name and route of administration to facilitate management of drug lists for clinical decision support (CDS) rules. We found a clear representation of generic drug name but not route of administration. We identified several issues related to data quality, including erroneous or missing defined relationships, and the use of different concept hierarchies to represent the same drug. More importantly, we found extensive semantic precoordination of orthogonal concepts related to route and dose form, which would complicate the use of RxNorm for drug-based CDS. This study demonstrated that while RxNorm is a valuable resource for the standardization of medications used in clinical practice, additional work is required to enhance the terminology so that it can support expanded use cases, such as managing drug lists for CDS. PMID:25954360

  7. Clinical Decision Support for Colon and Rectal Surgery: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Allison B.; Melton, Genevieve B.; Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) has been shown to improve clinical processes, promote patient safety, and reduce costs in healthcare settings, and it is now a requirement for clinicians as part of the Meaningful Use Regulation. However, most evidence for CDS has been evaluated primarily in internal medicine care settings, and colon and rectal surgery (CRS) has unique needs with CDS that are not frequently described in the literature. The authors reviewed published literature in informatics and medical journals, combined with expert opinion to define CDS, describe the evidence for CDS, outline the implementation process for CDS, and present applications of CDS in CRS.CDS functionalities such as order sets, documentation templates, and order facilitation aids are most often described in the literature and most likely to be beneficial in CRS. Further research is necessary to identify and better evaluate additional CDS systems in the setting of CRS. PMID:24436644

  8. Studying the Vendor Perspective on Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Ash, Joan S.; Sittig, Dean F.; McMullen, Carmit K.; McCormack, James L.; Wright, Adam; Bunce, Arwen; Wasserman, Joseph; Mohan, Vishnu; Cohen, Deborah J.; Shapiro, Michael; Middleton, Blackford

    2011-01-01

    In prior work, using a Rapid Assessment Process (RAP), we have investigated clinical decision support (CDS) in ambulatory clinics and hospitals. We realized that individuals in these settings provide only one perspective related to the CDS landscape, which also includes content vendors and electronic health record (EHR) vendors. To discover content vendors’ perspectives and their perceived challenges, we modified RAP for industrial settings. We describe how we employed RAP, and show its utility by describing two illustrative themes. We found that while the content vendors believe they provide unique much-needed services, the amount of labor involved in content development is underestimated by others. We also found that the content vendors believe their products are resources to be used by practitioners, so they are somewhat protected from liability issues. To promote adequate understanding about these issues, we recommend a “three way conversation” among content vendors, EHR vendors, and user organizations. PMID:22195058

  9. Free and Open Source Enabling Technologies for Patient-Centric, Guideline-Based Clinical Decision Support: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Leong, T.-Y.; Kaiser, K.; Miksch, S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Objectives: Guideline-based clinical decision support is an emerging paradigm to help reduce error, lower cost, and improve quality in evidence-based medicine. The free and open source (FOS) approach is a promising alternative for delivering cost-effective information technology (IT) solutions in health care. In this paper, we survey the current FOS enabling technologies for patient-centric, guideline-based care, and discuss the current trends and future directions of their role in clinical decision support. Methods: We searched PubMed, major biomedical informatics websites, and the web in general for papers and links related to FOS health care IT systems. We also relied on our background and knowledge for specific subtopics. We focused on the functionalities of guideline modeling tools, and briefly examined the supporting technologies for terminology, data exchange and electronic health record (EHR) standards. Results: To effectively support patient-centric, guideline-based care, the computerized guidelines and protocols need to be integrated with existing clinical information systems or EHRs. Technologies that enable such integration should be accessible, interoperable, and scalable. A plethora of FOS tools and techniques for supporting different knowledge management and quality assurance tasks involved are available. Many challenges, however, remain in their implementation. Conclusions: There are active and growing trends of deploying FOS enabling technologies for integrating clinical guidelines, protocols, and pathways into the main care processes. The continuing development and maturation of such technologies are likely to make increasingly significant contributions to patient-centric, guideline-based clinical decision support. PMID:17700908

  10. Biostatistics in clinical decision making for cardiothoracic radiologists.

    PubMed

    Zurakowski, David; Johnson, Victor M; Lee, Edward Y

    2013-11-01

    Cardiothoracic radiologists are intuitively aware of sensitivity and specificity as they pertain to diagnostic tests involving clinical information. However, many cardiothoracic radiologists are unfamiliar with odds ratios, likelihood ratios, predictive values, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, which provide more information about the performance of a test. Our article will first review the fundamental concepts of sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and likelihood ratios. The ROC curve methodology will be covered with an emphasis on creating a look-up table, a straightforward table that communicates important information to the clinician to aid in diagnosis. The article reviews sensitivity and specificity, as well as predictive values, logistic regression, and ROC curves, using conceptual principles without unnecessary mathematical rigor. We will apply principles of sensitivity and specificity to continuous measurements by constructing ROC curves in order to tie together key ideas in diagnostic decision making. Three clinical examples are presented to illustrate these fundamental statistical concepts: predictors of pulmonary embolism in children, use of dobutamine-cardiac magnetic resonance imaging to identify impaired ventricular function in patients who have suffered a myocardial infarction, and diagnostic accuracy of 64-multidetector row computed tomography to identify occluded vessels in adult patients with suspected coronary artery disease. In addition, a glossary is provided at the end of the article with key terms important in diagnostic imaging. An understanding of the concepts presented will assist cardiothoracic radiologists in critically discerning the usefulness of diagnostic tests and how these statistics can be applied to make judgments and decisions that are essential to clinical practice. PMID:23358369

  11. CRNA performance using a handheld, computerized, decision-making aid during critical events in a simulated environment: a methodologic inquiry.

    PubMed

    Coopmans, Vicki C; Biddle, Chuck

    2008-02-01

    Directives to improve patient outcomes and enhance safety within the healthcare system have led to development of technologies to assist practitioners in a variety of activities. The purpose of this study was to explore and evaluate a method for examining the effect of computer-assisted decision making (CADM) using a handheld device on the accuracy (ie, correct diagnosis and treatment) and speed of problem solving by Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) during simulated critical patient-care events. A randomized crossover design with matched-pair sampling was used. In a high-fidelity human simulation environment, 4 CRNAs participated in 2 plausible critical anesthesia case scenarios. CRNA performance with and without CADM technology, environmental authenticity, and reliability and validity of data collection tools and simulated case scenarios were evaluated. Time to correct diagnosis and treatment varied by scenario, taking less time with CADM for one but more with CADM for the other, likely due to differences in pace, intensity, and conduct of the 2 scenarios. We believe this study supports further exploration and application of CADM in complex patient scenarios involving anesthesia practitioners. Affirmation of environmental authenticity also validates the high-fidelity human simulation environment as an appropriate setting to conduct research in this area. PMID:18323317

  12. Quality and Safety in Health Care, Part IX: Computerized Provider Order Entry.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay A; Harolds, Laura Beth

    2016-04-01

    One of the most important technologic advances to reduce medication errors is computerized provider order entry linked with clinical decision support. These systems also have the potential to improve the adherence of clinicians to best practices, decrease the turnaround time for laboratory tests and radiology examinations, speed transmission of prescriptions to the pharmacy, decrease medication costs, and increase the frequency of vaccinations. PMID:26859206

  13. A clinical decision support system prototype for cardiovascular intensive care.

    PubMed

    Lau, F

    1994-08-01

    This paper describes the development and validation of a decision-support system prototype that can help manage hypovolemic hypotension in the Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit (CVICU). The prototype uses physiologic pattern-matching, therapeutic protocols, computational drug-dosage response modeling and expert reasoning heuristics in its selection of intervention strategies and choices. As part of model testing, the prototype simulated real-time operation by processing historical physiologic and intervention data on a patient sequentially, generating alerts on questionable data, critiques of interventions instituted and recommendations on preferred interventions. Bench-testing with 399 interventions from 13 historical cases showed therapies for bleeding and fluid replacement proposed by the prototype were significantly more consistent (p < 0.0001) than those instituted by the staff when compared against expert critiques (80% versus 44%). This study has demonstrated the feasibility of formalizing hemodynamic management of CVICU patients in a manner that may be implemented and evaluated in a clinical setting. PMID:7829934

  14. Can patient decision aids help people make good decisions about participating in clinical trials? A study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Brehaut, Jamie C; Lott, Alison; Fergusson, Dean A; Shojania, Kaveh G; Kimmelman, Jonathan; Saginur, Raphael

    2008-01-01

    Background Evidence shows that the standard process for obtaining informed consent in clinical trials can be inadequate, with study participants frequently not understanding even basic information fundamental to giving informed consent. Patient decision aids are effective decision support tools originally designed to help patients make difficult treatment or screening decisions. We propose that incorporating decision aids into the informed consent process will improve the extent to which participants make decisions that are informed and consistent with their preferences. A mixed methods study will test this proposal. Methods Phase one of this project will involve assessment of a stratified random sample of 50 consent documents from recently completed investigator-initiated clinical trials, according to existing standards for supporting good decision making. Phase two will involve interviews of a purposive sample of 50 trial participants (10 participants from each of five different clinical areas) about their experience of the informed consent process, and how it could be improved. In phase three, we will convert consent forms for two completed clinical trials into decision aids and pilot test these new tools using a user-centered design approach, an iterative development process commonly employed in computer usability literature. In phase four, we will conduct a pilot observational study comparing the new tools to standard consent forms, with potential recruits to two hypothetical clinical trials. Outcomes will include knowledge of key aspects of the decision, knowledge of the probabilities of different outcomes, decisional conflict, the hypothetical participation decision, and qualitative impressions of the experience. Discussion This work will provide initial evidence about whether a patient decision aid can improve the informed consent process. The larger goal of this work is to examine whether study recruitment can be improved from (barely) informed consent based on disclosure-oriented documents, towards a process of high-quality participant decision-making. PMID:18651981

  15. A Four-Phase Model of the Evolution of Clinical Decision Support Architectures

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F.

    2008-01-01

    Background A large body of evidence over many years suggests that clinical decision support systems can be helpful in improving both clinical outcomes and adherence to evidence-based guidelines. However, to this day, clinical decision support systems are not widely used outside of a small number of sites. One reason why decision support systems are not widely used is the relative difficulty of integrating such systems into clinical workflows and computer systems. Purpose To review and synthesize the history of clinical decision support systems, and to propose a model of various architectures for integrating clinical decision support systems with clinical systems. Methods The authors conducted an extensive review of the clinical decision support literature since 1959, sequenced the systems and developed a model. Results The model developed consists of four phases: standalone decision support systems, decision support integrated into clinical systems, standards for sharing clinical decision support content and service models for decision support. These four phases have not heretofore been identified, but they track remarkably well with the chronological history of clinical decision support, and show evolving and increasingly sophisticated attempts to ease integrating decision support systems into clinical workflows and other clinical systems. Conclusions Each of the four evolutionary approaches to decision support architecture has unique advantages and disadvantages. A key lesson was that there were common limitations that almost all the approaches faced, and no single approach has been able to entirely surmount: 1) fixed knowledge representation systems inherently circumscribe the type of knowledge that can be represented in them, 2) there are serious terminological issues, 3) patient data may be spread across several sources with no single source having a complete view of the patient, and 4) major difficulties exist in transferring successful interventions from one site to another. PMID:18353713

  16. Assessment of Readiness for Clinical Decision Support to Aid Laboratory Monitoring of Immunosuppressive Care at U.S. Liver Transplant Centers

    PubMed Central

    Weir, C.; Evans, R. S.; Staes, C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Following liver transplantation, patients require lifelong immunosuppressive care and monitoring. Computerized clinical decision support (CDS) has been shown to improve post-transplant immunosuppressive care processes and outcomes. The readiness of transplant information systems to implement computerized CDS to support post-transplant care is unknown. Objectives a) Describe the current clinical information system functionality and manual and automated processes for laboratory monitoring of immunosuppressive care, b) describe the use of guidelines that may be used to produce computable logic and the use of computerized alerts to support guideline adherence, and c) explore barriers to implementation of CDS in U.S. liver transplant centers. Methods We developed a web-based survey using cognitive interviewing techniques. We surveyed 119 U.S. transplant programs that performed at least five liver transplantations per year during 2010–2012. Responses were summarized using descriptive analyses; barriers were identified using qualitative methods. Results Respondents from 80 programs (67% response rate) completed the survey. While 98% of programs reported having an electronic health record (EHR), all programs used paper-based manual processes to receive or track immunosuppressive laboratory results. Most programs (85%) reported that 30% or more of their patients used external laboratories for routine testing. Few programs (19%) received most external laboratory results as discrete data via electronic interfaces while most (80%) manually entered laboratory results into the EHR; less than half (42%) could integrate internal and external laboratory results. Nearly all programs had guidelines regarding pre-specified target ranges (92%) or testing schedules (97%) for managing immunosuppressive care. Few programs used computerized alerting to notify transplant coordinators of out-of-range (27%) or overdue laboratory results (20%). Conclusions Use of EHRs is common, yet all liver transplant programs were largely dependent on manual paper-based processes to monitor immunosuppression for post-liver transplant patients. Similar immunosuppression guidelines provide opportunities for sharing CDS once integrated laboratory data are available. PMID:25589912

  17. Hypothesis-Driven Story Building Framework: Enhancing Iterative Process Support in Clinical Diagnostic Decision Support Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shizhuo; Reddy, Madhu; Yen, John

    2009-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis is an iterative process because of partial and ambiguous information, changing conditions, and resource constraints. Although clinical diagnostic decision support systems have been successfully used to support clinical care, they face certain limitations in supporting clinical diagnosis as an iterative process. An approach is required to enhance the iterative process support in clinical diagnostic decision support systems. We model the clinical diagnosis process as a hypothesis-driven story building, and implement a prototype clinical diagnostic decision support system that is able to generate and evaluate differential diagnoses, narrow and revise the diagnoses based on newly obtained information, and prioritize resources for information seeking. PMID:20351951

  18. Changes in diagnostic decision-making after a computerized decision support consultation based on perceptions of need and helpfulness: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Wolf, F M; Friedman, C P; Elstein, A S; Miller, J G; Murphy, G C; Heckerling, P; Fine, P; Miller, T; Sisson, J; Barlas, S; Capitano, A; Ng, M; Franz, T

    1997-01-01

    We examined the degree to which attending physicians, residents, and medical students' stated desire for a consultation on difficult-to-diagnose patient cases is related to changes in their diagnostic judgments after a computer consultation, and whether, in fact, their perceptions of the usefulness of these consultations are related to these changes. The decision support system (DSS) used in this study was ILIAD (v4.2). Preliminary findings based on 16 subjects' (6 general internists, 4 second-year residents in internal medicine, and 6 fourth-year medical students) workup of 136 patient cases indicated no significant main effects for 1) level of experience, 2) whether or not subjects indicated they would seek a diagnostic consultation before using the DSS, or 3) whether or not they found the DSS consultation in fact to be helpful in arriving at a diagnosis (p > .49 in all instances). Nor were there any significant interactions. Findings were similar using subjects or cases as the unit of analysis. It is possible that what may appear to be counter-intuitive, and perhaps irrational, may not necessarily be so. We are currently examining potential explanatory hypotheses in our ongoing current, larger study. PMID:9357629

  19. Improving Clinical Decisions on T2DM Patients Integrating Clinical, Administrative and Environmental Data.

    PubMed

    Segagni, Daniele; Sacchi, Lucia; Dagliati, Arianna; Tibollo, Valentina; Leporati, Paola; De Cata, Pasqale; Chiovato, Luca; Bellazzi, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    This work describes an integrated informatics system developed to collect and display clinically relevant data that can inform physicians and researchers about Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) patient clinical pathways and therapy adherence. The software we developed takes data coming from the electronic medical record (EMR) of the IRCCS Fondazione Maugeri (FSM) hospital of Pavia, Italy, and combines the data with administrative, pharmacy drugs (purchased from the local healthcare agency (ASL) of the Pavia area), and open environmental data of the same region. By using different use cases, we explain the importance of gathering and displaying the data types through a single informatics tool: the use of the tool as a calculator of risk factors and indicators to improve current detection of T2DM, a generator of clinical pathways and patients' behaviors from the point of view of the hospital care management, and a decision support tool for follow-up visits. The results of the performed data analysis report how the use of the dashboard displays meaningful clinical decisions in treating complex chronic diseases and might improve health outcomes. PMID:26262138

  20. Computerized analysis of mammographic parenchymal patterns on a large clinical dataset of full-field digital mammograms: robustness study with two high-risk datasets.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Giger, Maryellen L; Lan, Li; Bancroft Brown, Jeremy; MacMahon, Aoife; Mussman, Mary; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Sennett, Charlene

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the robustness of our prior computerized texture analysis method for breast cancer risk assessment, which was developed initially on a limited dataset of screen-film mammograms. This current study investigated the robustness by (1) evaluating on a large clinical dataset, (2) using full-field digital mammograms (FFDM) as opposed to screen-film mammography, and (3) incorporating analyses over two types of high-risk patient sets, as well as patients at low risk for breast cancer. The evaluation included the analyses on the parenchymal patterns of women at high risk of developing of breast cancer, including both BRCA1/2 gene mutation carriers and unilateral cancer patients, and of women at low risk of developing breast cancer. A total of 456 cases, including 53 women with BRCA1/2 gene mutations, 75 women with unilateral cancer, and 328 low-risk women, were retrospectively collected under an institutional review board approved protocol. Regions-of-interest (ROIs), were manually selected from the central breast region immediately behind the nipple. These ROIs were subsequently used in computerized feature extraction to characterize the mammographic parenchymal patterns in the images. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to assess the performance of the computerized texture features in the task of distinguishing between high-risk and low-risk subjects. In a round robin evaluation on the FFDM dataset with Bayesian artificial neural network analysis, AUC values of 0.82 (95% confidence interval [0.75, 0.88]) and 0.73 (95% confidence interval [0.67, 0.78]) were obtained between BRCA1/2 gene mutation carriers and low-risk women, and between unilateral cancer and low-risk women, respectively. These results from computerized texture analysis on digital mammograms demonstrated that high-risk and low-risk women have different mammographic parenchymal patterns. On this large clinical dataset, we validated our methods for quantitative analyses of mammographic patterns on FFDM, statistically demonstrating again that women at high risk tend to have dense breasts with coarse and low-contrast texture patterns. PMID:22246204

  1. Are more endodontic consultations needed in dental school clinic settings? A study of treatment decisions at one school.

    PubMed

    Aminoshariae, Anita; Tulunoglu, Ibrahim; Demko, Catherine; Galsterer, Mark; Montagnese, Thomas A; Mickel, Andre

    2015-04-01

    With no previous studies of the occurrence of interdisciplinary consultations for tooth extraction in a dental school clinic setting, the aim of this cross-sectional descriptive investigation was to measure and compare the consultation process that occurred among departments at one U.S. dental school for making treatment decisions on tooth extraction. A comprehensive computerized retrieval (Crystal Reports) was used to identify and gather data from patient records from July 1, 2007, to July 1, 2011. Treatment plans and progress notes were analyzed to determine why each tooth had been extracted and which department had recommended the extraction. Results showed that the clinical departments involved in treatment planning decisions were the DMD dental student clinic, Department of Periodontics, and Department of Endodontics. The narrative records of 227 patients who had 516 teeth extracted were examined. About three-fourths (73.26%) of the extracted teeth were extracted based on the recommendation of only one department. Of these extracted teeth, 22.0% (n=114) were previously endodontically treated, and only four were recommended for endodontic consultation prior to extraction. The study found that most extractions were performed without specialty consultations and that the Department of Endodontics was consulted the least of all departments. To foster interdisciplinary collaboration in dental school clinics and help students develop expertise in such collaborations, more specialty consultations are needed for teeth that are treatment planned for extraction in order to preclude needless extraction of potentially salvageable teeth. Doing so will provide benefits for both patient care and students' education. PMID:25838010

  2. Clinical decision support implemented with academic detailing improves prescribing of key renally cleared drugs in the hospital setting

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Christopher J; Cheney, Philip C; Govis, Stephen M; Belcher, Thomas W; Walsh, Scott A; Adams, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    Objective Lack of dose adjustment for renally cleared drugs in the presence of poor renal function is a common problem in the hospital setting. The absence of a clinical decision support system (CDSS) from direct clinician workflows such as computerized provider order entry (CPOE) hinders the uptake of CDSS. This study implemented CDSS in an environment independent of CPOE, introduced to prescribers via academic detailing, to address the dosing of renally cleared drugs. Design GFR+ was designed to automatically calculate and update renal function, doses of key drugs adjusted for renal function, and highlight clinically significant decreases in renal function. Prescribers were made aware of GFR+, its navigation, and surrounding clinical issues, using academic detailing. Measurement The rate of dosing conformity and management for key renally cleared drugs in hospitalized patients, before and after GFR+ implementation. Results Improvements were seen in dosing conformity for enoxaparin (from 68% to 86%, p=0.03), gentamicin (63–87%, p=0.01), and vancomycin (47–77%, p=0.07), as well as the appropriate use of gentamicin therapeutic drug monitoring (70–90%, p=0.02). During episodes of acute renal impairment, renally cleared drugs were held on 38% of instances in the pre-intervention period compared with 62% post-intervention (p=0.01). Conclusion Clinical decision support implemented with academic detailing improved dosing conformity and management of key renally cleared drugs in a hospitalized population. Academic detailing should be strongly considered to facilitate the introduction of CDSS systems that cannot be placed directly into the clinician workflow. PMID:20442149

  3. Molecular Allergy Diagnostics: Analytical Features That Support Clinical Decisions.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Robert G; Kleine-Tebbe, Joerg

    2015-09-01

    Application of purified native and recombinant allergenic molecules into IgE antibody assays can improve analytical sensitivity and specificity for selected allergen specificities. They enhance analytical sensitivity by allowing assays to detect IgE antibodies with a lower limit of quantification (LoQ) to missing or poorly represented allergens in diagnostic extracts that are commonly used in vivo and in vitro. Use of selected allergenic molecules can help improve the clinician's prediction of the risk of a serious allergic reaction to stable allergens. They can provide diagnostic information to determine if a provocation challenge (e.g., oral food challenge) is indeed mandatory or not necessarily needed to support the final diagnostic decision. Suspected cross-reactivity based on the clinical history can be adjudicated by analyzing IgE antibodies to allergenic molecules from cross-reactive protein families. Finally, genuine primary sensitization can be identified by IgE antibody responses that are measured to selected allergenic molecules which are present in only one particular allergen source. After allergen-specific IgE detection, careful interpretation is required by the physician who knows the patient's history. Applying single allergen molecules, positive IgE antibody results are still only relevant in the case of corresponding objective symptoms. Subsequently, clinical relevance of such an IgE antibody test result must be determined by the clinician and not by the test itself. Because of their comprehensive nature, allergen extracts will remain the principal allergen source for diagnostic in vivo and in vitro assays of IgE antibody for many years. Judicious use of individual allergenic molecules in serum IgE assays may provide their most cost effective and efficient application for establishing a definitive diagnosis of human allergic disease. PMID:26233428

  4. Attitude of Iranian physicians and nurses toward a clinical decision support system for pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Agharezaei, Zhila; Bahaadinbeigy, Kambiz; Tofighi, Shahram; Agharezaei, Laleh; Nemati, Ali

    2014-07-01

    This research project sought to design and implement a computerized clinical decision support system (CDSS) that was able to identify patients who were at risk of pulmonary embolism (PE) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT), as well as produce reminders for prophylactic action for these diseases. The main purpose of the CDSS was to attempt to reduce the morbidity and mortality caused by embolism and thrombosis in patients admitted to hospitals. After implementation of this system in one of the large educational hospitals of Iran, a standard questionnaire was used, and interviews were conducted with physicians and nurses to evaluate the performance of the designed system for reducing the incidence of pulmonary embolism and thrombosis. From physicians and nurses' point of view, a system which assists the medical staff in making better decisions regarding patient care, and also reminds pulmonary embolism and thrombosis preventive procedures with timely warnings, can influence patient care quality improvement and lead to the improved performance of the medical staff in preventing the incidence of pulmonary embolism and thrombosis. PMID:24768080

  5. Clinical decision-making in early breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Balch, C M; Singletary, S E; Bland, K I

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This in-depth review of the multidisciplinary approach to early breast cancer treatment (in situ, stage I and II) will update the surgeon about the indications, risks, and benefits of breast surgery, radiation therapy, adjuvant chemotherapy and hormonal therapy, and the importance of breast reconstructive surgery. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Breast cancer will occur in one of eight women in the United States during their lifetime and is the second leading cause of death in women from cancer. The practice of multidisciplinary breast cancer treatment has become the standard of care for the majority of breast cancer patients. If the surgeon is to retain the primary coordinating role in breast cancer management, then he or she must fully understand all modalities of oncology therapy and know how to deploy them to benefit individual patients. CONCLUSIONS: This article provides a framework for making clinical decisions about the appropriate combination and sequence of treatment for various presentations of early breast cancer. Images Figure 4. PMID:8383953

  6. Does Clinical Decision Support Reduce Unwarranted Variation in Yield of CT Pulmonary Angiogram?

    PubMed Central

    Prevedello, Luciano M.; Raja, Ali S.; Ip, Ivan K.; Sodickson, Aaron; Khorasani, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The study objective was to determine whether previously documented effects of clinical decision support on computed tomography for pulmonary embolism in the emergency department (ie, decreased use and increased yield) are due to a decrease in unwarranted variation. We evaluated clinical decision support effect on intra- and inter-physician variability in the yield of pulmonary embolism computed tomography (PE-CT) in this setting. METHODS The study was performed in an academic adult medical center emergency department with 60,000 annual visits. We enrolled all patients who had PE-CT performed 18 months pre- and post-clinical decision support implementation. Intra- and inter-physician variability in yield (% PE-CT positive for acute pulmonary embolism) were assessed. Yield variability was measured using logistic regression accounting for patient characteristics. RESULTS A total of 1542 PE-CT scans were performed before clinical decision support, and 1349 PE-CT scans were performed after clinical decision support. Use of PE-CT decreased from 26.5 to 24.3 computed tomography scans/1000 patient visits after clinical decision support (P < .02); yield increased from 9.2% to 12.6% (P < .01). Crude inter-physician variability in yield ranged from 2.6% to 20.5% before clinical decision support and from 0% to 38.1% after clinical decision support. After controlling for patient characteristics, the post-clinical decision support period showed significant inter-physician variability (P < .04). Intra-physician variability was significant in 3 of the 25 physicians (P < .04), all with increased yield post-clinical decision support. CONCLUSIONS Overall PE-CT yield increased after clinical decision support implementation despite significant heterogeneity among physicians. Increased inter-physician variability in yield after clinical decision support was not explained by patient characteristics alone and may be due to variable physician acceptance of clinical decision support. Clinical decision support alone is unlikely to eliminate unwarranted variability, and additional strategies and interventions may be needed to help optimize acceptance of clinical decision support to maximize returns on national investments in health information technology. PMID:24157288

  7. Clinical care paths: a role for finance in clinical decision-making.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Michael N; Cummings, Simone; Hage, Dana

    2012-12-01

    Care paths map the critical actions and decision points across a patient's course of medical treatment; their purpose is to guide physicians in the delivery of high-quality care while reducing care costs by avoiding services that do not contribute meaningfully to positive outcomes. Each care path development initiative should be led by a respected physician champion, whose specialty is in the area of the care episode being mapped, with the support of a clinician project manager. Once the care path has been developed and implemented, the finance leader's role begins in earnest with the tracking of financial and clinical data against care paths. PMID:23252234

  8. Clinical Decision Support to Implement CYP2D6 Drug-Gene Interaction.

    PubMed

    Caraballo, Pedro J; Parkulo, Mark; Blair, David; Elliott, Michelle; Schultz, Cloann; Sutton, Joseph; Rao, Padma; Bruflat, Jamie; Bleimeyer, Robert; Crooks, John; Gabrielson, Donald; Nicholson, Wayne; Rohrer Vitek, Carolyn; Wix, Kelly; Bielinski, Suzette J; Pathak, Jyotishman; Kullo, Iftikhar

    2015-01-01

    The level of CYP2D6 metabolic activity can be predicted by pharmacogenomic testing, and concomitant use of clinical decision support has the potential to prevent adverse effects from those drugs metabolized by this enzyme. Our initial findings after implementation of clinical decision support alerts integrated in the electronic health records suggest high feasibility, but also identify important challenges. PMID:26262248

  9. The Case for Conceptual and Computable Cross-Fertilization Between Audit and Feedback and Clinical Decision Support.

    PubMed

    Brown, Benjamin; Peek, Niels; Buchan, Iain

    2015-01-01

    Many patients do not receive care consistent with best practice. Health informatics interventions often attempt to address this problem by comparing care provided to patients (e.g., from electronic health record data) to quality standards (e.g., described in clinical guidelines) and feeding this information back to clinicians. Traditionally these interventions are delivered at the patient-level as computerized clinical decision support (CDS) or at the population level as audit and feedback (A&F). Both CDS and A&F can improve care for patients but are variably effective; the challenge is to understand how the efficacy can be maximized. Although CDS and A&F are traditionally considered separate approaches, we argue that the systems share common mechanisms, and efficacy may be improved by cross-fertilizing relevant features and concepts. We draw on the Health Informatics and Implementation Science literature to argue that common mechanisms include functions typically associated with the other system, in addition to other features that may prove fruitful for further research. PMID:26262084

  10. Clinical considerations. Surrogate decision making for hospitalized elders.

    PubMed

    Shawler, C; High, D M; Moore, K K; Velotta, C

    1992-06-01

    Nurses are increasingly caring for older persons who have become decisionally incapacitated due to acute or chronic illnesses. A nurse may be called on to share in the decision-making process for the elderly patient or to assist in bringing about a surrogate decision involving the patient's relatives and the medical team. PMID:1602116

  11. Decision Making in the PICU: An Examination of Factors Influencing Participation Decisions in Phase III Randomized Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Slosky, Laura E; Stern, Marilyn; Burke, Natasha L; Siminoff, Laura A

    2014-01-01

    Background. In stressful situations, decision making processes related to informed consent may be compromised. Given the profound levels of distress that surrogates of children in pediatric intensive care units (PICU) experience, it is important to understand what factors may be influencing the decision making process beyond the informed consent. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of clinician influence and other factors on decision making regarding participation in a randomized clinical trial (RCT). Method. Participants were 76 children under sedation in a PICU and their surrogate decision makers. Measures included the Post Decision Clinician Survey, observer checklist, and post-decision interview. Results. Age of the pediatric patient was related to participation decisions in the RCT such that older children were more likely to be enrolled. Mentioning the sponsoring institution was associated with declining to participate in the RCT. Type of health care provider and overt recommendations to participate were not related to enrollment. Conclusion. Decisions to participate in research by surrogates of children in the PICU appear to relate to child demographics and subtleties in communication; however, no modifiable characteristics were related to increased participation, indicating that the informed consent process may not be compromised in this population. PMID:25161672

  12. Coverage and predictors of vaccination against 2012/13 seasonal influenza in Madrid, Spain: analysis of population-based computerized immunization registries and clinical records.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Esteban-Vasallo, María D; Rodríguez-Rieiro, Cristina; Hernandez-Barrera, Valentín; Domínguez-Berjón, M A Felicitas; Carrasco Garrido, Pilar; Lopez de Andres, Ana; Cameno Heras, Moises; Iniesta Fornies, Domingo; Astray-Mochales, Jenaro

    2014-01-01

    We aim to determine 2012-13 seasonal influenza vaccination coverage. Data were analyzed by age group and by coexistence of concomitant chronic conditions. Factors associated with vaccine uptake were identified. We also analyze a possible trend in vaccine uptake in post pandemic seasons. We used computerized immunization registries and clinical records of the entire population of the Autonomous Community of Madrid, Spain (6,284,128 persons) as data source. A total of 871,631 individuals were vaccinated (13.87%). Coverage for people aged ≥ 65 years was 56.57%. Global coverage in people with a chronic condition was 15.7% in children and 18.69% in adults aged 15-59 years. The variables significantly associated with a higher likelihood of being vaccinated in the 2012-13 campaign for the age groups studied were higher age, being Spanish-born, higher number of doses of seasonal vaccine received in previous campaigns, uptake of pandemic vaccination, and having a chronic condition. We conclude that vaccination coverage in persons aged<60 years with chronic conditions is less than acceptable. The very low coverage among children with chronic conditions calls for urgent interventions. Among those aged ≥60 years, uptake is higher but still far from optimal and seems to be descending in post-pandemic campaigns. For those aged ≥65 years the mean percentage of decrease from the 2009/10 to the actual campaign has been 12%. Computerized clinical and immunization registers are useful tools for providing rapid and detailed information about influenza vaccination coverage in the population. PMID:24280728

  13. EBMPracticeNet: A Bilingual National Electronic Point-Of-Care Project for Retrieval of Evidence-Based Clinical Guideline Information and Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Belgium, the construction of a national electronic point-of-care information service, EBMPracticeNet, was initiated in 2011 to optimize quality of care by promoting evidence-based decision-making. The collaboration of the government, health care providers, evidence-based medicine (EBM) partners, and vendors of electronic health records (EHR) is unique to this project. All Belgian health care professionals get free access to an up-to-date database of validated Belgian and nearly 1000 international guidelines, incorporated in a portal that also provides EBM information from other sources than guidelines, including computerized clinical decision support that is integrated in the EHRs. Objective The objective of this paper was to describe the development strategy, the overall content, and the management of EBMPracticeNet which may be of relevance to other health organizations creating national or regional electronic point-of-care information services. Methods Several candidate providers of comprehensive guideline solutions were evaluated and one database was selected. Translation of the guidelines to Dutch and French was done with translation software, post-editing by translators and medical proofreading. A strategy is determined to adapt the guideline content to the Belgian context. Acceptance of the computerized clinical decision support tool has been tested and a randomized controlled trial is planned to evaluate the effect on process and patient outcomes. Results Currently, EBMPracticeNet is in "work in progress" state. Reference is made to the results of a pilot study and to further planned research including a randomized controlled trial. Conclusions The collaboration of government, health care providers, EBM partners, and vendors of EHRs is unique. The potential value of the project is great. The link between all the EHRs from different vendors and a national database held on a single platform that is controlled by all EBM organizations in Belgium are the strengths of EBMPracticeNet. PMID:23842038

  14. Usability of clinical decision support system as a facilitator for learning the assistive technology adaptation process.

    PubMed

    Danial-Saad, Alexandra; Kuflik, Tsvi; Weiss, Patrice L Tamar; Schreuer, Naomi

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usability of Ontology Supported Computerized Assistive Technology Recommender (OSCAR), a Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) for the assistive technology adaptation process, its impact on learning the matching process, and to determine the relationship between its usability and learnability. Two groups of expert and novice clinicians (total, n = 26) took part in this study. Each group filled out system usability scale (SUS) to evaluate OSCAR's usability. The novice group completed a learning questionnaire to assess OSCAR's effect on their ability to learn the matching process. Both groups rated OSCAR's usability as "very good", (M [SUS] = 80.7, SD = 11.6, median = 83.7) by the novices, and (M [SUS] = 81.2, SD = 6.8, median = 81.2) by the experts. The Mann-Whitney results indicated that no significant differences were found between the expert and novice groups in terms of OSCAR's usability. A significant positive correlation existed between the usability of OSCAR and the ability to learn the adaptation process (rs = 0.46, p = 0.04). Usability is an important factor in the acceptance of a system. The successful application of user-centered design principles during the development of OSCAR may serve as a case study that models the significant elements to be considered, theoretically and practically in developing other systems. Implications for Rehabilitation Creating a CDSS with a focus on its usability is an important factor for its acceptance by its users. Successful usability outcomes can impact the learning process of the subject matter in general, and the AT prescription process in particular. The successful application of User-Centered Design principles during the development of OSCAR may serve as a case study that models the significant elements to be considered, theoretically and practically. The study emphasizes the importance of close collaboration between the developers and the end users. PMID:26203588

  15. Implementation of workflow engine technology to deliver basic clinical decision support functionality

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Workflow engine technology represents a new class of software with the ability to graphically model step-based knowledge. We present application of this novel technology to the domain of clinical decision support. Successful implementation of decision support within an electronic health record (EHR) remains an unsolved research challenge. Previous research efforts were mostly based on healthcare-specific representation standards and execution engines and did not reach wide adoption. We focus on two challenges in decision support systems: the ability to test decision logic on retrospective data prior prospective deployment and the challenge of user-friendly representation of clinical logic. Results We present our implementation of a workflow engine technology that addresses the two above-described challenges in delivering clinical decision support. Our system is based on a cross-industry standard of XML (extensible markup language) process definition language (XPDL). The core components of the system are a workflow editor for modeling clinical scenarios and a workflow engine for execution of those scenarios. We demonstrate, with an open-source and publicly available workflow suite, that clinical decision support logic can be executed on retrospective data. The same flowchart-based representation can also function in a prospective mode where the system can be integrated with an EHR system and respond to real-time clinical events. We limit the scope of our implementation to decision support content generation (which can be EHR system vendor independent). We do not focus on supporting complex decision support content delivery mechanisms due to lack of standardization of EHR systems in this area. We present results of our evaluation of the flowchart-based graphical notation as well as architectural evaluation of our implementation using an established evaluation framework for clinical decision support architecture. Conclusions We describe an implementation of a free workflow technology software suite (available at http://code.google.com/p/healthflow) and its application in the domain of clinical decision support. Our implementation seamlessly supports clinical logic testing on retrospective data and offers a user-friendly knowledge representation paradigm. With the presented software implementation, we demonstrate that workflow engine technology can provide a decision support platform which evaluates well against an established clinical decision support architecture evaluation framework. Due to cross-industry usage of workflow engine technology, we can expect significant future functionality enhancements that will further improve the technology's capacity to serve as a clinical decision support platform. PMID:21477364

  16. Clinical Verification of A Clinical Decision Support System for Ventilator Weaning

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Weaning is typically regarded as a process of discontinuing mechanical ventilation in the daily practice of an intensive care unit (ICU). Among the ICU patients, 39%-40% need mechanical ventilator for sustaining their lives. The predictive rate of successful weaning achieved only 35-60% for decisions made by physicians. Clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) are promising in enhancing diagnostic performance and improve healthcare quality in clinical setting. To our knowledge, a prospective study has never been conducted to verify the effectiveness of the CDSS in ventilator weaning before. In this study, the CDSS capable of predicting weaning outcome and reducing duration of ventilator support for patients has been verified. Methods A total of 380 patients admitted to the respiratory care center of the hospital were randomly assigned to either control or study group. In the control group, patients were weaned with traditional weaning method, while in the study group, patients were weaned with CDSS monitored by physicians. After excluding the patients who transferred to other hospitals, refused further treatments, or expired the admission period, data of 168 and 144 patients in the study and control groups, respectively, were used for analysis. Results The results show that a sensitivity of 87.7% has been achieved, which is significantly higher (p<0.01) than the weaning determined by physicians (sensitivity: 61.4%). Furthermore, the days using mechanical ventilator for the study group (38.41 ± 3.35) is significantly (p<0.001) shorter than the control group (43.69 ± 14.89), with a decrease of 5.2 days in average, resulting in a saving of healthcare cost of NT$45,000 (US$1,500) per patient in the current Taiwanese National Health Insurance setting. Conclusions The CDSS is demonstrated to be effective in identifying the earliest time of ventilator weaning for patients to resume and sustain spontaneous breathing, thereby avoiding unnecessary prolonged ventilator use and decreasing healthcare cost. PMID:24565021

  17. The Clinical Intuition Exploration Guide: A Decision-Making Tool for Counselors and Supervisors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffrey, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Clinical intuition is a common experience among counselors, yet many do not know what to do with intuition when it occurs. This article reviews the role intuition plays in clinical work and presents the research-based Clinical Intuition Exploration Guide to help counselors navigate the decision-making process. The guide consists of self-reflection…

  18. The Clinical Intuition Exploration Guide: A Decision-Making Tool for Counselors and Supervisors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffrey, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Clinical intuition is a common experience among counselors, yet many do not know what to do with intuition when it occurs. This article reviews the role intuition plays in clinical work and presents the research-based Clinical Intuition Exploration Guide to help counselors navigate the decision-making process. The guide consists of self-reflection…

  19. Mental Workload as a Key Factor in Clinical Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Aidan

    2013-01-01

    The decision making process is central to the practice of a clinician and has traditionally been described in terms of the hypothetico-deductive model. More recently, models adapted from cognitive psychology, such as the dual process and script theories have proved useful in explaining patterns of practice not consistent with purely cognitive…

  20. Decision support for clinical trial eligibility determination in breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Ohno-Machado, L.; Wang, S. J.; Mar, P.; Boxwala, A. A.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a system for clinical trial eligibility determination where patients or primary care providers can enter clinical information about a patient and obtain a ranked list of clinical trials for which the patient is likely to be eligible. We used clinical trial eligibility information from the National Cancer Institute's Physician Data Query (PDQ) database. We translated each free-text eligibility criterion into a machine executable statement using a derivation of the Arden Syntax. Clinical trial protocols were then structured as collections of these eligibility criteria using XML. The application compares the entered patient information against each of the eligibility criteria and returns a numerical score. Results are displayed in order of likelihood of match. We have tested our system using all phase II and III clinical trials for treatment of metastatic breast cancer found in the PDQ database. Preliminary results are encouraging. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:10566377

  1. Factors Predicting Oncology Care Providers' Behavioral Intention to Adopt Clinical Decision Support Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfenden, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlation study was to examine the predictors of user behavioral intention on the decision of oncology care providers to adopt or reject the clinical decision support system. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) formed the foundation of the research model and survey instrument. The…

  2. Factors Predicting Oncology Care Providers' Behavioral Intention to Adopt Clinical Decision Support Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfenden, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlation study was to examine the predictors of user behavioral intention on the decision of oncology care providers to adopt or reject the clinical decision support system. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) formed the foundation of the research model and survey instrument. The…

  3. An Examination of Accelerated and Basic Baccalaureate Nursing Students' Perceptions of Clinical Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumwiede, Kelly A.

    2010-01-01

    Developing decision-making skills is essential in education in order to be a competent nurse. The purpose of this study was to examine and compare the perceptions of clinical decision-making skills of students enrolled in accelerated and basic baccalaureate nursing programs. A comparative descriptive research design was used for this study.…

  4. Disciplined Decision Making in an Interdisciplinary Environment: Some Implications for Clinical Applications of Statistical Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hantula, Donald A.

    1995-01-01

    Clinical applications of statistical process control (SPC) in human service organizations are considered. SPC is seen as providing a standard set of criteria that serves as a common interface for data-based decision making, which may bring decision making under the control of established contingencies rather than the immediate contingencies of…

  5. SANDS: A Service-Oriented Architecture for Clinical Decision Support in a National Health Information Network

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we describe and evaluate a new distributed architecture for clinical decision support called SANDS (Service-oriented Architecture for NHIN Decision Support), which leverages current health information exchange efforts and is based on the principles of a service-oriented architecture. The architecture allows disparate clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems to be seamlessly integrated over a network according to a set of interfaces and protocols described in this paper. The architecture described is fully defined and developed, and six use cases have been developed and tested using a prototype electronic health record which links to one of the existing prototype National Health Information Networks (NHIN): drug interaction checking, syndromic surveillance, diagnostic decision support, inappropriate prescribing in older adults, information at the point of care and a simple personal health record. Some of these use cases utilize existing decision support systems, which are either commercially or freely available at present, and developed outside of the SANDS project, while other use cases are based on decision support systems developed specifically for the project. Open source code for many of these components is available, and an open source reference parser is also available for comparison and testing of other clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems that wish to implement the SANDS architecture. PMID:18434256

  6. Caregiver Perceptions of Clinical Decision-Making for the Treatment of Children.

    PubMed

    Allen, Brian; Varela, Alberto

    2015-10-01

    Many sources of information impact one's clinical decision-making (CDM) (e.g. clinical intuition, previous experience, research results). Relatively little is known about the clients' perspectives of these factors. The current study is an examination of perceptions of the favorability of various CDM influences held by caregivers of children presenting for mental health treatment (n = 371). Responses to a questionnaire showed that caregivers overwhelmingly favored a treatment decision based on current scientific research, with one's clinical experience being the second most favored influence. Other influences, such as colleague consultation and clinical intuition, were less favorable. PMID:25820987

  7. Hip fractures and dementia: clinical decisions for the future

    PubMed Central

    Waran, Eswaran; William, Leeroy

    2016-01-01

    Severe dementia is a life-limiting condition; hip fractures are more common in patients who have dementia. This study outlines the case of a 92-year-old female with severe dementia who sustained a hip fracture. Despite having a terminal diagnosis (severe dementia and hip fracture) and poor premorbid quality of life, she had a life-prolonging surgery. The report outlines issues around treatment options in such circumstances, informed consent and substitute decision-making. The authors propose a ‘goals of care’ approach to manage patients in whom the best treatment is unclear, during their attendance to the emergency department. It is suggested that utilization of such a model may help with substitute decision-making and true informed consent.

  8. Decision analysis in clinical cardiology: When is coronary angiography required in aortic stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Georgeson, S.; Meyer, K.B.; Pauker, S.G. )

    1990-03-15

    Decision analysis offers a reproducible, explicit approach to complex clinical decisions. It consists of developing a model, typically a decision tree, that separates choices from chances and that specifies and assigns relative values to outcomes. Sensitivity analysis allows exploration of alternative assumptions. Cost-effectiveness analysis shows the relation between dollars spent and improved health outcomes achieved. In a tutorial format, this approach is applied to the decision whether to perform coronary angiography in a patient who requires aortic valve replacement for critical aortic stenosis.

  9. Seeking evidence to support usability principles for medication-related clinical decision support (CDS) functions.

    PubMed

    Marcilly, Romaric; Beuscart-Zéphir, Marie-Catherine; Ammenwerth, Elske; Pelayo, Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    There is a need for evidence-based usability principles to support the design of usable medication-related computerized CDS functions and systems. Such evidence requires establishing scientific relationships between usability principles, their violation in terms of usability flaws, issuing usage problems and their consequences or outcomes in the clinical work and patient care. This kind of evidence is not currently directly available in scientific evaluation studies of medication CDS functions. A possible proxy to seek evidence is systematic review of existing scientific evaluation reports. We rely on a four-stage framework describing the chain of consequences and inferences linking usability principles to clinical outcomes to design the systematic review methodology and interpretation principles. This paper describes the four-stage framework and the resulting consequences for the systematic review design. PMID:23920590

  10. Shared decision making: examining key elements and barriers to adoption into routine clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Légaré, France; Witteman, Holly O

    2013-02-01

    For many patients, the time spent meeting with their physician-the clinical encounter-is the most opportune moment for them to become engaged in their own health through the process of shared decision making. In the United States shared decision making is being promoted for its potential to improve the health of populations and individual patients, while also helping control care costs. In this overview we describe the three essential elements of shared decision making: recognizing and acknowledging that a decision is required; knowing and understanding the best available evidence; and incorporating the patient's values and preferences into the decision. To achieve the promise of shared decision making, more physicians need training in the approach, and more practices need to be reorganized around the principles of patient engagement. Additional research is also needed to identify the interventions that are most effective. PMID:23381520

  11. “Quality of prenatal and maternal care: bridging the know-do gap” (QUALMAT study): an electronic clinical decision support system for rural Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite strong efforts to improve maternal care, its quality remains deficient in many countries of Sub-Saharan Africa as persistently high maternal mortality rates testify. The QUALMAT study seeks to improve the performance and motivation of rural health workers and ultimately quality of primary maternal health care services in three African countries Burkina Faso, Ghana, and Tanzania. One major intervention is the introduction of a computerized Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) for rural primary health care centers to be used by health care workers of different educational levels. Methods A stand-alone, java-based software, able to run on any standard hardware, was developed based on assessment of the health care situation in the involved countries. The software scope was defined and the final software was programmed under consideration of test experiences. Knowledge for the decision support derived from the World Health Organization (WHO) guideline “Pregnancy, Childbirth, Postpartum and Newborn Care; A Guide for Essential Practice”. Results The QUALMAT CDSS provides computerized guidance and clinical decision support for antenatal care, and care during delivery and up to 24 hours post delivery. The decision support is based on WHO guidelines and designed using three principles: (1) Guidance through routine actions in maternal and perinatal care, (2) integration of clinical data to detect situations of concern by algorithms, and (3) electronic tracking of peri- and postnatal activities. In addition, the tool facilitates patient management and is a source of training material. The implementation of the software, which is embedded in a set of interventions comprising the QUALMAT study, is subject to various research projects assessing and quantifying the impact of the CDSS on quality of care, the motivation of health care staff (users) and its health economic aspects. The software will also be assessed for its usability and acceptance, as well as for its influence on workflows in the rural setting of primary health care in the three countries involved. Conclusion The development and implementation of a CDSS in rural primary health care centres presents challenges, which may be overcome with careful planning and involvement of future users at an early stage. A tailored software with stable functionality should offer perspectives to improve maternal care in resource-poor settings. Trial registration http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/NCT01409824. PMID:23574764

  12. Guest Expert: Barbara Biedzycki: Decision-making regarding clinical trial participation | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Welcome to our'Guest Blogger' Dr. Barbara Biedzycki. Barbara is a Clinical Research Associate at the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore. She recently completed her doctoral program and much of her research has been on decision-making regarding clinical trial participation.

  13. Computer Decision Support to Improve Autism Screening and Care in Community Pediatric Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Nerissa S.; Sturm, Lynne A.; Carroll, Aaron E.; Downs, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    An autism module was added to an existing computer decision support system (CDSS) to facilitate adherence to recommended guidelines for screening for autism spectrum disorders in primary care pediatric clinics. User satisfaction was assessed by survey and informal feedback at monthly meetings between clinical staff and the software team. To assess…

  14. Computer Decision Support to Improve Autism Screening and Care in Community Pediatric Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Nerissa S.; Sturm, Lynne A.; Carroll, Aaron E.; Downs, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    An autism module was added to an existing computer decision support system (CDSS) to facilitate adherence to recommended guidelines for screening for autism spectrum disorders in primary care pediatric clinics. User satisfaction was assessed by survey and informal feedback at monthly meetings between clinical staff and the software team. To assess…

  15. A Three-Question Framework to Facilitate Clinical Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibold, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Context: Highly developed critical thinking and the ability to discriminate among many possible therapeutic interventions is a core behavior for the practicing athletic trainer. However, while athletic training students receive a great deal of clinically applicable information, many are not explicitly trained in efficient methods for channeling…

  16. A Three-Question Framework to Facilitate Clinical Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibold, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Context: Highly developed critical thinking and the ability to discriminate among many possible therapeutic interventions is a core behavior for the practicing athletic trainer. However, while athletic training students receive a great deal of clinically applicable information, many are not explicitly trained in efficient methods for channeling…

  17. Clinical decision-making and therapeutic approaches in osteopathy - a qualitative grounded theory study.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Oliver P; Petty, Nicola J; Moore, Ann P

    2014-02-01

    There is limited understanding of how osteopaths make decisions in relation to clinical practice. The aim of this research was to construct an explanatory theory of the clinical decision-making and therapeutic approaches of experienced osteopaths in the UK. Twelve UK registered osteopaths participated in this constructivist grounded theory qualitative study. Purposive and theoretical sampling was used to select participants. Data was collected using semi-structured interviews which were audio-recorded and transcribed. As the study approached theoretical sufficiency, participants were observed and video-recorded during a patient appointment, which was followed by a video-prompted interview. Constant comparative analysis was used to analyse and code data. Data analysis resulted in the construction of three qualitatively different therapeutic approaches which characterised participants and their clinical practice, termed; Treater, Communicator and Educator. Participants' therapeutic approach influenced their approach to clinical decision-making, the level of patient involvement, their interaction with patients, and therapeutic goals. Participants' overall conception of practice lay on a continuum ranging from technical rationality to professional artistry, and contributed to their therapeutic approach. A range of factors were identified which influenced participants' conception of practice. The findings indicate that there is variation in osteopaths' therapeutic approaches to practice and clinical decision-making, which are influenced by their overall conception of practice. This study provides the first explanatory theory of the clinical decision-making and therapeutic approaches of osteopaths. PMID:23932101

  18. Interpreting Progress Feedback to Guide Clinical Decision-Making in Children's Mental Health Services.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Katherine H; Moskowitz, Andrew L; Brown, Todd E; Park, Alayna L; Chorpita, Bruce F

    2016-03-01

    Measurement feedback systems (MFSs) can help improve clinical outcomes by enhancing clinical decision-making. Unfortunately, limited information exists to guide the use and interpretation of data from MFSs. This study examined the amount of data that would provide a reasonable and reliable prediction of a client's rate of symptomatology in order to help inform clinical decision-making processes. Results showed that use of more data predicted greater levels of accuracy. However, there were diminishing returns on the ability for additional data to improve predictive accuracy. Findings inform efforts to develop guidelines on the interpretation of data from MFSs. PMID:25627140

  19. [The impact of guidelines, standards and economic restrictions on clinical decision-making processes].

    PubMed

    Linden, Michael

    2004-05-01

    Guidelines aim at improving clinical decision-making. Contrary to textbooks and reviews that want to improve medical knowledge, guidelines try to influence medical behaviour. Scientific models of clinical decision-making such as the action theory and empirical data on the effects of guidelines suggest that guidelines will not always reach their goals but can instead even lead to a deterioration in the quality of medical care. Therefore there is a need for controlled clinical trials to investigate whether guideline-exposed physicians yield better patient outcomes than guideline-naïve physicians. Guidelines should only be regarded as evidence-based if their positive effects have been empirically demonstrated. PMID:15250387

  20. Dental patient preferences and choice in clinical decision-making.

    PubMed

    Fukai, Kakuhiro; Yoshino, Koichi; Ohyama, Atsushi; Takaesu, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    In economics, the concept of utility refers to the strength of customer preference. In health care assessment, the visual analogue scale (VAS), the standard gamble, and the time trade-off are used to measure health state utilities. These utility measurements play a key role in promoting shared decision-making in dental care. Individual preference, however, is complex and dynamic. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between patient preference and educational intervention in the field of dental health. The data were collected by distributing questionnaires to employees of two companies in Japan. Participants were aged 18-65 years and consisted of 111 males and 93 females (204 in total). One company (Group A) had a dental program of annual check-ups and health education in the workplace, while the other company (Group B) had no such program. Statistical analyses were performed with the t-test and Chi-square test. The questionnaire items were designed to determine: (1) oral health-related quality of life, (2) dental health state utilities (using VAS), and (3) time trade-off for regular dental check-ups. The percentage of respondents in both groups who were satisfied with chewing function, appearance of teeth, and social function ranged from 23.1 to 42.4%. There were no significant differences between groups A and B in the VAS of decayed, filled, and missing teeth. The VAS of gum bleeding was 42.8 in Group A and 51.3 in Group B (p<0.05). The percentage of persons having a regular dental check-up every three months was 34.1 and 31.3% in Groups A and B respectively. These results suggest that low preference results from lack of opportunity or utilization of dental care in the worksite. Ascertaining the factors involved in patient preference may have significant potential benefits in shared decision-making. PMID:22790334

  1. Comparative evaluation of different medication safety measures for the emergency department: physicians’ usage and acceptance of training, poster, checklist and computerized decision support

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although usage and acceptance are important factors for a successful implementation of clinical decision support systems for medication, most studies only concentrate on their design and outcome. Our objective was to comparatively investigate a set of traditional medication safety measures such as medication safety training for physicians, paper-based posters and checklists concerning potential medication problems versus the additional benefit of a computer-assisted medication check. We concentrated on usage, acceptance and suitability of such interventions in a busy emergency department (ED) of a 749 bed acute tertiary care hospital. Methods A retrospective, qualitative evaluation study was conducted using a field observation and a questionnaire-based survey. Six physicians were observed while treating 20 patient cases; the questionnaire, based on the Technology Acceptance Model 2 (TAM2), has been answered by nine ED physicians. Results During field observations, we did not observe direct use of any of the implemented interventions for medication safety (paper-based and electronic). Questionnaire results indicated that the electronic medication safety check was the most frequently used intervention, followed by checklist and posters. However, despite their positive attitude, physicians most often stated that they use the interventions in only up to ten percent for subjectively “critical” orders. Main reasons behind the low usage were deficits in ease-of-use and fit to the workflow. The intention to use the interventions was rather high after overcoming these barriers. Conclusions Methodologically, the study contributes to Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) research in an ED setting and confirms TAM2 as a helpful diagnostic tool in identifying barriers for a successful implementation of medication safety interventions. In our case, identified barriers explaining the low utilization of the implemented medication safety interventions - despite their positive reception - include deficits in accessibility, briefing for the physicians about the interventions, ease-of-use and compatibility to the working environment. PMID:23890121

  2. Cholinesterase inhibitors: applying pharmacokinetics to clinical decision making.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Gomolin IH; Smith C; Jeitner TM

    2011-08-01

    BACKGROUND: Cholinesterase inhibitors are indicated for the treatment of Alzheimer-type dementia. There are few direct comparative studies of adverse effects or studies to suggest clinical superiority of one inhibitor over the others.OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to relate pharmacokinetic differences among the agents to potential clinical considerations.METHODS: Population pharmacokinetics were obtained from US Food and Drug Administration-approved label information and published literature. Plasma concentration-time profiles were derived from these parameters using noncompartmental pharmacokinetic modeling.RESULTS: Plasma concentration profiles differed significantly among different agents and between different formulations of the same agent.CONCLUSIONS: The initial choice among the various cholinesterase inhibitors requires consideration to adherence and cost. Consideration to differences in pharmacokinetics among these drugs provides a better understanding for the clinical practice of dose titration, identification and management of drug-related side effects, and lapses in therapy. Pharmacokinetic considerations among the various agents and formulations provide the clinician with options to enhance therapy when these agents are chosen for treatment of patients with Alzheimer-type dementia.

  3. Clinical Decision Support for Nurses: A Fall Risk and Prevention Example.

    PubMed

    Lytle, Kathryn S; Short, Nancy M; Richesson, Rachel L; Horvath, Monica M

    2015-12-01

    Clinical decision support tools in electronic health records have demonstrated improvement with process measures and clinician performance, predominantly for providers. Clinical decision support tools could improve patient fall risk identification and prevention plans, a common concern for nursing. This quality-improvement project used clinical decision support to improve the rate of nurse compliance with documented fall risk assessments and, for patients at high risk, fall prevention plans of care in 16 adult inpatient units. Preintervention and postintervention data were compared using quarterly audits, retrospective chart review, safety reports, and falls and falls-with-injury rates. Documentation of fall risk assessments on the 16 units improved significantly according to quarterly audit data (P = .05), whereas documentation of the plans of care did not. Retrospective chart review on two units indicated improvement for admission fall risk assessment (P = .05) and a decrease in the documentation of the shift plan of care (P = .01); one unit had a statistically significant decrease in documentation of plans of care on admission (P = .00). Examination of safety reports for patients who fell showed all patients before and after clinical decision support had fall risk assessments documented. Falls and falls with injury did not change significantly before and after clinical decision support intervention. PMID:26571334

  4. A controlled time-series trial of clinical reminders: using computerized firm systems to make quality improvement research a routine part of mainstream practice.

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, H. I.; Neighbor, W. E.; Cheadle, A. D.; Ramsey, S. D.; Diehr, P.; Gore, E.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the feasibility of conducting unobtrusive interventional research in community practice settings by integrating firm-system techniques with time-series analysis of relational-repository data. STUDY SETTING: A satellite teaching clinic divided into two similar, but geographically separated, primary care group practices called firms. One firm was selected by chance to receive the study intervention. Forty-two providers and 2,655 patients participated. STUDY DESIGN: A nonrandomized controlled trial of computer-generated preventive reminders. Net effects were determined by quantitatively combining population-level data from parallel experimental and control interrupted time series extending over two-month baseline and intervention periods. DATA COLLECTION: Mean rates at which mammography, colorectal cancer screening, and cholesterol testing were performed on patients due to receive each maneuver at clinic visits were the trial's outcome measures. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mammography performance increased on the experimental firm by 154 percent (0.24 versus 0.61, p = .03). No effect on fecal occult blood testing was observed. Cholesterol ordering decreased on both the experimental (0.18 versus 0.1 1, p = .02) and control firms (0.13 versus 0.07, p = .03) coincident with national guidelines retreating from recommending screening for young adults. A traditional uncontrolled interrupted time-series design would have incorrectly attributed the experimental-firm decrease to the introduction of reminders. The combined analysis properly indicated that no net prompting effect had occurred, as the difference between firms in cholesterol testing remained stochastically stable over time (0.05 versus 0.04, p = .75). A logistic-regression analysis applied to individual-level data produced equivalent findings. The trial incurred no supplementary data collection costs. CONCLUSIONS: The apparent validity and practicability of our reminder implementation study should encourage others to develop computerized firm systems capable of conducting controlled time-series trials. Images Fig. 1 PMID:10737451

  5. Multi-criteria clinical decision support: A primer on the use of multiple criteria decision making methods to promote evidence-based, patient-centered healthcare.

    PubMed

    Dolan, James G

    2010-01-01

    Current models of healthcare quality recommend that patient management decisions be evidence-based and patient-centered. Evidence-based decisions require a thorough understanding of current information regarding the natural history of disease and the anticipated outcomes of different management options. Patient-centered decisions incorporate patient preferences, values, and unique personal circumstances into the decision making process and actively involve both patients along with health care providers as much as possible. Fundamentally, therefore, evidence-based, patient-centered decisions are multi-dimensional and typically involve multiple decision makers.Advances in the decision sciences have led to the development of a number of multiple criteria decision making methods. These multi-criteria methods are designed to help people make better choices when faced with complex decisions involving several dimensions. They are especially helpful when there is a need to combine "hard data" with subjective preferences, to make trade-offs between desired outcomes, and to involve multiple decision makers. Evidence-based, patient-centered clinical decision making has all of these characteristics. This close match suggests that clinical decision support systems based on multi-criteria decision making techniques have the potential to enable patients and providers to carry out the tasks required to implement evidence-based, patient-centered care effectively and efficiently in clinical settings.The goal of this paper is to give readers a general introduction to the range of multi-criteria methods available and show how they could be used to support clinical decision-making. Methods discussed include the balance sheet, the even swap method, ordinal ranking methods, direct weighting methods, multi-attribute decision analysis, and the analytic hierarchy process (AHP). PMID:21394218

  6. Quantitative ultrasound texture analysis for clinical decision making support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jie Ying; Beland, Michael; Konrad, Joseph; Tuomi, Adam; Glidden, David; Grand, David; Merck, Derek

    2015-03-01

    We propose a general ultrasound (US) texture-analysis and machine-learning framework for detecting the presence of disease that is suitable for clinical application across clinicians, disease types, devices, and operators. Its stages are image selection, image filtering, ROI selection, feature parameterization, and classification. Each stage is modular and can be replaced with alternate methods. Thus, this framework is adaptable to a wide range of tasks. Our two preliminary clinical targets are hepatic steatosis and adenomyosis diagnosis. For steatosis, we collected US images from 288 patients and their pathology-determined values of steatosis (%) from biopsies. Two radiologists independently reviewed all images and identified the region of interest (ROI) most representative of the hepatic echotexture for each patient. To parameterize the images into comparable quantities, we filter the US images at multiple scales for various texture responses. For each response, we collect a histogram of pixel features within the ROI, and parameterize it as a Gaussian function using its mean, standard deviation, kurtosis, and skew to create a 36-feature vector. Our algorithm uses a support vector machine (SVM) for classification. Using a threshold of 10%, we achieved 72.81% overall accuracy, 76.18% sensitivity, and 65.96% specificity in identifying steatosis with leave-ten-out cross-validation (p<0.0001). Extending this framework to adenomyosis, we identified 38 patients with MR-confirmed findings of adenomyosis and previous US studies and 50 controls. A single rater picked the best US-image and ROI for each case. Using the same processing pipeline, we obtained 76.14% accuracy, 86.00% sensitivity, and 63.16% specificity with leave-one-out cross-validation (p<0.0001).

  7. Measuring clinical decision making: do key features problems measure higher level cognitive processes?

    PubMed

    Hurtz, Gregory M; Chinn, Roberta N; Barnhill, Grady C; Hertz, Norman R

    2012-12-01

    Reliable and objective assessment of clinical decision-making skills has been a long-standing goal in occupational testing in the allied health professions. With this goal in mind, the key features problem (KFP) format was developed which elicits targeted decisions about key features of clinical scenarios. To build on a small body of empirical evidence evaluating their efficacy, this study evaluates whether KFPs successfully assess higher order cognitive processes. Analysis of objective data (item length and difficulty, item performance, and response times) and subjective data (expert ratings of cognitive complexity) supported the proposition that KFPs tend to be more cognitively complex than conventional multiple-choice questions. Not only were they rated as more complex, but this complexity accounted for some of the increase in time spent responding to these items. Results support the use of KFPs in standardized assessments for measuring higher order cognitive processes such as clinical decision making. PMID:22605792

  8. Optimal Data Systems: The future of clinical predictions and decision support

    PubMed Central

    Celi, Leo Anthony; Csete, Marie; Stone, David

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review The purpose of the review is to describe the evolving concept and role of data as it relates to clinical predictions and decision-making. Recent Findings Critical care medicine is, as an especially data rich specialty, becoming acutely cognizant both of its historic deficits in data utilization but also of its enormous potential for capturing, mining, and leveraging such data into well designed decision support modalities as well as the formulation of robust best practices. Summary Modern electronic medical records create an opportunity to design complete and functional data systems that can support clinical care to a degree never seen before. Such systems are often referred to as ‘data-driven’ but a better term is ‘optimal data systems’. Here we discuss basic features of an optimal data system and its benefits, including the potential to transform clinical prediction and decision support. PMID:25137399

  9. Implementing an integrative multi-agent clinical decision support system with open source software.

    PubMed

    Sayyad Shirabad, Jelber; Wilk, Szymon; Michalowski, Wojtek; Farion, Ken

    2012-02-01

    Clinical decision making is a complex multi-stage process. Decision support can play an important role at each stage of this process. At present, the majority of clinical decision support systems have been focused on supporting only certain stages. In this paper we present the design and implementation of MET3-a prototype multi-agent system providing an integrative decision support that spans over the entire decision making process. The system helps physicians with data collection, diagnosis formulation, treatment planning and finding supporting evidence. MET3 integrates with external hospital information systems via HL7 messages and runs on various computing platforms available at the point of care (e.g., tablet computers, mobile phones). Building MET3 required sophisticated and reliable software technologies. In the past decade the open source software movement has produced mature, stable, industrial strength software systems with a large user base. Therefore, one of the decisions that should be considered before developing or acquiring a decision support system is whether or not one could use open source technologies instead of proprietary ones. We believe MET3 shows that the answer to this question is positive. PMID:20703742

  10. A service oriented approach for guidelines-based clinical decision support using BPMN.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Loya, Salvador; Aziz, Ayesha; Chatwin, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based medical practice requires that clinical guidelines need to be documented in such a way that they represent a clinical workflow in its most accessible form. In order to optimize clinical processes to improve clinical outcomes, we propose a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) based approach for implementing clinical guidelines that can be accessed from an Electronic Health Record (EHR) application with a Web Services enabled communication mechanism with the Enterprise Service Bus. We have used Business Process Modelling Notation (BPMN) for modelling and presenting the clinical pathway in the form of a workflow. The aim of this study is to produce spontaneous alerts in the healthcare workflow in the diagnosis of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). The use of BPMN as a tool to automate clinical guidelines has not been previously employed for providing Clinical Decision Support (CDS). PMID:25160142

  11. Sensitivity of a Clinical Decision Rule and Early Computed Tomography in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Dustin G.; Kene, Mamata V.; Udaltsova, Natalia; Vinson, David R.; Ballard, Dustin W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Application of a clinical decision rule for subarachnoid hemorrhage, in combination with cranial computed tomography (CT) performed within six hours of ictus (early cranial CT), may be able to reasonably exclude a diagnosis of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). This study’s objective was to examine the sensitivity of both early cranial CT and a previously validated clinical decision rule among emergency department (ED) patients with aSAH and a normal mental status. Methods Patients were evaluated in the 21 EDs of an integrated health delivery system between January 2007 and June 2013. We identified by chart review a retrospective cohort of patients diagnosed with aSAH in the setting of a normal mental status and performance of early cranial CT. Variables comprising the SAH clinical decision rule (age ?40, presence of neck pain or stiffness, headache onset with exertion, loss of consciousness at headache onset) were abstracted from the chart and assessed for inter-rater reliability. Results One hundred fifty-five patients with aSAH met study inclusion criteria. The sensitivity of early cranial CT was 95.5% (95% CI [90.9–98.2]). The sensitivity of the SAH clinical decision rule was also 95.5% (95% CI [90.9–98.2]). Since all false negative cases for each diagnostic modality were mutually independent, the combined use of both early cranial CT and the clinical decision rule improved sensitivity to 100% (95% CI [97.6–100.0]). Conclusion Neither early cranial CT nor the SAH clinical decision rule demonstrated ideal sensitivity for aSAH in this retrospective cohort. However, the combination of both strategies might optimize sensitivity for this life-threatening disease. PMID:26587089

  12. Integrating decision support, based on the Arden Syntax, in a clinical laboratory environment.

    PubMed

    Johansson, B; Bergqvist, Y

    1993-01-01

    A clinical decision support system prototype have been developed in the clinical laboratory environment. The knowledge base consists of Medical Logic Modules, written in the Arden Syntax, and the work describes how these modules can be written, evoked and executed in a system, that is integrated with a laboratory information system, and facilitate real time validation of laboratory data. Tools and methods for building a decision support system are described and design aspects, such as database access, system validation and platform independence, are discussed. PMID:8130502

  13. Use of a clinical decision support system to increase osteoporosis screening

    PubMed Central

    DeJesus, Ramona S; Angstman, Kurt B; Kesman, Rebecca; Stroebel, Robert J; Bernard, Matthew E; Scheitel, Sidna M; Hunt, Vicki L; Rahman, Ahmed S; Chaudhry, Rajeev

    2012-01-01

    Background In 2002, the US Preventive Services Task Force recommended routine osteoporosis screening for women aged 65 years or older. However, studies have indicated that osteoporosis remains underdiagnosed, and various methods such as the use of health information technology have been tried to increase screening rates. We investigated whether we could boost the low rates of bone mineral density testing with implementation of a point-of-care clinical decision support system in our primary care practice. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of female patients eligible for osteoporosis screening who had no prior bone mineral density test who were seen at our primary care practice sites in 2007 or 2008 (before and after implementation of a point-of-care clinical decision support system). Results Overall, screening rates were 80.1% in 2007 and 84.1% in 2008 (P < 0.001). Of patients who did not have osteoporosis screening before the visit, 5.87% completed the screening after the visit in 2007, compared with 9.79% in 2008 (when the clinical support system was implemented), a 66.7% improvement (P = 0.025). Conclusion Clinical decision support for primary care doctors significantly improved osteoporosis screening rates among eligible women. Carefully designed clinical decision support systems can optimize care delivery, ensuring that important preventive services such as osteoporosis screening for patients at risk for fracture are performed while unnecessary testing is avoided. PMID:20722888

  14. On implementing clinical decision support: achieving scalability and maintainability by combining business rules and ontologies.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Vipul; Morales, Alfredo; Hongsermeier, Tonya

    2006-01-01

    We present an approach and architecture for implementing scalable and maintainable clinical decision support at the Partners HealthCare System. The architecture integrates a business rules engine that executes declarative if-then rules stored in a rule-base referencing objects and methods in a business object model. The rules engine executes object methods by invoking services implemented on the clinical data repository. Specialized inferences that support classification of data and instances into classes are identified and an approach to implement these inferences using an OWL based ontology engine is presented. Alternative representations of these specialized inferences as if-then rules or OWL axioms are explored and their impact on the scalability and maintenance of the system is presented. Architectural alternatives for integration of clinical decision support functionality with the invoking application and the underlying clinical data repository; and their associated trade-offs are discussed and presented. PMID:17238374

  15. Mobile clinical decision support systems and applications: a literature and commercial review.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pérez, Borja; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; López-Coronado, Miguel; Sainz-de-Abajo, Beatriz; Robles, Montserrat; García-Gómez, Juan Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The latest advances in eHealth and mHealth have propitiated the rapidly creation and expansion of mobile applications for health care. One of these types of applications are the clinical decision support systems, which nowadays are being implemented in mobile apps to facilitate the access to health care professionals in their daily clinical decisions. The aim of this paper is twofold. Firstly, to make a review of the current systems available in the literature and in commercial stores. Secondly, to analyze a sample of applications in order to obtain some conclusions and recommendations. Two reviews have been done: a literature review on Scopus, IEEE Xplore, Web of Knowledge and PubMed and a commercial review on Google play and the App Store. Five applications from each review have been selected to develop an in-depth analysis and to obtain more information about the mobile clinical decision support systems. Ninety-two relevant papers and 192 commercial apps were found. Forty-four papers were focused only on mobile clinical decision support systems. One hundred seventy-one apps were available on Google play and 21 on the App Store. The apps are designed for general medicine and 37 different specialties, with some features common in all of them despite of the different medical fields objective. The number of mobile clinical decision support applications and their inclusion in clinical practices has risen in the last years. However, developers must be careful with their interface or the easiness of use, which can impoverish the experience of the users. PMID:24399281

  16. Ethics and the Computerization of Pharmacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Robert L.; Perrolle, Judith A.

    1991-01-01

    The current and potential impact of computerization on pharmacy practice is discussed, focusing on ethical dilemmas in the pharmacist-patient relationship, confidentiality of records, and the role of artificial intelligence in decision making about drug therapy. Case studies for use by teachers of pharmaceutical ethics are provided. (Author/MSE)

  17. Building a normative decision support system for clinical and operational risk management in hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Cornalba, Chiara; Bellazzi, Roberto G; Bellazzi, Riccardo

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a decision support system for risk management in hemodialysis (HD) departments. The proposed system exploits a domain ontology to formalize the problem as a Bayesian network. It also relies on a software tool, able to automatically collect HD data, to learn the network conditional probabilities. By merging prior knowledge and the available data, the system allows to estimate risk profiles both for patients and HD departments. The risk management process is completed by an influence diagram that enables scenario analysis to choose the optimal decisions that mitigate a patient's risk. The methods and design of the decision support tool are described in detail, and the derived decision model is presented. Examples and case studies are also shown. The tool is one of the few examples of normative system explicitly conceived to manage operational and clinical risks in health care environments. PMID:18779083

  18. The validity and reliability of 6 sets of clinical criteria to classify Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia in cases confirmed post-mortem: added value of a decision tree approach.

    PubMed

    Hogervorst, E; Bandelow, S; Combrinck, M; Irani, S R; Irani, S; Smith, A D

    2003-01-01

    Data from 204 participants from the Oxford Project to Investigate Memory and Ageing, who were diagnosed post-mortem using the histopathological criteria of the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD), were used to assess the validity of the clinical criteria for Alzheimer's disease (AD) of the 'National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke/the Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association' (NINCDS/ADRDA). Cases who had been diagnosed as NINCDS/ADRDA 'probable AD' in life were usually confirmed at autopsy, but half of the NINCDS/ADRDA 'negative' cases were not (low specificity). It was hypothesized that the overall clinical impression may have taken precedence over the use of the actual criteria. We therefore investigated the validity and reliability of the clinical criteria using a computerized 'dementia diagnosis system' for each of 6 sets of criteria [Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV), NINCDS/ADRDA and three sets of criteria specifically for vascular dementia (VaD): NINCDS-AIREN, State of California Alzheimer's Disease Diagnostic and Treatment Centers (ADDTC), and Vascular Cognitive Impairment (VCI)] to classify a subset (n = 96) of the cases confirmed post-mortem. The use of the computerized system significantly (p = 0.01) increased the specificity (81%, similar to sensitivity) of the NINCDS/ADRDA diagnoses, which were shown to have 'moderate' inter-rater reliability. The DSM-IV criteria had good validity for AD when compared with post-mortem confirmation and showed 'substantial' inter-rater reliability. The ADDTC and VCI criteria for VaD had good specificity (88%) and sensitivity (75%), but only for one rater. The DSM-IV and NINCDS-AIREN criteria for VaD showed poor validity and inter-rater reliability. We conclude that the forced use of decision trees through a computerized system enhances the accuracy of the clinical diagnoses of dementia. PMID:12826744

  19. Students' Stereotypes of Patients as Barriers to Clinical Decision-Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Shirley M.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    At the Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine, a study was designed that graphically illustrated to beginning students that unconscious sociocultural stereotypes may influence clinical decision-making. Students were shown a videotape depicting five simulated patients, each with the same physical complaint. (Author/MLW)

  20. The Value of Intelligent Multimedia Simulation for Teaching Clinical Decision-Making Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Bernard M.; Callear, David

    2001-01-01

    Examines advantages and disadvantages of multimedia simulation in nursing education. Provides an example of a modular design with an integrated intelligent agent and knowledge base for teaching clinical decision making. Concludes that this approach overcomes some of the problems of intelligent tutoring systems. Contains 40 references. (SK)

  1. The Contribution of Polysyllabic Words in Clinical Decision Making about Children's Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Deborah G. H.; van Doorn, Jan; McLeod, Sharynne

    2008-01-01

    Poor polysyllabic word (PSW) production seems to mark paediatric speech impairment as well as impairment in language, literacy and phonological processing. As impairment in these domains may only manifest in PSWs, PSW production may provide unique information that is often excluded from clinical decision making because insufficient PSWs are…

  2. A Mixed Methodological Analysis of the Role of Culture in the Clinical Decision-Making Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Danica G.; Prosek, Elizabeth A.; McLeod, Amy L.

    2010-01-01

    Even though literature indicates that particular cultural groups receive more severe diagnoses at disproportionate rates, there has been minimal research that addresses how culture interfaces specifically with clinical decision making. This mixed methodological study of 41 counselors indicated that cultural characteristics of both counselors and…

  3. The Contribution of Polysyllabic Words in Clinical Decision Making about Children's Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Deborah G. H.; van Doorn, Jan; McLeod, Sharynne

    2008-01-01

    Poor polysyllabic word (PSW) production seems to mark paediatric speech impairment as well as impairment in language, literacy and phonological processing. As impairment in these domains may only manifest in PSWs, PSW production may provide unique information that is often excluded from clinical decision making because insufficient PSWs are…

  4. Risk-Taking Behavior in a Computerized Driving Task: Brain Activation Correlates of Decision-Making, Outcome, and Peer Influence in Male Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Vorobyev, Victor; Kwon, Myoung Soo; Moe, Dagfinn; Parkkola, Riitta; Hämäläinen, Heikki

    2015-01-01

    Increased propensity for risky behavior in adolescents, particularly in peer groups, is thought to reflect maturational imbalance between reward processing and cognitive control systems that affect decision-making. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate brain functional correlates of risk-taking behavior and effects of peer influence in 18–19-year-old male adolescents. The subjects were divided into low and high risk-taking groups using either personality tests or risk-taking rates in a simulated driving task. The fMRI data were analyzed for decision-making (whether to take a risk at intersections) and outcome (pass or crash) phases, and for the influence of peer competition. Personality test-based groups showed no difference in the amount of risk-taking (similarly increased during peer competition) and brain activation. When groups were defined by actual task performance, risk-taking activated two areas in the left medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) significantly more in low than in high risk-takers. In the entire sample, risky decision-specific activation was found in the anterior and dorsal cingulate, superior parietal cortex, basal ganglia (including the nucleus accumbens), midbrain, thalamus, and hypothalamus. Peer competition increased outcome-related activation in the right caudate head and cerebellar vermis in the entire sample. Our results suggest that the activation of the medial (rather than lateral) PFC and striatum is most specific to risk-taking behavior of male adolescents in a simulated driving situation, and reflect a stronger conflict and thus increased cognitive effort to take risks in low risk-takers, and reward anticipation for risky decisions, respectively. The activation of the caudate nucleus, particularly for the positive outcome (pass) during peer competition, further suggests enhanced reward processing of risk-taking under peer influence. PMID:26052943

  5. Risk-Taking Behavior in a Computerized Driving Task: Brain Activation Correlates of Decision-Making, Outcome, and Peer Influence in Male Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Vorobyev, Victor; Kwon, Myoung Soo; Moe, Dagfinn; Parkkola, Riitta; Hämäläinen, Heikki

    2015-01-01

    Increased propensity for risky behavior in adolescents, particularly in peer groups, is thought to reflect maturational imbalance between reward processing and cognitive control systems that affect decision-making. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate brain functional correlates of risk-taking behavior and effects of peer influence in 18-19-year-old male adolescents. The subjects were divided into low and high risk-taking groups using either personality tests or risk-taking rates in a simulated driving task. The fMRI data were analyzed for decision-making (whether to take a risk at intersections) and outcome (pass or crash) phases, and for the influence of peer competition. Personality test-based groups showed no difference in the amount of risk-taking (similarly increased during peer competition) and brain activation. When groups were defined by actual task performance, risk-taking activated two areas in the left medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) significantly more in low than in high risk-takers. In the entire sample, risky decision-specific activation was found in the anterior and dorsal cingulate, superior parietal cortex, basal ganglia (including the nucleus accumbens), midbrain, thalamus, and hypothalamus. Peer competition increased outcome-related activation in the right caudate head and cerebellar vermis in the entire sample. Our results suggest that the activation of the medial (rather than lateral) PFC and striatum is most specific to risk-taking behavior of male adolescents in a simulated driving situation, and reflect a stronger conflict and thus increased cognitive effort to take risks in low risk-takers, and reward anticipation for risky decisions, respectively. The activation of the caudate nucleus, particularly for the positive outcome (pass) during peer competition, further suggests enhanced reward processing of risk-taking under peer influence. PMID:26052943

  6. Innovations in Computerized Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drasgow, Fritz, Ed.; Olson-Buchanan, Julie B., Ed.

    Chapters in this book present the challenges and dilemmas faced by researchers as they created new computerized assessments, focusing on issues addressed in developing, scoring, and administering the assessments. Chapters are: (1) "Beyond Bells and Whistles; An Introduction to Computerized Assessment" (Julie B. Olson-Buchanan and Fritz Drasgow);…

  7. A meta-analysis of confidence and judgment accuracy in clinical decision making.

    PubMed

    Miller, Deborah J; Spengler, Elliot S; Spengler, Paul M

    2015-10-01

    The overconfidence bias occurs when clinicians overestimate the accuracy of their clinical judgments. This bias is thought to be robust leading to an almost universal recommendation by clinical judgment scholars for clinicians to temper their confidence in clinical decision making. An extension of the Meta-Analysis of Clinical Judgment (Spengler et al., 2009) project, the authors synthesized over 40 years of research from 36 studies, from 1970 to 2011, in which the confidence ratings of 1,485 clinicians were assessed in relation to the accuracy of their judgments about mental health (e.g., diagnostic decision making, violence risk assessment, prediction of treatment failure) or psychological issues (e.g., personality assessment). Using a random effects model a small but statistically significant effect (r = .15; CI = .06, .24) was found showing that confidence is better calibrated with accuracy than previously assumed. Approximately 50% of the total variance between studies was due to heterogeneity and not to chance. Mixed effects and meta-regression moderator analyses revealed that confidence is calibrated with accuracy least when there are repeated judgments, and more when there are higher base rate problems, when decisions are made with written materials, and for earlier published studies. Sensitivity analyses indicate a bias toward publishing smaller sample studies with smaller or negative confidence-accuracy effects. Implications for clinical judgment research and for counseling psychology training and practice are discussed. PMID:26280710

  8. Methods of Observing Variations in Physicians' Decisions: The Opportunities of Clinical Vignettes.

    PubMed

    Converse, Lara; Barrett, Kirsten; Rich, Eugene; Reschovsky, James

    2015-08-01

    To support their efforts to promote high quality and efficient care, policymakers need to better understand the key factors associated with variations in physicians' decisions, and in particular, physician deviations from evidence-based care. Clinical vignette survey instruments hold potential for research in this area as an approach that both allows for practical, large-scale study and overcomes the data quality challenges posed by analysis of clinical data. These surveys present respondents with a narrative description of a hypothetical patient case and solicit responses to one or more questions regarding the care of the patient. In this review, we describe various methods for measuring variations in physicians' decisions and highlight a range of design features researchers should consider when developing a clinical vignette survey. We conclude by identifying areas for future research. PMID:26105672

  9. Workshop on using natural language processing applications for enhancing clinical decision making: an executive summary

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Vinay M; Rodgers, Mary; Conroy, Richard; Luo, James; Zhou, Ruixia; Seto, Belinda

    2014-01-01

    In April 2012, the National Institutes of Health organized a two-day workshop entitled ‘Natural Language Processing: State of the Art, Future Directions and Applications for Enhancing Clinical Decision-Making’ (NLP-CDS). This report is a summary of the discussions during the second day of the workshop. Collectively, the workshop presenters and participants emphasized the need for unstructured clinical notes to be included in the decision making workflow and the need for individualized longitudinal data tracking. The workshop also discussed the need to: (1) combine evidence-based literature and patient records with machine-learning and prediction models; (2) provide trusted and reproducible clinical advice; (3) prioritize evidence and test results; and (4) engage healthcare professionals, caregivers, and patients. The overall consensus of the NLP-CDS workshop was that there are promising opportunities for NLP and CDS to deliver cognitive support for healthcare professionals, caregivers, and patients. PMID:23921193

  10. A Set of Preliminary Standards Recommended for Achieving a National Repository of Clinical Decision Support Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Sittig, Dean F.; Wright, Adam; Ash, Joan S.; Middleton, Blackford

    2009-01-01

    We are investigating the development, implementation and evaluation of clinical decision support (CDS) projects to advance our understanding of how best to incorporate these interventions into the delivery of healthcare. Our overall goal is to explore how the translation of clinical knowledge into CDS and its incorporation into practice can be routinely achieved to improve the quality of healthcare delivered in the U.S.A. Toward this end, we have developed a 7-step model that provides a framework for clinical decision support-related standards that are necessary if we wish to achieve these goals. We believe that if all commercially available EHR systems had the features and functions described in these recommendations, many more healthcare organizations could begin to develop and implement the basic CDS features that are necessary to radically transform the quality, safety, and cost of the current healthcare system. PMID:20351928

  11. The problematic of decision-sharing: deconstructing 'cholesterol' in a clinical encounter.

    PubMed

    Gwyn, Richard; Elwyn, Glyn; Edwards, Adrian; Mooney, Annabelle

    2003-09-01

    Shared decision-making is increasingly advocated as a means of interacting with patients but there is also a widely accepted view that many factors will militate against this ideal. While some patients may not wish to take on the responsibility of decision-making, it is also evident that many find it difficult to assimilate probabilities about future events and overestimate the likelihood of some outcomes, especially when terms such as 'stroke', 'bleeding' and 'heart attack' are used in consultation and bring with them emotional connotations and reactions. Under such circumstances, should clinicians portray risks as best they can, in the hope that even a marginally improved understanding will be an improvement on unilateral professional decision-making? Or, conversely, should they 'guide' the decision process, acting in a way that is known as 'professional agency'? Developing some perspectives put forward in recent work by the authors and applying it to a distinct clinical context, this paper will provide (i) a discourse analytic exploration of a single extended example from clinical practice employing aspects of Bakhtin's theory of dialogism, and (ii) a discussion and summary of what we can learn from this analysis in the context of shared decision-making and risk communication. PMID:12940797

  12. Consensus Recommendations for Systematic Evaluation of Drug-Drug Interaction Evidence for Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Scheife, Richard T.; Hines, Lisa E.; Boyce, Richard D.; Chung, Sophie P.; Momper, Jeremiah; Sommer, Christine D.; Abernethy, Darrell R.; Horn, John; Sklar, Stephen J.; Wong, Samantha K.; Jones, Gretchen; Brown, Mary; Grizzle, Amy J.; Comes, Susan; Wilkins, Tricia Lee; Borst, Clarissa; Wittie, Michael A.; Rich, Alissa; Malone, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Healthcare organizations, compendia, and drug knowledgebase vendors use varying methods to evaluate and synthesize evidence on drug-drug interactions (DDIs). This situation has a negative effect on electronic prescribing and medication information systems that warn clinicians of potentially harmful medication combinations. Objective To provide recommendations for systematic evaluation of evidence from the scientific literature, drug product labeling, and regulatory documents with respect to DDIs for clinical decision support. Methods A conference series was conducted to develop a structured process to improve the quality of DDI alerting systems. Three expert workgroups were assembled to address the goals of the conference. The Evidence Workgroup consisted of 15 individuals with expertise in pharmacology, drug information, biomedical informatics, and clinical decision support. Workgroup members met via webinar from January 2013 to February 2014. Two in-person meetings were conducted in May and September 2013 to reach consensus on recommendations. Results We developed expert-consensus answers to three key questions: 1) What is the best approach to evaluate DDI evidence?; 2) What evidence is required for a DDI to be applicable to an entire class of drugs?; and 3) How should a structured evaluation process be vetted and validated? Conclusion Evidence-based decision support for DDIs requires consistent application of transparent and systematic methods to evaluate the evidence. Drug information systems that implement these recommendations should be able to provide higher quality information about DDIs in drug compendia and clinical decision support tools. PMID:25556085

  13. Comparing and using assessments of the value of information to clinical decision-making.

    PubMed Central

    Urquhart, C J; Hepworth, J B

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses the Value project, which assessed the value to clinical decision-making of information supplied by National Health Service (NHS) library and information services. The project not only showed how health libraries in the United Kingdom help clinicians in decision-making but also provided quality assurance guidelines for these libraries to help make their information services more effective. The paper reviews methods and results used in previous studies of the value of health libraries, noting that methodological differences appear to affect the results. The paper also discusses aspects of user involvement, categories of clinical decision-making, the value of information to present and future clinical decisions, and the combination of quantitative and qualitative assessments of value, as applied to the Value project and the studies reviewed. The Value project also demonstrated that the value placed on information depends in part on the career stage of the physician. The paper outlines the structure of the quality assurance tool kit, which is based on the findings and methods used in the Value project. PMID:8913550

  14. Assessing an Adolescent's Capacity for Autonomous Decision-Making in Clinical Care.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Pierre-André; Blum, Robert Wm; Benaroyo, Lazare; Zermatten, Jean; Baltag, Valentina

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide policy guidance on how to assess the capacity of minor adolescents for autonomous decision-making without a third party authorization, in the field of clinical care. In June 2014, a two-day meeting gathered 20 professionals from all continents, working in the field of adolescent medicine, neurosciences, developmental and clinical psychology, sociology, ethics, and law. Formal presentations and discussions were based on a literature search and the participants' experience. The assessment of adolescent decision-making capacity includes the following: (1) a review of the legal context consistent with the principles of the Convention on the Rights of the Child; (2) an empathetic relationship between the adolescent and the health care professional/team; (3) the respect of the adolescent's developmental stage and capacities; (4) the inclusion, if relevant, of relatives, peers, teachers, or social and mental health providers with the adolescent's consent; (5) the control of coercion and other social forces that influence decision-making; and (6) a deliberative stepwise appraisal of the adolescent's decision-making process. This stepwise approach, already used among adults with psychiatric disorders, includes understanding the different facets of the given situation, reasoning on the involved issues, appreciating the outcomes linked with the decision(s), and expressing a choice. Contextual and psychosocial factors play pivotal roles in the assessment of adolescents' decision-making capacity. The evaluation must be guided by a well-established procedure, and health professionals should be trained accordingly. These proposals are the first to have been developed by a multicultural, multidisciplinary expert panel. PMID:26281798

  15. Reward-Related Decision Making in Older Adults: Relationship to Clinical Presentation of Depression

    PubMed Central

    McGovern, Amanda R.; Alexopoulos, George S.; Yuen, Genevieve S.; Morimoto, Sarah Shizuko; Gunning, Faith M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Impairment in reward processes has been found in individuals with depression and in the aging population. The purpose of this study was twofold: 1. To use an affective neuroscience probe to identify abnormalities in reward-related decision making in late-life depression. 2. To examine the relationship of reward-related decision making abnormalities in depressed, older adults to the clinical expression of apathy in depression. We hypothesized that relative to elderly, healthy subjects, depressed, elderly patients would exhibit impaired decision making and that apathetic, depressed patients would show greater impairment in decision making than non-apathetic, depressed patients. Methods We used the Iowa Gambling Task to examine reward-related decision making in 60 non-demented, elderly patients with non-psychotic major depression and 36 elderly, psychiatrically healthy participants. Apathy was quantified using the Apathy Evaluation Scale. Of those with major depression, 18 individuals reported clinically significant apathy whereas 42 participants did not have apathy. Results Older adults with depression and healthy comparison participants did not differ in their performance on the IGT. However, apathetic, depressed older adults adopted an advantageous strategy and selected cards from the conservative decks compared to non-apathetic, depressed older adults. Non-apathetic, depressed patients showed a failure to adopt a conservative strategy and persisted in making risky decisions throughout the task. Conclusions This study indicates that apathy in older, depressed adults is associated with a conservative response style on a behavioral probe of the systems involved in reward-related decision making. This conservative response style may be the result of reduced sensitivity to rewards in apathetic individuals. PMID:25306937

  16. Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) for preventive management of COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of information and communication technologies to manage chronic diseases allows the application of integrated care pathways, and the optimization and standardization of care processes. Decision support tools can assist in the adherence to best-practice medicine in critical decision points during the execution of a care pathway. Objectives The objectives are to design, develop, and assess a clinical decision support system (CDSS) offering a suite of services for the early detection and assessment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which can be easily integrated into a healthcare providers' work-flow. Methods The software architecture model for the CDSS, interoperable clinical-knowledge representation, and inference engine were designed and implemented to form a base CDSS framework. The CDSS functionalities were iteratively developed through requirement-adjustment/development/validation cycles using enterprise-grade software-engineering methodologies and technologies. Within each cycle, clinical-knowledge acquisition was performed by a health-informatics engineer and a clinical-expert team. Results A suite of decision-support web services for (i) COPD early detection and diagnosis, (ii) spirometry quality-control support, (iii) patient stratification, was deployed in a secured environment on-line. The CDSS diagnostic performance was assessed using a validation set of 323 cases with 90% specificity, and 96% sensitivity. Web services were integrated in existing health information system platforms. Conclusions Specialized decision support can be offered as a complementary service to existing policies of integrated care for chronic-disease management. The CDSS was able to issue recommendations that have a high degree of accuracy to support COPD case-finding. Integration into healthcare providers' work-flow can be achieved seamlessly through the use of a modular design and service-oriented architecture that connect to existing health information systems. PMID:25471545

  17. The ‘CaP Calculator’: an online decision support tool for clinically localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Matthew S.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; D’Amico, Anthony V.; Kattan, Michael W.; Sanda, Martin G.; Nguyen, Paul L.; Smith, Matthew R.; Carroll, Peter R.; Zietman, Anthony L.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To design a decision-support tool to facilitate evidence-based treatment decisions in clinically localized prostate cancer, as individualized risk assessment and shared decision-making can decrease distress and decisional regret in patients with prostate cancer, but current individual models vary or only predict one outcome of interest. METHODS We searched Medline for previous reports and identified peer-reviewed articles providing pretreatment predictive models that estimated pathological stage and treatment outcomes in men with biopsy-confirmed, clinical T1-3 prostate cancer. Each model was entered into a spreadsheet to provide calculated estimates of extracapsular extension (ECE), seminal vesicle invasion (SVI), and lymph node involvement (LNI). Estimates of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) outcome after radical prostatectomy (RP) or radiotherapy (RT), and clinical outcomes after RT, were also entered. The data are available at http://www.capcalculator.org. RESULTS Entering a patient’s 2002 clinical T stage, Gleason score and pretreatment PSA level, and details from core biopsy findings, into the CaP Calculator provides estimates from predictive models of pathological extent of disease, four models for ECE, four for SVI and eight for LNI. The 5-year estimates of PSA relapse-free survival after RT and 10-year estimates after RP were available. A printout can be generated with individualized results for clinicians to review with each patient. CONCLUSIONS The CaP Calculator is a free, online ‘clearing house’ of several predictive models for prostate cancer, available in an accessible, user-friendly format. With further development and testing with patients, the CaP Calculator might be a useful decision-support tool to help doctors promote evidence-based shared decision-making in prostate cancer. PMID:20346051

  18. Improving Decision Making about Genetic Testing in the Clinic: An Overview of Effective Knowledge Translation Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Légaré, France; Robitaille, Hubert; Gane, Claire; Hébert, Jessica; Labrecque, Michel; Rousseau, François

    2016-01-01

    Background Knowledge translation (KT) interventions are attempts to change behavior in keeping with scientific evidence. While genetic tests are increasingly available to healthcare consumers in the clinic, evidence about their benefits is unclear and decisions about genetic testing are thus difficult for all parties. Objective We sought to identify KT interventions that involved decisions about genetic testing in the clinical context and to assess their effectiveness for improving decision making in terms of behavior change, increased knowledge and wellbeing. Methods We searched for trials assessing KT interventions in the context of genetic testing up to March 2014 in all systematic reviews (n = 153) published by two Cochrane review groups: Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) and Consumers and Communication. Results We retrieved 2473 unique trials of which we retained only 28 (1%). Two EPOC reviews yielded two trials of KT interventions: audit and feedback (n = 1) and educational outreach (n = 1). Both targeted health professionals and the KT intervention they assessed was found to be effective. Four Consumers and Communication reviews yielded 26 trials: decision aids (n = 15), communication of DNA-based disease risk estimates (n = 7), personalized risk communication (n = 3) and mobile phone messaging (n = 1). Among these, 25 trials targeted only health consumers or patients and the KT interventions were found to be effective in four trials, partly effective in seven, and ineffective in four. Lastly, only one trial targeted both physicians and patients and was found to be effective. Conclusions More research on the effectiveness of KT interventions regarding genetic testing in the clinical context may contribute to patients making informed value-based decisions and drawing the maximum benefit from clinical applications of genetic and genomic innovations. PMID:26938633

  19. Evidence-based practice: how to perform and use systematic reviews for clinical decision-making.

    PubMed

    Kranke, Peter

    2010-09-01

    One approach to clinical decision-making requires the integration of the best available research evidence with individual clinical expertise and patient values, and is known as evidence-based medicine (EBM). In clinical decision-making with the current best evidence, systematic reviews have an important role. This review article covers the basic principles of systematic reviews and meta-analyses, and their role in the process of evidence-based decision-making. The problems associated with traditional narrative reviews are discussed, as well as the way systematic reviews limit bias associated with the assembly, critical appraisal and synthesis of studies addressing specific clinical questions. The relevant steps in writing a systematic review from the formulation of an initial research question to sensitivity analyses in conjunction with the combined analysis of the pooled data are described. Important issues that need to be considered when appraising a systematic review or meta-analysis are outlined. Some of the terms that are used in the reporting of systematic reviews and meta-analyses, such as relative risk, confidence interval, Forest plot or L'Abbé plot, will be introduced and explained. PMID:20523217

  20. Risks, dangers and competing clinical decisions on venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in hospital care.

    PubMed

    Boiko, Olga; Sheaff, Rod; Child, Susan; Gericke, Christian A

    2014-07-01

    Drawing on wider sociologies of risk, this article examines the complexity of clinical risks and their management, focusing on risk management systems, expert decision-making and safety standards in health care. At the time of this study preventing venous thromboembolism (VTE) among in-patients was one of the top priorities for hospital safety in the English National Health Service (NHS). An analysis of 50 interviews examining hospital professionals' perceptions about VTE risks and prophylaxis illuminates how National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines influenced clinical decision-making in four hospitals in one NHS region. We examine four themes: the identification of new risks, the institutionalisation and management of risk, the relationship between risk and danger and the tensions between risk management systems and expert decision-making. The implementation of NICE guidelines for VTE prevention extended managerial control over risk management but some irreducible clinical dangers remained that were beyond the scope of the new VTE risk management systems. Linking sociologies of risk with the realities of hospital risk management reveals the capacity of these theories to illuminate both the possibilities and the limits of managerialism in health care. PMID:24635764

  1. Designing a Clinical Framework to Guide Gross Motor Intervention Decisions for Infants and Young Children with Hypotonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darrah, Johanna; O'Donnell, Maureen; Lam, Joyce; Story, Maureen; Wickenheiser, Diane; Xu, Kaishou; Jin, Xiaokun

    2013-01-01

    Clinical practice frameworks are a valuable component of clinical education, promoting informed clinical decision making based on the best available evidence and/or clinical experience. They encourage standardized intervention approaches and evaluation of practice. Based on an international project to support the development of an enhanced service…

  2. Studying the effect of clinical uncertainty on physicians' decision-making using ILIAD.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J D; Jay, S J; Weng, H C; Anderson, M M

    1995-01-01

    The influence of uncertainty on physicians' practice behavior is not well understood. In this research, ILIAD, a diagnostic expert system, has been used to study physicians' responses to uncertainty and how their responses affected clinical performance. The simulation mode of ILIAD was used to standardize the presentation and scoring of two cases to 46 residents in emergency medicine, internal medicine, family practice and transitional medicine at Methodist Hospital of Indiana. A questionnaire was used to collect additional data on how physicians respond to clinical uncertainty. A structural equation model was developed, estimated, and tested. The results indicate that stress that physicians experience in dealing with clinical uncertainty has a negative effect on their clinical performance. Moreover, the way that physicians respond to uncertainty has positive and negative effects on their performance. Open discussions with patients about clinical decisions and the use of practice guidelines improves performance. However, when the physician's clinical decisions are influenced by patient demands or their peers, their performance scores decline. PMID:8591572

  3. Clinical Decision Support using a Terminology Server to improve Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Jimenez, Alba; Moreno-Conde, Alberto; Martínez-García, Alicia; Marín-León, Ignacio; Medrano-Ortega, Francisco Javier; Parra-Calderón, Carlos L

    2015-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) are software applications that support clinicians in making healthcare decisions providing relevant information for individual patients about their specific conditions. The lack of integration between CDSS and Electronic Health Record (EHR) has been identified as a significant barrier to CDSS development and adoption. Andalusia Healthcare Public System (AHPS) provides an interoperable health information infrastructure based on a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) that eases CDSS implementation. This paper details the deployment of a CDSS jointly with the deployment of a Terminology Server (TS) within the AHPS infrastructure. It also explains a case study about the application of decision support to thromboembolism patients and its potential impact on improving patient safety. We will apply the inSPECt tool proposal to evaluate the appropriateness of alerts in this scenario. PMID:25991120

  4. Mobile technology support for clinical decision in diabetic keto-acidosis emergency.

    PubMed

    Frandes, Mirela; Timar, Bogdan; Tole, Alexandra; Holban, Stefan; Lungeanu, Diana

    2015-01-01

    The main challenge of effectively managing emergencies in diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is the fine tuning of the treatment in order to re-establish the normal metabolic homeostasis. We propose a mobile application for clinical decision support in DKA emergencies (mDKA), running under Android on smart phones and tablet PCs. mDKA provides decision support for treatment concerning the main components (i.e. choice and dose of re-hydration agent, insulin, potassium or bicarbonate) for up to 12 hours after the diagnosis. The application underwent a preliminary scanty evaluation aimed at assessing its perceived usability. The results sustained the informal hints that mDKA's accuracy in deciding the treatment path was acceptable in terms of general variability of medical decision in DKA and brought evidence of positive attitude towards the application itself. PMID:25991157

  5. Lung Cancer Assistant: a hybrid clinical decision support application for lung cancer care.

    PubMed

    Sesen, M Berkan; Peake, Michael D; Banares-Alcantara, Rene; Tse, Donald; Kadir, Timor; Stanley, Roz; Gleeson, Fergus; Brady, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings are becoming the model of care for cancer patients worldwide. While MDTs have improved the quality of cancer care, the meetings impose substantial time pressure on the members, who generally attend several such MDTs. We describe Lung Cancer Assistant (LCA), a clinical decision support (CDS) prototype designed to assist the experts in the treatment selection decisions in the lung cancer MDTs. A novel feature of LCA is its ability to provide rule-based and probabilistic decision support within a single platform. The guideline-based CDS is based on clinical guideline rules, while the probabilistic CDS is based on a Bayesian network trained on the English Lung Cancer Audit Database (LUCADA). We assess rule-based and probabilistic recommendations based on their concordances with the treatments recorded in LUCADA. Our results reveal that the guideline rule-based recommendations perform well in simulating the recorded treatments with exact and partial concordance rates of 0.57 and 0.79, respectively. On the other hand, the exact and partial concordance rates achieved with probabilistic results are relatively poorer with 0.27 and 0.76. However, probabilistic decision support fulfils a complementary role in providing accurate survival estimations. Compared to recorded treatments, both CDS approaches promote higher resection rates and multimodality treatments. PMID:24990290

  6. THE IMPACT OF RACISM ON CLINICIAN COGNITION, BEHAVIOR, AND CLINICAL DECISION MAKING.

    PubMed

    van Ryn, Michelle; Burgess, Diana J; Dovidio, John F; Phelan, Sean M; Saha, Somnath; Malat, Jennifer; Griffin, Joan M; Fu, Steven S; Perry, Sylvia

    2011-04-01

    Over the past two decades, thousands of studies have demonstrated that Blacks receive lower quality medical care than Whites, independent of disease status, setting, insurance, and other clinically relevant factors. Despite this, there has been little progress towards eradicating these inequities. Almost a decade ago we proposed a conceptual model identifying mechanisms through which clinicians' behavior, cognition, and decision making might be influenced by implicit racial biases and explicit racial stereotypes, and thereby contribute to racial inequities in care. Empirical evidence has supported many of these hypothesized mechanisms, demonstrating that White medical care clinicians: (1) hold negative implicit racial biases and explicit racial stereotypes, (2) have implicit racial biases that persist independently of and in contrast to their explicit (conscious) racial attitudes, and (3) can be influenced by racial bias in their clinical decision making and behavior during encounters with Black patients. This paper applies evidence from several disciplines to further specify our original model and elaborate on the ways racism can interact with cognitive biases to affect clinicians' behavior and decisions and in turn, patient behavior and decisions. We then highlight avenues for intervention and make specific recommendations to medical care and grant-making organizations. PMID:24761152

  7. Lung Cancer Assistant: a hybrid clinical decision support application for lung cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Sesen, M. Berkan; Peake, Michael D.; Banares-Alcantara, Rene; Tse, Donald; Kadir, Timor; Stanley, Roz; Gleeson, Fergus; Brady, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings are becoming the model of care for cancer patients worldwide. While MDTs have improved the quality of cancer care, the meetings impose substantial time pressure on the members, who generally attend several such MDTs. We describe Lung Cancer Assistant (LCA), a clinical decision support (CDS) prototype designed to assist the experts in the treatment selection decisions in the lung cancer MDTs. A novel feature of LCA is its ability to provide rule-based and probabilistic decision support within a single platform. The guideline-based CDS is based on clinical guideline rules, while the probabilistic CDS is based on a Bayesian network trained on the English Lung Cancer Audit Database (LUCADA). We assess rule-based and probabilistic recommendations based on their concordances with the treatments recorded in LUCADA. Our results reveal that the guideline rule-based recommendations perform well in simulating the recorded treatments with exact and partial concordance rates of 0.57 and 0.79, respectively. On the other hand, the exact and partial concordance rates achieved with probabilistic results are relatively poorer with 0.27 and 0.76. However, probabilistic decision support fulfils a complementary role in providing accurate survival estimations. Compared to recorded treatments, both CDS approaches promote higher resection rates and multimodality treatments. PMID:24990290

  8. THE IMPACT OF RACISM ON CLINICIAN COGNITION, BEHAVIOR, AND CLINICAL DECISION MAKING

    PubMed Central

    van Ryn, Michelle; Burgess, Diana J.; Dovidio, John F.; Phelan, Sean M.; Saha, Somnath; Malat, Jennifer; Griffin, Joan M.; Fu, Steven S.; Perry, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    Over the past two decades, thousands of studies have demonstrated that Blacks receive lower quality medical care than Whites, independent of disease status, setting, insurance, and other clinically relevant factors. Despite this, there has been little progress towards eradicating these inequities. Almost a decade ago we proposed a conceptual model identifying mechanisms through which clinicians’ behavior, cognition, and decision making might be influenced by implicit racial biases and explicit racial stereotypes, and thereby contribute to racial inequities in care. Empirical evidence has supported many of these hypothesized mechanisms, demonstrating that White medical care clinicians: (1) hold negative implicit racial biases and explicit racial stereotypes, (2) have implicit racial biases that persist independently of and in contrast to their explicit (conscious) racial attitudes, and (3) can be influenced by racial bias in their clinical decision making and behavior during encounters with Black patients. This paper applies evidence from several disciplines to further specify our original model and elaborate on the ways racism can interact with cognitive biases to affect clinicians’ behavior and decisions and in turn, patient behavior and decisions. We then highlight avenues for intervention and make specific recommendations to medical care and grant-making organizations. PMID:24761152

  9. A web-based intensive care clinical decision support system: from design to evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ozel, Deniz; Bilge, Ugur; Zayim, Nese; Cengiz, Melike

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study is to develop and evaluate a web-based clinical decision support system (CDSS) containing clinical guidelines and protocols that will support intensive care unit (ICU) providers in making decisions more effectively and quickly. First, a survey was carried out with 38 physicians in order to determine their preferences, needs and concerns regarding decision support tools. After the survey, guidelines were prepared by a group of specialists in ICU, and a medical informatician converted the guidelines into algorithm forms. Ten CDSS were developed using the algorithms, and placed onto the Intensive Care Decision Support Website (ICDSW). In order to evaluation of the website, 15 physicians were asked to answer 10 questions in 10 different scenarios first using a paper-based approach, then with ICDSW. When the answers were analyzed, it was found that the answers given by using ICDSW were significantly better than the paper-based approach (p

  10. Verbal protocols for assessing the usability of clinical decision support: the retrospective sense making protocol.

    PubMed

    Balatsoukas, Panagiotis; Ainsworth, John; Williams, Richard; Carruthers, Emma; Davies, Colin; McGrath, James; Akbarov, Artur; Soiland-Reyes, Claudia; Badiyani, Saurin; Buchan, Iain

    2013-01-01

    We compare the effectiveness of two types of verbal protocol, concurrent think aloud vs. retrospective sense making, for evaluating the usability of a clinical decision support tool. Thirty-five medical and nursing students participated in a usability experiment. Participants were asked to complete seven tasks using the system under evaluation. Eighteen students were allocated to the concurrent think aloud group and the remainder followed the retrospective protocol. The retrospective protocol was significantly more sensitive than the concurrent protocol in recording unique usability problems related to users' cognitive behaviour. These problems concerned the interpretation and comprehension of statistical output, search results and system messages. These findings can be explained by the retrospective protocol's greater ability to detect compound usability problems, capturing the cognitive dimensions of users' interactions with the interface in greater depth. Evaluations of clinical decision support systems should take an evidence-based approach to selecting protocols. PMID:23920561

  11. A Legal Framework to Enable Sharing of Clinical Decision Support Knowledge and Services across Institutional Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Hongsermeier, Tonya; Maviglia, Saverio; Tsurikova, Lana; Bogaty, Dan; Rocha, Roberto A.; Goldberg, Howard; Meltzer, Seth; Middleton, Blackford

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the CDS Consortium (CDSC) is to assess, define, demonstrate, and evaluate best practices for knowledge management and clinical decision support in healthcare information technology at scale – across multiple ambulatory care settings and Electronic Health Record technology platforms. In the course of the CDSC research effort, it became evident that a sound legal foundation was required for knowledge sharing and clinical decision support services in order to address data sharing, intellectual property, accountability, and liability concerns. This paper outlines the framework utilized for developing agreements in support of sharing, accessing, and publishing content via the CDSC Knowledge Management Portal as well as an agreement in support of deployment and consumption of CDSC developed web services in the context of a research project under IRB oversight. PMID:22195151

  12. A descriptive analysis of a nursing home clinical information system with decision support.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Gregory L

    2008-01-01

    Clinical information systems are absent in most nursing homes. Therefore, the vast numbers of elderly people who reside in the facilities are not reaping the benefits that these systems are thought to have, including better management of chronic conditions, greater efficiencies, and improved access to information. It is important for early adopters of nursing home information systems to share experiences to foster implementation of other systems and improve design and evaluation of these systems. The purpose of this study is to describe the activity of clinical decision support alerts and associated triggers during an analysis of an information system implemented in three nursing homes. The proportion of triggers used for each active alert in each alert category is described across resident diagnoses within the nursing home decision support system during six months of data collection. PMID:18784850

  13. A legal framework to enable sharing of Clinical Decision Support knowledge and services across institutional boundaries.

    PubMed

    Hongsermeier, Tonya; Maviglia, Saverio; Tsurikova, Lana; Bogaty, Dan; Rocha, Roberto A; Goldberg, Howard; Meltzer, Seth; Middleton, Blackford

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the CDS Consortium (CDSC) is to assess, define, demonstrate, and evaluate best practices for knowledge management and clinical decision support in healthcare information technology at scale - across multiple ambulatory care settings and Electronic Health Record technology platforms. In the course of the CDSC research effort, it became evident that a sound legal foundation was required for knowledge sharing and clinical decision support services in order to address data sharing, intellectual property, accountability, and liability concerns. This paper outlines the framework utilized for developing agreements in support of sharing, accessing, and publishing content via the CDSC Knowledge Management Portal as well as an agreement in support of deployment and consumption of CDSC developed web services in the context of a research project under IRB oversight. PMID:22195151

  14. Symptomatic peripheral arterial disease: the value of a validated questionnaire and a clinical decision rule

    PubMed Central

    Bendermacher, Bianca LW; Teijink, Joep AW; Willigendael, Edith M; Bartelink, Marie-Louise; Büller, Harry R; Peters, Ron JG; Boiten, Jelis; Langenberg, Machteld; Prins, Martin H

    2006-01-01

    Background If a validated questionnaire, when applied to patients reporting with symptoms of intermittent claudication, could adequately discriminate between those with and without peripheral arterial disease, GPs could avoid the diagnostic measurement of the ankle brachial index. Aim To investigate the Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire (ECQ) in general practice and to develop a clinical decision rule based on risk factors to enable GPs to easily assess the likelihood of peripheral arterial disease. Design of study An observational study. Setting General practice in The Netherlands. Method This observational study included patients of ?55 years visiting their GP for symptoms suggestive of intermittent claudication or with one risk factor. The ECQ and the ankle brachial index were performed. The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease, defined as an ankle brachial index <0.9, was related to risk factors using logistic regression analyses, on which a clinical decision rule was developed and related to the presence of peripheral arterial disease. Results Of the 4790 included patients visiting their GP with symptoms suggestive of intermittent claudication, 4527 were eligible for analyses. The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in this group was 48.3%. The sensitivity of the ECQ was only 56.2%. The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in a clinical decision rule that included age, male sex, smoking, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and a positive ECQ, increased from 14% in the lowest to 76% in the highest category. Conclusion This study indicates that the ECQ alone has an inadequate diagnostic value in detecting patients with peripheral arterial disease. The ankle brachial index should be performed to diagnose peripheral arterial disease in patients with complaints suggestive of intermittent claudication, although our clinical decision rule could help to differentiate between extremely high and lower prevalence of peripheral arterial disease. PMID:17132381

  15. Clinical judgment and decision making in wound assessment and management: is experience enough?

    PubMed

    Logan, Gemma

    2015-03-01

    The assessment and management of wounds forms a large proportion of community nurses' workload, often requiring judgment and decision-making in complex, challenging and uncertain circumstances. The processes through which nurses form judgments and make decisions within this context are reviewed in this article against existing theories on these on these subjects. There is variability in wound assessment and management practice which may be attributed to uncertainties within the context, a lack of knowledge in appropriate treatment choices and the inability to correctly value the importance of the clinical information presented. Nurses may be required to draw on intuition to guide their judgments and decision-making by association with experience and expertise. In addition, a step-by-step analytical approach underpinned by an evidence base may be required to ensure accuracy in practice. Developing an understanding of the different theories of judgment and decision-making may facilitate nurses' abilities to reflect on their own decision tasks, thereby enhancing the care provided. PMID:25790510

  16. Clinical judgment and decision-making in wound assessment and management: is experience enough?

    PubMed

    Logan, Gemma

    2015-03-01

    The assessment and management of wounds forms a large proportion of community nurses' workload, often requiring judgment and decision-making in complex, challenging and uncertain circumstances. The processes through which nurses form judgments and make decisions within this context are reviewed in this article against existing theories on these subjects. There is variability in wound assessment and management practice which may be attributed to uncertainties within the context, a lack of knowledge in appropriate treatment choices and the inability to correctly value the importance of the clinical information presented. Nurses may be required to draw on intuition to guide their judgments and decision-making by association with experience and expertise. In addition, a step-by-step analytical approach underpinned by an evidence base may be required to ensure accuracy in practice. Developing an understanding of the different theories of judgment and decision-making may facilitate nurses' abilities to reflect on their own decision tasks, thereby enhancing the care provided. PMID:25882591

  17. Ending the technology paradox: healthcare management technologies for clinical decision making.

    PubMed

    Karys, A

    1998-01-01

    As this article has shown, advances are beginning to put an end to the technology paradox that has hindered the industry's efforts to manage care better. Whereas in the past the management side of the healthcare industry has been slow to adopt new technologies, recent years have seen an explosion in the development and use of new tools for managing care. Most of these tools have traditionally focused on managing the administrative and financial aspects of providing care; however, that has also begun to change. Software systems incorporating clinical decision support criteria permit healthcare professionals to make clinical decision-making part of the care management process conveniently and efficiently. Clinical decision support criteria are also helping to change the focus of managed care. At the beginning of the managed care era, insurers and managed care companies concentrated primarily on reigning in costs, in many cases by restricting the types and duration of care provided to their members. Although these restrictions succeeded in conserving resources, they also helped foster an uneasy atmosphere between payers and providers, many of whom felt that their clinical judgment was too often overruled by the "bean counters." At the same time, many healthcare consumers grew to distrust both managed care professionals and providers, feeling that medical decisions were often made for the wrong reasons. However, as managed care companies have acknowledged that the most efficient way to provide care is to provide appropriate care, the focus has begun to move toward the clinical side of healthcare. Although healthcare organizations are still relying on financial management tools, they are also looking for systems that can make the clinical decision-making process more efficient and effective. The end result is that the healthcare industry is able to assure the best, most appropriate treatment while conserving resources. With the constant stream of new technologies into the healthcare management arena, healthcare professionals will have access to new tools to make the management process even more efficient. The healthcare industry's technology paradox will soon be a thing of the past. PMID:10338784

  18. Interoperability of clinical decision-support systems and electronic health records using archetypes: a case study in clinical trial eligibility.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Mar; Maldonado, Jose A; Martínez-Salvador, Begoña; Boscá, Diego; Robles, Montserrat

    2013-08-01

    Clinical decision-support systems (CDSSs) comprise systems as diverse as sophisticated platforms to store and manage clinical data, tools to alert clinicians of problematic situations, or decision-making tools to assist clinicians. Irrespective of the kind of decision-support task CDSSs should be smoothly integrated within the clinical information system, interacting with other components, in particular with the electronic health record (EHR). However, despite decades of developments, most CDSSs lack interoperability features. We deal with the interoperability problem of CDSSs and EHRs by exploiting the dual-model methodology. This methodology distinguishes a reference model and archetypes. A reference model is represented by a stable and small object-oriented model that describes the generic properties of health record information. For their part, archetypes are reusable and domain-specific definitions of clinical concepts in the form of structured and constrained combinations of the entities of the reference model. We rely on archetypes to make the CDSS compatible with EHRs from different institutions. Concretely, we use archetypes for modelling the clinical concepts that the CDSS requires, in conjunction with a series of knowledge-intensive mappings relating the archetypes to the data sources (EHR and/or other archetypes) they depend on. We introduce a comprehensive approach, including a set of tools as well as methodological guidelines, to deal with the interoperability of CDSSs and EHRs based on archetypes. Archetypes are used to build a conceptual layer of the kind of a virtual health record (VHR) over the EHR whose contents need to be integrated and used in the CDSS, associating them with structural and terminology-based semantics. Subsequently, the archetypes are mapped to the EHR by means of an expressive mapping language and specific-purpose tools. We also describe a case study where the tools and methodology have been employed in a CDSS to support patient recruitment in the framework of a clinical trial for colorectal cancer screening. The utilisation of archetypes not only has proved satisfactory to achieve interoperability between CDSSs and EHRs but also offers various advantages, in particular from a data model perspective. First, the VHR/data models we work with are of a high level of abstraction and can incorporate semantic descriptions. Second, archetypes can potentially deal with different EHR architectures, due to their deliberate independence of the reference model. Third, the archetype instances we obtain are valid instances of the underlying reference model, which would enable e.g. feeding back the EHR with data derived by abstraction mechanisms. Lastly, the medical and technical validity of archetype models would be assured, since in principle clinicians should be the main actors in their development. PMID:23707417

  19. Are clinical decisions in endodontics influenced by the patient's fee-paying status?

    PubMed

    Walker, I; Gilbert, D; Asimakopoulou, K

    2015-12-11

    Objective We explored whether the fee status of a UK patient influences clinical decision-making in endodontics.Subjects and methods In a randomised-controlled vignette study describing either an 'NHS-funded', 'Privately-funded' or undisclosed fee-status patient, we examined the importance vocational trainer dentists placed on a series of factors normally considered when deciding whether to offer patients endodontic treatment as opposed to extracting the tooth. N = 119 experienced (M years post qualification = 20.01) dentists participated.Main outcome measures Having read a vignette describing a hypothetical patient who could potentially be treated either endodontically or through an extraction, dentists rated a series of factors they would normally consider (for example, poor oral hygiene, the rest of their mouth is unfilled and caries-free), before recommending either endodontic treatment or an extraction.Results The patient's funding status had no influence on these dentists' clinical decision-making when considering endodontic treatment as an option (p >0.05) with the exception of a single item relating to infrequent attendance where the NHS patient was more likely than the 'undisclosed-fee' patient, to be offered extractions (F (2, 116) 3.43, p <0.04).Conclusions We have found no strong evidence to suggest that the fee-status of a patient influences clinical decision-making in endodontic treatment by experienced dentists. PMID:26657442

  20. Privacy-preserving clinical decision support system using Gaussian kernel-based classification.

    PubMed

    Rahulamathavan, Yogachandran; Veluru, Suresh; Phan, Raphael C-W; Chambers, Jonathon A; Rajarajan, Muttukrishnan

    2014-01-01

    A clinical decision support system forms a critical capability to link health observations with health knowledge to influence choices by clinicians for improved healthcare. Recent trends toward remote outsourcing can be exploited to provide efficient and accurate clinical decision support in healthcare. In this scenario, clinicians can use the health knowledge located in remote servers via the Internet to diagnose their patients. However, the fact that these servers are third party and therefore potentially not fully trusted raises possible privacy concerns. In this paper, we propose a novel privacy-preserving protocol for a clinical decision support system where the patients' data always remain in an encrypted form during the diagnosis process. Hence, the server involved in the diagnosis process is not able to learn any extra knowledge about the patient's data and results. Our experimental results on popular medical datasets from UCI-database demonstrate that the accuracy of the proposed protocol is up to 97.21% and the privacy of patient data is not compromised. PMID:24403404

  1. Heart to Heart: a computerized decision aid for assessment of coronary heart disease risk and the impact of risk-reduction interventions for primary prevention.

    PubMed

    Pignone, Michael; Sheridan, Stacey L; Lee, Yueh Z; Kuo, Johnny; Phillips, Christopher; Mulrow, Cynthia; Zeiger, Roni

    2004-01-01

    Heart to Heart is a computer-based decision aid for patients and providers that provides personalized, evidence-based information about coronary heart disease (CHD) risk and potential risk-reducing interventions. To develop Heart to Heart, the authors used Framing-ham risk equations and systematic reviews of risk-reducing interventions. The Web version was programmed using PHP: Hypertext Processor, a Web-based programming language, and has separate interfaces for providers and patients. The authors subsequently developed a modified version for personal digital assistants. Heart to Heart uses information about a patient's CHD risk factors (age, gender, total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, diabetes, smoking, systolic blood pressure, and left ventricular hypertrophy) to calculate risk of total CHD events over 5 or 10 years. Patients and providers can then examine the effect of introducing one or more risk-reducing interventions (aspirin, lipid-lowering drug therapy, antihypertensive medication, or smoking cessation) on the patient's CHD risk. Future research will be directed to determining whether Heart to Heart can improve utilization of effective CHD risk-reducing interventions. PMID:15010625

  2. Computerized Fleet Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cataldo, John J.

    1985-01-01

    The Computerized Fleet Maintenance (CFM) program of a New York school district has major component areas of garage operation, vehicle replacement, and fuel consumption. CFM detects high expenditures and provides the rationale for bus replacement. (MLF)

  3. Computerized Interactive Harness Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billitti, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Computerized interactive harness engineering program inexpensive, interactive system for learning and using engineering approach to interconnection systems. Basically data-base system that stores information as files of individual connectors and handles wiring information in circuit groups stored as records.

  4. Formative Evaluation of Clinician Experience with Integrating Family History-Based Clinical Decision Support into Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Doerr, Megan; Edelman, Emily; Gabitzsch, Emily; Eng, Charis; Teng, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Family health history is a leading predictor of disease risk. Nonetheless, it is underutilized to guide care and, therefore, is ripe for health information technology intervention. To fill the family health history practice gap, Cleveland Clinic has developed a family health history collection and clinical decision support tool, MyFamily. This report describes the impact and process of implementing MyFamily into primary care, cancer survivorship and cancer genetics clinics. Ten providers participated in semi-structured interviews that were analyzed to identify opportunities for process improvement. Participants universally noted positive effects on patient care, including increases in quality, personalization of care and patient engagement. The impact on clinical workflow varied by practice setting, with differences observed in the ease of integration and the use of specific report elements. Tension between the length of the report and desired detail was appreciated. Barriers and facilitators to the process of implementation were noted, dominated by the theme of increased integration with the electronic medical record. These results fed real-time improvement cycles to reinforce clinician use. This model will be applied in future institutional efforts to integrate clinical genomic applications into practice and may be useful for other institutions considering the implementation of tools for personalizing medical management. PMID:25563219

  5. Reproductive Ethics in Commercial Surrogacy: Decision-Making in IVF Clinics in New Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Tanderup, Malene; Reddy, Sunita; Patel, Tulsi; Nielsen, Birgitte Bruun

    2015-09-01

    As a neo-liberal economy, India has become one of the new health tourism destinations, with commercial gestational surrogacy as an expanding market. Yet the Indian Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) Bill has been pending for five years, and the guidelines issued by the Indian Council of Medical Research are somewhat vague and contradictory, resulting in self-regulated practices of fertility clinics. This paper broadly looks at clinical ethics in reproduction in the practice of surrogacy and decision-making in various procedures. Through empirical research in New Delhi, the capital of India, from December 2011 to November 2012, issues of decision-making on embryo transfer, fetal reduction, and mode of delivery were identified. Interviews were carried out with doctors in eighteen ART clinics, agents from four agencies, and fourteen surrogates. In aiming to fulfil the commissioning parents' demands, doctors were willing to go to the greatest extent possible in their medical practice. Autonomy and decision-making regarding choice of the number of embryos to transfer and the mode of delivery lay neither with commissioning parents nor surrogate mothers but mostly with doctors. In order to ensure higher success rates, surrogates faced the risk of multiple pregnancy and fetal reduction with little information regarding the risks involved. In the globalized market of commercial surrogacy in India, and with clinics compromising on ethics, there is an urgent need for formulation of regulative law for the clinical practice and maintenance of principles of reproductive ethics in order to ensure that the interests of surrogate mothers are safeguarded. PMID:26133889

  6. [Visual presentation of psychiatric clinical decision-making by "graphic assessment sheet for diagnoses and treatments"].

    PubMed

    Ota, Toshio; Yoshida, Sumiko; Tsunashima, Sousuke; Totsuka, Takao; Watanabe, Takafumi; Toyoshima, Ryoichi

    2011-01-01

    Psychiatrists often have to treat patients even when the clinical information is insufficient to make a definite diagnosis. This is the case especially when we are treating first-visit outpatients or inpatients who have just been admitted. One of the causes of information insufficiency is a delay in obtaining clinical information on the patient, and another is a lack of characteristic manifestations of the disease because of an immature developmental stage. Even in such situations, however, clinicians have to make reasonable judgements using the information that is available at that time. The framework for making judgements on such occasions, or "the framework of decision-making under imperfect-information conditions", is becoming more and more important in psychiatric clinical practice in Japan for the following reasons. First, team members in charge of a patient became very heterogeneous in terms of their career and motivation after the start of the new post-graduate clinical training system in Japan several years ago, resulting in a higher risk of miscommunication. Secondly, the need for precise explanation to patients and their families has become crucial in recent years as the result of various social changes. Ota T, one of the authors, once put forward the framework of decision-making under imperfect-information conditions on the basis of Bayesian statistics. In the present paper, in consideration of the above background, we devised a sheet for visualizing the above framework so that relevant staff could share the clinical decision-making process. Specifically, we visually arranged on a sheet of paper the components and variables of the framework, so that the staff could communicate with each other explicitly and precisely about the estimated probability of each possible disease, merits and demerits of each treatment option, etc. We employed the sheet on treating patients in our acute psychiatric ward, 2 of whom are presented in the paper. Discussions were made on the usefulness, limitations, and remaining problems. PMID:21882540

  7. Enabling health care decisionmaking through clinical decision support and knowledge management.

    PubMed Central

    Lobach, David; Sanders, Gillian D; Bright, Tiffani J; Wong, Anthony; Dhurjati, Ravi; Bristow, Erin; Bastian, Lori; Coeytaux, Remy; Samsa, Gregory; Hasselblad, Vic; Williams, John W; Wing, Liz; Musty, Michael; Kendrick, Amy S

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To catalogue study designs used to assess the clinical effectiveness of CDSSs and KMSs, to identify features that impact the success of CDSSs/KMSs, to document the impact of CDSSs/KMSs on outcomes, and to identify knowledge types that can be integrated into CDSSs/KMSs. DATA SOURCES MEDLINE(®), CINAHL(®), PsycINFO(®), and Web of Science(®). REVIEW METHODS We included studies published in English from January 1976 through December 2010. After screening titles and abstracts, full-text versions of articles were reviewed by two independent reviewers. Included articles were abstracted to evidence tables by two reviewers. Meta-analyses were performed for seven domains in which sufficient studies with common outcomes were included. RESULTS We identified 15,176 articles, from which 323 articles describing 311 unique studies including 160 reports on 148 randomized control trials (RCTs) were selected for inclusion. RCTs comprised 47.5 percent of the comparative studies on CDSSs/KMSs. Both commercially and locally developed CDSSs effectively improved health care process measures related to performing preventive services (n = 25; OR 1.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.27 to 1.58), ordering clinical studies (n = 20; OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.47 to 2.00), and prescribing therapies (n = 46; OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.35 to 1.82). Fourteen CDSS/KMS features were assessed for correlation with success of CDSSs/KMSs across all endpoints. Meta-analyses identified six new success features: Integration with charting or order entry system. Promotion of action rather than inaction. No need for additional clinician data entry. Justification of decision support via research evidence. Local user involvement. Provision of decision support results to patients as well as providers. Three previously identified success features were confirmed: Automatic provision of decision support as part of clinician workflow. Provision of decision support at time and location of decisionmaking. Provision of a recommendation, not just an assessment. Only 29 (19.6%) RCTs assessed the impact of CDSSs on clinical outcomes, 22 (14.9%) assessed costs, and 3 assessed KMSs on any outcomes. The primary source of knowledge used in CDSSs was derived from structured care protocols. CONCLUSIONS Strong evidence shows that CDSSs/KMSs are effective in improving health care process measures across diverse settings using both commercially and locally developed systems. Evidence for the effectiveness of CDSSs on clinical outcomes and costs and KMSs on any outcomes is minimal. Nine features of CDSSs/KMSs that correlate with a successful impact of clinical decision support have been newly identified or confirmed. PMID:23126650

  8. Impact of clinical and health services research projects on decision-making: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This article reports on the impact assessment experience of a funding program of non-commercial clinical and health services research. The aim was to assess the level of implementation of results from a subgroup of research projects (on respiratory diseases), and to detect barriers (or facilitators) in the translation of new knowledge to informed decision-making. Methods A qualitative study was performed. The sample consisted of six projects on respiratory diseases funded by the Agency for Health Quality and Assessment of Catalonia between 1996 and 2004. Semi-structured interviews to key informants including researchers and healthcare decision-makers were carried out. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed on an individual (key informant) and group (project) basis. In addition, the differences between achieved and expected impacts were described. Results Twenty-three semi-structured interviews were conducted. Most participants indicated changes in health services or clinical practice had resulted from research. The channels used to transfer new knowledge were mainly conventional ones, but also in less explicit ways, such as with the involvement of local scientific societies, or via debates and discussions with colleagues and local leaders. The barriers and facilitators identified were mostly organizational (in research management, and clinical and healthcare practice), although there were also some related to the nature of the research as well as personal factors. Both the expected and achieved impacts enabled the identification of the gaps between what is expected and what is truly achieved. Conclusions In this study and according to key informants, the impact of these research projects on decision-making can be direct (the application of a finding or innovation) or indirect, contributing to a more complex change in clinical practice and healthcare organization, both having other contextual factors. The channels used to transfer this new knowledge to clinical practice are complex. Local scientific societies and the relationships between researchers and decision-makers can play a very important role. Specifically, the relationships between managers and research teams and the mutual knowledge of their activity have shown to be effective in applying research funding to practice and decision-making. Finally the facilitating factors and barriers identified by the respondents are closely related to the idiosyncrasy of the human relations between the different stakeholders involved. PMID:23663364

  9. Enhancing Nurse and Physician Collaboration in Clinical Decision Making Through High-fidelity Interdisciplinary Simulation Training

    PubMed Central

    Maxson, Pamela M.; Dozois, Eric J.; Holubar, Stefan D.; Wrobleski, Diane M.; Dube, Joyce A. Overman; Klipfel, Janee M.; Arnold, Jacqueline J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether interdisciplinary simulation team training can positively affect registered nurse and/or physician perceptions of collaboration in clinical decision making. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: Between March 1 and April 21, 2009, a convenience sample of volunteer nurses and physicians was recruited to undergo simulation training consisting of a team response to 3 clinical scenarios. Participants completed the Collaboration and Satisfaction About Care Decisions (CSACD) survey before training and at 2 weeks and 2 months after training. Differences in CSACD summary scores between the time points were assessed with paired t tests. RESULTS: Twenty-eight health care professionals (19 nurses, 9 physicians) underwent simulation training. Nurses were of similar age to physicians (27.3 vs 34.5 years; p=.82), were more likely to be women (95.0% vs 12.5%; p<.001), and were less likely to have undergone prior simulation training (0% vs 37.5%; p=.02). The pretest showed that physicians were more likely to perceive that open communication exists between nurses and physicians (p=.04) and that both medical and nursing concerns influence the decision-making process (p=.02). Pretest CSACD analysis revealed that most participants were dissatisfied with the decision-making process. The CSACD summary score showed significant improvement from baseline to 2 weeks (4.2 to 5.1; p<.002), a trend that persisted at 2 months (p<.002). CONCLUSION: Team training using high-fidelity simulation scenarios promoted collaboration between nurses and physicians and enhanced the patient care decision-making process. PMID:21193653

  10. A Framework for Usable and Effective Clinical Decision Support: Experience from the iCPR Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kannry, Joseph; McCullagh, Lauren; Kushniruk, Andre; Mann, Devin; Edonyabo, Daniel; McGinn, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The promise of Clinical Decision Support (CDS) has always been to transform patient care and improve patient outcomes through the delivery of timely and appropriate recommendations that are patient specific and, more often than not, are appropriately actionable. However, the users of CDS—providers—are frequently bombarded with inappropriate and inapplicable CDS that often are not informational, not integrated into the workflow, not patient specific, and that may present out of date and irrelevant recommendations. Methods: The integrated clinical prediction rule (iCPR) project was a randomized clinical trial (RCT) conducted to determine if a novel form of CDS, i.e., clinical prediction rules (CPRs), could be efficiently integrated into workflow and result in changes in outcomes (e.g., antibiotic ordering) when embedded within a commercial electronic health record (EHR). We use the lessons learned from the iCPR project to illustrate a framework for constructing usable, useful, and effective actionable CDS while employing off-the-shelf functionality in a production system. Innovations that make up the framework combine the following: (1) active and actionable decision support, (2) multiple rounds of usability testing with iterative development for user acceptance, (3) numerous context sensitive triggers, (4) dedicated training and support for users of the CDS tool for user adoption, and (5) support from clinical and administrative leadership. We define “context sensitive triggers” as being workflow events (i.e., context) that result in a CDS intervention. Discussion: Success of the framework can be measured by CDS adoption (i.e., intervention is being used), acceptance (compliance with recommendations), and clinical outcomes (where appropriate). This framework may have broader implications for the deployment of Health Information Technology (HIT). Results and Conclusion: iCPR was well adopted(57.4% of users) and accepted (42.7% of users). Usability testing identified and fixed many issues before the iCPR RCT. The level of leadership support and clinical guidance for iCPR was key in establishing a culture of acceptance for both the tool and its recommendations contributing to adoption and acceptance. The dedicated training and support lead to the majority of the residents reporting a high level of comfort with both iCPR tools strep pharyngitis (64.4 percent) and pneumonia (62.7 percent) as well as a high likelihood of using the tools in the future. A surprising framework addition resulted from usability testing: context sensitive triggers. PMID:26290888

  11. Patient exposure in the basic science classroom enhances differential diagnosis formation and clinical decision-making.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Justin G; Grande, Joseph P

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The authors proposed that introducing real patients into a pathology classroom early in medical education would help integrate fundamental principles and disease pathology with clinical presentation and medical history. Methods. Three patients with different pathologies described their history and presentation without revealing their diagnosis. Students were required to submit a differential diagnosis in writing, and then were able to ask questions to arrive at the correct diagnosis. Students were surveyed on the efficacy of patient-based learning. Results. Average student scores on the differential diagnosis assignments significantly improved 32% during the course. From the survey, 72% of students felt that patient encounters should be included in the pathology course next year. Seventy-four percent felt that the differential diagnosis assignments helped them develop clinical decision-making skills. Seventy-three percent felt that the experience helped them know what questions to ask patients. Eighty-six percent felt that they obtained a better understanding of patients' social and emotional challenges. Discussion. Having students work through the process of differential diagnosis formulation when encountering a real patient and their clinical presentation improved clinical decision-making skills and integrated fundamental concepts with disease pathology during a basic science pathology course. PMID:25755935

  12. Students' stereotypes of patients as barriers to clinical decision-making.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S M; Kurtz, M E; Tomlinson, T; Howe, K R

    1986-09-01

    The ability to formulate quick, accurate clinical judgments is stressed in medical training. Speed is usually an asset when a physician sorts through his biomedical knowledge, but it is often a liability when the physician assesses the sociocultural context of a clinical encounter. At the Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine, a study was designed which graphically illustrated to beginning students that unconscious sociocultural stereotypes may influence clinical decision-making. Three entering classes of students were shown a videotape depicting five simulated patients (attractive black woman, attractive white woman, professional man, middle-aged housewife, and elderly man), each presenting with the same physical complaint. Elements of positive and negative stereotypes were incorporated into each of the portrayals, and the students rated these patients on positive and negative characteristics. The results suggested that the students attributed both positive and negative characteristics to patients on the basis of irrelevant characteristics, such as attractiveness, and with little further justification for their attributions. Such stereotypic generalizations held by students may become barriers to the students' objective clinical decision-making. PMID:3755759

  13. Technical desiderata for the integration of genomic data with clinical decision support.

    PubMed

    Welch, Brandon M; Eilbeck, Karen; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Meyer, Laurence J; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2014-10-01

    The ease with which whole genome sequence (WGS) information can be obtained is rapidly approaching the point where it can become useful for routine clinical care. However, significant barriers will inhibit widespread adoption unless clinicians are able to effectively integrate this information into patient care and decision-making. Electronic health records (EHR) and clinical decision support (CDS) systems may play a critical role in this integration. A previously published technical desiderata focused primarily on the integration of genomic data into the EHR. This manuscript extends the previous desiderata by specifically addressing needs related to the integration of genomic information with CDS. The objective of this study is to develop and validate a guiding set of technical desiderata for supporting the clinical use of WGS through CDS. A panel of domain experts in genomics and CDS developed a proposed set of seven additional requirements. These desiderata were reviewed by 63 experts in genomics and CDS through an online survey and refined based on the experts' comments. These additional desiderata provide important guiding principles for the technical development of CDS capabilities for the clinical use of WGS information. PMID:24931434

  14. Genetic stratification in myeloid diseases: from risk assessment to clinical decision support tool.

    PubMed

    Ofran, Yishai

    2014-10-01

    Genetic aberrations have become a dominant factor in the stratification of myeloid malignancies. Cytogenetic and a few mutation studies are the backbone of risk assessment models of myeloid malignancies which are a major consideration in clinical decisions, especially patient assignment for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Progress in our understanding of the genetic basis of the pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies and the growing capabilities of mass sequencing may add new roles for the clinical usage of genetic data. A few recently identified mutations recognized to be associated with specific diseases or clinical scenarios may soon become part of the diagnostic criteria of such conditions. Mutational studies may also advance our capabilities for a more efficient patient selection process, assigning the most effective therapy at the best timing for each patient. The clinical utility of genetic data is anticipated to advance further with the adoption of deep sequencing and next-generation sequencing techniques. We herein suggest some future potential applications of sequential genetic data to identify pending deteriorations at time points which are the best for aggressive interventions such as allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Genetics is moving from being mostly a prognostic factor to becoming a multitasking decision support tool for hematologists. Physicians must pay attention to advances in molecular hematology as it will soon be accessible and influential for most of our patients. PMID:25386341

  15. Exploring Decision-Making of HIV-Infected Hispanics and African Americans Participating in Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Goba, Migdalia V.; Dominguez, Dinora C.; Stoll, Pamela; Grady, Christine; Ramos, Catalina; Mican, JoAnn M.

    2011-01-01

    Underrepresentation of HIV-infected Hispanics and African Americans in clinical trials seriously limits our understanding of the benefits and risks of treatment in these populations. This qualitative study examined factors that racial/ethnic minority patients consider when making decisions regarding research participation. Thirty-five HIV-infected Hispanic and African American patients enrolled in clinical research protocols at the National Institutes of Health were recruited to participate in focus groups and in-depth interviews. The sample of mostly men (n = 22), had a mean age of 45, nearly equal representation of race/ethnicity, and diagnosed 2 to 22 years ago. Baseline questionnaires included demographics and measures of social support and acculturation. Interviewers had similar racial/ethnic, cultural, and linguistic backgrounds as the participants. Four major themes around participants’ decisions to enroll in clinical trials emerged: Enhancers, Barriers, Beliefs, and Psychosocial Context. Results may help researchers develop strategies to facilitate inclusion of HIV-infected Hispanics and African Americans into clinical trials. PMID:21256054

  16. Is there a "magic" hemoglobin number? Clinical decision support promoting restrictive blood transfusion practices.

    PubMed

    Goodnough, Lawrence Tim; Shah, Neil

    2015-10-01

    Blood transfusion has been identified as one of the most frequently performed therapeutic procedures, with a significant percentage of transfusions identified to be inappropriate. Recent key clinical trials in adults have provided Level 1 evidence to support restrictive red blood cell (RBC) transfusion practices. However, some advocates have attempted to identify a "correct" Hb threshold for RBC transfusion; whereas others assert that management of anemia, including transfusion decisions, must take into account clinical patient variables, rather than simply one diagnostic laboratory test. The heterogeneity of guidelines for blood transfusion by a number of medical societies reflects this controversy. Clinical decision support (CDS) uses a Hb threshold number in a smart Best Practices Alert (BPA) upon physician order, to trigger a concurrent utilization self-review for whether blood transfusion therapy is appropriate. This review summarizes Level 1 evidence in seven key clinical trials in adults that support restrictive transfusion practices, along strategies made possible by CDS that have demonstrated value in improving blood utilization by promoting restrictive transfusion practices. PMID:26113442

  17. The Utilization of a Clinical Decision Support System to Manage Adult Type 2 Diabetes: A Correlational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faught, I. Charie

    2012-01-01

    While the Institute of Medicine (2001) has promoted health information technology to improve the process of care such as compliance with clinical practice guidelines and quicker access to clinical information, diagnostic tests, and treatment results, very little was known about how a clinical decision support system can contribute to diabetes…

  18. The Utilization of a Clinical Decision Support System to Manage Adult Type 2 Diabetes: A Correlational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faught, I. Charie

    2012-01-01

    While the Institute of Medicine (2001) has promoted health information technology to improve the process of care such as compliance with clinical practice guidelines and quicker access to clinical information, diagnostic tests, and treatment results, very little was known about how a clinical decision support system can contribute to diabetes…

  19. ASSESSMENT OF UPPER EXTREMITY IMPAIRMENT, FUNCTION, AND ACTIVITY FOLLOWING STROKE: FOUNDATIONS FOR CLINICAL DECISION MAKING

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Catherine E.; Bland, Marghuretta D.; Bailey, Ryan R.; Schaefer, Sydney Y.; Birkenmeier, Rebecca L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive approach for assessing the upper extremity (UE) after stroke. First, common upper extremity impairments and how to assess them are briefly discussed. While multiple UE impairments are typically present after stroke, the severity of one impairment, paresis, is the primary determinant of UE functional loss. Second, UE function is operationally defined and a number of clinical measures are discussed. It is important to consider how impairment and loss of function affect UE activity outside of the clinical environment. Thus, this review also identifies accelerometry as an objective method for assessing UE activity in daily life. Finally, the role that each of these levels of assessment should play in clinical decision making is discussed in order to optimize the provision of stroke rehabilitation services. PMID:22975740

  20. Cancer Multidisciplinary Team Meetings: Evidence, Challenges, and the Role of Clinical Decision Support Technology

    PubMed Central

    Patkar, Vivek; Acosta, Dionisio; Davidson, Tim; Jones, Alison; Fox, John; Keshtgar, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Multidisciplinary team (MDT) model in cancer care was introduced and endorsed to ensure that care delivery is consistent with the best available evidence. Over the last few years, regular MDT meetings have become a standard practice in oncology and gained the status of the key decision-making forum for patient management. Despite the fact that cancer MDT meetings are well accepted by clinicians, concerns are raised over the paucity of good-quality evidence on their overall impact. There are also concerns over lack of the appropriate support for this important but overburdened decision-making platform. The growing acceptance by clinical community of the health information technology in recent years has created new opportunities and possibilities of using advanced clinical decision support (CDS) systems to realise full potential of cancer MDT meetings. In this paper, we present targeted summary of the available evidence on the impact of cancer MDT meetings, discuss the reported challenges, and explore the role that a CDS technology could play in addressing some of these challenges. PMID:22295234

  1. The impact of reading a clinical study on treatment decisions of physicians and residents.

    PubMed

    Bergman, D A; Pantell, R H

    1986-05-01

    The study presented here reports on the impact of newly published clinical research on physicians' decisions. Eighty-three pediatricians, pediatric residents, and family practitioners were presented with a common, potentially serious problem, an infant with a high fever, and were required to estimate the probabilities of bacteremia and of acquiring meningitis and to choose from management options. The participants then read a published scientific report addressing the risks of meningitis in febrile infants and were asked afterward to answer again the questions relating to the clinical problem. After reading the study, the participants significantly increased their probability estimates of the patient acquiring meningitis. Only 14 percent of the participants would have hospitalized the patient before reading the article, but 47 percent would have done so after reading the article. Pediatricians were more likely than family practitioners to use antibiotics after reading the article. These decisions were not based not based on logical processing of information, as there was no correlation between the physicians' estimate of the risk of meningitis and the underlying risk of bacteremia and no correlation between the participants' decisions to hospitalize or use antibiotics and their estimated risk of the patient developing meningitis. Physicians appear to have considerable difficulty in using probability data and appear to base estimates of serious disease and subsequent management on intuition rather than calculation. PMID:3701813

  2. [Human body meridian spatial decision support system for clinical treatment and teaching of acupuncture and moxibustion].

    PubMed

    Wu, Dehua

    2016-01-01

    The spatial position and distribution of human body meridian are expressed limitedly in the decision support system (DSS) of acupuncture and moxibustion at present, which leads to the failure to give the effective quantitative analysis on the spatial range and the difficulty for the decision-maker to provide a realistic spatial decision environment. Focusing on the limit spatial expression in DSS of acupuncture and moxibustion, it was proposed that on the basis of the geographic information system, in association of DSS technology, the design idea was developed on the human body meridian spatial DSS. With the 4-layer service-oriented architecture adopted, the data center integrated development platform was taken as the system development environment. The hierarchical organization was done for the spatial data of human body meridian via the directory tree. The structured query language (SQL) server was used to achieve the unified management of spatial data and attribute data. The technologies of architecture, configuration and plug-in development model were integrated to achieve the data inquiry, buffer analysis and program evaluation of the human body meridian spatial DSS. The research results show that the human body meridian spatial DSS could reflect realistically the spatial characteristics of the spatial position and distribution of human body meridian and met the constantly changeable demand of users. It has the powerful spatial analysis function and assists with the scientific decision in clinical treatment and teaching of acupuncture and moxibustion. It is the new attempt to the informatization research of human body meridian. PMID:26946752

  3. Computerized Grading of Anatomy Laboratory Practical Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krippendorf, Beth B.; Bolender, David L.; Kolesari, Gary L.

    2008-01-01

    At the Medical College of Wisconsin, a procedure was developed to allow computerized grading and grade reporting of laboratory practical examinations in the Clinical Human Anatomy course. At the start of the course, first year medical students were given four Lists of Structures. On these lists, numbered items were arranged alphabetically; the…

  4. Computerized Grading of Anatomy Laboratory Practical Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krippendorf, Beth B.; Bolender, David L.; Kolesari, Gary L.

    2008-01-01

    At the Medical College of Wisconsin, a procedure was developed to allow computerized grading and grade reporting of laboratory practical examinations in the Clinical Human Anatomy course. At the start of the course, first year medical students were given four Lists of Structures. On these lists, numbered items were arranged alphabetically; the…

  5. Influence of MRI field strength on clinical decision making in knee cartilage injury – A case study

    PubMed Central

    Cashman, Glenn; Attariwala, Raj

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To increase clinicians’ awareness of the differences in image resolution and potential diagnostic accuracy between small and large-field MR Scanners. To present an example of a clinical decision making challenge in how to proceed when knee MRI and clinical findings don’t agree. Clinical Features: A 38 year old female mountain biker presented with knee pain and clinical features strongly suggestive of a torn meniscus or loose bodies. An initial MRI using a small field strength (0.18T) scanner was reported as normal. Her clinical presentation was suspicious enough that a repeat MRI on a high-field (1.5T) scanner was ordered. The second MRI included high resolution 3D volumetric imaging which revealed cartilage damage and loose bodies. Intervention and Outcome: The patient was treated with arthroscopic surgery which confirmed the presence of meniscal and chondral injury and resulted in notable improvement in the patient’s symptoms. Conclusion: Clinicians should consider scanner quality and diagnostic accuracy before discounting strongly suggestive clinical history and examination findings when MRIs are reported as normal. PMID:25550664

  6. An ontology driven clinical evidence service providing diagnostic decision support in family practice

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Formulation of a working diagnostic hypothesis in family practice requires consideration of many differential diagnoses associated with any presenting patient complaint. There follows a process of refinement of the differentials to consider, through ruling in or out each candidate differential based on the confirmed presence or absence of diagnostic cues elicited during patient consultation. The patient safety implications of diagnostic error are potentially severe for patient and clinician. This paper describes a clinical evidence service supporting this diagnostic process. It allows decision support consumers to provide coded evidence-based recommendations to assist with diagnostic hypothesis formulation, integrated with an EHR in primary care. The solution implements ontology models of evidence accessible to consumers as a web service using open source components and standards. An implementation example is described that consumes the service to drive a diagnostic decision support tool developed for the TRANSFoRm project. PMID:26306282

  7. Constructing Clinical Decision Support Systems for Adverse Drug Event Prevention: A Knowledge-based Approach.

    PubMed

    Koutkias, Vassilis; Kilintzis, Vassilis; Stalidis, George; Lazou, Katerina; Collyda, Chrysa; Chazard, Emmanuel; McNair, Peter; Beuscart, Regis; Maglaveras, Nicos

    2010-01-01

    A knowledge-based approach is proposed that is employed for the construction of a framework suitable for the management and effective use of knowledge on Adverse Drug Event (ADE) prevention. The framework has as its core part a Knowledge Base (KB) comprised of rule-based knowledge sources, that is accompanied by the necessary inference and query mechanisms to provide healthcare professionals and patients with decision support services in clinical practice, in terms of alerts and recommendations on preventable ADEs. The relevant Knowledge Based System (KBS) is developed in the context of the EU-funded research project PSIP (Patient Safety through Intelligent Procedures in Medication). In the current paper, we present the foundations of the framework, its knowledge model and KB structure, as well as recent progress as regards the population of the KB, the implementation of the KBS, and results on the KBS verification in decision support operation. PMID:21347009

  8. A Critical Review of the Theoretical Frameworks and the Conceptual Factors in the Adoption of Clinical Decision Support Systems.

    PubMed

    Khong, Peck Chui Betty; Holroyd, Eleanor; Wang, Wenru

    2015-12-01

    The clinical decision support system is utilized to translate knowledge into evidence-based practice in clinical settings. Many studies have been conducted to understand users' adoption of the clinical decision support system. A critical review was conducted to understand the theoretical or conceptual frameworks used to inform the studies on the adoption of the clinical decision support system. The review identified 15 theoretical and conceptual frameworks using multiple hybrids of theories and concepts. The Technology Acceptance Model was the most frequently used baseline framework combined with frameworks such as the diffusion of innovation, social theory, longitudinal theory, and so on. The results from these articles yielded multiple concepts influencing the adoption of the clinical decision support system. These concepts can be recategorized into nine major concepts, namely, the information system, person (user or patient), social, organization, perceived benefits, emotions, trustability, relevance (fitness), and professionalism. None of the studies found all the nine concepts. That said, most of them have identified the information system, organization, and person concepts as three of its concepts affecting the use of the clinical decision support system. Within each of the concepts, its subconcepts were noted to be very varied. Yet each of these subconcepts has significantly contributed toward the different facets of the concepts. A pluralistic framework was built using the concepts and subconcepts to provide an overall framework construct for future study on the adoption of the clinical decision support system. PMID:26535769

  9. Comparison of Computer-based Clinical Decision Support Systems and Content for Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, M.; Wright, A.; Burton, M.; Fraser, G.; Krall, M.; Maviglia, S.; Mohammed-Rajput, N.; Simonaitis, L.; Sonnenberg, F.; Middleton, B.

    2011-01-01

    Background Computer-based clinical decision support (CDS) systems have been shown to improve quality of care and workflow efficiency, and health care reform legislation relies on electronic health records and CDS systems to improve the cost and quality of health care in the United States; however, the heterogeneity of CDS content and infrastructure of CDS systems across sites is not well known. Objective We aimed to determine the scope of CDS content in diabetes care at six sites, assess the capabilities of CDS in use at these sites, characterize the scope of CDS infrastructure at these sites, and determine how the sites use CDS beyond individual patient care in order to identify characteristics of CDS systems and content that have been successfully implemented in diabetes care. Methods We compared CDS systems in six collaborating sites of the Clinical Decision Support Consortium. We gathered CDS content on care for patients with diabetes mellitus and surveyed institutions on characteristics of their site, the infrastructure of CDS at these sites, and the capabilities of CDS at these sites. Results The approach to CDS and the characteristics of CDS content varied among sites. Some commonalities included providing customizability by role or user, applying sophisticated exclusion criteria, and using CDS automatically at the time of decision-making. Many messages were actionable recommendations. Most sites had monitoring rules (e.g. assessing hemoglobin A1c), but few had rules to diagnose diabetes or suggest specific treatments. All sites had numerous prevention rules including reminders for providing eye examinations, influenza vaccines, lipid screenings, nephropathy screenings, and pneumococcal vaccines. Conclusion Computer-based CDS systems vary widely across sites in content and scope, but both institution-created and purchased systems had many similar features and functionality, such as integration of alerts and reminders into the decision-making workflow of the provider and providing messages that are actionable recommendations. PMID:23616877

  10. Who Can Afford a Computerized Bookstore? Almost Anyone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Charles

    1982-01-01

    The decision to computerize operations in the DeAnza Community College bookstore was followed by a number of decisions about financing options (purchase, lease/purchase, lease, timesharing). A timesharing agreement was reached with a local bank, with no capital outlay and at a cost equivalent to an accountant's position. (MSE)

  11. A clinical decision support system for the diagnosis, fracture risks and treatment of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Halldorsson, Bjarni V; Bjornsson, Aron Hjalti; Gudmundsson, Haukur Tyr; Birgisson, Elvar Orn; Ludviksson, Bjorn Runar; Gudbjornsson, Bjorn

    2015-01-01

    Expanding medical knowledge increases the potential risk of medical errors in clinical practice. We present, OPAD, a clinical decision support system in the field of the medical care of osteoporosis. We utilize clinical information from international guidelines and experts in the field of osteoporosis. Physicians are provided with user interface to insert standard patient data, from which OPAD provides instant diagnostic comments, 10-year risk of fragility fracture, treatment options for the given case, and when to offer a follow-up DXA-evaluation. Thus, the medical decision making is standardized according to the best expert knowledge at any given time. OPAD was evaluated in a set of 308 randomly selected individuals. OPAD's ten-year fracture risk computation is nearly identical to FRAX (r = 0.988). In 58% of cases OPAD recommended DXA evaluation at the present time. Following a DXA measurement in all individuals, 71% of those that were recommended to have DXA at the present time received recommendation for further investigation or specific treatment by the OPAD. In only 5.9% of individuals in which DXA was not recommended, the result of the BMD measurement changed the recommendations given by OPAD. PMID:25815042

  12. A study of diverse clinical decision support rule authoring environments and requirements for integration

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Efficient rule authoring tools are critical to allow clinical Knowledge Engineers (KEs), Software Engineers (SEs), and Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) to convert medical knowledge into machine executable clinical decision support rules. The goal of this analysis was to identify the critical success factors and challenges of a fully functioning Rule Authoring Environment (RAE) in order to define requirements for a scalable, comprehensive tool to manage enterprise level rules. Methods The authors evaluated RAEs in active use across Partners Healthcare, including enterprise wide, ambulatory only, and system specific tools, with a focus on rule editors for reminder and medication rules. We conducted meetings with users of these RAEs to discuss their general experience and perceived advantages and limitations of these tools. Results While the overall rule authoring process is similar across the 10 separate RAEs, the system capabilities and architecture vary widely. Most current RAEs limit the ability of the clinical decision support (CDS) interventions to be standardized, sharable, interoperable, and extensible. No existing system meets all requirements defined by knowledge management users. Conclusions A successful, scalable, integrated rule authoring environment will need to support a number of key requirements and functions in the areas of knowledge representation, metadata, terminology, authoring collaboration, user interface, integration with electronic health record (EHR) systems, testing, and reporting. PMID:23145874

  13. Development and impact of computerised decision support systems for clinical management of depression: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Triñanes, Yolanda; Atienza, Gerardo; Louro-González, Arturo; de-las-Heras-Liñero, Elena; Alvarez-Ariza, María; Palao, Diego J

    2015-01-01

    One of the proposals for improving clinical practice is to introduce computerised decision support systems (CDSS) and integrate these with electronic medical records. Accordingly, this study sought to systematically review evidence on the effectiveness of CDSS in the management of depression. A search was performed in Medline, EMBASE and PsycInfo, in order to do this. The quality of quantitative studies was assessed using the SIGN method, and qualitative studies using the CASPe checklist. Seven studies were identified (3 randomised clinical trials, 3 non-randomised trials, and one qualitative study). The CDSS assessed incorporated content drawn from guidelines and other evidence-based products. In general, the CDSS had a positive impact on different aspects, such as the screening and diagnosis, treatment, improvement in depressive symptoms and quality of life, and referral of patients. The use of CDSS could thus serve to optimise care of depression in various scenarios by providing recommendations based on the best evidence available and facilitating decision-making in clinical practice. PMID:25500093

  14. Design of a nursing clinical decision support system applying nursing diagnosis and nursing evaluation model based data mining.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyungyung; Kim, Insook; Chae, Yougmoon

    2006-01-01

    This study a methodological study; to acquire knowledge on the nursing process by steps of knowledge definition, collection, and representation; then, to design a data warehouse and nursing process clinical decision support system. PMID:17102379

  15. Computerized physician order entry: promise, perils, and experience.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Raman; Yen, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Computerized physician order entry (CPOE) has been promoted as an important component of patient safety, quality improvement, and modernization of medical practice. In practice, however, CPOE affects health care delivery in complex ways, with benefits as well as risks. Every implementation of CPOE is associated with both generally recognized and unique local factors that can facilitate or confound its rollout, and neurohospitalists will often be at the forefront of such rollouts. In this article, we review the literature on CPOE, beginning with definitions and proceeding to comparisons to the standard of care. We then proceed to discuss clinical decision support systems, negative aspects of CPOE, and cultural context of CPOE implementation. Before concluding, we follow the experiences of a Chief Medical Information Officer and neurohospitalist who rolled out a CPOE system at his own health care organization and managed the resulting workflow changes and setbacks. PMID:24381708

  16. Systematic review of clinical decision support interventions with potential for inpatient cost reduction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Healthcare costs are increasing rapidly and at an unsustainable rate in many countries, and inpatient hospitalizations are a significant driver of these costs. Clinical decision support (CDS) represents a promising approach to not only improve care but to reduce costs in the inpatient setting. The purpose of this study was to systematically review trials of CDS interventions with the potential to reduce inpatient costs, so as to identify promising interventions for more widespread implementation and to inform future research in this area. Methods To identify relevant studies, MEDLINE was searched up to July 2013. CDS intervention studies with the potential to reduce inpatient healthcare costs were identified through titles and abstracts, and full text articles were reviewed to make a final determination on inclusion. Relevant characteristics of the studies were extracted and summarized. Results Following a screening of 7,663 articles, 78 manuscripts were included. 78.2% of studies were controlled before-after studies, and 15.4% were randomized controlled trials. 53.8% of the studies were focused on pharmacotherapy. The majority of manuscripts were published during or after 2008. 70.5% of the studies resulted in statistically and clinically significant improvements in an explicit financial measure or a proxy financial measure. Only 12.8% of the studies directly measured the financial impact of an intervention, whereas the financial impact was inferred in the remainder of studies. Data on cost effectiveness was available for only one study. Conclusions Significantly more research is required on the impact of clinical decision support on inpatient costs. In particular, there is a remarkable gap in the availability of cost effectiveness studies required by policy makers and decision makers in healthcare systems. PMID:24344752

  17. Translating shared decision-making into health care clinical practices: Proof of concepts

    PubMed Central

    Légaré, France; Elwyn, Glyn; Fishbein, Martin; Frémont, Pierre; Frosch, Dominick; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Kenny, David A; Labrecque, Michel; Stacey, Dawn; St-Jacques, Sylvie; van der Weijden, Trudy

    2008-01-01

    Background There is considerable interest today in shared decision-making (SDM), defined as a decision-making process jointly shared by patients and their health care provider. However, the data show that SDM has not been broadly adopted yet. Consequently, the main goal of this proposal is to bring together the resources and the expertise needed to develop an interdisciplinary and international research team on the implementation of SDM in clinical practice using a theory-based dyadic perspective. Methods Participants include researchers from Canada, US, UK, and Netherlands, representing medicine, nursing, psychology, community health and epidemiology. In order to develop a collaborative research network that takes advantage of the expertise of the team members, the following research activities are planned: 1) establish networking and on-going communication through internet-based forum, conference calls, and a bi-weekly e-bulletin; 2) hold a two-day workshop with two key experts (one in theoretical underpinnings of behavioral change, and a second in dyadic data analysis), and invite all investigators to present their views on the challenges related to the implementation of SDM in clinical practices; 3) conduct a secondary analyses of existing dyadic datasets to ensure that discussion among team members is grounded in empirical data; 4) build capacity with involvement of graduate students in the workshop and online forum; and 5) elaborate a position paper and an international multi-site study protocol. Discussion This study protocol aims to inform researchers, educators, and clinicians interested in improving their understanding of effective strategies to implement shared decision-making in clinical practice using a theory-based dyadic perspective. PMID:18194521

  18. Human-eye versus computerized color matching.

    PubMed

    Yap, A U; Sim, C P; Loh, W L; Teo, J H

    1999-01-01

    This project compared the difference in color matching between human-eye assessment and computerized colorimetry. Fifty dental personnel were asked to color match Vita Lumin shade tabs to seven different randomly arranged test tabs from the Z100 shade guide. All evaluators were blinded to the shades of the test tabs and were asked to match only body shade of the Vita Lumin tab to the middle third or body of each test tab. The results obtained were subsequently computed into L*a*b* values and compared with results obtained by computerized colorimetry. Results indicate that the difference in color matching between human-eye assessment and computerized colorimetry is shade dependent. Discrepancy was significant for b* coordinates for shades A1 and B2 and L* and b* coordinates for shade C4. For all shades evaluated, color difference between human-eye and computerized color matching is perceivable under clinical settings, as delta E values are greater than 3. There is a need for correction factors in the formal specification of the color-matching software due to the discrepancy between human-eye and computerized colorimetric color matching. PMID:10823085

  19. Implementation of a Clinical Decision Support Alert for the Management of Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Revolinski, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infections are common in hospitalized patients and can result in significant morbidity and mortality. It is imperative to optimize the management of C. difficile infections to help minimize disease complications. Antimicrobial stewardship techniques including guidelines, order sets and other clinical decision support functionalities may be utilized to assist with therapy optimization. We implemented a novel alert within our electronic medical record to direct providers to the C. difficile order set in order to assist with initiating therapy consistent with institutional guideline recommendations. The alert succeeded in significantly increasing order set utilization, but guideline compliance was unchanged.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of the vagina: an overview for radiologists with emphasis on clinical decision making*

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Daian Miranda; Bezerra, Régis Otaviano França; Ortega, Cinthia Denise; Blasbalg, Roberto; Viana, Públio César Cavalcante; de Menezes, Marcos Roberto; Rocha, Manoel de Souza

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is a method with high contrast resolution widely used in the assessment of pelvic gynecological diseases. However, the potential of such method to diagnose vaginal lesions is still underestimated, probably due to the scarce literature approaching the theme, the poor familiarity of radiologists with vaginal diseases, some of them relatively rare, and to the many peculiarities involved in the assessment of the vagina. Thus, the authors illustrate the role of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of vaginal diseases and the main relevant findings to be considered in the clinical decision making process. PMID:26379324

  1. Pharmacists’ Perceptions of the Influence of Interactions with the Pharmaceutical Industry on Clinical Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Tejani, Aaron M; Loewen, Peter; Bachand, Richard; Harder, Curtis K

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is a paucity of literature examining the perceptions of Canadian pharmacists toward drug promotion by the pharmaceutical industry and pharmacist–industry interactions. Objectives: To determine whether hospital pharmacists perceive their interactions with the pharmaceutical industry as influencing their clinical decision-making or that of their colleagues and whether hospital pharmacists perceive that interactions with the pharmaceutical industry create a conflict of interest. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of the complete sample of hospital pharmacists practising in 3 large health authorities in a single Canadian province was conducted from February to April 2010. Results: A total of 224 responses were received from the approximately 480 pharmacists in the target health authorities (response rate approximately 47%). Fifty-eight percent of respondents (127/218) did not believe that information received at industry-sponsored events influenced their clinical decision-making. Most (142/163 [87%]) disagreed that small gifts influenced their clinical decision-making, whereas responses were divided for large gifts. Respondents were also divided on the issue of whether their interactions created conflicts of interest, with most of those who had received gifts agreeing that large gifts would create a conflict of interest (134/163 [82%]) whereas small gifts would not (100/163 [61%]). There were positive correlations between respondents’ beliefs about their own susceptibility to influence from sponsored events or receipt of small or large gifts and the susceptibility of others, but 22% of respondents (28/127) expressed a different perception about sponsored events, all believing themselves to be less influenced than their colleagues. Only 6% (4/64) of those who received large gifts and 4% (5/142) of those who received small gifts and felt they were not influenced by these gifts reported that it was likely others would be influenced by the receipt of such gifts. Conclusions: Most hospital pharmacists who responded to this survey had attended industry-sponsored events, and the majority felt that it did not influence their clinical decision-making, despite recognition that the information received is unbalanced. Respondents were divided on the notion of whether these interactions led to conflicts of interest. Respondents generally felt that large and small gifts had different effects on influence and conflict of interest. PMID:26478583

  2. Integrating complex business processes for knowledge-driven clinical decision support systems.

    PubMed

    Kamaleswaran, Rishikesan; McGregor, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents in detail the component of the Complex Business Process for Stream Processing framework that is responsible for integrating complex business processes to enable knowledge-driven Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) recommendations. CDSSs aid the clinician in supporting the care of patients by providing accurate data analysis and evidence-based recommendations. However, the incorporation of a dynamic knowledge-management system that supports the definition and enactment of complex business processes and real-time data streams has not been researched. In this paper we discuss the process web service as an innovative method of providing contextual information to a real-time data stream processing CDSS. PMID:23366138

  3. Considerations on implementing diagnostic markers into clinical decision making in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Lotan, Yair; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Schmitz-Dräger, Bernd J; Sanchez-Carbayo, Marta; Jankevicius, Feliksas; Racioppi, Marco; Minner, Sarah J P; Stöhr, Brigitte; Bassi, Pier Francesco; Grossman, H Barton

    2010-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a common disease that is often detected late and has a high rate of recurrence and progression. Cystoscopy is the main tool in detection and surveillance of bladder cancer but is invasive and can miss some cancers. Cytology is frequently utilized but suffers from a poor sensitivity. There are several commercially available urine-based tumor markers currently available but their use is not recommended by guideline panels. Markers such as the Urovysion FISH assay and the NMP22 BladderChek test are approved for surveillance and detection in patients with hematuria. The added benefit of these markers and other commercially available markers (e.g. Ucyt+, BTA stat) has not been well investigated though it appears these markers are insufficiently sensitive to replace cystoscopy. Additional studies are needed to determine the clinical scenarios where bladder markers are best utilized (screening, surveillance, early detection, evaluating cytologic atypia) and what impact they should have on clinical decision making. Furthermore, a variety of issues and barriers can affect the movement of clinical tests from research to clinical practice. This article addresses some of the challenges facing research and medical communities in the delivery and integration of markers for bladder cancer diagnosis. Moreover, we attempt to outline criteria for the clinical utility of new bladder cancer diagnostic markers. PMID:20610281

  4. Clinical decision making in response to performance validity test failure in a psychiatric setting.

    PubMed

    Marcopulos, Bernice A; Caillouet, Beth A; Bailey, Christopher M; Tussey, Chriscelyn; Kent, Julie-Ann; Frederick, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the clinical utility of a performance validity test (PVT) for screening consecutive referrals (N = 436) to a neuropsychology service at a state psychiatric hospital treating both civilly committed and forensic patients. We created a contingency table with Test of Memory Malingering (TOMM) pass/fail (355/81) and secondary gain present/absent (181/255) to examine pass rates associated with patient demographic, clinical and forensic status characteristics. Of the 81 failed PVTs, 48 had secondary gain defined as active criminal legal charges; 33 failed PVTs with no secondary gain. These individuals tended to be older, female, Caucasian, and civilly committed compared with the group with secondary gain who failed. From estimations of TOMM False Positive Rate and True Positive Rate we estimated base rates of neurocognitive malingering for our clinical population using the Test Validation Summary (TVS; Frederick & Bowden, 2009 ). Although PVT failure is clearly more common in a group with secondary gain (31%), there were a number of false positives (11%). Clinical ratings of patients without gain who failed suggested cognitive deficits, behavioral issues, and inattention. Low scores on PVTs in the absence of secondary gain provide useful information on test engagement and can inform clinical decisions about testing. PMID:24678658

  5. Improving decision making about clinical trial participation – a randomised controlled trial of a decision aid for women considering participation in the IBIS-II breast cancer prevention trial

    PubMed Central

    Juraskova, I; Butow, P; Bonner, C; Bell, M L; Smith, A B; Seccombe, M; Boyle, F; Reaby, L; Cuzick, J; Forbes, J F

    2014-01-01

    Background: Decision aids may improve informed consent in clinical trial recruitment, but have not been evaluated in this context. This study investigated whether decision aids (DAs) can reduce decisional difficulties among women considering participation in the International Breast Cancer Intervention Study-II (IBIS-II) trial. Methods: The IBIS-II trial investigated breast cancer prevention with anastrazole in two cohorts: women with increased risk (Prevention), and women treated for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Australia, New Zealand and United Kingdom participants were randomised to receive a DA (DA group) or standard trial consent materials (control group). Questionnaires were completed after deciding about participation in IBIS-II (post decision) and 3 months later (follow-up). Results: Data from 112 Prevention and 34 DCIS participants were analysed post decision (73 DA; 73 control); 95 Prevention and 24 DCIS participants were analysed at follow-up (58 DA; 61 control). There was no effect on the primary outcome of decisional conflict. The DCIS–DA group had higher knowledge post decision, and the Prevention-DA group had lower decisional regret at follow-up. Conclusions: This was the first study to evaluate a DA in the clinical trial setting. The results suggest DAs can potentially increase knowledge and reduce decisional regret about clinical trial participation. PMID:24892447

  6. Usability Testing of a Complex Clinical Decision Support Tool in the Emergency Department: Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    McCullagh, Lauren; Khan, Sundas; Schachter, Andy; Pardo, Salvatore; McGinn, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background As the electronic health record (EHR) becomes the preferred documentation tool across medical practices, health care organizations are pushing for clinical decision support systems (CDSS) to help bring clinical decision support (CDS) tools to the forefront of patient-physician interactions. A CDSS is integrated into the EHR and allows physicians to easily utilize CDS tools. However, often CDSS are integrated into the EHR without an initial phase of usability testing, resulting in poor adoption rates. Usability testing is important because it evaluates a CDSS by testing it on actual users. This paper outlines the usability phase of a study, which will test the impact of integration of the Wells CDSS for pulmonary embolism (PE) diagnosis into a large urban emergency department, where workflow is often chaotic and high stakes decisions are frequently made. We hypothesize that conducting usability testing prior to integration of the Wells score into an emergency room EHR will result in increased adoption rates by physicians. Objective The objective of the study was to conduct usability testing for the integration of the Wells clinical prediction rule into a tertiary care center’s emergency department EHR. Methods We conducted usability testing of a CDS tool in the emergency department EHR. The CDS tool consisted of the Wells rule for PE in the form of a calculator and was triggered off computed tomography (CT) orders or patients’ chief complaint. The study was conducted at a tertiary hospital in Queens, New York. There were seven residents that were recruited and participated in two phases of usability testing. The usability testing employed a “think aloud” method and “near-live” clinical simulation, where care providers interacted with standardized patients enacting a clinical scenario. Both phases were audiotaped, video-taped, and had screen-capture software activated for onscreen recordings. Results Phase I: Data from the “think-aloud” phase of the study showed an overall positive outlook on the Wells tool in assessing a patient for a PE diagnosis. Subjects described the tool as “well-organized” and “better than clinical judgment”. Changes were made to improve tool placement into the EHR to make it optimal for decision-making, auto-populating boxes, and minimizing click fatigue. Phase II: After incorporating the changes noted in Phase 1, the participants noted tool improvements. There was less toggling between screens, they had all the clinical information required to complete the tool, and were able to complete the patient visit efficiently. However, an optimal location for triggering the tool remained controversial. Conclusions This study successfully combined “think-aloud” protocol analysis with “near-live” clinical simulations in a usability evaluation of a CDS tool that will be implemented into the emergency room environment. Both methods proved useful in the assessment of the CDS tool and allowed us to refine tool usability and workflow.

  7. Regulatory Framework for Clinical Decision Support Software: Present Uncertainty and Prospective Proposition.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y Tony; Thompson, Bradley Merrill

    2015-07-01

    US regulators have been slow to provide meaningful guidance to industry participants on the issue of clinical decision support (CDS) software. It is crucial that regulators soon clarify the differences between regulated medical devices and unregulated health management software that nevertheless has the potential to affect patient care. Future CDS regulation in the United States should aim to reduce ambiguity by establishing detailed and simple criteria for manufacturers to use in deciding if a CDS product will be regulated. Clear standards will help ensure the safety of CDS that is brought to market. In addition, clarification will facilitate technological innovation, delivering clinical benefits to needy patients. To this end, the regulatory framework implemented in the United States with respect to CDS should consider the "substantial dependence" standard. PMID:25776925

  8. Clinician Perspectives on the Quality of Patient Data Used for Clinical Decision Support: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, James L.; Ash, Joan S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Clinical decision support (CDS), defined broadly as patient-specific information and knowledge provided at the point of care, depends on a foundation of high quality electronic patient data. Little is known about how clinicians perceive the quality and value of data used to support CDS within an electronic health record (EHR) environment. Methods: During a three-year research study, we collected ethnographic data from ten diverse organizations, including community hospitals, academic medical centers and ambulatory clinics. Results: An in-depth analysis of the theme “data as a foundation for CDS” yielded a descriptive framework incorporating five subthemes related to data quality: completeness, accessibility, context specificity, accuracy, and reliability. Conclusion: We identified several multi-dimensional models that might be used to conceptualize data quality characteristics for future research. These results could provide new insights to system designers and implementers on the importance clinicians place on specific data quality characteristics regarding electronic patient data for CDS. PMID:23304409

  9. Interleukin 28B Polymorphisms and Hepatitis C—Translating the Association into Clinical Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Col Pankaj

    2011-01-01

    Host genetic factors have long been suspected to play a role in predicting outcome and treatment response in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. This was confirmed recently by three landmark genome-wide association studies (GWAS) published in 2009, which identified single nucleotide polymorphisms near the interleukin (IL) 28B region that were more common in responders to treatment. There has subsequently been rapidly increasing data regarding the significance of the IL28B polymorphism not only in response to therapy but also in spontaneous clearance of acute HCV infection. This clinical association of Il28B genotype with HCV may lead to personalized HCV therapy, where the clinician may tailor the duration and type of therapy for an individual patient. This review summarizes the available data on the impact of IL28B polymorphisms on HCV infection and discusses the possible approach to translate this association into clinical decision making for the treatment of HCV infection. PMID:25755307

  10. The Nijmegen Decision Tool for Chronic Low Back Pain. Development of a Clinical Decision Tool for Secondary or Tertiary Spine Care Specialists

    PubMed Central

    van Hooff, Miranda L.; van Loon, Jan; van Limbeek, Jacques; de Kleuver, Marinus

    2014-01-01

    Background In Western Europe, low back pain has the greatest burden of all diseases. When back pain persists, different medical specialists are involved and a lack of consensus exists among these specialists for medical decision-making in Chronic Low Back Pain (CLBP). Objective To develop a decision tool for secondary or tertiary spine care specialists to decide which patients with CLBP should be seen by a spine surgeon or by other non-surgical medical specialists. Methods A Delphi study was performed to identify indicators predicting the outcome of interventions. In the preparatory stage evidence from international guidelines and literature were summarized. Eligible studies were reviews and longitudinal studies. Inclusion criteria: surgical or non-surgical interventions and persistence of complaints, CLBP-patients aged 18–65 years, reported baseline measures of predictive indicators, and one or more reported outcomes had to assess functional status, quality of life, pain intensity, employment status or a composite score. Subsequently, a three-round Delphi procedure, to reach consensus on candidate indicators, was performed among a multidisciplinary panel of 29 CLBP-professionals (>five years CLBP-experience). The pre-set threshold for general agreement was ≥70%. The final indicator set was used to develop a clinical decision tool. Results A draft list with 53 candidate indicators (38 with conclusive evidence and 15 with inconclusive evidence) was included for the Delphi study. Consensus was reached to include 47 indicators. A first version of the decision tool was developed, consisting of a web-based screening questionnaire and a provisional decision algorithm. Conclusions This is the first clinical decision tool based on current scientific evidence and formal multidisciplinary consensus that helps referring the patient for consultation to a spine surgeon or a non-surgical spine care specialist. We expect that this tool considerably helps in clinical decision-making spine care, thereby improving efficient use of scarce sources and the outcomes of spinal interventions. PMID:25133645

  11. Principles of educational outreach ('academic detailing') to improve clinical decision making.

    PubMed

    Soumerai, S B; Avorn, J

    1990-01-26

    With the efficacy and costs of medications rising rapidly, it is increasingly important to ensure that drugs be prescribed as rationally as possible. Yet, physicians' choices of drugs frequently fall short of the ideal of precise and cost-effective decision making. Evidence indicates that such decisions can be improved in a variety of ways. A number of theories and principles of communication and behavior changes can be found that underlie the success of pharmaceutical manufacturers in influencing prescribing practices. Based on this behavioral science and several field trials, it is possible to define the theory and practice of methods to improve physicians' clinical decision making to enhance the quality and cost-effectiveness of care. Some of the most important techniques of such "academic detailing" include (1) conducting interviews to investigate baseline knowledge and motivations for current prescribing patterns, (2) focusing programs on specific categories of physicians as well as on their opinion leaders, (3) defining clear educational and behavioral objectives, (4) establishing credibility through a respected organizational identity, referencing authoritative and unbiased sources of information, and presenting both sides of controversial issues, (5) stimulating active physician participation in educational interactions, (6) using concise graphic educational materials, (7) highlighting and repeating the essential messages, and (8) providing positive reinforcement of improved practices in follow-up visits. Used by the nonprofit sector, the above techniques have been shown to reduce inappropriate prescribing as well as unnecessary health care expenditures. PMID:2104640

  12. Adaptive group sequential design for phase II clinical trials: a Bayesian decision theoretic approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiyi; Smith, Brian J

    2009-11-30

    Bayesian decision theoretic approaches (BDTAs) have been widely studied in the literature as tools for designing and conducting phase II clinical trials. However, full Bayesian approaches that consider multiple endpoints are lacking. Since the monitoring of toxicity is a major goal of phase II trials, we propose an adaptive group sequential design using a BDTA, which characterizes efficacy and toxicity as correlated bivariate binary endpoints. We allow trade-off between the two endpoints. Interim evaluations are conducted group sequentially, but the number of interim looks and the size of each group are chosen adaptively based on current observations.We utilize a loss function consisting of two components: the loss associated with accruing, treating, and monitoring patients, and the loss associated with making incorrect decisions. The performance of our Bayesian modeling, and the operating characteristics of decision rules under a wide range of loss function parameters are evaluated using seven scenarios in a simulation study.Our method is illustrated in the context of a single-arm phase II trial of bevacizumab, gemcitabine, and oxaliplatin in patients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:19725024

  13. Best Practices in Clinical Decision Support: the Case of Preventive Care Reminders.

    PubMed

    Wright, Adam; Phansalkar, Shobha; Bloomrosen, Meryl; Jenders, Robert A; Bobb, Anne M; Halamka, John D; Kuperman, Gilad; Payne, Thomas H; Teasdale, Sheila; Vaida, Allen J; Bates, David W

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence demonstrates that clinical decision support (CDS) is a powerful tool for improving healthcare quality and ensuring patient safety. However, implementing and maintaining effective decision support interventions presents multiple technical and organizational challenges. PURPOSE: To identify best practices for CDS, using the domain of preventive care reminders as an example. METHODS: We assembled a panel of experts in CDS and held a series of facilitated online and in-person discussions. We analyzed the results of these discussions using a grounded theory method to elicit themes and best practices. RESULTS: Eight best practice themes were identified as important: deliver CDS in the most appropriate ways, develop effective governance structures, consider use of incentives, be aware of workflow, keep content current, monitor and evaluate impact, maintain high quality data, and consider sharing content. Keys themes within each of these areas were also described. CONCLUSION: Successful implementation of CDS requires consideration of both technical and socio-technical factors. The themes identified in this study provide guidance on crucial factors that need consideration when CDS is implemented across healthcare settings. These best practice themes may be useful for developers, implementers, and users of decision support. PMID:21991299

  14. Factors influencing alert acceptance: a novel approach for predicting the success of clinical decision support

    PubMed Central

    Seidling, Hanna M; Phansalkar, Shobha; Seger, Diane L; Paterno, Marilyn D; Shaykevich, Shimon; Haefeli, Walter E

    2011-01-01

    Background Clinical decision support systems can prevent knowledge-based prescription errors and improve patient outcomes. The clinical effectiveness of these systems, however, is substantially limited by poor user acceptance of presented warnings. To enhance alert acceptance it may be useful to quantify the impact of potential modulators of acceptance. Methods We built a logistic regression model to predict alert acceptance of drug–drug interaction (DDI) alerts in three different settings. Ten variables from the clinical and human factors literature were evaluated as potential modulators of provider alert acceptance. ORs were calculated for the impact of knowledge quality, alert display, textual information, prioritization, setting, patient age, dose-dependent toxicity, alert frequency, alert level, and required acknowledgment on acceptance of the DDI alert. Results 50 788 DDI alerts were analyzed. Providers accepted only 1.4% of non-interruptive alerts. For interruptive alerts, user acceptance positively correlated with frequency of the alert (OR 1.30, 95% CI 1.23 to 1.38), quality of display (4.75, 3.87 to 5.84), and alert level (1.74, 1.63 to 1.86). Alert acceptance was higher in inpatients (2.63, 2.32 to 2.97) and for drugs with dose-dependent toxicity (1.13, 1.07 to 1.21). The textual information influenced the mode of reaction and providers were more likely to modify the prescription if the message contained detailed advice on how to manage the DDI. Conclusion We evaluated potential modulators of alert acceptance by assessing content and human factors issues, and quantified the impact of a number of specific factors which influence alert acceptance. This information may help improve clinical decision support systems design. PMID:21571746

  15. Paying for treatments? Influences on negotiating clinical need and decision-making for dental implant treatment

    PubMed Central

    Exley, Catherine E; Rousseau, Nikki S; Steele, Jimmy; Finch, Tracy; Field, James; Donaldson, Cam; Thomason, J Mark; May, Carl R; Ellis, Janice S

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to examine how clinicians and patients negotiate clinical need and treatment decisions within a context of finite resources. Dental implant treatment is an effective treatment for missing teeth, but is only available via the NHS in some specific clinical circumstances. The majority of people who receive this treatment therefore pay privately, often at substantial cost to themselves. People are used to paying towards dental treatment costs. However, dental implant treatment is much more expensive than existing treatments – such as removable dentures. We know very little about how dentists make decisions about whether to offer such treatments, or what patients consider when deciding whether or not to pay for them. Methods/Design Mixed methods will be employed to provide insight and understanding into how clinical need is determined, and what influences people's decision making processes when deciding whether or not to pursue a dental implant treatment. Phase 1 will use a structured scoping questionnaire with all the General dental practitioners (GDPs) in three Primary Care Trust areas (n = 300) to provide base-line data about existing practice in relation to dental implant treatment, and to provide data to develop a systematic sampling procedure for Phase 2. Phases 2 (GDPs) and 3 (patients) use qualitative focused one to one interviews with a sample of these practitioners (up to 30) and their patients (up to 60) to examine their views and experiences of decision making in relation to dental implant treatment. Purposive sampling for phases 2 and 3 will be carried out to ensure participants represent a range of socio-economic circumstances, and choices made. Discussion Most dental implant treatment is conducted in primary care. Very little information was available prior to this study about the quantity and type of treatment carried out privately. It became apparent during phase 2 that ISOD treatment was an unusual treatment in primary care. We thus extended our sample criteria for Phase 3 to include people who had had other implant supported restorations, although not single tooth replacements. PMID:19138389

  16. Decisions in complex clinical situations: Prevalence and factors associated in general public.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Martinez, Maria D; Luna, Aurelio; Perez-Carceles, Maria D

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have focused on advanced directives. However, the type of treatment that citizens would choose in critical health situations and whether their decision varies with their sociodemographic characteristics and their experiences of life both within and outside the family context, are unknown. This study analyzes the factors associated with choosing or refusing life support treatment in hypothetical situations of differing clinical complexity. This transversal descriptive study was carried out by questionnaires given to 1051 participants from primary care centres. The Life Support Preferences Questionnaire (LSPQ) used to assess preferences of life-sustaining treatment, describes six scenarios with different prognoses. Analysis of the sociodemographic characteristics and life experiences of the subjects led to the following findings. In situations of very severe prognosis, treatment is mostly rejected. When there is chance of recovery, treatment is mostly accepted, especially in the least aggressive cases and when deciding for another person. A greater propensity to reject treatment was observed among subjects over 55 years, those in poor health and those who had observed a terminal illness in a family member. Practising Catholics are more likely to accept treatment in all medical situations described. Preferences for life support treatment are linked to sociodemographic characteristics and life experiences of patients. Physicians should bear in mind these characteristics when confronted with critical clinical situations, involving difficult decisions. PMID:26952384

  17. Referral criteria and clinical decision support: radiological protection aspects for justification.

    PubMed

    Pérez, M del Rosario

    2015-06-01

    Advanced imaging technology has opened new horizons for medical diagnostics and improved patient care. However, many procedures are unjustified and do not provide a net benefit. An area of particular concern is the unnecessary use of radiation when clinical evaluation or other imaging modalities could provide an accurate diagnosis. Referral criteria for medical imaging are consensus statements based on the best-available evidence to assist the decision-making process when choosing the best imaging procedure for a given patient. Although they are advisory rather than compulsory, physicians should have good reasons for deviation from these criteria. Voluntary use of referral criteria has shown limited success compared with integration into clinical decision support systems. These systems support good medical practice, can improve health service delivery, and foster safer, more efficient, fair, cost-effective care, thus contributing to the strengthening of health systems. Justification of procedures and optimisation of protection, the two pillars of radiological protection in health care, are implicit in the notion of good medical practice. However, some health professionals are not familiar with these principles, and have low awareness of radiological protection aspects of justification. A stronger collaboration between radiation protection and healthcare communities could contribute to improve the radiation protection culture in medical practice. PMID:25915554

  18. Using statistical process control to make data-based clinical decisions.

    PubMed Central

    Pfadt, A; Wheeler, D J

    1995-01-01

    Applied behavior analysis is based on an investigation of variability due to interrelationships among antecedents, behavior, and consequences. This permits testable hypotheses about the causes of behavior as well as for the course of treatment to be evaluated empirically. Such information provides corrective feedback for making data-based clinical decisions. This paper considers how a different approach to the analysis of variability based on the writings of Walter Shewart and W. Edwards Deming in the area of industrial quality control helps to achieve similar objectives. Statistical process control (SPC) was developed to implement a process of continual product improvement while achieving compliance with production standards and other requirements for promoting customer satisfaction. SPC involves the use of simple statistical tools, such as histograms and control charts, as well as problem-solving techniques, such as flow charts, cause-and-effect diagrams, and Pareto charts, to implement Deming's management philosophy. These data-analytic procedures can be incorporated into a human service organization to help to achieve its stated objectives in a manner that leads to continuous improvement in the functioning of the clients who are its customers. Examples are provided to illustrate how SPC procedures can be used to analyze behavioral data. Issues related to the application of these tools for making data-based clinical decisions and for creating an organizational climate that promotes their routine use in applied settings are also considered. PMID:7592154

  19. Use of Clinical Decision Support to Increase Influenza Vaccination: Multi-year Evolution of the System

    PubMed Central

    Gerard, Mary N.; Trick, William E.; Das, Krishna; Charles-Damte, Marjorie; Murphy, Gregory A.; Benson, Irene M.

    2008-01-01

    Despite recognition that clinical decision support (CDS) can improve patient care, there has been poor penetration of this technology into healthcare settings. We used CDS to increase inpatient influenza vaccination during implementation of an electronic medical record, in which pharmacy and nursing transactions increasingly became electronic. Over three influenza seasons we evaluated standing orders, provider reminders, and pre-selected physician orders. A pre-intervention cross-sectional survey showed that most patients (95%) met criteria for vaccination. During our intervention, physicians were increasingly likely to accept pre-selected vaccination orders, Year 1 (47%), Year 2 (77%), Year 3 (83%); however vaccine administration by nurses was suboptimal. As electronic medical record functionality improved, patient receipt of vaccine increased dramatically, Year 1 [0/36; 0%], Year 2 [8/66; 12%], Year 3 [286/805; 36%]. Successful use of clinical decision support to increase inpatient influenza vaccination only occurred after initiation of CPOE for all medications and integration of an electronic medication administration record. Also, since most patients met criteria for influenza vaccination, complicated logic to identify high-risk patients was unnecessary. PMID:18756001

  20. Participants' Reactions to Computerized Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moe, Kim C.; Johnson, Marilyn F.

    This study investigated participants' reactions to computerized testing and assessed the practicability of this testing method in the classroom. A sample of 315 secondary-level students took a computerized and a printed version of a standardized aptitude test battery and a survey assessing their reactions to the computerized testing. Overall…

  1. A clinical decision support system with an integrated EMR for diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kunhimangalam, Reeda; Ovallath, Sujith; Joseph, Paul K

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence of peripheral neuropathy in general population is ever increasing. The diagnosis and classification of peripheral neuropathies is often difficult as it involves careful clinical and electro-diagnostic examination by an expert neurologist. In developing countries a large percentage of the disease remains undiagnosed due to lack of adequate number of experts. In this study a novel clinical decision support system has been developed using a fuzzy expert system. The study was done to provide a solution to the demand of systems that can improve health care by accurate diagnosis in limited time, in the absence of specialists. It employs a graphical user interface and a fuzzy logic controller with rule viewer for identification of the type of peripheral neuropathy. An integrated medical records database is also developed for the storage and retrieval of the data. The system consists of 24 input fields, which includes the clinical values of the diagnostic test and the clinical symptoms. The output field is the disease diagnosis, whether it is Motor (Demyelinating/Axonopathy) neuropathy, sensory (Demyelinating/Axonopathy) neuropathy, mixed type or a normal case. The results obtained were compared with the expert's opinion and the system showed 93.27 % accuracy. The study aims at showing that Fuzzy Expert Systems may prove useful in providing diagnostic and predictive medical opinions. It enables the clinicians to arrive at a better diagnosis as it keeps the expert knowledge in an intelligent system to be used efficiently and effectively. PMID:24692180

  2. Lung cancer patients' decisions about clinical trials and the theory of planned behavior.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Pratt, Christie L; Bryant-George, Kathy; Caraway, Vicki D; Paternoster, Bonnie; Roldan, Tere; Shaffer, Andrea; Shimizu, Cynthia O; Vaughn, Elizabeth J; Williams, Charles; Bepler, Gerold

    2011-12-01

    The theory of planned behavior explores the relationship between behavior, beliefs, attitudes, and intentions presupposing that behavioral intention is influenced by a person's attitude about the behavior and beliefs about whether individuals, who are important to them, approve or disapprove of the behavior (subjective norm). An added dimension to the theory is the idea of perceived behavioral control, or the belief that one has control over performing the behavior. The theory of planned behavior suggests that people may make greater efforts to perform a behavior if they feel they have a high level of control over it. In this examination of data, we explored the application of the theory of planned behavior to patient's decisions about participating in a clinic trial. Twelve respondents in this study had previously participated in a clinical trial for lung cancer and nine respondents had declined a clinical trial for lung cancer. The data were analyzed with regard to the four constructs associated with the theory of planned behavior: behavioral intention, attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control. Results indicate that the theory of planned behavior may be a useful tool to examine psychosocial needs in relation to behavioral intention of clinical trial participation. PMID:20949381

  3. A Proposed Clinical Decision Support Architecture Capable of Supporting Whole Genome Sequence Information

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Brandon M.; Rodriguez Loya, Salvador; Eilbeck, Karen; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2014-01-01

    Whole genome sequence (WGS) information may soon be widely available to help clinicians personalize the care and treatment of patients. However, considerable barriers exist, which may hinder the effective utilization of WGS information in a routine clinical care setting. Clinical decision support (CDS) offers a potential solution to overcome such barriers and to facilitate the effective use of WGS information in the clinic. However, genomic information is complex and will require significant considerations when developing CDS capabilities. As such, this manuscript lays out a conceptual framework for a CDS architecture designed to deliver WGS-guided CDS within the clinical workflow. To handle the complexity and breadth of WGS information, the proposed CDS framework leverages service-oriented capabilities and orchestrates the interaction of several independently-managed components. These independently-managed components include the genome variant knowledge base, the genome database, the CDS knowledge base, a CDS controller and the electronic health record (EHR). A key design feature is that genome data can be stored separately from the EHR. This paper describes in detail: (1) each component of the architecture; (2) the interaction of the components; and (3) how the architecture attempts to overcome the challenges associated with WGS information. We believe that service-oriented CDS capabilities will be essential to using WGS information for personalized medicine. PMID:25411644

  4. Esophageal perforation: diagnostic work-up and clinical decision-making in the first 24 hours

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Esophageal perforation is a rare and potentially life-threatening condition. Early clinical suspicion and imaging is important for case management to achieve a good outcome. However, recent studies continue to report high morbidity and mortality greater than 20% from esophageal perforation. At least half of the perforations are iatrogenic, mostly related to endoscopic instrumentation used in the upper gastrointestinal tract, while about a third are spontaneous perforations. Surgical treatment remains an important option for many patients, but a non-operative approach, with or without use of an endoscopic stent or placement of internal or external drains, should be considered when the clinical situation allows for a less invasive approach. The rarity of this emergency makes it difficult for a physician to obtain extensive individual clinical experience; it is also challenging to obtain firm scientific evidence that informs patient management and clinical decision-making. Improved attention to non-specific symptoms and signs and early diagnosis based on imaging may translate into better outcomes for this group of patients, many of whom are elderly with significant comorbidity. PMID:22035338

  5. Design, Development, and Initial Evaluation of a Terminology for Clinical Decision Support and Electronic Clinical Quality Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yanhua; Staes, Catherine J; Shields, David E; Kandula, Vijay; Welch, Brandon M; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2015-01-01

    When coupled with a common information model, a common terminology for clinical decision support (CDS) and electronic clinical quality measurement (eCQM) could greatly facilitate the distributed development and sharing of CDS and eCQM knowledge resources. To enable such scalable knowledge authoring and sharing, we systematically developed an extensible and standards-based terminology for CDS and eCQM in the context of the HL7 Virtual Medical Record (vMR) information model. The development of this terminology entailed three steps: (1) systematic, physician-curated concept identification from sources such as the Health Information Technology Standards Panel (HITSP) and the SNOMED-CT CORE problem list; (2) concept de-duplication leveraging the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) MetaMap and Metathesaurus; and (3) systematic concept naming using standard terminologies and heuristic algorithms. This process generated 3,046 concepts spanning 68 domains. Evaluation against representative CDS and eCQM resources revealed approximately 50–70% concept coverage, indicating the need for continued expansion of the terminology. PMID:26958220

  6. Computerized Fleet Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cataldo, John J.

    The computerization of school bus maintenance records by the Niskayuna (New York) Central School District enabled the district's transportation department to engage in management practices resulting in significant savings. The district obtains computer analyses of the work performed on all vehicles, including time spent, parts, labor, costs,…

  7. Computerized Language Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Steven

    1985-01-01

    The article describes a computerized language analysis system that produces a detailed description and summary statistics to track language growth within student populations. This microcomputer-based language assessment system simplifies identification of deficits in productive language, enabling the teacher or clinician to spend more time…

  8. Adaptive Computerized Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Roger D.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes an artificially intelligent multimedia computerized instruction system capable of developing a conceptual image of what a student is learning while the student is learning it. It focuses on principles of learning and adaptive behavioral control systems theory upon which the system is designed and demonstrates multiple user modes.…

  9. Adaptive Computerized Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Roger D.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes an artificially intelligent multimedia computerized instruction system capable of developing a conceptual image of what a student is learning while the student is learning it. It focuses on principles of learning and adaptive behavioral control systems theory upon which the system is designed and demonstrates multiple user modes.…

  10. Computerizing Your Attendance System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slaby, Robert

    A computerized attendance system is presented that includes immediate access to attendance records and allows same-day notification to parents of a child's absence. The system, used at Carson City High School (Nevada), is broken down into five chronological steps, generating several possible attendance updates during the day: (1) compiling a…

  11. Computerizing the Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Jeanie; Whelan, Errol

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the development of a computerized high school library which uses CD-ROM optical storage systems. Describes hardware and software, setting up the system, preparing the online catalog, teaching information retrieval skills, and project evaluation. Notes prices of CD-ROM disks and equipment purchased. 4 references. (SV)

  12. Computerized Test Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosser, Jon; And Others

    The application of a well-known and fairly simple information retrieval technology to the process of testing undergraduate college students is described. The Computerized Test Library allows the student and/or the professor to extract questions of varying difficulty covering whatever topic the student is studying; if the student performs at the…

  13. Computerized Transportation Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caswell, Peter J.; Hall, Calvin W.

    1987-01-01

    For the past six years, Los Angeles County Office of Education (California) has used a state-of-the-art computerized transportation management system that produces $2 million annual net savings and provides prompt, accurate bus service for students, parents, and teachers. This article details routing and scheduling programs used. Includes seven…

  14. The Computerized "Assistant Prof."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shough, J. Stuart

    The computerized "Assistant Prof" program at the University of South Carolina at Spartanburg is written in Lotus 1-2-3 to aid college professors in all their various administrative duties. The program performs four distinctive functions: (1) record keeping; (2) form producing; (3) grade calculating; and (4) feedback of student class standing as…

  15. Computerized Fleet Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cataldo, John J.

    The computerization of school bus maintenance records by the Niskayuna (New York) Central School District enabled the district's transportation department to engage in management practices resulting in significant savings. The district obtains computer analyses of the work performed on all vehicles, including time spent, parts, labor, costs,…

  16. Psychosocial Communication and Computerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Gunilla; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the effect of computerization of the work environment on psychosocial communication. The RAM program, developed at Stockholm University to explore the effect of computers on the structure of organizations and the psychosocial work environment, is described; theoretical models are explained; and the future use of knowledge-based systems…

  17. Improving the care of children with urinary tract infection: use of a clinical decision proforma

    PubMed Central

    Leach, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common and important clinical problem in children. Follow up imaging is indicated in some cases to reduce the risk of long-term harm from UTI and sometimes to help guide acute management. Overuse of imaging may be harmful due to radiation exposure, as well as increasing demand on services and budgets. On the other hand under-use of imaging may leave children vulnerable to renal damage and long-term morbidity. Accepted standards propose an imaging strategy specific to age and type of UTI. The complexity of the guideline makes compliance with the standards challenging. The aim of this project was to assess current practice for imaging of children with UTI managed at The Royal Oldham Hospital and to improve compliance with accepted standards through the use of a proforma to aid clinical decision making, supported by an education programme. A retrospective audit was performed over a 6 month period both prior to and after the intervention. The baseline audit found 57.7% of children treated for UTI (n=26) had imaging compliant with the accepted standards, which improved to 75.9% (n=29) on post-measurement. The percentage of inappropriate investigations reduced from 52.4% to 10.5%. The percentage of missed investigations reduced from 35.0% to 32.0%. The proforma was used and filed in 40% of cases where practice was in line with accepted standards. It was not used in any of the cases where practice deviated. In conclusion, a clear clinical decision aid, supported by an education programme, can significantly improve compliance with accepted standards for imaging of children with UTI. This may also be transferable to other scenarios where guidelines exist but have reduced efficacy due to complexity and/or lack of understanding.

  18. A patient-driven adaptive prediction technique to improve personalized risk estimation for clinical decision support

    PubMed Central

    Boxwala, Aziz A; El-Kareh, Robert; Kim, Jihoon; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2012-01-01

    Objective Competing tools are available online to assess the risk of developing certain conditions of interest, such as cardiovascular disease. While predictive models have been developed and validated on data from cohort studies, little attention has been paid to ensure the reliability of such predictions for individuals, which is critical for care decisions. The goal was to develop a patient-driven adaptive prediction technique to improve personalized risk estimation for clinical decision support. Material and methods A data-driven approach was proposed that utilizes individualized confidence intervals (CIs) to select the most ‘appropriate’ model from a pool of candidates to assess the individual patient's clinical condition. The method does not require access to the training dataset. This approach was compared with other strategies: the BEST model (the ideal model, which can only be achieved by access to data or knowledge of which population is most similar to the individual), CROSS model, and RANDOM model selection. Results When evaluated on clinical datasets, the approach significantly outperformed the CROSS model selection strategy in terms of discrimination (p<1e–14) and calibration (p<0.006). The method outperformed the RANDOM model selection strategy in terms of discrimination (p<1e–12), but the improvement did not achieve significance for calibration (p=0.1375). Limitations The CI may not always offer enough information to rank the reliability of predictions, and this evaluation was done using aggregation. If a particular individual is very different from those represented in a training set of existing models, the CI may be somewhat misleading. Conclusion This approach has the potential to offer more reliable predictions than those offered by other heuristics for disease risk estimation of individual patients. PMID:22493049

  19. The evaluation of a rectal cancer decision aid and the factors influencing its implementation in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is common in North America. Two surgical options exist for rectal cancer patients: low anterior resection with re-establishment of bowel continuity, and abdominoperineal resection with a permanent stoma. A rectal cancer decision aid was developed using the International Patient Decision Aid Standards to facilitate patients being more actively involved in making this decision with the surgeon. The overall aim of this study is to evaluate this decision aid and explore barriers and facilitators to implementing in clinical practice. Methods First, a pre- and post- study will be guided by the Ottawa Decision Support Framework. Eligible patients from a colorectal cancer center include: 1) adult patients diagnosed with rectal cancer, 2) tumour at a maximum of 10 cm from anal verge, and 3) surgeon screened candidates eligible to consider both low anterior resection and abdominoperineal resection. Patients will be given a paper-version and online link to the decision aid to review at home. Using validated tools, the primary outcomes will be decisional conflict and knowledge of surgical options. Secondary outcomes will be patient’s preference, values associated with options, readiness for decision-making, acceptability of the decision aid, and feasibility of its implementation in clinical practice. Proposed analysis includes paired t-test, Wilcoxon, and descriptive statistics. Second, a survey will be conducted to identify the barriers and facilitators of using the decision aid in clinical practice. Eligible participants include Canadian surgeons working with rectal cancer patients. Surgeons will be given a pre-notification, questionnaire, and three reminders. The survey package will include the patient decision aid and a facilitators and barriers survey previously validated among physicians and nurses. Principal component analysis will be performed to determine common themes, and logistic regression will be used to identify variables associated with the intention to use the decision aid. Discussion This study will evaluate the impact of the rectal cancer decision aid on patients and help with planning strategies to overcome barriers and facilitate implementation of the decision aid in routine clinical practice. To our knowledge this is the first study designed to evaluate a decision aid in the field of colorectal surgery. PMID:24655353

  20. Optimization of the decision-making process for the selection of therapeutics to undergo clinical testing for spinal cord injury in the North American Clinical Trials Network.

    PubMed

    Guest, James; Harrop, James S; Aarabi, Bizhan; Grossman, Robert G; Fawcett, James W; Fehlings, Michael G; Tator, Charles H

    2012-09-01

    The North American Clinical Trials Network (NACTN) includes 9 clinical centers funded by the US Department of Defense and the Christopher Reeve Paralysis Foundation. Its purpose is to accelerate clinical testing of promising therapeutics in spinal cord injury (SCI) through the development of a robust interactive infrastructure. This structure includes key committees that serve to provide longitudinal guidance to the Network. These committees include the Executive, Data Management, and Neurological Outcome Assessments Committees, and the Therapeutic Selection Committee (TSC), which is the subject of this manuscript. The NACTN brings unique elements to the SCI field. The Network's stability is not restricted to a single clinical trial. Network members have diverse expertise and include experts in clinical care, clinical trial design and methodology, pharmacology, preclinical and clinical research, and advanced rehabilitation techniques. Frequent systematic communication is assigned a high value, as is democratic process, fairness and efficiency of decision making, and resource allocation. This article focuses on how decision making occurs within the TSC to rank alternative therapeutics according to 2 main variables: quality of the preclinical data set, and fit with the Network's aims and capabilities. This selection process is important because if the Network's resources are committed to a therapeutic, alternatives cannot be pursued. A proposed methodology includes a multicriteria decision analysis that uses a Multi-Attribute Global Inference of Quality matrix to quantify the process. To rank therapeutics, the TSC uses a series of consensus steps designed to reduce individual and group bias and limit subjectivity. Given the difficulties encountered by industry in completing clinical trials in SCI, stable collaborative not-for-profit consortia, such as the NACTN, may be essential to clinical progress in SCI. The evolution of the NACTN also offers substantial opportunity to refine decision making and group dynamics. Making the best possible decisions concerning therapeutics selection for trial testing is a cornerstone of the Network's function. PMID:22985376

  1. A role for the sick role: Patient preferences regarding information and participation in clinical decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Stiggelbout, A M; Kiebert, G M

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether patient preferences regarding information and participation in decision-making about treatment options are related to patient characteristics and the context of the decision. Other studies have compared decision-making preferences in patients with cancer and healthy subjects, or in different contexts among patients in the same group. This study combined these designs. DESIGN: Questionnaire completed by the subjects. SETTING: Outpatient clinic of a university hospital. PARTICIPANTS: A consecutive sample of 55 patients with cancer treated at a radiotherapy clinic, 53 persons accompanying them, a consecutive sample of 53 patients visiting a surgical outpatient clinic for a nonmalignant condition and 36 persons accompanying them. MAIN MEASURES: Preferences regarding information and participation in decision-making in general and with respect to 4 vignettes that described different diseases of varying seriousness, varying treatment options and side effects. RESULTS: Older patients and men were more likely to let the physician make decisions regarding their treatment. Patients, as compared with nonpatients (their companions), were more likely to prefer a passive role regarding treatment decisions. No differences were seen between patients with cancer and patients with nonmalignant conditions. Also, no effect was observed in relation to the decision-making situations described in the vignettes. Of the patients who preferred more information, a substantial proportion still preferred a passive decision-making role. CONCLUSION: The lack of strong predictors of a preferred decision-making role implies that clinicians need to assess every patient individually to determine what role he or she prefers. The finding that the patients preferred a more passive role than their companions suggests that the "sick role" influences the preference regarding participation more strongly than the type of decision to be made or the presence of a life-threatening disease. This hypothesized shift in preference among subjects who are sick implies that these patients need encouragement to participate. PMID:9275945

  2. Successful Outcomes of a Clinical Decision Support System in an HIV Practice: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Gregory K.; Lester, William; Johnson, Kristin L.; Chang, Yuchiao; Estey, Gregory; Surrao, Dominic; Zachary, Kimon; Lammert, Sara M.; Chueh, Henry; Meigs, James B.; Freedberg, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Data to support improved patient outcomes from clinical decision support systems (CDSS) are lacking in HIV care. Objective To conduct a randomized controlled trial testing the efficacy of a CDSS to improve HIV outcomes in an outpatient clinic. Design We conducted a randomized controlled trial where half of each provider’s patients were randomized to interactive or static computer alerts (ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT00678600). Setting The study was conducted at the Massachusetts General Hospital HIV Clinic. Subjects Participants were HIV providers and their HIV-infected patients. Intervention Computer alerts were generated for virologic failure (HIV RNA >400 c/mL after HIV RNA ?400 c/mL), evidence of suboptimal follow-up, and 11 abnormal laboratory tests. Providers received interactive computer alerts, facilitating appointment rescheduling and repeat laboratory testing, for half of their patients and static alerts for the other half. Measurements The primary endpoint was change in CD4 count. Other endpoints included time-to-clinical event, 6-month suboptimal follow-up, and severe laboratory toxicity. Results Thirty-three HIV providers followed 1,011 HIV-infected patients. For the intervention arm, the mean CD4 count increase was greater (5.3 versus 3.2 cells/mm3/month; difference = 2.0 cells/mm3/month 95% CI [0.1, 4.0], p=0.040) and the rate of 6-month suboptimal follow-up was lower (20.6 versus 30.1 events per 100 patient-years, p=0.022). Median time-to-next scheduled appointment was shorter in the intervention arm after a suboptimal follow-up alert (1.71 versus 3.48 months; p<0.001) and after a toxicity alert (2.79 versus >6 months for control); p=0.072). Ninety-six percent of providers supported adopting the CDSS as part of standard care. Limitations This was a one-year informatics study conducted at a single hospital sub-specialty clinic. Conclusion A CDSS using interactive provider alerts improved CD4 counts and clinic follow-up for HIV-infected patients. Wider implementation of such systems can provide important clinical benefits. PMID:23208165

  3. Proceedings of Joint International Symposium on the role of noninvasive imaging modalities in clinical decision making of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Mena, I.G.; Strauss, H.W.

    1986-01-01

    This report contains ten papers on the use of noninvasive imaging in clinical diagnosis and decision making. Topics include a cost analysis of magnetic resonance imaging in medical technology, diagnostic uses of MRI in chronic coronary artery disease, clinical applications of cine computed tomography, the use of PET as a clinical tool, and the use of echocardiography in coronary artery disease. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base. (TEM)

  4. Clinical decision support systems for brain tumor characterization using advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Tsolaki, Evangelia; Kousi, Evanthia; Svolos, Patricia; Kapsalaki, Efthychia; Theodorou, Kyriaki; Kappas, Constastine; Tsougos, Ioannis

    2014-04-28

    In recent years, advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging and perfusion weighted imaging have been used in order to resolve demanding diagnostic problems such as brain tumor characterization and grading, as these techniques offer a more detailed and non-invasive evaluation of the area under study. In the last decade a great effort has been made to import and utilize intelligent systems in the so-called clinical decision support systems (CDSS) for automatic processing, classification, evaluation and representation of MRI data in order for advanced MRI techniques to become a part of the clinical routine, since the amount of data from the aforementioned techniques has gradually increased. Hence, the purpose of the current review article is two-fold. The first is to review and evaluate the progress that has been made towards the utilization of CDSS based on data from advanced MRI techniques. The second is to analyze and propose the future work that has to be done, based on the existing problems and challenges, especially taking into account the new imaging techniques and parameters that can be introduced into intelligent systems to significantly improve their diagnostic specificity and clinical application. PMID:24778769

  5. Clinical decision support systems for brain tumor characterization using advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques

    PubMed Central

    Tsolaki, Evangelia; Kousi, Evanthia; Svolos, Patricia; Kapsalaki, Efthychia; Theodorou, Kyriaki; Kappas, Constastine; Tsougos, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging and perfusion weighted imaging have been used in order to resolve demanding diagnostic problems such as brain tumor characterization and grading, as these techniques offer a more detailed and non-invasive evaluation of the area under study. In the last decade a great effort has been made to import and utilize intelligent systems in the so-called clinical decision support systems (CDSS) for automatic processing, classification, evaluation and representation of MRI data in order for advanced MRI techniques to become a part of the clinical routine, since the amount of data from the aforementioned techniques has gradually increased. Hence, the purpose of the current review article is two-fold. The first is to review and evaluate the progress that has been made towards the utilization of CDSS based on data from advanced MRI techniques. The second is to analyze and propose the future work that has to be done, based on the existing problems and challenges, especially taking into account the new imaging techniques and parameters that can be introduced into intelligent systems to significantly improve their diagnostic specificity and clinical application. PMID:24778769

  6. Defining the optimal treatment for clinical stage I nonseminomatous germ cell testicular cancer using decision analysis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Carvell T; Fu, Alex Z; Gilligan, Timothy D; Wells, Brian J; Klein, Eric A; Kattan, Michael W; Stephenson, Andrew J

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE There is equipoise regarding the optimal treatment of clinical stage (CS) I nonseminomatous germ cell testicular cancer (NSGCT). Formal mechanisms that enable patients to consider cancer outcomes, treatment-related morbidity, and personal preferences are needed to facilitate decision making between retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (RPLND), primary chemotherapy, and surveillance. METHODS Decision analysis was performed using a Markov model that incorporated likelihoods of survival, treatment-related morbidity, and utilities for seven undesired post-treatment health states to estimate the quality-adjusted survival (QAS) for each treatment option. Utilities were obtained from 24 hypothetical NSGCT patients using a visual analog (rating) scale and standard gamble. Results Overall, QAS associated with each treatment was high and differences in QAS were small. Surveillance was the preferred intervention for patients with a risk of relapse less than 33% and 37% using the rating scale and standard-gamble method of utility assessment, respectively. Active treatment was favored over surveillance for patients with relapse risk on surveillance greater than 33% and 37% by the rating scale (RPLND preferred) and standard-gamble methods (primary chemotherapy preferred), respectively. Substantial differences in average utilities were seen depending on the method used. By the rating scale, patients substantially devalued life in six of seven undesired health states but they were surprisingly tolerant of treatment-related morbidity using standard gamble. CONCLUSION A decision model has been developed for CS I NSGCT that estimates QAS for RPLND, primary chemotherapy, and surveillance by considering cancer outcomes, morbidity, and patient preferences. Surveillance was the preferred intervention for all except those patients at high risk for relapse. PMID:19917846

  7. Implementing a decision-theoretic design in clinical trials: why and how?

    PubMed

    Palmer, Christopher R; Shahumyan, Harutyun

    2007-11-30

    This paper addresses two main questions: first, why should Bayesian and other innovative, data-dependent design models be put into practice and, secondly, given the past dearth of actual applications, how might one example of such a design be implemented in a genuine example trial? Clinical trials amalgamate theory, practice and ethics, but this last point has become relegated to the background, rather than taking often a more appropriate primary role. Trial practice has evolved but has its roots in R. A. Fisher's randomized agricultural field trials of the 1920s. Reasons for, and consequences of, this are discussed from an ethical standpoint, drawing on an under-used dichotomy introduced by French authors Lellouch and Schwartz (Int. Statist. Rev. 1971; 39:27-36). Plenty of ethically motivated designs for trials, including Bayesian designs have been proposed, but have found little application thus far. One reason for this is a lack of awareness of such alternative designs among trialists, while another reason is a lack of user-friendly software to allow study simulations. To encourage implementation, a new C++ program called 'Daniel' is introduced, offering much potential to assist the design of today's randomized controlled trials. Daniel evaluates a particular decision-theoretic method suitable for coping with either two or three Bernoulli response treatments with input features allowing user-specified choices of: patient horizon (number to be treated before and after the comparative stages of the trial); an arbitrary fixed trial truncation size (to allow ready comparison with traditional designs or to cope with practical constraints); anticipated success rates and a measure of their uncertainty (a matter ignored in standard power calculations); and clinically relevant, and irrelevant, differences in treatment effect sizes. Error probabilities and expected trial durations can be thoroughly explored via simulation, it being better by far to harm 'computer patients' instead of real ones. Suppose the objective in a clinical trial is to select between two treatments using a maximum horizon of 500 patients, when the truly superior treatment is expected to yield a 40 per cent success rate, but is believed to really range between 20 and 60 per cent. Simulation studies show that to detect a clinically relevant, absolute difference of 10 per cent between treatments, simulation studies show the decision-theoretic procedure would treat a mean 68 pairs of patients (SD 37) before correctly identifying the better treatment 96.7 per cent of the time, an error rate of 3.3 per cent. Having made a recommendation based on these patients, the remaining, on average 364 individuals, could either be given the indicated treatment, knowing its choice is optimal for the chosen horizon, or, alternatively, they could be entered into another, separate clinical trial. For comparison, a fixed sample size trial, with standard 5 per cent level of significance and 80 per cent power to detect a 10 per cent difference, requires treating over 700 patients in two groups, with the half allocated to inferior treatment considerably outnumbering the 68 expected under the decision-theoretic design, and the overall number simply too high for realistic application. In brief, the keys to answering the above 'why?' and 'how?' questions are ethics and software, respectively. Wider implications, both pros and cons, of implementing the particular method described will be discussed, with the overall conclusion that, where appropriate, clinical trials are now ready to undergo modernization from the agricultural age to the information age. PMID:17582801

  8. Service oriented architecture for clinical decision support: a systematic review and future directions.

    PubMed

    Loya, Salvador Rodriguez; Kawamoto, Kensaku; Chatwin, Chris; Huser, Vojtech

    2014-12-01

    The use of a service-oriented architecture (SOA) has been identified as a promising approach for improving health care by facilitating reliable clinical decision support (CDS). A review of the literature through October 2013 identified 44 articles on this topic. The review suggests that SOA related technologies such as Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN) and Service Component Architecture (SCA) have not been generally adopted to impact health IT systems' performance for better care solutions. Additionally, technologies such as Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) and architectural approaches like Service Choreography have not been generally exploited among researchers and developers. Based on the experience of other industries and our observation of the evolution of SOA, we found that the greater use of these approaches have the potential to significantly impact SOA implementations for CDS. PMID:25325996

  9. Mechanical versus clinical data combination in selection and admissions decisions: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kuncel, Nathan R; Klieger, David M; Connelly, Brian S; Ones, Deniz S

    2013-11-01

    In employee selection and academic admission decisions, holistic (clinical) data combination methods continue to be relied upon and preferred by practitioners in our field. This meta-analysis examined and compared the relative predictive power of mechanical methods versus holistic methods in predicting multiple work (advancement, supervisory ratings of performance, and training performance) and academic (grade point average) criteria. There was consistent and substantial loss of validity when data were combined holistically-even by experts who are knowledgeable about the jobs and organizations in question-across multiple criteria in work and academic settings. In predicting job performance, the difference between the validity of mechanical and holistic data combination methods translated into an improvement in prediction of more than 50%. Implications for evidence-based practice are discussed. PMID:24041118

  10. Migrating toward a Next-Generation Clinical Decision Support Application: The BJC HealthCare Experience

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Noirot, Laura A.; Heard, Kevin M.; Reichley, Richard M.; Dunagan, Wm. Claiborne; Bailey, Thomas C.

    2007-01-01

    The next-generation model outlined in the AMIA Roadmap for National Action on Clinical Decision Support (CDS) is aimed to optimize the effectiveness of CDS interventions, and to achieve widespread adoption. BJC HealthCare re-engineered its existing CDS system in alignment with the AMIA roadmap and plans to use it for guidance on further enhancements. We present our experience and discuss an incremental approach to migrate towards the next generation of CDS applications from the viewpoint of a healthcare institution. Specifically, a CDS rule engine service with a standards-based rule representation format was built to simplify maintenance and deployment. Rules were separated from execution code and made customizable for multi-facility deployment. Those changes resulted in system improvements in the short term while aligning with long-term strategic objectives. PMID:18693855

  11. Exploring use of images in clinical articles for decision support in evidence-based medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antani, Sameer; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Li, Jiang; Srinivasan, Balaji V.; Thoma, George R.

    2008-01-01

    Essential information is often conveyed pictorially (images, illustrations, graphs, charts, etc.) in biomedical publications. A clinician's decision to access the full text when searching for evidence in support of clinical decision is frequently based solely on a short bibliographic reference. We seek to automatically augment these references with images from the article that may assist in finding evidence. In a previous study, the feasibility of automatically classifying images by usefulness (utility) in finding evidence was explored using supervised machine learning and achieved 84.3% accuracy using image captions for modality and 76.6% accuracy combining captions and image data for utility on 743 images from articles over 2 years from a clinical journal. Our results indicated that automatic augmentation of bibliographic references with relevant images was feasible. Other research in this area has determined improved user experience by showing images in addition to the short bibliographic reference. Multi-panel images used in our study had to be manually pre-processed for image analysis, however. Additionally, all image-text on figures was ignored. In this article, we report on developed methods for automatic multi-panel image segmentation using not only image features, but also clues from text analysis applied to figure captions. In initial experiments on 516 figure images we obtained 95.54% accuracy in correctly identifying and segmenting the sub-images. The errors were flagged as disagreements with automatic parsing of figure caption text allowing for supervised segmentation. For localizing text and symbols, on a randomly selected test set of 100 single panel images our methods reported, on the average, precision and recall of 78.42% and 89.38%, respectively, with an accuracy of 72.02%.

  12. Clinical prediction models to inform individualized decision-making in subfertile couples: a stratified medicine approach.

    PubMed

    McLernon, D J; te Velde, E R; Steyerberg, E W; Mol, B W J; Bhattacharya, S

    2014-09-01

    Infertility is defined as failure to conceive after 1 year of unprotected intercourse. This dichotomization into fertile versus infertile, based on lack of conception over 12-month period, is fundamentally flawed. Time to conception is strongly influenced by factors such as female age and whilst a minority of couples have absolute infertility (sterility), many are able to conceive without intervention but may take longer to do so, reflecting the degree of subfertility. This natural variability in time to conception means that subfertility reflects a prognosis rather than a diagnosis. Current clinical prediction models in fertility only provide individualized estimates of the probability of either treatment-independent pregnancy or treatment-dependent pregnancy, but do not take account of both. Together, prognostic factors which are able to predict natural pregnancy and predictive factors of response to treatment would be required to estimate the absolute increase in pregnancy chances with treatment. This stratified medicine approach would be appropriate for facilitating personalized decision-making concerning whether or not to treat subfertile patients. Published models are thus far of little value for decisions regarding when to initiate treatment in patients who undergo a period of, ultimately unsuccessful, expectant management. We submit that a dynamic prediction approach, which estimates the change in subfertility prognosis over the course of follow-up, would be ideally suited to inform when the commencement of treatment would be most beneficial in those undergoing expectant management. Further research needs to be undertaken to identify treatment predictive factors and to identify or create databases to allow these approaches to be explored. In the interim, the most feasible approach is to use a combination of previously published clinical prediction models. PMID:25061025

  13. Cardiac 123I-MIBG Imaging for Clinical Decision Making: 22-Year Experience in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Nakata, Tomoaki

    2015-06-01

    Cardiac neuroimaging with (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine ((123)I-MIBG) has been officially used in clinical practice in Japan since 1992. The nuclear cardiology guidelines of the Japanese Circulation Society, revised in 2010, recommended cardiac (123)I-MIBG imaging for the management of heart failure (HF) patients, particularly for the assessment of HF severity and prognosis of HF patients. Consensus in North American and European countries regarding incorporation into clinical practice, however, has not been established yet. This article summarizes 22 y of clinical applications in Japan of (123)I-MIBG imaging in the field of cardiology; these applications are reflected in cardiology guidelines, including recent methodologic advances. A standardized cardiac (123)I-MIBG parameter, the heart-to-mediastinum ratio (HMR), is the basis for clinical decision making and enables common use of parameters beyond differences in institutions and studies. Several clinical studies unanimously demonstrated its potent independent roles in prognosis evaluation and risk stratification irrespective of HF etiologies. An HMR of less than 1.6-1.8 and an accelerated washout rate are recognized as high-risk indicators of pump failure death, sudden cardiac death, and fatal arrhythmias and have independent and incremental prognostic values together with known clinical variables, such as left ventricular ejection fraction and brain natriuretic peptide. Another possible use of this imaging technique is the selection of therapeutic strategy, such as pharmacologic treatment and nonpharmacologic treatment with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator or cardiac resynchronization device; however, this possibility remains to be investigated. Recent multiple-cohort database analyses definitively demonstrated that patients who were at low risk for lethal events and who were defined by an HMR of greater than 2.0 on (123)I-MIBG studies had a good long-term prognosis. Future investigations of cardiac (123)I-MIBG imaging will contribute to better risk stratification of low-risk and high-risk populations, to the establishment of cost-effective use of this imaging technique for the management of HF patients, and to worldwide acceptance of this imaging technique in clinical cardiology practice. PMID:26033897

  14. Comparison of Decision-Assist and Clinical Judgment of Experts for Prediction of Lifesaving Interventions.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Colin F; Gao, Cheng; Hu, Peter F; Anazodo, Amechi; Chen, Hegang; Dinardo, Theresa; Imle, P Cristina; Hartsky, Lauren; Stephens, Christopher; Menaker, Jay; Fouche, Yvette; Murdock, Karen; Galvagno, Samuel; Alcorta, Richard; Shackelford, Stacy

    2015-03-01

    Early recognition of hemorrhage during the initial resuscitation of injured patients is associated with improved survival in both civilian and military casualties. We tested a transfusion and lifesaving intervention (LSI) prediction algorithm in comparison with clinical judgment of expert trauma care providers. We collected 15 min of pulse oximeter photopletysmograph waveforms and extracted features to predict LSIs. We compared this with clinical judgment of LSIs by individual categories of prehospital providers, nurses, and physicians and a combined judgment of all three providers using the Area Under Receiver Operating Curve (AUROC). We obtained clinical judgment of need for LSI from 405 expert clinicians in135 trauma patients. The pulse oximeter algorithm predicted transfusion within 6 h (AUROC, 0.92; P < 0.003) more accurately than either physicians or prehospital providers and as accurately as nurses (AUROC, 0.76; P = 0.07). For prediction of surgical procedures, the algorithm was as accurate as the three categories of clinicians. For prediction of fluid bolus, the diagnostic algorithm (AUROC, 0.9) was significantly more accurate than prehospital providers (AUROC, 0.62; P = 0.02) and nurses (AUROC, 0.57; P = 0.04) and as accurate as physicians (AUROC, 0.71; P = 0.06). Prediction of intubation by the algorithm (AUROC, 0.92) was as accurate as each of the three categories of clinicians. The algorithm was more accurate (P < 0.03) for blood and fluid prediction than the combined clinical judgment of all three providers but no different from the clinicians in the prediction of surgery (P = 0.7) or intubation (P = 0.8). Automated analysis of 15 min of pulse oximeter waveforms predicts the need for LSIs during initial trauma resuscitation as accurately as judgment of expert trauma clinicians. For prediction of emergency transfusion and fluid bolus, pulse oximetry features were more accurate than these experts. Such automated decision support could assist resuscitation decisions, trauma team, and operating room and blood bank preparations. PMID:25394243

  15. Patient involvement in decision-making: a cross-sectional study in a Malaysian primary care clinic

    PubMed Central

    Ambigapathy, Ranjini; Ng, Chirk Jenn

    2016-01-01

    Objective Shared decision-making has been advocated as a useful model for patient management. In developing Asian countries such as Malaysia, there is a common belief that patients prefer a passive role in clinical consultation. As such, the objective of this study was to determine Malaysian patients’ role preference in decision-making and the associated factors. Design A cross-sectional study. Setting Study was conducted at an urban primary care clinic in Malaysia in 2012. Participants Patients aged >21 years were chosen using systematic random sampling. Methods Consenting patients answered a self-administered questionnaire, which included demographic data and their preferred and actual role before and after consultation. Doctors were asked to determine patients’ role preference. The Control Preference Scale was used to assess patients’ role preference. Primary outcome Prevalence of patients’ preferred role in decision-making. Secondary outcomes (1) Actual role played by the patient in decision-making. (2) Sociodemographic factors associated with patients’ preferred role in decision-making. (3) Doctors’ perception of patients’ involvement in decision-making. Results The response rate was 95.1% (470/494). Shared decision-making was preferred by 51.9% of patients, followed by passive (26.3%) and active (21.8%) roles in decision-making. Higher household income was significantly associated with autonomous role preference (p=0.018). Doctors’ perception did not concur with patients’ preferred role. Among patients whom doctors perceived to prefer a passive role, 73.5% preferred an autonomous role (p=0.900, κ=0.006). Conclusions The majority of patients attending the primary care clinic preferred and played an autonomous role in decision-making. Doctors underestimated patients’ preference to play an autonomous role. PMID:26729393

  16. Computerized leak training

    SciTech Connect

    Parella, C.; Monroe, A.

    1985-11-01

    Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation's computerized leak detection training system is discussed. The system is able to simulate gas leak situations by means of a computer. The training setup includes actual visual display via slides of houses represented on a plotting board; computer with plotter board in front that simulates an area and various leakage situations; a typical handheld CGI; and a control pad for the computer. The training system has filled a valuable need in the area of emergency training.

  17. Computerized tomography calibrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Herbert P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A set of interchangeable pieces comprising a computerized tomography calibrator, and a method of use thereof, permits focusing of a computerized tomographic (CT) system. The interchangeable pieces include a plurality of nestable, generally planar mother rings, adapted for the receipt of planar inserts of predetermined sizes, and of predetermined material densities. The inserts further define openings therein for receipt of plural sub-inserts. All pieces are of known sizes and densities, permitting the assembling of different configurations of materials of known sizes and combinations of densities, for calibration (i.e., focusing) of a computerized tomographic system through variation of operating variables thereof. Rather than serving as a phanton, which is intended to be representative of a particular workpiece to be tested, the set of interchangeable pieces permits simple and easy standardized calibration of a CT system. The calibrator and its related method of use further includes use of air or of particular fluids for filling various openings, as part of a selected configuration of the set of pieces.

  18. The 2013 symposium on pathology data integration and clinical decision support and the current state of field

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Jason M.; Dighe, Anand S.; Arnaout, Ramy; Balis, Ulysses J.; Black-Schaffer, W. Stephen; Carter, Alexis B.; Henricks, Walter H.; Higgins, John M.; Jackson, Brian R.; Kim, JiYeon; Klepeis, Veronica E.; Le, Long P.; Louis, David N.; Mandelker, Diana; Mermel, Craig H.; Michaelson, James S.; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Platt, Mihae E.; Quinn, Andrew M.; Rao, Luigi; Shirts, Brian H.; Gilbertson, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pathologists and informaticians are becoming increasingly interested in electronic clinical decision support for pathology, laboratory medicine and clinical diagnosis. Improved decision support may optimize laboratory test selection, improve test result interpretation and permit the extraction of enhanced diagnostic information from existing laboratory data. Nonetheless, the field of pathology decision support is still developing. To facilitate the exchange of ideas and preliminary studies, we convened a symposium entitled: Pathology data integration and clinical decision support. Methods: The symposium was held at the Massachusetts General Hospital, on May 10, 2013. Participants were selected to represent diverse backgrounds and interests and were from nine different institutions in eight different states. Results: The day included 16 plenary talks and three panel discussions, together covering four broad areas. Summaries of each presentation are included in this manuscript. Conclusions: A number of recurrent themes emerged from the symposium. Among the most pervasive was the dichotomy between diagnostic data and diagnostic information, including the opportunities that laboratories may have to use electronic systems and algorithms to convert the data they generate into more useful information. Differences between human talents and computer abilities were described; well-designed symbioses between humans and computers may ultimately optimize diagnosis. Another key theme related to the unique needs and challenges in providing decision support for genomics and other emerging diagnostic modalities. Finally, many talks relayed how the barriers to bringing decision support toward reality are primarily personnel, political, infrastructural and administrative challenges rather than technological limitations. PMID:24672737

  19. Regulatory issues for computerized electrocardiographic devices.

    PubMed

    Muni, Neal I; Ho, Charles; Mallis, Elias

    2004-01-01

    Computerized electrocardiogram (ECG) devices are regulated in the U.S. by the FDA Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH). This article aims to highlight the salient points of the FDA regulatory review process, including the important distinction between a "tool" claim and a "clinical" claim in the intended use of a computerized ECG device. Specifically, a tool claim relates to the ability of the device to accurately measure a certain ECG parameter, such as T-wave alternans (TWA), while a clinical claim imputes a particular health hazard associated with the identified parameter, such as increased risk of ventricular tachyarrhythmia or sudden death. Given that both types of claims are equally important and receive the same regulatory scrutiny, the manufacturer of a new ECG diagnostic device should consider the distinction and regulatory pathways for approval between the two types of claims discussed in this paper. PMID:15534806

  20. Privacy-Preserving Patient-Centric Clinical Decision Support System on Naïve Bayesian Classification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ximeng; Lu, Rongxing; Ma, Jianfeng; Chen, Le; Qin, Baodong

    2016-03-01

    Clinical decision support system, which uses advanced data mining techniques to help clinician make proper decisions, has received considerable attention recently. The advantages of clinical decision support system include not only improving diagnosis accuracy but also reducing diagnosis time. Specifically, with large amounts of clinical data generated everyday, naïve Bayesian classification can be utilized to excavate valuable information to improve a clinical decision support system. Although the clinical decision support system is quite promising, the flourish of the system still faces many challenges including information security and privacy concerns. In this paper, we propose a new privacy-preserving patient-centric clinical decision support system, which helps clinician complementary to diagnose the risk of patients' disease in a privacy-preserving way. In the proposed system, the past patients' historical data are stored in cloud and can be used to train the naïve Bayesian classifier without leaking any individual patient medical data, and then the trained classifier can be applied to compute the disease risk for new coming patients and also allow these patients to retrieve the top- k disease names according to their own preferences. Specifically, to protect the privacy of past patients' historical data, a new cryptographic tool called additive homomorphic proxy aggregation scheme is designed. Moreover, to leverage the leakage of naïve Bayesian classifier, we introduce a privacy-preserving top- k disease names retrieval protocol in our system. Detailed privacy analysis ensures that patient's information is private and will not be leaked out during the disease diagnosis phase. In addition, performance evaluation via extensive simulations also demonstrates that our system can efficiently calculate patient's disease risk with high accuracy in a privacy-preserving way. PMID:26960216

  1. Integrating pharmacogenetic information and clinical decision support into the electronic health record

    PubMed Central

    Goldspiel, Barry R; Flegel, Willy A; DiPatrizio, Gary; Sissung, Tristan; Adams, Sharon D; Penzak, Scott R; Biesecker, Leslie G; Fleisher, Thomas A; Patel, Jharana J; Herion, David; Figg, William D; Lertora, Juan J L; McKeeby, Jon W

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics (PG) examines gene variations for drug disposition, response, or toxicity. At the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (NIH CC), a multidepartment Pharmacogenetics Testing Implementation Committee (PGTIC) was established to develop clinical decision support (CDS) algorithms for abacavir, carbamazepine, and allopurinol, medications for which human leukocyte antigen (HLA) variants predict severe hypersensitivity reactions. Providing PG CDS in the electronic health record (EHR) during order entry could prevent adverse drug events. Medical Logic Module (MLM) programming was used to implement PG CDS in our EHR. The MLM checks to see if an HLA sequence-based gene test is ordered. A message regarding test status (result present, absent, pending, or test not ordered) is displayed on the order form, and the MLM determines if the prescriber can place the order, place it but require an over-ride reason, or be blocked from placing the order. Since implementation, more than 725 medication orders have been placed for over 230 patients by 154 different prescribers for the three drugs included in our PG program. Prescribers commonly used an over-ride reason when placing the order mainly because patients had been receiving the drug without reaction before implementation of the CDS program. Successful incorporation of PG CDS into the NIH CC EHR required a coordinated, interdisciplinary effort to ensure smooth activation and a positive effect on patient care. Prescribers have adapted to using the CDS and have ordered PG testing as a direct result of the implementation. PMID:24302286

  2. Integrating pharmacogenetic information and clinical decision support into the electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Goldspiel, Barry R; Flegel, Willy A; DiPatrizio, Gary; Sissung, Tristan; Adams, Sharon D; Penzak, Scott R; Biesecker, Leslie G; Fleisher, Thomas A; Patel, Jharana J; Herion, David; Figg, William D; Lertora, Juan J L; McKeeby, Jon W

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics (PG) examines gene variations for drug disposition, response, or toxicity. At the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (NIH CC), a multidepartment Pharmacogenetics Testing Implementation Committee (PGTIC) was established to develop clinical decision support (CDS) algorithms for abacavir, carbamazepine, and allopurinol, medications for which human leukocyte antigen (HLA) variants predict severe hypersensitivity reactions. Providing PG CDS in the electronic health record (EHR) during order entry could prevent adverse drug events. Medical Logic Module (MLM) programming was used to implement PG CDS in our EHR. The MLM checks to see if an HLA sequence-based gene test is ordered. A message regarding test status (result present, absent, pending, or test not ordered) is displayed on the order form, and the MLM determines if the prescriber can place the order, place it but require an over-ride reason, or be blocked from placing the order. Since implementation, more than 725 medication orders have been placed for over 230 patients by 154 different prescribers for the three drugs included in our PG program. Prescribers commonly used an over-ride reason when placing the order mainly because patients had been receiving the drug without reaction before implementation of the CDS program. Successful incorporation of PG CDS into the NIH CC EHR required a coordinated, interdisciplinary effort to ensure smooth activation and a positive effect on patient care. Prescribers have adapted to using the CDS and have ordered PG testing as a direct result of the implementation. PMID:24302286

  3. A framework for genomic biomarker actionability and its use in clinical decision making

    PubMed Central

    Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Subbiah, Vivek; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2014-01-01

    The increasing scope and availability of genetic testing options for patients suffering from cancer has raised questions about how to use results of molecular diagnostics to inform patient care. For some biomarkers (e.g. BRAF mutations in melanoma), standards exist that outline treatments for individuals harboring aberrations in the biomarker; however for the vast majority of genomic abnormalities, few guidelines exist. Clinical decision making and the therapeutic approach for a patient with a given cancer characterized by aberrations in different genes may be aided by the use of a biomarker actionability framework that provides levels of evidence regarding whether and how a molecular abnormality can be considered a therapeutically relevant biomarker. A gene may be considered theoretically actionable if it has a basis of actionability, such that clinically available drugs can target a gene product that drives the cancer or is differentially expressed in tumor versus normal elements. Herein, we discuss a possible framework for developing guidelines for actionability, as they relate to genomically-based cancer therapeutics. PMID:25593991

  4. Evaluating acceptance and user experience of a guideline-based clinical decision support system execution platform.

    PubMed

    Buenestado, David; Elorz, Javier; Pérez-Yarza, Eduardo G; Iruetaguena, Ander; Segundo, Unai; Barrena, Raúl; Pikatza, Juan M

    2013-04-01

    This study aims to determine what the initial disposition of physicians towards the use of Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) based on Computerised Clinical Guidelines and Protocols (CCGP) is; and whether their prolonged utilisation has a positive effect on their intention to adopt them in the future. For a period of 3 months, 8 volunteer paediatricians monitored each up to 10 asthmatic patients using two CCGPs deployed in the-GuidesMed CDSS. A Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) questionnaire was supplied to them before and after using the system. Results from both questionnaires are analysed searching for significant improvements in opinion between them. An additional survey was performed to analyse the usability of the system. It was found that initial disposition of physicians towards e-GuidesMed is good. Improvement between the pre and post iterations of the TAM questionnaire has been found to be statistically significant. Nonetheless, slightly lower values in the Compatibility and Habit variables show that participants perceive possible difficulties to integrate e-GuidesMed into their daily routine. The variable Facilitators shows the highest correlation with the Intention to Use. Usability of the system has also been rated very high and, in this regard, no fundamental flaw has been detected. Initial views towards e-GuidesMed are positive, and become reinforced after continued utilisation of the system. In order to achieve an effective implementation, it becomes essential to facilitate conditions to integrate the system into the physician's daily routine. PMID:23377779

  5. [Adequacy of clinical interventions in patients with advanced and complex disease. Proposal of a decision making algorithm].

    PubMed

    Ameneiros-Lago, E; Carballada-Rico, C; Garrido-Sanjuán, J A; García Martínez, A

    2015-01-01

    Decision making in the patient with chronic advanced disease is especially complex. Health professionals are obliged to prevent avoidable suffering and not to add any more damage to that of the disease itself. The adequacy of the clinical interventions consists of only offering those diagnostic and therapeutic procedures appropriate to the clinical situation of the patient and to perform only those allowed by the patient or representative. In this article, the use of an algorithm is proposed that should serve to help health professionals in this decision making process. PMID:25666087

  6. The Morningside Initiative: Collaborative Development of a Knowledge Repository to Accelerate Adoption of Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Greenes, Robert; Bloomrosen, Meryl; Brown-Connolly, Nancy E.; Curtis, Clayton; Detmer, Don E; Enberg, Robert; Fridsma, Douglas; Fry, Emory; Goldstein, Mary K; Haug, Peter; Hulse, Nathan; Hongsermeier, Tonya; Maviglia, Saverio; Robbins, Craig W; Shah, Hemant

    2010-01-01

    The Morningside Initiative is a public-private activity that has evolved from an August, 2007, meeting at the Morningside Inn, in Frederick, MD, sponsored by the Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center (TATRC) of the US Army Medical Research Materiel Command. Participants were subject matter experts in clinical decision support (CDS) and included representatives from the Department of Defense, Veterans Health Administration, Kaiser Permanente, Partners Healthcare System, Henry Ford Health System, Arizona State University, and the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA). The Morningside Initiative was convened in response to the AMIA Roadmap for National Action on Clinical Decision Support and on the basis of other considerations and experiences of the participants. Its formation was the unanimous recommendation of participants at the 2007 meeting which called for creating a shared repository of executable knowledge for diverse health care organizations and practices, as well as health care system vendors. The rationale is based on the recognition that sharing of clinical knowledge needed for CDS across organizations is currently virtually non-existent, and that, given the considerable investment needed for creating, maintaining and updating authoritative knowledge, which only larger organizations have been able to undertake, this is an impediment to widespread adoption and use of CDS. The Morningside Initiative intends to develop and refine (1) an organizational framework, (2) a technical approach, and (3) CDS content acquisition and management processes for sharing CDS knowledge content, tools, and experience that will scale with growing numbers of participants and can be expanded in scope of content and capabilities. Intermountain Healthcare joined the initial set of participants shortly after its formation. The efforts of the Morningside Initiative are intended to serve as the basis for a series of next steps in a national agenda for CDS. It is based on the belief that sharing of knowledge can be highly effective as is the case in other competitive domains such as genomics. Participants in the Morningside Initiative believe that a coordinated effort between the private and public sectors is needed to accomplish this goal and that a small number of highly visible and respected health care organizations in the public and private sector can lead by example. Ultimately, a future collaborative knowledge sharing organization must have a sustainable long-term business model for financial support. PMID:21603282

  7. The Need for Clinical Decision Support Integrated with the Electronic Health Record for the Clinical Application of Whole Genome Sequencing Information

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Brandon M.; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2013-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing (WGS) is rapidly approaching widespread clinical application. Technology advancements over the past decade, since the first human genome was decoded, have made it feasible to use WGS for clinical care. Future advancements will likely drive down the price to the point wherein WGS is routinely available for care. However, were this to happen today, most of the genetic information available to guide clinical care would go unused due to the complexity of genetics, limited physician proficiency in genetics, and lack of genetics professionals in the clinical workforce. Furthermore, these limitations are unlikely to change in the future. As such, the use of clinical decision support (CDS) to guide genome-guided clinical decision-making is imperative. In this manuscript, we describe the barriers to widespread clinical application of WGS information, describe how CDS can be an important tool for overcoming these barriers, and provide clinical examples of how genome-enabled CDS can be used in the clinical setting. PMID:25411643

  8. Standards for Scalable Clinical Decision Support: Need, Current and Emerging Standards, Gaps, and Proposal for Progress

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Kensaku; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Lobach, David F.; Jenders, Robert A

    2010-01-01

    Despite their potential to significantly improve health care, advanced clinical decision support (CDS) capabilities are not widely available in the clinical setting. An important reason for this limited availability of CDS capabilities is the application-specific and institution-specific nature of most current CDS implementations. Thus, a critical need for enabling CDS capabilities on a much larger scale is the development and adoption of standards that enable current and emerging CDS resources to be more effectively leveraged across multiple applications and care settings. Standards required for such effective scaling of CDS include (i) standard terminologies and information models to represent and communicate about health care data; (ii) standard approaches to representing clinical knowledge in both human-readable and machine-executable formats; and (iii) standard approaches for leveraging these knowledge resources to provide CDS capabilities across various applications and care settings. A number of standards do exist or are under development to meet these needs. However, many gaps and challenges remain, including the excessive complexity of many standards; the limited availability of easily accessible knowledge resources implemented using standard approaches; and the lack of tooling and other practical resources to enable the efficient adoption of existing standards. Thus, the future development and widespread adoption of current CDS standards will depend critically on the availability of tooling, knowledge bases, and other resources that make the adoption of CDS standards not only the right approach to take, but the cost-effective path to follow given the alternative of using a traditional, ad hoc approach to implementing CDS. PMID:21603283

  9. Cost-Effectiveness of an Electronic Medical Record Based Clinical Decision Support System

    PubMed Central

    Gilmer, Todd P; O'Connor, Patrick J; Sperl-Hillen, JoAnn M; Rush, William A; Johnson, Paul E; Amundson, Gerald H; Asche, Stephen E; Ekstrom, Heidi L

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objective Medical groups have invested billions of dollars in electronic medical records (EMRs), but few studies have examined the cost-effectiveness of EMR-based clinical decision support (CDS). This study examined the cost-effectiveness of EMR-based CDS for adults with diabetes from the perspective of the health care system. Data Sources/Setting Clinical outcome and cost data from a randomized clinical trial of EMR-based CDS were used as inputs into a diabetes simulation model. The simulation cohort included 1,092 patients with diabetes with A1c above goal at baseline. Study Design The United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study Outcomes Model, a validated simulation model of diabetes, was used to evaluate remaining life years, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and health care costs over patient lifetimes (40-year time horizon) from the health system perspective. Principal Findings Patients in the intervention group had significantly lowered A1c (0.26 percent, p = .014) relative to patients in the control arm. Intervention costs were $120 (SE = 45) per patient in the first year and $76 (SE = 45) per patient in the following years. In the base case analysis, EMR-based CDS increased lifetime QALYs by 0.04 (SE = 0.01) and increased lifetime costs by $112 (SE = 660), resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $3,017 per QALY. The cost-effectiveness of EMR-based CDS persisted in one-way, two-way, and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Conclusions Widespread adoption of sophisticated EMR-based CDS has the potential to modestly improve the quality of care for patients with chronic conditions without substantially increasing costs to the health care system. PMID:22578085

  10. Supporting clinical decision making during deep brain stimulation surgery by means of a stochastic dynamical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamintziou, Sofia D.; Tsirogiannis, George L.; Stathis, Pantelis G.; Tagaris, George A.; Boviatsis, Efstathios J.; Sakas, Damianos E.; Nikita, Konstantina S.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. During deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery for the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), microelectrode recording (MER) in conjunction with functional stimulation techniques are commonly applied for accurate electrode implantation. However, the development of automatic methods for clinical decision making has to date been characterized by the absence of a robust single-biomarker approach. Moreover, it has only been restricted to the framework of MER without encompassing intraoperative macrostimulation. Here, we propose an integrated series of novel single-biomarker approaches applicable to the entire electrophysiological procedure by means of a stochastic dynamical model. Approach. The methods are applied to MER data pertinent to ten DBS procedures. Considering the presence of measurement noise, we initially employ a multivariate phase synchronization index for automatic delineation of the functional boundaries of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and determination of the acceptable MER trajectories. By introducing the index into a nonlinear stochastic model, appropriately fitted to pre-selected MERs, we simulate the neuronal response to periodic stimuli (130 Hz), and examine the Lyapunov exponent as an indirect indicator of the clinical effectiveness yielded by stimulation at the corresponding sites. Main results. Compared with the gold-standard dataset of annotations made intraoperatively by clinical experts, the STN detection methodology demonstrates a false negative rate of 4.8% and a false positive rate of 0%, across all trajectories. Site eligibility for implantation of the DBS electrode, as implicitly determined through the Lyapunov exponent of the proposed stochastic model, displays a sensitivity of 71.43%. Significance. The suggested comprehensive method exhibits remarkable performance in automatically determining both the acceptable MER trajectories and the optimal stimulation sites, thereby having the potential to accelerate precise target finalization during DBS surgery for PD.

  11. Using evidence-based algorithms to improve clinical decision making: the case of a first-time anterior shoulder dislocation.

    PubMed

    Federer, Andrew E; Taylor, Dean C; Mather, Richard C

    2013-09-01

    Decision making in health care has evolved substantially over the last century. Up until the late 1970s, medical decision making was predominantly intuitive and anecdotal. It was based on trial and error and involved high levels of problem solving. The 1980s gave way to empirical medicine, which was evidence based probabilistic, and involved pattern recognition and less problem solving. Although this represented a major advance in the quality of medical decision making, limitations existed. The advantages of the gold standard of the randomized controlled clinical trial (RCT) are well-known and this technique is irreplaceable in its ability to answer critical clinical questions. However, the RCT does have drawbacks. RCTs are expensive and can only capture a snapshot in time. As treatments change and new technologies emerge, new expensive clinical trials must be undertaken to reevaluate them. Furthermore, in order to best evaluate a single intervention, other factors must be controlled. In addition, the study population may not match that of another organization or provider. Although evidence-based medicine has provided powerful data for clinicians, effectively and efficiently tailoring it to the individual has not yet evolved. We are now in a period of transition from this evidence-based era to one dominated by the personalization and customization of care. It will be fueled by policy decisions to shift financial responsibility to the patient, creating a powerful and sophisticated consumer, unlike any patient we have known before. The challenge will be to apply medical evidence and personal preferences to medical decisions and deliver it efficiently in the increasingly busy clinical setting. In this article, we provide a robust review of the concepts of customized care and some of techniques to deliver it. We will illustrate this through a personalized decision model for the treatment decision after a first-time anterior shoulder dislocation. PMID:23924748

  12. Comparison of residents’ approaches to clinical decisions before and after the implementation of Evidence Based Medicine course

    PubMed Central

    KARIMIAN, ZAHRA; KOJURI, JAVAD; SAGHEB, MOHAMMAD MAHDI; MAHBOUDI, ALI; SABER, MAHBOOBEH; AMINI, MITRA; DEHGHANI, MOHAMMAD REZA

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: It has been found that the decision-making process in medicine is affected, to a large extent, by one’s experience, individual mentality, previous models, and common habitual approaches, in addition to scientific principles. Evidence-based medicine is an approach attempting to reinforce scientific, systematic and critical thinking in physicians and provide the ground for optimal decision making. In this connection, the purpose of the present study is to find out to what extent the education of evidence based medicine affects clinical decision making. Methods: The present quasi-experimental study was carried out on 110 clinical residents, who started their education in September, 2012 and finally 62 residents filled out the questionnaires. The instrument used was a researcher-made questionnaire containing items on four decision-making approaches. The questionnaire was used both as a pre-test and a post-test to assess the residents’ viewpoints on decision making approaches. The validity of the questionnaire was determined using medical education and clinical professionals’ viewpoints, and the reliability was calculated through Chronbach alpha; it was found to be 0.93. The results were analyzed by paired t-test using SPSS, version 14. Results: The results demonstrated that evidence-based medicine workshop significantly affected the residents’ decision-making approaches (p<0.001). The pre-test showed that principles-based, reference-based and routine model-based approaches were more preferred before the program (p<0.001). However, after the implementation of the program, the dominant approaches used by the residents in their decision making were evidence-based ones.  Conclusion: To develop the evidence-based approach, it is necessary for educational programs to continue steadily and goal-orientedly. In addition, the equipment infrastructure such as the Internet, access to data bases, scientific data, and clinical guides should develop more in the medical departments. PMID:25512942

  13. Cost-Effectiveness of Clinical Decision Support System in Improving Maternal Health Care in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Dalaba, Maxwell Ayindenaba; Akweongo, Patricia; Aborigo, Raymond Akawire; Saronga, Happiness Pius; Williams, John; Blank, Antje; Kaltschmidt, Jens; Sauerborn, Rainer; Loukanova, Svetla

    2015-01-01

    Objective This paper investigated the cost-effectiveness of a computer-assisted Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) in the identification of maternal complications in Ghana. Methods A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed in a before- and after-intervention study. Analysis was conducted from the provider’s perspective. The intervention area was the Kassena- Nankana district where computer-assisted CDSS was used by midwives in maternal care in six selected health centres. Six selected health centers in the Builsa district served as the non-intervention group, where the normal Ghana Health Service activities were being carried out. Results Computer-assisted CDSS increased the detection of pregnancy complications during antenatal care (ANC) in the intervention health centres (before-intervention= 9 /1,000 ANC attendance; after-intervention= 12/1,000 ANC attendance; P-value=0.010). In the intervention health centres, there was a decrease in the number of complications during labour by 1.1%, though the difference was not statistically significant (before-intervention =107/1,000 labour clients; after-intervention= 96/1,000 labour clients; P-value=0.305). Also, at the intervention health centres, the average cost per pregnancy complication detected during ANC (cost –effectiveness ratio) decreased from US$17,017.58 (before-intervention) to US$15,207.5 (after-intervention). Incremental cost –effectiveness ratio (ICER) was estimated at US$1,142. Considering only additional costs (cost of computer-assisted CDSS), cost per pregnancy complication detected was US$285. Conclusions Computer –assisted CDSS has the potential to identify complications during pregnancy and marginal reduction in labour complications. Implementing computer-assisted CDSS is more costly but more effective in the detection of pregnancy complications compared to routine maternal care, hence making the decision to implement CDSS very complex. Policy makers should however be guided by whether the additional benefit is worth the additional cost. PMID:25974093

  14. Transcranial Doppler monitoring and clinical decision-making after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    McGirt, Matthew J; Blessing, Robert P; Goldstein, Larry B

    2003-01-01

    Our objective was to examine the impact of transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) vasospasm monitoring on clinical decision-making following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The records of 50 randomly selected patients undergoing serial TCD monitoring following SAH were reviewed. Dates and results of TCDs and cerebral angiograms, the use of hypertensive hemodilution (HH) therapy, and the development of new neurological deficits were recorded. The independent effects of TCD-defined vasospasm and new neurological deficits on patient management were determined with multiple logistical regression. Results were validated in a second randomly selected, 50 patient cohort. Mild or moderate TCD-defined vasospasm developed in 76% of patients 5.8 +/- 0.5 days after SAH; 38% developed severe TCD-defined vasospasm after 7.9 +/- 0.7 days. Focal neurological deficits occurred in 50% after 5.7 +/- 0.6 days with TCD abnormalities preceding the deficit by 2.5 +/- 0.7 days in 64%. TCD-defined vasospasm or a new neurological deficit explained 60% of the variance in the use of HH therapy (P = .005). New neurological deficits increased the odds of HH therapy 33-fold (P = .004) whereas there was no independent effect of TCD-defined vasospasm. These variables explained 64% of the variance in the performance of angiography (P = .0002). An abnormal TCD did not increase the odds of angiography whereas its use increased 28-fold (P = .01) after a neurological deficit developed. These results were confirmed in an independent cohort. We concluded that TCD-defined vasospasm did not independently influence the use of HH therapy or angiography with both decisions associated with the development of new neurological deficits. As TCD-defined vasospasm preceded the neurological deficit in 64%, earlier intervention might reduce the incidence of vasospasm-related stroke in institutions with similar practice patterns. PMID:17903910

  15. Computerized procedures system

    DOEpatents

    Lipner, Melvin H. (Monroeville, PA); Mundy, Roger A. (North Huntingdon, PA); Franusich, Michael D. (Upper St. Clair, PA)

    2010-10-12

    An online data driven computerized procedures system that guides an operator through a complex process facility's operating procedures. The system monitors plant data, processes the data and then, based upon this processing, presents the status of the current procedure step and/or substep to the operator. The system supports multiple users and a single procedure definition supports several interface formats that can be tailored to the individual user. Layered security controls access privileges and revisions are version controlled. The procedures run on a server that is platform independent of the user workstations that the server interfaces with and the user interface supports diverse procedural views.

  16. Computerized design of CAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, B. E.; Pham, T. A.

    1982-11-01

    A computerized ballistic design technique for CAD/PAD is described by which a set of ballistic design parameters are determined, all of which satisfy a particular performance requirement. In addition, the program yields the remaining performance predictions, so that only a very few computer runs of the design program can quickly bring the ballistic design within the specification limits prescribed. An example is presented for a small propulsion device, such as a remover or actuator, for which the input specifications define a maximum allowable thrust and minimum end-of-stroke velocity. The resulting output automatically satisfies the input requirements, and will always yield an acceptable ballistic design.

  17. Computerized Adaptive Testing: What It is and How It Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straetmans, Gerard J. J. M.; Eggen, Theo J. H. M.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the workings of computerized adaptive testing (CAT). Focuses on the key concept of information and then discusses two important components of a CAT system: the calibrated item bank and the testing algorithm. Describes a CAT that was designed for making placement decisions on the basis of two typical test administrations and notes the…

  18. Assessment of Competence in Clinical Reasoning and Decision-Making under Uncertainty: The Script Concordance Test Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramaekers, Stephan; Kremer, Wim; Pilot, Albert; van Beukelen, Peter; van Keulen, Hanno

    2010-01-01

    Real-life, complex problems often require that decisions are made despite limited information or insufficient time to explore all relevant aspects. Incorporating authentic uncertainties into an assessment, however, poses problems in establishing results and analysing their methodological qualities. This study aims at developing a test on clinical…

  19. An Exploration of the Relationship between Clinical Decision-Making Ability and Educational Preparation among New Graduate Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blount, Kamilah V.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the impact of accelerated nursing direct entry master's programs on the development of clinical decision-making skills of new graduate nurses that completed the Performance Based Development System (PBDS) assessment during the study period of 2008-2012 at a healthcare organization. Healthcare today is practiced in a…

  20. An Exploration of the Relationship between Clinical Decision-Making Ability and Educational Preparation among New Graduate Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blount, Kamilah V.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the impact of accelerated nursing direct entry master's programs on the development of clinical decision-making skills of new graduate nurses that completed the Performance Based Development System (PBDS) assessment during the study period of 2008-2012 at a healthcare organization. Healthcare today is practiced in a…

  1. A clinical decision support system for femoral peripheral arterial disease treatment.

    PubMed

    Yurtkuran, Alkın; Tok, Mustafa; Emel, Erdal

    2013-01-01

    One of the major challenges of providing reliable healthcare services is to diagnose and treat diseases in an accurate and timely manner. Recently, many researchers have successfully used artificial neural networks as a diagnostic assessment tool. In this study, the validation of such an assessment tool has been developed for treatment of the femoral peripheral arterial disease using a radial basis function neural network (RBFNN). A data set for training the RBFNN has been prepared by analyzing records of patients who had been treated by the thoracic and cardiovascular surgery clinic of a university hospital. The data set includes 186 patient records having 16 characteristic features associated with a binary treatment decision, namely, being a medical or a surgical one. K-means clustering algorithm has been used to determine the parameters of radial basis functions and the number of hidden nodes of the RBFNN is determined experimentally. For performance evaluation, the proposed RBFNN was compared to three different multilayer perceptron models having Pareto optimal hidden layer combinations using various performance indicators. Results of comparison indicate that the RBFNN can be used as an effective assessment tool for femoral peripheral arterial disease treatment. PMID:24382983

  2. Molecular profiling of liver tumors: classification and clinical translation for decision making.

    PubMed

    Pinyol, Roser; Nault, Jean Charles; Quetglas, Iris M; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Llovet, Josep M

    2014-11-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a complex disease with a dismal prognosis. Consequently, a translational approach is required to personalized clinical decision making to improve survival of HCC patients. Molecular signatures from cirrhotic livers and single nucleotide polymorphism have been linked with HCC occurrence. Identification of high-risk populations will be useful to design chemopreventive trials. In addition, molecular signatures derived from tumor and nontumor samples are associated with early tumor recurrence due to metastasis and late tumor recurrence due to de novo carcinogenesis after curative treatment, respectively. Identification of patients with a high risk of relapse will guide adjuvant randomized trials. The genetic landscape drawn by next-generation sequencing has highlighted the genomic diversity of HCC. Genetic drivers recurrently mutated belong to different signaling pathways including telomere maintenance, cell-cycle regulators, chromatin remodeling, Wnt/b-catenin, RAS/RAF/MAPK kinase, and AKT/mTOR pathway. These cancer genes will be ideally targeted by biotherapies as a paradigm of stratified medicine adapted to tumor biology. PMID:25369299

  3. Four principles for user interface design of computerised clinical decision support systems.

    PubMed

    Kanstrup, Anne Marie; Christiansen, Marion Berg; Nøhr, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents results from a design research project of a user interface (UI) for a Computerised Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS). The ambition has been to design Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) that can minimise medication errors. Through an iterative design process a digital prototype for prescription of medicine has been developed. This paper presents results from the formative evaluation of the prototype conducted in a simulation laboratory with ten participating physicians. Data from the simulation is analysed by use of theory on how users perceive information. The conclusion is a model, which sum up four principles of interaction for design of CDSS. The four principles for design of user interfaces for CDSS are summarised as four A's: All in one, At a glance, At hand and Attention. The model emphasises integration of all four interaction principles in the design of user interfaces for CDSS, i.e. the model is an integrated model which we suggest as a guide for interaction design when working with preventing medication errors. PMID:21685612

  4. Dose coefficients and derived guidance and clinical decision levels for contaminated wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, Luiz; Toohey, Richard E

    2009-01-01

    The NCRP Wound Model describing the retention of selected radionuclides at the site of a contaminated wound and their uptake into the transfer compartment has been combined with the ICRP element-specific systemic models for those radionuclides to derive dose coefficients for intakes via contaminated wounds. Those coefficients have been used to generate derived guidance levels (i.e., the activity in a wound that would result in an effective dose of 20 or 50 mSv, or in some cases, a committed organ equivalent dose of 500 mSv), and clinical decision levels (i.e., activity levels that would indicate the need for consideration of medical intervention to remove activity from the wound site or administration of decorporation therapy or both), typically set at 5 times the derived guidance levels. Data are provided for the radionuclides commonly encountered at nuclear power plants and nuclear weapons, fuel fabrication or recycling, waste disposal, medical and research facilities. These include: {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 131}I, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 192}Ir, {sup 210}Po, {sup 226,228}Ra, {sup 228,232}Th, {sup 235,238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238,239}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 242,244}Cm, and {sup 252}Cf.

  5. Clinical Decision Support System to Enhance Quality Control of Spirometry Using Information and Communication Technologies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We recently demonstrated that quality of spirometry in primary care could markedly improve with remote offline support from specialized professionals. It is hypothesized that implementation of automatic online assessment of quality of spirometry using information and communication technologies may significantly enhance the potential for extensive deployment of a high quality spirometry program in integrated care settings. Objective The objective of the study was to elaborate and validate a Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) for automatic online quality assessment of spirometry. Methods The CDSS was done through a three step process including: (1) identification of optimal sampling frequency; (2) iterations to build-up an initial version using the 24 standard spirometry curves recommended by the American Thoracic Society; and (3) iterations to refine the CDSS using 270 curves from 90 patients. In each of these steps the results were checked against one expert. Finally, 778 spirometry curves from 291 patients were analyzed for validation purposes. Results The CDSS generated appropriate online classification and certification in 685/778 (88.1%) of spirometry testing, with 96% sensitivity and 95% specificity. Conclusions Consequently, only 93/778 (11.9%) of spirometry testing required offline remote classification by an expert, indicating a potential positive role of the CDSS in the deployment of a high quality spirometry program in an integrated care setting. PMID:25600957

  6. Current Status and Future Prospects for Electronic Point-of-Care Clinical Decision Support in Diabetes Care

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Patrick J.; Desai, Jay; Butler, John; Kharbanda, Elyse; Sperl-Hillen, JoAnn M.

    2013-01-01

    Early efforts to use point-of-care clinical decision support (CDS) were limited to the use of prompts and reminders, which improved test ordering but not intermediate outcomes of care such as glucose, blood pressure, or lipid levels. More sophisticated diabetes CDS tools are now available that use electronic medical record data to provide patient-specific advice on medication use based on previous treatment, distance from goal, and other clinical data. These tools have shown modest but significant improvement in glucose and blood pressure control. Promising next-generation developments will include prioritizing clinical actions that have maximum benefit to a given patient at the point of care and developing effective methods to communicate CDS information to patients to better incorporate patient preferences in care decisions. PMID:23225213

  7. Emerging medical informatics with case-based reasoning for aiding clinical decision in multi-agent system.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ying; Colloc, Joël; Jacquet-Andrieu, Armelle; Lei, Kai

    2015-08-01

    This research aims to depict the methodological steps and tools about the combined operation of case-based reasoning (CBR) and multi-agent system (MAS) to expose the ontological application in the field of clinical decision support. The multi-agent architecture works for the consideration of the whole cycle of clinical decision-making adaptable to many medical aspects such as the diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, therapeutic monitoring of gastric cancer. In the multi-agent architecture, the ontological agent type employs the domain knowledge to ease the extraction of similar clinical cases and provide treatment suggestions to patients and physicians. Ontological agent is used for the extension of domain hierarchy and the interpretation of input requests. Case-based reasoning memorizes and restores experience data for solving similar problems, with the help of matching approach and defined interfaces of ontologies. A typical case is developed to illustrate the implementation of the knowledge acquisition and restitution of medical experts. PMID:26133480

  8. Design, Implementation, Use, and Preliminary Evaluation of SEBASTIAN, a Standards-Based Web Service for Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Kensaku; Lobach, David F.

    2005-01-01

    Despite their demonstrated ability to improve care quality, clinical decision support systems are not widely used. In part, this limited use is due to the difficulty of sharing medical knowledge in a machine-executable format. To address this problem, we developed a decision support Web service known as SEBASTIAN. In SEBASTIAN, individual knowledge modules define the data requirements for assessing a patient, the conclusions that can be drawn using that data, and instructions on how to generate those conclusions. Using standards-based XML messages transmitted over HTTP, client decision support applications provide patient data to SEBASTIAN and receive patient-specific assessments and recommendations. SEBASTIAN has been used to implement four distinct decision support systems; an architectural overview is provided for one of these systems. Preliminary assessments indicate that SEBASTIAN fulfills all original design objectives, including the re-use of executable medical knowledge across diverse applications and care settings, the straightforward authoring of knowledge modules, and use of the framework to implement decision support applications with significant clinical utility. PMID:16779066

  9. Clinical heterogeneity and molecular findings in five Polish patients with glycerol kinase deficiency: investigation of two splice site mutations with computerized splice junction analysis and Xp21 gene-specific mRNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Hellerud, Christina; Adamowicz, Maciej; Jurkiewicz, Dorota; Taybert, Joanna; Kubalska, Jolanta; Ciara, Elzbieta; Popowska, Ewa; Ellis, James R; Lindstedt, Sven; Pronicka, Ewa

    2003-07-01

    Five cases of glycerol kinase deficiency are presented with clinical, biochemical, and genetic results. Two had the glycerol kinase deficiency as part of an Xp21 contiguous gene deletion syndrome-complex form-and three had an isolated form of the enzyme deficiency. In these we found two splice site mutations (IVS1+4A>G, IVS9-1G>T) and one insertion (1393_1394insG). In patients with the complex form, a deletion of the DAX1, GK genes and the distal part of the DMD gene was found. A computerized study was performed to predict the effects of the splice site mutations. It showed that the IVS9-1G>T mutation substantially altered and removed the wild-type site and enhanced a cryptic site seven nucleotides downstream, and that the IVS1+4A>G diminished the strength of the wild-type donor site from strong to leaky. To verify these predictions, we developed an RT-PCR system with gene-specific primers that exclusively amplifies the Xp21 glycerol kinase gene transcript. Identification of individuals at risk is motivated by a need to avoid delay in a correct diagnosis. For reliable identification of heterozygotes for isolated glycerol kinase deficiency, knowledge of the specific mutation in the proband is required. This is easily obtained with the RT-PCR analyses developed in this study. PMID:12855219

  10. Enabling cross-platform clinical decision support through Web-based decision support in commercial electronic health record systems: proposal and evaluation of initial prototype implementations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingyuan; Velasco, Ferdinand T; Musser, R Clayton; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2013-01-01

    Enabling clinical decision support (CDS) across multiple electronic health record (EHR) systems has been a desired but largely unattained aim of clinical informatics, especially in commercial EHR systems. A potential opportunity for enabling such scalable CDS is to leverage vendor-supported, Web-based CDS development platforms along with vendor-supported application programming interfaces (APIs). Here, we propose a potential staged approach for enabling such scalable CDS, starting with the use of custom EHR APIs and moving towards standardized EHR APIs to facilitate interoperability. We analyzed three commercial EHR systems for their capabilities to support the proposed approach, and we implemented prototypes in all three systems. Based on these analyses and prototype implementations, we conclude that the approach proposed is feasible, already supported by several major commercial EHR vendors, and potentially capable of enabling cross-platform CDS at scale. PMID:24551426

  11. Types of Unintended Consequences Related to Computerized Provider Order Entry

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Emily M.; Sittig, Dean F.; Ash, Joan S.; Guappone, Kenneth P.; Dykstra, Richard H.

    2006-01-01

    Objective To identify types of clinical unintended adverse consequences resulting from computerized provider order entry (CPOE) implementation. Design An expert panel provided initial examples of adverse unintended consequences of CPOE. The authors, using qualitative methods, gathered and analyzed additional examples from five successful CPOE sites. Methods Using a card sort method, the authors developed a categorization scheme for the 79 unintended consequences initially identified and then iteratively modified the scheme to categorize 245 additional adverse consequences resulting from fieldwork. Because the focus centered on consequences requiring prevention or remedial action, the authors did not further analyze reported unintended beneficial (positive) consequences. Results Unintended adverse consequences (UACs) fell into nine major categories (in order of decreasing frequency): 1) more/new work for clinicians; 2) unfavorable workflow issues; 3) never ending system demands; 4) problems related to paper persistence; 5) untoward changes in communication patterns and practices; 6) negative emotions; 7) generation of new kinds of errors; 8) unexpected changes in the power structure; and 9) overdependence on the technology. Clinical decision support features introduced many of these unintended consequences. Conclusion Identifying and understanding the types and in some instances the causes of unintended adverse consequences associated with CPOE will enable system developers and implementers to better manage implementation and maintenance of future CPOE projects. PMID:16799128

  12. Computerized training management system

    DOEpatents

    Rice, Harold B. (Franklin Furnace, OH); McNair, Robert C. (East Setauket, NY); White, Kenneth (Shirley, NY); Maugeri, Terry (Wading River, NY)

    1998-08-04

    A Computerized Training Management System (CTMS) for providing a procedurally defined process that is employed to develop accreditable performance based training programs for job classifications that are sensitive to documented regulations and technical information. CTMS is a database that links information needed to maintain a five-phase approach to training-analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation independent of training program design. CTMS is designed using R-Base.RTM., an-SQL compliant software platform. Information is logically entered and linked in CTMS. Each task is linked directly to a performance objective, which, in turn, is linked directly to a learning objective; then, each enabling objective is linked to its respective test items. In addition, tasks, performance objectives, enabling objectives, and test items are linked to their associated reference documents. CTMS keeps all information up to date since it automatically sorts, files and links all data; CTMS includes key word and reference document searches.

  13. Computerized training management system

    DOEpatents

    Rice, H.B.; McNair, R.C.; White, K.; Maugeri, T.

    1998-08-04

    A Computerized Training Management System (CTMS) is disclosed for providing a procedurally defined process that is employed to develop accreditable performance based training programs for job classifications that are sensitive to documented regulations and technical information. CTMS is a database that links information needed to maintain a five-phase approach to training-analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation independent of training program design. CTMS is designed using R-Base{trademark}, an-SQL compliant software platform. Information is logically entered and linked in CTMS. Each task is linked directly to a performance objective, which, in turn, is linked directly to a learning objective; then, each enabling objective is linked to its respective test items. In addition, tasks, performance objectives, enabling objectives, and test items are linked to their associated reference documents. CTMS keeps all information up to date since it automatically sorts, files and links all data; CTMS includes key word and reference document searches. 18 figs.

  14. The ethics of forgoing life-sustaining treatment: theoretical considerations and clinical decision making

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Withholding or withdrawing a life-sustaining treatment tends to be very challenging for health care providers, patients, and their family members alike. When a patient’s life seems to be nearing its end, it is generally felt that the morally best approach is to try a new intervention, continue all treatments, attempt an experimental course of action, in short, do something. In contrast to this common practice, the authors argue that in most instances, the morally safer route is actually to forgo life-sustaining treatments, particularly when their likelihood to effectuate a truly beneficial outcome has become small relative to the odds of harming the patient. The ethical analysis proceeds in three stages. First, the difference between neglectful omission and passive acquiescence is explained. Next, the two necessary conditions for any medical treatment, i.e., that it is medically indicated and that consent is obtained, are applied to life-sustaining interventions. Finally, the difference between withholding and withdrawing a life-sustaining treatment is discussed. In the second part of the paper the authors show how these theoretical-ethical considerations can guide clinical-ethical decision making. A case vignette is presented about a patient who cannot be weaned off the ventilator post-surgery. The ethical analysis of this case proceeds through three stages. First, it is shown that and why withdrawal of the ventilator in this case does not equate assistance in suicide or euthanasia. Next, the question is raised whether continued ventilation can be justified medically, or has become futile. Finally, the need for the health care team to obtain consent for the continuation of the ventilation is discussed. PMID:24618004

  15. Interface design principles for usable decision support: a targeted review of best practices for clinical prescribing interventions.

    PubMed

    Horsky, Jan; Schiff, Gordon D; Johnston, Douglas; Mercincavage, Lauren; Bell, Douglas; Middleton, Blackford

    2012-12-01

    Developing effective clinical decision support (CDS) systems for the highly complex and dynamic domain of clinical medicine is a serious challenge for designers. Poor usability is one of the core barriers to adoption and a deterrent to its routine use. We reviewed reports describing system implementation efforts and collected best available design conventions, procedures, practices and lessons learned in order to provide developers a short compendium of design goals and recommended principles. This targeted review is focused on CDS related to medication prescribing. Published reports suggest that important principles include consistency of design concepts across networked systems, use of appropriate visual representation of clinical data, use of controlled terminology, presenting advice at the time and place of decision making and matching the most appropriate CDS interventions to clinical goals. Specificity and contextual relevance can be increased by periodic review of trigger rules, analysis of performance logs and maintenance of accurate allergy, problem and medication lists in health records in order to help avoid excessive alerting. Developers need to adopt design practices that include user-centered, iterative design and common standards based on human-computer interaction (HCI) research methods rooted in ethnography and cognitive science. Suggestions outlined in this report may help clarify the goals of optimal CDS design but larger national initiatives are needed for systematic application of human factors in health information technology (HIT) development. Appropriate design strategies are essential for developing meaningful decision support systems that meet the grand challenges of high-quality healthcare. PMID:22995208

  16. A 2014 Medical Informatics Perspective on Clinical Decision Support Systems: Do We Hit The Ceiling of Effectiveness?

    PubMed Central

    Lamy, J.-B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective To summarize recent research and propose a selection of best papers published in 2013 in the field of computer-based decision support in health care. Method Two literature reviews were performed by the two section editors from bibliographic databases with a focus on clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) and computer provider order entry in order to select a list of candidate best papers to be peer-reviewed by external reviewers. Results The full review process highlighted three papers, illustrating current trends in the domain of clinical decision support. The first trend is the development of theoretical approaches for CDSSs, and is exemplified by a paper proposing the integration of family histories and pedigrees in a CDSS. The second trend is illustrated by well-designed CDSSs, showing good theoretical performances and acceptance, while failing to show a clinical impact. An example is given with a paper reporting on scorecards aiming to reduce adverse drug events. The third trend is represented by research works that try to understand the limits of CDSS use, for instance by analyzing interactions between general practitioners, patients, and a CDSS. Conclusions CDSSs can achieve good theoretical results in terms of sensibility and specificity, as well as a good acceptance, but evaluations often fail to demonstrate a clinical impact. Future research is needed to better understand the causes of this observation and imagine new effective solutions for CDSS implementation. PMID:25123737

  17. Clinical Trial Decision Making in Pediatric Sickle Cell Disease: A Qualitative Study of Perceived Benefits and Barriers to Participation.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Chavis A; Chavez, Veronica; Mondestin, Valerie; Deatrick, Janet; Li, Yimei; Barakat, Lamia P

    2015-08-01

    Clinical trial research forms the foundation for advancing treatments; yet, children with sickle cell disease (SCD) are currently underrepresented. This qualitative study examines decision-making processes of youth with SCD and their caregivers regarding enrollment in clinical trial research. A subsample of participants from a study of clinical trial decision making among youth with health disparity conditions, 23 caregivers and 29 children/teens/young adults with SCD (age, 10 to 29 y), indicated whether or not they would participate in hypothetical medical and psychosocial clinical trials and prioritized barriers and benefits to participation via card sort and semistructured interviews. Audio recordings were transcribed and coded for themes. Participants reported that concerns of potential harm most affected their decision. Secondary factors were potential benefit, manageable study demands, and trust in the medical staff. Caregivers weighed potential harm more heavily than their children. Young children were more likely to endorse potential benefit. Overall, participants stated they would be willing to participate in research if the potential benefit outweighs potential harm and unmanageable study demands. To optimize recruitment, results suggest addressing potential harm first while highlighting potential benefits, creating manageable study demands, and endorsing the future benefits of research to the sickle cell community. PMID:25072368

  18. Effort-Based Decision-Making Paradigms for Clinical Trials in Schizophrenia: Part 2—External Validity and Correlates.

    PubMed

    Horan, William P; Reddy, L Felice; Barch, Deanna M; Buchanan, Robert W; Dunayevich, Eduardo; Gold, James M; Marder, Steven R; Wynn, Jonathan K; Young, Jared W; Green, Michael F

    2015-09-01

    Effort-based decision making has strong conceptual links to the motivational disturbances that define a key subdomain of negative symptoms. However, the extent to which effort-based decision-making performance relates to negative symptoms, and other clinical and functionally important variables has yet to be systematically investigated. In 94 clinically stable outpatients with schizophrenia, we examined the external validity of 5 effort-based paradigms, including the Effort Expenditure for Rewards, Balloon Effort, Grip Strength Effort, Deck Choice Effort, and Perceptual Effort tasks. These tasks covered 3 types of effort: physical, cognitive, and perceptual. Correlations between effort related performance and 6 classes of variables were examined, including: (1) negative symptoms, (2) clinically rated motivation and community role functioning, (3) self-reported motivational traits, (4) neurocognition, (5) other psychiatric symptoms and clinical/demographic characteristics, and (6) subjective valuation of monetary rewards. Effort paradigms showed small to medium relationships to clinical ratings of negative symptoms, motivation, and functioning, with the pattern more consistent for some measures than others. They also showed small to medium relations with neurocognitive functioning, but were generally unrelated to other psychiatric symptoms, self-reported traits, antipsychotic medications, side effects, and subjective valuation of money. There were relatively strong interrelationships among the effort measures. In conjunction with findings from a companion psychometric article, all the paradigms warrant further consideration and development, and 2 show the strongest potential for clinical trial use at this juncture. PMID:26209546

  19. Clinical decisions in patients with diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors. A statement of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Huelgas, R; Pérez-Jiménez, F; Serrano-Ríos, M; González-Santos, P; Román, P; Camafort, M; Conthe, P; García-Alegría, J; Guijarro, R; López-Miranda, J; Tirado-Miranda, R; Valdivielso, P

    2014-05-01

    Although the mortality associated to cardiovascular diseases (CVD) has been reduced in the last decades, CVD remains the main cause of mortality in Spain and they are associated with an important morbidity and a huge economic burden. The increasing prevalence of obesity and diabetes could be slowing down the mortality reduction in Spain. Clinicians have often difficulty making clinical decisions due to the multiple clinical guidelines available. Moreover, in the current context of economic crisis it is critical to promote an efficient use of diagnostic and therapeutic proceedings to ensure the viability of public health care systems. The Spanish Society of Internal Medicine (SEMI) has coordinated a consensus document to answer questions of daily practice with the aim of facilitating physicians' decision-making in the management of diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors from a cost-efficiency point of view. PMID:24602600

  20. Mentoring in the Clinical Setting to Improve Student Decision-Making Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stick-Mueller, Misty; Boesch, Ron; Silverman, Steven; Carpenter, Scott; Illingworth, Robert; Countryman, James

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The physician-intern relationship can be difficult to develop. A new chiropractic intern in a teaching clinic undergoes a major transition from classroom to clinical practice and must learn to turn classroom knowledge into clinical application. The ability to start formulating clinical techniques and apply them on a patient is…

  1. Derivation and validation of a clinical decision rule to identify young children with skull fracture following isolated head trauma

    PubMed Central

    Gravel, Jocelyn; Gouin, Serge; Chalut, Dominic; Crevier, Louis; Décarie, Jean-Claude; Elazhary, Nicolas; Mâsse, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is no clear consensus regarding radiologic evaluation of head trauma in young children without traumatic brain injury. We conducted a study to develop and validate a clinical decision rule to identify skull fracture in young children with head trauma and no immediate need for head tomography. Methods: We performed a prospective cohort study in 3 tertiary care emergency departments in the province of Quebec. Participants were children less than 2 years old who had a head trauma and were not at high risk of clinically important traumatic brain injury (Glasgow Coma Scale score < 15, altered level of consciousness or palpable skull fracture). The primary outcome was skull fracture. For each participant, the treating physician completed a standardized report form after physical examination and before radiologic evaluation. The decision to order skull radiography was at the physician’s discretion. The clinical decision rule was derived using recursive partitioning. Results: A total of 811 patients (49 with skull fracture) were recruited during the derivation phase. The 2 predictors identified through recursive partitioning were parietal or occipital swelling or hematoma and age less than 2 months. The rule had a sensitivity of 94% (95% confidence interval [CI] 83%–99%) and a specificity of 86% (95% CI 84%–89%) in the derivation phase. During the validation phase, 856 participants (44 with skull fracture) were recruited. The rule had a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 87% during this phase. Interpretation: The clinical decision rule developed in this study identified about 90% of skull fractures among young children with mild head trauma who had no immediate indication for head tomography. Use of the rule would have reduced the number of radiologic evaluations by about 60%. PMID:26350911

  2. Understanding patient decisions about clinical trials and the associated communication process: a preliminary report. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    This article presents a conceptual model of factors affecting patient decisions about participating in clinical trials and describes videotaping methods for observing interactions between patients, physicians, and family members. Preliminary findings suggest that awareness of the camera during videotaped conversations does not significantly alter the behavior of participants. Further study of this model and methodology may produce results that can be incorporated into provider training.

  3. Adaptation of a Published Risk Model to Point-of-care Clinical Decision Support Tailored to Local Workflow

    PubMed Central

    Sobel, Jeffrey L.; Baker, Craig C.; Levy, David; Cain, Carol H.

    2015-01-01

    Electronic clinical decision support can bring newly published knowledge to the point of care. However, local organizational buy-in, support for team workflows, IT system ease of use and other sociotechnical factors are needed to promote adoption. We successfully implemented a multi-variate cardiac risk stratification model from another institution into ours. We recreated the model and integrated it into our workflow, accessing it from our EHR with patient-specific data and facilitating clinical documentation if the user accepts the model results. Our clinical leaders championed the change and led educational dissemination efforts. We describe the ad-hoc social and technical collaboration needed to build and deploy the tool. The tool complements a clinical initiative within a community of practice, and is correlated with appropriate use of nuclear imaging.

  4. Design and Development of a Sharable Clinical Decision Support System Based on a Semantic Web Service Framework.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Fan; Gou, Ling; Tian, Yu; Li, Tian-Chang; Zhang, Mao; Li, Jing-Song

    2016-05-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) systems provide clinicians and other health care stakeholders with patient-specific assessments or recommendations to aid in the clinical decision-making process. Despite their demonstrated potential for improving health care quality, the widespread availability of CDS systems has been limited mainly by the difficulty and cost of sharing CDS knowledge among heterogeneous healthcare information systems. The purpose of this study was to design and develop a sharable clinical decision support (S-CDS) system that meets this challenge. The fundamental knowledge base consists of independent and reusable knowledge modules (KMs) to meet core CDS needs, wherein each KM is semantically well defined based on the standard information model, terminologies, and representation formalisms. A semantic web service framework was developed to identify, access, and leverage these KMs across diverse CDS applications and care settings. The S-CDS system has been validated in two distinct client CDS applications. Model-level evaluation results confirmed coherent knowledge representation. Application-level evaluation results reached an overall accuracy of 98.66 % and a completeness of 96.98 %. The evaluation results demonstrated the technical feasibility and application prospect of our approach. Compared with other CDS engineering efforts, our approach facilitates system development and implementation and improves system maintainability, scalability and efficiency, which contribute to the widespread adoption of effective CDS within the healthcare domain. PMID:27002818

  5. Ethics of Involving Children in Health-Related Research: Applying a Decision-Making Framework to a Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    MacKay-Lyons, Marilyn J.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: This paper explores ethical issues related to the involvement of children in health-related research through the application of a conceptual model (the Miller and Kenny framework) to a current clinical trial on casting protocols for equinus gait of children with cerebral palsy (CP). Summary of key points: The direct involvement of children in health-related research is important for maintaining and improving standards of paediatric clinical care. Ethical considerations around investigations involving this highly vulnerable population are complex, however, requiring the involvement of many levels of decision makers—government, research ethics boards (REBs), health care providers, parents, and children. The Miller and Kenny framework is useful in distinguishing these levels and heightening awareness of the complexities of the issues around engaging children in research. Considerations include the role of parents/caregivers in decision making, individual assessment of the child's decisional capacities, close attention to the child's context and life experience, provision of developmentally appropriate information about the research study, and careful assessment of dissent prior to withdrawing the child from the study. Recommendations: Physical therapists involved in paediatric clinical practice and/or research must be knowledgeable about ethical principles, policies, and REB requirements. The Miller and Kenny framework is a helpful guide to clarify decision-making roles around children's participation in research. PMID:21886373

  6. Use of conditional rule structure to automate clinical decision support: a comparison of artificial intelligence and deterministic programming techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, R.H.; Frank, A.D.

    1983-08-01

    A rule-based computer system was developed to perform clinical decision-making support within a medical information system, oncology practice, and clinical research. This rule-based system, which has been programmed using deterministic rules, possesses features of generalizability, modularity of structure, convenience in rule acquisition, explanability, and utility for patient care and teaching, features which have been identified as advantages of artificial intelligence (AI) rule-based systems. Formal rules are primarily represented as conditional statements; common conditions and actions are stored in system dictionaries so that they can be recalled at any time to form new decision rules. Important similarities and differences exist in the structure of this system and clinical computer systems utilizing artificial intelligence (AI) production rule techniques. The non-AI rule-based system posesses advantages in cost and ease of implementation. The degree to which significant medical decision problems can be solved by this technique remains uncertain as does whether the more complex AI methodologies will be required. 15 references.

  7. Disciplined decision making in an interdisciplinary environment: some implications for clinical applications of statistical process control.

    PubMed Central

    Hantula, D A

    1995-01-01

    This paper explores some of the implications the statistical process control (SPC) methodology described by Pfadt and Wheeler (1995) may have for analyzing more complex performances and contingencies in human services or health care environments at an organizational level. Service delivery usually occurs in an organizational system that is characterized by functional structures, high levels of professionalism, subunit optimization, and organizational suboptimization. By providing a standard set of criteria and decision rules, SPC may provide a common interface for data-based decision making, may bring decision making under the control of the contigencies that are established by these rules rather than the immediate contingencies of data fluctuation, and may attenuate escalation of failing treatments. SPC is culturally consistent with behavior analysis, sharing an emphasis on data-based decisions, measurement over time, and graphic analysis of data, as well as a systemic view of organizations. PMID:7592155

  8. Computerized molecular modeling of carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Computerized molecular modleing continues to increase in capability and applicability to carbohydrates. This chapter covers nomenclature and conformational aspects of carbohydrates, perhaps of greater use to carbohydrate-inexperienced computational chemists. Its comments on various methods and studi...

  9. Helping patients make better decisions: how to apply behavioral economics in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, Maureen Reni; Spivey, Christy; Daniel, Kathy M

    2014-01-01

    Clinicians are committed to effectively educating patients and helping them to make sound decisions concerning their own health care. However, how do clinicians determine what is effective education? How do they present information clearly and in a manner that patients understand and can use to make informed decisions? Behavioral economics (BE) is a subfield of economics that can assist clinicians to better understand how individuals actually make decisions. BE research can help guide interactions with patients so that information is presented and discussed in a more deliberate and impactful way. We can be more effective providers of care when we understand the factors that influence how our patients make decisions, factors of which we may have been largely unaware. BE research that focuses on health care and medical decision making is becoming more widely known, and what has been reported suggests that BE interventions can be effective in the medical realm. The purpose of this article is to provide clinicians with an overview of BE decision science and derived practice strategies to promote more effective behavior change in patients. PMID:25378915

  10. Computerized international geothermal information systems

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, S.L.; Lawrence, J.D.; Lepman, S.R.

    1980-03-01

    The computerized international geothermal energy information system is reviewed. The review covers establishment of the Italy - United States linked data centers by the NATO Committee on Challenges of Modern Society, through a bilateral agreement, and up to the present time. The result of the information exchange project is given as the bibliographic and numerical data available from the data centers. Recommendations for the exchange of computerized geothermal information at the international level are discussed.

  11. Evaluation of User Interface and Workflow Design of a Bedside Nursing Clinical Decision Support System

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Michael Juntao; Finley, George Mike; Mills, Christy; Johnson, Ron Kim

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical decision support systems (CDSS) are important tools to improve health care outcomes and reduce preventable medical adverse events. However, the effectiveness and success of CDSS depend on their implementation context and usability in complex health care settings. As a result, usability design and validation, especially in real world clinical settings, are crucial aspects of successful CDSS implementations. Objective Our objective was to develop a novel CDSS to help frontline nurses better manage critical symptom changes in hospitalized patients, hence reducing preventable failure to rescue cases. A robust user interface and implementation strategy that fit into existing workflows was key for the success of the CDSS. Methods Guided by a formal usability evaluation framework, UFuRT (user, function, representation, and task analysis), we developed a high-level specification of the product that captures key usability requirements and is flexible to implement. We interviewed users of the proposed CDSS to identify requirements, listed functions, and operations the system must perform. We then designed visual and workflow representations of the product to perform the operations. The user interface and workflow design were evaluated via heuristic and end user performance evaluation. The heuristic evaluation was done after the first prototype, and its results were incorporated into the product before the end user evaluation was conducted. First, we recruited 4 evaluators with strong domain expertise to study the initial prototype. Heuristic violations were coded and rated for severity. Second, after development of the system, we assembled a panel of nurses, consisting of 3 licensed vocational nurses and 7 registered nurses, to evaluate the user interface and workflow via simulated use cases. We recorded whether each session was successfully completed and its completion time. Each nurse was asked to use the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Task Load Index to self-evaluate the amount of cognitive and physical burden associated with using the device. Results A total of 83 heuristic violations were identified in the studies. The distribution of the heuristic violations and their average severity are reported. The nurse evaluators successfully completed all 30 sessions of the performance evaluations. All nurses were able to use the device after a single training session. On average, the nurses took 111 seconds (SD 30 seconds) to complete the simulated task. The NASA Task Load Index results indicated that the work overhead on the nurses was low. In fact, most of the burden measures were consistent with zero. The only potentially significant burden was temporal demand, which was consistent with the primary use case of the tool. Conclusions The evaluation has shown that our design was functional and met the requirements demanded by the nurses’ tight schedules and heavy workloads. The user interface embedded in the tool provided compelling utility to the nurse with minimal distraction. PMID:23612350

  12. Clinical influences on antibiotic prescribing decisions for lower respiratory tract infection: a nine country qualitative study of variation in care

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Kerenza; Cooper, Lucy; Coenen, Samuel; Little, Paul; Verheij, Theo; Godycki-Cwirko, Maciek; Melbye, Hasse; Krawczyk, Jaroslaw; Borras-Santos, Alicia; Jakobsen, Kristin; Worby, Patricia; Goossens, Herman; Butler, Christopher C

    2012-01-01

    Objectives There is variation in antibiotic prescribing for lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) in primary care that does not benefit patients. This study aims to investigate clinicians' accounts of clinical influences on antibiotic prescribing decisions for LRTI to better understand variation and identify opportunities for improvement. Design Multi country qualitative interview study. Semi-structured interviews using open-ended questions and a patient scenario. Data were subjected to five-stage analytic framework approach (familiarisation, developing a thematic framework from the interview questions and emerging themes, indexing, charting and mapping to search for interpretations), with interviewers commenting on preliminary reports. Setting Primary care. Participants 80 primary care clinicians randomly selected from primary care research networks based in nine European cities. Results Clinicians reported four main individual clinical factors that guided their antibiotic prescribing decision: auscultation, fever, discoloured sputum and breathlessness. These were considered alongside a general impression of the patient derived from building a picture of the illness course, using intuition and familiarity with the patient. Comorbidity and older age were considered main risk factors for poor outcomes. Clinical factors were similar across networks, apart from C reactive protein near patient testing in Tromsø. Clinicians developed ways to handle diagnostic and management uncertainty through their own clinical routines. Conclusions Clinicians emphasised the importance of auscultation, fever, discoloured sputum and breathlessness, general impression of the illness course, familiarity with the patient, comorbidity, and age in informing their antibiotic prescribing decisions for LRTI. As some of these factors may be overemphasised given the evolving evidence base, greater standardisation of assessment and integration of findings may help reduce unhelpful variation in management. Non-clinical influences will also need to be addressed. PMID:22619265

  13. Clinical factors influencing the decision to transfuse after percutaneous native kidney biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Whittier, William L.; Sayeed, Khaleel; Korbet, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Transfusion of erythrocytes is the most common intervention after a complicated percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB). Anemia is considered to be a leading risk factor for bleeding following a PRB, and based on recent studies of transfusions in hospitalized patients, many institutions are restricting the threshold for erythrocyte transfusion to a lower hemoglobin concentration (Hgb). The purpose of this study is to analyze factors that influence the transfusion decision after a PRB, and to determine whether anemia is truly a risk factor for bleeding or anemic patients are simply more likely to receive a transfusion because of their already lower pre-PRB Hgb. Methods PRB of native kidneys was performed using real-time ultrasound with automated biopsy needles from January 1990 to April 2014. All patients were prospectively followed for bleeding with a 24-h inpatient observation. An intervention for a bleeding complication (BL-I) was defined by undergoing a procedure (cystoscopy, embolization), receiving a blood transfusion (BL-T), death and/or readmission related to the biopsy. To further define the effect of anemia, patients were divided into three pre-PRB Hgb groups: <9.0 g/dL (n = 79), 9.0–11.0 g/dL (n = 266) and >11.0 g/dL (n = 565). Results BL-I occurred in 71/910 (7.8%) of PRBs. The majority of these were BL-T (57/71, 80%; 57/910, 6.3% overall). Patients with BL-I had lower pre-PRB Hgb than those without BL-I (mean ± SD; 10.3 ± 2.0 versus 12.0 ± 2.1 g/dL, P < 0.0001) and a greater change (Δ) in Hgb (2.1 ± 1.6 versus 1.0 ± 0.8 g/dL, P < 0.0001). When compared with higher Hgb, patients with Hgb <9.0 g/dL had more traditional risk factors for bleeding (older age: 49 ± 18 versus 48 ± 18 versus 45 ± 16 years, P = 0.02; female: 72 versus 70 versus 56%, P < 0.0001; higher serum creatinine: 4.0 ± 2.9 versus 2.9 ± 2.6 versus 1.7 ± 1.4 mg/dL, P < 0.0001; higher systolic blood pressure: 138 ± 18 versus 133 ± 19 versus 133 ± 18 mmHg, P = 0.06; higher bleeding time: 7.6 ± 1.8 versus 7.4 ± 2.0 versus 6.7 ± 1.8 min, P < 0.0001). When BL-T was stratified by pre-PRB Hgb, there were more transfusions in those with lower pre-PRB Hgb (24 versus 9 versus 3%, P < 0.0001). However, these patients not only had fewer hematomas (58 versus 83 versus 87%, P = 0.04) but also demonstrated a smaller ΔHgb post-PRB (1.3 ± 1.0 versus 1.8 ± 0.8 versus 3.2 ± 1.6, P < 0.0001) compared with patients with higher pre-PRB Hgb, yet still received a transfusion. Conclusions While patients with lower pre-PRB Hgb have more of the traditional risk factors for a complication after PRB, there was actually less clinically evident bleeding in these patients who were transfused. Although anemia itself has been considered to be a risk factor for a complication in the past, it more accurately represents only a predictor of receiving an erythrocyte transfusion. In the setting of the PRB, the decision for transfusion is influenced more by the severity of anemia at baseline as opposed to clinically evident bleeding. PMID:26798469

  14. COMPUTERIZED TRAINING OF CRYOSURGERY – A SYSTEM APPROACH

    PubMed Central

    Keelan, Robert; Yamakawa, Soji; Shimada, Kenji; Rabin, Yoed

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the current study is to provide the foundation for a computerized training platform for cryosurgery. Consistent with clinical practice, the training process targets the correlation of the frozen region contour with the target region shape, using medical imaging and accepted criteria for clinical success. The current study focuses on system design considerations, including a bioheat transfer model, simulation techniques, optimal cryoprobe layout strategy, and a simulation core framework. Two fundamentally different approaches were considered for the development of a cryosurgery simulator, based on a finite-elements (FE) commercial code (ANSYS) and a proprietary finite-difference (FD) code. Results of this study demonstrate that the FE simulator is superior in terms of geometric modeling, while the FD simulator is superior in terms of runtime. Benchmarking results further indicate that the FD simulator is superior in terms of usage of memory resources, pre-processing, parallel processing, and post-processing. It is envisioned that future integration of a human-interface module and clinical data into the proposed computer framework will make computerized training of cryosurgery a practical reality. PMID:23995400

  15. Cognitive Workload of Computerized Nursing Process in Intensive Care Units.

    PubMed

    Dal Sasso, Grace Marcon; Barra, Daniela Couto Carvalho

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this work was to measure the cognitive workload to complete printed nursing process versus computerized nursing process from International Classification Practice of Nursing in intensive care units. It is a quantitative, before-and-after quasi-experimental design, with a sample of 30 participants. Workload was assessed using National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task-Load Index. Six cognitive categories were measured. The "temporal demand" was the largest contributor to the cognitive workload, and the role of the nursing process in the "performance" category has excelled that of computerized nursing process. It was concluded that computerized nursing process contributes to lower cognitive workload of nurses for being a support system for decision making based on the International Classification Practice of Nursing. The computerized nursing process as a logical structure of the data, information, diagnoses, interventions and results become a reliable option for health improvement of healthcare, because it can enhance nurse safe decision making, with the intent to reduce damage and adverse events to patients in intensive care. PMID:26061562

  16. Computerizing Your Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Rick

    This paper summarizes information about using computer hardware and software to aid in making purchase decisions that are based on user needs. The two major options in hardware are IBM-compatible machines and the Apple Macintosh line. The three basic software applications include word processing, database management, and spreadsheet applications.…

  17. A two-stage clinical decision support system for early recognition and stratification of patients with sepsis: an observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Jason J; Greene, Tracy L; Haley, James M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the diagnostic accuracy of a two-stage clinical decision support system for early recognition and stratification of patients with sepsis. Design Observational cohort study employing a two-stage sepsis clinical decision support to recognise and stratify patients with sepsis. The stage one component was comprised of a cloud-based clinical decision support with 24/7 surveillance to detect patients at risk of sepsis. The cloud-based clinical decision support delivered notifications to the patients’ designated nurse, who then electronically contacted a provider. The second stage component comprised a sepsis screening and stratification form integrated into the patient electronic health record, essentially an evidence-based decision aid, used by providers to assess patients at bedside. Setting Urban, 284 acute bed community hospital in the USA; 16,000 hospitalisations annually. Participants Data on 2620 adult patients were collected retrospectively in 2014 after the clinical decision support was implemented. Main outcome measure ‘Suspected infection’ was the established gold standard to assess clinical decision support clinimetric performance. Results A sepsis alert activated on 417 (16%) of 2620 adult patients hospitalised. Applying ‘suspected infection’ as standard, the patient population characteristics showed 72% sensitivity and 73% positive predictive value. A postalert screening conducted by providers at bedside of 417 patients achieved 81% sensitivity and 94% positive predictive value. Providers documented against 89% patients with an alert activated by clinical decision support and completed 75% of bedside screening and stratification of patients with sepsis within one hour from notification. Conclusion A clinical decision support binary alarm system with cross-checking functionality improves early recognition and facilitates stratification of patients with sepsis. PMID:26688744

  18. Clinical Decision Support and Perioperative Peripheral Nerve Injury: A Quality Improvement Project.

    PubMed

    Bouyer-Ferullo, Sharon; Androwich, Ida M; Dykes, Patricia C

    2015-06-01

    Decision support at the point of care has been demonstrated to be an effective tool in providing a safe environment and improving patient outcomes. The operating room is typically an area where advanced technology is introduced to nurses on a regular basis. This quality improvement project focused on preventing a peripheral nerve injury, which is an example of a postoperative adverse event that is considered preventable. Injury of a peripheral nerve is the result of compression, hyperextension, flexion, or ischemia surrounding the nerve. The goals for this project were to improve the knowledge of peripheral nerve injury of the operating room nurses, design and implement a peripheral nerve injury assessment screen that could provide decision support within the operating room record, improve the nursing documentation of peripheral nerve injury interventions, and (long term) decrease the incidence of peripheral nerve injury. A decision support screen within the operating room record was designed to supplement the operating room nurse's risk assessment for peripheral nerve injury. The components of this project involved a preliminary and postproject surveys on peripheral nerve injury knowledge, an educational presentation, and a retrospective random review of nursing documentation in the operating room electronic health records. Project results demonstrated a significant increase in nursing documentation of peripheral nerve injury interventions (63%-92%) and a positive attitude toward their exposure to basic decision support (P = .046). Recommendations for future studies and establishing a standardized coding system for peripheral nerve injury identification were identified. PMID:25851559

  19. Patient-reported Outcomes in Randomised Controlled Trials of Prostate Cancer: Methodological Quality and Impact on Clinical Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Efficace, Fabio; Feuerstein, Michael; Fayers, Peter; Cafaro, Valentina; Eastham, James; Pusic, Andrea; Blazeby, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Context Patient-reported outcomes (PRO) data from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are increasingly used to inform patient-centred care as well as clinical and health policy decisions. Objective The main objective of this study was to investigate the methodological quality of PRO assessment in RCTs of prostate cancer (PCa) and to estimate the likely impact of these studies on clinical decision making. Evidence acquisition A systematic literature search of studies was undertaken on main electronic databases to retrieve articles published between January 2004 and March 2012. RCTs were evaluated on a predetermined extraction form, including (1) basic trial demographics and clinical and PRO characteristics; (2) level of PRO reporting based on the recently published recommendations by the International Society for Quality of Life Research; and (3) bias, assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. Studies were systematically analysed to evaluate their relevance for supporting clinical decision making. Evidence synthesis Sixty-five RCTs enrolling a total of 22 071 patients were evaluated, with 31 (48%) in patients with nonmetastatic disease. When a PRO difference between treatments was found, it related in most cases to symptoms only (n = 29, 58%). Although the extent of missing data was generally documented (72% of RCTs), few reported details on statistical handling of this data (18%) and reasons for dropout (35%). Improvements in key methodological aspects over time were found. Thirteen (20%) RCTs were judged as likely to be robust in informing clinical decision making. Higher-quality PRO studies were generally associated with those RCTs that had higher internal validity. Conclusions Including PRO in RCTs of PCa patients is critical for better evaluating the treatment effectiveness of new therapeutic approaches. Marked improvements in PRO quality reporting over time were found, and it is estimated that at least one-fifth of PRO RCTs have provided sufficient details to allow health policy makers and physicians to make critical appraisals of results. Patient summary In this report, we have investigated the methodological quality of PCa trials that have included a PRO assessment. We conclude that including PRO is critical to better evaluating the treatment effectiveness of new therapeutic approaches from the patient's perspective. Also, at least one-fifth of PRO RCTs in PCa have provided sufficient details to allow health policy makers and physicians to make a critical appraisal of results. PMID:24210091

  20. Preserving residual renal function in dialysis patients: an update on evidence to assist clinical decision making

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Jens Dam; Peters, Christian Daugaard; Jespersen, Bente

    2011-01-01

    It has been documented that preservation of residual renal function in dialysis patients improves quality of life as well as survival. Clinical trials on strategies to preserve residual renal function are clearly lacking. While waiting for more results from clinical trials, patients will benefit from clinicians being aware of available knowledge. The aim of this review was to offer an update on current evidence assisting doctors in clinical practice. PMID:25949486

  1. Evaluating the Clinical Impact of a Genomic Classifier in Prostate Cancer Using Individualized Decision Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Jennifer Mason; Dicker, Adam P.; Buerki, Christine; Daviconi, Elai; Karnes, R. Jeffrey; Jenkins, Robert B.; Patel, Nirav; Den, Robert B.; Showalter, Timothy N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Currently there is controversy surrounding the optimal way to treat patients with prostate cancer in the post-prostatectomy setting. Adjuvant therapies carry possible benefits of improved curative results, but there is uncertainty in which patients should receive adjuvant therapy. There are concerns about giving toxicity to a whole population for the benefit of only a subset. We hypothesized that making post-prostatectomy treatment decisions using genomics-based risk prediction estimates would improve cancer and quality of life outcomes. Methods We developed a state-transition model to simulate outcomes over a 10 year horizon for a cohort of post-prostatectomy patients. Outcomes included cancer progression rates at 5 and 10 years, overall survival, and quality-adjusted survival with reductions for treatment, side effects, and cancer stage. We compared outcomes using population-level versus individual-level risk of cancer progression, and for genomics-based care versus usual care treatment recommendations. Results Cancer progression outcomes, expected life-years (LYs), and expected quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were significantly different when individual genomics-based cancer progression risk estimates were used in place of population-level risk estimates. Use of the genomic classifier to guide treatment decisions provided small, but statistically significant, improvements in model outcomes. We observed an additional 0.03 LYs and 0.07 QALYs, a 12% relative increase in the 5-year recurrence-free survival probability, and a 4% relative reduction in the 5-year probability of metastatic disease or death. Conclusions The use of genomics-based risk prediction to guide treatment decisions may improve outcomes for prostate cancer patients. This study offers a framework for individualized decision analysis, and can be extended to incorporate a wide range of personal attributes to enable delivery of patient-centered tools for informed decision-making. PMID:25837660

  2. Documentation of Nursing Practice Using a Computerized Medical Information System

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Carol

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses a definition of the content of the computerized nursing data base developed by the Nursing Department for the Clinical Center Medical Information System at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. The author describes the theoretical framework for the content and presents a model to describe the organization of the nursing data components in relation to the process of nursing care delivery. Nursing documentation requirements of Nurse Practice Acts, American Nurses Association Standards of Practice and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals are also addressed as they relate to this data base. The advantages and disadvantages of such an approach to computerized documentation are discussed.

  3. A clinical decision support system for integrating tuberculosis and HIV care in Kenya: a human-centered design approach.

    PubMed

    Catalani, Caricia; Green, Eric; Owiti, Philip; Keny, Aggrey; Diero, Lameck; Yeung, Ada; Israelski, Dennis; Biondich, Paul

    2014-01-01

    With the aim of integrating HIV and tuberculosis care in rural Kenya, a team of researchers, clinicians, and technologists used the human-centered design approach to facilitate design, development, and deployment processes of new patient-specific TB clinical decision support system for medical providers. In Kenya, approximately 1.6 million people are living with HIV and have a 20-times higher risk of dying of tuberculosis. Although tuberculosis prevention and treatment medication is widely available, proven to save lives, and prioritized by the World Health Organization, ensuring that it reaches the most vulnerable communities remains challenging. Human-centered design, used in the fields of industrial design and information technology for decades, is an approach to improving the effectiveness and impact of innovations that has been scarcely used in the health field. Using this approach, our team followed a 3-step process, involving mixed methods assessment to (1) understand the situation through the collection and analysis of site observation sessions and key informant interviews; (2) develop a new clinical decision support system through iterative prototyping, end-user engagement, and usability testing; and, (3) implement and evaluate the system across 24 clinics in rural West Kenya. Through the application of this approach, we found that human-centered design facilitated the process of digital innovation in a complex and resource-constrained context. PMID:25170939

  4. Single-patient (n-of-1) trials: a pragmatic clinical decision methodology for patient-centered comparative effectiveness research

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Naihua; Kravitz, Richard L.; Schmid, Christopher H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To raise awareness among clinicians and epidemiologists that single-patient (n-of-1) trials are potentially useful for informing personalized treatment decisions for patients with chronic conditions. Study Design and Setting We reviewed the clinical and statistical literature on methods and applications of single-patient trials and then critically evaluated the needs for further methodological developments. Results Existing literature reports application of 2,154 single-patient trials in 108 studies for diverse clinical conditions; various recent commentaries advocate for wider application of such trials in clinical decision making. Preliminary evidence from several recent pilot acceptability studies suggests that single-patient trials have the potential for widespread acceptance by patients and clinicians as an effective modality for increasing the therapeutic precision. Bayesian and adaptive statistical methods hold promise for increasing the informational yield of single-patient trials while reducing participant burden, but are not widely used. Personalized applications of single-patient trials can be enhanced through further development and application of methodologies on adaptive trial design, stopping rules, network meta-analysis, washout methods, and methods for communicating trial findings to patients and clinicians. Conclusions Single-patient trials may be poised to emerge as an important part of the methodological armamentarium for comparative effectiveness research and patient-centered outcomes research. By permitting direct estimation of individual treatment effects, they can facilitate finely graded individualized care, enhance therapeutic precision, improve patient outcomes, and reduce costs. PMID:23849149

  5. Construction of a Clinical Decision Support System for Undergoing Surgery Based on Domain Ontology and Rules Reasoning

    PubMed Central

    Bau, Cho-Tsan; Huang, Chung-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To construct a clinical decision support system (CDSS) for undergoing surgery based on domain ontology and rules reasoning in the setting of hospitalized diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: The ontology was created with a modified ontology development method, including specification and conceptualization, formalization, implementation, and evaluation and maintenance. The Protégé–Web Ontology Language editor was used to implement the ontology. Embedded clinical knowledge was elicited to complement the domain ontology with formal concept analysis. The decision rules were translated into JENA format, which JENA can use to infer recommendations based on patient clinical situations. Results: The ontology includes 31 classes and 13 properties, plus 38 JENA rules that were built to generate recommendations. The evaluation studies confirmed the correctness of the ontology, acceptance of recommendations, satisfaction with the system, and usefulness of the ontology for glycemic management of diabetic patients undergoing surgery, especially for domain experts. Conclusions: The contribution of this research is to set up an evidence-based hybrid ontology and an evaluation method for CDSS. The system can help clinicians to achieve inpatient glycemic control in diabetic patients undergoing surgery while avoiding hypoglycemia. PMID:24730353

  6. A Clinical Decision Support System for Integrating Tuberculosis and HIV Care in Kenya: A Human-Centered Design Approach

    PubMed Central

    Catalani, Caricia; Green, Eric; Owiti, Philip; Keny, Aggrey; Diero, Lameck; Yeung, Ada; Israelski, Dennis; Biondich, Paul

    2014-01-01

    With the aim of integrating HIV and tuberculosis care in rural Kenya, a team of researchers, clinicians, and technologists used the human-centered design approach to facilitate design, development, and deployment processes of new patient-specific TB clinical decision support system for medical providers. In Kenya, approximately 1.6 million people are living with HIV and have a 20-times higher risk of dying of tuberculosis. Although tuberculosis prevention and treatment medication is widely available, proven to save lives, and prioritized by the World Health Organization, ensuring that it reaches the most vulnerable communities remains challenging. Human-centered design, used in the fields of industrial design and information technology for decades, is an approach to improving the effectiveness and impact of innovations that has been scarcely used in the health field. Using this approach, our team followed a 3-step process, involving mixed methods assessment to (1) understand the situation through the collection and analysis of site observation sessions and key informant interviews; (2) develop a new clinical decision support system through iterative prototyping, end-user engagement, and usability testing; and, (3) implement and evaluate the system across 24 clinics in rural West Kenya. Through the application of this approach, we found that human-centered design facilitated the process of digital innovation in a complex and resource-constrained context. PMID:25170939

  7. Application of best practice approaches for designing decision support tools: The preparatory education about clinical trials (PRE-ACT) study

    PubMed Central

    Fleisher, Linda; Ruggieri, Dominique G.; Miller, Suzanne M.; Manne, Sharon; Albrecht, Terrance; Buzaglo, Joanne; Collins, Michael A.; Katz, Michael; Kinzy, Tyler G.; Liu, Tasnuva; Manning, Cheri; Charap, Ellen Specker; Millard, Jennifer; Miller, Dawn M.; Poole, David; Raivitch, Stephanie; Roach, Nancy; Ross, Eric A.; Meropol, Neal J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This article describes the rigorous development process and initial feedback of the PRE-ACT (Preparatory Education About Clinical Trials) web-based- intervention designed to improve preparation for decision making in cancer clinical trials. Methods The multi-step process included stakeholder input, formative research, user testing and feedback. Diverse teams (researchers, advocates and developers) participated including content refinement, identification of actors, and development of video scripts. Patient feedback was provided in the final production period and through a vanguard group (N = 100) from the randomized trial. Results Patients/advocates confirmed barriers to cancer clinical trial participation, including lack of awareness and knowledge, fear of side effects, logistical concerns, and mistrust. Patients indicated they liked the tool’s user-friendly nature, the organized and comprehensive presentation of the subject matter, and the clarity of the videos. Conclusion The development process serves as an example of operationalizing best practice approaches and highlights the value of a multi-disciplinary team to develop a theory-based, sophisticated tool that patients found useful in their decision making process. Practice implications Best practice approaches can be addressed and are important to ensure evidence-based tools that are of value to patients and supports the usefulness of a process map in the development of e-health tools. PMID:24813474

  8. Attitudes of Oncologists, Oncology Nurses, and Patients from a Women's Clinic Regarding Medical Decision Making for Older and Younger Breast Cancer Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beisecker, Analee E.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Administered Beisecker Locus of Authority in Decision Making: Breast Cancer survey to 67 oncologists, 94 oncology nurses, and 288 patients from women's clinic. All groups believed that physicians should have dominant role in decision making. Nurses felt that patients should have more input than patients or physicians felt they should. Physicians…

  9. Attitudes of Oncologists, Oncology Nurses, and Patients from a Women's Clinic Regarding Medical Decision Making for Older and Younger Breast Cancer Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beisecker, Analee E.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Administered Beisecker Locus of Authority in Decision Making: Breast Cancer survey to 67 oncologists, 94 oncology nurses, and 288 patients from women's clinic. All groups believed that physicians should have dominant role in decision making. Nurses felt that patients should have more input than patients or physicians felt they should. Physicians…

  10. Confidence and Information Access in Clinical Decision-Making: An Examination of the Cognitive Processes that affect the Information-seeking Behavior of Physicians.

    PubMed

    Uy, Raymonde Charles; Sarmiento, Raymond Francis; Gavino, Alex; Fontelo, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Clinical decision-making involves the interplay between cognitive processes and physicians' perceptions of confidence in the context of their information-seeking behavior. The objectives of the study are: to examine how these concepts interact, to determine whether physician confidence, defined in relation to information need, affects clinical decision-making, and if information access improves decision accuracy. We analyzed previously collected data about resident physicians' perceptions of information need from a study comparing abstracts and full-text articles in clinical decision accuracy. We found that there is a significant relation between confidence and accuracy (?=0.164, p<0.01). We also found various differences in the alignment of confidence and accuracy, demonstrating the concepts of underconfidence and overconfidence across years of clinical experience. Access to online literature also has a significant effect on accuracy (p<0.001). These results highlight possible CDSS strategies to reduce medical errors. PMID:25954424

  11. Application of a computerized environmental information system to master and sector planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    A computerized composite mapping system developed as an aid in the land use decision making process is described. Emphasis is placed on consideration of the environment in urban planning. The presence of alluvium, shallow bedrock, surface water, and vegetation growth are among the environmental factors considered. An analysis of the Shady Grove Sector planning is presented as an example of the use of computerized composite mapping for long range planning.

  12. A COMPUTERIZED OPERATOR SUPPORT SYSTEM PROTOTYPE

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas A. Ulrich; Roger Lew; Ronald L. Boring; Ken Thomas

    2015-03-01

    A computerized operator support system (COSS) is proposed for use in nuclear power plants to assist control room operators in addressing time-critical plant upsets. A COSS is a collection of technologies to assist operators in monitoring overall plant performance and making timely, informed decisions on appropriate control actions for the projected plant condition. A prototype COSS was developed in order to demonstrate the concept and provide a test bed for further research. The prototype is based on four underlying elements consisting of a digital alarm system, computer-based procedures, piping and instrumentation diagram system representations, and a recommender module for mitigation actions. The initial version of the prototype is now operational at the Idaho National Laboratory using the Human System Simulation Laboratory.

  13. Shared Surgical Decision Making and Youth Resilience Correlates of Satisfaction With Clinical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kapp-Simon, Kathleen A; Edwards, Todd; Ruta, Caroline; Bellucci, Claudia Crilly; Aspirnall, Cassandra L; Strauss, Ronald P; Topolski, Tari D; Rumsey, Nichola J; Patrick, Donald L

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with youth satisfaction with surgical procedures performed to address oral cleft or craniofacial conditions (CFCs). It was hypothesized that youth mental health, participation in decision making, perceived consequences of living with a CFC, and coping strategies would be associated with satisfaction with past surgeries. A total of 203 youth between the ages of 11 and 18 years (mean age = 14.5, standard deviation = 2.0, 61% male participants, 78% oral cleft) completed a series of questionnaires measuring depression, self-esteem, participation in decision making, condition severity, negative and positive consequences of having a CFC, coping, and satisfaction with past surgeries. Multiple regression analysis using boot-strapping techniques found that youth participation in decision making, youth perception of positive consequences of having a CFC, and coping accounted for 32% of the variance in satisfaction with past surgeries (P < 0.001). Youth age, sex, and assessment of condition severity were not significantly associated with satisfaction with surgical outcome. Depression, self-esteem, and negative consequences of having a CFC were not associated with satisfaction with past surgeries. Youth should be actively involved in the decision for craniofacial surgery. Youth who were more satisfied with their surgical outcomes also viewed themselves as having gained from the experience of living with a CFC. They felt that having a CFC made them stronger people and they believed that they were more accepting of others and more in touch with others' feelings because of what they had been through. PMID:26114527

  14. Clinical decision-making for repair of spontaneous childbirth trauma: validation of cues and related factors.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, Jane M; Arundell, Fiona; Swain, Julie

    2009-01-01

    From recalled childbirth cases, a series of cues and related factors were previously identified that were used by midwives when making decisions to suture or not suture perineal and associated trauma incurred during spontaneous vaginal delivery. This study aimed to determine the validity of these cues and related factors. A panel of 18 experienced midwives evaluated their content validity using the criteria of "necessity" and "sufficiency." The two main cue categories-"bleeding" and "birth trauma"-were considered by 18 (100%) of the panel members to be necessary to assess. At least 16 (89%) panel members considered the following specific cues necessary to assess: in the bleeding category-type, flow, amount, and effect of application of pressure or ice; in the birth trauma category-trauma sites, trauma types, dimensions of trauma, types of tissue, alignment of tissue, edema, and bruising. Seventeen (94%) panel members considered seven woman-centred related factors that were necessary to assess and 14 (78%) considered the combination of all cues in bleeding, birth trauma, and related factors sufficient for making the decision to suture or not. The availability of these validated cues and related factors has the potential to guide a comprehensive assessment on which the decision to suture or not suture depends. This addition to the domain of midwifery knowledge enables educational preparation of midwives who will have the capacity to more adequately support women in childbirth. PMID:19114241

  15. Null results in clinical trials: the need for a decision-theory approach.

    PubMed Central

    Ciampi, A.; Till, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    A framework is developed to take explicitly into account the conflicting demands of ethics and scientific rigor in the design of clinical trials. The framework recognizes the part played by the clinical-scientific community in the weighing of a new result provided by a clinical trial. To illustrate the usefulness of the framework, a value system is adopted which gives relatively high weight to ethical considerations. The analysis based on this value system reveals some limitations of the present clinical-trials mechanism, especially if success is defined exclusively in terms of cure, and other dimensions of the health system, such as explanatory, care, cost or prevention variables are neglected. On the basis of this analysis, it is suggested that: (a) If randomized clinical trials are to be ethically acceptable, they will necessarily yield a large proportion of null results. (b) Positive results from ethically acceptable clinical trials would be expected to have less impact than null results; unless this is the case, there will be a tendency to encourage false hopes. (c) Trials need not yield entirely null results, provided that attention is not focused exclusively on a single outcome variable. A trial of chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukaemia in adults is used to illustrate the need for new approaches to the planning and design of clinical trials. PMID:6930301

  16. Exploring a Clinically Friendly Web-Based Approach to Clinical Decision Support Linked to the Electronic Health Record: Design Philosophy, Prototype Implementation, and Framework for Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Phipps, Michael; Chatterjee, Sharmila; Rajeevan, Nallakkandi; Levin, Forrest; Frawley, Sandra; Tokuno, Hajime

    2014-01-01

    Background Computer-based clinical decision support (CDS) is an important component of the electronic health record (EHR). As an increasing amount of CDS is implemented, it will be important that this be accomplished in a fashion that assists in clinical decision making without imposing unacceptable demands and burdens upon the provider’s practice. Objective The objective of our study was to explore an approach that allows CDS to be clinician-friendly from a variety of perspectives, to build a prototype implementation that illustrates features of the approach, and to gain experience with a pilot framework for assessment. Methods The paper first discusses the project’s design philosophy and goals. It then describes a prototype implementation (Neuropath/CDS) that explores the approach in the domain of neuropathic pain and in the context of the US Veterans Administration EHR. Finally, the paper discusses a framework for assessing the approach, illustrated by a pilot assessment of Neuropath/CDS. Results The paper describes the operation and technical design of Neuropath/CDS, as well as the results of the pilot assessment, which emphasize the four areas of focus, scope, content, and presentation. Conclusions The work to date has allowed us to explore various design and implementation issues relating to the approach illustrated in Neuropath/CDS, as well as the development and pilot application of a framework for assessment. PMID:25580426

  17. Comparative outcome studies of clinical decision support software: limitations to the practice of evidence-based system acquisition.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, Gaurav Jay; Amber, Kyle T; Goodman, Kenneth W

    2015-04-01

    Clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) assist clinicians with patient diagnosis and treatment. However, inadequate attention has been paid to the process of selecting and buying systems. The diversity of CDSSs, coupled with research obstacles, marketplace limitations, and legal impediments, has thwarted comparative outcome studies and reduced the availability of reliable information and advice for purchasers. We review these limitations and recommend several comparative studies, which were conducted in phases; studies conducted in phases and focused on limited outcomes of safety, efficacy, and implementation in varied clinical settings. Additionally, we recommend the increased availability of guidance tools to assist purchasers with evidence-based purchases. Transparency is necessary in purchasers' reporting of system defects and vendors' disclosure of marketing conflicts of interest to support methodologically sound studies. Taken together, these measures can foster the evolution of evidence-based tools that, in turn, will enable and empower system purchasers to make wise choices and improve the care of patients. PMID:25665704

  18. Recommendations for Standardizing Glucose Reporting and Analysis to Optimize Clinical Decision Making in Diabetes: The Ambulatory Glucose Profile

    PubMed Central

    Bergenstal, Richard M.; Ahmann, Andrew J.; Bailey, Timothy; Beck, Roy W.; Bissen, Joan; Buckingham, Bruce; Deeb, Larry; Dolin, Robert H.; Garg, Satish K.; Goland, Robin; Hirsch, Irl B.; Klonoff, David C.; Kruger, Davida F.; Matfin, Glenn; Mazze, Roger S.; Olson, Beth A.; Parkin, Christopher; Peters, Anne; Powers, Margaret A.; Rodriguez, Henry; Southerland, Phil; Strock, Ellie S.; Tamborlane, William; Wesley, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Underutilization of glucose data and lack of easy and standardized glucose data collection, analysis, visualization, and guided clinical decision making are key contributors to poor glycemic control among individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus. An expert panel of diabetes specialists, facilitated by the International Diabetes Center and sponsored by the Helmsley Charitable Trust, met in 2012 to discuss recommendations for standardizing the analysis and presentation of glucose monitoring data, with the initial focus on data derived from continuous glucose monitoring systems. The panel members were introduced to a universal software report, the Ambulatory Glucose Profile, and asked to provide feedback on its content and functionality, both as a research tool and in clinical settings. This article provides a summary of the topics and issues discussed during the meeting and presents recommendations from the expert panel regarding the need to standardize glucose profile summary metrics and the value of a uniform glucose report to aid clinicians, researchers, and patients. PMID:23567014

  19. Individualized real-time clinical decision support to monitor cardiac loading during venoarterial ECMO.

    PubMed

    Broomé, Michael; Donker, Dirk W

    2016-01-01

    Veno-arterial extracoporeal membrane oxygenation (VA ECMO) is increasingly used for acute and refractory cardiogenic shock. Yet, in clinical practice, monitoring of cardiac loading conditions during VA ECMO can be cumbersome. To this end, we illustrate the validity and clinical applicability of a real-time cardiovascular computer simulation, which allows to integrate hemodynamics, cardiac dimensions and the corresponding degree of VA ECMO support and ventricular loading in individual patients over time. PMID:26739873

  20. Development and psychometric properties of a five-language multiperspective instrument to assess clinical decision making style in the treatment of people with severe mental illness (CDMS)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate psychometric properties of the Clinical Decision Making Style (CDMS) scale which measures general preferences for decision making as well as preferences regarding the provision of information to the patient from the perspectives of people with severe mental illness and staff. Methods A participatory approach was chosen for instrument development which followed 10 sequential steps proposed in a current guideline of good practice for the translation and cultural adaptation of measures. Following item analysis, reliability, validity, and long-term stability of the CDMS were examined using Spearman correlations in a sample of 588 people with severe mental illness and 213 mental health professionals in 6 European countries (Germany, UK, Italy, Denmark, Hungary, and Switzerland). Results In both patient and staff versions, the two CDMS subscales “Participation in Decision Making” and “Information” reliably measure distinct characteristics of decision making. Validity could be demonstrated to some extent, but needs further investigation. Conclusions Together with two other five-language patient- and staff-rated measures developed in the CEDAR study (ISRCTN75841675) – “Clinical Decision Making in Routine Care” and “Clinical Decision Making Involvement and Satisfaction” – the CDMS allows empirical investigation of the complex relation between clinical decision making and outcome in the treatment of people with severe mental illness across Europe. PMID:23379280

  1. Patient-specific simulation as a basis for clinical decision-making.

    PubMed

    Sadiq, S Kashif; Mazzeo, Marco D; Zasada, Stefan J; Manos, Steven; Stoica, Ileana; Gale, Catherine V; Watson, Simon J; Kellam, Paul; Brew, Stefan; Coveney, Peter V

    2008-09-13

    Patient-specific medical simulation holds the promise of determining tailored medical treatment based on the characteristics of an individual patient (for example, using a genotypic assay of a sequence of DNA). Decision-support systems based on patient-specific simulation can potentially revolutionize the way that clinicians plan courses of treatment for various conditions, ranging from viral infections to arterial abnormalities. Basing medical decisions on the results of simulations that use models derived from data specific to the patient in question means that the effectiveness of a range of potential treatments can be assessed before they are actually administered, preventing the patient from experiencing unnecessary or ineffective treatments. We illustrate the potential for patient-specific simulation by first discussing the scale of the evolving international grid infrastructure that is now available to underpin such applications. We then consider two case studies, one concerned with the treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS and the other addressing neuropathologies associated with the intracranial vasculature. Such patient-specific medical simulations require access to both appropriate patient data and the computational resources on which to perform potentially very large simulations. Computational infrastructure providers need to furnish access to a wide range of different types of resource, typically made available through heterogeneous computational grids, and to institute policies that facilitate the performance of patient-specific simulations on those resources. To support these kinds of simulations, where life and death decisions are being made, computational resource providers must give urgent priority to such jobs, for example by allowing them to pre-empt the queue on a machine and run straight away. We describe systems that enable such priority computing. PMID:18573758

  2. Electronic health record: integrating evidence-based information at the point of clinical decision making.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Susan A; Yaeger, Lauren H; Yu, Feliciano; Doerhoff, Dwight; Schoening, Paul; Kelly, Betsy

    2014-01-01

    The authors created two tools to achieve the goals of providing physicians with a way to review alternative diagnoses and improving access to relevant evidence-based library resources without disrupting established workflows. The “diagnostic decision support tool” lifted terms from standard, coded fields in the electronic health record and sent them to Isabel, which produced a list of possible diagnoses. The physicians chose their diagnoses and were presented with the “knowledge page,” a collection of evidence-based library resources. Each resource was automatically populated with search results based on the chosen diagnosis. Physicians responded positively to the “knowledge page.” PMID:24415920

  3. Electronic health record: integrating evidence-based information at the point of clinical decision making*

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Susan A.; Yaeger, Lauren H.; Yu, Feliciano; Doerhoff, Dwight; Schoening, Paul; Kelly, Betsy

    2014-01-01

    The authors created two tools to achieve the goals of providing physicians with a way to review alternative diagnoses and improving access to relevant evidence-based library resources without disrupting established workflows. The “diagnostic decision support tool” lifted terms from standard, coded fields in the electronic health record and sent them to Isabel, which produced a list of possible diagnoses. The physicians chose their diagnoses and were presented with the “knowledge page,” a collection of evidence-based library resources. Each resource was automatically populated with search results based on the chosen diagnosis. Physicians responded positively to the “knowledge page.” PMID:24415920

  4. Using Computational Modeling to Assess the Impact of Clinical Decision Support on Cancer Screening within Community Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Timothy Jay; Morgan, Geoffrey P.; Jones, Josette; McDaniel, Anna M.; Weaver, Michael; Weiner, Bryan; Haggstrom, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Our conceptual model demonstrates our goal to investigate the impact of clinical decision support (CDS) utilization on cancer screening improvement strategies in the community health care (CHC) setting. We employed a dual modeling technique using both statistical and computational modeling to evaluate impact. Our statistical model used the Spearman’s Rho test to evaluate the strength of relationship between our proximal outcome measures (CDS utilization) against our distal outcome measure (provider self-reported cancer screening improvement). Our computational model relied on network evolution theory and made use of a tool called Construct-TM to model the use of CDS measured by the rate of organizational learning. We employed the use of previously collected survey data from community health centers Cancer Health Disparities Collaborative (HDCC). Our intent is to demonstrate the added valued gained by using a computational modeling tool in conjunction with a statistical analysis when evaluating the impact a health information technology, in the form of CDS, on health care quality process outcomes such as facility-level screening improvement. Significant simulated disparities in organizational learning over time were observed between community health centers beginning the simulation with high and low clinical decision support capability. PMID:24953241

  5. Decision tree-based method for integrating gene expression, demographic, and clinical data to determine disease endotypes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Complex diseases are often difficult to diagnose, treat and study due to the multi-factorial nature of the underlying etiology. Large data sets are now widely available that can be used to define novel, mechanistically distinct disease subtypes (endotypes) in a completely data-driven manner. However, significant challenges exist with regard to how to segregate individuals into suitable subtypes of the disease and understand the distinct biological mechanisms of each when the goal is to maximize the discovery potential of these data sets. Results A multi-step decision tree-based method is described for defining endotypes based on gene expression, clinical covariates, and disease indicators using childhood asthma as a case study. We attempted to use alternative approaches such as the Student’s t-test, single data domain clustering and the Modk-prototypes algorithm, which incorporates multiple data domains into a single analysis and none performed as well as the novel multi-step decision tree method. This new method gave the best segregation of asthmatics and non-asthmatics, and it provides easy access to all genes and clinical covariates that distinguish the groups. Conclusions The multi-step decision tree method described here will lead to better understanding of complex disease in general by allowing purely data-driven disease endotypes to facilitate the discovery of new mechanisms underlying these diseases. This application should be considered a complement to ongoing efforts to better define and diagnose known endotypes. When coupled with existing methods developed to determine the genetics of gene expression, these methods provide a mechanism for linking genetics and exposomics data and thereby accounting for both major determinants of disease. PMID:24188919

  6. Arkansas' Curriculum Guide. Competency Based Computerized Accounting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock. Div. of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    This guide contains the essential parts of a total curriculum for a one-year secondary-level course in computerized accounting. Addressed in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: the complete accounting cycle, computer operations for accounting, computerized accounting and general ledgers, computerized accounts payable,…

  7. Arkansas' Curriculum Guide. Competency Based Computerized Accounting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock. Div. of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    This guide contains the essential parts of a total curriculum for a one-year secondary-level course in computerized accounting. Addressed in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: the complete accounting cycle, computer operations for accounting, computerized accounting and general ledgers, computerized accounts payable,…

  8. Cognitive elements in clinical decision-making: toward a cognitive model for medical education and understanding clinical reasoning.

    PubMed

    Dunphy, Bruce C; Cantwell, Robert; Bourke, Sid; Fleming, Mark; Smith, Bruce; Joseph, K S; Dunphy, Stacey L

    2010-05-01

    Physician cognition, metacognition and affect may have an impact upon the quality of clinical reasoning. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between measures of physician metacognition and affect and patient outcomes in obstetric practice. Reflective coping (RC), proactive coping, need for cognition (NFC), tolerance for ambiguity, state-trait anxiety and metacognitive awareness were assessed for obstetricians (n = 12) who provided intra-partum care to 4,149 women. Outcome measures included delivery mode and intrapartum asphyxia. Analysis was carried out using logistic regression and tree-based classification. Obstetricians with high RC scores were more likely to perform a caesarean section (OR 1.59, p < 0.0001), less likely undertake a mid-forceps or low forceps delivery (OR 0.41, p < 0.0001; OR 0.49, p < 0.0001), and more likely to supervise a spontaneous vaginal delivery (OR 1.17, p = 0.08). Obstetricians with high NFC scores were more likely to perform a caesarean section (OR 1.53, p = 0.03), more likely to undertake a vacuum delivery (OR 5.8, p = 0.001), less likely undertake a mid-forceps delivery (OR 0.45, p = 0.02) and less likely to supervise a spontaneous vaginal delivery (OR 0.47, p < 0.0001). Obstetricians high in trait anxiety were more likely to perform a mid forceps delivery (OR 2.49, p = 0.01) or a vacuum delivery (OR 5.08, p = 0.003), and less likely to supervise a spontaneous vaginal delivery (OR 0.38, p < 0.0001). NFC was negatively associated (OR 0.10, p < 0.001) and trait anxiety was positively associated with intrapartum asphyxia (p < 0.05, rho = 0.582). In summary, physician cognitive processes and affect have a significant impact on patient outcomes, particularly in situations where there is a higher level of clinical unpredictability. PMID:19763856

  9. An HL7-CDA wrapper for facilitating semantic interoperability to rule-based Clinical Decision Support Systems.

    PubMed

    Sáez, Carlos; Bresó, Adrián; Vicente, Javier; Robles, Montserrat; García-Gómez, Juan Miguel

    2013-03-01

    The success of Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) greatly depends on its capability of being integrated in Health Information Systems (HIS). Several proposals have been published up to date to permit CDSS gathering patient data from HIS. Some base the CDSS data input on the HL7 reference model, however, they are tailored to specific CDSS or clinical guidelines technologies, or do not focus on standardizing the CDSS resultant knowledge. We propose a solution for facilitating semantic interoperability to rule-based CDSS focusing on standardized input and output documents conforming an HL7-CDA wrapper. We define the HL7-CDA restrictions in a HL7-CDA implementation guide. Patient data and rule inference results are mapped respectively to and from the CDSS by means of a binding method based on an XML binding file. As an independent clinical document, the results of a CDSS can present clinical and legal validity. The proposed solution is being applied in a CDSS for providing patient-specific recommendations for the care management of outpatients with diabetes mellitus. PMID:23199936

  10. Impact of Health Information Exchange on Emergency Medicine Clinical Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Bradley D.; Bernard, Kyle; Salzman, Josh; Whitebird, Robin R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The objective of the study was to understand the immediate utility of health information exchange (HIE) on emergency department (ED) providers by interviewing them shortly after the information was retrieved. Prior studies of physician perceptions regarding HIE have only been performed outside of the care environment. Methods Trained research assistants interviewed resident physicians, physician assistants and attending physicians using a semi-structured questionnaire within two hours of making a HIE request. The responses were recorded, then transcribed for qualitative analysis. The transcribed interviews were analyzed for emerging qualitative themes. Results We analyzed 40 interviews obtained from 29 providers. Primary qualitative themes discovered included the following: drivers for requests for outside information; the importance of unexpected information; historical lab values as reference points; providing context when determining whether to admit or discharge a patient; the importance of information in refining disposition; improved confidence of provider; and changes in decisions for diagnostic imaging. Conclusion ED providers are driven to use HIE when they’re missing a known piece of information. This study finds two additional impacts not previously reported. First, providers sometimes find additional unanticipated useful information, supporting a workflow that lowers the threshold to request external information. Second, providers sometimes report utility when no changes to their existing plan are made as their confidence is increased based on external records. Our findings are concordant with previous studies in finding exchanged information is useful to provide context for interpreting lab results, making admission decisions, and prevents repeat diagnostic imaging. PMID:26759652

  11. Actionable clinical decisions based on comprehensive genomic evaluation in asymptomatic adults

    PubMed Central

    Pillar, Nir; Isakov, Ofer; Weissglas-Volkov, Daphna; Botchan, Shay; Friedman, Eitan; Arber, Nadir; Shomron, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing (WES) arises as a new approach in diagnosing individuals affected by multigenic and complex phenotypes. Herein, we aim to examine whether WES is useful in screening asymptomatic individuals for actionable interventions, which has not yet been established. Twenty-five healthy adults underwent WES, bioinformatics, and manual curation of their exomes. Six participants (24%) harbored significant, management-changing variants in cancer predisposition genes, American College of Medical Genetics, and genomics reportable cardiac diseases and pharmacogenomic biomarkers that have led to clinical recommendations and interventions. Furthermore, more than 80% of the participants (21) carried 1–3 genetic variants with an associated clinical guideline for an altered drug dosing or administration based on the FDA’s table of pharmacogenomics. These results support WES potential not only to answer specific diagnostic questions presented by the relevant personal and/or family history but also to uncover clinically important genetic findings unrelated to the primary indication for sequencing. PMID:26436109

  12. Clinical, pathological and molecular prognostic factors in prostate cancer decision-making process.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, Dario; Palermo, Giuseppe; Totaro, Angelo; Bassi, Pier Francesco; Pinto, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common urologic neoplasm and the second leading cause of cancer-related death among men in many developed countries. Given the highly heterogeneous behaviour of the disease, there is a great need for prognostic factors, in order to stratify the clinical risk and give the best treatment options to the patient. Clinical factors, such as prostate-specific antigen value and derivatives, and pathological factors, such as stage and Gleason grading, are well kown prognostic factors. Nomograms can provide useful prediction in each clinical sceario. The field of molecular biomarkers is briskly evolving towards personalized medicine. TMPRSS2-ERG fusion, deletion of PTEN ed and gene panels are some of the more extensively explored molecular features in prostate cancer outcome prediction. In the near future, circulating tumour cells, exosomes and microRNAs could give us further, not invasive important tools. PMID:26917215

  13. Computerized Cognitive Testing in the Management of Youth Sports-Related Concussion.

    PubMed

    De Marco, Anthony P; Broshek, Donna K

    2016-01-01

    Computerized neurocognitive testing has become a growing practice across medical populations, but particularly within sports medicine and the management of sports-related concussion. Although traditional neuropsychological measures are solely administered and interpreted by neuropsychologists, computerized cognitive tests are marketed to and utilized by a wide range of professionals involved in the management of sports-related concussions, many of whom lack specialized psychometric training. Although the benefits of computerized testing allow for many youth athletes to be evaluated quickly, professionals implementing their use should be aware of the potential pitfalls and the high potential for misuse. After briefly reviewing the recommended guidelines set forth by the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology and the National Academy of Neuropsychology, we review the benefits/limitations of computerized testing in the management of sports-related concussion and the basic psychometric properties of some of the more widely used computerized measures. Lastly, we discuss the practical application of these devices. PMID:25477270

  14. Student Perceptions of Computerized Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pino-Silva, Juan

    2008-01-01

    The challenge to test small groups by means of microcomputers demands appropriate software design and sound test design. To comply with this demand, students' beliefs or perceptions on the advantages and disadvantages of a computerized test were tapped. Overall, self-reported advantages outnumbered disadvantages to a significant degree. This was…

  15. Computerized Proof Techniques for Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Christopher J.; Tefera, Akalu; Zeleke, Aklilu

    2012-01-01

    The use of computer algebra systems such as Maple and Mathematica is becoming increasingly important and widespread in mathematics learning, teaching and research. In this article, we present computerized proof techniques of Gosper, Wilf-Zeilberger and Zeilberger that can be used for enhancing the teaching and learning of topics in discrete…

  16. Computerizing a High School Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whelan, Errol A.; Chan, Jeanie

    1988-01-01

    Describes how the Swift-Current Comprehensive High School (Saskatchewan) library computerized to create an online catalog, provide access to remote databases, and acquire CD-ROM reference systems. Objectives, hardware and software selection and costs, implementation, and evaluation are discussed. Seven references are listed, and a directory of…

  17. Computerized Legal Research. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Michael

    A project was undertaken to develop a curriculum for a course in computerized legal education that could be used at Highline Community College in Midway, Washington. As part of the curriculum development effort, project staff reviewed relevant literature, visited colleagues at the University of Washington and the University of Puget Sound Law…

  18. Function Recognition and Computerized Graphing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, John

    1991-01-01

    General physics students have difficulties interpreting experimental data and finding mathematical functions that produce curves resembling typical data. Proposes utilizing computer programs that generate graphs to develop function-recognition and curve-fitting skills. Discusses advantages of computerized curve fitting. (MDH)

  19. Computerized Legal Research. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Michael

    A project was undertaken to develop a curriculum for a course in computerized legal education that could be used at Highline Community College in Midway, Washington. As part of the curriculum development effort, project staff reviewed relevant literature, visited colleagues at the University of Washington and the University of Puget Sound Law…

  20. Computerized Adaptive Measurements of Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, William R.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Implemented computerized adaptive testing (CAT) to measure students' attitudes toward alcohol. Administered a paper-and-pencil version and a CAT version of an attitudes toward alcohol scale to 113 undergraduates enrolled in health education classes. Findings showed a high correlation between scores from the CAT and the paper-and-pencil versions.…

  1. Computerized Systems: Centralized or Decentralized?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seitz, Linda Ludington

    1985-01-01

    Computerized management information systems have long been used in business, and data integration and sophisticated programing now enable many businesses to decentralize their information operations. This approach has advantages and disadvantages that colleges and universities must weigh and plan for carefully. (MSE)

  2. Computerized Proof Techniques for Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Christopher J.; Tefera, Akalu; Zeleke, Aklilu

    2012-01-01

    The use of computer algebra systems such as Maple and Mathematica is becoming increasingly important and widespread in mathematics learning, teaching and research. In this article, we present computerized proof techniques of Gosper, Wilf-Zeilberger and Zeilberger that can be used for enhancing the teaching and learning of topics in discrete…

  3. Student Perceptions of Computerized Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pino-Silva, Juan

    2008-01-01

    The challenge to test small groups by means of microcomputers demands appropriate software design and sound test design. To comply with this demand, students' beliefs or perceptions on the advantages and disadvantages of a computerized test were tapped. Overall, self-reported advantages outnumbered disadvantages to a significant degree. This was…

  4. Should I Pack My Umbrella? Clinical versus Statistical Prediction of Mental Health Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aegisdottir, Stefania; Spengler, Paul M.; White, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    In this rejoinder, the authors respond to the insightful commentary of Strohmer and Arm, Chwalisz, and Hilton, Harris, and Rice about the meta-analysis on statistical versus clinical prediction techniques for mental health judgments. The authors address issues including the availability of statistical prediction techniques for real-life psychology…

  5. Targeting and Structuring Information Resource Use: A Path toward Informed Clinical Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangrulkar, Rajesh S.

    2004-01-01

    A core skill for all physicians to master is that of information manager. Despite a rapidly expanding set of electronic and print-based information resources, clinicians continue to answer their clinical queries predominantly through informal or formal consultation. Even as new tools are brought to market, the majority of them present information…

  6. Evidence-Based Decision about Test Scoring Rules in Clinical Anatomy Multiple-Choice Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severo, Milton; Gaio, A. Rita; Povo, Ana; Silva-Pereira, Fernanda; Ferreira, Maria Amélia

    2015-01-01

    In theory the formula scoring methods increase the reliability of multiple-choice tests in comparison with number-right scoring. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of the formula scoring method in clinical anatomy multiple-choice examinations, and to compare it with that from the number-right scoring method, hoping to achieve an…

  7. Calibrating for Comorbidity: Clinical Decision-Making in Youth Depression and Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Brian C.; Merson, Rachel A.; Zandberg, Laurie J.; Areizaga, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Comorbidity in clinical youth populations is more the rule than the exception, yet few established guidelines exist to help practicing clinicians manage complex diagnostic profiles. The current paper reviews efforts within the treatment development literature to handle comorbidity in depressed and anxious children and adolescents, including…

  8. Targeting and Structuring Information Resource Use: A Path toward Informed Clinical Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangrulkar, Rajesh S.

    2004-01-01

    A core skill for all physicians to master is that of information manager. Despite a rapidly expanding set of electronic and print-based information resources, clinicians continue to answer their clinical queries predominantly through informal or formal consultation. Even as new tools are brought to market, the majority of them present information…

  9. Impact of a Clinical Decision Model for Febrile Children at Risk for Serious Bacterial Infections at the Emergency Department: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    de Vos-Kerkhof, Evelien; Nijman, Ruud G.; Vergouwe, Yvonne; Polinder, Suzanne; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; van der Lei, Johan; Moll, Henriëtte A.; Oostenbrink, Rianne

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the impact of a clinical decision model for febrile children at risk for serious bacterial infections (SBI) attending the emergency department (ED). Methods Randomized controlled trial with 439 febrile children, aged 1 month-16 years, attending the pediatric ED of a Dutch university hospital during 2010-2012. Febrile children were randomly assigned to the intervention (clinical decision model; n=219) or the control group (usual care; n=220). The clinical decision model included clinical symptoms, vital signs, and C-reactive protein and provided high/low-risks for “pneumonia” and “other SBI”. Nurses were guided by the intervention to initiate additional tests for high-risk children. The clinical decision model was evaluated by 1) area-under-the-receiver-operating-characteristic-curve (AUC) to indicate discriminative ability and 2) feasibility, to measure nurses’ compliance to model recommendations. Primary patient outcome was defined as correct SBI diagnoses. Secondary process outcomes were defined as length of stay; diagnostic tests; antibiotic treatment; hospital admission; revisits and medical costs. Results The decision model had good discriminative ability for both pneumonia (n=33; AUC 0.83 (95% CI 0.75-0.90)) and other SBI (n=22; AUC 0.81 (95% CI 0.72-0.90)). Compliance to model recommendations was high (86%). No differences in correct SBI determination were observed. Application of the clinical decision model resulted in less full-blood-counts (14% vs. 22%, p-value<0.05) and more urine-dipstick testing (71% vs. 61%, p-value<0.05). Conclusions In contrast to our expectations no substantial impact on patient outcome was perceived. The clinical decision model preserved, however, good discriminatory ability to detect SBI, achieved good compliance among nurses and resulted in a more standardized diagnostic approach towards febrile children, with less full blood-counts and more rightfully urine-dipstick testing. Trial Registration Nederlands Trial Register NTR2381 PMID:26024532

  10. Diagnostic thinking and information used in clinical decision-making: a qualitative study of expert and student dental clinicians

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It is uncertain whether the range and frequency of Diagnostic Thinking Processes (DTP) and pieces of information (concepts) involved in dental restorative treatment planning are different between students and expert clinicians. Methods We video-recorded dental visits with one standardized patient. Clinicians were subsequently interviewed and their cognitive strategies explored using guide questions; interviews were also recorded. Both visit and interview were content-analyzed, following the Gale and Marsden model for clinical decision-making. Limited tests used to contrast data were t, ?2, and Fisher's. Scott's ? was used to determine inter-coder reliability. Results Fifteen dentists and 17 senior dental students participated in visits lasting 32.0 minutes (± 12.9) among experts, and 29.9 ± 7.1 among students; contact time with patient was 26.4 ± 13.9 minutes (experts), and 22.2 ± 7.5 (students). The time elapsed between the first and the last instances of the clinician looking in the mouth was similar between experts and students. Ninety eight types of pieces of information were used in combinations with 12 DTPs. The main differences found in DTP utilization had dentists conducting diagnostic interpretations of findings with sufficient certainty to be considered definitive twice as often as students. Students resorted more often to more general or clarifying enquiry in their search for information than dentists. Conclusions Differences in diagnostic strategies and concepts existed within clearly delimited types of cognitive processes; such processes were largely compatible with the analytic and (in particular) non-analytic approaches to clinical decision-making identified in the medical field. Because we were focused on a clinical presentation primarily made up of non-emergency treatment needs, use of other DTPs and concepts might occur when clinicians evaluate emergency treatment needs, complex rehabilitative cases, and/or medically compromised patients. PMID:20465826

  11. Clinical impact of treatment timing for chronic hepatitis C infection: a decision model

    PubMed Central

    Pho, M T; Jensen, D M; Meltzer, D O; Kim, A Y; Linas, B P

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection have led to the availability of both highly efficacious interferon-containing and interferon-sparing regimens. However, the use of such therapies faces restrictions due to high costs. For patients who are medically eligible to receive interferon, the choice between the two will likely be impacted by preferences surrounding interferon, severity of disease, coverage policies and out-of-pocket costs. We developed a decision model to quantify the trade-offs between immediate, interferon-containing therapy and delayed, interferon-free therapy for patients with chronic, genotype 1 HCV infection. We projected the quality-adjusted life expectancy stratified by the presence or absence of cirrhosis for four strategies: (i) no treatment; (ii) immediate, one-time treatment with an interferon-containing regimen; (iii) immediate treatment as above with the opportunity for retreatment in patients who fail to achieve sustained virologic response with interferon-free therapy in 1 year; and (iv) delayed therapy with interferon-free therapy in 1 year. When compared to one-time immediate treatment with the interferon-containing regimen, delayed treatment with the interferon-free regimen in 1 year resulted in longer life expectancy, with a 0.2 quality-adjusted life year (QALY) increase in noncirrhotic patients, and a 1.1 QALY increase in patients with cirrhosis. This superiority in health benefits was lost when wait time for interferon-free therapy was greater than 3–3.2 years. In this modelling analysis, interferon-free therapy resulted in superior health benefits compared to immediate therapy with interferon until wait time exceeded 3–3.2 years. Such data can inform decision-making regarding treatment initiation for HCV as healthcare financing evolves. PMID:26135026

  12. Clinical impact of treatment timing for chronic hepatitis C infection: a decision model.

    PubMed

    Pho, M T; Jensen, D M; Meltzer, D O; Kim, A Y; Linas, B P

    2015-08-01

    Recent advances in the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection have led to the availability of both highly efficacious interferon-containing and interferon-sparing regimens. However, the use of such therapies faces restrictions due to high costs. For patients who are medically eligible to receive interferon, the choice between the two will likely be impacted by preferences surrounding interferon, severity of disease, coverage policies and out-of-pocket costs. We developed a decision model to quantify the trade-offs between immediate, interferon-containing therapy and delayed, interferon-free therapy for patients with chronic, genotype 1 HCV infection. We projected the quality-adjusted life expectancy stratified by the presence or absence of cirrhosis for four strategies: (i) no treatment; (ii) immediate, one-time treatment with an interferon-containing regimen; (iii) immediate treatment as above with the opportunity for retreatment in patients who fail to achieve sustained virologic response with interferon-free therapy in 1 year; and (iv) delayed therapy with interferon-free therapy in 1 year. When compared to one-time immediate treatment with the interferon-containing regimen, delayed treatment with the interferon-free regimen in 1 year resulted in longer life expectancy, with a 0.2 quality-adjusted life year (QALY) increase in noncirrhotic patients, and a 1.1 QALY increase in patients with cirrhosis. This superiority in health benefits was lost when wait time for interferon-free therapy was greater than 3-3.2 years. In this modelling analysis, interferon-free therapy resulted in superior health benefits compared to immediate therapy with interferon until wait time exceeded 3-3.2 years. Such data can inform decision-making regarding treatment initiation for HCV as healthcare financing evolves. PMID:26135026

  13. Clinical Decision Making With Myocardial Perfusion Imaging in Patients With Known or Suspected Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cremer, Paul; Hachamovitch, Rory; Tamarappoo, Balaji

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) to diagnose coronary artery disease (CAD) is best performed in patients with intermediate pretest likelihood of disease; unfortunately, pretest likelihood is often overestimated, resulting in the inappropriate use of perfusion imaging. A good functional capacity often predicts low risk, and MPI for diagnosing CAD should be reserved for individuals with poor exercise capacity, abnormal resting electrocardiography, or an intermediate or high probability of CAD. With respect to anatomy-based testing, coronary CT angiography has a good negative predictive value, but stenosis severity correlates poorly with ischemia. Therefore decision making with respect to revascularization may be limited when a purely noninvasive anatomical test is used. Regarding perfusion imaging, the diagnostic accuracies of SPECT, PET, and cardiac magnetic resonance are similar, though fewer studies are available with cardiac magnetic resonance. PET coronary flow reserve may offer a negative predictive value sufficiently high to exclude severe CAD such that patients with mild to moderate reversible perfusion defects can forego invasive angiography. In addition, combined anatomical and perfusion-based imaging may eventually offer a definitive evaluation for diagnosing CAD, even in higher risk patients. Any remarkable findings on single-photon emission computed tomography and PET MPI studies are valuable for prognostication. Furthermore, assessment of myocardial blood flow with PET is particularly powerful for prognostication as it reflects the end result of many processes that lead to atherosclerosis. Decision making with respect to revascularization is limited for cardiac MRI and PET MPI. In contrast, retrospective radionuclide studies have identified an ischemic threshold, but randomized trials are needed. In patients with at least moderately reduced left ventricular systolic function, viable myocardium as assessed by PET or MRI, appears to identify patients who benefit from revascularization, but well-executed randomized trials are lacking. PMID:24948154

  14. Patients’ preoperative perspectives concerning the decision to undergo total knee arthroplasty and comparison of their clinical assessments

    PubMed Central

    Akbaba, Y?ld?z Analay; Yeldan, ?pek; Özdinçler, Arzu Razak; Güney, Nejat

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aims of our study were, 1. to assess pain, limitation of movement ability, and functionality in osteoarthritis patients scheduled to undergo total knee arthroplasty, 2. to determine if pain (Group 1) or function loss (Group 2) has a greater influence on the decision of patients to have surgery, and 3. to compare results between Group 1 and Group 2. [Subject and Methods] Fifty-five osteoarthritis patients classified as grades 3 and 4 according to the Kellgren-Lawrence system of classification were evaluated for preoperative pain intensity with the Visual Analogue Scale, knee flexion/extension range of movement with a clinical goniometer, and function with the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index. Patients were examined to reveal their reasons regarding the decision to undergo total knee arthroplasty (pain or function loss). [Results] The Visual Analog Scale scores at rest and during activity were 5.62 and 7.42, the knee flexion range of movement and extension limitation were 93.17° and ?7.04°, and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index value was 82.09. Regarding the decision to undergo surgery, 47.3% (n=26) of the knees were in Group 1, and 52.7% were in Group 2; the two groups were not significantly different. There were also no significant differences between the groups in Visual Analog Scale score during activity, the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index value, and knee flexion range of movement and extension limitation. The only statistically significant difference was found in the Visual Analog Scale score at rest in Group 1, which was significantly higher than that in Group 2. [Conclusion] Our results showed that osteoarthritis patients decided to undergo surgery only if all of the parameters were impaired significantly. Both pain and function loss have a similar impact on a patient’s decision to undergo surgery. We observed no significant difference in clinical and self-reported outcomes between patients who decided to undergo surgery due to pain or function loss. PMID:26357433

  15. Prognosis of multiple sclerosis: clinical factors predicting the late evolution for an early treatment decision.

    PubMed

    Bergamaschi, Roberto

    2006-03-01

    With the development of new immunomodulating therapies, with which early use is strongly encouraged, it is crucial to be in possession of reliable clinical predictors of multiple sclerosis evolution. Prognostic factors are important to patients wanting to be informed about their prospects; to the clinician needing to individualize patients requiring immune treatments at an early stage of the disease; and also to the researcher needing to to improve the design and analysis of the clinical therapeutic trials and observational studies. Frequentist analyses have indicated a poor prognosis for male gender, late age at onset, motor, cerebellar and sphincter involvement at onset, progressive course at onset, short inter-attack interval, high number of early attacks; and a relevant early residual disability. A recent application of a Bayesian analysis led to the construction of more detailed models of the natural history of multiple sclerosis and the estimated risk of unfavorable evolution at an individual patient level. PMID:16533140

  16. An RDF/OWL Knowledge Base for Query Answering and Decision Support in Clinical Pharmacogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Samwald, Matthias; Freimuth, Robert; Luciano, Joanne S.; Lin, Simon; Powers, Robert L.; Marshall, M. Scott; Adlassnig, Klaus-Peter; Dumontier, Michel; Boyce, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic testing for personalizing pharmacotherapy is bound to become an important part of clinical routine. To address associated issues with data management and quality, we are creating a semantic knowledge base for clinical pharmacogenetics. The knowledge base is made up of three components: an expressive ontology formalized in the Web Ontology Language (OWL 2 DL), a Resource Description Framework (RDF) model for capturing detailed results of manual annotation of pharmacogenomic information in drug product labels, and an RDF conversion of relevant biomedical datasets. Our work goes beyond the state of the art in that it makes both automated reasoning as well as query answering as simple as possible, and the reasoning capabilities go beyond the capabilities of previously described ontologies. PMID:23920613

  17. Development and initial evaluation of a treatment decision dashboard

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background For many healthcare decisions, multiple alternatives are available with different combinations of advantages and disadvantages across several important dimensions. The complexity of current healthcare decisions thus presents a significant barrier to informed decision making, a key element of patient-centered care. Interactive decision dashboards were developed to facilitate decision making in Management, a field marked by similarly complicated choices. These dashboards utilize data visualization techniques to reduce the cognitive effort needed to evaluate decision alternatives and a non-linear flow of information that enables users to review information in a self-directed fashion. Theoretically, both of these features should facilitate informed decision making by increasing user engagement with and understanding of the decision at hand. We sought to determine if the interactive decision dashboard format can be successfully adapted to create a clinically realistic prototype patient decision aid suitable for further evaluation and refinement. Methods We created a computerized, interactive clinical decision dashboard and performed a pilot test of its clinical feasibility and acceptability using a multi-method analysis. The dashboard summarized information about the effectiveness, risks of side effects and drug-drug interactions, out-of-pocket costs, and ease of use of nine analgesic treatment options for knee osteoarthritis. Outcome evaluations included observations of how study participants utilized the dashboard, questionnaires to assess usability, acceptability, and decisional conflict, and an open-ended qualitative analysis. Results The study sample consisted of 25 volunteers - 7 men and 18 women - with an average age of 51 years. The mean time spent interacting with the dashboard was 4.6 minutes. Mean evaluation scores on scales ranging from 1 (low) to 7 (high) were: mechanical ease of use 6.1, cognitive ease of use 6.2, emotional difficulty 2.7, decision-aiding effectiveness 5.9, clarification of values 6.5, reduction in decisional uncertainty 6.1, and provision of decision-related information 6.0. Qualitative findings were similarly positive. Conclusions Interactive decision dashboards can be adapted for clinical use and have the potential to foster informed decision making. Additional research is warranted to more rigorously test the effectiveness and efficiency of patient decision dashboards for supporting informed decision making and other aspects of patient-centered care, including shared decision making. PMID:23601912

  18. Nurses' Numeracy and Graphical Literacy: Informing Studies of Clinical Decision Support Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Karen Dunn; Wilkie, Diana J; Yao, Yingwei; Sousa, Vanessa; Febretti, Alessandro; Stifter, Janet; Johnson, Andrew; Keenan, Gail M

    2016-01-01

    We present findings of a comparative study of numeracy and graph literacy in a representative group of 60 practicing nurses. This article focuses on a fundamental concern related to the effectiveness of numeric information displayed in various features in the electronic health record during clinical workflow. Our findings suggest the need to consider numeracy and graph literacy when presenting numerical information as well as the potential for tailoring numeric display types to an individual's cognitive strengths. PMID:26323050

  19. The role (or not) of economic evaluation at the micro level: can Bourdieu's theory provide a way forward for clinical decision-making?

    PubMed

    Lessard, Chantale; Contandriopoulos, André-Pierre; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique

    2010-06-01

    Despite increasing interest in health economic evaluation, investigations have shown limited use by micro (clinical) level decision-makers. A considerable amount of health decisions take place daily at the point of the clinical encounter; especially in primary care. Since every decision has an opportunity cost, ignoring economic information in family physicians' (FPs) decision-making may have a broad impact on health care efficiency. Knowledge translation of economic evaluation is often based on taken-for-granted assumptions about actors' interests and interactions, neglecting much of the complexity of social reality. Health economics literature frequently assumes a rational and linear decision-making process. Clinical decision-making is in fact a complex social, dynamic, multifaceted process, involving relationships and contextual embeddedness. FPs are embedded in complex social networks that have a significant impact on skills, attitudes, knowledge, practices, and on the information being used. Because of their socially constructed nature, understanding preferences, professional culture, practices, and knowledge translation requires serious attention to social reality. There has been little exploration by health economists of whether the problem may be more fundamental and reside in a misunderstanding of the process of decision-making. There is a need to enhance our understanding of the role of economic evaluation in decision-making from a disciplinary perspective different than health economics. This paper argues for a different conceptualization of the role of economic evaluation in FPs' decision-making, and proposes Bourdieu's sociological theory as a research framework. Bourdieu's theory of practice illustrates how the context-sensitive nature of practice must be understood as a socially constituted practical knowledge. The proposed approach could substantially contribute to a more complex understanding of the role of economic evaluation in FPs' decision-making. PMID:20382461

  20. Nutrition Informatics Applications in Clinical Practice: a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    North, Jennifer C.; Jordan, Kristine C.; Metos, Julie; Hurdle, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Nutrition care and metabolic control contribute to clinical patient outcomes. Biomedical informatics applications represent a way to potentially improve quality and efficiency of nutrition management. We performed a systematic literature review to identify clinical decision support and computerized provider order entry systems used to manage nutrition care. Online research databases were searched using a specific set of keywords. Additionally, bibliographies were referenced for supplemental citations. Four independent reviewers selected sixteen studies out of 364 for review. These papers described adult and neonatal nutrition support applications, blood glucose management applications, and other nutrition applications. Overall, results indicated that computerized interventions could contribute to improved patient outcomes and provider performance. Specifically, computer systems in the clinical setting improved nutrient delivery, rates of malnutrition, weight loss, blood glucose values, clinician efficiency, and error rates. In conclusion, further investigation of informatics applications on nutritional and performance outcomes utilizing rigorous study designs is recommended.

  1. Key principles for a national clinical decision support knowledge sharing framework: synthesis of insights from leading subject matter experts

    PubMed Central

    Hongsermeier, Tonya; Wright, Adam; Lewis, Janet; Bell, Douglas S; Middleton, Blackford

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify key principles for establishing a national clinical decision support (CDS) knowledge sharing framework. Materials and methods As part of an initiative by the US Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC) to establish a framework for national CDS knowledge sharing, key stakeholders were identified. Stakeholders' viewpoints were obtained through surveys and in-depth interviews, and findings and relevant insights were summarized. Based on these insights, key principles were formulated for establishing a national CDS knowledge sharing framework. Results Nineteen key stakeholders were recruited, including six executives from electronic health record system vendors, seven executives from knowledge content producers, three executives from healthcare provider organizations, and three additional experts in clinical informatics. Based on these stakeholders' insights, five key principles were identified for effectively sharing CDS knowledge nationally. These principles are (1) prioritize and support the creation and maintenance of a national CDS knowledge sharing framework; (2) facilitate the development of high-value content and tooling, preferably in an open-source manner; (3) accelerate the development or licensing of required, pragmatic standards; (4) acknowledge and address medicolegal liability concerns; and (5) establish a self-sustaining business model. Discussion Based on the principles identified, a roadmap for national CDS knowledge sharing was developed through the ONC's Advancing CDS initiative. Conclusion The study findings may serve as a useful guide for ongoing activities by the ONC and others to establish a national framework for sharing CDS knowledge and improving clinical care. PMID:22865671

  2. Computerised clinical decision support systems to improve medication safety in long-term care homes: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Marasinghe, Keshini Madara

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Computerised clinical decision support systems (CCDSS) are used to improve the quality of care in various healthcare settings. This systematic review evaluated the impact of CCDSS on improving medication safety in long-term care homes (LTC). Medication safety in older populations is an important health concern as inappropriate medication use can elevate the risk of potentially severe outcomes (ie, adverse drug reactions, ADR). With an increasing ageing population, greater use of LTC by the growing ageing population and increasing number of medication-related health issues in LTC, strategies to improve medication safety are essential. Methods Databases searched included MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus and Cochrane Library. Three groups of keywords were combined: those relating to LTC, medication safety and CCDSS. One reviewer undertook screening and quality assessment. Results Overall findings suggest that CCDSS in LTC improved the quality of prescribing decisions (ie, appropriate medication orders), detected ADR, triggered warning messages (ie, related to central nervous system side effects, drug-associated constipation, renal insufficiency) and reduced injury risk among older adults. Conclusions CCDSS have received little attention in LTC, as attested by the limited published literature. With an increasing ageing population, greater use of LTC by the ageing population and increased workload for health professionals, merely relying on physicians’ judgement on medication safety would not be sufficient. CCDSS to improve medication safety and enhance the quality of prescribing decisions are essential. Analysis of review findings indicates that CCDSS are beneficial, effective and have potential to improve medication safety in LTC; however, the use of CCDSS in LTC is scarce. Careful assessment on the impact of CCDSS on medication safety and further modifications to existing CCDSS are recommended for wider acceptance. Due to scant evidence in the current literature, further research on implementation and effectiveness of CCDSS is required. PMID:25967986

  3. A multiresolution clinical decision support system based on fractal model design for classification of histological brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Al-Kadi, Omar S

    2015-04-01

    Tissue texture is known to exhibit a heterogeneous or non-stationary nature; therefore using a single resolution approach for optimum classification might not suffice. A clinical decision support system that exploits the subbands' textural fractal characteristics for best bases selection of meningioma brain histopathological image classification is proposed. Each subband is analysed using its fractal dimension instead of energy, which has the advantage of being less sensitive to image intensity and abrupt changes in tissue texture. The most significant subband that best identifies texture discontinuities will be chosen for further decomposition, and its fractal characteristics would represent the optimal feature vector for classification. The performance was tested using the support vector machine (SVM), Bayesian and k-nearest neighbour (kNN) classifiers and a leave-one-patient-out method was employed for validation. Our method outperformed the classical energy based selection approaches, achieving for SVM, Bayesian and kNN classifiers an overall classification accuracy of 94.12%, 92.50% and 79.70%, as compared to 86.31%, 83.19% and 51.63% for the co-occurrence matrix, and 76.01%, 73.50% and 50.69% for the energy texture signatures; respectively. These results indicate the potential usefulness as a decision support system that could complement radiologists' diagnostic capability to discriminate higher order statistical textural information; for which it would be otherwise difficult via ordinary human vision. PMID:24962336

  4. A Novel Clinical Decision Support System Using Improved Adaptive Genetic Algorithm for the Assessment of Fetal Well-Being

    PubMed Central

    Jambek, Asral Bahari; Neoh, Siew-Chin

    2015-01-01

    A novel clinical decision support system is proposed in this paper for evaluating the fetal well-being from the cardiotocogram (CTG) dataset through an Improved Adaptive Genetic Algorithm (IAGA) and Extreme Learning Machine (ELM). IAGA employs a new scaling technique (called sigma scaling) to avoid premature convergence and applies adaptive crossover and mutation techniques with masking concepts to enhance population diversity. Also, this search algorithm utilizes three different fitness functions (two single objective fitness functions and multi-objective fitness function) to assess its performance. The classification results unfold that promising classification accuracy of 94% is obtained with an optimal feature subset using IAGA. Also, the classification results are compared with those of other Feature Reduction techniques to substantiate its exhaustive search towards the global optimum. Besides, five other benchmark datasets are used to gauge the strength of the proposed IAGA algorithm. PMID:25793009

  5. Integration of heterogeneous clinical decision support systems and their knowledge sets: feasibility study with drug-drug interaction alerts

    PubMed Central

    Kam, Hye Jin; Kim, Jeong Ah; Cho, InSook; Kim, Yoon; Park, Rae Woong

    2011-01-01

    There exist limitations in both commercial and in-house clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) and issues related to the integration of different knowledge sources and CDSSs. We chose Standard-based Shareable Active Guideline Environment (SAGE) as a new architecture with knowledge integration and a centralized knowledge base which includes authoring/management functions and independent CDSS, and applied it to Drug-Drug Interaction (DDI) CDSS. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of the newly integrated DDI alerting CDSS into a real world hospital information system involving construction of an integrated CDSS derived from two heterogeneous systems and their knowledge sets. The proposed CDSS was successfully implemented and compensated for the weaknesses of the old CDSS from knowledge integration and management, and its applicability in actual situations was verified. Although the DDI CDSS was constructed as an example case, the new CDS architecture might prove applicable to areas of CDSSs. PMID:22195122

  6. A novel clinical decision support system using improved adaptive genetic algorithm for the assessment of fetal well-being.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Sindhu; Jambek, Asral Bahari; Muthusamy, Hariharan; Neoh, Siew-Chin

    2015-01-01

    A novel clinical decision support system is proposed in this paper for evaluating the fetal well-being from the cardiotocogram (CTG) dataset through an Improved Adaptive Genetic Algorithm (IAGA) and Extreme Learning Machine (ELM). IAGA employs a new scaling technique (called sigma scaling) to avoid premature convergence and applies adaptive crossover and mutation techniques with masking concepts to enhance population diversity. Also, this search algorithm utilizes three different fitness functions (two single objective fitness functions and multi-objective fitness function) to assess its performance. The classification results unfold that promising classification accuracy of 94% is obtained with an optimal feature subset using IAGA. Also, the classification results are compared with those of other Feature Reduction techniques to substantiate its exhaustive search towards the global optimum. Besides, five other benchmark datasets are used to gauge the strength of the proposed IAGA algorithm. PMID:25793009

  7. Opportunities to Increase the Effectiveness of EHR-Based Diabetes Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, P.

    2011-01-01

    There are many opportunities to improve diabetes care through more effective use of EHR-based CDS. The report of Kantor et al. [16] is encouraging because it demonstrates sustained efforts by leading health care organizations to implement diabetes-related EHR-based CDS. However, lack of sophisticated treatment-specific CDS and lack of prioritized recommendations are a cause for concern. Even more disturbing is the substantive heterogeneity in content of diabetes CDS recommendations now in the field. Some of CDS recommendations described by Kantor et al. [16] are clearly not evidence-based and could increase costs while not improving clinical benefits. The timely identification of these problems is an awkward but necessary first step towards improvement. The health care organizations that are pioneers in the field should be congratulated and encouraged to continue their collaborative efforts to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of EHR-based CDS. Attending to the modest proposals put forward here and by others may help translate the massive investments that we have made in EHR technology into clinical benefits for our patients. PMID:23616881

  8. Do computerised clinical decision support systems for prescribing change practice? A systematic review of the literature (1990-2007)

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Sallie-Anne; Moxey, Annette; Robertson, Jane; Hains, Isla; Williamson, Margaret; Reeve, James; Newby, David

    2009-01-01

    Background Computerised clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) are used widely to improve quality of care and patient outcomes. This systematic review evaluated the impact of CDSSs in targeting specific aspects of prescribing, namely initiating, monitoring and stopping therapy. We also examined the influence of clinical setting (institutional vs ambulatory care), system- or user-initiation of CDSS, multi-faceted vs stand alone CDSS interventions and clinical target on practice changes in line with the intent of the CDSS. Methods We searched Medline, Embase and PsychINFO for publications from 1990-2007 detailing CDSS prescribing interventions. Pairs of independent reviewers extracted the key features and prescribing outcomes of methodologically adequate studies (experiments and strong quasi-experiments). Results 56 studies met our inclusion criteria, 38 addressing initiating, 23 monitoring and three stopping therapy. At the time of initiating therapy, CDSSs appear to be somewhat more effective after, rather than before, drug selection has occurred (7/12 versus 12/26 studies reporting statistically significant improvements in favour of CDSSs on = 50% of prescribing outcomes reported). CDSSs also appeared to be effective for monitoring therapy, particularly using laboratory test reminders (4/7 studies reporting significant improvements in favour of CDSSs on the majority of prescribing outcomes). None of the studies addressing stopping therapy demonstrated impacts in favour of CDSSs over comparators. The most consistently effective approaches used system-initiated advice to fine-tune existing therapy by making recommendations to improve patient safety, adjust the dose, duration or form of prescribed drugs or increase the laboratory testing rates for patients on long-term therapy. CDSSs appeared to perform better in institutional compared to ambulatory settings and when decision support was initiated automatically by the system as opposed to user initiation. CDSSs implemented with other strategies such as education were no more successful in improving prescribing than stand alone interventions. Cardiovascular disease was the most studied clinical target but few studies demonstrated significant improvements on the majority of prescribing outcomes. Conclusion Our understanding of CDSS impacts on specific aspects of the prescribing process remains relatively limited. Future implementation should build on effective approaches including the use of system-initiated advice to address safety issues and improve the monitoring of therapy. PMID:19715591

  9. How do financial incentives affect physicians' clinical decisions and the financial performance of health maintenance organizations?

    PubMed

    Hillman, A L; Pauly, M V; Kerstein, J J

    1989-07-13

    It has been suggested that the use of financial incentives by health maintenance organizations (HMOs) may change physicians' behavior toward individual patients. To test this hypothesis, we used a regression analysis of data from a survey of HMOs to examine the relation between the presence of financial incentives and two measures of the use of resources (the rate of hospitalization and the rate of visits for outpatient services) and one measure of the HMOs' financial viability (the achievement of break-even status). When we controlled for the effect of market-area variables, we found that some forms of compensation were significantly associated with these indicators of decision making by physicians. Among methods of paying physicians, the use of capitation or salaries was associated with a lower rate of hospitalization than the use of fee-for-service payment; physicians in for-profit HMOs and group-model HMOs also used the hospital less often. Placing physicians at financial risk as individuals and imposing penalties for deficits in the HMO's hospital fund beyond the loss of withheld funds were associated with fewer outpatient visits per enrollee, but a higher percentage of HMO patients in a physician's caseload was associated with more frequent visits. HMOs were more likely to break even if they were larger, older, had physicians who treated more HMO patients, and placed physicians at personal financial risk for the cost of outpatient tests; break-even status was also related to the type of HMO. We conclude that the use of some, but not all, financial incentives, as well as the type of HMO, does influence the behavior of physicians toward patients. It remains to be determined how these factors affect the quality of care. PMID:2733758

  10. Potential Cost-Effectiveness of a New Infant Tuberculosis Vaccine in South Africa - Implications for Clinical Trials: A Decision Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ditkowsky, Jared B.; Schwartzman, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Novel tuberculosis vaccines are in varying stages of pre-clinical and clinical development. This study seeks to estimate the potential cost-effectiveness of a BCG booster vaccine, while accounting for costs of large-scale clinical trials, using the MVA85A vaccine as a case study for estimating potential costs. We conducted a decision analysis from the societal perspective, using a 10-year time frame and a 3% discount rate. We predicted active tuberculosis cases and tuberculosis-related costs for a hypothetical cohort of 960,763 South African newborns (total born in 2009). We compared neonatal vaccination with bacille Calmette-Guérin alone to vaccination with bacille Calmette-Guérin plus a booster vaccine at 4 months. We considered booster efficacy estimates ranging from 40% to 70%, relative to bacille Calmette-Guérin alone. We accounted for the costs of Phase III clinical trials. The booster vaccine was assumed to prevent progression to active tuberculosis after childhood infection, with protection decreasing linearly over 10 years. Trial costs were prorated to South Africa's global share of bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccination. Vaccination with bacille Calmette-Guérin alone resulted in estimated tuberculosis-related costs of $89.91 million 2012 USD, and 13,610 tuberculosis cases in the birth cohort, over the 10 years. Addition of the booster resulted in estimated cost savings of $7.69–$16.68 million USD, and 2,800–4,160 cases averted, for assumed efficacy values ranging from 40%–70%. A booster tuberculosis vaccine in infancy may result in net societal cost savings as well as fewer active tuberculosis cases, even if efficacy is relatively modest and large scale Phase III studies are required. PMID:24454706

  11. Evaluating patients' health using a hierarchical multi-attribute decision model.

    PubMed

    Sustersic, O; Rajkovic, U; Dinevski, D; Jereb, E; Rajkovic, Vladislav

    2009-01-01

    Evaluation of a patient's health status is an essential part of the healthcare process. For this purpose, Henderson's model of basic living activities (BLA) is often proposed as a set of criteria to be used in nursing. Despite its clarity and theoretical background, the model is only partially used in clinical practice. In this paper, we present the methodology for a hierar