Sample records for computerized clinical decision

  1. Decision Making Processes of Nurses Viewing Computerized Clinical Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Suzanne Bakken; Le Breck, Diane Belongia; Holzemer, William L.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the decision making processes of nurses viewing computerized clinical simulations and to assess the effect of instructions to verbalize on simulation performance. Sixty pediatric nurses with at least one year of pediatric experience were randomly assigned to one of three groups: control, concurrent verbalization, and prompted recall. Each subject viewed two computer simulations. Efficiency and proficiency scores were calculated. All sessions were tape recorded for verbal protocol analysis.

  2. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Nurse-Focused Computerized Clinical Decision Support on Urinary Catheter Practice Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Robin Lynn Neal

    2012-01-01

    A growing national emphasis has been placed on health information technology (HIT) with robust computerized clinical decision support (CCDS) integration into health care delivery. Catheter-associated urinary tract infection is the most frequent health care-associated infection in the United States and is associated with high cost, high volumes and…

  3. Improving Emergency Department Triage Classification with Computerized Clinical Decision Support at a Pediatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunisch, Joseph Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background: The Emergency Severity Index (ESI) is an emergency department (ED) triage classification system based on estimated patient-specific resource utilization. Rules for a computerized clinical decision support (CDS) system based on a patient's chief complaint were developed and tested using a stochastic model for predicting ESI scores.…

  4. Evaluating the use of a computerized clinical decision support system for asthma by pediatric pulmonologists

    PubMed Central

    Lomotan, Edwin A.; Hoeksema, Laura J.; Edmonds, Diana E.; Ramírez-Garnica, Gabriela; Shiffman, Richard N.; Horwitz, Leora I.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate use of a new guideline-based, computerized clinical decision support (CCDS) system for asthma in a pediatric pulmonology clinic of a large academic medical center. Methods We conducted a qualitative evaluation including review of electronic data, direct observation, and interviews with all nine pediatric pulmonologists in the clinic. Outcome measures included patterns of computer use in relation to patient care, and themes surrounding the relationship between asthma care and computer use. Results The pediatric pulmonologists entered enough data to trigger the decision support system in 397/445 (89.2%) of all asthma visits from January 2009 to May 2009. However, interviews and direct observations revealed use of the decision support system was limited to documentation activities after clinic sessions ended. Reasons for delayed use reflected barriers common to general medical care and barriers specific to subspecialty care. Subspecialist-specific barriers included the perceived high complexity of patients, the impact of subject matter expertise on the types of decision support needed, and unique workflow concerns such as the need to create letters to referring physicians. Conclusions Pediatric pulmonologists demonstrated low use of a computerized decision support system for asthma care because of a combination of general and subspecialist-specific factors. Subspecialist-specific factors should not be underestimated when designing guideline-based, computerized decision support systems for the subspecialty setting. PMID:22204897

  5. Accuracy of a computerized clinical decision-support system for asthma assessment and management

    PubMed Central

    Hoeksema, Laura J; Bazzy-Asaad, Alia; Lomotan, Edwin A; Edmonds, Diana E; Ramírez-Garnica, Gabriela; Shiffman, Richard N

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the accuracy of a computerized clinical decision-support system (CDSS) designed to support assessment and management of pediatric asthma in a subspecialty clinic. Design Cohort study of all asthma visits to pediatric pulmonology from January to December, 2009. Measurements CDSS and physician assessments of asthma severity, control, and treatment step. Results Both the clinician and the computerized CDSS generated assessments of asthma control in 767/1032 (74.3%) return patients, assessments of asthma severity in 100/167 (59.9%) new patients, and recommendations for treatment step in 66/167 (39.5%) new patients. Clinicians agreed with the CDSS in 543/767 (70.8%) of control assessments, 37/100 (37%) of severity assessments, and 19/66 (29%) of step recommendations. External review classified 72% of control disagreements (21% of all control assessments), 56% of severity disagreements (37% of all severity assessments), and 76% of step disagreements (54% of all step recommendations) as CDSS errors. The remaining disagreements resulted from pulmonologist error or ambiguous guidelines. Many CDSS flaws, such as attributing all ‘cough’ to asthma, were easily remediable. Pediatric pulmonologists failed to follow guidelines in 8% of return visits and 18% of new visits. Limitations The authors relied on chart notes to determine clinical reasoning. Physicians may have changed their assessments after seeing CDSS recommendations. Conclusions A computerized CDSS performed relatively accurately compared to clinicians for assessment of asthma control but was inaccurate for treatment. Pediatric pulmonologists failed to follow guideline-based care in a small proportion of patients. PMID:21486882

  6. Development of a Workflow Integration Survey (WIS) for Implementing Computerized Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Mindy; Arbuckle, Nicole; Saleem, Jason J.; Militello, Laura G.; Haggstrom, David A.; Doebbeling, Bradley N.

    2011-01-01

    Interventions that focus on improving computerized clinical decision support (CDS) demonstrate that successful workflow integration can increase the adoption and use of CDS. However, metrics for assessing workflow integration in clinical settings are not well established. The goal of this study was to develop and validate a survey to assess the extent to which CDS is integrated into workflow. Qualitative data on CDS design, usability, and integration from four sites was collected by direct observation, interviews, and focus groups. Thematic analysis based on the sociotechnical systems theory revealed consistent themes across sites. Themes related to workflow integration included navigation, functionality, usability, and workload. Based on these themes, a brief 12-item scale to assess workflow integration was developed, refined, and validated with providers in a simulation study. To our knowledge, this is one of the first tools developed to specifically measure workflow integration of CDS. PMID:22195096

  7. A Novel Computerized Clinical Decision Support System for Treating Thrombolysis in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Sung; Kim, Chi Kyung; Kang, Jihoon; Park, Jong-Moo; Park, Tai Hwan; Lee, Kyung Bok; Lee, Soo Joo; Cho, Yong-Jin; Ko, Jaehee; Seo, Jinwook; Bae, Hee-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Thrombolysis is underused in acute ischemic stroke, mainly due to the reluctance of physicians to treat thrombolysis patients. However, a computerized clinical decision support system can help physicians to develop individualized stroke treatments. Methods A consecutive series of 958 patients, hospitalized within 12 hours of ischemic stroke onset from a representative clinical center in Korea, was used to establish a prognostic model. Multivariable logistic regression was used to develop the model for global and safety outcomes. An external validation of developed model was performed using 954 patients data obtained from 5 university hospitals or regional stroke centers. Results Final global outcome predictors were age; previous modified Rankin scale score; initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score; previous stroke; diabetes; prior use of antiplatelet treatment, antihypertensive drugs, and statins; lacunae; thrombolysis; onset to treatment time; and systolic blood pressure. Final safety outcome predictors were age, initial NIHSS score, thrombolysis, onset to treatment time, systolic blood pressure, and glucose level. The discriminative ability of the prognostic model showed a C-statistic of 0.89 and 0.84 for the global and safety outcomes, respectively. Internal and external validation showed similar C-statistic results. After updating the model, calibration slopes were corrected from 0.68 to 1.0 and from 0.96 to 1.0 for the global and safety outcome models, respectively. Conclusions A novel computerized outcome prediction model for thrombolysis after ischemic stroke was developed using large amounts of clinical information. After external validation and updating, the model's performance was deemed clinically satisfactory. PMID:26060807

  8. Recommended practices for computerized clinical decision support and knowledge management in community settings: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to identify recommended practices for computerized clinical decision support (CDS) development and implementation and for knowledge management (KM) processes in ambulatory clinics and community hospitals using commercial or locally developed systems in the U.S. Methods Guided by the Multiple Perspectives Framework, the authors conducted ethnographic field studies at two community hospitals and five ambulatory clinic organizations across the U.S. Using a Rapid Assessment Process, a multidisciplinary research team: gathered preliminary assessment data; conducted on-site interviews, observations, and field surveys; analyzed data using both template and grounded methods; and developed universal themes. A panel of experts produced recommended practices. Results The team identified ten themes related to CDS and KM. These include: 1) workflow; 2) knowledge management; 3) data as a foundation for CDS; 4) user computer interaction; 5) measurement and metrics; 6) governance; 7) translation for collaboration; 8) the meaning of CDS; 9) roles of special, essential people; and 10) communication, training, and support. Experts developed recommendations about each theme. The original Multiple Perspectives framework was modified to make explicit a new theoretical construct, that of Translational Interaction. Conclusions These ten themes represent areas that need attention if a clinic or community hospital plans to implement and successfully utilize CDS. In addition, they have implications for workforce education, research, and national-level policy development. The Translational Interaction construct could guide future applied informatics research endeavors. PMID:22333210

  9. Computerized clinical decision support systems for chronic disease management: A decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The use of computerized clinical decision support systems (CCDSSs) may improve chronic disease management, which requires recurrent visits to multiple health professionals, ongoing disease and treatment monitoring, and patient behavior modification. The objective of this review was to determine if CCDSSs improve the processes of chronic care (such as diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of disease) and associated patient outcomes (such as effects on biomarkers and clinical exacerbations). Methods We conducted a decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Ovid's EBM Reviews database, Inspec, and reference lists for potentially eligible articles published up to January 2010. We included randomized controlled trials that compared the use of CCDSSs to usual practice or non-CCDSS controls. Trials were eligible if at least one component of the CCDSS was designed to support chronic disease management. We considered studies 'positive' if they showed a statistically significant improvement in at least 50% of relevant outcomes. Results Of 55 included trials, 87% (n = 48) measured system impact on the process of care and 52% (n = 25) of those demonstrated statistically significant improvements. Sixty-five percent (36/55) of trials measured impact on, typically, non-major (surrogate) patient outcomes, and 31% (n = 11) of those demonstrated benefits. Factors of interest to decision makers, such as cost, user satisfaction, system interface and feature sets, unique design and deployment characteristics, and effects on user workflow were rarely investigated or reported. Conclusions A small majority (just over half) of CCDSSs improved care processes in chronic disease management and some improved patient health. Policy makers, healthcare administrators, and practitioners should be aware that the evidence of CCDSS effectiveness is limited, especially with respect to the small number and size of studies measuring patient outcomes. PMID:21824386

  10. Usability Evaluation of Pharmacogenomics Clinical Decision Support Aids and Clinical Knowledge Resources in a Computerized Provider Order Entry System: A Mixed Methods Approach

    PubMed Central

    Devine, Emily Beth; Lee, Chia-Ju; Overby, Casey L.; Abernethy, Neil; McCune, Jeannine; Smith, Joe W.; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Pharmacogenomics (PGx) is positioned to have a widespread impact on the practice of medicine, yet physician acceptance is low. The presentation of context-specific PGx information, in the form of clinical decision support (CDS) alerts embedded in a computerized provider order entry (CPOE) system, can aid uptake. Usability evaluations can inform optimal design, which, in turn, can spur adoption. Objectives The study objectives were to: 1) evaluate an early prototype, commercial CPOE system with PGx-CDS alerts in a simulated environment, 2) identify potential improvements to the system user interface, and 3) understand the contexts under which PGx knowledge embedded in an electronic health record is useful to prescribers. Methods Using a mixed methods approach, we presented seven cardiologists and three oncologists with five hypothetical clinical case scenarios. Each scenario featured a drug for which a gene encoding drug metabolizing enzyme required consideration of dosage adjustment. We used Morae® to capture comments and on-screen movements as participants prescribed each drug. In addition to PGx-CDS alerts, ‘Infobutton®’ and ‘Evidence’ icons provided participants with clinical knowledge resources to aid decision-making. Results Nine themes emerged. Five suggested minor improvements to the CPOE user interface; two suggested presenting PGx information through PGx-CDS alerts using an ‘Infobutton’ or ‘Evidence’ icon. The remaining themes were strong recommendations to provide succinct, relevant guidelines and dosing recommendations of phenotypic information from credible and trustworthy sources; any more information was overwhelming. Participants’ median rating of PGx-CDS system usability was 2 on a Likert scale ranging from 1 (strongly agree) to 7 (strongly disagree). Conclusions Usability evaluation results suggest that participants considered PGx information important for improving prescribing decisions; and that they would incorporate PGx-CDS when information is presented in relevant and useful ways. PMID:24874987

  11. Cassel Psych Center Computerized Biofeedback Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.

    1982-01-01

    Describes Cassel Psych Center, a computerized biofeedback clinic, where the "well" patient is a major concern, and where biofeedback instruments are used with computers to form a Computerized-Biofeedback Clinical Support System. The Center's activities are designed to parallel the services of the pathologist in a medical setting. (PAS)

  12. Computerized decision support in adult and pediatric critical care

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Cydni N; Bratton, Susan L; Hirshberg, Eliotte L

    2013-01-01

    Computerized decision support (CDS) is the most advanced form of clinical decision support available and has evolved with innovative technologies to provide meaningful assistance to medical professionals. Critical care clinicians are in unique environments where vast amounts of data are collected on individual patients, and where expedient and accurate decisions are paramount to the delivery of quality healthcare. Many CDS tools are in use today among adult and pediatric intensive care units as diagnostic aides, safety alerts, computerized protocols, and automated recommendations for management. Some CDS use have significantly decreased adverse events and improved costs when carefully implemented and properly operated. CDS tools integrated into electronic health records are also valuable to researchers providing rapid identification of eligible patients, streamlining data-gathering and analysis, and providing cohorts for study of rare and chronic diseases through data-warehousing. Although the need for human judgment in the daily care of critically ill patients has limited the study and realization of meaningful improvements in overall patient outcomes, CDS tools continue to evolve and integrate into the daily workflow of clinicians, and will likely provide advancements over time. Through novel technologies, CDS tools have vast potential for progression and will significantly impact the field of critical care and clinical research in the future. PMID:24701413

  13. Clinical decision support for atypical orders: detection and warning of atypical medication orders submitted to a computerized provider order entry system

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Allie D; Mulherin, David P; Flynn, Allen J; Stevenson, James G; Zimmerman, Christopher R; Chaffee, Bruce W

    2014-01-01

    The specificity of medication-related alerts must be improved to overcome the pernicious effects of alert fatigue. A systematic comparison of new drug orders to historical orders could improve alert specificity and relevance. Using historical order data from a computerized provider order entry system, we alerted physicians to atypical orders during the prescribing of five medications: calcium, clopidogrel, heparin, magnesium, and potassium. The percentage of atypical orders placed for these five medications decreased during the 92?days the alerts were active when compared to the same period in the previous year (from 0.81% to 0.53%; p=0.015). Some atypical orders were appropriate. Fifty of the 68 atypical order alerts were over-ridden (74%). However, the over-ride rate is misleading because 28 of the atypical medication orders (41%) were changed. Atypical order alerts were relatively few, identified problems with frequencies as well as doses, and had a higher specificity than dose check alerts. PMID:24253195

  14. Objective assessment of clinical computerized thermal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbar, Michael

    1991-06-01

    The efficacy of diagnostic thermal imaging, the visualization of abnormal distribution of temperature over the human skin, can be significantly augmented by computerized image processing procedures that overcome the limitations of subjective image assessment. This paper reviews diagnostic thermal imaging and describes common image processing approaches applicable to the analysis of static thermal images and of time series of images that provide diagnostic information about the dynamics of neurological regulation of skin temperature.

  15. Decision time for clinical decision support systems.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Dympna; Fraccaro, Paolo; Carson, Ewart; Weller, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Clinical decision support systems are interactive software systems designed to help clinicians with decision-making tasks, such as determining a diagnosis or recommending a treatment for a patient. Clinical decision support systems are a widely researched topic in the computer science community, but their inner workings are less well understood by, and known to, clinicians. This article provides a brief explanation of clinical decision support systems and some examples of real-world systems. It also describes some of the challenges to implementing these systems in clinical environments and posits some reasons for the limited adoption of decision-support systems in practice. It aims to engage clinicians in the development of decision support systems that can meaningfully help with their decision-making tasks and to open a discussion about the future of automated clinical decision support as a part of healthcare delivery. PMID:25099829

  16. Development of a student nurse practitioner computerized clinical log.

    PubMed

    Longworth, J C; Lesh, D

    2000-04-01

    A computerized clinical log was developed and revised over a period of three semesters by the family nurse practitioner students at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio, Texas. Students entered data on a disk formatted in Microsoft Access, and results were analyzed by the Statistical Packages for the Social Sciences (SPSS). More than 4,000 patient encounters were documented during three semesters. The development and refinement of the computerized log are described. Results are presented and the implications of the database for educational, curricular and employment purposes are discussed. PMID:11930415

  17. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure treatment of premature infants; application of a computerized decision support system.

    PubMed

    Tehrani, Fleur T; Abbasi, Soraya

    2015-07-01

    The predictions of a computerized decision-support system (CDSS) are compared to clinical data obtained from a group of premature infants. The infants were suffering from respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and were treated by the Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) therapy. The predictions of the CDSS are found to be in general agreement with clinical measurements. The CDSS is also used to determine the effect of low level oxygen treatment on arterial oxygen pressure if the infant?s oxygenation is low despite CPAP therapy. Based on the computational results, application of low levels of supplemental inspired fraction of oxygen ( [Formula: see text] ) would result in significant improvement in oxygenation of premature infants provided such treatment is carefully controlled to avoid hyperoxemia. PMID:25932970

  18. Nurses' Use of Computerized Clinical Guidelines to Improve Patient Safety in Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Hovde, Birgit; Jensen, Kari H; Alexander, Gregory L; Fossum, Mariann

    2015-07-01

    Computerized clinical guidelines are frequently used to translate research into evidence-based behavioral practices and to improve patient outcomes. The purpose of this integrative review is to summarize the factors influencing nurses' use of computerized clinical guidelines and the effects of nurses' use of computerized clinical guidelines on patient safety improvements in hospitals. The Embase, Medline Complete, and Cochrane databases were searched for relevant literature published from 2000 to January 2013. The matrix method was used, and a total of 16 papers were included in the final review. The studies were assessed for quality with the Critical Appraisal Skills Program. The studies focused on nurses' adherence to guidelines and on improved patient care and patient outcomes as benefits of using computerized clinical guidelines. The nurses' use of computerized clinical guidelines demonstrated improvements in care processes; however, the evidence for an effect of computerized clinical guidelines on patient safety remains limited. PMID:25819699

  19. Diabetes Telehealth and Computerized Decision Support Systems: A Sound System with a Human Touch Is Needed

    PubMed Central

    Holmström, Inger

    2010-01-01

    Telehealth holds the promise of improved consistency and fast and equal access to care, and will have great impact on future care. To enhance its quality and safety, computerized decision support systems (CDSS) have been launched. This commentary focuses specifically on the impact of telehealth and CDSS on diabetes patient management. Ideally, clinical information should be linked to evidence based recommendations and guidelines in the CDSS to provide tailored recommendations at the moment of care. However, technical support such as CDSS is not enough. The human touch is essential. A named healthcare provider with access to telehealth and CDSS seems to promise a way of providing both patient-centered and evidence-based care. PMID:20663469

  20. Computerized Aid Improves Safety Decision Process for Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Nancy; Eden, Karen B.; Bloom, Tina; Perrin, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    A computerized safety decision aid was developed and tested with Spanish or English-speaking abused women in shelters or domestic violence (DV) support groups (n = 90). The decision aid provides feedback about risk for lethal violence, options for safety, assistance with setting priorities for safety, and a safety plan personalized to the user.…

  1. A Computerized Decision Support Aid for Critical Care Novice Nursing1 , H. Michel

    E-print Network

    Michel, Howard E.

    The traditional health care model of a novice nurse interacting with a senior staff nurse in a mentoring roleA Computerized Decision Support Aid for Critical Care Novice Nursing1 P. Fortier , H. Michel , B Engineering Department # Nursing Department pfortier@umassd.edu, hmichel@umassd.edu, g

  2. Engineering of a Clinical Decision Support Framework for the Point of Care Use

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Szymon Wilk; Wojtek Michalowski; Dympna O'Sullivan; Ken Farion; Stan Matwin

    Computerized decision support for use at the point of care has to be comprehensive. It means that clinical information stored in electronic health records needs to be integrated with various forms of clinical knowledge ( elicited from experts, discovered from data or summarized in systematic reviews of clinical trials). In order to provide such comprehensive support we created the MET

  3. What can Natural Language Processing do for Clinical Decision Support?

    PubMed Central

    Demner-Fushman, Dina; Chapman, Wendy W.; McDonald, Clement J.

    2009-01-01

    Computerized Clinical Decision Support (CDS) aims to aid decision making of health care providers and the public by providing easily accessible health-related information at the point and time it is needed. Natural Language Processing (NLP) is instrumental in using free-text information to drive CDS, representing clinical knowledge and CDS interventions in standardized formats, and leveraging clinical narrative. The early innovative NLP research of clinical narrative was followed by a period of stable research conducted at the major clinical centers and a shift of mainstream interest to biomedical NLP. This review primarily focuses on the recently renewed interest in development of fundamental NLP methods and advances in the NLP systems for CDS. The current solutions to challenges posed by distinct sublanguages, intended user groups, and support goals are discussed. PMID:19683066

  4. What can natural language processing do for clinical decision support?

    PubMed

    Demner-Fushman, Dina; Chapman, Wendy W; McDonald, Clement J

    2009-10-01

    Computerized clinical decision support (CDS) aims to aid decision making of health care providers and the public by providing easily accessible health-related information at the point and time it is needed. natural language processing (NLP) is instrumental in using free-text information to drive CDS, representing clinical knowledge and CDS interventions in standardized formats, and leveraging clinical narrative. The early innovative NLP research of clinical narrative was followed by a period of stable research conducted at the major clinical centers and a shift of mainstream interest to biomedical NLP. This review primarily focuses on the recently renewed interest in development of fundamental NLP methods and advances in the NLP systems for CDS. The current solutions to challenges posed by distinct sublanguages, intended user groups, and support goals are discussed. PMID:19683066

  5. Redesign of a computerized clinical reminder for colorectal cancer screening: a human-computer interaction evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Based on barriers to the use of computerized clinical decision support (CDS) learned in an earlier field study, we prototyped design enhancements to the Veterans Health Administration's (VHA's) colorectal cancer (CRC) screening clinical reminder to compare against the VHA's current CRC reminder. Methods In a controlled simulation experiment, 12 primary care providers (PCPs) used prototypes of the current and redesigned CRC screening reminder in a within-subject comparison. Quantitative measurements were based on a usability survey, workload assessment instrument, and workflow integration survey. We also collected qualitative data on both designs. Results Design enhancements to the VHA's existing CRC screening clinical reminder positively impacted aspects of usability and workflow integration but not workload. The qualitative analysis revealed broad support across participants for the design enhancements with specific suggestions for improving the reminder further. Conclusions This study demonstrates the value of a human-computer interaction evaluation in informing the redesign of information tools to foster uptake, integration into workflow, and use in clinical practice. PMID:22126324

  6. Developing and testing a computerized decision support system for nurse-to-patient assignment: a multimethod study.

    PubMed

    van Oostveen, Catharina J; Braaksma, Aleida; Vermeulen, Hester

    2014-06-01

    Nurse-to-patient assignment is a frequently recurring, time-consuming, and complex process owing to the many considerations involved. Creating well-balanced, high-quality assignments is crucial to ensuring patient safety, quality of care, and job satisfaction for nurses. A computerized decision support system can assist (charge) nurses in the nurse-to-patient assignment process. In this two-phase multimethod study, a computerized decision support system was developed and evaluated. Three nursing wards in a 1000-bed Dutch university hospital participated. In the first phase of this study, considerations relevant to the assignment process--and their relative importance--were investigated in a literature review, focus group sessions with nurses, and a survey among nurses. Using information from the first phase, the computerized decision support system was developed based on an integer linear program. In the second phase, a before-and-after study was conducted to test and evaluate the computerized decision support system both quantitatively (duration of the assignment process) and qualitatively (survey on workload). Thirty-six measurements were performed to test the computerized decision support system. After implementation, a 30% time reduction was achieved in the nurse-to-patient assignments, and nurses (N = 138) experienced a lower workload. Therefore, the implementation of computerized decision support system would increase both the quality and safety of care as well as the nurses' job satisfaction and should be investigated rigorously in the coming years. PMID:24781813

  7. Clinical decision making in nursing.

    PubMed

    Harbison, J

    1991-04-01

    In this paper, the author reflects on the new practitioner envisaged by developers of the Project 2000 curriculum in Scotland, and focuses on the need to develop critical thinking ability, in particular in relation to clinical decision making. Two approaches to decision making are outlined: the rationalist perspective and the phenomenological perspective, and a model illustrating each is discussed. The models examined are, respectively, decision analysis and hypothetico-deductive reasoning, and their relevance to nursing outlined. The author concludes by discussing the nursing process model from both perspectives; and by recommending that nurses learn from the work done by other disciplines on professional judgement. The suggested role of the nurse teacher in preparing the new practitioner is outlined. PMID:2061503

  8. Computerized Neuropsychological Assessment in Aging: Testing Efficacy and Clinical Ecology of Different Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Della Rosa, Pasquale Anthony; Catricalà, Eleonora; Castiglioni, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    Digital technologies have opened new opportunities for psychological testing, allowing new computerized testing tools to be developed and/or paper and pencil testing tools to be translated to new computerized devices. The question that rises is whether these implementations may introduce some technology-specific effects to be considered in neuropsychological evaluations. Two core aspects have been investigated in this work: the efficacy of tests and the clinical ecology of their administration (the ability to measure real-world test performance), specifically (1) the testing efficacy of a computerized test when response to stimuli is measured using a touch-screen compared to a conventional mouse-control response device; (2) the testing efficacy of a computerized test with respect to different input modalities (visual versus verbal); and (3) the ecology of two computerized assessment modalities (touch-screen and mouse-control), including preference measurements of participants. Our results suggest that (1) touch-screen devices are suitable for administering experimental tasks requiring precise timings for detection, (2) intrinsic nature of neuropsychological tests should always be respected in terms of stimuli presentation when translated to new digitalized environment, and (3) touch-screen devices result in ecological instruments being proposed for the computerized administration of neuropsychological tests with a high level of preference from elderly people. PMID:25147578

  9. Clinical Decision Support Capabilities of Commercially-available Clinical Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F.; Ash, Joan S.; Sharma, Sapna; Pang, Justine E.; Middleton, Blackford

    2009-01-01

    Background The most effective decision support systems are integrated with clinical information systems, such as inpatient and outpatient electronic health records (EHRs) and computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems. Purpose The goal of this project was to describe and quantify the results of a study of decision support capabilities in Certification Commission for Health Information Technology (CCHIT) certified electronic health record systems. Methods The authors conducted a series of interviews with representatives of nine commercially available clinical information systems, evaluating their capabilities against 42 different clinical decision support features. Results Six of the nine reviewed systems offered all the applicable event-driven, action-oriented, real-time clinical decision support triggers required for initiating clinical decision support interventions. Five of the nine systems could access all the patient-specific data items identified as necessary. Six of the nine systems supported all the intervention types identified as necessary to allow clinical information systems to tailor their interventions based on the severity of the clinical situation and the user's workflow. Only one system supported all the offered choices identified as key to allowing physicians to take action directly from within the alert. Discussion The principal finding relates to system-by-system variability. The best system in our analysis had only a single missing feature (from 42 total) while the worst had eighteen.This dramatic variability in CDS capability among commercially available systems was unexpected and is a cause for concern. Conclusions These findings have implications for four distinct constituencies: purchasers of clinical information systems, developers of clinical decision support, vendors of clinical information systems and certification bodies. PMID:19567796

  10. ClinicalAccess: A Clinical Decision Support Tool.

    PubMed

    Crowell, Karen; Vardell, Emily

    2015-01-01

    ClinicalAccess is a new clinical decision support tool that uses a question-and-answer format to mirror clinical decision-making strategies. The unique format of ClinicalAccess delivers concise, authoritative answers to more than 120,000 clinical questions. This column presents a review of the product, a sample search, and a comparison with other point-of-care search engines. PMID:25927513

  11. Towards Decentralised Clinical Decision Support Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paolo Besana; Adam Barker

    \\u000a The sheer quantity and complexity of medical information, even within a single speciality, is beyond the power of one person\\u000a to comprehend. Clinical decision support (CDS) systems have been clearly demonstrated to improve practice by removing complexity\\u000a and aiding the decision making process for clinicians. However, the specific pieces of information most relevant to a particular\\u000a clinical decision are typically

  12. A Computerized Case Study Exercise for Clinical Pharmacy Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guy, Wendell A.; Piltz, George W.

    1982-01-01

    A computer-assisted exercise consisting of a case history of an asthmatic patient and a series of multiple-choice questions that forced the student to reanswer until reaching the correct response enable students to practice using clinical information, follow treatment steps, and have feedback on their treatment choices. (Author/MSE)

  13. Computerizing Clinical Pathways: Ontology-Based Modeling and Execution

    E-print Network

    Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

    , Canada Abstract. Clinical Pathways (CP) stipulate an evidence-based patient care workflow for a specific that they can be executed at the point-of- care. We present our CP modeling approach that features. Introduction In Canada, the management of prostate cancer follows an integrated care approach involving

  14. Knowledge taxonomy for Clinical Practice Guidelines - Implications for Computerization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karen Marie Lyng

    Much effort has been put into developing clinical practice guidelines (CPG's), but yet the effect of CPG's is limited. A path for better practitioner adherence to CPG's could be to offer IT-based process support, based on CPG's To accomplish this it is necessary to transform existing narrative CPG's into a computer-readable format. Based on an analysis of a corpus of

  15. Computerized surveillance in clinical microbiology with time series analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Dessau, R B; Steenberg, P

    1993-01-01

    An automatic surveillance system to detect changes in the incidences of microorganisms diagnosed in the department of clinical microbiology has been developed. The program is incorporated into the laboratory computer system and gives a weekly list of microorganisms whose isolation rates compared with those of a previous period exceed a chosen limit. The system uses time series analysis with moving weighted averages, and the detection limit is based on the distribution of the residuals. Output from the system included information about potential outbreaks of gastroenteritis, nosocomial infection with Corynebacterium jeikeium, and a seasonal epidemic of respiratory syncytial virus. The system also listed organisms not commonly isolated in the laboratory and detected incorrect reports. We conclude that continuous surveillance of laboratory data with time series analysis is a valuable tool for epidemiologic surveillance and quality control. Large quantities of data may be screened. PMID:8463397

  16. Structuring clinical practice guidelines in a relational database model for decision support on the Internet.

    PubMed Central

    Lobach, D. F.; Gadd, C. S.; Hales, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    The rapid proliferation of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) has made computerization increasingly useful to clinicians. Computerization, however, requires transformation of the content and logic of each guideline into a computer-accessible form. In this project, we sought to use a relational database to construct a generalized guideline knowledge base for use with Internet-based decision support applications. We hypothesized that knowledge representation schemes could be developed to capture guideline content and logic within the constraints of a relational database model. In this paper we describe a database schema based on a relational model for computerizing CPGs using a hybrid of structured and procedural knowledge representation schemes. We developed and refined this model in the context of five diverse CPGs and found it accommodated all necessary representational requirements. PMID:9357608

  17. Improvements in immunization compliance using a computerized tracking system for inner city clinics.

    PubMed

    Tung, Ying; Duffy, Linda C; Gyamfi, Joyce O; Wojtaszczyk, Frances; Dozier, Askia; Tempfer, Tammy; Clark, Anne; Putnam, Theodore; Bonafede, Ronald

    2003-09-01

    Vaccination compliance rates were calculated for 1995 to 2001 for enrolled patients, based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines and age-appropriate vaccine schedules. The results reported here indicate computerized tracking with the Doctor's Pediatric Immunization Program (Dr. PIP) maintained vaccine compliance rates (> 90%) in healthy and immunocompromised children at 2 months and 12 months of age. Instituting the computerized system has yielded nearly optimal results in both indigenous inner-city clinics. Despite the efficient progress made by automated tracking, the results for specific vaccine strategies (Varicella) and target groups (human immunodeficiency virus, high-risk indigent populations) may require on-going and intensive educational efforts to achieve optimization levels. PMID:14552519

  18. Economics of Brucella ovis control in sheep: computerized decision-tree analysis.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, T E; Berry, S L; Glenn, J S

    1987-04-15

    The epidemiology and economics of Brucella ovis control in a hypothetical, commercial sheep flock (100 rams and 2,500 ewes) were investigated. The investigation consisted of an epidemiologic simulation model, reported in a companion paper, and a decision-tree analysis, reported here. It was predicted from the simulation model that B ovis could be eradicated successfully in 2 test periods (less than 1 year) from a flock by using intensive screening and culling. A computerized decision-tree program was used to determine the economically optimal control strategy among several alternatives. Two versions of the program were used to determine the optimal alternative, based on minimizing the expected monetary loss (deterministic) and minimizing the associated risk (stochastic). The economically optimal alternative was to screen the rams by means of palpation, semen testing, and ELISA prior to the mating season. Rams positive to any test were culled. After the mating season was completed, the optimal action was to use ELISA for the remaining rams and to cull all that were ELISA positive. The cost of this alternative was approximately $6,150, or less than one half the annual cost of a vaccination program ($12,800) or no program ($13,550). Continuing palpation and semen testing were considered worthwhile on the basis of detecting new cases of B ovis infection and in maintaining high flock fertility. Similarly, the cost of annual use of ELISA was small (approximately $100), compared with the potential cost of not detecting a new case of B ovis infection. PMID:3570958

  19. The Effect of Level of Patient Acuity, Critical Care Experience, and ACLS Certification on Clinical Decision Making: Implications for Computer Decision Support Systems

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Suzanne Bakken

    1990-01-01

    This study examined the effect of patient acuity, critical care experience, and ACLS certification on clinical decision making. Each subject (N=68) completed two computerized clinical simulations. Ventricular tachycardia (VT) represented the high acuity situation and atrial flutter (AF) the lower acuity situation. Clinical decision making was measured by proficiency score, patient outcome (cure/die), and amount of data collected. In the AF simulation, proficiency scores were higher (p=.000), more dysrhythmias were cured (p<.005), and more data were collected (p=.040) than in the VT simulation. Experienced and inexperienced nurses did not differ on proficiency score, however, inexperienced nurses collected more data (p=.048) and cured fewer atrial flutter simulations (p=.04). ACLS certified nurses had higher proficiency scores (p=.033) and collected less data (p=.048). Clinical decision making on two simulations was affected by patient acuity, critical care experience, and ACLS certification. These findings have implications for the design and implementation of clinical decision support systems.

  20. Computerized scintigraphic technique for the evaluation of adult respiratory distress syndrome: initial clinical trials

    SciTech Connect

    Tatum, J.L.; Burke, T.S.; Sugerman, H.J.; Strash, A.M.; Hirsch, J.I.; Fratkin, M.J.

    1982-04-01

    Eleven patients with suspected adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and five control patients were studied using a computerized gamma imaging and analysis technique and 99mTc-labeled human serum albumin. The heart and right lung were imaged, lung:heart ratio was plotted vs. time, and a linear regression was fitted to the data points displayed. The slope of this fit was termed the ''slope index.'' An index value of 2 standard deviations greater than the control mean was considered positive. Radiographs from the six positive studies revealed typical diffuse air-space disease. Radiographs from two of the five negative studies demonstrated air-space consolidation. Both of these patients had elevated pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, cardiomegaly, and clinical course consistent with cardiogenic pulmonary edema. These preliminary data demonstrated a good correlation between positive slope index and clinical ARDS.

  1. Computerized scintigraphic technique for the evaluation of adult respiratory distress syndrome: initial clinical trials

    SciTech Connect

    Tatum, J.L.; Burke, T.S.; Sugerman, H.T.; Strash, A.M.; Hirsch, J.I.; Fratkin, M.J.

    1982-04-01

    Eleven patients with suspected adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and five control patients were studied using a computerized gamma imaging and analysis technique and /sup 99m/Tc-labeled human serum albumin. The heart and right lung were imaged, lung:heart ratio was plotted vs. time, and a linear regression was fitted to the data points displayed. The slope of this fit was termed the ''slope index.'' An index value of 2 standard deviations greater than the control mean was considered positive. Radiographs from the six positive studies revealed typical diffuse air-space disease. Radiographs from two of the five negative studies demonstrated air-space consolidation. Both of these patients had elevated pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, cardiomegaly, and clinical course consistent with cardiogenic pulmonary edema. These preliminary data demonstrated a good correlation between positive slope index and clinical ARDS.

  2. A discussion of clinical decision support services.

    PubMed

    Booker, Corenthian Corey J; Andrews, Paige N

    2013-09-01

    The software known as Clinical Decision Support Services (CDSS) has emerged as a buzzword from the explosion of information systems within health care. CDSS is installed within a practice to provide resources and tools to support the utilization of patient data in the provider decision-making process. Additional applications of CDSS include streamlining administrative duties and assisting in cost control. This paper examines the details of CDSS design and implementation to analyze strengths, weaknesses, and feasibility of CDSS for practices of varying sizes and objectives. PMID:23787710

  3. Clinical knowledge management using computerized patient record systems: is the current infrastructure adequate?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel P. Lorence; Richard Churchill

    2005-01-01

    The proliferation of technology in health care, spurred by environmental factors encouraging the adoption of computerized patient records (CPRs), has led to a widely held perception of fully computerized patient information systems as the industry norm. To test the validity of this assumption, using data from a national survey of certified health information managers, we examined the CPR technology adoption

  4. Towards Meaningful Medication-Related Clinical Decision Support: Recommendations for an Initial Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Phansalkar, S.; Wright, A.; Kuperman, G.J.; Vaida, A.J.; Bobb, A.M.; Jenders, R.A.; Payne, T.H.; Halamka, J.; Bloomrosen, M.; Bates, D.W.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Clinical decision support (CDS) can improve safety, quality, and cost-effectiveness of patient care, especially when implemented in computerized provider order entry (CPOE) applications. Medication-related decision support logic forms a large component of the CDS logic in any CPOE system. However, organizations wishing to implement CDS must either purchase the computable clinical content or develop it themselves. Content provided by vendors does not always meet local expectations. Most organizations lack the resources to customize the clinical content and the expertise to implement it effectively. In this paper, we describe the recommendations of a national expert panel on two basic medication-related CDS areas, specifically, drug-drug interaction (DDI) checking and duplicate therapy checking. The goals of this study were to define a starter set of medication-related alerts that healthcare organizations can implement in their clinical information systems. We also draw on the experiences of diverse institutions to highlight the realities of implementing medication decision support. These findings represent the experiences of institutions with a long history in the domain of medication decision support, and the hope is that this guidance may improve the feasibility and efficiency CDS adoption across healthcare settings. PMID:23616860

  5. Integrating Healthcare Knowledge Artifacts for Clinical Decision Support: Towards Semantic

    E-print Network

    Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

    the systematic inte- gration of knowledge from multiple sources, such as clinical guidelines, clinical pathways by generating morphed knowledge about prostate cancer clinical pathways. 1 Introduction Healthcare decision `ar- tifacts', such as clinical practice guidelines, best evidence, clinical pathways and so on [1

  6. Computerized Neuropsychological Assessment Devices: Joint Position Paper of the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology and the National Academy of Neuropsychology†

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Russell M.; Iverson, Grant L.; Cernich, Alison N.; Binder, Laurence M.; Ruff, Ronald M.; Naugle, Richard I.

    2013-01-01

    This joint position paper of the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology and the National Academy of Neuropsychology sets forth our position on appropriate standards and conventions for computerized neuropsychological assessment devices (CNADs). In this paper, we first define CNADs and distinguish them from examiner-administered neuropsychological instruments. We then set forth position statements on eight key issues relevant to the development and use of CNADs in the healthcare setting. These statements address (a) device marketing and performance claims made by developers of CNADs; (b) issues involved in appropriate end-users for administration and interpretation of CNADs; (c) technical (hardware/software/firmware) issues; (d) privacy, data security, identity verification, and testing environment; (e) psychometric development issues, especially reliability and validity; (f) cultural, experiential, and disability factors affecting examinee interaction with CNADs; (g) use of computerized testing and reporting services; and (h) the need for checks on response validity and effort in the CNAD environment. This paper is intended to provide guidance for test developers and users of CNADs that will promote accurate and appropriate use of computerized tests in a way that maximizes clinical utility and minimizes risks of misuse. The positions taken in this paper are put forth with an eye toward balancing the need to make validated CNADs accessible to otherwise underserved patients with the need to ensure that such tests are developed and utilized competently, appropriately, and with due concern for patient welfare and quality of care. PMID:22394228

  7. Computerized Neuropsychological Assessment Devices: Joint Position Paper of the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology and the National Academy of Neuropsychology†

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Russell M.; Iverson, Grant L.; Cernich, Alison N.; Binder, Laurence M.; Ruff, Ronald M.; Naugle, Richard I.

    2012-01-01

    This joint position paper of the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology and the National Academy of Neuropsychology sets forth our position on appropriate standards and conventions for computerized neuropsychological assessment devices (CNADs). In this paper, we first define CNADs and distinguish them from examiner-administered neuropsychological instruments. We then set forth position statements on eight key issues relevant to the development and use of CNADs in the healthcare setting. These statements address (a) device marketing and performance claims made by developers of CNADs; (b) issues involved in appropriate end-users for administration and interpretation of CNADs; (c) technical (hardware/software/firmware) issues; (d) privacy, data security, identity verification, and testing environment; (e) psychometric development issues, especially reliability, and validity; (f) cultural, experiential, and disability factors affecting examinee interaction with CNADs; (g) use of computerized testing and reporting services; and (h) the need for checks on response validity and effort in the CNAD environment. This paper is intended to provide guidance for test developers and users of CNADs that will promote accurate and appropriate use of computerized tests in a way that maximizes clinical utility and minimizes risks of misuse. The positions taken in this paper are put forth with an eye toward balancing the need to make validated CNADs accessible to otherwise underserved patients with the need to ensure that such tests are developed and utilized competently, appropriately, and with due concern for patient welfare and quality of care. PMID:22382386

  8. Computerizing the Budget Office: An On-Line Decision Support System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Glenn R.; Peterson, William R.

    The implementation process and resource requirements of the University of Connecticut Budget Office's online decision support system are described. Successes and failures of shifting to a fully interactive budget review and development process are also reviewed. Special attention is given to the personnel problems and analytical challenges…

  9. Evaluating informatics applications - clinical decision support systems literature review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bonnie Kaplan

    2001-01-01

    This paper reviews clinical decision support systems (CDSS) literature, with a focus on evaluation. The literature indicates a general consensus that clinical decision support systems are thought to have the potential to improve care. Evidence is more equivocal for guidelines and for systems to aid physicians with diagnosis. There also is general consensus that a variety of systems are little

  10. Clinical decision support tools: analysis of online drug information databases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin A Clauson; Wallace A Marsh; Hyla H Polen; Matthew J Seamon; Blanca I Ortiz

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Online drug information databases are used to assist in enhancing clinical decision support. However, the choice of which online database to consult, purchase or subscribe to is likely made based on subjective elements such as history of use, familiarity, or availability during professional training. The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical decision support tools for drug information

  11. Developing a computerized data collection and decision support system for cancer pain management.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsiu-Ying; Wilkie, Diana J; Zong, Shi-Ping Sam; Berry, Donna; Hairabedian, Daniela; Judge, M Kay; Farber, Stuart; Chabal, Charles

    2003-01-01

    Contemporary nursing practice needs reengineering to deliver its service effectively and efficiently. Using computer technology to support clinicians' decision making may be a parsimonious way to provide high-quality, patient-centered, efficient care. The process of developing the PAINReportIt and PAINConsultN system is described, and the results of two pilot studies in which the system was tested are summarized. The feasibility of using the system to assess pain and provide decision support for clinicians is demonstrated. The findings show PAINReportIt to be promising as an effective, efficient way for patients to report their pain. Whether PAINConsultN is an effective answer to cancer pain management barriers warrants further evaluation with larger samples. The advantages of using the system, as compared with use of the traditional pain management process, are discussed. PMID:12869874

  12. Personalizing Drug Selection Using Advanced Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Pestian, John; Spencer, Malik; Matykiewicz, Pawel; Zhang, Kejian; Vinks, Alexander A.; Glauser, Tracy

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the process of developing an advanced pharmacogenetics clinical decision support at one of the United States’ leading pediatric academic medical centers. This system, called CHRISTINE, combines clinical and genetic data to identify the optimal drug therapy when treating patients with epilepsy or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. In the discussion a description of clinical decision support systems is provided, along with an overview of neurocognitive computing and how it is applied in this setting. PMID:19898682

  13. Decision-theoretic refinement planning: a new method for clinical decision analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Doan, A.; Haddawy, P.; Kahn, C. E.

    1995-01-01

    Clinical decision analysis seeks to identify the optimal management strategy by modelling the uncertainty and risks entailed in the diagnosis, natural history, and treatment of a particular problem or disorder. Decision trees are the most frequently used model in clinical decision analysis, but can be tedious to construct, cumbersome to use, and computationally prohibitive, especially with large, complex decision problems. We present a new method for clinical decision analysis that combines the techniques of decision theory and artificial intelligence. Our model uses a modular representation of knowledge that simplifies model building and enables more fully automated decision making. Moreover, the model exploits problem structures to yield better computational efficiency. As an example we apply our techniques to the problem of management of acute deep venous thrombosis. PMID:8563289

  14. Advancing clinical decision support using lessons from outside of healthcare: an interdisciplinary systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Greater use of computerized decision support (DS) systems could address continuing safety and quality problems in healthcare, but the healthcare field has struggled to implement DS technology. This study surveys DS experience across multiple non-healthcare disciplines for new insights that are generalizable to healthcare provider decisions. In particular, it sought design principles and lessons learned from the other disciplines that could inform efforts to accelerate the adoption of clinical decision support (CDS). Methods Our systematic review drew broadly from non-healthcare databases in the basic sciences, social sciences, humanities, engineering, business, and defense: PsychINFO, BusinessSource Premier, Social Sciences Abstracts, Web of Science, and Defense Technical Information Center. Because our interest was in DS that could apply to clinical decisions, we selected articles that (1) provided a review, overview, discussion of lessons learned, or an evaluation of design or implementation aspects of DS within a non-healthcare discipline and (2) involved an element of human judgment at the individual level, as opposed to decisions that can be fully automated or that are made at the organizational level. Results Clinical decisions share some similarities with decisions made by military commanders, business managers, and other leaders: they involve assessing new situations and choosing courses of action with major consequences, under time pressure, and with incomplete information. We identified seven high-level DS system design features from the non-healthcare literature that could be applied to CDS: providing broad, system-level perspectives; customizing interfaces to specific users and roles; making the DS reasoning transparent; presenting data effectively; generating multiple scenarios covering disparate outcomes (e.g., effective; effective with side effects; ineffective); allowing for contingent adaptations; and facilitating collaboration. The article provides examples of each feature. The DS literature also emphasizes the importance of organizational culture and training in implementation success. The literature contrasts “rational-analytic” vs. “naturalistic-intuitive” decision-making styles, but the best approach is often a balanced approach that combines both styles. It is also important for DS systems to enable exploration of multiple assumptions, and incorporation of new information in response to changing circumstances. Conclusions Complex, high-level decision-making has common features across disciplines as seemingly disparate as defense, business, and healthcare. National efforts to advance the health information technology agenda through broader CDS adoption could benefit by applying the DS principles identified in this review. PMID:22900537

  15. Mining Diabetes Complication and Treatment Patterns for Clinical Decision Support

    E-print Network

    Mining Diabetes Complication and Treatment Patterns for Clinical Decision Support Lu Liu , Jie Tang to utilize the heterogeneous medical records to aid the clinical treatments of diabetes mellitus. Diabetes mellitus, simply diabetes, is a group of metabolic diseases, which is often accompa- nied with many

  16. Clinical Factors and the Decision to Transfuse Chronic Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Whitman, Cynthia B.; Shreay, Sanatan; Gitlin, Matthew; van Oijen, Martijn G. H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Red blood cell transfusion was previously the principle therapy for anemia in CKD but became less prevalent after the introduction of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. This study used adaptive choice-based conjoint analysis to identify preferences and predictors of transfusion decision-making in CKD. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A computerized adaptive choice-based conjoint survey was administered between June and August of 2012 to nephrologists, internists, and hospitalists listed in the American Medical Association Masterfile. The survey quantified the relative importance of 10 patient attributes, including hemoglobin levels, age, occult blood in stool, severity of illness, eligibility for transplant, iron indices, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, cardiovascular disease, and functional status. Triggers of transfusions in common dialysis scenarios were studied, and based on adaptive choice-based conjoint-derived preferences, relative importance by performing multivariable regression to identify predictors of transfusion preferences was assessed. Results A total of 350 providers completed the survey (n=305 nephrologists; mean age=46 years; 21% women). Of 10 attributes assessed, absolute hemoglobin level was the most important driver of transfusions, accounting for 29% of decision-making, followed by functional status (16%) and cardiovascular comorbidities (12%); 92% of providers transfused when hemoglobin was 7.5 g/dl, independent of other factors. In multivariable regression, Veterans Administration providers were more likely to transfuse at 8.0 g/dl (odds ratio, 5.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.9 to 18.4). Although transplant eligibility explained only 5% of decision-making, nephrologists were five times more likely to value it as important compared with non-nephrologists (odds ratio, 5.2; 95% confidence interval, 2.4 to11.1). Conclusions Adaptive choice-based conjoint analysis was useful in predicting influences on transfusion decisions. Hemoglobin level, functional status, and cardiovascular comorbidities most strongly influenced transfusion decision-making, but preference variations were observed among subgroups. PMID:23929931

  17. Operationalizing Prostate Cancer Clinical Pathways: An Ontological Model to Computerize, Merge and

    E-print Network

    Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

    to be operationalized as a decision-support and care planning tool at the point-of-care. We applied a knowledge man be executed through a logic-based engine to realize a point-of-care decision-support system for managing prostate cancer care. 1 INTRODUCTION Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer among Cana- dian men

  18. Therapists' anxiety and attitudes toward computerized documentation in the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, K; Brodnik, M; Sachs, L; Schiller, M R

    1997-01-01

    Many hospitals are converting to electronic records and allied health professionals are required to modify their traditional documentation practices to accommodate this new technology. This paper discusses a study conducted to determine the computer anxiety and attitudes of physical, occupational, and speech therapists in a large urban teaching hospital before and after the implementation of a computerized documentation system. Fifty-three therapists surveyed with a preinstallation questionnaire reported mild computer anxiety and generally good attitudes about the planned computer system. A greater amount of previous computer use and better self-related computer skills were consistent with less computer anxiety. Seven of the original sample became the first to use the computer system. After their six month trial period, surveys revealed a reduction in computer anxieties. Manual time logs completed before and after the system implementation revealed a significant decrease in total documentation time when using computers. PMID:9451584

  19. Cognitive Elements in Clinical Decision-Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunphy, Bruce C.; Cantwell, Robert; Bourke, Sid; Fleming, Mark; Smith, Bruce; Joseph, K. S.; Dunphy, Stacey L

    2010-01-01

    Physician cognition, metacognition and affect may have an impact upon the quality of clinical reasoning. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between measures of physician metacognition and affect and patient outcomes in obstetric practice. Reflective coping (RC), proactive coping, need for cognition (NFC), tolerance for…

  20. Cognitive elements in clinical decision-making

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruce C. Dunphy; Robert Cantwell; Sid Bourke; Mark Fleming; Bruce Smith; K. S. Joseph; Stacey L. Dunphy

    2010-01-01

    Physician cognition, metacognition and affect may have an impact upon the quality of clinical reasoning. The purpose of this\\u000a study was to examine the relationship between measures of physician metacognition and affect and patient outcomes in obstetric\\u000a practice. Reflective coping (RC), proactive coping, need for cognition (NFC), tolerance for ambiguity, state-trait anxiety\\u000a and metacognitive awareness were assessed for obstetricians (n = 12)

  1. DocBot: a novel clinical decision support algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ninh, Andrew Q

    2014-01-01

    DocBot is a web-based clinical decision support system (CDSS) that uses patient interaction and electronic health record analytics to assist medical practitioners with decision making. It consists of two distinct HTML interfaces: a preclinical form wherein a patient inputs symptomatic and demographic information, and an interface wherein a medical practitioner views patient information and analysis. DocBot comprises an improved software architecture that uses patient information, electronic health records, and etiologically relevant binary decision questions (stored in a knowledgebase) to provide medical practitioners with information including, but not limited to medical assessments, treatment plans, and specialist referrals. PMID:25571435

  2. Enrollment into a time sensitive clinical study in the critical care setting: results from computerized septic shock sniffer implementation

    PubMed Central

    Pieper, Matthew S; Pulido, Juan; Gajic, Ognjen

    2011-01-01

    Objective Recruitment of patients into time sensitive clinical trials in intensive care units (ICU) poses a significant challenge. Enrollment is limited by delayed recognition and late notification of research personnel. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the implementation of electronic screening (septic shock sniffer) regarding enrollment into a time sensitive (24?h after onset) clinical study of echocardiography in severe sepsis and septic shock. Design We developed and tested a near-real time computerized alert system, the septic shock sniffer, based on established severe sepsis/septic shock diagnostic criteria. A sniffer scanned patients' data in the electronic medical records and notified the research coordinator on call through an institutional paging system of potentially eligible patients. Measurement The performance of the septic shock sniffer was assessed. Results The septic shock sniffer performed well with a positive predictive value of 34%. Electronic screening doubled enrollment, with 68 of 4460 ICU admissions enrolled during the 9?months after implementation versus 37 of 4149 ICU admissions before sniffer implementation (p<0.05). Efficiency was limited by study coordinator availability (not available at nights or weekends). Conclusions Automated electronic medical records screening improves the efficiency of enrollment and should be a routine tool for the recruitment of patients into time sensitive clinical trials in the ICU setting. PMID:21508415

  3. The Relationship Between the Clinical Orientation of Substance Abuse Professionals and Their Clinical Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toriello, Paul J.; Leierer, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the relationship between the clinical orientations of substance abuse professionals (SAPs) and their clinical decisions. Cluster analysis grouped a sample of 245 SAPs on two clinical orientations that differed in their relative endorsement of traditional versus contemporary substance abuse counseling processes…

  4. The role of emotions in clinical reasoning and decision making.

    PubMed

    Marcum, James A

    2013-10-01

    What role, if any, should emotions play in clinical reasoning and decision making? Traditionally, emotions have been excluded from clinical reasoning and decision making, but with recent advances in cognitive neuropsychology they are now considered an important component of them. Today, cognition is thought to be a set of complex processes relying on multiple types of intelligences. The role of mathematical logic (hypothetico-deductive thinking) or verbal linguistic intelligence in cognition, for example, is well documented and accepted; however, the role of emotional intelligence has received less attention-especially because its nature and function are not well understood. In this paper, I argue for the inclusion of emotions in clinical reasoning and decision making. To that end, developments in contemporary cognitive neuropsychology are initially examined and analyzed, followed by a review of the medical literature discussing the role of emotions in clinical practice. Next, a published clinical case is reconstructed and used to illustrate the recognition and regulation of emotions played during a series of clinical consultations, which resulted in a positive medical outcome. The paper's main thesis is that emotions, particularly in terms of emotional intelligence as a practical form of intelligence, afford clinical practitioners a robust cognitive resource for providing quality medical care. PMID:23975905

  5. The potential conflict between clinical and judicial decision making heuristics.

    PubMed

    Rassin, E; Merckelbach, H

    1999-01-01

    The Gudjonsson Suggestibility Scale (GSS; Gudjonsson, 1984) was introduced as a tool for identifying suspects who are at risk of making false confessions. High GSS-scores indicate a greater risk of making false confessions. Recently, some authors have claimed that low GSS-scores can be used to support the credibility of recovered memories. This new application broadens the use of the GSS in two ways. First, low GSS-scores are considered to possess diagnostic value. Second, the GSS is advocated as a practical tool in clinical settings. This article critically evaluates such a clinical application of the GSS. Our main argument has to do with the incompatibility of basic clinical and judicial decision making heuristics. Psychotherapists, and other medical professionals, should base their decisions on different parameters than judicial professionals. Compared to judicial heuristics, clinical heuristics can be characterized as more empathetic, less critical, and less conservative. Given these differences, clinical conclusions (including those about the accuracy of recovered memories) cannot be easily translated into judicial decisions. If they do enter the judicial domain, these conclusions may lead to dubious forensic decisions. PMID:10398333

  6. Clinical Research Databases and Clinical Decision Making in Chronic Diseases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael G. Kahn

    1999-01-01

    Chronic diseases are the major source of morbidity, mortality, and resource utilization. Large-scale longitudinal databases are rapidly proliferating in both single- and multi-institutional settings, providing clinical data on a broad range of patients who receive ‘real world’ management. Although bias and changing medical management may limit the types of questions that can be addressed using the data contained in longitudinal

  7. SUMMARY Clinical and radiological findings in patients diagnosed pulmonary thromboembolism by pulmonary computerized tomography angiography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fatma ARSLAN; Serpil ELADA? YURT; Neslihan TARAKÇI; Akin KAYA; Çetin ATASOY

    Pulmonary computed tomography angiography (PCTA) is the initial imaging test for the diagnosis of pulmonary throm- boembolism (PTE). In the study, it was aimed to determine the clinical, radiological findings in patients diagnosed PTE by PCTA, to investigate the relationship between the thrombus localisation and the clinical, laboratory parameters. 172 patients diagnosed PTE by PCTA between 2004 and 2007 were

  8. The design of an EHR for clinical decision support

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Liang Xiao; Gráinne Cousins; Lucy Hederman; Tom Fahey; Borislav Dimitrov

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we give an overview of methadone treatment in Ireland and outline the rationale for designing an electronic healthcare record (EHR) with extensibility, interoperability and decision support functionality. Incorporating the openEHR standard, we designed a set of archetypes in line with the current best practice and clinical guidelines. They guide the information gathering process. A web-based data entry

  9. Experiences with experimental clinical evaluation of a computerized drug delivery system for regulation of mean arterial blood pressure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Ezra Kwok; S. L. Shah; B. A. Finegan; G. K. Kwong

    1999-01-01

    A number of closed-loop control systems have been investigated and developed for the regulation of physiological variables by automatic administration of therapeutic agents. This paper reflects on several years of practical experience, by the authors, in this area including the development of an adaptive computerized drug delivery system. A computerized adaptive drug delivery system has been designed and tested for

  10. Enablers, Barriers, and the Influence of Organizational Environmental Factors on Computerized Clinical Documentation Training Developed and Delivered by Nursing Informaticists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulhanek, Brenda J.

    2010-01-01

    Within the past decade, the introduction of computerized medical records into the business and practice of health care has created a need for effective training. The implementation of computerized medical records into a health care organization has been often associated with increased costs and decreased productivity. Although existing human…

  11. Dynamic clinical data mining: search engine-based decision support.

    PubMed

    Celi, Leo Anthony; Zimolzak, Andrew J; Stone, David J

    2014-01-01

    The research world is undergoing a transformation into one in which data, on massive levels, is freely shared. In the clinical world, the capture of data on a consistent basis has only recently begun. We propose an operational vision for a digitally based care system that incorporates data-based clinical decision making. The system would aggregate individual patient electronic medical data in the course of care; query a universal, de-identified clinical database using modified search engine technology in real time; identify prior cases of sufficient similarity as to be instructive to the case at hand; and populate the individual patient's electronic medical record with pertinent decision support material such as suggested interventions and prognosis, based on prior outcomes. Every individual's course, including subsequent outcomes, would then further populate the population database to create a feedback loop to benefit the care of future patients. PMID:25600664

  12. Dynamic Clinical Data Mining: Search Engine-Based Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Zimolzak, Andrew J; Stone, David J

    2014-01-01

    The research world is undergoing a transformation into one in which data, on massive levels, is freely shared. In the clinical world, the capture of data on a consistent basis has only recently begun. We propose an operational vision for a digitally based care system that incorporates data-based clinical decision making. The system would aggregate individual patient electronic medical data in the course of care; query a universal, de-identified clinical database using modified search engine technology in real time; identify prior cases of sufficient similarity as to be instructive to the case at hand; and populate the individual patient's electronic medical record with pertinent decision support material such as suggested interventions and prognosis, based on prior outcomes. Every individual's course, including subsequent outcomes, would then further populate the population database to create a feedback loop to benefit the care of future patients. PMID:25600664

  13. An Intelligent Computerized Stretch Reflex Measurement System For Clinical And Investigative Neurology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, P. M.; Chutkow, J. G.; Riggs, M. T.; Cristiano, V. D.

    1987-05-01

    We describe the design of a reliable, user-friendly preprototype system for quantifying the tendon stretch reflexes in humans and large mammals. A hand-held, instrumented reflex gun, the impactor of which contains a single force sensor, interfaces with a computer. The resulting test system can deliver sequences of reproducible stimuli at graded intensities and adjustable durations to a muscle's tendon ("tendon taps"), measure the impacting force of each tap, and record the subsequent reflex muscle contraction from the same tendon -- all automatically. The parameters of the reflex muscle contraction include latency; mechanical threshold; and peak time, peak magnitude, and settling time. The results of clinical tests presented in this paper illustrate the system's potential usefulness in detecting neurologic dysfunction affecting the tendon stretch reflexes, in documenting the course of neurologic illnesses and their response to therapy, and in clinical and laboratory neurologic research.

  14. Clinical decision support systems: data quality management and governance.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Siaw-Teng

    2013-01-01

    This chapter examines data quality management (DQM) and information governance (IG) of electronic decision support (EDS) systems so that they are safe and fit for use by clinicians and patients and their carers. This is consistent with the ISO definition of data quality as being fit for purpose. The scope of DQM & IG should range from data creation and collection in clinical settings, through cleaning and, where obtained from multiple sources, linkage, storage, use by the EDS logic engine and algorithms, knowledge base and guidance provided, to curation and presentation. It must also include protocols and mechanisms to monitor the safety of EDS, which will feedback into DQM & IG activities. Ultimately, DQM & IG must be integrated across the data cycle to ensure that the EDS systems provide guidance that leads to safe and effective clinical decisions and care. PMID:24018528

  15. Clinical decision support with automated text processing for cervical cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    MacLaughlin, Kathy L; Henry, Michael R; Greenes, Robert A; Hankey, Ronald A; Liu, Hongfang; Chaudhry, Rajeev

    2012-01-01

    Objective To develop a computerized clinical decision support system (CDSS) for cervical cancer screening that can interpret free-text Papanicolaou (Pap) reports. Materials and Methods The CDSS was constituted by two rulebases: the free-text rulebase for interpreting Pap reports and a guideline rulebase. The free-text rulebase was developed by analyzing a corpus of 49?293 Pap reports. The guideline rulebase was constructed using national cervical cancer screening guidelines. The CDSS accesses the electronic medical record (EMR) system to generate patient-specific recommendations. For evaluation, the screening recommendations made by the CDSS for 74 patients were reviewed by a physician. Results and Discussion Evaluation revealed that the CDSS outputs the optimal screening recommendations for 73 out of 74 test patients and it identified two cases for gynecology referral that were missed by the physician. The CDSS aided the physician to amend recommendations in six cases. The failure case was because human papillomavirus (HPV) testing was sometimes performed separately from the Pap test and these results were reported by a laboratory system that was not queried by the CDSS. Subsequently, the CDSS was upgraded to look up the HPV results missed earlier and it generated the optimal recommendations for all 74 test cases. Limitations Single institution and single expert study. Conclusion An accurate CDSS system could be constructed for cervical cancer screening given the standardized reporting of Pap tests and the availability of explicit guidelines. Overall, the study demonstrates that free text in the EMR can be effectively utilized through natural language processing to develop clinical decision support tools. PMID:22542812

  16. Counseling About Medication-Induced Birth Defects with Clinical Decision Support in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Sara M.; Handler, Steven M.; Koren, Gideon; Shevchik, Grant; Fischer, Gary S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background We evaluated how computerized clinical decision support (CDS) affects the counseling women receive when primary care physicians (PCPs) prescribe potential teratogens and how this counseling affects women's behavior. Methods Between October 2008 and April 2010, all women aged 18–50 years visiting one of three community-based family practice clinics or an academic general internal medicine clinic were invited to complete a survey 5–30 days after their clinic visit. Women who received prescriptions were asked if they were counseled about teratogenic risks or contraception and if they used contraception at last intercourse. Results Eight hundred one women completed surveys; 27% received a prescription for a potential teratogen. With or without CDS, women prescribed potential teratogens were more likely than women prescribed safer medications to report counseling about teratogenic risks. However, even with CDS 43% of women prescribed potential teratogens reported no counseling. In multivariable models, women were more likely to report counseling if they saw a female PCP (odds ratio: 1.97; 95% confidence interval: 1.26–3.09). Women were least likely to report counseling if they received angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers. Women who were pregnant or trying to conceive were not more likely to report counseling. Nonetheless, women who received counseling about contraception or teratogenic risks were more likely to use contraception after being prescribed potential teratogens than women who received no counseling. Conclusions Physician counseling can reduce risk of medication-induced birth defects. However, efforts are needed to ensure that PCPs consistently inform women of teratogenic risks and provide access to highly effective contraception. PMID:23930947

  17. IBM’s Health Analytics and Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Sun, J.; Knoop, S.; Shabo, A.; Carmeli, B.; Sow, D.; Syed-Mahmood, T.; Rapp, W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives This survey explores the role of big data and health analytics developed by IBM in supporting the transformation of healthcare by augmenting evidence-based decision-making. Methods Some problems in healthcare and strategies for change are described. It is argued that change requires better decisions, which, in turn, require better use of the many kinds of healthcare information. Analytic resources that address each of the information challenges are described. Examples of the role of each of the resources are given. Results There are powerful analytic tools that utilize the various kinds of big data in healthcare to help clinicians make more personalized, evidenced-based decisions. Such resources can extract relevant information and provide insights that clinicians can use to make evidence-supported decisions. There are early suggestions that these resources have clinical value. As with all analytic tools, they are limited by the amount and quality of data. Conclusion Big data is an inevitable part of the future of healthcare. There is a compelling need to manage and use big data to make better decisions to support the transformation of healthcare to the personalized, evidence-supported model of the future. Cognitive computing resources are necessary to manage the challenges in employing big data in healthcare. Such tools have been and are being developed. The analytic resources, themselves, do not drive, but support healthcare transformation. PMID:25123736

  18. Cancer diagnostics: decision criteria for marker utilization in the clinic.

    PubMed

    Taube, Sheila E; Jacobson, James W; Lively, Tracy G

    2005-01-01

    A new diagnostic tool must pass three major tests before it is adopted for routine clinical use. First, the tool must be robust and reproducible; second, the clinical value of the tool must be proven, i.e. the tool should reliably trigger a clinical decision that results in patient benefit; and, third, the clinical community has to be convinced of the need for this tool and the benefits it affords. Another factor that can influence the adoption of new tools relates to the cost and the vagaries of insurance reimbursement. The Cancer Diagnosis Program (CDP) of the US National Cancer Institute (NCI) launched the Program for the Assessment of Clinical Cancer Tests (PACCT) in 2000 to develop a process for moving the results of new technologies and new understanding of cancer biology more efficiently and effectively into clinical practice. PACCT has developed an algorithm that incorporates the iterative nature of assay development into an evaluation process that includes developers and end users. The effective introduction of new tests into clinical practice has been hampered by a series of common problems that are best described using examples of successes and failures. The successful application of the PACCT algorithm is described in the discussion of the recent development of the OncotypeDX assay and plan for a prospective trial of this assay by the NCI-supported Clinical Trials Cooperative Groups. The assay uses reverse transcription (RT)-PCR evaluation of a set of 16 genes that were shown to strongly associate with the risk of recurrence of breast cancer in women who presented with early stage disease (hormone responsive, and no involvement of the auxiliary lymph nodes). The test is highly reproducible. It provides information to aid the physician and patient in making important clinical decisions, including the aggressiveness of the therapy that should be recommended. A trial is planned to test whether OncotypeDX can be used as a standalone trigger for specific treatment decisions. The problems that have been encountered and have delayed the development of other diagnostic tools are exemplified in the development of tests for human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2) overexpression, for predictors of response to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors, and for the detection of residual disease following chemotherapy. PMID:16336001

  19. Clinical Decision Making—A Functional Medicine Perspective

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    As 21st century health care moves from a disease-based approach to a more patient-centric system that can address biochemical individuality to improve health and function, clinical decision making becomes more complex. Accentuating the problem is the lack of a clear standard for this more complex functional medicine approach. While there is relatively broad agreement in Western medicine for what constitutes competent assessment of disease and identification of related treatment approaches, the complex functional medicine model posits multiple and individualized diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, most or many of which have reasonable underlying science and principles, but which have not been rigorously tested in a research or clinical setting. This has led to non-rigorous thinking and sometimes to uncritical acceptance of both poorly documented diagnostic procedures and ineffective therapies, resulting in less than optimal clinical care. PMID:24278827

  20. Lung function tests in clinical decision-making.

    PubMed

    Puente Maestú, Luis; García de Pedro, Julia

    2012-05-01

    In this article, we review the utility of the most common lung function tests (spirometry, reversibility test, peak expiratory flow, lung volumes, maximal respiratory pressure, carbon monoxide transference, arterial blood gas, 6-minute walk test and desaturation with exercise and ergospirometry) related to the most frequent pathologies (dyspnea of undetermined origin, chronic cough, asthma, COPD, neuromuscular diseases, interstitial diseases, pulmonary vascular diseases, pre-operative evaluation and disability evaluation). Our analysis has been developed from the perspective of decision-making, clinical interpretation or aspects that the physician should take into account with their use. Consequently, the paper does not deal with aspects of quality, technique or equipment, with the exception of when regarding costs as we believe that this is an important element in the decision-making process. The document is extensively supported by references from the literature. PMID:22364671

  1. 45 CFR 307.5 - Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...an operational computerized support enforcement system, which...improve the State's Child Support Enforcement program. ...disapproval is a final administrative decision and is not subject to administrative...FFP for costs of computerized support enforcement systems....

  2. A novel approach to the determination of clinical decision thresholds.

    PubMed

    Ebell, Mark H; Locatelli, Isabella; Senn, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    Our objective was to determine the test and treatment thresholds for common acute primary care conditions. We presented 200 clinicians with a series of web-based clinical vignettes, describing patients with possible influenza, acute coronary syndrome (ACS), pneumonia, deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and urinary tract infection (UTI). We randomly varied the probability of disease and asked whether the clinician wanted to rule out disease, order tests or rule in disease. By randomly varying the probability, we obtained clinical decisions across a broad range of disease probabilities that we used to create threshold curves. For influenza, the test (4.5% vs 32%, p<0.001) and treatment (55% vs 68%, p=0.11) thresholds were lower for US compared with Swiss physicians. US physicians had somewhat higher test (3.8% vs 0.7%, p=0.107) and treatment (76% vs 58%, p=0.005) thresholds for ACS than Swiss physicians. For both groups, the range between test and treatment thresholds was greater for ACS than for influenza (which is sensible, given the consequences of incorrect diagnosis). For pneumonia, US physicians had a trend towards higher test thresholds and lower treatment thresholds (48% vs 64%, p=0.076) than Swiss physicians. The DVT and UTI scenarios did not provide easily interpretable data, perhaps due to poor wording of the vignettes. We have developed a novel approach for determining decision thresholds. We found important differences in thresholds for US and Swiss physicians that may be a function of differences in healthcare systems. Our results can also guide development of clinical decision rules and guidelines. PMID:25736042

  3. Impact of Dysphagia Severity on Clinical Decision Making via Telerehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Clare L.; Theodoros, Deborah G.; Russell, Trevor G.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Recent research supports the proposal that valid and reliable clinical swallow examinations (CSEs) can be conducted via telerehabilitation. However, no studies have explored whether dysphagia severity has an impact on the success of the session or its outcomes. The current study examined how dysphagia severity impacted on either (a) clinical decision making for safety of oral intake or (b) clinician perceptions of CSEs conducted via telerehabilitation. Subjects and Methods: One hundred patients (25 nondysphagics and 25 mild, 25 moderate, and 25 severe dysphagics) were assessed using a telehealth system and methodology reported in prior research. For each assessment, the online and face-to-face (FTF) clinicians simultaneously completed a structured CSE. On session completion, the online clinician indicated level of agreement with two statements regarding the level of rapport and ability to competently assess the patient. Results: In each of the four groups, acceptable levels of agreement were observed between raters for the three primary outcomes (decisions regarding oral/nonoral intake and safe food and fluids) as well as over 90% of the CSE items. Clinicians agreed they could develop good rapport with the majority of patients in all groups. However, for a small but significant (p<0.5) proportion of patents in the severe dysphagic group, clinicians disagreed they were able to satisfactorily and competently assess to the best of their abilities using the telerehabilitation system. Conclusions: Clinical decisions made during and as an outcome of the total CSE were found to be comparable to those made in the FTF environment regardless of dysphagia severity. Clinicians noted some difficulty assessing patients with greater complexity, which occurred in greater numbers in the group with severe dysphagia. PMID:24443927

  4. Evaluation of RxNorm for Medication Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Freimuth, Robert R.; Wix, Kelly; Zhu, Qian; Siska, Mark; Chute, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the potential use of RxNorm to provide standardized representations of generic drug name and route of administration to facilitate management of drug lists for clinical decision support (CDS) rules. We found a clear representation of generic drug name but not route of administration. We identified several issues related to data quality, including erroneous or missing defined relationships, and the use of different concept hierarchies to represent the same drug. More importantly, we found extensive semantic precoordination of orthogonal concepts related to route and dose form, which would complicate the use of RxNorm for drug-based CDS. This study demonstrated that while RxNorm is a valuable resource for the standardization of medications used in clinical practice, additional work is required to enhance the terminology so that it can support expanded use cases, such as managing drug lists for CDS. PMID:25954360

  5. Studying the Vendor Perspective on Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Ash, Joan S.; Sittig, Dean F.; McMullen, Carmit K.; McCormack, James L.; Wright, Adam; Bunce, Arwen; Wasserman, Joseph; Mohan, Vishnu; Cohen, Deborah J.; Shapiro, Michael; Middleton, Blackford

    2011-01-01

    In prior work, using a Rapid Assessment Process (RAP), we have investigated clinical decision support (CDS) in ambulatory clinics and hospitals. We realized that individuals in these settings provide only one perspective related to the CDS landscape, which also includes content vendors and electronic health record (EHR) vendors. To discover content vendors’ perspectives and their perceived challenges, we modified RAP for industrial settings. We describe how we employed RAP, and show its utility by describing two illustrative themes. We found that while the content vendors believe they provide unique much-needed services, the amount of labor involved in content development is underestimated by others. We also found that the content vendors believe their products are resources to be used by practitioners, so they are somewhat protected from liability issues. To promote adequate understanding about these issues, we recommend a “three way conversation” among content vendors, EHR vendors, and user organizations. PMID:22195058

  6. Adolescent depression: an update and guide to clinical decision making.

    PubMed

    Cook, Mary N; Peterson, John; Sheldon, Christopher

    2009-09-01

    Depression in adolescence and adulthood is common, afflicting up to 20 percent of these populations. It represents a significant public health concern and is associated with considerable suffering and functional impairment. Adolescent-onset depression tends to be a particularly malignant and recalcitrant condition, increasing the likelihood of recurrence and chronicity in adulthood. Clinical presentations for various medical and psychiatric conditions, as well as reactions to psychosocial stressors, can mimic or confound the picture of depression in adolescents. Therefore, careful assessment and differential diagnosis is essential. Effective treatments, both pharmacological and psychosocial in nature, exist, and so early detection and intervention is paramount. This article presents an overview of optimal prevention, assessment, and clinical decision-making strategies for managing depression in adolescents. PMID:19855857

  7. Clinical Decision Support for Colon and Rectal Surgery: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Allison B.; Melton, Genevieve B.; Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) has been shown to improve clinical processes, promote patient safety, and reduce costs in healthcare settings, and it is now a requirement for clinicians as part of the Meaningful Use Regulation. However, most evidence for CDS has been evaluated primarily in internal medicine care settings, and colon and rectal surgery (CRS) has unique needs with CDS that are not frequently described in the literature. The authors reviewed published literature in informatics and medical journals, combined with expert opinion to define CDS, describe the evidence for CDS, outline the implementation process for CDS, and present applications of CDS in CRS.CDS functionalities such as order sets, documentation templates, and order facilitation aids are most often described in the literature and most likely to be beneficial in CRS. Further research is necessary to identify and better evaluate additional CDS systems in the setting of CRS. PMID:24436644

  8. Utilizing Computerized Entertainment Education in the Development of Decision Aids for Lower Literate and Naïve Computer Users

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria L. Jibaja-Weiss; Robert J. Volk

    2007-01-01

    Decision aids have been developed by using various delivery methods, including interactive computer programs. Such programs, however, still rely heavily on written information, health and digital literacy, and reading ease. We describe an approach to overcome these potential barriers for low-literate, underserved populations by making design considerations for poor readers and naïve computer users and by using concepts from entertainment

  9. Computerized Waters 

    E-print Network

    Wythe, Kathy

    2006-01-01

    tx H2O | pg. 9 Computerized Waters Story by Kathy Wythe Computerized Waters Model changes management of Texas surface waters In an office on the second floor of a Texas A&MUniversity building, on a desktop computeroperating with the popular... Microsoft Windows,Dr. Ralph Wurbs has designed a computer mod- eling system that has changed the way Texas manages its rivers, streams and reservoirs. The modeling system called Water Rights Availability Package, or WRAP for short, is a set of computer...

  10. Decision making for cancer clinical trial participation: a systematic review. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    More research on the decision-making process for participation in cancer clinical trials is needed. A better understanding of the decision-making process may help improve patient-provider communication and create interventions to facilitate decision-making, leading to increased clinical trial participation.

  11. Biostatistics in clinical decision making for cardiothoracic radiologists.

    PubMed

    Zurakowski, David; Johnson, Victor M; Lee, Edward Y

    2013-11-01

    Cardiothoracic radiologists are intuitively aware of sensitivity and specificity as they pertain to diagnostic tests involving clinical information. However, many cardiothoracic radiologists are unfamiliar with odds ratios, likelihood ratios, predictive values, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, which provide more information about the performance of a test. Our article will first review the fundamental concepts of sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and likelihood ratios. The ROC curve methodology will be covered with an emphasis on creating a look-up table, a straightforward table that communicates important information to the clinician to aid in diagnosis. The article reviews sensitivity and specificity, as well as predictive values, logistic regression, and ROC curves, using conceptual principles without unnecessary mathematical rigor. We will apply principles of sensitivity and specificity to continuous measurements by constructing ROC curves in order to tie together key ideas in diagnostic decision making. Three clinical examples are presented to illustrate these fundamental statistical concepts: predictors of pulmonary embolism in children, use of dobutamine-cardiac magnetic resonance imaging to identify impaired ventricular function in patients who have suffered a myocardial infarction, and diagnostic accuracy of 64-multidetector row computed tomography to identify occluded vessels in adult patients with suspected coronary artery disease. In addition, a glossary is provided at the end of the article with key terms important in diagnostic imaging. An understanding of the concepts presented will assist cardiothoracic radiologists in critically discerning the usefulness of diagnostic tests and how these statistics can be applied to make judgments and decisions that are essential to clinical practice. PMID:23358369

  12. Can patient decision aids help people make good decisions about participating in clinical trials? A study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Brehaut, Jamie C; Lott, Alison; Fergusson, Dean A; Shojania, Kaveh G; Kimmelman, Jonathan; Saginur, Raphael

    2008-01-01

    Background Evidence shows that the standard process for obtaining informed consent in clinical trials can be inadequate, with study participants frequently not understanding even basic information fundamental to giving informed consent. Patient decision aids are effective decision support tools originally designed to help patients make difficult treatment or screening decisions. We propose that incorporating decision aids into the informed consent process will improve the extent to which participants make decisions that are informed and consistent with their preferences. A mixed methods study will test this proposal. Methods Phase one of this project will involve assessment of a stratified random sample of 50 consent documents from recently completed investigator-initiated clinical trials, according to existing standards for supporting good decision making. Phase two will involve interviews of a purposive sample of 50 trial participants (10 participants from each of five different clinical areas) about their experience of the informed consent process, and how it could be improved. In phase three, we will convert consent forms for two completed clinical trials into decision aids and pilot test these new tools using a user-centered design approach, an iterative development process commonly employed in computer usability literature. In phase four, we will conduct a pilot observational study comparing the new tools to standard consent forms, with potential recruits to two hypothetical clinical trials. Outcomes will include knowledge of key aspects of the decision, knowledge of the probabilities of different outcomes, decisional conflict, the hypothetical participation decision, and qualitative impressions of the experience. Discussion This work will provide initial evidence about whether a patient decision aid can improve the informed consent process. The larger goal of this work is to examine whether study recruitment can be improved from (barely) informed consent based on disclosure-oriented documents, towards a process of high-quality participant decision-making. PMID:18651981

  13. Clinical validation of a new algorithm for computerized dosing of vitamin K antagonist therapy: a retrospective simulation study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michela Basileo; Carlo Micheluzzi; Marina Minozzi; Luigi Lazzaroni; Alfonso Iorio

    The number of patients on oral anticoagulant therapy has increased in recent years, and this trend is expected to continue.\\u000a The increased workload for physicians has led to the development of computerized systems to make organizational workflow more\\u000a efficient. These programs may include algorithms to propose a weekly dosage and timing for the following visit. Before introducing\\u000a a new algorithm

  14. Optimizing Perioperative Decision Making: Improved Information for Clinical Workflow Planning

    PubMed Central

    Doebbeling, Bradley N.; Burton, Matthew M.; Wiebke, Eric A.; Miller, Spencer; Baxter, Laurence; Miller, Donald; Alvarez, Jorge; Pekny, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Perioperative care is complex and involves multiple interconnected subsystems. Delayed starts, prolonged cases and overtime are common. Surgical procedures account for 40–70% of hospital revenues and 30–40% of total costs. Most planning and scheduling in healthcare is done without modern planning tools, which have potential for improving access by assisting in operations planning support. We identified key planning scenarios of interest to perioperative leaders, in order to examine the feasibility of applying combinatorial optimization software solving some of those planning issues in the operative setting. Perioperative leaders desire a broad range of tools for planning and assessing alternate solutions. Our modeled solutions generated feasible solutions that varied as expected, based on resource and policy assumptions and found better utilization of scarce resources. Combinatorial optimization modeling can effectively evaluate alternatives to support key decisions for planning clinical workflow and improving care efficiency and satisfaction. PMID:23304284

  15. Optimizing perioperative decision making: improved information for clinical workflow planning.

    PubMed

    Doebbeling, Bradley N; Burton, Matthew M; Wiebke, Eric A; Miller, Spencer; Baxter, Laurence; Miller, Donald; Alvarez, Jorge; Pekny, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Perioperative care is complex and involves multiple interconnected subsystems. Delayed starts, prolonged cases and overtime are common. Surgical procedures account for 40-70% of hospital revenues and 30-40% of total costs. Most planning and scheduling in healthcare is done without modern planning tools, which have potential for improving access by assisting in operations planning support. We identified key planning scenarios of interest to perioperative leaders, in order to examine the feasibility of applying combinatorial optimization software solving some of those planning issues in the operative setting. Perioperative leaders desire a broad range of tools for planning and assessing alternate solutions. Our modeled solutions generated feasible solutions that varied as expected, based on resource and policy assumptions and found better utilization of scarce resources. Combinatorial optimization modeling can effectively evaluate alternatives to support key decisions for planning clinical workflow and improving care efficiency and satisfaction. PMID:23304284

  16. Development of a clinical decision model for thyroid nodules

    PubMed Central

    Stojadinovic, Alexander; Peoples, George E; Libutti, Steven K; Henry, Leonard R; Eberhardt, John; Howard, Robin S; Gur, David; Elster, Eric A; Nissan, Aviram

    2009-01-01

    Background Thyroid nodules represent a common problem brought to medical attention. Four to seven percent of the United States adult population (10–18 million people) has a palpable thyroid nodule, however the majority (>95%) of thyroid nodules are benign. While, fine needle aspiration remains the most cost effective and accurate diagnostic tool for thyroid nodules in current practice, over 20% of patients undergoing FNA of a thyroid nodule have indeterminate cytology (follicular neoplasm) with associated malignancy risk prevalence of 20–30%. These patients require thyroid lobectomy/isthmusectomy purely for the purpose of attaining a definitive diagnosis. Given that the majority (70–80%) of these patients have benign surgical pathology, thyroidectomy in these patients is conducted principally with diagnostic intent. Clinical models predictive of malignancy risk are needed to support treatment decisions in patients with thyroid nodules in order to reduce morbidity associated with unnecessary diagnostic surgery. Methods Data were analyzed from a completed prospective cohort trial conducted over a 4-year period involving 216 patients with thyroid nodules undergoing ultrasound (US), electrical impedance scanning (EIS) and fine needle aspiration cytology (FNA) prior to thyroidectomy. A Bayesian model was designed to predict malignancy in thyroid nodules based on multivariate dependence relationships between independent covariates. Ten-fold cross-validation was performed to estimate classifier error wherein the data set was randomized into ten separate and unique train and test sets consisting of a training set (90% of records) and a test set (10% of records). A receiver-operating-characteristics (ROC) curve of these predictions and area under the curve (AUC) were calculated to determine model robustness for predicting malignancy in thyroid nodules. Results Thyroid nodule size, FNA cytology, US and EIS characteristics were highly predictive of malignancy. Cross validation of the model created with Bayesian Network Analysis effectively predicted malignancy [AUC = 0.88 (95%CI: 0.82–0.94)] in thyroid nodules. The positive and negative predictive values of the model are 83% (95%CI: 76%–91%) and 79% (95%CI: 72%–86%), respectively. Conclusion An integrated predictive decision model using Bayesian inference incorporating readily obtainable thyroid nodule measures is clinically relevant, as it effectively predicts malignancy in thyroid nodules. This model warrants further validation testing in prospective clinical trials. PMID:19664278

  17. Are more endodontic consultations needed in dental school clinic settings? A study of treatment decisions at one school.

    PubMed

    Aminoshariae, Anita; Tulunoglu, Ibrahim; Demko, Catherine; Galsterer, Mark; Montagnese, Thomas A; Mickel, Andre

    2015-04-01

    With no previous studies of the occurrence of interdisciplinary consultations for tooth extraction in a dental school clinic setting, the aim of this cross-sectional descriptive investigation was to measure and compare the consultation process that occurred among departments at one U.S. dental school for making treatment decisions on tooth extraction. A comprehensive computerized retrieval (Crystal Reports) was used to identify and gather data from patient records from July 1, 2007, to July 1, 2011. Treatment plans and progress notes were analyzed to determine why each tooth had been extracted and which department had recommended the extraction. Results showed that the clinical departments involved in treatment planning decisions were the DMD dental student clinic, Department of Periodontics, and Department of Endodontics. The narrative records of 227 patients who had 516 teeth extracted were examined. About three-fourths (73.26%) of the extracted teeth were extracted based on the recommendation of only one department. Of these extracted teeth, 22.0% (n=114) were previously endodontically treated, and only four were recommended for endodontic consultation prior to extraction. The study found that most extractions were performed without specialty consultations and that the Department of Endodontics was consulted the least of all departments. To foster interdisciplinary collaboration in dental school clinics and help students develop expertise in such collaborations, more specialty consultations are needed for teeth that are treatment planned for extraction in order to preclude needless extraction of potentially salvageable teeth. Doing so will provide benefits for both patient care and students' education. PMID:25838010

  18. Attitude of Iranian physicians and nurses toward a clinical decision support system for pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Agharezaei, Zhila; Bahaadinbeigy, Kambiz; Tofighi, Shahram; Agharezaei, Laleh; Nemati, Ali

    2014-07-01

    This research project sought to design and implement a computerized clinical decision support system (CDSS) that was able to identify patients who were at risk of pulmonary embolism (PE) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT), as well as produce reminders for prophylactic action for these diseases. The main purpose of the CDSS was to attempt to reduce the morbidity and mortality caused by embolism and thrombosis in patients admitted to hospitals. After implementation of this system in one of the large educational hospitals of Iran, a standard questionnaire was used, and interviews were conducted with physicians and nurses to evaluate the performance of the designed system for reducing the incidence of pulmonary embolism and thrombosis. From physicians and nurses' point of view, a system which assists the medical staff in making better decisions regarding patient care, and also reminds pulmonary embolism and thrombosis preventive procedures with timely warnings, can influence patient care quality improvement and lead to the improved performance of the medical staff in preventing the incidence of pulmonary embolism and thrombosis. PMID:24768080

  19. Development of a Parent-Report Cognitive Function Item Bank Using Item Response Theory and Exploration of its Clinical Utility in Computerized Adaptive Testing

    PubMed Central

    Butt, Zeeshan; Zelko, Frank; Cella, David; Krull, Kevin R.; Kieran, Mark W.; Goldman, Stewart

    2011-01-01

    Objective?The purpose of this study is to report the reliability, validity, and clinical utility of a parent-report perceived cognitive function (pedsPCF) item bank.?Methods?From the U.S. general population, 1,409 parents of children aged 7–17 years completed 45 pedsPCF items. Their psychometric properties were evaluated using Item Response Theory (IRT) approaches. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and discriminant function analysis were used to predict clinical problems on child behavior checklist (CBCL) scales. A computerized adaptive testing (CAT) simulation was used to evaluate clinical utility.?Results?The final 43-item pedsPCF item bank demonstrates no item bias, has acceptable IRT parameters, and provides good prediction of related clinical problems. CAT simulation resulted in correlations of 0.98 between CAT and the full-length pedsPCF.?Conclusions?The pedsPCF has sound psychometric properties, U.S. general population norms, and a brief-yet-precise CAT version is available. Future work will evaluate pedsPCF in other clinical populations in which cognitive function is important. PMID:21378106

  20. Encounter Decision Aid vs. Clinical Decision Support or Usual Care to Support Patient-Centered Treatment Decisions in Osteoporosis: The Osteoporosis Choice Randomized Trial II

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Annie; Wang, Amy T.; Wyatt, Kirk; Branda, Megan E.; Shah, Nilay D.; Van Houten, Holly; Pencille, Laurie; Wermers, Robert; Montori, Victor M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Osteoporosis Choice, an encounter decision aid, can engage patients and clinicians in shared decision making about osteoporosis treatment. Its effectiveness compared to the routine provision to clinicians of the patient’s estimated risk of fracture using the FRAX calculator is unknown. Methods Patient-level, randomized, three-arm trial enrolling women over 50 with osteopenia or osteoporosis eligible for treatment with bisphosphonates, where the use of Osteoporosis Choice was compared to FRAX only and to usual care to determine impact on patient knowledge, decisional conflict, involvement in the decision-making process, decision to start and adherence to bisphosphonates. Results We enrolled 79 women in the three arms. Because FRAX estimation alone and usual care produced similar results, we grouped them for analysis. Compared to these, use of Osteoporosis Choice increased patient knowledge (median score 6 vs. 4, p = .01), improved understanding of fracture risk and risk reduction with bisphosphonates (p = .01 and p<.0001, respectively), had no effect on decision conflict, and increased patient engagement in the decision making process (OPTION scores 57% vs. 43%, p = .001). Encounters with the decision aid were 0.8 minutes longer (range: 33 minutes shorter to 3.0 minutes longer). There were twice as many patients receiving and filling prescriptions in the decision aid arm (83% vs. 40%, p = .07); medication adherence at 6 months was no different across arms. Conclusion Supporting both patients and clinicians during the clinical encounter with the Osteoporosis Choice decision aid efficiently improves treatment decision making when compared to usual care with or without clinical decision support with FRAX results. Trial Registration clinical trials.gov NCT00949611 PMID:26010755

  1. EBMPracticeNet: A Bilingual National Electronic Point-Of-Care Project for Retrieval of Evidence-Based Clinical Guideline Information and Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Belgium, the construction of a national electronic point-of-care information service, EBMPracticeNet, was initiated in 2011 to optimize quality of care by promoting evidence-based decision-making. The collaboration of the government, health care providers, evidence-based medicine (EBM) partners, and vendors of electronic health records (EHR) is unique to this project. All Belgian health care professionals get free access to an up-to-date database of validated Belgian and nearly 1000 international guidelines, incorporated in a portal that also provides EBM information from other sources than guidelines, including computerized clinical decision support that is integrated in the EHRs. Objective The objective of this paper was to describe the development strategy, the overall content, and the management of EBMPracticeNet which may be of relevance to other health organizations creating national or regional electronic point-of-care information services. Methods Several candidate providers of comprehensive guideline solutions were evaluated and one database was selected. Translation of the guidelines to Dutch and French was done with translation software, post-editing by translators and medical proofreading. A strategy is determined to adapt the guideline content to the Belgian context. Acceptance of the computerized clinical decision support tool has been tested and a randomized controlled trial is planned to evaluate the effect on process and patient outcomes. Results Currently, EBMPracticeNet is in "work in progress" state. Reference is made to the results of a pilot study and to further planned research including a randomized controlled trial. Conclusions The collaboration of government, health care providers, EBM partners, and vendors of EHRs is unique. The potential value of the project is great. The link between all the EHRs from different vendors and a national database held on a single platform that is controlled by all EBM organizations in Belgium are the strengths of EBMPracticeNet. PMID:23842038

  2. Clinical decision support systems for patient safety: a focus group needs assessment with Korean ICU nurses.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mona; Choi, Ran; Bae, Young-Ran; Lee, Sun-Mi

    2011-11-01

    An ICU is known as a data-rich environment, and information technology can improve the quality of care by utilizing stored clinical data and providing decision support effectively and in a timely manner to clinicians. The necessity of clinical decision support systems is emphasized now more than ever because patient safety and nursing-sensitive outcomes in the clinical setting have become a critical issue. The purpose of this study was to explore nursing-sensitive outcomes issues related to patient safety in critical care and to understand the types and contents of clinical decision support systems that nurses desire in a clinical practice setting. Focus group interviews were conducted with 37 nurses who worked in one university hospital system in Korea. Our findings are summarized into threats to patient safety, nursing-sensitive outcomes, and the types and contents of clinical decision support systems, which are categorized into the following groups: (1) reminders, notification, alert, and warning systems; (2) point-of-care guidelines; and (3) references for information/guidelines. Nurses consistently stated that clinical decision support systems can help improve nursing outcomes by applying standardized nursing care. Our study is expected to provide a practical suggestion for developing and designing a new clinical decision support system or for refining an existing one. PMID:21415713

  3. Clinical Decision Making among Fourth-Year Nursing Students: An Interpretive Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Ann H.

    2003-01-01

    Interviews with 17 fourth-year nursing students identified essential components in the process of learning clinical decision making: gaining confidence, building relationships with staff, connecting with patients, being comfortable with nurse identity, and understanding the clinical picture. Results indicate that, without the big picture, clinical

  4. Users' Guides to the Medical Literature XXII: How to Use Articles About Clinical Decision Rules

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas G. McGinn; Gordon H. Guyatt; Peter C. Wyer; C. David Naylor; Ian G. Stiell; W. Scott Richardson

    Clinical experience provides clinicians with an intuitive sense of which find- ings on history, physical examination, and investigation are critical in mak- ing an accurate diagnosis, or an accurate assessment of a patient's fate. A clinical decision rule (CDR) is a clinical tool that quantifies the individual contributions that various components of the history, physical examina- tion, and basic laboratory

  5. The Clinical Intuition Exploration Guide: A Decision-Making Tool for Counselors and Supervisors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffrey, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Clinical intuition is a common experience among counselors, yet many do not know what to do with intuition when it occurs. This article reviews the role intuition plays in clinical work and presents the research-based Clinical Intuition Exploration Guide to help counselors navigate the decision-making process. The guide consists of self-reflection…

  6. System-Agnostic Clinical Decision Support Services: Benefits and Challenges for Scalable Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Kensaku; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Orton, Charles; Lobach, David F

    2010-01-01

    System-agnostic clinical decision support (CDS) services provide patient evaluation capabilities that are independent of specific CDS systems and system implementation contexts. While such system-agnostic CDS services hold great potential for facilitating the widespread implementation of CDS systems, little has been described regarding the benefits and challenges of their use. In this manuscript, the authors address this need by describing potential benefits and challenges of using a system-agnostic CDS service. This analysis is based on the authors’ formal assessments of, and practical experiences with, various approaches to developing, implementing, and maintaining CDS capabilities. In particular, the analysis draws on the authors’ experience developing and leveraging a system-agnostic CDS Web service known as SEBASTIAN. A primary potential benefit of using a system-agnostic CDS service is the relative ease and flexibility with which the service can be leveraged to implement CDS capabilities across applications and care settings. Other important potential benefits include facilitation of centralized knowledge management and knowledge sharing; the potential to support multiple underlying knowledge representations and knowledge resources through a common service interface; improved simplicity and componentization; easier testing and validation; and the enabling of distributed CDS system development. Conversely, important potential challenges include the increased effort required to develop knowledge resources capable of being used in many contexts and the critical need to standardize the service interface. Despite these challenges, our experiences to date indicate that the benefits of using a system-agnostic CDS service generally outweigh the challenges of using this approach to implementing and maintaining CDS systems. PMID:21603281

  7. Combining risks estimations and clinical practice guidelines in a computer decision aid: a pilot study of the EsPeR system.

    PubMed

    Colombet, Isabelle; Dart, Thierry; Leneveut, Laurence; Zunino, Sylvain; Ménard, Joël; Chatellier, Gilles

    2003-01-01

    Many preventable diseases such as ischemic heart diseases or breast cancer are still not adequately managed in the population. Computerized decision support systems are one of the solutions for improving the quality of prevention strategies. We designed a system called EsPeR (Personalised Estimate of Risks) combining calculation of several risks and computerisation of guidelines (cardio-vascular prevention, screening for breast cancer, colorectal cancer, uterine cervix cancer, and prostate cancer, diagnosis of depression and suicide risk). We present a qualitative evaluation of its ergonomics, its understanding and acceptance by a group of general practitioners. We organised 4 focus groups comprising 6-11 general practitioners. Physicians worked on several structured clinical scenario with help of EsPeR, and 3 senior investigators leaded structured discussion sessions. Initial sessions identified several ergonomics flaws that were easily corrected. Both clinical scenari and discussion sessions identified several problems of insufficient comprehension (expression of risks, definition of familial history of disease), lack of knowledge, and acceptance of recommendation by both the physician. Educational and organisational components (i.e. time constraints) as well as acceptance of evidence-based decision-making should be taken into account before launching computerised decision support system, or testing them in randomised trials. PMID:14664040

  8. Personalized versus non-personalized computerized decision support system to increase therapeutic quality control of oral anticoagulant therapy: an alternating time series analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Isabelle Colombet; Alessandra Bura-Rivière; Rémy Chatila; Gilles Chatellier; Pierre Durieux

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The quality control of oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) during the initiation and maintenance treatment is generally poor. Physicians' ordering of OAT (especially fluindione and warfarin) can be improved by dose adjustment algorithms, taking into account the results of International Normalized Ratio (INR). Reminders at the point of care, computerized or not, have been demonstrated to be effective in changing

  9. Factors Predicting Oncology Care Providers' Behavioral Intention to Adopt Clinical Decision Support Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfenden, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlation study was to examine the predictors of user behavioral intention on the decision of oncology care providers to adopt or reject the clinical decision support system. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) formed the foundation of the research model and survey instrument. The…

  10. An Examination of Accelerated and Basic Baccalaureate Nursing Students' Perceptions of Clinical Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumwiede, Kelly A.

    2010-01-01

    Developing decision-making skills is essential in education in order to be a competent nurse. The purpose of this study was to examine and compare the perceptions of clinical decision-making skills of students enrolled in accelerated and basic baccalaureate nursing programs. A comparative descriptive research design was used for this study.…

  11. SANDS: A Service-Oriented Architecture for Clinical Decision Support in a National Health Information Network

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we describe and evaluate a new distributed architecture for clinical decision support called SANDS (Service-oriented Architecture for NHIN Decision Support), which leverages current health information exchange efforts and is based on the principles of a service-oriented architecture. The architecture allows disparate clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems to be seamlessly integrated over a network according to a set of interfaces and protocols described in this paper. The architecture described is fully defined and developed, and six use cases have been developed and tested using a prototype electronic health record which links to one of the existing prototype National Health Information Networks (NHIN): drug interaction checking, syndromic surveillance, diagnostic decision support, inappropriate prescribing in older adults, information at the point of care and a simple personal health record. Some of these use cases utilize existing decision support systems, which are either commercially or freely available at present, and developed outside of the SANDS project, while other use cases are based on decision support systems developed specifically for the project. Open source code for many of these components is available, and an open source reference parser is also available for comparison and testing of other clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems that wish to implement the SANDS architecture. PMID:18434256

  12. Student nurses' perceptions of clinical decision-making in the final year of adult nursing studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Garrett

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses upon an exploration of undergraduate students' perceptions of clinical decision-making skills in their final year of a baccalaureate adult nursing programme. A phenomenological study was carried out, with a sample of 21 students undertaking their nursing management module. They produced a consensus concept mapping of clinical decision-making and completed self-assessment questionnaires exploring their personal confidence and understanding

  13. Managed Care and Clinical Decision-Making in Child and Adolescent Behavioral Health: Provider Perceptions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philip T. Yanos; Christine I. Garcia; Stephen Hansell; Mark G. Rosato; Shula Minsky

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated how managed care affects clinical decision-making in a behavioral health care system. Providers serving children and adolescents under both managed and unmanaged care (n=28) were interviewed about their awareness of differences between the benefit arrangements, how benefits affect clinical decision-making, outcomes and quality of care; and satisfaction with care. Quantitative and qualitative findings indicated that providers saw

  14. Evaluation of a novel electronic genetic screening and clinical decision support tool in prenatal clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Edelman, Emily A; Lin, Bruce K; Doksum, Teresa; Drohan, Brian; Edelson, Vaughn; Dolan, Siobhan M; Hughes, Kevin; O'Leary, James; Vasquez, Lisa; Copeland, Sara; Galvin, Shelley L; DeGroat, Nicole; Pardanani, Setul; Gregory Feero, W; Adams, Claire; Jones, Renee; Scott, Joan

    2014-07-01

    "The Pregnancy and Health Profile" (PHP) is a free prenatal genetic screening and clinical decision support (CDS) software tool for prenatal providers. PHP collects family health history (FHH) during intake and provides point-of-care risk assessment for providers and education for patients. This pilot study evaluated patient and provider responses to PHP and effects of using PHP in practice. PHP was implemented in four clinics. Surveys assessed provider confidence and knowledge and patient and provider satisfaction with PHP. Data on the implementation process were obtained through semi-structured interviews with administrators. Quantitative survey data were analyzed using Chi square test, Fisher's exact test, paired t tests, and multivariate logistic regression. Open-ended survey questions and interviews were analyzed using qualitative thematic analysis. Of the 83% (513/618) of patients that provided feedback, 97% felt PHP was easy to use and 98% easy to understand. Thirty percent (21/71) of participating physicians completed both pre- and post-implementation feedback surveys [13 obstetricians (OBs) and 8 family medicine physicians (FPs)]. Confidence in managing genetic risks significantly improved for OBs on 2/6 measures (p values ?0.001) but not for FPs. Physician knowledge did not significantly change. Providers reported value in added patient engagement and reported mixed feedback about the CDS report. We identified key steps, resources, and staff support required to implement PHP in a clinical setting. To our knowledge, this study is the first to report on the integration of patient-completed, electronically captured and CDS-enabled FHH software into primary prenatal practice. PHP is acceptable to patients and providers. Key to successful implementation in the future will be customization options and interoperability with electronic health records. PMID:24101435

  15. Computerized information-gathering in specialist rheumatology clinics: an initial evaluation of an electronic version of the Short Form 36

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. S. Wilson; G. D. Kitas; D. M. Carruthers; C. Reay; J. Skan; S. Harris; G. J. Treharne; S. P. Young; P. A. Bacon

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. Longitudinal outcome data are important for research and are becoming part of routine clinical practice. We assessed an initial version of an electronic Short Form 36 (SF-36), a well-established health assessment questionnaire, in comparison with standard paper forms, in two specialist rheumatology clinics. Methods. Out-patients (20 with systemic lupus erythematosus and 31 with vasculitis) were randomly selected to complete

  16. Research Paper: Effects of a Pharmacist-to-Dose Computerized Request on Promptness of Antimicrobial Therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William R. Vincent; Craig A. Martin; P. Shane Winstead; Kelly M. Smith; Jennifer Gatz; Daniel A. Lewis

    2009-01-01

    ObjectivesTo examine the effects of computerized requests for pharmacist-to-dose (PTD), an advanced clinical decision support tool for dosing guidance, on antimicrobial therapy with vancomycin and aminoglycosides, describe PTD request utilization, and identify factors that may prolong this process.DesignA retrospective review was conducted of patients hospitalized from Jan 2004 to Jun 2006 with suspected pneumonia who received vancomycin, tobramycin, or gentamicin

  17. [Locator or ball attachment: a guide for clinical decision making].

    PubMed

    Büttel, Adrian E; Bühler, Nico M; Marinello, Carlo P

    2009-01-01

    Various attachments are available to retain overdentures on natural roots or implants. Technical aspects, the clinical handling, the capability to adapt or repair and the costs are parameters to be considered when choosing the appropriate attachment. Ball attachments and bars are clinically established and well documented. Ball attachments as prefabricated, unsplinted units are easily replaceable and show hygienic advantages, while bars show favorable stability. The Locator is a newer, popular clinical alternative to these established attachments. The ball attachment and the Locator are compared from a technical and clinical point of view. PMID:19852208

  18. Mental Workload as a Key Factor in Clinical Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Aidan

    2013-01-01

    The decision making process is central to the practice of a clinician and has traditionally been described in terms of the hypothetico-deductive model. More recently, models adapted from cognitive psychology, such as the dual process and script theories have proved useful in explaining patterns of practice not consistent with purely cognitive…

  19. Hypertextual navigation operationalizing generic clinical practice guidelines for patient-specific therapeutic decisions.

    PubMed Central

    Bouaud, J.; Séroussi, B.; Antoine, E. C.; Gozy, M.; Khayat, D.; Boisvieux, J. F.

    1998-01-01

    Despite the proliferation of implemented clinical practice guidelines, there is still little evidence of physicians compliance to formal standards. The ONCODOC project proposes a framework for elaborating generic decision support guidelines in a document-based paradigm with a knowledge-based approach. It has been first applied to assist clinicians in the treatment of breast cancer patients. Therapeutic expertise has been encoded as a decision tree. The decision process is driven by the clinician who interactively browses a hypertext version of the decision tree. During the navigation, he incrementally assigns values to decision parameters on the basis of his free interpretation of his patient's condition and thus builds a clinical context leading to patient-specific therapeutic recommendations. These guidelines are distributed on a hospital intranet and are evaluated at the point of care in an oncology department. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9929267

  20. “Quality of prenatal and maternal care: bridging the know-do gap” (QUALMAT study): an electronic clinical decision support system for rural Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite strong efforts to improve maternal care, its quality remains deficient in many countries of Sub-Saharan Africa as persistently high maternal mortality rates testify. The QUALMAT study seeks to improve the performance and motivation of rural health workers and ultimately quality of primary maternal health care services in three African countries Burkina Faso, Ghana, and Tanzania. One major intervention is the introduction of a computerized Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) for rural primary health care centers to be used by health care workers of different educational levels. Methods A stand-alone, java-based software, able to run on any standard hardware, was developed based on assessment of the health care situation in the involved countries. The software scope was defined and the final software was programmed under consideration of test experiences. Knowledge for the decision support derived from the World Health Organization (WHO) guideline “Pregnancy, Childbirth, Postpartum and Newborn Care; A Guide for Essential Practice”. Results The QUALMAT CDSS provides computerized guidance and clinical decision support for antenatal care, and care during delivery and up to 24 hours post delivery. The decision support is based on WHO guidelines and designed using three principles: (1) Guidance through routine actions in maternal and perinatal care, (2) integration of clinical data to detect situations of concern by algorithms, and (3) electronic tracking of peri- and postnatal activities. In addition, the tool facilitates patient management and is a source of training material. The implementation of the software, which is embedded in a set of interventions comprising the QUALMAT study, is subject to various research projects assessing and quantifying the impact of the CDSS on quality of care, the motivation of health care staff (users) and its health economic aspects. The software will also be assessed for its usability and acceptance, as well as for its influence on workflows in the rural setting of primary health care in the three countries involved. Conclusion The development and implementation of a CDSS in rural primary health care centres presents challenges, which may be overcome with careful planning and involvement of future users at an early stage. A tailored software with stable functionality should offer perspectives to improve maternal care in resource-poor settings. Trial registration http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/NCT01409824. PMID:23574764

  1. Guest Expert: Barbara Biedzycki: Decision-making regarding clinical trial participation | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Welcome to our'Guest Blogger' Dr. Barbara Biedzycki. Barbara is a Clinical Research Associate at the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore. She recently completed her doctoral program and much of her research has been on decision-making regarding clinical trial participation.

  2. Computer Decision Support to Improve Autism Screening and Care in Community Pediatric Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Nerissa S.; Sturm, Lynne A.; Carroll, Aaron E.; Downs, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    An autism module was added to an existing computer decision support system (CDSS) to facilitate adherence to recommended guidelines for screening for autism spectrum disorders in primary care pediatric clinics. User satisfaction was assessed by survey and informal feedback at monthly meetings between clinical staff and the software team. To assess…

  3. Clinical decision-making and therapeutic approaches in osteopathy - a qualitative grounded theory study.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Oliver P; Petty, Nicola J; Moore, Ann P

    2014-02-01

    There is limited understanding of how osteopaths make decisions in relation to clinical practice. The aim of this research was to construct an explanatory theory of the clinical decision-making and therapeutic approaches of experienced osteopaths in the UK. Twelve UK registered osteopaths participated in this constructivist grounded theory qualitative study. Purposive and theoretical sampling was used to select participants. Data was collected using semi-structured interviews which were audio-recorded and transcribed. As the study approached theoretical sufficiency, participants were observed and video-recorded during a patient appointment, which was followed by a video-prompted interview. Constant comparative analysis was used to analyse and code data. Data analysis resulted in the construction of three qualitatively different therapeutic approaches which characterised participants and their clinical practice, termed; Treater, Communicator and Educator. Participants' therapeutic approach influenced their approach to clinical decision-making, the level of patient involvement, their interaction with patients, and therapeutic goals. Participants' overall conception of practice lay on a continuum ranging from technical rationality to professional artistry, and contributed to their therapeutic approach. A range of factors were identified which influenced participants' conception of practice. The findings indicate that there is variation in osteopaths' therapeutic approaches to practice and clinical decision-making, which are influenced by their overall conception of practice. This study provides the first explanatory theory of the clinical decision-making and therapeutic approaches of osteopaths. PMID:23932101

  4. By-Person Factor Analysis in Clinical Ethical Decision Making: Q Methodology in End-of-Life Care Decisions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William Wong; Arnold R. Eiser; Robert G. Mrtek; Paul S. Heckerling

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the usefulness of Q methodology to locate and describe shared subjective influences on clinical decision making among participant physicians using hypothetical cases containing common ethical issues.Design: Qualitative study using by-person factor analysis of subjective Q sort data matrix.Setting: University medical center.Participants: Convenience sample of internal medicine attending physicians and house staff (n = 35) at one midwestern

  5. Computerized tomographic colonography: performance evaluation in a retrospective multicenter setting 1 1 Vital Images Inc. has supported research at UCLA (to D. S. K. L., J. A. B., and E. G. M.). Monex provided support (to M. M.). GE Medical Systems provided software license and research support (to C. D. J., J. A. B., and A. H. D.). Voxar, Inc. produces products that compete with products listed in this paper (to M. A. B.). The study design was approved by the National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program. Computerized tomographic colonography examinations for American College of Radiology Imaging Network Protocol A6656 were submitted by E. G. McFarland, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, Missouri; M. Zalis, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; C. D. Johnson, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota; M. Macari, New York University, New York, New York; D. Lu, University of California, Los Angeles, California; A. H. Dachman, University of Chicago, C

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Daniel Johnson; Alicia Y. Toledano; Benjamin A. Herman; Abraham H. Dachman; Elizabeth G. Mcfarland; Matthew A. Barish; James A. Brink; Randy D. Ernst; Joel G. Fletcher; Robert A. Halvorsen; Amy K. Hara; Kenneth D. Hopper; Robert E. Koehler; David S. K. Lu; Michael Macari; Robert L. Maccarty; Frank H. Miller; Martina Morrin; Erik K. Paulson; Judy Yee; Michael Zalis

    2003-01-01

    Background & Aims: No multicenter study has been reported evaluating the performance and interobserver variability of computerized tomographic colonography. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of computerized tomographic colonography for detecting clinically important colorectal neoplasia (polyps ?10 mm in diameter) in a multi-institutional study. Methods: A retrospective study was developed from 341 patients who had computerized

  6. Improving clinical decision support through case-based data fusion.

    PubMed

    Azuaje, F; Dubitzky, W; Black, N; Adamson, K

    1999-10-01

    This paper presents an information fusion technique based on a knowledge discovery model, and the case-based reasoning decision framework. Using signal data and database records from the heart disease risk estimation domain, three data fusion methods are discussed. Two of these methods combine information at the retrieval-outcome level, and one method merges data at the discovery-input level. The result of these three models are compared and evaluated against the performance of single-source models. It is shown that the methods that fuse information at the retrieval-outcome level are significantly superior. PMID:10513121

  7. Visual Cluster Analysis in Support of Clinical Decision Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Gotz, David; Sun, Jimeng; Cao, Nan; Ebadollahi, Shahram

    2011-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) contain a wealth of information about patients. In addition to providing efficient and accurate records for individual patients, large databases of EHRs contain valuable information about overall patient populations. While statistical insights describing an overall population are beneficial, they are often not specific enough to use as the basis for individualized patient-centric decisions. To address this challenge, we describe an approach based on patient similarity which analyzes an EHR database to extract a cohort of patient records most similar to a specific target patient. Clusters of similar patients are then visualized to allow interactive visual refinement by human experts. Statistics are then extracted from the refined patient clusters and displayed to users. The statistical insights taken from these refined clusters provide personalized guidance for complex decisions. This paper focuses on the cluster refinement stage where an expert user must interactively (a) judge the quality and contents of automatically generated similar patient clusters, and (b) refine the clusters based on his/her expertise. We describe the DICON visualization tool which allows users to interactively view and refine multidimensional similar patient clusters. We also present results from a preliminary evaluation where two medical doctors provided feedback on our approach. PMID:22195102

  8. A Three-Question Framework to Facilitate Clinical Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibold, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Context: Highly developed critical thinking and the ability to discriminate among many possible therapeutic interventions is a core behavior for the practicing athletic trainer. However, while athletic training students receive a great deal of clinically applicable information, many are not explicitly trained in efficient methods for channeling…

  9. Detecting fast, online reasoning processes in clinical decision making.

    PubMed

    Flores, Amanda; Cobos, Pedro L; López, Francisco J; Godoy, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    In an experiment that used the inconsistency paradigm, experienced clinical psychologists and psychology students performed a reading task using clinical reports and a diagnostic judgment task. The clinical reports provided information about the symptoms of hypothetical clients who had been previously diagnosed with a specific mental disorder. Reading times of inconsistent target sentences were slower than those of control sentences, demonstrating an inconsistency effect. The results also showed that experienced clinicians gave different weights to different symptoms according to their relevance when fluently reading the clinical reports provided, despite the fact that all the symptoms were of equal diagnostic value according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.; American Psychiatric Association, 2000). The diagnostic judgment task yielded a similar pattern of results. In contrast to previous findings, the results of the reading task may be taken as direct evidence of the intervention of reasoning processes that occur very early, rapidly, and online. We suggest that these processes are based on the representation of mental disorders and that these representations are particularly suited to fast retrieval from memory and to making inferences. They may also be related to the clinicians' causal reasoning. The implications of these results for clinician training are also discussed. PMID:24274045

  10. [Knowledge management system for laboratory work and clinical decision support].

    PubMed

    Inada, Masanori; Sato, Mayumi; Yoneyama, Akiko

    2011-05-01

    This paper discusses a knowledge management system for clinical laboratories. In the clinical laboratory of Toranomon Hospital, we receive about 20 questions relevant to laboratory tests per day from medical doctors or co-medical staff. These questions mostly involve the essence to appropriately accomplish laboratory tests. We have to answer them carefully and suitably because an incorrect answer may cause a medical accident. Up to now, no method has been in place to achieve a rapid response and standardized answers. For this reason, the laboratory staff have responded to various questions based on their individual knowledge. We began to develop a knowledge management system to promote the knowledge of staff working for the laboratory. This system is a type of knowledge base for assisting the work, such as inquiry management, laboratory consultation, process management, and clinical support. It consists of several functions: guiding laboratory test information, managing inquiries from medical staff, reporting results of patient consultation, distributing laboratory staffs notes, and recording guidelines for laboratory medicine. The laboratory test information guide has 2,000 records of medical test information registered in the database with flexible retrieval. The inquiry management tool provides a methos to record all questions, answer easily, and retrieve cases. It helps staff to respond appropriately in a short period of time. The consulting report system treats patients' claims regarding medical tests. The laboratory staffs notes enter a file management system so they can be accessed to aid in clinical support. Knowledge sharing using this function can achieve the transition from individual to organizational learning. Storing guidelines for laboratory medicine will support EBM. Finally, it is expected that this system will support intellectual activity concerning laboratory work and contribute to the practice of knowledge management for clinical work support. PMID:21706867

  11. Medication recommendations vs. peer practice in pediatric levothyroxine dosing : a study of collective intelligence from a clinical data warehouse as a potential model for clinical decision support

    E-print Network

    Scheufele, Elisabeth Lee

    2009-01-01

    Clinical decision support systems (CDSS) are developed primarily from knowledge gleaned from evidence-based research, guidelines, trusted resources and domain experts. While these resources generally represent information ...

  12. Implementation of workflow engine technology to deliver basic clinical decision support functionality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vojtech Huser; Luke V Rasmussen; Ryan Oberg; Justin B Starren

    2011-01-01

    Background  Workflow engine technology represents a new class of software with the ability to graphically model step-based knowledge.\\u000a We present application of this novel technology to the domain of clinical decision support. Successful implementation of decision\\u000a support within an electronic health record (EHR) remains an unsolved research challenge. Previous research efforts were mostly\\u000a based on healthcare-specific representation standards and execution engines

  13. Achieving Quality in Clinical Decision Making: Cognitive Strategies and Detection of Bias

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pat Croskerry

    2002-01-01

    Clinical decision making is a cornerstone of high-quality care in emergency medicine. The density of decision making is unusually high in this unique milieu, and a combination of strategies has necessarily evolved to manage the load. In addition to the traditional hypo- thetico-deductive method, emergency physicians use several other approaches, principal among which are heuristics. These cognitive short-cutting strategies are

  14. Clinical and Socioeconomic Factors influence treatment decisions in Graves' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Elfenbein, Dawn M.; Schneider, David F.; Havlena, Jeffrey; Chen, Herbert; Sippel, Rebecca S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Definitive treatment of Graves' disease includes radioactive iodine (RAI) and thyroidectomy, but utilization varies. We hypothesize that, in addition to clinical reasons, there are socioeconomic factors that influence whether a patient undergoes thyroidectomy or RAI. Methods Patients treated for Graves' disease between 8/2007 and 9/2013 at our university hospital were included. A comparative analysis of clinical and socioeconomic factors was completed. Results Of 427 patients, 300 (70%) underwent RAI while 127 (30%) underwent surgery. Multiple factors were associated with surgery: younger age (mean 36 vs. 41 years old, p<0.01), female gender (33% vs. 19% males, p=0.01), black race (56% vs. 28% non-black, p<0.01), Medicaid or uninsured (43% vs. 27% private insurance or Medicare, p<0.01), ophthalmopathy (38% vs. 26%, p< 0.01), goiter (35% vs. 23%, p<0.01), lowest quartile of median household income (38% vs. 27% upper three quartiles, p=0.03). Thyroidectomy increased annually, with 52% undergoing surgery during the final year (p<0.01). Adjusting for confounding, younger age (OR 1.04; 95% CI 1.02, 1.05), female gender (OR 2.06; 95% CI 1.06, 4.01), ophthalmopathy (OR 2.35; 95% CI 1.40, 3.96), and later year of treatment (OR 1.66; 95% CI 1.41, 1.95) remained significantly associated with surgery. Conclusions Surgery has now become the primary treatment modality of choice for Graves' disease at our institution. Clinical factors are the main drivers behind treatment choice, but patients with lower SES are more likely to have clinical features best treated with surgery, underlying the importance of improving access to quality surgical care for all patients. PMID:25245130

  15. Identifying ultrasound and clinical features of breast cancer molecular subtypes by ensemble decision.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Li, Jing; Xiao, Yun; Cui, Hao; Du, Guoqing; Wang, Ying; Li, Ziyao; Wu, Tong; Li, Xia; Tian, Jiawei

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is molecularly heterogeneous and categorized into four molecular subtypes: Luminal-A, Luminal-B, HER2-amplified and Triple-negative. In this study, we aimed to apply an ensemble decision approach to identify the ultrasound and clinical features related to the molecular subtypes. We collected ultrasound and clinical features from 1,000 breast cancer patients and performed immunohistochemistry on these samples. We used the ensemble decision approach to select unique features and to construct decision models. The decision model for Luminal-A subtype was constructed based on the presence of an echogenic halo and post-acoustic shadowing or indifference. The decision model for Luminal-B subtype was constructed based on the absence of an echogenic halo and vascularity. The decision model for HER2-amplified subtype was constructed based on the presence of post-acoustic enhancement, calcification, vascularity and advanced age. The model for Triple-negative subtype followed two rules. One was based on irregular shape, lobulate margin contour, the absence of calcification and hypovascularity, whereas the other was based on oval shape, hypovascularity and micro-lobulate margin contour. The accuracies of the models were 83.8%, 77.4%, 87.9% and 92.7%, respectively. We identified specific features of each molecular subtype and expanded the scope of ultrasound for making diagnoses using these decision models. PMID:26046791

  16. Identifying ultrasound and clinical features of breast cancer molecular subtypes by ensemble decision

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Li, Jing; Xiao, Yun; Cui, Hao; Du, Guoqing; Wang, Ying; Li, Ziyao; Wu, Tong; Li, Xia; Tian, Jiawei

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is molecularly heterogeneous and categorized into four molecular subtypes: Luminal-A, Luminal-B, HER2-amplified and Triple-negative. In this study, we aimed to apply an ensemble decision approach to identify the ultrasound and clinical features related to the molecular subtypes. We collected ultrasound and clinical features from 1,000 breast cancer patients and performed immunohistochemistry on these samples. We used the ensemble decision approach to select unique features and to construct decision models. The decision model for Luminal-A subtype was constructed based on the presence of an echogenic halo and post-acoustic shadowing or indifference. The decision model for Luminal-B subtype was constructed based on the absence of an echogenic halo and vascularity. The decision model for HER2-amplified subtype was constructed based on the presence of post-acoustic enhancement, calcification, vascularity and advanced age. The model for Triple-negative subtype followed two rules. One was based on irregular shape, lobulate margin contour, the absence of calcification and hypovascularity, whereas the other was based on oval shape, hypovascularity and micro-lobulate margin contour. The accuracies of the models were 83.8%, 77.4%, 87.9% and 92.7%, respectively. We identified specific features of each molecular subtype and expanded the scope of ultrasound for making diagnoses using these decision models. PMID:26046791

  17. Outcomes: essential information for clinical decision support: an interview with Ellen B. White. Interview by Melinda L. Orlando.

    PubMed

    White, E B

    1998-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for outcomes data from both purchasers of health care and providers. This is especially true for the managed behavioral health care industry. Patients are more educated about health care and active in treatment decisions. Patient-reported outcomes data, clinical information, and functional status are components of the clinical decision support system. This article describes, in interview format, an outcomes measurement system for clinical decision support. PMID:9502059

  18. The pitfalls of premature closure: clinical decision-making in a case of aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Bharat; Kanna, Balavenkatesh; Kumar, Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Premature closure is a type of cognitive error in which the physician fails to consider reasonable alternatives after an initial diagnosis is made. It is a common cause of delayed diagnosis and misdiagnosis borne out of a faulty clinical decision-making process. The authors present a case of aortic dissection in which premature closure was avoided by the aggressive pursuit of the appropriate differential diagnosis, and discuss the importance of disciplined clinical decision-making in the setting of chest pain. PMID:22679162

  19. The pitfalls of premature closure: clinical decision-making in a case of aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Bharat; Kanna, Balavenkatesh; Kumar, Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Premature closure is a type of cognitive error in which the physician fails to consider reasonable alternatives after an initial diagnosis is made. It is a common cause of delayed diagnosis and misdiagnosis borne out of a faulty clinical decision-making process. The authors present a case of aortic dissection in which premature closure was avoided by the aggressive pursuit of the appropriate differential diagnosis, and discuss the importance of disciplined clinical decision-making in the setting of chest pain. PMID:22679162

  20. Comparative evaluation of different medication safety measures for the emergency department: physicians’ usage and acceptance of training, poster, checklist and computerized decision support

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although usage and acceptance are important factors for a successful implementation of clinical decision support systems for medication, most studies only concentrate on their design and outcome. Our objective was to comparatively investigate a set of traditional medication safety measures such as medication safety training for physicians, paper-based posters and checklists concerning potential medication problems versus the additional benefit of a computer-assisted medication check. We concentrated on usage, acceptance and suitability of such interventions in a busy emergency department (ED) of a 749 bed acute tertiary care hospital. Methods A retrospective, qualitative evaluation study was conducted using a field observation and a questionnaire-based survey. Six physicians were observed while treating 20 patient cases; the questionnaire, based on the Technology Acceptance Model 2 (TAM2), has been answered by nine ED physicians. Results During field observations, we did not observe direct use of any of the implemented interventions for medication safety (paper-based and electronic). Questionnaire results indicated that the electronic medication safety check was the most frequently used intervention, followed by checklist and posters. However, despite their positive attitude, physicians most often stated that they use the interventions in only up to ten percent for subjectively “critical” orders. Main reasons behind the low usage were deficits in ease-of-use and fit to the workflow. The intention to use the interventions was rather high after overcoming these barriers. Conclusions Methodologically, the study contributes to Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) research in an ED setting and confirms TAM2 as a helpful diagnostic tool in identifying barriers for a successful implementation of medication safety interventions. In our case, identified barriers explaining the low utilization of the implemented medication safety interventions - despite their positive reception - include deficits in accessibility, briefing for the physicians about the interventions, ease-of-use and compatibility to the working environment. PMID:23890121

  1. Clinical decision making in seizures and status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Teran, Felipe; Harper-Kirksey, Katrina; Jagoda, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Seizures and status epilepticus are frequent neurologic emergencies in the emergency department, accounting for 1% of all emergency department visits. The management of this time-sensitive and potentially life-threatening condition is challenging for both prehospital providers and emergency clinicians. The approach to seizing patients begins with differentiating seizure activity from mimics and follows with identifying potential secondary etiologies, such as alcohol-related seizures. The approach to the patient in status epilepticus and the patient with nonconvulsive status epilepticus constitutes a special clinical challenge. This review summarizes the best available evidence and recommendations regarding diagnosis and resuscitation of the seizing patient in the emergency setting. PMID:25902572

  2. Quantitative ultrasound texture analysis for clinical decision making support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jie Ying; Beland, Michael; Konrad, Joseph; Tuomi, Adam; Glidden, David; Grand, David; Merck, Derek

    2015-03-01

    We propose a general ultrasound (US) texture-analysis and machine-learning framework for detecting the presence of disease that is suitable for clinical application across clinicians, disease types, devices, and operators. Its stages are image selection, image filtering, ROI selection, feature parameterization, and classification. Each stage is modular and can be replaced with alternate methods. Thus, this framework is adaptable to a wide range of tasks. Our two preliminary clinical targets are hepatic steatosis and adenomyosis diagnosis. For steatosis, we collected US images from 288 patients and their pathology-determined values of steatosis (%) from biopsies. Two radiologists independently reviewed all images and identified the region of interest (ROI) most representative of the hepatic echotexture for each patient. To parameterize the images into comparable quantities, we filter the US images at multiple scales for various texture responses. For each response, we collect a histogram of pixel features within the ROI, and parameterize it as a Gaussian function using its mean, standard deviation, kurtosis, and skew to create a 36-feature vector. Our algorithm uses a support vector machine (SVM) for classification. Using a threshold of 10%, we achieved 72.81% overall accuracy, 76.18% sensitivity, and 65.96% specificity in identifying steatosis with leave-ten-out cross-validation (p<0.0001). Extending this framework to adenomyosis, we identified 38 patients with MR-confirmed findings of adenomyosis and previous US studies and 50 controls. A single rater picked the best US-image and ROI for each case. Using the same processing pipeline, we obtained 76.14% accuracy, 86.00% sensitivity, and 63.16% specificity with leave-one-out cross-validation (p<0.0001).

  3. Clinical decision rules, spinal pain classification and prediction of treatment outcome: A discussion of recent reports in the rehabilitation literature.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Jeffrey J; Fritz, Julie M

    2012-01-01

    Clinical decision rules are an increasingly common presence in the biomedical literature and represent one strategy of enhancing clinical-decision making with the goal of improving the efficiency and effectiveness of healthcare delivery. In the context of rehabilitation research, clinical decision rules have been predominantly aimed at classifying patients by predicting their treatment response to specific therapies. Traditionally, recommendations for developing clinical decision rules propose a multistep process (derivation, validation, impact analysis) using defined methodology. Research efforts aimed at developing a "diagnosis-based clinical decision rule" have departed from this convention. Recent publications in this line of research have used the modified terminology "diagnosis-based clinical decision guide." Modifications to terminology and methodology surrounding clinical decision rules can make it more difficult for clinicians to recognize the level of evidence associated with a decision rule and understand how this evidence should be implemented to inform patient care. We provide a brief overview of clinical decision rule development in the context of the rehabilitation literature and two specific papers recently published in Chiropractic and Manual Therapies. PMID:22726639

  4. Knowledge of risk factors and the periodontal disease-systemic link in dental students' clinical decisions.

    PubMed

    Friesen, Lynn Roosa; Walker, Mary P; Kisling, Rebecca E; Liu, Ying; Williams, Karen B

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluated second-, third-, and fourth-year dental students' ability to identify systemic conditions associated with periodontal disease, risk factors most important for referral, and medications with an effect on the periodontium and their ability to apply this knowledge to make clinical decisions regarding treatment and referral of periodontal patients. A twenty-one question survey was administered at one U.S. dental school in the spring semester of 2012 to elicit the students' knowledge and confidence regarding clinical reasoning. The response rate was 86 percent. Periodontal risk factors were accurately selected by at least 50 percent of students in all three classes; these were poorly controlled diabetes, ?6 mm pockets posteriorly, and lack of response to previous non-surgical therapy. Confidence in knowledge, knowledge of risk factors, and knowledge of medications with an effect on the periodontium improved with training and were predictive of better referral decision making. The greatest impact of training was seen on the students' ability to make correct decisions about referral and treatment for seven clinical scenarios. Although the study found a large increase in the students' abilities from the second through fourth years, the mean of 4.6 (out of 7) for the fourth-year students shows that, on average, those students missed correct treatment or referral on more than two of seven clinical cases. These results suggest that dental curricula should emphasize more critical decision making with respect to referral and treatment criteria in managing the periodontal patient. PMID:25179920

  5. Integrating clinical data with information transmitted by implantable cardiac defibrillators to support medical decision in telecardiology

    E-print Network

    Zweigenbaum, Pierre

    with their clinical context, to improve alert management. Methods The AKENATON system is composed of several modules to support medical decision in telecardiology: the application ontology of the AKENATON project Anita Burguna strictly device-centered follow-up to perspectives centered on the patient. In the AKENATON project, we

  6. A modular framework for clinical decision support systems: medical device plug-and-play is critical

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Williams; F. Wu; P. Kazanzides; K. Brady; J. Fackler

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the design and initial implementation of a modular framework for Clinical Decision Support Systems and highlights the need for medical device plug-and-play standards. The software handles the tasks of data acquisition and validation, visualization, and treatment management in order to enable the development of protocol guideline modules as \\

  7. Ability of online drug databases to assist in clinical decision-making with infectious disease therapies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hyla H Polen; Antonia Zapantis; Kevin A Clauson; Jennifer Jebrock; Mark Paris

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infectious disease (ID) is a dynamic field with new guidelines being adopted at a rapid rate. Clinical decision support tools (CDSTs) have proven beneficial in selecting treatment options to improve outcomes. However, there is a dearth of information on the abilities of CDSTs, such as drug information databases. This study evaluated online drug information databases when answering infectious disease-specific

  8. Clinical Decision Support Tools: Performance of Personal Digital Assistant versus Online Drug Information Databases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin A. Clauson; Hyla H. Polen; Wallace A. Marsh

    2007-01-01

    Study Objectives. To evaluate personal digital assistant (PDA) drug information databases used to support clinical decision-making, and to compare the performance of PDA databases with their online versions. Design. Prospective evaluation with descriptive analysis. Methods. Five drug information databases available for PDAs and online were evaluated according to their scope (inclusion of correct answers), completeness (on a 3-point scale), and

  9. A clinical decision rule in the evaluation of acute knee injuries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven J. Bauer; Judd E. Hollander; Susana H. Fuchs; Henry C. Thode

    1995-01-01

    We constructed a clinical decision rule to optimize the use of radiography in patients with acute knee injuries. A prospective observational study at a university hospital ED was conducted over 10 months. Patients 15 years of age and older with acute knee injuries who underwent radiography were included. Patients were excluded if they were intoxicated, had distracting injuries, previous knee

  10. The impact of goal-directed transvaginal ultrasonography on clinical decision-making for emergency physicians.

    PubMed

    Sayrac, Neslihan; Bektas, Firat; Soyuncu, Secgin; Sayrac, Vefa

    2015-07-01

    The aim of study was to determine the impact of "goal-directed transvaginal ultrasonography" (TVUSG) on real-time clinical decision making of attending emergency physicians evaluating their level of certainty for preliminary diagnosis, admission, surgery, treatment, additional laboratory, and discharge in patients presenting with acute pelvic pain to the emergency department (ED). This prospective cross-sectional clinical study was conducted on sexually active female patients older than 18 years who presented with acute pelvic pain in the ED. The level of certainty of clinical decision making as mentioned above was measured by a visual analogue scale from 0 to 100 mm with 100 mm being most certain before and after TVUSG. Statistical analysis was performed on 88 patients. The mean age was 31.7 ±8.3 years with a median of 30 years. Among clinical decisions, there was a significant difference between pre-TVUSG and post-TVUSG certainty of the decision to perform preliminary diagnoses derived from patient's history and physical examination but not in the other outcomes (treatment, admission, surgery, and discharge). (P = .05). Of the patients included in the study, 11 (12.5%) were admitted to hospital, and 2 (2.3%) of them were operated on. The remaining 75 (85.2%) patients were discharged from the ED; of the patients that had been discharged, 18 (20.5%) patients later consulted another physician, and no further pathology could be discovered. In conclusion, US performed by attending emergency physicians may affect the certainty of their decisions in patients presenting with acute pelvic pain. This effect statistically significantly on the decision to determine preliminary diagnosis. PMID:25963680

  11. Comparing and using assessments of the value of information to clinical decision-making.

    PubMed Central

    Urquhart, C J; Hepworth, J B

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses the Value project, which assessed the value to clinical decision-making of information supplied by National Health Service (NHS) library and information services. The project not only showed how health libraries in the United Kingdom help clinicians in decision-making but also provided quality assurance guidelines for these libraries to help make their information services more effective. The paper reviews methods and results used in previous studies of the value of health libraries, noting that methodological differences appear to affect the results. The paper also discusses aspects of user involvement, categories of clinical decision-making, the value of information to present and future clinical decisions, and the combination of quantitative and qualitative assessments of value, as applied to the Value project and the studies reviewed. The Value project also demonstrated that the value placed on information depends in part on the career stage of the physician. The paper outlines the structure of the quality assurance tool kit, which is based on the findings and methods used in the Value project. PMID:8913550

  12. Clinical Decision Support for Whole Genome Sequence Information Leveraging a Service-Oriented Architecture: a Prototype

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Brandon M.; Rodriguez-Loya, Salvador; Eilbeck, Karen; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2014-01-01

    Whole genome sequence (WGS) information could soon be routinely available to clinicians to support the personalized care of their patients. At such time, clinical decision support (CDS) integrated into the clinical workflow will likely be necessary to support genome-guided clinical care. Nevertheless, developing CDS capabilities for WGS information presents many unique challenges that need to be overcome for such approaches to be effective. In this manuscript, we describe the development of a prototype CDS system that is capable of providing genome-guided CDS at the point of care and within the clinical workflow. To demonstrate the functionality of this prototype, we implemented a clinical scenario of a hypothetical patient at high risk for Lynch Syndrome based on his genomic information. We demonstrate that this system can effectively use service-oriented architecture principles and standards-based components to deliver point of care CDS for WGS information in real-time. PMID:25954430

  13. Reward-Related Decision Making in Older Adults: Relationship to Clinical Presentation of Depression

    PubMed Central

    McGovern, Amanda R.; Alexopoulos, George S.; Yuen, Genevieve S.; Morimoto, Sarah Shizuko; Gunning, Faith M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Impairment in reward processes has been found in individuals with depression and in the aging population. The purpose of this study was twofold: 1. To use an affective neuroscience probe to identify abnormalities in reward-related decision making in late-life depression. 2. To examine the relationship of reward-related decision making abnormalities in depressed, older adults to the clinical expression of apathy in depression. We hypothesized that relative to elderly, healthy subjects, depressed, elderly patients would exhibit impaired decision making and that apathetic, depressed patients would show greater impairment in decision making than non-apathetic, depressed patients. Methods We used the Iowa Gambling Task to examine reward-related decision making in 60 non-demented, elderly patients with non-psychotic major depression and 36 elderly, psychiatrically healthy participants. Apathy was quantified using the Apathy Evaluation Scale. Of those with major depression, 18 individuals reported clinically significant apathy whereas 42 participants did not have apathy. Results Older adults with depression and healthy comparison participants did not differ in their performance on the IGT. However, apathetic, depressed older adults adopted an advantageous strategy and selected cards from the conservative decks compared to non-apathetic, depressed older adults. Non-apathetic, depressed patients showed a failure to adopt a conservative strategy and persisted in making risky decisions throughout the task. Conclusions This study indicates that apathy in older, depressed adults is associated with a conservative response style on a behavioral probe of the systems involved in reward-related decision making. This conservative response style may be the result of reduced sensitivity to rewards in apathetic individuals. PMID:25306937

  14. Clinical decision support must be useful, functional is not enough: a qualitative study of computer-based clinical decision support in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Health information technology, particularly electronic decision support systems, can reduce the existing gap between evidence-based knowledge and health care practice but professionals have to accept and use this information. Evidence is scant on which features influence the use of computer-based clinical decision support (eCDS) in primary care and how different professional groups experience it. Our aim was to describe specific reasons for using or not using eCDS among primary care professionals. Methods The setting was a Finnish primary health care organization with 48 professionals receiving patient-specific guidance at the point of care. Multiple data (focus groups, questionnaire and spontaneous feedback) were analyzed using deductive content analysis and descriptive statistics. Results The content of the guidance is a significant feature of the primary care professional’s intention to use eCDS. The decisive reason for using or not using the eCDS is its perceived usefulness. Functional characteristics such as speed and ease of use are important but alone these are not enough. Specific information technology, professional, patient and environment features can help or hinder the use. Conclusions Primary care professionals have to perceive eCDS guidance useful for their work before they use it. PMID:23039113

  15. Innovations in Computerized Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drasgow, Fritz, Ed.; Olson-Buchanan, Julie B., Ed.

    Chapters in this book present the challenges and dilemmas faced by researchers as they created new computerized assessments, focusing on issues addressed in developing, scoring, and administering the assessments. Chapters are: (1) "Beyond Bells and Whistles; An Introduction to Computerized Assessment" (Julie B. Olson-Buchanan and Fritz Drasgow);…

  16. Risks, dangers and competing clinical decisions on venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in hospital care.

    PubMed

    Boiko, Olga; Sheaff, Rod; Child, Susan; Gericke, Christian A

    2013-07-01

    Drawing on wider sociologies of risk, this article examines the complexity of clinical risks and their management, focusing on risk management systems, expert decision-making and safety standards in health care. At the time of this study preventing venous thromboembolism (VTE) among in-patients was one of the top priorities for hospital safety in the English National Health Service (NHS). An analysis of 50 interviews examining hospital professionals' perceptions about VTE risks and prophylaxis illuminates how National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines influenced clinical decision-making in four hospitals in one NHS region. We examine four themes: the identification of new risks, the institutionalisation and management of risk, the relationship between risk and danger and the tensions between risk management systems and expert decision-making. The implementation of NICE guidelines for VTE prevention extended managerial control over risk management but some irreducible clinical dangers remained that were beyond the scope of the new VTE risk management systems. Linking sociologies of risk with the realities of hospital risk management reveals the capacity of these theories to illuminate both the possibilities and the limits of managerialism in health care. PMID:24635764

  17. Clinical Decision Support using a Terminology Server to improve Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Jimenez, Alba; Moreno-Conde, Alberto; Martínez-García, Alicia; Marín-León, Ignacio; Medrano-Ortega, Francisco Javier; Parra-Calderón, Carlos L

    2015-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) are software applications that support clinicians in making healthcare decisions providing relevant information for individual patients about their specific conditions. The lack of integration between CDSS and Electronic Health Record (EHR) has been identified as a significant barrier to CDSS development and adoption. Andalusia Healthcare Public System (AHPS) provides an interoperable health information infrastructure based on a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) that eases CDSS implementation. This paper details the deployment of a CDSS jointly with the deployment of a Terminology Server (TS) within the AHPS infrastructure. It also explains a case study about the application of decision support to thromboembolism patients and its potential impact on improving patient safety. We will apply the inSPECt tool proposal to evaluate the appropriateness of alerts in this scenario. PMID:25991120

  18. Interoperability of clinical decision-support systems and electronic health records using archetypes: a case study in clinical trial eligibility.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Mar; Maldonado, Jose A; Martínez-Salvador, Begoña; Boscá, Diego; Robles, Montserrat

    2013-08-01

    Clinical decision-support systems (CDSSs) comprise systems as diverse as sophisticated platforms to store and manage clinical data, tools to alert clinicians of problematic situations, or decision-making tools to assist clinicians. Irrespective of the kind of decision-support task CDSSs should be smoothly integrated within the clinical information system, interacting with other components, in particular with the electronic health record (EHR). However, despite decades of developments, most CDSSs lack interoperability features. We deal with the interoperability problem of CDSSs and EHRs by exploiting the dual-model methodology. This methodology distinguishes a reference model and archetypes. A reference model is represented by a stable and small object-oriented model that describes the generic properties of health record information. For their part, archetypes are reusable and domain-specific definitions of clinical concepts in the form of structured and constrained combinations of the entities of the reference model. We rely on archetypes to make the CDSS compatible with EHRs from different institutions. Concretely, we use archetypes for modelling the clinical concepts that the CDSS requires, in conjunction with a series of knowledge-intensive mappings relating the archetypes to the data sources (EHR and/or other archetypes) they depend on. We introduce a comprehensive approach, including a set of tools as well as methodological guidelines, to deal with the interoperability of CDSSs and EHRs based on archetypes. Archetypes are used to build a conceptual layer of the kind of a virtual health record (VHR) over the EHR whose contents need to be integrated and used in the CDSS, associating them with structural and terminology-based semantics. Subsequently, the archetypes are mapped to the EHR by means of an expressive mapping language and specific-purpose tools. We also describe a case study where the tools and methodology have been employed in a CDSS to support patient recruitment in the framework of a clinical trial for colorectal cancer screening. The utilisation of archetypes not only has proved satisfactory to achieve interoperability between CDSSs and EHRs but also offers various advantages, in particular from a data model perspective. First, the VHR/data models we work with are of a high level of abstraction and can incorporate semantic descriptions. Second, archetypes can potentially deal with different EHR architectures, due to their deliberate independence of the reference model. Third, the archetype instances we obtain are valid instances of the underlying reference model, which would enable e.g. feeding back the EHR with data derived by abstraction mechanisms. Lastly, the medical and technical validity of archetype models would be assured, since in principle clinicians should be the main actors in their development. PMID:23707417

  19. A legal framework to enable sharing of Clinical Decision Support knowledge and services across institutional boundaries.

    PubMed

    Hongsermeier, Tonya; Maviglia, Saverio; Tsurikova, Lana; Bogaty, Dan; Rocha, Roberto A; Goldberg, Howard; Meltzer, Seth; Middleton, Blackford

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the CDS Consortium (CDSC) is to assess, define, demonstrate, and evaluate best practices for knowledge management and clinical decision support in healthcare information technology at scale - across multiple ambulatory care settings and Electronic Health Record technology platforms. In the course of the CDSC research effort, it became evident that a sound legal foundation was required for knowledge sharing and clinical decision support services in order to address data sharing, intellectual property, accountability, and liability concerns. This paper outlines the framework utilized for developing agreements in support of sharing, accessing, and publishing content via the CDSC Knowledge Management Portal as well as an agreement in support of deployment and consumption of CDSC developed web services in the context of a research project under IRB oversight. PMID:22195151

  20. Formative Evaluation of Clinician Experience with Integrating Family History-Based Clinical Decision Support into Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Doerr, Megan; Edelman, Emily; Gabitzsch, Emily; Eng, Charis; Teng, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Family health history is a leading predictor of disease risk. Nonetheless, it is underutilized to guide care and, therefore, is ripe for health information technology intervention. To fill the family health history practice gap, Cleveland Clinic has developed a family health history collection and clinical decision support tool, MyFamily. This report describes the impact and process of implementing MyFamily into primary care, cancer survivorship and cancer genetics clinics. Ten providers participated in semi-structured interviews that were analyzed to identify opportunities for process improvement. Participants universally noted positive effects on patient care, including increases in quality, personalization of care and patient engagement. The impact on clinical workflow varied by practice setting, with differences observed in the ease of integration and the use of specific report elements. Tension between the length of the report and desired detail was appreciated. Barriers and facilitators to the process of implementation were noted, dominated by the theme of increased integration with the electronic medical record. These results fed real-time improvement cycles to reinforce clinician use. This model will be applied in future institutional efforts to integrate clinical genomic applications into practice and may be useful for other institutions considering the implementation of tools for personalizing medical management. PMID:25563219

  1. EHRs Connect Research and Practice: Where Predictive Modeling, Artificial Intelligence, and Clinical Decision Support Intersect

    E-print Network

    Bennett, Casey; Selove, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Electronic health records (EHRs) are only a first step in capturing and utilizing health-related data - the challenge is turning that data into useful information. Furthermore, EHRs are increasingly likely to include data relating to patient outcomes, functionality such as clinical decision support, and genetic information as well, and, as such, can be seen as repositories of increasingly valuable information about patients' health conditions and responses to treatment over time. Methods: We describe a case study of 423 patients treated by Centerstone within Tennessee and Indiana in which we utilized electronic health record data to generate predictive algorithms of individual patient treatment response. Multiple models were constructed using predictor variables derived from clinical, financial and geographic data. Results: For the 423 patients, 101 deteriorated, 223 improved and in 99 there was no change in clinical condition. Based on modeling of various clinical indicators at baseline, the high...

  2. Risk-Taking Behavior in a Computerized Driving Task: Brain Activation Correlates of Decision-Making, Outcome, and Peer Influence in Male Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Vorobyev, Victor; Kwon, Myoung Soo; Moe, Dagfinn; Parkkola, Riitta; Hämäläinen, Heikki

    2015-01-01

    Increased propensity for risky behavior in adolescents, particularly in peer groups, is thought to reflect maturational imbalance between reward processing and cognitive control systems that affect decision-making. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate brain functional correlates of risk-taking behavior and effects of peer influence in 18–19-year-old male adolescents. The subjects were divided into low and high risk-taking groups using either personality tests or risk-taking rates in a simulated driving task. The fMRI data were analyzed for decision-making (whether to take a risk at intersections) and outcome (pass or crash) phases, and for the influence of peer competition. Personality test-based groups showed no difference in the amount of risk-taking (similarly increased during peer competition) and brain activation. When groups were defined by actual task performance, risk-taking activated two areas in the left medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) significantly more in low than in high risk-takers. In the entire sample, risky decision-specific activation was found in the anterior and dorsal cingulate, superior parietal cortex, basal ganglia (including the nucleus accumbens), midbrain, thalamus, and hypothalamus. Peer competition increased outcome-related activation in the right caudate head and cerebellar vermis in the entire sample. Our results suggest that the activation of the medial (rather than lateral) PFC and striatum is most specific to risk-taking behavior of male adolescents in a simulated driving situation, and reflect a stronger conflict and thus increased cognitive effort to take risks in low risk-takers, and reward anticipation for risky decisions, respectively. The activation of the caudate nucleus, particularly for the positive outcome (pass) during peer competition, further suggests enhanced reward processing of risk-taking under peer influence. PMID:26052943

  3. The EndoPredict Gene-Expression Assay in Clinical Practice - Performance and Impact on Clinical Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Berit Maria; Keil, Elke; Lehmann, Annika; Winzer, Klaus-Jürgen; Richter-Ehrenstein, Christiane; Prinzler, Judith; Bangemann, Nikola; Reles, Angela; Stadie, Sylvia; Schoenegg, Winfried; Eucker, Jan; Schmidt, Marcus; Lippek, Frank; Jöhrens, Korinna; Pahl, Stefan; Sinn, Bruno Valentin; Budczies, Jan; Dietel, Manfred; Denkert, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    The validated EndoPredict assay is a novel tool to predict the risk of metastases of patients with estrogen receptor positive, HER2 negative breast cancer treated with endocrine therapy alone. It has been designed to integrate genomic and clinical information and includes clinico-pathological factors such as tumor size and nodal status. The test is feasible in a decentral setting in molecular pathology laboratories. In this project, we investigated the performance of this test in clinical practice, and performed a retrospective evaluation of its impact on treatment decisions in breast cancer. During one year, EndoPredict assays from 167 patients could be successfully performed. For retrospective evaluation of treatment decisions, a questionnaire was sent to the clinical partner. Regarding the molecular EP class, samples from 56 patients (33.5%) had a low-risk, whereas 111 patients (66.5%) showed a high-risk gene profile. After integration of the clinicopathological factors the combined clinical and molecular score (EPclin) resulted in a low-risk group of 77 patients (46.4%), while 89 (53.6%) had a high risk EPclin score. The EPclin-based estimated median 10-year-risk for metastases with endocrine therapy alone was 11% for the whole cohort. The median handling time averaged three days (range: 0 to 11 days), 59.3% of the tests could be performed in three or less than three days. Comparison of pre- and post-test therapy decisions showed a change of therapy in 37.7% of patients. 16 patients (12.3%) had a change to an additional chemotherapy while 25.4% of patients (n?=?33) changed to an endocrine therapy alone. In 73 patients (56.2%) no change of therapy resulted. In 6.1% of patients (n?=?8), the patients did not agree to the recommendation of the tumor board. Our results show that the EndoPredict assay could be routinely performed in decentral molecular pathology laboratories and the results markedly change treatment decisions. PMID:23826382

  4. The EndoPredict Gene-Expression Assay in Clinical Practice - Performance and Impact on Clinical Decisions.

    PubMed

    Müller, Berit Maria; Keil, Elke; Lehmann, Annika; Winzer, Klaus-Jürgen; Richter-Ehrenstein, Christiane; Prinzler, Judith; Bangemann, Nikola; Reles, Angela; Stadie, Sylvia; Schoenegg, Winfried; Eucker, Jan; Schmidt, Marcus; Lippek, Frank; Jöhrens, Korinna; Pahl, Stefan; Sinn, Bruno Valentin; Budczies, Jan; Dietel, Manfred; Denkert, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    The validated EndoPredict assay is a novel tool to predict the risk of metastases of patients with estrogen receptor positive, HER2 negative breast cancer treated with endocrine therapy alone. It has been designed to integrate genomic and clinical information and includes clinico-pathological factors such as tumor size and nodal status. The test is feasible in a decentral setting in molecular pathology laboratories. In this project, we investigated the performance of this test in clinical practice, and performed a retrospective evaluation of its impact on treatment decisions in breast cancer. During one year, EndoPredict assays from 167 patients could be successfully performed. For retrospective evaluation of treatment decisions, a questionnaire was sent to the clinical partner. Regarding the molecular EP class, samples from 56 patients (33.5%) had a low-risk, whereas 111 patients (66.5%) showed a high-risk gene profile. After integration of the clinicopathological factors the combined clinical and molecular score (EPclin) resulted in a low-risk group of 77 patients (46.4%), while 89 (53.6%) had a high risk EPclin score. The EPclin-based estimated median 10-year-risk for metastases with endocrine therapy alone was 11% for the whole cohort. The median handling time averaged three days (range: 0 to 11 days), 59.3% of the tests could be performed in three or less than three days. Comparison of pre- and post-test therapy decisions showed a change of therapy in 37.7% of patients. 16 patients (12.3%) had a change to an additional chemotherapy while 25.4% of patients (n?=?33) changed to an endocrine therapy alone. In 73 patients (56.2%) no change of therapy resulted. In 6.1% of patients (n?=?8), the patients did not agree to the recommendation of the tumor board. Our results show that the EndoPredict assay could be routinely performed in decentral molecular pathology laboratories and the results markedly change treatment decisions. PMID:23826382

  5. Bridging from clinical endpoints to estimates of treatment value for external decision makers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. W. Zhu; C. Leibman; R. Townsend; T. Mclaughlin; N. Scarmeas; M. Albert; J. Brandt; D. Blacker; M. Sano; Y. Stern

    2009-01-01

    Aim  While clinical endpoints provide important information on the efficacy of treatment in controlled conditions, they often are\\u000a not relevant to decision makers trying to gauge the potential economic impact or value of new treatments. Therefore, it is\\u000a often necessary to translate changes in cognition, function or behavior into changes in cost or other measures, which can\\u000a be problematic if not

  6. Using Brain-Based Cognitive Measures to Support Clinical Decisions in ADHD

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leanne M. Williams; Daniel F. Hermens; Thida Thein; C. Richard Clark; Nicholas J. Cooper; Simon D. Clarke; Chris Lamb; Evian Gordon; Michael R. Kohn

    2010-01-01

    Measures of cognition support diagnostic and treat- ment decisions in attention deficit hyperactivity disor- der. We used an integrative neuroscience framework to assess cognition and associated brain-function corre- lates in large attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and healthy groups. Matched groups of 175 attention deficit hyperactivity disorder children\\/adolescents and 175 healthy control subjects were assessed clinically, with the touch screen-based cognitive

  7. Clinical judgment and decision making in wound assessment and management: is experience enough?

    PubMed

    Logan, Gemma

    2015-03-01

    The assessment and management of wounds forms a large proportion of community nurses' workload, often requiring judgment and decision-making in complex, challenging and uncertain circumstances. The processes through which nurses form judgments and make decisions within this context are reviewed in this article against existing theories on these on these subjects. There is variability in wound assessment and management practice which may be attributed to uncertainties within the context, a lack of knowledge in appropriate treatment choices and the inability to correctly value the importance of the clinical information presented. Nurses may be required to draw on intuition to guide their judgments and decision-making by association with experience and expertise. In addition, a step-by-step analytical approach underpinned by an evidence base may be required to ensure accuracy in practice. Developing an understanding of the different theories of judgment and decision-making may facilitate nurses' abilities to reflect on their own decision tasks, thereby enhancing the care provided. PMID:25790510

  8. Clinical judgment and decision-making in wound assessment and management: is experience enough?

    PubMed

    Logan, Gemma

    2015-03-01

    The assessment and management of wounds forms a large proportion of community nurses' workload, often requiring judgment and decision-making in complex, challenging and uncertain circumstances. The processes through which nurses form judgments and make decisions within this context are reviewed in this article against existing theories on these subjects. There is variability in wound assessment and management practice which may be attributed to uncertainties within the context, a lack of knowledge in appropriate treatment choices and the inability to correctly value the importance of the clinical information presented. Nurses may be required to draw on intuition to guide their judgments and decision-making by association with experience and expertise. In addition, a step-by-step analytical approach underpinned by an evidence base may be required to ensure accuracy in practice. Developing an understanding of the different theories of judgment and decision-making may facilitate nurses' abilities to reflect on their own decision tasks, thereby enhancing the care provided. PMID:25882591

  9. The Utilization of a Clinical Decision Support System to Manage Adult Type 2 Diabetes: A Correlational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faught, I. Charie

    2012-01-01

    While the Institute of Medicine (2001) has promoted health information technology to improve the process of care such as compliance with clinical practice guidelines and quicker access to clinical information, diagnostic tests, and treatment results, very little was known about how a clinical decision support system can contribute to diabetes…

  10. Physician Attitudes toward Adopting Genome-Guided Prescribing through Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Overby, Casey Lynnette; Erwin, Angelika Ludtke; Abul-Husn, Noura S.; Ellis, Stephen B.; Scott, Stuart A.; Obeng, Aniwaa Owusu; Kannry, Joseph L.; Hripcsak, George; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Gottesman, Omri

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed physician attitudes toward adopting genome-guided prescribing through clinical decision support (CDS), prior to enlisting in the Clinical Implementation of Personalized Medicine through Electronic Health Records and Genomics pilot pharmacogenomics project (CLIPMERGE PGx). We developed a survey instrument that includes the Evidence Based Practice Attitude Scale, adapted to measure attitudes toward adopting genome-informed interventions (EBPAS-GII). The survey also includes items to measure physicians’ characteristics (awareness, experience, and perceived usefulness), attitudes about personal genome testing (PGT) services, and comfort using technology. We surveyed 101 General Internal Medicine physicians from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (ISMMS). The majority were residency program trainees (~88%). Prior to enlisting into CLIPMERGE PGx, most physicians were aware of and had used decision support aids. Few physicians, however, were aware of and had used genome-guided prescribing. The majority of physicians viewed decision support aids and genotype data as being useful for making prescribing decisions. Most physicians had not heard of, but were willing to use, PGT services and felt comfortable interpreting PGT results. Most physicians were comfortable with technology. Physicians who perceived genotype data to be useful in making prescribing decisions, had more positive attitudes toward adopting genome-guided prescribing through CDS. Our findings suggest that internal medicine physicians have a deficit in their familiarity and comfort interpreting and using genomic information. This has reinforced the importance of gathering feedback and guidance from our enrolled physicians when designing genome-guided CDS and the importance of prioritizing genomic medicine education at our institutions. PMID:25562141

  11. Exploring Decision-Making of HIV-Infected Hispanics and African Americans Participating in Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Goba, Migdalia V.; Dominguez, Dinora C.; Stoll, Pamela; Grady, Christine; Ramos, Catalina; Mican, JoAnn M.

    2011-01-01

    Underrepresentation of HIV-infected Hispanics and African Americans in clinical trials seriously limits our understanding of the benefits and risks of treatment in these populations. This qualitative study examined factors that racial/ethnic minority patients consider when making decisions regarding research participation. Thirty-five HIV-infected Hispanic and African American patients enrolled in clinical research protocols at the National Institutes of Health were recruited to participate in focus groups and in-depth interviews. The sample of mostly men (n = 22), had a mean age of 45, nearly equal representation of race/ethnicity, and diagnosed 2 to 22 years ago. Baseline questionnaires included demographics and measures of social support and acculturation. Interviewers had similar racial/ethnic, cultural, and linguistic backgrounds as the participants. Four major themes around participants’ decisions to enroll in clinical trials emerged: Enhancers, Barriers, Beliefs, and Psychosocial Context. Results may help researchers develop strategies to facilitate inclusion of HIV-infected Hispanics and African Americans into clinical trials. PMID:21256054

  12. Patient exposure in the basic science classroom enhances differential diagnosis formation and clinical decision-making.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Justin G; Grande, Joseph P

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The authors proposed that introducing real patients into a pathology classroom early in medical education would help integrate fundamental principles and disease pathology with clinical presentation and medical history. Methods. Three patients with different pathologies described their history and presentation without revealing their diagnosis. Students were required to submit a differential diagnosis in writing, and then were able to ask questions to arrive at the correct diagnosis. Students were surveyed on the efficacy of patient-based learning. Results. Average student scores on the differential diagnosis assignments significantly improved 32% during the course. From the survey, 72% of students felt that patient encounters should be included in the pathology course next year. Seventy-four percent felt that the differential diagnosis assignments helped them develop clinical decision-making skills. Seventy-three percent felt that the experience helped them know what questions to ask patients. Eighty-six percent felt that they obtained a better understanding of patients' social and emotional challenges. Discussion. Having students work through the process of differential diagnosis formulation when encountering a real patient and their clinical presentation improved clinical decision-making skills and integrated fundamental concepts with disease pathology during a basic science pathology course. PMID:25755935

  13. Computerized Interactive Harness Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billitti, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Computerized interactive harness engineering program inexpensive, interactive system for learning and using engineering approach to interconnection systems. Basically data-base system that stores information as files of individual connectors and handles wiring information in circuit groups stored as records.

  14. ASSESSMENT OF UPPER EXTREMITY IMPAIRMENT, FUNCTION, AND ACTIVITY FOLLOWING STROKE: FOUNDATIONS FOR CLINICAL DECISION MAKING

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Catherine E.; Bland, Marghuretta D.; Bailey, Ryan R.; Schaefer, Sydney Y.; Birkenmeier, Rebecca L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive approach for assessing the upper extremity (UE) after stroke. First, common upper extremity impairments and how to assess them are briefly discussed. While multiple UE impairments are typically present after stroke, the severity of one impairment, paresis, is the primary determinant of UE functional loss. Second, UE function is operationally defined and a number of clinical measures are discussed. It is important to consider how impairment and loss of function affect UE activity outside of the clinical environment. Thus, this review also identifies accelerometry as an objective method for assessing UE activity in daily life. Finally, the role that each of these levels of assessment should play in clinical decision making is discussed in order to optimize the provision of stroke rehabilitation services. PMID:22975740

  15. THOMAS: Building Bayesian Statistical Expert Systems to Aid in Clinical Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Harold P.; Shortliffe, Edward H.

    1990-01-01

    Previous knowledge-based systems for statistical analysis separate the numeric knowledge needed for data analysis from the heuristic knowledge employed in using the results of the analysis. In contrast, a Bayesian framework for building biostatistical expert systems allows for the integration of the data-analytic and decision-making tasks. The architecture of such a framework entails enabling the system (1) to make its recommendations on decision-analytic grounds; (2) to update a statistical model based on the user's prior beliefs and on data from, and methodological concerns evinced by, the study; (3) to construct statistical models dynamically. This architecture permits the knowledge engineer to represent a variety of types of statistical and domain knowledge, such as methodological knowledge. Construction of such systems requires that the knowledge engineer reinterpret traditional statistical concerns, such as by replacing the notion of statistical significance with that of a pragmatic clinical threshold. The user of such a system can interact with the system at the level of general methodological concerns, rather than at the level of statistical details. We demonstrate these issues with a prototype system called THOMAS which helps a physician decision maker to interpret the results of a published randomized clinical trial.

  16. Research Paper: A Cognitive Task Analysis of Information Management Strategies in a Computerized Provider Order Entry Environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charlene R. Weir; Jonathan J. R. Nebeker; Bret L. Hicken; Rebecca Campo; Frank Drews; Beth LeBar

    2007-01-01

    ObjectiveComputerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE) with electronic documentation, and computerized decision support dramatically changes the information environment of the practicing clinician. Prior work patterns based on paper, verbal exchange, and manual methods are replaced with automated, computerized, and potentially less flexible systems. The objective of this study is to explore the information management strategies that clinicians use in the process

  17. A computerized business simulation for dental practice management.

    PubMed

    Willis, D O; Smith, J R; Golden, P

    1997-10-01

    Computerized simulations have been used for many years for teaching principles of management in business schools. This paper describes the development of a computerized business simulation for use in dental school practice management courses. The simulation is in a competitive game format. It requires students to formulate strategies and to implement management decisions that reinforce and fulfill that strategy. Participants use the outcomes of these decisions to formulate new management decisions for the upcoming period. Student response to participation in the simulation has been positive, with students indicating that participation is valuable for developing better understanding of analytical business management techniques and interpersonal techniques such as group process and leadership skills. PMID:9385326

  18. Instruments to assess the perception of physicians in the decision-making process of specific clinical encounters: a systematic review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Moher; Glyn Elwyn; Annie LeBlanc; Karine Gravel

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The measurement of processes and outcomes that reflect the complexity of the decision-making process within specific clinical encounters is an important area of research to pursue. A systematic review was conducted to identify instruments that assess the perception physicians have of the decision-making process within specific clinical encounters. METHODS: For every year available up until April 2007, PubMed, PsycINFO,

  19. Access flow measurement as a predictor of hemodialysis graft thrombosis: making clinical decisions.

    PubMed

    Krivitski, N M; Gantela, S

    2001-01-01

    Since the introduction of dilution methods for measurement of vascular access blood flow during hemodialysis, more than 170 publications addressing the accuracy, prognostic value, and economic impact of the technology have been presented. Recently researchers (Paulson et al.) have raised concerns about the accuracy of access flow measurements in predicting thrombosis. Our first objective was to address the inadequacies of the analysis by these authors. The second objective was to apply a statistically accepted three-step approach for clinical decision making to assess the utility of access flow surveillance (similar to the K/DOQI guidelines) in the prediction of thrombosis. These steps included 1) estimation of treatment thresholds based on harm-benefit analysis of fistulography-angioplasty versus thrombosis, 2) estimation of prior probability of thrombosis based on patient demographic and clinical characteristics, and 3) application of Bayes' theorem to evaluate whether flow test results provided information that could move patients across the treatment threshold, thus discriminating between patients who should be referred for fistulography-angioplasty and those who should not. These data and an analysis of recent publications show that the implementation of an access flow surveillance program decreases thrombosis rates in hemodialysis units and can significantly reduce the costs associated with hemodialysis access maintenance. We conclude that access flow monitoring (K/DOQI flow thresholds) is useful in the clinical decision-making process for thrombosis prediction across a wide range of demographic categories. PMID:11422924

  20. A study of diverse clinical decision support rule authoring environments and requirements for integration

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Efficient rule authoring tools are critical to allow clinical Knowledge Engineers (KEs), Software Engineers (SEs), and Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) to convert medical knowledge into machine executable clinical decision support rules. The goal of this analysis was to identify the critical success factors and challenges of a fully functioning Rule Authoring Environment (RAE) in order to define requirements for a scalable, comprehensive tool to manage enterprise level rules. Methods The authors evaluated RAEs in active use across Partners Healthcare, including enterprise wide, ambulatory only, and system specific tools, with a focus on rule editors for reminder and medication rules. We conducted meetings with users of these RAEs to discuss their general experience and perceived advantages and limitations of these tools. Results While the overall rule authoring process is similar across the 10 separate RAEs, the system capabilities and architecture vary widely. Most current RAEs limit the ability of the clinical decision support (CDS) interventions to be standardized, sharable, interoperable, and extensible. No existing system meets all requirements defined by knowledge management users. Conclusions A successful, scalable, integrated rule authoring environment will need to support a number of key requirements and functions in the areas of knowledge representation, metadata, terminology, authoring collaboration, user interface, integration with electronic health record (EHR) systems, testing, and reporting. PMID:23145874

  1. A Clinical Decision Support System for the Diagnosis, Fracture Risks and Treatment of Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Halldorsson, Bjarni V.; Bjornsson, Aron Hjalti; Gudmundsson, Haukur Tyr; Birgisson, Elvar Orn; Ludviksson, Bjorn Runar

    2015-01-01

    Expanding medical knowledge increases the potential risk of medical errors in clinical practice. We present, OPAD, a clinical decision support system in the field of the medical care of osteoporosis. We utilize clinical information from international guidelines and experts in the field of osteoporosis. Physicians are provided with user interface to insert standard patient data, from which OPAD provides instant diagnostic comments, 10-year risk of fragility fracture, treatment options for the given case, and when to offer a follow-up DXA-evaluation. Thus, the medical decision making is standardized according to the best expert knowledge at any given time. OPAD was evaluated in a set of 308 randomly selected individuals. OPAD's ten-year fracture risk computation is nearly identical to FRAX (r = 0.988). In 58% of cases OPAD recommended DXA evaluation at the present time. Following a DXA measurement in all individuals, 71% of those that were recommended to have DXA at the present time received recommendation for further investigation or specific treatment by the OPAD. In only 5.9% of individuals in which DXA was not recommended, the result of the BMD measurement changed the recommendations given by OPAD. PMID:25815042

  2. Knowledge of Fecal Calprotectin and Infliximab Trough Levels Alters Clinical Decision-making for IBD Outpatients on Maintenance Infliximab Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, Connie; Kroeker, Karen I.; Wang, Haili; Shalapay, Carol; Dhami, Neil; Fedorak, Darryl K.; Halloran, Brendan; Dieleman, Levinus A.; Goodman, Karen J.; Fedorak, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Infliximab is an effective therapy for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, more than 50% of patients lose response. Empiric dose intensification is not effective for all patients because not all patients have objective disease activity or subtherapeutic drug level. The aim was to determine how an objective marker of disease activity or therapeutic drug monitoring affects clinical decisions regarding maintenance infliximab therapy in outpatients with IBD. Methods: Consecutive patients with IBD on maintenance infliximab therapy were invited to participate by providing preinfusion stool and blood samples. Fecal calprotectin (FCP) and infliximab trough levels (ITLs) were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Three decisions were compared: (1) actual clinical decision, (2) algorithmic FCP or ITL decisions, and (3) expert panel decision based on (a) clinical data, (b) clinical data plus FCP, and (c) clinical data plus FCP plus ITL. In secondary analysis, Receiver-operating curves were used to assess the ability of FCP and ITL in predicting clinical disease activity or remission. Results: A total of 36 sets of blood and stool were available for analysis; median FCP 191.5 ?g/g, median ITLs 7.3 ?g/mL. The actual clinical decision differed from the hypothetical decision in 47.2% (FCP algorithm); 69.4% (ITL algorithm); 25.0% (expert panel clinical decision); 44.4% (expert panel clinical plus FCP); 58.3% (expert panel clinical plus FCP plus ITL) cases. FCP predicted clinical relapse (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.417; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.197–0.641) and subtherapeutic ITL (AUC = 0.774; 95% CI, 0.536–1.000). ITL predicted clinical remission (AUC = 0.498; 95% CI, 0.254–0.742) and objective remission (AUC = 0.773; 95% CI, 0.622–0.924). Conclusions: Using FCP and ITLs in addition to clinical data results in an increased number of decisions to optimize management in outpatients with IBD on stable maintenance infliximab therapy. PMID:25989340

  3. Heart to Heart: a computerized decision aid for assessment of coronary heart disease risk and the impact of risk-reduction interventions for primary prevention.

    PubMed

    Pignone, Michael; Sheridan, Stacey L; Lee, Yueh Z; Kuo, Johnny; Phillips, Christopher; Mulrow, Cynthia; Zeiger, Roni

    2004-01-01

    Heart to Heart is a computer-based decision aid for patients and providers that provides personalized, evidence-based information about coronary heart disease (CHD) risk and potential risk-reducing interventions. To develop Heart to Heart, the authors used Framing-ham risk equations and systematic reviews of risk-reducing interventions. The Web version was programmed using PHP: Hypertext Processor, a Web-based programming language, and has separate interfaces for providers and patients. The authors subsequently developed a modified version for personal digital assistants. Heart to Heart uses information about a patient's CHD risk factors (age, gender, total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, diabetes, smoking, systolic blood pressure, and left ventricular hypertrophy) to calculate risk of total CHD events over 5 or 10 years. Patients and providers can then examine the effect of introducing one or more risk-reducing interventions (aspirin, lipid-lowering drug therapy, antihypertensive medication, or smoking cessation) on the patient's CHD risk. Future research will be directed to determining whether Heart to Heart can improve utilization of effective CHD risk-reducing interventions. PMID:15010625

  4. Systematic review of clinical decision support interventions with potential for inpatient cost reduction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Healthcare costs are increasing rapidly and at an unsustainable rate in many countries, and inpatient hospitalizations are a significant driver of these costs. Clinical decision support (CDS) represents a promising approach to not only improve care but to reduce costs in the inpatient setting. The purpose of this study was to systematically review trials of CDS interventions with the potential to reduce inpatient costs, so as to identify promising interventions for more widespread implementation and to inform future research in this area. Methods To identify relevant studies, MEDLINE was searched up to July 2013. CDS intervention studies with the potential to reduce inpatient healthcare costs were identified through titles and abstracts, and full text articles were reviewed to make a final determination on inclusion. Relevant characteristics of the studies were extracted and summarized. Results Following a screening of 7,663 articles, 78 manuscripts were included. 78.2% of studies were controlled before-after studies, and 15.4% were randomized controlled trials. 53.8% of the studies were focused on pharmacotherapy. The majority of manuscripts were published during or after 2008. 70.5% of the studies resulted in statistically and clinically significant improvements in an explicit financial measure or a proxy financial measure. Only 12.8% of the studies directly measured the financial impact of an intervention, whereas the financial impact was inferred in the remainder of studies. Data on cost effectiveness was available for only one study. Conclusions Significantly more research is required on the impact of clinical decision support on inpatient costs. In particular, there is a remarkable gap in the availability of cost effectiveness studies required by policy makers and decision makers in healthcare systems. PMID:24344752

  5. Recruiting faculty with clinical responsibilities: factors that influence a decision to accept an academic position.

    PubMed

    Grauer, Gregory F

    2005-01-01

    The current opportunities for veterinary clinical specialists in private practice and industry have made recruiting and retaining faculty a major focus for most clinical academic departments. To gain a better understanding of the importance of the various factors considered in accepting an academic position, an electronic survey was distributed to newly hired veterinary faculty with clinical responsibilities. The results suggest that the perceived climate and collegiality within the prospective hiring department is the most important factor influencing the decision to accept an academic position. Salary is the second most important factor. Institutional support for the newly hired faculty member and the reputation and quality of the prospective institution rank as more important than the perceived quality of the local community and the geographic location of the institution. The search process and administrative support are the least important factors. There were no differences between the responses of faculty hired into tenure-track positions and those of faculty hired into clinical-track positions. Focusing on the advantages of a collegial environment, enhancing compensation packages, and using creative and flexible appointments may improve faculty recruitment and retention in clinical academic departments. PMID:16261500

  6. Developing key-feature problems and examinations to assess clinical decision-making skills.

    PubMed

    Page, G; Bordage, G; Allen, T

    1995-03-01

    This article introduces the concept of a key feature and describes its function as the cornerstone of key-feature problems, a new problem format for the written assessment of clinical decision-making skills of medical trainees and practitioners. The rationale for using this problem format and the steps in problem and examination development--including issues of scoring and standard setting--are described. A key feature is defined as a critical step in the resolution of a clinical problem, and a key-feature problem consists of a clinical case scenario followed by questions that focus on only those critical steps. The questions can be presented to require examinees either to write in their responses or to select them from a list of options. For each question, examines can be instructed to supply or select whatever number of responses is appropriate to the clinical task being tested, and answer keys can comprise one or several responses. This problem format, with its focus on only the critical steps in problem resolution, and with its flexibility in question format and scoring keys, effectively addresses the psychometric considerations of content validity and test score reliability, and accommodates the complexity and configurations of actions often required in the resolution of clinical problems. PMID:7873006

  7. Performance of online drug information databases as clinical decision support tools in infectious disease medication management.

    PubMed

    Polen, Hyla H; Zapantis, Antonia; Clauson, Kevin A; Clauson, Kevin Alan; Jebrock, Jennifer; Paris, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Infectious disease (ID) medication management is complex and clinical decision support tools (CDSTs) can provide valuable assistance. This study evaluated scope and completeness of ID drug information found in online databases by evaluating their ability to answer 147 question/answer pairs. Scope scores produced highest rankings (%) for: Micromedex (82.3), Lexi-Comp/American Hospital Formulary Service (81.0), and Medscape Drug Reference (81.0); lowest includes: Epocrates Online Premium (47.0), Johns Hopkins ABX Guide (45.6), and PEPID PDC (40.8). PMID:18999059

  8. Integrating complex business processes for knowledge-driven clinical decision support systems.

    PubMed

    Kamaleswaran, Rishikesan; McGregor, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents in detail the component of the Complex Business Process for Stream Processing framework that is responsible for integrating complex business processes to enable knowledge-driven Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) recommendations. CDSSs aid the clinician in supporting the care of patients by providing accurate data analysis and evidence-based recommendations. However, the incorporation of a dynamic knowledge-management system that supports the definition and enactment of complex business processes and real-time data streams has not been researched. In this paper we discuss the process web service as an innovative method of providing contextual information to a real-time data stream processing CDSS. PMID:23366138

  9. Clinical decision support systems and infection prevention: To know is not enough.

    PubMed

    Wright, Marc-Oliver; Robicsek, Ari

    2015-06-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) systems are an increasingly used form of technology designed to guide health care providers toward established protocols and best practices with the intent of improving patient care. Utilization of CDS for infection prevention is not widespread and is particularly focused on antimicrobial stewardship. This article provides an overview of CDS systems and summarizes key attributes of successfully executed tools. A selection of published reports of CDS for infection prevention and antimicrobial stewardship are described. Finally, an individual organization describes its CDS infrastructure, process of prioritization, design, and development, with selected highlights of CDS tools specifically targeting common infection prevention quality improvement initiatives. PMID:25798779

  10. The Effect of a Computerized Review on NCLEX-RN Scores

    PubMed Central

    Worrell, Pamela J.; Hodson, Kay E.; Henriksen, Larry

    1985-01-01

    This presentation will describe a pilot study being conducted at Ball State University. The study is attempting to determine the effect of a computerized review experience on the clinical subscale scores of NCLEX-RN. Relationships between the computerized review clinical subscores and the NCLEX-RN clinical subscale scores are also being investigated.

  11. Improving completeness of electronic problem lists through clinical decision support: a randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Justine; Feblowitz, Joshua C; Maloney, Francine L; Wilcox, Allison R; McLoughlin, Karen Sax; Ramelson, Harley; Schneider, Louise; Bates, David W

    2012-01-01

    Background Accurate clinical problem lists are critical for patient care, clinical decision support, population reporting, quality improvement, and research. However, problem lists are often incomplete or out of date. Objective To determine whether a clinical alerting system, which uses inference rules to notify providers of undocumented problems, improves problem list documentation. Study Design and Methods Inference rules for 17 conditions were constructed and an electronic health record-based intervention was evaluated to improve problem documentation. A cluster randomized trial was conducted of 11 participating clinics affiliated with a large academic medical center, totaling 28 primary care clinical areas, with 14 receiving the intervention and 14 as controls. The intervention was a clinical alert directed to the provider that suggested adding a problem to the electronic problem list based on inference rules. The primary outcome measure was acceptance of the alert. The number of study problems added in each arm as a pre-specified secondary outcome was also assessed. Data were collected during 6-month pre-intervention (11/2009–5/2010) and intervention (5/2010–11/2010) periods. Results 17?043 alerts were presented, of which 41.1% were accepted. In the intervention arm, providers documented significantly more study problems (adjusted OR=3.4, p<0.001), with an absolute difference of 6277 additional problems. In the intervention group, 70.4% of all study problems were added via the problem list alerts. Significant increases in problem notation were observed for 13 of 17 conditions. Conclusion Problem inference alerts significantly increase notation of important patient problems in primary care, which in turn has the potential to facilitate quality improvement. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01105923. PMID:22215056

  12. Incorporating INTERACT II Clinical Decision Support Tools into Nursing Home Health Information Technology

    PubMed Central

    Handler, Steven M.; Sharkey, Siobhan S.; Hudak, Sandra; Ouslander, Joseph G.

    2012-01-01

    A substantial reduction in hospitalization rates has been associated with the implementation of the Interventions to Reduce Acute Care Transfers (INTERACT) quality improvement intervention using the accompanying paper-based clinical practice tools (INTERACT II). There is significant potential to further increase the impact of INTERACT by integrating INTERACT II tools into nursing home (NH) health information technology (HIT) via standalone or integrated clinical decision support (CDS) systems. This article highlights the process of translating INTERACT II tools from paper to NH HIT. The authors believe that widespread dissemination and integration of INTERACT II CDS tools into various NH HIT products could lead to sustainable improvement in resident and clinician process and outcome measures, including enhanced interclinician communication and a reduction in potentially avoidable hospitalizations. PMID:22267955

  13. Multidisciplinary Modelling of Symptoms and Signs with Archetypes and SNOMED-CT for Clinical Decision Support.

    PubMed

    Marco-Ruiz, Luis; Maldonado, J Alberto; Karlsen, Randi; Bellika, Johan G

    2015-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) help to improve health care and reduce costs. However, the lack of knowledge management and modelling hampers their maintenance and reuse. Current EHR standards and terminologies can allow the semantic representation of the data and knowledge of CDSS systems boosting their interoperability, reuse and maintenance. This paper presents the modelling process of respiratory conditions' symptoms and signs by a multidisciplinary team of clinicians and information architects with the help of openEHR, SNOMED and clinical information modelling tools for a CDSS. The information model of the CDSS was defined by means of an archetype and the knowledge model was implemented by means of an SNOMED-CT based ontology. PMID:25991115

  14. Pilot study evaluating a clinical decision tool on suspected scaphoid fractures.

    PubMed

    Steenvoorde, Pascal; Jacobi, Cathrien; van Doorn, Louk; Oskam, Jacques

    2006-08-01

    In an earlier study we have proposed a scaphoid decision-protocol in order to improve diagnostic accuracy in case of suspected scaphoid fractures. This pilot study evaluated this protocol. In this pilot study (n = 31) most cases with clinical suspicion of scaphoid fractures reached a positive test result on the combined 7 clinical tests (93.5%). Using this test combination, no scaphoid fractures were missed (no false-negatives; sensitivity 100%), but it also included many patients with no scaphoid fracture. Many of these, however, were found to have another fracture. In total, 48% had a scaphoid fracture, 19% another fracture and 32% no fracture. In the pilot study the proposed protocol seems to be a safe protocol, without missing scaphoid fractures. It leads to a reduction of unnecessary plaster casting of sprained wrists and produces a marked reduction in plain radiographic examinations. PMID:17009820

  15. Clinical presentations of critical cardiac defects in the newborn: Decision making and initial management

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The risk of mortality and morbidity of patients with congenital heart defects (CHDs) is highest during neonatal period and increases when diagnosis and proper management are delayed. Neonates with critical CHDs may present with severe cyanosis, respiratory distress, shock, or collapse, all of which are also frequent clinical presentations of various respiratory problems or sepsis in the newborn. Early diagnosis and stabilization and timely referral to a tertiary cardiac center are crucial to improve the outcomes in neonates with CHDs. In this review, the clinical presentation of critical and potentially life-threatening CHDs is discussed along with brief case reviews to help understand the hemodynamics of these defects and ensure proper decision-making in critically ill patients. PMID:21189937

  16. Application of a diagnosis-based clinical decision guide in patients with neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Neck pain (NP) is a common cause of disability. Accurate and efficacious methods of diagnosis and treatment have been elusive. A diagnosis-based clinical decision guide (DBCDG; previously referred to as a diagnosis-based clinical decision rule) has been proposed which attempts to provide the clinician with a systematic, evidence-based guide in applying the biopsychosocial model of care. The approach is based on three questions of diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to present the prevalence of findings using the DBCDG in consecutive patients with NP. Methods Demographic, diagnostic and baseline outcome measure data were gathered on a cohort of NP patients examined by one of three examiners trained in the application of the DBCDG. Results Data were gathered on 95 patients. Signs of visceral disease or potentially serious illness were found in 1%. Centralization signs were found in 27%, segmental pain provocation signs were found in 69% and radicular signs were found in 19%. Clinically relevant myofascial signs were found in 22%. Dynamic instability was found in 40%, oculomotor dysfunction in 11.6%, fear beliefs in 31.6%, central pain hypersensitivity in 4%, passive coping in 5% and depression in 2%. Conclusion The DBCDG can be applied in a busy private practice environment. Further studies are needed to investigate clinically relevant means to identify central pain hypersensitivity, oculomotor dysfunction, poor coping and depression, correlations and patterns among the diagnostic components of the DBCDG as well as inter-examiner reliability, validity and efficacy of treatment based on the DBCDG. PMID:21871119

  17. External audit on the clinical practice and medical decision-making at the departments of radiotherapy in Budapest and Vienna

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olga Ésik; Wolfgang Seitz; József Lövey; Tomas H Knocke; István Gaudi; György Németh; Richard Pötter

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To present an example of how to study and analyze the clinical practice and the quality of medical decision-making under daily routine working conditions in a radiotherapy department, with the aims of detecting deficiencies and improving the quality of patient care.Methods: Two departments, each with a divisional organization structure and an established internal audit system, the University Clinic of

  18. Does Perfusion Computed Tomography Facilitate Clinical Decision Making for Thrombolysis in Unselected Acute Patients with Suspected Ischaemic Stroke?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Agarwal; P. S. Jones; J. A. Alawneh; N. M. Antoun; P. J. Barry; E. Carrera; P. E. Cotter; E. W. O’Brien; I. Salih; D. J. Scoffings; J.-C. Baron; E. A. Warburton

    2011-01-01

    Background: Despite use in clinical practice and major positive trials of thrombolysis, non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT) is not sensitive for identifying penumbral tissue in acute stroke. This study evaluated how physiological imaging using CT perfusion (CTP) could add to the diagnostic utility of an NCCT and inform clinical decisions regarding thrombolysis. Methods: Forty imaging datasets containing NCCT and CTP were

  19. Principles of educational outreach ('academic detailing') to improve clinical decision making.

    PubMed

    Soumerai, S B; Avorn, J

    1990-01-26

    With the efficacy and costs of medications rising rapidly, it is increasingly important to ensure that drugs be prescribed as rationally as possible. Yet, physicians' choices of drugs frequently fall short of the ideal of precise and cost-effective decision making. Evidence indicates that such decisions can be improved in a variety of ways. A number of theories and principles of communication and behavior changes can be found that underlie the success of pharmaceutical manufacturers in influencing prescribing practices. Based on this behavioral science and several field trials, it is possible to define the theory and practice of methods to improve physicians' clinical decision making to enhance the quality and cost-effectiveness of care. Some of the most important techniques of such "academic detailing" include (1) conducting interviews to investigate baseline knowledge and motivations for current prescribing patterns, (2) focusing programs on specific categories of physicians as well as on their opinion leaders, (3) defining clear educational and behavioral objectives, (4) establishing credibility through a respected organizational identity, referencing authoritative and unbiased sources of information, and presenting both sides of controversial issues, (5) stimulating active physician participation in educational interactions, (6) using concise graphic educational materials, (7) highlighting and repeating the essential messages, and (8) providing positive reinforcement of improved practices in follow-up visits. Used by the nonprofit sector, the above techniques have been shown to reduce inappropriate prescribing as well as unnecessary health care expenditures. PMID:2104640

  20. Multimedia Psychoeducation or Print Education in Preparing Patients With Cancer for Decision Making About Clinical Trial Participation | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This randomized clinical trial compares multimedia psychoeducation to print education in preparing patients with cancer for decision making about clinical trial participation. Multimedia psychoeducation includes a DVD and written materials with a combined focus on knowledge and attitude change, and may be an effective method to help patients prepare for decision making about clinical trial participation. It is not yet known whether a multimedia psychoeducation is more effective than print education in preparing patients for decision making about clinical trials.

  1. Paying for treatments? Influences on negotiating clinical need and decision-making for dental implant treatment

    PubMed Central

    Exley, Catherine E; Rousseau, Nikki S; Steele, Jimmy; Finch, Tracy; Field, James; Donaldson, Cam; Thomason, J Mark; May, Carl R; Ellis, Janice S

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to examine how clinicians and patients negotiate clinical need and treatment decisions within a context of finite resources. Dental implant treatment is an effective treatment for missing teeth, but is only available via the NHS in some specific clinical circumstances. The majority of people who receive this treatment therefore pay privately, often at substantial cost to themselves. People are used to paying towards dental treatment costs. However, dental implant treatment is much more expensive than existing treatments – such as removable dentures. We know very little about how dentists make decisions about whether to offer such treatments, or what patients consider when deciding whether or not to pay for them. Methods/Design Mixed methods will be employed to provide insight and understanding into how clinical need is determined, and what influences people's decision making processes when deciding whether or not to pursue a dental implant treatment. Phase 1 will use a structured scoping questionnaire with all the General dental practitioners (GDPs) in three Primary Care Trust areas (n = 300) to provide base-line data about existing practice in relation to dental implant treatment, and to provide data to develop a systematic sampling procedure for Phase 2. Phases 2 (GDPs) and 3 (patients) use qualitative focused one to one interviews with a sample of these practitioners (up to 30) and their patients (up to 60) to examine their views and experiences of decision making in relation to dental implant treatment. Purposive sampling for phases 2 and 3 will be carried out to ensure participants represent a range of socio-economic circumstances, and choices made. Discussion Most dental implant treatment is conducted in primary care. Very little information was available prior to this study about the quantity and type of treatment carried out privately. It became apparent during phase 2 that ISOD treatment was an unusual treatment in primary care. We thus extended our sample criteria for Phase 3 to include people who had had other implant supported restorations, although not single tooth replacements. PMID:19138389

  2. Referral criteria and clinical decision support: radiological protection aspects for justification.

    PubMed

    Del Rosario Pérez, M

    2015-06-01

    Advanced imaging technology has opened new horizons for medical diagnostics and improved patient care. However, many procedures are unjustified and do not provide a net benefit. An area of particular concern is the unnecessary use of radiation when clinical evaluation or other imaging modalities could provide an accurate diagnosis. Referral criteria for medical imaging are consensus statements based on the best-available evidence to assist the decision-making process when choosing the best imaging procedure for a given patient. Although they are advisory rather than compulsory, physicians should have good reasons for deviation from these criteria. Voluntary use of referral criteria has shown limited success compared with integration into clinical decision support systems. These systems support good medical practice, can improve health service delivery, and foster safer, more efficient, fair, cost-effective care, thus contributing to the strengthening of health systems. Justification of procedures and optimisation of protection, the two pillars of radiological protection in health care, are implicit in the notion of good medical practice. However, some health professionals are not familiar with these principles, and have low awareness of radiological protection aspects of justification. A stronger collaboration between radiation protection and healthcare communities could contribute to improve the radiation protection culture in medical practice. PMID:25915554

  3. Using statistical process control to make data-based clinical decisions.

    PubMed

    Pfadt, A; Wheeler, D J

    1995-01-01

    Applied behavior analysis is based on an investigation of variability due to interrelationships among antecedents, behavior, and consequences. This permits testable hypotheses about the causes of behavior as well as for the course of treatment to be evaluated empirically. Such information provides corrective feedback for making data-based clinical decisions. This paper considers how a different approach to the analysis of variability based on the writings of Walter Shewart and W. Edwards Deming in the area of industrial quality control helps to achieve similar objectives. Statistical process control (SPC) was developed to implement a process of continual product improvement while achieving compliance with production standards and other requirements for promoting customer satisfaction. SPC involves the use of simple statistical tools, such as histograms and control charts, as well as problem-solving techniques, such as flow charts, cause-and-effect diagrams, and Pareto charts, to implement Deming's management philosophy. These data-analytic procedures can be incorporated into a human service organization to help to achieve its stated objectives in a manner that leads to continuous improvement in the functioning of the clients who are its customers. Examples are provided to illustrate how SPC procedures can be used to analyze behavioral data. Issues related to the application of these tools for making data-based clinical decisions and for creating an organizational climate that promotes their routine use in applied settings are also considered. PMID:7592154

  4. Evaluation of Clinical Decision Rules for Bone Mineral Density Testing among White Women

    PubMed Central

    Anders, Michael E.; Turner, Lori; Freeman, Jeanne

    2013-01-01

    Background. Osteoporosis is a devastating, insidious disease that causes skeletal fragility. Half of women will suffer osteoporotic fractures during their lifetimes. Many fractures occur needlessly, because of inattentiveness to assessment, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of osteoporosis. Study Purpose. Study Purpose. To evaluate the discriminatory performance of clinical decision rules to determine the need to undergo bone mineral density testing. Methods. A nationally representative sample from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey consisted of 14,060 subjects who completed surveys, physical examinations, laboratory tests, and bone mineral density exams. Multivariable linear regression tested the correlation of covariates that composed the clinical decision rules with bone mineral density. Results. Increased age and decreased weight were variables in the final regression models for each gender and race/ethnicity. Among the indices, the Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool, which is composed of age and weight, performed best for White women. Study Implications. These results have implications for the prevention, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of osteoporosis. The Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool performed best and is inexpensive and the least time consuming to implement. PMID:23365786

  5. Clinical decision support for genetically guided personalized medicine: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Brandon M

    2013-01-01

    Objective To review the literature on clinical decision support (CDS) for genetically guided personalized medicine (GPM). Materials and Methods MEDLINE and Embase were searched from 1990 to 2011. The manuscripts included were summarized, and notable themes and trends were identified. Results Following a screening of 3416 articles, 38 primary research articles were identified. Focal areas of research included family history-driven CDS, cancer management, and pharmacogenomics. Nine randomized controlled trials of CDS interventions for GPM were identified, seven of which reported positive results. The majority of manuscripts were published on or after 2007, with increased recent focus on genotype-driven CDS and the integration of CDS within primary clinical information systems. Discussion Substantial research has been conducted to date on the use of CDS to enable GPM. In a previous analysis of CDS intervention trials, the automatic provision of CDS as a part of routine clinical workflow had been identified as being critical for CDS effectiveness. There was some indication that CDS for GPM could potentially be effective without the CDS being provided automatically, but we did not find conclusive evidence to support this hypothesis. Conclusion To maximize the clinical benefits arising from ongoing discoveries in genetics and genomics, additional research and development is recommended for identifying how best to leverage CDS to bridge the gap between the promise and realization of GPM. PMID:22922173

  6. A Proposed Clinical Decision Support Architecture Capable of Supporting Whole Genome Sequence Information

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Brandon M.; Rodriguez Loya, Salvador; Eilbeck, Karen; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2014-01-01

    Whole genome sequence (WGS) information may soon be widely available to help clinicians personalize the care and treatment of patients. However, considerable barriers exist, which may hinder the effective utilization of WGS information in a routine clinical care setting. Clinical decision support (CDS) offers a potential solution to overcome such barriers and to facilitate the effective use of WGS information in the clinic. However, genomic information is complex and will require significant considerations when developing CDS capabilities. As such, this manuscript lays out a conceptual framework for a CDS architecture designed to deliver WGS-guided CDS within the clinical workflow. To handle the complexity and breadth of WGS information, the proposed CDS framework leverages service-oriented capabilities and orchestrates the interaction of several independently-managed components. These independently-managed components include the genome variant knowledge base, the genome database, the CDS knowledge base, a CDS controller and the electronic health record (EHR). A key design feature is that genome data can be stored separately from the EHR. This paper describes in detail: (1) each component of the architecture; (2) the interaction of the components; and (3) how the architecture attempts to overcome the challenges associated with WGS information. We believe that service-oriented CDS capabilities will be essential to using WGS information for personalized medicine. PMID:25411644

  7. The use of clinical decision-support tools to facilitate geriatric education.

    PubMed

    Litvin, Cara B; Davis, Kimberly S; Moran, William P; Iverson, Patty J; Zhao, Yumin; Zapka, Jane

    2012-06-01

    Innovative methods are needed to incorporate effective geriatric education into internal medicine residency programs. The purpose of this report is to describe the development and use of clinical decision-support (CDS) tools to facilitate geriatric education and improve the care delivered to older adults in an academic internal medicine residency ambulatory care clinic. Starting in 2009, CDS tools were implemented as a major strategy of an initiative to improve resident physician clinical competencies in geriatrics and improve the quality of care and quality of life of older adults. These tools, designed to improve resident assessment and action for each of three educational modules (falls, vision, and dementia) were embedded within the ambulatory electronic medical record (EMR) and provided a method of point-of-care training to residents caring for older adults. One hundred internal medicine residents supervised by 17 general internal medicine faculty members participated. Data regarding CDS use and associated outcomes were recorded and extracted from the ambulatory clinic EMR. Residents screened between 67% and 88% of eligible patients using CDS algorithms; rates of additional assessment and referral or further examination reflected the prevalence of the condition in the patient population. Although further development may be necessary, CDS tools are a promising modality to supplement geriatric postgraduate education while simultaneously improving patient care. PMID:22642270

  8. Pilot Program Using Medical Simulation in Clinical Decision-Making Training for Internal Medicine Interns

    PubMed Central

    Miloslavsky, Eli M.; Hayden, Emily M.; Currier, Paul F.; Mathai, Susan K.; Contreras-Valdes, Fernando; Gordon, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of high-fidelity medical simulation in cognitive skills training within internal medicine residency programs remains largely unexplored. Objective To design a pilot study to introduce clinical decision-making training using simulation into a large internal medicine residency program, explore the practicability of using junior and senior residents as facilitators, and examine the feasibility of using the program to improve interns' clinical skills. Methods Interns on outpatient rotations participated in a simulation curriculum on a voluntary basis. The curriculum consisted of 8 cases focusing on acute clinical scenarios encountered on the wards. One-hour sessions were offered twice monthly from August 2010 to February 2011. Internal medicine residents and simulation faculty served as facilitators. Results A total of 36 of 75 total interns volunteered to participate in the program, with 42% attending multiple sessions. Of all participants, 88% rated the sessions as “excellent,” 97% felt that the program improved their ability to function as an intern and generate a plan, and 81% reported improvement in differential diagnosis skills. Conclusions Simulation training was well received by the learners and improved self-reported clinical skills. Using residents as facilitators, supervised by faculty, was well received by the learners and enabled the implementation of the curriculum in a large training program. Simulation can provide opportunities for deliberate practice, and learners perceive this modality to be effective. PMID:24294427

  9. [Which research is needed to support clinical decision-making on integrative medicine? Can comparative effectiveness research close the gap?].

    PubMed

    Witt, Claudia M; Huang, Wen-jing; Lao, Lixing; Berman, Brian M

    2013-08-01

    In clinical research on complementary and integrative medicine, experts and scientists have often pursued a research agenda in spite of an incomplete understanding of the needs of end users. Consequently, the majority of previous clinical trials have mainly assessed the efficacy of interventions. Scant data is available on their effectiveness. Comparative effectiveness research (CER) promises to support decision makers by generating evidence that compares the benefits and harms of best care options. This evidence, more generalizable than evidence generated by traditional randomized clinical trials (RCTs), is better suited to inform real-world care decisions. An emphasis on CER supports the development of the evidence base for clinical and policy decision-making. Whereas in most areas of complementary and integrative medicine data on CER is scarce, available acupuncture research already contributes to CER evidence. This paper will introduce CER and make suggestions for future research. PMID:24325048

  10. Effectiveness of a novel and scalable clinical decision support intervention to improve venous thromboembolism prophylaxis: a quasi-experimental study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE) causes morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients, and regulators and payors are encouraging the use of systems to prevent them. Here, we examine the effect of a computerized clinical decision support (CDS) intervention implemented across a multi-hospital academic health system on VTE prophylaxis and events. Methods The study included 223,062 inpatients admitted between April 2007 and May 2010, and used administrative and clinical data. The intervention was integrated into a commercial electronic health record (EHR) in an admission orderset used for all admissions. Three time periods were examined: baseline (period 1), and the time after implementation of the first CDS intervention (period 2) and a second iteration (period 3). Providers were prompted to accept or decline prophylaxis based on patient risk. Time series analyses examined the impact of the intervention on VTE prophylaxis during time periods two and three compared to baseline, and a simple pre-post design examined impact on VTE events and bleeds secondary to anticoagulation. VTE prophylaxis and events were also examined in a prespecified surgical subset of our population meeting the public reporting criteria defined by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Patient Safety Indicator (PSI). Results Unadjusted analyses suggested that “recommended”, “any”, and “pharmacologic” prophylaxis increased from baseline to the last study period (27.1% to 51.9%, 56.7% to 78.1%, and 42.0% to 54.4% respectively; p?

  11. Participants' Reactions to Computerized Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moe, Kim C.; Johnson, Marilyn F.

    This study investigated participants' reactions to computerized testing and assessed the practicability of this testing method in the classroom. A sample of 315 secondary-level students took a computerized and a printed version of a standardized aptitude test battery and a survey assessing their reactions to the computerized testing. Overall…

  12. Preliminary Development of a Clinical Decision Rule for Acute Aortic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Lovy, Andrew J; Bellin, Eran; Levsky, Jeffrey M; Esses, David; Haramati, Linda B

    2014-01-01

    Objective Patients with suspected acute aortic syndromes (AAS) often undergo CT with negative results. We sought clinical and diagnostic criteria to identify low risk patients, an initial step in developing a clinical decision rule. Methods We retrospectively identified all adults presenting to our Emergency Department (ED) from 1/1/2006- 8/1/2010 who underwent CT angiography for suspected AAS without prior trauma or AAS. 1,465 patients met inclusion criteria; a retrospective case-controlled review (ratio 1:4) was conducted. Cases were diagnosed with aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer or ruptured aneurysm. Results 2.7% (40/1,465) of patients who underwent CT had an AAS, 2 additional cases were diagnosed after admission [ED miss rate 5% (2/42)]. Patients with AAS were significantly older than controls (66 vs 59 yrs; p=.008). Risk factors included abnormal chest radiograph [sensitivity 79% (26/33), specificity 82% (113/137)] and acute chest pain [sensitivity 83% (29/35), specificity 71% (111/157)]. None of the 19 patients with resolved pain upon ED presentation had AAS. These data support a two-step rule: first screen for ongoing pain; if present, screen for acute chest pain or an abnormal chest radiograph. This approach achieves a 54% (84/155) reduction in CT usage with a sensitivity for AAS of 96% (95% CI: 89%-100%), negative predictive value of 99.8% (99.4%-100%) and a false negative rate of 1.7% (1/84). Conclusions Our results demonstrate a need to safely identify patients at low risk for AAS who can forgo CT. We developed a preliminary two-step clinical decision rule, which requires validation. PMID:24055476

  13. Computerized Budget Monitoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Julian U.; Rowe, Joe N.

    1989-01-01

    This article discusses the importance of budget monitoring in fiscal management; describes ways in which computerized budget monitoring increases accuracy, efficiency, and flexibility; outlines steps in the budget process; and presents sample reports, generated using the Lotus 1-2-3 spreadsheet and graphics program. (IAH)

  14. Computerized Language Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Steven

    1985-01-01

    The article describes a computerized language analysis system that produces a detailed description and summary statistics to track language growth within student populations. This microcomputer-based language assessment system simplifies identification of deficits in productive language, enabling the teacher or clinician to spend more time…

  15. Computerized shop floor scheduling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ELIYAHU M. GOLDRATT

    1988-01-01

    Computerized shop floor scheduling is probably one of the most glaring examples of an area in which the tremendous efforts and investments of a large number of companies have produced at best only a partial solution. One of the more successful attempts is known as OPT (optimized production technology) on which numerous papers have been published highlighting the various aspects

  16. Psychosocial Communication and Computerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Gunilla; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the effect of computerization of the work environment on psychosocial communication. The RAM program, developed at Stockholm University to explore the effect of computers on the structure of organizations and the psychosocial work environment, is described; theoretical models are explained; and the future use of knowledge-based systems…

  17. Computerizing the Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Jeanie; Whelan, Errol

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the development of a computerized high school library which uses CD-ROM optical storage systems. Describes hardware and software, setting up the system, preparing the online catalog, teaching information retrieval skills, and project evaluation. Notes prices of CD-ROM disks and equipment purchased. 4 references. (SV)

  18. Computerized Test Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosser, Jon; And Others

    The application of a well-known and fairly simple information retrieval technology to the process of testing undergraduate college students is described. The Computerized Test Library allows the student and/or the professor to extract questions of varying difficulty covering whatever topic the student is studying; if the student performs at the…

  19. Successful Outcomes of a Clinical Decision Support System in an HIV Practice: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Gregory K.; Lester, William; Johnson, Kristin L.; Chang, Yuchiao; Estey, Gregory; Surrao, Dominic; Zachary, Kimon; Lammert, Sara M.; Chueh, Henry; Meigs, James B.; Freedberg, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Data to support improved patient outcomes from clinical decision support systems (CDSS) are lacking in HIV care. Objective To conduct a randomized controlled trial testing the efficacy of a CDSS to improve HIV outcomes in an outpatient clinic. Design We conducted a randomized controlled trial where half of each provider’s patients were randomized to interactive or static computer alerts (ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT00678600). Setting The study was conducted at the Massachusetts General Hospital HIV Clinic. Subjects Participants were HIV providers and their HIV-infected patients. Intervention Computer alerts were generated for virologic failure (HIV RNA >400 c/mL after HIV RNA ?400 c/mL), evidence of suboptimal follow-up, and 11 abnormal laboratory tests. Providers received interactive computer alerts, facilitating appointment rescheduling and repeat laboratory testing, for half of their patients and static alerts for the other half. Measurements The primary endpoint was change in CD4 count. Other endpoints included time-to-clinical event, 6-month suboptimal follow-up, and severe laboratory toxicity. Results Thirty-three HIV providers followed 1,011 HIV-infected patients. For the intervention arm, the mean CD4 count increase was greater (5.3 versus 3.2 cells/mm3/month; difference = 2.0 cells/mm3/month 95% CI [0.1, 4.0], p=0.040) and the rate of 6-month suboptimal follow-up was lower (20.6 versus 30.1 events per 100 patient-years, p=0.022). Median time-to-next scheduled appointment was shorter in the intervention arm after a suboptimal follow-up alert (1.71 versus 3.48 months; p<0.001) and after a toxicity alert (2.79 versus >6 months for control); p=0.072). Ninety-six percent of providers supported adopting the CDSS as part of standard care. Limitations This was a one-year informatics study conducted at a single hospital sub-specialty clinic. Conclusion A CDSS using interactive provider alerts improved CD4 counts and clinic follow-up for HIV-infected patients. Wider implementation of such systems can provide important clinical benefits. PMID:23208165

  20. Longitudinal feasibility of MINDSET: a clinic decision aid for epilepsy self-management.

    PubMed

    Begley, Charles; Shegog, Ross; Harding, Angelique; Goldsmith, Corey; Hope, Omotola; Newmark, Michael

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report on the development and feasibility of the longitudinal version of MINDSET, a clinical tool to assist patients and health-care providers in epilepsy self-management. A previous study described the feasibility of using MINDSET to identify and prioritize self-management issues during a clinic visit. This paper describes the development of the longitudinal version of MINDSET and feasibility test over multiple visits with a printed action plan for goal setting and the capacity for monitoring changes in self-management. Feasibility was assessed based on 1) postvisit patient and provider interviews addressing ease of use and usefulness, patient/provider communication, and shared decision-making and 2) the capacity of the tool to monitor epilepsy characteristics and self-management over time. Results indicate MINDSET feasibility for 1) identifying and facilitating discussion of self-management issues during clinic visits, 2) providing a printable list of prioritized issues and tailored self-management goals, and 3) tracking changes in epilepsy characteristics and self-management over time. PMID:25705825

  1. Clinical decision support systems for brain tumor characterization using advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques

    PubMed Central

    Tsolaki, Evangelia; Kousi, Evanthia; Svolos, Patricia; Kapsalaki, Efthychia; Theodorou, Kyriaki; Kappas, Constastine; Tsougos, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging and perfusion weighted imaging have been used in order to resolve demanding diagnostic problems such as brain tumor characterization and grading, as these techniques offer a more detailed and non-invasive evaluation of the area under study. In the last decade a great effort has been made to import and utilize intelligent systems in the so-called clinical decision support systems (CDSS) for automatic processing, classification, evaluation and representation of MRI data in order for advanced MRI techniques to become a part of the clinical routine, since the amount of data from the aforementioned techniques has gradually increased. Hence, the purpose of the current review article is two-fold. The first is to review and evaluate the progress that has been made towards the utilization of CDSS based on data from advanced MRI techniques. The second is to analyze and propose the future work that has to be done, based on the existing problems and challenges, especially taking into account the new imaging techniques and parameters that can be introduced into intelligent systems to significantly improve their diagnostic specificity and clinical application. PMID:24778769

  2. Clinical decision support systems for brain tumor characterization using advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Tsolaki, Evangelia; Kousi, Evanthia; Svolos, Patricia; Kapsalaki, Efthychia; Theodorou, Kyriaki; Kappas, Constastine; Tsougos, Ioannis

    2014-04-28

    In recent years, advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging and perfusion weighted imaging have been used in order to resolve demanding diagnostic problems such as brain tumor characterization and grading, as these techniques offer a more detailed and non-invasive evaluation of the area under study. In the last decade a great effort has been made to import and utilize intelligent systems in the so-called clinical decision support systems (CDSS) for automatic processing, classification, evaluation and representation of MRI data in order for advanced MRI techniques to become a part of the clinical routine, since the amount of data from the aforementioned techniques has gradually increased. Hence, the purpose of the current review article is two-fold. The first is to review and evaluate the progress that has been made towards the utilization of CDSS based on data from advanced MRI techniques. The second is to analyze and propose the future work that has to be done, based on the existing problems and challenges, especially taking into account the new imaging techniques and parameters that can be introduced into intelligent systems to significantly improve their diagnostic specificity and clinical application. PMID:24778769

  3. Bayesian Models and Decision Algorithms for Complex Early Phase Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Thall, Peter F.

    2010-01-01

    An early phase clinical trial is the first step in evaluating the effects in humans of a potential new anti-disease agent or combination of agents. Usually called “phase I” or “phase I/II” trials, these experiments typically have the nominal scientific goal of determining an acceptable dose, most often based on adverse event probabilities. This arose from a tradition of phase I trials to evaluate cytotoxic agents for treating cancer, although some methods may be applied in other medical settings, such as treatment of stroke or immunological diseases. Most modern statistical designs for early phase trials include model-based, outcome-adaptive decision rules that choose doses for successive patient cohorts based on data from previous patients in the trial. Such designs have seen limited use in clinical practice, however, due to their complexity, the requirement of intensive, computer-based data monitoring, and the medical community’s resistance to change. Still, many actual applications of model-based outcome-adaptive designs have been remarkably successful in terms of both patient benefit and scientific outcome. In this paper, I will review several Bayesian early phase trial designs that were tailored to accommodate specific complexities of the treatment regime and patient outcomes in particular clinical settings. PMID:21318084

  4. Which research is needed to support clinical decision-making on integrative medicine?- Can comparative effectiveness research close the gap?

    PubMed

    Witt, Claudia M; Huang, Wen-jing; Lao, Lixing; Bm, Berman

    2012-10-01

    In clinical research on complementary and integrative medicine, experts and scientists have often pursued a research agenda in spite of an incomplete understanding of the needs of end users. Consequently, the majority of previous clinical trials have mainly assessed the efficacy of interventions. Scant data is available on their effectiveness. Comparative effectiveness research (CER) promises to support decision makers by generating evidence that compares the benefits and harms of the best care options. This evidence, more generalizable than the evidence generated by traditional randomized controlled trials (RCTs), is better suited to inform real-world care decisions. An emphasis on CER supports the development of the evidence base for clinical and policy decision-making. Whereas in most areas of complementary and integrative medicine data on comparative effectiveness is scarce, available acupuncture research already contributes to CER evidence. This paper will introduce CER and make suggestions for future research. PMID:22965697

  5. Cardiac 123I-MIBG Imaging for Clinical Decision Making: 22-Year Experience in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Nakata, Tomoaki

    2015-06-01

    Cardiac neuroimaging with (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine ((123)I-MIBG) has been officially used in clinical practice in Japan since 1992. The nuclear cardiology guidelines of the Japanese Circulation Society, revised in 2010, recommended cardiac (123)I-MIBG imaging for the management of heart failure (HF) patients, particularly for the assessment of HF severity and prognosis of HF patients. Consensus in North American and European countries regarding incorporation into clinical practice, however, has not been established yet. This article summarizes 22 y of clinical applications in Japan of (123)I-MIBG imaging in the field of cardiology; these applications are reflected in cardiology guidelines, including recent methodologic advances. A standardized cardiac (123)I-MIBG parameter, the heart-to-mediastinum ratio (HMR), is the basis for clinical decision making and enables common use of parameters beyond differences in institutions and studies. Several clinical studies unanimously demonstrated its potent independent roles in prognosis evaluation and risk stratification irrespective of HF etiologies. An HMR of less than 1.6-1.8 and an accelerated washout rate are recognized as high-risk indicators of pump failure death, sudden cardiac death, and fatal arrhythmias and have independent and incremental prognostic values together with known clinical variables, such as left ventricular ejection fraction and brain natriuretic peptide. Another possible use of this imaging technique is the selection of therapeutic strategy, such as pharmacologic treatment and nonpharmacologic treatment with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator or cardiac resynchronization device; however, this possibility remains to be investigated. Recent multiple-cohort database analyses definitively demonstrated that patients who were at low risk for lethal events and who were defined by an HMR of greater than 2.0 on (123)I-MIBG studies had a good long-term prognosis. Future investigations of cardiac (123)I-MIBG imaging will contribute to better risk stratification of low-risk and high-risk populations, to the establishment of cost-effective use of this imaging technique for the management of HF patients, and to worldwide acceptance of this imaging technique in clinical cardiology practice. PMID:26033897

  6. Pulmonary embolism in a stroke patient after systemic thrombolysis: clinical decisions and literature review.

    PubMed

    Pilato, Fabio; Calandrelli, Rosalinda; Profice, Paolo; Della Marca, Giacomo; Broccolini, Aldobrando; Bello, Giuseppe; Bocci, Maria Grazia; Distefano, Marisa; Colosimo, Cesare; Rossini, Paolo Maria

    2013-11-01

    Pulmonary embolism can be a catastrophic event that can result in early death or serious hemodynamic dysfunction. The dehydration, immobility, and infections occurring in acute stroke patients puts these patients at risk of developing deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) is the established therapy for acute ischemic stroke, and its prompt administration results in a better outcome in stroke patients. We describe a 73-year-old man who arrived at the emergency room within 2 hours of acute onset of left hemiparesis who was treated with rt-PA and suffered a pulmonary embolism 3 days after acute stroke therapy. rt-PA is also a current therapy for pulmonary embolism, but an ischemic stroke in the previous 3 months is an absolute contraindication to thrombolysis because of the high risk of intracranial hemorrhage. We discuss clinical and therapeutic decisions and review the current literature. PMID:23849749

  7. Towards the Merging of Multiple Clinical Protocols and Guidelines via Ontology-Driven Modeling

    E-print Network

    Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

    University, Canada Abstract. Decision support systems based on computerized Clinical Pro- tocols (CP the concurrent merg- ing of multiple CP/CPG. We present an ontology-based approach for the merging of CPG and CP ontological modeling constructs to facilitate merging of CPG and CP. We demonstrate the merging of multiple

  8. [From library to clinical decision support systems: access of general practitioner to quality information].

    PubMed

    Fauquert, B

    2012-09-01

    Since 2003, the following tools have been implemented in Belgium for improving the access of general practioners to the EBM literature: the Digital Library for Health and the evidence-linker of the CEBAM, the portal EBMPracticeNet.be and the multidimensional electronic clinical decision support EBMeDS. The aim of this article is to show the progress achieved in the information dissemination toward the belgian general practioners, particularly the access from the electronic health record. From the literature published these last years, the opportunities cited by the users are for using EBM and the strong willingness for using these literature access in the future; the limits are the medical data coding, the irrelevance of the search results, the alerts fatigue induced by EBMeDS. The achievements done and planned for the new EBMPracticeNet guidelines portal and the EBMeDS system are explained in the aim of informing belgian healthcare professionals. These projects are claiming for lauching a participatory process in the production and dissemination of EBM information. The discussion is focused on the belgian healthcare system advantages, the solutions for a reasonable implementation of these projects and for increasing the place of an evidence-based information in the healthcare decision process. Finally the input of these projects to the continuing medical education and to the healthcare quality are discussed, in a context of multifactorial interaction healthcare design (complexity design). PMID:23091948

  9. Exploring use of images in clinical articles for decision support in evidence-based medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antani, Sameer; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Li, Jiang; Srinivasan, Balaji V.; Thoma, George R.

    2008-01-01

    Essential information is often conveyed pictorially (images, illustrations, graphs, charts, etc.) in biomedical publications. A clinician's decision to access the full text when searching for evidence in support of clinical decision is frequently based solely on a short bibliographic reference. We seek to automatically augment these references with images from the article that may assist in finding evidence. In a previous study, the feasibility of automatically classifying images by usefulness (utility) in finding evidence was explored using supervised machine learning and achieved 84.3% accuracy using image captions for modality and 76.6% accuracy combining captions and image data for utility on 743 images from articles over 2 years from a clinical journal. Our results indicated that automatic augmentation of bibliographic references with relevant images was feasible. Other research in this area has determined improved user experience by showing images in addition to the short bibliographic reference. Multi-panel images used in our study had to be manually pre-processed for image analysis, however. Additionally, all image-text on figures was ignored. In this article, we report on developed methods for automatic multi-panel image segmentation using not only image features, but also clues from text analysis applied to figure captions. In initial experiments on 516 figure images we obtained 95.54% accuracy in correctly identifying and segmenting the sub-images. The errors were flagged as disagreements with automatic parsing of figure caption text allowing for supervised segmentation. For localizing text and symbols, on a randomly selected test set of 100 single panel images our methods reported, on the average, precision and recall of 78.42% and 89.38%, respectively, with an accuracy of 72.02%.

  10. [Adequacy of clinical interventions in patients with advanced and complex disease. Proposal of a decision making algorithm].

    PubMed

    Ameneiros-Lago, E; Carballada-Rico, C; Garrido-Sanjuán, J A; García Martínez, A

    2015-01-01

    Decision making in the patient with chronic advanced disease is especially complex. Health professionals are obliged to prevent avoidable suffering and not to add any more damage to that of the disease itself. The adequacy of the clinical interventions consists of only offering those diagnostic and therapeutic procedures appropriate to the clinical situation of the patient and to perform only those allowed by the patient or representative. In this article, the use of an algorithm is proposed that should serve to help health professionals in this decision making process. PMID:25666087

  11. Computerized acoustic assessment of treatment efficacy of nebulized epinephrine and albuterol in RSV bronchiolitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raphael Beck; Nael Elias; Shay Shoval; Naveh Tov; Gil Talmon; Simon Godfrey; Lea Bentur

    2007-01-01

    AIM: We evaluated the use of computerized quantification of wheezing and crackles compared to a clinical score in assessing the effect of inhaled albuterol or inhaled epinephrine in infants with RSV bronchiolitis. METHODS: Computerized lung sounds analysis with quantification of wheezing and crackles and a clinical score were used during a double blind, randomized, controlled nebulized treatment pilot study. Infants

  12. Measuring the Impact of Diagnostic Decision Support on the Quality of Clinical Decision Making: Development of a Reliable and Valid Composite Score

    PubMed Central

    Ramnarayan, Padmanabhan; Kapoor, Ritika R.; Coren, Michael; Nanduri, Vasantha; Tomlinson, Amanda L.; Taylor, Paul M.; Wyatt, Jeremy C.; Britto, Joseph F.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Few previous studies evaluating the benefits of diagnostic decision support systems have simultaneously measured changes in diagnostic quality and clinical management prompted by use of the system. This report describes a reliable and valid scoring technique to measure the quality of clinical decision plans in an acute medical setting, where diagnostic decision support tools might prove most useful. Design: Sets of differential diagnoses and clinical management plans generated by 71 clinicians for six simulated cases, before and after decision support from a Web-based pediatric differential diagnostic tool (ISABEL), were used. Measurements: A composite quality score was calculated separately for each diagnostic and management plan by considering the appropriateness value of each component diagnostic or management suggestion, a weighted sum of individual suggestion ratings, relevance of the entire plan, and its comprehensiveness. The reliability and validity (face, concurrent, construct, and content) of these two final scores were examined. Results: Two hundred fifty-two diagnostic and 350 management suggestions were included in the interrater reliability analysis. There was good agreement between raters (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.79 for diagnoses, and 0.72 for management). No counterintuitive scores were demonstrated on visual inspection of the sets. Content validity was verified by a consultation process with pediatricians. Both scores discriminated adequately between the plans of consultants and medical students and correlated well with clinicians' subjective opinions of overall plan quality (Spearman ? 0.65, p < 0.01). The diagnostic and management scores for each episode showed moderate correlation (r = 0.51). Conclusion: The scores described can be used as key outcome measures in a larger study to fully assess the value of diagnostic decision aids, such as the ISABEL system. PMID:12925549

  13. Enhancing case management through computerized patient files.

    PubMed

    Custer, M L

    1993-05-01

    The need for developing an organizational system for managing a large patient specialty population prompted the use of a computerized data entry and retrieval system. The use of a computerized system has facilitated patient case management, chart organization, and development of accessible data for research. Patient data fields (topic headings) are used for: (1) storing specific categories of patient data, (2) compiling lists for management and research, and (3) referring physician and patient/family contact information. Various lists can be compiled from the field data base in order to develop research and patient management lists. Patient management lists are used to track a patient's progress, provide quality assurance of care, and contribute researchable data. Also, patient information can be transferred automatically from the computerized daily management system into a computerized form letter. Individualized patient letters may be generated. Laboratory and test information from the last clinic or hospital visit can be mailed to families along with a handwritten personalized interpretation of their results by the CNS or physician. PMID:8343931

  14. Using evidence-based algorithms to improve clinical decision making: the case of a first-time anterior shoulder dislocation.

    PubMed

    Federer, Andrew E; Taylor, Dean C; Mather, Richard C

    2013-09-01

    Decision making in health care has evolved substantially over the last century. Up until the late 1970s, medical decision making was predominantly intuitive and anecdotal. It was based on trial and error and involved high levels of problem solving. The 1980s gave way to empirical medicine, which was evidence based probabilistic, and involved pattern recognition and less problem solving. Although this represented a major advance in the quality of medical decision making, limitations existed. The advantages of the gold standard of the randomized controlled clinical trial (RCT) are well-known and this technique is irreplaceable in its ability to answer critical clinical questions. However, the RCT does have drawbacks. RCTs are expensive and can only capture a snapshot in time. As treatments change and new technologies emerge, new expensive clinical trials must be undertaken to reevaluate them. Furthermore, in order to best evaluate a single intervention, other factors must be controlled. In addition, the study population may not match that of another organization or provider. Although evidence-based medicine has provided powerful data for clinicians, effectively and efficiently tailoring it to the individual has not yet evolved. We are now in a period of transition from this evidence-based era to one dominated by the personalization and customization of care. It will be fueled by policy decisions to shift financial responsibility to the patient, creating a powerful and sophisticated consumer, unlike any patient we have known before. The challenge will be to apply medical evidence and personal preferences to medical decisions and deliver it efficiently in the increasingly busy clinical setting. In this article, we provide a robust review of the concepts of customized care and some of techniques to deliver it. We will illustrate this through a personalized decision model for the treatment decision after a first-time anterior shoulder dislocation. PMID:23924748

  15. Computerized Adaptive Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bickerstaff, D.D.; Gardner, P.R. (Eastern Washington Univ., Cheney (USA). Dept. of Chemistry; Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA))

    1989-10-01

    Using exceedingly easy or difficult test items on a conventional fixed-length mastery test can result in a less-than-optimal measurement of achievement. Studies suggest that the use of variable-length adaptive tests may decrease the average test length, while improving the accuracy of the estimate of achievement. This paper presents an overview of criterion-referenced computerized adaptive testing and described an exploratory study at Westinghouse Hanford Company. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Integrating pharmacogenetic information and clinical decision support into the electronic health record

    PubMed Central

    Goldspiel, Barry R; Flegel, Willy A; DiPatrizio, Gary; Sissung, Tristan; Adams, Sharon D; Penzak, Scott R; Biesecker, Leslie G; Fleisher, Thomas A; Patel, Jharana J; Herion, David; Figg, William D; Lertora, Juan J L; McKeeby, Jon W

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics (PG) examines gene variations for drug disposition, response, or toxicity. At the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (NIH CC), a multidepartment Pharmacogenetics Testing Implementation Committee (PGTIC) was established to develop clinical decision support (CDS) algorithms for abacavir, carbamazepine, and allopurinol, medications for which human leukocyte antigen (HLA) variants predict severe hypersensitivity reactions. Providing PG CDS in the electronic health record (EHR) during order entry could prevent adverse drug events. Medical Logic Module (MLM) programming was used to implement PG CDS in our EHR. The MLM checks to see if an HLA sequence-based gene test is ordered. A message regarding test status (result present, absent, pending, or test not ordered) is displayed on the order form, and the MLM determines if the prescriber can place the order, place it but require an over-ride reason, or be blocked from placing the order. Since implementation, more than 725 medication orders have been placed for over 230 patients by 154 different prescribers for the three drugs included in our PG program. Prescribers commonly used an over-ride reason when placing the order mainly because patients had been receiving the drug without reaction before implementation of the CDS program. Successful incorporation of PG CDS into the NIH CC EHR required a coordinated, interdisciplinary effort to ensure smooth activation and a positive effect on patient care. Prescribers have adapted to using the CDS and have ordered PG testing as a direct result of the implementation. PMID:24302286

  17. Computerized tomography calibrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Herbert P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A set of interchangeable pieces comprising a computerized tomography calibrator, and a method of use thereof, permits focusing of a computerized tomographic (CT) system. The interchangeable pieces include a plurality of nestable, generally planar mother rings, adapted for the receipt of planar inserts of predetermined sizes, and of predetermined material densities. The inserts further define openings therein for receipt of plural sub-inserts. All pieces are of known sizes and densities, permitting the assembling of different configurations of materials of known sizes and combinations of densities, for calibration (i.e., focusing) of a computerized tomographic system through variation of operating variables thereof. Rather than serving as a phanton, which is intended to be representative of a particular workpiece to be tested, the set of interchangeable pieces permits simple and easy standardized calibration of a CT system. The calibrator and its related method of use further includes use of air or of particular fluids for filling various openings, as part of a selected configuration of the set of pieces.

  18. Cost-Effectiveness of an Electronic Medical Record Based Clinical Decision Support System

    PubMed Central

    Gilmer, Todd P; O'Connor, Patrick J; Sperl-Hillen, JoAnn M; Rush, William A; Johnson, Paul E; Amundson, Gerald H; Asche, Stephen E; Ekstrom, Heidi L

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objective Medical groups have invested billions of dollars in electronic medical records (EMRs), but few studies have examined the cost-effectiveness of EMR-based clinical decision support (CDS). This study examined the cost-effectiveness of EMR-based CDS for adults with diabetes from the perspective of the health care system. Data Sources/Setting Clinical outcome and cost data from a randomized clinical trial of EMR-based CDS were used as inputs into a diabetes simulation model. The simulation cohort included 1,092 patients with diabetes with A1c above goal at baseline. Study Design The United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study Outcomes Model, a validated simulation model of diabetes, was used to evaluate remaining life years, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and health care costs over patient lifetimes (40-year time horizon) from the health system perspective. Principal Findings Patients in the intervention group had significantly lowered A1c (0.26 percent, p = .014) relative to patients in the control arm. Intervention costs were $120 (SE = 45) per patient in the first year and $76 (SE = 45) per patient in the following years. In the base case analysis, EMR-based CDS increased lifetime QALYs by 0.04 (SE = 0.01) and increased lifetime costs by $112 (SE = 660), resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $3,017 per QALY. The cost-effectiveness of EMR-based CDS persisted in one-way, two-way, and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Conclusions Widespread adoption of sophisticated EMR-based CDS has the potential to modestly improve the quality of care for patients with chronic conditions without substantially increasing costs to the health care system. PMID:22578085

  19. Development and use of active clinical decision support for preemptive pharmacogenomics

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Gillian C; Crews, Kristine R; Wilkinson, Mark R; Haidar, Cyrine E; Hicks, J Kevin; Baker, Donald K; Kornegay, Nancy M; Yang, Wenjian; Cross, Shane J; Howard, Scott C; Freimuth, Robert R; Evans, William E; Broeckel, Ulrich; Relling, Mary V; Hoffman, James M

    2014-01-01

    Background Active clinical decision support (CDS) delivered through an electronic health record (EHR) facilitates gene-based drug prescribing and other applications of genomics to patient care. Objective We describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of active CDS for multiple pharmacogenetic test results reported preemptively. Materials and methods Clinical pharmacogenetic test results accompanied by clinical interpretations are placed into the patient's EHR, typically before a relevant drug is prescribed. Problem list entries created for high-risk phenotypes provide an unambiguous trigger for delivery of post-test alerts to clinicians when high-risk drugs are prescribed. In addition, pre-test alerts are issued if a very-high risk medication is prescribed (eg, a thiopurine), prior to the appropriate pharmacogenetic test result being entered into the EHR. Our CDS can be readily modified to incorporate new genes or high-risk drugs as they emerge. Results Through November 2012, 35 customized pharmacogenetic rules have been implemented, including rules for TPMT with azathioprine, thioguanine, and mercaptopurine, and for CYP2D6 with codeine, tramadol, amitriptyline, fluoxetine, and paroxetine. Between May 2011 and November 2012, the pre-test alerts were electronically issued 1106 times (76 for thiopurines and 1030 for drugs metabolized by CYP2D6), and the post-test alerts were issued 1552 times (1521 for TPMT and 31 for CYP2D6). Analysis of alert outcomes revealed that the interruptive CDS appropriately guided prescribing in 95% of patients for whom they were issued. Conclusions Our experience illustrates the feasibility of developing computational systems that provide clinicians with actionable alerts for gene-based drug prescribing at the point of care. PMID:23978487

  20. Towards integration of clinical decision support in commercial hospital information systems using distributed, reusable software and knowledge components

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marcel Lucas Müller; Thomas Ganslandt; Hans-peter Eich; Konrad Lang; Christian Ohmann; Hans-ulrich Prokosch

    2001-01-01

    Problem: Clinicians' acceptance of clinical decision support depends on its workflow-oriented, context-sensitive accessibility and availability at the point of care, integrated into the Electronic Patient Record (EPR). Commercially available Hospital Information Systems (HIS) often focus on administrative tasks and mostly do not provide additional knowledge based functionality. Their traditionally monolithic and closed software architecture encumbers integration of and interaction with

  1. Assessment of Competence in Clinical Reasoning and Decision-Making under Uncertainty: The Script Concordance Test Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramaekers, Stephan; Kremer, Wim; Pilot, Albert; van Beukelen, Peter; van Keulen, Hanno

    2010-01-01

    Real-life, complex problems often require that decisions are made despite limited information or insufficient time to explore all relevant aspects. Incorporating authentic uncertainties into an assessment, however, poses problems in establishing results and analysing their methodological qualities. This study aims at developing a test on clinical

  2. Impact of a Clinical Decision Support System on the Management of Patients with Hypercholesterolemia in the Primary Healthcare Setting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alex Bassa; Miguel del Val; Albert Cobos; Salvador Bergonon; Carlos Crespo; Max Brosa; Silvia Munio; Cristina Espinosa

    2005-01-01

    Introduction and objectives: The Optimcare study objective was to assess the impact on effectiveness and costs of a practice guideline implemented through a clinical decision support system (CDSS) for the management of patients with hypercholesterolemia in the primary healthcare setting. Study design and perspective: The study design was a prospective, naturalistic, single-center (Vila Olimpica Primary Health Care Center, Barcelona, Spain),

  3. Student specialty plans, clinical decision-making, and health care reform

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Robert L.; Romney, Crystal; Kano, Miria; Wright, Randy; Skipper, Betty; Getrich, Christina; Sussman, Andrew L.; Zyzanski, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Health care reform aims to increase evidence based, cost-conscious, and patient-centered care. Family medicine is seen as central to these aims in part due to evidence of lower cost, comparable quality care compared with other specialties. We sought evidence that senior medical students planning family medicine residency differ from peers entering other fields in decision-making patterns relevant to these health care reform aims. Methods We conducted a national, anonymous, internet-based survey of senior medical students. Students chose one of two equivalent management options for a set of patient vignettes based on preventive care, medication selection or initial chronic disease management scenarios, representing in turn, evidence-based care, cost-conscious care, and patient-centered care. We examined differences in student recommendations, comparing those planning to enter family medicine with all others using bivariate and weighted, multilevel, multivariable analyses. Results Among 4,656 surveys received from seniors at 84 participating medical schools, students entering family medicine were significantly more likely to recommend patient management options that were more cost-conscious (p=.01) and more patient-centered (p<.001). We did not find a significant difference between the student groups in recommendations for evidence-based care vignettes. Conclusions This study provides preliminary evidence suggesting that students planning to enter family practice may already have clinical decision-making patterns that support health care reform goals to a greater extent than their peers. If confirmed by additional studies, this could have implications for medical school admission and training processes. PMID:24915476

  4. Item Selection Criteria with Practical Constraints for Computerized Classification Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Chuan-Ju

    2011-01-01

    This study compares four item selection criteria for a two-category computerized classification testing: (1) Fisher information (FI), (2) Kullback-Leibler information (KLI), (3) weighted log-odds ratio (WLOR), and (4) mutual information (MI), with respect to the efficiency and accuracy of classification decision using the sequential probability…

  5. Constraining Item Exposure in Computerized Adaptive Testing with Shadow Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.; Veldkamp, Bernard P.

    2004-01-01

    Item-exposure control in computerized adaptive testing is implemented by imposing item-ineligibility constraints on the assembly process of the shadow tests. The method resembles Sympson and Hetter's (1985) method of item-exposure control in that the decisions to impose the constraints are probabilistic. The method does not, however, require…

  6. Guidelines for the Development of Computerized Student Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armes, Nancy, Ed.; And Others

    Designed to provide guidelines for the development of computerized student information systems, this report raises policy issues and questions to be resolved at the campus level and describes a variety of computer-generated reports and records that can assist in educational decision making and planning. Introductory material discusses the…

  7. Clinical practice guidelines for the care and treatment of breast cancer: 3. Mastectomy or lumpectomy? The choice of operation for clinical stages I and II breast cancer (2002 update)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hugh Scarth; Jacques Cantin; Mark Levine

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To assist women and their physicians in making the most clinically effective and personally acceptable decision regarding the choice of primary surgery for potentially curable breast cancer. Options: Breast-conserving surgery (BCS; also referred to as lumpectomy or wide local excision) or mastectomy. Outcomes: Local recurrence, disease-free survival, overall survival, cosmetic results. Evidence: Systematic computerized search of MEDLINE (1980 to

  8. Current Status and Future Prospects for Electronic Point-of-Care Clinical Decision Support in Diabetes Care

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Patrick J.; Desai, Jay; Butler, John; Kharbanda, Elyse; Sperl-Hillen, JoAnn M.

    2013-01-01

    Early efforts to use point-of-care clinical decision support (CDS) were limited to the use of prompts and reminders, which improved test ordering but not intermediate outcomes of care such as glucose, blood pressure, or lipid levels. More sophisticated diabetes CDS tools are now available that use electronic medical record data to provide patient-specific advice on medication use based on previous treatment, distance from goal, and other clinical data. These tools have shown modest but significant improvement in glucose and blood pressure control. Promising next-generation developments will include prioritizing clinical actions that have maximum benefit to a given patient at the point of care and developing effective methods to communicate CDS information to patients to better incorporate patient preferences in care decisions. PMID:23225213

  9. Shared decision making in clinical medicine: past research and future directions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dominick L Frosch; Robert M Kaplan

    1999-01-01

    Content: Shared medical decision making is a process by which patients and providers consider outcome probabilities and patient preferences and reach a health care decision based on mutual agreement. Shared decision making is best used for problems involving medical uncertainty. During the process the provider-patient dyad considers treatment options and consequences and explores the fit of expected benefits and consequences

  10. Session 2659 Instrumentation with Computerized Data Acquisition

    E-print Network

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    Session 2659 Instrumentation with Computerized Data Acquisition for an Innovative Thermal on the results. The emphasis here is given to the apparatus' instrumentation and computerized data acquisition and control are accomplished and integrated by using a computerized data acquisition system

  11. Computerized procedures system

    DOEpatents

    Lipner, Melvin H. (Monroeville, PA); Mundy, Roger A. (North Huntingdon, PA); Franusich, Michael D. (Upper St. Clair, PA)

    2010-10-12

    An online data driven computerized procedures system that guides an operator through a complex process facility's operating procedures. The system monitors plant data, processes the data and then, based upon this processing, presents the status of the current procedure step and/or substep to the operator. The system supports multiple users and a single procedure definition supports several interface formats that can be tailored to the individual user. Layered security controls access privileges and revisions are version controlled. The procedures run on a server that is platform independent of the user workstations that the server interfaces with and the user interface supports diverse procedural views.

  12. Dose coefficients and derived guidance and clinical decision levels for contaminated wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, Luiz [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Toohey, Richard E [ORISE/ORAU; Sugarman, Steven A [ORISE/ORAU; Christensen, Doran R [ORISE/ORAU

    2009-01-01

    The NCRP Wound Model describing the retention of selected radionuclides at the site of a contaminated wound and their uptake into the transfer compartment has been combined with the ICRP element-specific systemic models for those radionuclides to derive dose coefficients for intakes via contaminated wounds. Those coefficients have been used to generate derived guidance levels (i.e., the activity in a wound that would result in an effective dose of 20 or 50 mSv, or in some cases, a committed organ equivalent dose of 500 mSv), and clinical decision levels (i.e., activity levels that would indicate the need for consideration of medical intervention to remove activity from the wound site or administration of decorporation therapy or both), typically set at 5 times the derived guidance levels. Data are provided for the radionuclides commonly encountered at nuclear power plants and nuclear weapons, fuel fabrication or recycling, waste disposal, medical and research facilities. These include: {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 131}I, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 192}Ir, {sup 210}Po, {sup 226,228}Ra, {sup 228,232}Th, {sup 235,238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238,239}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 242,244}Cm, and {sup 252}Cf.

  13. Linking clinical measurements and kinematic gait patterns of toe-walking using fuzzy decision trees.

    PubMed

    Armand, Stéphane; Watelain, Eric; Roux, Emmanuel; Mercier, Moïse; Lepoutre, François-Xavier

    2007-03-01

    Toe-walking is one of the most prevalent gait deviations and has been linked to many diseases. Three major ankle kinematic patterns have been identified in toe-walkers, but the relationships between the causes of toe-walking and these patterns remain unknown. This study aims to identify these relationships. Clearly, such knowledge would increase our understanding of this gait deviation, and could help clinicians plan treatment. The large quantity of data provided by gait analysis often makes interpretation a difficult task. Artificial intelligence techniques were used in this study to facilitate interpretation as well as to decrease subjective interpretation. Of the 716 limbs evaluated, 240 showed signs of toe-walking and met inclusion criteria. The ankle kinematic pattern of the evaluated limbs during gait was assigned to one of three toe-walking pattern groups to build the training data set. Toe-walker clinical measurements (range of movement, muscle spasticity and muscle strength) were coded in fuzzy modalities, and fuzzy decision trees were induced to create intelligible rules allowing toe-walkers to be assigned to one of the three groups. A stratified 10-fold cross validation situated the classification accuracy at 81%. Twelve rules depicting the causes of toe-walking were selected, discussed and characterized using kinematic, kinetic and EMG charts. This study proposes an original approach to linking the possible causes of toe-walking with gait patterns. PMID:16837198

  14. An analysis and recommendations for multidisciplinary computerized handoff applications in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Sevgin; Staggers, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    In healthcare, patient handoffs are a common practice that is implemented by most clinicians who carry the responsibility of patient care. Ineffective handoffs have been associated with the occurrence of adverse clinical events. With the inception of the Joint Commissions' National Patient Safety Goal (NSPG) 2E on handoff communication, computerized clinical handoff applications are emerging in hospitals. Computerized clinical handoff applications are intended to assist the clinicians in conducting effective handoffs by providing easy access to accurate clinical information and reducing the burden of handoff report upkeep. The purpose of this paper is to identify various types of computerized clinical handoff tools that are used in hospitals and perform a comparison of application characteristics, review clinical and business advantages and disadvantages in implementing computerized clinical handoff applications, and give recommendations for improvement. PMID:22195114

  15. Designing an automated clinical decision support system to match clinical practice guidelines for opioid therapy for chronic pain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jodie A Trafton; Susana B Martins; Martha C Michel; Dan Wang; Samson W Tu; David J Clark; Jan Elliott; Brigit Vucic; Steve Balt; Michael E Clark; Charles D Sintek; Jack Rosenberg; Denise Daniels; Mary K Goldstein

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Opioid prescribing for chronic pain is common and controversial, but recommended clinical practices are followed inconsistently in many clinical settings. Strategies for increasing adherence to clinical practice guideline recommendations are needed to increase effectiveness and reduce negative consequences of opioid prescribing in chronic pain patients. METHODS: Here we describe the process and outcomes of a project to operationalize the

  16. An Arden-Syntax-based clinical decision support framework for medical guidelines--Lyme borreliosis as an example.

    PubMed

    Seitinger, Alexander; Fehre, Karsten; Adlassnig, Klaus-Peter; Rappelsberger, Andrea; Wurm, Elisabeth; Aberer, Elisabeth; Binder, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Medicine is evolving at a very fast pace. The overwhelming quantity of new data compels the practician to be consistently informed about the most recent scientific advances. While medical guidelines have proven to be an acceptable tool for bringing new medical knowledge into clinical practice and also support medical personnel, reading them may be rather time-consuming. Clinical decision support systems have been developed to simplify this process. However, the implementation or adaptation of such systems for individual guidelines involves substantial effort. This paper introduces a clinical decision support platform that uses Arden Syntax to implement medical guidelines using client-server architecture. It provides a means of implementing different guidelines without the need for adapting the system's source code. To implement a prototype, three Lyme borreliosis guidelines were aggregated and a knowledge base created. The prototype employs transfer objects to represent any text-based medical guideline. As part of the implementation, we show how Fuzzy Arden Syntax can improve the overall usability of a clinical decision support system. PMID:24825694

  17. A 2014 Medical Informatics Perspective on Clinical Decision Support Systems: Do We Hit The Ceiling of Effectiveness?

    PubMed Central

    Lamy, J.-B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective To summarize recent research and propose a selection of best papers published in 2013 in the field of computer-based decision support in health care. Method Two literature reviews were performed by the two section editors from bibliographic databases with a focus on clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) and computer provider order entry in order to select a list of candidate best papers to be peer-reviewed by external reviewers. Results The full review process highlighted three papers, illustrating current trends in the domain of clinical decision support. The first trend is the development of theoretical approaches for CDSSs, and is exemplified by a paper proposing the integration of family histories and pedigrees in a CDSS. The second trend is illustrated by well-designed CDSSs, showing good theoretical performances and acceptance, while failing to show a clinical impact. An example is given with a paper reporting on scorecards aiming to reduce adverse drug events. The third trend is represented by research works that try to understand the limits of CDSS use, for instance by analyzing interactions between general practitioners, patients, and a CDSS. Conclusions CDSSs can achieve good theoretical results in terms of sensibility and specificity, as well as a good acceptance, but evaluations often fail to demonstrate a clinical impact. Future research is needed to better understand the causes of this observation and imagine new effective solutions for CDSS implementation. PMID:25123737

  18. Ability of online drug databases to assist in clinical decision-making with infectious disease therapies

    PubMed Central

    Polen, Hyla H; Zapantis, Antonia; Clauson, Kevin A; Jebrock, Jennifer; Paris, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Background Infectious disease (ID) is a dynamic field with new guidelines being adopted at a rapid rate. Clinical decision support tools (CDSTs) have proven beneficial in selecting treatment options to improve outcomes. However, there is a dearth of information on the abilities of CDSTs, such as drug information databases. This study evaluated online drug information databases when answering infectious disease-specific queries. Methods Eight subscription drug information databases: American Hospital Formulary Service Drug Information (AHFS), Clinical Pharmacology (CP), Epocrates Online Premium (EOP), Facts & Comparisons 4.0 Online (FC), Lexi-Comp (LC), Lexi-Comp with AHFS (LC-AHFS), Micromedex (MM), and PEPID PDC (PPDC) and six freely accessible: DailyMed (DM), DIOne (DIO), Epocrates Online Free (EOF), Internet Drug Index (IDI), Johns Hopkins ABX Guide (JHAG), and Medscape Drug Reference (MDR) were evaluated for their scope (presence of an answer) and completeness (on a 3-point scale) in answering 147 infectious disease-specific questions. Questions were divided among five classifications: antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal, antiparasitic, and vaccination/immunization. Classifications were further divided into categories (e.g., dosage, administration, emerging resistance, synergy, and spectrum of activity). Databases were ranked based on scope and completeness scores. ANOVA and Chi-square were used to determine differences between individual databases and between subscription and free databases. Results Scope scores revealed three discrete tiers of database performance: Tier 1 (82-77%), Tier 2 (73-65%) and Tier 3 (56-41%) which were significantly different from each other (p < 0.05). The top tier performers: MM (82%), MDR (81%), LC-AHFS (81%), AHFS (78%), and CP (77%) answered significantly more questions compared to other databases (p < 0.05). Top databases for completeness were: MM (97%), DM (96%), IDI (95%), and MDR (95%). Subscription databases performed better than free databases in all categories (p = 0.03). Databases suffered from 37 erroneous answers for an overall error rate of 1.8%. Conclusion Drug information databases used in ID practice as CDSTs can be valuable resources. MM, MDR, LC-AHFS, AHFS, and CP were shown to be superior in their scope and completeness of information, and MM, AHFS, and MDR provided no erroneous answers. There is room for improvement in all evaluated databases. PMID:18990224

  19. Development of an Electronic Medical Record-Based Clinical Decision Support Tool to Improve HIV Symptom Management

    PubMed Central

    Tsevat, Joel; Justice, Amy C.; Mrus, Joseph M.; Levin, Forrest; Kozal, Michael J.; Mattocks, Kristin; Farber, Steven; Rogers, Michelle; Erdos, Joseph; Brandt, Cynthia; Kudel, Ian; Braithwaite, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Common symptoms associated with HIV disease and its management are often underrecognized and undertreated. A clinical decision support tool for symptom management was developed within the Veterans Health Administration electronic medical record (EMR), aiming at increasing provider awareness of and response to common HIV symptoms. Its feasibility was studied in March to May 2007 by implementing it within a weekly HIV clinic, comparing a 4-week intervention period with a 4-week control period. Fifty-six patients and their providers participated in the study. Patients' perceptions of providers' awareness of their symptoms, proportion of progress notes mentioning any symptom(s) and proportion of care plans mentioning any symptom(s) were measured. The clinical decision support tool used portable electronic “tablets” to elicit symptom information at the time of check-in, filtered, and organized that information into a concise and clinically relevant EMR note available at the point of care, and facilitated clinical responses to that information. It appeared to be well accepted by patients and providers and did not substantially impact workflow. Although this pilot study was not powered to detect effectiveness, 25 (93%) patients in the intervention group reported that their providers were very aware of their symptoms versuas 27 (75%) control patients (p = 0.07). The proportion of providers' notes listing symptoms was similar in both periods; however, there was a trend toward including a greater number of symptoms in intervention period progress notes. The symptom support tool seemed to be useful in clinical HIV care. The Veterans Health Administration EMR may be an effective “laboratory” for developing and testing decision supports. PMID:19538046

  20. The ethics of forgoing life-sustaining treatment: theoretical considerations and clinical decision making.

    PubMed

    Welie, Jos Vm; Ten Have, Henk Amj

    2014-01-01

    Withholding or withdrawing a life-sustaining treatment tends to be very challenging for health care providers, patients, and their family members alike. When a patient's life seems to be nearing its end, it is generally felt that the morally best approach is to try a new intervention, continue all treatments, attempt an experimental course of action, in short, do something. In contrast to this common practice, the authors argue that in most instances, the morally safer route is actually to forgo life-sustaining treatments, particularly when their likelihood to effectuate a truly beneficial outcome has become small relative to the odds of harming the patient. The ethical analysis proceeds in three stages. First, the difference between neglectful omission and passive acquiescence is explained. Next, the two necessary conditions for any medical treatment, i.e., that it is medically indicated and that consent is obtained, are applied to life-sustaining interventions. Finally, the difference between withholding and withdrawing a life-sustaining treatment is discussed. In the second part of the paper the authors show how these theoretical-ethical considerations can guide clinical-ethical decision making. A case vignette is presented about a patient who cannot be weaned off the ventilator post-surgery. The ethical analysis of this case proceeds through three stages. First, it is shown that and why withdrawal of the ventilator in this case does not equate assistance in suicide or euthanasia. Next, the question is raised whether continued ventilation can be justified medically, or has become futile. Finally, the need for the health care team to obtain consent for the continuation of the ventilation is discussed. PMID:24618004

  1. Radiation treatment in older patients: a framework for clinical decision making.

    PubMed

    Smith, Grace L; Smith, Benjamin D

    2014-08-20

    In older patients, radiation treatment plays a vital role in curative and palliative cancer therapy. Radiation treatment recommendations should be informed by a comprehensive, personalized risk-benefit assessment that evaluates treatment efficacy and toxicity. We review several clinical factors that distinctly affect efficacy and toxicity of radiation treatment in older patients. First, locoregional tumor behavior may be more indolent in older patients for some disease sites but more aggressive for other sites. Assessment of expected locoregional relapse risk informs the magnitude and timeframe of expected radiation treatment benefits. Second, assessment of the competing cancer versus noncancer mortality and morbidity risks contextualizes cancer treatment priorities holistically within patients' entire spectrum and time course of health needs. Third, assessment of functional reserve helps predict patients' acute treatment tolerance, differentiating those patients who are unlikely to benefit from treatment or who are at high risk for treatment complications. Potential radiation treatment options include immediate curative treatment, delayed curative treatment, and no treatment, with additional consideration given to altered radiation target, dose, or sequencing with chemotherapy and/or surgery. Finally, when cure is not feasible, palliative radiation therapy remains valuable for managing symptoms and achieving meaningful quality-of-life improvements. Our proposed decision-making framework integrates these factors to help radiation oncologists formulate strategic treatment recommendations within a multidisciplinary context. Future research is still needed to identify how advanced technologies can be judiciously applied in curative and palliative settings to enhance risk-benefit profiles of radiation treatment in older patients and more accurately quantify treatment efficacy in this group. PMID:25071132

  2. Net Clinical Benefit of Oral Anticoagulants: A Multiple Criteria Decision Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yea-Huei Kao; Lu, Christine Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background This study quantitatively evaluated the comparative efficacy and safety of new oral anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apizaban) and warfarin for treatment of nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. We also compared these agents under different scenarios, including population with high risk of stroke and for primary vs. secondary stroke prevention. Methods We used multiple criteria decision analysis (MCDA) to assess the benefit-risk of these medications. Our MCDA models contained criteria for benefits (prevention of ischemic stroke and systemic embolism) and risks (intracranial and extracranial bleeding). We calculated a performance score for each drug accounting for benefits and risks in comparison to treatment alternatives. Results Overall, new agents had higher performance scores than warfarin; in order of performance scores: dabigatran 150 mg (0.529), rivaroxaban (0.462), apixaban (0.426), and warfarin (0.191). For patients at a higher risk of stroke (CHADS2 score?3), apixaban had the highest performance score (0.686); performance scores for other drugs were 0.462 for dabigatran 150 mg, 0.392 for dabigatran 110 mg, 0.271 for rivaroxaban, and 0.116 for warfarin. Dabigatran 150 mg had the highest performance score for primary stroke prevention, while dabigatran 110 mg had the highest performance score for secondary prevention. Conclusions Our results suggest that new oral anticoagulants might be preferred over warfarin. Selecting appropriate medicines according to the patient’s condition based on information from an integrated benefit-risk assessment of treatment options is crucial to achieve optimal clinical outcomes. PMID:25897861

  3. Transforming User Needs into Functional Requirements for an Antibiotic Clinical Decision Support System

    PubMed Central

    Bright, T.J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Many informatics studies use content analysis to generate functional requirements for system development. Explication of this translational process from qualitative data to functional requirements can strengthen the understanding and scientific rigor when applying content analysis in informatics studies. Objective To describe a user-centered approach transforming emergent themes derived from focus group data into functional requirements for informatics solutions and to illustrate these methods to the development of an antibiotic clinical decision support system (CDS). Methods The approach consisted of five steps: 1) identify unmet therapeutic planning information needs via Focus Group Study-I, 2) develop a coding framework of therapeutic planning themes to refine the domain scope to antibiotic therapeutic planning, 3) identify functional requirements of an antibiotic CDS system via Focus Group Study-II, 4) discover informatics solutions and functional requirements from coded data, and 5) determine the types of information needed to support the antibiotic CDS system and link with the identified informatics solutions and functional requirements. Results The coding framework for Focus Group Study-I revealed unmet therapeutic planning needs. Twelve subthemes emerged and were clustered into four themes; analysis indicated a need for an antibiotic CDS intervention. Focus Group Study-II included five types of information needs. Comments from the Barrier/Challenge to information access and Function/Feature themes produced three informatics solutions and 13 functional requirements of an antibiotic CDS system. Comments from the Patient, Institution, and Domain themes generated required data elements for each informatics solution. Conclusion This study presents one example explicating content analysis of focus group data and the analysis process to functional requirements from narrative data. Illustration of this 5-step method was used to develop an antibiotic CDS system, resolving unmet antibiotic prescribing needs. As a reusable approach, these techniques can be refined and applied to resolve unmet information needs with informatics interventions in additional domains. PMID:24454586

  4. Use of the C4.5 machine learning algorithm to test a clinical guideline-based decision support system

    PubMed Central

    Lamy, Jean-Baptiste; Ellini, Anis; Ebrahiminia, Vahid; Zucker, Jean-Daniel; Falcoff, Hector; Venot, Alain

    2008-01-01

    Well-designed medical decision support system (DSS) have been shown to improve health care quality. However, before they can be used in real clinical situations, these systems must be extensively tested, to ensure that they conform to the clinical guidelines (CG) on which they are based. Existing methods cannot be used for the systematic testing of all possible test cases. We describe here a new exhaustive dynamic verification method. In this method, the DSS is considered to be a black box, and the Quinlan C4.5 algorithm is used to build a decision tree from an exhaustive set of DSS input vectors and outputs. This method was successfully used for the testing of a medical DSS relating to chronic diseases: the ASTI critiquing module for type 2 diabetes. PMID:18487735

  5. Computerized training management system

    DOEpatents

    Rice, Harold B. (Franklin Furnace, OH); McNair, Robert C. (East Setauket, NY); White, Kenneth (Shirley, NY); Maugeri, Terry (Wading River, NY)

    1998-08-04

    A Computerized Training Management System (CTMS) for providing a procedurally defined process that is employed to develop accreditable performance based training programs for job classifications that are sensitive to documented regulations and technical information. CTMS is a database that links information needed to maintain a five-phase approach to training-analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation independent of training program design. CTMS is designed using R-Base.RTM., an-SQL compliant software platform. Information is logically entered and linked in CTMS. Each task is linked directly to a performance objective, which, in turn, is linked directly to a learning objective; then, each enabling objective is linked to its respective test items. In addition, tasks, performance objectives, enabling objectives, and test items are linked to their associated reference documents. CTMS keeps all information up to date since it automatically sorts, files and links all data; CTMS includes key word and reference document searches.

  6. Computerized training management system

    DOEpatents

    Rice, H.B.; McNair, R.C.; White, K.; Maugeri, T.

    1998-08-04

    A Computerized Training Management System (CTMS) is disclosed for providing a procedurally defined process that is employed to develop accreditable performance based training programs for job classifications that are sensitive to documented regulations and technical information. CTMS is a database that links information needed to maintain a five-phase approach to training-analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation independent of training program design. CTMS is designed using R-Base{trademark}, an-SQL compliant software platform. Information is logically entered and linked in CTMS. Each task is linked directly to a performance objective, which, in turn, is linked directly to a learning objective; then, each enabling objective is linked to its respective test items. In addition, tasks, performance objectives, enabling objectives, and test items are linked to their associated reference documents. CTMS keeps all information up to date since it automatically sorts, files and links all data; CTMS includes key word and reference document searches. 18 figs.

  7. Exploration of the factors influencing parental decisions to allow their children to participate in clinical trials in paediatric infectious diseases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S J Douglas; M Casey; C Liossi; S N Faust

    2011-01-01

    AimsTo explore the reasons behind parental decisions about participation of their children in specific paediatric infection clinical research scenarios in order to improve recruitment strategies.MethodsParents of children aged 0–10 years were asked to complete a 20-page researcher-assisted semi-quantitative semi-structured questionnaire while waiting for their child's appointment in the outpatient waiting area. Socio-demographic information was collected. Open-ended and closed questions based

  8. How to translate therapeutic recommendations in clinical practice guidelines into rules for critiquing physician prescriptions? Methods and application to five guidelines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-Baptiste Lamy; Vahid Ebrahiminia; Christine Riou; Brigitte Seroussi; Jacques Bouaud; Christian Simon; Stéphane Dubois; Antoine Butti; Gérard Simon; Madeleine Favre; Hector Falcoff; Alain Venot

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical practice guidelines give recommendations about what to do in various medical situations, including therapeutical recommendations for drug prescription. An effective way to computerize these recommendations is to design critiquing decision support systems, i.e. systems that criticize the physician's prescription when it does not conform to the guidelines. These systems are commonly based on a list of \\

  9. Translating shared decision-making into health care clinical practices: Proof of concepts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Glyn Elwyn; Martin Fishbein; Pierre Frémont; Dominick Frosch; Marie-Pierre Gagnon; David A Kenny; Michel Labrecque; Dawn Stacey; Sylvie St-Jacques; Trudy van der Weijden

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is considerable interest today in shared decision-making (SDM), defined as a decision-making process jointly shared by patients and their health care provider. However, the data show that SDM has not been broadly adopted yet. Consequently, the main goal of this proposal is to bring together the resources and the expertise needed to develop an interdisciplinary and international research

  10. Religion, Spirituality and Health Care Treatment Decisions: The Role of Chaplains in the Australian Clinical Context

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lindsay B. Carey; Jeffrey Cohen

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the views of Australian health care chaplains concerning their role and involvement in patient\\/family health care treatment decisions. In general terms the findings indicated that the majority of chaplains surveyed believed that it was part of their pastoral role to help patients and their families make decisions about their health care treatment. Differences in involvement of volunteer

  11. “Many miles to go …”: a systematic review of the implementation of patient decision support interventions into routine clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Two decades of research has established the positive effect of using patient-targeted decision support interventions: patients gain knowledge, greater understanding of probabilities and increased confidence in decisions. Yet, despite their efficacy, the effectiveness of these decision support interventions in routine practice has yet to be established; widespread adoption has not occurred. The aim of this review was to search for and analyze the findings of published peer-reviewed studies that investigated the success levels of strategies or methods where attempts were made to implement patient-targeted decision support interventions into routine clinical settings. Methods An electronic search strategy was devised and adapted for the following databases: ASSIA, CINAHL, Embase, HMIC, Medline, Medline-in-process, OpenSIGLE, PsycINFO, Scopus, Social Services Abstracts, and the Web of Science. In addition, we used snowballing techniques. Studies were included after dual independent assessment. Results After assessment, 5322 abstracts yielded 51 articles for consideration. After examining full-texts, 17 studies were included and subjected to data extraction. The approach used in all studies was one where clinicians and their staff used a referral model, asking eligible patients to use decision support. The results point to significant challenges to the implementation of patient decision support using this model, including indifference on the part of health care professionals. This indifference stemmed from a reported lack of confidence in the content of decision support interventions and concern about disruption to established workflows, ultimately contributing to organizational inertia regarding their adoption. Conclusions It seems too early to make firm recommendations about how best to implement patient decision support into routine practice because approaches that use a ‘referral model’ consistently report difficulties. We sense that the underlying issues that militate against the use of patient decision support and, more generally, limit the adoption of shared decision making, are under-investigated and under-specified. Future reports from implementation studies could be improved by following guidelines, for example the SQUIRE proposals, and by adopting methods that would be able to go beyond the ‘barriers’ and ‘facilitators’ approach to understand more about the nature of professional and organizational resistance to these tools. The lack of incentives that reward the use of these interventions needs to be considered as a significant impediment. PMID:24625083

  12. Technological Innovations in the Development of Cardiovascular Clinical Information Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nan-Chen Hsieh; Chung-Yi Chang; Kuo-Chen Lee; Jeen-Chen Chen; Chien-Hui Chan

    Recent studies have shown that computerized clinical case management and decision support systems can be used to assist surgeons\\u000a in the diagnosis of disease, optimize surgical operation, aid in drug therapy and decrease the cost of medical treatment.\\u000a Therefore, medical informatics has become an extensive field of research and many of these approaches have demonstrated potential\\u000a value for improving medical

  13. Multicenter Validation of a Computer-Based Clinical Decision Support Tool for Glucose Control in Adult and Pediatric Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, B. Taylor; Orme, James F.; Zheng, Hui; Luckett, Peter M.; Truwit, Jonathon D.; Willson, Douglas F.; Duncan Hite, R.; Brower, Roy G.; Bernard, Gordon R.; Curley, Martha A. Q.; Steingrub, Jay S.; Sorenson, Dean K.; Sward, Kathy; Hirshberg, Ellie; Morris, Alan H.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Hyperglycemia during critical illness is common, and intravenous insulin therapy (IIT) to normalize blood glucose improves outcomes in selected populations. Methods differ widely in complexity, insulin dosing approaches, efficacy, and rates of hypoglycemia. We developed a simple bedside-computerized decision support protocol (eProtocol-insulin) that yields promising results in the development center. We examined the effectiveness and safety of this tool in six adult and five pediatric intensive care units (ICUs) in other centers. Methods We required attending physicians of eligible patients to independently intend to use intravenous insulin to normalize blood glucose. We used eProtocol-insulin for glucose control for a duration determined by the clinical caregivers. Adults had an anticipated length of stay of 3 or more days. In pediatric ICUs, we also required support or intended support with mechanical ventilation for greater than 24 hours or with a vasoactive infusion. We recorded all instances in which eProtocol-insulin instructions were not accepted and all blood glucose values. An independent data safety and monitoring board monitored study results and subject safety. Bedside nurses were selected randomly to complete a paper survey describing their perceptions of quality of care and workload related to eProtocol-insulin use. Results Clinicians accepted 93% of eProtocol-insulin instructions (11,773/12,645) in 100 adult and 48 pediatric subjects. Forty-eight percent of glucose values were in the target range. Both of these results met a priori-defined efficacy thresholds. Only 0.18% of glucose values were ?40 mg/dl. This is lower than values reported in prior IIT studies. Although nurses reported eProtocol-insulin required as much work as managing a mechanical ventilator, most nurses felt eProtocol-insulin had a low impact on their ability to complete non-IIT nursing activities. Conclusions A multicenter validation demonstrated that eProtocol-insulin is a valid, exportable tool that can assist clinicians in achieving control of glucose in critically ill adults and children. PMID:19885199

  14. Computerized training of cryosurgery - a system approach.

    PubMed

    Keelan, R; Yamakawa, S; Shimada, K; Rabin, Y

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the current study is to provide the foundation for a computerized training platform for cryosurgery. Consistent with clinical practice, the training process targets the correlation of the frozen region contour with the target region shape, using medical imaging and accepted criteria for clinical success. The current study focuses on system design considerations, including a bioheat transfer model, simulation techniques, optimal cryoprobe layout strategy, and a simulation core framework. Two fundamentally different approaches were considered for the development of a cryosurgery simulator, based on a finite-elements (FE) commercial code (ANSYS) and a proprietary finite-difference (FD) code. Results of this study demonstrate that the FE simulator is superior in terms of geometric modeling, while the FD simulator is superior in terms of runtime. Benchmarking results further indicate that the FD simulator is superior in terms of usage of memory resources, pre-processing, parallel processing, and post-processing. It is envisioned that future integration of a human-interface module and clinical data into the proposed computer framework will make computerized training of cryosurgery a practical reality. PMID:23995400

  15. Computerized Measurement of Negative Symptoms in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Alex S.; Alpert, Murray; Nienow, Tasha M.; Dinzeo, Thomas J.; Docherty, Nancy M.

    2008-01-01

    Accurate measurement of negative symptoms is crucial for understanding and treating schizophrenia. However, current measurement strategies are reliant on subjective symptom rating scales which often have psychometric and practical limitations. Computerized analysis of patients’ speech offers a sophisticated and objective means of evaluating negative symptoms. The present study examined the feasibility and validity of using widely-available acoustic and lexical-analytic software to measure flat affect, alogia and anhedonia (via positive emotion). These measures were examined in their relationships to clinically-rated negative symptoms and social functioning. Natural speech samples were collected and analyzed for 14 patients with clinically-rated flat affect, 46 patients without flat affect and 19 healthy controls. The computer-based inflection and speech rate measures significantly discriminated patients with flat affect from controls, and the computer-based measure of alogia and negative emotion significantly discriminated the flat and non-flat patients. Both the computer and clinical measures of positive emotion/anhedonia corresponded to functioning impairments. The computerized method of assessing negative symptoms offered a number of advantages over the symptom scale-based approach. PMID:17920078

  16. Computerized international geothermal information systems

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, S.L.; Lawrence, J.D.; Lepman, S.R.

    1980-03-01

    The computerized international geothermal energy information system is reviewed. The review covers establishment of the Italy - United States linked data centers by the NATO Committee on Challenges of Modern Society, through a bilateral agreement, and up to the present time. The result of the information exchange project is given as the bibliographic and numerical data available from the data centers. Recommendations for the exchange of computerized geothermal information at the international level are discussed.

  17. Attitudes of Oncologists, Oncology Nurses, and Patients from a Women's Clinic Regarding Medical Decision Making for Older and Younger Breast Cancer Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beisecker, Analee E.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Administered Beisecker Locus of Authority in Decision Making: Breast Cancer survey to 67 oncologists, 94 oncology nurses, and 288 patients from women's clinic. All groups believed that physicians should have dominant role in decision making. Nurses felt that patients should have more input than patients or physicians felt they should. Physicians…

  18. Patient-reported Outcomes in Randomised Controlled Trials of Prostate Cancer: Methodological Quality and Impact on Clinical Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Efficace, Fabio; Feuerstein, Michael; Fayers, Peter; Cafaro, Valentina; Eastham, James; Pusic, Andrea; Blazeby, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Context Patient-reported outcomes (PRO) data from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are increasingly used to inform patient-centred care as well as clinical and health policy decisions. Objective The main objective of this study was to investigate the methodological quality of PRO assessment in RCTs of prostate cancer (PCa) and to estimate the likely impact of these studies on clinical decision making. Evidence acquisition A systematic literature search of studies was undertaken on main electronic databases to retrieve articles published between January 2004 and March 2012. RCTs were evaluated on a predetermined extraction form, including (1) basic trial demographics and clinical and PRO characteristics; (2) level of PRO reporting based on the recently published recommendations by the International Society for Quality of Life Research; and (3) bias, assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. Studies were systematically analysed to evaluate their relevance for supporting clinical decision making. Evidence synthesis Sixty-five RCTs enrolling a total of 22 071 patients were evaluated, with 31 (48%) in patients with nonmetastatic disease. When a PRO difference between treatments was found, it related in most cases to symptoms only (n = 29, 58%). Although the extent of missing data was generally documented (72% of RCTs), few reported details on statistical handling of this data (18%) and reasons for dropout (35%). Improvements in key methodological aspects over time were found. Thirteen (20%) RCTs were judged as likely to be robust in informing clinical decision making. Higher-quality PRO studies were generally associated with those RCTs that had higher internal validity. Conclusions Including PRO in RCTs of PCa patients is critical for better evaluating the treatment effectiveness of new therapeutic approaches. Marked improvements in PRO quality reporting over time were found, and it is estimated that at least one-fifth of PRO RCTs have provided sufficient details to allow health policy makers and physicians to make critical appraisals of results. Patient summary In this report, we have investigated the methodological quality of PCa trials that have included a PRO assessment. We conclude that including PRO is critical to better evaluating the treatment effectiveness of new therapeutic approaches from the patient's perspective. Also, at least one-fifth of PRO RCTs in PCa have provided sufficient details to allow health policy makers and physicians to make a critical appraisal of results. PMID:24210091

  19. Documentation of Nursing Practice Using a Computerized Medical Information System

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Carol

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses a definition of the content of the computerized nursing data base developed by the Nursing Department for the Clinical Center Medical Information System at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. The author describes the theoretical framework for the content and presents a model to describe the organization of the nursing data components in relation to the process of nursing care delivery. Nursing documentation requirements of Nurse Practice Acts, American Nurses Association Standards of Practice and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals are also addressed as they relate to this data base. The advantages and disadvantages of such an approach to computerized documentation are discussed.

  20. Impact of ¹?F-florbetapir PET imaging of ?-amyloid neuritic plaque density on clinical decision-making.

    PubMed

    Zannas, Anthony S; Doraiswamy, P Murali; Shpanskaya, Katie S; Murphy, Kelly R; Petrella, Jeffrey R; Burke, James R; Wong, Terence Z

    2014-08-01

    ¹?F-florbetapir positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of the brain is now approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved for estimation of ? -amyloid neuritic plaque density when evaluating patients with cognitive impairment. However, its impact on clinical decision-making is not known. We present 11 cases (age range 67-84) of cognitively impaired subjects in whom clinician surveys were done before and after PET scanning to document the theoretical impact of amyloid imaging on the diagnosis and treatment plan of cognitively impaired subjects. Subjects have been clinically followed for about 5 months after the PET scan. Negative scans occurred in five cases, leading to a change in diagnosis for four patients and a change in treatment plan for two of these cases. Positive scans occurred in six cases, leading to a change in diagnosis for four patients and a change in treatment plan for three of these cases. Following the scan, only one case had indeterminate diagnosis. Our series suggests that both positive and negative florbetapir PET scans may enhance diagnostic certainty and impact clinical decision-making. Controlled longitudinal studies are needed to confirm our data and determine best practices. PMID:23672654

  1. Single-patient (n-of-1) trials: a pragmatic clinical decision methodology for patient-centered comparative effectiveness research

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Naihua; Kravitz, Richard L.; Schmid, Christopher H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To raise awareness among clinicians and epidemiologists that single-patient (n-of-1) trials are potentially useful for informing personalized treatment decisions for patients with chronic conditions. Study Design and Setting We reviewed the clinical and statistical literature on methods and applications of single-patient trials and then critically evaluated the needs for further methodological developments. Results Existing literature reports application of 2,154 single-patient trials in 108 studies for diverse clinical conditions; various recent commentaries advocate for wider application of such trials in clinical decision making. Preliminary evidence from several recent pilot acceptability studies suggests that single-patient trials have the potential for widespread acceptance by patients and clinicians as an effective modality for increasing the therapeutic precision. Bayesian and adaptive statistical methods hold promise for increasing the informational yield of single-patient trials while reducing participant burden, but are not widely used. Personalized applications of single-patient trials can be enhanced through further development and application of methodologies on adaptive trial design, stopping rules, network meta-analysis, washout methods, and methods for communicating trial findings to patients and clinicians. Conclusions Single-patient trials may be poised to emerge as an important part of the methodological armamentarium for comparative effectiveness research and patient-centered outcomes research. By permitting direct estimation of individual treatment effects, they can facilitate finely graded individualized care, enhance therapeutic precision, improve patient outcomes, and reduce costs. PMID:23849149

  2. Application of a computerized environmental information system to master and sector planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    A computerized composite mapping system developed as an aid in the land use decision making process is described. Emphasis is placed on consideration of the environment in urban planning. The presence of alluvium, shallow bedrock, surface water, and vegetation growth are among the environmental factors considered. An analysis of the Shady Grove Sector planning is presented as an example of the use of computerized composite mapping for long range planning.

  3. Fuzzy TOPSIS-based computerized maintenance management system selection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fahriye Uysal; Ömür Tosun

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to provide a structured methodology to permit the optimal selection of the best-suited computerized maintenance management system (CMMS) software within maintenance information technologies. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The analysis has been executed adopting a multi-attribute decision-making methodology, namely the technique for order preference by similarity to an ideal solution (TOPSIS). For the selection process,

  4. The factors facilitating and inhibiting effective clinical decision-making in nursing: a qualitative study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohsen Adib Hagbaghery; Mahvash Salsali; Fazlolah Ahmadi

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nurses' practice takes place in a context of ongoing advances in research and technology. The dynamic and uncertain nature of health care environment requires nurses to be competent decision-makers in order to respond to clients' needs. Recently, the public and the government have criticized Iranian nurses because of poor quality of patient care. However nurses' views and experiences on

  5. Successful clinical trial research in nursing homes: the Improving Decision-Making Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura C Hanson; Robin Gilliam; Tae Joon Lee

    2010-01-01

    Background One in four Americans, and 70% of people who have dementia, will spend their final days in nursing home care. Clinical research, particularly clinical trials, rarely includes this population due to unique challenges in research methods and ethics. Families of advanced dementia patients make choices about tube feeding and other feeding options with limited access to information or communication.

  6. Practicing nephrology with a computerized medical record

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William W Stead; Leland E Garrett; William E Hammond

    1983-01-01

    The practice of medicine revolves around the collection, interpretation, and dissemination of data about patients. Clinical decisions are based upon information gathered from the patient in light of medical knowledge which has been gained from the physician's experiences while taking care of other patients. The didactic portion of medical education includes the transfer of the profession's cumulative clinical experience to

  7. Evaluating the Clinical Impact of a Genomic Classifier in Prostate Cancer Using Individualized Decision Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Jennifer Mason; Dicker, Adam P.; Buerki, Christine; Daviconi, Elai; Karnes, R. Jeffrey; Jenkins, Robert B.; Patel, Nirav; Den, Robert B.; Showalter, Timothy N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Currently there is controversy surrounding the optimal way to treat patients with prostate cancer in the post-prostatectomy setting. Adjuvant therapies carry possible benefits of improved curative results, but there is uncertainty in which patients should receive adjuvant therapy. There are concerns about giving toxicity to a whole population for the benefit of only a subset. We hypothesized that making post-prostatectomy treatment decisions using genomics-based risk prediction estimates would improve cancer and quality of life outcomes. Methods We developed a state-transition model to simulate outcomes over a 10 year horizon for a cohort of post-prostatectomy patients. Outcomes included cancer progression rates at 5 and 10 years, overall survival, and quality-adjusted survival with reductions for treatment, side effects, and cancer stage. We compared outcomes using population-level versus individual-level risk of cancer progression, and for genomics-based care versus usual care treatment recommendations. Results Cancer progression outcomes, expected life-years (LYs), and expected quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were significantly different when individual genomics-based cancer progression risk estimates were used in place of population-level risk estimates. Use of the genomic classifier to guide treatment decisions provided small, but statistically significant, improvements in model outcomes. We observed an additional 0.03 LYs and 0.07 QALYs, a 12% relative increase in the 5-year recurrence-free survival probability, and a 4% relative reduction in the 5-year probability of metastatic disease or death. Conclusions The use of genomics-based risk prediction to guide treatment decisions may improve outcomes for prostate cancer patients. This study offers a framework for individualized decision analysis, and can be extended to incorporate a wide range of personal attributes to enable delivery of patient-centered tools for informed decision-making. PMID:25837660

  8. Comparative outcome studies of clinical decision support software: limitations to the practice of evidence-based system acquisition.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, Gaurav Jay; Amber, Kyle T; Goodman, Kenneth W

    2015-04-01

    Clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) assist clinicians with patient diagnosis and treatment. However, inadequate attention has been paid to the process of selecting and buying systems. The diversity of CDSSs, coupled with research obstacles, marketplace limitations, and legal impediments, has thwarted comparative outcome studies and reduced the availability of reliable information and advice for purchasers. We review these limitations and recommend several comparative studies, which were conducted in phases; studies conducted in phases and focused on limited outcomes of safety, efficacy, and implementation in varied clinical settings. Additionally, we recommend the increased availability of guidance tools to assist purchasers with evidence-based purchases. Transparency is necessary in purchasers' reporting of system defects and vendors' disclosure of marketing conflicts of interest to support methodologically sound studies. Taken together, these measures can foster the evolution of evidence-based tools that, in turn, will enable and empower system purchasers to make wise choices and improve the care of patients. PMID:25665704

  9. In it for the long haul: the integration of outcomes assessment, clinical services, and management decision-making.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, F L; Leckman, E; Russo, N; Knauf, L

    1999-05-01

    Behavioral health providers are increasingly called upon to develop outcomes strategies that highlight opportunities for performance improvement and assess in turn the impact of applying total quality management (TQM) principles to treatment outcomes. This article describes the evolution of an outcomes assessment program at a private psychiatric facility, and presents two case studies of the integration of outcomes data into clinical decision-making. In Study I, outcomes data were used to identify patterns in the responsiveness to treatment of child/adolescent patients with behavioral disorders and document changes in improvement rates following the application of continuous quality improvement (CQI) principles within the inpatient services. In Study II, improvements sought in the outcomes methodology resulted in improved response rates, improved data quality, and new opportunities for both clinical intervention and staff development. Benefits of committing to outcomes assessment over the long haul to facilitate empirically driven planning processes are described. PMID:24011414

  10. Recommendations for Standardizing Glucose Reporting and Analysis to Optimize Clinical Decision Making in Diabetes: The Ambulatory Glucose Profile

    PubMed Central

    Bergenstal, Richard M.; Ahmann, Andrew J.; Bailey, Timothy; Beck, Roy W.; Bissen, Joan; Buckingham, Bruce; Deeb, Larry; Dolin, Robert H.; Garg, Satish K.; Goland, Robin; Hirsch, Irl B.; Klonoff, David C.; Kruger, Davida F.; Matfin, Glenn; Mazze, Roger S.; Olson, Beth A.; Parkin, Christopher; Peters, Anne; Powers, Margaret A.; Rodriguez, Henry; Southerland, Phil; Strock, Ellie S.; Tamborlane, William; Wesley, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Underutilization of glucose data and lack of easy and standardized glucose data collection, analysis, visualization, and guided clinical decision making are key contributors to poor glycemic control among individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus. An expert panel of diabetes specialists, facilitated by the International Diabetes Center and sponsored by the Helmsley Charitable Trust, met in 2012 to discuss recommendations for standardizing the analysis and presentation of glucose monitoring data, with the initial focus on data derived from continuous glucose monitoring systems. The panel members were introduced to a universal software report, the Ambulatory Glucose Profile, and asked to provide feedback on its content and functionality, both as a research tool and in clinical settings. This article provides a summary of the topics and issues discussed during the meeting and presents recommendations from the expert panel regarding the need to standardize glucose profile summary metrics and the value of a uniform glucose report to aid clinicians, researchers, and patients. PMID:23567014

  11. Multiparametric MRI followed by targeted prostate biopsy for men with suspected prostate cancer: a clinical decision analysis

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Sarah R; Ahmed, Hashim U; Moore, Caroline M; Donaldson, Ian; Emberton, Mark; Miners, Alec H; van der Meulen, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the diagnostic outcomes of the current approach of transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsy in men with suspected prostate cancer to an alternative approach using multiparametric MRI (mpMRI), followed by MRI-targeted biopsy if positive. Design Clinical decision analysis was used to synthesise data from recently emerging evidence in a format that is relevant for clinical decision making. Population A hypothetical cohort of 1000 men with suspected prostate cancer. Interventions mpMRI and, if positive, MRI-targeted biopsy compared with TRUS-guided biopsy in all men. Outcome measures We report the number of men expected to undergo a biopsy as well as the numbers of correctly identified patients with or without prostate cancer. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis was carried out using Monte Carlo simulation to explore the impact of statistical uncertainty in the diagnostic parameters. Results In 1000 men, mpMRI followed by MRI-targeted biopsy ‘clinically dominates’ TRUS-guided biopsy as it results in fewer expected biopsies (600 vs 1000), more men being correctly identified as having clinically significant cancer (320 vs 250), and fewer men being falsely identified (20 vs 50). The mpMRI-based strategy dominated TRUS-guided biopsy in 86% of the simulations in the probabilistic sensitivity analysis. Conclusions Our analysis suggests that mpMRI followed by MRI-targeted biopsy is likely to result in fewer and better biopsies than TRUS-guided biopsy. Future research in prostate cancer should focus on providing precise estimates of key diagnostic parameters. PMID:24934207

  12. Decision Support: Decision Analysis

    E-print Network

    Bohanec, Marko

    1 Decision Support: Decision Analysis Jozef Stefan International Postgraduate School, Ljubljana of Nova Gorica Decision Analysis Part 1 Decision Analysis and Decision Tables Decision Analysis, Part 1 · Introduction to Decision Analysis ­ Concepts: modelling, evaluation, analysis ­ Decision Problem

  13. Using data mining techniques to explore physicians' therapeutic decisions when clinical guidelines do not provide recommendations: methods and example for type 2 diabetes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Massoud Toussi; Jean-Baptiste Lamy; Philippe Le Toumelin; Alain Venot

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical guidelines carry medical evidence to the point of practice. As evidence is not always available, many guidelines do not provide recommendations for all clinical situations encountered in practice. We propose an approach for identifying knowledge gaps in guidelines and for exploring physicians' therapeutic decisions with data mining techniques to fill these knowledge gaps. We demonstrate our method by

  14. Computerized Cognitive Testing in the Management of Youth Sports-Related Concussion.

    PubMed

    De Marco, Anthony P; Broshek, Donna K

    2014-12-01

    Computerized neurocognitive testing has become a growing practice across medical populations, but particularly within sports medicine and the management of sports-related concussion. Although traditional neuropsychological measures are solely administered and interpreted by neuropsychologists, computerized cognitive tests are marketed to and utilized by a wide range of professionals involved in the management of sports-related concussions, many of whom lack specialized psychometric training. Although the benefits of computerized testing allow for many youth athletes to be evaluated quickly, professionals implementing their use should be aware of the potential pitfalls and the high potential for misuse. After briefly reviewing the recommended guidelines set forth by the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology and the National Academy of Neuropsychology, we review the benefits/limitations of computerized testing in the management of sports-related concussion and the basic psychometric properties of some of the more widely used computerized measures. Lastly, we discuss the practical application of these devices. PMID:25477270

  15. Why and how to establish a computerized system for psychiatric case records.

    PubMed

    Modai, I; Rabinowitz, J

    1993-11-01

    Based on experience with successful implementation of an on-line computerized psychiatric case record system in a psychiatric hospital in Israel, the authors discuss the advantages of such systems and outline the process of converting paper records to computerized records. Computerized records can save time by automatically issuing routine reports, improve clinical practice, simplify quality assurance, and ease collection and analysis of data for research. The process of converting paper records to computerized records can begin with analysis of the hospital's reporting requirements and creation and pilot testing of structured paper forms with a multiple-choice format that is eventually incorporated into the computer program. The authors recommend an on-line computerized record system with direct input of data because such a system can be used for case audits and can generate reports, treatment plans, and medication orders without removing records from circulation. Other advantages include the system's usefulness in electronic communication within and outside the hospital. PMID:8288180

  16. The Stroop task: comparison between the original paradigm and computerized versions in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Penner, Iris-Katharina; Kobel, Maja; Stöcklin, Markus; Weber, Peter; Opwis, Klaus; Calabrese, Pasquale

    2012-01-01

    The Stroop task has a long-standing history in psychological research and diagnostics, and many variants have emerged. Computerized versions have recently gained popularity because of their applicability in brain-imaging studies. It remains unclear, however, whether computerized versions are content valid with reference to the original task. We compare the performance in the original task with two computerized versions. All three versions show high test-retest reliability and are able to elicit interference effects, but to varying degrees. However, performances in the computerized versions and in the original task do not correlate. The transition from oral to manual response and from listed to single stimulus presentation seems not only to diminish the interference effect, but also to alter its nature in such a way that it no longer looks genuinely "Stroop-like". These findings have important clinical implications on the use and interpretation of computerized Stroop tasks in children and adults. PMID:22928670

  17. Impact of a Clinical Decision Model for Febrile Children at Risk for Serious Bacterial Infections at the Emergency Department: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    de Vos-Kerkhof, Evelien; Nijman, Ruud G.; Vergouwe, Yvonne; Polinder, Suzanne; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; van der Lei, Johan; Moll, Henriëtte A.; Oostenbrink, Rianne

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the impact of a clinical decision model for febrile children at risk for serious bacterial infections (SBI) attending the emergency department (ED). Methods Randomized controlled trial with 439 febrile children, aged 1 month-16 years, attending the pediatric ED of a Dutch university hospital during 2010-2012. Febrile children were randomly assigned to the intervention (clinical decision model; n=219) or the control group (usual care; n=220). The clinical decision model included clinical symptoms, vital signs, and C-reactive protein and provided high/low-risks for “pneumonia” and “other SBI”. Nurses were guided by the intervention to initiate additional tests for high-risk children. The clinical decision model was evaluated by 1) area-under-the-receiver-operating-characteristic-curve (AUC) to indicate discriminative ability and 2) feasibility, to measure nurses’ compliance to model recommendations. Primary patient outcome was defined as correct SBI diagnoses. Secondary process outcomes were defined as length of stay; diagnostic tests; antibiotic treatment; hospital admission; revisits and medical costs. Results The decision model had good discriminative ability for both pneumonia (n=33; AUC 0.83 (95% CI 0.75-0.90)) and other SBI (n=22; AUC 0.81 (95% CI 0.72-0.90)). Compliance to model recommendations was high (86%). No differences in correct SBI determination were observed. Application of the clinical decision model resulted in less full-blood-counts (14% vs. 22%, p-value<0.05) and more urine-dipstick testing (71% vs. 61%, p-value<0.05). Conclusions In contrast to our expectations no substantial impact on patient outcome was perceived. The clinical decision model preserved, however, good discriminatory ability to detect SBI, achieved good compliance among nurses and resulted in a more standardized diagnostic approach towards febrile children, with less full blood-counts and more rightfully urine-dipstick testing. Trial Registration Nederlands Trial Register NTR2381 PMID:26024532

  18. When will tumor gene expression profiling be incorporated into clinical breast cancer decision making?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chad J Creighton; James M Rae

    2006-01-01

    DNA microarray based gene expression analysis of primary breast cancers is not in general clinical use in spite of the widespread enthusiasm for the approach. However, several studies have identified gene expression patterns, or \\

  19. Research Paper: Semi-automated Construction of Decision Rules to Predict Morbidities from Clinical Texts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richárd Farkas; György Szarvas; István Hegedüs; Attila Almási; Veronika Vincze; Róbert Ormándi; Róbert Busa-Fekete

    2009-01-01

    ObjectiveIn this study the authors describe the system submitted by the team of University of Szeged to the second i2b2 Challenge in Natural Language Processing for Clinical Data. The challenge focused on the development of automatic systems that analyzed clinical discharge summary texts and addressed the following question: “Who's obese and what co-morbidities do they (definitely\\/most likely) have?”. Target diseases

  20. Real-Time Computerized Annotation of Pictures Real-Time Computerized Annotation of Pictures

    E-print Network

    Li, Jia

    Real-Time Computerized Annotation of Pictures Real-Time Computerized Annotation of Pictures Jia Li. Wang alipr.com #12;Real-Time Computerized Annotation of Pictures How Visible Are Web Images? Keukenhof photos Jia Li, James Z. Wang alipr.com #12;Real-Time Computerized Annotation of Pictures ALIPR: Automatic

  1. Development and initial evaluation of a treatment decision dashboard

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background For many healthcare decisions, multiple alternatives are available with different combinations of advantages and disadvantages across several important dimensions. The complexity of current healthcare decisions thus presents a significant barrier to informed decision making, a key element of patient-centered care. Interactive decision dashboards were developed to facilitate decision making in Management, a field marked by similarly complicated choices. These dashboards utilize data visualization techniques to reduce the cognitive effort needed to evaluate decision alternatives and a non-linear flow of information that enables users to review information in a self-directed fashion. Theoretically, both of these features should facilitate informed decision making by increasing user engagement with and understanding of the decision at hand. We sought to determine if the interactive decision dashboard format can be successfully adapted to create a clinically realistic prototype patient decision aid suitable for further evaluation and refinement. Methods We created a computerized, interactive clinical decision dashboard and performed a pilot test of its clinical feasibility and acceptability using a multi-method analysis. The dashboard summarized information about the effectiveness, risks of side effects and drug-drug interactions, out-of-pocket costs, and ease of use of nine analgesic treatment options for knee osteoarthritis. Outcome evaluations included observations of how study participants utilized the dashboard, questionnaires to assess usability, acceptability, and decisional conflict, and an open-ended qualitative analysis. Results The study sample consisted of 25 volunteers - 7 men and 18 women - with an average age of 51 years. The mean time spent interacting with the dashboard was 4.6 minutes. Mean evaluation scores on scales ranging from 1 (low) to 7 (high) were: mechanical ease of use 6.1, cognitive ease of use 6.2, emotional difficulty 2.7, decision-aiding effectiveness 5.9, clarification of values 6.5, reduction in decisional uncertainty 6.1, and provision of decision-related information 6.0. Qualitative findings were similarly positive. Conclusions Interactive decision dashboards can be adapted for clinical use and have the potential to foster informed decision making. Additional research is warranted to more rigorously test the effectiveness and efficiency of patient decision dashboards for supporting informed decision making and other aspects of patient-centered care, including shared decision making. PMID:23601912

  2. Multi-Criteria Clinical Decision Support: A Primer on the Use of Multiple-Criteria Decision-Making Methods to Promote Evidence-Based, Patient-Centered Healthcare

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James G. Dolan

    2010-01-01

    Current models of healthcare quality recommend that patient management decisions be evidence based and patient centered. Evidence-based decisions require a thorough understanding of current information regarding the natural history of disease and the anticipated outcomes of different management options. Patient-centered decisions incorporate patient preferences, values, and unique personal circumstances in the decision-making process, and actively involve both patients and healthcare

  3. Arkansas' Curriculum Guide. Competency Based Computerized Accounting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock. Div. of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    This guide contains the essential parts of a total curriculum for a one-year secondary-level course in computerized accounting. Addressed in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: the complete accounting cycle, computer operations for accounting, computerized accounting and general ledgers, computerized accounts payable,…

  4. Diagnostic thinking and information used in clinical decision-making: a qualitative study of expert and student dental clinicians

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It is uncertain whether the range and frequency of Diagnostic Thinking Processes (DTP) and pieces of information (concepts) involved in dental restorative treatment planning are different between students and expert clinicians. Methods We video-recorded dental visits with one standardized patient. Clinicians were subsequently interviewed and their cognitive strategies explored using guide questions; interviews were also recorded. Both visit and interview were content-analyzed, following the Gale and Marsden model for clinical decision-making. Limited tests used to contrast data were t, ?2, and Fisher's. Scott's ? was used to determine inter-coder reliability. Results Fifteen dentists and 17 senior dental students participated in visits lasting 32.0 minutes (± 12.9) among experts, and 29.9 ± 7.1 among students; contact time with patient was 26.4 ± 13.9 minutes (experts), and 22.2 ± 7.5 (students). The time elapsed between the first and the last instances of the clinician looking in the mouth was similar between experts and students. Ninety eight types of pieces of information were used in combinations with 12 DTPs. The main differences found in DTP utilization had dentists conducting diagnostic interpretations of findings with sufficient certainty to be considered definitive twice as often as students. Students resorted more often to more general or clarifying enquiry in their search for information than dentists. Conclusions Differences in diagnostic strategies and concepts existed within clearly delimited types of cognitive processes; such processes were largely compatible with the analytic and (in particular) non-analytic approaches to clinical decision-making identified in the medical field. Because we were focused on a clinical presentation primarily made up of non-emergency treatment needs, use of other DTPs and concepts might occur when clinicians evaluate emergency treatment needs, complex rehabilitative cases, and/or medically compromised patients. PMID:20465826

  5. Semi-automated Construction of Decision Rules to Predict Morbidities from Clinical Texts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    RICHÁRD FARKAS; G YÖRGY SZARVAS; ISTVÁN HEGEDUS; A TTILA ALMÁSI; V ERONIKA VINCZE; RÓBERT ORMÁNDI; R ÓBERT BUSA-FEKETE

    Abstract,Objective: In this study the authors describe the system,submitted,by the team of University of Szeged to the second,i2b2 Challenge in Natural Language,Processing for Clinical Data. The challenge,focused,on the development,of automatic,systems,that analyzed,clinical discharge,summary,texts and,addressed,the following,question: “Who’s obese and,what,co-morbidities do they (definitely\\/most likely) have?”. Target diseases included obesity and its 15 most frequent comorbidities exhibited by patients, while the target labels corresponded

  6. Computerized dairy records management systems 

    E-print Network

    Acosta, Alejandro E. Gonzalez

    1992-01-01

    . . . . . . 1. 3. Management Tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. 3. 1. Record Keeping History. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 . . . . . . . 3 . . . . . 3 . . . . . . . 4 4 . . . . . . . 5 1. 3. 2. Hand-Kept v. s.... Computerized Records. . . . . . . . . . . 6 1. 3. 3. Direct Access to Records by Telephone. . . . . . . . . 6 II. HEIFER MANAGEMENT. 2. 1. Dairy Replacements. . 2. 2. Heifers Breeding Management . . . . . . . . . . . 7 . . . . . . . 7 . . . . . . . 8...

  7. Ionospheric imaging using computerized tomography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey R. Austen; Steven J. Franke; C. H. Liu

    1988-01-01

    Computerized tomography (CT) techniques can be used to produce a two-dimensional image of the electron density in the ionosphere. The CT problem requires that the measured data be the line integral through the medium of the unknown parameter; transionospheric satellite beacon total electron content data recorded simultaneously at multiple ground stations fulfill this requirement. In this paper the CT problem

  8. COMP (Computerized Operational Materials Prescription).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenkranz, Catherine I.

    Described is Project COMP (Computerized Operational Materials Prescription), an individualized reading instructional program for educable mentally retarded (EMR) children in regular or special classes. The program is designed to correlate with the Wisconsin Design for Reading (WDR) and to utilize a diagnostic teaching specialist who uses specific…

  9. Calibrating for Comorbidity: Clinical Decision-Making in Youth Depression and Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Brian C.; Merson, Rachel A.; Zandberg, Laurie J.; Areizaga, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Comorbidity in clinical youth populations is more the rule than the exception, yet few established guidelines exist to help practicing clinicians manage complex diagnostic profiles. The current paper reviews efforts within the treatment development literature to handle comorbidity in depressed and anxious children and adolescents, including…

  10. Should I Pack My Umbrella? Clinical versus Statistical Prediction of Mental Health Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aegisdottir, Stefania; Spengler, Paul M.; White, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    In this rejoinder, the authors respond to the insightful commentary of Strohmer and Arm, Chwalisz, and Hilton, Harris, and Rice about the meta-analysis on statistical versus clinical prediction techniques for mental health judgments. The authors address issues including the availability of statistical prediction techniques for real-life psychology…

  11. Toward Differentiated Decision-Making: Family Systems Theory with the Homeless Clinical Population

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KATHERINE MILEWSKI HERTLEIN; J. MARK KILLMER

    2004-01-01

    The clinical treatment of the homeless population typically focuses on issues of mental illness and drug\\/alcohol dependency. This treatment, however, does not address the problems of the homeless who are not mentally ill or those without a dependency problem. Because of the nature of the presenting problems of the homeless, Bowen family systems theory provides an appropriate framework from which

  12. Does automation bias decision-making?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Linda J. Skitka; Kathleen L. Mosier; Mark D. Burdick

    1999-01-01

    Computerized system monitors and decision aids are increasingly common additions to critical decision-making contexts such as intensive care units, nuclear power plants and aircraft cockpits. These aids are introduced with the ubiquitous goal of “reducing human error”. The present study compared error rates in a simulated flight task with and without a computer that monitored system states and made decision

  13. Developing a Physiotherapy-Specific Preliminary Clinical Decision-Making Tool for Oxygen Titration: A Modified Delphi Study

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Michelle; Bertin, Kendra; Henry, Renee; Singh, Deepti; Timmins, Nolla; Brooks, Dina; Mathur, Sunita

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To develop and evaluate a preliminary clinical decision-making tool (CDMT) to assist physiotherapists in titrating oxygen for acutely ill adults in Ontario. Methods: A panel of 14 experienced cardiorespiratory physiotherapists was recruited. Factors relating to oxygen titration were identified using a modified Delphi technique. Four rounds of questionnaires were conducted, during which the goals were to (1) generate factors, (2) reduce factors and debate contentious factors, (3) finalize factors and develop the preliminary CDMT, and (4) evaluate the usability of the tool in a clinical context. Results: The panel reached consensus on a total of 89 factors, which were compiled to create the preliminary CDMT. The global tool reached consensus for sensibility, receiving a mean score of 6/7 on a 7-point Likert-type scale (1=unacceptable; 7=excellent). Five of the nine individual components of evaluation of the tool achieved scores ?6.0; the remaining four had mean scores between 5.4 and 5.9. Conclusion: This study produced a preliminary CDMT for oxygen titration, which the panel agreed was highly comprehensible and globally sensible. Further research is necessary to evaluate the sensibility and applicability of the tool in a clinical setting. PMID:25125782

  14. Clinical utility of ImPACT assessment for postconcussion return-to-play counseling: Psychometric issues

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lester B. Mayers; Thomas S. Redick

    2011-01-01

    Computerized neuropsychological testing is commonly utilized in the management of sport-related concussion. In particular, the Immediate Postconcussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing 2.0 program (ImPACT) is widely used to assess the cognitive functioning of athletes before and after a concussion. We review the evidence for the clinical utility of this program in terms of validity, reliability, and use in return-to-play decisions.

  15. Clinical utility of ImPACT assessment for postconcussion return-to-play counseling: Psychometric issues

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lester B. Mayers; Thomas S. Redick

    2012-01-01

    Computerized neuropsychological testing is commonly utilized in the management of sport-related concussion. In particular, the Immediate Postconcussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing 2.0 program (ImPACT) is widely used to assess the cognitive functioning of athletes before and after a concussion. We review the evidence for the clinical utility of this program in terms of validity, reliability, and use in return-to-play decisions.

  16. Computerized hospitals: an attraction or deterrent to recruitment in nursing?

    PubMed

    Rapko, H; Adaskin, E

    1993-01-01

    This article describes a survey of 202 nursing recruits at an 850 bed hospital newly computerized with an Integrated Hospital Information System (IHIS). The nurses answered questions concerning their demographic characteristics, their experience with computers, their attitudes to computers and whether the fact that the hospital was computerized affected their decision to apply for employment. Results of this study suggest that the nurses' decision to apply to this setting for employment did not depend upon the factor of computerization. The majority of recruits held positive attitudes towards computers and it appeared that nurse recruits might be part of an ever increasing computer-literate population. Those having less experience with computers indicated greater anxiety. Implications for recruitment strategies and education are that while no major deterrents may exist for recruitment, new nurses with no computer experience require special attention because they may have higher levels of anxiety about computers. In orientation they may need clarification of what computers can be expected to do in a nursing environment so that they do not form unrealistic expectations. They may need to be informed as to whether a hospital is using a more general Hospital Information System which serves the needs of all departments, or a Nursing Information System which is more closely directed to the nurses' own daily work, since it is the latter which will most affect their degree of contact with computers. PMID:8347651

  17. The evolution of computerized treatment planning for brachytherapy: American contributions

    PubMed Central

    Rivard, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To outline the evolution of computerized brachytherapy treatment planning in the United States through a review of technological developments and clinical practice refinements. Material and methods A literature review was performed and interviews were conducted with six participants in the development of computerized treatment planning for brachytherapy. Results Computerized brachytherapy treatment planning software was initially developed in the Physics Departments of New York's Memorial Hospital (by Nelson, Meurk and Balter), and Houston's M. D. Anderson Hospital (by Stovall and Shalek). These public-domain programs could be used by institutions with adequate computational resources; other clinics had access to them via Memorial's and Anderson's teletype-based computational services. Commercial brachytherapy treatment planning programs designed to run on smaller computers (Prowess, ROCS, MMS), were developed in the late 1980s and early 1990s. These systems brought interactive dosimetry into the clinic and surgical theatre. Conclusions Brachytherapy treatment planning has evolved from systems of rigid implant rules to individualized pre- and intra-operative treatment plans, and post-operative dosimetric assessments. Brachytherapy dose distributions were initially calculated on public domain programs on large regionally located computers. With the progression of computer miniaturization and increase in processor speeds, proprietary software was commercially developed for microcomputers that offered increased functionality and integration with clinical practice. PMID:25097560

  18. Real-time clinical decision support system with data stream mining.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Fong, Simon; Fiaidhi, Jinan; Mohammed, Sabah

    2012-01-01

    This research aims to describe a new design of data stream mining system that can analyze medical data stream and make real-time prediction. The motivation of the research is due to a growing concern of combining software technology and medical functions for the development of software application that can be used in medical field of chronic disease prognosis and diagnosis, children healthcare, diabetes diagnosis, and so forth. Most of the existing software technologies are case-based data mining systems. They only can analyze finite and structured data set and can only work well in their early years and can hardly meet today's medical requirement. In this paper, we describe a clinical-support-system based data stream mining technology; the design has taken into account all the shortcomings of the existing clinical support systems. PMID:22851884

  19. Clinical impact of treatment timing for chronic hepatitis C infection: a decision model.

    PubMed

    Pho, M T; Jensen, D M; Meltzer, D O; Kim, A Y; Linas, B P

    2015-08-01

    Recent advances in the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection have led to the availability of both highly efficacious interferon-containing and interferon-sparing regimens. However, the use of such therapies faces restrictions due to high costs. For patients who are medically eligible to receive interferon, the choice between the two will likely be impacted by preferences surrounding interferon, severity of disease, coverage policies and out-of-pocket costs. We developed a decision model to quantify the trade-offs between immediate, interferon-containing therapy and delayed, interferon-free therapy for patients with chronic, genotype 1 HCV infection. We projected the quality-adjusted life expectancy stratified by the presence or absence of cirrhosis for four strategies: (i) no treatment; (ii) immediate, one-time treatment with an interferon-containing regimen; (iii) immediate treatment as above with the opportunity for retreatment in patients who fail to achieve sustained virologic response with interferon-free therapy in 1 year; and (iv) delayed therapy with interferon-free therapy in 1 year. When compared to one-time immediate treatment with the interferon-containing regimen, delayed treatment with the interferon-free regimen in 1 year resulted in longer life expectancy, with a 0.2 quality-adjusted life year (QALY) increase in noncirrhotic patients, and a 1.1 QALY increase in patients with cirrhosis. This superiority in health benefits was lost when wait time for interferon-free therapy was greater than 3-3.2 years. In this modelling analysis, interferon-free therapy resulted in superior health benefits compared to immediate therapy with interferon until wait time exceeded 3-3.2 years. Such data can inform decision-making regarding treatment initiation for HCV as healthcare financing evolves. PMID:26135026

  20. Computerised clinical decision support systems to improve medication safety in long-term care homes: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Marasinghe, Keshini Madara

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Computerised clinical decision support systems (CCDSS) are used to improve the quality of care in various healthcare settings. This systematic review evaluated the impact of CCDSS on improving medication safety in long-term care homes (LTC). Medication safety in older populations is an important health concern as inappropriate medication use can elevate the risk of potentially severe outcomes (ie, adverse drug reactions, ADR). With an increasing ageing population, greater use of LTC by the growing ageing population and increasing number of medication-related health issues in LTC, strategies to improve medication safety are essential. Methods Databases searched included MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus and Cochrane Library. Three groups of keywords were combined: those relating to LTC, medication safety and CCDSS. One reviewer undertook screening and quality assessment. Results Overall findings suggest that CCDSS in LTC improved the quality of prescribing decisions (ie, appropriate medication orders), detected ADR, triggered warning messages (ie, related to central nervous system side effects, drug-associated constipation, renal insufficiency) and reduced injury risk among older adults. Conclusions CCDSS have received little attention in LTC, as attested by the limited published literature. With an increasing ageing population, greater use of LTC by the ageing population and increased workload for health professionals, merely relying on physicians’ judgement on medication safety would not be sufficient. CCDSS to improve medication safety and enhance the quality of prescribing decisions are essential. Analysis of review findings indicates that CCDSS are beneficial, effective and have potential to improve medication safety in LTC; however, the use of CCDSS in LTC is scarce. Careful assessment on the impact of CCDSS on medication safety and further modifications to existing CCDSS are recommended for wider acceptance. Due to scant evidence in the current literature, further research on implementation and effectiveness of CCDSS is required. PMID:25967986

  1. How Usability of a Web-Based Clinical Decision Support System Has the Potential to Contribute to Adverse Medical Events

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Timothy A.D.; Kushniruk, Andre W.; Bullard, Michael J.; Holroyd, Brian R.; Meurer, David P.; Rowe, Brian H.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Clinical decision support systems (CDSS) have the potential to reduce adverse medical events, but improper design can introduce new forms of error. CDSS pertaining to community acquired pneumonia and neutropenic fever were studied to determine whether usability of the graphical user interface might contribute to potential adverse medical events. Methods Automated screen capture of 4 CDSS being used by volunteer emergency physicians was analyzed using structured methods. Results 422 events were recorded over 56 sessions. In total, 169 negative comments, 55 positive comments, 130 neutral comments, 21 application events, 34 problems, 6 slips, and 5 mistakes were identified. Three mistakes could have had life-threatening consequences. Conclusion Evaluation of CDSS will be of utmost importance in the future with increasing use of electronic health records. Usability engineering principles can identify interface problems that may lead to potential medical adverse events, and should be incorporated early in the software design phase. PMID:18998968

  2. A Novel Clinical Decision Support System Using Improved Adaptive Genetic Algorithm for the Assessment of Fetal Well-Being

    PubMed Central

    Jambek, Asral Bahari; Neoh, Siew-Chin

    2015-01-01

    A novel clinical decision support system is proposed in this paper for evaluating the fetal well-being from the cardiotocogram (CTG) dataset through an Improved Adaptive Genetic Algorithm (IAGA) and Extreme Learning Machine (ELM). IAGA employs a new scaling technique (called sigma scaling) to avoid premature convergence and applies adaptive crossover and mutation techniques with masking concepts to enhance population diversity. Also, this search algorithm utilizes three different fitness functions (two single objective fitness functions and multi-objective fitness function) to assess its performance. The classification results unfold that promising classification accuracy of 94% is obtained with an optimal feature subset using IAGA. Also, the classification results are compared with those of other Feature Reduction techniques to substantiate its exhaustive search towards the global optimum. Besides, five other benchmark datasets are used to gauge the strength of the proposed IAGA algorithm. PMID:25793009

  3. Dementia Prevention: optimizing the use of observational data for personal, clinical, and public health decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Dacks, Penny A; Andrieu, Sandrine; Blacker, Deborah; Carman, Aaron J; Green, Allan M; Grodstein, Francine; Henderson, Victor W; James, Bryan D.; Lane, Rachel F; Lau, Joseph; Lin, Pei-Jung; Reeves, Barnaby C.; Shah, Raj C.; Vellas, Bruno; Yaffe, Kristine; Yurko-Mauro, Karin; Shineman, Diana W; Bennett, David A; Fillit, Howard M

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, over 35 million people suffer from Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. This number is expected to triple over the next 40 years. How can we improve the evidence supporting strategies to reduce the rate of dementia in future generations? The risk of dementia is likely influenced by modifiable factors such as exercise, cognitive activity, and the clinical management of diabetes and hypertension. However, the quality of evidence is limited and it remains unclear whether specific interventions to reduce these modifiable risk factors can, in turn, reduce the risk of dementia. Although randomized controlled trials are the gold-standard for causality, the majority of evidence for long-term dementia prevention derives from, and will likely continue to derive from, observational studies. Although observational research has some unavoidable limitations, its utility for dementia prevention might be improved by, for example, better distinction between confirmatory and exploratory research, higher reporting standards, investment in effectiveness research enabled by increased data-pooling, and standardized exposure and outcome measures. Informed decision-making by the general public on low-risk health choices that could have broad potential benefits could be enabled by internet-based tools and decision-aids to communicate the evidence, its quality, and the estimated magnitude of effect.

  4. Do computerised clinical decision support systems for prescribing change practice? A systematic review of the literature (1990-2007)

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Sallie-Anne; Moxey, Annette; Robertson, Jane; Hains, Isla; Williamson, Margaret; Reeve, James; Newby, David

    2009-01-01

    Background Computerised clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) are used widely to improve quality of care and patient outcomes. This systematic review evaluated the impact of CDSSs in targeting specific aspects of prescribing, namely initiating, monitoring and stopping therapy. We also examined the influence of clinical setting (institutional vs ambulatory care), system- or user-initiation of CDSS, multi-faceted vs stand alone CDSS interventions and clinical target on practice changes in line with the intent of the CDSS. Methods We searched Medline, Embase and PsychINFO for publications from 1990-2007 detailing CDSS prescribing interventions. Pairs of independent reviewers extracted the key features and prescribing outcomes of methodologically adequate studies (experiments and strong quasi-experiments). Results 56 studies met our inclusion criteria, 38 addressing initiating, 23 monitoring and three stopping therapy. At the time of initiating therapy, CDSSs appear to be somewhat more effective after, rather than before, drug selection has occurred (7/12 versus 12/26 studies reporting statistically significant improvements in favour of CDSSs on = 50% of prescribing outcomes reported). CDSSs also appeared to be effective for monitoring therapy, particularly using laboratory test reminders (4/7 studies reporting significant improvements in favour of CDSSs on the majority of prescribing outcomes). None of the studies addressing stopping therapy demonstrated impacts in favour of CDSSs over comparators. The most consistently effective approaches used system-initiated advice to fine-tune existing therapy by making recommendations to improve patient safety, adjust the dose, duration or form of prescribed drugs or increase the laboratory testing rates for patients on long-term therapy. CDSSs appeared to perform better in institutional compared to ambulatory settings and when decision support was initiated automatically by the system as opposed to user initiation. CDSSs implemented with other strategies such as education were no more successful in improving prescribing than stand alone interventions. Cardiovascular disease was the most studied clinical target but few studies demonstrated significant improvements on the majority of prescribing outcomes. Conclusion Our understanding of CDSS impacts on specific aspects of the prescribing process remains relatively limited. Future implementation should build on effective approaches including the use of system-initiated advice to address safety issues and improve the monitoring of therapy. PMID:19715591

  5. Exceptions Handling within GLARE Clinical Guideline Framework

    PubMed Central

    Leonardi, Giorgio; Bottrighi, Alessio; Galliani, Gabriele; Terenziani, Paolo; Messina, Antonio; Corte, Francesco Della

    2012-01-01

    Computerized clinical guidelines (CIGs) are widely adopted in order to assist practitioner and patient decision making. However, a main problem in their adoption is the fact that, during guidelines executions on specific patients, unpredictable facts and conditions (henceforth called exceptions) may occur. A proper and immediate treatment of such exception is necessary, but most current software systems coping with CIGs do not support it. In this paper, we describe how the GLARE system has been extended to deal with exceptions in CIGs. PMID:23304323

  6. A Computerized Resource Retrieval System for a Comprehensive Psychiatric Facility

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Joy A.; Evanczuk, Karen J.; Coffman, Gerald A.

    1984-01-01

    The need to systematize the disposition process for psychiatric patients referred from the Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic after an initial evaluation or treatment episode resulted in the development of a Computerized Resource Retrieval System. The system is designed to provide, through on-line displays, a listing of all outpatient treatment programs within WPIC and outside agencies providing social and mental health care services as well as information necessary to complete the referral with a minimum of confusion and red tape.

  7. CAT (Computerized Axial Tomography) scans

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    David Grubin Productions

    2001-01-01

    This web page about CAT (computerized axial tomography) scans gives a brief overview of this imaging technique. CAT (or CT) scanning captures a lot of 2-dimensional X-rays that a computer then joins together to generate 3-dimensional images of internal structures. As part of a set of materials about brain scanning technologies, this page mentions what researchers can learn about the brain from CAT scans. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse

  8. Clinical decision-making: midwifery students' recognition of, and response to, post partum haemorrhage in the simulation environment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This paper reports the findings of a study of how midwifery students responded to a simulated post partum haemorrhage (PPH). Internationally, 25% of maternal deaths are attributed to severe haemorrhage. Although this figure is far higher in developing countries, the risk to maternal wellbeing and child health problem means that all midwives need to remain vigilant and respond appropriately to early signs of maternal deterioration. Methods Simulation using a patient actress enabled the research team to investigate the way in which 35 midwifery students made decisions in a dynamic high fidelity PPH scenario. The actress wore a birthing suit that simulated blood loss and a flaccid uterus on palpation. The scenario provided low levels of uncertainty and high levels of relevant information. The student's response to the scenario was videoed. Immediately after, they were invited to review the video, reflect on their performance and give a commentary as to what affected their decisions. The data were analysed using Dimensional Analysis. Results The students' clinical management of the situation varied considerably. Students struggled to prioritise their actions where more than one response was required to a clinical cue and did not necessarily use mnemonics as heuristic devices to guide their actions. Driven by a response to single cues they also showed a reluctance to formulate a diagnosis based on inductive and deductive reasoning cycles. This meant they did not necessarily introduce new hypothetical ideas against which they might refute or confirm a diagnosis and thereby eliminate fixation error. Conclusions The students response demonstrated that a number of clinical skills require updating on a regular basis including: fundal massage technique, the use of emergency standing order drugs, communication and delegation of tasks to others in an emergency and working independently until help arrives. Heuristic devices helped the students to evaluate their interventions to illuminate what else could be done whilst they awaited the emergency team. They did not necessarily serve to prompt the students' or help them plan care prospectively. The limitations of the study are critically explored along with the pedagogic implications for initial training and continuing professional development. PMID:22443712

  9. Informing sequential clinical decision-making through reinforcement learning: an empirical study

    PubMed Central

    Shortreed, Susan M.; Laber, Eric; Lizotte, Daniel J.; Stroup, T. Scott; Pineau, Joelle; Murphy, Susan A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper highlights the role that reinforcement learning can play in the optimization of treatment policies for chronic illnesses. Before applying any off-the-shelf reinforcement learning methods in this setting, we must first tackle a number of challenges. We outline some of these challenges and present methods for overcoming them. First, we describe a multiple imputation approach to overcome the problem of missing data. Second, we discuss the use of function approximation in the context of a highly variable observation set. Finally, we discuss approaches to summarizing the evidence in the data for recommending a particular action and quantifying the uncertainty around the Q-function of the recommended policy. We present the results of applying these methods to real clinical trial data of patients with schizophrenia. PMID:21799585

  10. Perioperative clinical decision-making in surgery for mitral valve repair.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, T Z

    2007-04-01

    Echocardiography has played a critical role in the progress in mitral valve reconstructive surgery which was revolutionized as ''the French correction'' by Alain Carpentier in the mid 1980s. Mitral regurgitation (MR) is the most challenging valvular heart disease throughout the world and is related to rheumatic etiology in the underdeveloped world and to degenerative etiology in the Western world. Echocardiography plays an integral role in the management of patients with significant MR. This includes evaluation and follow-up during the medical management phase of MR to intraoperative mitral valve repair and post operative follow-up, using a combination of transthoracic echocardiography and transesophageal echocardiography. Newer developments include evaluation by transthoracic and transesophageal three-dimensional echocardiography. This review summarizes role of echocardiography in diagnosis, therapy and follow-up of patients with clinically significant MR. Discussion will focus on mitral valve repair for degenerative MR of myxomatous etiology and functional and ischemic MR. PMID:17342039

  11. Misdiagnosis of Myocardial Infarction Related to Limitations of the Current Regulatory Approach to Define Clinical Decision Values for Cardiac Troponin

    PubMed Central

    Wildi, Karin; Gimenez, Maria Rubini; Twerenbold, Raphael; Reichlin, Tobias; Jaeger, Cedric; Heinzelmann, Amely; Arnold, Christiane; Nelles, Berit; Druey, Sophie; Haaf, Philip; Hillinger, Petra; Schaerli, Nicolas; Kreutzinger, Philipp; Tanglay, Yunus; Herrmann, Thomas; Moreno Weidmann, Zoraida; Krivoshei, Lian; Freese, Michael; Stelzig, Claudia; Puelacher, Christian; Rentsch, Katharina; Osswald, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Background— Misdiagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) may significantly harm patients and may result from inappropriate clinical decision values (CDVs) for cardiac troponin (cTn) owing to limitations in the current regulatory process. Methods and Results— In an international, prospective, multicenter study, we quantified the incidence of inconsistencies in the diagnosis of AMI using fully characterized and clinically available high-sensitivity (hs) cTn assays (hs-cTnI, Abbott; hs-cTnT, Roche) among 2300 consecutive patients with suspected AMI. We hypothesized that the approved CDVs for the 2 assays are not biologically equivalent and might therefore contribute to inconsistencies in the diagnosis of AMI. Findings were validated by use of sex-specific CDVs and parallel measurements of other hs-cTnI assays. AMI was the adjudicated diagnosis in 473 patients (21%). Among these, 86 patients (18.2%) had inconsistent diagnoses when the approved uniform CDV was used. When sex-specific CDVs were used, 14.1% of female and 22.7% of male AMI patients had inconsistent diagnoses. Using biologically equivalent CDV reduced inconsistencies to 10% (P<0.001). These findings were confirmed with parallel measurements of other hs-cTn assays. The incidence of inconsistencies was only 7.0% for assays with CDVs that were nearly biologically equivalent. Patients with inconsistent AMI had long-term mortality comparable to that of patients with consistent diagnoses (P=NS) and a trend toward higher long-term mortality than patients diagnosed with unstable angina (P=0.05). Conclusions— Currently approved CDVs are not biologically equivalent and contribute to major inconsistencies in the diagnosis of AMI. One of 5 AMI patients will receive a diagnosis other than AMI if managed with the alternative hs-cTn assay. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00470587. PMID:25948541

  12. Clinical Decision-Making in Community Children's Mental Health: Using Innovative Methods to Compare Clinicians with and without Training in Evidence-Based Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker-Ericzén, Mary J.; Jenkins, Melissa M.; Park, Soojin; Garland, Ann F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mental health professionals' decision-making practice is an area of increasing interest and importance, especially in the pediatric research and clinical communities. Objective: The present study explored the role of prior training in evidence-based treatments (EBTs) on clinicians' assessment and treatment formulations using…

  13. Computerized Assessment of Competence-Related Abilities in Living Liver Donors: The Adult-to-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Cohort Study (A2ALL)

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Jason; Emond, Jean; Gillespie, Brenda W.; Appelbaum, Paul S.; Weinrieb, Robert; Hill-Callahan, Peg; Gordon, Elisa J.; Terrault, Norah; Trotter, James; Ashworth, April; Dew, Mary Amanda; Pruett, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite its importance, determination of competence to consent to organ donation varies widely based on local standards. We piloted a new tool to aid transplant centers in donor assessment. Methods We assessed competence-related abilities among potential living liver donors (LDs) in the 9-center A2ALL study. Prospective LDs viewed an educational video, and were queried to assess Understanding, Appreciation, Reasoning, and ability to express a Final Choice using the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool for Clinical Research, adapted for computerized administration in LDs (“MacLiver”). Videotaped responses were scored by a clinical neuropsychologist (JF). Results Ninety-three LDs were assessed. Mean (standard deviation; domain maximum) scores were: Understanding: 18.1 (2.6; max=22), Appreciation: 5.1 (1.0; max=6), Reasoning: 3.1 (0.8; max=4), and Final Choice: 3.8 (0.5; max=4). Scores did not differ by demographics, relationship to the recipient, eligibility to donate, or eventual donation (p>0.4). Higher education was associated with greater Understanding (p=0.004) and Reasoning (p=0.03). Conclusion Standardized, computerized education with independent ratings of responses may (1) alert the clinical staff to potential donors who may not be competent to donate, and (2) highlight areas needing further assessment and education, leading to better informed decision-making. PMID:23859354

  14. Clinical decision support of therapeutic drug monitoring of phenytoin: measured versus adjusted phenytoin plasma concentrations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Therapeutic drug monitoring of phenytoin by measurement of plasma concentrations is often employed to optimize clinical efficacy while avoiding adverse effects. This is most commonly accomplished by measurement of total phenytoin plasma concentrations. However, total phenytoin levels can be misleading in patients with factors such as low plasma albumin that alter the free (unbound) concentrations of phenytoin. Direct measurement of free phenytoin concentrations in plasma is more costly and time-consuming than determination of total phenytoin concentrations. An alternative to direct measurement of free phenytoin concentrations is use of the Sheiner-Tozer equation to calculate an adjusted phenytoin that corrects for the plasma albumin concentration. Innovative medical informatics tools to identify patients who would benefit from adjusted phenytoin calculations or from laboratory measurement of free phenytoin are needed to improve safety and efficacy of phenytoin pharmacotherapy. The electronic medical record for an academic medical center was searched for the time period from August 1, 1996 to November 30, 2010 for patients who had total phenytoin and free phenytoin determined on the same blood draw, and also a plasma albumin measurement within 7 days of the phenytoin measurements. The measured free phenytoin plasma concentration was used as the gold standard. Results In this study, the standard Sheiner-Tozer formula for calculating an estimated (adjusted) phenytoin level more frequently underestimates than overestimates the measured free phenytoin relative to the respective therapeutic ranges. Adjusted phenytoin concentrations provided superior classification of patients than total phenytoin measurements, particularly at low albumin concentrations. Albumin plasma concentrations up to 7 days prior to total phenytoin measurements can be used for adjusted phenytoin concentrations. Conclusions The results suggest that a measured free phenytoin should be obtained where possible to guide phenytoin dosing. If this is not feasible, then an adjusted phenytoin can supplement a total phenytoin concentration, particularly for patients with low plasma albumin. PMID:22333264

  15. Optimal insemination and replacement decisions to minimize the cost of pathogen-specific clinical mastitis in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Cha, E; Kristensen, A R; Hertl, J A; Schukken, Y H; Tauer, L W; Welcome, F L; Gröhn, Y T

    2014-04-01

    Mastitis is a serious production-limiting disease, with effects on milk yield, milk quality, and conception rate, and an increase in the risk of mortality and culling. The objective of this study was 2-fold: (1) to develop an economic optimization model that incorporates all the different types of pathogens that cause clinical mastitis (CM) categorized into 8 classes of culture results, and account for whether the CM was a first, second, or third case in the current lactation and whether the cow had a previous case or cases of CM in the preceding lactation; and (2) to develop this decision model to be versatile enough to add additional pathogens, diseases, or other cow characteristics as more information becomes available without significant alterations to the basic structure of the model. The model provides economically optimal decisions depending on the individual characteristics of the cow and the specific pathogen causing CM. The net returns for the basic herd scenario (with all CM included) were $507/cow per year, where the incidence of CM (cases per 100 cow-years) was 35.6, of which 91.8% of cases were recommended for treatment under an optimal replacement policy. The cost per case of CM was $216.11. The CM cases comprised (incidences, %) Staphylococcus spp. (1.6), Staphylococcus aureus (1.8), Streptococcus spp. (6.9), Escherichia coli (8.1), Klebsiella spp. (2.2), other treated cases (e.g., Pseudomonas; 1.1), other not treated cases (e.g., Trueperella pyogenes; 1.2), and negative culture cases (12.7). The average cost per case, even under optimal decisions, was greatest for Klebsiella spp. ($477), followed by E. coli ($361), other treated cases ($297), and other not treated cases ($280). This was followed by the gram-positive pathogens; among these, the greatest cost per case was due to Staph. aureus ($266), followed by Streptococcus spp. ($174) and Staphylococcus spp. ($135); negative culture had the lowest cost ($115). The model recommended treatment for most CM cases (>85%); the range was 86.2% (Klebsiella spp.) to 98.5% (Staphylococcus spp.). In general, the optimal recommended time for replacement was up to 5 mo earlier for cows with CM compared with cows without CM. Furthermore, although the parameter estimates implemented in this model are applicable to the dairy farms in this study, the parameters may be altered to be specific to other dairy farms. Cow rankings and values based on disease status, pregnancy status, and milk production can be extracted; these provide guidance when determining which cows to keep or cull. PMID:24534495

  16. Constraining Item Exposure in Computerized Adaptive Testing with Shadow Tests. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.; Veldkamp, Bernard P.

    Item-exposure control in computerized adaptive testing is implemented by imposing item-ineligibility constraints on the assembly process of the shadow tests. The method resembles J. Sympson and R. Hetter's (1985) method of item-exposure control in that the decisions to impose the constraints are probabilistic. However, the method does not require…

  17. Evaluating a Web-Based Clinical Decision Support System for Language Disorders Screening in a Nursery School

    PubMed Central

    Valero Duboy, Miguel Ángel; Torcal Loriente, Carmen; Pau de la Cruz, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Background Early and effective identification of developmental disorders during childhood remains a critical task for the international community. The second highest prevalence of common developmental disorders in children are language delays, which are frequently the first symptoms of a possible disorder. Objective This paper evaluates a Web-based Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) whose aim is to enhance the screening of language disorders at a nursery school. The common lack of early diagnosis of language disorders led us to deploy an easy-to-use CDSS in order to evaluate its accuracy in early detection of language pathologies. This CDSS can be used by pediatricians to support the screening of language disorders in primary care. Methods This paper details the evaluation results of the “Gades” CDSS at a nursery school with 146 children, 12 educators, and 1 language therapist. The methodology embraces two consecutive phases. The first stage involves the observation of each child’s language abilities, carried out by the educators, to facilitate the evaluation of language acquisition level performed by a language therapist. Next, the same language therapist evaluates the reliability of the observed results. Results The Gades CDSS was integrated to provide the language therapist with the required clinical information. The validation process showed a global 83.6% (122/146) success rate in language evaluation and a 7% (7/94) rate of non-accepted system decisions within the range of children from 0 to 3 years old. The system helped language therapists to identify new children with potential disorders who required further evaluation. This process will revalidate the CDSS output and allow the enhancement of early detection of language disorders in children. The system does need minor refinement, since the therapists disagreed with some questions from the CDSS knowledge base (KB) and suggested adding a few questions about speech production and pragmatic abilities. The refinement of the KB will address these issues and include the requested improvements, with the support of the experts who took part in the original KB development. Conclusions This research demonstrated the benefit of a Web-based CDSS to monitor children’s neurodevelopment via the early detection of language delays at a nursery school. Current next steps focus on the design of a model that includes pseudo auto-learning capacity, supervised by experts. PMID:24870413

  18. Computerization of Mental Health Integration Complexity Scores at Intermountain Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Oniki, Thomas A.; Rodrigues, Drayton; Rahman, Noman; Patur, Saritha; Briot, Pascal; Taylor, David P.; Wilcox, Adam B.; Reiss-Brennan, Brenda; Cannon, Wayne H.

    2014-01-01

    Intermountain Healthcare’s Mental Health Integration (MHI) Care Process Model (CPM) contains formal scoring criteria for assessing a patient’s mental health complexity as “mild,” “medium,” or “high” based on patient data. The complexity score attempts to assist Primary Care Physicians in assessing the mental health needs of their patients and what resources will need to be brought to bear. We describe an effort to computerize the scoring. Informatics and MHI personnel collaboratively and iteratively refined the criteria to make them adequately explicit and reflective of MHI objectives. When tested on retrospective data of 540 patients, the clinician agreed with the computer’s conclusion in 52.8% of the cases (285/540). We considered the analysis sufficiently successful to begin piloting the computerized score in prospective clinical care. So far in the pilot, clinicians have agreed with the computer in 70.6% of the cases (24/34). PMID:25954401

  19. 45 CFR 307.5 - Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems. 307.5 Section 307.5 Public...SERVICES COMPUTERIZED SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT SYSTEMS § 307.5 Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems. (a) Basic requirement....

  20. 45 CFR 307.5 - Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems. 307.5 Section 307.5 Public...SERVICES COMPUTERIZED SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT SYSTEMS § 307.5 Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems. (a) Basic requirement....

  1. 45 CFR 307.5 - Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems. 307.5 Section 307.5 Public...SERVICES COMPUTERIZED SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT SYSTEMS § 307.5 Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems. (a) Basic requirement....

  2. Effect of a genomic classifier test on clinical practice decisions for patients with high-risk prostate cancer after surgery

    PubMed Central

    Badani, Ketan K; Thompson, Darby J; Brown, Gordon; Holmes, Daniel; Kella, Naveen; Albala, David; Singh, Amar; Buerki, Christine; Davicioni, Elai; Hornberger, John

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the impact of a genomic classifier (GC) test for predicting metastasis risk after radical prostatectomy (RP) on urologists' decision-making about adjuvant treatment of patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Subjects and Methods Patient case history was extracted from the medical records of each of the 145 patients with pT3 disease or positive surgical margins (PSMs) after RP treated by six high-volume urologists, from five community practices. GC results were available for 122 (84%) of these patients. US board-certified urologists (n = 107) were invited to provide adjuvant treatment recommendations for 10 cases randomly drawn from the pool of patient case histories. For each case, the study participants were asked to make an adjuvant therapy recommendation without (clinical variables only) and with knowledge of the GC test results. Recommendations were made without knowledge of other participants' responses and the presentation of case histories was randomised to minimise recall bias. Results A total of 110 patient case histories were available for review by the study participants. The median patient age was 62 years, 71% of patients had pT3 disease and 63% had PSMs. The median (range) 5-year predicted probability of metastasis by the GC test for the cohort was 3.9 (1–33)% and the GC test classified 72% of patients as having low risk for metastasis. A total of 51 urologists consented to the study and provided 530 adjuvant treatment recommendations without, and 530 with knowledge of the GC test results. Study participants performed a mean of 130 RPs/year and 55% were from community-based practices. Without GC test result knowledge, observation was recommended for 57% (n = 303), adjuvant radiation therapy (ART) for 36% (n = 193) and other treatments for 7% (n = 34) of patients. Overall, 31% (95% CI: 27–35%) of treatment recommendations changed with knowledge of the GC test results. Of the ART recommendations without GC test result knowledge, 40% (n = 77) changed to observation (95% CI: 33–47%) with this knowledge. Of patients recommended for observation, 13% (n = 38 [95% CI: 9–17%]) were changed to ART with knowledge of the GC test result. Patients with low risk disease according to the GC test were recommended for observation 81% of the time (n = 276), while of those with high risk, 65% were recommended for treatment (n = 118; P < 0.001). Treatment intensity was strongly correlated with the GC-predicted probability of metastasis (P < 0.001) and the GC test was the dominant risk factor driving decisions in multivariable analysis (odds ratio 8.6, 95% CI: 5.3–14.3%; P < 0.001). Conclusions Knowledge of GC test results had a direct effect on treatment strategies after surgery. Recommendations for observation increased by 20% for patients assessed by the GC test to be at low risk of metastasis, whereas recommendations for treatment increased by 16% for patients at high risk of metastasis. These results suggest that the implementation of genomic testing in clinical practice may lead to significant changes in adjuvant therapy decision-making for high-risk prostate cancer. PMID:24784420

  3. Improving risk assessment of violence among military Veterans: An evidence-based approach for clinical decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Elbogen, Eric B.; Fuller, Sara; Johnson, Sally C.; Brooks, Stephanie; Kinneer, Patricia; Calhoun, Patrick; Beckham, Jean C.

    2010-01-01

    Despite increased media attention on violent acts against others committed by military Veterans, few models have been developed to systematically guide violence risk assessment among Veterans. Ideally, a model would identify which Veterans are most at risk for violence and increased attention could then be turned to determining what could be done to prevent violent behavior. This article suggests how empirical approaches to risk assessment used successfully in civilian populations can be applied to Veterans. A review was conducted of the scientific literature on Veteran populations regarding factors related to interpersonal violence generally and to domestic violence specifically. A list was then generated of empirically-supported risk factors for clinicians to consider in practice. To conceptualize how these known risk factors relate to a Veteran’s violence potential, risk assessment scholarship was utilized to develop an evidence-based method to guide mental health professionals. The goals of this approach are to integrate science into practice, overcome logistical barriers, and permit more effective assessment, monitoring, and management of violence risk for clinicians working with Veterans, both in Veteran Administration settings and in the broader community. It is likely that the use of a systematic, empirical framework could lead to improved clinical decision-making in the area of risk assessment, and help reduce violence among Veterans. PMID:20627387

  4. A qualitative study of the activities performed by people involved in clinical decision support: recommended practices for success

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Adam; Ash, Joan S; Erickson, Jessica L; Wasserman, Joe; Bunce, Arwen; Stanescu, Ana; St Hilaire, Daniel; Panzenhagen, Morgan; Gebhardt, Eric; McMullen, Carmit; Middleton, Blackford; Sittig, Dean F

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the activities performed by people involved in clinical decision support (CDS) at leading sites. Materials and methods We conducted ethnographic observations at seven diverse sites with a history of excellence in CDS using the Rapid Assessment Process and analyzed the data using a series of card sorts, informed by Linstone's Multiple Perspectives Model. Results We identified 18 activities and grouped them into four areas. Area 1: Fostering relationships across the organization, with activities (a) training and support, (b) visibility/presence on the floor, (c) liaising between people, (d) administration and leadership, (e) project management, (f) cheerleading/buy-in/sponsorship, (g) preparing for CDS implementation. Area 2: Assembling the system with activities (a) providing technical support, (b) CDS content development, (c) purchasing products from vendors (d) knowledge management, (e) system integration. Area 3: Using CDS to achieve the organization's goals with activities (a) reporting, (b) requirements-gathering/specifications, (c) monitoring CDS, (d) linking CDS to goals, (e) managing data. Area 4: Participation in external policy and standards activities (this area consists of only a single activity). We also identified a set of recommendations associated with these 18 activities. Discussion All 18 activities we identified were performed at all sites, although the way they were organized into roles differed substantially. We consider these activities critical to the success of a CDS program. Conclusions A series of activities are performed by sites strong in CDS, and sites adopting CDS should ensure they incorporate these activities into their efforts. PMID:23999670

  5. SMARTHealth India: Development and Field Evaluation of a Mobile Clinical Decision Support System for Cardiovascular Diseases in Rural India

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Anushka; Raghu, Arvind; Clifford, Gari D; Maulik, Pallab K; Mohammad Abdul, Ameer; Mogulluru, Kishor; Tarassenko, Lionel; MacMahon, Stephen; Peiris, David

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the major cause of premature death and disability in India and yet few people at risk of CVD are able to access best practice health care. Mobile health (mHealth) is a promising solution, but very few mHealth interventions have been subjected to robust evaluation in India. Objective The objectives were to develop a multifaceted, mobile clinical decision support system (CDSS) for CVD management and evaluate it for use by public nonphysician health care workers (NPHWs) and physicians in a rural Indian setting. Methods Plain language clinical rules were developed based on standard guidelines and programmed into a computer tablet app. The algorithm was validated and field-tested in 11 villages in Andhra Pradesh, involving 11 NPHWs and 3 primary health center (PHC) physicians. A mixed method evaluation was conducted comprising clinical and survey data and in-depth patient and staff interviews to understand barriers and enablers to the use of the system. Then this was thematically analyzed using NVivo 10. Results During validation of the algorithm, there was an initial agreement for 70% of the 42 calculated variables between the CDSS and SPSS software outputs. Discrepancies were identified and amendments were made until perfect agreement was achieved. During field testing, NPHWs and PHC physicians used the CDSS to screen 227 and 65 adults, respectively. The NPHWs identified 39% (88/227) of patients for referral with 78% (69/88) of these having a definite indication for blood pressure (BP)-lowering medication. However, only 35% (24/69) attended a clinic within 1 month of referral, with 42% (10/24) of these reporting continuing medications at 3-month follow-up. Physicians identified and recommended 17% (11/65) of patients for BP-lowering medications. Qualitative interviews identified 3 interrelated interview themes: (1) the CDSS had potential to change prevailing health care models, (2) task-shifting to NPHWs was the central driver of change, and (3) despite high acceptability by end users, actual transformation was substantially limited by system-level barriers such as patient access to doctors and medicines. Conclusions A tablet-based CDSS implemented within primary health care systems has the potential to help improve CVD outcomes in India. However, system-level barriers to accessing medical care limit its full impact. These barriers need to be actively addressed for clinical innovations to be successful. Trial Registration Clinical Trials Registry of India: CTRI/2013/06/003753; http://ctri.nic.in/Clinicaltrials/showallp.php?mid1=6259&EncHid=51761.70513&userName=CTRI/2013/06/003753 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6UBDlrEuq). PMID:25487047

  6. Diversity in computerized reactor protection systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. D. Fischer; L. Piel

    1999-01-01

    Based on engineering judgement, the most important measures to increase the independency of redundant trains of a computerized safety instrumentation and control system (I&C) in a nuclear power plant are evaluated with respect to practical applications. This paper will contribute to an objective discussion on the necessary and justifiable arrangement of diversity in a computerized safety I&C system. Important conclusions

  7. Computerized Classification Testing with the Rasch Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggen, Theo J. H. M.

    2011-01-01

    If classification in a limited number of categories is the purpose of testing, computerized adaptive tests (CATs) with algorithms based on sequential statistical testing perform better than estimation-based CATs (e.g., Eggen & Straetmans, 2000). In these computerized classification tests (CCTs), the Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT) (Wald,…

  8. The Evaluation of SISMAKOM (Computerized SDI Project).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Science, Penang (Malaysia).

    A survey of 88 users of SISMAKOM, a computerized selective dissemination of information (SDI) and document delivery service provided by the Universiti Sains Malaysia and four other Malaysian universities, was conducted in August 1982 in order to collect data about SISMAKOM and to assess the value of a computerized SDI service in a developing…

  9. Computerized Management of Physical Plant Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkey, Earl W.; Kleinpeter, Joseph

    Outlining the major areas to be considered when deciding whether or not to computerize physical plant services in higher education institutions, the author points out the shortcomings of manual record keeping systems. He gives five factors to consider when deciding to computerize: (1) time and money, (2) extent of operation, (3) current and future…

  10. Resources for Improving Computerized Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeaman, Andrew R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Presents an annotated review of human factors literature that discusses computerized environments. Topics discussed include the application of office automation practices to educational environments; video display terminal (VDT) workstations; health and safety hazards; planning educational facilities; ergonomics in computerized offices; and…

  11. Protocol for the Quick Clinical study: a randomised controlled trial to assess the impact of an online evidence retrieval system on decision-making in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Coiera, Enrico; Magrabi, Farah; Westbrook, Johanna I; Kidd, Michael R; Day, Richard O

    2006-01-01

    Background Online information retrieval systems have the potential to improve patient care but there are few comparative studies of the impact of online evidence on clinicians' decision-making behaviour in routine clinical work. Methods/design A randomized controlled parallel design is employed to assess the effectiveness of an online evidence retrieval system, Quick Clinical (QC) in improving clinical decision-making processes in general practice. Eligible clinicians are randomised either to receive access or not to receive access to QC in their consulting rooms for 12 months. Participants complete pre- and post trial surveys. Two-hundred general practitioners are recruited. Participants must be registered to practice in Australia, have a computer with Internet access in their consulting room and use electronic prescribing. Clinicians planning to retire or move to another practice within 12 months or participating in any other clinical trial involving electronic extraction of prescriptions data are excluded from the study. The primary end-points for the study is clinician acceptance and use of QC and the resulting change in decision-making behaviour. The study will examine prescribing patterns related to frequently prescribed medications where there has been a recent significant shift in recommendations regarding their use based upon new evidence. Secondary outcome measures include self-reported changes in diagnosis, patient education, prescriptions written, investigations and referrals. Discussion A trial under experimental conditions is an effective way of examining the impact of using QC in routine general practice consultations. PMID:16928282

  12. Do doctors act on their self-reported intention to computerize? A follow-up population-based survey in Hong Kong

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Timothy Y. Y. Lai; Gabriel M. Leung; Irene O. L. Wong; Janice M. Johnston

    2004-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives: We performed a follow-up survey to document changes in the level of computerization among physicians in Hong Kong between 2000 and 2001, specifically examining whether their self-reported intention to computer- ize various clinical or administrative tasks actually translated into computerization of these tasks 1 year later. Determining such a relationship will indicate the reliabil- ity, and

  13. A pathway to personalization of integrated treatment: informatics and decision science in psychiatric rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, William; Deogun, Jitender

    2011-09-01

    Personalization of treatment is a current strategic goal for improving health care. Integrated treatment approaches such as psychiatric rehabilitation benefit from personalization because they involve matching diverse arrays of treatment options to individually unique profiles of need. The need for personalization is evident in the heterogeneity of people with severe mental illness and in the findings of experimental psychopathology. One pathway to personalization lies in analysis of the judgments and decision making of human experts and other participants as they respond to complex circumstances in pursuit of treatment and rehabilitation goals. Such analysis is aided by computer simulation of human decision making, which in turn informs development of computerized clinical decision support systems. This inspires a research program involving concurrent development of databases, domain ontology, and problem-solving algorithms, toward the goal of personalizing psychiatric rehabilitation through human collaboration with intelligent cyber systems. The immediate hurdle is to demonstrate that clinical decisions beyond diagnosis really do affect outcome. This can be done by supporting the hypothesis that a human treatment team with access to a reasonably comprehensive clinical database that tracks patient status and treatment response over time achieves better outcome than a treatment team without such access, in a controlled experimental trial. Provided the hypothesis can be supported, the near future will see prototype systems that can construct an integrated assessment, formulation, and rehabilitation plan from clinical assessment data and contextual information. This will lead to advanced systems that collaborate with human decision makers to personalize psychiatric rehabilitation and optimize outcome. PMID:21860042

  14. Computerized grading of anatomy laboratory practical examinations.

    PubMed

    Krippendorf, Beth B; Bolender, David L; Kolesari, Gary L

    2008-01-01

    At the Medical College of Wisconsin, a procedure was developed to allow computerized grading and grade reporting of laboratory practical examinations in the Clinical Human Anatomy course. At the start of the course, first year medical students were given four Lists of Structures. On these lists, numbered items were arranged alphabetically; the items were anatomical structures that could be tagged on a given lab practical examination. Each lab exam featured an anatomy laboratory component and a computer laboratory component. For the anatomy lab component, students moved from one question station to another at timed intervals and identified tagged anatomical structures. As students identified a tagged structure, they referred to a copy of the list (provided with their answer sheet) and wrote the number corresponding to the structure on their answer sheet. Immediately after the anatomy lab component, students were escorted to a computer instruction laboratory where they typed their answer numbers into a secured testing component of a learning management system that recorded their answers for automatic grading. After a brief review of examination scores and item analysis by faculty, exam scores were reported to students electronically. Adding this brief computer component to each lab exam greatly reduced faculty grading time, reduced grading errors and provided faster performance feedback for students without changing overall student performance. PMID:19177415

  15. Use Of Clinical Decision Analysis In Predicting The Efficacy Of Newer Radiological Imaging Modalities: Radioscintigraphy Versus Single Photon Transverse Section Emission Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prince, John R.

    1982-12-01

    Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive accuracy have been shown to be useful measures of the clinical efficacy of diagnostic tests and can be used to predict the potential improvement in diagnostic certitude resulting from the introduction of a competing technology. This communication demonstrates how the informal use of clinical decision analysis may guide health planners in the allocation of resources, purchasing decisions, and implementation of high technology. For didactic purposes the focus is on a comparison between conventional planar radioscintigraphy (RS) and single photon transverse section emission conputed tomography (SPECT). For example, positive predictive accuracy (PPA) for brain RS in a specialist hospital with a 50% disease prevalance is about 95%. SPECT should increase this predicted accuracy to 96%. In a primary care hospital with only a 15% disease prevalance the PPA is only 77% and SPECT may increase this accuracy to about 79%. Similar calculations based on published data show that marginal improvements are expected with SPECT in the liver. It is concluded that: a) The decision to purchase a high technology imaging modality such as SPECT for clinical purposes should be analyzed on an individual organ system and institutional basis. High technology may be justified in specialist hospitals but not necessarily in primary care hospitals. This is more dependent on disease prevalance than procedure volume; b) It is questionable whether SPECT imaging will be competitive with standard RS procedures. Research should concentrate on the development of different medical applications.

  16. Does accountability for reasonableness work? A protocol for a mixed methods study using an audit tool to evaluate the decision-making of clinical commissioning groups in England

    PubMed Central

    Kieslich, Katharina; Littlejohns, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) in England are tasked with making difficult decisions on which healthcare services to provide against the background of limited budgets. The question is how to ensure that these decisions are fair and legitimate. Accounts of what constitutes fair and legitimate priority setting in healthcare include Daniels’ and Sabin's accountability for reasonableness (A4R) and Clark's and Weale's framework for the identification of social values. This study combines these accounts and asks whether the decisions of those CCGs that adhere to elements of such accounts are perceived as fairer and more legitimate by key stakeholders. The study addresses the empirical gap arising from a lack of research on whether frameworks such as A4R hold what they promise. It aims to understand the criteria that feature in CCG decision-making. Finally, it examines the usefulness of a decision-making audit tool (DMAT) in identifying the process and content criteria that CCGs apply when making decisions. Methods and analysis The adherence of a sample of CCGs to criteria emerging from theories of fair priority setting will be examined using the DMAT developed by PL. The results will be triangulated with data from semistructured interviews with key stakeholders in the CCG sample to ascertain whether there is a correlation between those CCGs that performed well in the DMAT exercise and those whose decisions are perceived positively by interviewees. Descriptive statistical methods will be used to analyse the DMAT data. A combination of quantitative and qualitative content analysis methods will be used to analyse the interview transcripts. Ethics and dissemination Full ethics approval was received by the King's College London Biomedical Sciences, Dentistry, Medicine and Natural and Mathematical Sciences Research Ethics Subcommittee. The results of the study will be disseminated through publications in peer review journals. PMID:26163034

  17. An ontology model for clinical documentation templates

    E-print Network

    George, Joyce, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01

    There are various kinds of clinical documents used in a hospital or clinic setting. With the emergence of Electronic Medical Records, efforts are being made to computerize these documents in a structured fashion in order ...

  18. Support and Assessment for Fall Emergency Referrals (SAFER 1): Cluster Randomised Trial of Computerised Clinical Decision Support for Paramedics

    PubMed Central

    Snooks, Helen Anne; Carter, Ben; Dale, Jeremy; Foster, Theresa; Humphreys, Ioan; Logan, Philippa Anne; Lyons, Ronan Anthony; Mason, Suzanne Margaret; Phillips, Ceri James; Sanchez, Antonio; Wani, Mushtaq; Watkins, Alan; Wells, Bridget Elizabeth; Whitfield, Richard; Russell, Ian Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate effectiveness, safety and cost-effectiveness of Computerised Clinical Decision Support (CCDS) for paramedics attending older people who fall. Design Cluster trial randomised by paramedic; modelling. Setting 13 ambulance stations in two UK emergency ambulance services. Participants 42 of 409 eligible paramedics, who attended 779 older patients for a reported fall. Interventions Intervention paramedics received CCDS on Tablet computers to guide patient care. Control paramedics provided care as usual. One service had already installed electronic data capture. Main Outcome Measures Effectiveness: patients referred to falls service, patient reported quality of life and satisfaction, processes of care. Safety Further emergency contacts or death within one month. Cost-Effectiveness Costs and quality of life. We used findings from published Community Falls Prevention Trial to model cost-effectiveness. Results 17 intervention paramedics used CCDS for 54 (12.4%) of 436 participants. They referred 42 (9.6%) to falls services, compared with 17 (5.0%) of 343 participants seen by 19 control paramedics [Odds ratio (OR) 2.04, 95% CI 1.12 to 3.72]. No adverse events were related to the intervention. Non-significant differences between groups included: subsequent emergency contacts (34.6% versus 29.1%; OR 1.27, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.72); quality of life (mean SF12 differences: MCS ?0.74, 95% CI ?2.83 to +1.28; PCS ?0.13, 95% CI ?1.65 to +1.39) and non-conveyance (42.0% versus 36.7%; OR 1.13, 95% CI 0.84 to 1.52). However ambulance job cycle time was 8.9 minutes longer for intervention patients (95% CI 2.3 to 15.3). Average net cost of implementing CCDS was £208 per patient with existing electronic data capture, and £308 without. Modelling estimated cost per quality-adjusted life-year at £15,000 with existing electronic data capture; and £22,200 without. Conclusions Intervention paramedics referred twice as many participants to falls services with no difference in safety. CCDS is potentially cost-effective, especially with existing electronic data capture. Trial Registration ISRCTN Register ISRCTN10538608 PMID:25216281

  19. Computerized tomography using video recorded fluoroscopic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kak, A. C.; Jakowatz, C. V., Jr.; Baily, N. A.; Keller, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    A computerized tomographic imaging system is examined which employs video-recorded fluoroscopic images as input data. By hooking the video recorder to a digital computer through a suitable interface, such a system permits very rapid construction of tomograms.

  20. HUMAN RELIABILITY ANALYSIS FOR COMPUTERIZED PROCEDURES

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald L. Boring; David I. Gertman; Katya Le Blanc

    2011-09-01

    This paper provides a characterization of human reliability analysis (HRA) issues for computerized procedures in nuclear power plant control rooms. It is beyond the scope of this paper to propose a new HRA approach or to recommend specific methods or refinements to those methods. Rather, this paper provides a review of HRA as applied to traditional paper-based procedures, followed by a discussion of what specific factors should additionally be considered in HRAs for computerized procedures. Performance shaping factors and failure modes unique to computerized procedures are highlighted. Since there is no definitive guide to HRA for paper-based procedures, this paper also serves to clarify the existing guidance on paper-based procedures before delving into the unique aspects of computerized procedures.

  1. The Experiences of Using a Computerized Decision Support System

    PubMed Central

    Fossum, Mariann; Ehnfors, Margareta; Fruhling, Ann; Ehrenberg, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to describe the facilitators and barriers influencing the ability of nursing personnel to effectively use a CDSS for planning and treating pressure ulcers and malnutrition in nursing homes. Usability evaluations and group interviews were conducted. Facilitators were ease of use, usefulness and a supportive work environment. Lack of training, resistance to using computers and limited integration of the CDSS with the electronic health record system were reported. PMID:24199144

  2. The experiences of using a computerized decision support system.

    PubMed

    Fossum, Mariann; Ehnfors, Margareta; Fruhling, Ann; Ehrenberg, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to describe the facilitators and barriers influencing the ability of nursing personnel to effectively use a CDSS for planning and treating pressure ulcers and malnutrition in nursing homes. Usability evaluations and group interviews were conducted. Facilitators were ease of use, usefulness and a supportive work environment. Lack of training, resistance to using computers and limited integration of the CDSS with the electronic health record system were reported. PMID:24199144

  3. Current Status of Computerized Decision Support Systems in Mammography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. D. Tourassi

    Breast cancer is one of the most devastating and deadly diseases for women today. Despite advances in cancer treatment, early mammographic detection remains the first line of defense in the battle against breast cancer. Patients with early-detected malignancies have a significantly lower mortality rate. Nevertheless, it is reported that up to 30% of breast lesions go undetected in screening mammograms

  4. Electron-Beam Computerized Tomography Correlates with Coronary Angiogram in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Janelle Robinson; Ainah U. Tan; Robert L. Wilensky; William Matthai; Maura Munoz; Sylvia E. Rosas

    2007-01-01

    Background\\/Aim: Electron-beam computerized tomography (EBCT) is able to noninvasively quantify coronary artery calcification (CAC). Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients frequently have CAC, and clinicians are puzzled regarding the clinical significance of this finding and the diagnostic accuracy of coronary EBCT in CKD. The aim of this study was to determine the correlation in CKD patients between CAC measured by EBCT

  5. Computerized Tomography for Detecting Perivesical Infiltration and Lymph Node Metastasis in Invasive Bladder Carcinoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sumer Baltaci; Berkan Resorlu; Kadir Turkolmez; Cagatay Gogus; Yasar Beduk

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Computerized tomography (CT) is used in the preoperative staging of invasive bladder carcinoma. We evaluated the role of CT for detecting perivesical invasion and lymph node metastases in patients who had undergone radical cystectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy for invasive bladder carcinoma. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical and pathological data of 100 patients with invasive bladder carcinoma

  6. The Impact of Interactive, Computerized Educational Modules on Preclinical Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryner, Benjamin S.; Saddawi-Konefka, Daniel; Gest, Thomas R.

    2008-01-01

    Interactive computerized modules have been linked to improved retention of material in clinical medicine. This study examined the effects of a new series of interactive learning modules for preclinical medical education, specifically in the areas of quiz performance, perceived difficulty of concepts, study time, and perceived stress level. We…

  7. A Randomized Experiment to Compare Conventional, Computerized, and Computerized Adaptive Administration of Ordinal Polytomous Attitude Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hol, A. Michiel; Vorst, Harrie C. M.; Mellenbergh, Gideon J.

    2005-01-01

    A total of 520 high school students were randomly assigned to a paper-and-pencil test (PPT), a computerized standard test (CST), or a computerized adaptive test (CAT) version of the Dutch School Attitude Questionnaire (SAQ), consisting of ordinal polytomous items. The CST administered items in the same order as the PPT. The CAT administered all…

  8. Clinical diagnostic decision-making in real life contexts: A trans-theoretical approach for teaching: AMEE Guide No. 95.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rakesh; Sandars, John; Carr, Sue

    2015-03-01

    Making an accurate clinical diagnosis is an essential skill for all medical students and doctors, with important implications for patient safety. Current approaches for teaching how to make a clinical diagnosis tend to lack the complexity that faces clinicians in real-life contexts. In this Guide, we propose a new trans-theoretical model for teaching how to make an appropriate clinical diagnosis that can be used by teachers as an additional technique to their current approach. This educational model integrates situativity theory, dual-information processing theory and socio-cognitive theory. Mapping and microanalysis help the teacher to identify the main processes involved in making an accurate clinical diagnosis, so that feedback can be provided that is focused on improving key aspects of the skill. An essential aspect of using the new educational model is the role of the experienced clinical teacher in making judgments about the appropriateness of the learner's attempts to make a clinical diagnosis. PMID:25391895

  9. Utility of a computerized, paced semantic verbal fluency paradigm in differentiating schizophrenia and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Shakeel, Mohammed K; Halahalli, Harsha N; Kumar, Kiran; Jain, Sanjeev; John, John P

    2014-02-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) paradigms designed to study word generation traditionally utilize a computerized paced version of the verbal fluency task (VFT) comprising 'blocks' of word generation and a baseline word repetition task. The utility of the above paced VFT paradigm in differentiating neuropsychiatric patients from healthy subjects has not been systematically examined. We administered a computerized, paced version of the semantic VFT comprising word generation and word repetition blocks to 24 schizophrenia and 24 matched healthy subjects, both before and during fMRI acquisition. The performance of patients with schizophrenia was significantly inferior to that of healthy control subjects in both the 'pre-scan' and 'intra-scan' sessions of the computerized paced semantic VFT. Specifically, schizophrenia patients generated significantly fewer total responses (VFTR) as well as correct responses (VFCR), but a larger number of 'no response' trials. However, there were no significant group differences in perseverative responses in the pre-scan session or 'intra-scan' sessions. The above computerized task has been reported by us previously to generate a behavioral performance index with hemodynamic correlates (John et al., 2011). Thus, our findings support the use of computerized paced VFT comprising word generation and word repetition blocks in both clinical and research settings. PMID:24524705

  10. Development of the CAT-ANX: A Computerized Adaptive Test for Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Robert D.; Weiss, David J.; Pilkonis, Paul A.; Frank, Ellen; Moore, Tara; Kim, Jong Bae; Kupfer, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The authors developed a computerized adaptive test for anxiety that decreases patient and clinician burden and increases measurement precision. Method A total of 1,614 individuals with and without generalized anxiety disorder from a psychiatric clinic and community mental health center were recruited. The focus of the present study was the development of the Computerized Adaptive Testing–Anxiety Inventory (CAT-ANX). The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV was used to obtain diagnostic classifications of generalized anxiety disorder and major depressive disorder. Results An average of 12 items per subject was required to achieve a 0.3 standard error in the anxiety severity estimate and maintain a correlation of 0.94 with the total 431-item test score. CAT-ANX scores were strongly related to the probability of a generalized anxiety disorder diagnosis. Using both the Computerized Adaptive Testing–-Depression Inventory and the CAT-ANX, comorbid major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder can be accurately predicted. Conclusions Traditional measurement fixes the number of items but allows measurement uncertainty to vary. Computerized adaptive testing fixes measurement uncertainty and allows the number and content of items to vary, leading to a dramatic decrease in the number of items required for a fixed level of measurement uncertainty. Potential applications for inexpensive, efficient, and accurate screening of anxiety in primary care settings, clinical trials, psychiatric epidemiology, molecular genetics, children, and other cultures are discussed. PMID:23929270

  11. The Impact of Computerized Physician Order Entry on Medication Error Prevention

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David W Bates; J ONATHAN M. TEICH; JOSHUA LEE; Diane Seger; Gilad J Kuperman; Nell MaLuf; Deborah Boyle; Lucian Leape

    1999-01-01

    BackgroundMedication errors are common, and while most such errors have little potential for harm they cause substantial extra work in hospitals. A small proportion do have the potential to cause injury, and some cause preventable adverse drug events.ObjectiveTo evaluate the impact of computerized physician order entry (POE) with decision support in reducing the number of medication errors.DesignProspective time series analysis,

  12. Nursing education application of a computerized nursing expert system.

    PubMed

    Lappe, J M; Dixon, B; Lazure, L; Nilsson, P; Thielen, J; Norris, J

    1990-06-01

    Nurse educators are required to be knowledgeable about a wide variety of complex health care problems in order to provide quality education. At the same time, they are given a multitude of other responsibilities such as participating in scholarly activity, advising students, maintaining an active role in nursing practice, and performing community service. These educators must find innovative ways to present current lectures while at the same time meeting their other obligations. The use of Creighton Online Multiple Modular Expert System (COMMES), a computerized decision support consultant, was evaluated as a technique for faculty use in developing and organizing new lecture content. The study found that COMMES was beneficial as a systematic prompt for lecture content, as a tool for organizing content, and as a means to verify completeness of lecture material. PMID:2165143

  13. Lessons learned from implementation of computerized provider order entry in 5 community hospitals: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE) can improve patient safety, quality and efficiency, but hospitals face a host of barriers to adopting CPOE, ranging from resistance among physicians to the cost of the systems. In response to the incentives for meaningful use of health information technology and other market forces, hospitals in the United States are increasingly moving toward the adoption of CPOE. The purpose of this study was to characterize the experiences of hospitals that have successfully implemented CPOE. Methods We used a qualitative approach to observe clinical activities and capture the experiences of physicians, nurses, pharmacists and administrators at five community hospitals in Massachusetts (USA) that adopted CPOE in the past few years. We conducted formal, structured observations of care processes in diverse inpatient settings within each of the hospitals and completed in-depth, semi-structured interviews with clinicians and staff by telephone. After transcribing the audiorecorded interviews, we analyzed the content of the transcripts iteratively, guided by principles of the Immersion and Crystallization analytic approach. Our objective was to identify attitudes, behaviors and experiences that would constitute useful lessons for other hospitals embarking on CPOE implementation. Results Analysis of observations and interviews resulted in findings about the CPOE implementation process in five domains: governance, preparation, support, perceptions and consequences. Successful institutions implemented clear organizational decision-making mechanisms that involved clinicians (governance). They anticipated the need for education and training of a wide range of users (preparation). These hospitals deployed ample human resources for live, in-person training and support during implementation. Successful implementation hinged on the ability of clinical leaders to address and manage perceptions and the fear of change. Implementation proceeded smoothly when institutions identified and anticipated the consequences of the change. Conclusions The lessons learned in the five domains identified in this study may be useful for other community hospitals embarking on CPOE adoption. PMID:23800211

  14. Quality of ethical guidelines and ethical content in clinical guidelines: the example of end-of-life decision-making

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel Strech; Jan Schildmann

    2011-01-01

    BackgroundWhile there are many guidelines on how to make ethical decisions at the end of life, there is little evidence regarding the quality of this sort of ethical guidelines.ObjectivesFirst, this study aims to demonstrate the conceptual transferability of the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) instrument for the quality assessment of ethical guidelines. Second, it aims to illustrate

  15. Influence of air ambulance doctors on on-scene times, clinical interventions, decision-making and independent paramedic practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K Roberts; K Blethyn; M Foreman; A Bleetman

    2009-01-01

    Background:Critics of air ambulance doctors question their contribution and believe on-scene time is prolonged. Two helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS) models operate in the West Midlands, one with doctors and the other without. A study was undertaken to compare on-scene time, management and decision-making between the two units.Method:Cases were assessed over an 18-month period, identifying on-scene time, incidence of rapid

  16. A collaborative framework for contributing DICOM RT PHI (Protected Health Information) to augment data mining in clinical decision support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Ruchi; Thuptimdang, Wanwara; DeMarco, John; Liu, Brent J.

    2014-03-01

    We have built a decision support system that provides recommendations for customizing radiation therapy treatment plans, based on patient models generated from a database of retrospective planning data. This database consists of relevant metadata and information derived from the following DICOM objects - CT images, RT Structure Set, RT Dose and RT Plan. The usefulness and accuracy of such patient models partly depends on the sample size of the learning data set. Our current goal is to increase this sample size by expanding our decision support system into a collaborative framework to include contributions from multiple collaborators. Potential collaborators are often reluctant to upload even anonymized patient files to repositories outside their local organizational network in order to avoid any conflicts with HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules. We have circumvented this problem by developing a tool that can parse DICOM files on the client's side and extract de-identified numeric and text data from DICOM RT headers for uploading to a centralized system. As a result, the DICOM files containing PHI remain local to the client side. This is a novel workflow that results in adding only relevant yet valuable data from DICOM files to the centralized decision support knowledge base in such a way that the DICOM files never leave the contributor's local workstation in a cloud-based environment. Such a workflow serves to encourage clinicians to contribute data for research endeavors by ensuring protection of electronic patient data.

  17. A Scalable Architecture for Incremental Specification and Maintenance of Procedural and Declarative Clinical Decision-Support Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Hatsek, Avner; Shahar, Yuval; Taieb-Maimon, Meirav; Shalom, Erez; Klimov, Denis; Lunenfeld, Eitan

    2010-01-01

    Clinical guidelines have been shown to improve the quality of medical care and to reduce its costs. However, most guidelines exist in a free-text representation and, without automation, are not sufficiently accessible to clinicians at the point of care. A prerequisite for automated guideline application is a machine-comprehensible representation of the guidelines. In this study, we designed and implemented a scalable architecture to support medical experts and knowledge engineers in specifying and maintaining the procedural and declarative aspects of clinical guideline knowledge, resulting in a machine comprehensible representation. The new framework significantly extends our previous work on the Digital electronic Guidelines Library (DeGeL) The current study designed and implemented a graphical framework for specification of declarative and procedural clinical knowledge, Gesher. We performed three different experiments to evaluate the functionality and usability of the major aspects of the new framework: Specification of procedural clinical knowledge, specification of declarative clinical knowledge, and exploration of a given clinical guideline. The subjects included clinicians and knowledge engineers (overall, 27 participants). The evaluations indicated high levels of completeness and correctness of the guideline specification process by both the clinicians and the knowledge engineers, although the best results, in the case of declarative-knowledge specification, were achieved by teams including a clinician and a knowledge engineer. The usability scores were high as well, although the clinicians’ assessment was significantly lower than the assessment of the knowledge engineers. PMID:21611137

  18. Ontology-based Modeling of Clinical Practice Guidelines: A Clinical Decision Support System for Breast Cancer Follow-up Interventions at Primary Care Settings

    E-print Network

    Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

    for Breast Cancer Follow-up Interventions at Primary Care Settings Samina R. Abidi, Syed SR. Abidi, Sajjad, Canada Abstract Breast cancer follow-up care can be provided by family phy- sicians after specialists complete the primary treatment. Can- cer Care Nova Scotia has developed a breast cancer follow- up Clinical

  19. Computerized Control of Environmental Systems

    E-print Network

    Gatti, F. L.

    1980-01-01

    for adjustment in decisions. 2.2.3 Due to the large dispersion of environments, it was decided to provide a full telecommunications link via "MODEM" to a permanent extension and per mit control and reports to be exercised using a portable ASCI I terminal... into the' building. Due to strict USDA restrictions it was necessary to use a very intense level of feedback of temperature and demand information. As in 2.2.3, full telecommunications were implemented. 2.4.4 SOFTWARE : SOLUTIONS The system model has...

  20. Decision Support:Decision Support: Decision AnalysisDecision Analysis

    E-print Network

    Bohanec, Marko

    Decision Support:Decision Support: Decision AnalysisDecision Analysis JoJozzef Stefanef Stefan/Algebraic/Statistical Modelling · Accounting / Financial Modelling Modelling #12;Decision Support and Decis and University of Nova Gorica Decision Analysis Part 1 Decision Analysis and Decision Tables Decision Analysis

  1. Assessing the effectiveness of a computerized blood order "consultation" system.

    PubMed

    Lepage, E F; Gardner, R M; Laub, R M; Jacobson, J T

    1991-01-01

    To optimize blood ordering and accurately assess transfusion practice, in 1987, an "on line" computerized, knowledge-based, blood order critiquing system was integrated into the HELP Hospital Information System (HIS) at LDS Hospital. Evaluations of the computerized ordering system demonstrated its benefits and limitations on transfusion practice. Based on this experience, a second generation blood ordering system using a consultation mode was developed. A pilot test of this blood order consultant system, using historical data in the HELP system's database, was performed. This pilot test demonstrated that the consultation system provided accurate recommendations for red blood cell (RBC) and platelet orders. Comparing the appropriateness of blood orders with the recommendations made by the director of the blood bank, the orders recommended by the computer "consultant" agreed 95.5% of the time. The computer consultation system also recommended fewer RBC units for transfusion. Preliminary results obtained using the consultant approach suggest that we may be able to simplify blood ordering practice and also reduce the number of units of blood products ordered. Based on these findings we are now preparing to compare the "critiquing" and "consultation" approaches using a clinical trial. PMID:1807617

  2. Assessment of Minimal HE (with emphasis on computerized psychometric tests)

    PubMed Central

    Kappus, Matthew R; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is associated with a high risk of development of overt hepatic encephalopathy, impaired quality of life and driving accidents. The detection of MHE requires specialized testing since it cannot by definition, be diagnosed on standard clinical examination. Psychometric (paper-pencil or computerized or a combination) and neuro-physiological techniques are often used to test for MHE. Paper-pencil psychometric batteries like the Psychometric Hepatic Encephalopathy Score (PHES) have been validated in several countries but do not have US normative values. Computerized tests such as the inhibitory control test (ICT), cognitive drug research system and Scan test have proven useful to diagnose MHE and predict outcomes. The specificity and sensitivity of these tests are similar to the recommended gold standards. Neuro-physiological tests such as the EEG and its interpretations, evoked potentials and Critical Flicker Frequency (CFF) also provide useful information. The diagnosis of MHE is an important issue for clinicians and patients alike and the testing strategies depend on the normative data available, patient comfort and local expertise. PMID:22321464

  3. Building a web-based tool to support clinical decisions in the control of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) are the agents of two common, sexually transmitted diseases afflicting women in the United States (http://www.cdc.gov). We designed a novel web-based application that offers simple recommendations to help optimize medical outcomes with CT and GC prevention and control programs. This application takes population groups, prevalence rates, parameters for available screening assays and treatment regimens (costs, sensitivity, and specificity), as well as budget limits as inputs. Its output suggests optimal screening and treatment strategies for selected at-risk groups, commensurate with the clinic's budget allocation. Development of this tool illustrates how a clinical informatics application based on rigorous mathematics might have a significant impact on real-world clinical issues. PMID:24564848

  4. The clinical impact of staging bone marrow examination on treatment decisions and prognostic assessment of lymphoma patients.

    PubMed

    Painter, Dan; Smith, Alexandra; de Tute, Ruth; Crouch, Simon; Roman, Eve; Jack, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    This study investigates the value of performing a staging bone marrow in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), follicular lymphoma (FL) and classical hodgkin lymphoma (CHL). The results of 3112 staging bone marrow examinations were assessed for impact on prognostic assessment and critical treatment decisions. The detection of marrow involvement altered the disease-specific prognostic index for 4·3% of DLBCL, 6·2% of FL and 0·6% of CHL but marrow involvement in DLBCL was an independent prognostic factor. Knowing the marrow status potentially changed treatment in 92 patients, detection of these patients would have required 854 examinations to be performed. PMID:25920510

  5. Derivation of the children's head injury algorithm for the prediction of important clinical events decision rule for head injury in children

    PubMed Central

    Dunning, J; Daly, J Patrick; Lomas, J?P; Lecky, F; Batchelor, J; Mackway?Jones, K

    2006-01-01

    Background A quarter of all patients presenting to emergency departments are children. Although there are several large, well?conducted studies on adults enabling accurate selection of patients with head injury at high risk for computed tomography scanning, no such study has derived a rule for children. Aim To conduct a prospective multicentre diagnostic cohort study to provide a rule for selection of high?risk children with head injury for computed tomography scanning. Design All children presenting to the emergency departments of 10 hospitals in the northwest of England with any severity of head injury were recruited. A tailor?made proforma was used to collect data on around 40 clinical variables for each child. These variables were defined from a literature review, and a pilot study was conducted before the children's head injury algorithm for the prediction of important clinical events (CHALICE) study. All children who had a clinically significant head injury (death, need for neurosurgical intervention or abnormality on a computed tomography scan) were identified. Recursive partitioning was used to create a highly sensitive rule for the prediction of significant intracranial pathology. Results 22?772 children were recruited over 2½?years. 65% of these were boys and 56% were <5?years old. 281 children showed an abnormality on the computed tomography scan, 137 had a neurosurgical operation and 15 died. The CHALICE rule was derived with a sensitivity of 98% (95% confidence interval (CI) 96% to 100%) and a specificity of 87% (95% CI 86% to 87%) for the prediction of clinically significant head injury, and requires a computed tomography scan rate of 14%. Conclusion A highly sensitive clinical decision rule is derived for the identification of children who should undergo computed tomography scanning after head injury. This rule has the potential to improve and standardise the care of children presenting with head injuries. Validation of this rule in new cohorts of patients should now be undertaken. PMID:17056862

  6. Termination Criteria for Computerized Classification Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Nathan A.

    2011-01-01

    Computerized classification testing (CCT) is an approach to designing tests with intelligent algorithms, similar to adaptive testing, but specifically designed for the purpose of classifying examinees into categories such as "pass" and "fail." Like adaptive testing for point estimation of ability, the key component is the termination criterion,…

  7. NATIONAL ARCHIVE OF COMPUTERIZED DATA ON AGING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Archive of Computerized Data on Aging (NACDA), located within ICPSR, is funded by the National Institute on Aging. NACDA's mission is to advance research on aging by helping researchers to profit from the under-exploited potential of a broad range of datasets. NACDA ...

  8. The Four Generations of Computerized Educational Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunderson, C. Victor; And Others

    Educational measurement is undergoing a revolution due to the rapid dissemination of information-processing technology. The recent growth in computing resources and their widespread dissemination in daily life have brought about irreversible changes in educational measurement. Recent developments in computerized measurement are summarized by…

  9. Computerized Collective Training for Teams. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurmond, Paul; Kribs, H. Dewey

    The purpose of this investigation was to empirically demonstrate and evaluate a brassboard for computerized collective training for teams (COLT2). The underlying tasks were to (1) conduct a state of the art assessment of instructional strategies appropriate for COLT2, (2) derive a conceptual framework for COLT2 instructional strategies, (3)…

  10. Item Selection in Computerized Classification Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Nathan A.

    2009-01-01

    Several alternatives for item selection algorithms based on item response theory in computerized classification testing (CCT) have been suggested, with no conclusive evidence on the substantial superiority of a single method. It is argued that the lack of sizable effect is because some of the methods actually assess items very similarly through…

  11. STAR: A Computerized Tutorial in General Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaparro, Barbara S.; Halcomb, Charles G.

    This study investigated the use of a computerized tutorial--Self-Test and Review (STAR)--in a computer-managed general psychology course. STAR consists of four major modules which provide the student with a variety of learning exercises, including practice quizzes, practice final exams, performance reviews, and structured study questions. The…

  12. Artificial Intelligence in Computerized Linguistic Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tokmouline, Timur

    This article explores whether or not it is possible for computers to be effectively used to analyze textual information. Computerization of human linguistic analysis would be enormously useful, because it would relieve many highly skilled linguistics professionals (researchers and teachers) from having to spend enormous amounts of time on the…

  13. THE COMPUTERIZED COMPREHENSIBILITY SYSTEM MAINTAINER'S GUIDE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David E. Kieras

    Abstract The Computerized Comprehensibility System (CCS) generates a critique of the comprehensibility of a technical document, using techniques and results from AI and cognitive psychology. This report is a guide for the maintainer or developer of CCS. It is not intended as a tutorial on the mechanisms used in CCS, but to allow the qualified programmer to rapidly understand the

  14. [Computerization of hospital blood banks in France].

    PubMed

    Daurat, G; Py, J-Y

    2012-11-01

    In France, most blood products are delivered by the établissement francais du sang, directly to the recipients, and hospital blood banks deliver a minor part, but are independent from it. However that may be, hospital blood banks are hazardous activities regarding to recipients, blood products, blood supply of the hospital and regional blood supply. Because of the high risk level, a computerized information system is compulsory for all hospital blood banks, except for those only devoted to vital emergency transfusion. On the field, the integration of computerization in the different processes is very heterogeneous. So, it has been decided to publish guidelines for computerizing hospital blood banks information systems and production management. They have been built according to risk assessment and are intended to minimize those risks. The principle is that all acquisition and processing of data about recipients or blood products and tracking, must be fully computerized and that the result of all manual processes must be checked by computer before proceeding to the next step. The guidelines list the different processes and, for each of them, the functions the software must play. All together, they form the basic level all hospital blood banks should reach. Optional functions are listed. Moreover, the guidelines are also aimed to be a common tool for regional health authorities who supervise hospital blood banks. PMID:23039955

  15. Calibrator Blocks For Computerized Tomography (CT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, H. Peter

    1990-01-01

    Sets of calibrator blocks developed for use with industrial computerized tomography (CT) systems. Set of blocks (or number of stacked sets of blocks) placed on object table of CT system and scanned in usual way. Blocks include holes of known size, shape, and location. Appearance of holes in output image of CT system used to verify operation of system.

  16. An Introduction to the Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tian, Jian-quan; Miao, Dan-min; Zhu, Xia; Gong, Jing-jing

    2007-01-01

    Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) has unsurpassable advantages over traditional testing. It has become the mainstream in large scale examinations in modern society. This paper gives a brief introduction to CAT including differences between traditional testing and CAT, the principles of CAT, psychometric theory and computer algorithms of CAT, the…

  17. Preadmission Student Advising: A Prototype Computerized System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grupe, Fritz H.; Maples, Mary F.

    1992-01-01

    A prototype computerized expert system was designed to advise high school or first-year college students who are uncertain about a particular college or major. On-demand consultation gathers information about student grades, interests, test scores, and aptitudes, assesses admission qualifications for a variety of majors, then recommends curricula…

  18. Computerized Symbol Processing for Handicapped Persons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osguthorpe, Russell T.; And Others

    The paper describes the development of a computerized symbol processing system which allows nonspeaking severely handicapped persons to create communication electronically. Two pilot studies investigated the use of Rebus and Bliss Symbols with either an Apple Graphics Tablet or the Power Pad, a peripheral which allowed users to activate the…

  19. Real-Time Computerized Annotation of Pictures

    E-print Network

    Tian, Qi

    Real-Time Computerized Annotation of Pictures Presentation by: Yijuan Lu Data and Vision Seminar: real-time automatic annotation of pictures System Architecture Methodology: D2-clustering and Mixture image collections. Label: Images are often stored with the name that is produced by the digital camera

  20. Issues in Computerized Communication: Components and Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, Gregory Reed

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the growth of computerized communications. Attributes this growth to rapid growth of the computer industry, price reductions on computer equipment, and university installation of departmental computers. Describes the Internet, USENET, and electronic mail. Concludes that individuals must be trained to use, understand, and participate in…

  1. One Size Doesn't Fit All: The Efficiency of Graphical, Numerical and Textual Clinical Decision Support for Nurses

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Andrew

    the potential of significantly improving the quality and efficiency of patient care, but they need to present information in a way that is easily understandable by health care personnell. In the clinical setting, nurses are often tasked with the care of a large number of patients, and in specific scenarios are in charge

  2. Successful clinical trial research in nursing homes: the Improving Decision-Making Study. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Most clinical researchers (and, in fact, most physicians) have limited experiences in the nursing home setting. This is a highly regulated environment in which staff spend large amounts of time on quality oversight and are often wary of the demands of research participation.

  3. Linear models in decision making

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robyn M. Dawes; Bernard Corrigan

    1974-01-01

    A review of the literature indicates that linear models are frequently used in situations in which decisions are made on the basis of multiple codable inputs. These models are sometimes used (a) normatively to aid the decision maker, (b) as a contrast with the decision maker in the clinical vs statistical controversy, (c) to represent the decision maker \\

  4. Under the radar: how unexamined biases in decision-making processes in clinical interactions can contribute to health care disparities.

    PubMed

    Dovidio, John F; Fiske, Susan T

    2012-05-01

    Several aspects of social psychological science shed light on how unexamined racial/ethnic biases contribute to health care disparities. Biases are complex but systematic, differing by racial/ethnic group and not limited to love-hate polarities. Group images on the universal social cognitive dimensions of competence and warmth determine the content of each group's overall stereotype, distinct emotional prejudices (pity, envy, disgust, pride), and discriminatory tendencies. These biases are often unconscious and occur despite the best intentions. Such ambivalent and automatic biases can influence medical decisions and interactions, systematically producing discrimination in health care and ultimately disparities in health. Understanding how these processes may contribute to bias in health care can help guide interventions to address racial and ethnic disparities in health. PMID:22420809

  5. Computerized follow-up of discrepancies in image interpretation between emergency and radiology departments.

    PubMed

    Siegel, E; Groleau, G; Reiner, B; Stair, T

    1998-08-01

    Radiographs are ordered and interpreted for immediate clinical decisions 24 hours a day by emergency physicians (EP's). The Joint Commission for Accreditation of Health Care Organizations requires that all these images be reviewed by radiologists and that there be some mechanism for quality improvement (QI) for discrepant readings. There must be a log of discrepancies and documentation of follow up activities, but this alone does not guarantee effective Q.I. Radiologists reviewing images from the previous day and night often must guess at the preliminary interpretation of the EP and whether follow up action is necessary. EP's may remain ignorant of the final reading and falsely assume the initial diagnosis and treatment were correct. Some hospitals use a paper system in which the EP writes a preliminary interpretation on the requisition slip, which will be available when the radiologist dictates the final reading. Some hospitals use a classification of discrepancies based on clinical import and urgency, and communicated to the EP on duty at the time of the official reading, but may not communicate discrepancies to the EP's who initial read the images. Our computerized radiology department and picture archiving and communications system have increased technologist and radiologist productivity, and decreased retakes and lost films. There are fewer face-to-face consultants of radiologists and clinicians, but more communication by telephone and electronic annotation of PACS images. We have integrated the QI process for emergency department (ED) images into the PACS, and gained advantages over the traditional discrepancy log. Requisitions including clinical indications are entered into the Hospital Information System and then appear on the PACS along with images on readings. The initial impression, time of review, and the initials of the EP are available to the radiologist dictating the official report. The radiologist decides if there is a discrepancy, and whether it is category I (potentially serious, needs immediate follow-up), category II (moderate risk, follow-up in one day), or category III (low risk, follow-up in several days). During the working day, the radiologist calls immediately for category I discrepancies. Those noted from the evening, night, or weekend before are called to the EP the next morning. All discrepancies with the preliminary interpretation are communicated to the EP and are kept in a computerized log for review by a radiologist at a weekly ED teaching conference. This system has reduced the need for the radiologist to ask or guess what the impression was in the ED the night before. It has reduced the variability in recording of impressions by EP's, in communication back from radiologists, in the clinical] follow-up made, and in the documentation of the whole QI process. This system ensures that EP's receive notification of their discrepant readings, and provides continuing education to all the EP's on interpreting images on their patients. PMID:9735425

  6. A computerized neuropsychological test battery designed for idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A tool for standardized and repeated neuropsychological assessments in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (INPH) is needed. The objective of this study was to develop a computerized neuropsychological test battery designed for INPH and to evaluate its reliability, validity and patient’s ability to complete the tests. Methods Based on a structured review of the literature on neuropsychological testing in INPH, the eight tests most sensitive to the INPH cognitive profile were implemented in a computerized format. The Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) was also included. Tests were presented on a touch-screen monitor, with animated instructions and speaker sound. The battery was evaluated with the following cohorts: A. Test-retest reliability, 44 healthy elderly; B. Validity against standard pen and pencil testing, 28 patients with various cognitive impairments; C. Ability to complete test battery, defined as completion of at least seven of the eight tests, 40 investigated for INPH. Results A. All except the figure copy test showed good test-retest reliability, r?=?0.67-0.90; B. A high correlation was seen between conventional and computerized tests (r?=?0.66-0.85) except for delayed recognition and figure copy task; C. Seventy-eight percent completed the computerized battery; Patients diagnosed with INPH (n?=?26) performed worse on all tests, including depression score, compared to healthy controls. Conclusions A new computerized neuropsychological test battery designed for patients with communicating hydrocephalus and INPH was introduced. Its reliability, validity for general cognitive impairment and completion rate for INPH was promising. After exclusion of the figure copy task, the battery is ready for clinical evaluation and as a next step we suggest validation for INPH and a comparison before and after shunt surgery. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.org NCT01265251. PMID:25279138

  7. Evaluation of stream mining classifiers for real-time clinical decision support system: a case study of blood glucose prediction in diabetes therapy.

    PubMed

    Fong, Simon; Zhang, Yang; Fiaidhi, Jinan; Mohammed, Osama; Mohammed, Sabah

    2013-01-01

    Earlier on, a conceptual design on the real-time clinical decision support system (rt-CDSS) with data stream mining was proposed and published. The new system is introduced that can analyze medical data streams and can make real-time prediction. This system is based on a stream mining algorithm called VFDT. The VFDT is extended with the capability of using pointers to allow the decision tree to remember the mapping relationship between leaf nodes and the history records. In this paper, which is a sequel to the rt-CDSS design, several popular machine learning algorithms are investigated for their suitability to be a candidate in the implementation of classifier at the rt-CDSS. A classifier essentially needs to accurately map the events inputted to the system into one of the several predefined classes of assessments, such that the rt-CDSS can follow up with the prescribed remedies being recommended to the clinicians. For a real-time system like rt-CDSS, the major technological challenges lie in the capability of the classifier to process, analyze and classify the dynamic input data, quickly and upmost reliably. An experimental comparison is conducted. This paper contributes to the insight of choosing and embedding a stream mining classifier into rt-CDSS with a case study of diabetes therapy. PMID:24163813

  8. A Web-Based Clinical Decision Support Tool for Primary Health Care Management of Back Pain: Development and Mixed Methods Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Christopher; Holbrook, Rachel; Lindner, Robyn; Reeve, James; Das, Anurina; Maher, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Background Many patients with back pain do not receive health care in accordance with best practice recommendations. Implementation trials to address this issue have had limited success. Despite the known effectiveness of clinical decision support systems (CDSS), none of these are available for back pain management. Objective The objective of our study was to develop a Web-based CDSS to support Australian general practitioners (GPs) to diagnose and manage back pain according to guidelines. Methods Asking a panel of international experts to review recommendations for sixteen clinical vignettes validated the tool. It was then launched nationally as part of National Pain Week and promoted to GPs via a media release and clinic based visits. Following this, a mixed methods evaluation was conducted to determine tool feasibility, acceptability, and utility. The 12 month usage data were analyzed, and in-depth, semistructured interviews with 20 GPs were conducted to identify barriers and enablers to uptake. Results The tool had acceptable face validity when reviewed by experts. Over a 12 month period there were 7125 website visits with 4503 (63.20%) unique users. Assuming most unique users are GPs, around one quarter of the country’s GPs may have used the tool at least once. Although usage was high, GP interviews highlighted the sometimes complex nature of management where the tool may not influence care. Conversely, several “touch-points”, whereby the tool may exert its influence, were identified, most notably patient engagement. Conclusions A novel CDSS tool has the potential to assist with evidence-based management of back pain. A clinical trial is required to determine its impact on practitioner and patient outcomes. PMID:24694921

  9. Response to Medication Dosing Alerts for Pediatric Inpatients Using a Computerized Provider Order Entry System

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, S.L.; Fabrizio, L.; Shaha, S.H.; Magid, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Medication dosing errors are of particular concern in hospitalized children. Avoidance of such errors is essential to quality improvement and patient safety. Computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems with clinical decision support (CDS) have the potential to reduce medication errors. The objective of this study was to evaluate provider response to the dosing alerts in a CPOE system with CDS for pediatric inpatients and to identify differences in provider response based on clinician specialty. Patients and methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of all medication dosing alerts over a 1-year period (January 1 through December 31, 2008) for all pediatric inpatients at Hospital for Special Surgery. Alerts were analyzed with respect to medication dosing, prescriber, and action taken by the prescriber after the alert was triggered (i.e., accepted suggested change, ignored recommendation/overrode, or cancelled the order). Results During the study period, 18,163 medication orders were placed and 1,024 dosing alerts were fired. Overdosing of medications accounted for 91% of the alerts and underdosing 9%. The pediatric-trained providers ignored more alerts and cancelled fewer orders than the non-pediatric-trained providers (p<0.001). Both groups changed the order similarly based on CDS recommendations. Conclusions Differences in response to CDS were found between pediatric-trained and non-pediatric-trained providers caring for pediatric patients; however, both groups changed orders based on CDS similarly. CPOE with built-in CDS may be of particular value when providers with different specialties and types of training are caring for pediatric patients. PMID:23616893

  10. Standardizing Failure, Success, and Survival Decisions in Clinical Studies of Ceramic and Metal-Ceramic Fixed Dental Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Anusavice, Kenneth J.

    2011-01-01

    “Nothing worthwhile is ever without complications.”– Nora Roberts The recent increase in reports from clinical studies of ceramic chipping has raised the question of which criteria should constitute success or failure of total-ceramic prostheses. Terminology such as minor chipping[1], partial chipping, technical complications[2, 3], and biological complications have crept into the dental terminology and they have complicated our classification of success and failure of these crown and bridge restorations. Some journals have permitted the reporting of fractures as “complications” and they are not necessarily classified as failures in the study. One study has attempted to classify chipping fractures according to their severity and subsequent treatment.[4] This is a promising approach to resolve the challenges to the classification of chipping fracture. The term ‘chipping fracture’ is more descriptive than ‘chipping’ since the latter term tends to imply an event of minor consequence. Two types of statistics are reported routinely in these studies, i.e., percent success, which is a measure of restorations that survive without any adverse effects, and percent survival, which is a measure of all restorations that survive even though they may have exhibited chipping fracture or they may have been repaired. Why has this scenario occurred? One possible explanation is that many of these types of fractures are very small and do not affect function or esthetics. Another reason is that corporate sponsors prefer to use the term chipping since it does not connote failure in the sense that the term fracture does. In any event, we need to be more precise in our scientific observations of fracture and classifications of the various types of fracture including details on the location of fracture and the prosthesis design configuration. Because of the lack of standardized methods for describing chipping fractures, materials scientists are unable to properly analyze the effect of material properties and design factors on the time-dependent survival probability of ceramic fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). Based on the review of clinical trials and systematic reviews of these trials, the present study was designed to develop guidelines for classifying the functional performance, success, survival, and susceptibility to chipping fracture, and subsequent treatment of ceramic and metal-ceramic restorations. Objective To develop comprehensive descriptive guidelines and a clinical reporting form to assist dental scientists in their analyses of chipping fracture behavior of metal-ceramic and all-ceramic prostheses with particular emphasis on veneered-zirconia restorations. These guidelines are required to optimize the recording of fracture features that can be used to differentiate ceramic chipping fracture from bulk fracture and to assist dentists in identifying subsequent treatment that may minimize the need to replace affected restorations. A recording form for clinical fracture observations must be sufficiently clear and complete so that dental health professionals can translate the most relevant information in a context that allows their patients to fully understand the potential risks and benefits of treatment with ceramic restorations. It should clearly allow a clinician to determine whether or not a ceramic fracture constitutes a failure, which requires replacement of the prosthesis, or whether the fracture surface is relatively small or located in a nonfunctional area, i.e., one that is not contribute to occlusion, aesthetics, proximal contacts, or .food impaction. To accomplish this task, a review of the relevant publications of clinical trials was necessary to identify the variability in reporting of fracture events. The reviews were focused on clinical research studies of zirconia-based FDPs and PFM FDPs, which had been monitored through recall exams for three years or more. These reports and systematic reviews of all relevant publications were published in English dental journ

  11. Comparison of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography and Periapical Radiography in Predicting Treatment Decision for Periapical Lesions: A Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Balasundaram, Ashok; Shah, Punit; Hoen, Michael M.; Wheater, Michelle A.; Bringas, Josef S.; Gartner, Arnold; Geist, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To compare the ability of endodontists to determine the size of apical pathological lesions and select the most appropriate choice of treatment based on lesions' projected image characteristics using 2 D and 3 D images. Study Design. Twenty-four subjects were selected. Radiographic examination of symptomatic study teeth with an intraoral periapical radiograph revealed periapical lesions equal to or greater than 3 mm in the greatest diameter. Cone-beam Computed tomography (CBCT) images were made of the involved teeth after the intraoral periapical radiograph confirmed the size of lesion to be equal to greater than 3 mm. Six observers (endodontists) viewed both the periapical and CBCT images. Upon viewing each of the images from the two imaging modalities, observers (1) measured lesion size and (2) made decisions on treatment based on each radiograph. Chi-square test was used to look for differences in the choice of treatment among observers. Results. No significant difference was noted in the treatment plan selected by observers using the two modalities (?2(3) = .036, P > 0.05). Conclusion. Lesion size and choice of treatment of periapical lesions based on CBCT radiographs do not change significantly from those made on the basis of 2 D radiographs. PMID:23056050

  12. Clinical decision rules in rheumatoid arthritis: do they identify patients at high risk for osteoporosis? Testing clinical criteria in a population based cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis recruited from the Oslo Rheumatoid Arthritis Register

    PubMed Central

    Haugeberg, G; Orstavik, R; Uhlig, T; Falch, J; Halse, J; Kvien, T

    2002-01-01

    Background: Preliminary clinical criteria based on age, inflammation, and immobility have been proposed to identify which patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) should be examined by dual energy x ray absorptiometry (DXA) to diagnose osteoporosis. The three item criteria have not been evaluated in male patients with RA or in the entire female RA population. Objectives: (1) To test the proposed criteria in a cohort of men and women thought to be representative of the entire underlying RA population. (2) To develop clinical decision rules, which could be applied to all patients with RA irrespective of corticosteroid use. Methods: Clinical and demographic data were collected from a total of 287 representative patients with RA (235 (82%) women, 52 (18%) men, age range 25.3–73.1 years) from the Oslo RA register (completeness 85%). Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured in spine L2–4 (anterior-posterior view) and femoral neck by DXA. The criteria were applied and sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated. Results: Mean age (SD) for the women and men with RA was 56.8 (11.0) years and 61.5 (10.2) years; disease duration was 15.5 (9.5) years and 14.7 (8.6) years. Of the women 163 (69%) were postmenopausal. One hundred and seventeen (50%) women and 28 (54%) men fulfilled the three item criteria. For the diagnosis of osteoporosis (T score ?-2.5) using the original three item criteria sensitivity in women and men was 74% and 67%, specificity 57% and 50%, PPV 32% and 29% and NPV 89% and 83%, and including weight and ever use of corticosteroids in a five item criteria sensitivity increased to 82% and 83%, specificity decreased to 45% and 45%, PPV was 29% and 31%, and NPV was 90% and 90% respectively. Conclusion: The novel five item criteria (age, weight, inflammation, immobility, and ever use of corticosteroids) are a more accurate tool to identify patients with RA and osteoporosis than the original three item criteria (age, inflammation, and immobility). The clinical decision rules have an acceptable sensitivity and provide a practical tool for the doctor to identify patients with RA who should have a DXA measurement performed. PMID:12429540

  13. Normal Positron Emission Tomography-Computerized Tomogram in a Patient with Apparent Mesenteric Panniculitis: Biopsy Is Still the Answer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eli D. Ehrenpreis; Archana S. Rao; Robert Aki; Heather Brown; Thomas Pae; Ian Boiskin

    2009-01-01

    Mesenteric panniculitis (also known as sclerosing mesenteritis) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the mesenteric connective tissue. It is known to have a wide spectrum of clinical and radiological presentations. In general, biopsy is recommended for diagnosis; however, a recent study proposed that a negative positron emission tomography- computerized tomography (PET-CT) scan is accurate in differentiating benign and neoplastic mesenteric

  14. Computerized flow monitors detect small kicks

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, D.; White, D. (Sedco Forex, Paris (FR))

    1992-02-24

    This paper reports on a smart alarm system installed on a number of offshore rigs and one land rig which can detect kicks more quickly than conventional systems. This rapid kick detection improves rig safety because the smaller the detected influx, the easier it is to control the well. The extensive computerized monitoring system helps drilling personnel detect fluid influxes and fluid losses before the changes in flow would normally be apparent.

  15. Computerized tomography studies of concrete samples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. E. Martz; G. P. Roberson; M. F. Skeate; D. J. Schneberk; S. G. Azevedo

    1991-01-01

    X-ray computerized tomography (CAT or CT) is a sophisticated imaging technique that provides cross-sectional views of materials, components and assemblies for industrial nondestructive evaluation (NDE). We have studied the feasibility of using CT as an inspection tool for reinforced concrete and the use of multi-energy, linear, attenuation techniques to deduce variations in density (rho) and\\/or atomic number (Z) that could

  16. Bone Health Monitoring in Astronauts: Recommended Use of Quantitative Computed Tomography [QCT] for Clinical and Operational Decisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibonga, J. D.; Truskowski, P.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the concerns that astronauts in long duration flights might have a greater risk of bone fracture as they age than the general population. A panel of experts was convened to review the information and recommend mechanisms to monitor the health of bones in astronauts. The use of Quantitative Computed Tomography (QCT) scans for risk surveillance to detect the clinical trigger and to inform countermeasure evaluation is reviewed. An added benefit of QCT is that it facilitates an individualized estimation of bone strength by Finite Element Modeling (FEM), that can inform approaches for bone rehabilitation. The use of FEM is reviewed as a process that arrives at a composite number to estimate bone strength, because it integrates multiple factors.

  17. Training family physicians and residents in family medicine in shared decision making to improve clinical decisions regarding the use of antibiotics for acute respiratory infections: protocol for a clustered randomized controlled trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michel Labrecque; Gaston Godin; Annie LeBlanc; Claudine Laurier; Jeremy Grimshaw; Josette Castel; Isabelle Tremblay; Pierre Frémont; Michel Cauchon; Kathleen Lemieux; Caroline Rhéaume

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To explore ways to reduce the overuse of antibiotics for acute respiratory infections (ARIs), we conducted a pilot clustered randomized controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate DECISION+, a training program in shared decision making (SDM) for family physicians (FPs). This pilot project demonstrated the feasibility of conducting a large clustered RCT and showed that DECISION+ reduced the proportion of patients

  18. Use of personal digital assistant devices in order to access, consult and apply a corpus of clinical guidelines and decision-based support documentation like the Italian SPREAD Guidelines on stroke disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Cricelli

    2006-01-01

    During the past few years, personal digital assistants (PDAs) have become widespread commodities, like computers and mobile\\u000a phones. Many health-care providers, particularly physicians, routinely use PDAs in their everyday work. Accessing guidelines\\u000a and clinical decision-based support tools, such as the downloadable version of the Italian SPREAD Guidelines represents one\\u000a of the most important and common clinical applications. The current experience

  19. Computerized implant-dentistry: Advances toward automation

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Minkle; Anand, Vishal; Salaria, Sanjeev Kumar; Jain, Nikil; Gupta, Shilpi

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in the field of implantology such as three-dimensional imaging, implant-planning software, computer-aided-design/computer-aided-manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology, computer-guided, and navigated implant surgery have led to the computerization of implant-dentistry. This three-dimensional computer-generated implant-planning and surgery has not only enabled accurate preoperative evaluation of the anatomic limitations but has also facilitated preoperative planning of implant positions along with virtual implant placement and subsequently transferring the virtual treatment plans onto the surgical phase via static (guided) or dynamic (navigated) systems aided by CAD/CAM technology. Computerized-implant-dentistry being highly predictable and minimally invasive in nature has also allowed implant placement in patients with medical comorbidities (e.g. radiation therapy, blood dyscrasias), in patients with complex problems following a significant alteration of the bony anatomy as a result of benign or malignant pathology of the jaws or trauma and in patients with other physical and emotional problems. With significant achievements accomplished in the field of computerized implant-dentistry, attempts are now been made toward complete automation of implant-dentistry. PMID:25810585

  20. Accuracy of the “traffic light” clinical decision rule for serious bacterial infections in young children with fever: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine the accuracy of a clinical decision rule (the traffic light system developed by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE)) for detecting three common serious bacterial infections (urinary tract infection, pneumonia, and bacteraemia) in young febrile children. Design Retrospective analysis of data from a two year prospective cohort study Setting A paediatric emergency department. Participants 15 781 cases of children under 5 years of age presenting with a febrile illness. Main outcome measures Clinical features were used to categorise each febrile episodes as low, intermediate, or high probability of serious bacterial infection (green, amber, and red zones of the traffic light system); these results were checked (using standard radiological and microbiological tests) for each of the infections of interest and for any serious bacterial infection. Results After combination of the intermediate and high risk categories, the NICE traffic light system had a test sensitivity of 85.8% (95% confidence interval 83.6% to 87.7%) and specificity of 28.5% (27.8% to 29.3%) for the detection of any serious bacterial infection. Of the 1140 cases of serious bacterial infection, 157 (13.8%) were test negative (in the green zone), and, of these, 108 (68.8%) were urinary tract infections. Adding urine analysis (leucocyte esterase or nitrite positive), reported in 3653 (23.1%) episodes, to the traffic light system improved the test performance: sensitivity 92.1% (89.3% to 94.1%), specificity 22.3% (20.9% to 23.8%), and relative positive likelihood ratio 1.10 (1.06 to 1.14). Conclusion The NICE traffic light system failed to identify a substantial proportion of serious bacterial infections, particularly urinary tract infections. The addition of urine analysis significantly improved test sensitivity, making the traffic light system a more useful triage tool for the detection of serious bacterial infections in young febrile children. PMID:23407730

  1. Developing a New Computer-Aided Clinical Decision Support System for Prediction of Successful Postcardioversion Patients with Persistent Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Mark; Huang, David T.; Ghoraani, Behnaz

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new algorithm to predict the outcome of direct-current electric (DCE) cardioversion for atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. AF is the most common cardiac arrhythmia and DCE cardioversion is a noninvasive treatment to end AF and return the patient to sinus rhythm (SR). Unfortunately, there is a high risk of AF recurrence in persistent AF patients; hence clinically it is important to predict the DCE outcome in order to avoid the procedure's side effects. This study develops a feature extraction and classification framework to predict AF recurrence patients from the underlying structure of atrial activity (AA). A multiresolution signal decomposition technique, based on matching pursuit (MP), was used to project the AA over a dictionary of wavelets. Seven novel features were derived from the decompositions and were employed in a quadratic discrimination analysis classification to predict the success of post-DCE cardioversion in 40 patients with persistent AF. The proposed algorithm achieved 100% sensitivity and 95% specificity, indicating that the proposed computational approach captures detailed structural information about the underlying AA and could provide reliable information for effective management of AF.

  2. The role of bioimpedance and biomarkers in helping to aid clinical decision-making of volume assessments in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Davies, Simon J; Davenport, Andrew

    2014-09-01

    Bioimpedance analysis (BIA) derives two main pieces of information--total tissue fluid content, which when referring to the whole patient is equivalent to the total body water (TBW), and cell mass, which in the limbs mainly reflects muscle. The relationship between these measures, expressed in different ways, is abnormal in dialysis patients due to muscle wasting combined with tissue overhydration. In both dialysis modalities this is associated with aging, comorbidity, and inflammation, and there is a conflict between achieving euvolemia to improve blood pressure control and prevent left ventricular hypertrophy on one hand, but risking episodes of hypovolemia and loss of residual renal function on the other. In peritoneal dialysis, the situation is exacerbated by hypoalbuminemia, whereas in hemodialysis BIA is unable to distinguish between the plasma volume and tissue edema components of interdialytic weight gain. In longitudinal studies BIA can identify changes in hydration following a defined intervention, and spontaneous loss in TBW consequent on muscle wasting not appreciated clinically, resulting in a failure to sufficiently reduce the dry weight. Cardiac biomarkers provide additional information but it is not clear whether this reflects fluid status or underlying structural organ damage. Intervention studies are now needed that show how this information is best used to improve patient outcomes, including meaningful end points such as hospitalization and survival. PMID:24918155

  3. Cost Effectiveness of a Clinical Decision Support System Based on the Recommendations of the European Society of Cardiology and Other Societies for the Management of Hypercholesterolemia: Report of a Cluster-Randomized Trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Albert Cobos; Jordi Vilaseca; Juan Pedro-Botet; Emilia Sanchez; Alicia Val; Cristina Espinosa; Salvador Bergonon

    2005-01-01

    Introduction and objectives: To assess the cost effectiveness of a clinical decision support system (CDSS) based on the recommendations of the European Society of Cardiology and other societies for Hypercholesterolemia Management (ESCHM). Study design and perspective: A cluster-randomized, unblinded, pragmatic trial was conducted. To assess the impact in effectiveness and costs of a CDSS implementing an adapted version of the

  4. Fertility and contraceptive decision-making and support for HIV infected individuals: client and provider experiences and perceptions at two HIV clinics in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Some people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV) want to have children while others want to prevent pregnancies; this calls for comprehensive services to address both needs. This study explored decisions to have or not to have children and contraceptive preferences among PLHIV at two clinics in Uganda. Methods This was a qualitative cross-sectional study. We conducted seventeen focus group discussions and 14 in-depth interviews with sexually active adult men and women and adolescent girls and boys, and eight key informant interviews with providers. Overall, 106 individuals participated in the interviews; including 84 clients through focus group discussions. Qualitative latent content analysis technique was used, guided by key study questions and objectives. A coding system was developed before the transcripts were examined. Codes were grouped into categories and then themes and subthemes further identified. Results In terms of contraceptive preferences, clients had a wide range of preferences; whereas some did not like condoms, pills and injectables, others preferred these methods. Fears of complications were raised mainly about pills and injectables while cost of the methods was a major issue for the injectables, implants and intrauterine devices. Other than HIV sero-discordance and ill health (which was cited as transient), the decision to have children or not was largely influenced by socio-cultural factors. All adult men, women and adolescents noted the need to have children, preferably more than one. The major reasons for wanting more children for those who already had some were; the sex of the children (wanting to have both girls and boys and especially boys), desire for large families, pressure from family, and getting new partners. Providers were supportive of the decision to have children, especially for those who did not have any child at all, but some clients cited negative experiences with providers and information gaps for those who wanted to have children. Conclusions These findings show the need to expand family planning services for PLHIV to provide more contraceptive options and information as well as expand support for those who want to have children. PMID:23374175

  5. A pilot study to evaluate the role of the Spinal Cord Impairment Pressure Ulcer Monitoring Tool (SCI-PUMT) in clinical decisions for pressure ulcer treatment.

    PubMed

    Thomason, Susan S; Graves, Barbara Ann; Madaris, Linda

    2014-12-01

    The Spinal Cord Impairment Pressure Ulcer Monitoring Tool (SCI-PUMT) was designed to assess pressure ulcer (PrU) healing in the spinal cord impaired (SCI) population. The tool contains 7 variables: wound surface area, depth, edges, tunneling, undermining, exudate type, and necrotic tissue amount. A 2-phased, quantitative pilot study based on the Theory of Reasoned Action and Theory of Planned Behavior was conducted at a large SCI/Disorders Center in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). In the first phase of the study, a convenience sample of 5 physicians, 3 advanced practice registered nurses, and 3 certified wound care nurses (CWCN) was surveyed using a 2-part questionnaire to assess use of the SCI-PUMT instrument, its anticipated improvement in PrU assessment, and intent to use the SCI-PUMT in clinical practice. Attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral controls, and barriers related to the intent to use the SCI-PUMT were evaluated using a 5-point Likert scale (range: 1= extremely likely, 5 = extremely unlikely). In the second phase of the study, the electronic health records (EHR) of 24 veterans (with 30 PrUs) who had at least 2 completed SCI-PUMT scores during a 4-week period were used to evaluate whether an association existed between magnitudes of change of total SCI-PUMT scores and ordered changes in PrU treatment. The overall mean score for intent to use SCI-PUMT was 1.80 (SD 0.75). The least favorable scores were for convenience and motivation to use the SCI-PUMT. Analysis of EHR data showed no significant difference in magnitudes of change in the SCI-PUMT score and changes in PrU treatment recommendations made by the CWCNs. The significance was not affected regardless of an increase or no change in the score (?2 with 1 degree of freedom = 1.158, P = 0.282) or for a decrease in the score (?2 with 1 degree of freedom = 0.5, P = 0.478). In this pilot study, the expressed intent to use the SCI-PUMT in making clinical decisions was generally positive but reservations remain. Additional research is being conducted to determine the barriers and facilitators to SCI-PUMT implementation. The SCI-PUMT was the first tool found to be valid, reliable, and sensitive to assess PrU healing in persons with SCI, and studies to examine the prospective validity of using this instrument on ulcer treatment decisions and outcomes are warranted. PMID:25485550

  6. Prognostic utility of serum CRP levels in combination with CURB-65 in patients with clinically suspected sepsis: a decision curve analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Shungo; Yamazaki, Shin; Shimizu, Tsunehiro; Takeshima, Taro; Fukuma, Shingo; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Tochitani, Kentaro; Tsuchido, Yasuhiro; Shinohara, Koh; Fukuhara, Shunichi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The prognostic utility of serum C reactive protein (CRP) alone in sepsis is controversial. We used decision curve analysis (DCA) to evaluate the clinical usefulness of combining serum CRP levels with the CUBR-65 score in patients with suspected sepsis. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Emergency department (ED) of an urban teaching hospital in Japan. Participants Consecutive ED patients over 15?years of age who were admitted to the hospital after having a blood culture taken in the ED between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2012. Main outcome measures 30-day in-hospital mortality. Results Data from 1262 patients were analysed for score evaluation. The 30-day in-hospital mortality was 8.4%. Multivariable analysis showed that serum CRP ?150?mg/L was an independent predictor of death (adjusted OR 2.0; 95% CI 1.3 to 3.1). We compared the predictive performance of CURB-65 with the performance of a modified CURB-65 with that included CRP (?150?mg/L) to quantify the clinical usefulness of combining serum CRP with CURB-65. The areas under the receiver operating characteristics curves of CURB-65 and a modified CURB-65 were 0.76 (95% CI 0.72 to 0.80) and 0.77 (95% CI 0.72 to 0.81), respectively. Both models had good calibration for mortality and were useful among threshold probabilities from 0% to 30%. However, while incorporating CRP into CURB-65 yielded a significant category-free net reclassification improvement of 0.387 (95% CI 0.193 to 0.582) and integrated discrimination improvement of 0.015 (95% CI 0.004 to 0.027), DCA showed that CURB-65 and the modified CURB-65 score had comparable net benefits for prediction of mortality. Conclusions Measurement of serum CRP added limited clinical usefulness to CURB-65 in predicting mortality in patients with clinically suspected sepsis, regardless of the source. PMID:25922102

  7. Developing a Prototype System for Integrating Pharmacogenomics Findings into Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Overby, Casey Lynnette; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Kalet, Ira J.; Thummel, Kenneth E.; Smith, Joe W.; Fiol, Guilherme Del; Fenstermacher, David; Devine, Emily Beth

    2012-01-01

    Findings from pharmacogenomics (PGx) studies have the potential to be applied to individualize drug therapy to improve efficacy and reduce adverse drug events. Researchers have identified factors influencing uptake of genomics in medicine, but little is known about the specific technical barriers to incorporating PGx into existing clinical frameworks. We present the design and development of a prototype PGx clinical decision support (CDS) system that builds on existing clinical infrastructure and incorporates semi-active and active CDS. Informing this work, we updated previous evaluations of PGx knowledge characteristics, and of how the CDS capabilities of three local clinical systems align with data and functional requirements for PGx CDS. We summarize characteristics of PGx knowledge and technical needs for implementing PGx CDS within existing clinical frameworks. PGx decision support rules derived from FDA drug labels primarily involve drug metabolizing genes, vary in maturity, and the majority support the post-analytic phase of genetic testing. Computerized provider order entry capabilities are key functional requirements for PGx CDS and were best supported by one of the three systems we evaluated. We identified two technical needs when building on this system, the need for (1) new or existing standards for data exchange to connect clinical data to PGx knowledge, and (2) a method for implementing semi-active CDS. Our analyses enhance our understanding of principles for designing and implementing CDS for drug therapy individualization and our current understanding of PGx characteristics in a clinical context. Characteristics of PGx knowledge and capabilities of current clinical systems can help govern decisions about CDS implementation, and can help guide decisions made by groups that develop and maintain knowledge resources such that delivery of content for clinical care is supported. PMID:23741623

  8. Sensitivity and Specificity of Subacute Computerized Neurocognitive Testing and Symptom Evaluation in Predicting Outcomes After Sports-Related Concussion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian C. Lau; Michael W. Collins; Mark R. Lovell

    2011-01-01

    Background: Concussions affect an estimated 136 000 high school athletes yearly. Computerized neurocognitive testing has been shown to be appropriately sensitive and specific in diagnosing concussions, but no studies have assessed its utility to predict length of recovery. Determining prognosis during subacute recovery after sports concussion will help clinicians more confidently address return-to-play and academic decisions.Purpose: To quantify the prognostic

  9. CT based computerized identification and analysis of human airways: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Pu Jiantao; Gu Suicheng; Liu Shusen; Zhu Shaocheng; Wilson, David; Siegfried, Jill M.; Gur, David [Imaging Research Center, Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, 3362 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); School of Computing, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Department of Radiology, Henan Provincial People's Hospital, Zhengzhou 450003 (China); Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, 580 S. Aiken Avenue, Suite 400, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology, Hillman Cancer Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Imaging Research Center, Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, 3362 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    As one of the most prevalent chronic disorders, airway disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In order to understand its underlying mechanisms and to enable assessment of therapeutic efficacy of a variety of possible interventions, noninvasive investigation of the airways in a large number of subjects is of great research interest. Due to its high resolution in temporal and spatial domains, computed tomography (CT) has been widely used in clinical practices for studying the normal and abnormal manifestations of lung diseases, albeit there is a need to clearly demonstrate the benefits in light of the cost and radiation dose associated with CT examinations performed for the purpose of airway analysis. Whereas a single CT examination consists of a large number of images, manually identifying airway morphological characteristics and computing features to enable thorough investigations of airway and other lung diseases is very time-consuming and susceptible to errors. Hence, automated and semiautomated computerized analysis of human airways is becoming an important research area in medical imaging. A number of computerized techniques have been developed to date for the analysis of lung airways. In this review, we present a summary of the primary methods developed for computerized analysis of human airways, including airway segmentation, airway labeling, and airway morphometry, as well as a number of computer-aided clinical applications, such as virtual bronchoscopy. Both successes and underlying limitations of these approaches are discussed, while highlighting areas that may require additional work.

  10. Valid comparisons and decisions based on clinical registers and population based cohort studies: assessing the accuracy, completeness and epidemiological relevance of a breast cancer query database

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Data accuracy and completeness are crucial for ensuring both the correctness and epidemiological relevance of a given data set. In this study we evaluated a clinical register in the administrative district of Marburg-Biedenkopf, Germany, for these criteria. Methods The register contained data gathered from a comprehensive integrated breast-cancer network from three hospitals that treated all included incident cases of malignant breast cancer in two distinct time periods from 1996–97 (N=389) and 2003–04 (N=488). To assess the accuracy of this data, we compared distributions of risk, prognostic, and predictive factors with distributions from established secondary databases to detect any deviations from these “true” population parameters. To evaluate data completeness, we calculated epidemiological standard measures as well as incidence-mortality-ratios (IMRs). Results In total, 12% (13 of 109) of the variables exhibited inaccuracies: 9% (5 out of 56) in 1996–97 and 15% (8 out of 53) in 2003–04. In contrast to raw, unstandardized incidence rates, (in-) directly age-standardized incidence rates showed no systematic deviations. Our final completeness estimates were IMR=36% (1996–97) and IMR=43% (2003–04). Conclusion Overall, the register contained accurate, complete, and correct data. Regional differences accounted for detected inaccuracies. Demographic shifts occurred. Age-standardized measures indicate an acceptable degree of completeness. The IMR method of measuring completeness was inappropriate for incidence-based data registers. For the rising number of population-based health-care networks, further methodological advancements are necessary. Correct and epidemiologically relevant data are crucial for clinical and health-policy decision-making. PMID:23270464

  11. Time-dependent estimates of recurrence and survival in colon cancer: clinical decision support system tool development for adjuvant therapy and oncological outcome assessment.

    PubMed

    Steele, Scott R; Bilchik, Anton; Johnson, Eric K; Nissan, Aviram; Peoples, George E; Eberhardt, John S; Kalina, Philip; Petersen, Benjamin; Brücher, Björn; Protic, Mladjan; Avital, Itzhak; Stojadinovic, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Unanswered questions remain in determining which high-risk node-negative colon cancer (CC) cohorts benefit from adjuvant therapy and how it may differ in an equal access population. Machine-learned Bayesian Belief Networks (ml-BBNs) accurately estimate outcomes in CC, providing clinicians with Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) tools to facilitate treatment planning. We evaluated ml-BBNs ability to estimate survival and recurrence in CC. We performed a retrospective analysis of registry data of patients with CC to train-test-crossvalidate ml-BBNs using the Department of Defense Automated Central Tumor Registry (January 1993 to December 2004). Cases with events or follow-up that passed quality control were stratified into 1-, 2-, 3-, and 5-year survival cohorts. ml-BBNs were trained using machine-learning algorithms and k-fold crossvalidation and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis used for validation. BBNs were comprised of 5301 patients and areas under the curve ranged from 0.85 to 0.90. Positive predictive values for recurrence and mortality ranged from 78 to 84 per cent and negative predictive values from 74 to 90 per cent by survival cohort. In the 12-month model alone, 1,132,462,080 unique rule sets allow physicians to predict individual recurrence/mortality estimates. Patients with Stage II (N0M0) CC benefit from chemotherapy at different rates. At one year, all patients older than 73 years of age with T2-4 tumors and abnormal carcinoembryonic antigen levels benefited, whereas at five years, all had relative reduction in mortality with the largest benefit amongst elderly, highest T-stage patients. ml-BBN can readily predict which high-risk patients benefit from adjuvant therapy. CDSS tools yield individualized, clinically relevant estimates of outcomes to assist clinicians in treatment planning. PMID:24887722

  12. Computerized practice guidelines for heart failure management: the HeartMan system.

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, A.; Bray, B. E.; Gilbert, E. M.; Warner, H. R.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the initial stages of development and evaluation of the HeartMan system, a set of computerized practice guidelines for heart failure management. The concept of computerized guidelines as a hybrid of expert systems and practice guidelines methodologies and techniques is proposed. We show the results of the initial evaluation of the system, which are very promising, although the sample size is small, and the study is retrospective: Of 177 messages, 90% were considered appropriate, of which 97.5% would have been followed. Eight percent of the messages were classified as neutral, and 2% classified as inappropriate. The errors were correctable by changing the logic. The potential technical and sociological barriers to the complete development and clinical use of the system are discussed. PMID:8563274

  13. 45 CFR 307.13 - Security and confidentiality for computerized support enforcement systems in operation after...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...confidentiality for computerized support enforcement systems...in the computerized support enforcement system...establishing parental rights with respect to a child; and (iv) NDNH...of the computerized support enforcement...

  14. 45 CFR 307.13 - Security and confidentiality for computerized support enforcement systems in operation after...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...confidentiality for computerized support enforcement systems...in the computerized support enforcement system...establishing parental rights with respect to a child; and (iv) NDNH...of the computerized support enforcement...

  15. 45 CFR 307.13 - Security and confidentiality for computerized support enforcement systems in operation after...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...confidentiality for computerized support enforcement systems...in the computerized support enforcement system...establishing parental rights with respect to a child; and (iv) NDNH...of the computerized support enforcement...

  16. 45 CFR 307.15 - Approval of advance planning documents for computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...documents for computerized support enforcement systems. 307.15 Section 307.15 Public...SERVICES COMPUTERIZED SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT SYSTEMS § 307.15 Approval of advance planning...documents for computerized support enforcement systems. (a) Approval of an APD....

  17. 45 CFR 307.15 - Approval of advance planning documents for computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...documents for computerized support enforcement systems. 307.15 Section 307.15 Public...SERVICES COMPUTERIZED SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT SYSTEMS § 307.15 Approval of advance planning...documents for computerized support enforcement systems. (a) Approval of an APD....

  18. 45 CFR 307.15 - Approval of advance planning documents for computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...documents for computerized support enforcement systems. 307.15 Section 307.15 Public...SERVICES COMPUTERIZED SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT SYSTEMS § 307.15 Approval of advance planning...documents for computerized support enforcement systems. (a) Approval of an APD....

  19. 45 CFR 307.15 - Approval of advance planning documents for computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...documents for computerized support enforcement systems. 307.15 Section 307.15 Public...SERVICES COMPUTERIZED SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT SYSTEMS § 307.15 Approval of advance planning...documents for computerized support enforcement systems. (a) Approval of an APD....

  20. 45 CFR 307.13 - Security and confidentiality for computerized support enforcement systems in operation after...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Security and confidentiality for computerized support enforcement...SYSTEMS § 307.13 Security and confidentiality for computerized support enforcement...follows: § 307.13 Security and confidentiality for computerized support...

  1. Aiming for a fully integrated computerized procedure system

    SciTech Connect

    Marron, J. E. [Invensys Process Systems, 33 Commercial Street, Foxboro, MA 02035 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    A fully integrated Computerized Procedure System must provide, at a minimum, a) Specification: access to design basis procedures, b) Monitoring: incorporation of real-time plant status, c) Advise: highlighting likely decision paths, and d) Reporting: logging conditions and actions taken. The CPS plays a critical role in overcoming the human factors that lead to accidents. At the same time it can be an essential tool in providing the information and automation to augment what humans do best, identify patterns and make associative leaps in the presence of ambiguous data. Timeliner and TaskGuide are examples of CPS that have evolved from projects in the aerospace industry. They illustrate certain common characteristics of a CPS, namely the knowledge base, user interface, and traceability features. The complexity and number of procedures for a current nuclear project has led to the development of two tools, the Power Generation Control System (PGCS) and the Online Procedure System (OLPS). Together, these systems address the knowledge-base and user interface aspects of a CPS and go a long way in addressing other areas. PGCS and OLPS contain full configuration management capabilities for procedures and the operating recipe. They include administrative functions for online and offline management of documents and data. Some lessons learned from this pair of programs developed by Invensys is the need for more integrated recording mechanisms. The future of CPS is likely to see higher integration of the document access, system status, decision support and logging capabilities. The CPS may evolve into the standard operational interface. Internet technologies that are common-place today have made the possibility of the Active Document a reality. The OPC Foundation is pursuing standards that may accelerate such developments. (authors)

  2. Decision trees for identifying predictors of treatment effectiveness in clinical trials and its application to ovulation in a study of women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Heping; Legro, Richard S.; Zhang, Jeffrey; Zhang, Leon; Chen, Xiang; Huang, Hao; Casson, Peter R.; Schlaff, William D.; Diamond, Michael P.; Krawetz, Stephen A.; Coutifaris, Christos; Brzyski, Robert G.; Christman, Gregory M.; Santoro, Nanette; Eisenberg, Esther

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Double-blind, randomized clinical trials are the preferred approach to demonstrating the effectiveness of one treatment against another. The comparison is, however, made on the average group effects. While patients and clinicians have always struggled to understand why patients respond differently to the same treatment, and while much hope has been held for the nascent field of predictive biomarkers (e.g. genetic markers), there is still much utility in exploring whether it is possible to estimate treatment efficacy based on demographic and baseline variables. METHODS The pregnancy in polycystic ovary syndrome (PPCOS) study was a prospective, multi-center, randomized clinical trial comparing three ovulation induction regimens: clomiphene citrate (CC), metformin and the combination of the two. There were 446 women who ovulated in response to the treatments among the entire 626 participants. In this report, we focus on the 418 women who received CC (alone or combined with metformin) to determine if readily available baseline physical characteristics and/or easily obtainable baseline measures could be used to distinguish treatment effectiveness in stimulating ovulation. We used a recursive partitioning technique and developed a node-splitting rule to build decision tree models that reflected within-node and within-treatment responses. RESULTS Overall, the combination of CC plus metformin resulted in an increased incidence of ovulation compared with CC alone. This is particularly so in women with relatively larger left ovarian volumes (?19.5 cubic cm), and a left ovarian volume <19.5 cubic cm was related to treatment outcomes for all subsequent nodes. Women who were older, who had higher baseline insulin, higher waist-to-hip circumference ratio or higher sex hormone-binding globulin levels had better ovulatory rates with CC alone than with the combination of CC plus metformin. CONCLUSIONS Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a phenotypically diverse condition. Both baseline laboratory and clinical parameters can predict the ovulatory response in women with PCOS undergoing ovulation induction. Without a priori hypotheses with regard to any predictors, the observation regarding left ovary volume is novel and worthy of further investigation and validation. PMID:20716558

  3. A clinical decision framework for the identification of main problems and treatment goals for ambulant children with bilateral spastic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Franki, Inge; De Cat, Josse; Deschepper, Ellen; Molenaers, Guy; Desloovere, Kaat; Himpens, Eveline; Vanderstraeten, Guy; Van den Broeck, Chris

    2014-05-01

    The primary aim of the study was to investigate how a clinical decision process based on the International Classification of Function, Disability and Health (ICF) and the Hypothesis-Oriented Algorithm for Clinicians (HOAC-II) can contribute to a reliable identification of main problems in ambulant children with cerebral palsy (CP). As a secondary aim, to evaluate how the additional information from three-dimensional gait analysis (3DGA) can influence the reliability. Twenty-two physical therapists individually defined the main problems and specific goals of eight children with bilateral spastic CP. In four children, the results of 3DGA were provided additionally to the results of the clinical examination and the GMFM-88 (gross motor function measure-88). Frequency analysis was used to evaluate the selected main problems and goals. For the main problems, pair-wise agreement was calculated by the number of corresponding problems between the different therapists and using positive and negative agreement per problem. Cluster analysis using Ward's method was used to evaluate correspondence between the main problems and specific goals. The pair-wise agreement revealed frequencies of 47%, 32% and 3% for the identification of one, two or three corresponding main problems. The number of corresponding main problems was higher when additional information of 3DGA was provided. Most of the specific goals were targeting strength (34%), followed by range of motion (15.2%) and GMFM-D (11.8%). In 29.7% of the cases, therapists could not prioritize and exceeded the number of eight specific goals. Cluster analysis revealed a logic connection between the selection of strength as a main problem and as specific goal parameters. Alignment as a main problem was very often associated with specific parameters like ROM and muscle length and with hypertonia as a main problem. The results show a moderate agreement for the selection of main problems. Therapists are able to use the proposed model for a logic and structured clinical reasoning. Setting priorities in the definition of specific goals is revealed as a remaining difficulty. Further research is required to investigate the additional value of 3DGA and to improve priority setting. PMID:24631275

  4. Understanding variation in primary medical care: a nine-country qualitative study of clinicians’ accounts of the non-clinical factors that shape antibiotic prescribing decisions for lower respiratory tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Brookes-Howell, Lucy; Hood, Kerenza; Cooper, Lucy; Little, Paul; Verheij, Theo; Coenen, Samuel; Godycki-Cwirko, Maciek; Melbye, Hasse; Borras-Santos, Alicia; Worby, Patricia; Jakobsen, Kristin; Goossens, Herman; Butler, Christopher C

    2012-01-01

    Objectives There is a wide variation between European countries in antibiotic prescribing for patients in primary care with lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) that is not explained by case mix and clinical factors alone. Variation in antibiotic prescribing that is not warranted by differences in illness and clinical presentation may increase selection of resistant organisms, contributing to the problem of antibiotic resistance. This study aimed to investigate clinicians’ accounts of non-clinical factors that influence their antibiotic prescribing decision for patients with LRTI, to understand variation and identify opportunities for addressing possible unhelpful variation. Design Multicountry qualitative semistructured interview study, with data subjected to a five-stage analytic framework approach (familiarisation, developing a thematic framework from interview questions and emerging themes, indexing, charting and interpretation), and with interviewers commenting on preliminary analytic themes. Setting Primary care. Participants Eighty primary care clinicians randomly selected from primary care research networks based in nine European cities. Results Clinicians’ accounts identified non-clinical factors imposed by the healthcare system operating within specific regional primary care research networks, including patient access to antibiotics before consulting a doctor (Barcelona and Milan), systems to reduce patient expectations for antibiotics (Southampton and Antwerp) and lack of consistent treatment guidelines (Balatonfüred and ?ód?). Secondly, accounts revealed factors related to specific characteristics of clinicians regardless of network (professional ethos, self-belief in decision-making and commitment to shared decision-making). Conclusions Addressing healthcare system factors (eg, limiting patients’ self-management with antibiotics before consulting in primary care, increased public awareness and provision of more consistent guidelines) may assist in reducing unhelpful variation in antibiotic prescribing. Promoting clinicians’ receptivity to change, confidence in decision-making and readiness to invest in explaining prescribing decisions may also be beneficial. As factors were emphasised differently between networks, local flexibility in interventions is likely to maximise effectiveness. PMID:22918670

  5. Breaking from Big Brother: Computerizing Small, Government-Funded Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodberg, Leonard

    1991-01-01

    Discusses computerizing the operations of small nonprofit organizations and describes the process of computerization and software development for community-based organizations that receive funds from the New York State Weatherization Assistance Program. Training programs are described, and the need to focus on the local agencies is stressed. (LRW)

  6. R-WISE: A Computerized Environment for Tutoring Critical Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, P.; Crevoisier, M.

    This paper describes a computerized environment for teaching the conceptual patterns of critical literacy. While the full implementation of the software covers both reading and writing, this paper covers only the writing aspects of R-WISE (Reading and Writing in a Supportive Environment). R-WISE consists of a suite of computerized "tools" to aid…

  7. Application of computerized tomography to the investigation of ionospheric structures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. D. Raymund; J. R. Austen; S.J. Franke; J. A. Klobuchar; J. Stalker

    1990-01-01

    Ionospheric total electron content (TEC) measurements, obtained simultaneously at several locations, can be processed using computerized tomography (CT) algorithms to obtain two-dimensional images of ionospheric electron density. Using TEC data computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT) reconstructs an image of the electron density structures in a vertical slice above the receiving stations. We successfully applied this technique to realistic simulations of ionospheric

  8. Natural Language Computerized Comparison of Word List Content.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Albert J.; Jacobson, Milton D.

    The development of a computerized system of word analysis in order to compare and compile word lists is outlined. It is suggested that a computerized system would be an efficient way of comparing word lists for such elements as content (according to criteria of range, scope, and form of words), obsolescence, levels of difficulty, number of words,…

  9. A study of reconstruction algorithms in computerized tomographic images

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Arathi; Latha Parameswaran; K. P. Soman

    2010-01-01

    Computerized tomography is extensively used in the medical imaging field. It has made a revolutionary impact in diagnostic medicine, helping doctors to view the internal organs of the human body to a very high precision, at the same time ensuring complete safety to the patient. This paper is a study of two such reconstruction algorithms, most commonly used in computerized

  10. Enhancing Writing-Related Metacognitions through a Computerized Writing Partner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zellermayer, Michal; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Ongoing computerized procedural facilitation with strategies and writing-related metacognitions for improving writing during and after computerized assistance--the Writing Partner (WP)--was studied, using 60 Israeli high school students. Compared to two non-WP groups, the WP group wrote better essays, internalized explicitly provided guidance, and…

  11. Effect of Evidence-based Clinical Decision Support on the Use and Yield of CT Pulmonary Angiographic Imaging in Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Ruth M; Ip, Ivan K; Abbett, Sarah; Gershanik, Esteban F; Raja, Ali S; Hunsaker, Andetta; Khorasani, Ramin

    2015-07-01

    Purpose To determine the effect of clinical decision support (CDS) on the use and yield of inpatient computed tomographic (CT) pulmonary angiography for acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant, institutional review board-approved study with waiver of informed consent included all adults admitted to a 793-bed teaching hospital from April 1, 2007, to June 30, 2012. The CDS intervention, implemented after a baseline observation period, informed providers who placed an order for CT pulmonary angiographic imaging about the pretest probability of the study based on a validated decision rule. Use of CT pulmonary angiographic and admission data from administrative databases was obtained for this study. By using a validated natural language processing algorithm on radiology reports, each CT pulmonary angiographic examination was classified as positive or negative for acute PE. Primary outcome measure was monthly use of CT pulmonary angiography per 1000 admissions. Secondary outcome was CT pulmonary angiography yield (percentage of CT pulmonary angiographic examinations that were positive for acute PE). Linear trend analysis was used to assess for effect and trend differences in use and yield of CT pulmonary angiographic imaging before and after CDS. Results In 272 374 admissions over the study period, 5287 patients underwent 5892 CT pulmonary angiographic examinations. A 12.3% decrease in monthly use of CT pulmonary angiography (26.0 to 22.8 CT pulmonary angiographic examinations per 1000 admissions before and after CDS, respectively; P = .008) observed 1 month after CDS implementation was sustained over the ensuing 32-month period. There was a nonsignificant 16.3% increase in monthly yield of CT pulmonary angiography or percentage of CT pulmonary angiographic examinations positive for acute PE after CDS (P = .65). Conclusion Implementation of evidence-based CDS for inpatients was associated with a 12.3% immediate and sustained decrease in use of CT pulmonary angiographic examinations in the evaluation of inpatients for acute PE. (©) RSNA, 2015 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:25686367

  12. A cluster-randomized controlled trial of a computerized antithrombotic risk assessment tool to optimize stroke prevention in general practice: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Therapy for stroke prevention in older persons with atrial fibrillation (AF) is underutilized despite evidence to support its effectiveness. To prevent stroke in this high-risk population, antithrombotic treatment is necessary. Given the challenges and inherent risks of antithrombotic therapy, decision-making is particularly complex for clinicians, necessitating comprehensive risk:benefit assessments. Targeted interventions are urgently needed to support clinicians in this context; the Computerized Antithrombotic Risk Assessment Tool (CARAT) offers a unique approach to this clinical problem. Methods/design This study (a prospective, cluster-randomized controlled clinical trial) will be conducted across selected regions in the state of New South Wales, Australia. Fifty GPs will be randomized to either the ‘intervention’ or ‘control’ arm, with each GP recruiting 10 patients (aged ?65 with AF); target sample size is 500 patients. GPs in the intervention arm will use CARAT during routine patient consultations to: assess risk factors for stroke, bleeding and medication misadventure; quantify the risk/benefit ratio of antithrombotic treatment, identify the recommended therapy, and decide on the treatment course, for an individual patient. CARAT will be applied by the GP at baseline and repeated at 12 months to identify any changes to treatment requirements. At baseline, the participant (patients and GPs) characteristics will be recorded, as well as relevant practice and clinical parameters. Patient follow up will occur at 1, 6, and 12 months via telephone interview to identify changes to therapy, medication side effects, or clinical events. Discussion This project tests the utility of a novel decision support tool (CARAT) in improving the use of preventative therapy to reduce the significant burden of stroke. Importantly, it targets the interface of patient care (general practice), addresses the at-risk population, evaluates clinical outcomes, and offers a tool that may be sustainable via integration into prescribing software and primary care services. GP support and guidance in identifying at risk patients for the appropriate selection of therapy is widely acknowledged. This trial will evaluate the impact of CARAT on the prescription of antithrombotic therapy, its longer-term impact on clinical outcomes including stroke and bleeding, and clinicians perceived utility of CARAT in practice. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12613000060741. PMID:24507462

  13. Use of RSS feeds for the implementation of clinical reminder.

    PubMed

    Chi, Wen-Chou; Wen, Chia-Hsien; Lin, Chih-Yu; Poon, Sek-Kwong; Huang, Shih-Che

    2012-06-01

    A computer-based reminder system can help physicians get right information and make right decisions in daily clinical work in time. This study presents a RSS-based Clinical Reminding System (RCRS) designed for reminding clinicians to deal with their varied unfinished clinical works. The RCRS was implemented in a hospital to automatically generate messages for every clinician on the basis of clinical information gathered from the hospital information system (HIS) and send them by RSS feed. In order to allow all physicians to participate in the project, the RCRS was integrated with the Computerized Physician Order Entry (COPE) system to provide messages whenever a clinician logs in the HIS; the connection on screen lets the clinician easily make some response. The system can help clinicians focus on patient care without keeping track of the schedule of clinical chores stored in various systems. Two physicians, also directors from Clinical Informatics Research & Development Center (CIRD) who were appointed as project leaders of the RCRS project who went through the entire development process were chosen as interviewees to obtain a preliminary evaluation of the system. The results show the "Information Content" of this system was suggested to be modified, and "Information Accuracy", "Formats", "Ease of use" and "Timeliness" of the system were appropriate to meet the system design purposes. PMID:21399915

  14. A prospective observational study to assess the diagnostic accuracy of clinical decision rules for children presenting to emergency departments after head injuries (protocol): the Australasian Paediatric Head Injury Rules Study (APHIRST)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Head injuries in children are responsible for a large number of emergency department visits. Failure to identify a clinically significant intracranial injury in a timely fashion may result in long term neurodisability and death. Whilst cranial computed tomography (CT) provides rapid and definitive identification of intracranial injuries, it is resource intensive and associated with radiation induced cancer. Evidence based head injury clinical decision rules have been derived to aid physicians in identifying patients at risk of having a clinically significant intracranial injury. Three rules have been identified as being of high quality and accuracy: the Canadian Assessment of Tomography for Childhood Head Injury (CATCH) from Canada, the Children’s Head Injury Algorithm for the Prediction of Important Clinical Events (CHALICE) from the UK, and the prediction rule for the identification of children at very low risk of clinically important traumatic brain injury developed by the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) from the USA. This study aims to prospectively validate and compare the performance accuracy of these three clinical decision rules when applied outside the derivation setting. Methods/design This study is a prospective observational study of children aged 0 to less than 18 years presenting to 10 emergency departments within the Paediatric Research in Emergency Departments International Collaborative (PREDICT) research network in Australia and New Zealand after head injuries of any severity. Predictor variables identified in CATCH, CHALICE and PECARN clinical decision rules will be collected. Patients will be managed as per the treating clinicians at the participating hospitals. All patients not undergoing cranial CT will receive a follow up call 14 to 90 days after the injury. Outcome data collected will include results of cranial CTs (if performed) and details of admission, intubation, neurosurgery and death. The performance accuracy of each of the rules will be assessed using rule specific outcomes and inclusion and exclusion criteria. Discussion This study will allow the simultaneous comparative application and validation of three major paediatric head injury clinical decision rules outside their derivation setting. Trial registration The study is registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR)- ACTRN12614000463673 (registered 2 May 2014). PMID:24927811

  15. Overview of Computerized Library Networking in Canada. Canadian Computerized Bibliographic Centre Study Background Paper. 1979-05-10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duchesne, R. M.; And Others

    Conducted to review the present status of computerized bibliographic centers in Canada and to report on the most effective means of promoting computerized library network development in that country, this study summary of the findings of seven substudies (1) describes the salient features of 20 Canadian and United States centers; (2) reviews major…

  16. MEDICAL DECISION MAKING LIBRARY NUMERIC CATEGORIES 1 Teaching MDM

    E-print Network

    Ford, James

    MEDICAL DECISION MAKING LIBRARY · NUMERIC CATEGORIES 1 Teaching MDM 2 MDM by Computer 3 Medical Decision Making (general) 4 Clinical Decision Making "Rounds" · NEJM "CLinical Problem Solving" 5 Clinical Assessment · Shared Decision Making · Time Preference · Health Utilities 15 Risk 16 Conjoint Analysis 17

  17. Incorporation of expert variability into breast cancer treatment recommendation in designing clinical protocol guided fuzzy rule system models.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, Jonathan M; Zhou, Shang-Ming; Wang, Xiao-Ying; John, Robert I; Ellis, Ian O

    2012-06-01

    It has been often demonstrated that clinicians exhibit both inter-expert and intra-expert variability when making difficult decisions. In contrast, the vast majority of computerized models that aim to provide automated support for such decisions do not explicitly recognize or replicate this variability. Furthermore, the perfect consistency of computerized models is often presented as a de facto benefit. In this paper, we describe a novel approach to incorporate variability within a fuzzy inference system using non-stationary fuzzy sets in order to replicate human variability. We apply our approach to a decision problem concerning the recommendation of post-operative breast cancer treatment; specifically, whether or not to administer chemotherapy based on assessment of five clinical variables: NPI (the Nottingham Prognostic Index), estrogen receptor status, vascular invasion, age and lymph node status. In doing so, we explore whether such explicit modeling of variability provides any performance advantage over a more conventional fuzzy approach, when tested on a set of 1310 unselected cases collected over a fourteen year period at the Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, UK. The experimental results show that the standard fuzzy inference system (that does not model variability) achieves overall agreement to clinical practice around 84.6% (95% CI: 84.1-84.9%), while the non-stationary fuzzy model can significantly increase performance to around 88.1% (95% CI: 88.0-88.2%), p<0.001. We conclude that non-stationary fuzzy models provide a valuable new approach that may be applied to clinical decision support systems in any application domain. PMID:22265814

  18. Decision support system for open-pit lignite mining areas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. KADEN; L MICHELS; K. TDEMER

    1990-01-01

    Open-pit lignite mining has severe impacts on water resources systems. In the German Democratic Republic (GDR), for example, the amount of mine drainage water pumped by about 7000 dewatering wells exceeds 20% of the stable runoff of the whole country. A computerized decision support system (DSS) can be an efficient tool for the analysis of complicated water use problems in

  19. Computerized plutonium wound-analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Waechter, D.A.; Brake, R.J.; Vasilik, D.G.; Erkkila, B.H.

    1983-01-01

    A new plutonium wound monitor has been developed at Los Alamos to upgrade a system which has been in use for about five years. The instrument, called a Computerized Wound Screening System, is designed around a readily available personal computer. It includes a full-function 256-channel pulse height analyzer and software necessary to calculate plutonium and americium activity from a spectrum. This new system provides medical and health physics personnel with considerable flexability in recognizing and recording situations where a wound incurred in a plutonium processing facility might be contaminated. This flexibility includes fast, accurate determination of contaminants in a wound, hard copy printout of results, and full patient logging capabilities via flexible disk storage. Use of a low cost computer greatly simplifies hardware and software design, and makes duplication of the instrument very simple and inexpensive.

  20. Computerized Structure Clearance Measurement System (CSCMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Richard; Kubik, Kurt; Bub, Ed; Townson, Peter

    1994-10-01

    Traditional surveying techniques and the use of mechanical structures mounted on rolling stock are the current methods for measuring clearance around Queensland railway lines. A new method, described in this paper, is being developed for Queensland Rail by a consortium of three Brisbane companies. The project involves the merging of two technologies, both of which are themselves evolving rapidly. The first of these is Digital Photogrammetry which provides 3D information through the processing of stereo images. The second is the capture of digital images and the pre-processing and transmission of large quantities of video data in an industrial environment. The result is a Computerized Structure Clearance Measurement System which allows operators to make accurate measurements with reference to a clearance gauge profile.

  1. Computerized system for translating a torch head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.; Ives, R. E.; Bruce, M. M., Jr.; Pryor, P. P., Jr.; Gard, L. H. (inventors)

    1978-01-01

    The system provides a constant travel speed along a contoured workpiece. It has a driven skate characterized by an elongated bed, with a pair of independently pivoted trucks connected to the bed for support. The trucks are mounted on a contoured track of arbitrary configuration in a mutually spaced relation. An axially extensible torch head manipulator arm is mounted on the bed of the carriage and projects perpendicular from the midportion. The torch head is mounted at its distal end. A real-time computerized control drive subsystem is used to advance the skate along the track of a variable rate for maintaining a constant speed for the torch head tip, and to position the torch axis relative to a preset angle to the workpiece.

  2. Efficiently Establishing Concepts of Inferential Statistics and Hypothesis Decision Making through Contextually Controlled Equivalence Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fienup, Daniel M.; Critchfield, Thomas S.

    2010-01-01

    Computerized lessons that reflect stimulus equivalence principles were used to teach college students concepts related to inferential statistics and hypothesis decision making. Lesson 1 taught participants concepts related to inferential statistics, and Lesson 2 taught them to base hypothesis decisions on a scientific hypothesis and the direction…

  3. Development of a Computerized Adaptive Test for Schizotypy Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca-Pedrero, Eduardo; Menéndez, Luis Fernando; Paino, Mercedes; Lemos-Giráldez, Serafín; Muñiz, José

    2013-01-01

    Background Schizotypal traits in adolescents from the general population represent the behavioral expression of liability for psychotic disorders. Schizotypy assessment in this sector of population has advanced considerably in the last few years; however, it is necessary to incorporate recent advances in psychological and educational measurement. Objective The main goal of this study was to develop a Computerized Adaptive Test (CAT) to evaluate schizotypy through “The Oviedo Questionnaire for Schizotypy Assessment” (ESQUIZO-Q), in non-clinical adolescents. Methods The final sample consisted of 3,056 participants, 1,469 males, with a mean age of 15.9 years (SD?=?1.2). Results The results indicated that the ESQUIZO-Q scores presented adequate psychometric properties under both Classical Test Theory and Item Response Theory. The Information Function estimated using the Gradual Response Model indicated that the item pool effectively assesses schizotypy at the high end of the latent trait. The correlation between the CAT total scores and the paper-and-pencil test was 0.92. The mean number of presented items in the CAT with the standard error fixed at ?0.30 was of 34 items. Conclusion The CAT showed adequate psychometric properties for schizotypy assessment in the general adolescent population. The ESQUIZO-Q adaptive version could be used as a screening method for the detection of adolescents at risk for psychosis in both educational and mental health settings. PMID:24019907

  4. Making decisions: nursing practices in critical care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Judy Currey; Linda Worrall-Carter

    2001-01-01

    This article reports the types and complexity level of decisions made in everyday clinical practice by critical care nurses. It also reports factors that influence the complexity of those decisions. A combination of methods were chosen for the two phase study. In the first phase, 12 qualified critical care nurses documented decisions (over a 2 hour period) on a clinical

  5. Outpatient prescribing errors and the impact of computerized prescribing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tejal K. Gandhi; Saul N. Weingart; Andrew C. Seger; Joshua Borus; Elisabeth Burdick; Eric G. Poon; Lucian L. Leape; David W. Bates

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medication errors are common among inpatients and many are preventable with computerized prescribing. Relatively little is\\u000a known about outpatient prescribing errors or the impact of computerized prescribing in this setting.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a OBJECTIVE: To assess the rates, types, and severity of outpatient prescribing errors and understand the potential impact of computerized\\u000a prescribing.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a DESIGN: Prospective cohort study in 4 adult primary care

  6. Quantitative computerized color vision testing in diabetic retinopathy: A possible screening tool?

    PubMed Central

    Al Saeidi, Rashid; Kernt, Marcus; Kreutzer, Thomas C; Rudolph, Guenther; Neubauer, Aljoscha S; Haritoglou, Christos

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of a computerized color vision testing (Arden color contrast test) as a screening test for detection of diabetic macular edema (DME). Materials and Methods: A consecutive, prospective case series of 83 eyes of 42 diabetic patients with and without macular edema was enrolled. Macular edema was assessed clinically by stereoscopic grading and by central retinal thickness measurement with optical coherence tomography (OCT). Additionally, a computerized chromatest for the protan- and tritan-axis was performed. Analysis of test characteristics included receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and calculated sensitivity and specificity. Results: Sixty-one eyes had clinically significant macular edema (CSME). OCT yielded an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.92. Color vision testing yielded an AUC of 0.82 for the tritan- and 0.80 for the protan-axis. Using a cut off of 199 microns OCT resulted in a 100% sensitivity at 39% specificity. With a cut-off of 4.85, color testing yielded a sensitivity of 100% at a specificity of 8% on the tritan-axis, respectively. Considering OCT instead of clinical examination as a reference standard resulted in a comparable high sensitivity, but low specificity for color vision testing. Disturbance of the tritan axis was more pronounced than for the protan axis in present macular edema and also better correlated (r = 0.46) with retinal thickness measured with OCT. Conclusions: Computerized, quantitative color testing using the chromatest allows detection of diabetic maculopathy with high sensitivity. However, only a low specificity exists for retinal macular edema, as in diabetic retinopathy (DR) frequently abnormalities of the tritan axis exist before any retinal thickening occurs. PMID:24391371

  7. Effect of CPOE User Interface Design on User-Initiated Access to Educational and Patient Information during Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbloom, S. Trent; Geissbuhler, Antoine J.; Dupont, William D.; Giuse, Dario A.; Talbert, Douglas A.; Tierney, William M.; Plummer, W. Dale; Stead, William W.; Miller, Randolph A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Authors evaluated whether displaying context sensitive links to infrequently accessed educational materials and patient information via the user interface of an inpatient computerized care provider order entry (CPOE) system would affect access rates to the materials. Design: The CPOE of Vanderbilt University Hospital (VUH) included “baseline” clinical decision support advice for safety and quality. Authors augmented this with seven new primarily educational decision support features. A prospective, randomized, controlled trial compared clinicians' utilization rates for the new materials via two interfaces. Control subjects could access study-related decision support from a menu in the standard CPOE interface. Intervention subjects received active notification when study-related decision support was available through context sensitive, visibly highlighted, selectable hyperlinks. Measurements: Rates of opportunities to access and utilization of study-related decision support materials from April 1999 through March 2000 on seven VUH Internal Medicine wards. Results: During 4,466 intervention subject-days, there were 240,504 (53.9/subject-day) opportunities for study-related decision support, while during 3,397 control subject-days, there were 178,235 (52.5/subject-day) opportunities for such decision support, respectively (p = 0.11). Individual intervention subjects accessed the decision support features at least once on 3.8% of subject-days logged on (278 responses); controls accessed it at least once on 0.6% of subject-days (18 responses), with a response rate ratio adjusted for decision support frequency of 9.17 (95% confidence interval 4.6–18, p < 0.0005). On average, intervention subjects accessed study-related decision support materials once every 16 days individually and once every 1.26 days in aggregate. Conclusion: Highlighting availability of context-sensitive educational materials and patient information through visible hyperlinks significantly increased utilization rates for study-related decision support when compared to “standard” VUH CPOE methods, although absolute response rates were low. PMID:15802487

  8. Type IV collagen immunostaining and computerized image analysis (SAMBA) in breast and endometrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Charpin, C; Andrac, L; Devictor, B; Habib, M C; Vacheret, H; Xerri, L; Lavaut, M N; Toga, M

    1989-01-01

    Type IV collagen immunostaining was performed on tissue sections from a large series of non-malignant and malignant disorders of the breast and endometrium. The results were analysed by means of a computerized system of image analysis referred to as SAMBA. It was shown that this system provided an accurate, reliable, reproducible, automated and multiparameteric analysis of collagen IV immunoprecipitates. It was concluded that this standardized method of analyses can be routinely used for the measurement of collagen IV, thus enabling correlations to be sought with histopathological and clinical data. PMID:2466757

  9. Development of a computerized equipment management program at Children's Hospital "Bambino Gesù" of Rome, Italy.

    PubMed

    Branca, F P; Cappa, P

    1993-01-01

    The main activities of the Clinical Engineering Service at the Children's Hospital "Bambino Gesù" of Rome, Italy and the computerized system developed in-house for electromedical equipment management are described here. The approach recently adopted and implemented for an objective cost/benefit evaluation of the equipment installed at the hospital is also described. The program outputs appear to be effective tools, both in evaluating maintenance costs and workload increases from new equipment installations and, more relevantly, in comparing similar equipment from different manufacturers during prepurchase evaluation. PMID:10130862

  10. Impact of an electronic clinical decision support system on workflow in antenatal care: the QUALMAT eCDSS in rural health care facilities in Ghana and Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Mensah, Nathan; Sukums, Felix; Awine, Timothy; Meid, Andreas; Williams, John; Akweongo, Patricia; Kaltschmidt, Jens; Haefeli, Walter E.; Blank, Antje

    2015-01-01

    Background The implementation of new technology can interrupt established workflows in health care settings. The Quality of Maternal Care (QUALMAT) project has introduced an electronic clinical decision support system (eCDSS) for antenatal care (ANC) and delivery in rural primary health care facilities in Africa. Objective This study was carried out to investigate the influence of the QUALMAT eCDSS on the workflow of health care workers in rural primary health care facilities in Ghana and Tanzania. Design A direct observation, time-and-motion study on ANC processes was conducted using a structured data sheet with predefined major task categories. The duration and sequence of tasks performed during ANC visits were observed, and changes after the implementation of the eCDSS were analyzed. Results In 24 QUALMAT study sites, 214 observations of ANC visits (144 in Ghana, 70 in Tanzania) were carried out at baseline and 148 observations (104 in Ghana, 44 in Tanzania) after the software was implemented in 12 of those sites. The median time spent combined for all centers in both countries to provide ANC at baseline was 6.5 min [interquartile range (IQR) =4.0–10.6]. Although the time spent on ANC increased in Tanzania and Ghana after the eCDSS implementation as compared to baseline, overall there was no significant increase in time used for ANC activities (0.51 min, p=0.06 in Ghana; and 0.54 min, p=0.26 in Tanzania) as compared to the control sites without the eCDSS. The percentage of medical history taking in women who had subsequent examinations increased after eCDSS implementation from 58.2% (39/67) to 95.3% (61/64) p<0.001 in Ghana but not in Tanzania [from 65.4% (17/26) to 71.4% (15/21) p=0.70]. Conclusions The QUALMAT eCDSS does not increase the time needed for ANC but partly streamlined workflow at sites in Ghana, showing the potential of such a system to influence quality of care positively. PMID:25630707

  11. Computerized image analysis of nails affected by fungal infection: evaluation using digital photographs and manually defined areas.

    PubMed

    Baran, Robert; Sparavigna, Adele; Setaro, Michele; Mailland, Federico

    2004-01-01

    Despite the relevant increase in clinical trials on the efficacy of various systemic and/or topical antifungal agents in onychomycosis therapy, the evaluation of the results is largely subjective. The aim of this study was to set up and ensure an objective, reproducible and reliable method to measure nail plate involvement in onychomycosis. In order to validate a specifically designed software for the computerized image analysis of affected areas of the nail, standardized clinical pictures of onychomycosis were prepared by six different clinicians using a sample of 11 affected nails. Diseased areas and total nail plates were measured both on the clinical pictures and on their drawings traced by the different clinicians on transparent tapes adhering to sample nails. The computerized procedure was undertaken by a trained operator who was not a dermatologist. The variation coefficients of measurements on clinical pictures (automatically detected) and on drawings were compared. In addition, the agreement between automatic evaluation and drawing was evaluated by means of Bland-Altman analysis. To consider the effect of possible variations linked to different operators using the computerized method, 11 clinical pictures (one for each clinical case considered) were selected and submitted to computerized image analysis by six different trained operators. The computerized detection of affected nail areas showed a coefficient of variation (vc=8.5%) lower than that observed on drawings (vc=14.7%). The two methods showed appreciable agreement, as demonstrated by Bland-Altman plot. The coefficient of variation of image analysis conducted by six different operators was very low for the total area calculation (vc=0.9%) and acceptable for pathological area detection (vc=4.8%). Based on the results obtained, we conclude that automatic evaluation is a reliable and helpful method for the measurement of the clinical involvement of the nail plate in onychomycosis and for the evaluation of therapies, since it can increase the objectivity and reproducibility of data. However, in a minority of difficult cases, expert dermatological evaluation is needed. PMID:15552601

  12. Cognitive performance in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis: A longitudinal study in daily practice using a brief computerized cognitive battery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chris Edgar; Peter J Jongen; Evert Sanders; Christian Sindic; Sophie Goffette; Michel Dupuis; Philippe Jacquerye; Daniel Guillaume; Regine Reznik; Keith Wesnes

    2011-01-01

    Background  There is need for a cognitive test battery that can be easily used in clinical practice to detect or monitor cognitive performance\\u000a in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). In order to conduct, in this patient group, a preliminary investigation of the validity\\u000a and utility of a brief computerized battery, the Cognitive Drug Research (CDR) battery, we longitudinally assessed cognition\\u000a in

  13. The Carrot To Read: Computerized Reading Incentive Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engvall, Barb

    1999-01-01

    Describes and compares four computerized reading incentive programs that quiz students on their reading comprehension of self-selected books and award points for their efforts. Topics include price, hardware requirements, reading level, training, and recommendations. (LRW)

  14. Improving Efficiency and Quality in a Computerized ICU

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Karen E.; Sittig, Dean F.; Gardner, Reed M.; Pryor, T. Allan; Budd, Marge

    1988-01-01

    Ongoing efforts have been made to improve the efficiency and quality of care available in ICU's at LDS Hospital. ICU's have been computerized, and patient data collection, storage and presentation have been improved. Nurse care plans and charting have been computerized, and effects of these changes have been evaluated. Work sampling studies showed a decrease in direct patient care (49.1% to 43.2%) and an increase in nurse charting (18.2% to 24.2%) after implementation of computerized nurse charting. These changes were accounted for by a decrease in patient severity of illness. Implementation of the computerized nurse charting system had no significant impact on daily ICU nursing activities. Time savings are not automatic, but could be realized through management practices designed to maximize benefits of the nurse charting system and to make best use of available nursing resources.

  15. Computerized Mappings of the Cerebral Cortex: A Multiresolution Flattening Method

    E-print Network

    Van Essen, David

    Computerized Mappings of the Cerebral Cortex: A Multiresolution Flattening Method and a Surface for the amount o f distortion introduced. The second stage reduces distortions using a multiresolution strategy

  16. Computerized Manufacturing Cell An Earthworm and a Leech robot

    E-print Network

    Major, Arkady

    Computerized Manufacturing Cell An Earthworm and a Leech robot Flexible Robot Gripper Professor S modeled after observing the motion of an earthwork and a leech. #12;Aerodynamic testing of a wind turbine

  17. Evaluation of the Computerized Assessment System for Psychotherapy Evaluation and Research (CASPER) as a Measure of Treatment Effectiveness with Psychiatric Inpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinnaman, Joanna E. Strong; Farrell, Albert D.; Bisconer, Sarah W.

    2006-01-01

    Assessment procedures to evaluate inpatient treatment effectiveness can provide information to inform clinical practice. The Computerized Assessment System for Psychotherapy Evaluation and Research (CASPER) represents a standardized approach to assess patients' target problems that combines elements of individualized and nomothetic approaches.…

  18. Why and how a functional information system improves computerized operations

    SciTech Connect

    Pirus, D. [EDF SEPTEN, Service Etudes et Projets Thermiques et Nucleaires, 12-14, Avenue Dutrievoz, 69628 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2006-07-01

    At the beginning of the eighties, designing a computerized control room was similar to exploring a terra incognita. Some major projects were carried out (N4 project, Kashiwasaki for example) in order to provide initial experience feedback. Today design guidelines and standards exist to help designers and now all projects (for new control rooms or for renovating existing ones) are designed to use computerized operations. Experience feedback on existing projects clearly shows that the computerization of operations significantly improves the overall quality and efficiency of operations. Nevertheless, the computerization of operations introduces new specific problems, the most important being the 'key hole effect' and the lack of global vision. These problems can be directly attributed to the media currently used (the screens) where space is scarce, and to the philosophy used when designing the information system (fundamentally, based on a reproduction of existing piping diagrams with little or no summary information). Yesterday, the challenge was to computerize the control room, today, it is to computerize operations and reduce or eliminate these existing problems. One promising method is to design the HSI using a functional methodology. This paper describes the operators' operational needs and how and why a functional information system can help address those needs. Finally, the paper presents a few proposals on how to design a functional information system. (authors)

  19. Evidence-based care and the case for intuition and tacit knowledge in clinical assessment and decision making in mental health nursing practice: an empirical contribution to the debate.

    PubMed

    Welsh, I; Lyons, C M

    2001-08-01

    This paper provides empirical evidence that challenges the view that methods of clinical assessment and decision making should not rely solely on logical positivist approaches. Whilst the National Health Service (NHS) Executive currently takes a hard positivist line on what constitutes evidence-based practice, data reveal that it is not always appropriate to disregard the tacit knowledge and intuition of experienced practitioners when making assessment decisions in mental health nursing practice. Data support the case for a holistic approach which may draw on intuition and tacit knowledge, as well as traditional approaches, to meet the requirements of clients with complex mental health problems. A model based on Schon's notion of reflection in and reflection on practice is proposed which demonstrates the value of intuition and tacit knowledge. This model allows the generation of insights which may ultimately be demonstrated to be acceptable and empirically testable. It is accepted that an element of risk taking is inevitable, but the inclusion of a formal analytical process into the model reduces the likelihood of inappropriate care interventions. The cognitive processes which experienced nurses use to make clinical decisions and their implications for practice will be explored. PMID:11882142

  20. Decision Making and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reyna, Valerie F.; Nelson, Wendy L.; Han, Paul K.; Pignone, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    We review decision-making along the cancer continuum in the contemporary context of informed and shared decision making, in which patients are encouraged to take a more active role in their health care. We discuss challenges to achieving informed and shared decision making, including cognitive limitations and emotional factors, but argue that understanding the mechanisms of decision making offers hope for improving decision support. Theoretical approaches to decision making that explain cognition, emotion, and their interaction are described, including classical psychophysical approaches, dual-process approaches that focus on conflicts between emotion versus cognition (or reason), and modern integrative approaches such as fuzzy-trace theory. In contrast to the earlier emphasis on rote use of numerical detail, modern approaches emphasize understanding the bottom-line gist of options (which encompasses emotion and other influences on meaning) and retrieving relevant social and moral values to apply to those gist representations. Finally, research on interventions to support better decision making in clinical settings is reviewed, drawing out implications for future research on decision making and cancer. PMID:25730718

  1. Computerized craniofacial reconstruction: Conceptual framework and review.

    PubMed

    Claes, Peter; Vandermeulen, Dirk; De Greef, Sven; Willems, Guy; Clement, John Gerald; Suetens, Paul

    2010-09-10

    When confronted with a corpse that is unrecognizable due to its state of decomposition, soft-tissue mutilation or incineration, and if no other identification evidence is available, craniofacial reconstruction (CFR) can be a useful tool in the identification of the body. Traditional methods are based on manual reconstruction by physically modelling a face on a skull replica with clay or plasticine. The progress in computer science and the improvement of medical imaging technologies during recent years has had a significant impact on this domain. New, fast, flexible and computer-based objective reconstruction programs are under development. Employing the newer technologies and permanently evaluating the obtained results will hopefully lead to more accurate reconstructions, beneficial to the added value of CFR methods during crime-scene investigations. A general model-based workflow is observed, when analysing computerized CFR techniques today. The main purpose of this paper is to give an overview of existing computer-based CFR methods up to date defined within a common framework using a general taxonomy. The paper will also discuss the various alternatives and problems which arise during the process of designing a CFR program. PMID:20359837

  2. Computerized assessment of dental student writing skills.

    PubMed

    Holtzman, Joseph M; Elliot, Norbert; Biber, Cheryl L; Sanders, R Michael

    2005-02-01

    This study tested the feasibility of using computer-based tools for the assessment of written materials produced by dental students. Written assignments produced by three consecutive incoming dental school classes (240 students) were assessed, and the performance among and between classes was analyzed. Computerized assessment of documents produced by students in the context of their regular coursework proved to be an efficient and effective mechanism for assessing performance. Student performance, assessed as a byproduct of this research, was disappointing. The performance of all classes fell below the eleventh grade level, with some students producing written material at a level of sophistication generally expected from middle school children. Existing technology shows promise as a vehicle for enhancing the assessment of dental students' written communication skills. The ease of use and minimal training necessary to apply this technology can help mitigate the time-intensive nature of writing assessment. If this assessment information is then used to enhance instruction--a process inherently available through software such as WebCT--the distance between assessment and instruction may be more readily bridged through an increase in the use of technology. PMID:15689614

  3. Computerized tomography studies of concrete samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martz, H. E.; Roberson, G. P.; Skeate, M. F.; Schneberk, D. J.; Azevedo, S. G.

    1991-06-01

    X-ray computerized tomography (CAT or CT) is a sophisticated imaging technique that provides cross-sectional views of materials, components and assemblies for industrial nondestructive evaluation (NDE). We have studied the feasibility of using CT as an inspection tool for reinforced concrete and the use of multi-energy, linear, attenuation techniques to deduce variations in density (?) and/or atomic number ( Z) that could be caused by varying the types of concrete mixes and/or compaction in the concrete itself. To perform this study, we designed and built a prototype medium-/high-energy (200- to 2000 keV) CT scanner — ZCAT — to image small concrete samples (± 30 cm in diameter and ± 75 cm in height) with a spatial resolution of about 2 mm. We used ZCAT to quantitatively inspect a 20 cm concrete cube with 1.27 cm diameter reinforcing bars (rebars) and to measure p and/or Z variations in a 20 cm diameter concrete cylinder. We describe the ZCAT scanner design, some of its physical limitations and the data-acquisition parameters used in our study. Our results and those of others [1,2] show that CT can be used to inspect reinforced concrete and to distinguish material p and/or Z variations within concrete.

  4. Computerized method for evaluating diagnostic image quality of calcified plaque images in cardiac CT: Validation on a physical dynamic cardiac phantom

    SciTech Connect

    King, Martin; Rodgers, Zachary; Giger, Maryellen L.; Bardo, Dianna M. E.; Patel, Amit R. [Department of Radiology, Committee on Medical Physics, University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, MC 2026, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oregon Health and Science University, 3181 Southwest Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, Oregon 97239 (United States); Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, MC 5084, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: In cardiac computed tomography (CT), important clinical indices, such as the coronary calcium score and the percentage of coronary artery stenosis, are often adversely affected by motion artifacts. As a result, the expert observer must decide whether or not to use these indices during image interpretation. Computerized methods potentially can be used to assist in these decisions. In a previous study, an artificial neural network (ANN) regression model provided assessability (image quality) indices of calcified plaque images from the software NCAT phantom that were highly agreeable with those provided by expert observers. The method predicted assessability indices based on computer-extracted features of the plaque. In the current study, the ANN-predicted assessability indices were used to identify calcified plaque images with diagnostic calcium scores (based on mass) from a physical dynamic cardiac phantom. The basic assumption was that better quality images were associated with more accurate calcium scores. Methods: A 64-channel CT scanner was used to obtain 500 calcified plaque images from a physical dynamic cardiac phantom at different heart rates, cardiac phases, and plaque locations. Two expert observers independently provided separate sets of assessability indices for each of these images. Separate sets of ANN-predicted assessability indices tailored to each observer were then generated within the framework of a bootstrap resampling scheme. For each resampling iteration, the absolute calcium score error between the calcium scores of the motion-contaminated plaque image and its corresponding stationary image served as the ground truth in terms of indicating images with diagnostic calcium scores. The performances of the ANN-predicted and observer-assigned indices in identifying images with diagnostic calcium scores were then evaluated using ROC analysis. Results: Assessability indices provided by the first observer and the corresponding ANN performed similarly (AUC{sub OBS1}=0.80 [0.73,0.86] vs AUC{sub ANN1}=0.88 [0.82,0.92]) as that of the second observer and the corresponding ANN (AUC{sub OBS2}=0.87 [0.83,0.91] vs AUC{sub ANN2}=0.90 [0.85,0.94]). Moreover, the ANN-predicted indices were generated in a fraction of the time required to obtain the observer-assigned indices. Conclusions: ANN-predicted assessability indices performed similar to observer-assigned assessability indices in identifying images with diagnostic calcium scores from the physical dynamic cardiac phantom. The results of this study demonstrate the potential of using computerized methods for identifying images with diagnostic clinical indices in cardiac CT images.

  5. Computerized Farm of the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrann, James M.

    Advancement in computer technology comes at a time when agriculture is in transition from a production-oriented to a business-oriented activity and will require new skills and knowledge if farmers are to be prepared for the future. Electronic technology applications on 21st century commercial farms and ranches will include farm decision support…

  6. Experience in computerized case history handling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. I. Burakovskii; L. A. Bokeriya; V. A. Lishchuk; V. L. Stolyar

    1987-01-01

    Experience of the use of ACH in a clinic for cardiac surgery now extends over a period of 3 years. Definite reorganization of the work of virtually all services of the clinic was required for this purpose, in connection with the possibilities and the specific features of information input\\/output in the ACH.

  7. Advances in gastric emptying studies by means of computerized scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Gordón, F; Muñóz, R; Villarreal, J; González-Montesinos, F; Lifshitz, A; Cervantes, L

    1980-01-01

    Gastric emptying studies were begun in 1833. However, as information on this phenomenon became more available it became more difficult to unify studies in order to make them more applicable for the study and treatment of functional disturbances and organic diseases. In this work an innocuous, objective and precise method is described, that consists of the study of gastric emptying in two stages in healthy individuals. In the first, basic substances of food were administered and in the second, usual 1,050 calorie meals all marked with Technetium-99 m macroaggregates, were given. Two scintillation cameras were used coupled to computerized data processing systems from where quantitative information and black and white Polaroid pictures were obtained. In the first stage, six healthy volunteers were studied who received basic food substances in different sessions. In the second stage, 10 healthy volunteers were studied who received a type of meal common in our environment. In all cases gastric emptying curves were obtained plotting radioactivity counts v.s. time. Weibull's distribution was the statistical method applied. According to the ingested substances, results showed different emptying curves of a complex exponential type. Although gastric emptying is immediate, it is parallel to the presence of plateaus in the initial part of the study; an apparently delayed phenomenon that had been overlooked and is explained in the discussion part of this paper. Results obtained have offered the possibility of an abundant volume of studies that should clarify existing doubts in the future with a wide field for clinical application. PMID:7469657

  8. Classifying mammographic lesions using computerized image analysis.

    PubMed

    Kilday, J; Palmieri, F; Fox, M D

    1993-01-01

    The classification of 3 common breast lesions, fibroadenomas, cysts, and cancers, was achieved using computerized image analysis of tumor shape in conjunction with patient age. The process involved the digitization of 69 mammographic images using a video camera and a commercial frame grabber on a PC-based computer system. An interactive segmentation procedure identified the tumor boundary using a thresholding technique which successfully segmented 57% of the lesions. Several features were chosen based on the gross and fine shape describing properties of the tumor boundaries as seen on the radiographs. Patient age was included as a significant feature in determining whether the tumor was a cyst, fibroadenoma, or cancer and was the only patient history information available for this study. The concept of a radial length measure provided a basis from which 6 of the 7 shape describing features were chosen, the seventh being tumor circularity. The feature selection process was accomplished using linear discriminant analysis and a Euclidean distance metric determined group membership. The effectiveness of the classification scheme was tested using both the apparent and the leaving-one-out test methods. The best results using the apparent test method resulted in correctly classifying 82% of the tumors segmented using the entire feature space and the highest classification rate using the leaving-one-out test method was 69% using a subset of the feature space. The results using only the shape descriptors, and excluding patient age resulted in correctly classifying 72% using the entire feature space (except age), and 51% using a subset of the feature space. PMID:18218460

  9. The Influence of Family and Significant Others on Women's Decisions to Obtain an Abortion: A Study of a Northwest Louisiana Abortion Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Bertina Loutrice

    2011-01-01

    This study researched whether family members and significant others influence a woman's decision to obtain an abortion. Influence is defined by Merriam-Webster (2011) as the power or capacity of causing an effect in indirect or intangible ways; power exerted over the minds or behaviors of others. The theoretical framework that will be used in…

  10. Application of Adaptive Decision Aiding Systems to Computer-Assisted Instruction. Final Report, January-December 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Donald M.; And Others

    The minicomputer-based Computerized Diagnostic and Decision Training (CDDT) system described combines the principles of artificial intelligence, decision theory, and adaptive computer assisted instruction for training in electronic troubleshooting. The system incorporates an adaptive computer program which learns the student's diagnostic and…

  11. The abortion decision: fantasy processes.

    PubMed

    Allanson, S; Astbury, J

    1996-09-01

    This paper considers that features intrinsic to pregnancy and to an unwanted pregnancy/abortion decision heighten the likelihood of the occurrence, and the importance, of fantasy in the decision-maker's thinking. In addition, investigation of fantasy or non-rational processes in an abortion decision emphasizes the complexity of decision-making in a way which may challenge ideas of decision-making in general. The results of a pilot study using a short fantasy inventory with 20 women facing an abortion decision are presented to highlight fantasy, not as irrational or pathological, but as legitimately coexisting with logical, reasoning, non-fantasy thought in the abortion decision. The clinical value of the fantasy inventory is explored. PMID:8892162

  12. Methodology for Studying the Cost-Effectiveness of the TRIMIS Computerized Electrocardiography System*

    PubMed Central

    Lyddy, James E.; Drazen, Erica L.

    1980-01-01

    The TRIMIS Program Office has implemented an initial computerized electrocardiography (ECG) system, known as CAPOC, in the San Diego, California region. With sponsorship from TRIMIS, Arthur D. Little, Inc. is conducting an evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of CAPOC in order to provide information to be used in decision-making regarding purchase of additional systems for other regions of the United States. The evaluation method has included the establishment of criteria for acceptable ECG services. Based upon these criteria the cost per acceptable ECG both before and after computer implementation will be determined. This paper describes the method, which may also be applicable for assessing other types of computer-based medical systems.

  13. 45 CFR 310.25 - What conditions apply to acquisitions of Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED TRIBAL IV-D SYSTEMS AND OFFICE AUTOMATION Funding for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation § 310.25 What conditions apply to acquisitions of Computerized Tribal...

  14. 45 CFR 310.25 - What conditions apply to acquisitions of Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED TRIBAL IV-D SYSTEMS AND OFFICE AUTOMATION Funding for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation § 310.25 What conditions apply to acquisitions of Computerized Tribal...

  15. 45 CFR 310.25 - What conditions apply to acquisitions of Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED TRIBAL IV-D SYSTEMS AND OFFICE AUTOMATION Funding for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation § 310.25 What conditions apply to acquisitions of Computerized Tribal...

  16. 45 CFR 310.25 - What conditions apply to acquisitions of Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED TRIBAL IV-D SYSTEMS AND OFFICE AUTOMATION Funding for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation § 310.25 What conditions apply to acquisitions of Computerized Tribal...

  17. 45 CFR 310.25 - What conditions apply to acquisitions of Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED TRIBAL IV-D SYSTEMS AND OFFICE AUTOMATION Funding for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation § 310.25 What conditions apply to acquisitions of Computerized Tribal...

  18. An e-Health Decision Support System for Improving Compliance of Health Workers to the Maternity Care Protocols in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Horner, V.; Rautenbach, P.; Mbananga, N.; Mashamba, T.; Kwinda, H.

    2013-01-01

    Background There are problems of quality in maternity services at primary health care level in South Africa. Many of these problems can be traced to non-adherence to the maternity care guidelines and lack of tools to support clinic staff and managers in their roles. Objective: The aim of this research was to investigate the utility of e-health (computerized) decision support systems at addressing the problem of compliance of health workers to the maternity care guidelines at primary health care in South Africa. At present there are no documented studies on e-health clinical decision support systems for primary health care in South Africa, though clinical decision support systems for primary health care are listed as part of the e-health strategy of the National Department of Health. Methods: An e-health decision support system named the Bacis (Basic Antenatal Care Information System) Program was developed, then implemented and evaluated at a primary health care clinic. The duration of the study was two years: this includes development, implementation and evaluation. Results and Conclusion There was an overall improvement in compliance from 85.1 % to 89.3%. This result was not statistically significant. However when results were stratified into specific categories, the Bacis Program showed statistically significant improvement in compliance over the checklist system in three out of nine important categories. These are compliance at booking, patients younger than 18 years and patients booking after week 20. Further, insights and experience were also gained on development and implementation of clinical information systems at resource strained environments such as primary health care in South Africa. These results, insights and experience are invaluable for the implementation of the proposed e-health strategy in South Africa. PMID:23650485

  19. GENERATING PROSTATE MODELS BY MEANS OF GEOMETRIC DEFORMATION WITH APPLICATION TO COMPUTERIZED TRAINING OF CRYOSURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Sehrawat, Anjali; Shimada, Kenji; Rabin, Yoed

    2014-01-01

    Purpose As a part of an ongoing effort to develop computerized training tools for cryosurgery, this study presents a scheme to geometrically deform a 3D organ template in order to generate clinically relevant prostate models. The objective for creating deformed models is to develop a database for computerized training. This study further presents compiled literature data on the likelihood of cancer tumor growth in the prostate and its relationship to the prostate shape. Methods Cryosurgery is typically performed on patients with localized prostate cancer, found in stages T3 or earlier. The analysis is restricted to cancer originating from the peripheral zone of the prostate as majority of cancer cases are found within this region. The distribution of geometric features, likely to be found in prostates at stage T3, is determined using tumor growth patterns that attribute to changes in the prostate surface. The extended free-form deformation (EFFD) method is applied on a 3D prostate template to create localized surface changes that resemble cancerous prostates. Results Deformed prostate models were generated using the process of: (1) selecting the desired deformation parameters—extra capsular extension (ECE) range and location, and (2) manipulating the lattice control points until the deformed prostate model's ECE length and transverse span fall within the pre-selected ranges. Conclusions EFFD is an efficient method to rapidly generate prostate models for the application of computerized training of cryosurgery. While the selected criteria for deformation do not lead to a unique shape, since the contours of the deformed body are randomly selected, they do lead to shapes resembling cancer growth, as various growth histories can lead to different ECE shapes of the same maximum extension. PMID:22782183

  20. Current Human Reliability Analysis Methods Applied to Computerized Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald L. Boring

    2012-06-01

    Computerized procedures (CPs) are an emerging technology within nuclear power plant control rooms. While CPs have been implemented internationally in advanced control rooms, to date no US nuclear power plant has implemented CPs in its main control room (Fink et al., 2009). Yet, CPs are a reality of new plant builds and are an area of considerable interest to existing plants, which see advantages in terms of enhanced ease of use and easier records management by omitting the need for updating hardcopy procedures. The overall intent of this paper is to provide a characterization of human reliability analysis (HRA) issues for computerized procedures. It is beyond the scope of this document to propose a new HRA approach or to recommend specific methods or refinements to those methods. Rather, this paper serves as a review of current HRA as it may be used for the analysis and review of computerized procedures.