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Sample records for computerized ionospheric tomography

  1. Mid-America Computerized Ionospheric Tomography Experiment (MACE '93)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronschnabl, G. R.; Bust, G. S.; Cook, J. A.; Vasicek, C. J.

    1995-01-01

    A computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT) experiment utilizing an array of nine Navy Navigation Satellite System (NNSS) receivers deployed along a north-south line from South Dakota to south Texas (spanning over 2000 km) is currently underway. The Mid-America Computerized Ionospheric Tomography Experiment (MACE '93) began collecting data from three receivers deployed in Texas on June 1, 1993. This "short communiqué" presents preliminary results from the experiment.

  2. Comparisons of ionospheric electron density distributions reconstructed by GPS computerized tomography, backscatter ionograms, and vertical ionograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen; Lei, Yong; Li, Bofeng; An, Jiachun; Zhu, Peng; Jiang, Chunhua; Zhao, Zhengyu; Zhang, Yuannong; Ni, Binbin; Wang, Zemin; Zhou, Xuhua

    2015-12-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) computerized ionosphere tomography (CIT) and ionospheric sky wave ground backscatter radar are both capable of measuring the large-scale, two-dimensional (2-D) distributions of ionospheric electron density (IED). Here we report the spatial and temporal electron density results obtained by GPS CIT and backscatter ionogram (BSI) inversion for three individual experiments. Both the GPS CIT and BSI inversion techniques demonstrate the capability and the consistency of reconstructing large-scale IED distributions. To validate the results, electron density profiles obtained from GPS CIT and BSI inversion are quantitatively compared to the vertical ionosonde data, which clearly manifests that both methods output accurate information of ionopsheric electron density and thereby provide reliable approaches to ionospheric soundings. Our study can improve current understanding of the capability and insufficiency of these two methods on the large-scale IED reconstruction.

  3. Using computerized tomography to determine ionospheric structures. Part 1, Notivation and basic approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Vittitoe, C.N.

    1993-08-01

    Properties of the ionosphere are reviewed along with its correlations with other geophysical phenomena and with applications of ionospheric studies to communication, navigation, and surveillance systems. Computer tomography is identified as a method to determine the detailed, three-dimensional distribution of electron density within the ionosphere. Several tomography methods are described, with a basic approach illustrated by an example. Limitations are identified.

  4. A new mapping technique for conversion of slant TEC to vertical TEC based on Computerized Ionospheric Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuyan, Pradip; Bhuyan, Pradip; Bhuyan, Kalyan

    The most frequently used mapping function for converting slant TEC to vertical TEC uses a single layer model with the assumption that all free electrons are concentrated in an infinitesimally thick spherical shell at the mean ionospheric height and containing the ionospheric pierce point. Spatial structures present in the ionosphere are not taken into account in such single layer models. A three dimensional mapping algorithm developed by Mannucci et al. (1999) uses three independent constant density slabs stacked vertically to model the electron density with the result of reduction in a level error of the TEC maps. We describe a new approach based on Computerized Ionospheric Tomography (CIT) to convert STEC to VTEC. The new method is independent of any assumption regarding the electron density distribution of the ionosphere. In this method, the ionosphere region of interest is divided in to pixels and TEC is represented as the sum of the integration of empirical functions within the pixels, which are intersected by the path along which TEC is measured. Using a suitable inversion algorithm, the empirical function within each pixel is retrieved from TEC data recorded simultaneously at a meridional chain of GPS receivers. The VTEC values are then easily obtained as the sum of the integration of the empirical functions within each pixel along a vertical path. The CIT method is applied for converting STEC to VTEC using GPS TEC data collected at 12 locations across India since 2003. The stations are aligned along three meridional chains. The vertical TEC values obtained from the CIT method are then compared to VTEC obtained from a single layer model. Results have shown that the CIT can be suitably adapted as a mapping technique, which takes into account the presence of spatial structures in the ionosphere. Keywords: Ionosphere (Indian equatorial and low latitude ionosphere, Vertical Total Electron Content, mapping functions, computerized ionospheric tomography)

  5. Regional model-based computerized ionospheric tomography using GPS measurements: IONOLAB-CIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuna, Hakan; Arikan, Orhan; Arikan, Feza

    2015-10-01

    Three-dimensional imaging of the electron density distribution in the ionosphere is a crucial task for investigating the ionospheric effects. Dual-frequency Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite signals can be used to estimate the slant total electron content (STEC) along the propagation path between a GPS satellite and ground-based receiver station. However, the estimated GPS-STEC is very sparse and highly nonuniformly distributed for obtaining reliable 3-D electron density distributions derived from the measurements alone. Standard tomographic reconstruction techniques are not accurate or reliable enough to represent the full complexity of variable ionosphere. On the other hand, model-based electron density distributions are produced according to the general trends of ionosphere, and these distributions do not agree with measurements, especially for geomagnetically active hours. In this study, a regional 3-D electron density distribution reconstruction method, namely, IONOLAB-CIT, is proposed to assimilate GPS-STEC into physical ionospheric models. The proposed method is based on an iterative optimization framework that tracks the deviations from the ionospheric model in terms of F2 layer critical frequency and maximum ionization height resulting from the comparison of International Reference Ionosphere extended to Plasmasphere (IRI-Plas) model-generated STEC and GPS-STEC. The suggested tomography algorithm is applied successfully for the reconstruction of electron density profiles over Turkey, during quiet and disturbed hours of ionosphere using Turkish National Permanent GPS Network.

  6. 4D computerized ionospheric tomography by using GPS measurements and IRI-Plas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuna, Hakan; Arikan, Feza; Arikan, Orhan

    2016-07-01

    Ionospheric imaging is an important subject in ionospheric studies. GPS based TEC measurements provide very accurate information about the electron density values in the ionosphere. However, since the measurements are generally very sparse and non-uniformly distributed, computation of 3D electron density estimation from measurements alone is an ill-defined problem. Model based 3D electron density estimations provide physically feasible distributions. However, they are not generally compliant with the TEC measurements obtained from GPS receivers. In this study, GPS based TEC measurements and an ionosphere model known as International Reference Ionosphere Extended to Plasmasphere (IRI-Plas) are employed together in order to obtain a physically accurate 3D electron density distribution which is compliant with the real measurements obtained from a GPS satellite - receiver network. Ionospheric parameters input to the IRI-Plas model are perturbed in the region of interest by using parametric perturbation models such that the synthetic TEC measurements calculated from the resultant 3D electron density distribution fit to the real TEC measurements. The problem is considered as an optimization problem where the optimization parameters are the parameters of the parametric perturbation models. Proposed technique is applied over Turkey, on both calm and storm days of the ionosphere. Results show that the proposed technique produces 3D electron density distributions which are compliant with IRI-Plas model, GPS TEC measurements and ionosonde measurements. The effect of the GPS receiver station number on the performance of the proposed technique is investigated. Results showed that 7 GPS receiver stations in a region as large as Turkey is sufficient for both calm and storm days of the ionosphere. Since the ionization levels in the ionosphere are highly correlated in time, the proposed technique is extended to the time domain by applying Kalman based tracking and smoothing

  7. Computerized tomography calibrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Herbert P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A set of interchangeable pieces comprising a computerized tomography calibrator, and a method of use thereof, permits focusing of a computerized tomographic (CT) system. The interchangeable pieces include a plurality of nestable, generally planar mother rings, adapted for the receipt of planar inserts of predetermined sizes, and of predetermined material densities. The inserts further define openings therein for receipt of plural sub-inserts. All pieces are of known sizes and densities, permitting the assembling of different configurations of materials of known sizes and combinations of densities, for calibration (i.e., focusing) of a computerized tomographic system through variation of operating variables thereof. Rather than serving as a phanton, which is intended to be representative of a particular workpiece to be tested, the set of interchangeable pieces permits simple and easy standardized calibration of a CT system. The calibrator and its related method of use further includes use of air or of particular fluids for filling various openings, as part of a selected configuration of the set of pieces.

  8. A new computerized ionosphere tomography model using the mapping function and an application to the study of seismic-ionosphere disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Jian; Yao, Yibin; Liu, Lei; Zhai, Changzhi; Wang, Zemin

    2016-08-01

    A new algorithm for ionosphere tomography using the mapping function is proposed in this paper. First, the new solution splits the integration process into four layers along the observation ray, and then, the single-layer model (SLM) is applied to each integration part using a mapping function. Next, the model parameters are estimated layer by layer with the Kalman filtering method by introducing the scale factor (SF) γ to solve the ill-posed problem. Finally, the inversed images of different layers are combined into the final CIT image. We utilized simulated data from 23 IGS GPS stations around Europe to verify the estimation accuracy of the new algorithm; the results show that the new CIT model has better accuracy than the SLM in dense data areas and the CIT residuals are more closely grouped. The stability of the new algorithm is discussed by analyzing model accuracy under different error levels (the max errors are 5TECU, 10TECU, 15TECU, respectively). In addition, the key preset parameter, SFγ , which is given by the International Reference Ionosphere model (IRI2012). The experiment is designed to test the sensitivity of the new algorithm to SF variations. The results show that the IRI2012 is capable of providing initial SF values. Also in this paper, the seismic-ionosphere disturbance (SID) of the 2011 Japan earthquake is studied using the new CIT algorithm. Combined with the TEC time sequence of Sat.15, we find that the SID occurrence time and reaction area are highly related to the main shock time and epicenter. According to CIT images, there is a clear vertical electron density upward movement (from the 150-km layer to the 450-km layer) during this SID event; however, the peak value areas in the different layers were different, which means that the horizontal movement velocity is not consistent among the layers. The potential physical triggering mechanism is also discussed in this paper. Compared with the SLM, the RMS of the new CIT model is improved by

  9. A new computerized ionosphere tomography model using the mapping function and an application to the study of seismic-ionosphere disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Jian; Yao, Yibin; Liu, Lei; Zhai, Changzhi; Wang, Zemin

    2016-05-01

    A new algorithm for ionosphere tomography using the mapping function is proposed in this paper. First, the new solution splits the integration process into four layers along the observation ray, and then, the single-layer model (SLM) is applied to each integration part using a mapping function. Next, the model parameters are estimated layer by layer with the Kalman filtering method by introducing the scale factor (SF) γ to solve the ill-posed problem. Finally, the inversed images of different layers are combined into the final CIT image. We utilized simulated data from 23 IGS GPS stations around Europe to verify the estimation accuracy of the new algorithm; the results show that the new CIT model has better accuracy than the SLM in dense data areas and the CIT residuals are more closely grouped. The stability of the new algorithm is discussed by analyzing model accuracy under different error levels (the max errors are 5TECU, 10TECU, 15TECU, respectively). In addition, the key preset parameter, SFγ , which is given by the International Reference Ionosphere model (IRI2012). The experiment is designed to test the sensitivity of the new algorithm to SF variations. The results show that the IRI2012 is capable of providing initial SF values. Also in this paper, the seismic-ionosphere disturbance (SID) of the 2011 Japan earthquake is studied using the new CIT algorithm. Combined with the TEC time sequence of Sat.15, we find that the SID occurrence time and reaction area are highly related to the main shock time and epicenter. According to CIT images, there is a clear vertical electron density upward movement (from the 150-km layer to the 450-km layer) during this SID event; however, the peak value areas in the different layers were different, which means that the horizontal movement velocity is not consistent among the layers. The potential physical triggering mechanism is also discussed in this paper. Compared with the SLM, the RMS of the new CIT model is improved by

  10. Using computerized tomography to determine ionospheric structures. Part 2, A method using curved paths to increase vertical resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Vittitoe, C.N.

    1993-08-01

    A method is presented to unfold the two-dimensional vertical structure in electron density by using data on the total electron content for a series of paths through the ionosphere. The method uses a set of orthonormal basis functions to represent the vertical structure and takes advantage of curved paths and the eikonical equation to reduce the number of iterations required for a solution. Curved paths allow a more thorough probing of the ionosphere with a given set of transmitter and receiver positions. The approach can be directly extended to more complex geometries.

  11. Research on ionospheric tomography based on variable pixel height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Dunyong; Li, Peiqing; He, Jie; Hu, Wusheng; Li, Chaokui

    2016-05-01

    A novel ionospheric tomography technique based on variable pixel height was developed for the tomographic reconstruction of the ionospheric electron density distribution. The method considers the height of each pixel as an unknown variable, which is retrieved during the inversion process together with the electron density values. In contrast to conventional computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT), which parameterizes the model with a fixed pixel height, the variable-pixel-height computerized ionospheric tomography (VHCIT) model applies a disturbance to the height of each pixel. In comparison with conventional CIT models, the VHCIT technique achieved superior results in a numerical simulation. A careful validation of the reliability and superiority of VHCIT was performed. According to the results of the statistical analysis of the average root mean square errors, the proposed model offers an improvement by 15% compared with conventional CIT models.

  12. Radio tomography of the ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kunitsyn, V.E.; Tereshchenko, E.D. RAN, Poliarnyi Geofizicheskii Inst., Murmansk )

    1992-10-01

    This paper provides on overview of tomographic approaches to ionospheric remote sensing in the radio-wave range. The ionosphere has a very complicated structure. Thus, it is reasonable to divide tomographic methods into deterministic and statistical ones. The deterministic tomography problems can be subdivided into ray radio tomography and diffraction radio tomography. The statistical radio tomography approach is used when it is necessary to reconstruct the statistical structure of a great number of inhomogeneities, on the basis of measurements of field statistics (instead of one realization of the reconstruction of an inhomogeneity). The methods of solving radio-tomography problems, and their connection with inverse-scattering problems, are considered. The results of some first experiments are described, which show the possibilities of the radio tomography approaches. In conclusion, we discuss perspectives, directions of the development of radio tomography, and problems which appear. 30 refs.

  13. X-ray computerized tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wellington, S.L.; Vinegar, H.J.

    1987-08-01

    Computerized tomography (CT) is a new radiological imaging technique that measures density and atomic composition inside opaque objects. A revolutionary advance in medical radiology since 1972, CT has only recently been applied in petrophysics and reservoir engineering. This paper discusses several petrophysical applications, including three-dimensional (3D) measurement of density and porosity; rock mechanics studies; correlation of core logs with well logs; characterization of mud invasion, fractures, and disturbed core; and quantification of complex mineralogies and sand/shale ratios. Reservoir engineering applications presented include fundamental studies of CO/sub 2/ displacement in cores, focussing on viscous fingering, gravity segregation, miscibility, and mobility control.

  14. Calibrator Blocks For Computerized Tomography (CT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, H. Peter

    1990-01-01

    Sets of calibrator blocks developed for use with industrial computerized tomography (CT) systems. Set of blocks (or number of stacked sets of blocks) placed on object table of CT system and scanned in usual way. Blocks include holes of known size, shape, and location. Appearance of holes in output image of CT system used to verify operation of system.

  15. Computerized tomography in evaluation of hepatic neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Luna, R.F.; Resende, C.; Tishler, J.M.A.; Aldrete, J.S.; Shin, M.S.; Rubin, E.; Rahn, N.H.

    1984-08-01

    The authors reviewed their experience with computerized tomography (CT) of the abdomen in 212 patients with histologically documented liver neoplasms seen during a 30-month period. The CT findings in cavernous hemangioma and focal nodular hyperplasia were specific, and permitted accurate diagnosis of this lesion before biopsy. The CT appearance of all other lesions was variable. CT is useful in providing an accurate evaluation of the intrahepatic and extrahepatic extent of the neoplasm.

  16. Analysis of rocket beacon transmissions for computerized reconstruction of ionospheric densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Huba, J. D.; Chaturvedi, P. K.; Fulford, J. A.; Forsyth, P. A.; Anderson, D. N.; Zalesak, S. T.

    1993-08-01

    Three methods are described to obtain ionospheric electron densities from transionospheric, rocket-beacon TEC data. First, when the line-of-sight from a ground receiver to the rocket beacon is tangent to the flight trajectory, the electron concentration can be obtained by differentiating the TEC with respect to the distance to the rocket. A similar method may be used to obtain the electron-density profile if the layer is horizontally stratified. Second, TEC data obtained during chemical release experiments may be interpreted with the aid of physical models of the disturbed ionosphere to yield spatial maps of the modified regions. Third, computerized tomography (CT) can be used to analyze TEC data obtained along a chain of ground-based receivers aligned along the plane of the rocket trajectory. CT analysis of TEC data is used to reconstruct a 2D image of a simulated equatorial plume. TEC data is computed for a linear chain of nine receivers with adjacent spacings of either 100 or 200 km. The simulation data are analyzed to provide an F region reconstruction on a grid with 15 x 15 km pixels. Ionospheric rocket tomography may also be applied to rocket-assisted measurements of amplitude and phase scintillations and airglow intensities.

  17. Analysis of rocket beacon transmissions for computerized reconstruction of ionospheric densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Huba, J. D.; Chaturvedi, P. K.; Fulford, J. A.; Forsyth, P. A.; Anderson, D. N.; Zalesak, S. T.

    1993-01-01

    Three methods are described to obtain ionospheric electron densities from transionospheric, rocket-beacon TEC data. First, when the line-of-sight from a ground receiver to the rocket beacon is tangent to the flight trajectory, the electron concentration can be obtained by differentiating the TEC with respect to the distance to the rocket. A similar method may be used to obtain the electron-density profile if the layer is horizontally stratified. Second, TEC data obtained during chemical release experiments may be interpreted with the aid of physical models of the disturbed ionosphere to yield spatial maps of the modified regions. Third, computerized tomography (CT) can be used to analyze TEC data obtained along a chain of ground-based receivers aligned along the plane of the rocket trajectory. CT analysis of TEC data is used to reconstruct a 2D image of a simulated equatorial plume. TEC data is computed for a linear chain of nine receivers with adjacent spacings of either 100 or 200 km. The simulation data are analyzed to provide an F region reconstruction on a grid with 15 x 15 km pixels. Ionospheric rocket tomography may also be applied to rocket-assisted measurements of amplitude and phase scintillations and airglow intensities.

  18. Ionospheric tomography using the FORTE satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T.C.

    1993-08-01

    The possibility of obtaining ionospheric profile data via tomographic techniques has elicited considerable interest in recent years. The input data for the method is a set of total electron content measurements along intersecting lines of sight which form a grid. This can conveniently be provided by a fast-moving satellite with a VHF beacon which will generate the multiple paths needed for effective tomography. Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories will launch and operate the FORTE satellite for the US Department of Energy, with launch scheduled in 1995. FORTE will provide such a beacon. Additionally, wideband VHF receivers aboard the satellite will allow corraborative measurements of ionospheric profile parameters in some cases.

  19. Computerized tomography in acute and chronic pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Kalmar, J.A.; Matthews, C.C.; Bishop, L.A.

    1984-11-01

    Modern imaging techniques have revolutionized the diagnostic evaluation of pancreatitis, primarily demonstrating its complications. Computerized tomography (CT) is a more sensitive method than ultrasonography and pancreatic ductography. A chart review revealed 214 patients at our hospital with a discharge diagnosis of pancreatitis. Sixty patients had CT for evaluation of possible complications. Only five scans were normal. Of 37 cases of acute pancreatitis, 92% demonstrated localized or diffuse enlargement, and 65% showed loss of pancreatic outline. Other frequent findings included thickening of perirenal fascia (49%), ileus (43%), edema of mesentery (35%), and inflammatory exudate (32%). Abscess and pseudocyst were each detected in 8% of cases. In chronic pancreatitis 65% of patients showed localized or diffuse pancreatic enlargement. Atrophy of the gland (30%), calcification (30%), pseudocyst (26%), and dilated pancreatic ducts (17%) were also seen. CT is effective in evaluating pancreatitis and its complications. 14 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  20. Using sparse regularization for multiresolution tomography of the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panicciari, T.; Smith, N. D.; Mitchell, C. N.; Da Dalt, F.; Spencer, P. S. J.

    2015-03-01

    Computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT) is a technique that allows reconstructing the state of the ionosphere in terms of electron content from a set of Slant Total Electron Content (STEC) measurements. It is usually denoted as an inverse problem. In this experiment, the measurements are considered coming from the phase of the GPS signal and, therefore, affected by bias. For this reason the STEC cannot be considered in absolute terms but rather in relative terms. Measurements are collected from receivers not evenly distributed in space and together with limitations such as angle and density of the observations, they are the cause of instability in the operation of inversion. Furthermore, the ionosphere is a dynamic medium whose processes are continuously changing in time and space. This can affect CIT by limiting the accuracy in resolving structures and the processes that describe the ionosphere. Some inversion techniques are based on l2 minimization algorithms (i.e. Tikhonov regularization) and a standard approach is implemented here using spherical harmonics as a reference to compare the new method. A new approach is proposed for CIT that aims to permit sparsity in the reconstruction coefficients by using wavelet basis functions. It is based on the l1 minimization technique and wavelet basis functions due to their properties of compact representation. The l1 minimization is selected because it can optimise the result with an uneven distribution of observations by exploiting the localization property of wavelets. Also illustrated is how the interfrequency biases on the STEC are calibrated within the operation of inversion, and this is used as a way for evaluating the accuracy of the method. The technique is demonstrated using a simulation, showing the advantage of l1 minimization to estimate the coefficients over the l2 minimization. This is in particular true for an uneven observation geometry and especially for multi resolution CIT.

  1. Medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances by three-dimensional ionospheric GPS tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H.; Saito, A.; Lin, C. H.; Yamamoto, M.; Suzuki, S.; Seemala, G. K.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we develop a three-dimensional ionospheric tomography with the ground-based global position system (GPS) total electron content observations. Because of the geometric limitation of GPS observation path, it is difficult to solve the ill-posed inverse problem for the ionospheric electron density. Different from methods given by pervious studies, we consider an algorithm combining the least-square method with a constraint condition, in which the gradient of electron density tends to be smooth in the horizontal direction and steep in the vicinity of the ionospheric F2 peak. This algorithm is designed to be independent of any ionospheric or plasmaspheric electron density models as the initial condition. An observation system simulation experiment method is applied to evaluate the performance of the GPS ionospheric tomography in detecting ionospheric electron density perturbation at the scale size of around 200 km in wavelength, such as the medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances.

  2. Computerized tomography using video recorded fluoroscopic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kak, A. C.; Jakowatz, C. V., Jr.; Baily, N. A.; Keller, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    A computerized tomographic imaging system is examined which employs video-recorded fluoroscopic images as input data. By hooking the video recorder to a digital computer through a suitable interface, such a system permits very rapid construction of tomograms.

  3. Initial clinical experience with computerized tomography of the body.

    PubMed

    Stephens, D H; Sheedy, P F; Hattery, R R; Hartman, G W

    1976-04-01

    Computerized tomography of the body, now possible with an instrument that can complete a scan rapidly enough to permit patients to suspend respiration, adds an important new dimension to radiologic diagnosis. Cross-sectional antomy is uniquely reconstructed to provide accurate diagnostic information for various disorders throughout the body. PMID:772746

  4. Grid-based representation and dynamic visualization of ionospheric tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, L. M.; Yang, Y.; Su, C.; Yu, J. Q.; Yang, F.; Wu, L. X.

    2013-10-01

    The ionosphere is a dynamic system with complex structures. With the development of abundant global navigation satellite systems, the ionospheric electron density in different altitudes and its time variations can be obtained by ionospheric tomography technique using GNSS observations collected by the continuously operating GNSS tracking stations distributed over globe. However, it is difficult to represent and analyze global and local ionospheric electron density variations in three-dimensional (3D) space due to its complex structures. In this paper, we introduce a grid-based system to overcome this constraint. First, we give the principles, algorithms and procedures of GNSS-based ionospheric tomography technique. Then, the earth system spatial grid (ESSG) based on the spheroid degenerated octree grid (SDOG) is introduced in detail. Finally, more than 400 continuously operating GNSS receivers from the International GNSS Service are utilized to realize global ionospheric tomography, and then the ESSG is used to organize and express the tomography results in 4D, including 3 spatial dimensions and time.

  5. Diffuse nesidioblastosis diagnosed on a Ga-68 DOTATATE positron emission tomography/computerized tomography.

    PubMed

    Arun, Sasikumar; Rai Mittal, Bhagwant; Shukla, Jaya; Bhattacharya, Anish; Kumar, Praveen

    2013-07-01

    The authors describe a 50 days old pre-term infant with persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy in whom Ga-68 DOTATATE positron emission tomography/computerized tomography scan showed diffusely increased tracer uptake in the entire pancreas with no abnormal tracer uptake anywhere else in the body, suggestive of a diffuse variant of nesidioblastosis. PMID:24250024

  6. Soft x-ray holographic computerized tomography imaging: experimental research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuxuan; Jiang, Shiping; Zhang, Xinyi

    2003-03-01

    A high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) imaging technology has been developed, which is a combination of x-ray holography and computerized tomography (CT) technology called holographic computerized tomography (HCT). The theory and experimental techniques on biological specimens with the use of synchrotron radiation are discussed. Projections at different angles are reconstructed with the numerical method of in-line holography, and then the reconstructed data with a higher lateral resolution are used to restore the 3D image by the CT technique. With this method, the degradation caused by the diffraction of x rays is canceled, and 3D images with high resolution of micrometer magnitude in both the lateral and the longitudinal directions are obtained.

  7. Computerized Tomography: Its Role in Interstitial Brachytherapy of Pelvic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, P. Pradeep; Taylor, Judith; Jones, E.O.; McAnulty, Bruce

    1986-01-01

    The advantages of computerized tomography (CT) in the treatment planning of external beam radiation therapy have been shown in several studies. The authors extended the use of CT to the interstitial brachytherapy treatment planning of pelvic malignancies. CT was found to be invaluable in localizing pelvic tumors, selecting implant techniques, and checking the accuracy of the implant. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:3950985

  8. Imaging the topside ionosphere and plasmasphere with ionospheric tomography using COSMIC GPS TEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto Jayawardena, Talini S.; Chartier, Alex T.; Spencer, Paul; Mitchell, Cathryn N.

    2016-01-01

    GPS-based ionospheric tomography is a well-known technique for imaging the total electron content (TEC) between GPS satellites and receivers. However, as an integral measurement of electron concentration, TEC typically encompasses both the ionosphere and plasmasphere, masking signatures from the topside ionosphere-plasmasphere due to the dominant ionosphere. Imaging these regions requires a technique that isolates TEC in the topside ionosphere-plasmasphere. Multi-Instrument Data Analysis System (MIDAS) employs tomography to image the electron distribution in the ionosphere. Its implementation for regions beyond is yet to be seen due to the different dynamics present above the ionosphere. This paper discusses the extension of MIDAS to image these altitudes using GPS phase-based TEC measurements and follows the work by Spencer and Mitchell (2011). Plasma is constrained to dipole field lines described by Euler potentials, resulting in a distribution symmetrical about the geomagnetic equator. A simulation of an empirical plasmaspheric model by Gallagher et al. (1988) is used to verify the technique by comparing reconstructions of the simulation with the empirical model. The Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) is used as GPS receiver locations. The verification is followed by a validation of the modified MIDAS algorithm, where the regions' TEC is reconstructed from COSMIC GPS phase measurements and qualitatively compared with previous studies using Jason-1 and COSMIC data. Results show that MIDAS can successfully image features/trends of the topside ionosphere-plasmasphere observed in other studies, with deviations in absolute TEC attributed to differences in data set properties and the resolution of the images.

  9. Model-assisted ionospheric tomography: A new algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Raymund, T.D.; Bresler, Y.; Anderson, D.N.; Daniell, R.E.

    1994-12-01

    Ionospheric tomography uses total electron content (TEC) records collected by longitudinally aligned stations, which receive a beacon satellite orbiting overhead. The electron density distribution is reconstructed for the region bounded by the satellite orbit and the line of ground receivers. A new reconstruction algorithm is describes which satisfies the TEC records, makes use of an ionospheric model, and allows the incorporation of complementary measurements. The new algorithm also accepts relative (rather than absolute) TEC as input data. A comparison of the new algorithm and one used recently shows significant improvement over early techniques, particularly when a scaled ionogram is included in the data.

  10. IONOTOMO: A new approach for ionospheric tomography using OTH radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Corinna; Occhipinti, Giovanni; Boschi, Lapo; Moliné, Jean-Philippe

    2013-04-01

    Most of the recent methods in ionospheric tomography are based on the inversion of the Total Electron Content (TEC) measured by ground-based GPS receivers [e.g., Garcia et al. 2008]. As a consequence of the high frequency of the GPS, the electron density structure is principally well reconstructed at the F2 region, where the ionosphere reaches the maximum of ionization, neglecting the lower ionosphere. Here, we develop a new 3D ionospheric tomography method based on the full analysis of over-the-horizon (OTH) radar data. Previous studies in ionospheric tomography by OTH radar (Fridman and Fridman, 1994; Ruelle and Landeau, 1994; Landeau et al., 1997; Fridman, 1998) are all based on the inversion of the leading edge echo curve, consequently an important amount of valuable information present in the data is necessarily neglected. To overcome this limit, we set up a new method, based on the ray-tracing tool TDR [Occhipinti, 2006], to invert the propagation time of electromagnetic waves emitted by monostatic OTH radars. The major advance of our methodology is taking into account, numerically and jointly, not only the speed variation of EM wave induced by the electron density variation (solved analytically with a linear inversion) but also the perturbation in the raypath (nonlinear numerical method). As the present problem is an ill posed problem we calculate the matrix inversion numerically, using a regularisation method (Tikhonov, 1963). We determine the best regularisation parameter using the Lcurve method (Hansen, 2000). We present here the originality and the advantage of our method with a full set of synthetic benchmark highlighting the sensitivity of our tomography to the plasma heterogeneities. Some preliminary test on real data will be presented with a full coverage over Europe. Indeed, the ionospheric tomography by OTH radar, jointly with GPS, could open new exciting perspective in the plasma density estimation with a good resolution to the entire ionosphere

  11. Bayesian statistical ionospheric tomography improved by incorporating ionosonde measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, Johannes; Virtanen, Ilkka I.; Roininen, Lassi; Vierinen, Juha; Orispää, Mikko; Kauristie, Kirsti; Lehtinen, Markku S.

    2016-04-01

    We validate two-dimensional ionospheric tomography reconstructions against EISCAT incoherent scatter radar measurements. Our tomography method is based on Bayesian statistical inversion with prior distribution given by its mean and covariance. We employ ionosonde measurements for the choice of the prior mean and covariance parameters and use the Gaussian Markov random fields as a sparse matrix approximation for the numerical computations. This results in a computationally efficient tomographic inversion algorithm with clear probabilistic interpretation. We demonstrate how this method works with simultaneous beacon satellite and ionosonde measurements obtained in northern Scandinavia. The performance is compared with results obtained with a zero-mean prior and with the prior mean taken from the International Reference Ionosphere 2007 model. In validating the results, we use EISCAT ultra-high-frequency incoherent scatter radar measurements as the ground truth for the ionization profile shape. We find that in comparison to the alternative prior information sources, ionosonde measurements improve the reconstruction by adding accurate information about the absolute value and the altitude distribution of electron density. With an ionosonde at continuous disposal, the presented method enhances stand-alone near-real-time ionospheric tomography for the given conditions significantly.

  12. Computerized tomography and skeletal density of coral skeletons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosscher, Hemmo

    1993-07-01

    In this paper I describe and discuss the use of medical X-ray computerized tomography (CT) in the study of coral skeletons. CT generates X-ray images along freely chosen sections through the skeleton and offers, as well, the possibility of density measurements based on X-ray attenuation. This method has been applied to measure the skeletal density of the Caribbean reef-building coral Montastrea annularis, from Curaçao, Netherlands Antilles. The observed, non-linear increase of skeletal density with depth can be attributed to decreasing photo-synthetic rates with increasing water depth. A comparison with extension rate measurements shows the inverse relationship between extension rate and skeletal density. CT proves to be aquick and non-destructive method to reveal growth structures (density banding) since it measures skeletal density.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography in malignant external otitis

    SciTech Connect

    Gherini, S.G.; Brackmann, D.E.; Bradley, W.G.

    1986-05-01

    In malignant external otitis (MEO), determining the anatomic extent of disease and evaluating the physiologic response to therapy remain a problem. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has recently become available in limited clinical settings. Four patients with MEO were evaluated using MRI, computerized tomography (CT), technetium-99 (Tc-99) bone scanning, and gallium-67 citrate (Ga-67 citrate) scanning. MRI is superior to CT, Tc-99 bone scanning, and Ga-67 citrate scanning in evaluating the anatomic extent of soft tissue changes in MEO. MRI alone cannot be relied upon to determine the physiologic response to therapy. MRI can, however, serve as a valuable guide to the interpretation of Tc-99 bone and Ga-67 citrate scans, and in this respect, MRI is extremely useful in the treatment of MEO.

  14. Null space and resolution in dynamic computerized tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Bernadette N.

    2016-02-01

    One major challenge in computerized tomography is to image objects which change during the data acquisition and hence lead to inconsistent data sets. Motion artefacts in the reconstructions can be reduced by applying specially adapted algorithms which take the dynamic behaviour into account. Within this article, we analyse the achievable resolution in the dynamic setting in case of two-dimensional affine deformations. To this end, we characterize the null space of the operator describing the dynamic case, using its singular value decomposition and a necessary dynamic consistency condition. This shows that independent of any reconstruction method, the specimen’s dynamics results in a loss of resolution compared to the stationary setting. Our theoretical results are illustrated at a numerical example.

  15. The development of algorithms in electrical impedance computerized tomography.

    PubMed

    Shie, J R; Li, C J; Lin, J T

    2000-01-01

    Electrical Impedance Computerized Tomography (EICT) is an imaging method to reconstruct the impedance distribution inside of domain through the boundary injected current and display the impedance contrast ratio as an image. This paper concentrates on developing two algorithms to enhance the quality of the conductivity image. The two algorithms are "Fine-Mesh Conversion Method" and "Sub-Domain EICT Method". "Fine-Mesh Conversion Method" is a numerical calibration process to find a coarse mesh impedance network that behaves like a fine mesh network in terms of giving similar voltages under the same current excitations. "Sub-Domain EICT" solves a higher resolution EICT with the cost of a lower resolution EICT by combining "Fine-Mesh Conversion Method", and a Fuzzy Logic Inference Systems (FLIS) classifier. PMID:10834231

  16. Dental development of the Taung skull from computerized tomography.

    PubMed

    Conroy, G C; Vannier, M W

    Just over 60 years ago, Dart's description and analysis of the Taung child's skull triggered an intellectual revolution about human origins. Recently, several authors have suggested that one of the most significant hominid-like traits of australopithecines, delayed maturation, may not after all be valid. This is a radical departure from Mann's classic study of australopithecine maturation and palaeodemography based on dental eruption patterns. The resolution of this debate has important implications for the history of the biological and social evolution of the human species. In view of the controversies generated by recent studies, and particularly because the Taung skull is the type specimen of Australopithecus africanus, we have investigated the relevant anatomy of the Taung 'child' using computerized tomography. We conclude that the Taung 'child' shows some important dental maturational affinities with great apes, although as Dart noted, other hominid-like features are clearly present. PMID:3116435

  17. Cubesat-Based Dtv Receiver Constellation for Ionospheric Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahcivan, H.; Leveque, K.; Doe, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Radio Aurora Explorer mission, funded by NSF's Space Weather and Atmospheric Research program, has demonstrated the utility of CubeSat-based radio receiver payloads for ionospheric research. RAX has primarily been an investigation of microphysics of meter-scale ionospheric structures; however, the data products are also suitable for research on ionospheric effects on radio propagation. To date, the spacecraft has acquired (1) ground-based UHF radar signals that are backscattered from meter-scale ionospheric irregularities, which have been used to measure the dispersion properties of meter-scale plasma waves and (2) ground-based signals, directly on the transmitter-spacecraft path, which have been used to measure radio propagation disturbances (scintillations). Herein we describe the application of a CubeSat constellation of UHF receivers to expand the latter research topic for global-scale ionospheric tomography. The enabling factor for this expansion is the worldwide availability of ground-based digital television (DTV) broadcast signals whose characteristics are optimal for scintillation analysis. A significant part of the populated world have transitioned, or soon to be transitioned, to DTV. The DTV signal has a standard format that contains a highly phase-stable pilot carrier that can be readily adapted for propagation diagnostics. A multi-frequency software-defined radar receiver, similar to the RAX payload, can measure these signals at a large number of pilot carrier frequencies to make radio ray and diffraction tomographic measurements of the ionosphere and the irregularities contained in it. A constellation of CubeSats, launched simultaneously, or in sequence over years, similar to DMSPs, can listen to the DTV stations, providing a vast and dense probing of the ionosphere. Each spacecraft can establish links to a preprogrammed list of DTV stations and cycle through them using time-division frequency multiplexing (TDFM) method. An on board program can

  18. Radio Tomography of Ionospheric Structures (probably) due to Underground-Surface-Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunitsyn, V.; Nesterov, I.; Andreeva, E.; Rekenthaler, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    Ionospheric radio-tomography (RT) utilizes radio signals transmitted from the global navigational satellite systems (GNSS), including low-orbiting (LO) navigational systems such as Transit, Tsikada, etc., and high-orbiting (HO) navigational systems such as GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, Beidou, etc. The signals that are transmitted from the LO navigational satellites and recorded by ground receiving chains can be inverted for almost instantaneous (5-8 min) 2D snapshots of electron density. The data from the networks of ground receivers that record the signals of the HO satellites are suitable for implementing high-orbital RT (HORT), i.e. reconstructing the 4D distributions of the ionospheric electron density (one 3D image every 20-30 min). In the regions densely covered by the GNSS receivers, it is currently possible to get a time step of 2-4 min. The LORT and HORT approaches have a common methodical basis: in both these techniques, the integrals of electron density along the ray between the satellite and the receiver are measured, and then the tomographic procedures are applied to reconstruct the distributions of electron density. We present several examples of the experiments on the ionospheric RT, which are related to the Underground-Surface-Atmosphere-Ionosphere (USAI) coupling. In particular, we demonstrate examples of RT images of the ionosphere after industrial explosions, rocket launches, and modification of the ionosphere by high-power radio waves. We also show RT cross sections reflecting ionospheric disturbances caused by the earthquakes (EQ) and tsunami waves. In these cases, there is an evident cause-and-effect relationship. The perturbations are transferred between the geospheres predominantly by acoustic gravity waves (AGW), whose amplitudes increase with increasing height. As far as EQ are concerned, the cause of the USAI coupling mechanism is not obvious. It is clear, however, that the regular RT studies can promote the solution of this challenging problem

  19. Using sparse regularization for multi-resolution tomography of the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panicciari, T.; Smith, N. D.; Mitchell, C. N.; Da Dalt, F.; Spencer, P. S. J.

    2015-10-01

    Computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT) is a technique that allows reconstructing the state of the ionosphere in terms of electron content from a set of slant total electron content (STEC) measurements. It is usually denoted as an inverse problem. In this experiment, the measurements are considered coming from the phase of the GPS signal and, therefore, affected by bias. For this reason the STEC cannot be considered in absolute terms but rather in relative terms. Measurements are collected from receivers not evenly distributed in space and together with limitations such as angle and density of the observations, they are the cause of instability in the operation of inversion. Furthermore, the ionosphere is a dynamic medium whose processes are continuously changing in time and space. This can affect CIT by limiting the accuracy in resolving structures and the processes that describe the ionosphere. Some inversion techniques are based on ℓ2 minimization algorithms (i.e. Tikhonov regularization) and a standard approach is implemented here using spherical harmonics as a reference to compare the new method. A new approach is proposed for CIT that aims to permit sparsity in the reconstruction coefficients by using wavelet basis functions. It is based on the ℓ1 minimization technique and wavelet basis functions due to their properties of compact representation. The ℓ1 minimization is selected because it can optimize the result with an uneven distribution of observations by exploiting the localization property of wavelets. Also illustrated is how the inter-frequency biases on the STEC are calibrated within the operation of inversion, and this is used as a way for evaluating the accuracy of the method. The technique is demonstrated using a simulation, showing the advantage of ℓ1 minimization to estimate the coefficients over the ℓ2 minimization. This is in particular true for an uneven observation geometry and especially for multi-resolution CIT.

  20. The study of compressive sampling in ultrasonic computerized tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wentao; Wang, Chonghe; Bao, Yuequan; Li, Hui

    2015-04-01

    This paper proposes a novel and effective method in the field of Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE). Traditional ultrasonic computerized tomography (UCT) is a heavy task to detect the damages in the object for the numerous measuring times and the huge cost of manual labor. However, utilizing the method proposed in this paper can effectively overcome this great disadvantage, the essence of the application of Compressive Sampling(CS) in the detection of the object is to selectively choose a small quantity of measuring path in the huge number of total measurements. Due to the sparsity of damages in concrete structure, the usage of CS is available. Firstly, we divide the object entirely into numerous grids in order to image the internal situation of the object respectively. Secondly, a measurement matrix to massively decline the quantity of the measuring time should be computed. Thirdly, the travel time of each path we selected according to the matrix should be acquired, utilizing these travel time by adopting the l1-minimization program can we consequently obtained the slowness of the elements inside the object, thus reconstruct the internal situation of the object clearly and effectively. Furthermore, by applying this method we proposed in this paper into the simulation we can not only determine the damage location but also figure the size of it out. Because of the massive decline of the measuring times and accurate reconstruction, we substantiate CS method applied into the monitoring of concrete structure proves to be a shortcut in the field of NDE.

  1. Vertebral sarcoidosis: demonstration of bone involvement by computerized axial tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Dinerstein, S.L.; Kovarsky, J.

    1984-08-01

    A report is given of a rare case of vertebral sarcoidosis with negative conventional spinal x-ray films, yet with typical cystic lesions of the spine found incidentally during abdominal computerized axial tomography (CAT). The patient was a 28-year-old black man, who was admitted for evaluation of a 1 1/2-year history of diffuse myalgias, intermittent fever to 102 F orally, bilateral hilar adenopathy, and leukopenia. A technetium polyphosphate bone scan revealed diffuse areas of increased uptake over the sternum, entire vertebral column, and pelvis. Conventional x-ray films of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, and an AP view of the pelvis were all normal. Chest x-ray film revealed only bilateral hilar adenopathy. During the course of an extensive negative evaluation for infection, an abdominal CAT scan was done, showing multiple, small, sclerotic-rimmed cysts at multiple levels of the lower thoracic and lumbar spine. Bone marrow biopsy revealed only changes consistent with anemia of chronic disease. Mediastinal lymph node biopsy revealed noncaseating granulomas. A tentative diagnosis of sarcoidosis was made, and treatment with prednisone, isoniazid and rifampin was begun. Within two weeks of initiation of prednisone therapy, the patient was symptom-free. A repeat technetium polyphosphate bone scan revealed only a small residual area of mildly increased uptake over the upper thoracic vertebrae.

  2. Sodankylä ionospheric tomography data set 2003-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, Johannes; Roininen, Lassi; Kero, Antti; Raita, Tero; Ulich, Thomas; Markkanen, Markku; Juusola, Liisa; Kauristie, Kirsti

    2016-07-01

    Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory has been operating a receiver network for ionospheric tomography and collecting the produced data since 2003. The collected data set consists of phase difference curves measured from COSMOS navigation satellites from the Russian Parus network (Wood and Perry, 1980) and tomographic electron density reconstructions obtained from these measurements. In this study vertical total electron content (VTEC) values are integrated from the reconstructed electron densities to make a qualitative and quantitative analysis to validate the long-term performance of the tomographic system. During the observation period, 2003-2014, there were three to five operational stations at the Fennoscandia sector. Altogether the analysis consists of around 66 000 overflights, but to ensure the quality of the reconstructions, the examination is limited to cases with descending (north to south) overflights and maximum elevation over 60°. These constraints limit the number of overflights to around 10 000. Based on this data set, one solar cycle of ionospheric VTEC estimates is constructed. The measurements are compared against the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI)-2012 model, F10.7 solar flux index and sunspot number data. Qualitatively the tomographic VTEC estimate corresponds to reference data very well, but the IRI-2012 model results are on average 40 % higher than that of the tomographic results.

  3. Tomography of the ionospheric electron density with geostatistical inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minkwitz, D.; van den Boogaart, K. G.; Gerzen, T.; Hoque, M.

    2015-08-01

    In relation to satellite applications like global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) and remote sensing, the electron density distribution of the ionosphere has significant influence on trans-ionospheric radio signal propagation. In this paper, we develop a novel ionospheric tomography approach providing the estimation of the electron density's spatial covariance and based on a best linear unbiased estimator of the 3-D electron density. Therefore a non-stationary and anisotropic covariance model is set up and its parameters are determined within a maximum-likelihood approach incorporating GNSS total electron content measurements and the NeQuick model as background. As a first assessment this 3-D simple kriging approach is applied to a part of Europe. We illustrate the estimated covariance model revealing the different correlation lengths in latitude and longitude direction and its non-stationarity. Furthermore, we show promising improvements of the reconstructed electron densities compared to the background model through the validation of the ionosondes Rome, Italy (RO041), and Dourbes, Belgium (DB049), with electron density profiles for 1 day.

  4. Computerized tomography of the acute left upper quadrant pain.

    PubMed

    Tirkes, Temel; Ballenger, Zachary; Steenburg, Scott D; Altman, Daniel J; Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of computerized tomography (CT) of the abdomen in the emergent setting of left upper quadrant pain. One hundred patients (average age: 45, range: 19-93 years, female: 57 %, male: 43 %) who presented to the emergency department (ED) and underwent CT scanning of abdomen with the given indication of left upper quadrant pain were included in this study. The results from CT examinations were compared to final diagnoses determined by either ED physician or clinician on a follow-up visit. Sensitivity of CT was 69 % (95 %CI: 52-83 %) for 39 patients who eventually were diagnosed with an acute abdominal abnormality. Twenty-seven patients had an acute abnormal finding on abdominal CT that represented the cause of the patient's pain (positive predictive value of 100 %, 95 %CI: 87-100 %). Of the remaining 73 patients with negative CT report, 12 were diagnosed clinically (either in the ED or on follow-up visit to specialist) with a pathology that was undetectable on the CT imaging (negative predictive value of 83 %, 95 %CI: 73-91 %). None of the remaining 61 patients with negative CT were found to have pathology by clinical evaluation (specificity of 100 %, 95 %CI: 94-100 %). CT is a useful examination for patients with acute left upper quadrant pain in the emergency department setting with moderate sensitivity and excellent specificity. PMID:27230731

  5. Infantile Autism and Computerized Tomography Brain-Scan Findings: Specific versus Nonspecific Abnormalities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balottin, Umberto; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The study of computerized tomography brain-scan findings with 45 autistic and 19 control subjects concluded that autism is nonspecifically associated with brain-scan abnormalities, and that other nonorganic, as well as organic, factors should be taken into account. (Author/DB)

  6. Differentiation of Calcium Oxalate Monohydrate and Calcium Oxalate Dihydrate Stones Using Quantitative Morphological Information from Micro-Computerized and Clinical Computerized Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xinhui; Qu, Mingliang; Wang, Jia; Trevathan, James; Vrtiska, Terri; Williams, James C.; Krambeck, Amy; Lieske, John; McCollough, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We differentiated calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dihydrate kidney stones using micro and clinical computerized tomography images. Materials and Methods A total of 22 calcium oxalate monohydrate and 15 calcium oxalate dihydrate human kidney stones were scanned using a commercial micro-computerized tomography scanner with a pixel size of 7 to 23 μm. Under an institutional review board approved protocol, image data on 10 calcium oxalate monohydrate and 9 calcium oxalate dihydrate stones greater than 5 mm were retrieved from a total of 80 patients who underwent clinical dual energy computerized tomography for clinical indications and had stones available for infrared spectroscopic compositional analysis. Micro and clinical computerized tomography images were processed using in-house software, which quantified stone surface morphology with curvature based calculations. A shape index was generated as a quantitative shape metric to differentiate calcium oxalate monohydrate from calcium oxalate dihydrate stones. Statistical tests were used to test the performance of the shape index. Results On micro-computerized tomography images the shape index of calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dihydrate stones significantly differed (ROC curve AUC 0.92, p <0.0001). At the optimal cutoff sensitivity was 0.93 and specificity was 0.91. On clinical computerized tomography images a significant morphological difference was also detected (p = 0.007). AUC, sensitivity and specificity were 0.90, 1 and 0.73, respectively. Conclusions On micro and clinical computerized tomography images a morphological difference was detectable in calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dihydrate stones larger than 5 mm. The shape index is a highly promising method that can distinguish calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dihydrate stones with reasonable accuracy. PMID:23142201

  7. Remote sensing of ionosphere and upper atmosphere based on low-orbital and GNSS radio tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunitsyn, V.; Tereshchenko, E.; Andreeva, E.; Khudukon, B.; Kozharin, M.; Nazarenko, M.; Nesterov, I.

    A dozen of currently operating multi-point receiving networks that carry out measurements of transmissions from low-orbiting LO navigational systems exists at present in different regions of the world - in Europe America and Asia Numerous radio tomographic RT experiments based on LO satellite systems revealed a complexity and variety of ionospheric structures observed under disturbed and quiet conditions Various shapes of the ionospheric trough were detected A series of specific features in the structure and dynamics of the equatorial anomaly were studied RT images of traveling ionospheric disturbances provided information about the parameters of perturbations and allowed investigation of atmospheric-ionospheric coupling RT study of strong ionospheric disturbances caused by anthropogenic factors in particular by rocket launching industrial explosions powerful high-frequency radiation and so on is performed By means of statistical radio tomography distributions of the intensity of ionospheric plasma fluctuations were retrieved LO RT method allows also determination of plasma fluxes from a time-sequence of RT images of the ionosphere Manifestations of particle precipitation in electron density distributions were observed repeatedly in LO RT images of the ionosphere With a several receiving chains spaced a few hundred kilometer apart it is possible to study the three-dimensional structure of the ionosphere In spite of its high efficiency LO RT employment is basically limited due to the necessity to arrange multi-point receiving systems Deployment of

  8. Imaging results of multi-modal ultrasound computerized tomography system designed for breast diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Opieliński, Krzysztof J; Pruchnicki, Piotr; Gudra, Tadeusz; Podgórski, Przemysław; Kurcz, Jacek; Kraśnicki, Tomasz; Sąsiadek, Marek; Majewski, Jarosław

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays, in the era of common computerization, transmission and reflection methods are intensively developed in addition to improving classical ultrasound methods (US) for imaging of tissue structure, in particular ultrasound transmission tomography UTT (analogous to computed tomography CT which uses X-rays) and reflection tomography URT (based on the synthetic aperture method used in radar imaging techniques). This paper presents and analyses the results of ultrasound transmission tomography imaging of the internal structure of the female breast biopsy phantom CIRS Model 052A and the results of the ultrasound reflection tomography imaging of a wire sample. Imaging was performed using a multi-modal ultrasound computerized tomography system developed with the participation of a private investor. The results were compared with the results of imaging obtained using dual energy CT, MR mammography and conventional US method. The obtained results indicate that the developed UTT and URT methods, after the acceleration of the scanning process, thus enabling in vivo examination, may be successfully used for detection and detailed characterization of breast lesions in women. PMID:25759234

  9. The applications of optical computerized tomography (OCT) in cold and hot complex flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun-Yun; Chen, Li-zhu; Gu, Fang

    2014-11-01

    Optical computerized tomography (OCT), as a branch of computerized tomography (CT) techniques, has been widely used to display and diagnose a variety of complex flow fields, due to its characteristics of real-time, stable, non-contact and can supply 3-D distributions. In practical applications, we found some different phenomenon when they are adopted in clod and hot complex flow fields. In this paper, the cold and hot flow field's OCT diagnosis is analyzed and compared. The results show that 1) OCT can directly reflect the spatial distribution of the measured flow field's refractive index, for both the cold and the hot complex flow fields; 2) OCT can reflect the boundary or structure of the cold flow fields, but could not well done for the hot flow fields. The involved results will help us to make better use of OCT methods to diagnose various cold or hot complex flow fields.

  10. Dental implants in bilateral bifid canal and compromised interocclusal space using cone beam computerized tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Nizar; Arunachalam, Lalitha Tanjore; Jacob, Caroline Annette; Kumar, Suresh Anand

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of various anatomic landmarks is pivotal for important success. Bifid canals pose a challenge and can lead to difficulties while performing implant surgery in the mandible. Bifid canals can be diagnosed with panoramic radiography and more accurately with cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). This case report details the placement of the implant in a patient with bilateral bifid canal and compromised interocclusal space, which was successfully treated using CBCT. PMID:27433073

  11. Dental implants in bilateral bifid canal and compromised interocclusal space using cone beam computerized tomography.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nizar; Arunachalam, Lalitha Tanjore; Jacob, Caroline Annette; Kumar, Suresh Anand

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of various anatomic landmarks is pivotal for important success. Bifid canals pose a challenge and can lead to difficulties while performing implant surgery in the mandible. Bifid canals can be diagnosed with panoramic radiography and more accurately with cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). This case report details the placement of the implant in a patient with bilateral bifid canal and compromised interocclusal space, which was successfully treated using CBCT. PMID:27433073

  12. Extension of the Gladstone-Dale equation for flame flow field diagnosis by optical computerized tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yunyun; Li Zhenhua; Song Yang; He Anzhi

    2009-05-01

    An extended model of the original Gladstone-Dale (G-D) equation is proposed for optical computerized tomography (OCT) diagnosis of flame flow fields. For the purpose of verifying the newly established model, propane combustion is used as a practical example for experiment, and moire deflection tomography is introduced with the probe wavelength 808 nm. The results indicate that the temperature based on the extended model is more accurate than that based on the original G-D equation. In a word, the extended model can be suitable for all kinds of flame flow fields whatever the components, temperature, and ionization are.

  13. Evaluation of Biomaterials Using Micro-Computerized Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torris, A. T. Arun; Columbus, K. C. Soumya; Saaj, U. S.; Nair, Manitha B.; Krishnan, Kalliyana V.

    2008-09-01

    Micro-computed tomography or Micro-CT is a high resolution, non-invasive, x-ray scanning technique that allows precise three-dimensional imaging and quantification of micro-architectural and structural parameters of objects. Tomographic reconstruction is based on a cone-beam convolution-back-projection algorithm. Micro-architectural and structural parameters such as porosity, surface area to volume ratio, interconnectivity, pore size, wall thickness, anisotropy and cross-section area of biomaterials and bio-specimens such as trabecular bone, polymer scaffold, bio-ceramics and dental restorative were evaluated through imaging and computer aided manipulation of the object scan data sets.

  14. Evaluation of Biomaterials Using Micro-Computerized Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Torris, A. T. Arun; Columbus, K. C. Soumya; Saaj, U. S.; Krishnan, Kalliyana V.; Nair, Manitha B.

    2008-09-26

    Micro-computed tomography or Micro-CT is a high resolution, non-invasive, x-ray scanning technique that allows precise three-dimensional imaging and quantification of micro-architectural and structural parameters of objects. Tomographic reconstruction is based on a cone-beam convolution-back-projection algorithm. Micro-architectural and structural parameters such as porosity, surface area to volume ratio, interconnectivity, pore size, wall thickness, anisotropy and cross-section area of biomaterials and bio-specimens such as trabecular bone, polymer scaffold, bio-ceramics and dental restorative were evaluated through imaging and computer aided manipulation of the object scan data sets.

  15. [Diagnosis of para-laryngeal tumors using computerized tomography].

    PubMed

    Höing, R

    1990-04-01

    Computed tomography of the larynx is generally recommended for carcinoma, laryngoceles, and laryngeal trauma. On the basis of several case examples, in which dysphagia and hoarseness were caused by a submucosal thickening of the arytenoid and aryepiglottic fold, the authors propose that these unclear symptoms also be regarded as indication for larynx CT. It must be borne in mind that the underlying process may be one of the rare tumors in the space between the thyroid cartilage and elastic cone, often called the paraglottic space (or paralaryngeal space, by many American authors). PMID:2162176

  16. [Densitometric follow-up of algodystrophy using computerized tomography].

    PubMed

    Lindecken, K D; Krawzak, H W; Strosche, H; Kukulies, R; Schmidt, W G

    1987-01-01

    Clinical and radiological findings obtained from diagnosis and follow-up examination of post-traumatic algodystrophy (Morbus Sudeck) are very much open to subjective interpretation. Decisive importance is attributed not only to alteration of soft tissue but also to typical distribution patterns and severity of bone demineralisation. No objectifiable and quantifiable have so far become available for proper assessment but are urgently desirable in view of the great number of therapeutic approaches. Densitometry integrated with computed tomography was applied to nine patients with algodystrophy of hand or foot in the region of spongy bones to determine absorption values which were then compared with those on the clinically intact side. Significant differences between sides proved to be objectifiable and were quantifiable measures by which demineralisation of the effected extremity could be assessed. Repeated examinations were undertaken for follow-up through a period up to nine months. PMID:3630448

  17. IONOSPHERIC POWER-SPECTRUM TOMOGRAPHY IN RADIO INTERFEROMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Koopmans, L. V. E.

    2010-08-01

    A tomographic method is described to quantify the three-dimensional power spectrum of the ionospheric electron-density fluctuations based on radio-interferometric observations by a two-dimensional planar array. The method is valid for the first-order Born approximation and might be applicable in correcting observed visibilities for phase variations due to the imprint of the full three-dimensional ionosphere. It is shown that the ionospheric electron-density distribution is not the primary structure to model in interferometry, but rather its autocorrelation function or equivalently its power spectrum. An exact mathematical expression is derived that provides the three-dimensional power spectrum of the ionospheric electron-density fluctuations directly from a rescaled scattered intensity field and an incident intensity field convolved with a complex unit phasor that depends on the w-term and is defined on the full sky pupil plane. In the limit of a small field of view, the method reduces to the single phase-screen approximation. Tomographic self-calibration can become important in high-dynamic range observations at low radio frequencies with wide-field antenna interferometers because a three-dimensional ionosphere causes a spatially varying convolution of the sky, whereas a single phase screen results in a spatially invariant convolution. A thick ionosphere can therefore not be approximated by a single phase screen without introducing errors in the calibration process. By applying a Radon projection and the Fourier projection-slice theorem, it is shown that the phase-screen approach in three dimensions is identical to the tomographic method. Finally, we suggest that residual speckle can cause a diffuse intensity halo around sources due to uncorrectable ionospheric phase fluctuations in the short integrations, which could pose a fundamental limit on the dynamic range in long-integration images.

  18. Using tomography of GPS TEC to routinely determine ionospheric average electron density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yizengaw, E.; Moldwin, M. B.; Dyson, P. L.; Essex, E. A.

    2007-03-01

    This paper introduces a technique that calculates average electron density (Ne) profiles over a wide geographic area of coverage, using tomographic ionospheric Ne profiles. These Ne profiles, which can provide information of the Ne distribution up to global positioning system (GPS) orbiting altitude (with the coordination of space-based GPS tomographic profiles), can be incorporated into the next generation of the international reference ionosphere (IRI) model. An additional advantage of tomography is that it enables accurate modeling of the topside ionosphere. By applying the tomographic reconstruction approach to ground-based GPS slant total electron content (STEC), we calculate 3-h average Ne profiles over a wide region. Since it uses real measurement data, tomographic average Ne profiles describe the ionosphere during quiet and disturbed periods. The computed average Ne profiles are compared with IRI model profiles and average Ne profiles obtained from ground-based ionosondes.

  19. GPS ionospheric tomography: A comparison with the IRI-2001 model over South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, S.; Park, J.-U.

    2007-04-01

    The International Reference Ionosphere model 2001 (IRI-2001) is one of the most comprehensive empirical models of the ionosphere and has been widely used to estimate the electron density profiles in the altitude ranging from about 60 to 2000 km and the total electron content (TEC) at any given location, time and date, which reflect smooth-average global ionospheric behaviors. However, whether it provides normal actual estimations in the ionosphere over some regions should be tested with real observation data. In this paper, the three-dimensional ionospheric electron density profiles over South Korea in 2003 are obtained using the ionospheric tomography reconstruction technique with the permanent Korean GPS Network (KGN) data, and its validity is further verified by another independent ionosonde data. The GPS ionospheric reconstruction results are used to compare then results obtained with the IRI-2001 model in South Korea in terms of NmF2 and TEC. The monthly averaged diurnal values of these key parameters in January, April, July and October 2003 are considered to represent the winter, spring, summer and autumn seasons, respectively. Compared with the GPS reconstruction results, averaged monthly NmF2 medians from the IRI-2001 are overestimated in daytime and underestimated in nighttime for all seasons, but the deviation magnitudes in autumn and winter are smaller than in spring and summer. In addition, averaged monthly TEC medians from the IRI-2001 are overestimated in daytime in winter, but almost always underestimated in other seasons.

  20. Ionospheric Tomography Network of Egypt: A New Receiver Network in Support of the International Heliophysical Year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, T. W.; Gaussiran, T. L.; York, J. A.; Munton, D. M.; Slack, C. M.; Mahrous, A. M.

    2009-04-01

    The International Heliophysical Year (IHY) 2007 is an international scientific program designed to coordinate observations of the heliosphere, the region of space from the solar surface through the solar wind and various planetary magnetospheres to the planetary upper atmospheres. A particular emphasis is given to the development of long-term international collaborations that will study the external drivers to the space environment and climate. The Ionospheric Tomography Network of Egypt (ITNE) is one such collaboration. It is a new chain of ionospheric tomography receivers that will be deployed to investigate the equatorial regions of the Earth’s ionosphere. The distribution of plasma density within 20° of the magnetic equator is highly sensitive to forcing from the solar wind through a process known as the equatorial fountain. ITNE will provide new observations of the density structures associated with the equatorial fountain.

  1. Enhancements of OI 630.0 nm Emission And Ionospheric Tomography Using GPS STEC Measurements During the Period of the Strong Geomagnetic Storm, 2003 Halloween Event in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, J.; Choi, B.; Kim, Y.; Wu, Q.; Park, J.; Won, Y.; Pyo, Y.

    2005-12-01

    All-sky camera and GPS measurements were used to investigate the thermosphere and ionosphere during the strong geomagnetic storm period of the 28-31 October 2003. Enhancement in 630.0 nm emission was observed in the northern sky from all-sky images taken at Mt. Bohyun (36.2° N, 128.9° E, geomagnetic latitude = 29°), Korea at 17:48-18:58 UT on 29 October during the main phase of the geomagnetic storm. We show the vertical variation of electron density between 28 and 31 October 2003. The vertical profiles of electron distribution have been examined by the computerized tomographic method using Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART). The slant total electron contents (STEC) for ionospheric tomography were measured at the regional GPS reference network of the nine stations that have been operated by Korea Astronomy & Space Science Institute (KASI). The results of ionospheric tomography are compared with Ionosonde measurements and IRI-2001 model. The possible cause of enhancement in 630.0 nm emission and the variation of electron density during the period of the geomagnetic storm will be discussed.

  2. Discrimination of Earthquake Precursors using Radio-Tomography of the Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rekenthaler, Douglas; Currie, Douglas; Kunitsyn, Vyacheslav; Gribkov, Dmitrii; Andreeva, Elena; Nesterov, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    This program relates to addresses lithospheric-ionospheric coupling during strong earthquakes (EQ). We discuss both the ionospheric implications of EQs, and the ionospheric precursors to EQ. the data are analyzed using the methods of satellite radio tomography (RT). Signals from both low-orbiting beacons ("LORT": Transit, Parus, Tsikada, etc.) and high orbiting global navigational satellite systems ("HORT": the GNSS satellites: GPS, GLONASS, Beidot, ....)are used for tomographic reconstructions. Our resulting 2D and 3D tomographic images and their time flow (4-D RT) allow us to map spatio-temporal changes due to ionospheric perturbations induced by EQs and EQ precursors. Low-orbital RT (LORT) provides near "instantaneous" mappings, with a time span of 5-8 minutes, and 2-D graphics of the electron density over the seismically active region of interest. LORT supports 2D imaging of various anomalies, including wave structures such as ionospheric manifestations of acoustic-gravity waves (AGW), wave-like disturbances, and solitary waves with the gaps between images, depending on the number of operating satellites (currently, 30-100 minutes). High-orbital RT (HORT) provides imaging of 4D distributions of ionospheric plasma (resulting in 3D snapshots every 20-30 minutes). Using this approach, one can reconstruct RT images of ionospheric irregularities, wave structures, and perturbations such as solitary waves. In regions with a sufficient number of GNSS receivers (California, Japan), 4-D RT images can be generated every 2-4 minutes. The spatial resolution of LORT and HORT systems is on the order of 20-40 km, and 100 km, respectively. We present the results of a long-term study using HORT and LORT techniques for study of the ionosphere over California, Alaska, and Southeast Asia (Taiwan region). In particular, we established a ground station array extending from Washington to California, which we operated from 2011 to 2013 on a 24/7 basis. Reconstructions of the ionosphere

  3. EISCAT verification in the development of ionospheric tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, I. K.; Heaton, J. A. T.; Kersley, L.; Mitchell, C. N.; Pryse, S. E.; Williams, M. J.

    1996-12-01

    This paper highlights the important role played by the EISCAT radar for verification in the development of tomographic techniques to produce images of ionospheric electron density. A brief review is given of some of the stages in the application of tomographic reconstruction techniques to the ionosphere. Results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the method in imaging ionospheric structures at high latitudes. In addition, the results include the first tomographic image of the ionosphere for a region extending from mid-latitudes over mainland Scandinavia to high latitudes above Svalbard. Acknowledgements. This work has been supported by the UK Particle-Physics and Astronomy Research Council. The assistance of the director and staff of the EISCAT Scientific Association, the staff of the Norsk Polarinstitutt and the director and staff of the Swedish Institute of Space Physics is gratefully acknowledged. In addition the authors would like to thank Professor Evgeny Tereshchenko of the Polar Geophysical Institute in Mumansk, Russia and Dr Tuomo Nygrén of the University of Oulu, Finland for provision of data from EISCAT special program time during the November 1995 campaign. Topical Editor D. Alcaydé thanks E. J. Fremouw and another referee for their help in evaluating this paper.--> Correspondence to: I. K. Walker-->

  4. Karyotype, Pedigree and cone-beam computerized tomography analysis of a case of nonsyndromic pandental anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Dharmani, Umesh; Jadhav, Ganesh Ranganath; Kaur Dharmani, Charan Kamal; Rajput, Akhil; Mittal, Priya; Abraham, Sathish; Soni, Vinay

    2015-01-01

    This case report presented a karyotype and pedigree analysis of a case with unusual combination of dental anomalies: Generalized short roots, talon cusps, dens invagination, low alveolar bone heights, very prominent cusp of carabelli and protostylid on first permanent molars, taurodontism of second permanent molars, rotated, missing and impacted teeth. None of the anomalies alone are rare. However, until date, nonsyndromic pandental anomalies that are affecting entire dentition with detailed karyotype, pedigree and cone-beam computerized tomography analysis have not been reported. The occurrence of these anomalies is probably incidental as the conditions are etiologically unrelated. PMID:26283856

  5. Detection of drugs and explosives using neutron computerized tomography and artificial intelligence techniques.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, F J O; Crispim, V R; Silva, A X

    2010-06-01

    In this study the development of a methodology to detect illicit drugs and plastic explosives is described with the objective of being applied in the realm of public security. For this end, non-destructive assay with neutrons was used and the technique applied was the real time neutron radiography together with computerized tomography. The system is endowed with automatic responses based upon the application of an artificial intelligence technique. In previous tests using real samples, the system proved capable of identifying 97% of the inspected materials. PMID:20149671

  6. Numerical calculation of the rock permittivity using micro computerized tomography image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chen; Liu, Richard; Jin, Zhao; He, Zhili

    2014-05-01

    A numerical evaluation of the permittivity of sandstones through the micro computerized tomography (micro CT) images at 1.1 GHz is conducted by using an image porosity extracting algorithm and an improved Finite Difference Method (FDM). Within the acquired physical properties by 3D micro CT scanning, numerical method is used to compute the permittivity of the rock samples. A resonant cavity is used for experimental measurement. The simulated results of 2 clastic sandstone samples with dry state and saturated state are compared with experimental data for validating the accuracy of the proposed numerical method. The results show great agreement and the error of permittivity evaluation is less than 3%.

  7. [Computerized tomography of the organs of the small pelvis in children with anorectal atresia].

    PubMed

    Sitkovskiĭ, N B; Babiĭ, Ia S; Kaplan, V M; Dan'shin, T I; Sil'chenko, M I; Bodnar', V V; Gbenu, A S

    1992-01-01

    In 12 children with the different forms of anorectal atresia, for studying the state of a sphincter apparatus of the rectum and assessment of quality of its bringing down into the perineum after proctoplasty, computerized tomography of the organs of a small pelvis was used. Underdeveloped and undifferentiated musculus levator ani in children with high anorectal atresia and fistula to the urinary bladder was revealed. The method permits to establish exact location of the intestine brought down relative to musculus levator ani and external anal sphincter. PMID:1518247

  8. Ionosonde measurements in Bayesian statistical ionospheric tomography with incoherent scatter radar validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, J.; Virtanen, I. I.; Roininen, L.; Vierinen, J.; Orispää, M.; Kauristie, K.; Lehtinen, M. S.

    2015-09-01

    We validate two-dimensional ionospheric tomography reconstructions against EISCAT incoherent scatter radar measurements. Our tomography method is based on Bayesian statistical inversion with prior distribution given by its mean and covariance. We employ ionosonde measurements for the choice of the prior mean and covariance parameters, and use the Gaussian Markov random fields as a sparse matrix approximation for the numerical computations. This results in a computationally efficient and statistically clear inversion algorithm for tomography. We demonstrate how this method works with simultaneous beacon satellite and ionosonde measurements obtained in northern Scandinavia. The performance is compared with results obtained with a zero mean prior and with the prior mean taken from the International Reference Ionosphere 2007 model. In validating the results, we use EISCAT UHF incoherent scatter radar measurements as the ground truth for the ionization profile shape. We find that ionosonde measurements improve the reconstruction by adding accurate information about the absolute value and the height distribution of electron density, and outperforms the alternative prior information sources. With an ionosonde at continuous disposal, the presented method enhances stand-alone near real-time ionospheric tomography for the given conditions significantly.

  9. Non-Conventional Applications of Computerized Tomography: Analysis of Solid Dosage Forms Produced by Pharmaceutical Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Martins de Oliveira, Jose Jr.; Germano Martins, Antonio Cesar

    2010-05-21

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) refers to the cross-sectional imaging of an object measuring the transmitted radiation at different directions. In this work, we describe a non-conventional application of computerized tomography: visualization and improvements in the understanding of some internal structural features of solid dosage forms. A micro-CT X-ray scanner, with a minimum resolution of 30 mum was used to characterize some pharmaceutical tablets, granules, controlled-release osmotic tablet and liquid-filled soft-gelatin capsules. The analysis presented in this work are essentially qualitative, but quantitative parameters, such as porosity, density distribution, tablets dimensions, etc. could also be obtained using the related CT techniques.

  10. An introduction to computerized x-ray tomography for petroleum research

    SciTech Connect

    Castanier, L.M.

    1989-06-01

    This report summarizes the state of the art in the application of medical tomography (CT) to petroleum recovery problems. A brief review of the basic principles of x-ray computerized tomography is followed by a discussion of the governing equations of the method. Calculation techniques and appropriate correlations for continued testing are described and discussed. A review of existing medical software is done. Consideration of the specific software needed for petroleum engineering as well as applications of new technologies such as image processing and computer networking are described. Criteria for the choice of a machine suitable for most petroleum-related applications are given. Emphasis is placed on flexibility, reliability, accuracy and price of the scanner. Two separate sections discuss positioning of the core and design of the core holders. Examples of possible applications of CT scanning to problems of geology, core analysis, EOR as well as operational process problems are discussed. 9 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Non-Conventional Applications of Computerized Tomography: Analysis of Solid Dosage Forms Produced by Pharmaceutical Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, José Martins; Germano Martins, Antonio César

    2010-05-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) refers to the cross-sectional imaging of an object measuring the transmitted radiation at different directions. In this work, we describe a non-conventional application of computerized tomography: visualization and improvements in the understanding of some internal structural features of solid dosage forms. A micro-CT X-ray scanner, with a minimum resolution of 30 μm was used to characterize some pharmaceutical tablets, granules, controlled-release osmotic tablet and liquid-filled soft-gelatin capsules. The analysis presented in this work are essentially qualitative, but quantitative parameters, such as porosity, density distribution, tablets dimensions, etc. could also be obtained using the related CT techniques.

  12. Accuracy of cone-beam computerized tomography in determining the thickness of palatal masticatory mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Prabhati; Jan, Suhail Majid; Behal, Roobal; Mir, Reyaz Ahmad; Shafi, Munaza

    2015-01-01

    Background: The palatal masticatory mucosa is the main donor area of soft tissue and connective tissue grafts used for increasing the keratinized mucosa around teeth and implants, covering exposed roots and increasing localized alveolar ridge thickness. The aim of this study was to compare the thickness of the palatal masticatory mucosa as determined on a cone-beam computerized tomography scan versus thickness determined via bone-sounding. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 patients requiring palatal surgery participated. Thickness of the palatal tissue was measured at various points radiographically and clinically. The two techniques were compared to determine the agreement of the two measurement modalities. Results: Statistical analysis determined that there was no significant difference between the two methods. Moreover, the tissue thickness was shown to increase as the distance from the gingival margin increased, and the tissue over the premolars was thicker than the other teeth. Conclusion: Cone-beam computerized tomography can be used as a noninvasive method to accurately and consistently determine the soft tissue thickness of the palatal masticatory mucosa with minimal bias at different locations on the palate. PMID:26392687

  13. Regional application of multi-layer artificial neural networks in 3-D ionosphere tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari Razin, Mir Reza; Voosoghi, Behzad

    2016-08-01

    Tomography is a very cost-effective method to study physical properties of the ionosphere. In this paper, residual minimization training neural network (RMTNN) is used in voxel-based tomography to reconstruct of 3-D ionosphere electron density with high spatial resolution. For numerical experiments, observations collected at 37 GPS stations from Iranian permanent GPS network (IPGN) are used. A smoothed TEC approach was used for absolute STEC recovery. To improve the vertical resolution, empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) obtained from international reference ionosphere 2012 (IRI-2012) used as object function in training neural network. Ionosonde observations is used for validate reliability of the proposed method. Minimum relative error for RMTNN is 1.64% and maximum relative error is 15.61%. Also root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.17 × 1011 (electrons/m3) is computed for RMTNN which is less than RMSE of IRI2012. The results show that RMTNN has higher accuracy and compiles speed than other ionosphere reconstruction methods.

  14. Proposal for ionospheric tomography technique using a new HF radio source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; MacDougall, J. W.

    Ionospheric tomography has developed near 20 years from a theoretical concept to a powerful experimental method and it has been used successfully to image a wide range of ionospheric structures over altitude-versus-latitude planes Measurements of the line integral of the electron density along ray paths from ground transmitter to satellite i e TEC are inverted in a reconstruction algorithm to create an image of the spatial distribution of the density over the region of interest Recent ionospheric tomography experiments use VHF UHF signals transmitted from NNSS or GPS satellite networks We propose a new signal source using transmission from ground HF radar networks and received by a satellite HF signals carry rich information about the ionosphere and sensitive to small changes HF measurements such as signal amplitude group delay DOA and Doppler frequency shift provide a priori knowledge for the tomographic image reconstruction The initial phase problem inherent in the phase or TEC measurement can be eliminated by Faraday rotation measurements and the relative rotations on two adjacent frequencies solves the ambiguity problems at HF frequencies We are currently working on the simulations and the transmitter design A great opportunity to implement this idea will come from the launch of the CASSIOPE a multi-purpose small satellite that receives HF signals from ground radar fertilities in 2007

  15. Sodankylä ionospheric tomography dataset 2003-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, J.; Roininen, L.; Kero, A.; Raita, T.; Ulich, T.; Markkanen, M.; Juusola, L.; Kauristie, K.

    2015-12-01

    Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory has been operating a tomographic receiver network and collecting the produced data since 2003. The collected dataset consists of phase difference curves measured from Russian COSMOS dual-frequency (150/400 MHz) low-Earth-orbit satellite signals, and tomographic electron density reconstructions obtained from these measurements. In this study vertical total electron content (VTEC) values are integrated from the reconstructed electron densities to make a qualitative and quantitative analysis to validate the long-term performance of the tomographic system. During the observation period, 2003-2014, there were three-to-five operational stations at the Fenno-Scandinavian sector. Altogether the analysis consists of around 66 000 overflights, but to ensure the quality of the reconstructions, the examination is limited to cases with descending (north to south) overflights and maximum elevation over 60°. These constraints limit the number of overflights to around 10 000. Based on this dataset, one solar cycle of ionospheric vertical total electron content estimates is constructed. The measurements are compared against International Reference Ionosphere IRI-2012 model, F10.7 solar flux index and sunspot number data. Qualitatively the tomographic VTEC estimate corresponds to reference data very well, but the IRI-2012 model are on average 40 % higher of that of the tomographic results.

  16. Ionospheric Asymmetry Evaluation using Tomography to Assess the Effectiveness of Radio Occultation Data Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, M. M.; Notarpietro, R.; Yin, P.; Nava, B.

    2013-12-01

    The Multi-Instrument Data Analysis System (MIDAS) algorithm is based on the oceanographic imaging techniques first applied to do the imaging of 2D slices of the ionosphere. The first version of MIDAS (version 1.0) was able to deal with any line-integral data such as GPS-ground or GPS-LEO differential-phase data or inverted ionograms. The current version extends tomography into four dimensional (lat, long, height and time) spatial-temporal mapping that combines all observations simultaneously in a single inversion with the minimum of a priori assumptions about the form of the ionospheric electron-concentration distribution. This work is an attempt to investigate the Radio Occultation (RO) data assimilation into MIDAS by assessing the ionospheric asymmetry and its impact on RO data inversion, when the Onion-peeling algorithm is used. Ionospheric RO data from COSMIC mission, specifically data collected during 24 September 2011 storm over mid-latitudes, has been used for the data assimilation. Using output electron density data from Midas (with/without RO assimilation) and ideal RO geometries, we tried to assess ionospheric asymmetry. It has been observed that the level of asymmetry was significantly increased when the storm was active. This was due to the increased ionization, which in turn produced large gradients along occulted ray path in the ionosphere. The presence of larger gradients was better observed when Midas was used with RO assimilated data. A very good correlation has been found between the evaluated asymmetry and errors related to the inversion products, when the inversion is performed considering standard techniques based on the assumption of spherical symmetry of the ionosphere. Errors are evaluated considering the peak electron density (NmF2) estimate and the Vertical TEC (VTEC) evaluation. This work highlights the importance of having a tool which should be able to state the effectiveness of Radio Occultation data inversion considering standard

  17. Single photon emission computerized tomography in obsessive compulsive disorder: a preliminary study.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, B L; Warneke, L B; McEwan, A J; Fraser, B A

    1993-01-01

    Patterns of cerebral perfusion in patients with obsessive compulsive disorder were evaluated using single photon emission computerized tomography. Eleven patients, who satisfied the DSM-III-R criteria and Research Diagnostic Criteria for the disorder, were evaluated using the distribution of 99m-Tc-HMPAO as a radiotracer. The Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale was administered to each patient to assess the severity of their symptoms. The images obtained were evaluated qualitatively and semi-quantitatively by a physician in nuclear medicine who was blind to the patients' diagnoses. Eight of the 11 patients demonstrated asymmetric perfusion of the basal ganglia; the left side showed impaired perfusion in six patients. PMID:8499426

  18. Comparison of ultrasonography, computerized tomography, and radionuclide imaging in the diagnosis of acute and chronic cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Matolo, N.M.; Stadalnik, R.C.; McGahan, J.P.

    1982-12-01

    Seventy-five patients with abdominal pain in the right upper quadrant who were subsequently confirmed operatively and histologically to have acute or chronic cholecystitis underwent radionuclide imaging of the biliary tree, ultrasonography, and/or computerized tomography before operation. fifty-eight of the patients had acute cholecystitis and 17 had chronic cholecystitis and cholelithiasis. Analysis of our data indicates that ultrasonography is an accurate and better screening test than cholescintigraphy in the diagnosis of chronic cholecystitis and cholelithiasis, but it is less accurate in the detection of acute cholecystitis. On the other hand, radionuclide imaging is highly sensitive and specific in the early diagnosis of acute cholecystitis, but it is poor in the diagnosis of chronic cholecystitis and cholelithiasis unless the cystic duct is obstructed. CT scanning is more expensive than ultrasonography but may be extremely helpful in problematic cases such as the diagnosis of the cause in biliary obstruction or in imaging of the pancreas.

  19. An artificial neural net and error backpropagation to reconstruct single photon emission computerized tomography data.

    PubMed

    Knoll, P; Mirzaei, S; Müllner, A; Leitha, T; Koriska, K; Köhn, H; Neumann, M

    1999-02-01

    At present, algorithms used in nuclear medicine to reconstruct single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) data are usually based on one of two principles: filtered backprojection and iterative methods. In this paper a different algorithm, applying an artificial neural network (multilayer perception) and error backpropagation as training method are used to reconstruct transaxial slices from SPECT data. The algorithm was implemented on an Elscint XPERT workstation (i486, 50 MHz), used as a routine digital image processing tool in our departments. Reconstruction time for a 64 x 64 matrix is approximately 45 s/transaxial slice. The algorithm has been validated by a mathematical model and tested on heart and Jaszczak phantoms. Phantom studies and very first clinical results ((111)In octreotide SPECT, 99mTc MDP bone SPECT) show in comparison with filtered backprojection an enhancement in image quality. PMID:10076982

  20. Computerized axial tomography of the chest for visualization of ''absent'' pulmonary arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Sondheimer, H.M.; Oliphant, M.; Schneider, B.; Kavey, R.E.W.; Blackman, M.S.; Parker, F.B. Jr.

    1982-05-01

    To expand the search for central pulmonary arteries in six patients with absence of cardiac-pulmonary continuity, computerized axial tomography (CAT) of the chest was performed. The CAT scans were compared with previous arteriograms and pulmonary vein wedge angiograms. Three patients with type IV truncus arteriosus were studied, and none had a central, right or left pulmonary artery on CAT scan. However, two patients with tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia and a patent ductus arteriosus to the right lung demonstrated the presence of a left pulmonary artery. In addition, one child with truncus arteriosus with ''absent'' left pulmonary artery demonstrated a left pulmonary artery on the CAT scan. The CAT scan may therefore enhance our ability to search for disconnected pulmonary arteries in children with complex cyanotic congenital heart disease.

  1. Computerized tomography of pelvic osteomyelitis in patients with spinal cord injuries

    SciTech Connect

    Firooznia, H.; Rafii, M.; Golimbu, C.; Sokolow, J.

    1983-12-01

    Computerized tomography (CT) was performed in 19 patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) who had large pressure sores and in whom other complications were suspected. CT detected the depth, extent, and degree of undermining of the edges of the pressure sores in 19 of 27 lesions. Conventional radiography detected four cases of pelvic osteomyelitis. CT detected eight additional cases of pelvic osteomyelitis, as well as eight clinically unsuspected peripelvic and intrapelvic abscesses. Technetium-99m bone scanning was not very helpful because of localization in chronic proliferative changes of bone and widespread foci of myositis ossificans, as well as in osteomyelitis. Gallium-67 scanning detected only one of six abscesses. It was not very helpful because of confusion of abscess and osteomyelitis with intense soft tissue swelling and cellulitis, which are often associated with pressure sores in patients with chronic SCI. CT was found to be, by far, the modality of choice for detection of pelvic osteomyelitis and abscess in patients with SCI.

  2. textbf{Tomography of Ionosphere electron density and its abnormity analysis during Wenchuan earthquake }

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoya; Xing, Nan

    2010-05-01

    A multiple-arc method and Kriging interpolation are applied to obtain VTEC as well as DCB using ground-based GPS data. Given by the time variation characteristics of VTEC and DCB, VTEC is calculated every 30 minutes as local variables, and DCB is calculated every day as global variables. Kriging method, taking the spatial information of VTEC into account, is useful to make VTEC more precise and stable. Meanwhile, based on 3-variable spline basis function, we expand electron density into a linear combination of a set of grid points. Tomography of Ionosphere electron density is made by MART. The results show the coherence with CHAMP occultation results. We applied these two ways to process the ground-based GPS data of Yangzi River Triangle Region in May, 2008 when the shocking earthquake happened in Wenchuan. A simple statistic analysis reveals the response of ionosphere to the earthquake and also the abnormal signal occurred before the earthquake.

  3. Compact cold stage for micro-computerized tomography imaging of chilled or frozen samples.

    PubMed

    Hullar, Ted; Paige, David F; Rowland, Douglas J; Anastasio, Cort

    2014-04-01

    High resolution X-ray microCT (computerized tomography) can be used to image a variety of objects, including temperature-sensitive materials. In cases where the sample must be chilled or frozen to maintain sample integrity, either the microCT machine itself must be placed in a refrigerated chamber, or a relatively expensive commercial cold stage must be purchased. We describe here the design and construction of a low-cost custom cold stage suitable for use in a microCT imaging system. Our device uses a boron nitride sample holder, two-stage Peltier cooler, fan-cooled heat sink, and electronic controller to maintain sample temperatures as low as -25 °C ± 0.2 °C for the duration of a tomography acquisition. The design does not require modification to the microCT machine, and is easily installed and removed. Our custom cold stage represents a cost-effective solution for refrigerating CT samples for imaging, and is especially useful for shared equipment or machines unsuitable for cold room use. PMID:24784619

  4. Compact cold stage for micro-computerized tomography imaging of chilled or frozen samples

    SciTech Connect

    Hullar, Ted; Anastasio, Cort; Paige, David F.; Rowland, Douglas J.

    2014-04-15

    High resolution X-ray microCT (computerized tomography) can be used to image a variety of objects, including temperature-sensitive materials. In cases where the sample must be chilled or frozen to maintain sample integrity, either the microCT machine itself must be placed in a refrigerated chamber, or a relatively expensive commercial cold stage must be purchased. We describe here the design and construction of a low-cost custom cold stage suitable for use in a microCT imaging system. Our device uses a boron nitride sample holder, two-stage Peltier cooler, fan-cooled heat sink, and electronic controller to maintain sample temperatures as low as −25 °C ± 0.2 °C for the duration of a tomography acquisition. The design does not require modification to the microCT machine, and is easily installed and removed. Our custom cold stage represents a cost-effective solution for refrigerating CT samples for imaging, and is especially useful for shared equipment or machines unsuitable for cold room use.

  5. Compact cold stage for micro-computerized tomography imaging of chilled or frozen samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hullar, Ted; Paige, David F.; Rowland, Douglas J.; Anastasio, Cort

    2014-04-01

    High resolution X-ray microCT (computerized tomography) can be used to image a variety of objects, including temperature-sensitive materials. In cases where the sample must be chilled or frozen to maintain sample integrity, either the microCT machine itself must be placed in a refrigerated chamber, or a relatively expensive commercial cold stage must be purchased. We describe here the design and construction of a low-cost custom cold stage suitable for use in a microCT imaging system. Our device uses a boron nitride sample holder, two-stage Peltier cooler, fan-cooled heat sink, and electronic controller to maintain sample temperatures as low as -25 °C ± 0.2 °C for the duration of a tomography acquisition. The design does not require modification to the microCT machine, and is easily installed and removed. Our custom cold stage represents a cost-effective solution for refrigerating CT samples for imaging, and is especially useful for shared equipment or machines unsuitable for cold room use.

  6. Comparison of global ionospheric maps, high-orbital and low-orbital radio tomography.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunitsyn, Viacheslav E.; Andreeva, Elena S.; Nesterov, Ivan A.; Kalashnikova, Svetlana A.; Padokhin, Artem M.

    2010-05-01

    Observations on the GPS receivers networks which are being actively developed at present provide the input data for constructing global ionospheric maps (GIM) of the distributions of total electron content (TEC) in the ionosphere. The methods applied in the GIM construction at several data processing centers are different although all based on the common idea of finding the appropriate model parameters to fit the selected model of the vertical distribution of electron density to the observed GPS data. At the same time, the existing global IGS network together with several regional GPS networks open the possibility for solving the problem of 4D (spatiotemporal) ionospheric radio tomography (RT) based on the data of high-orbiting navigational satellite systems (the high orbital radio tomography, HORT). The approaches used in HORT are similar to those applied and found highly efficient in 2D low-orbital radio tomography (LORT). The purpose of the present work is to compare TEC estimations based on GIMs, calculated by different centers, with HORT and LORT reconstructions observed at different geomagnetic activity. The results of such comparison along RT systems in Russia and Alaska during the periods of geomagnetic storms of 2003-2004 are reported and discussed. The reconstructions for quiet periods are basically similar, although higher GIM and HORT TEC compared to LORT TEC, which might be due to the plasmaspheric contribution, are still noteworthy. However, during the geomagnetic storms, GIM TEC significantly differs from either LORT and HORT TEC. The work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grants nos. 10-05-01126, 08-05-00676). The authors acknowledge IGS for GNSS data. We are also grateful to our colleagues in PGI and NWRS for the shared raw RT data.

  7. Medium-scale 4-D ionospheric tomography using a dense GPS network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Kamp, M. M. J. L.

    2013-01-01

    The ionosphere above Scandinavia in December 2006 is successfully imaged by 4-dimensional tomography using the software package MIDAS from the University of Bath. The method concentrates on medium-scale structures: between 100 km and 2000 km in horizontal size. The input consists of TEC measurements from the dense GPS network Geotrim in Finland. In order to ensure sufficient vertical resolution of the result, EISCAT incoherent scatter radar data from Tromsø are used as additional input to provide the vertical profile information. The TEC offset of the measurements is unknown, but the inversion procedure is able to determine this automatically. This auto-calibration is shown to work well. Comparisons with EISCAT radar results and with occultation results show that the inversion using EISCAT data for profile information is much better able to resolve vertical profiles of irregular structures than the inversion using built-in profiles. Still, with either method the intensities of irregular structures of sizes near the resolution (about 100 km horizontal size) can be underestimated. Also, the accuracy of the inversion worsens above areas where no receivers are available. The ionosphere over Scandinavia in December 2006 often showed a dense E-layer in early morning hours, which generally disappeared during midday when a dense F-layer was present. On 14 December, a strong coronal mass ejection occurred, and many intense irregularities appeared in the ionosphere, which extended to high altitudes.

  8. Computerized tomography technique for reconstruction of obstructed temperature field in infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sham, F. C.; Huang, Y. H.; Liu, L.; Chen, Y. S.; Hung, Y. Y.; Lo, T. Y.

    2010-01-01

    Infrared thermography is a rapid, non-invasive and full-field technique for non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E). With all the achievements on IR instrumentation and image processing techniques attained, it has been extended far beyond simple hot-spot detection and becomes one of the most promising NDT&E techniques in the last decades. It has achieved increasing acceptance in different sectors include medical imaging, manufacturing component fault detection and buildings diagnostic. However, one limitation of IR thermography is that the testing results are greatly affected by object surface emissivity. Surface with various emissivities may lead to difficult discrimination between area of defect and area with different emissivity. Therefore, many studies have been carried out on eliminating emissivity, for example, the time derivative approach, lock-in processing and differential contrast measurements. In these methods, sequence of themo-data/images are recorded and being processed in order to eliminate differences of emissivity. Another problem of IR thermography is that any obstruction may limit stimulations and imaging which leads to the observation of unclear defect image. To solve this problem, this paper proposes an algorithm based on the principle of computerized tomography which permits the reconstruction of unavailable/partially available temperature distribution of the affected area using the measured surrounding temperature field. In the process, a set of imaginary rays are projected from many different directions across the area. For each ray, integration of the temperature derivatives along the ray is equals to the temperature difference between the boundary points intercepted by the ray. Therefore, a set of linear equations can be established by considering the multiple rays. Each equation expresses the unknown temperature derivatives in the affected area in terms of the measured boundary temperature data. Solution of the set of simultaneous

  9. [Multislice computerized tomography coronary angiography: general principles, technique and clinical applications].

    PubMed

    Karabulut, Nevzat

    2008-07-01

    Electrocardiogram-gated coronary multislice computerized tomography (CT) angiography is a rapidly improving technology allowing noninvasive imaging of coronary arteries. After the initial promising results obtained with four-section CT scanners, progressively higher temporal and spatial resolutions have been achieved by increasing gantry rotation speed and the number of detector rows and by reducing individual detector size. This review presents an overview of the general principles, technique and emerging applications and artifacts of coronary multislice CT angiography. The diagnostic performance of this new technology allows it to be used to evaluate the presence of coronary plaques and stenosis, coronary bypass graft patency, and the origin and course of congenital coronary anomalies. As it visualizes coronary artery wall in addition to lumen and provides volumetric data of heart and great vessels, it readily demonstrates plaque remodeling, ostial lesions and other cardiac and extracardiac abnormalities. The high negative predictive value of coronary CT angiography makes it a valuable tool in the evaluation of patients with low or intermediate pretest probability for coronary artery disease. However, improvements in spatial and temporal resolution are still needed in the imaging of small coronary stents, in the detection and characterization of noncalcified plaques, and to overcome image degradation by arrhythmias, higher heart rates, and calcium-related artifacts. PMID:18611837

  10. Noise reduction in ultrasonic computerized tomography by preprocessing for projection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norose, Yoko; Mizutani, Koichi; Wakatsuki, Naoto; Ebihara, Tadashi

    2015-07-01

    In this study, an ultrasonic computerized tomography (CT) using time-of-flights (TOFs) has been used for the nondestructive inspection of steel billets with high acoustic attenuation. One of the remaining problems of this method is noise in CT images, which makes it difficult to distinguish defects from noise. Conventionally, noise is suppressed by a low-pass filter (LPF) in the process of filtered back projection (FBP). However, it has been found that there is residual noise even after filtering. To cope with this problem, in this study, the noise observed in ultrasonic testing was examined. As a result, it was found that the TOF data used for CT processing contains impulse noise, which remains in the CT image even after filtering, owing to the existence of transducer directivity. To remove impulse noise selectively, we propose a noise reduction technique for ultrasonic CT for steel billet inspection, that is, preprocessing (outlier detection and removal) of TOF data. The performance of the proposed technique was evaluated experimentally. The obtained results suggest that the proposed technique can remove impulse noise selectively and markedly improve the quality of the CT image. Hence, the proposed technique can improve the performance of ultrasonic CT for steel billet inspection.

  11. Processing of projections containing phase contrast in laboratory micro-computerized tomography imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zápražný, Zdenko; Korytár, Dušan; Mikulík, Petr; Áč, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Free-space-propagation-based imaging belongs to several techniques for achieving phase contrast in the hard X-ray range. The basic precondition is to use an X-ray beam with a high degree of coherence. Although the best sources of coherent X-rays are synchrotrons, spatially coherent X-rays emitted from a sufficiently small spot of laboratory microfocus or sub-microfocus sources allow the transfer of some of the modern imaging techniques from synchrotrons to laboratories. Spatially coherent X-rays traverse a sample leading to a phase shift. Beam deflection induced by the local change of refractive index may be expressed as a dark–bright contrast on the edges of the object in an X-ray projection. This phenomenon of edge enhancement leads to an increase in spatial resolution of X-ray projections but may also lead to unpleasant artefacts in computerized tomography unless phase and absorption contributions are separated. The possibilities of processing X-ray images of lightweight objects containing phase contrast using phase-retrieval methods in laboratory conditions are tested and the results obtained are presented. For this purpose, simulated and recorded X-ray projections taken from a laboratory imaging system with a microfocus X-ray source and a high-resolution CCD camera were processed and a qualitative comparison of results was made. PMID:24046501

  12. Correlations between computerized tomography of the head and motor developmental disturbances of children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y H

    1981-01-01

    Two hundred and eight-two children with cerebral palsy (C.P.) and thirty-seven normal children were studied by computerized tomography (C.T.) of the head for finding out the correlations between the organic damage of the brain and the motor developmental disturbance. The abnormal findings of C.T. were: enlargement of the ventricular system, high density area, low density area and porencephalus, enlargement of the sulcus and anomaly of the medial structure. Enlargement of the ventricular system seemed to have correlation with spasticity; the portion and the extent of the enlargement corresponded to the affected extremities and the severity of the spasticity. Children of other types also showed various abnormal C.T. findings but, in general, less than that of spastic types. The prognosis of the motor development of C.P. children cannot be predicted by serial C.T. examinations strictly, because early treatment could cause improvement to that of these children. However, it is of worthy notice that C.T. is an effective method of helping to diagnose the motor developmental disturbance in earlier childhood. PMID:6974207

  13. Survey radiography and computerized tomography imaging of the thorax in female dogs with mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Accurate early diagnosis of lung metastases is important for establishing therapeutic measures. Therefore, the present study aimed to compare survey thoracic radiographs and computerized tomography (CT) scans to specifically identify lung metastases in female dogs with mammary tumors. Methods Twenty-one female dogs, weighing 3 to 34 kg and aged from 5 years to 14 years and 10 months, with mammary tumors were studied. In all dogs before the imaging examinations, fine-needle aspiration cytology of the mammary tumors was performed to confirm the diagnosis. Three-view thoracic radiographs were accomplished: right lateral, left lateral and ventrodorsal views. Sequential transverse images of the thorax were acquired on a spiral Scanner, before and after intravenous bolus injection of nonionic iodine contrast. Soft-tissue and lung windows were applied. All the mammary tumors were surgically removed and examined histologically. Results The correlation between the cytological and histological results regarding presence of malignancy was observed in only 17 cases. In radiographic examinations, no dog displayed signs of lung metastases or thorax chest lesions. CT detected lung metastasis in two cases, while small areas of lung atelectasis located peripherally were found in 28.57% of the dogs. Conclusion In this study population, spiral CT showed higher sensitivity than chest radiographies to detect lung metastasis; this indicates that CT should be performed on all female dogs with malignant mammary tumors. PMID:20214816

  14. Numerical Modeling of Jointed Rock Under Compressive Loading Using X-ray Computerized Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qinglei; Yang, Shengqi; Ranjith, P. G.; Zhu, Wancheng; Yang, Tianhong

    2016-03-01

    As jointed rocks consist of joints embedded within intact rock blocks, the presence and geometrical fabric of joints have a great influence on the mechanical behavior of rock. With consideration of the actual spatial shape of joints, a numerical model is proposed to investigate the fracture evolution mechanism of jointed rocks. In the proposed model, computerized tomography (CT) scanning is first used to capture the microstructure of a jointed sandstone specimen, which is artificially fabricated by loading the intact sample until the residual strength, and then digital image processing (DIP) techniques are applied to characterize the geometrical fabric of joints from the CT images. A simple vectorization method is used to convert the microstructure based on a cross-sectional image into a layer of 3-D vectorized microstructure and the overall 3-D model of the jointed sandstone including the real spatial shape of the joints is established by stacking the layers in a specific sequence. The 3-D model is then integrated into a well-established code [three-dimensional Rock Failure Process Analysis, (RFPA3D)]. Using the proposed model, a uniaxial compression test of the jointed sandstone is simulated. The results show that the presence of joints can produce tensile stress zones surrounding them, which result in the fracture of jointed rocks under a relatively small external load. In addition, the spatial shape of the joints has a great influence on the fracture process of jointed rocks.

  15. Computerized Tomography Scanning and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Will Terminate the Era of the Autopsy - A Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Benharroch, Daniel; Shvarts, Shifra; Jotkowitz, Alan; Shelef, Ilan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Reports on a marked reduction of the number of autopsies performed worldwide to less than 5% of hospital deaths remain without a satisfactory explanation. The premature disappearance of the autopsy might represent a medical tragedy of a major order. One of the causes for the decrease in autopsies is poorly documented: we suspect that the attending physician might show some reluctance when requesting a consent for an autopsy from the bereaved family. Moreover, this officer might consider that the post mortem will add little information to that already obtained from the computerized tomography scanner or the magnetic resonance imaging. Methods: In order to confirm our hypothesis, we carried out a review of 300 articles indexed as "radiologic-histologic correlation", 118 of which were selected for a significant correlation. From the abstracts, we retrieved the type of the article, the degree of correlation as assessed by the authors and the form of imaging employed, and we computed them. Results & conclusions: The most striking correlation was observed in the small prospective series. An additional search for the "radiologic-autopsy correlation" supported a marked reduction in the number of post-mortems, especially those related with prospective studies. Based on the present study, we cannot determine precisely the role of the house officer in this tragedy. We may have demonstrated, however, that the modern radiologic methods have not yet reached a high enough performance quality to achieve the status of a candidate substitute for the autopsy. PMID:26722367

  16. A modified conjugate gradient method based on the Tikhonov system for computerized tomography (CT).

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Wang, Huaxiang

    2011-04-01

    During the past few decades, computerized tomography (CT) was widely used for non-destructive testing (NDT) and non-destructive examination (NDE) in the industrial area because of its characteristics of non-invasiveness and visibility. Recently, CT technology has been applied to multi-phase flow measurement. Using the principle of radiation attenuation measurements along different directions through the investigated object with a special reconstruction algorithm, cross-sectional information of the scanned object can be worked out. It is a typical inverse problem and has always been a challenge for its nonlinearity and ill-conditions. The Tikhonov regulation method is widely used for similar ill-posed problems. However, the conventional Tikhonov method does not provide reconstructions with qualities good enough, the relative errors between the reconstructed images and the real distribution should be further reduced. In this paper, a modified conjugate gradient (CG) method is applied to a Tikhonov system (MCGT method) for reconstructing CT images. The computational load is dominated by the number of independent measurements m, and a preconditioner is imported to lower the condition number of the Tikhonov system. Both simulation and experiment results indicate that the proposed method can reduce the computational time and improve the quality of image reconstruction. PMID:21129739

  17. An interesting case of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia: The "pirate sign" evaluated with Tc-99m methylene diphosphonate single-photon emission computed tomography/computerized tomography.

    PubMed

    Harisankar, Chidambaram Natarajan Balasubramanian; Bhattacharya, Anish; Bhadada, Sanjay Kumar; Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusamy; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2011-01-01

    Polyostotic fibrous dysplasia is a rare progressive benign disorder of the bone. Bone scintigraphy is extremely useful in the initial evaluation for identifying the extent of disease. We report a case presenting with pathological fracture of the shaft of the right femur. After treatment of the fracture, bone scintigraphy revealed involvement of multiple bones including the skull and facial bones. The utility of single-photon emission computed tomography/computerized tomography in the evaluation of the extent of skull base involvement is highlighted. PMID:21969780

  18. Use of microfocus computerized tomography as a new technique for characterizing bone tissue around oral implants.

    PubMed

    Van Oossterwyck, H; Duyck, J; Vander Sloten, J; Van der Perre, G; Jansen, J; Wevers, M; Naert, I

    2000-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analysis of peri-implant tissues around retrieved oral implants is typically done by means of light microscopy on thin histological sections containing the metal surface and the undecalcified bone. It remains, however, a labor-intensive and thus time-consuming job. Moreover, it is a destructive technique that allows tissue quantification in only a limited number of two-dimensional sections. As an alternative, we evaluated the bone structure around screw-shaped titanium implants by means of microfocus computerized tomography (micro-CT) because it presents a number of advantages compared to conventional sectioning techniques: micro-CT is nondestructive, fast, and allows a fully three-dimensional characterization of the bone structure around the implant. Images can be reconstructed in an arbitrary plane, and three-dimensional reconstructions are also possible. Because of its high resolution, individual trabeculae can be visualized. The accuracy of micro-CT was qualitatively evaluated by comparing histological sections with the corresponding CT slices for the same specimen. The overall trabecular structure is very similar according to both techniques. Even very close to the interface, the titanium implant does not seem to produce significant artifacts. Furthermore, because the complete digital data on the trabecular bone structure around the implant is available, it is possible to create finite-element models of the bone-implant system that model the trabeculae in detail so that mechanical stress transfer at the interface can be studied at the level of individual trabeculae. Therefore, micro-CT seems to be very promising for the in vitro assessment of the three-dimensional bone structure around oral implants. Further research will be needed to evaluate its accuracy in a more quantitative way. PMID:11831302

  19. Assessment of the Anterior Loop of the Mental Nerve Using Cone Beam Computerized Tomography Scan.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chun-I; Won, John; Al-Ardah, Aladdin; Santana, Ruben; Rice, Dwight; Lozada, Jaime

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to use cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT) scans with oblique-transverse reconstruction modality to measure and compare the anterior loop length (AnLL) of the mental nerve between gender and age groups and to compare the difference between the right and left sides. Sixty-one female and 61 male CBCT scans were randomly selected for each age group: 21-40, 41-60, and 61-80 years. Both right- and left-side AnLLs were measured in each subject using i-CATVision software to measure AnLLs on the oblique transverse plane using multiplanar reconstruction. The anterior loop was identified in 85.2% of cases, with the mean AnLL of the 366 subjects (732 hemimandibles) being 1.46 ± 1.25 mm with no statistically significant difference between right and left sides or between different gender groups. However, the mean AnLL in the 21-40 year group (1.89 ± 1.35 mm) was larger than the AnLL in the 41-60 year group (1.35 ± 1.19 mm) and the 61-80 year group (1.13 ± 1.08 mm). In conclusion, when placing implants in close proximity to mental foramina, caution is recommended to avoid injury to the inferior alveolar nerve. No fixed distance anteriorly from the mental foramen should be considered safe. Using CBCT scans with the oblique-transverse method to accurately identify and measure the AnLL is of utmost importance in avoiding and protecting its integrity. PMID:24552176

  20. A computerized tomography study of the morphological interrelationship between the temporal bones and the craniofacial complex

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Helder Nunes; Slavicek, Rudolf; Sato, Sadao

    2012-01-01

    The hypothesis that the temporal bones are at the center of the dynamics of the craniofacial complex, directly influencing facial morphology, has been put forward long ago. This study examines the role of the spatial positioning of temporal bones (frontal and sagittal inclination) in terms of influencing overall facial morphology. Several 3D linear, angular and orthogonal measurements obtained through computerized analysis of virtual models of 163 modern human skulls reconstructed from cone-beam computed tomography images were analyzed and correlated. Additionally, the sample was divided into two subgroups based on the median value of temporal bone sagittal inclination [anterior rotation group (n = 82); posterior rotation group (n = 81)], and differences between groups evaluated. Correlation coefficients showed that sagittal inclination of the temporal bone was significantly (P < 0.01) related to midline flexion, transversal width and anterior–posterior length of the basicranium, to the anterior–posterior positioning of the mandible and maxilla, and posterior midfacial height. Frontal inclination of the temporal bone was significantly related (P < 0.01) to basicranium anterior–posterior and transversal dimensions, and to posterior midfacial height. In comparison with the posterior rotation group, the anterior rotation group presented a less flexed and anterior–posteriorly longer cranial base, a narrower skull, porion and the articular eminence located more superiorly and posteriorly, a shorter posterior midfacial height, the palatal plane rotated clockwise, a more retrognathic maxilla and mandible, and the upper posterior occlusal plane more inclined and posteriorly located. The results suggest that differences in craniofacial morphology are highly integrated with differences in the positional relationship of the temporal bones. The sagittal inclination of the temporal bone seems to have a greater impact on the 3D morphology of the craniofacial complex than

  1. Characterizing analogue caldera collapse with computerized X-ray micro-tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, Sam; Holohan, Eoghan; Boone, Matthieu; Pauwels, Elin; Cnudde, Veerle; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2013-04-01

    Analogue models in the past mainly explored caldera collapse structures by documenting 2D model cross-sections. Kinematic aspects and 3D structures of caldera collapse are less well understood, although they are essential to interpret recent field and monitoring data. We applied high resolution radiography and computerized X-ray micro-tomography (µCT) to image the deformation during analogue fluid withdrawal in small-scale caldera collapse models. The models test and highlight the possibilities and limitations of µCT-scanning to qualitatively image and quantitatively analyse deformation of analogue volcano-tectonic experiments. High resolution interval radiography sequences document '2.5D' surface and internal model geometry, and subsidence kinematics of a collapsing caldera block into an emptying fluid body in an unprecedented way. During the whole drainage process, all subsidence was bound by caldera ring faults. Subsidence was associated with dilatation of the analogue granular material within the collapsing column. The temporal subsidence rate pattern within the subsiding volume comprised three phases: 1) Upward ring fault propagation, 2) Rapid subsidence with the highest subsidence rates within the uppermost subsiding volume, 3) Relatively slower subsidence rates over the whole column with intermittent subsidence rate acceleration. Such acceleration did almost never affect the whole column. By using radiography sequences it is possible in a non-destructive manner to obtain a continuous observation of fault propagation, down sag mechanisms and the subsequent development of collapse structures. Multi-angle µCT scans of the collapse result allow for a full virtual 3D reconstruction of the model. This leads to an unprecedented 3D view on fault geometries. The developed method is a step towards the quantitative documentation of volcano-tectonic models that would render data interpretations immediately comparable to monitoring data available from recent

  2. Application of IRI-Plas in Ionospheric Tomography and HF Communication Studies with Assimilation of GPS-TEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arikan, Feza; Gulyaeva, Tamara; Sezen, Umut; Arikan, Orhan; Toker, Cenk; Hakan Tuna, MR.; Erdem, Esra

    2016-07-01

    International Reference Ionosphere is the most acknowledged climatic model of ionosphere that provides electron density profile and hourly, monthly median values of critical layer parameters of the ionosphere for a desired location, date and time between 60 to 2,000 km altitude. IRI is also accepted as the International Standard Ionosphere model. Recently, the IRI model is extended to the Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite orbital range of 20,000 km. The new version is called IRI-Plas and it can be obtained from http://ftp.izmiran.ru/pub/izmiran /SPIM/. A user-friendly online version is also provided at www.ionolab.org as a space weather service. Total Electron Content (TEC), which is defined as the line integral of electron density on a given ray path, is an observable parameter that can be estimated from earth based GPS receivers in a cost-effective manner as GPS-TEC. One of the most important advantages of IRI-Plas is the possible input of GPS-TEC to update the background deterministic ionospheric model to the current ionospheric state. This option is highly useful in regional and global tomography studies and HF link assessments. IONOLAB group currently implements IRI-Plas as a background model and updates the ionospheric state using GPS-TEC in IONOLAB-CIT and IONOLAB-RAY algorithms. The improved state of ionosphere allows the most reliable 4-D imaging of electron density profiles and HF and satellite communication link simulations.This study is supported by TUBITAK 115E915 and joint TUBITAK 114E092 and AS CR 14/001.

  3. Ionospheric tomography over South Africa: Comparison of MIDAS and ionosondes measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giday, Nigussie M.; Katamzi, Zama T.; McKinnell, Lee-Anne

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to show the results of an ionospheric tomography algorithm called Multi-Instrument Data Analysis System (MIDAS) over the South African region. Recorded data from a network of 49-53 Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers over the South African region was used as input for the inversion. The inversion was made for April, July, October and December representing the four distinct seasons (Autumn, Winter, Spring and Summer respectively) of the year 2012. MIDAS reconstructions were validated by comparing maximum electron density of the F2 layer (NmF2) and peak height (hmF2) values predicted by MIDAS to those derived from three South African ionosonde measurements. The diurnal and seasonal trends of the MIDAS NmF2 values were in good agreement with the respective NmF2 values derived from the ionosondes. In addition, good agreement was found between the two measurements with minimum and maximum coefficients of determination (r2) between 0.84 and 0.96 in all the stations and validation days. The seasonal trend of the NmF2 values over the South Africa region has been reproduced using this inversion which was in good agreement with the ionosonde measurements. Moreover, a comparison of the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI-2012) model NmF2 values with the respective ionosonde derived NmF2 values showed to have higher deviation than a similar comparison between the MIDAS reconstruction and the ionosonde measurements. However, the monthly averaged hmF2 values derived from IRI 2012 model showed better agreement than the respective MIDAS reconstructed hmF2 values compared with the ionosonde derived hmF2 values.The performance of the MIDAS reconstruction was observed to deteriorate with increased geomagnetic conditions. MIDAS reconstructed electron density were slightly elevated during three storm periods studied (24 April, 15 July and 8 October) which was in good agreement with the ionosonde measurements.

  4. AMPS data management requirements study. [user manuals (computer programs)/display devices - computerized simulation/experimentation/ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A data simulation is presented for instruments and associated control and display functions required to perform controlled active experiments of the atmosphere. A comprehensive user's guide is given for the data requirements and software developed for the following experiments: (1) electromagnetic wave transmission; (2) passive observation of ambient plasmas; (3) ionospheric measurements with a subsatellite; (4) electron accelerator beam measurements; and (5) measurement of acoustic gravity waves in the sodium layer using lasers. A complete description of each experiment is given.

  5. Comparison of micro-computerized tomography and cone-beam computerized tomography in the detection of accessory canals in primary molars

    PubMed Central

    Kamburoğlu, Kıvanç; Tatar, İlkan; Arıkan, Volkan; Çelik, Hakan Hamdi; Yüksel, Selcen; Özen, Tuncer

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to compare the accuracy of micro-computed tomography (CT) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in detecting accessory canals in primary molars. Materials and Methods Forty-one extracted human primary first and second molars were embedded in wax blocks and scanned using micro-CT and CBCT. After the images were taken, the samples were processed using a clearing technique and examined under a stereomicroscope in order to establish the gold standard for this study. The specimens were classified into three groups: maxillary molars, mandibular molars with three canals, and mandibular molars with four canals. Differences between the gold standard and the observations made using the imaging methods were calculated using Spearman's rho correlation coefficient test. Results The presence of accessory canals in micro-CT images of maxillary and mandibular root canals showed a statistically significant correlation with the stereomicroscopic images used as a gold standard. No statistically significant correlation was found between the CBCT findings and the stereomicroscopic images. Conclusion Although micro-CT is not suitable for clinical use, it provides more detailed information about minor anatomical structures. However, CBCT is convenient for clinical use but may not be capable of adequately analyzing the internal anatomy of primary teeth. PMID:26730367

  6. AMPS data management requirements study, appendix 1. [user manuals (computer programs)/display devices - computerized simulation/experimentation/ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Flow charts and display formats for the simulation of five experiments are given. The experiments are: (1) electromagnetic wave transmission; (2) passive observations of ambient plasma; (3) ionospheric measurements with subsatellite; (4) electron accelerator beam measurements; and (5) measurement of acoustical gravity waves in the sodium layer using lasers. A detailed explanation of the simulation procedure, definition of variables, and an explanation of how the experimenter makes display choices is also presented. A functional description is included on each flow chart and the assumptions and definitions of terms and scope of the flow charts and displays are presented.

  7. Two-dimensional ionospheric tomography over the low-latitude Indian region: An intercomparison of ART and MART algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sukanta Kumar; Shukla, Ashish Kumar

    2011-04-01

    Single-frequency users of a satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS) rely on ionospheric models to mitigate the delay due to the ionosphere. The ionosphere is the major source of range and range rate errors for users of the Global Positioning System (GPS) who require high-accuracy positioning. The purpose of the present study is to develop a tomography model to reconstruct the total electron content (TEC) over the low-latitude Indian region which lies in the equatorial ionospheric anomaly belt. In the present study, the TEC data collected from the six TEC collection stations along a longitudinal belt of around 77 degrees are used. The main objective of the study is to find out optimum pixel size which supports a better reconstruction of the electron density and hence the TEC over the low-latitude Indian region. Performance of two reconstruction algorithms Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) and Multiplicative Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (MART) is analyzed for different pixel sizes varying from 1 to 6 degrees in latitude. It is found from the analysis that the optimum pixel size is 5° × 50 km over the Indian region using both ART and MART algorithms.

  8. The use of ionospheric tomography and elevation masks to reduce the overall error in single-frequency GPS timing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Julian A. R.; Tong, Jenna R.; Allain, Damien J.; Mitchell, Cathryn N.

    2011-01-01

    Signals from Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites at the horizon or at low elevations are often excluded from a GPS solution because they experience considerable ionospheric delays and multipath effects. Their exclusion can degrade the overall satellite geometry for the calculations, resulting in greater errors; an effect known as the Dilution of Precision (DOP). In contrast, signals from high elevation satellites experience less ionospheric delays and multipath effects. The aim is to find a balance in the choice of elevation mask, to reduce the propagation delays and multipath whilst maintaining good satellite geometry, and to use tomography to correct for the ionosphere and thus improve single-frequency GPS timing accuracy. GPS data, collected from a global network of dual-frequency GPS receivers, have been used to produce four GPS timing solutions, each with a different ionospheric compensation technique. One solution uses a 4D tomographic algorithm, Multi-Instrument Data Analysis System (MIDAS), to compensate for the ionospheric delay. Maps of ionospheric electron density are produced and used to correct the single-frequency pseudorange observations. This method is compared to a dual-frequency solution and two other single-frequency solutions: one does not include any ionospheric compensation and the other uses the broadcast Klobuchar model. Data from the solar maximum year 2002 and October 2003 have been investigated to display results when the ionospheric delays are large and variable. The study focuses on Europe and results are produced for the chosen test site, VILL (Villafranca, Spain). The effects of excluding all of the GPS satellites below various elevation masks, ranging from 5° to 40°, on timing solutions for fixed (static) and mobile (moving) situations are presented. The greatest timing accuracies when using the fixed GPS receiver technique are obtained by using a 40° mask, rather than a 5° mask. The mobile GPS timing solutions are most

  9. Evaluation of the accuracy of Cone Beam Computerized Tomography (CBCT): medical imaging technology in head and neck reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With the introduction, development and commercialization of Cone Beam Computerized Tomography (CBCT) technologies in the field of head and neck reconstruction, clinicians now have increased access to the technology. Given the growth of this new user group, there is an increasing concern regarding proper use, understanding, quality and patient safety. Methods The present study was carried out to evaluate data acquisition of CBCT medical imaging technology and the accuracy of the scanning at three different machine warming times. The study also compared the accuracy of CBCT at 0.2 mm slice thickness and Computerized Tomography (CT) at 1 mm slice thickness. A control model was CT scanned at five random intervals, at 1 mm slice thickness and CBCT scanned at specialized intervals, at 0.2 mm slice thickness. The data was then converted and imported into a software program where a digital registration procedure was used to compare the average deviations of the scanned models to the control. Results The study found that there was no statistically significant difference amongst the three CBCT machine warming times. There was a statistically significant difference between CT scanning with 1 mm slice thickness and CBCT scanning with 0.2 mm slice thickness. Conclusions The accuracy of the i-CAT CBCT scans used in the present study with a parameter at voxel size 0.2, will remain consistent and reliable at any warming stage. Also the difference between the CBCT i-CAT scans and the CT scans was not clinically significant based on suggested requirements of clinicians in head and neck reconstruction. PMID:23672880

  10. Simultaneous multiplicative column-normalized method (SMART) for 3-D ionosphere tomography in comparison to other algebraic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerzen, T.; Minkwitz, D.

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy and availability of satellite-based applications like GNSS positioning and remote sensing crucially depends on the knowledge of the ionospheric electron density distribution. The tomography of the ionosphere is one of the major tools to provide link specific ionospheric corrections as well as to study and monitor physical processes in the ionosphere. In this paper, we introduce a simultaneous multiplicative column-normalized method (SMART) for electron density reconstruction. Further, SMART+ is developed by combining SMART with a successive correction method. In this way, a balancing between the measurements of intersected and not intersected voxels is realised. The methods are compared with the well-known algebraic reconstruction techniques ART and SART. All the four methods are applied to reconstruct the 3-D electron density distribution by ingestion of ground-based GNSS TEC data into the NeQuick model. The comparative case study is implemented over Europe during two periods of the year 2011 covering quiet to disturbed ionospheric conditions. In particular, the performance of the methods is compared in terms of the convergence behaviour and the capability to reproduce sTEC and electron density profiles. For this purpose, independent sTEC data of four IGS stations and electron density profiles of four ionosonde stations are taken as reference. The results indicate that SMART significantly reduces the number of iterations necessary to achieve a predefined accuracy level. Further, SMART+ decreases the median of the absolute sTEC error up to 15, 22, 46 and 67 % compared to SMART, SART, ART and NeQuick respectively.

  11. Application of High- and Low-Orbiting Radio Tomography for Exploring the Ionospheric Structures on Different Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, Elena; Padokhin, Artem; Nazarenko, Marina; Nesterov, Ivan; Tumanova, Yulia; Tereshchenko, Evgeniy; Kozharin, Maksim

    2016-07-01

    The methods of ionospheric radio tomography (RT) are actively developing at present. These methods are suitable for reconstructing the spatial distributions of electron density from radio signals transmitted from the navigational satellite systems and recorded by the networks of ground-based receivers. The RT systems based on the low-orbiting (LO) (Parus/Transit) navigational systems have been in operation since the early 1990s. Recently, the RT methods employing the signals from high-orbiting (HO) satellite navigational systems such as GPS/GLONASS have come into play. In our presentation, we discuss the accuracies, advantages, and limitations of LORT and HORT as well as the possibilities of their combined application fro reconstructing the structure of the ionosphere in the same region during the same time interval on the different spatiotemporal scales. The LORT reconstructions provide practically instantaneous (spanning 5-10 min) 2D snapshots of the ionosphere within a spatial interval with a length of up to a few thousand km. The vertical resolution of LORT is 25-30 km and the horizontal resolution, 15-25 km. The HORT methods are capable of reconstructing the 4D structure of the ionosphere (three spatial coordinates and time). The spatial resolution of HORT is generally not better than 100 km with a 60-20 min interval between the successive reconstructions. In the regions of dense receiving networks, the resolution can be improved to 30-50 km and the time step can be reduced to 30-10 min. In California and Japan which are covered by extremely dense receiving networks the resolution can be even higher (10-30 km) and the time interval between the reconstruction even shorter (up to 2 min). In the presentation, we discuss the LORT and HORT reconstructions of the ionosphere during different time periods of the 23rd and 24th solar cycles in the different regions of the world. We analyze the spatiotemporal features and dynamics of the ionosphere depending on the solar

  12. Hodgkin lymphoma patients in first remission: routine positron emission tomography/computerized tomography imaging is not superior to clinical follow-up for patients with no residual mass.

    PubMed

    Dann, Eldad J; Berkahn, Leanne; Mashiach, Tatiana; Frumer, Michael; Agur, Ariel; McDiarmid, Bridgett; Bar-Shalom, Rachel; Paltiel, Ora; Goldschmidt, Neta

    2014-03-01

    There is no consensus regarding optimal follow-up mode for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients that achieve complete remission following chemotherapy or combined chemo- and radiation therapy. Several studies demonstrated high sensitivity of positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT) in detecting disease progression; however, these techniques are currently not recommended for routine follow-up. This retrospective study conducted in two Israeli (N = 291) and one New Zealand academic centres (N = 77), compared a group of HL patients, followed-up with routine imaging every 6 months during the first 2 years after achieving remission, once in the third year, with additional dedicated studies performed due to symptoms or physical findings (Group I) to a group of patients without residual masses who underwent clinically-based surveillance with dedicated imaging upon relapse suspicion (Group II). Five-year overall survival (OS) was 94% and median time to relapse was 8·6 months for both modes. Relapse rates in Groups I and II were 13% and 9%, respectively. During the first 3 years of follow-up, 47·5 and 4·7 studies were performed per detected relapse in Groups I and II, respectively. The current study demonstrated no benefit in either progression-free survival (PFS) or OS in HL patients followed by routine imaging versus clinical follow-up. The cost was 10 times higher for routine imaging. PMID:24313286

  13. Computerized X-ray reconstruction tomography in stereometric analysis of cardiovascular dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robb, R. A.; Harris, L. D.; Ritman, E. L.

    1977-01-01

    A computerized technique is proposed for obtaining cross-sectional images of the dynamic spatial distribution of X-ray attenuation covering the entire anatomic extent of the thorax and its contents in living dogs with a resolution of 1 mm and at time intervals of 1/60 sec. Use is made of an X-ray imaging chain which is a new high-performance video-fluoroscopic system, unique in its design and construction and called SSDSR for single source dynamic spatial reconstructor. This dynamic spatial reconstruction system is shown to provide the temporally and spatially coherent multiple cross sections required to obtain the full three-dimensional anatomic and simultaneous hemodynamic information necessary for detailed quantitative analyses of regional cardiopulmonary and vascular functions in both basic investigations of animals and clinical diagnostic applications to patients. Numerous photographs supplement the text.

  14. A study of 3D structure of nighttime electron density enhancement in the mid-latitude ionosphere by GPS tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Saito, A.

    2011-12-01

    The mid-latitude summer nighttime anomaly (MSNA) is a feature that the nighttime electron density larger than that in the daytime mid-latitude ionosphere. This anomaly was first detected in the southern hemisphere five decades ago and observed in the northern hemisphere recently by ionosondes and satellites. Previous studies presented the electron density structure of MSNA by using COSMIC occultation data and found that MSNA is clearly seen around 300 km altitude during local summer. However, due to lack of observation, the day-to-day variation of MSNA was not investigated. A GPS tomography method by SPEL of Kyoto University using the total electron content (TEC) data measured by the ground-based GPS receiver network is employed in this study. The wide coverage and continuous observation of GPS receivers are suitable for investigating the spatial and day-to-day variations of ionospheric electron densities. The algorithm of the GPS tomography developed by SPEL of Kyoto University use a constraint condition that the gradient of election density tends to be smooth in the horizontal direction and steep in the vicinity of the F2 peak, instead of inputting the initial conditions. Therefore, the algorithm is independent of any ionospheric and plasmaspheric electron density distribution models. The dense ground-based GPS receiver network around European region is used to study the three dimensional (3D) structure of MSNA with GPS tomography. Results show that the MSNA usually appear around the geomagnetic mid-latitude region during local summer nighttime. The feature of MSNA is most obvious at the ionospheric F2-peak altitudes. The result also shows a day-to-day variation in the formation of MSNA, in terms of the occurrence time, intensity, and spatial extent. The tomographic results are compared with the ionosondes, satellites, and radar measurements. A theoretical model simulation, SAMI2, is also used to further discuss the mechanism of MSNA. The comparison with other

  15. A novel three-dimensional image reconstruction method for near-field coded aperture single photon emission computerized tomography

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Zhiping; Hong, Baoming; Li, Shimin; Liu, Yi-Hwa

    2009-01-01

    Coded aperture imaging for two-dimensional (2D) planar objects has been investigated extensively in the past, whereas little success has been achieved in imaging 3D objects using this technique. In this article, the authors present a novel method of 3D single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) reconstruction for near-field coded aperture imaging. Multiangular coded aperture projections are acquired and a stack of 2D images is reconstructed separately from each of the projections. Secondary projections are subsequently generated from the reconstructed image stacks based on the geometry of parallel-hole collimation and the variable magnification of near-field coded aperture imaging. Sinograms of cross-sectional slices of 3D objects are assembled from the secondary projections, and the ordered subset expectation and maximization algorithm is employed to reconstruct the cross-sectional image slices from the sinograms. Experiments were conducted using a customized capillary tube phantom and a micro hot rod phantom. Imaged at approximately 50 cm from the detector, hot rods in the phantom with diameters as small as 2.4 mm could be discerned in the reconstructed SPECT images. These results have demonstrated the feasibility of the authors’ 3D coded aperture image reconstruction algorithm for SPECT, representing an important step in their effort to develop a high sensitivity and high resolution SPECT imaging system. PMID:19544769

  16. Radio Tomography and Imaging of Ionospheric Disturbances Caused by Active Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunitsyn, Viacheslav; Padokhin, Artem; Andreeva, Elena; Tereshchenko, Evgeny; Nesterov, Ivan; Vladimir Frolov, S.

    We present the results of the radiotomographic imaging of the artificial ionospheric disturbances obtained in the experiments on the modification of the midlatitude ionosphere by powerful HF radiowaves carried out during last decade at the Sura heating facility. The experiments were conducted using both O- and X- mode radiowaves at frequencies lower than critical frequency of the ionospheric F2 layer both in daytime and nighttime ionosphere. Various schemes of the radiation of the heating wave were used including square wave modulation of the effective radiated power (ERP) at various frequencies and power stepping. Radio transmissions of the low- (Parus/Tsikada) and high-orbital (GPS/GLONASS) navigational satellites received at the mobile network of receiving sites were used for the remote sensing of the heated area of the ionosphere. We study the variations in TEC caused by HF heating showing that the GNSS TEC spectra often contain frequency components corresponding to the modulation periods of the ERP of the heating wave. The manifestations of the heating-induced variations in TEC are most prominent in the area of magnetic zenith of the pumping wave. In this work we also present the radiotomographic reconstructions of the spatial structure of the disturbed area of the ionosphere corresponding to the directivity pattern of the heater as well as the spatial structure of the wave-like disturbances, which are possibly AGWs, diverging from the heated area of the ionosphere. We also compare the effects obsereved during artificial heating experiments with those obsereved during rocket launches and powerful industiral explosions. The possibility of generation of electromagnetic waves by moving wave-like structures in ionosphere (like AGWs induced by HF-heating observed in our experiments) is also addressed in this work. The authors acknowledge the support of the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grants № 13-05-01122, 14-05-31445, 14-05-00855, 14-05-10069), grants

  17. An assessment of computerized tomography parameters in spinal bone mineralization determination

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    This research investigates the effects of changes in clinical parameters on measured bone density values using Quantitative Computed Tomography (QCT). These parameters include changes in patient size, geometry, internal anatomic conditions such as aortic calcifications and bowel gas, gantry slice position and angulation, spin-water bolus air gap distance, and field uniformity effects. It also assesses the reproducibility of the QCT technique on the G.E. 9800 CT scanner as well as the dose to radiosensitive tissues. The CIRS torso phantom was used in each of three size configurations to assess size effects. Mean bone mineral density (BMD) did not significantly vary with phantom size. Variations in patient cross-sectional geometry at constant volume were assessed using a custom manufactured body phantom.

  18. Computerized tomography technique for reconstruction of obstructed phase data in shearography.

    PubMed

    Hung, Y Y; Huang, Y H; Liu, L; Ng, S P; Chen, Y S

    2008-06-10

    Shearography is an interferometric method that overcomes several limitations of holography by eliminating the reference beam. It greatly simplifies the optical setup and has much higher tolerance to environmental disturbances. Consequently, the technique has received considerable industrial acceptance, particularly for nondestructive testing. Shearography, however, is generally not applicable to the measurement of an obstructed area, as the area to be measured must be accessible to both illumination and imaging. We present an algorithm based on the principle of tomography that permits the reconstruction of the unavailable phase distribution in an obstructed area from the measured boundary phase distribution. In the process, a set of imaginary rays is projected from many different directions across the area. For each ray, integration of the phase directional derivative along the ray is equal to the phase difference between the boundary points intercepted by the ray. Therefore, a set of linear equations can be established by considering the multiple rays. Each equation expresses the unknown phase derivatives in the obstructed area in terms of the measured boundary phase. Solution of the set of simultaneous equations yields the unknown phase distribution in the blind area. While its applications to shearography are demonstrated, the technique is potentially applicable to all full-field optical measurement techniques such as holography, speckle interferometry, classical interferometry, thermography, moiré, photoelasticity, and speckle correlation techniques. PMID:18545289

  19. The development and role of megavoltage cone beam computerized tomography in radiation oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, Olivier

    External beam radiation therapy has now the ability to deliver doses that conform tightly to a tumor volume. The steep dose gradients planned in these treatments make it increasingly important to reproduce the patient position and anatomy at each treatment fraction. For this reason, considerable research now focuses on in-room three-dimensional imaging. This thesis describes the first clinical megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MVCBCT) system, which utilizes a conventional linear accelerator equipped with an amorphous silicon flat panel detector. The document covers the system development and investigation of its clinical applications over the last 4-5 years. The physical performance of the system was evaluated and optimized for soft-tissue contrast resolution leading to recommendations of imaging protocols to use for specific clinical applications and body sites. MVCBCT images can resolve differences of 5% in electron density for a mean dose of 9 cGy. Hence, the image quality of this system is sufficient to differentiate some soft-tissue structures. The absolute positioning accuracy with MVCBCT is better than 1 mm. The accuracy of isodose lines calculated using MVCBCT images of head and neck patients is within 3% and 3 mm. The system shows excellent stability in image quality, CT# calibration, radiation exposure and absolute positioning over a period of 8 months. A procedure for MVCBCT quality assurance was developed. In our clinic, MVCBCT has been used to detect non rigid spinal cord distortions, to position a patient with a paraspinous tumor close to metallic hardware, to position prostate cancer patients using gold markers or soft-tissue landmarks, to monitor head and neck anatomical changes and their dosimetric consequences, and to complement the convention CT for treatment planning in presence of metallic implants. MVCBCT imaging is changing the clinical practice of our department by increasingly revealing patient-specific errors. New verification

  20. Interfraction Prostate Rotation Determined from In-Room Computerized Tomography Images

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Rebecca; Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad; Milner, Alvin; Cox, Jennifer; Duchesne, Gillian

    2011-07-01

    Fiducial markers (FMs) are commonly used as a correction technique for interfraction translations of the prostate. The aim of this investigation was to determine the magnitude of prostate rotations using 2 methods: FM coordinates and the anatomical border of the prostate and rectum. Daily computed tomography (CT) scans (n = 346) of 10 prostate cancer patients with 3 implanted FMs were acquired using the CT on rails. FM coordinates were used to determine rotation in the sagittal, transverse, and coronal planes, and CT contours of the prostate and rectum were used to determine rotation along the sagittal plane. An adaptive technique based on a subset of images (n = 6; planning and first 5 treatment CTs) to reduce systematic rotation errors in the sagittal plane was tested. The standard deviation (SD) of systematic rotation from FM coordinates was 7.6{sup o}, 7.7{sup o}, and 5.0{sup o} in the sagittal, transverse and coronal planes. The corresponding SD of random error was 10.2{sup o}, 15.8{sup o}, and 6.5{sup o}. Errors in the sagittal plane, determined from prostate and rectal contours, were 10.1{sup o} (systematic) and 7.7{sup o} (random). These results did not correlate with rotation computed from FM coordinates (r = -0.017; p = 0.753, n = 337). The systematic error could be reduced by 43% to 5.6{sup o} when the mean prostate position was estimated from 6 CT scans. Prostate rotation is a significant source of error that appears to be more accurately determined using the anatomical border of the prostate and rectum rather than FMs, thus highlighting the utility of CT image guidance.

  1. A Concept for Ionospheric Tomography from a CubeSat Platform at Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, S.; Cook, T.; Finn, S. C.; Mendillo, C.; Martel, J.; Geddes, G.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing of the neutral atmosphere and ionosphere using extreme and far ultraviolet airglow has now been well established. It has been shown that the OI 135.6 nm nightglow can be used to infer the density of singly ionized atomic oxygen ions, the dominant ion in the F2 region. It has also been shown that zenith angle profiles of OII 83.4 nm emissions in the dayglow are sensitive to the electron density profiles as measured by incoherent scatter radar. Finally, simultaneous measurements of OII 61.7 nm and OII 83.4 nm emissions have been shown to yield daytime electron densities. We describe several key technological advances that have made it possible to consider self-consistent characterization of the thermosphere and ionosphere from a CubeSat platform.

  2. Metal Artifact Reduction and Segmentation of Dental Computerized Tomography Images Using Least Square Support Vector Machine and Mean Shift Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Mortaheb, Parinaz; Rezaeian, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Segmentation and three-dimensional (3D) visualization of teeth in dental computerized tomography (CT) images are of dentists’ requirements for both abnormalities diagnosis and the treatments such as dental implant and orthodontic planning. On the other hand, dental CT image segmentation is a difficult process because of the specific characteristics of the tooth's structure. This paper presents a method for automatic segmentation of dental CT images. We present a multi-step method, which starts with a preprocessing phase to reduce the metal artifact using the least square support vector machine. Integral intensity profile is then applied to detect each tooth's region candidates. Finally, the mean shift algorithm is used to partition the region of each tooth, and all these segmented slices are then applied for 3D visualization of teeth. Examining the performance of our proposed approach, a set of reliable assessment metrics is utilized. We applied the segmentation method on 14 cone-beam CT datasets. Functionality analysis of the proposed method demonstrated precise segmentation results on different sample slices. Accuracy analysis of the proposed method indicates that we can increase the sensitivity, specificity, precision, and accuracy of the segmentation results by 83.24%, 98.35%, 72.77%, and 97.62% and decrease the error rate by 2.34%. The experimental results show that the proposed approach performs well on different types of CT images and has better performance than all existing approaches. Moreover, segmentation results can be more accurate by using the proposed algorithm of metal artifact reduction in the preprocessing phase. PMID:27014607

  3. Computerized tomography myelography with coronal and oblique coronal view for diagnosis of nerve root avulsion in brachial plexus injury

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Background The authors describe a new computerized tomography (CT) myelography technique with coronal and oblique coronal view to demonstrate the status of the cervical nerve rootlets involved in brachial plexus injury. They discuss the value of this technique for diagnosis of nerve root avulsion compared with CT myelography with axial view. Methods CT myelography was performed with penetration of the cervical subarachnoid space by the contrast medium. Then the coronal and oblique coronal reconstructions were created. The results of CT myelography were evaluated and classified with presence of pseudomeningocele, intradural ventral nerve rootlets, and intradural dorsal nerve rootlets. The diagnosis was by extraspinal surgical exploration with or without spinal evoked potential measurements and choline acetyl transferase activity measurement in 25 patients and recovery by a natural course in 3 patients. Its diagnostic accuracy was compared with that of CT myelography with axial view, correlated with surgical findings or a natural course in 57 cervical roots in 28 patients. Results Coronal and oblique coronal views were superior to axial views in visualization of the rootlets and orientation of the exact level of the root. Sensitivity and specificity for coronal and oblique coronal views of unrecognition of intradural ventral and dorsal nerve root shadow without pseudomeningocele in determining pre-ganglionic injury were 100% and 96%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between coronal and oblique coronal views and axial views. Conclusion The information by the coronal and oblique coronal slice CT myelography enabled the authors to assess the rootlets of the brachial plexus and provided valuable data for helping to decide whether to proceed with exploration, nerve repair, primary reconstruction. PMID:17651476

  4. Investigating the effect of characteristic x-rays in cadmium zinc telluride detectors under breast computerized tomography operating conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Glick, Stephen J.; Didier, Clay

    2013-10-14

    A number of research groups have been investigating the use of dedicated breast computerized tomography (CT). Preliminary results have been encouraging, suggesting an improved visualization of masses on breast CT as compared to conventional mammography. Nonetheless, there are many challenges to overcome before breast CT can become a routine clinical reality. One potential improvement over current breast CT prototypes would be the use of photon counting detectors with cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) (or CdTe) semiconductor material. These detectors can operate at room temperature and provide high detection efficiency and the capability of multi-energy imaging; however, one factor in particular that limits image quality is the emission of characteristic x-rays. In this study, the degradative effects of characteristic x-rays are examined when using a CZT detector under breast CT operating conditions. Monte Carlo simulation software was used to evaluate the effect of characteristic x-rays and the detector element size on spatial and spectral resolution for a CZT detector used under breast CT operating conditions. In particular, lower kVp spectra and thinner CZT thicknesses were studied than that typically used with CZT based conventional CT detectors. In addition, the effect of characteristic x-rays on the accuracy of material decomposition in spectral CT imaging was explored. It was observed that when imaging with 50-60 kVp spectra, the x-ray transmission through CZT was very low for all detector thicknesses studied (0.5–3.0 mm), thus retaining dose efficiency. As expected, characteristic x-ray escape from the detector element of x-ray interaction increased with decreasing detector element size, approaching a 50% escape fraction for a 100 μm size detector element. The detector point spread function was observed to have only minor degradation with detector element size greater than 200 μm and lower kV settings. Characteristic x-rays produced increasing distortion in

  5. Quantification of Soil Physical Properties by Using X-Ray Computerized Tomography (CT) and Standard Laboratory (STD) Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Maria Ambert Sanchez

    2003-12-12

    The implementation of x-ray computerized tomography (CT) on agricultural soils has been used in this research to quantify soil physical properties to be compared with standard laboratory (STD) methods. The overall research objective was to more accurately quantify soil physical properties for long-term management systems. Two field studies were conducted at Iowa State University's Northeast Research and Demonstration Farm near Nashua, IA using two different soil management strategies. The first field study was conducted in 1999 using continuous corn crop rotation for soil under chisel plow with no-till treatments. The second study was conducted in 2001 and on soybean crop rotation for the same soil but under chisel plow and no-till practices with wheel track and no-wheel track compaction treatments induced by a tractor-manure wagon. In addition, saturated hydraulic (K{sub s}) conductivity and the convection-dispersion (CDE) model were also applied using long-term soil management systems only during 2001. The results obtained for the 1999 field study revealed no significant differences between treatments and laboratory methods, but significant differences were found at deeper depths of the soil column for tillage treatments. The results for standard laboratory procedure versus CT method showed significant differences at deeper depths for the chisel plow treatment and at the second lower depth for no-till treatment for both laboratory methods. The macroporosity distribution experiment showed significant differences at the two lower depths between tillage practices. Bulk density and percent porosity had significant differences at the two lower depths of the soil column. The results obtained for the 2001 field study showed no significant differences between tillage practices and compaction practices for both laboratory methods, but significant differences between tillage practices with wheel track and no-wheel compaction treatments were found along the soil profile for

  6. Investigating the effect of characteristic x-rays in cadmium zinc telluride detectors under breast computerized tomography operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, Stephen J.; Didier, Clay

    2013-10-01

    A number of research groups have been investigating the use of dedicated breast computerized tomography (CT). Preliminary results have been encouraging, suggesting an improved visualization of masses on breast CT as compared to conventional mammography. Nonetheless, there are many challenges to overcome before breast CT can become a routine clinical reality. One potential improvement over current breast CT prototypes would be the use of photon counting detectors with cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) (or CdTe) semiconductor material. These detectors can operate at room temperature and provide high detection efficiency and the capability of multi-energy imaging; however, one factor in particular that limits image quality is the emission of characteristic x-rays. In this study, the degradative effects of characteristic x-rays are examined when using a CZT detector under breast CT operating conditions. Monte Carlo simulation software was used to evaluate the effect of characteristic x-rays and the detector element size on spatial and spectral resolution for a CZT detector used under breast CT operating conditions. In particular, lower kVp spectra and thinner CZT thicknesses were studied than that typically used with CZT based conventional CT detectors. In addition, the effect of characteristic x-rays on the accuracy of material decomposition in spectral CT imaging was explored. It was observed that when imaging with 50-60 kVp spectra, the x-ray transmission through CZT was very low for all detector thicknesses studied (0.5-3.0 mm), thus retaining dose efficiency. As expected, characteristic x-ray escape from the detector element of x-ray interaction increased with decreasing detector element size, approaching a 50% escape fraction for a 100 μm size detector element. The detector point spread function was observed to have only minor degradation with detector element size greater than 200 μm and lower kV settings. Characteristic x-rays produced increasing distortion in the

  7. Ionospheric physics

    SciTech Connect

    Sojka, J.J. )

    1991-01-01

    Advances in all areas of ionospheric research are reviewed for the 1987-1990 time period. Consideration is given to the equatorial ionosphere, the midlatitude ionosphere and plasmasphere, the auroral ionosphere, the polar ionosphere and polar wind, ionospheric electrodynamic inputs, plasma waves and irregularities, active experiments, ionospheric forecasting, and coupling the ionosphere with other regions.

  8. Localized three-dimensional ionospheric tomography with GPS ground receiver measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeffrey K.; Kamalabadi, Farzad; Makela, Jonathan J.

    2007-08-01

    This paper describes a technique for 3-D tomographic imaging of the ionosphere with high spatial resolution (75 to 95 km in latitude/longitude and 30 km in altitude). The total electron content (TEC) values are derived from dual-frequency measurements obtained from GPS satellites by ground-based receivers. When available, ionosonde data are used to construct a priori vertical profiles modeled using Chapman functions. Two regularization algorithms are investigated for tomographic image reconstruction: Tikhonov and Total Variation (TV), corresponding to quadratic and l1 norm minimizations of the penalty constraint, respectively. The TV method is used because it generally preserves discontinuities in the image effectively and is more resistant to noise. By contrast, Tikhonov, or quadratic, regularization tends to oversmooth image structures and discontinuities. However, a closed-form solution of the TV method does not exist and so performance depends heavily on numerical optimization techniques, which are nontrivial to implement because the inverse problem is both ill-posed and ill-conditioned. We also apply regularization parameter-selection methods to demonstrate their applicability in our study. The algorithms are demonstrated using real GPS TEC measurements from an observation geometry centered in southern California. We demonstrate the performance of these techniques under quiet, midlatitude conditions. The resulting reconstructions reasonably determine the shape of the ionospheric profile. Artifacts can potentially appear near voxels with no raypath information, which is directly related to the sparseness and nonuniform distribution of the GPS raypaths. We discuss some methods to constrain the solution to realistic bounds.

  9. A retrospective radiographic evaluation of the anterior loop of the mental nerve: Comparison between panoramic radiography and cone beam computerized tomography

    PubMed Central

    Vujanovic-Eskenazi, Aleksandar; Valero-James, Jesus-Manuel; Sánchez-Garcés, María-Angeles

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the prevalence and the length of mental loop, measured with panoramic radiography (PR) and cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). Material and Methods: PG and CBCT images where analyzed by a single calibrated examiner to determine the presence and the position of the mental foramen (MF), its distance to the lower mandible border, the anterior length of the mental loop (ML) and the bone quality in 82 PR and 82 CBCT. Results: ML was identified in 36.6 % of PR and 48.8 % of CBCT. PR showed a magnification of 1.87 when compared to CBCT. The mean of anterior extension of the inferior alveolar nerve and the distance to the inferior border of the mandible was higher for PR (2.8 mm, sd 0.91 mm on the PR , range 1.5 to 4.7 mm and 1.59, sd 0.9 on the CBCT ,range 0.4 to 4.0 mm) Conclusions: There is a magnification in PR images with respect to those of CBCT. The differences between CBCT and PR with regards to the identification and length of the ML are not statistically significant. Identification and accuracy measurements of ML did not depend on the bone quality. Considering that two dimensional imaging provides less accurate and reliable information regarding the anterior loop, a CBCT scan could be recommended when planning implant placement in the anterior region. Key words:Mental loop, mental nerve, mental canal, preoperative implant planning, panoramic tomography, cone beam computerized tomography. PMID:25549693

  10. Implant-guided volumetric analysis of edentulous maxillary bone with cone-beam computerized tomography scan. Maxillary sinus pneumatization classification.

    PubMed

    Tolstunov, Len; Thai, David; Arellano, Leo

    2012-08-01

    The primary goal of this anatomic study was to measure the average bone volume of the edentulous maxilla with a cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT) scan and to determine its suitability for implant treatment without additional bone grafting. The secondary goal of the study was to estimate the degree of sinus pneumatization (SP) in reviewed CBCT scans, assess the sinus-to-maxillary bone interrelationship in edentulism, and attempt to classify maxillary sinuses based on the degree of their pneumatization. This retrospective radiographic quantitative study consisted of the analysis of CBCT scans of 30 randomly selected maxillary edentulous patients who presented in 2008-2010 to the University of the Pacific, Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry, for evaluation and treatment of their edentulism. A volume of edentulous maxillary bone mesial to the maxillary sinuses (intersinal region) that can be used for a full-arch implant treatment was evaluated based on specifically selected and clinically relevant measurement criteria. There were 30 CBCT scans of maxillary edentulous patients reviewed (9 men, 21 women) with a mean age of 67.3 years (range, 41 to 92 years). The total mean maxillary bone volume (MMBV) suitable for implantation was 4 408.1 mm(3) and ranged from 1489.7 to 7263.1 mm(3). The MMBV in the study was higher than an assumed or hypothetical bone volume minimally suitable for 4-implant treatment as proposed by the authors for comparative purposes (3500 mm(3)). The degree of SP as seen on a CBCT scan (60 sinuses analyzed on panoramic images of 30 CBCT scans) had the following results in the study: SP0 (clear: not interfering with implant treatment in cases of high/small sinus), 2 sinuses or 3.3%; SP1 (mild sinus enlargement), 29 sinuses or 48.3%; SP2 (moderate SP), 16 sinuses or 26.7%; SP3 (severe SP), 9 sinuses or 15.0%; and SP4 (extreme), 4 sinuses or 6.7%. Most analyzed maxillary sinuses (47 of 60, or 78.3%) were in the clear, mild, or moderate

  11. Investigating the effect of characteristic x-rays in cadmium zinc telluride detectors under breast computerized tomography operating conditions

    PubMed Central

    Glick, Stephen J.; Didier, Clay

    2013-01-01

    A number of research groups have been investigating the use of dedicated breast computerized tomography (CT). Preliminary results have been encouraging, suggesting an improved visualization of masses on breast CT as compared to conventional mammography. Nonetheless, there are many challenges to overcome before breast CT can become a routine clinical reality. One potential improvement over current breast CT prototypes would be the use of photon counting detectors with cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) (or CdTe) semiconductor material. These detectors can operate at room temperature and provide high detection efficiency and the capability of multi-energy imaging; however, one factor in particular that limits image quality is the emission of characteristic x-rays. In this study, the degradative effects of characteristic x-rays are examined when using a CZT detector under breast CT operating conditions. Monte Carlo simulation software was used to evaluate the effect of characteristic x-rays and the detector element size on spatial and spectral resolution for a CZT detector used under breast CT operating conditions. In particular, lower kVp spectra and thinner CZT thicknesses were studied than that typically used with CZT based conventional CT detectors. In addition, the effect of characteristic x-rays on the accuracy of material decomposition in spectral CT imaging was explored. It was observed that when imaging with 50-60 kVp spectra, the x-ray transmission through CZT was very low for all detector thicknesses studied (0.5–3.0 mm), thus retaining dose efficiency. As expected, characteristic x-ray escape from the detector element of x-ray interaction increased with decreasing detector element size, approaching a 50% escape fraction for a 100 μm size detector element. The detector point spread function was observed to have only minor degradation with detector element size greater than 200 μm and lower kV settings. Characteristic x-rays produced increasing

  12. X-ray computerized tomography analysis and density estimation using a sediment core from the Challenger Mound area in the Porcupine Seabight, off Western Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Akiko; Nakano, Tsukasa; Ikehara, Ken

    2011-02-01

    X-ray computerized tomography (CT) analysis was used to image a half-round core sample of 50 cm long recovered from near Challenger Mound in the Porcupine Seabight, off western Ireland during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 307. This allowed three-dimensional examination of complex shapes of pebbles and ice-rafted debris in sedimentary sequences. X-ray CT analysis was also used for the determination of physical properties; a comparison between bulk density by the mass-volume method and estimated density based on linear attenuation coefficients of X-ray CT images provides insight into a spatially detailed and precise map of density variation in samples through the distribution of CT numbers.

  13. The Electron Density Features Revealed by the GNSS-Based Radio Tomography in the Different Latitudinal and Longitudinal Sectors of the Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, Elena; Tereshchenko, Evgeniy; Nazarenko, Marina; Nesterov, Ivan; Kozharin, Maksim; Padokhin, Artem; Tumanova, Yulia

    2016-04-01

    The ionospheric radio tomography is an efficient method for electron density imaging in the different geographical regions of the world under different space weather conditions. The input for the satellite-based ionospheric radio tomography is provided by the signals that are transmitted from the navigational satellites and recorded by the chains or networks of ground receivers. The low-orbiting (LO) radio tomography employs the 150/400 MHz radio transmissions from the Earth's orbiters (like the Russian Tsikada/Parus and American Transit) flying at a height of ~1000 km above the Earth in the nearly polar orbits. The phases of the signals from a moving satellite which are recorded by the chains of ground receivers oriented along the satellite path form the families of linear integrals of electron density along the satellite-receiver rays that are used as the input data for LORT. The LO tomographic inversion of these data by phase difference method yields the 2D distributions of the ionospheric plasma in the vertical plane containing the receiving chain and the satellite path. LORT provides vertical resolution of 20-30 km and horizontal resolution of 30-40 km. The high-orbiting (HO) radio tomography employs the radio transmissions from the GPS/GLONASS satellites and enables 4D imaging of the ionosphere (3 spatial coordinates and time). HORT has a much wider spatial coverage (almost worldwide) and provides continuous time series of the reconstructions. However, the spatial resolution of HORT is lower (~100 km horizontally with a time step 60-20 min). In the regions with dense receiving networks (Europe, USA, Alaska, Japan), the resolution can be increased to 30-50 km with a time interval of 30-10 min. To date, the extensive RT data collected from the existing RT chains and networks enable a thorough analysis of both the regular and sporadic ionospheric features which are observed systematically or appear spontaneously, whose origin is fairly well understood or

  14. Vertical structure of medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ssessanga, Nicholas; Kim, Yong Ha; Kim, Eunsol

    2015-11-01

    We develop an algorithm of computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT) to infer information on the vertical and horizontal structuring of electron density during nighttime medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs). To facilitate digital CIT we have adopted total electron contents (TEC) from a dense Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver network, GEONET, which contains more than 1000 receivers. A multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique was utilized with a calibrated IRI-2012 model as an initial solution. The reconstructed F2 peak layer varied in altitude with average peak-to-peak amplitude of ~52 km. In addition, the F2 peak layer anticorrelated with TEC variations. This feature supports a theory in which nighttime MSTID is composed of oscillating electric fields due to conductivity variations. Moreover, reconstructed TEC variations over two stations were reasonably close to variations directly derived from the measured TEC data set. Our tomographic analysis may thus help understand three-dimensional structure of MSTIDs in a quantitative way.

  15. Diagnosis of Vertical Root Fracture with Cone-Beam Computerized Tomography in Endodontically Treated Teeth: Three Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Miyagaki, Daniela Cristina; Marion, Jefferson; Randi Ferraz, Caio Cézar

    2013-01-01

    A definitive diagnosis of vertical root fracture (VRF) is often a challenging task for clinicians. This is because two dimensional periapical radiographs are usually unable to detect the fracture line due to the direction of the X-ray beam. This report presents a set of 3 cases of endodontically treated teeth that were diagnosed with VRFs based on findings from clinical, radiographic, and cone-beam computerized tomographic (CBCT) examinations. After extraction, VRFs were confirmed in all cases. The presence of periodontal pockets or other signs which would compromise the correct diagnosis could not be detected in all three cases. Fracture lines were only visible with the aid of CBCT which provided useful information for the diagnosis and management of VRF. However, the clinical and radiographic data should not be discarded, but used in conjunction with CBCT. PMID:23717335

  16. Diagnosis of vertical root fracture with cone-beam computerized tomography in endodontically treated teeth: three case reports.

    PubMed

    Miyagaki, Daniela Cristina; Marion, Jefferson; Randi Ferraz, Caio Cézar

    2013-01-01

    A definitive diagnosis of vertical root fracture (VRF) is often a challenging task for clinicians. This is because two dimensional periapical radiographs are usually unable to detect the fracture line due to the direction of the X-ray beam. This report presents a set of 3 cases of endodontically treated teeth that were diagnosed with VRFs based on findings from clinical, radiographic, and cone-beam computerized tomographic (CBCT) examinations. After extraction, VRFs were confirmed in all cases. The presence of periodontal pockets or other signs which would compromise the correct diagnosis could not be detected in all three cases. Fracture lines were only visible with the aid of CBCT which provided useful information for the diagnosis and management of VRF. However, the clinical and radiographic data should not be discarded, but used in conjunction with CBCT. PMID:23717335

  17. Low dose four-dimensional computerized tomography with volume rendering reconstruction for primary hyperparathyroidism: How I do it?

    PubMed

    Platz, Timothy A; Kukar, Moshim; Elmarzouky, Rania; Cance, William; Abdelhalim, Ahmed

    2014-09-28

    Modification of 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) technique with volume rendering reconstructions and significant dose reduction is a safe and accurate method of pre-operative localization for primary hyperparathyroidism. Modified low dose 4D-CT with volume rendering reconstructions provides precise preoperative localization and is associated with a significant reduction in radiation exposure compared to classic preoperative localizing techniques. It should be considered the preoperative localization study of choice for primary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:25276315

  18. Regional cerebral blood flow during rest and skilled hand movements by xenon-133 inhalation and emission computerized tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Lauritzen, M.; Henriksen, L.; Lassen, N.A.

    1981-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) was studied in 16 normal adult volunteers during rest and in 10 the study was repeated during skilled hand movements. A fast-rotating (''dynamic''), single-photon emission computerized tomograph (ECT) with four detector heads was used. Xenon-133 was inhaled over a 1-min period at a concentration of 10 mCi/L. The arrival and washout of the radioisotope was recorded during four 1-min periods. Two slices, 2 cm thick, 7 and 12 cm above the orbitomeatal line were obtained in every study. CBF averaged 60 ml/100 g/min (SD +/- 11) in the lower slice and 51 ml/100 g/min (SD +/- 13) in the upper slice. A symmetric pattern comparing right to left sides was found in both slices. Finger tapping and writing with the right hand increased CBF in specific areas of the upper slice: in the contralateral hand area by 35 +/- 15% (p less than 0.025), and in the supplementary motor area on both sides by 34 +/- 15% (p less than 0.025).

  19. Improved algorithm for computerized detection and quantification of pulmonary emphysema at high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tylen, Ulf; Friman, Ola; Borga, Magnus; Angelhed, Jan-Erik

    2001-05-01

    Emphysema is characterized by destruction of lung tissue with development of small or large holes within the lung. These areas will have Hounsfield values (HU) approaching -1000. It is possible to detect and quantificate such areas using simple density mask technique. The edge enhancement reconstruction algorithm, gravity and motion of the heart and vessels during scanning causes artefacts, however. The purpose of our work was to construct an algorithm that detects such image artefacts and corrects them. The first step is to apply inverse filtering to the image removing much of the effect of the edge enhancement reconstruction algorithm. The next step implies computation of the antero-posterior density gradient caused by gravity and correction for that. Motion artefacts are in a third step corrected for by use of normalized averaging, thresholding and region growing. Twenty healthy volunteers were investigated, 10 with slight emphysema and 10 without. Using simple density mask technique it was not possible to separate persons with disease from those without. Our algorithm improved separation of the two groups considerably. Our algorithm needs further refinement, but may form a basis for further development of methods for computerized diagnosis and quantification of emphysema by HRCT.

  20. Tomographic reconstruction of ionospheric electron density during the storm of 5-6 August 2011 using multi-source data.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jun; Yao, Yibin; Zhang, Liang; Kong, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The insufficiency of data is the essential reason for ill-posed problem existed in computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT) technique. Therefore, the method of integrating multi-source data is proposed. Currently, the multiple satellite navigation systems and various ionospheric observing instruments provide abundant data which can be employed to reconstruct ionospheric electron density (IED). In order to improve the vertical resolution of IED, we do research on IED reconstruction by integration of ground-based GPS data, occultation data from the LEO satellite, satellite altimetry data from Jason-1 and Jason-2 and ionosonde data. We used the CIT results to compare with incoherent scatter radar (ISR) observations, and found that the multi-source data fusion was effective and reliable to reconstruct electron density, showing its superiority than CIT with GPS data alone. PMID:26266764

  1. Tomographic reconstruction of ionospheric electron density during the storm of 5-6 August 2011 using multi-source data

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jun; Yao, Yibin; Zhang, Liang; Kong, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The insufficiency of data is the essential reason for ill-posed problem existed in computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT) technique. Therefore, the method of integrating multi-source data is proposed. Currently, the multiple satellite navigation systems and various ionospheric observing instruments provide abundant data which can be employed to reconstruct ionospheric electron density (IED). In order to improve the vertical resolution of IED, we do research on IED reconstruction by integration of ground-based GPS data, occultation data from the LEO satellite, satellite altimetry data from Jason-1 and Jason-2 and ionosonde data. We used the CIT results to compare with incoherent scatter radar (ISR) observations, and found that the multi-source data fusion was effective and reliable to reconstruct electron density, showing its superiority than CIT with GPS data alone. PMID:26266764

  2. Increased perfusion in motor areas after constraint-induced movement therapy in chronic stroke: a single-photon emission computerized tomography study.

    PubMed

    Könönen, Mervi; Kuikka, Jyrki T; Husso-Saastamoinen, Minna; Vanninen, Esko; Vanninen, Ritva; Soimakallio, Seppo; Mervaala, Esa; Sivenius, Juhani; Pitkänen, Kauko; Tarkka, Ina M

    2005-12-01

    Hemiparesis is the most common deficit after cerebral stroke. Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) is a new neurorehabilitation method that emphasizes task-relevant repetitive training for the stroke hand. Twelve chronic stroke patients were studied with single-photon emission computerized tomography at rest before and after the two-week CIMT period. Increased perfusion was found in motor control related areas. The specific areas with an increase in perfusion in the affected hemisphere were in the precentral gyrus, premotor cortex (Brodmann's area 6 (BA6)), frontal cortex, and superior frontal gyrus (BA10). In the nonaffected hemisphere, perfusion was increased in the superior frontal gyrus (BA6) and cingulate gyrus (BA31). In the cerebellum increased perfusion was seen bilaterally. The brain areas with increased perfusion receive and integrate the information from different sensory systems and plan the movement execution. Regional cerebral perfusion decreased in the lingual gyrus (BA18) in the affected hemisphere. In the nonaffected frontal cortex, two areas with decreased perfusion were found in the middle frontal gyrus (BA8/10). Also, the fusiform gyrus (BA20) and inferior temporal gyrus (BA37) in the nonaffected hemisphere showed decreased perfusion. Intensive movement therapy appears to change local cerebral perfusion in areas known to participate in movement planning and execution. These changes might be a sign of active reorganization processes after CIMT in the chronic state of stroke. PMID:15931162

  3. Horizontal Bone Augmentation Using Autogenous Block Grafts and Particulate Xenograft in the Severe Atrophic Maxillary Anterior Ridges: A Cone-Beam Computerized Tomography Case Series.

    PubMed

    Monje, Alberto; Monje, Florencio; Hernández-Alfaro, Federico; Gonzalez-García, Raúl; Suárez-López del Amo, Fernando; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Montanero-Fernández, Jesús; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to use cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT) to assess horizontal bone augmentation using block grafts, harvested from either the iliac crest (IC) or mandibular ramus (MR) combined with particulate xenograft and a collagen membrane for in the severe maxillary anterior ridge defects (cases Class III-IV according to Cadwood and Howell's classification). Fourteen healthy partially edentulous patients requiring extensive horizontal bone reconstruction in the anterior maxilla were selected for the study. Nineteen onlay block grafts (from IC or MR) were placed. The amount of horizontal bone gain was recorded by CBCT at 3 levels (5, 7, and 11 mm from the residual ridge) and at the time of bone grafting as well as the time of implant placement (≈5 months). Both block donor sites provided enough ridge width for proper implant placement. Nonetheless, IC had significantly greater ridge width gain than MR (Student t test) (4.93 mm vs 3.23 mm). This was further confirmed by nonparametric Mann-Whitney test (P = .007). Moreover, mean pristine ridge and grafted ridge values showed a direct association (Spearman coefficient of correlation = .336). A combination of block graft, obtained from the IC or MR, combined with particulate xenograft then covered with an absorbable collagen membrane is a predictable technique for augmenting anterior maxillary horizontal ridge deficiency. PMID:24702157

  4. Strong correlation between lung ultrasound and chest computerized tomography imaging for the detection of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Huan; Huang, Daozheng; Guo, Liheng; Chen, Quanfu; Zhong, Wenzhao

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung ultrasound (LUS) is a clinical imaging technique for diagnosing acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In humans and several large animals, LUS demonstrates similar specificity and sensitivity to computerized tomography (CT) scanning. Current study evaluated the degree of agreement between LUS and CT imaging in characterizing ALI/ARDS in rats. Methods Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were imaged by LUS before randomization into three groups to receive intratracheal saline, 3 or 6 mg/kg LPS respectively (n=10). LUS and CT imaging was conducted 2 hours after instillation. Cross table analyses and kappa statistics were used to determine agreement levels between LUS and CT assessments of lung condition. Results Before instillation, rats presented with a largely A-pattern in LUS images, however, a significantly increase B-lines were observed in all groups after instillation and showed dose response to LPS or to saline. One rat treated with 6 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS) presented with lung consolidation. The agreement between the LUS and the CT in detecting the main characteristics of ALI/ARDS in rat was strong (r=0.758, P<0.01, k=0.737). Conclusions In conclusion, LUS detects ALI/ARDS with high agreement with micro PET/CT scanning in a rat model, suggesting that LUS represents a positive refinement in rat ALI/ARDS disease models. PMID:27499930

  5. Spatio-temporal characteristics of the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA) in the East African region via ionospheric tomography during the year 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassa, T.; Damtie, B.; Bires, A.; Yizengaw, E.; Cilliers, P.

    2015-01-01

    We present the characteristics of the EIA in the East African sector inferred from ground-based GPS receivers via ionospheric tomography during the year 2012. For the analysis, we developed and used a 2D ionospheric tomography imaging software based on Bayesian inversion approach. To reconstruct ionospheric electron density form slant Total Electron Content (sTEC) measurements, we selected a chain of ten ground-based GPS receivers with stations' codes and geomagnetic coordinates: ARMI (3.03 °S, 109.29 °E), DEBK (4.32 °N, 109.48 °E), ASOS (1.14 °N, 106.16 °E), NEGE (3.60 °S, 111.35 °E), SHIS (3.26 °N, 110.62 °E), ASAB (4.91 °N, 114.34 °E), SHEB (7.36 °N, 110.60 °E), EBBE (9.54 °S, 104.10 °E), DODM (16.03 °S, 109.04 °E) & NAMA (11.49 °N, 113.60 °E). The temporal, spatial and storm-time characteristics of the EIA and the hourly, day-to-day and seasonal variations of the maximum electron density of F2 region (NmF2) at 15.29°S geomagnetic latitude are presented. We found that the magnitude of the peak and the width/thickness of the EIA pronounced during the equinox and weakened during the solstice seasons at 2100 LT. It is also observed that the EIA persisted for longer time in equinox season than the solstice season. The spatial appearance of the northern and southern anomalies are observed starting from 6.12 ° N and 10 ° S respectively along geomagnetic latitude during equinox season. The EIA is localized between 180 km and 450 km along the altitude during December solstice. The analysis on the NmF2 demonstrated a significant dependence on local time, day and season of the year. We also investigated the storm response of the EIA for the magnetic storm of Day Of the Year (DOY) 274-276. It is observed that the disturbance dynamo related composition change (O/N2 ratio) resulted in a well-developed EIA with an increase in the peak and the width of the EIA at 2100 LT on DOY 275 (main phase of the storm) compared to 274 (initial phase of the storm

  6. Computerized Automated Quantification of Subcutaneous and Visceral Adipose Tissue From Computed Tomography Scans: Development and Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Jae; Park, Ji Won; Kim, Jong Wan; Park, Chan-Soo; Gonzalez, John Paul S; Lee, Seung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background Computed tomography (CT) is often viewed as one of the most accurate methods for measuring visceral adipose tissue (VAT). However, measuring VAT and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) from CT is a time-consuming and tedious process. Thus, evaluating patients’ obesity levels during clinical trials using CT scans is both cumbersome and limiting. Objective To describe an image-processing-based and automated method for measuring adipose tissue in the entire abdominal region. Methods The method detects SAT and VAT levels using a separation mask based on muscles of the human body. The separation mask is the region that minimizes the unnecessary space between a closed path and muscle area. In addition, a correction mask, based on bones, corrects the error in VAT. Results To validate the method, the volume of total adipose tissue (TAT), SAT, and VAT were measured for a total of 100 CTs using the automated method, and the results compared with those from manual measurements obtained by 2 experts. Dice’s similarity coefficients (DSCs) between the first manual measurement and the automated result for TAT, SAT, and VAT are 0.99, 0.98, and 0.97, respectively. The DSCs between the second manual measurement and the automated result for TAT, SAT, and VAT are 0.98, 0.98, and 0.97, respectively. Moreover, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) between the automated method and the results of the manual measurements indicate high reliability as the ICCs for the items are all .99 (P<.001). Conclusions The results described in this paper confirm the accuracy and reliability of the proposed method. The method is expected to be both convenient and useful in the clinical evaluation and study of obesity in patients who require SAT and VAT measurements. PMID:26846251

  7. A Comparison of In-Room Computerized Tomography Options for Detection of Fiducial Markers in Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Rebecca; Foroudi, Farshad; Kron, Tomas; Milner, Alvin; Cox, Jennifer; Cramb, Jim; Zhu Li; Duchesne, Gillian

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To compare volumetric in-room computed tomography (CT) and kilovoltage (kV) cone-beam CT (CBCT) to planar imaging with respect to their ability to localize fiducial markers (FMs) for radiotherapy of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Image guidance options from two linear accelerators were compared in terms of identifying the center of gravity (COG) of FMs from the isocenter: a Siemens Primatom, where the couch is rotated 180 degrees from the treatment isocenter to the in-room CT vs. electronic portal imaging (EPI); and a Varian OBI system, where kV CBCT, EPI, and planar kV radiographs were compared. In all, 387 image pairs (CBCT = 133; CT = 254) from 18 patients were analyzed. A clinical tolerance of 3 mm was predefined as the acceptable threshold for agreement. Results: COG location on in-room CT and EPI was in agreement 96.9%, 85.8%, and 89.0% of the time in the left-right (LR), superior-inferior (SI), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions, respectively, vs. 99.2%, 91.7%, and 93.2% for the CBCT and EPI analysis. The CBCT vs. kV radiographs were in agreement 100% (LR), 85.4% (SI), and 88.5% (AP), and EPI vs. kV radiographs were in agreement 100% (LR), 94.6% (SI), and 91.5% (AP) of the time. Conclusion: Identification of FMs on volumetric or planar images was found to be not equivalent ({+-}3 mm) using either linear accelerator. Intrafraction prostate motion, interpretation of FM location, and spatial properties of images are contributing factors. Although in-room CT has superior image quality, the process of realigning the treatment couch to acquire a CT introduces an error, highlighting the benefits of a single isocentric system.

  8. Computerized tomography based “patient specific blocks” improve postoperative mechanical alignment in primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Vijay, Vipul; Birla, Vikas P; Agarwal, Amit K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare the postoperative mechanical alignment achieved after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using computer tomography (CT) based patient specific blocks (PSB) to conventional instruments (CI). METHODS: Total 80 knees were included in the study, with 40 knees in both the groups operated using PSB and CI. All the knees were performed by a single surgeon using the same cruciate sacrificing implants. In our study we used CT based PSB to compare with CI. Postoperative mechanical femoro-tibial angle (MFT angle) was measured on long leg x-rays using picture archiving and communication system (PACS). We compared mechanical alignment achieved using PSB and CI in TKA using statistical analysis. RESULTS: The PSB group (group 1) included 17 females and seven males while in CI group (group 2) there were 15 females and eight males. The mean age of patients in group 1 was 60.5 years and in group 2 it was 60.2 years. The mean postoperative MFT angle measured on long-leg radiographs in group 1 was 178.23° (SD = 2.67°, range: 171.9° to 182.5°) while in group 2, the mean MFT angle was 175.73° (SD = 3.62°, range: 166.0° to 179.8°). There was significant improvement in postoperative mechanical alignment (P value = 0.001), in PSB group compared to CI. Number of outliers were also found to be less in group operated with PSB (7 Knee) compared to those operated with CI (17 Knee). CONCLUSION: PSB improve mechanical alignment after total knee arthroplasty, compared to CI. This may lead to lower rates of revision in the PSB based TKA as compared to the conventional instrumentation. PMID:27458553

  9. Pedicle Screw Placement in the Thoracolumbar Spine Using a Novel, Simple, Safe, and Effective Guide-Pin : A Computerized Tomography Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Seung-Jae; Kim, Yongjung J.; Cheh, Gene; Cho, Samuel K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To improve pedicle screw placement accuracy with minimal radiation and low cost, we developed specially designed K-wire with a marker. To evaluate the accuracy of thoracolumbar pedicle screws placed using the novel guide-pin and portable X-rays. Methods Observational cohort study with computerized tomography (CT) analysis of in vivo and in vitro pedicle screw placement. Postoperative CT scans of 183 titanium pedicle screws (85 lumbar and 98 thoracic from T1 to L5) placed into 2 cadavers and 18 patients were assessed. A specially designed guide-pin with a marker was inserted into the pedicle to identify the correct starting point (2 mm lateral to the center of the pedicle) and aiming point (center of the pedicle isthmus) in posteroanterior and lateral X-rays. After radiographically confirming the exact starting and aiming points desired, a gearshift was inserted into the pedicle from the starting point into the vertebral body through the center of pedicle isthmus. Results Ninety-nine percent (181/183) of screws were contained within the pedicle (total 183 pedicle screws : 98 thoracic pedicle screws and 85 lumbar screws). Only two of 183 (1.0%) thoracic pedicle screws demonstrated breach (1 lateral in a patient and 1 medial in a cadaver specimen). None of the pedicle breaches were associated with neurologic or other clinical sequelae. Conclusion A simple, specially designed guide-pin with portable X-rays can provide correct starting and aiming points and allows for accurate pedicle screw placement without preoperative CT scan and intraoperative fluoroscopic assistance. PMID:26279807

  10. The minimum residual root thickness after using ProTaper, RaCe and Gates-Glidden drills: A cone beam computerized tomography study

    PubMed Central

    Akhlaghi, Nahid Mohammadzadeh; Bajgiran, Laleh Mohammadian; Naghdi, Amirali; Behrooz, Elaheh; Khalilak, Zohreh

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the minimum residual root thickness (MRRT) of the danger zone after preflaring of the mesio-buccal (MB) canal of mandibular first molars using ProTaper, RaCe and Gates-Glidden (GG) drills as coronal shapers by cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, the initial CBCT scans of 75 MB canals of mandibular first molars were provided within 1, 2, 3 and 4 mm of the furcation level. The samples were divided into three groups. The samples of ProTaper and RaCe groups were prepared up to F2 and #25.04 as the master apical file (MAF), respectively. The coronal preparation of the samples in the GG group was done using GG drills #2, #3 and #4 and canals were prepared till MAF # 25. After obtaining the postinstrumentation images, the MRRT and the amount of removed dentin were analyzed by t-test and ANOVA statistical analyses. Results: The GG drills removed significantly more dentin than RaCe at all the sections (P < 0.05) and more than ProTaper at 3 mm from the furcation. Statistically there was no significant difference between ProTaper and RaCe groups (P > 0.05). There was no significant difference in MRRT between the groups (P > 0.05). The mean MRRT was not < 0.75 mm at all sections. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, when an appropriate root thickness is initially present, all of the instruments that were investigated may safely be used as coronal shapers in MB canals of mandibular first molars. PMID:26038655

  11. The Detectability and Localization Accuracy of Implanted Fiducial Markers Determined on In-Room Computerized Tomography (CT) and Electronic Portal Images (EPI)

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Rebecca Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad; Cox, Jennifer; Zhu Li; Cramb, Jim; Sparks, Laura; Duchesne, Gillian

    2008-10-01

    Many different methods of image guidance are available for radiotherapy treatment (IGRT). The aims of the study were (1) to determine the optimal diameter of gold markers for IGRT to the prostate; (2) to compare, using the Siemens Primatom, the relative merits of in-room computerized tomography (CT) and electronic portal image (EPI) for locating the marker seeds. Gold markers of differing widths were embedded in 2 phantoms (perspex slabs and anthropomorphic). Images were acquired with an amorphous silicon flat panel detector (Siemens Optivue 500) and with the in-room CT scanner (Siemens Somatom Balance). The EPIs were reviewed independently by 6 operators to determine which diameter marker could be best visualized. The optimal marker technique was determined by comparing the investigators' observed marker co-ordinates with the known locations within the phantom. The visibility of all markers on anterior-posterior EPIs was 100%. On the lateral EPI, of a possible 180 visualizations of 1.2-, 1.0-, and 0.8-mm diameter markers, 176 (97.8%), 151 (83.9%), and 132 (73.3%), respectively, were successful. On EPI, the average deviation of fiducial markers from the known position was less than 0.5 mm in any direction. On CT, the largest deviation (2.17 mm) of markers from the known coordinate position was in the superior-inferior direction, reflecting the 3.0-mm slice thickness used. EPI accurately located internal markers in all dimensions. The availability of 'gold standard' CT imagery at the treatment unit does not improve how accurately the position of markers in a phantom can be defined compared with EPI. However, CT imagery does provide important soft tissue information, the benefits of which are being investigated further.

  12. Therapeutic monitoring of experimental invasive pulmonary aspergillosis by ultrafast computerized tomography, a novel, noninvasive method for measuring responses to antifungal therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, T J; Garrett, K; Feurerstein, E; Girton, M; Allende, M; Bacher, J; Francesconi, A; Schaufele, R; Pizzo, P A

    1995-01-01

    Pulmonary infiltrates in neutropenic hosts with invasive aspergillosis are due to vascular invasion and hemorrhagic infarction. In order to measure the effect of antifungal compounds on this organism-mediated tissue injury, we monitored the course of pulmonary infiltrates by serial ultrafast computerized tomography (UFCT) in persistently granulocytopenic rabbits with experimental invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. The course of pulmonary lesions measured by serial UFCT scans was compared with those measured by conventional chest radiography, histopathological resolution of lesions, and microbiological clearance of Aspergillus fumigatus. Treatment groups included either amphotericin B colloidal dispersion in dosages of 1, 5, and 10 mg/kg of body weight per day intravenously or conventional desoxycholate amphotericin B at 1 mg/kg/day intravenously. Therapeutic monitoring of pulmonary lesions by UFCT demonstrated a significant dose-response relationship. Lesions continued to progress in untreated controls, whereas lesions in treated rabbits initially increased and then decreased in response to antifungal therapy in a dosage-dependent manner (P < or = 0.05 to P < or = 0.005, depending upon the groups compared). This same trend of resolution of lesions in response to antifungal therapy was also demonstrated by postmortem examination and by microbiological clearance of the organism. These data indicated that amphotericin B colloidal dispersion at 5 and 10 mg/kg/day exerted a more rapid rate of clearance of lesions than conventional amphotericin B. UFCT was more sensitive than conventional chest radiography in detecting lesions due to invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (P < 0.05 to P < 0.005, depending upon the groups compared). These findings establish a correlation among UFCT-defined lesions, microbiological response, and resolution of pathologically defined lesions in experimental invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Serial monitoring of UFCT-defined lesions of aspergillosis

  13. Large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances using ionospheric imaging at storm time: A case study on 17 march 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jun; Yao, Yibin; Kong, Jian; Zhang, Liang

    2016-07-01

    A moderate geomagnetic storm occurred on March 17, 2013, during which large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (LSTIDs) are observed over China by ionosondes and GPS from Crustal Movement Observation Network of China (CMONOC) and the International GNSS Service (IGS). Ionosonde data and computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT) technique are employed to analyze the disturbances in our study. The maximum entropy cross spectral analysis (MECSA) method is used to obtain the propagation parameters of the LSTIDs. Spatio-temporal variations of ionospheric electron density (IED) and total electron content (TEC) during this geomagnetic storm over China are investigated. Disturbance images of IED and TEC are also presented in the paper. The results show two LSTID events at about 12:00 UT and 15:00 UT during the main phase of the storm. Besides, the LSTIDs with a duration of 40 min are detected over China. It is confirmed that the LSTIDs travel from north to south with a horizontal velocity of 400-500 m/s, and moved southwestwards with a horizontal velocity of 250-300 m/s, respectively.

  14. Helical computerized tomography and NT-proBNP for screening of right ventricular overload on admission and at long term follow-up of acute pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) in acute pulmonary embolism (APE) can be assessed with helical computerized tomography (CT) and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). Signs of RVD and elevated natriuretic peptides like NT-proBNP and cardiac troponin (TnT) are associated with increased risk of mortality. However, the prognostic role of both initial diagnostic strategy and the use of NT-proBNP and TnT for screening for long-term probability of RVD remains unknown. The aim of the study was to determine the role of helical CT and NT-proBNP in detection of RVD in the acute phase. In addition, the value of NT-proBNP for ruling out RVD at long-term follow-up was assessed. Methods Sixty-three non-high risk APE patients were studied. RVD was assessed at admission in the emergency department by CT and TTE, and both NT-proBNP and TnT samples were taken. These, excepting CT, were repeated seven months later. Results At admission RVD was detected by CT in 37 (59 %) patients. RVD in CT correlated strongly with RVD in TTE (p < 0.0001). NT-proBNP was elevated (≥ 350 ng/l) in 32 (86 %) patients with RVD but in only seven (27 %) patients without RVD (p < 0.0001). All the patients survived until the 7-month follow-up. TTE showed persistent RVD in 6 of 63 (10 %) patients who all had RVD in CT at admission. All of them had elevated NT-proBNP levels in the follow-up compared with 5 (9 %) of patients without RVD (p < 0.0001). Conclusions TTE does not confer further benefit when helical CT is used for screening for RVD in non-high risk APE. All the patients who were found to have RVD in TTE at seven months follow-up had had RVD in the acute phase CT as well. Thus, patients without RVD in diagnostic CT do not seem to require further routine follow-up to screen for RVD later. On the other hand, persistent RVD and thus need for TTE control can be ruled out by assessment of NT-proBNP at follow-up. A follow-up protocol based on these findings is suggested. PMID:22559861

  15. NOTE: Cone beam computerized tomography: the effect of calibration of the Hounsfield unit number to electron density on dose calculation accuracy for adaptive radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatton, Joan; McCurdy, Boyd; Greer, Peter B.

    2009-08-01

    The availability of cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) images at the time of treatment has opened possibilities for dose calculations representing the delivered dose for adaptive radiation therapy. A significant component in the accuracy of dose calculation is the calibration of the Hounsfield unit (HU) number to electron density (ED). The aim of this work is to assess the impact of HU to ED calibration phantom insert composition and phantom volume on dose calculation accuracy for CBCT. CBCT HU to ED calibration curves for different commercial phantoms were measured and compared. The effect of the scattering volume of the phantom on the HU to ED calibration was examined as a function of phantom length and radial diameter. The resulting calibration curves were used at the treatment planning system to calculate doses for geometrically simple phantoms and a pelvic anatomical phantom to compare against measured doses. Three-dimensional dose distributions for the pelvis phantom were calculated using the HU to ED curves and compared using Chi comparisons. The HU to ED calibration curves for the commercial phantoms diverge at densities greater than that of water, depending on the elemental composition of the phantom insert. The effect of adding scatter material longitudinally, increasing the phantom length from 5 cm to 26 cm, was found to be up to 260 HU numbers for the high-density insert. The change in the HU value, by increasing the diameter of the phantom from 18 to 40 cm, was found to be up to 1200 HU for the high-density insert. The effect of phantom diameter on the HU to ED curve can lead to dose differences for 6 MV and 18 MV x-rays under bone inhomogeneities of up to 20% in extreme cases. These results show significant dosimetric differences when using a calibration phantom with materials which are not tissue equivalent. More importantly, the amount of scattering material used with the HU to ED calibration phantom has a significant effect on the dosimetric

  16. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and single photon emission computerized tomography--cerebral blood flow in a case of pure sensory stroke and mild dementia owing to subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy (Binswanger's disease)

    SciTech Connect

    De Chiara, S.; Lassen, N.A.; Andersen, A.R.; Gade, A.; Lester, J.; Thomsen, C.; Henriksen, O.

    1987-01-01

    Pure sensory stroke (PSS) is typically caused by a lacunar infarct located in the ventral-posterior (VP) thalamic nucleus contralateral to the paresthetic symptoms. The lesion is usually so small that it cannot be seen on computerized tomography (CT), as illustrated by our case. In our moderately hypertensive, 72-year-old patient with PSS, CT scanning and conventional nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) scanning using a 7-mm-thick slice on a 1.5 Tesla instrument all failed to visualize the thalamic infarct. Using the high-resolution mode with 2-mm slice thickness it was, however, clearly seen. In addition, NMRI unexpectedly showed diffuse periventricular demyelinization as well as three other lacunar infarcts, i.e., findings characteristic of subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy (SAE). This prompted psychometric testing, which revealed signs of mild (subclinical) dementia, in particular involving visiospatial apraxia; this pointed to decreased function of the right parietal cortex, which was structurally intact on CT and NMRI. Single photon emission computerized tomography by Xenon-133 injection and by hexamethyl-propyleneamine-oxim labeled with Technetium-99m showed asymmetric distribution of cerebral blood flow (CBF), with an 18% lower value in the right parietal cortex compared to the left side; this indicated asymmetric disconnection of the cortex by the SAE. Thus, the tomograms of the functional parameter, CBF, correlated better with the deficits revealed by neuropsychological testing than by CT or NMRI.

  17. Ionospheric Sounding Opportunities Using Signal Data From Preexisting Amateur Radio And Other Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushley, A. C.; Noel, J. M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Amateur radio and other transmissions used for dedicated purposes, such as the Automatic Packet Reporting System (APRS) and Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B), are signals that exist for another reason, but can be used for ionospheric sounding. Whether mandated and government funded or voluntarily constructed and operated, these networks provide data that can be used for scientific and operational purposes which rely on space weather data. Given the current state of the global economic environment and fiscal consequences to scientific research funding in Canada, these types of networks offer an innovative solution with preexisting hardware for more real-time and archival space-weather data to supplement current methods, particularly for data assimilation, modelling and forecasting. Furthermore, mobile ground-based transmitters offer more flexibility for deployment than stationary receivers. Numerical modelling has demonstrated that APRS and ADS-B signals are subject to Faraday rotation (FR) as they pass through the ionosphere. Ray tracingtechniques were used to determine the characteristics of individual waves, including the wave path and the state of polarization. The modelled FR was computed and converted to total electron content (TEC) along the raypaths. TEC data can be used as input for computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT) in order to reconstruct electron density maps of the ionosphere.

  18. Volumetric imaging system for the ionosphere (VISION)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymond, Kenneth F.; Budzien, Scott A.; Nicholas, Andrew C.; Thonnard, Stefan E.; Fortna, Clyde B.

    2002-01-01

    The Volumetric Imaging System for the Ionosphere (VISION) is designed to use limb and nadir images to reconstruct the three-dimensional distribution of electrons over a 1000 km wide by 500 km high slab beneath the satellite with 10 km x 10 km x 10 km voxels. The primary goal of the VISION is to map and monitor global and mesoscale (> 10 km) electron density structures, such as the Appleton anomalies and field-aligned irregularity structures. The VISION consists of three UV limb imagers, two UV nadir imagers, a dual frequency Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, and a coherently emitting three frequency radio beacon. The limb imagers will observe the O II 83.4 nm line (daytime electron density), O I 135.6 nm line (nighttime electron density and daytime O density), and the N2 Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) bands near 143.0 nm (daytime N2 density). The nadir imagers will observe the O I 135.6 nm line (nighttime electron density and daytime O density) and the N2 LBH bands near 143.0 nm (daytime N2 density). The GPS receiver will monitor the total electron content between the satellite containing the VISION and the GPS constellation. The three frequency radio beacon will be used with ground-based receiver chains to perform computerized radio tomography below the satellite containing the VISION. The measurements made using the two radio frequency instruments will be used to validate the VISION UV measurements.

  19. Emission tomography of the kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Teates, C.D.; Croft, B.Y.; Brenbridge, N.A.; Bray, S.T.; Williamson, B.R.

    1983-12-01

    Single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) was done on two patients with suspected renal masses. Nuclear scintigraphy was equivocal on two tumors readily identified by SPECT. Single photon tomography is cost effective and increases the reliability of nuclear scintigraphy.

  20. Ionospheric corrections for GPS time transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Julian A. R.; Watson, Robert J.; Allain, Damien J.; Mitchell, Cathryn N.

    2014-03-01

    A real-time ionospheric mapping system is tested to investigate its ability to compensate for the ionospheric delay in single-frequency Global Positioning System (GPS) time transfer over Europe. This technique is compared with two other single-frequency systems: one that does not incorporate any ionospheric correction and one that uses the broadcast Klobuchar model. A dual-frequency technique is also shown as a benchmark. A period in March 2003, during a solar maximum, has been used to display results when the ionospheric delays are large and variable. Data from two European GPS monitoring centers were used to test the time-transfer methods. For averaging times between several minutes and a few hours, the instabilities in the time transfers were dominated by ionospheric effects. The instabilities at longer averaging times were found to be due to clock noise and hardware instabilities. Improvements in time-transfer instabilities are shown by using the ionospheric tomography system.

  1. Pleural-based changes on chest x-ray after irradiation for primary breast cancer: correlation with findings on computerized tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, G.; Kurtz, D.W.; Lichter, A.S.

    1983-10-01

    In treating breast cancer with excisional biopsy and irradiation, a volume of lung underlying the breast and chest wall receives significant doses of irradiation. This irradiation can produce pleural and pulmonary changes that can be seen on routine chest radiographs. In five such cases, we have examined pre and post-treatment computerized tomograms of the chest and show that these radiographic changes are pleural-based and lie within the high dose radiation volume. Failure to correct radiation treatment plans for the influence of lung density results in an increased dose to lung and pleura that could, in theory, exacerbate pulmonary and pleural radiation effects.

  2. Ionosphere research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A report is presented on on-going research projects in ionospheric studies. The topics discussed are planetary atmospheres, E and F region, D region, mass spectrometer measurements, direct measurements and atmospheric reactions.

  3. Ionospheric research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Data from research on ionospheric D, E, and F, regions are reported. Wave propagation, mass spectrometer measurements, and atmospheric reactions of HO2 with NO and NO2 and NH2 with NO and O2 are summarized.

  4. Ionospheric Scintillation Explorer (ISX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iuliano, J.; Bahcivan, H.

    2015-12-01

    NSF has recently selected Ionospheric Scintillation Explorer (ISX), a 3U Cubesat mission to explore the three-dimensional structure of scintillation-scale ionospheric irregularities associated with Equatorial Spread F (ESF). ISX is a collaborative effort between SRI International and Cal Poly. This project addresses the science question: To what distance along a flux tube does an irregularity of certain transverse-scale extend? It has been difficult to measure the magnetic field-alignment of scintillation-scale turbulent structures because of the difficulty of sampling a flux tube at multiple locations within a short time. This measurement is now possible due to the worldwide transition to DTV, which presents unique signals of opportunity for remote sensing of ionospheric irregularities from numerous vantage points. DTV spectra, in various formats, contain phase-stable, narrowband pilot carrier components that are transmitted simultaneously. A 4-channel radar receiver will simultaneously record up to 4 spatially separated transmissions from the ground. Correlations of amplitude and phase scintillation patterns corresponding to multiple points on the same flux tube will be a measure of the spatial extent of the structures along the magnetic field. A subset of geometries where two or more transmitters are aligned with the orbital path will be used to infer the temporal development of the structures. ISX has the following broad impact. Scintillation of space-based radio signals is a space weather problem that is intensively studied. ISX is a step toward a CubeSat constellation to monitor worldwide TEC variations and radio wave distortions on thousands of ionospheric paths. Furthermore, the rapid sampling along spacecraft orbits provides a unique dataset to deterministically reconstruct ionospheric irregularities at scintillation-scale resolution using diffraction radio tomography, a technique that enables prediction of scintillations at other radio frequencies, and

  5. Computerized tomographic evaluation of aortic prosthetic graft complications

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, D.; Kalmar, J.A.

    1985-03-01

    Computerized tomography has been found to be an accurate and sensitive method of diagnosing complications of synthetic aortic grafts. Complications in this series of four cases included aortoesophageal fistula, aortoduodenal fistula, pseudoaneurysm, and retroperitoneal hematoma. 6 references, 5 figures.

  6. The CERTO and CITRIS Instruments for Radio Scintillation and Electron Density Tomography from the C/NOFS, COSMIC, NPSAT1 and STPSAT1 Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Siefring, C. L.

    2004-05-01

    A new constellation of radio beacon and radio beacon receivers will be providing global measurements of radio scintillations and total electron content (TEC) for near real time measurements of the ionosphere. This constellation is comprised of the NRL Coherent Electromagnetic Radio Tomography (CERTO) beacons on the Communications/Navigation Forecast Outage System (C/NOFS) satellite, the six Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) satellites, and the Naval Postgraduate (NPSAT1) Satellite. These satellites will be launched in the time period of 2004 through 2006. The CERTO beacons operating at 150.012, 400.032, and 1066.752 MHz will be transmitting to ground receivers located in chains to acquire TEC data for computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT). In addition, in early 2006 a five frequency receiver will be placed in low earth orbit with the United States Air Force Space Test Program (STPSAT1) satellite. This CITRIS receiver will use radio beacon transmissions from the French DORIS network of ground beacons at 401.25 and 2036.25 MHz and space-based beacons at 150, 400 and 1067 MHz to measure the earth's ionosphere. On board tracking software will lock onto Doppler shifted frequencies to determine total electron content (TEC) and scintillation parameters. The STPSAT1 will be launched along with a companion satellite (NPSAT1) which carries the CERTO radio beacon and a Langmuir probe. All of the CERTO beacons as well as the ionospheric sensors on STPSAT1 and NPSAT1 are being constructed at the Naval Research Laboratory. The data obtained using the CITRIS instrument will provide a global description of the ionosphere from orbits with inclinations ranging from 15 degrees to 70 degrees and altitudes from 375 to 800 km. The tandem operations of the CITRIS and CERTO instruments will provide the fully low-earth-orbit based occultation measurements of the ionosphere. All of the data will be available for rapid assimilation

  7. The ability of cone-beam computerized tomography to detect vertical root fractures in endodontically treated and nonendodontically treated teeth: a report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaoying; Liu, Denggao; Yue, Lin; Wu, Minkai

    2011-06-01

    A definitive diagnosis of vertical root fracture (VRFs) is often a challenging task for clinicians. Two-dimensional periapical radiographs (PRs) may be not helpful in such a diagnosis when the x-ray beam is not parallel to the plane of the fracture line. This report presents a set of 3 cases in which 1 endodontically treated and 2 nonendodontically treated mandibular molars were diagnosed with VRFs based on findings from clinical, radiographic, and cone-beam computerized tomographic (CBCT) examinations. After extraction, VRFs were confirmed in all of the teeth. Deep and narrow periodontal pockets were detected in 2 molars. A widening of the root canal space was observed in the PR of 1 molar only, and crown cracks were detected in none of these cases. However, in all 3 molars, fracture lines were visible on the CBCT images. Thus, CBCT provided useful information in diagnosing VRFs in both endodontically treated and nonendodontically treated teeth, especially when VRFs could not be confirmed by clinical findings and PRs. PMID:21439864

  8. Clinical evaluation of a high-resolution new peripheral quantitative computerized tomography (pQCT) scanner for the bone densitometry at the lower limbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, M. J.; Meta, M. D.; Schneider, P.; Reiners, Chr

    1998-08-01

    Precision, long-term stability, linearity and accuracy of the x-ray peripheral quantitative computerized tomographic (pQCT) bone scanner XCT 3000 (Norland-Stratec Medical Sys.) were evaluated using the European Forearm Phantom (EFP). In vivo measurements were assessed using a standardized procedure at the distal femur and the distal tibia. In the patient-scan mode, the spatial resolution of the system was lp/mm as measured at the 10% level of the modulation transfer function (MTF). The contrast-detail diagram (CDD) yielded a minimal difference in attenuation coefficient (AC) of 0.07 at an object size of 0.5 mm. The effective dose for humans was calculated to be less than 1.5 Sv per scan. Short-term precision in vivo was expressed as root mean square standard deviation of paired measurements of 20 healthy volunteers (%). At the distal femur total volumetric density (ToD) and total cross-sectional area (ToA) were found to be less sensitive to positioning errors than at the distal tibia. Structural parameters like the polar cross-sectional moment of inertia or the polar cross-sectional moment of resistance showed a good short-term precision at the distal femur ( and 1.4%). The relation between the two skeletal sites with respect to or showed a high

  9. Predictive value of excretory urography, ultrasonography, computerized tomography, and liver and bone scan in the staging of bilharzial bladder cancer in Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Hanash, K.A.; Bissada, N.K.; Abla, A.; Esmail, D.; Dowling, A.

    1984-07-01

    The role of ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), and radioisotopic scanning in the staging of bilharzial bladder cancer has not been reported previously. Forty patients with invasive bladder cancer seen at the King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre between January 1978 and June 1981 underwent complete preoperative workup for staging of their tumors prior to radical cystectomy. The preoperative radiologic investigations included excretory urography (IVP), ultrasonography (US), CT of the pelvis, and liver and bone scans. The results of these investigations were compared with the operative and pathologic staging. Ninety-three percent of the patients with bilharzial cancer had evidence of ureteric obstruction on IVP compared with 22% of the nonbilharzial cancer patients. The presence of ureteric obstruction in these patients did not correlate with the stage of the disease with 83% of the patients with superficial tumors (T1 and T2) having hydroureteronephrosis. Ultrasonography and CT had an 83% accuracy in the staging of superficial tumors. Stage T3 tumors were understaged in 14% of the cases. Ultrasonography did not differentiate Stages T3 and T4 tumors while CT scan differentiated these two stages in 57% of the cases. Bone scan failed to reveal evidence of metastatic disease in any of the bilharzial cancer patients. Liver scan was suspicious for liver metastases in two patients with bilharzial cancers in whom open liver biopsy revealed only hepatic bilharziasis. Of all the radiographic studies, US or preferably CT scan seem to be of some value in the staging of bilharzial tumors localized to the bladder. Bone and liver scans are probably of no cost effective benefit.

  10. A general framework and review of scatter correction methods in x-ray cone-beam computerized tomography. Part 1: Scatter compensation approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Ruehrnschopf, Ernst-Peter; Klingenbeck, Klaus

    2011-07-15

    Since scattered radiation in cone-beam volume CT implies severe degradation of CT images by quantification errors, artifacts, and noise increase, scatter suppression is one of the main issues related to image quality in CBCT imaging. The aim of this review is to structurize the variety of scatter suppression methods, to analyze the common structure, and to develop a general framework for scatter correction procedures. In general, scatter suppression combines hardware techniques of scatter rejection and software methods of scatter correction. The authors emphasize that scatter correction procedures consist of the main components scatter estimation (by measurement or mathematical modeling) and scatter compensation (deterministic or statistical methods). The framework comprises most scatter correction approaches and its validity also goes beyond transmission CT. Before the advent of cone-beam CT, a lot of papers on scatter correction approaches in x-ray radiography, mammography, emission tomography, and in Megavolt CT had been published. The opportunity to avail from research in those other fields of medical imaging has not yet been sufficiently exploited. Therefore additional references are included when ever it seems pertinent. Scatter estimation and scatter compensation are typically intertwined in iterative procedures. It makes sense to recognize iterative approaches in the light of the concept of self-consistency. The importance of incorporating scatter compensation approaches into a statistical framework for noise minimization has to be underscored. Signal and noise propagation analysis is presented. A main result is the preservation of differential-signal-to-noise-ratio (dSNR) in CT projection data by ideal scatter correction. The objective of scatter compensation methods is the restoration of quantitative accuracy and a balance between low-contrast restoration and noise reduction. In a synopsis section, the different deterministic and statistical methods are

  11. Innovations in Computerized Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drasgow, Fritz, Ed.; Olson-Buchanan, Julie B., Ed.

    Chapters in this book present the challenges and dilemmas faced by researchers as they created new computerized assessments, focusing on issues addressed in developing, scoring, and administering the assessments. Chapters are: (1) "Beyond Bells and Whistles; An Introduction to Computerized Assessment" (Julie B. Olson-Buchanan and Fritz Drasgow);…

  12. Computerized Data Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grzywinski, Carol M.

    1983-01-01

    Argues that a computerized data management system can help the developmental educator maintain professional accountability. Reports on a project conducted at the State University of New York Agricultural and Technical College at Canton during which paperwork was reduced and report writing expedited through a computerized management information…

  13. Global ionospheric weather. Scientific report No. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, D.T.; Doherty, P.H.

    1995-02-28

    Work on global F region modeling has consisted of participation in the Phillips Laboratory Low Latitude Ionospheric Tomography Campaign, testing of the Global Theoretical Ionospheric Model (GTIM), and testing of the Parameterized Ionospheric Model (PIM). Analysis of TEC data and comparisons with other ionospheric models have been successfully conducted and are ongoing. Analysis of GPS observations are also ongoing. Studies have been made concerning limitations in determining TEC from dual frequency GPS measurements as well as the statistics of time rate of change of TEC. Software has been developed to process RINEX formatted GPS data into TEC. Work comparing the aulthors electron proton H atom model to both observations and other models has been very successful. The authors have also successfully modeled the creation of boundary blobs using time varying convection to first create patches in the polar cap and then to transport and distort them into boundary blobs in the auroral region.

  14. Ionosphere-reflected propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, B. M.

    1979-01-01

    The predictability of those ionospheric parameters relevant to ionosphere-reflected communications is considered along with their optimum utilization. Several excellent original articles and review papers which have been published from time to time dealing with the long term and short term forecasting of ionospheric parameters, radio systems, and modelling needs for ionospheric communications, are covered.

  15. Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements (GAIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunk, Robert W.; Scherliess, Ludger; Sojka, Jan J.; Thompson, Donald C.; Anderson, David N.; Codrescu, Mihail; Minter, Cliff; Fuller-Rowell, Timothy J.; Heelis, Roderick A.; Hairston, Marc; Howe, Bruce M.

    2004-02-01

    The ionosphere is a highly dynamic medium that exhibits weather disturbances at all latitudes, longitudes, and altitudes, and these disturbances can have detrimental effects on both military and civilian systems. In an effort to mitigate the adverse effects, we are developing a physics-based data assimilation model of the ionosphere and neutral atmosphere called the Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements (GAIM). GAIM will use a physics-based ionosphere-plasmasphere model and a Kalman filter as a basis for assimilating a diverse set of real-time (or near real-time) measurements. Some of the data to be assimilated include in situ density measurements from satellites, ionosonde electron density profiles, occultation data, ground-based GPS total electron contents (TECs), two-dimensional ionospheric density distributions from tomography chains, and line-of-sight UV emissions from selected satellites. When completed, GAIM will provide specifications and forecasts on a spatial grid that can be global, regional, or local. The primary output of GAIM will be a continuous reconstruction of the three-dimensional electron density distribution from 90 km to geosynchronous altitude (35,000 km). GAIM also outputs auxiliary parameters, including NmF2, hmF2, NmE, hmE, and slant and vertical TEC. Furthermore, GAIM provides global distributions for the ionospheric drivers (neutral winds and densities, magnetospheric and equatorial electric fields, and electron precipitation patterns). In its specification mode, GAIM yields quantitative estimates for the accuracy of the reconstructed ionospheric densities.

  16. An LS-MARS method for modeling regional 3D ionospheric electron density based on GPS data and IRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Szu-Pyng; Chen, Yao-Chung; Ning, Fang-Shii; Tu, Yuh-Min

    2015-05-01

    The methods of developing an accurate and effective ionospheric electron density (IED) model have greatly interested ionosphere researchers. Numerous scholars have proposed many effective and reliable models and methods of global positioning system (GPS)-based computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT) in the past decades. This study introduced a new function-based CIT method, namely the LS-MARS (Least Squares method-Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines), combining MARS with IEDs calculated by International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) to automatically choose the best representing basis functions for the three-dimensional (3D) electron density inside that modeling area. This selected basis functions was substituted into the observation equation of the GPS total electron content (TEC) to calculate the design matrix. Finally, the weighted damped least squares (WDLS) were adopted to reestimate the IED model coefficients. In contrast to common function-based CIT methods, the LS-MARS can be used to attain optimal 3D model automatically, flexibly, adaptively based on the IRI without a priori knowledge of the IED distribution mathematical function. The findings indicated that the LS-MARS model had a smaller recovery TEC error than did the MARS_IRI2012 model, and the VTEC calculated using the LS-MARS model was closer to the VTEC obtained from International GNSS Service (IGS) final IONEX files than was the VTEC calculated using the MARS_IRI2012 and IRI2012. Therefore, this method exhibits strong modeling effectiveness and reliability, and can be an efficient alternative method for estimating regional 3D IED models.

  17. Computerized Fleet Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cataldo, John J.

    1985-01-01

    The Computerized Fleet Maintenance (CFM) program of a New York school district has major component areas of garage operation, vehicle replacement, and fuel consumption. CFM detects high expenditures and provides the rationale for bus replacement. (MLF)

  18. The terrestrial ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schunk, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    The theory relating to the basic physics governing the behavior of the terrestrial ionosphere is reviewed. The review covers the coupling of the ionosphere to both the neutral atmosphere and magnetosphere, the creation and transport of ionization in the ionosphere, and the ionospheric thermal structure. The review also covers the variation of the ionosphere with altitude, latitude, longitude, universal time, season, solar cycle, and geomagnetic activity. In addition, some unique ionospheric features are discussed, such as the polar ionization hole, the main electron density trough, the ion temperature hot spots, the high-latitude ionization tongue, the equatorial fountain, Appleton's peaks, and the polar wind.

  19. Computerized tomography using video recorded fluoroscopic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kak, A. C.; Jakowatz, C. V., Jr.; Baily, N. A.; Keller, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    The use of video-recorded fluoroscopic images as input data for digital reconstruction of objects from their projections is examined. The fluoroscopic and the scanning apparatus used for the experiments are of a commercial type already in existence in most hospitals. It is shown that for beams with divergence up to about 15 deg, one can use a convolution algorithm designed for the parallel radiation case with negligible degradation both quantitatively and from a visual quality standpoint. This convolution algorithm is computationally more efficient than either the algebraic techniques or the convolution algorithms for radially diverging data. Results from studies on Lucite phantoms and a freshly sacrificed rat are included.

  20. Physics of planetary ionospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    The fundamental physical and chemical processes in an idealized planetary ionosphere are considered as a general abstraction, with actual planetary ionospheres representing special cases. After describing the structure of the neutral atmospheres (the barosphere, the thermosphere, and the exosphere) and noting the principal ionizing radiations responsible for the formation of planetary ionospheres, a detailed study is made of the thermal structure of these ionospheres and of the chemical processes and plasma-transport processes occurring in them. The features of equilibrium and realistic models of planetary ionospheres are discussed, and an attempt is made to determine the extent of these ionospheres. Considering the ionosphere as a plasma, a plasma kinetic approach is developed for determining the effects of interactions between individual particles and waves in this plasma. The use of remote-sensing radio techniques and direct measurement or in situ techniques is discussed. Finally, the observed properties of the ionospheres of the Earth, Mars, Venus, and Jupiter are reviewed.

  1. Photochemistry of planetary ionospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, Andrew F.

    1987-01-01

    The dominant photochemical reactions taking place in the ionospheres of Venus, Saturn, and Comet P/Halley are presented. It is shown that the differences in the ionospheres of these celestial bodies result from the different chemistry, energetics, and dynamics of the respective atmospheres. The role of photochemistry in the formation of the individual ionospheres is discussed.

  2. Propagation in the ionosphere, A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, Paul S.

    1994-09-01

    The use of ionospheric models and ray tracing models as components of a propagation model are discussed. These can be used as decision aids to support human interpretation of ionospheric propagation. The physical basis for ionospheric decision aids is introduced by reference to ionospheric morphology and the basic theory of ionospheric propagation, which, along with ray tracing techniques, is then reviewed.

  3. Seismic Computerized Alert Network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1986-01-01

    In 1985 the USGS devised a model for a Seismic Computerized Alert Network (SCAN) that would use continuous monitoring of seismic data from existing types of instruments to provide automatic, highly-reliable early warnings of earthquake shaking. In a large earthquake, substantial damaging ground motions may occur at great distances from the earthquake's epicenter.

  4. The History Computerization Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David L.

    1992-01-01

    Description of the History Computerization Project, which is being developed for the exchange of information between researchers, librarians, archivists, museum curators, preservation groups, and historical societies, focuses on workshops that teach the use of computer database management for historical cataloging and research. (LRW)

  5. Computerized Drug Information Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Smith, Daniel R.

    1972-01-01

    To compare computerized services in chemistry, pharmacology, toxicology, and clinical medicine of pharmaceutical interest, equivalent profiles were run on magnetic tape files of CA-Condensates," CBAC," Excerpta Medica," MEDLARS" and Ringdoc." The results are tabulated for overlap of services, relative speed of citing references, and unique…

  6. Adaptive Computerized Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Roger D.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes an artificially intelligent multimedia computerized instruction system capable of developing a conceptual image of what a student is learning while the student is learning it. It focuses on principles of learning and adaptive behavioral control systems theory upon which the system is designed and demonstrates multiple user modes.…

  7. Computerized Fleet Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cataldo, John J.

    The computerization of school bus maintenance records by the Niskayuna (New York) Central School District enabled the district's transportation department to engage in management practices resulting in significant savings. The district obtains computer analyses of the work performed on all vehicles, including time spent, parts, labor, costs,…

  8. Transformations and algorithms in a computerized brain atlas

    SciTech Connect

    Thurfjell, L. . Centre for Image Analysis); Bohm, C. . Dept. of Physics); Eriksson, L. . Dept. of Neuroradiology Karolinska Institute/Hospital, Stockholm . Dept of Clinical Neurophysiology)

    1993-08-01

    The computerized brain atlas constructed at the Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden, has been further developed. This atlas was designed to be employed in different fields of neuro imaging such as positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission tomography (SPECT), computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MR). The main objectives with the atlas is to aid the interpretation of functional images by introducing anatomical information, to serve as a tool in the merging of data from different imaging modalities and to facilitate the comparisons of data from different individuals by allowing for anatomical standardization of individual data. The purpose of this paper is to describe the algorithms and transformations used in the implementation of the atlas software.

  9. Ionospheric research opportunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickel, Dwight

    1985-05-01

    Ground-based explosions have been exploited successfully in the past as a relatively controlled source for producing ionospheric disturbances. On June 25, the Defense Nuclear Agency will conduct a high explosives test on the northern section of the White Sands Missile Range. Approximately 4,800 tons of ammonium nitrate and fuel oil (ANFO) will be detonated at ground level, producing an acoustic shock wave with a surface pressure change of approximately 20 mbar at a 6 km range. This shock front will have sufficient strength to propagate into the ionosphere with at least a 10% change in the ambient pressure across the disturbance front in the lower F region. Such an ionospheric perturbation will give ionospheric researchers an excellent opportunity to investigate acoustic propagation at ionospheric heights, shock dissipation effect, the ion-neutral coupling process, acoustic-gravity wave (traveling ionospheric disturbance) generation mechanisms, and associated RF phenomena.

  10. Computerizing Audit Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lahey, Joanna N.; Beasley, Ryan A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper briefly discusses the history, benefits, and shortcomings of traditional audit field experiments to study market discrimination. Specifically it identifies template bias and experimenter bias as major concerns in the traditional audit method, and demonstrates through an empirical example that computerization of a resume or correspondence audit can efficiently increase sample size and greatly mitigate these concerns. Finally, it presents a useful meta-tool that future researchers can use to create their own resume audits. PMID:24904189

  11. Computerized leak training

    SciTech Connect

    Parella, C.; Monroe, A.

    1985-11-01

    Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation's computerized leak detection training system is discussed. The system is able to simulate gas leak situations by means of a computer. The training setup includes actual visual display via slides of houses represented on a plotting board; computer with plotter board in front that simulates an area and various leakage situations; a typical handheld CGI; and a control pad for the computer. The training system has filled a valuable need in the area of emergency training.

  12. International reference ionosphere 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilitza, Dieter; Rawer, K.; Bossy, L.; Kutiev, I.; Oyama, K.-I.; Leitinger, R.; Kazimirovsky, E.

    1990-01-01

    The International Reference Ionosphere 1990 (IRI-90) is described. IRI described monthly averages of the electron density, electron temperature, ion temperature, and ion composition in the altitude range from 50 to 1000 km for magnetically quiet conditions in the non-auroral ionosphere. The most important improvements and new developments are summarized.

  13. Ionospheric modelling for navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragon Angel, M. A.

    Signals transmitted to and from satellites for communication and navigation purposes must pass through the ionosphere Ionospheric irregularities most common at equatorial latitudes although they could occur anywhere can have a major impact on system performance and reliability and commercial navigation service satellite-based providers need to account for their effects For a GNSS single-frequency receiver the Slant Total Electron Content STEC must be known by the user through broadcast corrections In this context there are several sets of broadcast parameters that can be defined to take into account this ionospheric term The chosen model to generate the ionospheric correction coefficients for the present study is the NeQuick model although with a number of adaptations intended to improve effective ionospheric effect modelling performances The aim of this study is to describe a possible adaptation to the NeQuick model for real time purposes and suitable for single frequency users Therefore it will be necessary to determine the performance of this modified NeQuick model in correcting the ionospheric delay In order to generate the ionospheric corrections for single frequency receivers using the NeQuick model a certain approach should be followed to adapt the performance of NeQuick since this model was originally developed to provide TEC using averaged monthly information of the solar activity and not daily one Thus to use NeQuick for real time applications as an ionospheric broadcasted model such as Klobuchar solar daily information at the user point

  14. New Ionospheric Interaction Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheerin, J. P.

    2004-11-01

    Current upgrades to both the HF transmitter and diagnostic capabilities at the HAARP facility near Gakona, AK will permit a new generation ionospheric interaction experiments. We explore some of the new phenomena accessible with significantly increased ERP. Large-scale long-lived density structures induced by the HF pump in the ionospheric plasma are investigated. Long-lived density structures which convect with the ambient ionosphere, may serve as tracers for ionospheric flows and fields. Recent advances in HF and VHF radar diagnostics available for HAARP experiments, permit plasma wave detection and monitoring. We survey the mode structures expected with the next generation of high intensity experiments. Together with existing complementary diagnostics such as stimulated HF emissions and optical effects, these data will provide unprecedented views of highly nonlinear phenomena induced by high intensity RF radiation in the ionosphere.

  15. LISN: A distributed observatory to image and study ionospheric irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, R.; Valladares, C. E.

    2013-05-01

    During nighttime the low-latitude ionosphere commonly develops plasma irregularities and density structures able to disrupt radio wave signals. This interference produces an adverse impact on satellite communication and navigation signals. For example, EM signals originated from satellites can suffer fading as deep as 20 dB even at UHF frequencies. In addition, civil aviation is increasingly dependent upon Global Navigation Satellite Systems and disruption of the navigation capability from ionospheric irregularities poses a clear threat to passengers and crews. To monitor and specify the conditions of the ionosphere over South America, the Low-latitude Ionospheric Sensor Network (LISN) was established as a permanent array of scientific instruments that operate continuously and transmit their observables to a central server in a real-time basis. Presently, the LISN observatory includes 3 different types of instruments: (1) 47 GPS receivers, (2) 5 flux-gate magnetometers and (3) 2 Vertical Incidence Pulsed Ionospheric Radar (VIPIR) ionosondes. In addition to providing a nowcast of the disturbed state of the ionosphere over South America, LISN permits detailed studies of the initiation and development of plasma irregularities. By using data assimilation and tomography techniques, LISN provides continuous estimates of several important geophysical parameters that are indispensable to a program aimed at forecasting the plasma electrodynamics and the formation of density structures in the low-latitude ionosphere.

  16. Computerized design of CAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, B. E.; Pham, T. A.

    1982-11-01

    A computerized ballistic design technique for CAD/PAD is described by which a set of ballistic design parameters are determined, all of which satisfy a particular performance requirement. In addition, the program yields the remaining performance predictions, so that only a very few computer runs of the design program can quickly bring the ballistic design within the specification limits prescribed. An example is presented for a small propulsion device, such as a remover or actuator, for which the input specifications define a maximum allowable thrust and minimum end-of-stroke velocity. The resulting output automatically satisfies the input requirements, and will always yield an acceptable ballistic design.

  17. Computerized procedures system

    DOEpatents

    Lipner, Melvin H.; Mundy, Roger A.; Franusich, Michael D.

    2010-10-12

    An online data driven computerized procedures system that guides an operator through a complex process facility's operating procedures. The system monitors plant data, processes the data and then, based upon this processing, presents the status of the current procedure step and/or substep to the operator. The system supports multiple users and a single procedure definition supports several interface formats that can be tailored to the individual user. Layered security controls access privileges and revisions are version controlled. The procedures run on a server that is platform independent of the user workstations that the server interfaces with and the user interface supports diverse procedural views.

  18. Computerized Placement Tests: Background Readings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Entrance Examination Board, Princeton, NJ.

    This document is a compilation of background readings for the user of Computerized Placement Tests (CPTs) developed by the College Board for student placement purposes. CPTs are computerized adaptive tests that test the individual abilities and backgrounds of examinees. CPTs are part of the ACCUPLACER student information management system. The…

  19. Computerized Numerical Control Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reneau, Fred; And Others

    This guide is intended for use in a course in programming and operating a computerized numerical control system. Addressed in the course are various aspects of programming and planning, setting up, and operating machines with computerized numerical control, including selecting manual or computer-assigned programs and matching them with…

  20. Ionospheric irregularity physics modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Ossakow, S.L.; Keskinen, M.J.; Zalesak, S.T.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical simulation techniques have been employed to study ionospheric F region plasma cloud striation phenomena, equatorial spread F phenomena, and high latitude diffuse auroral F region irregularity phenomena. Each of these phenomena can cause scintillation effects. The results and ideas from these studies are state-of-the-art, agree well with experimental observations, and have induced experimentalists to look for theoretically predicted results. One conclusion that can be drawn from these studies is that ionospheric irregularity phenomena can be modelled from a first principles physics point of view. Theoretical and numerical simulation results from the aforementioned ionospheric irregularity areas will be presented.

  1. Radar Ionospheric Impact Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, G.; Decker, D.; Baker, C.

    2006-12-01

    New ionospheric modeling technology is being developed to improve correction of ionospheric impacts on the performance of ground-based space-surveillance radars (SSRs) in near-real-time. These radars, which detect and track space objects, can experience significant target location errors due to ionospheric delay and refraction of the radar signals. Since these radars must detect and track targets essentially to the radar horizon, it is necessary to accurately model the ionosphere as the radar would observe it, down to the local horizon. To correct for spatial and temporal changes in the ionosphere the model must be able to update in near-real-time using ionospheric sensor data. Since many radars are in isolated locations, or may have requirements to operate autonomously, an additional required capability is to provide accurate ionospheric mitigation by exploiting only sensor data from the radar site. However, the model must also be able to update using additional data from other types of sensors that may be available. The original radar ionospheric mitigation approach employed the Bent climatological model. This 35-year-old technology is still the means employed in the many DoD SSRs today. One more recent approach used capabilities from the PRISM model. PRISM technology has today been surpassed by `assimilative models' which employ better physics and Kalman filtering techniques. These models are not necessarily tailored for SSR application which needs to optimize modeling of very small regions using only data from a single sensor, or very few. The goal is to develop and validate the performance of innovative and efficient ionospheric modeling approaches that are optimized for the small regions applicable to ground-based radar coverage (radius of ~2000 km at ionospheric altitudes) and somewhat beyond. These approaches must adapt a continuous modeling scheme in near-real-time to be consistent with all observational data that may become available, and degrade

  2. Dayside Ionospheric Superfountain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Verkhoglyadova, Olga P.; Mannucci, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    The Dayside Ionospheric Super-fountain modified SAMI2 code predicts the uplift, given storm-time electric fields, of the dayside near-equatorial ionosphere to heights of over 800 kilometers during magnetic storm intervals. This software is a simple 2D code developed over many years at the Naval Research Laboratory, and has importance relating to accuracy of GPS positioning, and for satellite drag.

  3. Global Ionosphere Radio Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkin, I. A.; Reinisch, B. W.; Huang, X. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Global Ionosphere Radio Observatory (GIRO) comprises a network of ground-based high-frequency vertical sounding sensors, ionosondes, with instrument installations in 27 countries and a central Lowell GIRO Data Center (LGDC) for data acquisition and assimilation, including 46 real-time data streams as of August 2014. The LGDC implemented a suite of technologies for post-processing, modeling, analysis, and dissemination of the acquired and derived data products, including: (1) IRI-based Real-time Assimilative Model, "IRTAM", that builds and publishes every 15-minutes an updated "global weather" map of the peak density and height in the ionosphere, as well as a map of deviations from the classic IRI climate; (2) Global Assimilative Model of Bottomside Ionosphere Timelines (GAMBIT) Database and Explorer holding 15 years worth of IRTAM computed maps at 15 minute cadence;. (3) 17+ million ionograms and matching ionogram-derived records of URSI-standard ionospheric characteristics and vertical profiles of electron density; (4) 10+ million records of the Doppler Skymaps showing spatial distributions over the GIRO locations and plasma drifts; (5) Data and software for Traveling Ionospheric Disturbance (TID) diagnostics; and (6) HR2006 ray tracing software mated to the "realistic" IRTAM ionosphere. In cooperation with the URSI Ionosonde Network Advisory Group (INAG), the LGDC promotes cooperative agreements with the ionosonde observatories of the world to accept and process real-time data of HF radio monitoring of the ionosphere, and to promote a variety of investigations that benefit from the global-scale, prompt, detailed, and accurate descriptions of the ionospheric variability.

  4. Computerized Physician Order Entry

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Raman; Yen, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Computerized physician order entry (CPOE) has been promoted as an important component of patient safety, quality improvement, and modernization of medical practice. In practice, however, CPOE affects health care delivery in complex ways, with benefits as well as risks. Every implementation of CPOE is associated with both generally recognized and unique local factors that can facilitate or confound its rollout, and neurohospitalists will often be at the forefront of such rollouts. In this article, we review the literature on CPOE, beginning with definitions and proceeding to comparisons to the standard of care. We then proceed to discuss clinical decision support systems, negative aspects of CPOE, and cultural context of CPOE implementation. Before concluding, we follow the experiences of a Chief Medical Information Officer and neurohospitalist who rolled out a CPOE system at his own health care organization and managed the resulting workflow changes and setbacks. PMID:24381708

  5. Computerized training management system

    DOEpatents

    Rice, H.B.; McNair, R.C.; White, K.; Maugeri, T.

    1998-08-04

    A Computerized Training Management System (CTMS) is disclosed for providing a procedurally defined process that is employed to develop accreditable performance based training programs for job classifications that are sensitive to documented regulations and technical information. CTMS is a database that links information needed to maintain a five-phase approach to training-analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation independent of training program design. CTMS is designed using R-Base{trademark}, an-SQL compliant software platform. Information is logically entered and linked in CTMS. Each task is linked directly to a performance objective, which, in turn, is linked directly to a learning objective; then, each enabling objective is linked to its respective test items. In addition, tasks, performance objectives, enabling objectives, and test items are linked to their associated reference documents. CTMS keeps all information up to date since it automatically sorts, files and links all data; CTMS includes key word and reference document searches. 18 figs.

  6. Computerized training management system

    DOEpatents

    Rice, Harold B.; McNair, Robert C.; White, Kenneth; Maugeri, Terry

    1998-08-04

    A Computerized Training Management System (CTMS) for providing a procedurally defined process that is employed to develop accreditable performance based training programs for job classifications that are sensitive to documented regulations and technical information. CTMS is a database that links information needed to maintain a five-phase approach to training-analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation independent of training program design. CTMS is designed using R-Base.RTM., an-SQL compliant software platform. Information is logically entered and linked in CTMS. Each task is linked directly to a performance objective, which, in turn, is linked directly to a learning objective; then, each enabling objective is linked to its respective test items. In addition, tasks, performance objectives, enabling objectives, and test items are linked to their associated reference documents. CTMS keeps all information up to date since it automatically sorts, files and links all data; CTMS includes key word and reference document searches.

  7. Computerized Measuring Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonmaker, Thomas D.

    1980-05-01

    In the manufacturing of printed circuit boards, microscopic analysis is an essential process control activity. An inspector microscopically analyzes board samples to deter-mine board lot quality and process conditions. Prior to computerizing, this sustained measurement-taking involved the tedious process of recording raw data, converting microscope filar readings, calculating averages, logging information in a job notebook, and completing detailed final lab reports. It is evident from this brief task description that this time-consuming repetitious data recording routine was an added burden to the already fatiguing visual inspection method and therefore was a prime candidate for automatic data capture and printout. Secondly, the creation of a permanent and easily accessible data base would improve process feedback and provide for a system with quick identification of any suspect boards if further assembly/testing exhibited board-related failures. This paper describes the evolution and implementation of a computer-aided microscopic inspection operation.

  8. Computerizing natural history collections.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, Mary E

    2013-09-01

    Computers are ubiquitous in the life sciences and are associated with many of the practical and conceptual changes that characterize biology's twentieth-century transformation. Yet comparatively little has been written about how scientists use computers. Despite this relative lack of scholarly attention, the claim that computers revolutionized the life sciences by making the impossible possible is widespread, and relatively unchallenged. How did the introduction of computers into research programs shape scientific practice? The Museum of Vertebrate Zoology (MVZ) at the University of California, Berkeley provides a tractable way into this under-examined question because it is possible to follow the computerization of data in the context of long-term research programs. PMID:23664113

  9. Tsunami Ionospheric warning and Ionospheric seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lognonne, Philippe; Rolland, Lucie; Rakoto, Virgile; Coisson, Pierdavide; Occhipinti, Giovanni; Larmat, Carene; Walwer, Damien; Astafyeva, Elvira; Hebert, Helene; Okal, Emile; Makela, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    The last decade demonstrated that seismic waves and tsunamis are coupled to the ionosphere. Observations of Total Electron Content (TEC) and airglow perturbations of unique quality and amplitude were made during the Tohoku, 2011 giant Japan quake, and observations of much lower tsunamis down to a few cm in sea uplift are now routinely done, including for the Kuril 2006, Samoa 2009, Chili 2010, Haida Gwai 2012 tsunamis. This new branch of seismology is now mature enough to tackle the new challenge associated to the inversion of these data, with either the goal to provide from these data maps or profile of the earth surface vertical displacement (and therefore crucial information for tsunami warning system) or inversion, with ground and ionospheric data set, of the various parameters (atmospheric sound speed, viscosity, collision frequencies) controlling the coupling between the surface, lower atmosphere and the ionosphere. We first present the state of the art in the modeling of the tsunami-atmospheric coupling, including in terms of slight perturbation in the tsunami phase and group velocity and dependance of the coupling strength with local time, ocean depth and season. We then show the confrontation of modelled signals with observations. For tsunami, this is made with the different type of measurement having proven ionospheric tsunami detection over the last 5 years (ground and space GPS, Airglow), while we focus on GPS and GOCE observation for seismic waves. These observation systems allowed to track the propagation of the signal from the ground (with GPS and seismometers) to the neutral atmosphere (with infrasound sensors and GOCE drag measurement) to the ionosphere (with GPS TEC and airglow among other ionospheric sounding techniques). Modelling with different techniques (normal modes, spectral element methods, finite differences) are used and shown. While the fits of the waveform are generally very good, we analyse the differences and draw direction of future

  10. Computed Tomography Status

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Hansche, B. D.

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a relatively new radiographic technique which has become widely used in the medical field, where it is better known as computerized axial tomographic (CAT) scanning. This technique is also being adopted by the industrial radiographic community, although the greater range of densities, variation in samples sizes, plus possible requirement for finer resolution make it difficult to duplicate the excellent results that the medical scanners have achieved.

  11. Computed tomography status

    SciTech Connect

    Hansche, B.D.

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a relatively new radiographic technique which has become widely used in the medical field, where it is better known as computerized axial tomographic (CAT) scanning. This technique is also being adopted by the industrial radiographic community, although the greater range of densities, variation in samples sizes, plus possible requirement for finer resolution make it difficult to duplicate the excellent results that the medical scanners have achieved.

  12. Computerized molecular modeling of carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Computerized molecular modleing continues to increase in capability and applicability to carbohydrates. This chapter covers nomenclature and conformational aspects of carbohydrates, perhaps of greater use to carbohydrate-inexperienced computational chemists. Its comments on various methods and studi...

  13. Robust detection of ionospheric irregularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, T.; Hansen, A.; Blanch, J.; Enge, P.; Mannucci, T.; Pi, X.; Sparks, L.; Iijima, B.; El-Arini, B.; Lejeune, R.; Hagen, M.; Altshuler, E.; Fries, R.; Chu, A.

    2000-01-01

    The approach outlined in this paper conservatively bounds the ionospheric errors even for the worst observed ionospheric conditions to date, using data sets taken from the operational receivers in the WAAS reference station network.

  14. Computerized international geothermal information systems

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, S.L.; Lawrence, J.D.; Lepman, S.R.

    1980-03-01

    The computerized international geothermal energy information system is reviewed. The review covers establishment of the Italy - United States linked data centers by the NATO Committee on Challenges of Modern Society, through a bilateral agreement, and up to the present time. The result of the information exchange project is given as the bibliographic and numerical data available from the data centers. Recommendations for the exchange of computerized geothermal information at the international level are discussed.

  15. Magnetosphere-ionosphere waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, A. J. B.; Wright, A. N.

    2012-01-01

    Self-consistent electrodynamic coupling of the ionosphere and magnetosphere produces waves with clearly defined properties, described here for the first time. Large scale (ideal) disturbances to the equilibrium, for which electron inertia is unimportant, move in the direction of the electric field at a characteristic speed. This may be as fast as several hundred meters per second or approximately half the E × B drift speed. In contrast, narrow scale (strongly inertial) waves are nearly stationary and oscillate at a specific frequency. Estimates of this frequency suggest periods from several tenths of a second to several minutes may be typical. Both the advection speed and frequency of oscillation are derived for a simple model and depend on a combination of ionospheric and magnetospheric parameters. Advection of large scale waves is nonlinear: troughs in E-region number density move faster than crests and this causes waves to break on their trailing edge. Wavebreaking is a very efficient mechanism for producing narrow (inertial) scale waves in the coupled system, readily accessing scales of a few hundred meters in just a few minutes. All magnetosphere-ionosphere waves are damped by recombination in the E-region, suggesting that they are to be best observed at night and in regions of low ionospheric plasma density. Links with observations, previous numerical studies and ionospheric feedback instability are discussed, and we propose key features of experiments that would test the new theory.

  16. Report from ionospheric science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raitt, W. J.; Banks, Peter M.; Nagy, A. F.; Chappell, C. R.

    1989-01-01

    The general strategy to advance knowledge of the ionospheric component of the solar terrestrial system should consist of a three pronged attack on the problem. Ionospheric models should be refined by utilization of existing and new data bases. The data generated in the future should emphasize spatial and temporal gradients and their relation to other events in the solar terrestrial system. In parallel with the improvement in modeling, it will be necessary to initiate a program of advanced instrument development. In particular, emphasis should be placed on the area of improved imaging techniques. The third general activity to be supported should be active experiments related to a better understanding of the basic physics of interactions occurring in the ionospheric environment. These strategies are briefly discussed.

  17. Ionospheric Data Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunk, R.; Scherliess, L.; Sojka, J.; Thompson, D.

    2003-04-01

    Ionospheric weather disturbances can have detrimental effects on a variety of civilian and military systems and operations. They can affect over-the-horizon (OTH) radars, HF communications, surveying and navigation systems, surveillance, spacecraft charging, power grids, pipelines, and the FAA's Wide-Area Augmentation System (WAAS). In an effort to mitigate the adverse effects of the ionosphere on these systems/operations, there is a strong emphasis on developing specification and forecast models. One of the models under development is the Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements (GAIM) model. GAIM uses a physics-based ionosphere-plasmasphere-polar wind model and a Kalman filter as a basis for assimilating a diverse set of real-time (or near real-time) measurements. Some of the data that are assimilated include in situ electron density measurements from the DMSP satellites, bottomside electron density profiles from the Air Force network of digisondes, GPS-TEC data from a network of more than 100 stations, and occultation data. GAIM provides specifications and forecasts on a spatial grid that can be global, regional, or local (25 x 25 km). The primary GAIM output is in the form of 3-dimensional electron density distributions from 90 km to the geosynchronous altitude (35,000 km). GAIM also provides auxiliary parameters (N_mF_2, h_mF_2, N_mE, h_mE, slant and vertical TEC) and global distributions of the self-consistent ionospheric drivers (neutral winds and densities, magnetospheric and dynamo electric fields, and particle precipitation patterns). In its specification mode, GAIM provides quantitative estimates for the accuracy of the reconstructed ionospheric densities. An outline of the GAIM model will be presented and then the presentation will focus on data issues, including the availability of real-time data sources, data quality problems, and the need to have realistic errors attached to all of the real-time data.

  18. Ionospheric and magnetospheric 'plasmapauses'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Maynard, N. C.; Hoffman, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    The locations of Explorer 45 plasmapause crossings are studied as a likely indicator of ionospheric and magnetospheric trough locations. Attention is given to vertical flows of H(+) ions in the light ion trough, as detected by the magnetic ion mass spectrometer aboard Isis 2 (which was operating in conjunction with Explorer 45 during August 1972). The possibility of an equatorial plasmapause is discussed, whose field lines map into the ionosphere at latitudes poleward of the H(+) density decrease, probably due to the refilling of magnetic flux tubes in the outer plasmasphere.

  19. Ionosphere Waves Service - A demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespon, François

    2013-04-01

    In the frame of the FP7 POPDAT project the Ionosphere Waves Service was developed by ionosphere experts to answer several questions: How make the old ionosphere missions more valuable? How provide scientific community with a new insight on wave processes that take place in the ionosphere? The answer is a unique data mining service accessing a collection of topical catalogues that characterize a huge number of Atmospheric Gravity Waves, Travelling Ionosphere Disturbances and Whistlers events. The Ionosphere Waves Service regroups databases of specific events extracted by experts from a ten of ionosphere missions which end users can access by applying specific searches and by using statistical analysis modules for their domain of interest. The scientific applications covered by the IWS are relative to earthquake precursors, ionosphere climatology, geomagnetic storms, troposphere-ionosphere energy transfer, and trans-ionosphere link perturbations. In this presentation we propose to detail the service design, the hardware and software architecture, and the service functions. The service interface and capabilities will be the focus of a demonstration in order to help potential end-users for their first access to the Ionosphere Waves Service portal. This work is made with the support of FP7 grant # 263240.

  20. Global ionospheric weather

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, D.T.; Doherty, P.H.

    1994-02-28

    In the last year, the authors have studied several issues that are critical for understanding ionospheric weather. Work on global F-region modeling has consisted of testing the Phillips Laboratory Global Theoretical Ionosphere Model. Comparisons with both data and other theoretical models have been successfully conducted and are ongoing. GPS observations, as well as data analysis, are also ongoing. Data have been collected for a study on the limitations in making absolute ionospheric measurements using GPS. Another study on ionospheric variability is the first of its kind using GPS data. The observed seasonal total electron content behavior is consistent with that determined from the Faraday rotation technique. Work on the FAA's Phase 1 Wide Area Differential GPS (WADGPS) Satellite Navigation Testbed Experiment also continues. Initial results indicate that stations using operational WADGPS should be located no greater than 430 km apart. Work comparing the authors electron-proton-H atom model to both observations and other models has been generally successful. They have successfully modeled the creation of high-latitude large-scale plasma structures using two separate mechanisms (time-varying global convection and meso-scale convection events).

  1. Solitons and ionospheric heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weatherall, J. C.; Goldman, M. V.; Sheerin, J. P.; Nicholson, D. R.; Payne, G. L.; Hansen, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    It is noted that for parameters characterizing the Platteville ionospheric heating facility, the Langmuir wave evolution at the exact reflection point of the heater wave involves an oscillating two-stream instability followed by a collisionally damped three-dimensional soliton collapse. The result gives an alternative explanation for certain experimental observations.

  2. GROUP-C and LITES Experiments for Ionospheric Remote Sensing aboard the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budzien, S. A.; Stephan, A. W.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2013-12-01

    Ionospheric irregularities, also known as ionospheric bubbles, are transient features of the low and middle latitude ionosphere with important implications for operational systems. Understanding irregularity formation, development, and evolution is vital for efforts within NASA and DoD to forecast scintillation. Irregularity structures have been studied primarily using ground-based systems, though some spaced-based remote and in-situ sensing has been performed. An ionospheric observatory aboard the International Space Station (ISS) would provide new capability to study low- and mid-latitude ionospheric structures on a global scale. The GPS Radio Occultation and Ultraviolet Photometry Colocated (GROUPC) and the Limb-imaging Ionospheric and Thermospheric Extreme-ultraviolet Spectrograph (LITES) experiments are being considered for flight aboard the Space Test Program Houston 5 (STP-H5) experiment pallet. By combining for the first time high-sensitivity in-track photometry with vertical ionospheric airglow spectrographic imagery, we demonstrate that high-fidelity optical tomographic reconstruction of bubbles can be performed from the ISS. Ground-based imagery can supplement the tomography by providing all-sky images of ionospheric structures (e.g. bubbles and TIDs) and of signatures of lower atmospheric dynamics, such as gravity waves, that may play a role in irregularity formation. The optical instrumentation can be augmented with additional sensors to provide measurements of scintillation and in situ plasma density, composition, and drifts.

  3. Chemistry in the Thermosphere and Ionosphere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roble, Raymond G.

    1986-01-01

    An informative review which summarizes information about chemical reactions in the thermosphere and ionosphere. Topics include thermal structure, ultraviolet radiation, ionospheric photochemistry, thermospheric photochemistry, chemical heating, thermospheric circulation, auroral processes and ionospheric interactions. Provides suggested followup…

  4. Arkansas' Curriculum Guide. Competency Based Computerized Accounting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock. Div. of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    This guide contains the essential parts of a total curriculum for a one-year secondary-level course in computerized accounting. Addressed in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: the complete accounting cycle, computer operations for accounting, computerized accounting and general ledgers, computerized accounts payable,…

  5. Computerized Proof Techniques for Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Christopher J.; Tefera, Akalu; Zeleke, Aklilu

    2012-01-01

    The use of computer algebra systems such as Maple and Mathematica is becoming increasingly important and widespread in mathematics learning, teaching and research. In this article, we present computerized proof techniques of Gosper, Wilf-Zeilberger and Zeilberger that can be used for enhancing the teaching and learning of topics in discrete…

  6. California's Computerized Pupil Transportation Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, James C.

    1983-01-01

    Traces efforts to develop a statewide plan for computerized school bus fleet operation by means of questionnaires distributed to all 58 county education offices, 7 regional data processing centers, and selected private school bus contractors and school districts. Findings indicate significant potential savings for fleets of 20 or more busses. (JBM)

  7. Student Perceptions of Computerized Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pino-Silva, Juan

    2008-01-01

    The challenge to test small groups by means of microcomputers demands appropriate software design and sound test design. To comply with this demand, students' beliefs or perceptions on the advantages and disadvantages of a computerized test were tapped. Overall, self-reported advantages outnumbered disadvantages to a significant degree. This was…

  8. Modelling ionospheric density structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schunk, R. W.; Sojka, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    Large-scale density structures are a common feature in the high-latitude ionsphere. The structures were observed in the dayside cusp, polar cap, and nocturnal auroral region over a range of altitudes, including the E-region, F-region and topside ionosphere. The origins, lifetimes and transport characteristics of large-scale density structures were studied with the aid of a three-dimensional, time-dependent ionospheric model. Blob creation due to particle precipitation, the effect that structured electric fields have on the ionosphere, and the lifetimes and transport characteristics of density structures for different seasonal, solar cycle, and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions were studied. The main conclusions drawn are: (1) the observed precipitation energy fluxes are sufficient for blob creation if the plasma is exposed to the precipitation for 5 to 10 minutes; (2) structured electric fields produce structured electron densities, ion temperatures, and ion composition; (3) the lifetime of an F-region density structure depends on several factors, including the initial location where it was formed, the magnitude of the perturbation, season, solar cycle and IMF; and (4) depending on the IMF, horizontal plasma convection can cause an initial structure to break up into multiple structures of various sizes, remain as a single distorted structure, or become stretched into elongated segments.

  9. Ionospheric variability over Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezquer, R. G.; Mosert, M.; Corbella, R.; Erazu, M.; de La Zerda, L.

    The understanding of ionospheric variability is important for the user of ionospheric models. A satellite designer or operator needs to know not only monthly average conditions but also the expected deviations from these mean values. In order to contribute to the studies on ionospheric variability, in this paper values of critical frequencies of F2, F1 and E regions and M(3000)F2 factor measured at 4 Japanese stations are used. Data correspond to equinoxes, solstices, high and low solar activity. Quartiles and median values are used to specify variability, because they have the advantage of being less affected by large deviations that can occur during magnetic storms. The results are similar for the considered stations and show that the highest variability correspond to foF2. For March high solar activity the variability of fof2 decreases during hours of maximum ionisation. The M3000F2 factor, in general, shown low variability. Akita (39.72° N, 140.13° E) showed the highest variability for the three frequencies. Moreover, it can be seen that quartiles are not equidistant from the median value.

  10. Russian-American tomography experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, J.C.; Buonsanto, M.J.; Holt, J.M.; Klobucha, J.A.; Fougere, P.

    1994-12-31

    To intercompare various techniques used in reconstructing tomographic images, and to benchmark those results with direct observations obtained by the incoherent scatter technique, an experimental campaign and subsequent analysis program, the Russian-American Tomography Experiment (RATE), was implemented in late 1993. Russian experimental teams from the Polar Geophysical Institute in Murmansk and Moscow State University joined with American investigators from the Phillips Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and an array of four receiving stations was set up in the northeastern United States and in eastern Canada to obtain data for the tomographic reconstructions. Phase-difference and total-phase tomographic reconstruction techniques have been employed and are intercompared. The spatial/altitude distribution of ionospheric electron content was observed by the MIT Millstone Hill incoherent scatter radar that scanned the ionosphere in a plane parallel to the satellite overflights. The authors present preliminary reconstructions of the ionospheric structure observed during a severe mid-latitude ionospheric storm that took place during the campaign. The drastic large-scale changes in the ionospheric structure that accompanied the November 1993 storm were well observed by the two diagnostic techniques.

  11. Electron Density Profiles of the Topside Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Xue-Qin; Reinsch, Bodo W.; Bilitza, Dieter; Benson, Robert F.

    2002-01-01

    The existing uncertainties about the electron density profiles in the topside ionosphere, i.e., in the height region from h,F2 to - 2000 km, require the search for new data sources. The ISIS and Alouette topside sounder satellites from the sixties to the eighties recorded millions of ionograms but most were not analyzed in terms of electron density profiles. In recent years an effort started to digitize the analog recordings to prepare the ionograms for computerized analysis. As of November 2001 about 350000 ionograms have been digitized from the original 7-track analog tapes. These data are available in binary and CDF format from the anonymous ftp site of the National Space Science Data Center. A search site and browse capabilities on CDAWeb assist the scientific usage of these data. All information and access links can be found at http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/space/isis/isis- status.htm1. This paper describes the ISIS data restoration effort and shows how the digital ionograms are automatically processed into electron density profiles from satellite orbit altitude (1400 km for ISIS-2) down to the F peak. Because of the large volume of data an automated processing algorithm is imperative. The TOPside Ionogram Scaler with True height algorithm TOPIST software developed for this task is successfully scaling - 70% of the ionograms. An <> is available to manually scale the more difficult ionograms. The automated processing of the digitized ISIS ionograms is now underway, producing a much-needed database of topside electron density profiles for ionospheric modeling covering more than one solar cycle.

  12. Coupled Magnetotail-Ionosphere Asymmetries from Ionospheric Hall Conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotko, W.; Smith, R. H.; Zhang, B.; Ouellette, J.; Brambles, O.; Lyon, J.; Wiltberger, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Fast convective transport in the plasma sheet is more prevalent in the premidnight (dusk) sector relative to postmidnight. Ionospheric convection exhibits related asymmetries - more flux typically circulates in the dusk cell than in the dawn cell, and the nightside convection pattern is rotated clockwise when viewed over the North Pole. We show, using global simulations of the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere interaction, that the electrodynamic interaction between Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere produces asymmetries resembling observed distributions in plasmasheet flows and ionospheric convection (Figure, center panel). The primary causal agent in the simulations is a meridional gradient in ionospheric Hall conductance which, through Cowling polarization, regulates the distributions of i) electrical currents flowing within and between the ionosphere and magnetotail and ii) the nightside reconnection rate and resulting dawn-dusk distribution of plasma sheet fast flows. The asymmetry disappears in the simulation when the Hall conductance is taken to be uniform (left panel), and it reverses when the conductance is artificially depleted at auroral latitudes (right panel). The coupling between meridional currents and electric fields in the ionosphere and axial currents and electric fields in the plasmasheet is demonstrated by a simple model for non-ideal coupling of field-aligned currents flowing between the plasma sheet and the region of enhanced ionospheric conductance straddling the nightside convection throat.

  13. Anomalous reflections from the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Givishvili, G. V.; Leshchenko, L. N.

    2013-09-01

    The existence of anomalous ionospheric reflections was shown on the basis of vertical soundings at the Moskow station. They are observed at heights of 100-200 km. These anomalous reflections are not related to the main Ne( h) ionospheric profile. Morphological characteristics of such reflections are presented: the daily, seasonal, and cyclic dependences of their appearance.

  14. Computerized PET/CT image analysis in the evaluation of tumour response to therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J; Zhang, H H

    2015-01-01

    Current cancer therapy strategy is mostly population based, however, there are large differences in tumour response among patients. It is therefore important for treating physicians to know individual tumour response. In recent years, many studies proposed the use of computerized positron emission tomography/CT image analysis in the evaluation of tumour response. Results showed that computerized analysis overcame some major limitations of current qualitative and semiquantitative analysis and led to improved accuracy. In this review, we summarize these studies in four steps of the analysis: image registration, tumour segmentation, image feature extraction and response evaluation. Future works are proposed and challenges described. PMID:25723599

  15. Clinical applications of computerized thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anbar, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Computerized or digital, thermography is a rapidly growing diagnostic imaging modality. It has superseded contact thermography and analog imaging thermography which do not allow effective quantization. Medical applications of digital thermography can be classified in two groups: static and dynamic imaging. They can also be classified into macro thermography (resolution greater than 1 mm) and micro thermography (resolution less than 100 microns). Both modalities allow a thermal resolution of 0.1 C. The diagnostic power of images produced by any of these modalities can be augmented by the use of digital image enhancement and image recognition procedures. Computerized thermography has been applied in neurology, cardiovascular and plastic surgery, rehabilitation and sports medicine, psychiatry, dermatology and ophthalmology. Examples of these applications are shown and their scope and limitations are discussed.

  16. Computerized accounting methods. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    This report summarizes the results of the research performed under the Task Order on computerized accounting methods in a period from 03 August to 31 December 1994. Computerized nuclear material accounting methods are analyzed and evaluated. Selected methods are implemented in a hardware-software complex developed as a prototype of the local network-based CONMIT system. This complex has been put into trial operation for test and evaluation of the selected methods at two selected ``Kurchatov Institute`` Russian Research Center (``KI`` RRC) nuclear facilities. Trial operation is carried out since the beginning of Initial Physical Inventory Taking in these facilities that was performed in November 1994. Operation of CONMIT prototype system was demonstrated in the middle of December 1994. Results of evaluation of CONMIT prototype system features and functioning under real operating conditions are considered. Conclusions are formulated on the ways of further development of computerized nuclear material accounting methods. The most important conclusion is a need to strengthen computer and information security features supported by the operating environment. Security provisions as well as other LANL Client/Server System approaches being developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory are recommended for selection of software and hardware components to be integrated into production version of CONMIT system for KI RRC.

  17. Solitons and ionospheric modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheerin, J. P.; Nicholson, D. R.; Payne, G. L.; Hansen, P. J.; Weatherall, J. C.; Goldman, M. V.

    1982-01-01

    The possibility of Langmuir soliton formation and collapse during ionospheric modification is investigated. Parameters characterizing former facilities, existing facilities, and planned facilities are considered, using a combination of analytical and numerical techniques. At a spatial location corresponding to the exact classical reflection point of the modifier wave, the Langmuir wave evolution is found to be dominated by modulational instability followed by soliton formation and three-dimensional collapse. The earth's magnetic field is found to affect the shape of the collapsing soliton. These results provide an alternative explanation for some recent observations.

  18. A Medium-Scale Traveling Ionospheric Disturbance Observed from the Ground and from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, C.; Dymond, K. F.; Coker, C.; Budzien, S.; Bernhardt, P.; Kassim, N.; Lazio, J.; Cohen, A.; Weiler, K.; Crane, P.; Clarke, T.; Rickard, L. J.; Taylor, G. B.; Schinzel, F.; Philstrom, Y.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Close, S.; Colestock, P.; Myers, S.; Datta, A.

    2008-12-01

    We report the first optical observations from space of a Medium-scale Traveling Ionospheric Disturbance (MSTID) of the Traveling Wave Packet type. The observations were made during the Combined Radio Interferometry and COSMIC Experiment in Tomography Campaign (CRICKET) held on September 15, 2007 at ~0830 UT. The experiment used a Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC also known as FORMOSAT-3) satellite in conjunction with the Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope, located near Socorro, NM, to study the ionosphere from the global scale down to the regional scale while the TIDs propagated through it. The COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 satellite measured the ionosphere both horizontally and with altitude while the VLA measured the directions and speed of the TIDs. Our observations provide new information on this poorly understood class of TID

  19. Ionospheric and magnetospheric plasmapauses'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Hoffman, J. H.; Maynard, N. C.

    1977-01-01

    During August 1972, Explorer 45 orbiting near the equatorial plane with an apogee of about 5.2 R sub e traversed magnetic field lines in close proximity to those simultaneously traversed by the topside ionospheric satellite ISIS 2 near dusk in the L range 2-5.4. The locations of the Explorer 45 plasmapause crossings during this month were compared to the latitudinal decreases of the H(+) density observed on ISIS 2 near the same magnetic field lines. The equatorially determined plasmapause field lines typically passed through or poleward of the minimum of the ionospheric light ion trough, with coincident satellite passes occurring for which the L separation between the plasmapause and trough field lines was between 1 and 2. Vertical flows of the H(+) ions in the light ion trough as detected by the magnetic ion mass spectrometer on ISIS were directed upward with velocities between 1 and 2 kilometers/sec near dusk on these passes. These velocities decreased to lower values on the low latitude side of the H(+) trough but did not show any noticeable change across the field lines corresponding to the magnetospheric plasmapause.

  20. Ionospherically reflected proton whistlers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavilov, D. I.; Shklyar, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    We present experimental observations and detailed investigation of the variety of proton whistlers that includes transequatorial and ionospherically reflected proton whistlers. The latter have previously been indicated from numerical modeling of spectrograms. The study is based on six-component ELF wave data from the Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER) satellite which permits to obtain not only spectrograms displaying the power spectral density but also such wave properties as the polarization, wave normal angle, wave refractive index, and normalized parallel component of the Poynting vector. The explanation of various types of proton whistlers is based on the properties of ion cyclotron wave propagation in a multicomponent magnetoplasma, with special consideration of the effect of ion hybrid resonance reflection. Analysis of experimental data is supplemented by numerical modeling of spectrograms that reproduces the main features of experimental ones. As a self-contained result, we provide conclusive experimental evidences that the region illuminated by a lightning stroke in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide may spread over a distance of 4000 km in both hemispheres.

  1. Ionospheric climate and weather modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Schunk, R.W.; Sojka, J.J.

    1988-03-01

    Simulations of the ionospheric model of Schunk et al. (1986) have been used for climatology and weather modeling. Steady state empirical models were used in the climatology model to provide plasma convection and particle precipitation patterns in the northern high-latitude region. The climatology model also depicts the ionospheric electron density and ion and electron temperatures for solar maximum, winter solstice, and strong geomagnetic activity conditions. The weather model describes the variations of ionospheric features during the solar cycle, seasonal changes, and geomagnetic activity. Prospects for future modeling are considered. 23 references.

  2. The Ionosphere and Ocean Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindqwister, Ulf J.

    1999-01-01

    The accuracy of satellite-based single-frequency radar ocean altimeters benefits from calibration of the total electron content (TEC) of the ionosphere below the satellite. Data from the global network of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers provides timely, continuous, and globally well-distributed measurements of ionospheric electron content. We have created a daily automated process called Daily Global Ionospheric Map (Daily-GIM) whose primary purpose is to use global GPS data to provide ionospheric calibration data for the Geosat Follow-On (GFO) ocean altimeter. This process also produces an hourly time-series of global maps of the electron content of the ionosphere. This system is designed to deliver "quick-look" ionospheric calibrations within 24 hours with 90+% reliability and with a root-mean-square accuracy of 2 cm at 13.6 GHz. In addition we produce a second product within 72 hours which takes advantage of additional GPS data which were not available in time for the first process. The diagram shows an example of a comparison between TEC data from the Topographic Experiment (TOPEX) ocean altimeter and Daily-GIM. TEC are displayed in TEC units, TECU, where 5 TECU is 1 cm at 13.6 GHz. Data from a single TOPEX track is shown. Also shown is the Bent climatological model TEC for the track. Although the GFO satellite is not yet in its operational mode, we have been running Daily-GIM reliably (much better than 90%) with better than 2-cm accuracy (based on comparisons against TOPEX) for several months. When timely ephemeris files for the European Remote Sensing Satellite 2 (ERS-2) are available, daily ERS-2 altimeter ionospheric calibration files are produced. When GFO ephemeris files are made available to us, we produce GFO ionosphere calibration files. Users of these GFO ionosphere calibration files find they are a great improvement over the alternative International Reference Ionosphere 1995 (IRI-95) climatological model. In addition, the TOPEX orbit

  3. Multiple-energy Techniques in Industrial Computerized Tomography

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Schneberk, D.; Martz, H.; Azevedo, S.

    1990-08-01

    Considerable effort is being applied to develop multiple-energy industrial CT techniques for materials characterization. Multiple-energy CT can provide reliable estimates of effective Z (Z{sub eff}), weight fraction, and rigorous calculations of absolute density, all at the spatial resolution of the scanner. Currently, a wide variety of techniques exist for CT scanners, but each has certain problems and limitations. Ultimately, the best multi-energy CT technique would combine the qualities of accuracy, reliability, and wide range of application, and would require the smallest number of additional measurements. We have developed techniques for calculating material properties of industrial objects that differ somewhat from currently used methods. In this paper, we present our methods for calculating Z{sub eff}, weight fraction, and density. We begin with the simplest case -- methods for multiple-energy CT using isotopic sources -- and proceed to multiple-energy work with x-ray machine sources. The methods discussed here are illustrated on CT scans of PBX-9502 high explosives, a lexan-aluminum phantom, and a cylinder of glass beads used in a preliminary study to determine if CT can resolve three phases: air, water, and a high-Z oil. In the CT project at LLNL, we have constructed several CT scanners of varying scanning geometries using {gamma}- and x-ray sources. In our research, we employed two of these scanners: pencil-beam CAT for CT data using isotopic sources and video-CAT equipped with an IRT micro-focal x-ray machine source.

  4. Small angle scattering signals for (neutron) computerized tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Strobl, M.; Treimer, W.; Hilger, A.

    2004-07-19

    Small angle neutron scattering is a well-established tool for the determination of microscopic structures in various materials. With the ultrasmall angle neutron scattering technique (USANS), structures with sizes of approximately 50 nm to 50 {mu}m can be resolved by a double crystal diffractometer (DCD). USANS signals recorded with a special DCD were used for tomographic purposes investigating the macroscopic structure of a sample with a maximum resolution of 200 {mu}m. Thereby, macroscopic regions within the sample with different ultrasmall angle scattering properties, i.e., with different microscopic structures, could be imaged by the means of tomographic reconstruction from projections (on a macroscopic scale)

  5. [Computerized tomography of the orbit in Graves' ophthalmopathy. New observations].

    PubMed

    Bagnolesi, P; Cilotti, A; Campassi, C; Lencioni, R; Napoli, V; Bartolozzi, C

    1992-05-01

    In order to evaluate Graves' ophthalmopathy new CT parameters have been introduced such as: the diameters of the five extraocular muscles, the value of their addition, the grade of apical crowding, the enlargement of optic nerve sheaths and of the superior ophthalmic vein, and the anterior displacement of the lacrimal gland. On this subject we report our further experience after reviewing 68 cases in which the new ocular parameters were correlated with altered ocular motility and optic neuropathy. The results confirmed our previous study, dealing with several groups of patients, which at the moment seem to be 2, instead of 3 groups: a) patients with increase in both muscular and fatty tissue (54/68 cases); b) patients with main or exclusive increase in fatty tissue (14/68 cases). Relevant clinical signs were present only in the first group of patients, where the medial, inferior and superior muscles were affected in 53/55, 53/55 and 50/55 cases respectively. A muscle increase by nearly 50% was more frequently found in cases with altered ocular motility, an increase by 90% was often associated with optic neuropathy. In case of optic neuropathy apical crowding was often observed, mainly in coronal scans, together with significant enlargement of the optic nerve sheath and of the superior ophthalmic vein. As to proptosis, preseptal area and anterior displacement of the lacrimal gland, they demonstrated lower correlation with the reference symptoms, even though their occurrence was high in symptomatic patients. PMID:1631331

  6. Advanced Ionospheric Sensing using GROUP-C and LITES aboard the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budzien, S. A.; Stephan, A. W.; Chakrabarti, S.; Finn, S. C.; Cook, T.; Powell, S. P.; O'Hanlon, B.; Bishop, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    The GPS Radio Occultation and Ultraviolet Photometer Co-located (GROUP-C) and Limb-imaging Ionospheric and Thermospheric Extreme-ultraviolet Spectrograph (LITES) experiments are manifested for flight aboard the International Space Station (ISS) in 2016 as part of the Space Test Program Houston #5 payload. The two experiments provide technical development and risk-reduction for future DoD space weather sensors suitable for ionospheric specification, space situational awareness, and data products for global ionosphere assimilative models. In addition, the combined instrument complement of these two experiments offers a unique opportunity to study structures of the nighttime ionosphere. GROUP-C includes an advanced GPS receiver providing ionospheric electron density profiles and scintillation measurements and a high-sensitivity far-ultraviolet photometer measuring horizontal ionospheric gradients. LITES is an imaging spectrograph that spans 60-140 nm and will obtain high-cadence limb profiles of the ionosphere and thermosphere from 150-350 km altitude. In the nighttime ionosphere, recombination of O+ and electrons produces optically thin emissions at 91.1 and 135.6 nm that can be used to tomographically reconstruct the two-dimensional plasma distribution in the orbital plane below ISS altitudes. Ionospheric irregularities, such as plasma bubbles and blobs, are transient features of the low and middle latitude ionosphere with important implications for operational systems. Irregularity structures have been studied primarily using ground-based systems, though some spaced-based remote and in-situ sensing has been performed. An ionospheric observatory aboard the ISS would provide new capability to study low- and mid-latitude ionospheric structures on a global scale. By combining for the first time high-sensitivity in-track photometry, vertical ionospheric airglow spectrographic imagery, and recent advancements in UV tomography, high-fidelity tomographic reconstruction of

  7. Observations of Ionospheric Features over the Anatolian Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, T. W.; Slack, C. M.; Scholze, A.; Mehta, K.; Mahrous, A.

    2010-12-01

    Helwan University and the Applied Research Laboratories at the University of Texas have collaborated to field the Ionospheric Tomography Network of Egypt (ITNE). ITNE consists of 3 UHF/VHF beacon receivers across Egypt. The first of these receivers was placed in Helwan, Egypt. It frequently observes a peak in ΔTEC/Δt measurements where the F-region intercept of the radio rays crosses the southern edge of the Anatolian Plateau. This feature was observed repeatedly in passes over Anatolia during the summer of 2008. The ΔTEC/Δt peaks occur where the 300 km intercept passes over the edge. Visually the ΔTEC/Δt peaks are correlated with steep surface topography gradients. These correlations suggest that the local ionosphere is affected by the ground topography, possibly through the upward propagation of mountain-generated gravity waves.

  8. Ionospheric scintillation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rino, C. L.; Freemouw, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    The diffracted field of a monochromatic plane wave was characterized by two complex correlation functions. For a Gaussian complex field, these quantities suffice to completely define the statistics of the field. Thus, one can in principle calculate the statistics of any measurable quantity in terms of the model parameters. The best data fits were achieved for intensity statistics derived under the Gaussian statistics hypothesis. The signal structure that achieved the best fit was nearly invariant with scintillation level and irregularity source (ionosphere or solar wind). It was characterized by the fact that more than 80% of the scattered signal power is in phase quadrature with the undeviated or coherent signal component. Thus, the Gaussian-statistics hypothesis is both convenient and accurate for channel modeling work.

  9. Magnetosphere, ionosphere and atmosphere interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, P. M.

    1979-01-01

    In the present review, the general nature of the earth's space environment is discussed with particular reference to the physical processes which link the magnetosphere, the ionosphere, and the upper atmosphere. Recent theoretical and experimental research has revealed the existence of subtle couplings which closely link the electrical and mass properties of these regions. Some of these couplings have been known for many years. Recent discoveries include such couplings as the formation of the plasmasphere through the mutual action of convective electric fields and ionospheric plasma flows. However, there is still insufficient information to define accurately the basic processes associated with space plasma dynamics when cool thermal plasma of ionospheric origin interacts with the neutral atmosphere, the energetic plasma of the ionosphere, and the solar wind. The primary objective of the discussion is to provide a general introduction to the more challenging processes as they are presently known.

  10. A new global ionospheric model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yip, K. W.; Vonroos, O. H.

    1975-01-01

    A new global ionospheric model was successfully implemented. The daytime portion of this model provides one-way ionospheric range corrections that compare favorably with those derived from the Mariner Venus/Mercury S- and X-band dual frequency Doppler data. For elevation angles, gamma higher than 30 deg and solar zenith angle less than 80 deg, this model provides calibrations accurate to a few centimeters. The calibrations provided by the nighttime model are also very reasonable. It is interesting to note that the daytime ionospheric calibrations derived from the current calibration scheme, DIEN/TIEN, are fairly close to those given by the new global model, especially in the temporal variations and thus the Doppler effects. The comparison between the nighttime model and DIEN/TIEN was based on the one-way ionospheric range corrections for three passes near the Mariner 9 encounter with Mars in 1971. They can differ by over 30%.

  11. The worldwide ionospheric data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilitza, Dieter

    1989-01-01

    The worldwide ionospheric data base is scattered over the entire globe. Different data sets are held at different institutions in the U.S., U.S.S.R., Australia, Europe, and Asia. The World Data Centers on the different continents archive and distribute part of the huge data base; the scope and cross section of the individual data holdings depend on the regional and special interest of the center. An attempt is made to pull together all the strings that point toward different ionospheric data holdings. Requesters are provided with the information about what is available and where to get it. An attempt is also made to evaluate the reliability and compatibility of the different data sets based on the consensus in the ionospheric research community. The status and accuracy of the standard ionospheric models are also discussed because they may facilitate first order assessment of ionospheric effects. This is a first step toward an ionospheric data directory within the framework of NSSDC's master directory.

  12. Computerized Sociometric Assessment for Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endedijk, Hinke M.; Cillessen, Antonius H. N.

    2015-01-01

    In preschool classes, sociometric peer ratings are used to measure children's peer relationships. The current study examined a computerized version of preschool sociometric ratings. The psychometric properties were compared of computerized sociometric ratings and traditional peer ratings for preschoolers. The distributions, inter-item…

  13. A First Life with Computerized Business Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thavikulwat, Precha

    2011-01-01

    The author discusses the theoretical lens, origins, and environment of his work on computerized business simulations. Key ideas that inform his work include the two dimensions (control and interaction) of computerized simulation, the two ways of representing a natural process (phenotypical and genotypical) in a simulation, which he defines as a…

  14. The Computerization of East Asian Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Douglas W.

    1984-01-01

    Describes two methods for the computerization of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean (CJK) input and output--Research Libraries Group's Sinoterm and OCLC's Asiagraphics. East Asian vernacular computerization efforts, system development, character sets, terminal design and keyboards, and member library use of CJK records are highlighted. Six references…

  15. Computerized Management of Physical Plant Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkey, Earl W.; Kleinpeter, Joseph

    Outlining the major areas to be considered when deciding whether or not to computerize physical plant services in higher education institutions, the author points out the shortcomings of manual record keeping systems. He gives five factors to consider when deciding to computerize: (1) time and money, (2) extent of operation, (3) current and future…

  16. Advanced Composition and the Computerized Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hult, Christine

    1989-01-01

    Discusses four kinds of computerized access tools: online catalogs; computerized reference; online database searching; and compact disks and read only memory (CD-ROM). Examines how these technologies are changing research. Suggests how research instruction in advanced writing courses can be refocused to include the new technologies. (RS)

  17. Cassel Psych Center Computerized Biofeedback Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.

    1982-01-01

    Describes Cassel Psych Center, a computerized biofeedback clinic, where the "well" patient is a major concern, and where biofeedback instruments are used with computers to form a Computerized-Biofeedback Clinical Support System. The Center's activities are designed to parallel the services of the pathologist in a medical setting. (PAS)

  18. Resources for Improving Computerized Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeaman, Andrew R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Presents an annotated review of human factors literature that discusses computerized environments. Topics discussed include the application of office automation practices to educational environments; video display terminal (VDT) workstations; health and safety hazards; planning educational facilities; ergonomics in computerized offices; and…

  19. Protecting Privacy in Computerized Medical Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    This report analyzes the implications of computerized medical information and the challenges it brings to individual privacy. The report examines the nature of the privacy interest in health care information and the current state of the law protecting that information; the nature of proposals to computerize health care information and the…

  20. Computerized Classification Testing with the Rasch Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggen, Theo J. H. M.

    2011-01-01

    If classification in a limited number of categories is the purpose of testing, computerized adaptive tests (CATs) with algorithms based on sequential statistical testing perform better than estimation-based CATs (e.g., Eggen & Straetmans, 2000). In these computerized classification tests (CCTs), the Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT) (Wald,…

  1. Computerization of the Student Neurophysiology Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Beverly

    1985-01-01

    Describes how a traditional neurophysiology laboratory has been computerized and how students work with digitizing on-line data. Points out advantages of computerization, including the speed, accuracy, and reliability in the acquisition, reduction, and analysis of data. Also describes four generic computer programs tailored to the particular…

  2. The Evaluation of SISMAKOM (Computerized SDI Project).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Science, Penang (Malaysia).

    A survey of 88 users of SISMAKOM, a computerized selective dissemination of information (SDI) and document delivery service provided by the Universiti Sains Malaysia and four other Malaysian universities, was conducted in August 1982 in order to collect data about SISMAKOM and to assess the value of a computerized SDI service in a developing…

  3. Computerized Adaptive Testing under Nonparametric IRT Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Xueli; Douglas, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    Nonparametric item response models have been developed as alternatives to the relatively inflexible parametric item response models. An open question is whether it is possible and practical to administer computerized adaptive testing with nonparametric models. This paper explores the possibility of computerized adaptive testing when using…

  4. High-Latitude Ionospheric Imaging using Canadian High Arctic Ionospheric Network (CHAIN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meziane, K.; Jayachandran, P. T.; Hamza, A. M.; MacDougall, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the polar cap dynamics is a fundamental problem in solar-terrestrial physics; any breakthroughs would have to take into account the interactions that take place at the interfaces between the Solar Wind and the Magnetosphere and between the latter and the ionosphere, respectively. Over the past decade a significant number of ground-based GPS receivers and digital ionosondes have been deployed in the polar cap and auroral region. This deployment has allowed the harvest of much needed data, otherwise not available, which in turn helps understand the dynamics of the polar ionospheric regions. A technique, used consistently by researchers in the field, consists of inverting the Total Electron Content (TEC) along the ray path obtained from a system of GPS receivers. In the present study, a combination of tomography and ionosonde data from the CHAIN network is used to examine the dynamics of polar cap patches. First, the TEC derived from GPS receivers through tomographic reconstruction is directly compared with ionosonde data. The comparison includes periods of quite and disturbed geomagnetic activity. We then use the vertical density profiles derived from the CHAIN ionosondes as initial seeds for the reconstruction of the tomographic images of the polar cap regions. Precise electron density peaks obtained through the tomographic reconstruction fall within a range that is consistent with direct CHAIN measurements when certain conditions are met. An assessment of the performance of the resulting combination of GPS and ionosonde data is performed, and conclusions are presented.

  5. A computerized obstetric medical record.

    PubMed

    Stead, W W; Brame, R G; Hammond, W E; Jelovsek, F R; Estes, E H; Parker, R T

    1977-04-01

    Duke University has utilized computerized obstetric medical records since 1971. System evolution is described. Deficiencies in the current system appear to evolve from the computer/human interface rather than from basic system design. Critical elements in system success are physician acceptance of the appearance of data collection sheets and printed notes and continual rapid response in programing modification to allow for physician individuality and changes in medical practice. The limiting factor in the potential usefulness of such a system is the rate of incomplete data collection. It is suggested that if the physician were to enter data directly into the computer through a terminal, data collection would be more accurate and complete. PMID:854253

  6. Ionospheric Profiling using GPS/MET Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajj, George; Romans, Larry

    1996-01-01

    A report on ionospheric profiling using GPS and MET data is presented. A description of the GPS occultation technique, some examples of GPS/MET data products, the data processing system and a preliminary validation of ionospheric profiles is discussed.

  7. Earthquake-Ionosphere Coupling Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamogawa, Masashi

    After a giant earthquake (EQ), acoustic and gravity waves are excited by the displacement of land and sea surface, propagate through atmosphere, and then reach thermosphere, which causes ionospheric disturbances. This phenomenon was detected first by ionosonde and by HF Doppler sounderin the 1964 M9.2 Great Alaskan EQ. Developing Global Positioning System (GPS), seismogenic ionospheric disturbance detected by total electron content (TEC) measurement has been reported. A value of TEC is estimated by the phase difference between two different carrier frequencies through the propagation in the dispersive ionospheric plasma. The variation of TEC is mostly similar to that of F-region plasma. Acoustic-gravity waves triggered by an earthquake [Heki and Ping, EPSL, 2005; Liu et al., JGR, 2010] and a tsunami [Artu et al., GJI, 2005; Liu et al., JGR, 2006; Rolland, GRL, 2010] disturb the ionosphere and travel in the ionosphere. Besides the traveling ionospheric disturbances, ionospheric disturbances excited by Rayleigh waves [Ducic et al, GRL, 2003; Liu et al., GRL, 2006] as well as post-seismic 4-minute monoperiodic atmospheric resonances [Choosakul et al., JGR, 2009] have been observed after the large earthquakes. Since GPS Earth Observation Network System (GEONET) with more than 1200 GPS receiving points in Japan is a dense GPS network, seismogenic ionospheric disturbance is spatially observed. In particular, the seismogenic ionospheric disturbance caused by the M9.0 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku EQ (henceforth the Tohoku EQ) on 11 March 2011 was clearly observed. Approximately 9 minutes after the mainshock, acoustic waves which propagated radially emitted from the tsunami source area were observed through the TEC measurement (e. g., Liu et al. [JGR, 2011]). Moreover, there was a depression of TEC lasting for several tens of minutes after a huge earthquake, which was a large-scale phenomenon extending to a radius of a few hundred kilometers. This TEC depression may be

  8. The International Reference Ionosphere - Climatological Standard for the Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilitza, Dieter

    2006-01-01

    The International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) a joint project of URSI and COSPAR is the defacto standard for a climatological specification of ionospheric parameters. IRI is based on a wide range of ground and space data and has been steadily improved since its inception in 1969 with the ever-increasing volume of ionospheric data and with better mathematical descriptions of the observed global and temporal variation patterns. The IRI model has been validated with a large amount of data including data from the most recent ionospheric satellites (KOMPSAT, ROCSAT and TIMED) and data from global network of ionosondes. Several IRI teams are working on specific aspects of the IRI modeling effort including an improved representation of the topside ionosphere with a seamless transition to the plasmasphere, a new effort to represent the global variation of F2 peak parameters using the Neural Network (NN) technique, and the inclusion of several additional parameters in IRI, e.g., spread-F probability and ionospheric variability. Annual IRI workshops are the forum for discussions of these efforts and for all science activities related to IRI as well as applications of the IRI model in engineering and education. In this paper I will present a status report about the IRI effort with special emphasis on the presentations and results from the most recent IRI Workshops (Paris, 2004; Tortosa, 2005) and on the most important ongoing IRI activities. I will discuss the latest version of the IRI model, IRI-2006, highlighting the most recent changes and additions. Finally, the talk will review some of the applications of the IRI model with special emphasis on the use for radiowave propagation studies and communication purposes.

  9. Low-latitude ionospheric effects on SBAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenas, J.; Sardón, E.; Sainz, A.; Ochoa, B.; Magdaleno, S.

    2016-06-01

    Satellite-based augmentation systems (SBAS) provide augmentation to Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) users in three areas: (1) broadcasting accurate corrections to GNSS satellite ephemeris, (2) providing a real-time empirical ionospheric model in the service area, and (3) providing integrity information in the form of estimates of the confidence of the ephemeris corrections and ionospheric delays. Ionospheric effects on SBAS are twofold: (a) the input data used by the SBAS will be affected by ionospheric effects, and (b) the more perturbed the ionosphere is, the more difficult it will be to provide accurate and reliable ionospheric information to the users. The ionosphere at low latitudes presents larger variability and more intense phenomena than at midlatitudes. Therefore, SBAS providing service to low-latitude regions will be more affected than those at other latitudes. From the different low-latitude ionospheric effects, this paper will focus on those having the largest impact on SBAS, which are total electron content temporal and spatial gradients, ionospheric scintillations, and depletions. This paper will present the impact of these effects on EGNOS (European Global Navigation Overlay System), the European SBAS. Although EGNOS can be considered as a midlatitude SBAS, it has to provide coverage down to rather low latitudes, so sometimes low-latitude ionospheric effects are observed in the EGNOS data. It will be shown how EGNOS performs under nominal conditions and how its performance is degraded when low-latitude ionospheric phenomena occur. Real EGNOS data affected by low-latitude ionospheric phenomena will be used.

  10. Ionospheric refraction correction in radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Yan; Han, Wen-Jun

    1986-10-01

    Using Snell's law in polar coordinates, the ionospheric refraction effects on the declination and right ascension determination are discussed in this paper. A ray tracing method is also given. With the ionospheric data observed in Beijing, the correction of ionospheric refraction is estimated and some useful conclusions are drawn.

  11. 45 CFR 307.5 - Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2014-10-01 2012-10-01 true Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT SYSTEMS § 307.5 Mandatory computerized support... operational computerized support enforcement system, which meets Federal requirements under § 302.85(a)(1)...

  12. 45 CFR 307.5 - Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT SYSTEMS § 307.5 Mandatory computerized support... operational computerized support enforcement system, which meets Federal requirements under § 302.85(a)(1)...

  13. 45 CFR 307.5 - Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT SYSTEMS § 307.5 Mandatory computerized support... operational computerized support enforcement system, which meets Federal requirements under § 302.85(a)(1)...

  14. Ionospheres of the terrestrial planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunk, R. W.; Nagy, A. F.

    1980-11-01

    The theory and observations relating to the ionospheres of the terrestrial planets Venus, the earth, and Mars are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on comparing the basic differences and similarities between the planetary ionospheres. The review covers the plasma and electric-magnetic field environments that surround the planets, the theory leading to the creation and transport of ionization in the ionospheres, the relevant observations, and the most recent model calculations. The theory section includes a discussion of ambipolar diffusion in a partially ionized plasma, diffusion in a fully ionized plasma, supersonic plasma flow, photochemistry, and heating and cooling processes. The sections on observations and model calculations cover the neutral atmosphere composition, the ion composition, the electron density, and the electron, ion, and neutral temperatures.

  15. Ionospheres of the terrestrial planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schunk, R. W.; Nagy, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    The theory and observations relating to the ionospheres of the terrestrial planets Venus, the earth, and Mars are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on comparing the basic differences and similarities between the planetary ionospheres. The review covers the plasma and electric-magnetic field environments that surround the planets, the theory leading to the creation and transport of ionization in the ionospheres, the relevant observations, and the most recent model calculations. The theory section includes a discussion of ambipolar diffusion in a partially ionized plasma, diffusion in a fully ionized plasma, supersonic plasma flow, photochemistry, and heating and cooling processes. The sections on observations and model calculations cover the neutral atmosphere composition, the ion composition, the electron density, and the electron, ion, and neutral temperatures.

  16. Chemical releases in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, T. N.

    1979-01-01

    The study of the interaction between the atmosphere, ionosphere and magnetosphere is identified as a major task worthy of pursuit. The present review demonstrates the major contributions to this complex problem already made by active experiments involving the injection of chemicals and energetic electron beams into the atmosphere, ionosphere and magnetosphere. Through the use of chemical releases, it has been possible to investigate a number of quantities including high-altitude winds and electric fields, the detailed configurations of the geomagnetic field within the ionosphere and the magnetosphere, as well as the propagation of energetic particle beams and their interaction with natural neutral and ionized constituents of the high atmosphere. So far, virtually all of this effort has been accomplished using rockets. In the future, it is obvious that satellite platforms will play a greater role, both in making injections and in observing their effects.

  17. Metrology and ionospheric observation standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panshin, Evgeniy; Minligareev, Vladimir; Pronin, Anton

    Accuracy and ionospheric observation validity are urgent trends nowadays. WMO, URSI and national metrological and standardisation services bring forward requirements and descriptions of the ionospheric observation means. Researches in the sphere of metrological and standardisation observation moved to the next level in the Russian Federation. Fedorov Institute of Applied Geophysics (IAG) is in charge of ionospheric observation in the Russian Federation and the National Technical Committee, TC-101 , which was set up on the base of IAG- of the standardisation in the sphere. TC-101 can be the platform for initiation of the core international committee in the network of ISO The new type of the ionosounde “Parus-A” is engineered, which is up to the national requirements. “Parus-A” calibration and test were conducted by National metrological Institute (NMI) -D.I. Mendeleyev Institute for Metrology (VNIIM), signed CIMP MRA in 1991. VNIIM is a basic NMI in the sphere of Space weather (including ionospheric observations), the founder of which was celebrated chemist and metrologist Dmitriy I. Mendeleyev. Tests and calibration were carried out for the 1st time throughout 50-year-history of ionosonde exploitation in Russia. The following metrological characteristics were tested: -measurement range of radiofrequency time delay 0.5-10 ms; -time measurement inaccuracy of radio- frequency pulse ±12mcs; -frequency range of radio impulse 1-20 MHz ; -measurement inaccuracy of radio impulse carrier frequency± 5KHz. For example, the sound impulse simulator that was built-in in the ionosounde was used for measurement range of radiofrequency time delay testing. The number of standards on different levels is developed. - “Ionospheric observation guidance”; - “The Earth ionosphere. Terms and definitions”.

  18. HUMAN RELIABILITY ANALYSIS FOR COMPUTERIZED PROCEDURES

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald L. Boring; David I. Gertman; Katya Le Blanc

    2011-09-01

    This paper provides a characterization of human reliability analysis (HRA) issues for computerized procedures in nuclear power plant control rooms. It is beyond the scope of this paper to propose a new HRA approach or to recommend specific methods or refinements to those methods. Rather, this paper provides a review of HRA as applied to traditional paper-based procedures, followed by a discussion of what specific factors should additionally be considered in HRAs for computerized procedures. Performance shaping factors and failure modes unique to computerized procedures are highlighted. Since there is no definitive guide to HRA for paper-based procedures, this paper also serves to clarify the existing guidance on paper-based procedures before delving into the unique aspects of computerized procedures.

  19. Computerized cash management: the new frontier.

    PubMed

    Grimmelman, F J

    1979-01-01

    Because cash management in a hospital is more complicated today than it was ten years ago, the finanical manager needs a computerized cash management system to help assess cash resources and control cash demands. PMID:10242146

  20. Graphical Models and Computerized Adaptive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almond, Russell G.; Mislevy, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    Considers computerized adaptive testing from the perspective of graphical modeling (GM). GM provides methods for making inferences about multifaceted skills and knowledge and for extracting data from complex performances. Provides examples from language-proficiency assessment. (SLD)

  1. Computerized Bus Routing in San Francisco.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caswell, Peter J.; Jungherr, J. Anton

    1979-01-01

    A computerized routing and scheduling system for the San Francisco Public Schools includes the batch processing of bus route assignments and schedules for all schools and the online terminal processing of daily changes. (Author/MLF)

  2. The lower ionosphere of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitten, R. C.; Poppoff, I. G.

    1975-01-01

    Recently reported (Savich et al. 1975) results of dual frequency (0.94 and 3.75 GHz) radio occultation experiments indicated the existence of a nocturnal ionospheric layer between the Martian surface and 80 km altitude. It is suggested that the observed ionosphere is due to ionization by galactic cosmic rays. The observed nocturnal electron density profile is compared with that of the negative ion model assumed by Whitten et al. (1971). The profiles are similar below 50 km if the negative ion concentration is reduced by a factor of 10.

  3. Overview of midlatitude ionospheric storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kintner, Paul; Coster, Anthea; Fuller-Rowell, Tim; Mannucci, Anthony J.

    Solar flares and coronal mass ejections erupting from the roiling Sun can smash into the Earth's magnetosphere causing geomagnetic storms that penetrate deep into the atmosphere, which can short out satellites, upset radio communications, disrupt navigation, and even damage terrestrial electrical power grids. Though effects on other regions of the atmosphere have been analyzed, the mechanism by which geomagnetic storms influence the ionosphere's middle latitudes remains poorly understood.This brief report provides an overview of current knowledge in midlatitude ionospheric dynamics and disturbances, from the historic record to recent discoveries presented at a January AGU Chapman Conference.

  4. The Research on Computerized Adaptive Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Peng; Cong, Xiao

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, computerized adaptive testing is becoming the focus of the field of modern educational evaluation. In this form of the test, the response relationship between the examinee with the item by IRT modelling, then use the computer to estimates the ability level of the examinees and real-time select item. Computerized adaptive test development process were reviewed in the paper, and discuss the latest research results and pointed out that the current problems and future trends.

  5. Computerized Mental Status Testing in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Slaughter, J.R.; Hesse, B.W.; Turner, C.W.

    1988-01-01

    To assist in the evaluation of the hundreds of thousands of geriatric veterans that will inundate the VA health care system through the latter part of this century and the early part of the next, the authors are applying a computerized mental status screening instrument. The authors have computerized a cognitive and emotive screening instrument aimed primarily at the early detection of dementia and depression, specially adapted to elderly patients.

  6. A medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbance observed from the ground and from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymond, K. F.; Watts, C.; Coker, C.; Budzien, S. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Kassim, N.; Lazio, T. J.; Weiler, K.; Crane, P. C.; Ray, P. S.; Cohen, A.; Clarke, T.; Rickard, L. J.; Taylor, G. B.; Schinzel, F.; Pihlstrom, Y.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Close, S.; Colestock, P.; Myers, S.; Datta, A.

    2011-10-01

    We report ultraviolet optical observations from space of a Medium-Scale Traveling Ionospheric Disturbance (MSTID) made during the Combined Radio Interferometry and COSMIC Experiment in Tomography Campaign (CRICKET) held on September 15, 2007 at ˜8:30 UT. The experiment used a Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC also known as FORMOSAT-3) satellite in conjunction with the Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope, located near Socorro, NM, to study the ionosphere from the global scale down to the regional scale while the TIDs propagated through it. The COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 satellite measured the F region electron density both horizontally and with altitude while the VLA measured the directions and speeds of the TIDs. These observations provide new information on this poorly understood class of TID and demonstrate the possibility of studying MSTIDs using space-based optical instruments.

  7. Computerized Dental Injection Fear Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, L.J.; Leroux, B.G.; Ruff, P.A.; Coldwell, S.E.

    2013-01-01

    One in four adults reports a clinically significant fear of dental injections, leading many to avoid dental care. While systematic desensitization is the most common therapeutic method for treating specific phobias such as fear of dental injections, lack of access to trained therapists, as well as dentists’ lack of training and time in providing such a therapy, means that most fearful individuals are not able to receive the therapy needed to be able to receive necessary dental treatment. Computer Assisted Relaxation Learning (CARL) is a self-paced computerized treatment based on systematic desensitization for dental injection fear. This multicenter, block-randomized, dentist-blind, parallel-group study conducted in 8 sites in the United States compared CARL with an informational pamphlet in reducing fear of dental injections. Participants completing CARL reported significantly greater reduction in self-reported general and injection-specific dental anxiety measures compared with control individuals (p < .001). Twice as many CARL participants (35.3%) as controls (17.6%) opted to receive a dental injection after the intervention, although this was not statistically significant. CARL, therefore, led to significant changes in self-reported fear in study participants, but no significant differences in the proportion of participants having a dental injection (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00609648). PMID:23690352

  8. Computerized provider order entry systems.

    PubMed

    2001-01-01

    Computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems are designed to replace a hospital's paper-based ordering system. They allow users to electronically write the full range of orders, maintain an online medication administration record, and review changes made to an order by successive personnel. They also offer safety alerts that are triggered when an unsafe order (such as for a duplicate drug therapy) is entered, as well as clinical decision support to guide caregivers to less expensive alternatives or to choices that better fit established hospital protocols. CPOE systems can, when correctly configured, markedly increase efficiency and improve patient safety and patient care. However, facilities need to recognize that currently available CPOE systems require a tremendous amount of time and effort to be spent in customization before their safety and clinical support features can be effectively implemented. What's more, even after they've been customized, the systems may still allow certain unsafe orders to be entered. Thus, CPOE systems are not currently a quick or easy remedy for medical errors. ECRI's Evaluation of CPOE systems--conducted in collaboration with the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP)--discusses these and other related issues. It also examines and compares CPOE systems from three suppliers: Eclipsys Corp., IDX Systems Corp., and Siemens Medical Solutions Health Services Corp. Our testing focuses primarily on the systems' interfacing capabilities, patient safeguards, and ease of use. PMID:11696968

  9. Automatic ionospheric layers detection: Algorithms analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, María G.; Zuccheretti, Enrico; Cabrera, Miguel A.; Bianchi, Cesidio; Sciacca, Umberto; Baskaradas, James

    2016-03-01

    Vertical sounding is a widely used technique to obtain ionosphere measurements, such as an estimation of virtual height versus frequency scanning. It is performed by high frequency radar for geophysical applications called "ionospheric sounder" (or "ionosonde"). Radar detection depends mainly on targets characteristics. While several targets behavior and correspondent echo detection algorithms have been studied, a survey to address a suitable algorithm for ionospheric sounder has to be carried out. This paper is focused on automatic echo detection algorithms implemented in particular for an ionospheric sounder, target specific characteristics were studied as well. Adaptive threshold detection algorithms are proposed, compared to the current implemented algorithm, and tested using actual data obtained from the Advanced Ionospheric Sounder (AIS-INGV) at Rome Ionospheric Observatory. Different cases of study have been selected according typical ionospheric and detection conditions.

  10. Holes in the nightside ionosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brace, L. H.; Theis, R. F.; Mayr, H. G.; Curtis, S. A.; Luhmann, J. G.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of electron density and temperature by the Pioneer Venus orbiter electron temperature probe have been employed to examine the characteristics and morphology of ionospheric holes in the antisolar ionosphere of Venus. The holes apparently exist as north-south pairs which penetrate the ionosphere vertically down to altitudes as low as 160 km. Magnetic field measurements show that the holes are permeated by strong radial fields whose pressure is sufficient to balance the plasma pressure of the surrounding ionosphere. The electron temperature in the holes is substantially cooler than the surrounding ionosphere, except in the lowest density regions of the holes where the temperatures greatly exceed the ionosphere temperature. The low temperatures and the low densities of the holes are consistent with the strong radial magnetic fields which inhibit horizontal transport of plasma and thermal energy from the surrounding ionosphere. Plasma depletion processes associated with magnetotail electric fields may be important in the formation of the holes.

  11. Calibrating for Ionospheric Phase Delays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdoran, P. F.

    1985-01-01

    Technique determines ionospheric phase delay on real-time universally applicable basis in terms of electrons per meter squared by coherently modulating two L-band carrier frequencies received from two Global Positioning System satelites. Two pseudorandom number sequences cross-correlated to derive delay time.

  12. Magnetospheric-ionospheric Poynting flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thayer, Jeffrey P.

    1994-01-01

    Over the past three years of funding SRI, in collaboration with the University of Texas at Dallas, has been involved in determining the total electromagnetic energy flux into the upper atmosphere from DE-B electric and magnetic field measurements and modeling the electromagnetic energy flux at high latitudes, taking into account the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere system. This effort has been very successful in establishing the DC Poynting flux as a fundamental quantity in describing the coupling of electromagnetic energy between the magnetosphere and ionosphere. The DE-B satellite electric and magnetic field measurements were carefully scrutinized to provide, for the first time, a large data set of DC, field-aligned, Poynting flux measurement. Investigations describing the field-aligned Poynting flux observations from DE-B orbits under specific geomagnetic conditions and from many orbits were conducted to provide a statistical average of the Poynting flux distribution over the polar cap. The theoretical modeling effort has provided insight into the observations by formulating the connection between Poynting's theorem and the electromagnetic energy conversion processes that occur in the ionosphere. Modeling and evaluation of these processes has helped interpret the satellite observations of the DC Poynting flux and improved our understanding of the coupling between the ionosphere and magnetosphere.

  13. Observation and Modeling of Ionospheric Scintillation Associated with Irregularities in the Polar Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyadarshi, S.; Zhang, Q. H.; Ma, Y. Z.; Wang, Y.; Zanyang, X.

    2015-12-01

    It is well understood that Ionospheric scintillation is a consequence of random electron density fluctuations present in the ionosphere. They appear at all local time of the polar regions therefore, it is essential to understand their evolution and dynamics. Using Madrigal database and South Pole Scintillation Receiver data an empirical model of ionospheric scintillation has been proposed for South Pole. Model has been validated and compared with the observations. We have investigated some interesting scintillation patterns associated with polar patches and structured flux of precipitated electrons. Our results illustrate well the irregularity structures causing ionospheric scintillation at the polar ionosphere. Limitations of our modeling approach is discussed. Keywords: Ionospheric irregularities, polar patches, scintillation.

  14. Computerized Adaptive Personality Testing: A Review and Illustration With the MMPI-2 Computerized Adaptive Version.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbey, Johnathan D.; Ben-Porath, Yossef S.

    2007-01-01

    Computerized adaptive testing in personality assessment can improve efficiency by significantly reducing the number of items administered to answer an assessment question. Two approaches have been explored for adaptive testing in computerized personality assessment: item response theory and the countdown method. In this article, the authors…

  15. A Computerized Implementation of a Flexilevel Test and Its Comparison with a Bayesian Computerized Adaptive Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeAyala, R. J.; Koch, William R.

    A computerized flexilevel test was implemented and its ability estimates were compared with those of a Bayesian estimation based computerized adaptive test (CAT) as well as with known true ability estimates. Results showed that when the flexilevel test was terminated according to Lord's criterion, its ability estimates were highly and…

  16. The energetics of Titan's ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roboz, A.; Nagy, A. F.

    1994-02-01

    We have developed a comprehensive model to study the dynamics and energetics of the ionosphere of Titan. We solved the one-dimensional, time-dependent, coupled continuity and momentum equations for several ion species, together with single ion and electron energy equations, in order to calculate density, velocity, and temperature profiles. Calculations were carried out for several cases corresponding to different local times and configurations of the Titan-Saturn system. In our model the effects of horizontal magnetic fields were assumed to be negligible, except for their effect on reducing the electron and ion thermal conductivities and inhibiting vertical transport in the subram region. The ionospheric density peak was found to be at an altitude of about 1100 km, in accordance with earlier model calculations. The ionosphere is chemically controlled below an altitude of about 1500 km. Above this level, ion densities differ significantly from their chemical equilibrium values due to strong upward ion velocities. Heat is deposited in a narrow region around the ionospheric peak, resulting in temperature profiles increasing sharply and reaching nearly constant values of 800-1000 deg K for electrons and 300 deg K for ions in the topside, assuming conditions appropriate for the wake region. In the subram region magnetic correction factors make the electron heat conductivities negligible, resulting in electron temperatures increasing strongly with altitude and reaching values in the order of 5000 deg K at our upper boundary located at 2200 km. Ion chemical heating is found to play an important role in shaping the ion energy balance in Titan's ionosphere.

  17. The ionospheric outflow feedback loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T. E.; Fok, M.-C.; Garcia-Sage, K.

    2014-08-01

    Following a long period of observation and investigation beginning in the early 1970s, it has been firmly established that Earth's magnetosphere is defined as much by the geogenic plasma within it as by the geomagnetic field. This plasma is not confined to the ionosphere proper, defined as the region within a few density scale heights of the F-region plasma density peak. Rather, it fills the flux tubes on which it is created, and circulates throughout the magnetosphere in a pattern driven by solar wind plasma that becomes magnetically connected to the ionosphere by reconnection through the dayside magnetopause. Under certain solar wind conditions, plasma and field energy is stored in the magnetotail rather than being smoothly recirculated back to the dayside. Its release into the downstream solar wind is produced by magnetotail disconnection of stored plasma and fields both continuously and in the form of discrete plasmoids, with associated generation of energetic Earthward-moving bursty bulk flows and injection fronts. A new generation of global circulation models is showing us that outflowing ionospheric plasmas, especially O+, load the system in a different way than the resistive F-region load of currents dissipating energy in the plasma and atmospheric neutral gas. The extended ionospheric load is reactive to the primary dissipation, forming a time-delayed feedback loop within the system. That sets up or intensifies bursty transient behaviors that would be weaker or absent if the ionosphere did not “strike back” when stimulated. Understanding this response appears to be a necessary, if not sufficient, condition for us to gain accurate predictive capability for space weather. However, full predictive understanding of outflow and incorporation into global simulations requires a clear observational and theoretical identification of the causal mechanisms of the outflows. This remains elusive and requires a dedicated mission effort.

  18. A new algorithm of ionospheric tomography——two-step solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Debao

    The inherent non-ideal geometry of ground-based global navigation satellite system (GNSS) observation stations distribution results in limited-angle tomographic inverse problems that are ill-posed. To cope with the above problem, a new tomographic algorithm, which is called two-step solution (TSS), is presented in this paper. In the new method, the electron density can be estimated by using two steps: 1) Phillips smoothing method (PSM) is first used to resolve the ill-posed problem in ionospheric tomography system; 2) The "coarse" solution of PSM is then input as the initial value of multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) and improved by iterative mode. Numerical simulation experiment demonstrates that the two-step solution is feasible to GNSS-based ionospheric tomography and superior to PSM or MART alone.

  19. Results From YOUTHSAT - Indian experiment in earths thermosphere-ionosphere region.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarun Kumar, Pant

    It is known that the characterization and modeling of the ionosphere/thermosphere necessitates a comprehensive understanding of the various processes prevailing therein. India’s first, indigenous and dedicated aeronomy satellite 'YOUTHSAT' carrying two Indian payloads - RaBIT (Radio Beacon for Ionospheric Tomography), and LiVHySI (Limb Viewing Hyper Spectral Imager) and one Russian payload SOLRAD, was conceived primarily to address to this aspect and launched on April 20, 2011 in an 818 Km polar orbit from SHAR on ISRO launch vehicle PSLV. The payloads RaBIT and LiVHySI were designed specifically to observe the ionised and neutral components of the upper atmosphere respectively. YOUTHSAT is a small satellite quiet advanced in its class having all the functionalities which are normally associated with a bigger satellite. The rising phase of the 23rd solar cycle was considered to be the best window for various observations from onboard YOUTHSAT. As an Indo Russian endeavour, it was launched with an objective of investigating the terrestrial upper atmosphere vis-a-vis the activity on the sun. RaBIT, an ISRO venture, is a radio beacon emitting coherent radio signal at 150 and 400 MHz frequencies. These are received using a chain of five receivers deployed along the ~76oE meridian at Trivandrum, Bangalore, Hyderabad, Bhopal and Delhi. The receivers estimate the Total Electron Content (TEC) of the ionosphere through the relative phase change of the received radio signals. The TECs thus estimated near simultaneously, are used to generate a tomogram, which gives an Altitude-Latitude distribution of the ionospheric electron density. For YOUTHSAT configuration, the tomogram covers the ionosphere from a few degrees (5-6o) south of Trivandrum to about 3-4o north of Delhi depending upon the satellite elevation. The RaBIT tomography network is by far the longest network existing anywhere in the world, and is unique therefore. Through RaBIT, a unique dataset leading to

  20. Computerized microtomography for new applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ice, G.; Thompson, A.

    1996-09-01

    The advent of high brilliance synchrotron sources has stimulated the development of advanced x-ray microtomography. However, materials research problems challenge existing tomographic techniques. High spatial resolution is required to identify and characterize microstructure in real materials. Good elemental sensitivity is required to study the effects of microalloying. Three-dimensional crystal texture, strain and phase information is required to understand advanced materials. Materials samples can include a wide range of elements, can come in unfavorable geometries, and sometimes require dynamic measurements of their three-dimensional structure. One challenge for x-ray microtomography is the measurement of low concentrations with good spatial resolution and high elemental sensitivity. Another challenge to standard x-ray microtomography is the study of elemental distributions in planar structures where elemental sensitivity is required in one or two dimensions, but the spatial sensitivity in all three dimensions is not required. For a large class of materials, crystalline structure, strain and texture are critical to the materials properties. Recent work has now demonstrated the possibility of extending X-ray microdiffraction to the study of three dimensional crystallographic distributions. Efforts are now underway at the APS, ALS, SSRL and NSLS to further develop x-ray microdiffraction and x-ray microdiffraction tomography. The measurement of strain and texture in three dimensions will have important applications to the study of high J{sub c} high {Tc} superconductors, the study of second phase distributions and texture in composite materials, and the study of crack and void evolution in structural and electronic materials. Another frontier for x-ray tomography is the development of dynamic, real-time measurements.

  1. Preface: International Reference Ionosphere - Progress in Ionospheric Modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilitza Dieter; Reinisch, Bodo

    2010-01-01

    The international reference ionosphere (lRI) is the internationally recommended empirical model for the specification of ionospheric parameters supported by the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) and the International Union of Radio Science (URSI) and recognized by the International Standardization Organization (ISO). IRI is being continually improved by a team of international experts as new data become available and better models are being developed. This issue chronicles the latest phase of model updates as reported during two IRI-related meetings. The first was a special session during the Scientific Assembly of the Committee of Space Research (COSPAR) in Montreal, Canada in July 2008 and the second was an IRI Task Force Activity at the US Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs in May 2009. This work led to several improvements and additions of the model which will be included in the next version, IRI-201O. The issue is divided into three sections focusing on the improvements made in the topside ionosphere, the F-peak, and the lower ionosphere, respectively. This issue would not have been possible without the reviewing efforts of many individuals. Each paper was reviewed by two referees. We thankfully acknowledge the contribution to this issue made by the following reviewers: Jacob Adeniyi, David Altadill, Eduardo Araujo, Feza Arikan, Dieter Bilitza, Jilijana Cander, Bela Fejer, Tamara Gulyaeva, Manuel Hermindez-Pajares, Ivan Kutiev, John MacDougal, Leo McNamara, Bruno Nava, Olivier Obrou, Elijah Oyeyemi, Vadym Paznukhov, Bodo Reinisch, John Retterer, Phil Richards, Gary Sales, J.H. Sastri, Ludger Scherliess, Iwona Stanislavska, Stamir Stankov, Shin-Yi Su, Manlian Zhang, Y ongliang Zhang, and Irina Zakharenkova. We are grateful to Peggy Ann Shea for her final review and guidance as the editor-in-chief for special issues of Advances in Space Research. We thank the authors for their timely submission and their quick response to the reviewer comments and humbly

  2. Interaction of Titan's ionosphere with Saturn's magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Coates, Andrew J

    2009-02-28

    Titan is the only Moon in the Solar System with a significant permanent atmosphere. Within this nitrogen-methane atmosphere, an ionosphere forms. Titan has no significant magnetic dipole moment, and is usually located inside Saturn's magnetosphere. Atmospheric particles are ionized both by sunlight and by particles from Saturn's magnetosphere, mainly electrons, which reach the top of the atmosphere. So far, the Cassini spacecraft has made over 45 close flybys of Titan, allowing measurements in the ionosphere and the surrounding magnetosphere under different conditions. Here we review how Titan's ionosphere and Saturn's magnetosphere interact, using measurements from Cassini low-energy particle detectors. In particular, we discuss ionization processes and ionospheric photoelectrons, including their effect on ion escape from the ionosphere. We also discuss one of the unexpected discoveries in Titan's ionosphere, the existence of extremely heavy negative ions up to 10000amu at 950km altitude. PMID:19073464

  3. Remote Sensing of the Ionosphere and Plasmasphere from Space Using Radiowaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mannucci, Anthony J.

    2008-01-01

    Topics include the scientific context, trans-ionospheric and sounding, small-scale structure, plasmasphere, fast and slow tomography, and pseudo-imaging. Individual slides focus on where geospace science stands today, variability in inner magnetosphere electric fields, Appleton-Hartree formula, phase and range ionospheric observables, examples of leveling, large ionization changes during storms, new mid-latitude phenomena, ionospheric sounding, COSMIC CERTO/Tri-band beacon, LEO-ground radio tomography, irregularity measurements, COSMIC, critical sensor data from COSMIC GPS limb sounding, occultation geometry, comparison of calibrated slant TEC measurements for 26 June 2006, historic examples of Abel electron density profiles, comparison of UCAR and JPL Able profiles of 26 June 2006, validating UCAR and JPL Abel profiles using Arecibo ISR measurements for 26 June 2006, E-region from GPS/MET 1995, Abel versus gradient assisted retrieval, 3000 profiles/day, plasmasphere, JASON TEC above satellite, GPS equatorial plasmasphere measurements, April 2002 geomagnetic storm, and space-based GPS tomography.

  4. Ionospheric Change and Solar EUV Irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojka, J. J.; David, M.; Jensen, J. B.; Schunk, R. W.

    2011-12-01

    The ionosphere has been quantitatively monitored for the past six solar cycles. The past few years of observations are showing trends that differ from the prior cycles! Our good statistical relationships between the solar radio flux index at 10.7 cm, the solar EUV Irradiance, and the ionospheric F-layer peak density are showing indications of divergence! Present day discussion of the Sun-Earth entering a Dalton Minimum would suggest change is occurring in the Sun, as the driver, followed by the Earth, as the receptor. The dayside ionosphere is driven by the solar EUV Irradiance. But different components of this spectrum affect the ionospheric layers differently. For a first time the continuous high cadence EUV spectra from the SDO EVE instrument enable ionospheric scientists the opportunity to evaluate solar EUV variability as a driver of ionospheric variability. A definitive understanding of which spectral components are responsible for the E- and F-layers of the ionosphere will enable assessments of how over 50 years of ionospheric observations, the solar EUV Irradiance has changed. If indeed the evidence suggesting the Sun-Earth system is entering a Dalton Minimum periods is correct, then the comprehensive EVE solar EUV Irradiance data base combined with the ongoing ionospheric data bases will provide a most fortuitous fiduciary reference baseline for Sun-Earth dependencies. Using the EVE EUV Irradiances, a physics based ionospheric model (TDIM), and 50 plus years of ionospheric observation from Wallops Island (Virginia) the above Sun-Earth ionospheric relationship will be reported on.

  5. Far ultraviolet nighttime ionospheric photometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Liping; Peng, Ruyi; Shi, Entao; Peng, Jilong; Wang, Tianfang; Jiang, Fang; Jia, Nan; Li, Xiaoyin; Wang, Yongmei

    2015-01-01

    Far Ultraviolet Nighttime Ionopsheric Photometer (FNIP) is a newly-designed instrument for low earth orbit missions, observing the earth night airglow nadir at OI 135.6 nm emission produced by ionospheric O++e recombination and receiving the horizontal information on nighttime ionosphere with a spatial resolution of about 1.6∘×3.8∘. This simple, highly robust instrument excludes OI 130.4 nm emission and Herzberg oxygen bands with lower power and approximately achieves a sensitivity of about 400 counts/s/Rayleigh at 135.6 nm with stray light less than 2 %. Some tests of the instrument have been conducted and the results will be discussed in the end.

  6. Investigation of traveling ionospheric disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossi, M.; Estes, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    Maximum entropy power spectra of the ionospheric electron density were constructed to enable PINY to compare them with the power independently obtained by PINY with in situ measurements of ionospheric electron density and neutral species performed with instrumentation carried by the Atmospheric Explorer (AE) satellite. This comparison corroborated evidence on the geophysical reality of the alleged electron density irregularities detected by the ASTP dual frequency Doppler link. Roughly half of the localized wave structures which are confined to dimensions of 1800 km or less (as seen by an orbiting Doppler baseline) were found to be associated with the larger crest of the geomagnetic anomaly in the Southern (winter) Hemisphere in the morning. The observed nighttime structures are also associated with local peaks in the electron density.

  7. HAARP-Induced Ionospheric Ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Milikh, Gennady; Vartanyan, Aram

    2011-01-04

    It is well known that strong electron heating by a powerful HF-facility can lead to the formation of electron and ion density perturbations that stretch along the magnetic field line. Those density perturbations can serve as ducts for ELF waves, both of natural and artificial origin. This paper presents observations of the plasma density perturbations caused by the HF-heating of the ionosphere by the HAARP facility. The low orbit satellite DEMETER was used as a diagnostic tool to measure the electron and ion temperature and density along the satellite orbit overflying close to the magnetic zenith of the HF-heater. Those observations will be then checked against the theoretical model of duct formation due to HF-heating of the ionosphere. The model is based on the modified SAMI2 code, and is validated by comparison with well documented experiments.

  8. A computerized brain atlas: construction, anatomical content, and some applications.

    PubMed

    Greitz, T; Bohm, C; Holte, S; Eriksson, L

    1991-01-01

    An adjustable computerized atlas of the human brain has been developed, which can be adapted to fit individual anatomy. It is primarily intended for positron emission tomography (PET) but may also be used for single photon emission CT, transmission CT, magnetic resonance imaging, and neuroimaging-based procedures, such as stereotactic surgery and radiotherapy. The atlas is based on anatomical information obtained from brains fixed in situ soon after death. All structures have been drawn in on digitized photos of slices from one cryosectioned brain. The definition and classification of the anatomical structures and divisions are in agreement with the standard textbooks of anatomy, and the nomenclature is that of the Nomina Anatomica of 1965. The boundaries of the cortical cytoarchitectonic areas (Brodmann areas) have been determined using information from several sources, since three-dimensional literature data on their distribution are incomplete, scarce, and partly contradictory. However, no analysis of the cytoarchitectonics of the atlas brain itself has been undertaken. At present the data base contains three-dimensional representations of the brain surface, the ventricular system, the cortical gyri and sulci, as well as the Brodmann cytoarchitectonic areas. The major basal ganglia, the brain stem nuclei, the lobuli of the vermis, and the cerebellar hemispheres are also included. The computerized atlas can be used to improve the quantification and evaluation of PET data in several ways. For instance, it can serve as a guide in selecting regions of interest. It may also facilitate comparisons of data from different individuals or groups of individuals, by applying the inverse atlas transformation to PET data volume, thus relating the PET information to the anatomy of the reference atlas rather than to the patient's anatomy. Reformatted PET data from individuals can thus be averaged, and averages from different categories or different functional states of patients

  9. Ionospheric very low frequency transmitter

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2015-02-15

    The theme of this paper is to establish a reliable ionospheric very low frequency (VLF) transmitter, which is also broad band. Two approaches are studied that generate VLF waves in the ionosphere. The first, classic approach employs a ground-based HF heater to directly modulate the high latitude ionospheric, or auroral electrojet. In the classic approach, the intensity-modulated HF heater induces an alternating current in the electrojet, which serves as a virtual antenna to transmit VLF waves. The spatial and temporal variations of the electrojet impact the reliability of the classic approach. The second, beat-wave approach also employs a ground-based HF heater; however, in this approach, the heater operates in a continuous wave mode at two HF frequencies separated by the desired VLF frequency. Theories for both approaches are formulated, calculations performed with numerical model simulations, and the calculations are compared to experimental results. Theory for the classic approach shows that an HF heater wave, intensity-modulated at VLF, modulates the electron temperature dependent electrical conductivity of the ionospheric electrojet, which, in turn, induces an ac electrojet current. Thus, the electrojet becomes a virtual VLF antenna. The numerical results show that the radiation intensity of the modulated electrojet decreases with an increase in VLF radiation frequency. Theory for the beat wave approach shows that the VLF radiation intensity depends upon the HF heater intensity rather than the electrojet strength, and yet this approach can also modulate the electrojet when present. HF heater experiments were conducted for both the intensity modulated and beat wave approaches. VLF radiations were generated and the experimental results confirm the numerical simulations. Theory and experimental results both show that in the absence of the electrojet, VLF radiation from the F-region is generated via the beat wave approach. Additionally, the beat wave approach

  10. Lithosphere - Atmosphere - Ionosphere Circuit Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kereselidze, Z.; Kachakhidze, N.; Kachakhidze, M.

    2012-04-01

    There are offered possibilities of original LAI circuit model. The problem concerns of existence of self-generated electromagnetic oscillations in the segment of LAI system, which are results of tectonic stress developing in the focus area of expected earthquake. By this model the main (lowest) frequency of these electromagnetic oscillations frequency spectrum is expressed analytically by following formula: ω = β c l where β(ω) is the coefficient depended on the frequency and geological characteristics of the medium and approximate to one, c-is the speed of light, and l- the length of the fault in the focus of the expected earthquake. On the base of relevant diagnosis of experimental data, the model gives us possibility to discuss the problem about location, time of occurrence and intensity of an expected earthquake with certain accuracy. In addition to it, considered model does not block the fall-unstable model of earthquake preparing and electromagnetic phenomena accompanied earthquake preparing process. On the contrary, the imagination of physical picture may be simplified in the separate stage of earthquakes preparing. Namely, it is possible to reliably separate series of foreshocks and aftershocks. By this point of view, the certain optimism about using of EM emission as earthquake precursor of full value may be expressed. The base of such optimism is developing of various phenomena connected to VLF emission many times fixed in the surroundings of epicentral area and cosmic space (changing of intensity of electro-telluric current, perturbations of geomagnetic field in forms of irregular pulsations or regular short-period pulsations, perturbations of atmospheric electric field, perturbations of ionosphere critical frequency and TEC, variations of height of lower ionosphere, parameters of ionospheric medium: changing of specific dielectric conductivity and spectrum of MGD waves in it, atmospheric-ionospheric discharging and etc.).

  11. Ionospheric redistribution during geomagnetic storms

    PubMed Central

    Immel, T J; Mannucci, A J

    2013-01-01

    [1]The abundance of plasma in the daytime ionosphere is often seen to grow greatly during geomagnetic storms. Recent reports suggest that the magnitude of the plasma density enhancement depends on the UT of storm onset. This possibility is investigated over a 7year period using global maps of ionospheric total electron content (TEC) produced at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The analysis confirms that the American sector exhibits, on average, larger storm time enhancement in ionospheric plasma content, up to 50% in the afternoon middle-latitude region and 30% in the vicinity of the high-latitude auroral cusp, with largest effect in the Southern Hemisphere. We investigate whether this effect is related to the magnitude of the causative magnetic storms. Using the same advanced Dst index employed to sort the TEC maps into quiet and active (Dst<−100 nT) sets, we find variation in storm strength that corresponds closely to the TEC variation but follows it by 3–6h. For this and other reasons detailed in this report, we conclude that the UT-dependent peak in storm time TEC is likely not related to the magnitude of external storm time forcing but more likely attributable to phenomena such as the low magnetic field in the South American region. The large Dst variation suggests a possible system-level effect of the observed variation in ionospheric storm response on the measured strength of the terrestrial ring current, possibly connected through UT-dependent modulation of ion outflow. PMID:26167429

  12. Evaluation of manual and computerized methods for the determination of axial vertebral rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrtovec, Tomaž; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2010-03-01

    Axial vertebral rotation is among the most important parameters for the evaluation of spinal deformities, and several manual and computerized methods have been proposed for its measurement. Routine manual measurement of axial vertebral rotation from three-dimensional (3D) images is error-prone due to the limitations of the observers, different properties of imaging techniques, variable characteristics of the observed anatomy, and difficulties in image navigation and representation. Computerized methods do not suffer from these limitations and may yield accurate results, however, they also require manual identification of multiple anatomical landmarks or neglect the sagittal and coronal inclinations of vertebrae. The variability of manual and computerized methods for measuring axial vertebral rotation in 3D images has not been thoroughly investigated yet. In this study we evaluated, compared and analyzed four different manual and a computerized method for measuring axial vertebral rotation. Using each method, three observers independently performed two series of manual measurements on 56 normal and scoliotic vertebrae in images, acquired by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR), which allowed the estimation of intra-observer, inter-observer and inter-method variability. The relatively low intra-observer standard deviation (0.8, 0.7 and 1.3 degrees for each observer), inter-observer standard deviation (1.3, 2.0 and 1.9 degrees for each observer pair), and inter-method standard deviation (best: 1.9 degrees) of the computerized method indicate that it is feasible for the determination of axial vertebral rotation and may represent an efficient alternative to manual methods in terms of repeatability, reliability and user effort.

  13. Sudden ionospheric disturbances in solar cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothmer, Volker; Bernert, Barbara

    2014-05-01

    Sudden ionospheric disturbances in solar cycle 24 Within the framework of the UN International Space Weather Initiative, and building upon the achievements of the International Heliophysical Year, the German project SIMONE (Sun Ionosphere MOnitoring NEtwork) operates several SID monitors provided by the University of Stanford. Here we present an overview of sudden ionospheric disturbances recorded since 2006 at the high school Gymnasium Walsrode until to date. The continous measurements allow a detailed comparison of locally measured SIDs with the general trend of solar activity during the current solar maximum. We further show that the measurements reveal specific information on the variable response of the dayside ionosphere to solar flares.

  14. Response of Ionosphere to the Tropospheric disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, A. K.; Dube, A.; Singh, R.; Cohen, M.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present work is to find out response of the ionosphere to the various cases of tropical cyclones. The main process involved is suggested through Atmospheric Gravity waves (AGWs) originating from strong convective systems, propagating upward upto the ionospheric heights and perturbing ionospheric parameters (Bishop et al., 2006). We have used ground and satellite data to extract cyclone induced perturbations at different ionospheric heights along with the various parameters of AGWs during cyclones and associated thunderstorm. The initial results suggest that there is increase in total electron content of the ionosphere with wave like signatures in ionosphere. The satellite observation in optical band shows presence of concentric gravity wave pattern associated with troposphere disturbances with horizontal wavelength of ~50-200km and periods ranging from hours to days. The ground based Very Low Frequency (VLF) measurement shows fluctuations in VLF navigational transmitter signal passing over the region of disturbance. The lightning data from GLD360 lightning network shows intense activity associated with cyclones and increase in lightning peak current and energy during main phase of cyclones which seems to be sufficient enough to derive ionospheric disturbances in the ionosphere. This multi-instrument analysis provide detail information of the three dimensional structure of cyclone and their effect at different altitudes of the ionosphere in the Indian subcontinent.

  15. Ionospheric research for space weather service support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanislawska, Iwona; Gulyaeva, Tamara; Dziak-Jankowska, Beata

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge of the behavior of the ionosphere is very important for space weather services. A wide variety of ground based and satellite existing and future systems (communications, radar, surveillance, intelligence gathering, satellite operation, etc) is affected by the ionosphere. There are the needs for reliable and efficient support for such systems against natural hazard and minimalization of the risk failure. The joint research Project on the 'Ionospheric Weather' of IZMIRAN and SRC PAS is aimed to provide on-line the ionospheric parameters characterizing the space weather in the ionosphere. It is devoted to science, techniques and to more application oriented areas of ionospheric investigation in order to support space weather services. The studies based on data mining philosophy increasing the knowledge of ionospheric physical properties, modelling capabilities and gain applications of various procedures in ionospheric monitoring and forecasting were concerned. In the framework of the joint Project the novel techniques for data analysis, the original system of the ionospheric disturbance indices and their implementation for the ionosphere and the ionospheric radio wave propagation are developed since 1997. Data of ionosonde measurements and results of their forecasting for the ionospheric observatories network, the regional maps and global ionospheric maps of total electron content from the navigational satellite system (GNSS) observations, the global maps of the F2 layer peak parameters (foF2, hmF2) and W-index of the ionospheric variability are provided at the web pages of SRC PAS and IZMIRAN. The data processing systems include analysis and forecast of geomagnetic indices ap and kp and new eta index applied for the ionosphere forecasting. For the first time in the world the new products of the W-index maps analysis are provided in Catalogues of the ionospheric storms and sub-storms and their association with the global geomagnetic Dst storms is

  16. Solar Rotational Effects on the Mars Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talaat, E. R.; Paxton, L.; Zhu, X.; Yee, J.; Smith, D. C.

    2006-05-01

    In this paper, using opportune periods during the five years of MGS radio occultation observations of the Martian ionosphere, we examine the short-term variability in the ionospheric profile peak densities and peak heights. During solar maximum, strong solar rotational signatures were observed. On Mars, the morphology of the ionosphere is thought to be controlled by photochemical processes (coupled with the neutral atmosphere). In this paper, we will present the observed magnitude of the variabilities the phasing with solar forcing, and quantify the source mechanisms with a 1-D ionospheric model.

  17. Plasma temperatures in Saturn's ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Luke; Galand, Marina; Mueller-Wodarg, Ingo; Yelle, Roger; Mendillo, Michael

    2008-10-01

    We have calculated self-consistent electron and ion temperatures in Saturn's ionosphere using a series of coupled fluid and kinetic models developed to help interpret Cassini observations and to examine the energy budget of Saturn's upper atmosphere. Electron temperatures in the midlatitude topside ionosphere during solar maximum are calculated to range between 500 and 560 K during the Saturn day, approximately 80-140 K above the neutral temperature. Ion temperatures, calculated for only the major ions H+ and H3+, are nearly equal to the neutral temperature at altitudes near and below the height of peak electron density, while they can reach 500 K during the day at the topside. Plasma scale heights of the dusk electron density profile from radio occultation measurements of the Voyager 2 flyby of Saturn have been used to estimate plasma temperature as a comparison. Such an estimate agrees well with the temperatures calculated here, although there is a topside enhancement in electron density that remains unexplained by ionospheric calculations that include photochemistry and plasma diffusion. Finally, parameterizations of the heating rate from photoelectrons and secondary electrons to thermal, ambient electrons have been developed. They may apply for other conditions at Saturn and possibly at other giant planets and exoplanets as well.

  18. TRIO (Triplet Ionospheric Observatory) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D.; Seon, J.; Jin, H.; Kim, K.; Lee, J.; Jang, M.; Pak, S.; Kim, K.; Lin, R. P.; Parks, G. K.; Halekas, J. S.; Larson, D. E.; Eastwood, J. P.; Roelof, E. C.; Horbury, T. S.

    2009-12-01

    Triplets of identical cubesats will be built to carry out the following scientific objectives: i) multi-observations of ionospheric ENA (Energetic Neutral Atom) imaging, ii) ionospheric signature of suprathermal electrons and ions associated with auroral acceleration as well as electron microbursts, and iii) complementary measurements of magnetic fields for particle data. Each satellite, a cubesat for ion, neutral, electron, and magnetic fields (CINEMA), is equipped with a suprathermal electron, ion, neutral (STEIN) instrument and a 3-axis magnetometer of magnetoresistive sensors. TRIO is developed by three institutes: i) two CINEMA by Kyung Hee University (KHU) under the WCU program, ii) one CINEMA by UC Berkeley under the NSF support, and iii) three magnetometers by Imperial College, respectively. Multi-spacecraft observations in the STEIN instruments will provide i) stereo ENA imaging with a wide angle in local times, which are sensitive to the evolution of ring current phase space distributions, ii) suprathermal electron measurements with narrow spacings, which reveal the differential signature of accelerated electrons driven by Alfven waves and/or double layer formation in the ionosphere between the acceleration region and the aurora, and iii) suprathermal ion precipitation when the storm-time ring current appears. In addition, multi-spacecraft magnetic field measurements in low earth orbits will allow the tracking of the phase fronts of ULF waves, FTEs, and quasi-periodic reconnection events between ground-based magnetometer data and upstream satellite data.

  19. Mechanisms of Ionospheric Mass Escape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2010-01-01

    The dependence of ionospheric O+ escape flux on electromagnetic energy flux and electron precipitation into the ionosphere is derived for a hypothetical ambipolar pick-up process, powered the relative motion of plasmas and neutral upper atmosphere, and by electron precipitation, at heights where the ions are magnetized but influenced by photo-ionization, collisions with gas atoms, ambipolar and centrifugal acceleration. Ion pick-up by the convection electric field produces "ring-beam" or toroidal velocity distributions, as inferred from direct plasma measurements, from observations of the associated waves, and from the spectra of incoherent radar echoes. Ring-beams are unstable to plasma wave growth, resulting in rapid relaxation via transverse velocity diffusion, into transversely accelerated ion populations. Ion escape is substantially facilitated by the ambipolar potential, but is only weakly affected by centrifugal acceleration. If, as cited simulations suggest, ion ring beams relax into non-thermal velocity distributions with characteristic speed equal to the local ion-neutral flow speed, a generalized "Jeans escape" calculation shows that the escape flux of ionospheric O+ increases with Poynting flux and with precipitating electron density in rough agreement with observations.

  20. The Construction and Uses of CATIA, a Computerized Mathematics Testbank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Charles R.; Marosz, Wanda A.

    1977-01-01

    Described is the construction of a computerized test bank to generate and score tests in college algebra, trigonometry, and intermediate algebra; including a discussion of uses, advantages and disadvantages of computerized testing. (JLH)

  1. Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, Isabel; Geleijns, Jacob

    After its clinical introduction in 1973, computed tomography developed from an x-ray modality for axial imaging in neuroradiology into a versatile three dimensional imaging modality for a wide range of applications in for example oncology, vascular radiology, cardiology, traumatology and even in interventional radiology. Computed tomography is applied for diagnosis, follow-up studies and screening of healthy subpopulations with specific risk factors. This chapter provides a general introduction in computed tomography, covering a short history of computed tomography, technology, image quality, dosimetry, room shielding, quality control and quality criteria.

  2. Detection of ionospheric Alfvén resonator signatures in the equatorial ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simões, Fernando; Klenzing, Jeffrey; Ivanov, Stoyan; Pfaff, Robert; Freudenreich, Henry; Bilitza, Dieter; Rowland, Douglas; Bromund, Kenneth; Liebrecht, Maria Carmen; Martin, Steven; Schuck, Peter; Uribe, Paulo; Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro

    2012-11-01

    The ionosphere response resulting from minimum solar activity during cycle 23/24 was unusual and offered unique opportunities for investigating space weather in the near-Earth environment. We report ultra low frequency electric field signatures related to the ionospheric Alfvén resonator detected by the Communications/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite in the equatorial region. These signatures are used to constrain ionospheric empirical models and offer a new approach for monitoring ionosphere dynamics and space weather phenomena, namely aeronomy processes, Alfvén wave propagation, and troposphere-ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling mechanisms.

  3. A Computerized Adaptive Edition of the Differential Aptitude Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, James R.

    An overview of the development of a computerized version of the Differential Aptitude Tests (DAT) is presented. It describes the previously existing printed version of the DAT, design of the computerized adaptive edition, calibration of the test items for use in the computerized version, and two field studies that compared the Adaptive and…

  4. 39 CFR 501.15 - Computerized Meter Resetting System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Computerized Meter Resetting System. 501.15... AND DISTRIBUTE POSTAGE EVIDENCING SYSTEMS § 501.15 Computerized Meter Resetting System. (a) Description. The Computerized Meter Resetting System (CMRS) permits customers to reset their postage meters...

  5. 39 CFR 501.15 - Computerized Meter Resetting System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Computerized Meter Resetting System. 501.15... AND DISTRIBUTE POSTAGE EVIDENCING SYSTEMS § 501.15 Computerized Meter Resetting System. (a) Description. The Computerized Meter Resetting System (CMRS) permits customers to reset their postage meters...

  6. 39 CFR 501.15 - Computerized Meter Resetting System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Computerized Meter Resetting System. 501.15... AND DISTRIBUTE POSTAGE EVIDENCING SYSTEMS § 501.15 Computerized Meter Resetting System. (a) Description. The Computerized Meter Resetting System (CMRS) permits customers to reset their postage meters...

  7. 39 CFR 501.15 - Computerized Meter Resetting System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Computerized Meter Resetting System. 501.15... AND DISTRIBUTE POSTAGE EVIDENCING SYSTEMS § 501.15 Computerized Meter Resetting System. (a) Description. The Computerized Meter Resetting System (CMRS) permits customers to reset their postage meters...

  8. NATIONAL ARCHIVE OF COMPUTERIZED DATA ON AGING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Archive of Computerized Data on Aging (NACDA), located within ICPSR, is funded by the National Institute on Aging. NACDA's mission is to advance research on aging by helping researchers to profit from the under-exploited potential of a broad range of datasets. NACDA ...

  9. The Computerized Adaptive Testing System Development Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, James R.; Sympson, J. B.

    The Computerized Adaptive Testing (CAT) project is a joint Armed Services coordinated effort to develop and evaluate a system for automated, adaptive administration of the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB). The CAT is a system for administering personnel tests that differs from conventional test administration in two major…

  10. 36 CFR 1120.52 - Computerized records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... additional programming of the computer, thus producing information not previously in being, is not required... from the computer which permits copying the printout, the material will be made available at the per... information from computerized records frequently involves a minimum computer time cost of approximately...

  11. MMI Preparatory School Computerized Model Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everhart, Nancy

    This booklet provides a detailed description of the computerization of the library of MMI Preparatory School, a private, non-sectarian college preparatory school in Pennsylvania for students in grades 7 through 12. Each of the following functions is investigated: (1) catalog card production; (2) online reference services; (3) circulation; (4) word…

  12. Implementation of a Computerized Maintenance Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Yong-Hong; Askari, Bruce

    1994-01-01

    A primer Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) has been established for NASA Ames pressure component certification program. The CMMS takes full advantage of the latest computer technology and SQL relational database to perform periodic services for vital pressure components. The Ames certification program is briefly described and the aspects of the CMMS implementation are discussed as they are related to the certification objectives.

  13. Individual Differences in Computerized Adaptive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, JinGyu

    Research on the major computerized adaptive testing (CAT) strategies is reviewed, and some findings are reported that examine effects of examinee demographic and psychological characteristics on CAT strategies. In fixed branching strategies, all examinees respond to a common routing test, the score of which is used to assign examinees to a…

  14. Computerized Symbol Processing for Handicapped Persons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osguthorpe, Russell T.; And Others

    The paper describes the development of a computerized symbol processing system which allows nonspeaking severely handicapped persons to create communication electronically. Two pilot studies investigated the use of Rebus and Bliss Symbols with either an Apple Graphics Tablet or the Power Pad, a peripheral which allowed users to activate the…

  15. Issues in Computerized Communication: Components and Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, Gregory Reed

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the growth of computerized communications. Attributes this growth to rapid growth of the computer industry, price reductions on computer equipment, and university installation of departmental computers. Describes the Internet, USENET, and electronic mail. Concludes that individuals must be trained to use, understand, and participate in…

  16. Item Selection in Computerized Classification Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Nathan A.

    2009-01-01

    Several alternatives for item selection algorithms based on item response theory in computerized classification testing (CCT) have been suggested, with no conclusive evidence on the substantial superiority of a single method. It is argued that the lack of sizable effect is because some of the methods actually assess items very similarly through…

  17. Principles for Creating a Computerized Test Battery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyllonen, Patrick C.

    1991-01-01

    The experience of developing a set of comprehensive aptitude batteries for computer administration for the Air Force Human Resources Laboratory's Learning Abilities Measurement Program resulted in the formulation of nine principles for creation of a computerized test battery. These principles are discussed in the context of research on…

  18. Computerized Mastery Testing with Nonequivalent Testlets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheehan, Kathleen; Lewis, Charles

    1992-01-01

    A procedure is introduced for determining the effect of testlet nonequivalence on operating characteristics of a testlet-based computerized mastery test (CMT). The procedure, which involves estimating the CMT decision rule twice with testlet likelihoods treated as equivalent or nonequivalent, is demonstrated with testlet pools from the Architect…

  19. An Introduction to the Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tian, Jian-quan; Miao, Dan-min; Zhu, Xia; Gong, Jing-jing

    2007-01-01

    Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) has unsurpassable advantages over traditional testing. It has become the mainstream in large scale examinations in modern society. This paper gives a brief introduction to CAT including differences between traditional testing and CAT, the principles of CAT, psychometric theory and computer algorithms of CAT, the…

  20. Computerized system for measuring cerebral metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    McGlone, J.S.; Hibbard, L.S.; Hawkins, R.A.; Kasturi, R.

    1987-09-01

    A computerized stereotactic measurement system for evaluating rat brain metabolism was developed to utilize the large amount of data generated by quantitative autoradiography. Conventional methods of measurement only analyze a small percent of these data because these methods are limited by instrument design and the subjectiveness of the investigator. However, a computerized system allows digital images to be analyzed by placing data at their appropriate three-dimensional stereotactic coordinates. The system automatically registers experimental data to a standard three-dimensional image using alignment, scaling, and matching operations. Metabolic activity in different neuronal structures is then measured by generating digital masks and superimposing them on to experimental data. Several experimental data sets were evaluated and it was noticed that the structures measured by the computerized system, had in general, lower metabolic activity than manual measurements had indicated. This was expected because the computerized system measured the structure over its volume while the manual readings were taken from the most active metabolic area of a particular structure.

  1. Evaluating Content Alignment in Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Steven L.; Kingsbury, G. Gage; Webb, Norman L.

    2015-01-01

    The alignment between a test and the content domain it measures represents key evidence for the validation of test score inferences. Although procedures have been developed for evaluating the content alignment of linear tests, these procedures are not readily applicable to computerized adaptive tests (CATs), which require large item pools and do…

  2. MU's Early Space-Planning Computerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shader, Scott; Vaughn, Anthony

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the development of the University of Missouri-Columbia's Space Planning and Management office (SPAM) and the computerization of the school's space-planning archives. Discusses SPAM's software selection for standardization as well as its manual development, placing the school's buildings and floor plans on the Web, and its space-modeling…

  3. Special Education Curriculum (Computerized IEP Catalog).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garland Independent School District, TX.

    This special education curriculum, developed by the Garland (Texas) Independent School District, outlines the basic tools for preparing an Individual Educational Plan (IEP) for each handicapped student. The curricular information is organized and coded to facilitate computerized printing of the IEP. The document begins with a list of 13…

  4. The Four Generations of Computerized Educational Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunderson, C. Victor; And Others

    Educational measurement is undergoing a revolution due to the rapid dissemination of information-processing technology. The recent growth in computing resources and their widespread dissemination in daily life have brought about irreversible changes in educational measurement. Recent developments in computerized measurement are summarized by…

  5. Nursing Research Using Computerized Data Bases

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Kathleen A.

    1981-01-01

    Because of the implementation of large computerized information systems, the analyses of patient care data important to clinical nursing research is possible. Simultaneously, the heralding of computer technology in clinical practice areas has necessitated new research ideas to be pursued. This paper will describe a taxonomy of research data available on hospital information systems that may be used for clinical nursing research.

  6. Computerized Numerical Control Test Item Bank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reneau, Fred; And Others

    This guide contains 285 test items for use in teaching a course in computerized numerical control. All test items were reviewed, revised, and validated by incumbent workers and subject matter instructors. Items are provided for assessing student achievement in such aspects of programming and planning, setting up, and operating machines with…

  7. Computerized Adaptive Mastery Tests as Expert Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frick, Theodore W.

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of expert systems and computerized adaptive tests describes two versions of EXSPRT, a new approach that combines uncertain inference in expert systems with sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) stopping rules. Results of two studies comparing EXSPRT to adaptive mastery testing based on item response theory and SPRT approaches are…

  8. Computerized Inspection Of Gear-Tooth Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, R. F.; Litvin, F. L.; Zhang, Y.; Kuan, C.

    1994-01-01

    Method of manufacturing gears with precisely shaped teeth involves computerized inspection of gear-tooth surfaces followed by adjustments of machine-tool settings to minimize deviations between real and theoretical versions of surfaces. Thus, iterated cycles of cutting gear teeth, inspection, and adjustments help increase and/or maintain precision of subsequently manufactured gears.

  9. Termination Criteria for Computerized Classification Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Nathan A.

    2011-01-01

    Computerized classification testing (CCT) is an approach to designing tests with intelligent algorithms, similar to adaptive testing, but specifically designed for the purpose of classifying examinees into categories such as "pass" and "fail." Like adaptive testing for point estimation of ability, the key component is the termination criterion,…

  10. Computerized management information systems and organizational structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zannetos, Z. S.; Sertel, M. R.

    1970-01-01

    The computerized management of information systems and organizational structures is discussed. The subjects presented are: (1) critical factors favoring centralization and decentralization of organizations, (2) classification of organizations by relative structure, (3) attempts to measure change in organization structure, and (4) impact of information technology developments on organizational structure changes.

  11. Computerized Enrollment Driven Financial Forecasting Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarvella, John R.

    An interactive, computerized model developed for Old Dominion University utilizes university historical data, demographic characteristics, projected selected economic variables and population figures by various age groups and planning districts to forecast enrollment, financial projections, and future fiscal conditions of the institution. The…

  12. Computerized Financial Reporting Based on GAAP.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tikkanen, Stan; Liljeberg, Burt

    1983-01-01

    Describes the statewide computerized system developed in Minnesota following the 1976 enactment of the Uniform Financial Accounting and Reporting Standards (UFARS) law. UFARS includes provisions for an advisory council responsible for recommending accounting and reporting procedures, and seven data processing centers to serve all 560 Minnesota…

  13. Computerized Grading of Anatomy Laboratory Practical Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krippendorf, Beth B.; Bolender, David L.; Kolesari, Gary L.

    2008-01-01

    At the Medical College of Wisconsin, a procedure was developed to allow computerized grading and grade reporting of laboratory practical examinations in the Clinical Human Anatomy course. At the start of the course, first year medical students were given four Lists of Structures. On these lists, numbered items were arranged alphabetically; the…

  14. Computerizing Maintenance Management Improves School Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conroy, Pat

    2002-01-01

    Describes how a Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS), a centralized maintenance operations database that facilitates work order procedures and staff directives, can help individual school campuses and school districts to manage maintenance. Presents the benefits of CMMS and things to consider in CMMS selection. (EV)

  15. Topside Ionospheric Sounder for CubeSats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, C.; Pratt, J.; Fish, C. S.; Winkler, C.; Pilinski, M.; Azeem, I.; Crowley, G.; Jeppesen, M.; Martineau, R.

    2014-12-01

    This presentation will outline the design of a Topside Ionospheric Sounder (TIS) for CubeSats. In the same way that an ionosonde measures the ionospheric profile from the ground, a Topside Sounder measures the ionospheric profile from a location above the F-region peak. The TIS will address the need for increased space situational awareness and environmental monitoring by estimating electron density profiles in the topside of the ionosphere. The TIS will measure topside electron density profiles for plasma frequencies ranging from 0.89 MHz to 28.4 MHz below the satellite altitude. The precision of the measurement will be 5% or 10,000 p/cm^3. The TIS average power consumption will be below 10 W and a mass of less than 10 kg, so it is appropriate for a 6U Cubesat (or multiple of that size). The sounder will operate via a transmitted frequency sweep across the desired plasma frequencies which, upon reception, can be differenced to determine range and density information of the topside ionosphere. The velocity of the spacecraft necessitates careful balancing of range resolution and frequency knowledge requirements as well as novel processing techniques to correctly associate the return signal with the correct plasma frequency. TIS is being designed to provide a low cost, low mass spacecraft that can provide accurate topside profiles of the ionospheric electron density in order to further understanding of ionospheric structure and dynamic processes in the ionosphere.

  16. Solitons versus parametric instabilities during ionospheric heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, D. R.; Payne, G. L.; Downie, R. M.; Sheerin, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    Various effects associated with ionospheric heating are investigated by numerically solving the modified Zakharov (1972) equations. It is shown that, for typical ionospheric parameters, the modulational instability is more important than the parametric decay instability in the spatial region of strongest heater electric field. It is concluded that the modulational instability leads to the formation of solitons, as originally predicted by Petviashvili (1976).

  17. Investigations of the ionosphere by space techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowhill, S. A.

    1974-01-01

    Much of the impetus to ionosphere research since the International Geophysical Year has come from new types of measurement using space vehicles. The key developments are outlined, together with the contributions that they have made to the understanding of the ionosphere.

  18. Ionospheric disturbances produced by powerful explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagorskii, P. M.; Tarashchuk, Yu. E.

    1992-09-01

    Results of a study of wave-like ionospheric disturbances initiated by powerful explosives are presented and analyzed. Three types of wave processes with differing physical natures which propagate in the upper atmosphere and ionosphere to distances of thousands of kilometers are distinguished. The effect of shock-acoustic waves on indirect short wave radio propagation is considered.

  19. Driving mechanism of the nightside ionospheric convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, T.

    2001-12-01

    Magnetometer and SuperDARN observations provided evidence of the instantaneous reaction of ionospheric convection on the dayside and nightside. The AMIE analyses revealed that the potential pattern did not move but remained nearly at fixed locations. SuperDARN observations demonstrated that the plasma motion in the nightside ionosphere was intensified immediately after the motion of dayside ionospheric plasma was intensified within a resolution of the measurement (2 min). The convection in the night-side polar ionosphere would cause the plasma convection in the near-earth magnetotail. In the companion paper (Hashimoto and Kikuchi, this meeting) we demonstrate that the growth phase signature at the geosynchronous orbit and the ground magnetic signatures of the partial ring currents developed several minutes after the magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause. These results suggest that the electric field responsible for the convection in the near-Earth magnetotail propagated from the night-side polar ionosphere after having propagated from the magnetosphere to the polar ionosphere on the dayside. In order to explain the quick response of the nightside ionospheric convection, we examine possible propagation modes that could transmit the convection electric field from the dayside outer magnetosphere to the nightside ionosphere. The magnetospheric convection may be generated either by accumulation of the FTEs or by the dynamo action in the cusp and the HLBL. In either case, the electric field propagates from the dayside magnetosphere to the nightside ionosphere within a few minutes. One possible propagation mode would be the magnetosonic wave propagating across the geomagnetic field and the other is the shear Alfvén mode propagating parallel to the geomagnetic field. The magnetosonic waves would be totally reflected at the ionosphere and the resultant electric field would be vanished almost completely. On the other hand, the convective motion of the plasma can

  20. Ionospheric modification by rocket effluents. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhardt, P.A.; Price, K.M.; da Rosa, A.V.

    1980-06-01

    This report describes experimental and theoretical studies related to ionospheric disturbances produced by rocket exhaust vapors. The purpose of our research was to estimate the ionospheric effects of the rocket launches which will be required to place the Satellite Power System (SPS) in operation. During the past year, we have developed computational tools for numerical simulation of ionospheric changes produced by the injection of rocket exhaust vapors. The theoretical work has dealt with (1) the limitations imposed by condensation phenomena in rocket exhaust; (2) complete modeling of the ionospheric depletion process including neutral gas dynamics, plasma physics, chemistry and thermal processes; and (3) the influence of the modified ionosphere on radio wave propagation. We are also reporting on electron content measurements made during the launch of HEAO-C on Sept. 20, 1979. We conclude by suggesting future experiments and areas for future research.

  1. Ionospheric data assimilation and forecasting during storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chartier, Alex T.; Matsuo, Tomoko; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Collins, Nancy; Hoar, Timothy J.; Lu, Gang; Mitchell, Cathryn N.; Coster, Anthea J.; Paxton, Larry J.; Bust, Gary S.

    2016-01-01

    Ionospheric storms can have important effects on radio communications and navigation systems. Storm time ionospheric predictions have the potential to form part of effective mitigation strategies to these problems. Ionospheric storms are caused by strong forcing from the solar wind. Electron density enhancements are driven by penetration electric fields, as well as by thermosphere-ionosphere behavior including Traveling Atmospheric Disturbances and Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances and changes to the neutral composition. This study assesses the effect on 1 h predictions of specifying initial ionospheric and thermospheric conditions using total electron content (TEC) observations under a fixed set of solar and high-latitude drivers. Prediction performance is assessed against TEC observations, incoherent scatter radar, and in situ electron density observations. Corotated TEC data provide a benchmark of forecast accuracy. The primary case study is the storm of 10 September 2005, while the anomalous storm of 21 January 2005 provides a secondary comparison. The study uses an ensemble Kalman filter constructed with the Data Assimilation Research Testbed and the Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model. Maps of preprocessed, verticalized GPS TEC are assimilated, while high-latitude specifications from the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics and solar flux observations from the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Experiment are used to drive the model. The filter adjusts ionospheric and thermospheric parameters, making use of time-evolving covariance estimates. The approach is effective in correcting model biases but does not capture all the behavior of the storms. In particular, a ridge-like enhancement over the continental USA is not predicted, indicating the importance of predicting storm time electric field behavior to the problem of ionospheric forecasting.

  2. Atmospheric waves and the ionosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, T.

    1972-01-01

    A review of evidence supporting the existence of atmospheric waves is presented, and a simple, theoretical approach for describing them is shown. Suggestions for gravity wave sources include equatorial and auroral electrojet, auroral and polar substorm heating, atmospheric jet streams, and large oceanic tides. There are reviewed previous studies dealing with the interaction between ionization and atmospheric waves believed to exist at ionospheric heights. These waves include acoustic waves, evanescent waves, and internal atmospheric gravity waves. It is explained that mode analysis, often employed when an increased number of layers is used for a more complete profile, is inapplicable for waves very close to a source.

  3. Aerosol growth in Titan's ionosphere.

    PubMed

    Lavvas, Panayotis; Yelle, Roger V; Koskinen, Tommi; Bazin, Axel; Vuitton, Véronique; Vigren, Erik; Galand, Marina; Wellbrock, Anne; Coates, Andrew J; Wahlund, Jan-Erik; Crary, Frank J; Snowden, Darci

    2013-02-19

    Photochemically produced aerosols are common among the atmospheres of our solar system and beyond. Observations and models have shown that photochemical aerosols have direct consequences on atmospheric properties as well as important astrobiological ramifications, but the mechanisms involved in their formation remain unclear. Here we show that the formation of aerosols in Titan's upper atmosphere is directly related to ion processes, and we provide a complete interpretation of observed mass spectra by the Cassini instruments from small to large masses. Because all planetary atmospheres possess ionospheres, we anticipate that the mechanisms identified here will be efficient in other environments as well, modulated by the chemical complexity of each atmosphere. PMID:23382231

  4. Determination of travelling ionospheric disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degenhardt, W.; Hartmann, G. H.; Davies, K.

    1978-01-01

    A total of 35 days of Faraday rotation data was obtained from the ATS-6 radio beacon experiment operating with the closely spaced network of Elbert, Table Mountain, and Fort Morgan. The 140-MHz Faraday bandpass data are uncorrelated in the transmission range from 8 to 45 minutes. There are distinct, well correlated, and time-displaced maxima and minima that allow the calculation of the speed and direction of horizontal motions of plane fronts of disturbances in the ionosphere. For some selected events, velocities between 88 and 278 m/sec were obtained.

  5. Saturn: atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Gombosi, Tamas I; Ingersoll, Andrew P

    2010-03-19

    The Cassini spacecraft has been in orbit around Saturn since 30 June 2004, yielding a wealth of data about the Saturn system. This review focuses on the atmosphere and magnetosphere and briefly outlines the state of our knowledge after the Cassini prime mission. The mission has addressed a host of fundamental questions: What processes control the physics, chemistry, and dynamics of the atmosphere? Where does the magnetospheric plasma come from? What are the physical processes coupling the ionosphere and magnetosphere? And, what are the rotation rates of Saturn's atmosphere and magnetosphere? PMID:20299587

  6. Capabilities and Limitations of Radio Occultation Measurements for Ionosphere Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajj, G. A.; Romans, L. J.; Pi, X.; Wang, Chunming

    1999-01-01

    The paper: (1) describes the range of capabilities of GPS radio occultation missions in ionospheric research: (a) ionospheric profiling; (b) ionospheric imaging; (c) ionospheric data assimilation; and (d) measurement of scintillation. (2) Identify strengths and weaknesses of measurements: (a) coverage; (b) resolution; and (c) uniqueness of solution.

  7. Precise Point Positioning with Ionosphere Estimation and application of Regional Ionospheric Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galera Monico, J. F.; Marques, H. A.; Rocha, G. D. D. C.

    2015-12-01

    The ionosphere is one of most difficult source of errors to be modelled in the GPS positioning, mainly when applying data collected by single frequency receivers. Considering Precise Point Positioning (PPP) with single frequency data the options available include, for example, the use of Klobuchar model or applying Global Ionosphere Maps (GIM). The GIM contains Vertical Electron Content (VTEC) values that are commonly estimated considering a global network with poor covering in certain regions. For this reason Regional Ionosphere Maps (RIM) have been developed considering local GNSS network, for instance, the La Plata Ionospheric Model (LPIM) developed inside the context of SIRGAS (Geocentric Reference System for Americas). The South American RIM are produced with data from nearly 50 GPS ground receivers and considering these maps are generated for each hour with spatial resolution of one degree it is expected to provide better accuracy in GPS positioning for such region. Another possibility to correct for ionosphere effects in the PPP is to apply the ionosphere estimation technique based on Kalman filter. In this case, the ionosphere can be treated as a stochastic process and a good initial guess is necessary what can be obtained from an ionospheric map. In this paper we present the methodology involved with ionosphere estimation by using Kalman filter and also the application of global and regional ionospheric maps in the PPP as first guess. The ionosphere estimation strategy was implemented in the house software called RT_PPP that is capable of accomplishing PPP either for single or dual frequency data. GPS data from Brazilian station near equatorial region were processed and results with regional maps were compared with those by using global maps. Improvements of the order 15% were observed. In case of ionosphere estimation, the estimated coordinates were compared with ionosphere free solution and after PPP convergence the results reached centimeter accuracy.

  8. CT based computerized identification and analysis of human airways: A review

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Jiantao; Gu, Suicheng; Liu, Shusen; Zhu, Shaocheng; Wilson, David; Siegfried, Jill M.; Gur, David

    2012-01-01

    As one of the most prevalent chronic disorders, airway disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In order to understand its underlying mechanisms and to enable assessment of therapeutic efficacy of a variety of possible interventions, noninvasive investigation of the airways in a large number of subjects is of great research interest. Due to its high resolution in temporal and spatial domains, computed tomography (CT) has been widely used in clinical practices for studying the normal and abnormal manifestations of lung diseases, albeit there is a need to clearly demonstrate the benefits in light of the cost and radiation dose associated with CT examinations performed for the purpose of airway analysis. Whereas a single CT examination consists of a large number of images, manually identifying airway morphological characteristics and computing features to enable thorough investigations of airway and other lung diseases is very time-consuming and susceptible to errors. Hence, automated and semiautomated computerized analysis of human airways is becoming an important research area in medical imaging. A number of computerized techniques have been developed to date for the analysis of lung airways. In this review, we present a summary of the primary methods developed for computerized analysis of human airways, including airway segmentation, airway labeling, and airway morphometry, as well as a number of computer-aided clinical applications, such as virtual bronchoscopy. Both successes and underlying limitations of these approaches are discussed, while highlighting areas that may require additional work. PMID:22559631

  9. CT based computerized identification and analysis of human airways: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Pu Jiantao; Gu Suicheng; Liu Shusen; Zhu Shaocheng; Wilson, David; Siegfried, Jill M.; Gur, David

    2012-05-15

    As one of the most prevalent chronic disorders, airway disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In order to understand its underlying mechanisms and to enable assessment of therapeutic efficacy of a variety of possible interventions, noninvasive investigation of the airways in a large number of subjects is of great research interest. Due to its high resolution in temporal and spatial domains, computed tomography (CT) has been widely used in clinical practices for studying the normal and abnormal manifestations of lung diseases, albeit there is a need to clearly demonstrate the benefits in light of the cost and radiation dose associated with CT examinations performed for the purpose of airway analysis. Whereas a single CT examination consists of a large number of images, manually identifying airway morphological characteristics and computing features to enable thorough investigations of airway and other lung diseases is very time-consuming and susceptible to errors. Hence, automated and semiautomated computerized analysis of human airways is becoming an important research area in medical imaging. A number of computerized techniques have been developed to date for the analysis of lung airways. In this review, we present a summary of the primary methods developed for computerized analysis of human airways, including airway segmentation, airway labeling, and airway morphometry, as well as a number of computer-aided clinical applications, such as virtual bronchoscopy. Both successes and underlying limitations of these approaches are discussed, while highlighting areas that may require additional work.

  10. Ionospheric Challenges for GNSS Based Augmentation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, P.; Valladares, C. E.

    2007-12-01

    The ionosphere is a highly dynamic physical phenomenon that presents a variable source of error for Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals and GNSS based operational systems. The Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Wide-Area Augmentation System (WAAS) was designed to enhance the GNSS standard positioning service by providing additional accuracy, availability and integrity that is sufficient for use in commercial aviation. It is the first of a number of planned regional Satellite Based Augmentation Systems (SBAS). Other systems in development include the European EGNOS system, the MSAS system in Japan and the GAGAN system in India. In addition, the South American countries are investigating the feasibility of operating an SBAS system in this region. Much of the WAAS ionospheric research and development focused on defining and mitigating ionospheric challenges characteristic of the mid-latitude regions, where the ionosphere is well studied and relatively quiescent. The EGNOS and MSAS systems will primarily operate under a similarly quiescent mid-latitude ionosphere. SBAS system development in South America, India and other low-latitude regions, however, will have to contend with much more extreme conditions. These conditions include strong spatial and temporal gradients, plasma depletions and scintillation. All of these conditions have a potential to limit SBAS performance in the low latitude regions. This presentation will review the effects that the ionosphere has on the mid-latitude WAAS system. It will present the techniques that are used to mitigate ionospheric disturbances induced on the system during severe geomagnetic activity and it will quantify the effect that this activity has on system performance. The presentation will then present data from the South American Low-latitude Ionospheric Sensor Network (LISN) that can be used to infer the ionospheric effects on SBAS performance in the most challenging low-latitude ionospheric environment

  11. Computerized analysis of pelvic incidence from 3D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrtovec, Tomaž; Janssen, Michiel M. A.; Pernuš, Franjo; Castelein, René M.; Viergever, Max A.

    2012-02-01

    The sagittal alignment of the pelvis can be evaluated by the angle of pelvic incidence (PI), which is constant for an arbitrary subject position and orientation and can be therefore compared among subjects in standing, sitting or supine position. In this study, PI was measured from three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) images of normal subjects that were acquired in supine position. A novel computerized method, based on image processing techniques, was developed to automatically determine the anatomical references required to measure PI, i.e. the centers of the femoral heads in 3D, and the center and inclination of the sacral endplate in 3D. Multiplanar image reformation was applied to obtain perfect sagittal views with all anatomical structures completely in line with the hip axis, from which PI was calculated. The resulting PI (mean+/-standard deviation) was equal to 46.6°+/-9.2° for male subjects (N = 189), 47.6°+/-10.7° for female subjects (N = 181), and 47.1°+/-10.0° for all subjects (N = 370). The obtained measurements of PI from 3D images were not biased by acquisition projection or structure orientation, because all anatomical structures were completely in line with the hip axis. The performed measurements in 3D therefore represent PI according to the actual geometrical relationships among anatomical structures of the sacrum, pelvis and hips, as observed from the perfect sagittal views.

  12. Computerized tomographic analysis of fluid flow in fractured tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, C.W.; Sharer, J.C. ); Springer, E.P. )

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this summary is to demonstrate the usefulness of X-ray computerized tomography to observe fluid flow down a fracture and rock matrix imbibition in a sample of Bandelier tuff. This was accomplished by using a tuff sample 152.4 mm long and 50.8 mm in diameter. A longitudinal fracture was created by cutting the core with a wire saw. The fractured piece was then coupled to its adjacent section to that the fracture was not expected. Water was injected into a dry sample at five flow rates and CT scanning performed at set intervals during the flow. Cross sectional images and longitudinal reconstructions were built and saturation profiles calculated for the sample at each time interval at each flow rate. The results showed that for the test conditions, the fracture was not a primary pathway of fluid flow down the sample. At a slow fluid injection rate into the dry sample, the fluid was imbibed into the rock uniformly down the length of the core. With increasing injection rates, the flow remained uniform over the core cross section through complete saturation.

  13. Online service for monitoring the ionosphere based on data from the global navigation satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleshin, I. M.; Alpatov, V. V.; Vasil'ev, A. E.; Burguchev, S. S.; Kholodkov, K. I.; Budnikov, P. A.; Molodtsov, D. A.; Koryagin, V. N.; Perederin, F. V.

    2014-07-01

    A service is described that makes possible the effective construction of a three-dimensional ionospheric model based on the data of ground receivers of signals from global navigation satellite positioning systems (GNSS). The obtained image has a high resolution, mainly because data from the IPG GNSS network of the Federal Service for Hydrometeorology and Environmental Monitoring (Rosgidromet) are used. A specially developed format and its implementation in the form of SQL structures are used to collect, transmit, and store data. The method of high-altitude radio tomography is used to construct the three-dimensional model. The operation of all system components (from registration point organization to the procedure for constructing the electron density three-dimensional distribution and publication of the total electron content map on the Internet) has been described in detail. The three-dimensional image of the ionosphere, obtained automatically, is compared with the ionosonde measurements, calculated using the two-dimensional low-altitude tomography method and averaged by the ionospheric model.

  14. ISIS : a formation flying ionospheric seismic imaging experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimoun, D.; Lognonné, Ph; Garcia, R.; Occhipinti, G.; Abbondanza, S.

    Today, available techniques for the lithosphere tomography are limited by the number of seismic stations that we can deploy : it is sometimes difficult to access to some remote regions, but foremost the number of stations that are deployable over the oceans is strongly reduced. If we can dispose of some sites on islands (which are all characterized by a strong background noise), and on the measurements on coastal areas borders, it is therefore difficult to inverse the fine structure of the oceanic lithosphere. A promising idea is to use a long known idea, that earthquakes have a measurable impact on the ionosphere. As a matter of fact, the decrease of the atmosphere density with respect to altitude implies an amplification of the Rayleigh waves in the atmosphere, up to a maximum at about 250 km. This effect has been quantified for the Denali earthquake (Ducic et al, 2003) though its impact on the TEC content on the ionosphere. We therefore propose to detect this effect from space, thanks to a spaceborne multistatic SAR. Our concept includes 3 satellites in formation (along the same orbit) in a MEO orbit (about 19000 km). The master satellite payload is a slightly modified SAR, which operates around two main frequencies, in order to allow the computation of the delay induced by ionospheric fluctuations. The two other satellites have a passive payload which is time-synchronized with the master SAR: the use of their crossing rays will allow a 3D reconstruction of the ionosphere. A preliminary design of the space segment proposes an implementation on a MEO-orbit compatible bus, with high peak power capabilities. In order to allow the compatibility of the payload concept with the on-board available power, we have assumed that the satellite will enter in its alert mode on ground request. When an earthquake occurs, we dispose of a ten minutes delay to "wake-up" the satellite. When not in alert mode, its nominal imaging frequency will be reduced to allow the detection of

  15. The NASA/LRC Computerized Test System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, W. Kirk; Washburn, David A.; Hopkins, William D.; Savage-Rumbaugh, E. Sue; Rumbaugh, Duane M.

    1990-01-01

    A new testing package, including apparatus and tasks for the behavioral study of a number of species in a variety of experiments is presented. The package is described with respect to the kinds of comparative psychological investigations for which it is best suited. The preliminary data generated within this new testing paradigm demonstrate that the NASA/LRC Computerized Test System provides a flexible yet powerful environment for the investigation of behavioral and psychological processes.

  16. Computerized flow monitors detect small kicks

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, D.; White, D. )

    1992-02-24

    This paper reports on a smart alarm system installed on a number of offshore rigs and one land rig which can detect kicks more quickly than conventional systems. This rapid kick detection improves rig safety because the smaller the detected influx, the easier it is to control the well. The extensive computerized monitoring system helps drilling personnel detect fluid influxes and fluid losses before the changes in flow would normally be apparent.

  17. Mid-latitude Ionospheric HF Channel Reciprocity: Evidence from the Ionospheric Oblique Incidence Sounding Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen; Zhao, Zhengyu; Zhang, Yuannong

    The mid-latitude ionospheric HF channel reciprocity is studied in this paper through theoret-ical considerations and ionospheric oblique incidence sounding experiments. The reciprocity of ionospheric HF channel experiments were carried out by using two identical Wuhan Iono-spheric Oblique Incidence Sounding Systems (WIOISS) located in Wuhan (30° 32N, 114° 21E) and Wanning (18° 58N, 110° 31E) respectively. The comparisons of group distance and Doppler shift between Wuhan-Wanning and Wanning-Wuhan HF ionospheric propagation paths show that the reciprocity of ionospheric HF channel is satisfied to some extent. The group dis-tances of two paths are calculated by a 3-D ray tracing simulation as well. The theoretical and experimental results could be widely used for HF communication systems and sky wave over-the-horizon radar.

  18. Midlatitude ionospheric HF channel reciprocity: Evidence from the ionospheric oblique incidence sounding experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen; Zhao, Zhengyu; Deng, Feng; Ni, Binbin; Chen, Gang

    2010-12-01

    Ionospheric HF channel reciprocity is investigated at middle latitudes on the basis of ionospheric oblique incidence sounding experiments. Two identical Wuhan Ionospheric Oblique Incidence Sounding Systems (WIOISS), located at Wuhan (30°32'N, 114°21'E) and Wanning (18°58'N, 110°31'E), are used to carry out the campaign. Comparisons of group distance and Doppler shift between Wuhan-Wanning and Wanning-Wuhan HF ionospheric propagation paths indicate that the reciprocity of the ionospheric HF channel is satisfied at midlatitude region. A 3-D ray tracing simulation is also implemented to evaluate the group distances of the two paths. Midlatitude ionospheric HF channel reciprocity, as verified both experimentally and theoretically in the present study, can be useful for HF communication systems and sky wave over-the-horizon radars.

  19. Ionospheric top side model ingesting observed STEC into an empirical ionospheric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gularte Scarone, A. E.; Brunini, C.; Meza, A. M.

    Several empirical models are currently used to describe the electron density distribution in the ionosphere The driving parameters used for the majority of these models are the electron density NmF2 and the height hmF2 of the peak Dual frequency ground GPS satellite observations provide estimates of the slant total electron content STEC that is the integral of the electron density along the ray-path of the signal In this contribution we present a method to improve the ionospheric top side model ingesting the observed STEC into an empirical ionospheric model and updating the climatological parameters to a better representation of the meteorological conditions of the ionosphere The analysis is done in periods with different levels of ionospheric activity during solstices or equinoxes and La Plata Ionospheric Model LPIM is used for computing 4-D free electron distribution

  20. Computerized implant-dentistry: Advances toward automation

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Minkle; Anand, Vishal; Salaria, Sanjeev Kumar; Jain, Nikil; Gupta, Shilpi

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in the field of implantology such as three-dimensional imaging, implant-planning software, computer-aided-design/computer-aided-manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology, computer-guided, and navigated implant surgery have led to the computerization of implant-dentistry. This three-dimensional computer-generated implant-planning and surgery has not only enabled accurate preoperative evaluation of the anatomic limitations but has also facilitated preoperative planning of implant positions along with virtual implant placement and subsequently transferring the virtual treatment plans onto the surgical phase via static (guided) or dynamic (navigated) systems aided by CAD/CAM technology. Computerized-implant-dentistry being highly predictable and minimally invasive in nature has also allowed implant placement in patients with medical comorbidities (e.g. radiation therapy, blood dyscrasias), in patients with complex problems following a significant alteration of the bony anatomy as a result of benign or malignant pathology of the jaws or trauma and in patients with other physical and emotional problems. With significant achievements accomplished in the field of computerized implant-dentistry, attempts are now been made toward complete automation of implant-dentistry. PMID:25810585

  1. Ionosphere monitoring using NOAA's CORS network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D.

    NOAA's National Geodetic Survey is currently engaged in research to use the CORS (Continuously Operating GPS Reference Stations) network to model the ionosphere over the conterminous United States and surrounding areas. The CORS network consists of over 700 stations that continuously collect data from all GPS satellite vehicles in view; these data are available free of charge for (predominantly) positioning applications. However, the nature of the network makes it an excellent tool for continuously monitoring the nature of the ionosphere over and near the conterminous United States. From the standpoint of geodesy, the ionosphere effect is generally considered a nuisance parameter: that should be modeled and removed so that the ambiguity in dual frequency GPS carrier-phase signals may be resolved and accurate positions determined. As such, the initial direction of this research is toward modeling the ionosphere for geodetic use, using a single-layer "shell model". The results presented here show the first steps toward accurately modeling the ionosphere through the CORS network, in terms of absolute (non-differential) Total Electron Content Units (TECUs) through an innovative cross-over adjustment of "tracks". Each track is made by the intersection of a satellite/receiver vector with the ionosphere shell as the satellite moves overhead. Results of the initial research in applying the modeled ionosphere toward ambiguity resolution will be discussed. Limitations of using the one-dimensional shell will also be presented. Future plans for creating a time-stream of the ionosphere, increasing the complexity beyond the shell model, and applications toward nowcast and forecast of the ionosphere, will also be discussed.

  2. Ionosphere of Mars observed by Mars Express.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinin, Eduard; Fraenz, Markus; Andrews, Dave; Morgan, Dave

    2016-04-01

    The Martian ionosphere is studied at different solar zenith angles using the local electron number densities and total electron content (TEC) derived from the observations by MARSIS onboard Mars Express. The data are complemented by the ASPERA-3 observations which provide us with the information about upward/downward velocity of the low-energy ions and electron precipitation. We consider the Mars Express observations at different solar cycle intervals. Different factors which influence the ionosphere dynamics are analyzed. The focus is made on a role of the crustal magnetic field on the Martian ionosphere and its influence on ion escape.

  3. Ionospheric irregularity physics modelling. Memorandum report

    SciTech Connect

    Ossakow, S.L.; Keskinen, M.J.; Zalesak, S.T.

    1982-02-09

    Theoretical and numerical simulation techniques have been employed to study ionospheric F region plasma cloud striation phenomena, equatorial spread F phenomena, and high latitude diffuse auroral F region irregularity phenomena. Each of these phenomena can cause scintillation effects. The results and ideas from these studies are state-of-the-art, agree well with experimental observations, and have induced experimentalists to look for theoretically predicted results. One conclusion that can be drawn from these studies is that ionospheric irregularity phenomena can be modelled from a first principles physics point of view. Theoretical and numerical simulation results from the aforementioned ionospheric irregularity areas will be presented.

  4. Ionospheric calibration for single frequency altimeter measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiner, William S.; Born, George H.

    1993-01-01

    This report investigates the potential of using Global Positioning System (GPS) data and a model of the ionosphere to supply a measure of the sub-satellite Total Electron Current (TEC) of the required accuracy (10 TECU rms) for the purpose of calibrating single frequency radar altimeter measurements. Since climatological (monthly mean) models are known to be in error by as much as 50 percent, this work focused on the Parameterized Real-Time Ionospheric Specification Model (PRISM) which has the capability to improve model accuracy by ingesting (adjusting to) in situ ionospheric measurements. A set of globally distributed TEC measurements were generated using GPS data and were used as input to improve the accuracy of the PRISM model. The adjusted PRISM TEC values were compared to TOPEX dual frequency TEC measurements (which are considered truth) for a number of TOPEX sub-satellite tracks. The adjusted PRISM values generally compared to the TOPEX measurements within the 10 TECU accuracy requirements when the sub-satellite track passed within 300 to 400 km of the GPS TEC data or when the track passed through a night time ionosphere. However, when the sub-satellite points were greater than 300 to 400 km away from the GPS TEC data or when a local noon ionosphere was sampled, the adjusted PRISM values generally differed by greater than 10 TECU rms with data excursions from the TOPEX TEC measurements of as much as 40 TECU (an 8 cm path delay error at K band). Therefore, it can be concluded from this analysis that an unrealistically large number of GPS stations would be needed to predict sub-satellite TEC at the 10 TECU level in the day time ionosphere using a model such as PRISM. However, a technique currently being studied at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) may provide a means of supplying adequate TEC data to meet the 10 TECU ionospheric correction accuracy when using a realistic number of ionospheric stations. This method involves using global GPS TEC data to

  5. Physics of planetary atmospheres and ionospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, S. J.

    1981-01-01

    The traditional atmospheric regions, the distinction between homosphere and heterosphere, and changing atmospheric composition are discussed. The validity of the barometric law based on a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, for the major part of a planetary atmosphere and its breakdown in the exosphere due to escape of atmospheric particles is considered. The formation and maintenance of photochemical and diffusion-controlled ionospheric layers are treated. Their applicability to planetary ionospheres is dealt with. The spatial extent of magnetic and nonmagnetic planet ionospheres is investigated. Thermal and nonthermal processes responsible for the mass loss of planetary atmospheres are surveyed.

  6. Ionosphere/thermosphere heating determined from dynamic magnetosphere-ionosphere/thermosphere coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Jiannan; Song, Paul; Vasyliūnas, Vytenis M.

    2011-09-01

    Ionosphere/thermosphere heating driven by magnetospheric convection is investigated through a three-fluid inductive (including Faraday's law) approach to describing magnetosphere-ionosphere/thermosphere coupling, for a 1-D stratified ionosphere/thermosphere in this initial study. It is shown that the response of the ionosphere/thermosphere and thus the heating is dynamic and height-dependent. The heating is essentially frictional in nature rather than Joule heating as commonly assumed. The heating rate reaches a quasi-steady state after about 25 Alfvén travel times. During the dynamic period, the heating can be enhanced and displays peaks at multiple times due to wave reflections. The dynamic heating rate can be more than twice greater than the quasi-steady state value. The heating is strongest in the E-layer but the heating rate per unit mass is concentrated around the F-layer peak height. This implies a potential mechanism of driving O+ upflow from O+ rich F-layer. It is shown that the ionosphere/thermosphere heating caused by the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling can be simply evaluated through the relative velocity between the plasma and neutrals without invoking field-aligned currents, ionospheric conductance, and electric field. The present study provides understanding of the dynamic magnetosphere-ionosphere/thermosphere coupling from the ionospheric/thermospheric view in addition to magnetospheric perspectives.

  7. Ionospheric Modelling using GPS to Calibrate the MWA. II: Regional Ionospheric Modelling using GPS and GLONASS to Estimate Ionospheric Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, B. S.; Morgan, J.; Ord, S. M.; Tingay, S. J.; Bell, M.; Callingham, J. R.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; For, B.-Q.; Hancock, P.; Hindson, L.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kapińska, A. D.; Lenc, E.; McKinley, B.; Offringa, A. R.; Procopio, P.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Wayth, R. B.; Wu, C.; Zheng, Q.

    2016-07-01

    We estimate spatial gradients in the ionosphere using the Global Positioning System and GLONASS (Russian global navigation system) observations, utilising data from multiple Global Positioning System stations in the vicinity of Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory. In previous work, the ionosphere was characterised using a single-station to model the ionosphere as a single layer of fixed height and this was compared with ionospheric data derived from radio astronomy observations obtained from the Murchison Widefield Array. Having made improvements to our data quality (via cycle slip detection and repair) and incorporating data from the GLONASS system, we now present a multi-station approach. These two developments significantly improve our modelling of the ionosphere. We also explore the effects of a variable-height model. We conclude that modelling the small-scale features in the ionosphere that have been observed with the MWA will require a much denser network of Global Navigation Satellite System stations than is currently available at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory.

  8. Artificial defocusing lens in ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyko, G. N.; Vaskov, V. V.; Golyan, S. F.; Gurevich, A. V.; Dimant, Y. S.; Zyuzkin, V. A.; Kim, V. Y.; Komrakov, G. P.; Lobacheviskiy, L. A.; Migulin, V. V.

    1984-10-01

    Strong defocusing of perturbing radio waves is detected, indicating the creation of an effective defocusing lens in the ionosphere. Modess in which there is not anomalous absorption are employed in order to isolate the defocusing effects unambiguously. The experimental setup incorporates a 300 MW SURG heating system with a narrow radiation pattern. The concentration perturbations are diagnosed in the vertical sounding mode at 8 frequencies by means of a Doppler system. The experimental results were obtained during May and July 1983 under daytime conditions. The amplitude and Doppler frequency shift behavior of the probe wave is analyzed, and the defocusing coefficient is computed as a function of the frequency of the probe wave and power of the heating wave. The artificial lens detected results in significant attenuation of radio waves passing through it.

  9. Auroral pulsations from ionospheric winds

    SciTech Connect

    Nakada, M.P. )

    1989-11-01

    The possibility that auroral pulsations are due to oscillatory electrical circuits in the ionosphere that are driven by the negative resistance of jet stream winds is examined. For the condenser plates, the highly conducting surfaces above the edges of the jet stream are postulated. The dielectric constant of the plasma between the plates is quite large. The current that is driven perpendicular to and by the jet stream closes along the plates and through Pederson currents in the F region above the stream. This closed loop gives the inductance and resistance for the circuit. Periods of oscillation for this circuit appear to be in the range of Pc 1 to Pc 3. In accord with observations, this circuit appears to be able to limit the brightness of pulsations.

  10. Ionospheric effects of supernova explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, P. J.

    Possible ionospheric effects of supernova explosions are considered, with special attention given to those of SN 1987a. Results are presented on the calculations of anticipated X-ray/UV flare parameters, including the shock temperature, the minimum flare duration, the average photon energy, and the shock-front travel time for a range of stellar radii bracketing SK 202-69, which was identified by White Malin (1987) as the progenitor star for SN 1987a. It is shown that the characteristics of the X-ray/UV flare are strongly influenced by the radius of the shock wave breakout, so that the flare from SN 1987a can be anticipated to have characteristics intermediate between those attributed to compact stars and stars with extended envelopes.

  11. Magnetic Earth Ionosphere Resonant Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaniol, Craig

    1994-01-01

    The Community College Division is pleased to report progress of NASA funded research at West Virginia State College. During this reporting period, the project research group has continued with activities to develop instrumentation capability designed to monitor resonant cavity frequencies in the atmospheric region between the Earth's surface and the ionosphere. In addition, the project's principal investigator, Dr. Craig Spaniol, and NASA technical officer, Dr. John Sutton, have written and published technical papers intended to expand the scientific and technical framework needed for project research. This research continues to provide an excellent example of government and education working together to provide significant research in the college environment. This cooperative effort has provided many students with technical project work which compliments their education.

  12. Investigation of ionospheric gradients for GAGAN application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, K. Ravi; Srinivas, V. Satya; Sarma, A. D.

    2009-05-01

    To cater to the needs of aviation applications, GPS Aided GEO Augmented Navigation (GAGAN) system is being implemented over the Indian region. The most prominent parameter affecting the navigation accuracy of GAGAN is ionospheric delay which is a function of TEC. In the equatorial and low latitude regions such as India, TEC is often quite high with large spatial gradients. Carrier phase data from the GAGAN network of Indian TEC Stations is used for estimating ionospheric gradients in multiple viewing directions. Rate of TEC (ROT) and Rate of TEC Index (ROTI) are calculated to identify the ionospheric gradients. Among the satellite signals arriving in multiple directions, the signals which suffer from severe ionospheric gradients are identified and avoided for improving GAGAN positional accuracy. The outcome of this paper will be helpful for improving GAGAN system performance.

  13. The upper atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brace, Larry H.

    1992-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: the dynamic atmosphere of Mars; possible similarities with Earth and Venus; the atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars; solar wind interactions; future approved missions; and possible future mission.

  14. Thermospheric storms and related ionospheric effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, S.; Spencer, N. W.

    1976-01-01

    A comparative study of thermospheric storms for equinox and winter conditions is presented based on neutral-composition measurements from the Aeros-A neutral-atmosphere temperature experiment. The main features of the two storms as inferred from changes in N2, Ar, He, and O are described, and their implications for current theories of thermospheric storms are discussed. On the basis of the study of the F-region critical frequency measured from a chain of ground-based ionospheric stations during the two storm periods, the general characteristics of the ionospheric storms and the traveling ionospheric disturbances are described. It is suggested that the positive and negative phases of ionospheric storms are different manifestations of thermospheric storms.

  15. Pulsating aurora: The importance of the ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H.C.

    1980-05-01

    A number of different, but mainly optical, observations made in pulsating auroras are presented. These observations indicate that active ionospheric processes are likely to play an important role in causing and/or modifying pulsating aurora.

  16. Wave coupling of atmosphere-ionosphere system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharenko, L. P.

    2011-12-01

    The dynamic coupling of atmosphere-ionosphere system is a complex interdisciplinary problem. Current thinking suggests that the upward propagation of internal atmospheric waves (planetary waves, tides, gravity waves) from the lower atmosphere is an essential source of energy and momentum for the thermosphere and embedded ionosphere. Studies over the last decade presented fascinating experimental and modeling evidence of global coupling from the troposphere to mesosphere, thermosphere and ionosphere. They were enabled by unprecedented availability of satellite data, in particularly from TIMED, MLS, CHAMP, and GRACE, focused experimental campaigns from ground-based instruments, and major advances in global coupling models. This paper will summarize several developments over the past decade, including non-migrating structures in the ionosphere and thermosphere, advances in studies of gravity waves and planetary waves, and their implications for better understanding of ITM. The paper will also identify questions that need to be answered in the future, and outline promising topics of future development.

  17. Space weather. Ionospheric control of magnetotail reconnection.

    PubMed

    Lotko, William; Smith, Ryan H; Zhang, Binzheng; Ouellette, Jeremy E; Brambles, Oliver J; Lyon, John G

    2014-07-11

    Observed distributions of high-speed plasma flows at distances of 10 to 30 Earth radii (R(E)) in Earth's magnetotail neutral sheet are highly skewed toward the premidnight sector. The flows are a product of the magnetic reconnection process that converts magnetic energy stored in the magnetotail into plasma kinetic and thermal energy. We show, using global numerical simulations, that the electrodynamic interaction between Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere produces an asymmetry consistent with observed distributions in nightside reconnection and plasmasheet flows and in accompanying ionospheric convection. The primary causal agent is the meridional gradient in the ionospheric Hall conductance which, through the Cowling effect, regulates the distribution of electrical currents flowing within and between the ionosphere and magnetotail. PMID:25013068

  18. Propagation studies using a theoretical ionosphere model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M.

    1973-01-01

    The mid-latitude ionospheric and neutral atmospheric models are coupled with an advanced three dimensional ray tracing program to see what success would be obtained in predicting the wave propagation conditions and to study to what extent the use of theoretical ionospheric models is practical. The Penn State MK 1 ionospheric model, the Mitra-Rowe D region model, and the Groves' neutral atmospheric model are used throughout this work to represent the real electron densities and collision frequencies. The Faraday rotation and differential Doppler velocities from satellites, the propagation modes for long distance high frequency propagation, the group delays for each mode, the ionospheric absorption, and the spatial loss are all predicted.

  19. A Model of Callisto's Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartkorn, O. A.; Saur, J.; Bloecker, A.; Strobel, D. F.; Simon, S.

    2014-12-01

    We develop a model of the ionosphere of Jupiter's moon Callisto, where we assume a stationary balance between sources and sinks of electrons and electron energy. Hence, effects of electron transport and electron energy transport are neglected. At Callisto, the production of electrons and electron energy is basically driven by photoionization, which is implemented using the EUVAC model for solar activity. Dissociative recombination is the main electron loss process, whereas electron energy loss is further driven by dissociation, electron impact ionization as well as vibrational and rotational excitations of neutral atmospheric particles. All these effects are incorporated within our model by considering the associated cross sections. The neutral atmosphere is assumed to be stationary and consists of molecular oxygen with a column density of 3 to 4 x 1020 m-2 (e.g. Kliore et al. (2002), Liang et al. (2005)). Our results can be compared to radio occultation observations of four Galileo spacecraft flybys reported by Kliore et al. (2002), which shows that this simple model can explain the general pattern of the observational data. Indeed, our results indicate that the detection of enhanced electron densities is very sensitive to the exact position of the tangential point of the radio occultation method. Our model shows that photoionization produces a strong asymmetry of the electron density distribution between day and night-side of the moon. Further, model results for the electron energy allow for an estimation of the day glow of Callisto's atmosphere. This can be compared to HST observations (Strobel et al. (2002)) in order to evaluate the density of the neutral oxygen atmosphere. Future studies imply the modeling of the modification of the ionospheric structure through interaction with upstreaming jovian magnetospheric plasma.

  20. Remote Sensing of Ionosphere by IONOLAB Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arikan, Feza

    2016-07-01

    Ionosphere is a temporally and spatially varying, dispersive, anisotropic and inhomogeneous medium that is characterized primarily by its electron density distribution. Electron density is a complex function of spatial and temporal variations of solar, geomagnetic, and seismic activities. Ionosphere is the main source of error for navigation and positioning systems and satellite communication. Therefore, characterization and constant monitoring of variability of the ionosphere is of utmost importance for the performance improvement of these systems. Since ionospheric electron density is not a directly measurable quantity, an important derivable parameter is the Total Electron Content (TEC), which is used widely to characterize the ionosphere. TEC is proportional to the total number of electrons on a line crossing the atmosphere. IONOLAB is a research group is formed by Hacettepe University, Bilkent University and Kastamonu University, Turkey gathered to handle the challenges of the ionosphere using state-of-the-art remote sensing and signal processing techniques. IONOLAB group provides unique space weather services of IONOLAB-TEC, International Reference Ionosphere extended to Plasmasphere (IRI-Plas) model based IRI-Plas-MAP, IRI-Plas-STEC and Online IRI-Plas-2015 model at www.ionolab.org. IONOLAB group has been working for imaging and monitoring of ionospheric structure for the last 15 years. TEC is estimated from dual frequency GPS receivers as IONOLAB-TEC using IONOLAB-BIAS. For high spatio-temporal resolution 2-D imaging or mapping, IONOLAB-MAP algorithm is developed that uses automated Universal Kriging or Ordinary Kriging in which the experimental semivariogram is fitted to Matern Function with Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO). For 3-D imaging of ionosphere and 1-D vertical profiles of electron density, state-of-the-art IRI-Plas model based IONOLAB-CIT algorithm is developed for regional reconstruction that employs Kalman Filters for state

  1. An Ionospheric Metric Study Using Operational Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojka, J. J.; Schunk, R. W.; Thompson, D. C.; Scherliess, L.; Harris, T. J.

    2006-12-01

    One of the outstanding challenges in upgrading ionospheric operational models is quantifying their improvement. This challenge is not necessarily an absolute accuracy one, but rather answering the question, "Is the newest operational model an improvement over its predecessor under operational scenarios?" There are few documented cases where ionospheric models are compared either with each other or against "ground truth". For example a CEDAR workshop team, PRIMO, spent almost a decade carrying out a models comparison with ionosonde and incoherent scatter radar measurements from the Millstone Hill, Massachusetts location [Anderson et al.,1998]. The result of this study was that all models were different and specific conditions could be found when each was the "best" model. Similarly, a National Space Weather Metrics ionospheric challenge was held and results were presented at a National Space Weather meeting. The results were again found to be open to interpretation, and issues with the value of the specific metrics were raised (Fuller-Rowell, private communication, 2003). Hence, unlike the tropospheric weather community, who have established metrics and exercised them on new models over many decades to quantify improvement, the ionospheric community has not yet settled on a metric of both scientific and operational value. We report on a study in which metrics were used to compare various forms of the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI), the Ionospheric Forecast Model (IFM), and the Utah State University Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements Model (USU-GAIM) models. The ground truth for this study was a group of 11 ionosonde data sets taken between 20 March and 19 April 2004. The metric parameter was the ionosphere's critical frequency. The metric was referenced to the IRI. Hence, the study addressed the specific question what improvement does IFM and USU-GAIM have over IRI. Both strengths (improvements) and weaknesses of these models are discussed

  2. Tsunamis warning from space :Ionosphere seismology

    SciTech Connect

    Larmat, Carene

    2012-09-04

    Ionosphere is the layer of the atmosphere from about 85 to 600km containing electrons and electrically charged atoms that are produced by solar radiation. Perturbations - layering affected by day and night, X-rays and high-energy protons from the solar flares, geomagnetic storms, lightning, drivers-from-below. Strategic for radio-wave transmission. This project discusses the inversion of ionosphere signals, tsunami wave amplitude and coupling parameters, which improves tsunami warning systems.

  3. Computerized adaptive control weld skate with CCTV weld guidance project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    This report summarizes progress of the automatic computerized weld skate development portion of the Computerized Weld Skate with Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Arc Guidance Project. The main goal of the project is to develop an automatic welding skate demonstration model equipped with CCTV weld guidance. The three main goals of the overall project are to: (1) develop a demonstration model computerized weld skate system, (2) develop a demonstration model automatic CCTV guidance system, and (3) integrate the two systems into a demonstration model of computerized weld skate with CCTV weld guidance for welding contoured parts.

  4. Solar Cycle Variations in the Polar Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrell, A. G.; Yeoman, T. K.; Milan, S. E.; Lester, M.

    2014-12-01

    The polar ionosphere is a dynamic region that readily responds to changes in solar irradiance, solar wind, the magnetosphere, and the neutral atmosphere. The most recent solar minimum brought to light gaps in the current understanding of the relationship between ionospheric structure and solar irradiance. The Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) offers an invaluable dataset for studying long-term ionospheric variability, as it has been continuously providing extensive coverage of the northern and southern polar ionosphere since 1995 (the solar minimum preceding the 23rd solar cycle). An under-utilized portion of the SuperDARN dataset is the ground-backscatter: the backscatter that returns from a reflection point on the ground along an open (or irregularity-free) propagation path. The ground-backscatter provides a measure the ionospheric density at the peak of the radar signal's path. These measurements are used to the examine the changes in the bottomside, polar ionosphere over the 23rd and 24th solar cycles.

  5. Ionospheric Response Due to Seismic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Dinesh Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Signatures of the seismic activity in the ionospheric F2 region have been studied by analyzing the measurement of electron and ion temperatures during the occurrence of earthquake. The ionospheric electron and ion temperatures data recorded by the RPA payload aboard the Indian SROSS-C2 satellite during the period from January 1995 to December 2000 were used for the altitude range 430-630 km over Indian region. The normal day's electron and ion temperatures have been compared to the temperatures recorded during the seismic activity. The details of seismic events were obtained from USGS earthquake data information website. It has been found that the average electron temperature is enhanced during the occurrence of earthquakes by 1.2 to 1.5 times and this enhancement was for ion temperature ranging from 1.1to 1.3 times over the normal day's average temperatures. The above careful quantitative analysis of ionospheric electron and ion temperatures data shows the consistent enhancement in the ionospheric electron and ion temperatures. It is expected that the seismogenic vertical electrical field propagates up to the ionospheric heights and induces Joule heating that may cause the enhancement in ionospheric temperatures.

  6. LIFDAR: A Diagnostic Tool for the Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kia, O. E.; Rodgers, C. T.; Batholomew, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    ITT Corporation proposes a novel system to measure and monitor the ion species within the Earth's ionosphere called Laser Induced Fluorescence Detection and Ranging (LIFDAR). Unlike current ionosphere measurements that detect electrons and magnetic field, LIFDAR remotely measures the major contributing ion species to the electron plasma. The LIFDAR dataset has the added capability to demonstrate stratification and classification of the layers of the ionosphere to ultimately give a true tomographic view. We propose a proof of concept study using existing atmospheric LIDAR sensors combined with a mountaintop observatory for a single ion species that is prevalent in all layers of the atmosphere. We envision the LIFDAR concept will enable verification, validation, and exploration of the physics of the magneto-hydrodynamic models used in ionosphere forecasting community. The LIFDAR dataset will provide the necessary ion and electron density data for the system wide data gap. To begin a proof of concept, we present the science justification of the LIFDAR system based on the model photon budget. This analysis is based on the fluorescence of ionized oxygen within the ionosphere versus altitude. We use existing model abundance data of the ionosphere during normal and perturbed states. We propagate the photon uncertainties from the laser source through the atmosphere to the plasma and back to the collecting optics and detector. We calculate the expected photon budget to determine signal to noise estimates based on the targeted altitude and detection efficiency. Finally, we use these results to derive a LIFDAR observation strategy compatible with operational parameters.

  7. The Combined Radio Interferometry and COSMIC Experiment in Tomography (CRICKET) Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymond, Kenneth; Coker, Clayton; Bernhardt, Paul; Cohen, Aaron; Crane, Patrick; Kassim, Namir; Lazio, Joseph; Weiler, Kurt; Watts, Christopher; Rickard, Lee J.; Taylor, Greg; Schinzel, Frank; Philstrom, Ylva; Close, Sigrid; Colestock, Patrick; Myers, Steve; Datta, Abirhup

    We report on the Combined Radio Interferometry and COSMIC Experiment in Tomography Campaign (CRICKET) held on September 15 and 17, 2007. The experiment used the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC also known as FORMOSAT-3) in conjunction with the Very Large Array radio telescope, located near Socorro, NM, to study the ionosphere from the global scale down to the regional scale. Each COSMIC satellite includes three instruments capable of measuring the ionosphere: the Tiny Ionospheric Photometer (TIP), a UV radiometer; the GPS Occultation experiment (GOX), a dual-frequency GPS occultation receiver; and the Tri-band Beacon (TBB), a three frequency coherently radiating radio beacon. These three instruments have been demonstrated to be a powerful means for characterizing the global-scale ionosphere. The VLA when deployed at its largest extent and while operating at 73.8 MHz is incredibly sensitive to relative total electron content variations of the regional ionosphere over about a 30-100 km diameter area. In this work, we concentrate on the first set of observations on September 15, 2007 at approximately 0830 UT. We have successfully married these heterogeneous data sets, using a tomographic data fusion approach, to produce a consistent ionospheric specification from the global scale down to the regional scale.

  8. Pseudolocal tomography

    DOEpatents

    Katsevich, A.J.; Ramm, A.G.

    1996-07-23

    Local tomographic data is used to determine the location and value of a discontinuity between a first internal density of an object and a second density of a region within the object. A beam of radiation is directed in a predetermined pattern through the region of the object containing the discontinuity. Relative attenuation data of the beam is determined within the predetermined pattern having a first data component that includes attenuation data through the region. The relative attenuation data is input to a pseudo-local tomography function, where the difference between the internal density and the pseudo-local tomography function is computed across the discontinuity. The pseudo-local tomography function outputs the location of the discontinuity and the difference in density between the first density and the second density. 7 figs.

  9. Pseudolocal tomography

    DOEpatents

    Katsevich, Alexander J.; Ramm, Alexander G.

    1996-01-01

    Local tomographic data is used to determine the location and value of a discontinuity between a first internal density of an object and a second density of a region within the object. A beam of radiation is directed in a predetermined pattern through the region of the object containing the discontinuity. Relative attenuation data of the beam is determined within the predetermined pattern having a first data component that includes attenuation data through the region. The relative attenuation data is input to a pseudo-local tomography function, where the difference between the internal density and the pseudo-local tomography function is computed across the discontinuity. The pseudo-local tomography function outputs the location of the discontinuity and the difference in density between the first density and the second density.

  10. Shielding for thermoacoustic tomography with RF excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, M.; Becker, G.; Dey, P.; Generotzky, J.; Patch, S. K.

    2008-02-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) pulses used to generate thermoacoustic computerized tomography (TCT) signal couple directly into the pulser-receiver and oscilloscope, swamping true TCT signal. We use a standard RF enclosure housing both RF amplifier and object being imaged. This is similar to RF shielding of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suites and protects electronics outside from stray RF. Unlike MRI, TCT receivers are ultrasound transducers, which must also be shielded from RF. A transducer housing that simultaneously shields RF and permits acoustic transmission was developed specifically for TCT. We compare TCT signals measured with and without RF shielding.

  11. Micro-tomography using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Q.C.; Kinney, J.H.; Bonse, U.; Nichols, M.C.; Nusshardt, R.; Brase, J.M.

    1986-04-09

    This paper discusses the results of recent experiments at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) and Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor (HASYLAB) which were designed to explore the feasibility of using synchrotron radiation in high-resolution, computerized, critical-absorption tomography. The results demonstrate that it is possible, using absorption-edge differencing, to identify adjacent elements in the periodic table with high sensitivity. Furthermore, by using the fine structure in the absorption spectra, it is possible to distinguish between regions of different chemical states. Methods of using synchrotron radiation for high-resolution, three-dimensional chemical-state mapping in small samples are discussed.

  12. Neurologic applications of positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Lenzi, G L; Pantano, P

    1984-11-01

    The impact of computerized neuroimaging in the neurologic sciences has been so dramatic that it has completely changed our approach to the individual patient. Further changes may be expected from the newborn positron emission tomography (PET) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in order to help the reader digest a large bulk of data and fully realize the present state of the art of PET, the authors have shaped this review mainly on results rather than on methods and on published reports rather than on future potential. PMID:6335222

  13. Teaching consultation psychiatry through computerized case simulation.

    PubMed

    Jachna, J S; Powsner, S M; McIntyre, P J; Byck, R

    1993-03-01

    The PsyConsult Adventure Simulation program presents a case simulation of consultation in a general hospital. Exploring this computerized case helps trainees prepare for the complexities of consultation that they will face on the hospital wards. The simulation provides a distinctive approach, modeling the process of an actual consultation and allowing trainees to explore on their own initiative. It presents general techniques of psychiatric consultation as well as specifics of diagnosis and treatment. The program demonstrates the feasibility of using case simulation with a personal computer system as a supplement to bedside teaching of consultation psychiatry. PMID:24443195

  14. Computerized certification of digital ultrasonic instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, M. W.

    1987-09-01

    A computerized inspection system is being set up at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant to enable certification of the Krautkramer Branson ultrasonic instrumentation used extensively in Y-12 production operations. The system takes the data required to certify the linearity and frequency response of the receiver and to certify the correct operation of the pulsers, gates, and computer interface. A subset of the program will be able to verify correct instrumentation in the field by using the actual computer and instrumentation being used for production ultrasonic weld inspections. The system can reduce the certification time from approximately one week to less than an hour.

  15. Comparison of the USU ionospheric model with the UCL-Sheffield coupled thermospheric-ionospheric model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sojka, J. J.; Schunk, R. W.; Rees, D.; Fuller-Rowell, T. J.; Moffett, R. J.; Quegan, S.

    1992-01-01

    Several physical models of the high-latitude ionosphere have been developed that describe the time-dependent evolution of the E- and F-region plasma density. The models require a variety of inputs, including solar EUV fluxes, magnetospheric convection, auroral precipitation, and neutral atmosphere. Of specific relevance to this study is how the neutral atmosphere is incorporated into the ionospheric models. For the USU ionospheric model, the neutral atmosphere is the MSIS 1986 empirical model, while for the UCL-Sheffield coupled thermospheric-ionospheric model the neutral atmosphere is computed simultaneously with the ionosphere. Both models were run for similar solar and magnetospheric conditions (solar maximum, moderate geomagnetic activity, and winter solstice). Solar maximum conditions ensured a strong coupling between the ionosphere and thermosphere, which provided the possibility of a large ionospheric difference between the two physical models. This was further enhanced by choosing winter conditions so that the densities were not dominated by sunlight. The comparison of the two models indicated that both models predict the same morphological features with similar ionospheric densities, generally within about 30 percent.

  16. Testing Ionospheric Faraday Rotation Corrections in CASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, Jason E.; Moellenbrock, George

    2015-04-01

    The Earth’s ionosphere introduces direction- and time-dependent effects over a range of physical and temporal scales and so is a major source for unmodeled phase offsets for low frequency radioastronomical observations. Ionospheric effects are often the limiting factor to making sensitive radioastronomical measurements to probe the solar corona or coronal mass ejections at low frequencies (< 5 GHz). It has become common practice to use global ionospheric models derived from the Global Positioning System (GPS) to provide a means of externally calibrating low frequency data. We have developed a new calibration algorithm in the Common Astronomy Software Applications (CASA) package. CASA, which was developed to meet the data post-processing needs of next generation telescopes such as the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), did not previously have the capability to mitigate ionospheric effects. This algorithm uses GPS-based global ionosphere maps to mitigate the first and second order ionospheric effects (dispersion delay and Faraday rotation, respectively). We investigated several data centers as potential sources for global ionospheric models and chose the International Global Navigation Satellite System Service data product because data from other sources are generally too sparse to use without additional interpolation schemes. This implementation of ionospheric corrections in CASA has been tested on several sets of VLA observations and all of them showed a significant reduction of the dispersion delay. In order to rigorously test CASA’s ability to mitigate ionospheric Faraday rotation, we made VLA full-polarization observations of the standard VLA phase calibrators J0359+5057 and J0423+4150 in August 2014, using L band (1 - 2 GHz), S band (2 - 4 GHz), and C band (4 - 6 GHz) frequencies in the D array configuration. The observations were 4 hours in duration, beginning near local sunrise. In this paper, we give a general description of how these corrections are

  17. 3D Imaging with Holographic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Colin J. R.; Kou, Shan Shan

    2010-04-01

    There are two main types of tomography that enable the 3D internal structures of objects to be reconstructed from scattered data. The commonly known computerized tomography (CT) give good results in the x-ray wavelength range where the filtered back-projection theorem and Radon transform can be used. These techniques rely on the Fourier projection-slice theorem where rays are considered to propagate straight through the object. Another type of tomography called `diffraction tomography' applies in applications in optics and acoustics where diffraction and scattering effects must be taken into account. The latter proves to be a more difficult problem, as light no longer travels straight through the sample. Holographic tomography is a popular way of performing diffraction tomography and there has been active experimental research on reconstructing complex refractive index data using this approach recently. However, there are two distinct ways of doing tomography: either by rotation of the object or by rotation of the illumination while fixing the detector. The difference between these two setups is intuitive but needs to be quantified. From Fourier optics and information transformation point of view, we use 3D transfer function analysis to quantitatively describe how spatial frequencies of the object are mapped to the Fourier domain. We first employ a paraxial treatment by calculating the Fourier transform of the defocused OTF. The shape of the calculated 3D CTF for tomography, by scanning the illumination in one direction only, takes on a form that we might call a 'peanut,' compared to the case of object rotation, where a diablo is formed, the peanut exhibiting significant differences and non-isotropy. In particular, there is a line singularity along one transverse direction. Under high numerical aperture conditions, the paraxial treatment is not accurate, and so we make use of 3D analytical geometry to calculate the behaviour in the non-paraxial case. This time, we

  18. Heat balance of the ionosphere - Implications for the International Reference Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilitza, D.

    1985-01-01

    Theoretical considerations can be helpful tools in modeling ionospheric parameters in regions and for times where not enough experimental data are available. This study asks whether results of heat balance calculations should be introduced to supplement the data base for the International Reference Ionosphere. The present status of the theoretical understanding is discussed and the influence of the following unresolved or neglected times are examined: (1) electron heating rate, (2) electron cooling by fine structure excitation of atomic oxygen, and (3) height-dependent Coulomb Logarithm. The ambiguity introduced by these terms leads to up to 30 percent uncertainty in the electron temperature of the lower ionosphere. The electron temperature in the upper ionosphere is largely determined by heat conduction from above and depends critically on the conditions assumed at the boundary between ionosphere and plasmasphere.

  19. Seismic Tomography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Don L.; Dziewonski, Adam M.

    1984-01-01

    Describes how seismic tomography is used to analyze the waves produced by earthquakes. The information obtained from the procedure can then be used to map the earth's mantle in three dimensions. The resulting maps are then studied to determine such information as the convective flow that propels the crustal plates. (JN)

  20. Computerized medication administration records decrease medication occurrences.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A L; Hill, J J; Wilson, R G; Nipper, K; Kwon, I W

    1997-04-01

    Studies have demonstrated that medication errors occur at a number of locations in the continuum between ordering of drug therapy and administration of the medication. Computer management of patient medication profiles offers the opportunity to enhance communication between pharmacists and nurses, and to decrease medication errors and delays in delivery of therapy. A number of authors have postulated that computerization of medication profiles would enhance medication delivery accuracy and timeliness, but no study has demonstrated this improvement. We report the results of a retrospective analysis undertaken to assess the improvements resulting from sharing a computerized medication record. We used a broader definition of medication occurrences that includes the more traditional definition, and averted errors, delays in delivery of medications and information, and disagreements between pharmacy and nursing medication profiles. We compared medication occurrences reported through an existing internal system between two periods; the first when separate pharmacy and nursing medication records were used, and the second period when a shared medication record was used by pharmacy and nursing. Average medication occurrences per admission decreased from 0.1084 to 0.0658 (p < 0.01). Medication occurrences per dose decreased from 0.0005 to 0.0003 (p < 0.01). The use of a shared medication record by pharmacy and nursing led to a statistically significant decrease in medication occurrences. Information shared between the two professions allowed timely resolution of discrepancies in medication orders, leading to better execution of drug therapy, decreased medication occurrences, and increased efficiency. PMID:10166241

  1. Computerized Clinical Decision Support: Contributions from 2014

    PubMed Central

    Koutkias, V.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective To summarize recent research and propose a selection of best papers published in 2014 in the field of computerized clinical decision support for the Decision Support section of the IMIA yearbook. Method A literature review was performed by searching two bibliographic databases for papers related to clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) and computerized provider order entry systems in order to select a list of candidate best papers to be then peer-reviewed by external reviewers. A consensus meeting between the two section editors and the editorial team was finally organized to conclude on the selection of best papers. Results Among the 1,254 returned papers published in 2014, the full review process selected four best papers. The first one is an experimental contribution to a better understanding of unintended uses of CDSSs. The second paper describes the effective use of previously collected data to tailor and adapt a CDSS. The third paper presents an innovative application that uses pharmacogenomic information to support personalized medicine. The fourth paper reports on the long-term effect of the routine use of a CDSS for antibiotic therapy. Conclusions As health information technologies spread more and more meaningfully, CDSSs are improving to answer users’ needs more accurately. The exploitation of previously collected data and the use of genomic data for decision support has started to materialize. However, more work is still needed to address issues related to the correct usage of such technologies, and to assess their effective impact in the long term. PMID:26293858

  2. Computerized interpretation of solitary pulmonary nodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hideo; Takabatake, Hirotsugu; Mori, Masaki; Mitani, Masanobu; Natori, Hiroshi

    1998-04-01

    In physicians' interpretation, morphologic characteristics of pulmonary nodules are not only important signs for the discrimination, but also important features for the diagnosis with a reasonable degree of confidence. This paper describes about the computerized interpretation system which is developed to analyze the relation between the measuring values and the morphologic characteristics, and to make clear the logic of physicians' diagnosis. We think that the four basic morphologic characteristics of the discriminative diagnosis between benign and malignant nodules exist which are: (1) the density; (2) the homogeneity; (3) the definition; and (4) the convergence. To obtain each grade of the parameters, we developed an interpretation system. On the other hand, to obtain digital feature values, we used our computer aided diagnosis system. Interpretation experiments were performed by using 15 benign and 19 malignant cases of chest x-ray CT images. As the result of a statistical analysis, some digital features have the significant differences between benign and malignant nodules, and the morphological characteristics have also differences. Therefore the computerized system is feasible to help physicians' interpretation to distinct between malignant and benign nodules by showing digital feature values as some references.

  3. A computerized multichannel platelet aggregometer system.

    PubMed

    Kuzara, D; Zoltan, B J; Greathouse, S L; Jordan, C W; Kohler, C A

    1986-08-01

    Commercially available instrumentation for conducting platelet aggregation studies in clinical and research laboratories consists of one-, two-, or four-channel aggregometers used in conjunction with strip chart recorders. These instruments have limited utility in large-scale drug screening and evaluation of the mode of action of drugs or in the clinical diagnosis of platelet disorders. A new instrument, a computerized multichannel aggregometer system (CMPAS) has been developed to collect, display, and analyze platelet aggregation data. The system is comprised of a 24-channel Born-type aggregometer, interfaced to a Rockwell AIM-65 microcomputer through an analogue-to-digital converter and an Epson dot-matrix printer. Each channel is individually calibrated, and aggregation data can be collected on up to 24 different platelet-rich plasma samples simultaneously. Conversational programs written in BASIC prompt the user for the addition of agonists and inhibitors. The tracings for each channel are displayed simultaneously, and a program automatically analyzes the data to generate the following parameters: baseline optical density, maximum aggregation response, positive and negative slopes, time to peak aggregation, and percentage response. Computerized multichannel aggregometer system data outputs are comparable to data generated by a standard Chronolog aggregometer unit. The advantages of the system include multichannel capability, simultaneous display of all channels allowing relative comparisons between control and experimental groups, and time savings and improved efficiency in conducting and analyzing aggregation experiments. PMID:3755779

  4. Ionospheric irregularity influences on GPS time delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansoori, Azad Ahmad; Gwal, Ashok Kumar; Khan, Parvaiz A.; Bhawre, Purushottam

    All the trans-ionospheric signals interact with the ionosphere during their passage through ionosphere, hence are strongly influenced by the ionosphere. One of most important ionospheric effects on the trans-ionospheric signals is the delay both in range and time. Under this investigation we have studied the variability of ionospheric range delay in GPS signals. To accomplish this study we have used the GPS measurements at a low latitude station, IISC Bangalore (13.02N, 77.57E) during January 2012 to December 2012. We studied the diurnal monthly as well as seasonal variability of the range delay. We also selected five intense geomagnetic storms that occurred during 2012 and investigated the variability of delay during the disturbed conditions. From our study we found the diurnal variability of the range delay is similar to the diurnal pattern observed for TEC. The delay is maximum during the month of October while lowest delay is found to occur in the month of December. During summer season the range delay in GPS signals in less while the largest delay occurs during the equinox season. The variability of delay during the geomagnetic storms of 09 Mar. 2012, 24 Apr. 2012, 15 Jul. 2012, 01 Oct. 2012 and 14 Nov. 2012 were also studied. All these geomagnetic storms belonged to intense category. We found that the value of delay is strongly increased during the course of geomagnetic storms. We took the peak value of delay as well as calculated the enhancement in the delay during these geomagnetic storms and then investigated their correlation with the storm intensity index Dst. Both the delays follow a very good correlation with Dst index.

  5. Ionospheric Variability and Storms on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendillo, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this grant was to conduct the first-ever study of ionospheric variability on Mars. To do so, we used data from the Radio Science (RS) experiment onboard the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) satellite. Dr. David Hinson of the RS team at Stanford University was a most helpful and valuable colleague throughout the studies we conducted. For the initial RS datasets available from the MGS mission, there were no severe storms caused by solar wind activity, so we concentrated on day-to-day effects. This turned out to be a wise approach since understanding "normal variability" had to be done before any claim could be made about "space weather" effects. Our approach was three-fold: (1) select a good dataset for characterization of ionosphere variability at Mars, one for which excellent terrestrial data were also available. This turned out to be the period 9-27 March 1999; (2) once the variability at Mars was described, develop and use a new photochemical model of the martian ionosphere to find the extent to which solar variability on those days caused or contributed to the observed patterns; (3) use the results from the above, together with additional datasets from the MGS/RS experiment, to describe some practical consequences that the martian ionosphere would have upon NASA s proposed navigation and communications systems for Mars. The results of these studies showed that: (a) solar variability is the dominant source of ionospheric variability at Mars (during periods of quiet solar wind), (b) that current models do a good job in portraying such effects at the height of the ionospheric peak electron density, and (c) that ionospheric structure on Mars can affect attempts at precise position-fixing at Mars should relatively high (GPS-like) frequencies not be used in a Mars communications and navigation system.

  6. Role of Ionospheric Plasmas in Earth's Magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas E.

    2007-01-01

    This tutorial will summarize observations and theories indicating a prominent role of ionospheric plasma in the Earth's magnetotail. At the Global scale, I will argue that it is ionospheric plasma momentum and dynamic pressure that are responsible for the production of plasmoids, through the action of a transient near-Earth neutral or X-line, which serves to release excessive plasma pressure from the magnetotail field. Ionospheric plasma gains the momentum and energy to produce plasmoids and their related effects through its interaction with the solar wind, beginning at the dayside reconnection region and extending across the polar caps through the magnetotail lobes. This distant neutral line can be depicted as a feature much like that found in cometary magnetospheres, where disconnection limits the amount of IMF hung up on the cometary coma. On the other hand, the near-Earth neutral one can be seen as a feature unique to planets with an intrinsic magnetic field and internal source of plasma, the heating of which produces pressures too large to be restrained. Ionospheric plasmas also have other more local roles to play in the magnetotail. The circulation influences the composition of the plasma sheet, and the resultant wave environment, giving rise to reduced wave propagation speeds. Important heavy ion cyclotron resonances, and enhanced finite gyro-radius effects including non-adiabatic particle acceleration. At minimum, the presence of ionospheric plasma must influence the rate of reconnection via its enhanced mass density. Other non-MHD effects of ionospheric plasma presence are likely to be important but need much more investigation to be well understood. The MMS mission is designed to penetrate the subtle diffusion region physics that is involved, and its ability to observe ionospheric plasma involvement in reconnection will contribute significantly toward that goal.

  7. Ionospheric Storms in Equatorial Region: Digisonde Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paznukhov, V.; Altadill, D.; Blanch, E.

    2011-12-01

    We present a study of the ionospheric storms observed in the low-latitude and equatorial ionosphere at several digisonde stations: Jicamarca (Geomagnetic Coordinates: 2.0 S, 355.3 E), Kwajalein Island (3.8 N, 238.2 E), Ascension Island (2.5 S, 56.8 E), Fortaleza (4.8 N, 33.7 W), and Ramey (28.6 N, 5.2 E). The strongest geomagnetic storms from years 1995-2009 have been analyzed. The main ionospheric characteristics, hmF2 and foF2 were used in the study, making it possible to investigate the changes in the ionosphere peak density and height during the storms. All digisonde data were manually processed to assure the accuracy of the measurements. Solar wind data, geomagnetic field variations, and auroral activity indices have been used to characterize the geomagnetic environment during the events. It was found in our analysis that the major drivers for the ionospheric storms, electric field and neutral wind have approximately equal importance at the low-latitude and equatorial latitudes. This is noticeably different from the behavior of the ionsphere in the middle latitudes, where the neutral wind is usually a dominant factor. It was found that the auroral index, AE is the best precursor of the ionospheric effects observed during the storms in this region. We analyze the difference between time delays of the storm effects observed at the stations located in different local time sectors. The overall statistics of the time delays of the storms as a function of the local time at the stations is also presented. Several very interesting cases of sudden very strong ionospheric uplifting and their possible relation to the equatorial super fountain effect are investigated in greater details.

  8. The global ionosphere thermosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridley, A. J.; Deng, Y.; Tóth, G.

    2006-05-01

    The recently created global ionosphere thermosphere model (GITM) is presented. GITM uses a three-dimensional spherical grid that can be stretched in both latitude and altitude, while having a fixed resolution in longitude. GITM is nontraditional in that it does not use a pressure-based coordinate system. Instead it uses an altitude-based grid and does not assume a hydrostatic solution. This allows the model to more realistically capture physics in the high-latitude region, where auroral heating is prevalent. The code can be run in a one-dimensional (1-D) or three-dimensional (3-D) mode. In 3-D mode, the modeling region is broken into blocks of equal size for parallelization. In 1-D mode, a single latitude and longitude is modeled by neglecting any horizontal transport or gradients, except in the ionospheric potential. GITM includes a modern advection solver and realistic source terms for the continuity, momentum, and energy equations. Each neutral species has a separate vertical velocity, with coupling of the velocities through a frictional term. The ion momentum equation is solved for assuming steady-state, taking into account the pressure, gravity, neutral winds, and external electric fields. GITM is an extremely flexible code—allowing different models of high-latitude electric fields, auroral particle precipitation, solar EUV inputs, and particle energy deposition to be used. The magnetic field can be represented by an ideal dipole magnetic field or a realistic APEX magnetic field. Many of the source terms can be controlled (switched on and off, or values set) by an easily readable input file. The initial state can be set in three different ways: (1) using an ideal atmosphere, where the user inputs the densities and temperature at the bottom of the atmosphere; (2) using MSIS and IRI; and (3) restarting from a previous run. A 3-D equinox run and a 3-D northern summer solstice run are presented. These simulations are compared with MSIS and IRI to show that the

  9. Computerized Adaptive Assessment of Cognitive Abilities among Disabled Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engdahl, Brian

    This study examined computerized adaptive testing and cognitive ability testing of adults with cognitive disabilities. Adult subjects (N=250) were given computerized tests on language usage and space relations in one of three administration conditions: paper and pencil, fixed length computer adaptive, and variable length computer adaptive.…

  10. Kinds of Arguments Emerging While Exploring in a Computerized Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavy, Ilana

    2004-01-01

    In this paper there is a description of a case in which mathematical argumentation emerge and develop between 7th grade students working in an interactive computerized environment without a deliberate mentoring. The computerized environment has its influence on the characteristics of this argumentation which include mathematical regularities based…

  11. 45 CFR 307.5 - Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... operational computerized support enforcement system, which meets Federal requirements under § 302.85(a)(1) of... October 1, 2000, each State must have in effect an operational computerized support enforcement system... plans to use and how they will interface with the base system; (3) Provide documentation that...

  12. The 24-Hour Job Machine: Computerized Applicant Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiedman, Lisa W.

    1986-01-01

    The evolution of computerized job applicant systems is described and compared to that of computerized banking systems; the characteristics of such systems in the future, especially for minimizing data entry and maximizing accessibility, are then outlined and illustrated with the Carnegie-Mellon University system. (MSE)

  13. Real-Data Simulation of Computerized Adaptive Bayesian Scaling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, W. Paul

    1993-01-01

    Investigated model for reducing time for administration of Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) using real-data simulation of Bayesian scaling in computerized adaptive administration. Findings from simulation study using data from 127 undergraduates are strongly supportive of use of Bayesian scaled computerized adaptive administration of MBTI.…

  14. The Reality, Direction, and Future of Computerized Publications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenstein, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Sharing information in digital form by using a computer is a growing phenomenon. Many universities are making their applications available on computer. More than one hundred and thirty-six universities have developed computerized applications on their own or through a commercial vendor. Universities developed computerized applications in order to…

  15. 11 CFR 9033.12 - Production of computerized information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... magnetic media, such as magnetic tapes or magnetic diskettes, containing the computerized information at the times specified in 11 CFR 9038.1(b)(1): (1) Information required by law to be maintained regarding.... The computerized magnetic media shall be prepared and delivered at the committee's expense and...

  16. MCATL: A Language for Authoring Computerized Adaptive Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vale, C. David

    The specification of a computerized adaptive test, like the specification of computer-assisted instruction, is easier and can be done by personnel who are not proficient in computer programming if an authoring language is provided. The Minnesota Computerized Adaptive Testing Language (MCATL) is an authoring language specifically designed for…

  17. Computerized Ability Testing, 1972-1975. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, David J.

    Three and one-half years of research on computerized ability testing are summarized. The original objectives of the research were: (1) to develop and implement the stratified computer-based ability test; (2) to compare, on psychometric criteria, the various approaches to computer-based ability testing, including the stratified computerized test,…

  18. Differential Experiences of Men and Women in Computerized Offices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutek, Barbara A.; Bikson, Tora K.

    1985-01-01

    Presents data from a multiple-instrument, multisite, two-wave study of office computerized procedures in order to determine if they differentially affect men and women employees. Preliminary analysis supports hypothesis that men benefit more in terms of career enhancement, but women are generally satisfied with computerized offices. (SA)

  19. 11 CFR 9033.12 - Production of computerized information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the times specified in 11 CFR 9038.1(b)(1): (1) Information required by law to be maintained regarding... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Production of computerized information. 9033.12...: PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY MATCHING FUND ELIGIBILITY FOR PAYMENTS § 9033.12 Production of computerized...

  20. Development of GPS Instrumentation for Ionospheric Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kintner, P. M.; Cerruti, A.; Powell, S.; Humphreys, T.; Psiaki, M.; Ledvina, B.

    2006-12-01

    GPS satellites transmit at two frequencies, L1 and L2, enabling the calculation of TEC from the dispersion in the two signals. Unfortunately the only code on the L2 signal is encrypted and it must be compared to the same encrypted code on L1. The most effective comparison is called semi-codeless tracking which yields TEC in quiet conditions for stationary receivers. When the ionosphere becomes active or when the receiver is in an accelerated environment, semi-codeless tracking fails. Fortunately there is a solution emerging to correct these short comings. The new GPS satellites will transmit an unencrypted signal on L2, called L2C, that can be compared with the unencrypted signal on L1. This comparison will be much more robust and easier to implement. The first GPS satellite with the L2C signal was launched in 2005 and another GPS satellite with the L2C signal should be launched in the Fall of 2006. In this paper we describe two techniques to use the new L2C signal. The first technique is a digital storage receiver that captures data and stores it on a PC. The signals can then be "received" and TEC determined at a later time. This approach allows extracting the maximum possible information from the signal. Applications for the digital storage receiver include ionospheric tomography inside a sounding rocket trajectory or high resolution measurements of mesospheric temperatures with a drop sphere. The second technique is a real-time software receiver that is implemented on a digital signal processing chip. This approach allows for the mass production of inexpensive TEC and fast amplitude and phase scintillation receivers that can be easily accessed through the internet. In future years these approaches can be expanded with the Galileo signals although larger bandwidths will be required.

  1. Meteoric Ions in Planetary Ionospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesnell, W. D.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Solar system debris, in the form of meteoroids, impacts every planet. The flux, relative composition and speed of the debris at each planet depends on the planet's size and location in the solar system. Ablation in the atmosphere evaporates the meteoric material and leaves behind metal atoms. During the ablation process metallic ions are formed by impact ionization. For small inner solar system planets, including Earth, this source of ionization is typically small compared to either photoionization or charge exchange with ambient molecular ions. For Earth, the atmosphere above the main deposition region absorbs the spectral lines capable of ionizing the major metallic atoms (Fe and Mg) so that charge exchange with ambient ions is the dominant source. Within the carbon dioxide atmosphere of Mars (and possibly Venus), photoionization is important in determining the ion density. For a heavy planet like Jupiter, far from the sun, impact ionization of ablated neutral atoms by impacts with molecules becomes a prominent source of ionization due to the gravitational acceleration to high incident speeds. We will describe the processes and location and extent of metal ion layers for Mars, Earth and Jupiter, concentrating on flagging the uncertainties in the models at the present time. This is an important problem, because low altitude ionosphere layers for the planets, particularly at night, probably consist predominantly of metallic ions. Comparisons with Earth will be used to illustrate the differing processes in the three planetary atmospheres.

  2. Electric fields in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirchhoff, V. W. J. H.

    1975-01-01

    F-region drift velocities, measured by incoherent-scatter radar were analyzed in terms of diurnal, seasonal, magnetic activity, and solar cycle effects. A comprehensive electric field model was developed that includes the effects of the E and F-region dynamos, magnetospheric sources, and ionospheric conductivities, for both the local and conjugate regions. The E-region dynamo dominates during the day but at night the F-region and convection are more important. This model provides much better agreement with observations of the F-region drifts than previous models. Results indicate that larger magnitudes occur at night, and that daily variation is dominated by the diurnal mode. Seasonal variations in conductivities and thermospheric winds indicate a reversal in direction in the early morning during winter from south to northward. On magnetic perturbed days and the drifts deviate rather strongly from the quiet days average, especially around 13 L.T. for the northward and 18 L.T. for the westward component.

  3. Ionospheric Scintillation Effects on GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenburgh, R. A.; Smithtro, C.; Groves, K.

    2007-12-01

    . Ionospheric scintillation of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals threatens navigation and military operations by degrading performance or making GPS unavailable. Scintillation is particularly active, although not limited to, a belt encircling the earth within 20 degrees of the geomagnetic equator. As GPS applications and users increases, so does the potential for detrimental impacts from scintillation. We examined amplitude scintillation data spanning seven years from Ascension Island, U.K.; Ancon, Peru; and Antofagasta, Chile in the Atlantic/Americas longitudinal sector at as well as data from Parepare, Indonesia; Marak Parak, Malaysia; Pontianak, Indonesia; Guam; and Diego Garcia, U.K.; in the Pacific longitudinal sector. From these data, we calculate percent probability of occurrence of scintillation at various intensities described by the S4 index. Additionally, we determine Dilution of Precision at one minute resolution. We examine diurnal, seasonal and solar cycle characteristics and make spatial comparisons. In general, activity was greatest during the equinoxes and solar maximum, although scintillation at Antofagasta, Chile was higher during 1998 rather than at solar maximum.

  4. Ionospheric calibration for single frequency altimeter measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiner, William S.; Born, George H.; Markin, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    This study is a preliminary analysis of the effectiveness (in terms of altimeter calibration accuracy) of various ionosphere models and the Global Positioning System (GPS) to calibrate single frequency altimeter height measurements for ionospheric path delay. In particular, the research focused on ingesting GPS Total Electron Content (TEC) data into the physical Parameterized Real-Time Ionospheric Specification Model (PRISM), which estimates the composition of the ionosphere using independent empirical and physical models and has the capability of adjusting to additional ionospheric measurements. Two types of GPS data were used to adjust the PRISM model: GPS receiver station data mapped from line-of-sight observations to the vertical at the point of interest and a grid map (generated at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory) of GPS derived TEC in a sun-fixed longitude frame. The adjusted PRISM TEC values, as well as predictions by the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI-90), a climatological (monthly mean) model of the ionosphere, were compared to TOPEX dual-frequency TEC measurements (considered as truth) for a number of TOPEX sub-satellite tracks. For a 13.6 GHz altimeter, a Total Electron Content (TEC) of 1 TECU 10(exp 16) electrons/sq m corresponds to approximately 0.218 centimeters of range delay. A maximum expected TEC (at solar maximum or during solar storms) of 10(exp 18) electrons/sq m will create 22 centimeters of range delay. Compared with the TOPEX data, the PRISM predictions were generally accurate within the TECU when the sub-satellite track of interest passed within 300 to 400 km of the GPS TEC data or when the track passed through a night-time ionosphere. If neither was the case, in particular if the track passed through a local noon ionosphere, the PRISM values differed by more than 10 TECU and by as much as 40 TECU. The IRI-90 model, with no current ability to unseat GPS data, predicted TEC to a slightly higher error of 12 TECU. The performance of

  5. Experimental evidence of electromagnetic pollution of ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pronenko, Vira; Korepanov, Valery; Dudkin, Denis

    The Earth’s ionosphere responds to external perturbations originated mainly in the Sun, which is the primary driver of the space weather (SW). But solar activity influences on the ionosphere and the Earth's atmosphere (i.e., the energy transfer in the direction of the Sun-magnetosphere-ionosphere-atmosphere-surface of the Earth), though important, is not a unique factor affecting its state - there is also a significant impact of the powerful natural and anthropogenic processes, which occur on the Earth’s surface and propagating in opposite direction along the Earth’s surface-atmosphere-ionosphere-magnetosphere chain. Numerous experimental data confirm that the powerful sources and consumers of electrical energy (radio transmitters, power plants, power lines and industrial objects) cause different ionospheric phenomena, for example, changes of the electromagnetic (EM) field and plasma in the ionosphere, and affect on the state of the Earth atmosphere. Anthropogenic EM effects in the ionosphere are already observed by the scientific satellites and the consequences of their impact on the ionosphere are not currently known. Therefore, it is very important and urgent task to conduct the statistically significant research of the ionospheric parameters variations due to the influence of the powerful man-made factors, primarily owing to substantial increase of the EM energy production. Naturally, the satellite monitoring of the ionosphere and magnetosphere in the frequency range from tens of hertz to tens of MHz with wide ground support offers the best opportunity to observe the EM energy release, both in the global and local scales. Parasitic EM radiation from the power supply lines, when entering the ionosphere-magnetosphere system, might have an impact on the electron population in the radiation belt. Its interaction with trapped particles will change their energy and pitch angles; as a result particle precipitations might occur. Observations of EM emission by

  6. Ionospheric criticial frequencies and solar cycle effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilcik, Ali; Ozguc, Atila; Rozelot, Jean Pierre; Yiǧit, Erdal; Elias, Ana; Donmez, Burcin; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl

    2016-07-01

    The long term solar activity dependencies of ionospheric F1 and F2 regions critical frequencies (foF1 and foF2) are investigated observationally for the last four solar cycles (1976-2015). We here show that the ionospheric F1 and F2 regions have different solar activity dependencies in terms of the sunspot group (SG) numbers: F1 region critical frequency (foF1) peaks at the same time with small SG numbers, while the foF2 reaches its maximum at the same time with the large SG numbers especially during the solar cycle 23. Thus, we may conclude that the sensitivities of ionospheric F1 and F2 region critical frequencies to sunspot group (SG) numbers are associated with different physical processes that are yet to be investigated in detail. Such new results provide further evidence that the two ionospheric regions have different responses to the solar activity. We also analyzed short term oscillatory behavior of ionospheric critical frequencies and found some solar signatures.

  7. Fast ionospheric feedback instability and substorm onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lysak, Robert L.; Grieger, John; Song, Yan

    1992-01-01

    A study suggesting that the Alfven resonator can play an important role in modifying the ionosphere on the time and space scales required to play a significant role in substorm formation is presented. Although the effect of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling on the onset of substorms has been studied, the effects due to gradients of the Alfven speed along auroral field line were neglected. The large increase of the Alfven speed with altitude above the ionosphere creates an effective resonant cavity, which can lead to fluctuations in the electric and magnetic fields as well as in particle fluxes in the range 0.1 to 1 Hz. Such fluctuations can be observed from the ground as PiB pulsations associated with substorm onset. These fluctuations can be excited by a fast feedback instability, which can grow on time scales much less than the Alfven travel time between the ionosphere and the plasma sheet. The instability enhances the value of both the Pedersen and Hall conductivity, and may play a role in preparing the ionosphere for substorm onset.

  8. Ionospheric Specifications for SAR Interferometry (ISSI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pi, Xiaoqing; Chapman, Bruce D; Freeman, Anthony; Szeliga, Walter; Buckley, Sean M.; Rosen, Paul A.; Lavalle, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The ISSI software package is designed to image the ionosphere from space by calibrating and processing polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) data collected from low Earth orbit satellites. Signals transmitted and received by a PolSAR are subject to the Faraday rotation effect as they traverse the magnetized ionosphere. The ISSI algorithms combine the horizontally and vertically polarized (with respect to the radar system) SAR signals to estimate Faraday rotation and ionospheric total electron content (TEC) with spatial resolutions of sub-kilometers to kilometers, and to derive radar system calibration parameters. The ISSI software package has been designed and developed to integrate the algorithms, process PolSAR data, and image as well as visualize the ionospheric measurements. A number of tests have been conducted using ISSI with PolSAR data collected from various latitude regions using the phase array-type L-band synthetic aperture radar (PALSAR) onboard Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Advanced Land Observing Satellite mission, and also with Global Positioning System data. These tests have demonstrated and validated SAR-derived ionospheric images and data correction algorithms.

  9. Comparison of global and regional ionospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranner, H.-P.; Krauss, S.; Stangl, G.

    2012-04-01

    Modelling of the Earth's ionosphere means the description of the variability of the vertical TEC (Total Electron Content) in dependence of geographic latitude and longitude, height, diurnal and seasonal variation as well as solar activity. Within the project GIOMO (next Generation near real-time IOnospheric MOdels) the objectives are the identification and consolidation of improved ionospheric modelling technologies. The global models Klobuchar (GPS) and NeQuick (currently in use by EGNOS, in future used by Galileo) are compared to the IGS (International GNSS Service) Final GIM (Global Ionospheric Map). Additionally a RIM (Regional Ionospheric Map) for Europe provided by CODE (Center for Orbit Determination in Europe) is investigated. Furthermore the OLG (Observatorium Lustbühel Graz) regional models are calculated for two test beds with different latitudes and extensions (Western Austria and the Aegean region). There are three different approaches, two RIMs are based on spherical harmonics calculated either from code or phase measurements and one RIM is based on a Taylor series expansion around a central point estimated from zero-difference observations. The benefits of regional models are the local flexibility using a dense network of GNSS stations. Near real-time parameters are provided within ten minutes after every clock hour. All models have been compared according to their general behavior, the ability to react upon extreme solar events and the robustness of estimation. A ranking of the different models showed a preference for the RIMs while the global models should be used within a fall-back strategy.

  10. Characteristics of High Latitude Ionosphere Scintillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Y.

    2012-12-01

    As we enter a new solar maximum period, global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) receivers, especially the ones operating in high latitude and equatorial regions, are facing an increasing threat from ionosphere scintillations. The increased solar activities, however, also offer a great opportunity to collect scintillation data to characterize scintillation signal parameters and ionosphere irregularities. While there are numerous GPS receivers deployed around the globe to monitor ionosphere scintillations, most of them are commercial receivers whose signal processing mechanisms are not designed to operate under ionosphere scintillation. As a result, they may distort scintillation signal parameters or lose lock of satellite signals under strong scintillations. Since 2008, we have established and continuously improved a unique GNSS receiver array at HAARP, Alaska. The array contains high ends commercial receivers and custom RF front ends which can be automatically triggered to collect high quality GPS and GLONASS satellite signals during controlled heating experiments and natural scintillation events. Custom designed receiver signal tracking algorithms aim to preserve true scintillation signatures are used to process the raw RF samples. Signal strength, carrier phase, and relative TEC measurements generated by the receiver array since its inception have been analyzed to characterize high latitude scintillation phenomena. Daily, seasonal, and solar events dependency of scintillation occurrence, spectral contents of scintillation activities, and plasma drifts derived from these measurements will be presented. These interesting results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of our experimental data collection system in providing insightful details of ionosphere responses to active perturbations and natural disturbances.

  11. Ionospheric TEC observations from TOPEX satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimer, J.A.; Ewell, V.R.; Lee, M.C.; Doherty, P.H.; Decker, D.T.; Anderson, D.N.; Klobuchar, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    Variability of Total Electron Content (TEC) in the equatorial anomaly region of the ionosphere can be studied extensively using the results of measurements taken by the NASA/CNES satellite, TOPEX/Poseidon. The NASA radar altimeter (NRA) is the first space-borne dual-frequency altimeter capable of accurately measuring vertical ionospheric TEC below 1,340 km. TOPEX TEC observations have already been used to support results from an ionospheric measurement campaign that was conducted in equatorial anomaly regions of South America by Phillips Laboratory in Spring, 1994. The best agreement in TEC values is seen during intervals of longitudinal proximity of the satellites` paths. The TOPEX over-ocean data can be used as a supplement to land based measurements in applications to ionospheric research at low and middle latitudes. This study focuses on comparisons between TOPEX vertical TEC data and GPS equivalent vertical TEC measurements taken near the East and West coastal regions of South America. Also the Phillips Laboratory Global Parameterized Ionospheric Model (PIM) is utilized in an effort to estimate slant to vertical conversion errors.

  12. Infrasonic troposphere-ionosphere coupling in Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garces, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    The propagation of infrasonic waves in the ionospheric layers has been considered since the 1960's. It is known that space weather can alter infrasonic propagation below the E layer (~120 km altitude), but it was thought that acoustic attenuation was too severe above this layer to sustain long-range propagation. Although volcanoes, earthquakes and tsunamis (all surface sources) appear to routinely excite perturbations in the ionospheric F layer by the propagation of acoustic and acoustic-gravity waves through the atmosphere, there are few reports of the inverse pathway. This paper discusses some of the routine ground-based infrasonic array observations of ionospheric returns from surface sources. These thermospheric returns generally point back towards the source, with an azimuth deviation that can be corrected using the wind velocity profiles in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. However, the seismic excitation in the North Pacific by the Tohoku earthquake ensonified the coupled lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere waveguide in the 0.01 - 0.1 Hz frequency band, producing anomalous signals observed by infrasound arrays in Hawaii. These infrasonic signals propagated at curiously high velocities, suggesting that some assumptions on ionospheric sound generation and propagation could be revisited.

  13. Geophysicochemical model of an ionospheric auroral gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serban, Andreea I.; Geicu, Ovidiu I.; Serban, Florea

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a geophysicochemical model of an ionospheric auroral gyroscope. The gyroscopic effect occurs due to the electromagnetic interaction in Earth's polar regions between two types of vertical cavity auroras: the herpolhodic cone (proton cavity aurora), operating in the cusp polar region, and two polhodic cones (an electronic cone and a protonic cone), operating in the aurora region. The ratio between the angular speeds of the herpolhodic and polhodic cones is established by the angle between Earth's rotational axis and the geomagnetic dipole axis. We have developed a theory of the ionospheric auroral gyroscope as a kinematic part of the terrestrial magnetosphere and ionosphere that enables a unified explanation of important macroscopic phenomena that occur at this level. Accordingly, we have explained the oval shape of the polar auroras, Schumann resonances, geomagnetic micropulsation excitation, and the structuring of Earth's areas of radiation. The terrestrial gravitomagnetic field and dark matter are implicated in the initiation and behavior of the auroral ionospheric gyroscope, both of which provide stability and accuracy. Viewed in a wider context, the ionospheric auroral gyroscope theory could offer a way to experimentally investigate dark matter on Earth. Furthermore, it may have a potential value as a predictive tool, providing information about the large earthquakes and Earth's phenomena.

  14. Empirical model of topside polar ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, S.; Abe, T.; Sagawa, E.; Yau, A. W.

    A new model of topside polar ionosphere was made on the bases of data obtained by Suprathermal Ion Mass Spectrometer (SMS) installed in Akebono satellite. The SMS measures ion energy distributions in the energy range from 0 to 25 eV and in the mass range from 1 to 64 m/q. The satellite still continues to observe the topside polar ionosphere in the periods more than one solar cycle from 1989. Model functions in the 5 dimensional space were fitted to the data, such as plasma parameters of density, velocity and temperature, with a least square method. The model of topside polar ionosphere provides ion densities, ion velocities and ion temperatures of H+, He+ and O+ as functions of magnetic latitude, magnetic local time, altitude, F10.7 solar flux intensity and geomagnetic activity. The model results show clearly the solar activity dependence of ion density and that of ion escape flux from topside polar ionosphere to the magnetosphere. Both the density and the escape flux increase during the solar maximum. The flux from topside polar ionospheres exceeds more than 10 tons/day. We suggest that the ion escape is one of the source mechanisms of magnetospheric plasma and affects the evolution of the earth's atmosphere.

  15. A Comparative Study of the Ionospheric TEC Measurements Using Global Ionospheric Maps of GPS, TOPEX Radar and the Bent Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C.; Wilson, B.; Mannucci, A.; Lindqwister, U.; Yuan, D.

    1997-01-01

    Global ionospheric mapping (GIM) is a new, emerging technique for determining global ionospheric TEC (total electron content) based on measurements from a worldwide network of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers.

  16. Ionospheric and plasmaspheric electron contents inferred from radio occultations and global ionospheric maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Casado, G.; Juan, J. M.; Sanz, J.; Rovira-Garcia, A.; Aragon-Angel, A.

    2015-07-01

    We introduce a methodology to extract the separate contributions of the ionosphere and the plasmasphere to the vertical total electron content, without relying on a fixed altitude to perform that separation. The method combines two previously developed and tested techniques, namely, the retrieval of electron density profiles from radio occultations using an improved Abel inversion technique and a two-component model for the topside ionosphere plus protonosphere. Taking measurements of the total electron content from global ionospheric maps and radio occultations from the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate/FORMOSAT-3 constellation, the ionospheric and plasmaspheric electron contents are calculated for a sample of observations covering 2007, a period of low solar and geomagnetic activity. The results obtained are shown to be consistent with previous studies for the last solar minimum period and with model calculations, confirming the reversal of the winter anomaly, the hemispheric asymmetry of the semiannual anomaly, and the existence in the plasmasphere of an annual anomaly in the South American sector of longitudes. The analysis of the respective fractional contributions from the ionosphere and the plasmasphere to the total electron content shows quantitatively that during the night the plasmasphere makes the largest contribution, peaking just before sunrise and during winter. On the other hand, the fractional contribution from the ionosphere reaches a maximum value around noon, which is nearly independent of season and geomagnetic latitude.

  17. Global scale, physical models of the F region ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sojka, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to the development and verification of global computer models of the F-region which simulate the interactions between physical processes in the ionosphere. The limitations of the physical models are discussed, focusing on the inputs to the ionospheric system such as magnetospheric electric field and auroral precipitation. The possibility of coupling ionospheric models with thermospheric and magnetospheric models is examined.

  18. Online, automatic, ionospheric maps: IRI-PLAS-MAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arikan, F.; Sezen, U.; Gulyaeva, T. L.; Cilibas, O.

    2015-04-01

    Global and regional behavior of the ionosphere is an important component of space weather. The peak height and critical frequency of ionospheric layer for the maximum ionization, namely, hmF2 and foF2, and the total number of electrons on a ray path, Total Electron Content (TEC), are the most investigated and monitored values of ionosphere in capturing and observing ionospheric variability. Typically ionospheric models such as International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) can provide electron density profile, critical parameters of ionospheric layers and Ionospheric electron content for a given location, date and time. Yet, IRI model is limited by only foF2 STORM option in reflecting the dynamics of ionospheric/plasmaspheric/geomagnetic storms. Global Ionospheric Maps (GIM) are provided by IGS analysis centers for global TEC distribution estimated from ground-based GPS stations that can capture the actual dynamics of ionosphere and plasmasphere, but this service is not available for other ionospheric observables. In this study, a unique and original space weather service is introduced as IRI-PLAS-MAP from http://www.ionolab.org

  19. Assimilating Electron Density Profiles Measured by the Real Time Global Ionospheric Radio Observatory - GIRO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinisch, B. W.; Galkin, I. A.

    2009-04-01

    Operational applications of ionospheric models, whether they are first principles or data-driven models, rely on the accuracy of the models during quiet and disturbed conditions. Of course models can correctly describe ionospheric weather only if they assimilate measured ionospheric characteristics and electron density profiles (EDPs). For the "assimilating model" to make correct predictions, the measurements in turn must be accurate and reliable. Ionosondes provide the most accurate vertical EDPs at the site locations but do not cover all parts of the globe. Ionogram-derived EDPs have become the ground truth reference for ionospheric specification, presenting the unrivaled accuracy of the data on continuous demand for validation of alternative ionospheric techniques, including radio occultation, ultraviolet, and tomography. In recent years the digisonde network of ionosondes has grown to eighty stations and is expected to expand to more than 100 stations in the next couple of years. The new Digisonde-4D is running the Automatic Real Time Ionogram Scaler with True height inversion, ARTIST-5. The ARTIST-5 autoscaling program now calculates the EDPs together with density uncertainty limits at each height, making the data products suitable for ingestion in assimilative ionospheric models. In order to specify uncertainty at each height, two boundary profiles, inner and outer, are determined. The inner and outer boundaries reflect the uncertainties of the critical frequencies of each layer, the internal uncertainty of the starting height of the profile, and the uncertainties of the E valley model representation. The actual uncertainties are calculated from a cumulative difference characteristic representing a mismatch between automatically and manually scaled parameters (i.e., foF2, foF1) for the same ionogram. The cumulative differences are determined from statistical analysis of a large amount of ionograms for a specific station. The characteristics of interest are

  20. Ionospheric disturbances during November 30-December 1, 1988. IV - Ionospheric disturbances observed by oblique ionospheric sounding network in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, Kiyoshi; Takeuchi, Tetsuo

    1992-07-01

    The oblique ionospheric-sounding network of the Communications Research Laboratory (CRL) was used to obtain oblique ionograms every 15 minutes during severe ionospheric disturbances from November 30 through December I, 1988. Vertical-sounding HF signals (l to 25 MHz) from Wakkanai, Akita, Yamagawa, and Okinawa were received at Kokubunji. Oblique ionograms on the night of November 30 exhibit scattered and oblique echoes due to anomalous signal propagation as well as normal echoes. Anomalous propagation occurred when the maximum observable frequency (MOF) largely increased. Furthermore, scattered echoes appeared more frequently and with more intensity on the southernmost path (Okinawa-Kokubunji) than on the northernmost one (Wakkanai-Kokubunji).

  1. Ionosphere-Plasmasphere coupling using the ionosphere-plasmasphere-electrodynamics (IPE) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, N.; Richards, P. G.; Fedrizzi, M.; Fuller-Rowell, T. J.; Fang, T. W.; Codrescu, M.; Pierrard, V.; Denton, M.

    2015-12-01

    A close connection between ionospheric SEDs and plasmaspheric plumes has been reported during the main phase of magnetic storms in previous studies. The temporal and spatial variation of the connection has not yet been studied in detail, as the plasmas in ionosphere and plasmasphere get redistributed dynamically during various phases of a storm. Furthermore, how the Ionosphere-Plasmasphere coupling depends on the types of the solar wind driving conditions has not yet been studied. A newly developed global three dimensional ionosphere-plasmasphere-electrodynamics (IPE) model is used to address the coupling between the ionosphere and plasmasphere. IPE model has reproduced the Storm Enhanced Density plume feature in TEC being transported into cusp and over the pole, characterized as the Tongue of Ionization (TOI). Furthermore, the same simulation reveals the plasmaspheric plume like structure in the magnetospheric equatorial plane. Our simulations suggest that neither SAPS nor midlatitude SED bulge is essential in reproducing the SED plume-like features. A term analysis of the ion continuity equations in the IPE model has indicated that the SED plume/TOI feature observed in the ionosphere is produced due primarily to a combination of plasma transport and production/loss, which is supportive of previous studies. However, the plasmaspheric plume responds differently to that of the ionospheric plume depending on the various setting of the numerical experiments. The results indicate a need of a careful examination of the relative importance of the plasma transport between the parallel and perpendicular directions to the magnetic field in both the ionosphere and plasmasphere. In this presentation, we will compare how the ionosphere-plasmasphere coupling depends on the solar wind driving conditions for the selected campaign events.

  2. An Initial Investigation of Ionospheric Gradients for Detection of Ionospheric Disturbances over Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koroglu, Meltem; Arikan, Feza; Koroglu, Ozan

    2015-04-01

    Ionosphere is an ionized layer of earth's atmosphere which affect the propagation of radio signals due to highly varying electron density structure. Total Electron Content (TEC) and Slant Total Electron Content (STEC) are convenient measures of total electron density along a ray path. STEC model is given by the line integral of the electron density between the receiver and GPS satellite. TEC and STEC can be estimated by observing the difference between the two GPS signal time delays that have different frequencies L1 (1575 MHz) and L2 (1227 MHz). During extreme ionospheric storms ionospheric gradients becomes larger than those of quiet days since time delays of the radio signals becomes anomalous. Ionosphere gradients can be modeled as a linear semi-infinite wave front with constant propagation speed. One way of computing the ionospheric gradients is to compare the STEC values estimated between two neighbouring GPS stations. In this so-called station-pair method, ionospheric gradients are defined by dividing the difference of the time delays of two receivers, that see the same satellite at the same time period. In this study, ionospheric gradients over Turkey are computed using the Turkish National Permanent GPS Network (TNPGN-Active) between May 2009 and September 2012. The GPS receivers are paired in east-west and north-south directions with distances less than 150 km. GPS-STEC for each station are calculated using IONOLAB-TEC and IONOLAB-BIAS softwares (www.ionolab.org). Ionospheric delays are calculated for each paired station for both L1 and L2 frequencies and for each satellite in view with 30 s time resolution. During the investigation period, different types of geomagnetic storms, Travelling Ionospheric Disturbances (TID), Sudden Ionospheric Disturbances (SID) and various earthquakes with magnitudes between 3 to 7.4 have occured. Significant variations in the structure of station-pair gradients have been observed depending on location of station-pairs, the

  3. Representation of the Auroral and Polar Ionosphere in the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilitza, Dieter; Reinisch, Bodo

    2013-01-01

    This issue of Advances in Space Research presents a selection of papers that document the progress in developing and improving the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI), a widely used standard for the parameters that describe the Earths ionosphere. The core set of papers was presented during the 2010 General Assembly of the Committee on Space Research in Bremen, Germany in a session that focused on the representation of the auroral and polar ionosphere in the IRI model. In addition, papers were solicited and submitted from the scientific community in a general call for appropriate papers.

  4. SPECTRE (www.noveltis.fr/spectre): a web Service for Ionospheric Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeansou, E.; Crespon, F.; Garcia, R.; Helbert, J.; Moreaux, G.; Lognonne, P.

    2005-12-01

    The dense GPS networks developed for geodesic applications appear to be very efficient ionospheric sensors because of interaction between plasma and electromagnetic waves. Indeed, the dual frequency receivers provide data from which the Slant Total Electron Content (STEC) can be easily extracted to compute Vertical Total Electron Content (VTEC) maps. The SPECTRE project, Service and Products for ionospheric Electron Content and Tropospheric Refractivity over Europe, is currently a pre-operational service providing VTEC maps with high time and space resolution after 3 days time delay (http://www.noveltis.fr/spectre and http://ganymede.ipgp.jussieu.fr/spectre). This project is a part of SWENET, SpaceWeather European Network, initiated by the European Space Agency. The SPECTRE data products are useful for many applications. We will present these applications in term of interest for the scientific community with a special focus on spaceweather and transient ionospheric perturbations related to Earthquakes. Moreover, the pre-operational extensions of SPECTRE to the californian (SCIGN/BARD) and japanese (GEONET) dense GPS networks will be presented. Then the method of 3D tomography of the electron density from GPS data will be presented and its resolution discussed. The expected improvements of the 3D tomographic images by new tomographic reconstruction algorithms and by the advent of the Galileo system will conclude the presentation.

  5. Rocket studies of the lower ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowhill, Sidney A.

    1990-01-01

    The earth's ionosphere in the altitude range of 50 to 200 km was investigated by rocket-borne sensors, supplemented by ground-based measurement. The rocket payloads included mass spectrometers, energetic particle detectors, Langmuir probes and radio propagation experiments. Where possible, rocket flights were included in studies of specific phenomena, and the availability of data from other experiments greatly increased the significance of the results. The principal ionospheric phenomena studied were: winter anomaly in radiowave absorption, ozone and molecular oxygen densities, mid-latitude sporadic-E layers, energetic particle precipitation at middle and low latitudes, ionospheric instabilities and turbulence, and solar eclipse effects in the D and E regions. This document lists personnel who worked on the project, and provides a bibliography of resultant publications.

  6. Influence of ionospheric anomalies in the positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Caderot, G.; Moreno, B.; de Lacy, M. C.

    2009-04-01

    GNSS observables depend on the satellite-receiver distance, atmospheric effects, satellite and receiver offsets and phase ambiguities, as well as satellite and receiver equipment delays. GNSS observations specific to a receiver and a satellite (undifferenced observations) can be used to estimate the ionospheric effect. In this study, different procedures are used to estimate the ionospheric delay from GNSS data belonging to permanent GPS stations. In particular, these tests intend to detect ionospheric anomalies under certain conditions in equatorial geographical latitudes. From the Slant Total Electron Content (STEC) estimated between one GPS station and several satellites the contribution of the anomalies is isolated and its amplitude and duration are computed. Finally, an analysis of the possible influence of these anomalies in the positioning estimation is carried out.

  7. Ionosphere/microwave beam interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, W. E.; Duncan, L. M.

    1978-01-01

    The microwave beam of the Solar Power Satellite (SPS) is predicted to interact with the ionosphere producing thermal runaway up to an altitude of about 100 kilometers at a power density threshold of 12 mW/cm sq (within a factor of two). The operation of the SPS at two frequencies, 2450 and 5800 MHz, is compared. The ionosphere interaction is less at the higher frequency, but the tropospheric problem scattering from heavy rain and hail is worse at the higher frequency. Microwave signals from communication satellites were observed to scintillate, but there is some concern that the uplink pilot signal may be distorted by the SPS heated ionosphere. The microwave scintillations are only observed in the tropics in the early evenings near the equinoxes. Results indicate that large phase errors in the uplink pilot signal can be reduced.

  8. Feedback instability of the ionospheric resonant cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lysak, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    A model is developed that provides a theoretical basis for previous numerical results showing a feedback instability with frequencies characteristic of Alfven travel times within the region of the large increase of Alfven speed above the ionosphere. These results have been extended to arbitrary ionospheric conductivity by developing a numerical solution of the cavity dispersion relation that involves Bessel functions of complex order and argument. It is concluded that the large contrast between the magnetospheric and ionospheric Alfven speed leads to the formation of resonant cavity modes with frequencies ranging from 0.1 to 1 Hz. The presence of the cavity leads to a modification of the reflection characteristics of Alfven waves with frequencies that compare to the cavity's normal modes.

  9. Correlative Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, T. L.; McDonald, S. A.; Gholinia, A.; Geurts, R.; Janus, M.; Slater, T.; Haigh, S. J.; Ornek, C.; Almuaili, F.; Engelberg, D. L.; Thompson, G. E.; Withers, P. J.

    2014-04-01

    Increasingly researchers are looking to bring together perspectives across multiple scales, or to combine insights from different techniques, for the same region of interest. To this end, correlative microscopy has already yielded substantial new insights in two dimensions (2D). Here we develop correlative tomography where the correlative task is somewhat more challenging because the volume of interest is typically hidden beneath the sample surface. We have threaded together x-ray computed tomography, serial section FIB-SEM tomography, electron backscatter diffraction and finally TEM elemental analysis all for the same 3D region. This has allowed observation of the competition between pitting corrosion and intergranular corrosion at multiple scales revealing the structural hierarchy, crystallography and chemistry of veiled corrosion pits in stainless steel. With automated correlative workflows and co-visualization of the multi-scale or multi-modal datasets the technique promises to provide insights across biological, geological and materials science that are impossible using either individual or multiple uncorrelated techniques.

  10. Correlative tomography.

    PubMed

    Burnett, T L; McDonald, S A; Gholinia, A; Geurts, R; Janus, M; Slater, T; Haigh, S J; Ornek, C; Almuaili, F; Engelberg, D L; Thompson, G E; Withers, P J

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly researchers are looking to bring together perspectives across multiple scales, or to combine insights from different techniques, for the same region of interest. To this end, correlative microscopy has already yielded substantial new insights in two dimensions (2D). Here we develop correlative tomography where the correlative task is somewhat more challenging because the volume of interest is typically hidden beneath the sample surface. We have threaded together x-ray computed tomography, serial section FIB-SEM tomography, electron backscatter diffraction and finally TEM elemental analysis all for the same 3D region. This has allowed observation of the competition between pitting corrosion and intergranular corrosion at multiple scales revealing the structural hierarchy, crystallography and chemistry of veiled corrosion pits in stainless steel. With automated correlative workflows and co-visualization of the multi-scale or multi-modal datasets the technique promises to provide insights across biological, geological and materials science that are impossible using either individual or multiple uncorrelated techniques. PMID:24736640

  11. Correlative Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, T. L.; McDonald, S. A.; Gholinia, A.; Geurts, R.; Janus, M.; Slater, T.; Haigh, S. J.; Ornek, C.; Almuaili, F.; Engelberg, D. L.; Thompson, G. E.; Withers, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly researchers are looking to bring together perspectives across multiple scales, or to combine insights from different techniques, for the same region of interest. To this end, correlative microscopy has already yielded substantial new insights in two dimensions (2D). Here we develop correlative tomography where the correlative task is somewhat more challenging because the volume of interest is typically hidden beneath the sample surface. We have threaded together x-ray computed tomography, serial section FIB-SEM tomography, electron backscatter diffraction and finally TEM elemental analysis all for the same 3D region. This has allowed observation of the competition between pitting corrosion and intergranular corrosion at multiple scales revealing the structural hierarchy, crystallography and chemistry of veiled corrosion pits in stainless steel. With automated correlative workflows and co-visualization of the multi-scale or multi-modal datasets the technique promises to provide insights across biological, geological and materials science that are impossible using either individual or multiple uncorrelated techniques. PMID:24736640

  12. Computerized nursing staffing: a software evaluation.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Irene Mari; Gaidzinski, Raquel Rapone; Fugulin, Fernanda Maria Togeiro; Peres, Heloísa Helena Ciqueto; Lima, Antônio Fernandes Costa; Castilho, Valéria; Mira, Vera Lúcia; Massarollo, Maria Cristina Komatsu Braga

    2011-12-01

    The complexity involved in operationalizing the method for nursing staffing, in view of the uncountable variable related to identifying the workload, the effective working time of the staff, and the Technical Security Index (TSI) revealed the need to develop a software program named: Computerized Nursing Staffing (DIPE, in Portuguese acronyms). This exploratory, descriptive study was performed with the objective to evaluate the technical quality and functional performance of DIPE. Participants were eighteen evaluators, ten of whom where nurse faculty or nurse hospital unit managers, and eight health informatics experts. The software evaluation was performed according to norm NBR ISO/IEC 9126-1, considering the features functionality, reliability, usability, efficiency, and maintainability. The software evaluation reached positive results and agreement among the evaluators for all the evaluated features. The reported suggestions are important for proposing further improving and enhancing the DIPE. PMID:22282068

  13. Economic Evaluation of Computerized Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortin, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    This completed effort involved a technical and economic study of the capabilities of computer programs in the area of structural analysis. The applicability of the programs to NASA projects and to other users was studied. The applications in other industries was explored including both research and development and applied areas. The costs of several alternative analysis programs were compared. A literature search covered applicable technical literature including journals, trade publications and books. In addition to the literature search, several commercial companies that have developed computerized structural analysis programs were contacted and their technical brochures reviewed. These programs include SDRC I-DEAS, MSC/NASTRAN, SCADA, SUPERSAP, NISA/DISPLAY, STAAD-III, MICAS, GTSTRUDL, and STARS. These programs were briefly reviewed as applicable to NASA projects.

  14. Computerized system for translating a torch head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.; Ives, R. E.; Bruce, M. M., Jr.; Pryor, P. P., Jr.; Gard, L. H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The system provides a constant travel speed along a contoured workpiece. It has a driven skate characterized by an elongated bed, with a pair of independently pivoted trucks connected to the bed for support. The trucks are mounted on a contoured track of arbitrary configuration in a mutually spaced relation. An axially extensible torch head manipulator arm is mounted on the bed of the carriage and projects perpendicular from the midportion. The torch head is mounted at its distal end. A real-time computerized control drive subsystem is used to advance the skate along the track of a variable rate for maintaining a constant speed for the torch head tip, and to position the torch axis relative to a preset angle to the workpiece.

  15. Computerized bone analysis of hand radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietka, Ewa; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Hall, Theodore R.; Huang, H. K.

    1992-06-01

    A computerized approach to the problem of skeletal maturity is presented. The analysis of a computed radiography (CR) hand image results in obtaining features, that can be used to assess the skeletal age of pediatric patients. It is performed on a standard left hand radiograph. First, epiphyseal regions of interest (EROI) are located. Then, within each EROI the distals, middles, and proximals are separated. This serves as a basis to locate the extremities of epiphyses and metaphyses. Next, the diameters of epiphyses and metaphyses are calculated. Finally, an epiphyseal diameter and metaphyseal diameter ratio is calculated. A pilot study indicated that these features are sensitive to the changes of the anatomical structure of a growing hand and can be used in the skeletal age assessment.

  16. Implementing a computerized operating room management system.

    PubMed

    Choy, M

    1991-01-01

    The Queen's Medical Center implemented a computerized operating room management system in 1987 that includes surgery scheduling, intraoperative recording, and resource tracking. In addition to the important functional components, the system provides management with a better tool for decision-making. The purpose of this article is to describe this implementation. Background is provided to identify the manual system's deficiencies followed by the anticipated benefits of the computer system. The paper concentrates on Queen's implementation experiences in coding the surgical procedure information, confronting staff anxiety, managing the changing roles of the staff and providing adequate resources. Minimum requirements for a successful implementation include designating an effective project leader, assigning system responsibilities to the user, relieving all operational responsibilities from key members of the project team and providing adequate resources to support the system. PMID:1760543

  17. A COMPUTERIZED OPERATOR SUPPORT SYSTEM PROTOTYPE

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas A. Ulrich; Roger Lew; Ronald L. Boring; Ken Thomas

    2015-03-01

    A computerized operator support system (COSS) is proposed for use in nuclear power plants to assist control room operators in addressing time-critical plant upsets. A COSS is a collection of technologies to assist operators in monitoring overall plant performance and making timely, informed decisions on appropriate control actions for the projected plant condition. A prototype COSS was developed in order to demonstrate the concept and provide a test bed for further research. The prototype is based on four underlying elements consisting of a digital alarm system, computer-based procedures, piping and instrumentation diagram system representations, and a recommender module for mitigation actions. The initial version of the prototype is now operational at the Idaho National Laboratory using the Human System Simulation Laboratory.

  18. The Computerized Anatomical Man (CAM) model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, M. P.; Yucker, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    A computerized anatomical man (CAM) model, representing the most detailed and anatomically correct geometrical model of the human body yet prepared, has been developed for use in analyzing radiation dose distribution in man. This model of a 50-percentile standing USAF man comprises some 1100 unique geometric surfaces and some 2450 solid regions. Internal body geometry such as organs, voids, bones, and bone marrow are explicitly modeled. A computer program called CAMERA has also been developed for performing analyses with the model. Such analyses include tracing rays through the CAM geometry, placing results on magnetic tape in various forms, collapsing areal density data from ray tracing information to areal density distributions, preparing cross section views, etc. Numerous computer drawn cross sections through the CAM model are presented.

  19. GNSS data filtering optimization for ionospheric observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, G.; Spogli, L.; Cesaroni, C.; Sgrigna, V.; Alfonsi, L.; Aquino, M. H. O.

    2015-12-01

    In the last years, the use of GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite Systems) data has been gradually increasing, for both scientific studies and technological applications. High-rate GNSS data, able to generate and output 50-Hz phase and amplitude samples, are commonly used to study electron density irregularities within the ionosphere. Ionospheric irregularities may cause scintillations, which are rapid and random fluctuations of the phase and the amplitude of the received GNSS signals. For scintillation analysis, usually, GNSS signals observed at an elevation angle lower than an arbitrary threshold (usually 15°, 20° or 30°) are filtered out, to remove the possible error sources due to the local environment where the receiver is deployed. Indeed, the signal scattered by the environment surrounding the receiver could mimic ionospheric scintillation, because buildings, trees, etc. might create diffusion, diffraction and reflection. Although widely adopted, the elevation angle threshold has some downsides, as it may under or overestimate the actual impact of multipath due to local environment. Certainly, an incorrect selection of the field of view spanned by the GNSS antenna may lead to the misidentification of scintillation events at low elevation angles. With the aim to tackle the non-ionospheric effects induced by multipath at ground, in this paper we introduce a filtering technique, termed SOLIDIFY (Standalone OutLiers IDentIfication Filtering analYsis technique), aiming at excluding the multipath sources of non-ionospheric origin to improve the quality of the information obtained by the GNSS signal in a given site. SOLIDIFY is a statistical filtering technique based on the signal quality parameters measured by scintillation receivers. The technique is applied and optimized on the data acquired by a scintillation receiver located at the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, in Rome. The results of the exercise show that, in the considered case of a noisy

  20. Multi-GNSS for Ionospheric Scintillation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Y.

    2015-12-01

    GNSS have been widely used for ionospheric monitoring. We anticipate over 160 GNSS satellites broadcasting 400 signals by 2023, nearly double the number today. With their well-defined signal structures, high spatial density and spectral diversity, GNSS offers low cost and distributed passive sensing of ionosphere effects. There are, however, many challenges to utilize GNSS resources to characterize and forecast ionospheric scintillation. Originally intended for navigation purposes, GNSS receivers are designed to filter out nuisance effects due to ionosphere effects. GNSS measurements are plagued with errors from multipath, oscillator jitters, processing artifacts, and neutral atmosphere effects. Strong scintillation events are often characterized by turbulent structures in ionosphere, causing simultaneous deep amplitude fading and abrupt carrier phase changes. The combined weak signal and high carrier dynamics imposes conflicting requirements for GNSS receiver design. Therefore, GNSS receivers often experience cycle slips and loss of lock of signals during strong scintillation events. High quality, raw GNSS signals bearing space weather signatures and robust receiver algorithms designed to capture these signatures are needed in order for GNSS to be a reliable and useful agent for scintillation monitoring and forecasting. Our event-driven, reconfigurable data collection system is designed to achieve this purpose. To date, our global network has collected ~150TB of raw GNSS data during space weather events. A suite of novel receiver processing algorithms has been developed by exploitating GNSS spatial, frequency, temporal, and constellation diversity to process signals experiencing challenging scintillation impact. The algorithms and data have advanced our understanding of scintillation impact on GNSS, lead to more robust receiver technologies, and enabled high spatial and temporal resolution depiction of ionosphere responses to solar and geomagnetic conditions. This

  1. Topside ionospheric response to solar EUV variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Phillip C.; Hawkins, Jessica M.

    2016-02-01

    We present an analysis of 23 years of thermal plasma measurements in the topside ionosphere from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft. The H+/O+ ratio and density vary dramatically with the solar cycle; cross-correlation coefficients between E10.7 and the daily averaged densities are greater than 0.85. The ionospheric parameters also vary dramatically with season, particularly at latitudes away from the equator where the solar zenith angle varies greatly with season. There are also 27 day solar rotation periodicities in the density, associated with periodicities in the directly measured solar EUV flux. Empirical orthogonal function analysis captures over 95% of the variation in the density in the first two principal components. The first principal component (PC1) is clearly associated with the solar EUV while the second principal component (PC2) is clearly associated with the solar zenith angle variation. The magnitude of the variation of the response of the topside ionosphere to solar EUV variability is shown to be closely related to the ionospheric composition. This is interpreted as the result of the effect of composition on the scale height in the topside ionosphere and the "pivot effect" in which the variation in density near the F2 peak is amplified by a factor of e at an altitude a scale height above the F2 peak. When the topside ionosphere is H+ dominated during solar minimum, DMSP may be much less than a scale height above the F2 peak while during solar maximum, when it is O+ dominated, DMSP may be several scale heights above the F2 peak.

  2. Quantitative computerized color vision testing in diabetic retinopathy: A possible screening tool?

    PubMed Central

    Al Saeidi, Rashid; Kernt, Marcus; Kreutzer, Thomas C; Rudolph, Guenther; Neubauer, Aljoscha S; Haritoglou, Christos

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of a computerized color vision testing (Arden color contrast test) as a screening test for detection of diabetic macular edema (DME). Materials and Methods: A consecutive, prospective case series of 83 eyes of 42 diabetic patients with and without macular edema was enrolled. Macular edema was assessed clinically by stereoscopic grading and by central retinal thickness measurement with optical coherence tomography (OCT). Additionally, a computerized chromatest for the protan- and tritan-axis was performed. Analysis of test characteristics included receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and calculated sensitivity and specificity. Results: Sixty-one eyes had clinically significant macular edema (CSME). OCT yielded an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.92. Color vision testing yielded an AUC of 0.82 for the tritan- and 0.80 for the protan-axis. Using a cut off of 199 microns OCT resulted in a 100% sensitivity at 39% specificity. With a cut-off of 4.85, color testing yielded a sensitivity of 100% at a specificity of 8% on the tritan-axis, respectively. Considering OCT instead of clinical examination as a reference standard resulted in a comparable high sensitivity, but low specificity for color vision testing. Disturbance of the tritan axis was more pronounced than for the protan axis in present macular edema and also better correlated (r = 0.46) with retinal thickness measured with OCT. Conclusions: Computerized, quantitative color testing using the chromatest allows detection of diabetic maculopathy with high sensitivity. However, only a low specificity exists for retinal macular edema, as in diabetic retinopathy (DR) frequently abnormalities of the tritan axis exist before any retinal thickening occurs. PMID:24391371

  3. Diurnal variations of Titan's ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, J.; Galand, M.; Yelle, R. V.; Vuitton, V.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Lavvas, P. P.; Müller-Wodarg, I. C. F.; Cravens, T. E.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Waite, J. H.

    2009-06-01

    We present our analysis of the diurnal variations of Titan's ionosphere (between 1000 and 1300 km) based on a sample of Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) measurements in the Open Source Ion (OSI) mode obtained from eight close encounters of the Cassini spacecraft with Titan. Although there is an overall ion depletion well beyond the terminator, the ion content on Titan's nightside is still appreciable, with a density plateau of ˜700 cm-3 below ˜1300 km. Such a plateau is a combined result of significant depletion of light ions and modest depletion of heavy ones on Titan's nightside. We propose that the distinctions between the diurnal variations of light and heavy ions are associated with their different chemical loss pathways, with the former primarily through “fast” ion-neutral chemistry and the latter through “slow” electron dissociative recombination. The strong correlation between the observed night-to-day ion density ratios and the associated ion lifetimes suggests a scenario in which the ions created on Titan's dayside may survive well to the nightside. The observed asymmetry between the dawn and dusk ion density profiles also supports such an interpretation. We construct a time-dependent ion chemistry model to investigate the effect of ion survival associated with solid body rotation alone as well as superrotating horizontal winds. For long-lived ions, the predicted diurnal variations have similar general characteristics to those observed. However, for short-lived ions, the model densities on the nightside are significantly lower than the observed values. This implies that electron precipitation from Saturn's magnetosphere may be an additional and important contributor to the densities of the short-lived ions observed on Titan's nightside.

  4. Unusual case of hepatic metastasis in follicular thyroid carcinoma detected using I-131 whole body scintigraphy and single-photon emission computerized tomography/computerized tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusamy; Natarajan, Sudhakar; Mohanan, Vyshak; Shinto, Ajit Sugunan

    2015-01-01

    Papillary and follicular thyroid carcinomas, together known as differentiated thyroid carcinomas (DTC), are among the most curable of cancers. Distant metastases are rare events at the onset of DTC. Among these presentations, metastasis to the liver is even more unusual. Only 11 cases of DTC with liver metastasis were previously reported in the literature. We present a 55-year-old male on Iodine-131 whole body scintigraphy showed intense uptake in thyroid bed, metastasis in both lungs and right lobe of the liver. Radioiodine concentration in liver metastases made him amenable to high-dose radioiodine therapy patient. PMID:26430327

  5. Electrodynamics and plasma processes in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heelis, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    The paper examines the advances achieved between 1983 and 1986 on understanding ionospheric electrodynamics and associated plasma processes, including an assessment of the roles of the E- and F-region neutral winds in providing the large-scale electric field in the ionosphere, as well as of the influence of electric fields of magnetospheric origin on the motion and distribution of plasma. Studies of the factors affecting the creation and evolution of plasma structure with many different scale sizes are discussed. Consideration is also given to the ground-based and in situ techniques used in these studies.

  6. Operational physical models of the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nisbet, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    Global models of the neutral constituents are considered relevant to ion density models and improved knowledge of the ion chemistry. Information provided on the pressure gradients that control the wind system and the electric field systems due to balloon, satellite, and incoherent scatter measurements is discussed along with the implication of these results to the development of global ionospheric models. The current state of knowledge of the factors controlling the large day to day variations in the ionosphere and possible approaches for operational models are reviewed.

  7. Characteristics of ionospheric storms in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao; Wang, Guojun; Shi, Jiankui

       The ionosphere experiences intense response during the geomagnetic storm and it varies with latitude and longitude. The DPS-4 digisonde measurements and GPS-TEC data of ionospheric stations located at different latitudes in the longitudinal sector of 90-130E during 2002 to 2012 were analyzed to investigate the ionospheric effects in the different latitude of East Asia during geomagnetic storm. About 70 geomagnetic storms are selected according to the Dst index and observed data and they are in different seasons and different solar activity levels. A few quiet days’ averages of data before geomagnetic storm were used as the undisturbed level. Results show that for the middle and high latitude, the short-lived positive disturbance associated with the initial phase of the every storm was observed in each season and then the disturbances were negative till the termination of storm. At the low latitude, storm-time disturbances of foF2 have obvious diurnal, seasonal and solar cycle characteristics. Generally, geomagnetic activity will cause foF2 to increase at daytime and decrease at nighttime except for the summer in low solar activity period. The intensity of response of foF2 is stronger at nighttime than that at daytime. The negative ionospheric storm effect is the strongest in summer and the positive ionospheric storm effect is the strongest in winter. In high solar activity period, the diurnal variation of the response of foF2 is very pronounced in each season, and the strong ionospheric response can last several days. In low solar activity period, ionospheric response has very pronounced diurnal variation in winter only. It’s notable that geomagnetic activities occurred at local time nighttime can cause stronger and longer responses of foF2 at the low latitude. All in all, the obvious negative phase ionospheric storms often occurred at the low latitude. Moreover a notable phenomenon was observed for the low latitude, there are the intensive

  8. Ionospheric effects of solar x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danskin, Donald

    2016-07-01

    The ionospheric absorption of radio waves caused by solar x-ray bursts is measured directly by Riometers from the Canada Riometer Array. The absorption is found to be proportional to the square root of the flux intensity of the X-ray burst with time delays of 18-20 seconds between the peak X-ray emission and absorption in the ionosphere. A detailed analysis showed that some X-ray flares during 2011-2014 are more effective at producing absorption than others. Solar longitude of X-ray burst for several X-class flares shows no consistent pattern of enhancement in the absorption.

  9. Ionospheric effects of the Chelyabinsk meteoroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernogor, L. F.

    2015-05-01

    Observation results are presented for the lower and upper ionosphere disturbances accompanying the passage and explosion of the Chelyabinsk space body. The effects near the meteoroid's path are investigated from the total electron content variations detected by GPS radio receivers. The ionosphere observations at distances of ˜2000-300 km are based on the ionosonde data and the phase and amplitude measurements for a radio signal at 66.67 kHz on the route from Moscow to Kharkiv. Manifestations are found both of acoustic and gravity waves following the passage and explosion of the space body. Their connection with the passage of the Chelyabinsk meteoroid is discussed.

  10. Studing Solar Flare Effects on Ionosphere Using AWESOME Receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, Famil; Babayev, Elchin; Alekperov, Ilgar

    2015-08-01

    Ground based observations of Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) / Very Low Frequency (VLF) (300 Hz 30 kHz) waves are considered as an important remote sensing tool for the investigation of the ionosphere and the magnetosphere. VLF waves find their origin in various natural and artificial phenomena; the natural sources include thunderstorms, lightning and associated phenomena. Sub-ionospheric VLF transmissions propagating inside the Earth-ionosphere wave-guide is also being widely used for investigating sudden ionospheric perturbations (SIDs) in lower part of the ionosphere.

  11. Normalized mean shapes and reference index values for computerized quantitative assessment indices of chest wall deformities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho Chul; Park, Man Sik; Lee, Seong Keon; Nam, Ki Chang; Park, Hyung Joo; Kim, Min Gi; Song, Jae-Jun; Choi, Hyuk

    2015-11-01

    We previously proposed a computerized index (eccentricity index [EI]) for chest-wall deformity measurements, such as pectus excavatum. We sought to define mean shapes based on normal chest walls and to propose for computerized index reference values of that are used in the quantitative analysis of the severity of chest-wall deformities. A total of 584 patients were classified into 18 groups, and a database of their chest-wall computed tomography (CT) scan images was constructed. The boundaries of the chest wall were extracted by using a segmentation algorithm, and the mean shapes were subsequently developed. The reference index values were calculated from the developed mean shapes. Reference index values for the EI were compared with a conventional index, the Haller index (HI). A close association has been shown between the two indices in multiple subjects (r = 0.974, P < 0.001). The newly developed mean shapes and reference index values supply both reliability and objectivity to the diagnosis, analysis, and treatment of chest-wall deformities. They promise to be highly useful in clinical settings.

  12. Atmosphere-Ionosphere Response to the M9 Tohoku Earthquake Revealed by Joined Satellite and Ground Observations. Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ouzounov, Dimitar; Pulinets, Sergey; Romanov, Alexey; Tsybulya, Konstantin; Davidenko, Dimitri; Kafatos, Menas; Taylor, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    The recent M9 Tohoku Japan earthquake of March 11, 2011 was the largest recorded earthquake ever to hit this nation. We retrospectively analyzed the temporal and spatial variations of four different physical parameters - outgoing long wave radiation (OLR), GPS/TEC, Low-Earth orbit tomography and critical frequency foF2. These changes characterize the state of the atmosphere and ionosphere several days before the onset of this earthquake. Our first results show that on March 8th a rapid increase of emitted infrared radiation was observed from the satellite data and an anomaly developed near the epicenter. The GPS/TEC data indicate an increase and variation in electron density reaching a maximum value on March 8. Starting on this day in the lower ionospheric there was also confirmed an abnormal TEC variation over the epicenter. From March 3-11 a large increase in electron concentration was recorded at all four Japanese ground based ionosondes, which return to normal after the main earthquake. We found a positive correlation between the atmospheric and ionospheric anomalies and the Tohoku earthquake. This study may lead to a better understanding of the response of the atmosphere/ionosphere to the Great Tohoku earthquake.

  13. Studies of ionospheric plasma and electrodynamics and their application to ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heelis, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    The contribution of the Dynamics Explorer (DE) program to the study of small-scale structure in the equatorial ionospheric number density and the bulk motion of the plasma in the equatorial ionosphere is considered. DE results have helped elucidate the role of E region and F region winds in decreasing the magnitude of variations in the east-west plasma drift at night, as a function of magnetic flux tube apex height, with increasing height above the altitude of the peak F region concentration. Other results concern the ionospheric convection pattern at high latitudes during periods of southward IMF, the magnetosphere/solar-wind interaction that may be involved in the production of the convection pattern, and the characteristics of the high-latitude ionospheric plasma motion during periods of northward IMF.

  14. Modifications of the ionosphere prior to large earthquakes: report from the Ionosphere Precursor Study Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, K.-I.; Devi, M.; Ryu, K.; Chen, C. H.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, H.; Bankov, L.; Kodama, T.

    2016-12-01

    The current status of ionospheric precursor studies associated with large earthquakes (EQ) is summarized in this report. It is a joint endeavor of the "Ionosphere Precursor Study Task Group," which was formed with the support of the Mitsubishi Foundation in 2014-2015. The group promotes the study of ionosphere precursors (IP) to EQs and aims to prepare for a future EQ dedicated satellite constellation, which is essential to obtain the global morphology of IPs and hence demonstrate whether the ionosphere can be used for short-term EQ predictions. Following a review of the recent IP studies, the problems and specific research areas that emerged from the one-year project are described. Planned or launched satellite missions dedicated (or suitable) for EQ studies are also mentioned.

  15. Ionospheric effects of magnetic storm observed by means of oblique sounding of artificial ionospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uryadov, V. P.; Vertogradov, G. G.; Vertogradov, V. G.; Ponyatov, A. A.

    Results of experimental studies of the influence of the artificial ionospheric turbulence (AIT) on HF propagation are presented. Ionospheric modification and the creation of a scatterer was produced by powerful radio emission of the SURA heating facility (Nizhny Novgorod region). For diagnostics of the AIT were used the Russian chirp sounders network and HF Doppler radar. The reception of scattered signals was carried out in the Rostov-Don on the oblique V-type antenna oriented to the SURA heating facility. It is investigated ionospheric effects of magnetic storm during August 17-22, 2003 accompanied a period of the experiment. It is shown that ionospheric effects of the magnetic storm observed by means of Doppler frequency shift (DFS) measurements signals scattered from artificial small-scale field-aligned irregularities correlate well with the behavior of the southward component Bz of the interplanetary magnetic field and with variations in the geomagnetic field near the Earth surface. It has been found that at heights of the mid-latitude ionospheric F region under undisturbed conditions the electric field and the drift velocity of irregularities correspond to the typical values about 1 mV m-1 and 20 m s-1, respectively. During magnetic storm these values increase up to values of about 8.6 mV m-1 and 186 m s-1, which better correspond to the values typical for the high-latitude ionosphere. It is found that in the magnetically-disturbed period sporadically appearing trains with quasi-periodical modulation of DFS for the scattered signal with a period of ˜ 40-60 s and amplitude reaching 2 Hz were observed. The relation of the quasi-periodical oscillations of the DFS for the scattered signal to the presence of magnetohydrodynamics waves excited during a magnetic storm is considered. It is concluded that use HF Doppler radar for AIT sounding is of interest for diagnostics of wave processes in the ionosphere and magnetosphere. The conditions of formation of the HF

  16. A review of ionospheric effects on Earth-space propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klobuchar, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    A short description is given of each ionospheric total electron content (TEC) effect upon radio waves, along with a representative value of the magnitude of each of these effects under normal ionospheric conditions. A discussion is given of the important characteristics of average ionospheric TEC behavior and the temporal and spatial variability of TEC. Radio waves undergo several effects when they pass through the Earth's ionosphere. One of the most important of these effects is a retardation, or group delay, on the modulation or information carried on the radio wave that is due to its encounter with the free, thermal electrons in the Earth's ionosphere. Other effects the ionosphere has on radio waves include: radio frequency (RF) carrier phase advance; Doppler shift of the RF carrier of the radio wave; Faraday rotation of the plane of polarization of linearly polarized waves; angular refraction or bending of the radio wave path as it travels through the ionosphere; and amplitude and phase scintillations.

  17. Ray trace calculation of ionospheric propagation at lower frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, Michael H.

    2006-10-01

    The Raytrace/Ionospheric Conductivity and Electron Density-Bent-Gallagher model has been revised to make it applicable to ionospheric propagation at low radio frequencies (0.5-5.0 MHz), where the ionosphere and magnetic anisotropy drastically alter propagation paths and provide a severe test of propagation model algorithms. The necessary revisions are discussed, and the model is applied to the problem of ionospheric penetration from a source below the ionosphere to a receiver above the ionosphere. It is necessary to include the electron collision frequency in the Appleton-Hartree index of refraction in order to permit ionospheric penetration for radio frequencies below the maximum plasma frequency (e.g., whistler modes). The associated reformulation of the ray trace equations for a complex index of refraction is straightforward. Difficulties with numerical methods are cited for the lowest frequencies, and future improvements are indicated.

  18. Model of Jovian F region ionosphere (Saturnian ionosphere in offset dipole approximation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, A.

    1991-01-01

    Researchers investigated the offset effect of Saturn's dipole on its ionosphere. The magnetic field of Saturn is primarily that of a dipole closely aligned to the rotational axis, but displaced northward from the center by a distance approximately equal to 0.05 R sub S, R sub S being the reference radius of Saturn. This offset effect would manifest itself most prominently between the ionospheric profiles in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres of Saturn.

  19. Monitoring and modeling Hong Kong ionosphere using regional GPS networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shan

    The ionosphere is the region from 90 km to 2000 km altitude, where the solar radiation produces partially ionized plasma of different gas components. Knowledge of ionospheric electronic density and its variation is essential for a wide range of applications, such as radio and telecommunications, satellite tracking, earth observation from space, and satellite navigation. This research aims at monitoring detailed low latitude structures of the ionosphere using Hong Kong GPS network. In this study, the distribution characteristics of ionospheric TEC and disturbances are investigated and researched. It is shown that in Hong Kong, there is a two-dimensional peak along local solar time and latitude for the TEC distribution due to the solar radiation and equatorial ionospheric anomaly. The peak values appear around geographic latitude 22° north and the local solar time 2pm. On both sides of the peak, there exist large TEC slopes. Therefore, even with short baselines (i.e. <10 km), ionospheric delays cannot be eliminated by double difference technique. Ionospheric disturbances happen frequently in Hong Kong, with the severe ones mainly concentrating at geographic latitude 22° north and the local solar time 10pm. Both ionospheric TEC values and disturbances reach their seasonal maximum around the equinoxes. With the aids of PPP technique and satellite difference widelane technique, ionospheric modeling equation is reformed with less unknown parameters, which support the stable and precise estimation of ionospheric VTEC along with the constant biases within a short and peace period. On this basis, a new localized ionospheric modeling technique, which models ionospheric VTEC along the satellite track on the assumed ionospheric shell for each satellite with a short piecewise modeling period, is proposed for precise ionospheric TEC modeling, especially in low latitude regions where the ionosphere is active. The numerical results demonstrate that the new model has a several

  20. Optical Coherence Tomography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and MRA) Computed Tomography (CT) Scan Diagnostic Tests and Procedures Echocardiography Electrocardiogram ... Ultrasound Nuclear Stress Test Nuclear Ventriculography Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Stress ... Optical Coherence Tomography | ...