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Sample records for computerized whiteboard system

  1. Supporting Patient Care in the Emergency Department with a Computerized Whiteboard System

    PubMed Central

    Aronsky, Dominik; Jones, Ian; Lanaghan, Kevin; Slovis, Corey M.

    2008-01-01

    Efficient information management and communication within the emergency department (ED) is essential to providing timely and high-quality patient care. The ED whiteboard (census board) usually serves as an ED’s central access point for operational and patient-related information. This article describes the design, functionality, and experiences with a computerized ED whiteboard, which has the ability to display relevant operational and patient-related information in real time. Embedded functionality, additional whiteboard views, and the integration with ED and institutional information system components, such as the computerized patient record or the provider order entry system, provide rapid access to more detailed information. As an information center, the computerized whiteboard supports our ED environment not only for providing patient care, but also for operational, educational, and research activities. PMID:18096913

  2. Computerized procedures system

    DOEpatents

    Lipner, Melvin H.; Mundy, Roger A.; Franusich, Michael D.

    2010-10-12

    An online data driven computerized procedures system that guides an operator through a complex process facility's operating procedures. The system monitors plant data, processes the data and then, based upon this processing, presents the status of the current procedure step and/or substep to the operator. The system supports multiple users and a single procedure definition supports several interface formats that can be tailored to the individual user. Layered security controls access privileges and revisions are version controlled. The procedures run on a server that is platform independent of the user workstations that the server interfaces with and the user interface supports diverse procedural views.

  3. Computerized training management system

    DOEpatents

    Rice, H.B.; McNair, R.C.; White, K.; Maugeri, T.

    1998-08-04

    A Computerized Training Management System (CTMS) is disclosed for providing a procedurally defined process that is employed to develop accreditable performance based training programs for job classifications that are sensitive to documented regulations and technical information. CTMS is a database that links information needed to maintain a five-phase approach to training-analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation independent of training program design. CTMS is designed using R-Base{trademark}, an-SQL compliant software platform. Information is logically entered and linked in CTMS. Each task is linked directly to a performance objective, which, in turn, is linked directly to a learning objective; then, each enabling objective is linked to its respective test items. In addition, tasks, performance objectives, enabling objectives, and test items are linked to their associated reference documents. CTMS keeps all information up to date since it automatically sorts, files and links all data; CTMS includes key word and reference document searches. 18 figs.

  4. Computerized training management system

    DOEpatents

    Rice, Harold B.; McNair, Robert C.; White, Kenneth; Maugeri, Terry

    1998-08-04

    A Computerized Training Management System (CTMS) for providing a procedurally defined process that is employed to develop accreditable performance based training programs for job classifications that are sensitive to documented regulations and technical information. CTMS is a database that links information needed to maintain a five-phase approach to training-analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation independent of training program design. CTMS is designed using R-Base.RTM., an-SQL compliant software platform. Information is logically entered and linked in CTMS. Each task is linked directly to a performance objective, which, in turn, is linked directly to a learning objective; then, each enabling objective is linked to its respective test items. In addition, tasks, performance objectives, enabling objectives, and test items are linked to their associated reference documents. CTMS keeps all information up to date since it automatically sorts, files and links all data; CTMS includes key word and reference document searches.

  5. Computerized international geothermal information systems

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, S.L.; Lawrence, J.D.; Lepman, S.R.

    1980-03-01

    The computerized international geothermal energy information system is reviewed. The review covers establishment of the Italy - United States linked data centers by the NATO Committee on Challenges of Modern Society, through a bilateral agreement, and up to the present time. The result of the information exchange project is given as the bibliographic and numerical data available from the data centers. Recommendations for the exchange of computerized geothermal information at the international level are discussed.

  6. Distributed Computerized Catalog System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borgen, Richard L.; Wagner, David A.

    1995-01-01

    DarkStar Distributed Catalog System describes arbitrary data objects in unified manner, providing end users with versatile, yet simple search mechanism for locating and identifying objects. Provides built-in generic and dynamic graphical user interfaces. Design of system avoids some of problems of standard DBMS, and system provides more flexibility than do conventional relational data bases, or object-oriented data bases. Data-collection lattice partly hierarchical representation of relationships among collections, subcollections, and data objects.

  7. Computerized IEP Management Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krivacska, James J.

    The preparation of the Individualized Education Program (IEP) for each handicapped child is seen as cumbersome and time consuming and involves writing similar goals and objectives repetitively for different students. Utilization of a microcomputer-based IEP preparation system has a significant impact on this process and what the school…

  8. Intelligent Computerized Training System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Lui; Baffes, Paul; Loftin, R. Bowen; Hua, Grace C.

    1991-01-01

    Intelligent computer-aided training system gives trainees same experience gained from best on-the-job training. Automated system designed to emulate behavior of experienced teacher devoting full time and attention to training novice. Proposes challenging training scenarios, monitors and evaluates trainee's actions, makes meaningful comments in response to errors, reponds to requests for information, gives hints when appropriate, and remembers strengths and weaknesses so it designs suitable exercises. Used to train flight-dynamics officers in deploying satellites from Space Shuttle. Adapted to training for variety of tasks and situations, simply by modifying one or at most two of its five modules. Helps to ensure continuous supply of trained specialists despite scarcity of experienced and skilled human trainers.

  9. Computerized provider order entry systems.

    PubMed

    2001-01-01

    Computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems are designed to replace a hospital's paper-based ordering system. They allow users to electronically write the full range of orders, maintain an online medication administration record, and review changes made to an order by successive personnel. They also offer safety alerts that are triggered when an unsafe order (such as for a duplicate drug therapy) is entered, as well as clinical decision support to guide caregivers to less expensive alternatives or to choices that better fit established hospital protocols. CPOE systems can, when correctly configured, markedly increase efficiency and improve patient safety and patient care. However, facilities need to recognize that currently available CPOE systems require a tremendous amount of time and effort to be spent in customization before their safety and clinical support features can be effectively implemented. What's more, even after they've been customized, the systems may still allow certain unsafe orders to be entered. Thus, CPOE systems are not currently a quick or easy remedy for medical errors. ECRI's Evaluation of CPOE systems--conducted in collaboration with the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP)--discusses these and other related issues. It also examines and compares CPOE systems from three suppliers: Eclipsys Corp., IDX Systems Corp., and Siemens Medical Solutions Health Services Corp. Our testing focuses primarily on the systems' interfacing capabilities, patient safeguards, and ease of use. PMID:11696968

  10. California's Computerized Pupil Transportation Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, James C.

    1983-01-01

    Traces efforts to develop a statewide plan for computerized school bus fleet operation by means of questionnaires distributed to all 58 county education offices, 7 regional data processing centers, and selected private school bus contractors and school districts. Findings indicate significant potential savings for fleets of 20 or more busses. (JBM)

  11. 45 CFR 307.5 - Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2014-10-01 2012-10-01 true Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT SYSTEMS § 307.5 Mandatory computerized support... operational computerized support enforcement system, which meets Federal requirements under § 302.85(a)(1)...

  12. 45 CFR 307.5 - Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT SYSTEMS § 307.5 Mandatory computerized support... operational computerized support enforcement system, which meets Federal requirements under § 302.85(a)(1)...

  13. 45 CFR 307.5 - Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT SYSTEMS § 307.5 Mandatory computerized support... operational computerized support enforcement system, which meets Federal requirements under § 302.85(a)(1)...

  14. Lecturing with a Virtual Whiteboard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanovic, Zoran

    2006-09-01

    Recent advances in computer technology, word processing software, and projection systems have made traditional whiteboard lecturing obsolete. Tablet personal computers connected to display projectors and running handwriting software have replaced the marker-on-whiteboard method of delivering a lecture. Since the notes can be saved into an electronic file, they can be uploaded to a class website to be perused by the students later. This paper will describe the author's experiences in using this new technology to deliver physics lectures at an engineering school. The benefits and problems discovered will be reviewed and results from a survey of student opinions will be discussed.

  15. The Computerized Adaptive Testing System Development Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, James R.; Sympson, J. B.

    The Computerized Adaptive Testing (CAT) project is a joint Armed Services coordinated effort to develop and evaluate a system for automated, adaptive administration of the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB). The CAT is a system for administering personnel tests that differs from conventional test administration in two major…

  16. Computerized Adaptive Mastery Tests as Expert Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frick, Theodore W.

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of expert systems and computerized adaptive tests describes two versions of EXSPRT, a new approach that combines uncertain inference in expert systems with sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) stopping rules. Results of two studies comparing EXSPRT to adaptive mastery testing based on item response theory and SPRT approaches are…

  17. Computerized system for measuring cerebral metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    McGlone, J.S.; Hibbard, L.S.; Hawkins, R.A.; Kasturi, R.

    1987-09-01

    A computerized stereotactic measurement system for evaluating rat brain metabolism was developed to utilize the large amount of data generated by quantitative autoradiography. Conventional methods of measurement only analyze a small percent of these data because these methods are limited by instrument design and the subjectiveness of the investigator. However, a computerized system allows digital images to be analyzed by placing data at their appropriate three-dimensional stereotactic coordinates. The system automatically registers experimental data to a standard three-dimensional image using alignment, scaling, and matching operations. Metabolic activity in different neuronal structures is then measured by generating digital masks and superimposing them on to experimental data. Several experimental data sets were evaluated and it was noticed that the structures measured by the computerized system, had in general, lower metabolic activity than manual measurements had indicated. This was expected because the computerized system measured the structure over its volume while the manual readings were taken from the most active metabolic area of a particular structure.

  18. Implementation of a Computerized Maintenance Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Yong-Hong; Askari, Bruce

    1994-01-01

    A primer Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) has been established for NASA Ames pressure component certification program. The CMMS takes full advantage of the latest computer technology and SQL relational database to perform periodic services for vital pressure components. The Ames certification program is briefly described and the aspects of the CMMS implementation are discussed as they are related to the certification objectives.

  19. Computerized management information systems and organizational structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zannetos, Z. S.; Sertel, M. R.

    1970-01-01

    The computerized management of information systems and organizational structures is discussed. The subjects presented are: (1) critical factors favoring centralization and decentralization of organizations, (2) classification of organizations by relative structure, (3) attempts to measure change in organization structure, and (4) impact of information technology developments on organizational structure changes.

  20. 39 CFR 501.15 - Computerized Meter Resetting System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Computerized Meter Resetting System. 501.15... AND DISTRIBUTE POSTAGE EVIDENCING SYSTEMS § 501.15 Computerized Meter Resetting System. (a) Description. The Computerized Meter Resetting System (CMRS) permits customers to reset their postage meters...

  1. 39 CFR 501.15 - Computerized Meter Resetting System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Computerized Meter Resetting System. 501.15... AND DISTRIBUTE POSTAGE EVIDENCING SYSTEMS § 501.15 Computerized Meter Resetting System. (a) Description. The Computerized Meter Resetting System (CMRS) permits customers to reset their postage meters...

  2. 39 CFR 501.15 - Computerized Meter Resetting System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Computerized Meter Resetting System. 501.15... AND DISTRIBUTE POSTAGE EVIDENCING SYSTEMS § 501.15 Computerized Meter Resetting System. (a) Description. The Computerized Meter Resetting System (CMRS) permits customers to reset their postage meters...

  3. 39 CFR 501.15 - Computerized Meter Resetting System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Computerized Meter Resetting System. 501.15... AND DISTRIBUTE POSTAGE EVIDENCING SYSTEMS § 501.15 Computerized Meter Resetting System. (a) Description. The Computerized Meter Resetting System (CMRS) permits customers to reset their postage meters...

  4. Using the Diffusion of Innovation Theory to Explain the Degree of English Teachers' Adoption of Interactive Whiteboards in the Modern Systems School in Jordan: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jwaifell, Mustafa; Gasaymeh, Al-Mothana

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to explain the use of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) by English female teachers in Modern Systems School in Jordan. Viewed from the lens of Rogers' Diffusion of Innovation Theory, the study examined and reported teachers' use of IWB and its features that have impact on their decisions to adopt it in Modern Systems School . The…

  5. The NASA/LRC Computerized Test System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, W. Kirk; Washburn, David A.; Hopkins, William D.; Savage-Rumbaugh, E. Sue; Rumbaugh, Duane M.

    1990-01-01

    A new testing package, including apparatus and tasks for the behavioral study of a number of species in a variety of experiments is presented. The package is described with respect to the kinds of comparative psychological investigations for which it is best suited. The preliminary data generated within this new testing paradigm demonstrate that the NASA/LRC Computerized Test System provides a flexible yet powerful environment for the investigation of behavioral and psychological processes.

  6. Medical high-resolution image sharing and electronic whiteboard system: A pure-web-based system for accessing and discussing lossless original images in telemedicine.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Liang; Li, Ying; Chen, Xin; Yang, Sheng; Gao, Peng; Liu, Hongjun; Feng, Zhengquan; Nian, Yongjian; Qiu, Mingguo

    2015-09-01

    There are various medical image sharing and electronic whiteboard systems available for diagnosis and discussion purposes. However, most of these systems ask clients to install special software tools or web plug-ins to support whiteboard discussion, special medical image format, and customized decoding algorithm of data transmission of HRIs (high-resolution images). This limits the accessibility of the software running on different devices and operating systems. In this paper, we propose a solution based on pure web pages for medical HRIs lossless sharing and e-whiteboard discussion, and have set up a medical HRI sharing and e-whiteboard system, which has four-layered design: (1) HRIs access layer: we improved an tile-pyramid model named unbalanced ratio pyramid structure (URPS), to rapidly share lossless HRIs and to adapt to the reading habits of users; (2) format conversion layer: we designed a format conversion engine (FCE) on server side to real time convert and cache DICOM tiles which clients requesting with window-level parameters, to make browsers compatible and keep response efficiency to server-client; (3) business logic layer: we built a XML behavior relationship storage structure to store and share users' behavior, to keep real time co-browsing and discussion between clients; (4) web-user-interface layer: AJAX technology and Raphael toolkit were used to combine HTML and JavaScript to build client RIA (rich Internet application), to meet clients' desktop-like interaction on any pure webpage. This system can be used to quickly browse lossless HRIs, and support discussing and co-browsing smoothly on any web browser in a diversified network environment. The proposal methods can provide a way to share HRIs safely, and may be used in the field of regional health, telemedicine and remote education at a low cost. PMID:26093385

  7. A Computerized Reference Retrieval System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harline, N. La Var

    An automated retrieval system for reference works was constructed as a prototype in order to illustrate the capabilities and potentialities of future retrieval systems. More than 170 biographical works were indexed and stored in a computer disk to form a biographical data base, and a computer program was written to match patron queries. Consistent…

  8. Computerized ultrasound risk evaluation system

    DOEpatents

    Duric, Nebojsa; Littrup, Peter J.; Holsapple, III, Earle; Barter, Robert Henry; Moore, Thomas L.; Azevedo, Stephen G.; Ferguson, Sidney W.

    2007-10-23

    A method and system for examining tissue are provided in which the tissue is maintained in a position so that it may be insonified with a plurality of pulsed spherical or cylindrical acoustic waves. The insonifying acoustic waves are scattered by the tissue so that scattered acoustic radiation including a mix of reflected and transmitted acoustic waves is received. A representation of a portion of the tissue is then derived from the received scattered acoustic radiation.

  9. A computerized multichannel platelet aggregometer system.

    PubMed

    Kuzara, D; Zoltan, B J; Greathouse, S L; Jordan, C W; Kohler, C A

    1986-08-01

    Commercially available instrumentation for conducting platelet aggregation studies in clinical and research laboratories consists of one-, two-, or four-channel aggregometers used in conjunction with strip chart recorders. These instruments have limited utility in large-scale drug screening and evaluation of the mode of action of drugs or in the clinical diagnosis of platelet disorders. A new instrument, a computerized multichannel aggregometer system (CMPAS) has been developed to collect, display, and analyze platelet aggregation data. The system is comprised of a 24-channel Born-type aggregometer, interfaced to a Rockwell AIM-65 microcomputer through an analogue-to-digital converter and an Epson dot-matrix printer. Each channel is individually calibrated, and aggregation data can be collected on up to 24 different platelet-rich plasma samples simultaneously. Conversational programs written in BASIC prompt the user for the addition of agonists and inhibitors. The tracings for each channel are displayed simultaneously, and a program automatically analyzes the data to generate the following parameters: baseline optical density, maximum aggregation response, positive and negative slopes, time to peak aggregation, and percentage response. Computerized multichannel aggregometer system data outputs are comparable to data generated by a standard Chronolog aggregometer unit. The advantages of the system include multichannel capability, simultaneous display of all channels allowing relative comparisons between control and experimental groups, and time savings and improved efficiency in conducting and analyzing aggregation experiments. PMID:3755779

  10. Implementing a computerized operating room management system.

    PubMed

    Choy, M

    1991-01-01

    The Queen's Medical Center implemented a computerized operating room management system in 1987 that includes surgery scheduling, intraoperative recording, and resource tracking. In addition to the important functional components, the system provides management with a better tool for decision-making. The purpose of this article is to describe this implementation. Background is provided to identify the manual system's deficiencies followed by the anticipated benefits of the computer system. The paper concentrates on Queen's implementation experiences in coding the surgical procedure information, confronting staff anxiety, managing the changing roles of the staff and providing adequate resources. Minimum requirements for a successful implementation include designating an effective project leader, assigning system responsibilities to the user, relieving all operational responsibilities from key members of the project team and providing adequate resources to support the system. PMID:1760543

  11. The 24-Hour Job Machine: Computerized Applicant Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiedman, Lisa W.

    1986-01-01

    The evolution of computerized job applicant systems is described and compared to that of computerized banking systems; the characteristics of such systems in the future, especially for minimizing data entry and maximizing accessibility, are then outlined and illustrated with the Carnegie-Mellon University system. (MSE)

  12. A COMPUTERIZED OPERATOR SUPPORT SYSTEM PROTOTYPE

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas A. Ulrich; Roger Lew; Ronald L. Boring; Ken Thomas

    2015-03-01

    A computerized operator support system (COSS) is proposed for use in nuclear power plants to assist control room operators in addressing time-critical plant upsets. A COSS is a collection of technologies to assist operators in monitoring overall plant performance and making timely, informed decisions on appropriate control actions for the projected plant condition. A prototype COSS was developed in order to demonstrate the concept and provide a test bed for further research. The prototype is based on four underlying elements consisting of a digital alarm system, computer-based procedures, piping and instrumentation diagram system representations, and a recommender module for mitigation actions. The initial version of the prototype is now operational at the Idaho National Laboratory using the Human System Simulation Laboratory.

  13. 45 CFR 307.5 - Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... operational computerized support enforcement system, which meets Federal requirements under § 302.85(a)(1) of... October 1, 2000, each State must have in effect an operational computerized support enforcement system... plans to use and how they will interface with the base system; (3) Provide documentation that...

  14. Integer Operations Using a Whiteboard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Delise R.

    2011-01-01

    Interactive whiteboards are somewhat unimpressive at first and look like the whiteboards that already hang on the walls of many classrooms. However, integrating interactive whiteboard technology in a unit on adding and subtracting integers enhances student engagement and understanding. In this article, the author describes how she used an…

  15. Automatic Data Processing System and Procedures, Computerized Academic Counseling System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zagorski, Henry J.; And Others

    The Computerized Academic Counseling System (CACS) designed by the System Development Corporation is reviewed. Aspects of the system, constructed to assist counselors in guiding undergraduates in the selection of academic majors, which are discussed include: problem definition, system analysis, design rationale, methodology, measurement…

  16. Computerized system for translating a torch head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.; Ives, R. E.; Bruce, M. M., Jr.; Pryor, P. P., Jr.; Gard, L. H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The system provides a constant travel speed along a contoured workpiece. It has a driven skate characterized by an elongated bed, with a pair of independently pivoted trucks connected to the bed for support. The trucks are mounted on a contoured track of arbitrary configuration in a mutually spaced relation. An axially extensible torch head manipulator arm is mounted on the bed of the carriage and projects perpendicular from the midportion. The torch head is mounted at its distal end. A real-time computerized control drive subsystem is used to advance the skate along the track of a variable rate for maintaining a constant speed for the torch head tip, and to position the torch axis relative to a preset angle to the workpiece.

  17. The Wonders of Interactive Whiteboards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkman, Neal

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses the advantages of using interactive whiteboards in the classroom. Developed by Smart Technologies, the Smart Board is one of several interactive whiteboards on the market today. Through Smart Board, starters can write, erase, and perform mouse functions with their finger, a pen, or anything with a maneuverable, firm surface.…

  18. Computerized Adaptive Testing System Design: Preliminary Design Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croll, Paul R.

    A functional design model for a computerized adaptive testing (CAT) system was developed and presented through a series of hierarchy plus input-process-output (HIPO) diagrams. System functions were translated into system structure: specifically, into 34 software components. Implementation of the design in a physical system was addressed through…

  19. A Comparison of Computerized Job Matching Systems. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botterbusch, Karl F.

    This publication describes and compares 15 nationally available computerized job matching systems. The first section discusses job matching systems in general and provides an outline and a summary comparison table of the systems. The second section, which makes up the major part of the document, contains descriptions of 15 systems. For each…

  20. Computerized Systems for Collecting Real-Time Observational Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahng, SungWoo; Iwata, Brian

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 15 developers of computerized real-time observation systems found many systems have incorporated laptop or handheld computers as well as bar-code scanners. Most systems used IBM-compatible software, and ranged from free to complete systems costing more than $1,500. Data analysis programs were included with most programs. (Author/CR)

  1. Unesco Integrated Documentation Network; Computerized Documentation System (CDS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Dept. of Documentation, Libraries, and Archives.

    Intended for use by the Computerized Documentation System (CDS), the Unesco version of ISIS (Integrated Set of Information Systems)--originally developed by the International Labour Organization--was developed in 1975 and named CDS/ISIS. This system has a comprehensive collection of programs for input, management, and output, running in batch or…

  2. A Report on Project CVIS (Computerized Vocational Information System).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willowbrook High School, Villa Park, IL. Computerized Vocational Information System Project.

    The Computerized Vocational Information System (CVIS) team, has designed a system utilizing a computer as a tool to help students explore occupations in the light of their own student records. This system aims at teaching a decision-making process in a way that interests students and allows counselors more time for counseling functions. The…

  3. PLATO IV: First Year Report, Computerized Training System, Project ABACUS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinkle, Lawrence R.

    This report covers the PLATO IV activities during calendar year 1973 at the Computerized Training System. The work reported herein is supported by a program sponsored by the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) to evaluate the PLATO IV system for use in training, oriented to the needs of the Armed Services. The report presents a synopsis of…

  4. The Computerized Comprehensibility System. Maintainer's Guide. Technical Report No. 33.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieras, David E.

    This report is a guide for the maintainer or developer of the computerized comprehensibility system (CCS), a system that uses techniques and results from artificial intelligence and cognitive psychology to critique the comprehensibility of a technical document. The purpose of this report is to allow the qualified programmer to rapidly understand…

  5. Oakton Community College Computerized Vocational Information System, 1974-75.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, James E.

    The Computerized Vocational Information System (CVIS) at Oakton Community College (OCC) is an integrated set of guidance systems designed to help students expand their awareness of the various career and educational opportunities available to them. Terminals are available for student use every weekday from 8:30 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. The Career…

  6. Allied health applications of a computerized clinical log database system.

    PubMed

    Boyce, K E; Winn, J S; Anderson, S L; Bryant, B G

    1999-01-01

    Preliminary research in the development and use of computerized clinical log records began in 1987 in an allied health college at a midwestern academic health center. This article reviews development and implementation of a computerized system for managing clinical log records to improve and enhance allied health educational programs in the radiation sciences. These clinical log databases are used for quantitative and qualitative analyses of student participation in clinical procedures, and educational planning for each student. Collecting and recording data from clinical log records serves as a valuable instructional tool for students, with both clinical and didactic applications. PMID:10389054

  7. Documentation of Nursing Practice Using a Computerized Medical Information System

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Carol

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses a definition of the content of the computerized nursing data base developed by the Nursing Department for the Clinical Center Medical Information System at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. The author describes the theoretical framework for the content and presents a model to describe the organization of the nursing data components in relation to the process of nursing care delivery. Nursing documentation requirements of Nurse Practice Acts, American Nurses Association Standards of Practice and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals are also addressed as they relate to this data base. The advantages and disadvantages of such an approach to computerized documentation are discussed.

  8. A Computerized System for Workplace Design for Visually Impaired Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, J-G; Hou, C-A

    1991-01-01

    VITAL (Vision Impaired Task and Assignment Lexicon) is an integrated computerized system that performs workplace design tasks for visually impaired workers. VITAL consists of three modules: ergonomics consultation, disability index, and work measurement. Evaluation indicated that VITAL could be used as a tool to help nonprofessional vocational…

  9. A Preliminary Instructional Model for a Computerized Training System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimberlin, D. A.

    A preliminary instructional model suitable for lesson preparation for a Computerized Training System is described. Topics discussed include general course architecture, general course structure, and the training decision process. Guidelines for the design of the model are presented and information is provided on the adaptation of the model to…

  10. COMPUTERIZED FGD BYPRODUCT PRODUCTION AND MARKETING SYSTEM: USERS MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The users manual describes a computerized system--consisting of a number of integrated programs, models, and data bases--that has been developed to compare the costs of power plant strategies designed to meet clean air regulations. It describes the data bases, programs, and proce...

  11. Guidelines for the Development of Computerized Student Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armes, Nancy, Ed.; And Others

    Designed to provide guidelines for the development of computerized student information systems, this report raises policy issues and questions to be resolved at the campus level and describes a variety of computer-generated reports and records that can assist in educational decision making and planning. Introductory material discusses the…

  12. 21 CFR 884.2800 - Computerized Labor Monitoring System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...: “Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Computerized Labor Monitoring System. 884.2800 Section 884.2800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  13. A Computerized Interactive Vocabulary Development System for Advanced Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukulska-Hulme, Agnes

    1988-01-01

    Argues that the process of recording newly encountered vocabulary items in a typical language learning situation can be improved through a computerized system of vocabulary storage based on database management software that improves the discovery and recording of meaning, subsequent retrieval of items for productive use, and memory retention.…

  14. The Development and Evaluation of a Computerized Adaptive Testing System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de-la-Torre, Roberto; Vispoel, Walter P.

    The development and preliminary evaluation of the Computerized Adaptive Testing System (CATSYS), a new testing package for IBM-compatible microcomputers, are described. CATSYS can be used to administer and score operational adaptive tests or to conduct on-line computer simulation studies. The package incorporates several innovative features,…

  15. 45 CFR 302.85 - Mandatory computerized support enforcement system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mandatory computerized support enforcement system. 302.85 Section 302.85 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT (CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES STATE...

  16. 21 CFR 884.2800 - Computerized Labor Monitoring System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Computerized Labor Monitoring System. 884.2800 Section 884.2800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... a monitor and ultrasound transducers. Ultrasound transducers are placed on the maternal abdomen...

  17. 21 CFR 884.2800 - Computerized Labor Monitoring System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Computerized Labor Monitoring System. 884.2800 Section 884.2800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... a monitor and ultrasound transducers. Ultrasound transducers are placed on the maternal abdomen...

  18. 21 CFR 884.2800 - Computerized Labor Monitoring System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Computerized Labor Monitoring System. 884.2800 Section 884.2800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... a monitor and ultrasound transducers. Ultrasound transducers are placed on the maternal abdomen...

  19. 21 CFR 884.2800 - Computerized Labor Monitoring System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Computerized Labor Monitoring System. 884.2800 Section 884.2800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... a monitor and ultrasound transducers. Ultrasound transducers are placed on the maternal abdomen...

  20. Exploration of Career Information Delivery Systems Via Computerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Rod; And Others

    Based on research conducted by Southwest Virginia Community College, this monograph presents information in a variety of formats on seven computerized career information systems: (1) microcomputers, which have the advantage of low cost, amenability to the production of locally generated databases, and portability; (2) the Coordinated Occupational…

  1. 39 CFR 501.15 - Computerized Meter Resetting System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... following payment options (listed in order of preference): (1) Automated clearinghouse (ACH) debits/credits...) Description. The Computerized Meter Resetting System (CMRS) permits customers to reset their postage meters at... companies (RCs). (b) A customer is required to have funds available on deposit with the Postal...

  2. Thirty Simple Ideas for Interactive Whiteboards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Caralee

    2011-01-01

    This article presents thirty simple ideas for interactive whiteboards and how IWB can make one's teaching life easier. These teaching ideas for the interactive whiteboard can be used by teachers every day. Tips for classroom management are also presented.

  3. An integrated computerized triage system in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Aronsky, Dominik; Jones, Ian; Raines, Bill; Hemphill, Robin; Mayberry, Scott R; Luther, Melissa A; Slusser, Ted

    2008-01-01

    Emergency department (ED) triage is a fast-paced process that prioritizes the allocation of limited health care resources to patients in greatest need. This paper describes the experiences with an integrated, computerized triage application. The system exchanges information with other information systems, including the ED patient tracking board, the longitudinal electronic medical record, the computerized provider order entry, and the medi-cation reconciliation application. The application includes decision support capabilities such as assessing the patients acuity level, age-dependent alerts for vital signs, and clinical reminders. The browser-based system utilizes the institutions controlled vocabulary, improves data completeness and quality, such as compliance with capturing required data elements and screening questions, initiates clinical processes, such as pneumococcal vaccination ordering, and reminders to start clinical pathways, issues alerts for clinical trial eligibility, and facilitates various reporting needs. The system has supported the triage documentation of >140,000 pediatric and adult patients. PMID:18999190

  4. 45 CFR 307.13 - Security and confidentiality for computerized support enforcement systems in operation after...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Security and confidentiality for computerized...), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT SYSTEMS § 307.13 Security and confidentiality for computerized support enforcement systems...

  5. THE ESC COMPUTERIZED CIRCULATION SYSTEM MODEL II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SHAWVER, W.; STRAIN, P.M.

    A NEW CIRCULATION SYSTEM NOW IN USE AT THE ELECTRONICS SYSTEMS CENTER (ESC) LIBRARY, PART OF INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION, IS BASED UPON A PREVIOUS SYSTEM WHICH USED TABULATING CARDS, UNIT RECORD MACHINES, AND A SMALL COMPUTER. THE NEW SYSTEM IS A TRANSACTION CARD SYSTEM, IN WHICH ONE BASIC TYPE OF CARD FORMAT IS USED FOR CHARGING,…

  6. Implementing a Computerized Film Rental System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerveny, William

    1988-01-01

    Explains the process used at Oakton Community College in Illinois to automate the system for renting audiovisual titles. Describes the previous rental process and the new system utilizing dBASE III. Illustrates the features and products of the new system. (DMM)

  7. BEACON: H. W. Wilson's Computerized Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarn, Davis B.; McCarn, Grace H.

    1983-01-01

    Describes ongoing project to automate production of 26 indexes and catalogs produced by H. W. Wilson Company through use of the BEACON system and its online screen-edit program, SCREED. System objectives, system architecture, specifications, components (data entry, validation, release, file generation, retrieval, publication, photocomposition,…

  8. A PC based computerized maintenance system

    SciTech Connect

    Pruett, D.P.; Walker, G.D.; Imel, G.R.

    1990-03-01

    The present regulatory climate in the research reactor community has made an easily manageable and auditable maintenance system a necessity. We at NRAD have developed a computer-based system that is easy to implement and use, meets all our regulatory and reporting requirements, and is extremely useful to us in our daily operations. The system, developed at the NRAD reactor facility at Argonne National Laboratory in Idaho Falls, Idaho, uses DBASE-III coupled with C language routines, written for specific purposes. It is a menu-driven system that can be mastered in a short period of time and maintained with only a few hours of computer operation per month. It uses three computer processes: job scheduling, file updating, and report preparation, to produce schedules, work orders, and miscellaneous report forms. The heart of the system is an IBM PC with a 10 MB hard disk, providing adequate data storage capacity for a facility the size of NRAD. The computer is totally dedicated to the maintenance system, thus guarding against inadvertent loss of, or damage to, data files. Computer operator training time is minimized by the menu driven program. Multiple operators can share the computer operation responsibilities, and maintain the system with only 12 to 16 hours of computer operation per month. The system is adaptable to almost any facility, and can be altered and expanded to satisfy changing requirements. 7 figs.

  9. Electronic whiteboard construction using whiteboard and image-locating techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen-Yuan; Wang, Jing-Wein; Chung, Chin-Ho

    2009-11-01

    We use image-locating techniques and a traditional whiteboard with two cameras to construct an electronic whiteboard (EWB) with a size of 88×176 cm corresponding to 1280-×1024-pixel resolution. We employ two strategies achieve the goal: (1) we develope a modified scale and bilinear interpolation (MSBI) method for pen locating and acceleration operation, and obtain high accuracy detection; and (2) a block parameter database (BPD) is created to improve the accuracy. For the BPD, we divide the whiteboard image into several blocks and record each block parameter (the X and Y coordinates) to follow pen position calculation. Experimental results demonstrate that the MSBI method can correctly calculate the pen position. Additionally, the BPD strategy is better than the traditional method as it improves the accuracy and decreases the maximum detection error from 6 to 3 pixels. The simulation results prove our method is an effective and low-cost EWB technique.

  10. Computerized systems to provide materials selection advice

    SciTech Connect

    Krisher, A.S.

    1996-07-01

    The rapid advance of computer science has increased the ability to store and retrieve information. These new capabilities are beginning to be applied to the problem of providing sound advice to non-specialist engineers who make materials selection decisions. This paper presents an overview of the large scale systems which exist in finished or near finished form and are (or may soon be) available for use by the public. The paper focuses on systems which transfer knowledge taking into account the many qualifications which enter into the reasoning processes of materials/corrosion specialists. The paper discusses both the strengths and limitations of each system.

  11. The Washington Library Network's Computerized Bibliographic System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Mary Jane Pobst

    1975-01-01

    Describes the development of the state of Washington's computer-assisted bibliographic system, along with its present batch-mode cataloging support subsystem and efforts toward on-line integrated acquisitions and cataloging support. (LS)

  12. [Computerized system validation of clinical researches].

    PubMed

    Yan, Charles; Chen, Feng; Xia, Jia-lai; Zheng, Qing-shan; Liu, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Validation is a documented process that provides a high degree of assurance. The computer system does exactly and consistently what it is designed to do in a controlled manner throughout the life. The validation process begins with the system proposal/requirements definition, and continues application and maintenance until system retirement and retention of the e-records based on regulatory rules. The objective to do so is to clearly specify that each application of information technology fulfills its purpose. The computer system validation (CSV) is essential in clinical studies according to the GCP standard, meeting product's pre-determined attributes of the specifications, quality, safety and traceability. This paper describes how to perform the validation process and determine relevant stakeholders within an organization in the light of validation SOPs. Although a specific accountability in the implementation of the validation process might be outsourced, the ultimate responsibility of the CSV remains on the shoulder of the business process owner-sponsor. In order to show that the compliance of the system validation has been properly attained, it is essential to set up comprehensive validation procedures and maintain adequate documentations as well as training records. Quality of the system validation should be controlled using both QC and QA means. PMID:26911028

  13. System requirements for computerized scan report generation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, W.L.; De Puey, E.G.; Murphy, P.H.; Burdine, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    A patient report generation system on a small computer (IBM series/1) has been designed for a large nuclear medicine department. Requirements for much a system differ considerably from those of computers used for image processing. This system has eleven terminals and four printers located in both the main laboratory and a satellite cardiac stress laboratory 23 floors below. Patient records are independently accessed by clerical staff, technologists, and physicians for the addition of information. Individual programs for each organ link and display screens of selectable statements. Those preprogrammed selections together with free text are processed to form a personalized report in complete sentences. Software design minimizes delays in computer response due to increasing numbers of users. Printer spooling enables the physician to immediately proceed to the next patient report without waiting for the previous one to finish printing. Logical decisions are made by the software to print reports in appropriate locations, such as near the cardiac clinic in the case of cardiac studies. One can display the status of the day's schedule with incomplete studies highlighted, and generate a list of billing charges at the end of each day. Logistical problems of transmitting dictated reports to a central office, having them transcribed, proofread, retyped and distributed to key areas of the hospital are eliminated. The authors' experience over a two year period has indicated that ''static screen'' terminal hardware capability, high terminal speed, and printer spooling are essential, all of which are commonplace on small business computers.

  14. Core on-line monitoring and computerized procedures systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gangloff, W.C.

    1986-04-01

    The availability of operating nuclear power plants has been affected significantly by the difficulty people have in coping with the complexity of the plants and the operating procedures. Two ways to use modern computer technology to ease the burden of coping are discussed in this paper, an on-line core monitoring system with predictive capability and a computerized procedures system using live plant data. These systems reduce human errors by presenting information rather than simply data, using the computer to manipulate the data, but leaving the decisions to the plant operator.

  15. The optimal planning computerized manufacturing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuts, M. F.; Lucanton, D. M.; Geiszler, C.

    1981-02-01

    The utility of interactive computation in answering questions on the behavior, design, and control of certain service systems is demonstrated. The stationary distributions of various waiting times are also discussed. A queue with N servers which may break down and require repair at a facility which has C repair crews is studied. Under exponential assumptions, this model has an algorithmically tractable solution. It is then a particular case of the M/M/n queue in a Markovian environment. It is shown that during periods when most servers are down, large build-ups may occur which affect the queue adversely for a long time afterwards. Potential applications are in manpower planning, as in a typing pool where persons may be absent, and in determining the size of a battery of machines, where machines may be inoperative due to maintenance and repair.

  16. A computerized diet analysis system for the research nutritionist.

    PubMed

    Dare, D; Al-Bander, S Y

    1987-05-01

    A computerized diet analysis system can assist in the many dietary computations performed daily by the research nutritionist. When selecting a computerized diet analysis system, the research nutritionist must consider present and future needs and select a system that is accurate, efficient, and cost-effective. The purpose of this article is to review the computer needs of the research nutritionist, identify areas to be considered when selecting a diet analysis system, and describe a system that functions easily in research or clinical settings. The diet analysis system described here is interactive and easy to use and provides flexible programming to accommodate changing research or clinical needs. The nutrient data base is accurate, verified, and periodically updated by the company that provides the system. Data entry is easy, and new foods or recipes can readily be added to the nutrient data base. The system's programs and special features provide efficient, accurate methods for creating and analyzing complex research diets, analyzing nutrient intake, and reporting nutrient data. PMID:3106451

  17. Assessing the effectiveness of a computerized blood order "consultation" system.

    PubMed

    Lepage, E F; Gardner, R M; Laub, R M; Jacobson, J T

    1991-01-01

    To optimize blood ordering and accurately assess transfusion practice, in 1987, an "on line" computerized, knowledge-based, blood order critiquing system was integrated into the HELP Hospital Information System (HIS) at LDS Hospital. Evaluations of the computerized ordering system demonstrated its benefits and limitations on transfusion practice. Based on this experience, a second generation blood ordering system using a consultation mode was developed. A pilot test of this blood order consultant system, using historical data in the HELP system's database, was performed. This pilot test demonstrated that the consultation system provided accurate recommendations for red blood cell (RBC) and platelet orders. Comparing the appropriateness of blood orders with the recommendations made by the director of the blood bank, the orders recommended by the computer "consultant" agreed 95.5% of the time. The computer consultation system also recommended fewer RBC units for transfusion. Preliminary results obtained using the consultant approach suggest that we may be able to simplify blood ordering practice and also reduce the number of units of blood products ordered. Based on these findings we are now preparing to compare the "critiquing" and "consultation" approaches using a clinical trial. PMID:1807617

  18. CRRIS: a computerized radiological risk-investigation system

    SciTech Connect

    Baes, C.F. III; Miller, C.W.

    1981-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is responsible for regulating radioactive airborne effluents in the US. A comprehensive, integrated Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System (CRRIS) is being developed to support EPA's radiation standards development. This modular system consists primarily of five computer codes and their supporting data bases for estimating environmental transport and radiation doses and risks. Health effects are estimated on the basis of a life-table methodology developed by EPA. CRRIS is designed to provide EPA with a reasonable and flexible way of assessing the risk to man associated with radionuclide releases to the atmosphere.

  19. Interactive electronic whiteboards in the medical classroom.

    PubMed Central

    Jain, N. L.; Murphy, J. F.; Hassan, S. W.; Cunnius, E. L.; Metcalfe, E. S.; Schnase, J. L.; Schoening, P. A.; Spooner, S. A.; Frisse, M. E.

    1994-01-01

    Most research on computer-assisted instruction has concentrated on developing systems to be used outside the teaching environment to supplement or complement in-class teaching. We believe that interactive large-screen computers can be used effectively in the classroom as electronic whiteboards to more effectively teach select medical school courses. We describe our experience with one such device, the Xerox LiveBoard, to teach a course on computer-assisted clinical decision analysis to a group of first-year medical students. Images Figure 1 PMID:7949986

  20. Interactive Whiteboards in Japanese Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liversidge, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    The use of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) is widespread in the United Kingdom, Australia, and to some extent in the United States and Canada. However, this potentially learning enhancing technology has been adopted very little in Japan at any level of education, apart from some international schools. Furthermore, one of the world's two leading IWB…

  1. Students and the Interactive Whiteboard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biró, Piroska

    2011-01-01

    The spread of Interactive Whiteboards in Hungary has made students more curious, interested and motivated. The new digital generation claims reform and besides the traditional education they need digital material, extra knowledge since it is much easier to access extra information in connection with a particular curriculum. They spend a lot of…

  2. Health-based payment and computerized patient record systems.

    PubMed

    Hornbrook, M C; Goodman, M J; Fishman, P A; Meenan, R T

    1998-01-01

    Health care information technology is changing rapidly and dramatically. A small but growing number of clinicians, especially those in staff and group model HMOs and hospital-affiliated practices, are automating their patient medical records in response to pressure to improve quality and reduce costs. Computerized patient record systems in HMOs track risks, diagnoses, patterns of care, and outcomes across large populations. These systems provide access to large amounts of clinical information; as a result, they are very useful for risk-adjusted or health-based payment. The next stage of evolution in health-based payment is to switch from fee-for-service (claims) to HMO technology in calculating risk coefficients. This will occur when HMOs accumulate data sets containing records on provider-defined disease episodes, with every service linked to its appropriate disease episode for millions of patients. Computerized patient record systems support clinically meaningful risk-assessment models and protect patients and medical groups from the effects of adverse selection. They also offer significant potential for improving quality of care. PMID:10187225

  3. Study of on-line computerized procedures system of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Fei; Zhang Zhijian; Peng Minjun

    2006-07-01

    An on-line computerized procedures system (OCPS) for normal operation is developed. The system makes use of the advantages of computerized procedures system and provides the detailed and comprehensible procedures. The configuration is introduced. OCPS has been built on Embedded real-time operation system VxWorks using C language. Computerized procedures are described exampled with cold start-up in this paper, helping operators to know about the state of plants during the complex operating course. After adopting the computerized procedures, the labor intensity and mental pressure of operators will be reduced. (authors)

  4. The computerized OMAHA system in microsoft office excel.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xiaobin; Wong, Frances K Y; Zhang, Peiqiang; Leung, Carenx W Y; Lee, Lai H; Wong, Jessica S Y; Lo, Yim F; Ching, Shirley S Y

    2014-01-01

    The OMAHA System was adopted as the documentation system in an interventional study. To systematically record client care and facilitate data analysis, two Office Excel files were developed. The first Excel file (File A) was designed to record problems, care procedure, and outcomes for individual clients according to the OMAHA System. It was used by the intervention nurses in the study. The second Excel file (File B) was the summary of all clients that had been automatically extracted from File A. Data in File B can be analyzed directly in Excel or imported in PASW for further analysis. Both files have four parts to record basic information and the three parts of the OMAHA System. The computerized OMAHA System simplified the documentation procedure and facilitated the management and analysis of data. PMID:24943560

  5. Computerized decision support system for kidney paired donation program.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanhua; Song, Peter X-K

    2011-01-01

    In order to assist physicians and other health professionals for health care improvement, clinical decision support systems, through interactive computerized software, become very popular in clinical practice. The crisis associated with kidney organ shortage has triggered an innovative strategy, termed as Kidney Paired Donation (KPD) program, to address a rapidly expanding demand for donor kidneys. KPD program involves how to making optimal decision for allowing patients with incompatible living donors to receive compatible organs by best matching donors. Although some computerized optimization tools are being used in the current KPD program, there still lacks a general decision support system which enables us to evaluate and compare different kidney allocation strategies and effects of policy. In this paper, we discuss a general computer-based KPD decision model that appropriately reflects the real world clinical application. Also, the whole decision process is to be visualized by our Graphical User Interface (GUI) software, which offers a user friendly platform not only to provide a convenient interface for clinicians but also to assess different kidney exchange strategies of clinical importance. PMID:22255013

  6. The Evolution of a Computerized Medical Information System

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, W. Ed; Stead, W. W.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents the eighteen year history leading to the development of a computerized medical information system and discusses the factors which influenced its philosophy, design and implementation. This system, now called TMR, began as a single-user, tape-oriented minicomputer package and now exists as a multi-user, multi-database, multi-computer system capable of supporting a full range of users in both the inpatient and outpatient settings. The paper discusses why we did what we did, what worked, and what didn't work. Current projects are emphasized including networking and the integration of inpatient and outpatient functions into a single system. A theme of the paper is how hardware and software technological advancements, increasing sophistication of our users, our increasing experience, and just plain luck contributed to the success of TMR.

  7. A computerized data base system for medical diagnostic studies (Diastu).

    PubMed

    Rosen, I I; Hall, T C; Mettler, F; Wicks, J; Kelsey, C A; Gustafson, D E

    1980-12-01

    A computerized database system (DIASTU) has been developed for the storage and selective retrieval of the results of medical diagnostic studies. The system is being used to analyze the disease process and the efficacy and yield of selected diagnostic studies. The system runs on a DEC PDP-11/60 computer. It consists of three FORTRAN IV programs linked to a general-purpose assembly language database handler. One program, DSENT, interactively modifies the information in the database. The second, DSLIST, prints all or portions of the database. The third program, DSTAT, interactively assembles the parameters for selective searches of the database and executes them. A query language is used that allows the use of time and size specifications and Boolean operators in nested loops. PMID:7249603

  8. A Case-Study of One Teacher's Use of an Interactive Whiteboard System to Support Knowledge Co-Construction in the History Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deaney, Rosemary; Chapman, Arthur; Hennessy, Sara

    2009-01-01

    Interactive whiteboards (IWBs) have rapidly become an integral feature of many classrooms across the UK and elsewhere, but debate continues regarding the pedagogical implications of their use. This article reports on an in-depth case-study from the wider T-MEDIA project (Teacher Mediation of Subject Learning with ICT: a Multimedia Approach). A key…

  9. Comparing the security risks of paper-based and computerized patient record systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collmann, Jeff R.; Meissner, Marion C.; Tohme, Walid G.; Winchester, James F.; Mun, Seong K.

    1997-05-01

    How should hospital administrators compare the security risks of paper-based and computerized patient record systems. There is a general tendency to assume that because computer networks potentially provide broad access to hospital archives, computerized patient records are less secure than paper records and increase the risk of breaches of patient confidentiality. This assumption is ill-founded on two grounds. Reasons exist to say that the computerized patient record provides better access to patient information while enhancing overall information system security. A range of options with different trade-offs between access and security exist in both paper-based and computerized records management systems. The relative accessibility and security of any particular patient record management system depends, therefore, on administrative choice, not simply on the intrinsic features of paper or computerized information management systems.

  10. 45 CFR 310.25 - What conditions apply to acquisitions of Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED TRIBAL IV-D SYSTEMS AND OFFICE AUTOMATION Funding for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation § 310.25 What conditions apply...

  11. 45 CFR 310.25 - What conditions apply to acquisitions of Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED TRIBAL IV-D SYSTEMS AND OFFICE AUTOMATION Funding for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation § 310.25 What conditions apply...

  12. 45 CFR 310.25 - What conditions apply to acquisitions of Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED TRIBAL IV-D SYSTEMS AND OFFICE AUTOMATION Funding for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation § 310.25 What conditions apply...

  13. 45 CFR 310.25 - What conditions apply to acquisitions of Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED TRIBAL IV-D SYSTEMS AND OFFICE AUTOMATION Funding for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation § 310.25 What conditions apply...

  14. 45 CFR 310.25 - What conditions apply to acquisitions of Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED TRIBAL IV-D SYSTEMS AND OFFICE AUTOMATION Funding for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation § 310.25 What conditions apply...

  15. 45 CFR 310.5 - What options are available for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and office automation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... for access to that agency's existing automated data processing computer system to support... effect an operational computerized support enforcement system that meets Federal requirements under this part. (b) Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems. A Computerized Tribal IV-D System must be one of the...

  16. 45 CFR 310.5 - What options are available for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and office automation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... for access to that agency's existing automated data processing computer system to support... effect an operational computerized support enforcement system that meets Federal requirements under this part. (b) Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems. A Computerized Tribal IV-D System must be one of the...

  17. 45 CFR 310.5 - What options are available for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and office automation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... for access to that agency's existing automated data processing computer system to support... effect an operational computerized support enforcement system that meets Federal requirements under this part. (b) Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems. A Computerized Tribal IV-D System must be one of the...

  18. Computerized Assessment System for Academic Satisfaction (ASAS) for First-Year University Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medrano, Leonardo Adrian; Liporace, Mercedes Fernandez; Perez, Edgardo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Computerized tests have become one of the most widely used and efficient educational assessment methods. Increasing efforts to generate computerized assessment systems to identify students at risk for drop out have been recently noted. An important variable influencing student retention is academic satisfaction. Accordingly, the…

  19. Computerized parts list system coordinates engineering releases, parts control, and manufacturing planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, W.; Kinsey, M.

    1967-01-01

    Computerized parts list system compiles and summarize all pertinent and available information on complex new systems. The parts list system consists of three computer subroutines - list of parts, parts numerical sequence list, and specifications list.

  20. The Initial Development of a Computerized Operator Support System

    SciTech Connect

    Roger Lew; Ronald L Boring; Thomas A Ulrich; Ken Thomas

    2014-08-01

    A computerized operator support system (COSS) is a collection of resilient software technologies to assist operators in monitoring overall nuclear power plant performance and making timely, informed decisions on appropriate control actions for the projected plant condition. The COSS provides rapid assessments, computations, and recommendations to reduce workload and augment operator judgment and decision-making during fast- moving, complex events. A prototype COSS for a chemical volume control system at a nuclear power plant has been developed in order to demonstrate the concept and provide a test bed for further research. The development process identified four underlying elements necessary for the prototype, which consist of a digital alarm system, computer-based procedures, piping and instrumentation diagram system representations, and a recommender module for mitigation actions. An operational prototype resides at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) using the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Human Systems Simulation Laboratory (HSSL). Several human-machine interface (HMI) considerations are identified and incorporated in the prototype during this initial round of development.

  1. Computerized Operator Support System – Phase II Development

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Thomas A.; Boring, Ronald L.; Lew, Roger T.; Thomas, Kenneth D.

    2015-02-01

    A computerized operator support system (COSS) prototype for nuclear control room process control is proposed and discussed. The COSS aids operators in addressing rapid plant upsets that would otherwise result in the shutdown of the power plant and interrupt electrical power generation, representing significant costs to the owning utility. In its current stage of development the prototype demonstrates four advanced functions operators can use to more efficiently monitor and control the plant. These advanced functions consist of: (1) a synthesized and intuitive high level overview display of system components and interrelations, (2) an enthalpy-based mathematical chemical and volume control system (CVCS) model to detect and diagnose component failures, (3) recommended strategies to mitigate component failure effects and return the plant back to pre-fault status, and (4) computer-based procedures to walk the operator through the recommended mitigation actions. The COSS was demonstrated to a group of operators and their feedback was collected. The operators responded positively to the COSS capabilities and features and indicated the system would be an effective operator aid. The operators also suggested several additional features and capabilities for the next iteration of development. Future versions of the COSS prototype will include additional plant systems, flexible computer-based procedure presentation formats, and support for simultaneous component fault diagnosis and dual fault synergistic mitigation action strategies to more efficiently arrest any plant upsets.

  2. 45 CFR 310.5 - What options are available for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and office automation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... IV-D Systems and office automation? 310.5 Section 310.5 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public... AUTOMATION Requirements for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation § 310.5 What options are available for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and office automation? (a) Allowable computerized...

  3. 45 CFR 310.5 - What options are available for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and office automation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... IV-D Systems and office automation? 310.5 Section 310.5 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public... AUTOMATION Requirements for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation § 310.5 What options are available for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and office automation? (a) Allowable computerized...

  4. 45 CFR 310.40 - What requirements apply for accessing systems and records for monitoring Computerized Tribal IV-D...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... records for monitoring Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation? 310.40 Section 310.40... COMPUTERIZED TRIBAL IV-D SYSTEMS AND OFFICE AUTOMATION Accountability and Monitoring Procedures for... monitoring Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation? In accordance with Part 95 of this...

  5. 45 CFR 310.40 - What requirements apply for accessing systems and records for monitoring Computerized Tribal IV-D...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... records for monitoring Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation? 310.40 Section 310.40... COMPUTERIZED TRIBAL IV-D SYSTEMS AND OFFICE AUTOMATION Accountability and Monitoring Procedures for... monitoring Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation? In accordance with Part 95 of this...

  6. 45 CFR 310.40 - What requirements apply for accessing systems and records for monitoring Computerized Tribal IV-D...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... records for monitoring Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation? 310.40 Section 310.40... COMPUTERIZED TRIBAL IV-D SYSTEMS AND OFFICE AUTOMATION Accountability and Monitoring Procedures for... monitoring Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation? In accordance with Part 95 of this...

  7. 45 CFR 310.40 - What requirements apply for accessing systems and records for monitoring Computerized Tribal IV-D...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... records for monitoring Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation? 310.40 Section 310.40... COMPUTERIZED TRIBAL IV-D SYSTEMS AND OFFICE AUTOMATION Accountability and Monitoring Procedures for... monitoring Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation? In accordance with Part 95 of this...

  8. 45 CFR 310.40 - What requirements apply for accessing systems and records for monitoring Computerized Tribal IV-D...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... records for monitoring Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation? 310.40 Section 310.40... COMPUTERIZED TRIBAL IV-D SYSTEMS AND OFFICE AUTOMATION Accountability and Monitoring Procedures for... monitoring Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation? In accordance with Part 95 of this...

  9. Design of a computerized, temperature-controlled, recirculating aquaria system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Widmer, A.M.; Carveth, C.J.; Keffler, J.W.; Bonar, Scott A.

    2006-01-01

    We built a recirculating aquaria system with computerized temperature control to maintain static temperatures, increase temperatures 1 ??C/day, and maintain diel temperature fluctuations up to 10 ??C. A LabVIEW program compared the temperature recorded by thermocouples in fish tanks to a desired set temperature and then calculated the amount of hot or cold water to add to tanks to reach or maintain the desired temperature. Intellifaucet?? three-way mixing valves controlled temperature of the input water and ensured that all fish tanks had the same turnover rate. The system was analyzed over a period of 50 days and was fully functional for 96% of that time. Six different temperature treatments were run simultaneously in 18, 72 L fish tanks and temperatures stayed within 0.5 ??C of set temperature. We used the system to determine the upper temperature tolerance of fishes, but it could be used in aquaculture, ecological studies, or other aquatic work where temperature control is required. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Computerized database management system for breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Sim, Kok Swee; Chong, Sze Siang; Tso, Chih Ping; Nia, Mohsen Esmaeili; Chong, Aun Kee; Abbas, Siti Fathimah

    2014-01-01

    Data analysis based on breast cancer risk factors such as age, race, breastfeeding, hormone replacement therapy, family history, and obesity was conducted on breast cancer patients using a new enhanced computerized database management system. My Structural Query Language (MySQL) is selected as the application for database management system to store the patient data collected from hospitals in Malaysia. An automatic calculation tool is embedded in this system to assist the data analysis. The results are plotted automatically and a user-friendly graphical user interface is developed that can control the MySQL database. Case studies show breast cancer incidence rate is highest among Malay women, followed by Chinese and Indian. The peak age for breast cancer incidence is from 50 to 59 years old. Results suggest that the chance of developing breast cancer is increased in older women, and reduced with breastfeeding practice. The weight status might affect the breast cancer risk differently. Additional studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:25045606

  11. Stabilometer Computerized Analog Recording System for Studying Gross Motor Skill Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chasey, William C., Jr.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The stabilometer computerized analog recording system (SCARS) provides for storing analog and digital information on a single channel audio tape recorder at lower cost and greater versatility than other systems. (MB)

  12. Computerized Risk and Bioaccumulation System (Version 1. 0)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.; Winsor, M.; Pelletier, J.; Randall, R.; Bertling, J.

    1991-11-01

    The Computerized Risk And Bioaccumulation System (CRABS, Version 1.0) is an expert system that predicts tissue residues of fifteen neutral organic pollutants in sediment-dwelling organisms and the human cancer risk from consumption of the contaminated shellfish. Bioaccumulation from bedded sediment can be predicted from the thermodynamic partitioning, first-order kinetic, or toxicokinetic model. All the models can predict steady-state tissue residues while the two kinetic models can predict non-steady-state uptake or elimination. CRABS then predicts the lifetime human cancer risk from consumption of clams and other non-mobile sediment-dwelling organisms containing the predicted (or measured) tissue residue. The linearized multistage model is used to predict cancer risk for a single pollutant from a single species diet. The program guides the user in estimating shellfish consumption rates if no site-specific rates are available. CRABS is designed to promote thorough documentation of the assumptions and data as well as to error check the entered values.

  13. Evaluation of computerized health management information system for primary health care in rural India

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Comprehensive Rural Health Services Project Ballabgarh, run by All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi has a computerized Health Management Information System (HMIS) since 1988. The HMIS at Ballabgarh has undergone evolution and is currently in its third version which uses generic and open source software. This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a computerized Health Management Information System in rural health system in India. Methods The data for evaluation were collected by in-depth interviews of the stakeholders i.e. program managers (authors) and health workers. Health Workers from AIIMS and Non-AIIMS Primary Health Centers were interviewed to compare the manual with computerized HMIS. A cost comparison between the two methods was carried out based on market costs. The resource utilization for both manual and computerized HMIS was identified based on workers' interviews. Results There have been no major hardware problems in use of computerized HMIS. More than 95% of data was found to be accurate. Health workers acknowledge the usefulness of HMIS in service delivery, data storage, generation of workplans and reports. For program managers, it provides a better tool for monitoring and supervision and data management. The initial cost incurred in computerization of two Primary Health Centers was estimated to be Indian National Rupee (INR) 1674,217 (USD 35,622). Equivalent annual incremental cost of capital items was estimated as INR 198,017 (USD 4213). The annual savings is around INR 894,283 (USD 11,924). Conclusion The major advantage of computerization has been in saving of time of health workers in record keeping and report generation. The initial capital costs of computerization can be recovered within two years of implementation if the system is fully operational. Computerization has enabled implementation of a good system for service delivery, monitoring and supervision. PMID:21078203

  14. The ABC's required for establishing a practical computerized plant engineering management data base system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiocco, F. R.; Hume, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    A system's approach is outlined in the paper to assist facility and Plant Engineers improve their organization's data management system. The six basic steps identified may appear somewhat simple; however, adequate planning, proper resources, and the involvement of management will determine the success of a computerized facility management data base. Helpful suggestions are noted throughout the paper to insure the development of a practical computerized data management system.

  15. Electronic whiteboards: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Randell, Rebecca; Greenhalgh, Joanne; Wyatt, Jeremy; Gardner, Peter; Pearman, Alan; Honey, Stephanie; Dowding, Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Electronic whiteboards are being introduced into hospitals to communicate real-time patient information instantly to staff. This paper provides a preliminary review of the current state of evidence for the effect of electronic whiteboards on care processes and patient outcomes. A literature search was performed for the dates 1996 to 2014 on MEDLINE, EMBASE, IEEE Xplore, Science Direct, and the ACM Digital Library. Thirteen papers, describing 11 studies, meeting the inclusion criteria were identified. The majority of studies took place in the Emergency Department. While studies looked at the impact of electronic whiteboards on the process of care, there is an absence of evidence concerning impact on patient outcomes. There is a need for robust research measuring the impact of electronic whiteboards on inpatient care. PMID:25991172

  16. SCAN (Systems Coding Analysis): Computerized Analysis of Reading Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, S. Alan; Bednarik, John

    Analysis of behaviorally expressed instructional objectives, materials, and criterion test items in reading has generated a finite list of operations and conditions that cover almost all possible reading activities and behaviors. The list has been organized into a short, simple Code Key. A 15-cell computerized syntax has been designed to carry the…

  17. A Computerized Library and Evaluation System for Integral Neutron Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampel, Viktor E.; And Others

    A computerized library of references to integral neutron experiments has been developed at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory at Livermore. This library serves as a data base for the systematic retrieval of documents describing diverse critical and bulk nuclear experiments. The evaluation and reduction of the physical parameters of the experiments…

  18. Application of a computerized environmental information system to master and sector planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    A computerized composite mapping system developed as an aid in the land use decision making process is described. Emphasis is placed on consideration of the environment in urban planning. The presence of alluvium, shallow bedrock, surface water, and vegetation growth are among the environmental factors considered. An analysis of the Shady Grove Sector planning is presented as an example of the use of computerized composite mapping for long range planning.

  19. Image selection system. [computerized data storage and retrieval system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knutson, M. A.; Hurd, D.; Hubble, L.; Kroeck, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    An image selection (ISS) was developed for the NASA-Ames Research Center Earth Resources Aircraft Project. The ISS is an interactive, graphics oriented, computer retrieval system for aerial imagery. An analysis of user coverage requests and retrieval strategies is presented, followed by a complete system description. Data base structure, retrieval processors, command language, interactive display options, file structures, and the system's capability to manage sets of selected imagery are described. A detailed example of an area coverage request is graphically presented.

  20. Whiteboards: mediating professional tensions in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Riley, Robin; Forsyth, Rowena; Manias, Elizabeth; Iedema, Rick

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we argue that whiteboards in clinical settings play a hybrid role: communicating inter- and intraprofessional directives, mediating professional tensions, and mitigating potentially face-threatening acts. The data upon which this paper is based emanate from two independently conducted ethnographic studies: the first explored a range of nurse-nurse and nurse-doctor communication practices in operating rooms, while the second explored work routines and communication methods in oncology wards. Data collection included fieldwork using observations, interviews assisted by photographic methods, and in the first study, a personal diary. A deconstructive analysis was independently undertaken. As a communication method, the use of whiteboards in clinical settings provided a focal point for the coordination of clinical work activities and for the dissemination of information to large groups of people. Whiteboards were a conduit for potentially face-threatening information in that they facilitated the policing and disciplining of staff, while distancing communicators from one another. We conclude that whiteboards are 'pseudo-synchronous' in nature, enabling 'communication at a distance'. In doing so, whiteboards may facilitate and economize clinical communication but they also perpetuate the invisibility of nurses' contribution to ensuring safe care, and they mask the symbolic violence that is committed within and between health professionals. PMID:18052816

  1. Converting a School District's Manual Business Operation to a Computerized System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, David H.; LeVan, Donald D.

    1983-01-01

    The first in a series of three articles highlighting some of the experiences of the Deptford Township Public Schools (New Jersey) in transforming the business operations from a manual process into a computerized system. Describes procedures for acquiring hardware and software and setting up a district accounting system. (MLF)

  2. The Development of COBOL and RPG Instructional Modules to Audit Computerized Accounting Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skudrna, Vincent J.

    1982-01-01

    Details steps involved (as found in the literature) in the systems approach to design and develop instruction in order to provide a rationale for the development of instructional modules in COBOL and RPG to teach accounting students how to audit computerized accounting systems. Outlines of two modules are appended. (EAO)

  3. Combining an Exciting Classroom Learning Environment with an Effective Computerized Learning Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallam, Teresa A.; Hallam, Stephen F.

    2009-01-01

    Imagine a computerized learning management system that enables teachers to deliver pertinent learning materials to students. Lectures are prerecorded and made available to download from the learning management system. If all their lectures were prerecorded, what would teachers do in the classroom? Classroom time could be used to coordinate…

  4. 45 CFR 307.40 - Suspension of approval of advance planning documents for computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Suspension of approval of advance planning documents for computerized support enforcement systems. 307.40 Section 307.40 Public Welfare Regulations... ENFORCEMENT SYSTEMS § 307.40 Suspension of approval of advance planning documents for computerized...

  5. ECAT: A New Computerized Tomographic Imaging System for Position-Emitting Radiopharmaceuticals

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Phelps, M. E.; Hoffman, E. J.; Huang, S. C.; Kuhl, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    The ECAT was designed and developed as a complete computerized positron radionuclide imaging system capable of providing high contrast, high resolution, quantitative images in 2 dimensional and tomographic formats. Flexibility, in its various image mode options, allows it to be used for a wide variety of imaging problems.

  6. Means for constructing distributed process control systems on the basis of the SARGON computerized automation suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendelevich, V. A.

    2009-10-01

    The main characteristics of distributed control facilities available in the modern version of the SARGON computerized automation suite are described, and possible implementations of distributed full-scale automated process control systems of thermal power installations are presented taking concrete projects accomplished by ZAO NVT-Avtomatika as examples.

  7. Validation of a Computerized Cognitive Assessment System for Persons with Stroke: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yip, Chi Kwong; Man, David W. K.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the validity of a newly developed computerized cognitive assessment system (CCAS) that is equipped with rich multimedia to generate simulated testing situations and considers both test item difficulty and the test taker's ability. It is also hypothesized that better predictive validity of the CCAS in self-care of persons…

  8. 45 CFR 307.20 - Submittal of advance planning documents for computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... prescribed in 45 CFR part 95, subpart F. ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Submittal of advance planning documents for... § 307.20 Submittal of advance planning documents for computerized support enforcement systems. The...

  9. 45 CFR 307.20 - Submittal of advance planning documents for computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... prescribed in 45 CFR part 95, subpart F. ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2014-10-01 2012-10-01 true Submittal of advance planning documents for... § 307.20 Submittal of advance planning documents for computerized support enforcement systems. The...

  10. 45 CFR 307.20 - Submittal of advance planning documents for computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... prescribed in 45 CFR part 95, subpart F. ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Submittal of advance planning documents for... § 307.20 Submittal of advance planning documents for computerized support enforcement systems. The...

  11. 45 CFR 307.20 - Submittal of advance planning documents for computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... prescribed in 45 CFR part 95, subpart F. ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Submittal of advance planning documents for... § 307.20 Submittal of advance planning documents for computerized support enforcement systems. The...

  12. 45 CFR 307.20 - Submittal of advance planning documents for computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... prescribed in 45 CFR part 95, subpart F. ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Submittal of advance planning documents for... § 307.20 Submittal of advance planning documents for computerized support enforcement systems. The...

  13. 45 CFR 307.13 - Security and confidentiality for computerized support enforcement systems in operation after...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Security and confidentiality for computerized support enforcement systems in operation after October 1, 1997. 307.13 Section 307.13 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT (CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND...

  14. Using Interactive Whiteboards to Orchestrate Classroom Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, Neil; Hennessy, Sara; Warwick, Paul

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the use of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) as a tool for encouraging and supporting classroom dialogue. The authors' concern here is with the promotion of "dialogic" communication between teachers and students, which is now widely recognised as educationally valuable. In this study they investigated how teachers could use the…

  15. Talking about Science in Interactive Whiteboard Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murcia, Karen; Sheffield, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Teachers using interactive whiteboards (IWB) effectively can engage and motivate students with a range of digital resources to explore science's role in making sense of our world and to construct knowledge of key scientific concepts. The case study research described in this paper illustrates how interactive pedagogies in the IWB classroom were…

  16. Primary School Students' Perceptions of Interactive Whiteboards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Ian; Higgins, S

    2005-01-01

    Students involved in the interactive whiteboard (IWB) evaluation, sponsored by the Centre for British Teachers (CfBT), were interviewed in regard to their perceptions about IWBs. Twelve group interviews (72 students) were conducted between January and Easter 2004 with Year 6 students (between 10 and 11 years of age) in six Local Education…

  17. Using Interactive Whiteboards in Teaching Retail Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Marla; Kirpalani, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Undergraduate marketing students have sometimes been found to lack mathematical skills. It can therefore be challenging for instructors to effectively teach courses that depend on mathematical problem-solving skills. This paper discusses the use of interactive whiteboards as an innovative way to teach retail mathematics effectively. The authors…

  18. Interactive Whiteboards: Real Beauty or Just "Lipstick"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slay, Hannah; Sieborger, Ingrid; Hodgkinson-Williams, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    There has been extensive investment by governments and individual schools in interactive whiteboard technology in developed countries premised on the assumption that their use in education will impact positively on learners' achievements. Developing countries, such as South Africa, keen to raise attainment among their learners are following suit.…

  19. Interactive Whiteboards and Schooling: The Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Mal

    2010-01-01

    This paper seeks to set the scene for the ensuing articles in this themed issue by placing the recent developments with interactive whiteboards (IWBs) in their historical context. It argues that use of this instructional technology has already had a profound impact upon teaching and highlights the importance of educational researchers considering…

  20. Using Interactive Whiteboards to Enhance Mathematics Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Over the past three years, Richardson Primary School has transformed its entire educational program based around the widespread introduction of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) into the school. A review of this initiative states that "Richardson is the first school in the ACT, and probably Australia, where the total school community, the students,…

  1. Crew/computer communications study. Volume 1: Final report. [onboard computerized communications system for spacecrews

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johannes, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    Techniques, methods, and system requirements are reported for an onboard computerized communications system that provides on-line computing capability during manned space exploration. Communications between man and computer take place by sequential execution of each discrete step of a procedure, by interactive progression through a tree-type structure to initiate tasks or by interactive optimization of a task requiring man to furnish a set of parameters. Effective communication between astronaut and computer utilizes structured vocabulary techniques and a word recognition system.

  2. Implementation and Evaluation of a Computerized Reminder System in Ambulatory Care

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Naomi J.; Palmer, R. Heather; Kane, Nancy M.; Braun, Peter; Feldstein, Michael L.; Harrington, Alesandra M.

    1988-01-01

    We have developed and are testing computerized reminders for providers to determine whether automated systems can improve patient care in ambulatory settings. The reminder system is based on stepwise clinical protocols, and is entirely controlled by the provider. It does not require clinic use of computerized medical records. A randomized controlled trial will assess provider compliance with protocols, detection of serious pathology, and volume of service usage. Preliminary findings suggest that providers who receive reminders to work up a low hematocrit are more likely to order appropriate diagnostic tests than those not receiving reminders. Incremental costs for implementation of a reminder system are consistent with expenses for other new computer services at the study site. Provider use of the system varies greatly.

  3. Computerized practice guidelines for heart failure management: the HeartMan system.

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, A.; Bray, B. E.; Gilbert, E. M.; Warner, H. R.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the initial stages of development and evaluation of the HeartMan system, a set of computerized practice guidelines for heart failure management. The concept of computerized guidelines as a hybrid of expert systems and practice guidelines methodologies and techniques is proposed. We show the results of the initial evaluation of the system, which are very promising, although the sample size is small, and the study is retrospective: Of 177 messages, 90% were considered appropriate, of which 97.5% would have been followed. Eight percent of the messages were classified as neutral, and 2% classified as inappropriate. The errors were correctable by changing the logic. The potential technical and sociological barriers to the complete development and clinical use of the system are discussed. PMID:8563274

  4. COMPUTERIZED SYSTEM FOR THE EVALUATION OF AQUATIC HABITATS BASED ON ENVIRONMENTAL REQUIREMENTS AND POLLUTION TOLERANCE ASSOCIATIONS OF RESIDENT ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Requirements and Pollution Tolerance (ERAPT) system is a computerized retrieval and analysis system for environmental information on aquatic organisms. It can be used to predict organism assemblages based on environmental conditions, to describe environmental ch...

  5. Identification codes for organizations listed in computerized data systems of the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, Melvin D.; Drilleau, Margery O.

    1976-01-01

    This report contains codes for the identification of public and private organizations listed in computerized data systems. These codes are used by the U.S. Geological Survey 's National Water Data Exchange (NAWDEX), National Water Data Storage and Retrieval System (WATSTORE), and National Cartographic Information Center (NCIC). The format structure of the codes is discussed and instructions are given for requesting new codes. (Woodard-USGS)

  6. Identification codes for organizations listed in computerized data systems of the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, Melvin D.; Josefson, Beverly M.

    1982-01-01

    This report contains codes for the identification of public and private organizations listed in computerized data systems. These codes are used by the U.S. Geological Survey 's National Water Data Exchange (NAWDEX), National Water Data Storage and Retrieval System (WATSTORE), National Cartographic Information Center (NCIC), Office of Water Data Coordination (OWDC). The format structure of the codes is discussed and instructions are given for requesting new codes. (USGS)

  7. Identification codes for organizations listed in computerized data systems of the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, Melvin D.; Myers, Beverly M.

    1979-01-01

    This report contains codes for the identification of public and private organizations listed in computerized data systems. These codes are used by the U.S. Geological Survey 's National Water Data Exchange (NAWDEX), National Water Data Storage and Retrieval System (WATSTORE), National Cartographic Information Center (NCIC), and Office of Water Data Coordination (OWDC). The format structure of the codes is discussed and instructions are given for requesting new codes. (Woodard-USGS)

  8. Identification codes for organizations listed in computerized data systems of the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blackwell, C.D.

    1988-01-01

    Codes for the unique identification of public and private organizations listed in computerized data systems are presented. These codes are used by the U.S. Geological Survey 's National Water Data Exchange (NAWDEX), National Water Data Storage and Retrieval System (WATSTORE), National Cartographic Information Center (NCIC), and Office of Water Data Coordination (OWDC). The format structure of the codes is discussed and instructions are given for requesting new books. (Author 's abstract)

  9. Identification codes for organizations listed in computerized data systems of the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, Melvin D.; Drilleau, Margery O.

    1978-01-01

    This report contains codes for the identification of public and private organizations listed in computerized data systems. These codes are used by the U.S. Geological Survey 's National Water Data Exchange (NAWDEX), National Water Data Storage and Retrieval System (WATSTORE), National Cartographic Information Center (NCIC), and Office of Water Data Coordination (OWDC). The format structure of the codes is discussed and instructions are given for requesting new codes. (Woodard-USGS)

  10. Identification codes for organizations listed in computerized data systems of the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, Melvin D.; Myers, Beverly M.

    1981-01-01

    This report contains codes for the identification of public and private organizations listed in computerized data systems. These codes are used by the U.S. Geological Survey 's National Water Data Exchange (NAWDEX), National Water Data Storage and Retrieval System (WATSTORE), National Cartographic Information Center (NCIC), and Office of Water Data Coordination (OWDC). The format structure of the codes is discussed and instructions are given for requesting new codes. (USGS)

  11. Basic concepts of computerized student-oriented system on language teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivleva, N. V.

    2015-10-01

    This article covers the main concepts of a computerized student- oriented system on language teaching which implies more thorough lesson plan design for students who need a strong language command in their professional area. The system analyses all input characteristics and screens lesson plans tailored to individual students which can be integrated into a language course. The designed course is going to be aimed at meeting students’ needs as soon as practicable.

  12. Computerized design of removable partial dentures: a knowledge-based system for the future.

    PubMed

    Davenport, J C; Hammond, P; Fitzpatrick, F J

    1993-06-01

    Dentists frequently fail to provide dental technicians with the design information necessary for the construction of removable partial dentures. The computerization of dental practices and the development of appropriate knowledge-based systems could provide a powerful tool for improving this aspect of dental care. This article describes one such system currently under development which is an example of the kind of additional facility that will become available for those practices with the necessary hardware. PMID:8299844

  13. Computerized management of national pollutant discharge elimination system (NPDES) data at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Carnes, D.P.; Blum, S.R.

    1982-01-01

    A program for computerized handling of information on quality of wastewater discharges at three Oak Ridge National Laboratory monitoring stations has been designed and implemented. This computer system analyses field and laboratory data and calculates water quality statistics appropriate for meeting National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) reporting requirements. The interactive nature of the program guarantees automatic identification of compliance violations for immediate notification of the responsible agencies. Reduction of manual processing has resulted in cost savings and greater reporting accuracy.

  14. Wind energy Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) : data collection recommendations for reliability analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Valerie A.; Ogilvie, Alistair; Veers, Paul S.

    2009-09-01

    This report addresses the general data requirements for reliability analysis of fielded wind turbines and other wind plant equipment. The report provides a list of the data needed to support reliability and availability analysis, and gives specific recommendations for a Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) to support automated analysis. This data collection recommendations report was written by Sandia National Laboratories to address the general data requirements for reliability analysis of fielded wind turbines. This report is intended to help the reader develop a basic understanding of what data are needed from a Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) and other data systems, for reliability analysis. The report provides: (1) a list of the data needed to support reliability and availability analysis; and (2) specific recommendations for a CMMS to support automated analysis. Though written for reliability analysis of wind turbines, much of the information is applicable to a wider variety of equipment and a wider variety of analysis and reporting needs.

  15. Evaluating the use of a computerized clinical decision support system for asthma by pediatric pulmonologists

    PubMed Central

    Lomotan, Edwin A.; Hoeksema, Laura J.; Edmonds, Diana E.; Ramírez-Garnica, Gabriela; Shiffman, Richard N.; Horwitz, Leora I.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate use of a new guideline-based, computerized clinical decision support (CCDS) system for asthma in a pediatric pulmonology clinic of a large academic medical center. Methods We conducted a qualitative evaluation including review of electronic data, direct observation, and interviews with all nine pediatric pulmonologists in the clinic. Outcome measures included patterns of computer use in relation to patient care, and themes surrounding the relationship between asthma care and computer use. Results The pediatric pulmonologists entered enough data to trigger the decision support system in 397/445 (89.2%) of all asthma visits from January 2009 to May 2009. However, interviews and direct observations revealed use of the decision support system was limited to documentation activities after clinic sessions ended. Reasons for delayed use reflected barriers common to general medical care and barriers specific to subspecialty care. Subspecialist-specific barriers included the perceived high complexity of patients, the impact of subject matter expertise on the types of decision support needed, and unique workflow concerns such as the need to create letters to referring physicians. Conclusions Pediatric pulmonologists demonstrated low use of a computerized decision support system for asthma care because of a combination of general and subspecialist-specific factors. Subspecialist-specific factors should not be underestimated when designing guideline-based, computerized decision support systems for the subspecialty setting. PMID:22204897

  16. Integrating bar-code devices with computerized MC and A systems

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.K.; Boor, M.G.; Hurford, J.M.

    1998-12-31

    Over the past seven years, Los Alamos National Laboratory developed several generations of computerized nuclear materials control and accountability (MC and A) systems for tracking and reporting the storage, movement, and management of nuclear materials at domestic and international facilities. During the same period, Oak Ridge National Laboratory was involved with automated data acquisition (ADA) equipment, including installation of numerous bar-code scanning stations at various facilities to serve as input devices to computerized systems. Bar-code readers, as well as other ADA devices, reduce input errors, provide faster input, and allow the capture of data in remote areas where workstations do not exist. Los Alamos National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory teamed together to implement the integration of bar-code hardware technology with computerized MC and A systems. With the expertise of both sites, the two technologies were successfully merged with little difficulty. Bar-code input is now available with several functions of the MC and A systems: material movements within material balance areas (MBAs), material movements between MBAs, and physical inventory verification. This paper describes the various components required for the integration of these MC and A systems with the installed bar-code reader devices and the future directions for these technologies.

  17. Design and implementation of a computerized diet order entry system for a hospital.

    PubMed

    Helbig, L C; Bald, M L

    1990-01-01

    A computerized diet entry system was developed to control entry of diet orders by hospital ward clerks from an established list of items. Three reporting systems were then designed for delivery of the computerized order to the Nutrition Services Department. One report contains only essential information and is printed instantly upon entry for confirmation of a "stat" diet order. Another report collates diet orders by time periods and then organizes them by wards and sequentially by room number. That report is then used for diet changes prior to meal service. The third report stores advance diet orders and test diet orders and reports them upon the date they are to be served. Diet orders are also collated and retained in the system, in sequential order for each patient, to allow for an instant report of the patient's diet history upon demand. This computerized diet order system has resolved problems regarding receipt of complete information required for a diet order and receipt of a diet order for all patients. An overview of the information support system used by the Nutrition Services Department, which was created from programs developed for other hospital departments, is also presented. PMID:2295762

  18. Now You Can Micro-Computerize Your Personnel System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, Larry E.

    1979-01-01

    Pinpoints problems associated with personnel operations' inclusion in large complex information systems: personnel information system redesign requirements, potential confidentiality loss, reduced information accessibility, awkward data format requirements, and psychological problems. Discusses single chip micro-processor and micro-computer…

  19. COMPUTERIZED RISK AND BIOACCUMULATION SYSTEM (VERSION 1.0)

    EPA Science Inventory

    CRABS is a combination of a rule-based expert system and more traditional procedural programming techniques. ule-based expert systems attempt to emulate the decision making process of human experts within a clearly defined subject area. xpert systems consist of an "inference engi...

  20. 45 CFR 307.5 - Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... hardware, operational system software, and electronic linkages with the separate components of an... and for operating costs including hardware, operational software and applications software of...

  1. A Versatile, User-Oriented, Computerized Library System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuron, Eric

    This paper deals with the problem of the referencing or storing methods in information systems which must be designed to allow for rapid retrieval of the key data leading to the desired information or the recovery of the information directly. Considered as a secondary, but frequently desirable, feature for the system is the ability to determine…

  2. AN IMPROVEMENT TO THE MOUSE COMPUTERIZED UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The original MOUSE (Modular Oriented Uncertainty System) system was designed to deal with the problem of uncertainties in Environmental engineering calculations, such as a set of engineering cast or risk analysis equations. It was especially intended for use by individuals with l...

  3. Diabetes Telehealth and Computerized Decision Support Systems: A Sound System with a Human Touch Is Needed

    PubMed Central

    Holmström, Inger

    2010-01-01

    Telehealth holds the promise of improved consistency and fast and equal access to care, and will have great impact on future care. To enhance its quality and safety, computerized decision support systems (CDSS) have been launched. This commentary focuses specifically on the impact of telehealth and CDSS on diabetes patient management. Ideally, clinical information should be linked to evidence based recommendations and guidelines in the CDSS to provide tailored recommendations at the moment of care. However, technical support such as CDSS is not enough. The human touch is essential. A named healthcare provider with access to telehealth and CDSS seems to promise a way of providing both patient-centered and evidence-based care. PMID:20663469

  4. A Study on the Implementation of the Ecotran Systems, Inc. Computerized Routing and Scheduling Pupil Transportation System. San Diego Unified School District, Superintendent's Organizational Study Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carriedo, Ruben; And Others

    The San Diego Unified School District (California) began operating a computerized routing and scheduling system for its pupil transportation services at the beginning of the 1985-86 academic school year. The computerized system, provided by Ecotran Systems, Inc. (ECO) of Cleveland, Ohio experienced an inordinate number of difficulties. A…

  5. [Computerized barcode operational system for package of surgical instruments in operating room].

    PubMed

    Wu, Su-Lan; Liu, Yu-Chu; Shih, Whie-Mei; Wu, Shu-Chu; Lee, Hsiu-Fang; Lin, Chau-Tzu

    2008-10-01

    About 8,000 people die every year in Taiwan as a result of nosocomial infection. Clinically, there is a high possibility for patients to contract nosocomial infection if medical equipment is not completely sterilized. In order to provide care and safety to patients in the operating room, increase management effectiveness and efficiency, and to reduce equipment operating costs, a project was developed to improve operating room management through data collection and analysis. A computerized barcode operational system for packages of surgical instruments was developed and executed throughout an entire operating room. The results showed that average time spent searching for surgical instruments decreased by 2,872 minutes (47.8hrs/month), 150% of the target figure; computerized monitoring of equipment expiration dates reduced total cost by 29.2% abnormal recognition of equipment tags was reduced to 0%. This project is the first one of its kind in the world. PMID:18836975

  6. Teacher Adoption of Interactive Whiteboards: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosevear, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    This case study investigated the process of adopting and integrating interactive whiteboards into the daily practice of teachers and compared the findings to relevant theoretical models. Participants were drawn from a small international school in Damascus, Syria, where interactive whiteboards were introduced for the first time. The findings…

  7. Computerized management report system for monitoring manpower and cost

    SciTech Connect

    Bullington, V.R.; Stephenson, R.L.; Cardwell, R.G.

    1980-04-01

    Although most cost systems offer complete detail and traceability, not all provide timely detail in a concise form useful to senior management. This system was developed for a multifunction research organization funded from many sources. It extracts cost and manpower data from the general cost systems, summarizes it, compares it by program with previous cost periods, and presents it with minimum detail yet with maximum overview. The system monitors the basic manpower distribution of effort at the source, that is, the division time-card input. Cost data are taken from the central computer ahead of the print-out and report-distribution steps; thus, the summary information is available several days ahead of the detailed reports. This procedure has been regularly used for several months, and has proven to be a valuable tool in management action and planning. 9 figures.

  8. A computerized cataloging management system for health science audiovisuals.

    PubMed

    Metz, K S; Calhoun, J G; Hull, A L

    1981-10-01

    This paper describes the implementation of the Stanford Public Information and Retrieval System (SPIRES) by the University of Michigan Medical School Learning Resources Center. SPIRES is a bibliographic data base management system which offers on-line search capabilities and retrieval of data in programmable formats. The Learning Resource Center utilizes SPIRES for the interactive retrieval of cataloging data, bibliographical compilations, and book catalog production. PMID:6170373

  9. Language Research Center's Computerized Test System (LRC-CTS) - Video-formatted tasks for comparative primate research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumbaugh, Duane M.; Washburn, David A.; Savage-Rumbaugh, E. S.; Hopkins, William D.; Richardson, W. K.

    1991-01-01

    Automation of a computerized test system for comparative primate research is shown to improve the results of learning in standard paradigms. A mediational paradigm is used to determine the degree to which criterion in the learning-set testing reflects stimulus-response associative or mediational learning. Rhesus monkeys are shown to exhibit positive transfer as the criterion levels are shifted upwards, and the effectiveness of the computerized testing system is confirmed.

  10. Computerized decision support for concurrent utilization review using the HELP system.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, B D; Gardner, R M; Hedrick, G; Gould, P

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Development and evaluation of computerized concurrent utilization review (UR) support taking advantage of a clinically rich computerized patient database. DESIGN: The Automated Support System for Utilization Review (ASSURE) applies the Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (AEP) Day of Care criteria to computerized patient data in the HELP hospital information system. This paper reports the development, verification, and validation of ASSURE. MEASUREMENTS: Implementation correctness was verified by measuring agreement with a nurse reviewer, using separate sample sets for all 20 criteria for a total of 560 current inpatients. Usefulness in detecting inappropriate days of care was validated by two nurse reviewers who were crossed with manual and computer-assisted review methods in a blocked design for 168 current inpatients. Agreement with reviewers, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were measured. RESULTS: Agreement was very good for satisfaction of criteria, and good for appropriateness of day of care. A patient day identified by ASSURE as potentially inappropriate would be twice as likely to be judged inappropriate by a reviewer as a randomly selected patient day. Review of the 10% of patient days identified as potentially inappropriate by ASSURE would identify approximately 21% of the inappropriate days of care. CONCLUSION: ASSURE is a clinically useful tool for screening adult acute care patients for inappropriate days of care, and promises to make a major contribution to reducing health care costs. The prognosis for successful routine clinical use is good. PMID:7719820

  11. Efficient computerized model for dynamic analysis of energy conversion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, R. D.; Lansing, F. L.; Khan, I. R.

    1983-01-01

    In searching for the optimum parameters that minimize the total life cycle cost of an energy conversion system, various combinations of components are examined and the resulting system performance and associated economics are studied. The systems performance and economics simulation computer program (SPECS) was developed to fill this need. The program simulates the fluid flow, thermal, and electrical characteristics of a system of components on a quasi-steady state basis for a variety of energy conversion systems. A unique approach is used in which the set of characteristic equations is solved by the Newton-Raphson technique. This approach eliminates the tedious iterative loops which are found in comparable programs such as TRNSYS or SOLTES-1. Several efficient features were also incorporated such as the centralized control and energy management scheme, and analogous treatment of energy flow in electrical and mechanical components, and the modeling of components of similar fundamental characteristics using generic subroutines. Initial tests indicate that this model can be used effectively with a relatively small number of time steps and low computer cost.

  12. Efficient computerized model for dynamic analysis of energy conversion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, R. D.; Lansing, F. L.; Khan, I. R.

    1983-02-01

    In searching for the optimum parameters that minimize the total life cycle cost of an energy conversion system, various combinations of components are examined and the resulting system performance and associated economics are studied. The systems performance and economics simulation computer program (SPECS) was developed to fill this need. The program simulates the fluid flow, thermal, and electrical characteristics of a system of components on a quasi-steady state basis for a variety of energy conversion systems. A unique approach is used in which the set of characteristic equations is solved by the Newton-Raphson technique. This approach eliminates the tedious iterative loops which are found in comparable programs such as TRNSYS or SOLTES-1. Several efficient features were also incorporated such as the centralized control and energy management scheme, and analogous treatment of energy flow in electrical and mechanical components, and the modeling of components of similar fundamental characteristics using generic subroutines. Initial tests indicate that this model can be used effectively with a relatively small number of time steps and low computer cost.

  13. Developing and testing a computerized decision support system for nurse-to-patient assignment: a multimethod study.

    PubMed

    van Oostveen, Catharina J; Braaksma, Aleida; Vermeulen, Hester

    2014-06-01

    Nurse-to-patient assignment is a frequently recurring, time-consuming, and complex process owing to the many considerations involved. Creating well-balanced, high-quality assignments is crucial to ensuring patient safety, quality of care, and job satisfaction for nurses. A computerized decision support system can assist (charge) nurses in the nurse-to-patient assignment process. In this two-phase multimethod study, a computerized decision support system was developed and evaluated. Three nursing wards in a 1000-bed Dutch university hospital participated. In the first phase of this study, considerations relevant to the assignment process--and their relative importance--were investigated in a literature review, focus group sessions with nurses, and a survey among nurses. Using information from the first phase, the computerized decision support system was developed based on an integer linear program. In the second phase, a before-and-after study was conducted to test and evaluate the computerized decision support system both quantitatively (duration of the assignment process) and qualitatively (survey on workload). Thirty-six measurements were performed to test the computerized decision support system. After implementation, a 30% time reduction was achieved in the nurse-to-patient assignments, and nurses (N = 138) experienced a lower workload. Therefore, the implementation of computerized decision support system would increase both the quality and safety of care as well as the nurses' job satisfaction and should be investigated rigorously in the coming years. PMID:24781813

  14. Whiteboard sharing: capture, process, and print or email

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gormish, Michael; Erol, Berna; Van Olst, Daniel G.; Li, Tim; Mariotti, Andrea

    2011-03-01

    Whiteboards support face to face meetings by facilitating the sharing of ideas, focusing attention, and summarizing. However, at the end of the meeting participants desire some record of the information from the whiteboard. While there are whiteboards with built-in printers, they are expensive and relatively uncommon. We consider the capture of the information on a whiteboard with a mobile phone, improving the image quality with a cloud service, and sharing the results. This paper describes the algorithm for improving whiteboard image quality, the user experience for both a web widget and a smartphone application, and the necessary adaptations for providing this as a web service. The web widget, and mobile apps for both iPhone and Android are currently freely available, and have been used by more than 50,000 people.

  15. MAPS - a computerized management analysis and planning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packe, D. R.; Raffaeli, G. A.

    1971-01-01

    Program lists work structure of projects at all levels. System integrates work item, its schedule, its status against the schedule, responsible personnel, and explanatory comments. structure of MAPS promotes natural organization of project work elements, project features and uses are given.

  16. Clinical and Management Requirements for Computerized Mental Health Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Levinton, Paula H.; Dunning, Tessa F.E.

    1980-01-01

    Information requirements of mental health providers are sufficiently different from those of other health care managers to warrant a different approach to the development of management information systems (MIS). Advances in computer technology and increased demands for fiscal accountability have led to developing integrated mental health information systems (MHIS) that support clinical and management requirements. In a study made to define a set of generic information requirements of mental health providers that can be supported by an MHIS, it was found that basic data needs can be defined and classified in functional terms: clinical, management, and consultation/education requirements. A basic set of data to support these needs was defined: demographic, financial, clinical, programmatic, and service delivery data.

  17. A flexible computerized system for environmental data acquisition and transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappalà, G.

    2009-04-01

    In recent years increasing importance has been addressed to the knowledge of the marine environment, either to help detecting and understanding global climate change phenomena, or to protect and preserve those coastal areas, where multiple interests converge (linked to the tourism, recreational or productive activities…) and which suffer greater impact from anthropogenic activities; this has in turn stimulated the start of research programs devoted to the monitoring and surveillance of these particular zones, coupling the needs for knowledge, sustainable development and exploitation of natural resources. There is an increasing need to have data available in real time or near real time in order to intervene in emergency situations. Cabled or wireless data transmission can be used. The first allows the transmission of a higher amount of data only in coastal sites, while the second gives a bigger flexibility in terms of application to different environments; more, using mobile phone services (either terrestrial or satellite), it is possible to allocate the data centre in the most convenient place, without any need of proximity to the sea. Traditional oceanographic techniques, based on ship surveys, hardly fit the needs of operational oceanography, because of their high cost and fragmentary nature, both in spatial and temporal domains. To obtain a good synopticity, it is necessary to complement traditional ship observations with measurements from fixed stations (buoys moored in sites chosen to be representative of wider areas, or to constitute a sentinel against the arrival of pollutants), satellite observations, use of ships of opportunity and of newly developed instruments, like the gliders, or towed sliding devices, like the SAVE. Modern instruments rely on an electronic heart; an integrated hardware-software system developed in Messina is here presented, used in various versions to control data acquisition and transmission on buoys or on ship

  18. Electret Acoustic Transducer Array For Computerized Ultrasound Risk Evaluation System

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Thomas L.; Fisher, Karl A.

    2005-08-09

    An electret-based acoustic transducer array is provided and may be used in a system for examining tissue. The acoustic transducer array is formed with a substrate that has a multiple distinct cells formed therein. Within each of the distinct cells is positioned an acoustic transducing element formed of an electret material. A conductive membrane is formed over the distinct cells and may be flexible.

  19. Use of Computerized Information Systems in HMOs and Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Drazen, Erica L.; Moore, Nicola L.

    1985-01-01

    A comparison was made between the use of data processing in hospitals and HMOs. Findings indicate that the HMO and Hospital data processing markets are currently quite distinct. As expected, the functions automated reflect the uses of the different care delivery systems. The hardware and software vendors to these markets are also different. A high percentage (50%) of HMOs are using software they developed in-house. In this respect, current HMO data processing is similar to the hospitals of a decade ago. The Hospital market (for hardware and total systems) is highly concentrated. A few firms have a combined market share of over 50% and there are a large number of firms with very small shares. In the HMO market, there is a high concentration ratio for hardware but not for software or systems. HMOs and hospitals are almost uniformly satisfied with their hardware. Satisfaction with most applications is between 80%-90% but there is a need, at least within HMOs, for improvements in support of the software supplied.

  20. A flexible computerized system for environmental data acquisition and transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappalà, G.

    2009-04-01

    In recent years increasing importance has been addressed to the knowledge of the marine environment, either to help detecting and understanding global climate change phenomena, or to protect and preserve those coastal areas, where multiple interests converge (linked to the tourism, recreational or productive activities…) and which suffer greater impact from anthropogenic activities; this has in turn stimulated the start of research programs devoted to the monitoring and surveillance of these particular zones, coupling the needs for knowledge, sustainable development and exploitation of natural resources. There is an increasing need to have data available in real time or near real time in order to intervene in emergency situations. Cabled or wireless data transmission can be used. The first allows the transmission of a higher amount of data only in coastal sites, while the second gives a bigger flexibility in terms of application to different environments; more, using mobile phone services (either terrestrial or satellite), it is possible to allocate the data centre in the most convenient place, without any need of proximity to the sea. Traditional oceanographic techniques, based on ship surveys, hardly fit the needs of operational oceanography, because of their high cost and fragmentary nature, both in spatial and temporal domains. To obtain a good synopticity, it is necessary to complement traditional ship observations with measurements from fixed stations (buoys moored in sites chosen to be representative of wider areas, or to constitute a sentinel against the arrival of pollutants), satellite observations, use of ships of opportunity and of newly developed instruments, like the gliders, or towed sliding devices, like the SAVE. Modern instruments rely on an electronic heart; an integrated hardware-software system developed in Messina is here presented, used in various versions to control data acquisition and transmission on buoys or on ship

  1. Bandlimited computerized improvements in characterization of nonlinear systems with memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuttall, Albert H.; Katz, Richard A.; Hughes, Derke R.; Koch, Robert M.

    2016-05-01

    The present article discusses some inroads in nonlinear signal processing made by the prime algorithm developer, Dr. Albert H. Nuttall and co-authors, a consortium of research scientists from the Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division, Newport, RI. The algorithm, called the Nuttall-Wiener-Volterra 'NWV' algorithm is named for its principal contributors [1], [2],[ 3] over many years of developmental research. The NWV algorithm significantly reduces the computational workload for characterizing nonlinear systems with memory. Following this formulation, two measurement waveforms on the system are required in order to characterize a specified nonlinear system under consideration: (1) an excitation input waveform, x(t) (the transmitted signal); and, (2) a response output waveform, z(t) (the received signal). Given these two measurement waveforms for a given propagation channel, a 'kernel' or 'channel response', h= [h0,h1,h2,h3] between the two measurement points, is computed via a least squares approach that optimizes modeled kernel values by performing a best fit between measured response z(t) and a modeled response y(t). New techniques significantly diminish the exponential growth of the number of computed kernel coefficients at second and third order in order to combat and reasonably alleviate the curse of dimensionality.

  2. Computerized Alerting System Warns of Life-Threatening Events

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Karen E.

    1986-01-01

    Problems associated with acute patient care include 1) information overload, 2) complexity of patient data, 3) data communication, 4) delays in treatment leading to critical illness, and 5) absence of attending physicians when decisions are required. Because of their speed and information processing capabilities, computers have been increasingly employed to help overcome these problems. At LDS Hospital, a comprehensive computer system called HELP has been developed. This system acquires, stores and manages patient data, and provides decision-making capabilities. HELP's capabilities have been applied to develop a tool for identifying life-threatening conditions in patients based on laboratory test results. Once a life-threatening condition is identified by the computer, the computer sends an alert message so that appropriate treatment may be rapidly instituted. Preliminary results from our evaluation of the expert system show that it does affect patient care by increasing the number of times that patients are treated for life-threatening conditions. Patient outcome is benefited by shortening the time needed for the patients laboratory test values to return within normal limits.

  3. Software configurable optical test system: a computerized reverse Hartmann test.

    PubMed

    Su, Peng; Parks, Robert E; Wang, Lirong; Angel, Roger P; Burge, James H

    2010-08-10

    A software configurable optical test system (SCOTS) based on the geometry of the fringe reflection or phase measuring deflectometry method was developed for rapidly, robustly, and accurately measuring large, highly aspherical shapes such as solar collectors and primary mirrors for astronomical telescopes. In addition to using phase shifting methods for data collection and reduction, we explore the test from the point view of performing traditional optical testing methods, such as Hartmann or Hartmann-Shack tests, in a reverse way. Using this concept, the slope data calculation and unwrapping in the test can also be done with centroiding and line-scanning methods. These concepts expand the test to work in more general situations where fringe illumination is not practical. Experimental results show that the test can be implemented without complex calibration for many applications by taking the geometric advantage of working near the center curvature of the test part. The results also show that the test has a large dynamic range, can achieve measurement accuracy comparable with interferometric methods, and can provide a good complement to interferometric tests in certain circumstances. A variation of this method is also useful for measuring refractive optics and optical systems. As such, SCOTS provides optical manufacturers with a new tool for performing quantitative full field system evaluation. PMID:20697443

  4. Evaluating an oncology systemic therapy computerized physician order entry system using international guidelines.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Sonal; Tyono, Ivan; Pasetka, Mark; Trudeau, Maureen

    2014-03-01

    Chemotherapy is prone to medication error resulting from complexities in ordering and administration. Computerized physician order entry (CPOE) has been established as an important tool to minimize such errors and hence improve patient safety. As a leading Canadian advisory body in oncology, Cancer Care Ontario (CCO) has been a champion in developing and implementing its own cancer systemic therapy CPOE, the Oncology Patient Information System (OPIS). This article reviews and consolidates principles for oncology CPOE systems as found in the literature and in guidelines created by three international oncology organizations (American Society of Clinical Oncology, Clinical Oncological Society of Australia, and CCO). It then evaluates OPIS by these standards and provides a working example of what a cancer CPOE system should look like. This document can therefore be used as a framework to help develop and evaluate cancer CPOE platforms in different national settings. As end users, oncologists are considered key stakeholders in developing such systems and thus should be well informed about CPOE principles to help make decisions on the appropriate implementation of these platforms in their local practice settings. In addition, oncologists are also important champions for the successful uptake of oncology CPOE platforms and would benefit from a better understanding of whether proposed or existing local CPOE systems meet established standards. PMID:24254406

  5. Review of the IEEE Standard for Computerized Operating Procedure Systems

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, J.; Higgins, J.

    2010-02-26

    Increasingly nuclear power plant procedures, such as emergency operating procedures, are being presented in computer form with functionality to support operator use and management of the procedures. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) currently has guidance for the review of computer-based procedures (CBPs); however, there remain CBP functions and human performance issues for which up-to-date guidance is lacking. The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) has initiated a standard development effort to address the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of CBP systems. When completed, it may provide guidance to supplement the NRC staff's review criteria. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the suitability of the IEEE Standard for use in the NRC's HFE safety reviews of CBP systems and to ensure that the guidance meets the NRC's standard for scientific and engineering rigor used in its own guidance development efforts. We established the following criteria with which to evaluate the Standard: (1) it should meet an existing need of NRC reviewers, (2) it should be based in sound HFE principles, (3) it should be thoroughly peer-reviewed, and (4) it should address CBP-related human performance issues identified in the literature. This report describes the methodology we used to evaluate each criterion. Our evaluation concluded that the Standard generally does meet these criteria, however several areas were identified for which additional clarifications are needed. Thus consideration of the Standard's use by the NRC is supported. The standard evaluation methodology developed in this study can be generally applied to the review of other HFE standards being considered for possible use or endorsement by the NRC.

  6. Computerized Data Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grzywinski, Carol M.

    1983-01-01

    Argues that a computerized data management system can help the developmental educator maintain professional accountability. Reports on a project conducted at the State University of New York Agricultural and Technical College at Canton during which paperwork was reduced and report writing expedited through a computerized management information…

  7. The role of computerized modeling and simulation in the development of life support system technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Modell, Michael; Evanich, Peggy; Chen, Chau-Chyun; Anavi, Selim; Mai, Jeff

    1989-01-01

    Computerized modeling and simulation (CMAS) is a tool that can greatly reduce both the time and cost of technology development. CMAS refers to computer methods for correlating, storing, and retrieving property data for chemical species and for solving the phenomenological equations of physical/chemical processes. Furthermore, process conditions based on properties of materials, mass, and energy balances; equipment sizing based on rate processes; and the governing equations for unit operations can be determined using CMAS. CMAS systems can be used to evaluate an LSS process with minimal requirements for laboratory experimentation. A CMAS model is presented for a vapor compression distillation system(VCD) for reclaiming water from urine.

  8. Computerized patient information system in a psychiatric unit: five-year experience.

    PubMed

    Modai, I; Valevski, A

    1993-10-01

    A computerized psychiatric clinical application based on CLICKS program was developed, consisting of a network of 34 personal computers, run by Novell Netware version 3.11. It includes all clinical records and covers most of the administrative needs of the department; it may be used also in the outpatient clinics. Implementation of the system followed the stages of planning, record structuring, record programming, practice and operation. The system is favorably accepted by the patients, has several important advantages over pencil and paper record keeping, and although it is slightly more time-consuming, it improves record quality and departmental efficiency. PMID:8113635

  9. A technique to evaluate the performance of computerized ECG analysis systems.

    PubMed

    Teppner, U; Lobodzinski, S; Neubert, D; Laks, M M

    1987-10-01

    No objective method to test computerized ECG systems has been available. Until now, tests have been conducted separately for instrumentation and algorithms. Hence, to facilitate objective verification and testing of modern computerized ECG equipment, a dedicated high resolution, low noise instrument (an "electronic test patient") has been developed. The purpose of this communication is to describe this new instrument and its electrocardiographic database. The instrument is designed not to cause any disturbances to the original ECG signals in the frequency range from 0 to 1 kHz. The input channels accommodating standard 12-lead and 3-lead Frank systems are sampled simultaneously at 10 kHz each with 90 dB dynamic range. The overall RMS noise figure of the instrument is 1 microV. The integral part of the instrument is a high resolution, high bandwidth minidatabase consisting of selected A-type and B-type verified electrocardiograms such as infarctions, ventricular hypertrophies, atrial fibrillations, etc. The minidatabase was collected with the aid of a computerized ECG system, which has a program for searching for specific electrocardiographic diagnosis. Each database record consists of simultaneous electrocardiographic signals of all standard leads and Frank leads, and a validated diagnostic report. A system under test is typically connected via its patient cable to the analog output of the instrument. The testing is performed with reference to the validated ECG from the database. In that way, our minidatabase is compatible with any electrocardiographic system. The only similar database assembled for testing purposes is that of the CSE group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3694104

  10. Using Interactive Whiteboard to Enhance Student Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanton, Patricia

    2008-03-01

    Several years ago I became a member of a supportive group of physics teachers trained in the use of a physics teaching pedagogy we have come to call "modeling." This approach began at Arizona State University under the direction of Dr. David Hestenes. One aspect of the program provides an active listserv for those teachers who are implementing the approach in their teaching of introductory physics. One current discussion topic deals with the use of interactive whiteboards, and I think several of the points that have been posted for discussion are important to make as you consider the use of this technology in your classroom.

  11. Development and trial operation of a site-wide computerized material accounting system at Kurchatov Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Roumiantsev, A.N.; Ostroumov, Y.A.; Yevstropov, A.V.

    1997-11-01

    Since August 1994 Kurchatov Institute in cooperation with several US Department of Energy Laboratories has been developing a site-wide computerized material accounting system for nuclear materials. In 1994 a prototype system was put into trial operation at two Kurchatov facilities. Evaluation of this prototype led to the development of a new computerized material accounting system named KI-MACS, which has been operational since 1996. This system is a site-wide local secure computer network with centralized database capable of dealing with strictly confidential data and performing near-real time accountancy. It utilizes a Microsoft Windows NT operating system with SQL Server and Visual Basic, and has a `star`-like network architecture. KI-MACS is capable of dealing with materials in itemized and bulk form, and can perform statistical evaluations of measurements and material balance. KI-MACS is fully integrated with bar code equipment, electronic scales, gamma-ray spectrometers and an Active Well Coincidence Counter, thus providing almost on-line evaluation and utilization of results of measurements, item identification and accounting. At present KI-MACS is being used in Physical Inventory Taking at the Kurchatov Central Storage Facility, and by the end of 1997 will be installed at twelve Kurchatov nuclear facilities.

  12. Design techniques for developing a computerized instrumentation test plan. [for wind tunnel test data acquisition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, S. Kay; Forsyth, Theodore J.; Maynard, Everett E.

    1987-01-01

    The development of a computerized instrumentation test plan (ITP) for the NASA/Ames Research Center National Full Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) is discussed. The objective of the ITP program was to aid the instrumentation engineer in documenting the configuration and calibration of data acquisition systems for a given test at any of four low speed wind tunnel facilities (Outdoor Aerodynamic Research Facility, 7 x 10, 40 x 80, and 80 x 120) at the NFAC. It is noted that automation of the ITP has decreased errors, engineering hours, and setup time while adding a higher level of consistency and traceability.

  13. Computerized diode laser system for CO content investigation in human expiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouznetsov, Andrian I.; Logachev, A. P.; Stepanov, Eugene V.

    1990-07-01

    First results of diode laser spectroscopy methods applications for diagnosing the gas content of expired air are presented. Carbon monoxide (CO) contents of expirations of a sportsman and a smoker were subjected to analysis by using a computerized diode laser system. In the first case there was detected a considerable growth of CO concentration after an intensive exercise. In the second one there were revealed and measured three time constants - characteristics of CO removal from the organism. Promising trends of development and applications of diode laser spectroscopy in medicine are at issue.

  14. Organizational Benefits of Computerized Physican Order Entry (CPOE) System in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Atique, Suleman; Hsu, Chien-Yeh; Shabbir, Syed-Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Electronic prescribing is also known as Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE). It is a computer-aided system which offers the health professionals a robust platform for entering the prescription electronically. Due to paucity of facilities in Pakistan which are available around the world, there is an observable overburden on the health professionals and practitioners. CPOE system has shown to be very effective in minimizing medication errors. CPOE is beneficial for both patient and health organizations. There is great deal of interest in the adoption of this system in our healthcare system. The results state clearly that this system is equally beneficial for organizations who want to adopt this system as perceived by the health professionals. It supports the idea of adoption and implementation of CPOE in healthcare facilities healthcare institutes. CPOE must be adopted to ease and optimize nursing services in Pakistani healthcare system. PMID:27332401

  15. Preliminary Results with a Computerized Information System for Emergency Medical Services

    PubMed Central

    Attinger, E. O.; Anné, A.; Edlich, R.

    1977-01-01

    The design and implementation of a comprehensive Emergency Medical Care system for Central Virginia is described. From its inception, the design of the proposed EMS System was based on the concept that continuous monitoring and evaluation of systems performance is necessary if the impact of the system on the medical care provided within the region was to be assessed. To provide the necessary data for this task, a computerized information system was designed and implemented, that provides three functions: 1. A data base, accessible in real time, containing demographic characteristics, process and outcome data and treatment protocols. 2. Online consultation for physician and Advanced Life Support personnel. 3. Systems structure: (Resource inventory) Preliminary results obtained with this system are discussed.

  16. A physical comparison of a fluoroscopic CAT system and the EMI head scanner. [Computerized Axial Tomograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.; Keller, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    A quantitative comparison of the capabilities to produce computerized tomograms was made between the EMI head scanner and reconstructions from images provided by a large screen low light level-TV camera fluoroscopic system. A phantom made from lucite containing rods of various materials and sizes was used. The computer printout of each was analyzed and a correlation of 0.8 was noted between the results of both systems. The differential attenuation detectability of the fluoroscopic system was found to be comparable to or better than the EMI unit. As expected from a consideration of the quantum statistics for each system, the noise in the obtained reconstructions was also comparable. It is concluded that such a fluoroscopic system performs favorably when compared to the presently available commercial systems.

  17. Brief Report: Learning via the Electronic Interactive Whiteboard for Two Students with Autism and a Student with Moderate Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yakubova, Gulnoza; Taber-Doughty, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    The effects of a multicomponent intervention (a self-operated video modeling and self-monitoring delivered via an electronic interactive whiteboard (IWB) and a system of least prompts) on skill acquisition and interaction behavior of two students with autism and one student with moderate intellectual disability were examined using a multi-probe…

  18. Revealing the Whiteboard to Blind Students: An Inclusive Approach to Provide Mediation in Synchronous E-Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freire, Andre P.; Linhalis, Flavia; Bianchini, Sandro L.; Fortes, Renata P. M.; Pimentel, Maria de Graca C.

    2010-01-01

    Promoting the inclusion of students with disabilities in e-learning systems has brought many challenges for researchers and educators. The use of synchronous communication tools such as interactive whiteboards has been regarded as an obstacle for inclusive education. In this paper, we present the proposal of an inclusive approach to provide blind…

  19. Development of an expert system for haemodynamic monitoring: computerized symbolization of on-line monitoring data.

    PubMed

    Koski, E M; Mäkivirta, A; Sukuvaara, T; Kari, A

    The development of intelligent alarm systems for intensive care benefits from the transformation of data from a quantitative to a qualitative mode. We constructed a computerized algorithm for the symbolization of on-line monitoring data of heart rate, systemic arterial, pulmonary arterial and central venous pressures, as well as central and peripheral temperatures. We tested the ability of the algorithm to symbolize the levels of the parameters and to detect significant long-term trends in ten adult patients admitted to the intensive care unit after cardiac surgery. The estimations of an experienced clinician were taken as the 'gold standard'. The symbolization of the levels of the monitored parameters was in agreement with the clinician in 99.4% of the estimations. The algorithm detected 93.0% of the trends correctly and also estimated their reliability. The clinician considered its estimations to be accurate in 96.2% of cases. On the other hand, the clinician considered unreliable 2.4% of all the trends detected and classified as reliable by the algorithm. The computerized algorithm for the symbolization of real-time monitoring data performed efficiently enough for its further use in expert systems for intelligent monitoring. PMID:1820419

  20. Wind energy Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) : data collection recommendations for reliability analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Valerie A.; Ogilvie, Alistair B.

    2012-01-01

    This report addresses the general data requirements for reliability analysis of fielded wind turbines and other wind plant equipment. The report provides a rationale for why this data should be collected, a list of the data needed to support reliability and availability analysis, and specific data recommendations for a Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) to support automated analysis. This data collection recommendations report was written by Sandia National Laboratories to address the general data requirements for reliability analysis of operating wind turbines. This report is intended to help develop a basic understanding of the data needed for reliability analysis from a Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) and other data systems. The report provides a rationale for why this data should be collected, a list of the data needed to support reliability and availability analysis, and specific recommendations for a CMMS to support automated analysis. Though written for reliability analysis of wind turbines, much of the information is applicable to a wider variety of equipment and analysis and reporting needs. The 'Motivation' section of this report provides a rationale for collecting and analyzing field data for reliability analysis. The benefits of this type of effort can include increased energy delivered, decreased operating costs, enhanced preventive maintenance schedules, solutions to issues with the largest payback, and identification of early failure indicators.

  1. Developing a Computerized Aging Management System for Concrete Structures in Finnish Nuclear Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Neshawy, F.; Piironen, J.; Sistonen, E.; Vesikari, E.; Tuomisto, M.; Hradil, P.; Ferreira, M.

    2013-07-01

    Finland has four nuclear reactors units in two power plants. The first unit started operation in 1977 and in the early 1980's all four units were in use. During the last few years the aging management of the Nuclear Power Plant's (NPP) concrete structures has grown an important issue because the existing structures are reaching the end of their licensed operating lifetime (about 40 years). Therefore the nuclear power companies are developing aging management systems to avoid premature degradation of NPP facilities and to be able to extend their operating lifetime. This paper is about the development of a computerized ageing management system for the nuclear power plants concrete structures. The computerized ageing management system is built upon central database and implementation applications. It will assist the personnel of power companies to implement the aging management activities at different phases of the lifetime of a power plant. It will provide systematic methods for planning, surveillance, inspection, monitoring, condition assessment, maintenance and repair of structures.

  2. A technical approach for determining the importance of information in computerized alarm systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fortney, D.S.; Lim, J.J.

    1994-06-10

    Computerized alarm and access control systems must be treated as special entities rather than as generic automated information systems. This distinction arises due to the real-time control and monitoring functions performed by these systems at classified facilities and the degree of centralization of a site`s safeguards system information in the associated databases. As an added requirement for these systems, DOE safeguards and security classification policy is to protect information whose dissemination has the potential for significantly increasing the probability of successful adversary action against the facility, or lowering adversary resources needed for a successful attack. Thus at issue is just how valuable would specific alarm system information be to an adversary with a higher order objective. We have developed and applied a technical approach for determining the importance of information contained in computerized alarm and access control systems. The methodology is based on vulnerability assessment rather than blanket classification rules. This method uses a system architecture diagram to guide the analysis and to develop adversary defeat methods for each node and link. These defeat methods are evaluated with respect to required adversary resources, technical difficulty, and detection capability. Then they are incorporated into site vulnerability assessments to determine the significance of alarm system information in the context of a facility attack. This methodology was successfully applied to the Argus alarm, access control, and assessment system developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Lab. Argus is software-driven, contains interrelated databases, shares host computers, and communicates with field processors and alarms through a common network. The evaluation results provided insights into the importance of alarm system information while the methodology itself provided a framework for addressing associated information protection issues.

  3. A Comparison of an Expert Systems Approach to Computerized Adaptive Testing and an Item Response Theory Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frick, Theodore W.

    Expert systems can be used to aid decisionmaking. A computerized adaptive test is one kind of expert system, although not commonly recognized as such. A new approach, termed EXSPRT, was devised that combines expert systems reasoning and sequential probability ratio test stopping rules. Two versions of EXSPRT were developed, one with random…

  4. The Whiteboard Revolution: Illuminating Science Communication in the Digital Age.

    PubMed

    Mar, Florie Anne; Ordovas-Montanes, Jose; Oksenberg, Nir; Olson, Alexander M

    2016-04-01

    Journal-based science communication is not accessible or comprehensible to a general public curious about science and eager for the next wave of scientific innovation. We propose an alternative medium for scientists to communicate their work to the general public in an engaging and digestible way through the use of whiteboard videos. We describe the process of producing science whiteboard videos and the benefits and challenges therein. PMID:26976327

  5. Imaging results of multi-modal ultrasound computerized tomography system designed for breast diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Opieliński, Krzysztof J; Pruchnicki, Piotr; Gudra, Tadeusz; Podgórski, Przemysław; Kurcz, Jacek; Kraśnicki, Tomasz; Sąsiadek, Marek; Majewski, Jarosław

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays, in the era of common computerization, transmission and reflection methods are intensively developed in addition to improving classical ultrasound methods (US) for imaging of tissue structure, in particular ultrasound transmission tomography UTT (analogous to computed tomography CT which uses X-rays) and reflection tomography URT (based on the synthetic aperture method used in radar imaging techniques). This paper presents and analyses the results of ultrasound transmission tomography imaging of the internal structure of the female breast biopsy phantom CIRS Model 052A and the results of the ultrasound reflection tomography imaging of a wire sample. Imaging was performed using a multi-modal ultrasound computerized tomography system developed with the participation of a private investor. The results were compared with the results of imaging obtained using dual energy CT, MR mammography and conventional US method. The obtained results indicate that the developed UTT and URT methods, after the acceleration of the scanning process, thus enabling in vivo examination, may be successfully used for detection and detailed characterization of breast lesions in women. PMID:25759234

  6. Efficacy of a computerized sensor system for evaluation and training of dizzy patients.

    PubMed

    Kao, Chung-Lan; Hsieh, Wan-Ling; Wang, Shuu-Jiun; Chen, Shih-Jen; Wei, Shun-Hwa; Chan, Rai-Chi

    2010-01-01

    Patients with vestibular hypofunction often experience dizziness and unsteadiness while moving their heads. Appropriate sensors can effectively detect a patient's dynamic visual acuity and associated body balance control. Forty-one vestibular-deficit patients and 10 normal individuals were invited to participate in this study. Questionnaires, clinical assessment scales and objective measures were evaluated on participants' first visits. After 12 sessions of training, all scales were evaluated again on vestibular-deficit patients. The computerized system was composed of sensors, including a gyro and strain gauges, data acquisition accessories and LabVIEW software. Results revealed that the system could effectively distinguish normal subjects from subjects with vestibular deficits. In addition, after a rehabilitation program, subjects' subjective and objective performances were significantly improved. Based on our results, we concluded that the present system, which uses a gyro and strain gauges, may provide an effective method for assessing and treating vestibular-deficit patients. PMID:22163617

  7. g--Acceleration of Gravity: Its Measurement from the Shape of Water by Using a Computerized Rotational System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pintao, Carlos A. F.; de Souza Filho, Moacir P.

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes a different experimental setup compared with the traditional ones, in order to determine the acceleration of gravity, which is carried out by using a fluid at a constant rotation. A computerized rotational system--by using a data acquisition system with specific software, a power amplifier and a rotary motion sensor--is…

  8. Computerized Vocational Information System (CVIS): Evaluation Manual. A Futuristic Concept of Vocational and Educational Decision-Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, JoAnn, Ed.

    Designed to assist Computerized Vocational Information System (CVIS) users in evaluating projects in local secondary school sites, the handbook provides users with a variety of variables or viewpoints from which to assess the CVIS system. Four different approaches are presented to CVIS evaluation: the analysis of use patterns; the reaction of…

  9. The Design and Development of a Computerized Attention-Training Game System for School-Aged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Tsui-Ying; Huang, Ho-Chuan

    2013-01-01

    A computerized attention-training game system has been developed to support attention training for school-aged children. The present system offers various types of computer games that provide training in different aspects of attention, such as selective attention, sustained attention, and divided attention. The N-tier architecture of the Web-based…

  10. 45 CFR 307.31 - Federal financial participation at the 80 percent rate for computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... enforcement system is designed effectively and efficiently and will improve the management and administration... 45 Public Welfare 2 2014-10-01 2012-10-01 true Federal financial participation at the 80 percent... ENFORCEMENT SYSTEMS § 307.31 Federal financial participation at the 80 percent rate for computerized...

  11. 45 CFR 307.31 - Federal financial participation at the 80 percent rate for computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... enforcement system is designed effectively and efficiently and will improve the management and administration... 45 Public Welfare 2 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Federal financial participation at the 80 percent... ENFORCEMENT SYSTEMS § 307.31 Federal financial participation at the 80 percent rate for computerized...

  12. 45 CFR 307.31 - Federal financial participation at the 80 percent rate for computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... enforcement system is designed effectively and efficiently and will improve the management and administration... 45 Public Welfare 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Federal financial participation at the 80 percent... ENFORCEMENT SYSTEMS § 307.31 Federal financial participation at the 80 percent rate for computerized...

  13. 45 CFR 307.31 - Federal financial participation at the 80 percent rate for computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... enforcement system is designed effectively and efficiently and will improve the management and administration... 45 Public Welfare 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Federal financial participation at the 80 percent... ENFORCEMENT SYSTEMS § 307.31 Federal financial participation at the 80 percent rate for computerized...

  14. 75 FR 81635 - Privacy Act of 1974: Notice of New System of Records, Single Family Computerized Homes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Privacy Act of 1974: Notice of New System of Records, Single Family Computerized Homes Underwriting Management Systems AGENCY: Department of Housing and Urban Development. ACTION: Revision to the... 27, 2011. ADDRESSES: Office of Single Family Program Development, 451 7th Street, SW., Washington,...

  15. 45 CFR 307.15 - Approval of advance planning documents for computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... capacity planning services. (F) Develop performance metrics which allow tracking project completion against... CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT...

  16. 45 CFR 307.15 - Approval of advance planning documents for computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... capacity planning services. (F) Develop performance metrics which allow tracking project completion against... CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT...

  17. A generic, computerized nuclear materials accountability system (NucMAS) and its layered products

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Jr, J M

    1989-01-01

    NucMAS provides a material balance area with a computerized data management system for nuclear materials accountability. NucMAS is a generic application. It handles the data management and reporting functions for different processing facilities by storing all process-specific information as data rather than procedure. A NucMAS application is configured for each facility it supports. NucMAS and its layered products are compatible with three types of data clients. Core NucMAS has a screen-oriented user interface to support the accountability clerk as a client. Accountability clerks enter data from operating logs and laboratory analyses one to three days after actual processing. Layered products support process operators and automated systems as near-real-time and real-time data clients. The core and layered products use a data-driven approach which results in software that is configurable and maintainable. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  18. A Method of Retrospective Computerized System Validation for Drug Manufacturing Software Considering Modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Masakazu; Fukue, Yoshinori

    This paper proposes a Retrospective Computerized System Validation (RCSV) method for Drug Manufacturing Software (DMSW) that relates to drug production considering software modification. Because DMSW that is used for quality management and facility control affects big impact to quality of drugs, regulatory agency required proofs of adequacy for DMSW's functions and performance based on developed documents and test results. Especially, the work that explains adequacy for previously developed DMSW based on existing documents and operational records is called RCSV. When modifying RCSV conducted DMSW, it was difficult to secure consistency between developed documents and test results for modified DMSW parts and existing documents and operational records for non-modified DMSW parts. This made conducting RCSV difficult. In this paper, we proposed (a) definition of documents architecture, (b) definition of descriptive items and levels in the documents, (c) management of design information using database, (d) exhaustive testing, and (e) integrated RCSV procedure. As a result, we could conduct adequate RCSV securing consistency.

  19. Interaction with a 'sex-expert' system enhances attitudes towards computerized sex therapy.

    PubMed

    Binik, Y M; Westbury, C F; Servan-Schreiber, D

    1989-01-01

    The present experiment investigated whether a new rule-based expert system, Sexpert, designed to assess and treat sexual dysfunction would be positively evaluated by näive users. In a between groups design, four groups of eight students were randomly assigned to one of two experimental groups or one of two control groups. Ss in the experimental groups interacted with one of two versions of Sexpert. Ss in one control group filled out a questionnaire concerning their sexual functioning while Ss in the other interacted with a non-sex related computer program. Perceived dissimilarity to other established treatments for sexual dysfunction and semantic differential attitudes measures taken both before and after the experimental manipulations showed a significant positive shift in favor of computerized sex therapy for those Ss who interacted with either version of Sexpert but not for Ss in either of the control conditions. PMID:2730512

  20. Ellipsis and Coreference Resolution in a Computerized Virtual Patient Dialogue System.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chuan-Jie; Pao, Chien-Wei; Chen, Yen-Heng; Liu, Chi-Ting; Hsu, Hui-Huang

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the design of an ellipsis and coreference resolution module integrated in a computerized virtual patient dialogue system. Real medical diagnosis dialogues have been collected and analyzed. Several groups of diagnosis-related concepts were defined and used to construct rules, patterns, and features to detect and resolve ellipsis and coreference. The best F-scores of ellipsis detection and resolution were 89.15 % and 83.40 %, respectively. The best F-scores of phrasal coreference detection and resolution were 93.83 % and 83.40 %, respectively. The accuracy of pronominal anaphora resolution was 92 % for the 3rd-person singular pronouns referring to specific entities, and 97.31 % for other pronouns. PMID:27518854

  1. Analyzing the Perceptions and Use of Interactive Whiteboards by Prekindergarten Teachers in Presentation of Classroom Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosetti, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    In an attempt to improve poor academic performance of students, many schools are purchasing interactive whiteboards to enhance lesson presentations. Interactive whiteboards are seldom being used to present lessons. The purpose of this quantitative study was to compare how frequently interactive whiteboards are used by prekindergarten teachers in…

  2. Interactive Whiteboard for Primary Schools in Mauritius: An Effective Tool or Just Another Trend?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahadur, Goonesh Kumar; Oogarah, Deorani

    2013-01-01

    Mauritius is among the few African countries where the interactive whiteboard has been implemented in all primary schools. The interactive whiteboard is an important tool in the classroom as it changes the mode of instruction. Many researches have been carried out in many countries to investigate the effectiveness of the interactive whiteboard.…

  3. Don't Erase that Whiteboard! Archiving Student Work on a Photo-Sharing Website

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Edward; Tsui, Stephen; Hart, Alicia; Saucedo, Lydia

    2011-01-01

    Students in physics courses often use whiteboards to brainstorm, solve problems, and present results to the rest of the class, particularly in courses involving collaborative small group work and whole class discussions. The whiteboards contain a valuable record of students' collaborative work. Once a whiteboard is erased, however, its contents…

  4. Reproducibility of ad libitum energy intake with the use of a computerized vending machine system123

    PubMed Central

    Votruba, Susanne B; Franks, Paul W; Krakoff, Jonathan; Salbe, Arline D

    2010-01-01

    Background: Accurate assessment of energy intake is difficult but critical for the evaluation of eating behavior and intervention effects. Consequently, methods to assess ad libitum energy intake under controlled conditions have been developed. Objective: Our objective was to evaluate the reproducibility of ad libitum energy intake with the use of a computerized vending machine system. Design: Twelve individuals (mean ± SD: 36 ± 8 y old; 41 ± 8% body fat) consumed a weight-maintaining diet for 3 d; subsequently, they self-selected all food with the use of a computerized vending machine system for an additional 3 d. Mean daily energy intake was calculated from the actual weight of foods consumed and expressed as a percentage of weight-maintenance energy needs (%WMEN). Subjects repeated the study multiple times during 2 y. The within-person reproducibility of energy intake was determined through the calculation of the intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) between visits. Results: Daily energy intake for all subjects was 5020 ± 1753 kcal during visit 1 and 4855 ± 1615 kcal during visit 2. There were no significant associations between energy intake and body weight, body mass index, or percentage body fat while subjects used the vending machines, which indicates that intake was not driven by body size or need. Despite overconsumption (%WMEN = 181 ± 57%), the reproducibility of intake between visits, whether expressed as daily energy intake (ICC = 0.90), %WMEN (ICC = 0.86), weight of food consumed (ICC = 0.87), or fat intake (g/d; ICC = 0.87), was highly significant (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Although ad libitum energy intake exceeded %WMEN, the within-person reliability of this intake across multiple visits was high, which makes this a reproducible method for the measurement of ad libitum intake in subjects who reside in a research unit. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00342732. PMID:19923376

  5. Preliminary Evaluation Plan for US Army Computerized Training System. Report No. CTS-TR-74-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Alexander A.; And Others

    The outline, steps, prodecures, methods, and format of a planned evaluation of the United States Army's Computerized Training System (CTS) are given. The evaluation is built into the CTS project and will have both summative and formative aspects. The three main areas to which the evaluation is directed and for which specific evaluation plans are…

  6. 45 CFR 307.40 - Suspension of approval of advance planning documents for computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension of approval of advance planning documents for computerized support enforcement systems. 307.40 Section 307.40 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT (CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT...

  7. Documentation--A Computerized Instructional Resource Management System. The Illinois Series on Educational Application of Computers, No. 26e.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockard, Henry; Cox, John

    This paper, which describes a computerized appointment scheduling system for individualized instruction from the point of view of the teachers and students who will use it, also includes more technical data for those readers who are familiar with the BASIC language. A guide to the logic, possible modifications, and a program listing are included,…

  8. Computerized Analytical Data Management System and Automated Analytical Sample Transfer System at the COGEMA Reprocessing Plants in La Hague

    SciTech Connect

    Flament, T.; Goasmat, F.; Poilane, F.

    2002-02-25

    Managing the operation of large commercial spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, such as UP3 and UP2-800 in La Hague, France, requires an extensive analytical program and the shortest possible analysis response times. COGEMA, together with its engineering subsidiary SGN, decided to build high-performance laboratories to support operations in its plants. These laboratories feature automated equipment, safe environments for operators, and short response times, all in centralized installations. Implementation of a computerized analytical data management system and a fully automated pneumatic system for the transfer of radioactive samples was a key factor contributing to the successful operation of the laboratories and plants.

  9. Evaluating the potential effectiveness of using computerized information systems to prevent adverse drug events.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J. G.; Jay, S. J.; Anderson, M.; Hunt, T. J.

    1997-01-01

    In this study a dynamic computer simulation model is used to estimate the effectiveness of various information systems applications designed to detect and prevent medication errors that result in adverse drug events (ADEs). The model simulates the four stages of the drug ordering and delivery system: prescribing, transcribing, dispensing and administering drugs. In this study we simulated interventions that have been demonstrated in prior studies to decrease error rates. The results demonstrated that a computerized information system that detected 26% of medication errors and prevented associated ADEs could save 1,226 days of excess hospitalization and $1.4 million in hospital costs annually. Those results suggest that such systems are potentially a cost-effective means of preventing ADEs in hospitals. The results demonstrated the importance of viewing adverse drug events from a systems perspective. Prevention efforts that focus on a single stage of the process had limited impact on the overall error rate. This study suggests that system-wide changes to the drug-ordering and delivery system are required to significantly reduce adverse drug events in a hospital setting. PMID:9357622

  10. Development of the Computerized Model of Performance-Based Measurement System to Measure Nurses' Clinical Competence.

    PubMed

    Liou, Shwu-Ru; Liu, Hsiu-Chen; Tsai, Shu-Ling; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Yu, Wei-Chieh; Chu, Tsui-Ping

    2016-04-01

    Critical thinking skills and clinical competence are for providing quality patient care. The purpose of this study is to develop the Computerized Model of Performance-Based Measurement system based on the Clinical Reasoning Model. The system can evaluate and identify learning needs for clinical competency and be used as a learning tool to increase clinical competency by using computers. The system includes 10 high-risk, high-volume clinical case scenarios coupled with questions testing clinical reasoning, interpersonal, and technical skills. Questions were sequenced to reflect patients' changing condition and arranged by following the process of collecting and managing information, diagnosing and differentiating urgency of problems, and solving problems. The content validity and known-groups validity was established. The Kuder-Richardson Formula 20 was 0.90 and test-retest reliability was supported (r = 0.78). Nursing educators can use the system to understand students' needs for achieving clinical competence, and therefore, educational plans can be made to better prepare students and facilitate their smooth transition to a future clinical environment. Clinical nurses can use the system to evaluate their performance-based abilities and weakness in clinical reasoning. Appropriate training programs can be designed and implemented to practically promote nurses' clinical competence and quality of patient care. PMID:26829522

  11. Financial management using a computerized system for evaluating health care invoices.

    PubMed

    Magnezi, Racheli; Ashkenazi, Isaac

    2005-02-01

    The Medical Corps of the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) provides health care services for hundreds of thousands of soldiers in IDF clinics and by purchasing services from civilian institutes. Monthly invoices from civilian institutes are so numerous that most are paid with insufficient scrutiny and valuable information regarding soldiers' health care is lost. Our objective was to develop a computerized system for reviewing invoices and gathering data. Based on Oracle software (Oracle, Redwood Shores, California), the system stores the terms of agreements with medical institutes, enters billing data, calculates invoice totals, manages information, and generates reports. It automatically checks for duplicate invoices and confirms payment. The system allows users to view data for decision-making, creates insurance claim files, identifies incorrect charges, assists in quality assurance, and maintains personal patient records. With the system in operation since 2001, savings significantly increased, to approximately 5% of the IDF health care budget. On the basis of information gathered by the system, changes in medical procedures were implemented that are expected to generate even greater savings. PMID:15782831

  12. A template-based computerized instruction entry system helps the comunication between doctors and nurses.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Toshihiro; Mihara, Naoki; Nakagawa, Rie; Manabe, Shiro; Shimai, Yoshie; Teramoto, Kei; Matsumura, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    In a hospital, doctors and nurses shares roles in treating admitted patients. Communication between them is necessary and communication errors become the problem in medical safety. In Japan, verbal instruction is prohibited and doctors write their instruction on paper instruction slips. However, because it is difficult to ascertain revision history and the active instructions on instruction slips, human errors can occur. We developed template-based computerized instruction entry system to reduce ward workloads and contribute to medical safety. Templates enable us to input the instructions easily and standardize the descriptions of instructions. By standardizing and combine the instruction into one template for one instruction item, the systems could prevent instructions overlap. We created sets of templates (e.g., admission set, preoperative set), so that doctors could enter their instructions easily. Instructions entered via any of the sets can be subdivided into separate items by the system before being submitted, and can also be changed on a per-item basis. The instructions were displayed as calendar form. Calendar form represents the instruction shift and current active instructions. We prepared 382 standardized instruction templates. In our system, 66% of instructions were entered via templates, and 34% were entered as free-text comments. Our system prevents communication errors between medical staff. PMID:25991148

  13. [Development of a computerized three-dimension system for displaying and analyzing mandibular helical axis pathways].

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Zhang, Hao; Feng, Hailan; Zhang, Fengjun

    2014-12-01

    This paper is aimed to develop a computerized three dimensional system for displaying and analyzing mandibular helical axis pathways. Mandibular movements were recorded using a six-degrees-of-freedom ultrasonic jaw movement recording device. The three-dimensional digital models of the midface and the mandible were reconstructed and segmented from CT skull images. The digital models were then transformed to the coordinate system of mandibular motion data by using an optical measuring system. The system was programmed on the base of the Visualization ToolKit and Open Scene Graphics Library. According to the motion data, transformation matrices were calculated to simulate mandibular movements. Meanwhile, mandibular helical axis pathways were calculated and displayed three dimensionally by means of an eigenvalues method. The following parameters of mandibular helical axis were calculated: the rotation around instantaneous helical axis, the translation along it, its spatial orientation, its position and distance relative to any special reference point. These parameters could be exported to describe comprehensively the whole mandiblular movements. It could be concluded that our system would contribute to the study of mandiblular helical axis pathways. PMID:25868236

  14. An Evaluation of Professional Development on Using Student Response Systems and Interactive Whiteboards for Formative Assessment in the Middle Schools of a Southeastern School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Julia Susanne

    2011-01-01

    The purchase of 21st-century technologies for each middle school teacher in my school system coinciding with a historic lack of significant professional development in technology integration provided the impetus for the study. To address the problem, professional development focused on helping teachers use student response systems and mobile…

  15. A computerized recognition system for the home-based physiotherapy exercises using an RGBD camera.

    PubMed

    Ar, Ilktan; Akgul, Yusuf Sinan

    2014-11-01

    Computerized recognition of the home based physiotherapy exercises has many benefits and it has attracted considerable interest among the computer vision community. However, most methods in the literature view this task as a special case of motion recognition. In contrast, we propose to employ the three main components of a physiotherapy exercise (the motion patterns, the stance knowledge, and the exercise object) as different recognition tasks and embed them separately into the recognition system. The low level information about each component is gathered using machine learning methods. Then, we use a generative Bayesian network to recognize the exercise types by combining the information from these sources at an abstract level, which takes the advantage of domain knowledge for a more robust system. Finally, a novel postprocessing step is employed to estimate the exercise repetitions counts. The performance evaluation of the system is conducted with a new dataset which contains RGB (red, green, and blue) and depth videos of home-based exercise sessions for commonly applied shoulder and knee exercises. The proposed system works without any body-part segmentation, bodypart tracking, joint detection, and temporal segmentation methods. In the end, favorable exercise recognition rates and encouraging results on the estimation of repetition counts are obtained. PMID:24860037

  16. Computerized Ultrasonic Testing System (CUTS) for in-process thickness determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankel, J.; Doxbeck, M.; Schroeder, S. C.; Abbate, A.

    1994-02-01

    A Computerized Ultrasonic Testing System (CUTS) was developed to measure, in real-time, the rate of deposition and thickness of chromium plated on the inside of thick steel tubes. The measurements are made from the outside of the tubes with the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. The resolution of the system is 2.5 micron. (0.0001 in.) and the accuracy is better than 10 micron (0.0004 in.). The thickness is measured using six transducers mounted at different locations on the tube. In addition, two transducers are mounted on two reference standards, thereby allowing the system to be continuously calibrated. The tube temperature varies during the process, thus the input from eight thermocouples, located at the measurement sites, is used to calculate and compensate for the change in return time of the ultrasonic echo due to the temperature dependence of the sound velocity. CUTS is applicable to any commercial process where real-time change of thickness of a sample has to be known, with the advantage of facilitating increased efficiency and of improving process control.

  17. The role of computerized modeling and simulation in the development of life support system technologies.

    PubMed

    Modell, M; Evanich, P; Chen, C C; Anavi, S; Mai, J

    1989-01-01

    Using conventional means of process development, it would take decades and hundreds of millions of dollars to develop technology for recycling of water and solid waste for lunar missions within the next thirty years. Since we anticipate neither that amount of time nor level of funding, new methodologies for developing life support systems (LSS) technologies are essential. Computerized modeling and simulation (CMAS) is a tool that can greatly reduce both the time and cost of technology development. By CMAS, we refer to computer methods for correlating, storing and retrieving property data for chemical species and for solving the phenomenological equations of physical/chemical processes (i.e., process conditions based on properties of materials and mass and energy balances, equipment sizing based on rate processes and the governing equations for unit operations). In particular, CMAS systems can be used to evaluate a LSS process design with minimal requirements for laboratory experimentation. A CMAS model using ASPEN PLUS is presented for a vapor compression distillation (VCD) system designed for reclaiming water from urine. PMID:11537381

  18. Computerized method and system for designing an aerodynamic focusing lens stack

    DOEpatents

    Gard, Eric; Riot, Vincent; Coffee, Keith; Woods, Bruce; Tobias, Herbert; Birch, Jim; Weisgraber, Todd

    2011-11-22

    A computerized method and system for designing an aerodynamic focusing lens stack, using input from a designer related to, for example, particle size range to be considered, characteristics of the gas to be flowed through the system, the upstream temperature and pressure at the top of a first focusing lens, the flow rate through the aerodynamic focusing lens stack equivalent at atmosphere pressure; and a Stokes number range. Based on the design parameters, the method and system determines the total number of focusing lenses and their respective orifice diameters required to focus the particle size range to be considered, by first calculating for the orifice diameter of the first focusing lens in the Stokes formula, and then using that value to determine, in iterative fashion, intermediate flow values which are themselves used to determine the orifice diameters of each succeeding focusing lens in the stack design, with the results being output to a designer. In addition, the Reynolds numbers associated with each focusing lens as well as exit nozzle size may also be determined to enhance the stack design.

  19. Computerized Ultrasonic Testing System (CUTS) for in-process thickness determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankel, J.; Doxbeck, M.; Schroeder, S. C.; Abbate, A.

    1994-01-01

    A Computerized Ultrasonic Testing System (CUTS) was developed to measure, in real-time, the rate of deposition and thickness of chromium plated on the inside of thick steel tubes. The measurements are made from the outside of the tubes with the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. The resolution of the system is 2.5 micron. (0.0001 in.) and the accuracy is better than 10 micron (0.0004 in.). The thickness is measured using six transducers mounted at different locations on the tube. In addition, two transducers are mounted on two reference standards, thereby allowing the system to be continuously calibrated. The tube temperature varies during the process, thus the input from eight thermocouples, located at the measurement sites, is used to calculate and compensate for the change in return time of the ultrasonic echo due to the temperature dependence of the sound velocity. CUTS is applicable to any commercial process where real-time change of thickness of a sample has to be known, with the advantage of facilitating increased efficiency and of improving process control.

  20. FDDI information management system for centralizing interactive, computerized multimedia clinical experiences in pediatric rheumatology/Immunology.

    PubMed

    Rouhani, R; Cronenberger, H; Stein, L; Hannum, W; Reed, A M; Wilhelm, C; Hsiao, H

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the design, authoring, and development of interactive, computerized, multimedia clinical simulations in pediatric rheumatology/immunology and related musculoskeletal diseases, the development and implementation of a high speed information management system for their centralized storage and distribution, and analytical methods for evaluating the total system's educational impact on medical students and pediatric residents. An FDDI fiber optic network with client/server/host architecture is the core. The server houses digitized audio, still-image video clips and text files. A host station houses the DB2/2 database containing case-associated labels and information. Cases can be accessed from any workstation via a customized interface in AVA/2 written specifically for this application. OS/2 Presentation Manager controls, written in C, are incorporated into the interface. This interface allows SQL searches and retrievals of cases and case materials. In addition to providing user-directed clinical experiences, this centralized information management system provides designated faculty with the ability to add audio notes and visual pointers to image files. Users may browse through case materials, mark selected ones and download them for utilization in lectures or for editing and converting into 35mm slides. PMID:8591407

  1. Evaluation of computerized physician order entry system-a satisfaction survey in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yui, Bey-Hwa; Jim, Wai-Tim; Chen, Marcelo; Hsu, Jong-Ming; Liu, Chieh-Yu; Lee, Ting-Ting

    2012-12-01

    In the rapidly developing world of information technology, computers have been used in various settings for clinical medicine application. Studies have focused on computerized physician order entry (CPOE) system interface design and functional development to achieve a successful technology adoption process. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate physician satisfaction with the CPOE system. This survey included user attitude toward interface design, operation functions/usage effectiveness, interface usability, and user satisfaction. We used questionnaires for data collection from June to August 2008, and 225 valid questionnaires were returned with a response rate of 84.5 %. Canonical correlation was applied to explore the relationship of personal attributes and usability with user satisfaction. The results of the data analysis revealed that certain demographic groups showed higher acceptance and satisfaction levels, especially residents, those with less pressure when using computers or those with less experience with the CPOE systems. Additionally, computer use pressure and usability were the best predictors of user satisfaction. Based on the study results, it is suggested that future CPOE development should focus on interface design and content links, as well as providing educational training programs for the new users; since a learning curve period should be considered as an indespensible factor for CPOE adoption. PMID:22549624

  2. Reducing drug–herb interaction risk with a computerized reminder system

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Sheng-Shing; Tsai, Chiu-Lin; Tu, Ching-Yeh; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Background Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and Western medicine are both popular in Taiwan. Approximately 14.1% of Taiwanese residents use Western drugs and Chinese herbs concurrently; therefore, drug–herb interaction is critical to patient safety. This paper presents a new procedure for reducing the risk of drug interactions. Methods Hospital computer systems are modified to ensure that drug–herb interactions are automatically detected when a TCM practitioner is writing a prescription. A pop-up reminder appears, warning of interactions, and the practitioner may adjust doses, delete herbs, or leave the prescription unchanged. A pharmacist will receive interaction information through the system and provide health education to the patient. Results During the 2011–2013 study period, 256 patients received 891 herbal prescriptions with potential drug–herb interactions. Three of the 50 patients who concurrently used ginseng and antidiabetic drugs manifested hypoglycemia (fasting blood sugar level ≤70 mg/dL). Conclusion Drug–herb interactions can cause adverse reactions. A computerized reminder system can enable TCM practitioners to reduce the risk of drug–herb interactions. In addition, health education for patients is crucial in avoiding adverse reaction by the interactions. PMID:25733840

  3. A modified conjugate gradient method based on the Tikhonov system for computerized tomography (CT).

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Wang, Huaxiang

    2011-04-01

    During the past few decades, computerized tomography (CT) was widely used for non-destructive testing (NDT) and non-destructive examination (NDE) in the industrial area because of its characteristics of non-invasiveness and visibility. Recently, CT technology has been applied to multi-phase flow measurement. Using the principle of radiation attenuation measurements along different directions through the investigated object with a special reconstruction algorithm, cross-sectional information of the scanned object can be worked out. It is a typical inverse problem and has always been a challenge for its nonlinearity and ill-conditions. The Tikhonov regulation method is widely used for similar ill-posed problems. However, the conventional Tikhonov method does not provide reconstructions with qualities good enough, the relative errors between the reconstructed images and the real distribution should be further reduced. In this paper, a modified conjugate gradient (CG) method is applied to a Tikhonov system (MCGT method) for reconstructing CT images. The computational load is dominated by the number of independent measurements m, and a preconditioner is imported to lower the condition number of the Tikhonov system. Both simulation and experiment results indicate that the proposed method can reduce the computational time and improve the quality of image reconstruction. PMID:21129739

  4. PROMIS in Primary Care: Demonstration of a Computerized Problem-Oriented Medical Information System in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Powell, H.; Davis, E.; Wolf, L.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a computerized PROMIS (Problem Oriented Medical Information System) at the Champlain Islands Health Center, a Rural Health Initiative Project, in Grand Isle County, Vermont. The goal of the contract with the National Center for Health Services Research was to develop a well defined, computerized and coordinated system of care that would provide a mid-level provider staff with guidance, as they practice health care in a rural, isolated county. The conceptualization of this technology as a method to meet the needs of rural health care, a brief description of POMR (Problem Oriented Medical Records) and the technological aspects of the system will all be addressed in this paper.

  5. Adaptive Computerized Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Roger D.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes an artificially intelligent multimedia computerized instruction system capable of developing a conceptual image of what a student is learning while the student is learning it. It focuses on principles of learning and adaptive behavioral control systems theory upon which the system is designed and demonstrates multiple user modes.…

  6. The computerized notation system: a portable, self-contained system for entry of physicians' and nurses' notes.

    PubMed

    Ash, S R; Mertz, S L; Ulrich, D K

    1983-01-01

    The Computerized Notation System (CNS) is a portable microprocessor system designed for use in outpatient clinics, hospital wards, and intensive care units. It can produce essentially all written communications required of both physicians and nurses, with printout at the bedside or in the clinic examining room. It is designed to ameliorate several problems which have limited direct computer entry by physicians and nurses (keyboard and processor access, marginal typing skills, lack of immediate printout, and logical restriction of menu choices). The system encourages and simplifies use of the problem-oriented approach to the patient, by producing organized, legible daily notes and patient summaries. Printouts of the system are compatible with the present hospital and clinic "paper charts." Clinical trials have confirmed the applicability, variability, and acceptability of the CNS in both hospital and outpatient practice. PMID:10295287

  7. Human Factors and Technical Considerations for a Computerized Operator Support System Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Thomas Anthony; Lew, Roger Thomas; Medema, Heather Dawne; Boring, Ronald Laurids; Thomas, Kenneth David

    2015-09-01

    A prototype computerized operator support system (COSS) has been developed in order to demonstrate the concept and provide a test bed for further research. The prototype is based on four underlying elements consisting of a digital alarm system, computer-based procedures, PI&D system representations, and a recommender module for mitigation actions. At this point, the prototype simulates an interface to a sensor validation module and a fault diagnosis module. These two modules will be fully integrated in the next version of the prototype. The initial version of the prototype is now operational at the Idaho National Laboratory using the U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Human Systems Simulation Laboratory (HSSL). The HSSL is a full-scope, full-scale glass top simulator capable of simulating existing and future nuclear power plant main control rooms. The COSS is interfaced to the Generic Pressurized Water Reactor (gPWR) simulator with industry-typical control board layouts. The glass top panels display realistic images of the control boards that can be operated by touch gestures. A section of the simulated control board was dedicated to the COSS human-system interface (HSI), which resulted in a seamless integration of the COSS into the normal control room environment. A COSS demonstration scenario has been developed for the prototype involving the Chemical & Volume Control System (CVCS) of the PWR simulator. It involves a primary coolant leak outside of containment that would require tripping the reactor if not mitigated in a very short timeframe. The COSS prototype presents a series of operator screens that provide the needed information and soft controls to successfully mitigate the event.

  8. A computerized tank system for studying the effect of temperature on calcification of reef organisms.

    PubMed

    Abramovitch-Gottlib, Liat; Katoshevski, David; Vago, Razi

    2002-01-01

    Mediated by algal symbionts, calcification in reef building corals is one of the important processes, which enable coral's growth. In the present study, we used a buoyant weighing technique to study calcification of two coralline species, Stylophora pistillata and the hydrocoral Millepora dichotoma. The colonies were grown in a tank system, in which light, nutrition and water motion were kept constant and temperature was elevated by means of a computerized controlled apparatus. An almost constant rate of calcification was observed in the two species at 22-28 degrees C. Elevation of the temperature above this range to 29-31 degrees C caused a slow down in calcification in both species. A grater number of S. pistillata colonies became bleached at temperatures of >or=29 degrees C, whereas M. dichotoma colonies suffered from bleaching only after three days at 31 degrees C. For both species, control groups, remained viable during the experimental period. The differences in responses to changes in temperature of the two species may be as a consequence of different adaptive mechanisms or to different susceptibilities of the corals to elevated temperatures. We have shown that elevating temperatures above annual maximal ranges have a significant effect on coral calcification. We also demonstrated that sessile calcified marine organisms having ecological and biomedical significance could be cultured and manipulated under laboratory conditions. PMID:11741711

  9. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System (CAIRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Briscoe, G.J.

    1993-06-07

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System (CAIRS) is a comprehensive data base containing more than 50,000 investigation reports of injury/illness, property damage and vehicle accident cases representing safety data from 1975 to the present for more than 150 DOE contractor organizations. A special feature is that the text of each accident report is translated using a controlled dictionary and rigid sentence structure called Factor Relationship and Sequence of Events (FRASE) that enhances the ability to retrieve specific types of information and to perform detailed analyses. DOE summary and individual contractor reports are prepared quarterly and annually. In addition, ``Safety Performance Profile`` reports for individual organizations are prepared to provide advance information to appraisal teams, and special topical reports are prepared for areas of concern such as an increase in the number of security injuries or environmental releases. The data base is open to all DOE and Contractor registered users with no access restrictions other than that required by the Privacy Act.

  10. Information security risk management for computerized health information systems in hospitals: a case study of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Javad; Sadoughi, Farahnaz

    2016-01-01

    Background In recent years, hospitals in Iran – similar to those in other countries – have experienced growing use of computerized health information systems (CHISs), which play a significant role in the operations of hospitals. But, the major challenge of CHIS use is information security. This study attempts to evaluate CHIS information security risk management at hospitals of Iran. Materials and methods This applied study is a descriptive and cross-sectional research that has been conducted in 2015. The data were collected from 551 hospitals of Iran. Based on literature review, experts’ opinion, and observations at five hospitals, our intensive questionnaire was designed to assess security risk management for CHISs at the concerned hospitals, which was then sent to all hospitals in Iran by the Ministry of Health. Results Sixty-nine percent of the studied hospitals pursue information security policies and procedures in conformity with Iran Hospitals Accreditation Standards. At some hospitals, risk identification, risk evaluation, and risk estimation, as well as risk treatment, are unstructured without any specified approach or methodology. There is no significant structured approach to risk management at the studied hospitals. Conclusion Information security risk management is not followed by Iran’s hospitals and their information security policies. This problem can cause a large number of challenges for their CHIS security in future. Therefore, Iran’s Ministry of Health should develop practical policies to improve information security risk management in the hospitals of Iran. PMID:27313481

  11. Comments by a peer review panel on the computerized radiological risk investigation system (CRRIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.

    1988-08-01

    This document represents the comprehensive review by experts of the documents describing the models, computer programs, and data bases making up the Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System (CRRIS). The CRRIS methodology has been produced for the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Office of Radiation Programs (ORP) by the Health and Safety Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to assess the significance of releases of radioactive material from facilities handling such materials. The comments covered a wide range of aspects of the CRRIS models. Special review topics covered were uncertainty, validation, verification, and health effects. The reports making up the CRRIS documentation were reviewed in detail. The following are some of the more frequent comments about the methodology. This is a very comprehensive work, but too complex and hard to use. Too little explanation of some of the assumptions taken such as variance from standard ICRP organ weighting factors. Overly complex model for soil to root transfer and interception fraction. Gaussian plume model was used, when more state-of-art models are available. 35 refs.

  12. Semiautomated computerized system for fracture assessment of spinal x-ray films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Jill C.; Heyano, Scott L.; Yaffe, Laurence G.; von Ingersleben, Gabriel; Chestnut, Charles H., III

    1996-04-01

    This report describes a computerized system for assisting with the image analysis of digitized spine x-ray films. It was developed for vertebral height assessment (morphometry), a procedure widely used in research and clinical trials of spinal osteoporosis. Good image presentation is important for effective, interactive analysis of x-ray images, and was achieved by using a 12-bit color map for the image display. This provides virtually instantaneous updating of image display parameters even with large (4 - 10 MB) image files. The software has both semi-automated and automated features, and is integrated with a relational database for the storage and retrieval of images and textual information. It contains an on-line tutorial and facilities for later review and editing of the analyzed data. An active contour model for obtaining additional indices of vertebral fracture has been incorporated, and is undergoing further development. We discuss the organization of the analysis software, the database and on-line tutorial, and present some of the details of the implementation of the active contour model.

  13. Computerized interactive morphometry. An expert system for the diagnosis of lymphoid-rich effusions.

    PubMed

    Walts, A E; Marchevsky, A M

    1989-12-01

    The authors present experimental techniques for the diagnosis of malignant lymphoma and benign lymphocytosis in lymphoid-rich effusions with the use of an inexpensive microcomputer-based video system for computerized interactive morphometry (CIM). Lymphoid cells were randomly selected by a trained observer from real-time images of Papanicolaou-fixed and -stained cytospin smears prepared from pleural, peritoneal, or pericardial effusions. The lymphoid cells were classified by the instrument, based on the size and shape of their nuclear profiles. The morphometric data collected by the instrument were interpreted by a simple rule-based expert system that classified the smears as benign or malignant. One hundred four cases, including 28 malignant lymphomas, 63 benign lymphocytoses, 8 chronic lymphocytic leukemias, and 5 cases with incomplete immunopathologic data, were studied retrospectively. Sixty-three of these effusions had been stained to detect light chain monoclonality. Ninety-one effusions were correctly classified by the expert system. There were four potential false negative diagnoses and one potential false positive diagnosis by the CIM system. Eight effusions from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) were consistently classified as benign. Although the author's series of patients with a history of CLL is small, their results suggest that CIM is unsuitable for the diagnosis of malignancy in these effusions. If only those effusions from patients with a history of CLL are excluded, the predictive value of a diagnosis of malignant lymphoma was 96.5%, whereas the predictive value of a diagnosis of benign lymphocytosis was 94.0%. PMID:2686396

  14. DARE: Unesco Computerized Data Retrieval System for Documentation in the Social and Human Sciences (Including an Analysis of the Present System).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasarhelyi, Paul

    The new data retrieval system for the social sciences which has recently been installed in the UNESCO Secretariat in Paris is described in this comprehensive report. The computerized system is designed to facilitate the existing storage systems in the circulation of information, data retrieval, and indexing services. Basically, this report…

  15. Testing primates with joystick-based automated apparatus - Lessons from the Language Research Center's Computerized Test System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, David A.; Rumbaugh, Duane M.

    1992-01-01

    Nonhuman primates provide useful models for studying a variety of medical, biological, and behavioral topics. Four years of joystick-based automated testing of monkeys using the Language Research Center's Computerized Test System (LRC-CTS) are examined to derive hints and principles for comparable testing with other species - including humans. The results of multiple parametric studies are reviewed, and reliability data are presented to reveal the surprises and pitfalls associated with video-task testing of performance.

  16. Human factors analysis and design methods for nuclear waste retrieval systems. Volume IV. Computerized Event-Tree Analysis Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Deretsky, Z.; Casey, S.M.

    1980-08-01

    This document contains a program listing and brief description of CETAT, the Computerized Event-Tree Analysis Technique. CETAT was developed to serve as a tool for developing, organizing, and analyzing operator-initiated event probabilities associated with the tasks required during the retrieval of spent fuel canisters. The principal uses of CETAT in the waste retrieval development project will be to develop models of system reliability and evaluate alternative equipment designs and operator tasks.

  17. Computerized Placement Tests: Background Readings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Entrance Examination Board, Princeton, NJ.

    This document is a compilation of background readings for the user of Computerized Placement Tests (CPTs) developed by the College Board for student placement purposes. CPTs are computerized adaptive tests that test the individual abilities and backgrounds of examinees. CPTs are part of the ACCUPLACER student information management system. The…

  18. Computerized Numerical Control Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reneau, Fred; And Others

    This guide is intended for use in a course in programming and operating a computerized numerical control system. Addressed in the course are various aspects of programming and planning, setting up, and operating machines with computerized numerical control, including selecting manual or computer-assigned programs and matching them with…

  19. The Language Research Center's Computerized Test System for environmental enrichment and psychological assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, D. A.; Rumbaugh, D. M.; Richardson, W. K.

    1992-01-01

    In the spring of 1987, we undertook to provide environmental enrichment to nonhuman primate subjects in ways that would complement and even contribute to the bio-behaviorial science that justified the monkeys' captivity. Of course, the psychological well-being of captive primates--and indeed all research species-- has been an area of intense research activity since the 1985 amendment of the Animal Welfare Act. This mandate for researchers to ensure the psychological, as well as physical, fitness of experimental animals catalyzed the humane and scientific interests of the research community. The contemporary literature is replete with proposed means both of assaying and of providing enrichment and well-being. Notwithstanding, consensus on either assessment or intervention has yet to be reached. The paradigm we employed was modelled after successful efforts with chimpanzees. An automated test system was constructed in which subjects responded to computer tasks by manipulating a joystick. The tasks, interactive game-like versions of many of the classic testing paradigms of cognitive and comparative psychology, permitted the controlled presentation of stimuli and demands without the required presence of a human experimenter. Despite significant barriers to the success, rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and a variety of other primate species (including, of course, humans) have mastered the skills necessary for testing in this paradigm. Previous experiments have illustrated the utility of the test system for addressing questions of learning, memory, attention, perception, and motivation. Additional data have been reported to support the contention that the Language Research Center's Computerized Test System (LRC-CTS) serves its other raison d'etre--providing environmental enrichment and assessing psychological well-being. This paper is designed to augment previous descriptions of the technology and the paradigm for scientists and caretakers interested in environmental

  20. Build Your Own Inventory System. Annual Cost: $100.00 (Approximate). Fixed Assets, Materials and Supplies. The Practical Elements for a Computerized, Continuing Inventory System in Schools and Use in Determining a Measure for Instructional Cost.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Arnold, Comp.

    This publication presents performance flow charts and other accompanying forms that are elements of an economical computerized continuing inventory system. The system described here is intended to serve school systems as an adequate fixed asset system and to provide a computerized inventory model that offers support for costs of future educational…

  1. Exploring Pedagogy with Interactive Whiteboards in Australian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney, Matthew; Schuck, Sandy

    2008-01-01

    This research project investigated the use of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) in K-12 education. Exploration of the use of IWBs in six different school settings provided insights into the activities, approaches, roles and beliefs of students and teachers in a range of primary and secondary class contexts and discipline areas. The study was informed…

  2. Revealing Significant Learning Moments with Interactive Whiteboards in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Catherine D.; McPherson, Richard; Sabeti, Farhad Mordy; Flynn, Tara

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify when and how the interactive whiteboard (IWB) functioned as a productive tool that impacted student learning in mathematics. Using video data, field notes, and interview transcripts from 1 school year in two optimal case study classrooms, we were able to examine the unique opportunities afforded by the size of…

  3. Integration of Interactive Whiteboard in Swedish Preschool Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourbour, Maryam; Vigmo, Sylvi; Samuelsson, Ingrid Pramling

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at exploring the roles preschool teachers give technologies in mathematics education and the ways they structure their mathematics learning activities using interactive whiteboard (IWB) as a technological artefact. Data collected from observations of three preschool teachers embedding IWB in a preschool practice in Sweden provided…

  4. Shared Cognition Facilitated by Teacher Use of Interactive Whiteboard Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redman, Christine; Vincent, John Terence

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine questioning opportunities afforded by interactive whiteboards (IWBs) by highlighting pedagogical decisions enacted by teachers to ensure that they work with the wider affordances of the device. Design/Methodology/Approach: Three primary/elementary teachers participated in a study designed to…

  5. Understanding the Use of Interactive Whiteboards in Primary Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Trudy

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the dimensions of change experienced by a specialist primary science teacher in Australia as she attempted to embed an interactive whiteboard into her practice as a tool to enhance interactive teaching and learning. This paper uses the theoretical frameworks of activity theory and the stages of concern to understand the…

  6. Shared Cognition Facilitated by Teacher Use of Interactive Whiteboard Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redman, Christine; Vincent, John

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a study designed to examine the dialogic processes teachers used to sustain focused discussions, using questioning techniques and Interactive Whiteboards (IWBs). IWBs and their related technologies such as plasma touch screens and projected tablets have passed through several phases of implementation as classroom objects,…

  7. Interactive Whiteboards and Implications for Use in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Danita C.

    2013-01-01

    Interactive whiteboards (IWBs) have increasingly become a technology tool used in the educational field. IWBs are touch-sensitive screens that work in conjunction with a computer and a projector, and which are used to display information from a computer. As a qualitative case study, this study investigated the SMART Board-infused instructional…

  8. Easy Implementation of Internet-Based Whiteboard Physics Tutorials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The requirement for a method of capturing problem solving on a whiteboard for later replay stems from my teaching load, which includes two classes of first-year university general physics, each with relatively large class sizes of approximately 80-100 students. Most university-level teachers value one-to-one interaction with the students and find…

  9. Lutheran School Teachers' Instructional Usage of the Interactive Whiteboard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Jillian R.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed methods study was twofold. First, the study assessed whether Davis' (1989) Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) was useful in predicting instructional usage of the interactive whiteboard (IWB), as reported by K-8 teachers. Second, the study set out to understand what motivated those teachers to use the IWB for classroom…

  10. Children's Perceptions of Learning with an Interactive Whiteboard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yanez, Lorena; Coyle, Yvette

    2011-01-01

    The appearance of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) in schools in Britain and other parts of the world has been accompanied by research that attempts to analyse their effects on teaching and learning processes. The majority of studies to date have been carried out in schools in England in mainstream numeracy and literacy classes. The present paper…

  11. Interactive Whiteboards: Creating Higher-Level, Technological Thinkers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacina, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Across the United States, many school districts are investing large sums of money to install interactive whiteboards (IWBs) in classrooms. For example, the Fort Worth Independent School District (FWISD) aims to become a "digital district" by installing IWBs into 5,000 classrooms over the next two years. This particular implementation of IWB…

  12. SMARTer Music Teaching: Interactive Whiteboard Use in Music Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Karin K.

    2009-01-01

    Interactive whiteboard use is rapidly becoming a popular and effective teaching tool in classrooms; this article explores specific uses within music classrooms. Not only do these boards prepare students to function in a technological world, they offer myriad creative uses within the music classroom, allowing for enhanced interaction, instruction,…

  13. Teachers' Attitudes toward Using Interactive Whiteboards in English Language Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gashan, Amani K.; Alshumaimeri, Yousif A.

    2015-01-01

    Educational technology plays an increasingly important role in the teaching and learning process. Successful integration is the goal of any new educational technology. The interactive whiteboard (IWB) can be effectively used by teachers to enhance the effectiveness of their lessons. This study explored the attitudes and insights of Saudi female…

  14. Perceptions of the Effectiveness of Interactive Whiteboards on Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Robin J.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of interactive whiteboards on student engagement. Perceptions from 108 middle school students and one middle school teacher were analyzed to answer the research question: What are the perceptions of middle school students and one middle school teacher regarding student engagement during lessons using an…

  15. Interactivity and the Digital Whiteboard: Weaving the Fabric of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haldane, Maureen

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the interactive whiteboard as a unique teaching and learning medium and explores the distinctive pedagogy that is emerging as its functionality continues to be exploited by increasing numbers of teachers. It draws on Kozma's studies of the characteristics of other learning media and how these define pedagogic opportunities to…

  16. An Interactive Whiteboard Student Survey: Development, Validity and Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turel, Yalin Kilic

    2011-01-01

    The interactive whiteboard (IWB) has become a popular technology for instructors over the last decade. Though research asserts that the IWBs facilitate learning in different ways, there is a lack of studies examining actual IWB use in classroom settings based on learners' perspectives by means of valid instruments. The purpose of this study is to…

  17. Intercepting Wrong-Patient Orders in a Computerized Provider Order Entry System

    PubMed Central

    Green, Robert A; Hripcsak, George; Salmasian, Hojjat; Lazar, Eliot J; Bostwick, Susan B; Bakken, Suzanne R; Vawdrey, David K

    2014-01-01

    Study Objective We evaluated the short- and long-term impact of a computerized provider entry (CPOE)-based patient verification intervention to reduce wrong-patient orders in five emergency departments. Methods A patient verification dialog appeared at the beginning of each ordering session, requiring providers to confirm the patient's identity after a mandatory 2.5–second delay. Using the retract-and-reorder technique, we estimated the rate of wrong-patient orders before and after the implementation of the intervention to intercept these errors. We conducted a short- and long-term quasi-experimental study with both historical and parallel controls. We also measured the amount of time providers spent addressing the verification system, and reasons for discontinuing ordering sessions as a result of the intervention. Results Wrong-patient orders were reduced by 30% immediately after implementation of the intervention. This reduction persisted when using inpatients as a parallel control. After two years, the rate of wrong-patient orders remained 24.8% less than before intervention. The mean viewing time of the patient verification dialog was 4.2 seconds (SD = 4.0), and was longer when providers indicated they placed the order for the wrong patient (4.9 versus 4.1 seconds). Although the display of each dialog took only seconds, the large number of display episodes triggered meant that the physician time to prevent each retract-and-reorder event was 1.5 hours. Conclusion A CPOE-based patient verification system led to a moderate reduction in wrong-patient orders that was sustained over time. Interception of wrong-patient orders at the time of entry is an important step in reducing these errors. PMID:25534652

  18. Student Persistence Patterns: A Computerized System for Monitoring Enrollment. AIR Forum 1982 Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Dyk, Jane M.; Kerstein, Dianne

    The design and development of a computerized student flow model at Eastern Montana College and its use in monitoring student enrollment are considered. In addition, guidelines are presented for adapting a flow model to the dimensions of a particular institution. Particular emphasis is given to reviewing the criteria that researchers should use…

  19. Validating a Computerized Scoring System for Assessing Writing and Placing Students in Composition Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Cindy L.

    2006-01-01

    How do scores from writing samples generated by computerized essay scorers compare to those generated by ''untrained'' human scorers and what combination of scores, if any, is more accurate at placing students in composition courses? This study endeavored to answer this two-part question by evaluating the correspondence between writing sample…

  20. Learning with Interactive Whiteboards: Determining the Factors on Promoting Interactive Whiteboards to Students by Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilic, Eylem; Güler, Çetin; Çelik, H. Eray; Tatli, Cemal

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the factors which might affect the intention to use interactive whiteboards (IWBs) by university students, using Technology Acceptance Model by the structural equation modeling approach. The following hypothesis guided the current study: H1. There is a positive relationship between IWB…

  1. Effects of Instruction with Interactive Whiteboards versus Instruction without Interactive Whiteboards on End-of-Course Test Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Kendra J.

    2010-01-01

    This study addressed the implementation of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) on academic achievement in a Georgia public high school. The researcher studied the effects of the implementation of IWBs on Georgia's end-of-course test (EOCT) scores and satisfaction of students with this method of instruction. The researcher compared EOCT scores of a…

  2. Cost-Effectiveness of a Computerized Provider Order Entry System in Improving Medication Safety Ambulatory Care

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, Sara H.; Hepp, Zsolt; Roth, Joshua A.; Wirtz, Heidi S.; Devine, Emily Beth

    2014-01-01

    Background Computerized provider order entry (CPOE) is the process of entering physician orders directly into an electronic health record. Although CPOE has been shown to improve medication safety and reduce health care costs, these improvements have been demonstrated largely in the inpatient setting; the cost-effectiveness in the ambulatory setting remains uncertain. Objective The objective was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of CPOE in reducing medication errors and adverse drug events (ADEs) in the ambulatory setting. Methods We created a decision-analytic model to estimate the cost-effectiveness of CPOE in a midsized (400 providers) multidisciplinary medical group over a 5-year time horizon— 2010 to 2014— the time frame during which health systems are implementing CPOE to meet Meaningful Use criteria. We adopted the medical group’s perspective and utilized their costs, changes in efficiency, and actual number of medication errors and ADEs. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted. Scenario analyses were explored. Results In the base case, CPOE dominated paper prescribing, that is, CPOE cost $18 million less than paper prescribing, and was associated with 1.5 million and 14,500 fewer medication errors and ADEs, respectively, over 5 years. In the scenario that reflected a practice group of five providers, CPOE cost $265,000 less than paper prescribing, was associated with 3875 and 39 fewer medication errors and ADEs, respectively, over 5 years, and was dominant in 80% of the simulations. Conclusions Our model suggests that the adoption of CPOE in the ambulatory setting provides excellent value for the investment, and is a cost-effective strategy to improve medication safety over a wide range of practice sizes. PMID:24968993

  3. The CloudBoard Research Platform: an interactive whiteboard for corporate users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrus, John; Schwartz, Edward L.

    2013-03-01

    Over one million interactive whiteboards (IWBs) are sold annually worldwide, predominantly for classroom use with few sales for corporate use. Unmet needs for IWB corporate use were investigated and the CloudBoard Research Platform (CBRP) was developed to investigate and test technology for meeting these needs. The CBRP supports audio conferencing with shared remote drawing activity, casual capture of whiteboard activity for long-term storage and retrieval, use of standard formats such as PDF for easy import of documents via the web and email and easy export of documents. Company RFID badges and key fobs provide secure access to documents at the board and automatic logout occurs after a period of inactivity. Users manage their documents with a web browser. Analytics and remote device management is provided for administrators. The IWB hardware consists of off-the-shelf components (a Hitachi UST Projector, SMART Technologies, Inc. IWB hardware, Mac Mini, Polycom speakerphone, etc.) and a custom occupancy sensor. The three back-end servers provide the web interface, document storage, stroke and audio streaming. Ease of use, security, and robustness sufficient for internal adoption was achieved. Five of the 10 boards installed at various Ricoh sites have been in daily or weekly use for the past year and total system downtime was less than an hour in 2012. Since CBRP was installed, 65 registered users, 9 of whom use the system regularly, have created over 2600 documents.

  4. Interactive whiteboards in third grade science instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivers, Grier

    Strategies have been put into place to affect improvement in science achievement, including the use of Interactive Whiteboards (IWBs) in science instruction. IWBs enable rich resources, appropriate pacing, and multimodal presentation of content deemed as best practices. Professional development experiences, use of resources, instructional practices, and changes in professional behavior in science teachers were recorded. Also recorded were differences in the engagement and motivation of students in IWB classrooms versus IWB-free classrooms and observed differences in students' problem solving, critical thinking, and collaboration. Using a mixed-method research design quantitative data were collected to identify achievement levels of the target population on the assumption that all students, regardless of ability, will achieve greater mastery of science content in IWB classrooms. Qualitative data were collected through observations, interviews, videotapes, and a survey to identify how IWBs lead to increased achievement in third grade classrooms and to develop a record of teachers' professional practices, and students' measures of engagement and motivation. Comparative techniques determined whether science instruction is more effective in IWB classroom than in IWB-free classrooms. The qualitative findings concluded that, compared to science teachers who work in IWB-free settings, elementary science teachers who used IWBs incorporated more resources to accommodate learning objectives and the varied abilities and learning styles of their students. They assessed student understanding more frequently and perceived their classrooms as more collaborative and interactive. Furthermore, they displayed willingness to pursue professional development and employed different engagement strategies. Finally, teachers who used IWBs supported more instances of critical thinking and problem-solving. Quantitative findings concluded that students of all ability levels were more motivated

  5. An integrated nursing-pharmacy approach to a computerized medication dispensing/administration system.

    PubMed

    Cook, A A

    1985-05-01

    This paper describes the collaborative efforts of the nursing and pharmacy departments to develop a nurse-generated/pharmacist-verified computerized medication administration record (MAR). The objectives were to improve accuracy in dispensing and administering medications and a avoid duplicate labor efforts created by separate records to dispense and to administer the medications. These efforts provided the nurses with an accurate record to administer the medication and the physicians with an informative record with which to review their patient's drug therapy. PMID:10271106

  6. Computerized leak training

    SciTech Connect

    Parella, C.; Monroe, A.

    1985-11-01

    Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation's computerized leak detection training system is discussed. The system is able to simulate gas leak situations by means of a computer. The training setup includes actual visual display via slides of houses represented on a plotting board; computer with plotter board in front that simulates an area and various leakage situations; a typical handheld CGI; and a control pad for the computer. The training system has filled a valuable need in the area of emergency training.

  7. Design of a computerized system for the retrospective analysis by the physician of his own drug prescriptions.

    PubMed

    Liu, J H; Venot, A

    2001-01-01

    The quality of drug prescription is known to be poor in many medical domains. Feedback information may help the physician to improve this component of his medical activity. The increasing use of computerized drug prescription systems makes possible the retrospective processing of prescriptions made over a given time period. This paper describes the design of a computerized system for providing feedback information to the physician about the quality of his drug prescribing activity. It is designed to be used by the physician himself. The analysis is based on two groups of quantitative indicators, simple and composite. The constraints that must be satisfied to calculate these indices automatically are given. They are related to the coding systems used for drug prescription, knowledge on drugs and patient data. The system design is based on modeling according to UML formalism. We give also a concrete view of the main functions of the system, based on a pictorial illustration with a component of the user interface. Some limitations and the possible extensions of this system for analyzing simultaneously the prescriptions made by set of physicians are discussed. PMID:11604915

  8. The CADSS design automation system. [computerized design language for small digital systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franke, E. A.

    1973-01-01

    This research was designed to implement and extend a previously defined design automation system for the design of small digital structures. A description is included of the higher level language developed to describe systems as a sequence of register transfer operations. The system simulator which is used to determine if the original description is correct is also discussed. The design automation system produces tables describing the state transistions of the system and the operation of all registers. In addition all Boolean equations specifying system operation are minimized and converted to NAND gate structures. Suggestions for further extensions to the system are also given.

  9. Can utilizing a computerized provider order entry (CPOE) system prevent hospital medical errors and adverse drug events?

    PubMed

    Charles, Krista; Cannon, Margaret; Hall, Robert; Coustasse, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems allow physicians to prescribe patient services electronically. In hospitals, CPOE essentially eliminates the need for handwritten paper orders and achieves cost savings through increased efficiency. The purpose of this research study was to examine the benefits of and barriers to CPOE adoption in hospitals to determine the effects on medical errors and adverse drug events (ADEs) and examine cost and savings associated with the implementation of this newly mandated technology. This study followed a methodology using the basic principles of a systematic review and referenced 50 sources. CPOE systems in hospitals were found to be capable of reducing medical errors and ADEs, especially when CPOE systems are bundled with clinical decision support systems designed to alert physicians and other healthcare providers of pending lab or medical errors. However, CPOE systems face major barriers associated with adoption in a hospital system, mainly high implementation costs and physicians' resistance to change. PMID:25593568

  10. Development of computerized materials, protection, control and accountability systems in the former Soviet republics: a joint effort

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteson, R.; Ryan, R.H.; Seitz, S.; Landry, R.P.

    1996-07-01

    The laboratory-to-laboratory programs of cooperation between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Institutes of the Russian Federation and the government-to-government programs between the US and Russia have the goal of reducing the danger of nuclear weapons proliferation by strengthening systems of nuclear materials protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A). As part of these programs, DOE is making available to sites in the former Soviet Republics a new-generation nuclear materials accountability system similar to one developed for DOE sites. This new system, the Core Materials Accountability System (COREMAS), is designed for international use. It is a core system to which facility-specific extensions are expected to be made. This paper describes the joint efforts of US personnel and software development teams at sites in Russia, Kazakhstan, and the Ukraine to develop sophisticated computerized MPC&A systems that are customized for the site-specific needs of each facility.

  11. A computerized data acquisition system for infusion devices--a clinical support tool, or a risk management tool?

    PubMed

    Belal, S Y; Nevill, A J; Jeyaratnam, P

    2001-01-01

    A prototype computerized system for automatic data collection from multi-vendor infusion devices was constructed. The system was specifically designed around the needs of the critical care environment, and a survey of clinical staff was conducted to determine the functional requirements. Hardware, software and system configuration was based on the Medical Information Bus IEEE 1073 standard for medical device data communications. The infusion devices were configured into device communication controllers (DCC), which were polled at 0.25 Hz by a PC configured as a bedside communication controller (BCC). The system stores data samples after intervals of 1 ml of drug delivery and following any changes in the infusion rate. The system demonstrated significant opportunities for supporting clinical care and for the management of health care technology. PMID:11452634

  12. Getting the Most out of Your Interactive Whiteboard: A Practical Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buttner, Amy

    2011-01-01

    Put your interactive whiteboard to immediate use with confidence and skill, and launch your classroom directly into the 21st-century! In this book, teacher and SMART-Certified Trainer Amy Buttner provides clear, practical steps for making the most of your interactive whiteboard, plus other multimedia tools and the web. You'll learn how to design…

  13. The New Digital Wave: Dive in! Whiteboards Are Quickly Changing How We Teach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shorr, Pamela Wheaton

    2006-01-01

    There was a time when the chalkboard was revolutionary. Before it came along, teachers would walk from student to student, drawing problems on individual slates. Now interactive whiteboards promise to reinvent instruction again. Many teachers are now discovering the benefits of using whiteboards. This article presents several strategies on how…

  14. Using the Interactive Whiteboards to Teach Picture Books: The Case of Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Shan-Hua; Tsai, Mei-Yun

    2013-01-01

    Since literacy is essential for learning, one of the main purposes of elementary school is to enhance students' literacy skills. In many countries, it's quite common to use an interactive whiteboard in class, and Taiwan is no exception. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of using an interactive whiteboard to teach picture…

  15. Teachers' Remarks on Interactive Whiteboard with LCD Panel Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koçak, Ömer; Gülcü, Aslan

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the opinions of teachers about using interactive whiteboards with an LCD panel that was installed in classrooms within the FATIH educational project. The study was conducted at six high schools in which installation of interactive whiteboards with an LCD panel in classrooms was completed and teachers who received training…

  16. Tips for Using Interactive Whiteboards to Increase Participation of Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitby, Peggy J. S.; Leininger, Mark L.; Grillo, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Whiteboard technology has become commonplace in the inclusive classroom and has the potential to merge traditional teaching pedagogy with the technological age. However, teachers report little training on how to incorporate whiteboards into lesson planning. The number of students with disabilities educated in the general education setting has…

  17. Using Interactive Whiteboards in Pre-Service Teacher Education: Examples from Two Australian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Chris; Kent, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Research indicates that when interactive whiteboards are used well they can increase student engagement and learning (Glover, Miller, Averis & Door, 2007; Schuck & Kearney, 2007, 2008). This means it is important to educate future teachers in how to use interactive whiteboards and how to incorporate them successfully into their teaching. Current…

  18. Use an Interactive Whiteboard: Get a Handle on How This Technology Can Spice up the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branzburg, Jeffrey

    2006-01-01

    Interactive whiteboards are desirable peripherals these days. When hooked up to a computer, the whiteboard's screen becomes a "live" computer desktop, which can be tapped to pull down menus, highlight, and move or open files. Users can also circle relevant sections on the projected image, draw geometric figures, and underline. Then they can save…

  19. [Computerization and the importance of information in health system, as in health care resources registry].

    PubMed

    Troselj, Mario; Fanton, Davor

    2005-01-01

    The possibilities of creating a health care resources registry and its operating in Croatia as well as the importance of information in health system are described. At the Croatian Institute of Public Health, monitoring of human resources is performed through the national Health Workers Registry. It also covers basic data on all health units, bed capacities of health facilities included. The initiated health care computerization has urged the idea of forming one more database on physical resources, i.e. on registered medical devices and equipment, more complete. Linking these databases on health resources would produce a single Health Care Resources Registry. The concept views Health Care Resources Registry as part of the overall health information system with centralized information on the health system. The planned development of segments of a single health information system is based on the implementation of the accepted international standards and common network services. Network services that are based on verified Internet technologies are used within a safe, reliable and closed health computer network, which makes up the health intranet (WAN--Wide Area Network). The resource registry is a software solution based on the relational database that monitors history, thus permitting the data collected over a longer period to be analyzed. Such a solution assumes the existence of a directory service, which would replace the current independent software for the Health Workers Registry. In the Health Care Resources Registry, the basic data set encompasses data objects and attributes from the directory service. The directory service is compatible with the LDAP protocol (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol), providing services uniformly to the current records on human and physical resources. Through the storage of attributes defined according to the HL7 (Health Level Seven) standard, directory service is accessible to all applications of the health information system

  20. Computerized tomography calibrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Herbert P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A set of interchangeable pieces comprising a computerized tomography calibrator, and a method of use thereof, permits focusing of a computerized tomographic (CT) system. The interchangeable pieces include a plurality of nestable, generally planar mother rings, adapted for the receipt of planar inserts of predetermined sizes, and of predetermined material densities. The inserts further define openings therein for receipt of plural sub-inserts. All pieces are of known sizes and densities, permitting the assembling of different configurations of materials of known sizes and combinations of densities, for calibration (i.e., focusing) of a computerized tomographic system through variation of operating variables thereof. Rather than serving as a phanton, which is intended to be representative of a particular workpiece to be tested, the set of interchangeable pieces permits simple and easy standardized calibration of a CT system. The calibrator and its related method of use further includes use of air or of particular fluids for filling various openings, as part of a selected configuration of the set of pieces.

  1. MOUSE (MODULAR ORIENTED UNCERTAINTY SYSTEM): A COMPUTERIZED UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS SYSTEM. OPERATIONAL MANUAL.

    EPA Science Inventory

    MOUSE (Modular Oriented Uncertainty SystEm) deals with the problem of uncertainties in models that consist of one or more algebraic equations. It was especially designed for use by those with little or no knowledge of computer languages or programming. It is compact (and thus can...

  2. Integrating a Computerized Clinical Laboratory Information System into a Global Hospital Information System

    PubMed Central

    Rappoport, Arthur E.

    1981-01-01

    We have developed Laboratory (LIS) and Hospital (HIS) Information Systems in a distributed, shared satellite-host configuration. The LIS processes data on-line from 25 electronic analytical instruments from two geographically separated hospital units connected on-line to a laboratory computer (LDM). Manual test results are entered by CRTs or punch cards. Free Text is entered by CRT or CMC/ST. Machine readable specimen identification is accomplished by OCR or mini-punch card readers attached to the test instruments. The LDM transmits all test data to the HIS for storage in patients' files. The HIS is an IBM 4341 and serves both hospital units through 8100's. It performs all administrative tasks. The LIS is the Technicon 7000R system. A communication system, DIVOTS (Data Voice Output Telephone System) is based on an IBM S/7 processor coupled to the 4341 and uses Touch-Tone, Audio-Response technology. It provides test order entry and result inquiry functions between nursing stations, clinics and physicians' offices to and from the laboratory and other departments. HIS prints all interim and daily updated, reformatted, cumulative patient summary reports which are sent to the wards.

  3. Chemotherapy prescribing errors: an observational study on the role of information technology and computerized physician order entry systems

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chemotherapy administration is a high-risk process. Aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency, type, preventability, as well as potential and actual severity of outpatient chemotherapy prescribing errors in an Oncology Department where electronic prescribing is used. Methods Up to three electronic prescriptions per patient record were selected from the clinical records of consecutive patients who received cytotoxic chemotherapy between January 2007 and December 2008. Wrong prescriptions were classified as incomplete, incorrect or inappropriate. Error preventability was classified using a four-point scale. Severity was defined according to the Healthcare Failure Mode and Effect Analysis Severity Scale. Results Eight hundred and thirty-five prescriptions were eligible. The overall error rate was 20%. Excluding systematic errors (i.e. errors due to an initially faulty implementation of chemotherapy protocols into computerized dictionaries) from the analysis, the error rate decreased to 8%. Incomplete prescriptions were the majority. Most errors were deemed definitely preventable. According to error presumptive potential for damage, 72% were classified as minor; only 3% had the potential to produce major or catastrophic injury. Sixty-eight percent were classified as near misses; adverse drug events had no or little effect on clinical outcome. Conclusions Chemotherapy prescribing errors may arise even using electronic prescribing. Although periodic audits may be useful to detect common errors and guide corrective actions, it is crucial to get the computerized physician order entry system and set-ups correct before implementation. PMID:24344973

  4. Toward multidisciplinary use of LANDSAT: Interfacing computerized LANDSAT analysis systems with geographic information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, W. L.

    1981-01-01

    The LANDSAT-geographic information system (GIS) interface must summarize the results of the LANDSAT classification over the same cells that serve as geographic referencing units for the GIS, and output these summaries on a cell-by-cell basis in a form that is readable by the input routines of the GIS. The ZONAL interface for cell-oriented systems consists of two primary programs. The PIXCEL program scans the grid of cells and outputs a channel of pixels. Each pixel contains not the reflectance values but the identifier of the cell in which the center of the pixel is located. This file of pixelized cells along with the results of a pixel-by-pixel classification of the scene produced by the LANDSAT analysis system are input to the CELSUM program which then outputs a cell-by-cell summary formatted according to the requirements of the host GIS. Cross-correlation of the LANDSAT layer with the other layers in the data base is accomplished with the analysis and display facilities of the GIS.

  5. Development of a clinical event monitor for use with the Veterans Affairs Computerized Patient Record System and other data sources.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, T. H.; Savarino, J.

    1998-01-01

    We are developing an event monitor to operate with the Veterans Affairs Computerized Patient Record System (CPRS). The event monitor is designed to receive messages when important patient events such as posting of new results, patient movement, and orders occur. Our design separates the event monitor from CPRS itself, using communication via a network connection to receive HL7 messages, to access other data needed to run rules, and to communicate with providers by message display, electronic mail and other mechanisms. Results from operation of the event monitor using patient data in our test account show that a wide variety of data can be accessed by the event monitor with acceptable response times. Images Figure 1 PMID:9929199

  6. An Analysis of a Computerized System for Managing Curriculum Decisions and Tracking Student Progress in a Home-Based Pre-School Education Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutz, John E.; And Others

    The degree of success of the computerized Child-Based Information System (CBIS) was analyzed in two areas--presenting, delivering, and managing a developmental curriculum; and recording, filing, and monitoring child tracking data, including requirements for Individualized Education Plans (IEP's). Preschool handicapped and high-risk children and…

  7. Guidelines for Optimum Utilization of Computerized Training Systems as Based on an Analysis and Evaluation of Such Programs in the U.S. Army.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Alexander A.

    To develop guidelines for the optimum use of computerized training systems in the Army, data related to computer based training were analyzed, including the results of a feasibility study and the results of comparative studies on student achievement, attrition, and attitudes. Three issues were addressed: (1) the effectiveness of computer based…

  8. Exploring Kepler’s laws using an interactive whiteboard and Algodoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregorcic, Bor

    2015-09-01

    Combining an interactive whiteboard with the right software, and with an appropriate instructional approach, is crucial for its productive use in physics classrooms. We describe how the interactive whiteboard can be used in combination with a physics-based sandbox software program (Algodoo) to address the topic of Kepler’s laws. The proposed activity engages students in collaborative inquiry and draws on students’ experience in using touch-screen technology. Students engage in the manipulation of virtual objects on the interactive whiteboard and investigate Kepler’s laws by actively participating in the creation of planets, sending them into orbit, and representing their motion using a wide variety of virtual tools.

  9. The process of development of a prioritization tool for a clinical decision support build within a computerized provider order entry system: Experiences from St Luke's Health System.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Matthew; Miller, Suzanne; DeJong, Doug; House, John A; Dirks, Carl; Beasley, Brent

    2016-09-01

    To establish a process for the development of a prioritization tool for a clinical decision support build within a computerized provider order entry system and concurrently to prioritize alerts for Saint Luke's Health System. The process of prioritizing clinical decision support alerts included (a) consensus sessions to establish a prioritization process and identify clinical decision support alerts through a modified Delphi process and (b) a clinical decision support survey to validate the results. All members of our health system's physician quality organization, Saint Luke's Care as well as clinicians, administrators, and pharmacy staff throughout Saint Luke's Health System, were invited to participate in this confidential survey. The consensus sessions yielded a prioritization process through alert contextualization and associated Likert-type scales. Utilizing this process, the clinical decision support survey polled the opinions of 850 clinicians with a 64.7 percent response rate. Three of the top rated alerts were approved for the pre-implementation build at Saint Luke's Health System: Acute Myocardial Infarction Core Measure Sets, Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis within 4 h, and Criteria for Sepsis. This study establishes a process for developing a prioritization tool for a clinical decision support build within a computerized provider order entry system that may be applicable to similar institutions. PMID:25814483

  10. The Computerization of East Asian Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Douglas W.

    1984-01-01

    Describes two methods for the computerization of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean (CJK) input and output--Research Libraries Group's Sinoterm and OCLC's Asiagraphics. East Asian vernacular computerization efforts, system development, character sets, terminal design and keyboards, and member library use of CJK records are highlighted. Six references…

  11. Computerized Management of Physical Plant Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkey, Earl W.; Kleinpeter, Joseph

    Outlining the major areas to be considered when deciding whether or not to computerize physical plant services in higher education institutions, the author points out the shortcomings of manual record keeping systems. He gives five factors to consider when deciding to computerize: (1) time and money, (2) extent of operation, (3) current and future…

  12. Cassel Psych Center Computerized Biofeedback Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.

    1982-01-01

    Describes Cassel Psych Center, a computerized biofeedback clinic, where the "well" patient is a major concern, and where biofeedback instruments are used with computers to form a Computerized-Biofeedback Clinical Support System. The Center's activities are designed to parallel the services of the pathologist in a medical setting. (PAS)

  13. Physicians’ and Nurses’ Opinions about the Impact of a Computerized Provider Order Entry System on Their Workflow

    PubMed Central

    Ayatollahi, Haleh; Roozbehi, Masoud; Haghani, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In clinical practices, the use of information technology, especially computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems, has been found to be an effective strategy to improve patient care. This study aimed to compare physicians’ and nurses’ views about the impact of CPOE on their workflow. Methods This case study was conducted in 2012. The potential participants included all physicians (n = 28) and nurses (n = 145) who worked in a teaching hospital. Data were collected using a five-point Likert-scale questionnaire and were analyzed using SPSS version 18.0. Results The results showed a significant difference between physicians’ and nurses’ views about the impact of the system on interorganizational workflow (p = .001) and working relationships between physicians and nurses (p = .017). Conclusion Interorganizational workflow and working relationships between care providers are important issues that require more attention. Before a CPOE system is designed, it is necessary to identify workflow patterns and hidden structures to avoid compromising quality of care and patient safety. PMID:26604876

  14. Effectiveness of Computerized Decision Support Systems Linked to Electronic Health Records: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kwag, Koren H.; Lytras, Theodore; Bertizzolo, Lorenzo; Brandt, Linn; Pecoraro, Valentina; Rigon, Giulio; Vaona, Alberto; Ruggiero, Francesca; Mangia, Massimo; Iorio, Alfonso; Kunnamo, Ilkka; Bonovas, Stefanos

    2014-01-01

    We systematically reviewed randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effectiveness of computerized decision support systems (CDSSs) featuring rule- or algorithm-based software integrated with electronic health records (EHRs) and evidence-based knowledge. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Cochrane Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects. Information on system design, capabilities, acquisition, implementation context, and effects on mortality, morbidity, and economic outcomes were extracted. Twenty-eight RCTs were included. CDSS use did not affect mortality (16 trials, 37395 patients; 2282 deaths; risk ratio [RR] = 0.96; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.85, 1.08; I2 = 41%). A statistically significant effect was evident in the prevention of morbidity, any disease (9 RCTs; 13868 patients; RR = 0.82; 95% CI = 0.68, 0.99; I2 = 64%), but selective outcome reporting or publication bias cannot be excluded. We observed differences for costs and health service utilization, although these were often small in magnitude. Across clinical settings, new generation CDSSs integrated with EHRs do not affect mortality and might moderately improve morbidity outcomes. PMID:25322302

  15. Organization-wide adoption of computerized provider order entry systems: a study based on diffusion of innovations theory

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems have been introduced to reduce medication errors, increase safety, improve work-flow efficiency, and increase medical service quality at the moment of prescription. Making the impact of CPOE systems more observable may facilitate their adoption by users. We set out to examine factors associated with the adoption of a CPOE system for inter-organizational and intra-organizational care. Methods The diffusion of innovation theory was used to understand physicians' and nurses' attitudes and thoughts about implementation and use of the CPOE system. Two online survey questionnaires were distributed to all physicians and nurses using a CPOE system in county-wide healthcare organizations. The number of complete questionnaires analyzed was 134 from 200 nurses (67.0%) and 176 from 741 physicians (23.8%). Data were analyzed using descriptive-analytical statistical methods. Results More nurses (56.7%) than physicians (31.3%) stated that the CPOE system introduction had worked well in their clinical setting (P < 0.001). Similarly, more physicians (73.9%) than nurses (50.7%) reported that they found the system not adapted to their specific professional practice (P = < 0.001). Also more physicians (25.0%) than nurses (13.4%) stated that they did want to return to the previous system (P = 0.041). We found that in particular the received relative advantages of the CPOE system were estimated to be significantly (P < 0.001) higher among nurses (39.6%) than physicians (16.5%). However, physicians' agreements with the compatibility of the CPOE and with its complexity were significantly higher than the nurses (P < 0.001). Conclusions Qualifications for CPOE adoption as defined by three attributes of diffusion of innovation theory were not satisfied in the study setting. CPOE systems are introduced as a response to the present limitations in paper-based systems. In consequence, user expectations are often high on their relative

  16. Students' use of the interactive whiteboard during physics group work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strøm Mellingsæter, Magnus; Bungum, Berit

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a case study of how the interactive whiteboard (IWB) may facilitate collective meaning-making processes in group work in engineering education. In the case, first-year students attended group-work sessions as an organised part of a basic physics course at a Norwegian university college. Each student group was equipped with an IWB, which the groups used to write down and hand in their solutions to the physics problems. Based on a Vygotskian, dialectical stance, this study investigates how the students used the IWB in the group-work situation. From qualitative analysis of video data, we identified four group-work processes where the IWB played a key role: exploratory, explanatory, clarifying and insertion. The results show that the IWB may facilitate a 'joint workspace', a social realm in which the students' dialogues are situated.

  17. Computerized Proof Techniques for Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Christopher J.; Tefera, Akalu; Zeleke, Aklilu

    2012-01-01

    The use of computer algebra systems such as Maple and Mathematica is becoming increasingly important and widespread in mathematics learning, teaching and research. In this article, we present computerized proof techniques of Gosper, Wilf-Zeilberger and Zeilberger that can be used for enhancing the teaching and learning of topics in discrete…

  18. Computerized mappings of the cerebral cortex: a multiresolution flattening method and a surface-based coordinate system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drury, H. A.; Van Essen, D. C.; Anderson, C. H.; Lee, C. W.; Coogan, T. A.; Lewis, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    We present a new method for generating two-dimensional maps of the cerebral cortex. Our computerized, two-stage flattening method takes as its input any well-defined representation of a surface within the three-dimensional cortex. The first stage rapidly converts this surface to a topologically correct two-dimensional map, without regard for the amount of distortion introduced. The second stage reduces distortions using a multiresolution strategy that makes gross shape changes on a coarsely sampled map and further shape refinements on progressively finer resolution maps. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by creating flat maps of the entire cerebral cortex in the macaque monkey and by displaying various types of experimental data on such maps. We also introduce a surface-based coordinate system that has advantages over conventional stereotaxic coordinates and is relevant to studies of cortical organization in humans as well as non-human primates. Together, these methods provide an improved basis for quantitative studies of individual variability in cortical organization.

  19. A Computerized Decision Support System Improves the Accuracy of Temperature Capture from Nursing Personnel at the Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Kroth, Philip J.; Dexter, Paul R.; Overhage, J. Marc; Knipe, Cynthia; Hui, Siu L.; Belsito, Anne; McDonald, Clement J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of a computerized decision support system (CDSS) on the accuracy of patient temperature recording at the bed side. Design This is a randomized, controlled trial comparing nurses assigned to an intervention group that received CDSS whenever they attempted to store a low temperature (≤ 96.4°F) or a control group that received no CDSS. Measurements The computer recorded temperatures that would trigger reminders equally in both control and intervention groups. It also logged the reactions of nurses who received reminders and whether they retook the patient’s temperature or chose to store the original low value. Results We analyzed the temperature data over a 10-month period tracking a total of 44339 temperatures taken by the control group and 45823 temperatures taken by the intervention group. We showed a 51% relative reduction in the number of erroneous low temperatures stored by the intervention versus the control group. Conclusion CDSS are effective with nursing personnel in improving the accuracy of temperature capture at the bedside. PMID:17238380

  20. Computerized tomography using video recorded fluoroscopic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kak, A. C.; Jakowatz, C. V., Jr.; Baily, N. A.; Keller, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    A computerized tomographic imaging system is examined which employs video-recorded fluoroscopic images as input data. By hooking the video recorder to a digital computer through a suitable interface, such a system permits very rapid construction of tomograms.

  1. Designing and Implementing a Computerized Information Management System for Employment Demand Data in Agriculture/Agribusiness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkey, Arthur L.; Cooper, Gloria S.

    Planning for educational programs in agriculture/agribusiness demands knowledge of future employment demand for various occupations. At present, a functional and comprehensive occupational information system for agriculture/agribusiness does not exist. Systems that do exist, such as the Occupational Information System (OIS) and the Dictionary of…

  2. PADRE (PARTICLE DATA REDUCTION): A COMPUTERIZED DATA REDUCTION SYSTEM FOR CASCADE IMPACTOR MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes the Particle Data Reduction (PADRE) system, developed to attract high-quality size-mass distribution data for the Fine Particle Emissions Information System (FPEIS), a component of EPA's Environmental Assessment Data Systems (EADS). FPEIS is the heart of a com...

  3. Data engineering systems: Computerized modeling and data bank capabilities for engineering analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopp, H.; Trettau, R.; Zolotar, B.

    1984-01-01

    The Data Engineering System (DES) is a computer-based system that organizes technical data and provides automated mechanisms for storage, retrieval, and engineering analysis. The DES combines the benefits of a structured data base system with automated links to large-scale analysis codes. While the DES provides the user with many of the capabilities of a computer-aided design (CAD) system, the systems are actually quite different in several respects. A typical CAD system emphasizes interactive graphics capabilities and organizes data in a manner that optimizes these graphics. On the other hand, the DES is a computer-aided engineering system intended for the engineer who must operationally understand an existing or planned design or who desires to carry out additional technical analysis based on a particular design. The DES emphasizes data retrieval in a form that not only provides the engineer access to search and display the data but also links the data automatically with the computer analysis codes.

  4. A computerized approach to select the most cost-effective telemetry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shell, Richard L.; Damachi, Nicholas A.; Chaudhry, Jagtar S.

    Large water utilities adopt various levels of automation involving digital computer technology and modern instrumentation that provide the capability of controlling most operations in the water treatment and distribution system. One of the major components of water system automation is telemetering of information to and from a central control centre. Most water utility systems currently use leased telephone lines for telemetry requirement. An alternative approach is microwave telemetry. Concern about recent increases in leased-line tariff rates, the apparent tendency for further increases, and the degree of service provided by local telephone systems led to a study which showed that overall water distribution system telemetry cost can be minimized by adopting a hybrid telemetry system composed of both radio links and telephone links. A need arises to determine the transmission links for which each alternative method is economically more suitable. This paper presents an interactive computer program which performs an economic analysis of the transmission links in a water distribution system to determine the hybrid configuration of radio and leased phone lines that provide the most cost-effective telemetry system. A typical phone tariff structure is presented. The set of input variables can be altered interactively, and the effect of the change on system telemetry cost can be examined, allowing a resolution of a series of 'what if' questions of interest to a water utility manager. A case example is presented.

  5. Computerized Physician Order Entry

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Raman; Yen, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Computerized physician order entry (CPOE) has been promoted as an important component of patient safety, quality improvement, and modernization of medical practice. In practice, however, CPOE affects health care delivery in complex ways, with benefits as well as risks. Every implementation of CPOE is associated with both generally recognized and unique local factors that can facilitate or confound its rollout, and neurohospitalists will often be at the forefront of such rollouts. In this article, we review the literature on CPOE, beginning with definitions and proceeding to comparisons to the standard of care. We then proceed to discuss clinical decision support systems, negative aspects of CPOE, and cultural context of CPOE implementation. Before concluding, we follow the experiences of a Chief Medical Information Officer and neurohospitalist who rolled out a CPOE system at his own health care organization and managed the resulting workflow changes and setbacks. PMID:24381708

  6. MEDSIRCH: A Computerized System for the Retrieval of Multiple Choice Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazlett, C. B.

    Medsirch (Medical Search) is an information retrieval system designed to aid in preparing examinations for medical students. There are two versions of the system: a sequential access file suitable for shallow indexing with a broad choice of search terms and a random direct access file for deep indexing with a restricted range of choices for search…

  7. Acquisition of quantitative physiological data and computerized image reconstruction using a single scan TV system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.

    1976-01-01

    A single-scan radiography system has been interfaced to a minicomputer, and the combined system has been used with a variety of fluoroscopic systems and image intensifiers available in clinical facilities. The system's response range is analyzed, and several applications are described. These include determination of the gray scale for typical X-ray-fluoroscopic-television chains, measurement of gallstone volume in patients, localization of markers or other small anatomical features, determinations of organ areas and volumes, computer reconstruction of tomographic sections of organs in motion, and computer reconstruction of transverse axial body sections from fluoroscopic images. It is concluded that this type of system combined with a minimum of statistical processing shows excellent capabilities for delineating small changes in differential X-ray attenuation.

  8. Transforming to a computerized system for nursing care: organizational success within Magnet idealism.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Carolyn L; Elie, Leslie G; Vidal, Elizabeth C; Vasserman, Alex

    2010-01-01

    In reaching the goal for standardized, quality care, a not-for-profit healthcare system consisting of seven institutional entities is transforming nursing practice guidelines, patient care workflow, and patient documents into electronic, online, real-time modalities for use across departments and all healthcare delivery entities of the system. Organizational structure and a strategic plan were developed for the 2-year Clinical Transformation Project. The Siemens Patient Care Document System was adopted and adapted to the hospitals' documentation and information needs. Two fast-track sessions of more than 100 nurses and representatives from other health disciplines were held to standardize assessments, histories, care protocols, and interdisciplinary plans of care for the top 10 diagnostic regulatory groups. Education needs of the users were addressed. After the first year, a productive, functional system is evidenced. For example, the bar-coded Medication Administration Check System is in full use on the clinical units of one of the hospitals, and the other institutional entities are at substantial stages of implementation of Patient Care Documentation System. The project requires significant allocation of personnel and financial resources for a highly functional informatics system that will transform clinical care. The project exemplifies four of the Magnet ideals and serves as a model for others who may be deciding about launching a similar endeavor. PMID:20182156

  9. Computerized systems analysis and optimization of aircraft engine performance, weight, and life cycle costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbach, L. H.

    1980-01-01

    The computational techniques are described which are utilized at Lewis Research Center to determine the optimum propulsion systems for future aircraft applications and to identify system tradeoffs and technology requirements. Cycle performance, and engine weight can be calculated along with costs and installation effects as opposed to fuel consumption alone. Almost any conceivable turbine engine cycle can be studied. These computer codes are: NNEP, WATE, LIFCYC, INSTAL, and POD DRG. Examples are given to illustrate how these computer techniques can be applied to analyze and optimize propulsion system fuel consumption, weight and cost for representative types of aircraft and missions.

  10. Acquisition of quantitative physiological data and computerized image reconstruction using a single scan TV system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.

    1975-01-01

    Single scan operation of television X-ray fluoroscopic systems allow both analog and digital reconstruction of tomographic sections from single plan images. This type of system combined with a minimum of statistical processing showed excellent capabilities for delineating small changes in differential X-ray attenuation. Patient dose reduction is significant when compared to normal operation or film recording. Flat screen, low light level systems were both rugged and light in weight, making them applicable for a variety of special purposes. Three dimensional information was available from the tomographic methods and the recorded data was sufficient when used with appropriate computer display devices to give representative 3D images.

  11. The automated/computerized TLD-personnel monitoring system in Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duftschmid, K. E.

    1980-09-01

    The paper discusses the layout and operation details of the automated TLD system used in Austria for several years to monitor some 13000 radiation workers per month. Dosimetric properties, handling and computer software are described.

  12. Perceived Satisfaction of a Computerized Vocational Counseling System as a Function of Monetary Investment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Mark J.; Springer, Thomas P.

    1986-01-01

    Compared 61 college students' satisfaction with DISCOVER, a computer assisted guidance system, relative to the amount of money paid for such a service. No significant differences were found. (Author/BL)

  13. 45 CFR 307.25 - Review and certification of computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT (CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES... in the OCSE guideline entitled “Automated Systems for Child Support Enforcement: A Guide for States”....

  14. Computerized system for the selection of the most HLA-compatible kidney recipient (France-Transplant).

    PubMed

    Busson, M; Petit, A; Hors, J; Dausset, J; Mathieu, J P; Jourde, P; Puerto, A; Pinson, G

    1978-01-01

    The RITRAN program is applied to renal transplantation and operates within the framework of France Transplant. It makes it possible to choose the most compatible kidney recipient within the ABO blood group system and within the major histocompatibility system in man (HLA). The file presently comprises the data stored on tape concerning 1800 dialysis patients who are awaiting grafts. It is managed by UNIVAC 1108 computer. More than 25 medical-surgical transplant teams from France, Switzerland, Holland and Spain are connected with the computer. It was five years ago that the first interrogation system began operating in real time 20 hours out of 24, using a telex line, and it continues to provide complete satisfaction. The updating of the data is done by the RITREC system, also using a telex machine. An adaptation of the programs applied for choosing blood and platelet donors is in the process of being realized. PMID:355985

  15. Comparison with manual registration reveals satisfactory completeness and efficiency of a computerized cancer registration system.

    PubMed

    Contiero, Paolo; Tittarelli, Andrea; Maghini, Anna; Fabiano, Sabrina; Frassoldi, Emanuela; Costa, Enrica; Gada, Daniela; Codazzi, Tiziana; Crosignani, Paolo; Tessandori, Roberto; Tagliabue, Giovanna

    2008-02-01

    Automated software for cancer registration, called Open Registry and developed by ourselves was adopted by the Varese (population-based) Cancer Registry starting from 1997. Since the use of automated cancer registration is increasing, it is important to assess the quality and completeness of the automated data being produced. In this study, we assessed the completeness of the automatically generated data by comparison with a gold standard of all cases identified by manual and automatic systems for the year 1997 when the automated system was introduced, and the manual system was still in operation. We also evaluated the efficiency of the automated system. 5027 cases were generated automatically; 2959 (59%) were accepted automatically and 2068 (41%) were flagged for manual checking. Sixty-nine cases (1.3%) were not recorded automatically, the most common reason (0.8%) being that the incidence record was dated 1998, even though the case was incident in 1997. A total of 98.7% of all cases found were picked up by the automated system. A completeness figure of 98.7% indicates that the automatic procedure is a valid alternative to manual methods for routine case generation. The fact that 59% of cases were registered automatically indicates that the system can speed up data production and enhance registry efficiency. PMID:17452020

  16. Computerized evaluation of mean residence times in multicompartmental linear system and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Villalba, J M; Barbero, A J; Diaz-Sierra, R; Arribas, E; Garcia-Meseguer, M J; Garcia-Sevilla, F; Garcia-Moreno, M; De Labra, J A Vidal; Varon, R

    2011-04-15

    Deriving mean residence times (MRTs) is an important task both in pharmacokinetics and in multicompartmental linear systems. Taking as starting point the analysis of MRTs in open or closed (Garcia-Meseguer et al., Bull Math Biol 2003, 65, 279) multicompartmental linear systems, we implement a versatile software, using the Visual Basic 6.0 language for MS-Windows, that is easy to use and with a user-friendly format for the input of data and the output of results. For any multicompartmental linear system of up to 512 compartments, whether closed or open, with traps or without traps and with zero input in one or more of the compartments, this software allows the user to obtain the symbolic expressions, in the most simplified form, and/or the numerical values of the MRTs in any of its compartments, in the entire system or in a part of the system. As far as we known from the literature, such a software has not been implemented before. The advantage of the present software is that it reduces on the work time needed and minimizes the human errors that are frequent in compartmental systems even those that are relatively staightforward. The software bioCelTer, along with instructions, can be downloaded from http://oretano.iele-ab.uclm.es/~fgarcia/bioCelTer/. PMID:20960438

  17. Cost-effectiveness of a shared computerized decision support system for diabetes linked to electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, Anne; Blackhouse, Gordon; Troyan, Sue; Goeree, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Background Computerized decision support systems (CDSSs) are believed to enhance patient care and reduce healthcare costs; however the current evidence is limited and the cost-effectiveness remains unknown. Objective To estimate the long-term cost-effectiveness of a CDSS linked to evidence-based treatment recommendations for type 2 diabetes. Methods Using the Ontario Diabetes Economic Model, changes in factors (eg, HbA1c) from a randomized controlled trial were used to estimate cost-effectiveness. The cost of implementation, development, and maintenance of the core dataset, and projected diabetes-related complications were included. The base case assumed a 1-year treatment effect, 5% discount rate, and 40-year time horizon. Univariate, one-way sensitivity analyses were carried out by altering different parameter values. The perspective was the Ontario Ministry of Health and costs were in 2010 Canadian dollars. Results The cost of implementing the intervention was $483 699. The one-year intervention reduced HbA1c by 0.2 and systolic blood pressure by 3.95 mm Hg, but increased body mass index by 0.02 kg/m2, resulting in a relative risk reduction of 14% in the occurrence of amputation. The model estimated that the intervention resulted in an additional 0.0117 quality-adjusted life year; the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $160 845 per quality-adjusted life-year. Conclusion The web-based prototype decision support system slightly improved short-term risk factors. The model predicted moderate improvements in long-term health outcomes. This disease management program will need to develop considerable efficiencies in terms of costs and processes or improved effectiveness to be considered a cost-effective intervention for treating patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:22052900

  18. Computerized Automated Reminder Diabetes System (CARDS): E-Mail and SMS Cell Phone Text Messaging Reminders to Support Diabetes Management

    PubMed Central

    Hanauer, David A.; Wentzell, Katherine; Laffel, Nikki

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cell phone text messaging, via the Short Messaging Service (SMS), offers the promise of a highly portable, well-accepted, and inexpensive modality for engaging youth and young adults in the management of their diabetes. This pilot and feasibility study compared two-way SMS cell phone messaging with e-mail reminders that were directed at encouraging blood glucose (BG) monitoring. Methods: Forty insulin-treated adolescents and young adults with diabetes were randomized to receive electronic reminders to check their BG levels via cell phone text messaging or e-mail reminders for a 3-month pilot study. Electronic messages were automatically generated, and participant replies with BG results were processed by the locally developed Computerized Automated Reminder Diabetes System (CARDS). Participants set their schedule for reminders on the secure CARDS website where they could also enter and review BG data. Results: Of the 40 participants, 22 were randomized to receive cell phone text message reminders and 18 to receive e-mail reminders; 18 in the cell phone group and 11 in the e-mail group used the system. Compared to the e-mail group, users in the cell phone group received more reminders (180.4 vs. 106.6 per user) and responded with BG results significantly more often (30.0 vs. 6.9 per user, P=0.04). During the first month cell phone users submitted twice as many BGs as e-mail users (27.2 vs. 13.8 per user); by month 3, usage waned. Conclusions: Cell phone text messaging to promote BG monitoring is a viable and acceptable option in adolescents and young adults with diabetes. However, maintaining interest levels for prolonged intervals remains a challenge. PMID:19848576

  19. Computerized systems analysis and optimization of aircraft engine performance, weight, and life cycle costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbach, L. H.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes the computational techniques employed in determining the optimal propulsion systems for future aircraft applications and to identify system tradeoffs and technology requirements. The computer programs used to perform calculations for all the factors that enter into the selection process of determining the optimum combinations of airplanes and engines are examined. Attention is given to the description of the computer codes including NNEP, WATE, LIFCYC, INSTAL, and POD DRG. A process is illustrated by which turbine engines can be evaluated as to fuel consumption, engine weight, cost and installation effects. Examples are shown as to the benefits of variable geometry and of the tradeoff between fuel burned and engine weights. Future plans for further improvements in the analytical modeling of engine systems are also described.

  20. An Intelligent Computerized Stretch Reflex Measurement System For Clinical And Investigative Neurology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, P. M.; Chutkow, J. G.; Riggs, M. T.; Cristiano, V. D.

    1987-05-01

    We describe the design of a reliable, user-friendly preprototype system for quantifying the tendon stretch reflexes in humans and large mammals. A hand-held, instrumented reflex gun, the impactor of which contains a single force sensor, interfaces with a computer. The resulting test system can deliver sequences of reproducible stimuli at graded intensities and adjustable durations to a muscle's tendon ("tendon taps"), measure the impacting force of each tap, and record the subsequent reflex muscle contraction from the same tendon -- all automatically. The parameters of the reflex muscle contraction include latency; mechanical threshold; and peak time, peak magnitude, and settling time. The results of clinical tests presented in this paper illustrate the system's potential usefulness in detecting neurologic dysfunction affecting the tendon stretch reflexes, in documenting the course of neurologic illnesses and their response to therapy, and in clinical and laboratory neurologic research.

  1. The Impact of Interactive Whiteboard Technology on Ninth Grade English at Selected Rural High Schools in Upstate South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of interactive whiteboard technology on ninth grade English End of Course scores in two high schools in the Upstate of South Carolina in the school year 2011-2012. This study also sought to determine what impact interactive whiteboard technology had on the factors of gender, socio-economic…

  2. Attitudes of Students and Teachers towards the Use of Interactive Whiteboards in Elementary and Secondary School Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balta, Nuri; Duran, Muharrem

    2015-01-01

    Recently much have been invested in the interactive whiteboard educational technology in Turkey. The government is still wishful to spread it to schools of all levels. This study tries to understand teachers' and students' attitudes toward interactive whiteboard technology along with differences in attitudes resulting from some demographic…

  3. Evaluation of Search Time for Two Computerized Information Retrieval Systems at the University of Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ware, Glenn O.; Park, Margaret K.

    1973-01-01

    Two statistical models for estimating search time have been developed for the CA Condensates data base using the University of Georgia Text Search System. Comparative timings between the Chemical Abstracts Service search program and the University of Georgia search program are made for the Ca Condensates data base. (5 references) (Author/NH)

  4. A Computerized Task Inventory System for Providing Curriculum Content. [Carpentry]. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Clair S.

    The pilot study was designed to develop a system for analyzing and providing task inventories for carpentry curriculum development. An initial task inventory of 174 statements was constructed from available published sources, including only those tasks thought to be performed by incumbent workers in residential carpentry in Arizona. The tasks were…

  5. AUTOMOUSE: AN IMPROVEMENT TO THE MOUSE COMPUTERIZED UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS SYSTEM OPERATIONAL MANUAL.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under a mandate of national environmental laws, the agency strives to formulate and implement actions leading to a compatible balance between human activities and the ability of natural systems to support and nurture life. The Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory is responsible ...

  6. Computerizing the Budget Office: An On-Line Decision Support System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Glenn R.; Peterson, William R.

    The implementation process and resource requirements of the University of Connecticut Budget Office's online decision support system are described. Successes and failures of shifting to a fully interactive budget review and development process are also reviewed. Special attention is given to the personnel problems and analytical challenges…

  7. A computerized system for retrieval of case information in a veterinary diagnostic laboratory.

    PubMed

    Wagner, J E; Burton, C H; Morehouse, L G; Mann, P C

    1979-03-01

    Morbidity and mortality data are necessary bases for the decision-making processes relevant to allocation of public funds for animal disease diagnoses and research. A system for information storage and retrieval capable of handling diagnostic data such as results of microbiology, parasitology, necropsy, and histopathology as well as demographic data such as owner, species, sex, breed, or geographic origin of the animal is described. This information is available to veterinarians, epidemiologists, herdsmen, and others involved in disease prevention or control efforts. The system described utilizes natural language, thus overcoming difficulties encountered in systems with numerical intermediates. Used and revised for the last 10 years, the system described has proved useful for annual administrative quantitation of services performed. In fact, the Concordance Index serves as the annual report of the University of Missouri Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory. Having accurate detailed information on individual cases, as well as a variety of composite data, has been extremely helpful in the documentation necessary for attracting funding for study of specific disease states. PMID:475103

  8. Development of a computerized system for inventory of controlled drug substances.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, W; Alberici, G; Cook, L

    1988-01-01

    An automated drug inventory system was developed to facilitate record keeping requirements for controlled drug substances. A hand-held barcode scanner and a computer-accessible top-loading electronic balance are used to identify and weigh samples each time they are removed from or returned to the safe. A computer compares the initial sample weight to its last recorded weight to assure that no discrepancies occurred prior to sample use. Upon return, the computer compares the difference in initial and return tare weights to the stated amount of drug used to assure accuracy of the written inventory record. Unreconciled errors are immediately brought to the attention of the safe custodian. During its first year of operation, 2791 sample out/sample return transactions on 381 drug samples were tracked by the system. The most common errors detected by the system include sample loss of moisture (9), sample absorption of moisture (4), wrong sample used (4), incorrect weight recorded (4), and sample used without log entry (4). Importantly, all errors were immediately identified and reconciled. At the end of each working day, a printout of all daily transactions shows sample use, possible errors, and whether all samples have been returned to the safe. A printout of the total drug inventory is immediately available when called for. This system provides enhanced vigilance and security, and has been readily accepted by all investigators using controlled drug substances in our laboratory. PMID:3136356

  9. COMPUTERIZED SYSTEM FOR PERFORMING RISK ASSESSMENTS FOR CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has sponsored the development of a software system to assist environmental personnel in conducting risk assessments at hazardous waste sites, and also in reviewing assessments generated by contractors for correspondence with EPA and state ...

  10. Implementation and commissioning of an integrated micro-CT/RT system with computerized independent jaw collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Michael D.; Hrinivich, W. Thomas; Jung, Jongho A.; Holdsworth, David W.; Drangova, Maria; Chen, Jeff; Wong, Eugene

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To design, construct, and commission a set of computer-controlled motorized jaws for a micro-CT/RT system to perform conformal image-guided small animal radiotherapy.Methods: The authors designed and evaluated a system of custom-built motorized orthogonal jaws, which allows the delivery of off-axis rectangular fields on a GE eXplore CT 120 preclinical imaging system. The jaws in the x direction are independently driven, while the y-direction jaws are symmetric. All motors have backup encoders, verifying jaw positions. Mechanical performance of the jaws was characterized. Square beam profiles ranging from 2 × 2 to 60 × 60 mm{sup 2} were measured using EBT2 film in the center of a 70 × 70 × 22 mm{sup 3} solid water block. Similarly, absolute depth dose was measured in a solid water and EBT2 film stack 50 × 50 × 50 mm{sup 3}. A calibrated Farmer ion chamber in a 70 × 70 × 20 mm{sup 3} solid water block was used to measure the output of three field sizes: 50 × 50, 40 × 40, and 30 × 30 mm{sup 2}. Elliptical target plans were delivered to films to assess overall system performance. Respiratory-gated treatment was implemented on the system and initially proved using a simple sinusoidal motion phantom. All films were scanned on a flatbed scanner (Epson 1000XL) and converted to dose using a fitted calibration curve. A Monte Carlo beam model of the micro-CT with the jaws has been created using BEAMnrc for comparison with the measurements. An example image-guided partial lung irradiation in a rat is demonstrated.Results: The averaged random error of positioning each jaw is less than 0.1 mm. Relative output factors measured with the ion chamber agree with Monte Carlo simulations within 2%. Beam profiles and absolute depth dose curves measured from the films agree with simulations within measurement uncertainty. Respiratory-gated treatments applied to a phantom moving with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 5 mm showed improved beam penumbra (80%–20%) from 3.9 to

  11. Computerized Measuring Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonmaker, Thomas D.

    1980-05-01

    In the manufacturing of printed circuit boards, microscopic analysis is an essential process control activity. An inspector microscopically analyzes board samples to deter-mine board lot quality and process conditions. Prior to computerizing, this sustained measurement-taking involved the tedious process of recording raw data, converting microscope filar readings, calculating averages, logging information in a job notebook, and completing detailed final lab reports. It is evident from this brief task description that this time-consuming repetitious data recording routine was an added burden to the already fatiguing visual inspection method and therefore was a prime candidate for automatic data capture and printout. Secondly, the creation of a permanent and easily accessible data base would improve process feedback and provide for a system with quick identification of any suspect boards if further assembly/testing exhibited board-related failures. This paper describes the evolution and implementation of a computer-aided microscopic inspection operation.

  12. National Immunization Program: Computerized System as a tool for new challenges

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Ana Paula Sayuri

    2015-01-01

    The scope and coverage of the Brazilian Immunization Program can be compared with those in developed countries because it provides a large number of vaccines and has a considerable coverage. The increasing complexity of the program brings challenges regarding its development, high coverage levels, access equality, and safety. The Immunization Information System, with nominal data, is an innovative tool that can more accurately monitor these indicators and allows the evaluation of the impact of new vaccination strategies. The main difficulties for such a system are in its implementation process, training of professionals, mastering its use, its constant maintenance needs and ensuring the information contained remain confidential. Therefore, encouraging the development of this tool should be part of public health policies and should also be involved in the three spheres of government as well as the public and private vaccination services. PMID:26176746

  13. Practical use of computerized hospital information systems to improve blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Butch, S H

    1997-04-01

    Data collection can be enhanced with the use of computers. Care must be taken, however, to ensure that the data collected have a purpose and meet either the quality assessment needs or business functions of the transfusion service. Required data elements are frequently in several data repositories and must be merged to obtain needed information. Effective data collection may be hindered by several factors, including a lack of data elements in the computer systems, data retention limitations, and changes in the computer system or collection needs. Personal computers with commonly available spreadsheet and database management software are useful in preparing summarized reports. An ideal report is legibly printed on one side of a sheet of paper and includes graphs and charts that enhance data presentation and facilitate trend analysis. PMID:9124230

  14. Innovations in Computerized Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drasgow, Fritz, Ed.; Olson-Buchanan, Julie B., Ed.

    Chapters in this book present the challenges and dilemmas faced by researchers as they created new computerized assessments, focusing on issues addressed in developing, scoring, and administering the assessments. Chapters are: (1) "Beyond Bells and Whistles; An Introduction to Computerized Assessment" (Julie B. Olson-Buchanan and Fritz Drasgow);…

  15. Computerized optimal control system design for reusable and expendable boost vehicles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connor, C. L.; Trautwein, W.; Livingston, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    An optimization technique has been developed which combines the practical features of hybrid simulation of the dynamic system under study with the systematic approach of modern control theory where a mathematically formulated design criterion is optimized by functional minimization. Standard hybrid computer optimization methods using high-speed repetitive simulations and gradient minimization schemes have been extended to obtain time-varying optimal gain schedules and reduce the sensitivity of the optimized system to parameter and disturbance uncertainties. In this approach the performance index is expressed in meaningful engineering terms that reflect the interactions among all major disciplines, structures, control/actuation system design, aerodynamics and performance. The basic optimization technique is developed and its application to current aerospace control problems including the space shuttle is presented in detail. In the discussion of the application, the controllers resulting from the technique are compared with controllers developed by conventional methods. The paper concludes with a review of the advantages and disadvantages of the technique and plans for future applications.

  16. Computerized systems analysis and optimization of aircraft engine performance, weight, and life cycle costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbach, L. H.

    1979-01-01

    The computational techniques utilized to determine the optimum propulsion systems for future aircraft applications and to identify system tradeoffs and technology requirements are described. The characteristics and use of the following computer codes are discussed: (1) NNEP - a very general cycle analysis code that can assemble an arbitrary matrix fans, turbines, ducts, shafts, etc., into a complete gas turbine engine and compute on- and off-design thermodynamic performance; (2) WATE - a preliminary design procedure for calculating engine weight using the component characteristics determined by NNEP; (3) POD DRG - a table look-up program to calculate wave and friction drag of nacelles; (4) LIFCYC - a computer code developed to calculate life cycle costs of engines based on the output from WATE; and (5) INSTAL - a computer code developed to calculate installation effects, inlet performance and inlet weight. Examples are given to illustrate how these computer techniques can be applied to analyze and optimize propulsion system fuel consumption, weight, and cost for representative types of aircraft and missions.

  17. Computerized "drag-and-drop" alignment of GPC-based optical micromanipulation system.

    PubMed

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Rodrigo, Peter John; Perch-Nielsen, Ivan R; Alonzo, Carlo Amadeo; Glückstad, Jesper

    2007-02-19

    In the past, aligning the counterpropagating beams in our 3D real-time generalized phase contrast (GPC) trapping system has been a task requiring moderate skills and prior experience with optical instrumentation. A ray transfer matrix analysis and computer-controlled actuation of mirrors, objective, and sample stage has made this process user friendly. The alignment procedure can now be done in a very short time with just a few drag-and-drop tasks in the user-interface. The future inclusion of an image recognition algorithm will allow the alignment process to be executed completely without any user interaction. An automated sample loading tray with a loading precision of a few microns has also been added to simplify the switching of samples under study. These enhancements have significantly reduced the level of skill and experience required to operate the system, thus making the GPC-based micromanipulation system more accessible to people with little or no technical expertise in optics. PMID:19532431

  18. The Impact of Implementing a New Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE) System on Pharmaceutical Interventions in a Tertiary Brazilian Hospital.

    PubMed

    Pinto Pizzo, Vladimir Ribeiro; Gonçalves, Paula Brito; Goncalves Barbosa, Lívia Maria; Mantovani Faustino de Carvalho, Debora Cecilia; Ortiz de Camargo, Margareth; Onofre de Lira, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed trends in pharmaceutical interventions during the implementation of a new computerized physician order entry (CPOE) process in a tertiary hospital in Brazil. The new process utilized an eletronic interface that was designed in-house and an automatic order extension program. The new process reduced the number of order transcriptions and mitigated other potential CPOE-related errors [1]. PMID:26262242

  19. 45 CFR 307.10 - Functional requirements for computerized support enforcement systems in operation by October 1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... to provide for case referral and the transfer of the medical support information specified in 45 CFR... payments; (ii) Providing automated maintenance of case records for purposes of the management and tracking...), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED...

  20. 45 CFR 307.10 - Functional requirements for computerized support enforcement systems in operation by October 1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... to provide for case referral and the transfer of the medical support information specified in 45 CFR... payments; (ii) Providing automated maintenance of case records for purposes of the management and tracking...), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED...

  1. 45 CFR 307.10 - Functional requirements for computerized support enforcement systems in operation by October 1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... to provide for case referral and the transfer of the medical support information specified in 45 CFR... payments; (ii) Providing automated maintenance of case records for purposes of the management and tracking...), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED...

  2. Computerized cash management: the new frontier.

    PubMed

    Grimmelman, F J

    1979-01-01

    Because cash management in a hospital is more complicated today than it was ten years ago, the finanical manager needs a computerized cash management system to help assess cash resources and control cash demands. PMID:10242146

  3. Computerized Bus Routing in San Francisco.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caswell, Peter J.; Jungherr, J. Anton

    1979-01-01

    A computerized routing and scheduling system for the San Francisco Public Schools includes the batch processing of bus route assignments and schedules for all schools and the online terminal processing of daily changes. (Author/MLF)

  4. Characteristics and Consequences of Drug Allergy Alert Overrides in a Computerized Physician Order Entry System

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Tyken C.; Kuperman, Gilad J.; Jaggi, Tonushree; Hojnowski-Diaz, Patricia; Fiskio, Julie; Williams, Deborah H.; Bates, David W.; Gandhi, Tejal K.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine characteristics of drug allergy alert overrides, assess how often they lead to preventable adverse drug events (ADEs), and suggest methods for improving the allergy-alerting system. Design: Chart review was performed on a stratified random subset of all allergy alerts occurring during a 3-month period (August through October 2002) at a large academic hospital. Measurements: Factors that were measured were drug/allergy combinations that triggered alerts, frequency of specific override reasons, characteristics of ADEs, and completeness of allergy documentation. Results: A total of 6,182 (80%) of 7,761 alerts were overridden in 1,150 patients. In this sample, only 10% of alerts were triggered by an exact match between the drug ordered and allergy listed. Physicians' most common reasons for overriding alerts were “Aware/Will monitor” (55%), “Patient does not have this allergy/tolerates” (33%), and “Patient taking already” (10%). In a stratified random subset of 320 patients (28% of 1,150) on chart review, 19 (6%) experienced ADEs attributed to the overridden drug; of these, 9 (47%) were serious. None of the ADEs was considered preventable, because the overrides were deemed clinically justifiable. The degree of completeness of patients' allergy lists was highly variable and generally low in both paper charts and the CPOE system. Conclusion: Overrides of drug-allergy alerts were common and about 1 in 20 resulted in ADEs, but all of the overrides resulting in ADEs appeared clinically justifiable. The high rate of alert overrides was attributable to frequent nonexact match alerts and infrequent updating of allergy lists. Based on these findings, we have made specific recommendations for increasing the specificity of alerting and thereby improving the clinical utility of the drug allergy alerting system. PMID:15298998

  5. A computerized low-level alpha and beta particle detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Hjellming, T. ); McKlveen, J.W.; Klingler, G.W. )

    1989-12-01

    This paper reports that at Arizona State University's Radiation Measurements Facility, a microprocessor simultaneously controls a commercial gas-flow proportional counter and a prototype low background anticoincidence beta scintillation counter. This fully automatic system supports multiple count scheduling, routine quality assurance and operational checks, on-line diagnostic routines, and detector high voltage control. An operator may execute MS-DOS programs using the microcomputer, while count data is being acquired asynchronously on special hardware interface cards. Data analysis and output is available in both graphic and tabular formats.

  6. A Proposal of Operational Risk Management Method Using FMEA for Drug Manufacturing Computerized System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Masakazu; Nanba, Reiji; Fukue, Yoshinori

    This paper proposes operational Risk Management (RM) method using Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) for drug manufacturing computerlized system (DMCS). The quality of drug must not be influenced by failures and operational mistakes of DMCS. To avoid such situation, DMCS has to be conducted enough risk assessment and taken precautions. We propose operational RM method using FMEA for DMCS. To propose the method, we gathered and compared the FMEA results of DMCS, and develop a list that contains failure modes, failures and countermeasures. To apply this list, we can conduct RM in design phase, find failures, and conduct countermeasures efficiently. Additionally, we can find some failures that have not been found yet.

  7. [Publications committee of a multicenter study and computerized support system--publiELSA].

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Marilia Sá; Barreto, Maurício Lima; Coeli, Cláudia Medina; Raposo, Rafael Monteiro; Mota, Eduardo Luiz Andrade; Duncan, Bruce Bartholow

    2013-06-01

    The publications committee of a multicenter study has the aim of organizing the proposals for articles, so as to ensure wide-ranging access to the data, quality and precedence. An online information and management system for study proposals (publiELSA) was developed, composed of three modules: (i) submission and approval of proposals; (ii) follow-up of approved proposals; and (iii) consolidated reports. The first module allows any interested party to search for and become acquainted with articles that have already been published or are in progress and submit new proposals. The approval process and data transfer to the researcher responsible is organized at this stage. In the second module, the aim is to monitor proposals approved until they are finally published. The third module enables searching for and viewing proposals and articles. The system has innovative characteristics, especially with regard to encouraging cooperation between different researchers, through circulation of information on each proposal submitted. In this manner, interaction between different viewpoints and experiences involved in the research is stimulated. PMID:24346720

  8. [A computerized system for the detection of fragmentations in depolarization. I].

    PubMed

    Hernández, J E; Algorri, M E; Armijo de Vega, R; Dovarganes, J P

    1990-01-01

    It was developed a computer system which allows the amplification, digitalization, signal averaging and analysis of the: time domain, first derivative and fast Fourier transform of the ECG signal. Through this methods it was possible to detect late-potentials that arise from morphologically altered myocardium with abnormalities in the conduction velocity. To validate the system 28 studies were done in 15 normal subjects (Group 1), ten in patients with recent or old myocardial infarction (Group 2), and 3 studies in patients with myocardial infarction and sustained ventricular tachycardia during the coronary care unit stay or documented by ambulatory electrocardiogram (Group 3). Of the 31 variables documented of the time domain, first derivative and frequency domain, the RMS voltage of the last 40 msegs. of the filtered QRS al 25 Hz., the crossings through the base line of the first derivative in lead Y and the RMS voltage of the last 40 msegs. with the fast Fourier Transform analysis, from 3.9 to 304.7 Hz., allowed the identification of patients in group 3 from group 1 (p less than 0.0001). By the other hand, the RMS voltage of the first derivative in lead Y, the peak to peak amplitude of the first derivative in lead Z and the RMS voltage of the first derivative in lead Z differentiate group 3 from group 2 (p less than 0.002). It is concluded that the first derivative, the frequency domain and the time domain, in this sequence, are useful in the identification of late potentials in the terminal portions of the filtered QRS. PMID:2091546

  9. Implementation of a quality assurance program for computerized treatment planning systems

    SciTech Connect

    Camargo, Priscilla R. T. L.; Rodrigues, Laura N.; Furnari, Laura; Rubo, Rodrigo A.

    2007-07-15

    In the present investigation, the necessary tests for implementing a quality assurance program for a commercial treatment planning system (TPS), recently installed at Sao Paulo University School of Medicine Clinicas Hospital--Brazil, was established and performed in accordance with the new IAEA publication TRS 430, and with AAPM Task Group 53. The tests recommended by those documents are classified mainly into acceptance, commissioning (dosimetric and nondosimetric), periodic quality assurance, and patient specific quality assurance tests. The recommendations of both IAEA and AAPM documents are being implemented at the hospital for photon beams produced by two linear accelerators. A Farmer ionization chamber was used in a 30x30x30 cm{sup 3} phantom with a dose rate of 320 monitor unit (MU)/min and 50 MU in the case of the dosimetric tests. The acceptance tests verified hardware, network systems integration, data transfer, and software parameters. The results obtained are in good agreement with the specifications of the manufacturer. For the commissioning dosimetric tests, the absolute dose was measured for simple geometries, such as square and rectangular fields, up to more complex geometries such as off-axis hard wedges and for behavior in the build up region. Results were analysed by the use of confidence limit as proposed by Venselaar et al. [Radio Ther. Oncol. 60, 191-201 (2001)]. Criteria of acceptability had been applied also for the comparison between the values of MU calculated manually and MU generated by TPS. The results of the dosimetric tests show that work can be reduced by choosing to perform only those that are more crucial, such as oblique incidence, shaped fields, hard wedges, and buildup region behavior. Staff experience with the implementation of the quality assurance program for a commercial TPS is extremely useful as part of a training program.

  10. Implementation of a quality assurance program for computerized treatment planning systems.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Priscilla R T L; Rodrigues, Laura N; Furnari, Laura; Rubo, Rodrigo A

    2007-07-01

    In the present investigation, the necessary tests for implementing a quality assurance program for a commercial treatment planning system (TPS), recently installed at Sao Paulo University School of Medicine Clinicas Hospital-Brazil, was established and performed in accordance with the new IAEA publication TRS 430, and with AAPM Task Group 53. The tests recommended by those documents are classified mainly into acceptance, commissioning (dosimetric and nondosimetric), periodic quality assurance, and patient specific quality assurance tests. The recommendations of both IAEA and AAPM documents are being implemented at the hospital for photon beams produced by two linear accelerators. A Farmer ionization chamber was used in a 30 x 30 x 30 cm3 phantom with a dose rate of 320 monitor unit (MU)/min and 50 MU in the case of the dosimetric tests. The acceptance tests verified hardware, network systems integration, data transfer, and software parameters. The results obtained are in good agreement with the specifications of the manufacturer. For the commissioning dosimetric tests, the absolute dose was measured for simple geometries, such as square and rectangular fields, up to more complex geometries such as off-axis hard wedges and for behavior in the build up region. Results were analysed by the use of confidence limit as proposed by Venselaar et al. [Radio Ther. Oncol. 60, 191-201 (2001)]. Criteria of acceptability had been applied also for the comparison between the values of MU calculated manually and MU generated by TPS. The results of the dosimetric tests show that work can be reduced by choosing to perform only those that are more crucial, such as oblique incidence, shaped fields, hard wedges, and buildup region behavior. Staff experience with the implementation of the quality assurance program for a commercial TPS is extremely useful as part of a training program. PMID:17821990

  11. Impact of a computerized system for evidence-based diabetes care on completeness of records: a before–after study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Physicians practicing in ambulatory care are adopting electronic health record (EHR) systems. Governments promote this adoption with financial incentives, some hinged on improvements in care. These systems can improve care but most demonstrations of successful systems come from a few highly computerized academic environments. Those findings may not be generalizable to typical ambulatory settings, where evidence of success is largely anecdotal, with little or no use of rigorous methods. The purpose of our pilot study was to evaluate the impact of a diabetes specific chronic disease management system (CDMS) on recording of information pertinent to guideline-concordant diabetes care and to plan for larger, more conclusive studies. Methods Using a before–after study design we analyzed the medical record of approximately 10 patients from each of 3 diabetes specialists (total = 31) who were seen both before and after the implementation of a CDMS. We used a checklist of key clinical data to compare the completeness of information recorded in the CDMS record to both the clinical note sent to the primary care physician based on that same encounter and the clinical note sent to the primary care physician based on the visit that occurred prior to the implementation of the CDMS, accounting for provider effects with Generalized Estimating Equations. Results The CDMS record outperformed by a substantial margin dictated notes created for the same encounter. Only 10.1% (95% CI, 7.7% to 12.3%) of the clinically important data were missing from the CDMS chart compared to 25.8% (95% CI, 20.5% to 31.1%) from the clinical note prepared at the time (p < 0.001) and 26.3% (95% CI, 19.5% to 33.0%) from the clinical note prepared before the CDMS was implemented (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference between dictated notes created for the CDMS-assisted encounter and those created for usual care encounters (absolute mean difference, 0.8%; 95% CI, −8.5% to

  12. Aspheric and freeform surfaces metrology with software configurable optical test system: a computerized reverse Hartmann test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Peng; Khreishi, Manal A. H.; Su, Tianquan; Huang, Run; Dominguez, Margaret Z.; Maldonado, Alejandro; Butel, Guillaume; Wang, Yuhao; Parks, Robert E.; Burge, James H.

    2014-03-01

    A software configurable optical test system (SCOTS) based on deflectometry was developed at the University of Arizona for rapidly, robustly, and accurately measuring precision aspheric and freeform surfaces. SCOTS uses a camera with an external stop to realize a Hartmann test in reverse. With the external camera stop as the reference, a coordinate measuring machine can be used to calibrate the SCOTS test geometry to a high accuracy. Systematic errors from the camera are carefully investigated and controlled. Camera pupil imaging aberration is removed with the external aperture stop. Imaging aberration and other inherent errors are suppressed with an N-rotation test. The performance of the SCOTS test is demonstrated with the measurement results from a 5-m-diameter Large Synoptic Survey Telescope tertiary mirror and an 8.4-m diameter Giant Magellan Telescope primary mirror. The results show that SCOTS can be used as a large-dynamic-range, high-precision, and non-null test method for precision aspheric and freeform surfaces. The SCOTS test can achieve measurement accuracy comparable to traditional interferometric tests.

  13. Don't Erase that Whiteboard! Archiving Student Work on a Photo-Sharing Website

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Edward; Tsui, Stephen; Hart, Alicia; Saucedo, Lydia

    2011-10-01

    Students in physics courses often use whiteboards to brainstorm, solve problems, and present results to the rest of the class, particularly in courses involving collaborative small group work and whole class discussions. The whiteboards contain a valuable record of students' collaborative work. Once a whiteboard is erased, however, its contents are lost and no longer accessible to students, instructors, or researchers and curriculum developers. We solve this problem using wireless-enabled digital cameras to create an archive of students' work on the photo-sharing website Flickr.com. This provides a persistent record of class activities that our students use frequently and find valuable. In this paper, we describe how this works in class and how students use the photos.

  14. Computerized accounting methods. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    This report summarizes the results of the research performed under the Task Order on computerized accounting methods in a period from 03 August to 31 December 1994. Computerized nuclear material accounting methods are analyzed and evaluated. Selected methods are implemented in a hardware-software complex developed as a prototype of the local network-based CONMIT system. This complex has been put into trial operation for test and evaluation of the selected methods at two selected ``Kurchatov Institute`` Russian Research Center (``KI`` RRC) nuclear facilities. Trial operation is carried out since the beginning of Initial Physical Inventory Taking in these facilities that was performed in November 1994. Operation of CONMIT prototype system was demonstrated in the middle of December 1994. Results of evaluation of CONMIT prototype system features and functioning under real operating conditions are considered. Conclusions are formulated on the ways of further development of computerized nuclear material accounting methods. The most important conclusion is a need to strengthen computer and information security features supported by the operating environment. Security provisions as well as other LANL Client/Server System approaches being developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory are recommended for selection of software and hardware components to be integrated into production version of CONMIT system for KI RRC.

  15. COMPUTERIZED EXPERT SYSTEM FOR EVALUATION OF AUTOMATED VISUAL FIELDS FROM THE ISCHEMIC OPTIC NEUROPATHY DECOMPRESSION TRIAL: METHODS, BASELINE FIELDS, AND SIX-MONTH LONGITUDINAL FOLLOW-UP

    PubMed Central

    Feldon, Steven E

    2004-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose To validate a computerized expert system evaluating visual fields in a prospective clinical trial, the Ischemic Optic Neuropathy Decompression Trial (IONDT). To identify the pattern and within-pattern severity of field defects for study eyes at baseline and 6-month follow-up. Design Humphrey visual field (HVF) change was used as the outcome measure for a prospective, randomized, multi-center trial to test the null hypothesis that optic nerve sheath decompression was ineffective in treating nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy and to ascertain the natural history of the disease. Methods An expert panel established criteria for the type and severity of visual field defects. Using these criteria, a rule-based computerized expert system interpreted HVF from baseline and 6-month visits for patients randomized to surgery or careful follow-up and for patients who were not randomized. Results A computerized expert system was devised and validated. The system was then used to analyze HVFs. The pattern of defects found at baseline for patients randomized to surgery did not differ from that of patients randomized to careful follow-up. The most common pattern of defect was a superior and inferior arcuate with central scotoma for randomized eyes (19.2%) and a superior and inferior arcuate for nonrandomized eyes (30.6%). Field patterns at 6 months and baseline were not different. For randomized study eyes, the superior altitudinal defects improved (P = .03), as did the inferior altitudinal defects (P = .01). For nonrandomized study eyes, only the inferior altitudinal defects improved (P = .02). No treatment effect was noted. Conclusions A novel rule-based expert system successfully interpreted visual field defects at baseline of eyes enrolled in the IONDT. PMID:15747764

  16. Computerized Ultrasound Risk Evaluation (CURE) System: Development of Combined Transmission and Reflection Ultrasound with New Reconstruction Algorithms for Breast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Littrup, P J; Duric, N; Azevedo, S; Chambers, D; Candy, J V; Johnson, S; Auner, G; Rather, J; Holsapple, E T

    2001-09-07

    Our Computerized Ultrasound Risk Evaluation (CURE) system has been developed to the engineering prototype stage and generated unique data sets of both transmission and reflection ultrasound (US). This paper will help define the clinical underpinnings of the developmental process and interpret the imaging results from a similar perspective. The CURE project was designed to incorporate numerous diagnostic parameters to improve upon two major areas of early breast cancer detection. CURE may provide improved tissue characterization of breast masses and reliable detection of abnormal microcalcifications found in some breast cancers and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Current breast US is limited to mass evaluation, whereas mammography also detects and guides biopsy of malignant calcifications. Screening with CURE remains a distant goal, but improved follow-up of mammographic abnormalities may represent a feasible breakthrough. Improved tissue characterization could result in reduction of the estimated one million benign biopsies each year in the United States, costing up to several billion dollars. Most breast calcifications are benign and comprise-80% of stereotactic biopsies guided by mammography. Ultrasound has the capability of finding some groups of calcifications, but further improvements in resolution should also address tissue characterization to define the soft tissue filling of ducts by DCIS. In this manner, CURE may be able to more accurately identify the malignant calcifications associated with progression of DCIS or early cancers. Currently, high-resolution US images of the breast are performed in the reflection mode at higher frequencies, which also limits depth of penetration. Reconstruction of reflection ultrasound images relies upon acoustic impedance differences in the tissue and includes only direct backscatter of the ultrasound signal. Resolution and tissue contrast of current US continues to improve with denser transducer arrays and image

  17. Designing privacy-friendly digital whiteboards for mediation of clinical progress

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In hospitals, digital versions of dry-erase whiteboards are increasingly becoming more common. One of the purposes with such whiteboards is to support coordination of care by augmenting visibility and availability of clinical information. However, clinical information usually concerns patients and is regarded as sensitive personal health information, meaning that it should be access controlled. The purpose of this study is to explore how digital whiteboards can be designed for supporting coordination of care, by providing clinicians with useful information in a usable way, and at the same time protect patient privacy. Methods A demo application was designed, demonstrated and evaluated iteratively. In total, 15 professional ward nurses role-played a scenario in which the application played a central part. Afterwards, the participants were interviewed. All interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analysed qualitatively. Results The participants valued having updated clinical information presented on a digital whiteboard, even if the information was de-identified and abstracted. According to the participants, such information could possibly improve inter-departmental communication, reduce the number of electronic health record-logins, and make nurses more rapidly aware of new information. The participants expected that they would be able to re-identify much of the de-identified information in real situations based on their insight into their patients’ recent and expected care activities. Moreover, they also valued being able to easily access more detailed information and verify patient identities. While abstraction and de-identification was regarded to sufficiently protect the patients’ privacy, the nurses also pointed out the importance of having control over what can be seen by other patients and passers-by if detailed medical information was accessed on a digital whiteboard. Conclusions Presenting updated information from patient care

  18. Computerized Mental Status Testing in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Slaughter, J.R.; Hesse, B.W.; Turner, C.W.

    1988-01-01

    To assist in the evaluation of the hundreds of thousands of geriatric veterans that will inundate the VA health care system through the latter part of this century and the early part of the next, the authors are applying a computerized mental status screening instrument. The authors have computerized a cognitive and emotive screening instrument aimed primarily at the early detection of dementia and depression, specially adapted to elderly patients.

  19. Barriers to implementation of a computerized decision support system for depression: an observational report on lessons learned in "real world" clinical settings

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite wide promotion, clinical practice guidelines have had limited effect in changing physician behavior. Effective implementation strategies to date have included: multifaceted interventions involving audit and feedback, local consensus processes, marketing; reminder systems, either manual or computerized; and interactive educational meetings. In addition, there is now growing evidence that contextual factors affecting implementation must be addressed such as organizational support (leadership procedures and resources) for the change and strategies to implement and maintain new systems. Methods To examine the feasibility and effectiveness of implementation of a computerized decision support system for depression (CDSS-D) in routine public mental health care in Texas, fifteen study clinicians (thirteen physicians and two advanced nurse practitioners) participated across five sites, accruing over 300 outpatient visits on 168 patients. Results Issues regarding computer literacy and hardware/software requirements were identified as initial barriers. Clinicians also reported concerns about negative impact on workflow and the potential need for duplication during the transition from paper to electronic systems of medical record keeping. Conclusion The following narrative report based on observations obtained during the initial testing and use of a CDSS-D in clinical settings further emphasizes the importance of taking into account organizational factors when planning implementation of evidence-based guidelines or decision support within a system. PMID:19159458

  20. Computerized Fleet Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cataldo, John J.

    1985-01-01

    The Computerized Fleet Maintenance (CFM) program of a New York school district has major component areas of garage operation, vehicle replacement, and fuel consumption. CFM detects high expenditures and provides the rationale for bus replacement. (MLF)

  1. Feasibility of integrating a clinical decision support tool into an existing computerized physician order entry system to increase seasonal influenza vaccination in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Venkat, Arvind; Chan-Tompkins, Noreen H; Hegde, Gajanan G; Chuirazzi, David M; Hunter, Roger; Szczesiul, Jillian M

    2010-08-23

    While emergency department (ED) seasonal influenza vaccination programs are feasible, reported implementation barriers include added staffing requirements to identify eligible patients and getting busy ED personnel to order and provide vaccination. We present a prospective, observational trial of integrating a clinical decision support tool into an existing ED computerized physician order entry (CPOE) system to increase ED seasonal influenza vaccination without added staffing resources, the operational barriers identified to program implementation, the revenue generated and data on opportunities for future quality improvement. Compared to the comparable pre-protocol period, ED influenza vaccination rose by 17.5% with a resultant profit margin of 34.5%. PMID:20620167

  2. Evaluating computerized health information systems: hardware, software and human ware: experiences from the Northern Province, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Herbst, K; Littlejohns, P; Rawlinson, J; Collinson, M; Wyatt, J C

    1999-09-01

    Despite enormous investment world-wide in computerized health information systems their overall benefits and costs have rarely been fully assessed. A major new initiative in South Africa provides the opportunity to evaluate the introduction of information technology from a global perspective and assess its impact on public health. The Northern Province is implementing a comprehensive integrated hospital information system (HIS) in all of its 42 hospitals. These include two mental health institutions, eight regional hospitals (two acting as a tertiary complex with teaching responsibilities) and 32 district hospitals. The overall goal of the HIS is to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of health (and welfare) services through the creation and use of information, for clinical, administrative and monitoring purposes. This multi-site implementation is being undertaken as a single project at a cost of R130 million (which represents 2.5 per cent of the health and welfare budget on an annual basis). The implementation process commenced on 1 September 1998 with the introduction of the system into Mankweng Hospital as the pilot site and is to be completed in the year 2001. An evaluation programme has been designed to maximize the likelihood of success of the implementation phase (formative evaluation) as well as providing an overall assessment of its benefits and costs (summative evaluation). The evaluation was designed as a form of health technology assessment; the system will have to prove its worth (in terms of cost-effectiveness) relative to other interventions. This is more extensive than the traditional form of technical assessment of hardware and software functionality, and moves into assessing the day-to-day utility of the system, the clinical and managerial environment in which it is situated (humanware), and ultimately its effects on the quality of patient care and public health. In keeping with new South African legislation the evaluation process sought to

  3. Computerized adaptive control weld skate with CCTV weld guidance project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    This report summarizes progress of the automatic computerized weld skate development portion of the Computerized Weld Skate with Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Arc Guidance Project. The main goal of the project is to develop an automatic welding skate demonstration model equipped with CCTV weld guidance. The three main goals of the overall project are to: (1) develop a demonstration model computerized weld skate system, (2) develop a demonstration model automatic CCTV guidance system, and (3) integrate the two systems into a demonstration model of computerized weld skate with CCTV weld guidance for welding contoured parts.

  4. Interactive Whiteboards and the First Year Experience: Integrating IWBs into Pre-Service Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Chris; Martin, Dona

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on how pre-service teachers investigate using interactive whiteboards (IWBs) to incorporate e-teaching into their lessons. Digital convergence in the classroom makes technology an integral part of teaching rather than an add-on feature (Kent, 2004a, 2004b). To establish a context for the use of IWB in schools, the paper…

  5. Can the Interactive Whiteboard Support Young Children's Collaborative Communication and Thinking in Classroom Science Activities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kershner, Ruth; Mercer, Neil; Warwick, Paul; Kleine Staarman, Judith

    2010-01-01

    Interactive whiteboards (IWBs) have been widely introduced to English primary schools (5-11 years) in the last decade and this has generated much research interest. In the past, research has focused on IWB-use in teacher-led sessions, attending particularly to the nature of teacher-pupil interaction at the IWB and the apparent motivational…

  6. Students' Use of the Interactive Whiteboard during Physics Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellingsaeter, Magnus Strøm; Bungum, Berit

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of how the interactive whiteboard (IWB) may facilitate collective meaning-making processes in group work in engineering education. In the case, first-year students attended group-work sessions as an organised part of a basic physics course at a Norwegian university college. Each student group was equipped with an…

  7. Getting the Most from Your Interactive Whiteboard Investment: Three Guiding Principles for Designing Effective Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeSantis, Josh

    2012-01-01

    The adoption of interactive whiteboards (IWB) in many schools outpaced the delivery of adequate professional development on their use. Many teachers receive IWBs without adequate training on methods to use the technology to improve their instruction. Consequently, IWBs remain an underutilized resource in many classrooms. Teachers who are given…

  8. Interactive Whiteboards in Early Childhood Mathematics: Strategies for Effective Implementation in Pre-K-Grade 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linder, Sandra M.

    2012-01-01

    Teachers are using technological innovations--including interactive whiteboards--in pre-K-grade 3 classrooms across the country. An IWB is a wall-mounted, touch-sensitive flat screen. When connected to a computer (or another electronic device) and a projector, it displays enlarged instructional content (such as a math word problem, pictures or…

  9. Learning Effects of Interactive Whiteboard Pedagogy for Students in Taiwan from the Perspective of Multiple Intelligences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hong-Ren; Chiang, Chih-Hao; Lin, Wen-Shan

    2013-01-01

    With the rapid progress in information technology, interactive whiteboards have become IT-integrated in teaching activities. The theory of multiple intelligences argues that every person possesses multiple intelligences, emphasizing learners' cognitive richness and the possible role of these differences in enhanced learning. This study is the…

  10. Development of the Interactive Whiteboard Acceptance Scale (IWBAS): An Initial Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Kung-Teck; Teo, Timothy; Goh, Pauline Swee Choo

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to develop and to conduct an initial psychometric evaluation of the Interactive Whiteboard Acceptance Scale (IWBAS). The process of item-generation for the IWBAS was carried out through the sequential mixed-method approach. A total of 149 student teachers from a teacher-education institution in Australia…

  11. The Use of Interactive Whiteboards in Teaching Non-Roman Scripts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tozcu, Anjel

    2008-01-01

    This study explores the use of the interactive whiteboards in teaching the non-Latin based orthographies of Hindi, Pashto, Dari, Persian (Farsi), and Hebrew. All these languages use non-roman scripts, and except for Hindi, they are cursive. Thus, letters within words are connected and for beginners the script may look quite complicated,…

  12. Can the Interactive Whiteboard Help to Provide "Dialogic Space" for Children's Collaborative Activity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, Neil; Warwick, Paul; Kershner, Ruth; Kleine Staarman, Judith

    2010-01-01

    This paper is based on a project investigating the use of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) as tools for children's group-based learning in primary science. A series of science activities were designed with participating teachers, in which groups of three or four children used the IWB to access information, consider options, plan actions and make…

  13. Finding the Way: Signposts in Teachers' Development of Effective Interactive Whiteboard Pedagogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murcia, Karen; McKenzie, Susan

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the process and outcomes of an action research project conducted in collaboration with classroom teachers who developed strategies that utilized Interactive Whiteboard technology for improving children's literacy and numeracy. Critical incident stories are used to demonstrate significant signposts in the teachers' development…

  14. The Effect of Interactive Whiteboard Technology on a Math Curriculum Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flory, Vern

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research was to determine the effect of interactive whiteboard technology on the math curriculum in a single school district. Methodology: Six second grade teachers tracked their technology use during math instruction to be compared with student performance on a common assessment at the conclusion a counting money unit…

  15. Saudi Secondary School Teachers Attitudes' towards Using Interactive Whiteboard in Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isman, Aytekin; Abanmy, Fahad AbdulAziz; Hussein, Hisham Barakat; Al Saadany, Mohammed Abdelrahman

    2012-01-01

    The research aims at investigating the Saudi Secondary school Teachers' Attitudes towards using Interactive Whiteboard in the classrooms. The research uses the Quasi- Experimental approach, with one group (100) teachers, and limited to the Secondary school Teachers that enrolled in the first semester of (2011/2012) academic year. The research uses…

  16. Perceptions of Elementary School Teachers and Students Using Interactive Whiteboards in English Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Ju Yin; Teng, Ya Wen

    2014-01-01

    Interactive whiteboards (IWBs) have been widely used in elementary schools in Taiwan. Hence, the purpose of this study was to investigate the perceptions of elementary school teachers and students using IWBs in English teaching and learning. Six public school English teachers and 614 students of 5th and 6th-grades in Yangmei Township, Taoyuan…

  17. Networked Interactive Whiteboards: Rationale, Affordances and New Pedagogies for Regional Australian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an argument for the use of networked interactive whiteboards (NIWBs) in regional Australian higher education and identifies new pedagogies for this context. Most Australian universities operate multiple campuses, and many use video conference facilities to deliver courses across these sites. For students at remote video…

  18. Build Your Own Board: Brightboards Offer a Cost-Effective Alternative to Interactive Whiteboards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallis, Keith; Williamson, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Interactive whiteboards are all the rage in classrooms across the world these days, and for good reason. Like most technology, they hold students' attention much better than a traditional lecture-and-blackboard lesson ever could. They also solve the problem of having only one classroom computer for 30 students by projecting the screen at the front…

  19. A Qualitative Study of Student and Teacher Perceptions Utilizing Interactive Whiteboards in Middle School Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbo, Donna Cirillo

    2014-01-01

    Since the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, interactive whiteboards (IWBs) have become a reality and a popular concept in addressed technology use in elementary and secondary schools and the importance of 21st century skills, integrating classrooms across the United States and abroad. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine the…

  20. Interactive Whiteboards: Boon or Bandwagon? A Critical Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Heather J.; Higgins, Steve; Wall, Kate; Miller, Jen

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews the literature concerning the introduction of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) in educational settings. It identifies common themes to emerge from a burgeoning and diverse literature, which includes reports and summaries available on the Internet. Although the literature reviewed is overwhelmingly positive about the impact and…

  1. Quantitative causal-comparative relationship between interactive whiteboard instruction and student science proficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danelczyk, Ewa Krystyna

    The purpose of this quantitative causal-comparative study was to investigate the relationship between the instructional effects of the interactive whiteboard and students' proficiency levels in eighth-grade science as evidenced by the state FCAT scores. A total of 46 eighth-grade science teachers in a South Florida public school district completed a survey via the Internet. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, t tests, Pearson's product moment correlation, and Spearman's rank order correlation. Results revealed a significant difference in mean between eighth-grade students' proficiency percentages reported by participating teachers and the statewide results for the years 2008-2012 (p < .0005), with the exception of results reported in the year 2010 (p > .05). The significant results were not found between use of the interactive whiteboard for science instruction and students' science proficiency levels as evidenced by FCAT (p > .05), and teachers' professional experience and students' proficiency levels (p > .05). The recommendation from the current study is to continue research pertaining to instructional effectiveness of the interactive whiteboard in relationship to standardized tests because existing findings on similar topics are contradictory. There is a need for more empirical evidence on the long-term impact of the interactive whiteboard on students' achievement in science.

  2. Whiteboard animation for knowledge mobilization: a test case from the Slave River and Delta, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Lori E. A.; Bharadwaj, Lalita A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To present the co-creation of a whiteboard animation video, an enhanced e-storytelling technique for relaying traditional knowledge interview results as narratives. Design We present a design for translating interview results into a script and accompanying series of figures, followed by technical steps to create a whiteboard animation product. Method Our project used content analysis and researcher triangulation, followed by a collaborative process to develop an animated video to disseminate research findings. A 13-minute long whiteboard animation video was produced from a research study about changing environments in northern Canadian communities and was distributed to local people. Three challenging issues in the video creation process including communication issues, technical difficulties and contextual debate were resolved among the supporting agencies and researchers. Conclusions Dissemination of findings is a crucial step in the research process. Whiteboard animation video products may be a viable and culturally-appropriate form of relaying research results back to Indigenous communities in a storytelling format. PMID:26507716

  3. Interactive Whiteboard Professional Development: A Look through the Eyes of Early Childhood Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Nicole Southerland

    2012-01-01

    With vastly ever-changing technology, there come greater possibilities in the school classroom. One possibility includes the interactive whiteboard, IWB (Higgins, Beauchamp, & Miller, 2007). However, there is little research on how to effectively promote the use of an IWB in the classroom for anything other than as a mediating tool. One option…

  4. Making Learning Active with Interactive Whiteboards, Podcasts, and Digital Storytelling in ELL Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hur, Jung Won; Suh, Suhyun

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine effective ways to integrate an interactive whiteboard, podcast, and digital storytelling for language proficiency development in English language learners. Researchers integrated these three technologies into a 60-hour intensive summer English program and investigated their impacts on student vocabulary…

  5. The Effects of Using an Interactive Whiteboard on the Academic Achievement of University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akbas, Oktay; Pektas, Huseyin Mirac

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the effects of the use of an interactive whiteboard on the academic achievement of university students on the topic of electricity in a science and technology laboratory class. The study was designed as a pretest/posttest control group experimental study. Mean, standard deviation and t- tests were used for…

  6. Improving a Lecture-Size Molecular Model Set by Repurposing Used Whiteboard Markers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dragojlovic, Veljko

    2015-01-01

    Preparation of an inexpensive model set from whiteboard markers and either HGS molecular model set or atoms made of wood is described. The model set is relatively easy to prepare and is sufficiently large to be suitable as an instructor set for use in lectures.

  7. SMART Moves? A Case Study of One Teacher's Pedagogical Change through Use of the Interactive Whiteboard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohon, Elizabeth H.

    2008-01-01

    This case study investigates how the use of an interactive whiteboard (IWB) leads to pedagogical change within a UK secondary school classroom. A teacher's experiences as recorded in a reflective journal, and the responses of students as recorded in a questionnaire, are set within the context of rhetoric about the value of IWBs. It is argued that…

  8. Reasons for Using or Not Using Interactive Whiteboards: Perspectives of Taiwanese Elementary Mathematics and Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jang, Syh-Jong; Tsai, Meng-Fang

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the reasons for using or not using interactive whiteboards (IWBs) by elementary school mathematics and science teachers in Taiwan. It also considers whether there were any significant differences in the reasons according to teaching subjects, teacher gender, and teaching experience. The survey was developed based on an overview…

  9. A Thematic Review of Interactive Whiteboard Use in Science Education: Rationales, Purposes, Methods and General Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ormanci, Ummuhan; Cepni, Salih; Deveci, Isa; Aydin, Ozhan

    2015-01-01

    In Turkey and many other countries, the importance of the interactive whiteboard (IWB) is increasing, and as a result, projects and studies are being conducted regarding the use of the IWB in classrooms. Accordingly, in these countries, many issues are being researched, such as the IWB's contribution to the education process, its use in classroom…

  10. Teachers' Belief and Use of Interactive Whiteboards for Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turel, Yalin Kilic; Johnson, Tristan E.

    2012-01-01

    Interactive whiteboards (IWB) are regarded as one of the most revolutionary instructional technologies for various educational levels. While the impacts of IWBs in classroom settings have been examined recently in a number of studies, this study not only looks at the perception but also examines the actual usage and behaviors associated with…

  11. Transforming Pedagogy through Interactive Whiteboards: Using Activity Theory to Understand Tensions in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Trudy

    2010-01-01

    There has been considerable investment in the use of interactive whiteboard technology in Australia, particularly in primary schools. School leaders and teachers are seeking advice on effective ways to support teachers' pedagogical development to achieve the potential benefits of these devices. Using activity theory as a framework for lesson…

  12. Open Educational Resources for Call Teacher Education: The iTILT Interactive Whiteboard Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whyte, Shona; Schmid, Euline Cutrim; van Hazebrouck Thompson, Sanderin; Oberhofer, Margret

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses challenges and opportunities arising during the development of open educational resources (OERs) to support communicative language teaching (CLT) with interactive whiteboards (IWBs). iTILT (interactive Technologies in Language Teaching), a European Lifelong Learning Project, has two main aims: (a) to promote "best…

  13. Technology Integration: Exploring Interactive Whiteboards as Dialogic Spaces in the Foundation Phase Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Silva, Chamelle R.; Chigona, A.; Adendorff, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Among its many affordances, the interactive whiteboard (IWB) as a digital space for children's dialogic engagement in the Foundation Phase classroom remains largely under-exploited. This paper emanates from a study which was undertaken in an attempt to understand how teachers acquire knowledge of emerging technologies and how this shapes their…

  14. Metaphors of High School Students about the Concept of "Interactive Whiteboard"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akturk, Ahmet Oguz; Mihci, Sinem; Celik, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim of this phenomenographic study is to discover the perceptions of high school students regarding the concept of "Interactive Whiteboard" through metaphors. Phenomenography, which is a qualitative research method, was used in the study. The research group of the study consisted of a total of 162 students studying at the…

  15. Interactive Whiteboard Factor in Education: Students' Points of View and Their Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aytac, Tufan

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to investigate the students' viewpoints and the problems they face during the use of Interactive Whiteboard (IWB). This research has been applied on 202 students in primary school and high school in Ankara. In this study, the quantitative data were collected through "IWB Survey Questions"…

  16. Quantitative Causal-Comparative Relationship between Interactive Whiteboard Instruction and Student Science Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danelczyk, Ewa Krystyna

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative causal-comparative study was to investigate the relationship between the instructional effects of the interactive whiteboard and students' proficiency levels in eighth-grade science as evidenced by the state FCAT scores. A total of 46 eighth-grade science teachers in a South Florida public school district completed…

  17. The Effect of Interactive Whiteboard-Based Instruction on Mathematics Performance of English Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Link, Tammy

    2012-01-01

    A quasi-experimental research study was conducted to investigate the performance of English learners (ELs) on mathematics assessments when using interactive whiteboard (IWB)-based instruction as compared to text-based instruction. A sample of 47 seventh-and eighth-grade EL students from ABC Middle School (name has been changed) was included in…

  18. Turkish Students' and Teachers' Attitudes toward the Use of Interactive Whiteboards in EFL Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews-Aydinli, Julie; Elaziz, Fatih

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the attitudes of students and teachers toward the use of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) in a foreign language teaching and learning context. The study also investigated possible factors affecting teachers' and students' attitudes toward IWB technology. Data were collected through questionnaires distributed to 458 students and…

  19. Preferences and Attitudes for Using Interactive Whiteboards in Different Courses and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ipek, Ismail; Sözcü, Ömer Faruk

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate teachers' and students' considerations, preferences, attitudes and awareness related to using Interactive Whiteboards in 7-12 grades and different courses, and learning. 1013 students from elementary and secondary schools and 65 teachers from different schools were selected to take questionnaire for…

  20. Primary School Teachers' Use of Digital Resources with Interactive Whiteboards: The Australian Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Damian; Phelps, Renata; Urane, Nikkita; Lee, Mal

    2012-01-01

    As interactive whiteboards appear in increasing numbers in primary classrooms, questions will continue to be asked about the effectiveness of these devices in supporting teaching and learning. It is not the board itself, however, which is likely to make a difference to student learning outcomes, but the resources which teachers choose to use in…

  1. Teachers' Interactive Whiteboard Training in Title I Mathematics Classrooms: A Qualitative Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, James M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to investigate the lived experiences of teachers at an urban Title 1 elementary school regarding the training, beliefs and use of interactive whiteboards as a resource to raise student mathematical achievement levels. The problem addressed in this qualitative phenomenological study was the…

  2. Learning Mathematics with Interactive Whiteboards and Computer-Based Graphing Utility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erbas, Ayhan Kursat; Ince, Muge; Kaya, Sukru

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of a technology-supported learning environment utilizing an interactive whiteboard (IWB) and NuCalc graphing software compared to a traditional direct instruction-based environment on student achievement in graphs of quadratic functions and attitudes towards mathematics and technology. Sixty-five…

  3. Interactive Whiteboard and Virtual Learning Environment Combined: Effects on Mathematics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heemskerk, I.; Kuiper, E.; Meijer, J.

    2014-01-01

    This study reports on the effects of the combined use of an interactive whiteboard (IWB) and a virtual learning environment (VLE) on mathematics performance and motivation. Lessons taught with an IWB were made available on the VLE, so that they could be consulted regardless of time and place. Students' mathematics performance was monitored…

  4. Understanding Early Childhood Student Teachers' Acceptance and Use of Interactive Whiteboard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Kung-Teck; Russo, Sharon; McDowall, Janet

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to understand early childhood student teachers' self-reported acceptance and use of interactive whiteboard (IWB), by employing the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) as the research framework. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 112 student teachers enrolled in science-related…

  5. Multimodality, Orchestration and Participation in the Context of Classroom Use of the Interactive Whiteboard: A Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twiner, Alison; Coffin, Caroline; Littleton, Karen; Whitelock, Denise

    2010-01-01

    This paper will offer a discussion of the literature concerning multimodality, orchestration and participation related to classroom use of the interactive whiteboard (IWB). Specifically, it will explore the place, or potential use, of the IWB to resource a multimodal approach to teaching and learning, emphasising the complex connections that need…

  6. Interactive Whiteboards and Digital Teaching Book to Secondary School Teachers and Contextual Affordances: Hybrid or Substitute?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacurar, Ecaterina; Clad, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The objective of our study is to analyze the utility and the integration of the interactive whiteboard (IWB) and interactive textbook into the teaching skills. This project concerns middle and high school teachers with professional career guidance in France. The research had as objectives the appropriation in the use of IWB features and the…

  7. Efficacy of Interactive Whiteboard on Psychomotor Skills Achievement of Students in Isometric and Orthographic Projection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gambari, Isiaka A.; Balogun, Sherifat A.; Alfa, Ahmadu S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses importance of technology education and evidences of declining performance of junior secondary school students in basic technology subject. Potentials on interactive whiteboard (IWB) as one of the new technologies to meet the challenges of the 21st century are also discussed. The efficacy of IWB for teaching Isometric and…

  8. Calibrator Blocks For Computerized Tomography (CT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, H. Peter

    1990-01-01

    Sets of calibrator blocks developed for use with industrial computerized tomography (CT) systems. Set of blocks (or number of stacked sets of blocks) placed on object table of CT system and scanned in usual way. Blocks include holes of known size, shape, and location. Appearance of holes in output image of CT system used to verify operation of system.

  9. A Management Information System Model for Program Management. Ph.D. Thesis - Oklahoma State Univ.; [Computerized Systems Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipman, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    The development of a model to simulate the information system of a program management type of organization is reported. The model statistically determines the following parameters: type of messages, destinations, delivery durations, type processing, processing durations, communication channels, outgoing messages, and priorites. The total management information system of the program management organization is considered, including formal and informal information flows and both facilities and equipment. The model is written in General Purpose System Simulation 2 computer programming language for use on the Univac 1108, Executive 8 computer. The model is simulated on a daily basis and collects queue and resource utilization statistics for each decision point. The statistics are then used by management to evaluate proposed resource allocations, to evaluate proposed changes to the system, and to identify potential problem areas. The model employs both empirical and theoretical distributions which are adjusted to simulate the information flow being studied.

  10. [A computerized system for the management of letters of authorization for access to sensitive data in a research and teaching hospital].

    PubMed

    Bodina, Annalisa; Brizzolara, Antonella; Vadruccio, Gianluca; Castaldi, Silvana

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the experience of a hospital which has introduced a system of computerized management of letters of authorization for healthcare workers to access sensitive health data, through the use of open source software. A new corporate intranet portal was created with access given only to the privacy contacts of each operational unit of the hospital. Once the privacy contact has entered the relevant user authorization, these must be approved first by the Directors of the respective operational units and finally by the privacy officer. The introduction of this system has allowed a systematic approach to the management of authorization for access to health data by hospital staff, regular updating and monitoring of the authorization and the start of a process of digitalization of documents. PMID:22507990

  11. Seismic Computerized Alert Network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1986-01-01

    In 1985 the USGS devised a model for a Seismic Computerized Alert Network (SCAN) that would use continuous monitoring of seismic data from existing types of instruments to provide automatic, highly-reliable early warnings of earthquake shaking. In a large earthquake, substantial damaging ground motions may occur at great distances from the earthquake's epicenter.

  12. The History Computerization Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David L.

    1992-01-01

    Description of the History Computerization Project, which is being developed for the exchange of information between researchers, librarians, archivists, museum curators, preservation groups, and historical societies, focuses on workshops that teach the use of computer database management for historical cataloging and research. (LRW)

  13. Computerized Drug Information Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Smith, Daniel R.

    1972-01-01

    To compare computerized services in chemistry, pharmacology, toxicology, and clinical medicine of pharmaceutical interest, equivalent profiles were run on magnetic tape files of CA-Condensates," CBAC," Excerpta Medica," MEDLARS" and Ringdoc." The results are tabulated for overlap of services, relative speed of citing references, and unique…

  14. Computerized Fleet Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cataldo, John J.

    The computerization of school bus maintenance records by the Niskayuna (New York) Central School District enabled the district's transportation department to engage in management practices resulting in significant savings. The district obtains computer analyses of the work performed on all vehicles, including time spent, parts, labor, costs,…

  15. Nursing Research Using Computerized Data Bases

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Kathleen A.

    1981-01-01

    Because of the implementation of large computerized information systems, the analyses of patient care data important to clinical nursing research is possible. Simultaneously, the heralding of computer technology in clinical practice areas has necessitated new research ideas to be pursued. This paper will describe a taxonomy of research data available on hospital information systems that may be used for clinical nursing research.

  16. Evaluation of medium-term consequences of implementing commercial computerized physician order entry and clinical decision support prescribing systems in two ‘early adopter’ hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Cresswell, Kathrin M; Bates, David W; Williams, Robin; Morrison, Zoe; Slee, Ann; Coleman, Jamie; Robertson, Ann; Sheikh, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Objective To understand the medium-term consequences of implementing commercially procured computerized physician order entry (CPOE) and clinical decision support (CDS) systems in ‘early adopter’ hospitals. Materials and methods In-depth, qualitative case study in two hospitals using a CPOE or a CDS system for at least 2 years. Both hospitals had implemented commercially available systems. Hospital A had implemented a CPOE system (with basic decision support), whereas hospital B invested additional resources in a CDS system that facilitated order entry but which was integrated with electronic health records and offered more advanced CDS. We used a combination of documentary analysis of the implementation plans, audiorecorded semistructured interviews with system users, and observations of strategic meetings and systems usage. Results We collected 11 documents, conducted 43 interviews, and conducted a total of 21.5 h of observations. We identified three major themes: (1) impacts on individual users, including greater legibility of prescriptions, but also some accounts of increased workloads; (2) the introduction of perceived new safety risks related to accessibility and usability of hardware and software, with users expressing concerns that some problems such as duplicate prescribing were more likely to occur; and (3) realizing organizational benefits through secondary uses of data. Conclusions We identified little difference in the medium-term consequences of a CPOE and a CDS system. It is important that future studies investigate the medium- and longer-term consequences of CPOE and CDS systems in a wider range of hospitals. PMID:24431334

  17. A computerized obstetric medical record.

    PubMed

    Stead, W W; Brame, R G; Hammond, W E; Jelovsek, F R; Estes, E H; Parker, R T

    1977-04-01

    Duke University has utilized computerized obstetric medical records since 1971. System evolution is described. Deficiencies in the current system appear to evolve from the computer/human interface rather than from basic system design. Critical elements in system success are physician acceptance of the appearance of data collection sheets and printed notes and continual rapid response in programing modification to allow for physician individuality and changes in medical practice. The limiting factor in the potential usefulness of such a system is the rate of incomplete data collection. It is suggested that if the physician were to enter data directly into the computer through a terminal, data collection would be more accurate and complete. PMID:854253

  18. Assessment of social cognition in non-human primates using a network of computerized automated learning device (ALDM) test systems.

    PubMed

    Fagot, Joël; Marzouki, Yousri; Huguet, Pascal; Gullstrand, Julie; Claidière, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Fagot & Paleressompoulle(1) and Fagot & Bonte(2) have published an automated learning device (ALDM) for the study of cognitive abilities of monkeys maintained in semi-free ranging conditions. Data accumulated during the last five years have consistently demonstrated the efficiency of this protocol to investigate individual/physical cognition in monkeys, and have further shown that this procedure reduces stress level during animal testing(3). This paper demonstrates that networks of ALDM can also be used to investigate different facets of social cognition and in-group expressed behaviors in monkeys, and describes three illustrative protocols developed for that purpose. The first study demonstrates how ethological assessments of social behavior and computerized assessments of cognitive performance could be integrated to investigate the effects of socially exhibited moods on the cognitive performance of individuals. The second study shows that batteries of ALDM running in parallel can provide unique information on the influence of the presence of others on task performance. Finally, the last study shows that networks of ALDM test units can also be used to study issues related to social transmission and cultural evolution. Combined together, these three studies demonstrate clearly that ALDM testing is a highly promising experimental tool for bridging the gap in the animal literature between research on individual cognition and research on social cognition. PMID:25992495

  19. An Observational Study of the Impact of a Computerized Physician Order Entry System on the Rate of Medication Errors in an Orthopaedic Surgery Unit

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Fabien; Majoul, Elyes; Montes-Palacios, Carlota; Antignac, Marie; Cherrier, Bertrand; Doursounian, Levon; Feron, Jean-Marc; Robert, Cyrille; Hejblum, Gilles; Fernandez, Christine; Hindlet, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Aim To assess the impact of the implementation of a Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE) associated with a pharmaceutical checking of medication orders on medication errors in the 3 stages of drug management (i.e. prescription, dispensing and administration) in an orthopaedic surgery unit. Methods A before-after observational study was conducted in the 66-bed orthopaedic surgery unit of a teaching hospital (700 beds) in Paris France. Direct disguised observation was used to detect errors in prescription, dispensing and administration of drugs, before and after the introduction of computerized prescriptions. Compliance between dispensing and administration on the one hand and the medical prescription on the other hand was studied. The frequencies and types of errors in prescribing, dispensing and administration were investigated. Results During the pre and post-CPOE period (two days for each period) 111 and 86 patients were observed, respectively, with corresponding 1,593 and 1,388 prescribed drugs. The use of electronic prescribing led to a significant 92% decrease in prescribing errors (479/1593 prescribed drugs (30.1%) vs 33/1388 (2.4%), p < 0.0001) and to a 17.5% significant decrease in administration errors (209/1222 opportunities (17.1%) vs 200/1413 (14.2%), p < 0.05). No significant difference was found in regards to dispensing errors (430/1219 opportunities (35.3%) vs 449/1407 (31.9%), p = 0.07). Conclusion The use of CPOE and a pharmacist checking medication orders in an orthopaedic surgery unit reduced the incidence of medication errors in the prescribing and administration stages. The study results suggest that CPOE is a convenient system for improving the quality and safety of drug management. PMID:26207363

  20. Computerizing Audit Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lahey, Joanna N.; Beasley, Ryan A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper briefly discusses the history, benefits, and shortcomings of traditional audit field experiments to study market discrimination. Specifically it identifies template bias and experimenter bias as major concerns in the traditional audit method, and demonstrates through an empirical example that computerization of a resume or correspondence audit can efficiently increase sample size and greatly mitigate these concerns. Finally, it presents a useful meta-tool that future researchers can use to create their own resume audits. PMID:24904189

  1. KrasMAS: Implementation of a nuclear material computerized accounting system at the Mining and Chemical Combine through the Russian/US cooperative MPC and A program

    SciTech Connect

    Dorofeev, K.V.; Zhidkov, V.V.; Martinez, B.J.; Perry, R.T.; Scott, S.C.

    1998-12-31

    The Russian/US Mining and Chemical Combine (Gorno-Kimichesky Kombinat, GKhK, also referred to as Krasnoyarsk-26) Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC and A) project was initiated in June 1996. A critical component of the ongoing cooperative MPC and A enhancements at the GKhK is the implementation of a computerized nuclear material control and accountability (MC and A) system. This system must meet the MC and A requirements of the GKhK by integrating the information generated by numerous existing and new MC and A components in place at the GKhK (e.g., scales, bar-code equipment, NDA measurement systems). During the first phase of this effort, the GKhK adapted CoreMAS (developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory) for use in the PuO{sub 2} storage facility. This included formulation of Web-based user interfaces for plant personnel, Russification of the existing user interface, and at the functional level, modification of the CoreMAS stored procedures. The modified system is referred to as KrasMAS and builds upon completed work on CoreMAS. Ongoing efforts include adding GKhK specific report forms and expanding the functionality of the system for implementation at the radiochemical processing and reactor plants of the GKhK. Collaborations with other Russian facilities for appropriate parts of these efforts will be pursued.

  2. Computerized Symbol Processing for Handicapped Persons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osguthorpe, Russell T.; And Others

    The paper describes the development of a computerized symbol processing system which allows nonspeaking severely handicapped persons to create communication electronically. Two pilot studies investigated the use of Rebus and Bliss Symbols with either an Apple Graphics Tablet or the Power Pad, a peripheral which allowed users to activate the…

  3. Computerized Financial Reporting Based on GAAP.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tikkanen, Stan; Liljeberg, Burt

    1983-01-01

    Describes the statewide computerized system developed in Minnesota following the 1976 enactment of the Uniform Financial Accounting and Reporting Standards (UFARS) law. UFARS includes provisions for an advisory council responsible for recommending accounting and reporting procedures, and seven data processing centers to serve all 560 Minnesota…

  4. Computerizing Maintenance Management Improves School Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conroy, Pat

    2002-01-01

    Describes how a Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS), a centralized maintenance operations database that facilitates work order procedures and staff directives, can help individual school campuses and school districts to manage maintenance. Presents the benefits of CMMS and things to consider in CMMS selection. (EV)

  5. Human factors analysis and design methods for nuclear waste retrieval systems. Volume III. User's guide for the computerized event-tree analysis technique. [CETAT computer program

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, S.M.; Deretsky, Z.

    1980-08-01

    This document provides detailed instructions for using the Computerized Event-Tree Analysis Technique (CETAT), a program designed to assist a human factors analyst in predicting event probabilities in complex man-machine configurations found in waste retrieval systems. The instructions contained herein describe how to (a) identify the scope of a CETAT analysis, (b) develop operator performance data, (c) enter an event-tree structure, (d) modify a data base, and (e) analyze event paths and man-machine system configurations. Designed to serve as a tool for developing, organizing, and analyzing operator-initiated event probabilities, CETAT simplifies the tasks of the experienced systems analyst by organizing large amounts of data and performing cumbersome and time consuming arithmetic calculations. The principal uses of CETAT in the waste retrieval development project will be to develop models of system reliability and evaluate alternative equipment designs and operator tasks. As with any automated technique, however, the value of the output will be a function of the knowledge and skill of the analyst using the program.

  6. Computerized design of CAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, B. E.; Pham, T. A.

    1982-11-01

    A computerized ballistic design technique for CAD/PAD is described by which a set of ballistic design parameters are determined, all of which satisfy a particular performance requirement. In addition, the program yields the remaining performance predictions, so that only a very few computer runs of the design program can quickly bring the ballistic design within the specification limits prescribed. An example is presented for a small propulsion device, such as a remover or actuator, for which the input specifications define a maximum allowable thrust and minimum end-of-stroke velocity. The resulting output automatically satisfies the input requirements, and will always yield an acceptable ballistic design.

  7. Computerized flow monitors detect small kicks

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, D.; White, D. )

    1992-02-24

    This paper reports on a smart alarm system installed on a number of offshore rigs and one land rig which can detect kicks more quickly than conventional systems. This rapid kick detection improves rig safety because the smaller the detected influx, the easier it is to control the well. The extensive computerized monitoring system helps drilling personnel detect fluid influxes and fluid losses before the changes in flow would normally be apparent.

  8. Automated testing of cognitive performance in monkeys: use of a battery of computerized test systems by a troop of semi-free-ranging baboons (Papio papio).

    PubMed

    Fagot, Joël; Bonté, Elodie

    2010-05-01

    Fagot and Paleressompoulle (2009) published an automated learning device for monkeys (ALDM) to test the cognitive functions of nonhuman primates within their social groups, but the efficiency of the ALDM procedure with large groups remains unknown. In the present study, 10 ALDM systems were provided ad lib to a troop of 26 semi-free-ranging baboons that were initially naive with computerized testing. The test program taught baboons to solve two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) and matching-to-sample (MTS) tasks. A million trials were recorded for the group during a period of 85 days (Experiment 1). Their analysis shows that 75% of the baboons participated at high frequencies and quickly learned the 2AFC and MTS tasks. In Experiment 2, we compared the baboons' behavior when the ADLM systems were either accessible or closed. ALDM reduced frequencies of object-directed behaviors, but had no overt consequence on social conflicts. In Experiment 3, we tested the process of the global or local attributes of visual stimuli in MTS-trained baboons in order to illustrate the efficiency of ALDM for behavioral studies requiring complex experimental designs. Altogether, the results of the present study validate the use of ALDM to efficiently test monkeys in large social groups. ALDM has a strong potential for a variety of scientific disciplines, including for biomedical research. Supplemental materials for this article may be downloaded from http://brm.psychonomic-journals.org/content/supplemental. PMID:20479182

  9. Computerized Point of Sale = Faster Service + Better Accountability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannell, Dorothy V.

    1991-01-01

    Describes selecting and installing a computerized point of sale for a district food service program; the equipment needed and preferred; and the training of trainers, managers, and cashiers. Also discusses the direct benefits and side benefits of the system. (MLF)

  10. The effect of Computerized Physician Order Entry and decision support system on medication errors in the neonatal ward: experiences from an Iranian teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, Alireza; Ellenius, Johan; Pourasghar, Faramarz; Tofighi, Shahram; Salehi, Aref; Amanati, Ali; Fors, Uno G H

    2011-02-01

    Medication dosing errors are frequent in neonatal wards. In an Iranian neonatal ward, a 7.5 months study was designed in three periods to compare the effect of Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE) without and with decision support functionalities in reducing non-intercepted medication dosing errors in antibiotics and anticonvulsants. Before intervention (Period 1), error rate was 53%, which did not significantly change after the implementation of CPOE without decision support (Period 2). However, errors were significantly reduced to 34% after that the decision support was added to the CPOE (Period 3; P < 0.001). Dose errors were more often intercepted than frequency errors. Over-dose was the most frequent type of medication errors and curtailed-interval was the least. Transcription errors did not reduce after the CPOE implementation. Physicians ignored alerts when they could not understand why they appeared. A suggestion is to add explanations about these reasons to increase physicians' compliance with the system's recommendations. PMID:20703588

  11. Hardware synthesis from DDL description. [simulating a digital system for computerized design of large scale integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiva, S. G.; Shah, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    The details of digital systems can be conveniently input into the design automation system by means of hardware description language (HDL). The computer aided design and test (CADAT) system at NASA MSFC is used for the LSI design. The digital design language (DDL) was selected as HDL for the CADAT System. DDL translator output can be used for the hardware implementation of the digital design. Problems of selecting the standard cells from the CADAT standard cell library to realize the logic implied by the DDL description of the system are addressed.

  12. Computerizing natural history collections.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, Mary E

    2013-09-01

    Computers are ubiquitous in the life sciences and are associated with many of the practical and conceptual changes that characterize biology's twentieth-century transformation. Yet comparatively little has been written about how scientists use computers. Despite this relative lack of scholarly attention, the claim that computers revolutionized the life sciences by making the impossible possible is widespread, and relatively unchallenged. How did the introduction of computers into research programs shape scientific practice? The Museum of Vertebrate Zoology (MVZ) at the University of California, Berkeley provides a tractable way into this under-examined question because it is possible to follow the computerization of data in the context of long-term research programs. PMID:23664113

  13. Detection of human immunodeficiency virus in infected CEM cells using fluorescent DNA probes and a laser-based computerized image cytofluorometry system.

    PubMed

    Hart, L; Donovan, R M; Goldstein, E; Brady, F P

    1990-04-01

    Quantitative nonradioactive methods to measure the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in individually infected cells are needed for the direct assessment of HIV infection, for the evaluation of antiviral chemotherapy and for testing the efficacy of vaccines. As a first step in accomplishing this goal, we built an argon ion laser-based computerized image cytofluorometry (ALCIC) system and determined this instrument's ability to quantitatively measure HIV nucleotides in infected lymphocytes. ALCIC consisted of a 43-mW argon ion laser connected to a Zeiss Universal microscope via a fiberoptic cable, a charged coupled-device video camera, a video frame grabber and array processor and a Micro Vax II computer using computer programs written in FORTRAN. HIV RNA and DNA were detected in infected CEM lymphocytes in culture by in situ hybridization using acetylaminofluorene (AAF)-labeled HIV-DNA probes, a rabbit anti-AAF antibody and a fluorescein-labeled goat anti-rabbit antibody. ALCIC measurements showed that 61% of the CEM cells were infected and that quantitative differences were distinguishable within this group. The levels of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) fluorescence were sixfold or more greater than that observed with the same system using a 100-W mercury lamp for illumination; the improved intensity of the laser-based system is due to greater excitation intensity of the laser and the matching of the excitation spectrum to the peak wavelength of FITC. ALCIC has potential clinical value for determining the effect of antiviral agents on HIV infection and for assessing the susceptibility of different cell types to infection. PMID:2112391

  14. ‘Too much, too late’: mixed methods multi-channel video recording study of computerized decision support systems and GP prescribing

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, James; Thomson, Fionagh; Milne, Heather; Buckingham, Susan; Sheikh, Aziz; Fernando, Bernard; Cresswell, Kathrin; Williams, Robin; Pinnock, Hilary

    2013-01-01

    Objective Computerized decision support systems (CDSS) are commonly deployed to support prescribing, although over-riding of alerts by prescribers remains a concern. We aimed to understand how general practitioners (GPs) interact with prescribing CDSS in order to inform deliberation on how better to support prescribing decisions in primary care. Materials and methods Quantitative and qualitative analysis of interactions between GPs, patients, and computer systems using multi-channel video recordings of 112 primary care consultations with eight GPs in three UK practices. Results 132 prescriptions were issued in the course of 73 of the consultations, of which 81 (61%) attracted at least one alert. Of the total of 117 alerts, only three resulted in the GP checking, but not altering, the prescription. CDSS provided information and safety alerts at the point of generating a prescription. This was ‘too much, too late’ as the majority of the ‘work’ of prescribing occurred prior to using the computer. By the time an alert appeared, the GP had formulated the problem(s), potentially spent several minutes considering, explaining, negotiating, and reaching agreement with the patient about the proposed treatment, and had possibly given instructions and printed an information leaflet. Discussion CDSS alerts do not coincide with the prescribing workflow throughout the whole GP consultation. Current systems interrupt to correct decisions that have already been taken, rather than assisting formulation of the management plan. Conclusions CDSS are likely to be more acceptable and effective if the prescribing support is provided much earlier in the process of generating a prescription. PMID:23470696

  15. Use of a computerized tracking system to monitor and provide feedback on dietary goals for calorie-restricted diets: the POUNDS LOST study.

    PubMed

    Anton, Stephen D; LeBlanc, Eric; Allen, H Raymond; Karabetian, Christy; Sacks, Frank; Bray, George; Williamson, Donald A

    2012-09-01

    The use of self-monitoring as a tool to facilitate behavioral modification is common in many lifestyle-based weight loss interventions. Electronic tracking programs, including computer-based systems and smart phone applications, have been developed to allow individuals to self-monitor their behavior digitally. These programs offer an advantage over traditional self-report modalities in that they can provide users with direct feedback about dietary and/or physical activity adherence levels and thereby assist them in real-time decision making. This article describes the use of an Internet-based computerized tracking system (CTS) that was developed specifically for the POUNDS LOST study, a 2-year randomized controlled trial designed to test the efficacy of four macronutrient diets for weight and fat reduction in healthy, overweight men and women (body mass index range = 25.0-39.9 kg/m(2)). The CTS served many functions in this study, including data collection, dietary and exercise assessment and feedback, messaging system, and report generation. Across all groups, participants with high usage of the CTS during the initial 8 weeks lost greater amounts of weight than participants with low usage (8.7% versus 5.5% of initial body weight, respectively; p < .001) at week 32. Rates of CTS utilization were highest during the first year of this 2-year intervention, and utilization of the CTS declined steadily over time. The unique features of the CTS combined with technological developments, such as smart phone applications, offer significant potential to improve the user's self-monitoring experience and adherence to health promotion programs designed specifically for individuals with obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:23063049

  16. Development and Evaluation of an Adaptive Computerized Training System (ACTS). R&D Report 78-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knerr, Bruce W.; Nawrocki, Leon H.

    This report describes the development of a computer based system designed to train electronic troubleshooting procedures. The ACTS uses artificial intelligence techniques to develop models of student and expert troubleshooting behavior as they solve a series of troubleshooting problems on the system. Comparisons of the student and expert models…

  17. SMILES (SIMPLIFIED MOLECULAR IDENTIFICATION AND LINE ENTRY SYSTEM): A LINE NOTATION AND COMPUTERIZED INTERPRETER FOR CHEMICAL STRUCTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A line notation syntax and software interpreter for specifying chemical structures on small and large computers is presented. The Simplified Molecular Identification and Line Entry System, SMILES, contains the advantages of line notations for specifying structures but avoids the ...

  18. Improving Efficiency and Quality in a Computerized ICU

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Karen E.; Sittig, Dean F.; Gardner, Reed M.; Pryor, T. Allan; Budd, Marge

    1988-01-01

    Ongoing efforts have been made to improve the efficiency and quality of care available in ICU's at LDS Hospital. ICU's have been computerized, and patient data collection, storage and presentation have been improved. Nurse care plans and charting have been computerized, and effects of these changes have been evaluated. Work sampling studies showed a decrease in direct patient care (49.1% to 43.2%) and an increase in nurse charting (18.2% to 24.2%) after implementation of computerized nurse charting. These changes were accounted for by a decrease in patient severity of illness. Implementation of the computerized nurse charting system had no significant impact on daily ICU nursing activities. Time savings are not automatic, but could be realized through management practices designed to maximize benefits of the nurse charting system and to make best use of available nursing resources.

  19. A controlled time-series trial of clinical reminders: using computerized firm systems to make quality improvement research a routine part of mainstream practice.

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, H. I.; Neighbor, W. E.; Cheadle, A. D.; Ramsey, S. D.; Diehr, P.; Gore, E.

    2000-01-01

    encourage others to develop computerized firm systems capable of conducting controlled time-series trials. Images Fig. 1 PMID:10737451

  20. Reducing diagnostic errors in primary care. A systematic meta-review of computerized diagnostic decision support systems by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Nurek, Martine; Kostopoulou, Olga; Delaney, Brendan C; Esmail, Aneez

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Computerized diagnostic decision support systems (CDDSS) have the potential to support the cognitive task of diagnosis, which is one of the areas where general practitioners have greatest difficulty and which accounts for a significant proportion of adverse events recorded in the primary care setting. Objective: To determine the extent to which CDDSS may meet the requirements of supporting the cognitive task of diagnosis, and the currently perceived barriers that prevent the integration of CDDSS with electronic health record (EHR) systems. Methods: We conducted a meta-review of existing systematic reviews published in English, searching MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO and Web of Knowledge for articles on the features and effectiveness of CDDSS for medical diagnosis published since 2004. Eligibility criteria included systematic reviews where individual clinicians were primary end users. Outcomes we were interested in were the effectiveness and identification of specific features of CDDSS on diagnostic performance. Results: We identified 1970 studies and excluded 1938 because they did not fit our inclusion criteria. A total of 45 articles were identified and 12 were found suitable for meta-review. Extraction of high-level requirements identified that a more standardized computable approach is needed to knowledge representation, one that can be readily updated as new knowledge is gained. In addition, a deep integration with the EHR is needed in order to trigger at appropriate points in cognitive workflow. Conclusion: Developing a CDDSS that is able to utilize dynamic vocabulary tools to quickly capture and code relevant diagnostic findings, and coupling these with individualized diagnostic suggestions based on the best-available evidence has the potential to improve diagnostic accuracy, but requires evaluation. PMID:26339829

  1. Computerization of workflows, guidelines, and care pathways: a review of implementation challenges for process-oriented health information systems

    PubMed Central

    Roudsari, Abdul

    2011-01-01

    Objective There is a need to integrate the various theoretical frameworks and formalisms for modeling clinical guidelines, workflows, and pathways, in order to move beyond providing support for individual clinical decisions and toward the provision of process-oriented, patient-centered, health information systems (HIS). In this review, we analyze the challenges in developing process-oriented HIS that formally model guidelines, workflows, and care pathways. Methods A qualitative meta-synthesis was performed on studies published in English between 1995 and 2010 that addressed the modeling process and reported the exposition of a new methodology, model, system implementation, or system architecture. Thematic analysis, principal component analysis (PCA) and data visualisation techniques were used to identify and cluster the underlying implementation ‘challenge’ themes. Results One hundred and eight relevant studies were selected for review. Twenty-five underlying ‘challenge’ themes were identified. These were clustered into 10 distinct groups, from which a conceptual model of the implementation process was developed. Discussion and conclusion We found that the development of systems supporting individual clinical decisions is evolving toward the implementation of adaptable care pathways on the semantic web, incorporating formal, clinical, and organizational ontologies, and the use of workflow management systems. These architectures now need to be implemented and evaluated on a wider scale within clinical settings. PMID:21724740

  2. Computerized tracking of mammography patients: value of a radiology information system integrated with a personal-computer data base.

    PubMed

    Frank, M S; Johnson, J A

    1994-09-01

    OBJECTIVE. We investigated the advantages of using a radiology information system as the primary data source for a mammographic patient-tracking system that is based on a personal-computer local-area network and that requires almost no data entry. HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE. Our mammographic data base is maintained on a file server that provides cross-platform access to both Macintosh and IBM-compatible personal computers. Locally developed software automatically transfers mammographic data from our radiology information system to the file server's mammographic data base. The data transferred include patients' demographics (e.g., hospital identification number, address, referring physician) and the complete mammographic report. With the use of specific terminology, the need for follow-up can be automatically gleaned from the mammographic report and coded within the data base. Graphically oriented, commercially available software provides easy access to this information from any personal computer on our department's network. The software provides considerable flexibility for searching and manipulating the data without the need for customized data-base programming. Redundant data entry and associated errors are drastically reduced, as are personnel requirements for maintaining the system. Relative to most commercial radiology information systems, a personal computer facilitates the steps involved in tracking patients and obtaining highly customized analyses of the mammographic data base. The data in the mammographic data base exactly match those in the hospital's registration data and are easily transferred to other personal-computer programs for ancillary processing. CONCLUSION. This technique is ideal for departments that use a general-purpose radiology information system for mammographic reporting, yet need a more powerful but user-friendly and low-cost method for tracking their mammography patients. PMID:8079872

  3. The Impact of Interactive Whiteboard Technology on Medical Students' Achievement in ESL Essay Writing: An Early Study in Egypt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albaaly, Emad; Higgins, Steven

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of the interactive whiteboard on Egyptian medical students' achievement in essay writing in English as a second language (ESL). First, the writing micro-skills judged essential to help these students improve their essay writing were identified, using a questionnaire which investigated experts' views. This gave…

  4. Primary Teachers' Understanding of the Interactive Whiteboard as a Tool for Children's Collaborative Learning and Knowledge-Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warwick, Paul; Kershner, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on the second phase of a joint teacher/researcher project that explored teachers' understandings of the potential of the interactive whiteboard (IWB) as a tool for primary school children's collaborative group work. By examining teachers' written analyses and discussions of work carried out in their own classrooms, the paper…

  5. The Digital Learning Classroom: Improving English Language Learners' Academic Success in Mathematics and Reading Using Interactive Whiteboard Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Omar S.

    2010-01-01

    This study presents the findings from the first-year evaluation of the Round Rock Independent School District's (ISD) Digital Learning Classroom project, an initiative focused on the improvement of English Language Learners' (ELL) learning using interactive whiteboard (IWB) technology. An objective of the evaluation was to determine the extent IWB…

  6. Understanding an Elementary School Teachers' Journey of Using Technology in the Classroom from Sand Table to Interactive Whiteboard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ersoy, Ali; Bozkurt, Mahmut

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to understand an elementary teachers' experiences about using interactive whiteboard (IWB) in the classroom. Narrative inquiry were adopted to conduct the study. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews with the teacher and analysed through narrative analysis. In the study, two major stories emerged. The…

  7. Exploring the TPACK of Taiwanese Elementary Mathematics and Science Teachers with Respect to Use of Interactive Whiteboards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jang, Syh-Jong; Tsai, Meng-Fang

    2012-01-01

    There has been an increasing tendency to enhance teachers' ability to apply educational technology. Few researchers have investigated with the relationships between the use of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) and the impact on the technological pedagogical and content knowledge (TPACK) of teachers. The purposes of the study were to examine Taiwanese…

  8. Teachers' and Students' Perceptions of Interactive Whiteboards in the English as a Foreign Language Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Öz, Hüseyin

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the findings of a study conducted to investigate teachers' and students' perceptions of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) in the English as a foreign language (EFL) classroom and to find out differences of perceptions according to some variables such as gender, level of English proficiency, hours of weekly IWB use,…

  9. Disparity in Practice: Diverse Strategies among Teachers Implementing Interactive Whiteboards into Teaching Practice in Two Swedish Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundberg, Bodil; Spante, Maria; Stenlund, Jorgen

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a project aimed at identifying and exploring the development and implementation processes of teaching practices with interactive whiteboards (IWBs) in two Swedish K-6 schools. The purpose of the project was to generate results and insights of value when preparing student teachers for professional use of IWBs and to give…

  10. Using the Interactive Whiteboard to Scaffold a Metalanguage: Teaching Higher Order Thinking Skills in Preservice Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Neil

    2013-01-01

    This research focuses on how the interactive whiteboard (IWB) can be effectively used to teach higher order thinking skills to primary preservice teachers in the history classroom. The case study finds that skills such as analysis, evaluation and inference constitute a valuable metalanguage that needs to be explicitly taught to preservice…

  11. "The Visual Helps Me Understand the Complicated Things": Pupil Views of Teaching and Learning with Interactive Whiteboards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Kate; Higgins, Steve; Smith, Heather

    2005-01-01

    This study is one element of a government-sponsored evaluation into the introduction of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) to Years 5 and 6 in English primary schools. This element of the research aimed to gather information regarding pupil views of IWBs and the impact these tools can have on teaching and learning. To extend current literature, the…

  12. The Impact of the Interactive Whiteboard on the Teacher and Children's Language Use in an ESL Immersion Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyle, Yvette; Yanez, Lorena; Verdu, Mercedes

    2010-01-01

    As a teaching resource, interactive whiteboards (IWB) are becoming increasingly popular in schools outside the UK, including Spain. Research carried out so far has tended to examine the effects of IWB use on teaching and learning in monolingual contexts where English is the first language for learners. The present study adds a new dimension to…

  13. The Pros and Cons of Interactive Whiteboards in Relation to the Key Stage 3 Strategy and Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Carol; Hagger-Vaughan, Lesley; Pilkington, Rachel; Tomkins, Sally-Ann

    2005-01-01

    The article describes data emerging from a study of a group of language teachers integrating use of the interactive whiteboard (IWB) into their classroom practice. Data collection tools were developed which allowed participants freedom of action and expression whilst providing a framework for reflection designed to focus on pedagogy rather than…

  14. Affordances of Interactive Whiteboards and Associated Pedagogical Practices: Perspectives of Teachers of Science with Children Aged Five to Six Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teck, Wong Kung

    2013-01-01

    The integration of information and communication technology into early year's classrooms is increasingly important for engaging and motivating digital learners. One of the more promising recent revolutions in educational technology that encourages learner's involvement is interactive whiteboard (IWB). Many schools have accepted IWB as core…

  15. Promoting Teacher and School Development through Co-Enquiry: Developing Interactive Whiteboard Use in a "Dialogic Classroom"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warwick, Paul; Hennessy, Sara; Mercer, Neil

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the work of a teacher-researcher collaborative group in the UK, who explored the idea of 'a dialogic approach' to classroom interaction and examined its relationship to use of the interactive whiteboard (IWB) in orchestrating classroom talk. We focus on how the co-inquiry process within this group led to the articulation of…

  16. Mid-America Computerized Ionospheric Tomography Experiment (MACE '93)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronschnabl, G. R.; Bust, G. S.; Cook, J. A.; Vasicek, C. J.

    1995-01-01

    A computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT) experiment utilizing an array of nine Navy Navigation Satellite System (NNSS) receivers deployed along a north-south line from South Dakota to south Texas (spanning over 2000 km) is currently underway. The Mid-America Computerized Ionospheric Tomography Experiment (MACE '93) began collecting data from three receivers deployed in Texas on June 1, 1993. This "short communiqué" presents preliminary results from the experiment.

  17. Evaluation of the computerized utilities energy monitoring and control system installed at the US Military Community at Goeppingen, Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Purucker, S.L.; Gettings, M.B.

    1991-11-18

    Under the provisions of an Interagency Agreement between the US Army and the Department of Energy, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is evaluating the Utilities and Energy Monitoring and Control System (UEMCS) installed at the US Military Community Activity at Goeppingen, Germany. This evaluation relies on examination of existing data and information to determine the effectiveness of the UEMCS. The Goeppingen UEMCS is an integral part of a combined UEMCS/district heating system which includes the UEMCS at Schwaebisch Gmuend, Germany. The system was installed during 1985 and 1986. The UEMCS at Goeppingen and Schwaebisch Gmuend are both well designed, implemented, and maintained. The UEMCS is operated in a supervisory mode with distributed intelligence in local controllers. At present, the UEMCS is operated in a supervisory mode with distributed intelligence in local controllers. At present, the UEMCS at Schwaebisch Gmuend does not have a central computer, but requires only a dedicated phone line to couple with the one at Goeppingen. Though the conversion to district heat has produced the majority of energy savings, the UEMCS day/night setback program also contributes substantially, with additional savings from start/stop programs, such as seasonal switchover, and various temperature control programs. Further opportunities for savings exist in increasing monitoring and control of water usage and connecting the community`s electrical network to the UEMCS, permitting demand limiting and increased power factor control.

  18. Evaluation of the computerized utilities energy monitoring and control system installed at the US Military Community at Goeppingen, Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Purucker, S.L.; Gettings, M.B.

    1991-11-18

    Under the provisions of an Interagency Agreement between the US Army and the Department of Energy, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is evaluating the Utilities and Energy Monitoring and Control System (UEMCS) installed at the US Military Community Activity at Goeppingen, Germany. This evaluation relies on examination of existing data and information to determine the effectiveness of the UEMCS. The Goeppingen UEMCS is an integral part of a combined UEMCS/district heating system which includes the UEMCS at Schwaebisch Gmuend, Germany. The system was installed during 1985 and 1986. The UEMCS at Goeppingen and Schwaebisch Gmuend are both well designed, implemented, and maintained. The UEMCS is operated in a supervisory mode with distributed intelligence in local controllers. At present, the UEMCS is operated in a supervisory mode with distributed intelligence in local controllers. At present, the UEMCS at Schwaebisch Gmuend does not have a central computer, but requires only a dedicated phone line to couple with the one at Goeppingen. Though the conversion to district heat has produced the majority of energy savings, the UEMCS day/night setback program also contributes substantially, with additional savings from start/stop programs, such as seasonal switchover, and various temperature control programs. Further opportunities for savings exist in increasing monitoring and control of water usage and connecting the community's electrical network to the UEMCS, permitting demand limiting and increased power factor control.

  19. Teaching College Level Content and Reading Comprehension Skills Simultaneously via an Artificially Intelligent Adaptive Computerized Instructional System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Roger D.; Belden, Noelle

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a behavioral model for conceptualizing advanced reading comprehension as a "higher order" behavior class. Also discussed are strategies and tactics utilized by an artificially intelligent adaptive tutoring and testing software system designed to shape such comprehension skills while also teaching subject-specific "content" to…

  20. 45 CFR 307.10 - Functional requirements for computerized support enforcement systems in operation by October 1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... to provide for case referral and the transfer of the medical support information specified in 45 CFR... enable the Office to monitor State operations and assess program performance through the audit conducted... enforcement systems in operation by October 1, 1997. 307.10 Section 307.10 Public Welfare Regulations...

  1. Computerized molecular modeling of carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Computerized molecular modleing continues to increase in capability and applicability to carbohydrates. This chapter covers nomenclature and conformational aspects of carbohydrates, perhaps of greater use to carbohydrate-inexperienced computational chemists. Its comments on various methods and studi...

  2. Comparison of numeric keyboard and CRT line-labeled buttons for information access. [in computerized, area navigation system for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D.

    1976-01-01

    Test were conducted to determine whether differences in speed and accuracy are experienced when using either line-labeled index buttons or a numeric keyboard for page selection in airborne CRT-display area navigation systems. The experiment was conducted with six airline pilots, each flying the same two simulated RNAV routes. Three pilot subjects used line-labeled buttons adjacent to the CRT screen, while three used a numeric keyboard for page access. The hypothesis of no differences in response times between the two modes of access could not be rejected.

  3. Survey of methods for improving operator acceptance of computerized aids

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, P. R.; Kisner, R. A.

    1982-04-01

    The success of current attempts to improve the operational performance and safety of nuclear power plants by installing computerized operational aids in the control rooms is dependent, in part, on the operator's attitude toward the aid. Utility experience with process computer systems indicates that problems may already exist with operator acceptance of computerized aids. The growth of the role that computers have in nuclear power plants makes user acceptance of computer technology an important issue for the nuclear industry. The purpose of this report is to draw from the literature factors related to user acceptance of computerized equipment that may also be applicable to the acceptance of computerized aids used in the nuclear power plant control room.

  4. Evaluation of the Expressiveness of an ICNP-based Nursing Data Dictionary in a Computerized Nursing Record System

    PubMed Central

    Cho, InSook; Park, Hyeoun-Ae

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the domain completeness and expressiveness issues of the International Classification for Nursing Practice-based (ICNP) nursing data dictionary (NDD) through its application in an enterprise electronic medical record (EMR) system as a standard vocabulary at a single tertiary hospital in Korea. Data from 2,262 inpatients obtained over a period of 9 weeks (May to July 2003) were extracted from the EMR system for analysis. Among the 530,218 data-input events, 401,190 (75.7%) were entered from the NDD, 20,550 (3.9%) used only free text, and 108,478 (20.4%) used a combination of coded data and free text. A content analysis of the free-text events showed that 80.3% of the expressions could be found in the NDD, whereas 10.9% were context-specific expressions such as direct quotations of patient complaints and responses, and references to the care plan or orders of physicians. A total of 7.8% of the expressions was used for a supplementary purpose such as adding a conjunction or end verb to make an expression appear as natural language. Only 1.0% of the expressions were identified as not being covered by the NDD. This evaluation study demonstrates that the ICNP-based NDD has sufficient power to cover most of the expressions used in a clinical nursing setting. PMID:16622170

  5. Evaluation of the expressiveness of an ICNP-based nursing data dictionary in a computerized nursing record system.

    PubMed

    Cho, Insook; Park, Hyeoun-Ae

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the domain completeness and expressiveness issues of the International Classification for Nursing Practice-based (ICNP) nursing data dictionary (NDD) through its application in an enterprise electronic medical record (EMR) system as a standard vocabulary at a single tertiary hospital in Korea. Data from 2,262 inpatients obtained over a period of 9 weeks (May to July 2003) were extracted from the EMR system for analysis. Among the 530,218 data-input events, 401,190 (75.7%) were entered from the NDD, 20,550 (3.9%) used only free text, and 108,478 (20.4%) used a combination of coded data and free text. A content analysis of the free-text events showed that 80.3% of the expressions could be found in the NDD, whereas 10.9% were context-specific expressions such as direct quotations of patient complaints and responses, and references to the care plan or orders of physicians. A total of 7.8% of the expressions was used for a supplementary purpose such as adding a conjunction or end verb to make an expression appear as natural language. Only 1.0% of the expressions were identified as not being covered by the NDD. This evaluation study demonstrates that the ICNP-based NDD has sufficient power to cover most of the expressions used in a clinical nursing setting. PMID:16622170

  6. The Dortmund Data Bank: A computerized system for retrieval, correlation, and prediction of thermodynamic properties of mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Onken, U.; Rarey-Nies, J.; Gmehling, J. )

    1989-05-01

    The Dortmund Data Bank (DDB) was started in 1973 with the intention to employ the vast store of vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) data from the literature for the development of models for the prediction of VLE. From the beginning, the structure of the DDB has been organized in such a way that it was possible to take advantage of the full potential of electronic computers. With the experience gained in fitting and processing VLE data, the authors extended the DDB system to other types of mixture properties, i.e., liquid-liquid equilibria (LLE), gas solubilities (GLE), activity coefficients at infinite dilution ({gamma}{sup {infinity}}), heats of mixing h{sup E}, and excess heat capacities. Besides the files for mixture properties, the DDB contains pure-component data and program packages for various applications. New experimental data are checked for consistency before they are stored. For data retrieval user-specified search masks can be used. The data files are available via an online data service and through the Dechema Chemistry Data Series. For the purpose of data correlation and model testing, parameter fitting is performed with an optimization routine (Nelder-Mead). In the past years the DDB system has been successfully employed for the development of prediction methods for VLE, LLE, GLE, {gamma}{sup {infinity}}, and h{sup E} (UNIFAC, mod. UNIFAC, etc.).

  7. A General Simulator Using State Estimation for a Space Tug Navigation System. [computerized simulation, orbital position estimation and flight mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boland, J. S., III

    1975-01-01

    A general simulation program is presented (GSP) involving nonlinear state estimation for space vehicle flight navigation systems. A complete explanation of the iterative guidance mode guidance law, derivation of the dynamics, coordinate frames, and state estimation routines are given so as to fully clarify the assumptions and approximations involved so that simulation results can be placed in their proper perspective. A complete set of computer acronyms and their definitions as well as explanations of the subroutines used in the GSP simulator are included. To facilitate input/output, a complete set of compatable numbers, with units, are included to aid in data development. Format specifications, output data phrase meanings and purposes, and computer card data input are clearly spelled out. A large number of simulation and analytical studies were used to determine the validity of the simulator itself as well as various data runs.

  8. Data capture of transdermal glucose monitoring through computerized appliance-based virtual remote sensing and alert systems.

    PubMed

    Jameson, Robert; Lorence, Daniel; Lin, Jennifer

    2012-08-01

    Monitoring of blood glucose levels is important to persons with diabetes or pre-diabetic, abnormal glucose indications. Such individuals must determine when insulin is needed to reduce glucose levels in their bodies, or when additional glucose must be administered to raise levels. A conventional technique used by many diabetics to personally monitor their glucose level includes the periodic drawing of blood, the application of blood to a test strip, and determination of blood glucose level using calorimetric, electrochemical, or photometric detection. This technique does not permit continuous or automatic monitoring of levels in the body, but typically must be performed manually, and on a periodic basis. Unfortunately, checking consistency varies widely among individuals, where wide variation of high or low levels of glucose or other analytes may have detrimental effects. The ongoing capture of data through continuous and/or automatic in vivo monitoring of analyte levels, and its inclusion with a user-friendly computer interface, is now possible using a subcutaneous implanted sensor. Such devices are small and comfortable when used, allowing a wide range of life activities. In this technology review we propose one promising model using a combination of emerging, systems-based technologies in non-invasive analyte monitoring, as integrated within household-based health monitoring using home appliances. PMID:21537854

  9. Implementation of a Computerized Decision Support System to Improve the Appropriateness of Antibiotic Therapy Using Local Microbiologic Data

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Maresca, Manuel; Sorlozano, Antonio; Grau, Magnolia; Rodriguez-Castaño, Rocio; Ruiz-Valverde, Andres; Gutierrez-Fernandez, Jose

    2014-01-01

    A prospective quasi-experimental study was undertaken in 218 patients with suspicion of nosocomial infection hospitalized in a polyvalent ICU where a new electronic device (GERB) has been designed for antibiotic prescriptions. Two GERB-based applications were developed to provide local resistance maps (LRMs) and preliminary microbiological reports with therapeutic recommendation (PMRTRs). Both applications used the data in the Laboratory Information System of the Microbiology Department to report on the optimal empiric therapeutic option, based on the most likely susceptibility profile of the microorganisms potentially responsible for infection in patients and taking into account the local epidemiology of the hospital department/unit. LRMs were used for antibiotic prescription in 20.2% of the patients and PMRTRs in 78.2%, and active antibiotics against the finally identified bacteria were prescribed in 80.0% of the former group and 82.4% of the latter. When neither LMRs nor PMRTRs were considered for empiric treatment prescription, only around 40% of the antibiotics prescribed were active. Hence, the percentage appropriateness of the empiric antibiotic treatments was significantly higher when LRM or PMRTR guidelines were followed rather than other criteria. LRMs and PMRTRs applications are dynamic, highly accessible, and readily interpreted instruments that contribute to the appropriateness of empiric antibiotic treatments. PMID:25197643

  10. Computerized implant-dentistry: Advances toward automation

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Minkle; Anand, Vishal; Salaria, Sanjeev Kumar; Jain, Nikil; Gupta, Shilpi

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in the field of implantology such as three-dimensional imaging, implant-planning software, computer-aided-design/computer-aided-manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology, computer-guided, and navigated implant surgery have led to the computerization of implant-dentistry. This three-dimensional computer-generated implant-planning and surgery has not only enabled accurate preoperative evaluation of the anatomic limitations but has also facilitated preoperative planning of implant positions along with virtual implant placement and subsequently transferring the virtual treatment plans onto the surgical phase via static (guided) or dynamic (navigated) systems aided by CAD/CAM technology. Computerized-implant-dentistry being highly predictable and minimally invasive in nature has also allowed implant placement in patients with medical comorbidities (e.g. radiation therapy, blood dyscrasias), in patients with complex problems following a significant alteration of the bony anatomy as a result of benign or malignant pathology of the jaws or trauma and in patients with other physical and emotional problems. With significant achievements accomplished in the field of computerized implant-dentistry, attempts are now been made toward complete automation of implant-dentistry. PMID:25810585

  11. Industry and Occupation in the Electronic Health Record: An Investigation of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Industry and Occupation Computerized Coding System

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Inclusion of information about a patient’s work, industry, and occupation, in the electronic health record (EHR) could facilitate occupational health surveillance, better health outcomes, prevention activities, and identification of workers’ compensation cases. The US National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has developed an autocoding system for “industry” and “occupation” based on 1990 Bureau of Census codes; its effectiveness requires evaluation in conjunction with promoting the mandatory addition of these variables to the EHR. Objective The objective of the study was to evaluate the intercoder reliability of NIOSH’s Industry and Occupation Computerized Coding System (NIOCCS) when applied to data collected in a community survey conducted under the Affordable Care Act; to determine the proportion of records that are autocoded using NIOCCS. Methods Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) codes are used by several federal agencies in databases that capture demographic, employment, and health information to harmonize variables related to work activities among these data sources. There are 359 industry and occupation responses that were hand coded by 2 investigators, who came to a consensus on every code. The same variables were autocoded using NIOCCS at the high and moderate criteria level. Results Kappa was .84 for agreement between hand coders and between the hand coder consensus code versus NIOCCS high confidence level codes for the first 2 digits of the SOC code. For 4 digits, NIOCCS coding versus investigator coding ranged from kappa=.56 to .70. In this study, NIOCCS was able to achieve production rates (ie, to autocode) 31%-36% of entered variables at the “high confidence” level and 49%-58% at the “medium confidence” level. Autocoding (production) rates are somewhat lower than those reported by NIOSH. Agreement between manually coded and autocoded data are “substantial” at the 2-digit level, but only

  12. Standardized Glycemic Management with a Computerized Workflow and Decision Support System for Hospitalized Patients with Type 2 Diabetes on Different Wards

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Katharina M.; Höll, Bernhard; Aberer, Felix; Donsa, Klaus; Augustin, Thomas; Schaupp, Lukas; Spat, Stephan; Beck, Peter; Fruhwald, Friedrich M.; Schnedl, Christian; Rosenkranz, Alexander R.; Lumenta, David B.; Kamolz, Lars-Peter; Plank, Johannes; Pieber, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: This study investigated the efficacy, safety, and usability of standardized glycemic management by a computerized decision support system for non-critically ill hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes on four different wards. Materials and Methods: In this open, noncontrolled intervention study, glycemic management of 99 patients with type 2 diabetes (62% acute admissions; 41 females; age, 67±11 years; hemoglobin A1c, 65±21 mmol/mol; body mass index, 30.4±6.5 kg/m2) on clinical wards (Cardiology, Endocrinology, Nephrology, Plastic Surgery) of a tertiary-care hospital was guided by GlucoTab® (Joanneum Research GmbH [Graz, Austria] and Medical University of Graz [Graz, Austria]), a mobile decision support system providing automated workflow support and suggestions for insulin dosing to nurses and physicians. Results: Adherence to insulin dosing suggestions was high (96.5% bolus, 96.7% basal). The primary outcome measure, percentage of blood glucose (BG) measurements in the range of 70–140 mg/dL, occurred in 50.2±22.2% of all measurements. The overall mean BG level was 154±35 mg/dL. BG measurements in the ranges of 60–70 mg/dL, 40–60 mg/dL, and <40 mg/dL occurred in 1.4%, 0.5%, and 0.0% of all measurements, respectively. A regression analysis showed that acute admission to the Cardiology Ward (+30 mg/dL) and preexisting home insulin therapy (+26 mg/dL) had the strongest impact on mean BG. Acute admission to other wards had minor effects (+4 mg/dL). Ninety-one percent of the healthcare professionals felt confident with GlucoTab, and 89% believed in its practicality and 80% in its ability to prevent medication errors. Conclusions: An efficacious, safe, and user-accepted implementation of GlucoTab was demonstrated. However, for optimized personalized patient care, further algorithm modifications are required. PMID:26355756

  13. Report of the National Sub-Committee to the Interprovincial Standards Program Coordinating Committee on the Interprovincial Computerized Examination Management System=Rapport du Sous-Comite National presente au Comite de Coordination du Programme de Normes Interprovincials sur le systeme de gestion des examens informatises interprovinciaux.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Brunswick Dept. of Advanced Education and Training, Fredericton. Interprovincial Standards Program Coordinating Committee.

    In January 1985, Employment and Immigration Canada funded a pilot project in New Brunswick for the development and testing of an Interprovincial Computerized Examination Management (ICEM) System. The resulting system is comprised of a dual interprovincial and provincial item bank facility, a software component offering the option of computerized…

  14. Computerized certification of digital ultrasonic instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, M. W.

    1987-09-01

    A computerized inspection system is being set up at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant to enable certification of the Krautkramer Branson ultrasonic instrumentation used extensively in Y-12 production operations. The system takes the data required to certify the linearity and frequency response of the receiver and to certify the correct operation of the pulsers, gates, and computer interface. A subset of the program will be able to verify correct instrumentation in the field by using the actual computer and instrumentation being used for production ultrasonic weld inspections. The system can reduce the certification time from approximately one week to less than an hour.

  15. Computerized clinical decision support systems for primary preventive care: A decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review of effects on process of care and patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Computerized clinical decision support systems (CCDSSs) are claimed to improve processes and outcomes of primary preventive care (PPC), but their effects, safety, and acceptance must be confirmed. We updated our previous systematic reviews of CCDSSs and integrated a knowledge translation approach in the process. The objective was to review randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of CCDSSs for PPC on process of care, patient outcomes, harms, and costs. Methods We conducted a decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Ovid's EBM Reviews Database, Inspec, and other databases, as well as reference lists through January 2010. We contacted authors to confirm data or provide additional information. We included RCTs that assessed the effect of a CCDSS for PPC on process of care and patient outcomes compared to care provided without a CCDSS. A study was considered to have a positive effect (i.e., CCDSS showed improvement) if at least 50% of the relevant study outcomes were statistically significantly positive. Results We added 17 new RCTs to our 2005 review for a total of 41 studies. RCT quality improved over time. CCDSSs improved process of care in 25 of 40 (63%) RCTs. Cumulative scientifically strong evidence supports the effectiveness of CCDSSs for screening and management of dyslipidaemia in primary care. There is mixed evidence for effectiveness in screening for cancer and mental health conditions, multiple preventive care activities, vaccination, and other preventive care interventions. Fourteen (34%) trials assessed patient outcomes, and four (29%) reported improvements with the CCDSS. Most trials were not powered to evaluate patient-important outcomes. CCDSS costs and adverse events were reported in only six (15%) and two (5%) trials, respectively. Information on study duration was often missing, limiting our ability to assess sustainability of CCDSS effects. Conclusions Evidence supports the

  16. Interactive Whiteboard Use: The Catalyst of Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamberth, Tenneille Terrell

    2012-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 forced school districts to become more accountable by requiring all students to read on grade level by the year 2014. However, President Obama's educational policy shift is allowing states to develop their own accountability and improvement system. This study examined fourth and eighth grade math…

  17. Flexibility First, Then Standardize: A Strategy for Growing Inter-Departmental Systems.

    PubMed

    á Torkilsheyggi, Arnvør

    2015-01-01

    Any attempt to use IT to standardize work practices faces the challenge of finding a balance between standardization and flexibility. In implementing electronic whiteboards with the goal of standardizing inter-departmental practices, a hospital in Denmark chose to follow the strategy of "flexibility first, then standardization." To improve the local grounding of the system, they first focused on flexibility by configuring the whiteboards to support intra-departmental practices. Subsequently, they focused on standardization by using the white-boards to negotiate standardization of inter-departmental practices. This paper investigates the chosen strategy and finds: that super users on many wards managed to configure the whiteboard to support intra-departmental practices; that initiatives to standardize inter-departmental practices improved coordination of certain processes; and that the chosen strategy posed a challenge for finding the right time and manner to shift the balance from flexibility to standardization. PMID:26262096

  18. Interactive Whiteboard Integration in Classrooms: Active Teachers Understanding about Their Training Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujol, Meritxell Cortada; Quintana, Maria Graciela Badilla; Romaní, Jordi Riera

    With the incorporation in education of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT), especially the Interactive Whiteboard (IWB), emerges the need for a proper teacher training process due to adequate the integration and the didactic use of this tool in the classroom. This article discusses the teachers' perception on the training process for ICT integration. Its main aim is to contribute to the unification of minimum criteria for effective ICT implementation in any training process for active teachers. This case study begins from the development of a training model called Eduticom which was putted into practice in 4 schools in Catalonia, Spain. Findings indicated different teachers' needs such as an appropriate infrastructure, a proper management and a flexible training model which essentially addresses methodological and didactic aspects of IWB uses in the classroom.

  19. Arkansas' Curriculum Guide. Competency Based Computerized Accounting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock. Div. of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    This guide contains the essential parts of a total curriculum for a one-year secondary-level course in computerized accounting. Addressed in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: the complete accounting cycle, computer operations for accounting, computerized accounting and general ledgers, computerized accounts payable,…

  20. Student Perceptions of Computerized Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pino-Silva, Juan

    2008-01-01

    The challenge to test small groups by means of microcomputers demands appropriate software design and sound test design. To comply with this demand, students' beliefs or perceptions on the advantages and disadvantages of a computerized test were tapped. Overall, self-reported advantages outnumbered disadvantages to a significant degree. This was…