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  1. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  2. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  3. Innate Immunity to Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickx, Rodinde; Stichling, Nicole; Koelen, Jorien; Kuryk, Lukasz; Lipiec, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Human adenoviruses are the most widely used vectors in gene medicine, with applications ranging from oncolytic therapies to vaccinations, but adenovirus vectors are not without side effects. In addition, natural adenoviruses pose severe risks for immunocompromised people, yet infections are usually mild and self-limiting in immunocompetent individuals. Here we describe how adenoviruses are recognized by the host innate defense system during entry and replication in immune and nonimmune cells. Innate defense protects the host and represents a major barrier to using adenoviruses as therapeutic interventions in humans. Innate response against adenoviruses involves intrinsic factors present at constant levels, and innate factors mounted by the host cell upon viral challenge. These factors exert antiviral effects by directly binding to viruses or viral components, or shield the virus, for example, soluble factors, such as blood clotting components, the complement system, preexisting immunoglobulins, or defensins. In addition, Toll-like receptors and lectins in the plasma membrane and endosomes are intrinsic factors against adenoviruses. Important innate factors restricting adenovirus in the cytosol are tripartite motif-containing proteins, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like inflammatory receptors, and DNA sensors triggering interferon, such as DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box polypeptide 41 and cyclic guanosine monophosphate–adenosine monophosphate synthase. Adenovirus tunes the function of antiviral autophagy, and counters innate defense by virtue of its early proteins E1A, E1B, E3, and E4 and two virus-associated noncoding RNAs VA-I and VA-II. We conclude by discussing strategies to engineer adenovirus vectors with attenuated innate responses and enhanced delivery features. PMID:24512150

  4. Structure of human adenovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Nemerow, Glen R.; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Reddy, Vijay S.

    2012-07-11

    A detailed structural analysis of the entire human adenovirus capsid has been stymied by the complexity and size of this 150 MDa macromolecular complex. Over the past 10 years, the steady improvements in viral genome manipulation concomitant with advances in crystallographic techniques and data processing software has allowed structure determination of this virus by X-ray diffraction at 3.5 {angstrom} resolution. The virus structure revealed the location, folds, and interactions of major and minor (cement proteins) on the inner and outer capsid surface. This new structural information sheds further light on the process of adenovirus capsid assembly and virus-host cell interactions.

  5. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  6. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying the peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  7. Recombinant soluble adenovirus receptor

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are isolated polypeptides from human CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor) protein which bind adenovirus. Specifically disclosed are amino acid sequences which corresponds to adenovirus binding domain D1 and the entire extracellular domain of human CAR protein comprising D1 and D2. In other aspects, the disclosure relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding these domains as well as expression vectors which encode the domains and bacterial cells containing such vectors. Also disclosed is an isolated fusion protein comprised of the D1 polypeptide sequence fused to a polypeptide sequence which facilitates folding of D1 into a functional, soluble domain when expressed in bacteria. The functional D1 domain finds application for example in a therapeutic method for treating a patient infected with a virus which binds to D1, and also in a method for identifying an antiviral compound which interferes with viral attachment. Also included is a method for specifically targeting a cell for infection by a virus which binds to D1.

  8. Canine adenovirus based rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tordo, N; Foumier, A; Jallet, C; Szelechowski, M; Klonjkowski, B; Eloit, M

    2008-01-01

    Adenovirus based vectors are very attractive candidates for vaccination purposes as they induce in mammalian hosts potent humoral, mucosal and cellular immune responses to antigens encoded by the inserted genes. We have generated E1-deleted and replication-competent recombinant canine type-2 adenoviruses expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein (G). The effectiveness of both vectors to express a native G protein has been characterized in vitro in permissive cell lines. We compared the humoral and cellular immune responses induced in mice by intramuscular injection of the recombinant canine adenovirus vectors with those induced by a human (Ad5) E1-deleted virus expressing the same rabies G protein. Humoral responses specific to the adenoviruses or the rabies glycoprotein antigens were studied. The influence of the mouse strain was observed using replication-competent canine adenovirus. A high level of rabies neutralizing antibody was observed upon i.m. inoculation, and 100% of mice survived lethal challenge. These results are very promising in the perspective of oral vaccine for dog rabies control. PMID:18634509

  9. Adenoviruses in the immunocompromised host.

    PubMed Central

    Hierholzer, J C

    1992-01-01

    Adenoviruses are among the many pathogens and opportunistic agents that cause serious infection in the congenitally immunocompromised, in patients undergoing immunosuppressive treatment for organ and tissue transplants and for cancers, and in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. Adenovirus infections in these patients tend to become disseminated and severe, and the serotypes involved are clustered according to the age of the patient and the nature of the immunosuppression. Over 300 adenovirus infections in immunocompromised patients, with an overall case fatality rate of 48%, are reviewed in this paper. Children with severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome and other primary immunodeficiencies are exposed to the serotypes of subgroups B and C that commonly infect young children, and thus their infections are due to types 1 to 7 and 31 of subgenus A. Children with bone marrow and liver transplants often have lung and liver adenovirus infections that are due to an expanded set of subgenus A, B, C, and E serotypes. Adults with kidney transplants have viruses of subgenus B, mostly types 11, 34, and 35, which cause cystitis. This review indicates that 11% of transplant recipients become infected with adenoviruses, with case fatality rates from 60% for bone marrow transplant patients to 18% for renal transplant patients. Patients with AIDS become infected with a diversity of serotypes of all subgenera because their adult age and life-style expose them to many adenoviruses, possibly resulting in antigenically intermediate strains that are not found elsewhere. Interestingly, isolates from the urine of AIDS patients are generally of subgenus B and comprise types 11, 21, 34, 35, and intermediate strains of these types, whereas isolates from stool are of subgenus D and comprise many rare, new, and intermediate strains that are untypeable for practical purposes. It has been estimated that adenoviruses cause active infection in 12% of AIDS patients and that 45% of

  10. In vitro transcription of adenovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Fire, A; Baker, C C; Manley, J L; Ziff, E B; Sharp, P A

    1981-01-01

    A series of recombinants of adenovirus DNA fragments and pBR322 was used to test the transcriptional activity of the nine known adenovirus promoters in a cell-free extract. Specific initiation was seen at all five early promoters as well as at the major late promotor and at the intermediate promoter for polypeptide IX. The system failed to recognize the two other adenovirus promoters, which were prominent in vivo only at intermediate and late stages in infection. Microheterogeneity of 5' termini at several adenovirus promoters, previously shown in vivo, was reproduced in the in vitro reaction and indeed appeared to result from heterogeneous initiation rather than 5' processing. To test for the presence of soluble factors involved in regulation of nRNA synthesis, the activity of extracts prepared from early and late stages of infection was compared on an assortment of viral promoter sites. Although mock and early extracts showed identical transcription patterns, extracts prepared from late stages gave 5- to 10-fold relative enhancement of the late and polypeptide IX promoters as compared with early promoters. Images PMID:7321101

  11. Mechanism of adenovirus-mediated endosome lysis: role of the intact adenovirus capsid structure.

    PubMed

    Seth, P

    1994-12-15

    Adenoviruses have been previously shown to enhance the delivery of many ligands including proteins and plasmid DNAs to the cells. The key biochemical step during this process is the ability of adenovirus to disrupt (lyse) the endosome membrane releasing the co-internalized virus and the other ligands into the cytosol (Seth et al, 1986, In: Adenovirus attachment and entry into cells, pp 191-195, American Society for Microbiology, Washington, D.C.). To understand the role of the adenovirus proteins involved in the endosome lysis, it is further shown here that empty capsids of adenovirus also possess this membrane vesicle lytic activity; though the activity is about 5-times lower than the adenovirus. Incubation of adenovirus with low concentration of ionic detergent or brief exposure to 45 degrees C destroyed this lytic activity without affecting the adenovirus binding to cell surface receptor, suggesting the lytic activity of adenovirus to be of enzymatic nature. However, exposing adenovirus to conditions that can disrupt adenovirus capsid structure such as heating at 65 degrees C, treating with 0.5% SDS, treating with different proteases, dialyzing against no glycerol buffer, treating with 6 M urea or with 10% pyridine, and sonication destroyed the adenovirus-associated lytic activity. Results suggest the requirement of an intact capsid structure for adenovirus-mediated lysis of the endosome. PMID:7802664

  12. Canine adenovirus downstream processing protocol.

    PubMed

    Puig, Meritxell; Piedra, Jose; Miravet, Susana; Segura, María Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are efficient gene delivery tools. A major caveat with vectors derived from common human adenovirus serotypes is that most adults are likely to have been exposed to the wild-type virus and exhibit active immunity against the vectors. This preexisting immunity limits their clinical success. Strategies to circumvent this problem include the use of nonhuman adenovirus vectors. Vectors derived from canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2) are among the best-studied representatives. CAV-2 vectors are particularly attractive for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. In addition, CAV-2 vectors have shown great promise as oncolytic agents in virotherapy approaches and as vectors for recombinant vaccines. The rising interest in CAV-2 vectors calls for the development of scalable GMP compliant production and purification strategies. A detailed protocol describing a complete scalable downstream processing strategy for CAV-2 vectors is reported here. Clarification of CAV-2 particles is achieved by microfiltration. CAV-2 particles are subsequently concentrated and partially purified by ultrafiltration-diafiltration. A Benzonase(®) digestion step is carried out between ultrafiltration and diafiltration operations to eliminate contaminating nucleic acids. Chromatography purification is accomplished in two consecutive steps. CAV-2 particles are first captured and concentrated on a propyl hydrophobic interaction chromatography column followed by a polishing step using DEAE anion exchange monoliths. Using this protocol, high-quality CAV-2 vector preparations containing low levels of contamination with empty viral capsids and other inactive vector forms are typically obtained. The complete process yield was estimated to be 38-45 %. PMID:24132487

  13. Construction and Evaluation of Novel Rhesus Monkey Adenovirus Vaccine Vectors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F.; Ng'ang'a, David; Borducchi, Erica N.; Iampietro, M. Justin; Bricault, Christine A.; Teigler, Jeffrey E.; Blackmore, Stephen; Parenteau, Lily; Wagh, Kshitij; et al

    2014-11-19

    Adenovirus vectors are widely used as vaccine candidates for a variety of pathogens, including HIV-1. To date, human and chimpanzee adenoviruses have been explored in detail as vaccine vectors. Furthermore, the phylogeny of human and chimpanzee adenoviruses is overlapping, and preexisting humoral and cellular immunity to both are exhibited in human populations worldwide. More distantly related adenoviruses may therefore offer advantages as vaccine vectors. We describe the primary isolation and vectorization of three novel adenoviruses from rhesus monkeys. The seroprevalence of these novel rhesus monkey adenovirus vectors was extremely low in sub-Saharan Africa human populations, and these vectors proved tomore » have immunogenicity comparable to that of human and chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine vectors in mice. These rhesus monkey adenoviruses phylogenetically clustered with the poorly described adenovirus species G and robustly stimulated innate immune responses. These novel adenoviruses represent a new class of candidate vaccine vectors.« less

  14. Construction and Evaluation of Novel Rhesus Monkey Adenovirus Vaccine Vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F.; Ng'ang'a, David; Borducchi, Erica N.; Iampietro, M. Justin; Bricault, Christine A.; Teigler, Jeffrey E.; Blackmore, Stephen; Parenteau, Lily; Wagh, Kshitij; Handley, Scott A.; Zhao, Guoyan; Virgin, Herbert W.; Korber, Bette; Barouch, Dan H.

    2014-11-19

    Adenovirus vectors are widely used as vaccine candidates for a variety of pathogens, including HIV-1. To date, human and chimpanzee adenoviruses have been explored in detail as vaccine vectors. Furthermore, the phylogeny of human and chimpanzee adenoviruses is overlapping, and preexisting humoral and cellular immunity to both are exhibited in human populations worldwide. More distantly related adenoviruses may therefore offer advantages as vaccine vectors. We describe the primary isolation and vectorization of three novel adenoviruses from rhesus monkeys. The seroprevalence of these novel rhesus monkey adenovirus vectors was extremely low in sub-Saharan Africa human populations, and these vectors proved to have immunogenicity comparable to that of human and chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine vectors in mice. These rhesus monkey adenoviruses phylogenetically clustered with the poorly described adenovirus species G and robustly stimulated innate immune responses. These novel adenoviruses represent a new class of candidate vaccine vectors.

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of adenovirus sequences.

    PubMed

    Harrach, Balázs; Benko, Mária

    2007-01-01

    Members of the family Adenoviridae have been isolated from a large variety of hosts, including representatives from every major vertebrate class from fish to mammals. The high prevalence, together with the fairly conserved organization of the central part of their genomes, make the adenoviruses one of (if not the) best models for studying viral evolution on a larger time scale. Phylogenetic calculation can infer the evolutionary distance among adenovirus strains on serotype, species, and genus levels, thus helping the establishment of a correct taxonomy on the one hand, and speeding up the process of typing new isolates on the other. Initially, four major lineages corresponding to four genera were recognized. Later, the demarcation criteria of lower taxon levels, such as species or types, could also be defined with phylogenetic calculations. A limited number of possible host switches have been hypothesized and convincingly supported. Application of the web-based BLAST and MultAlin programs and the freely available PHYLIP package, along with the TreeView program, enables everyone to make correct calculations. In addition to step-by-step instruction on how to perform phylogenetic analysis, critical points where typical mistakes or misinterpretation of the results might occur will be identified and hints for their avoidance will be provided. PMID:17656792

  16. Anti-Viral Drugs for Human Adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Waye, Mary Miu Yee; Sing, Chor Wing

    2010-01-01

    There are many stages in the development of a new drug for viral infection and such processes are even further complicated for adenovirus by the fact that there are at least 51 serotypes, forming six distinct groups (A–F), with different degree of infectivity. This review attempts to address the importance of developing pharmaceuticals for adenovirus and also review recent development in drug discovery for adenovirus, including newer strategies such as microRNA approaches. Different drug screening strategies will also be discussed.

  17. An outbreak of adenovirus keratoconjunctivitis in bristol.

    PubMed Central

    Tullo, A B; Higgins, P G

    1979-01-01

    Nineteen cases of keratoconjunctivitis caused by an adenovirus serologically related to types 10 and 19 are described. Seventeen of the patients presented over a period of 7 weeks and included 4 who were involved in a minor outbreak at a factory. The presentation and clinical features closely resembled those caused by adenoviruses types 8 and 19. Mild to severe follicular conjunctivitis, superficial punctate keratitis, discrete subepithelial opacities, membrane formation, and conjunctival scarring were all observed. Images PMID:226115

  18. Core labeling of adenovirus with EGFP

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Long P.; Le, Helen N.; Nelson, Amy R.; Matthews, David A.; Yamamoto, Masato; Curiel, David T. . E-mail: curiel@uab.edu

    2006-08-01

    The study of adenovirus could greatly benefit from diverse methods of virus detection. Recently, it has been demonstrated that carboxy-terminal EGFP fusions of adenovirus core proteins Mu, V, and VII properly localize to the nucleus and display novel function in the cell. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that the core proteins may serve as targets for labeling the adenovirus core with fluorescent proteins. To this end, we constructed various chimeric expression vectors with fusion core genes (Mu-EGFP, V-EGFP, preVII-EGFP, and matVII-EGFP) while maintaining expression of the native proteins. Expression of the fusion core proteins was suboptimal using E1 expression vectors with both conventional CMV and modified (with adenovirus tripartite leader sequence) CMV5 promoters, resulting in non-labeled viral particles. However, robust expression equivalent to the native protein was observed when the fusion genes were placed in the deleted E3 region. The efficient Ad-wt-E3-V-EGFP and Ad-wt-E3-preVII-EGFP expression vectors were labeled allowing visualization of purified virus and tracking of the viral core during early infection. The vectors maintained their viral function, including viral DNA replication, viral DNA encapsidation, cytopathic effect, and thermostability. Core labeling offers a means to track the adenovirus core in vector targeting studies as well as basic adenovirus virology.

  19. Nuclear actin and myosins in adenovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Fuchsova, Beata; Serebryannyy, Leonid A; de Lanerolle, Primal

    2015-11-01

    Adenovirus serotypes have been shown to cause drastic changes in nuclear organization, including the transcription machinery, during infection. This ability of adenovirus to subvert transcription in the host cell facilitates viral replication. Because nuclear actin and nuclear myosin I, myosin V and myosin VI have been implicated as direct regulators of transcription and important factors in the replication of other viruses, we sought to determine how nuclear actin and myosins are involved in adenovirus infection. We first confirmed reorganization of the host's transcription machinery to viral replication centers. We found that nuclear actin also reorganizes to sites of transcription through the intermediate but not the advanced late phase of viral infection. Furthermore, nuclear myosin I localized with nuclear actin and sites of transcription in viral replication centers. Intriguingly, nuclear myosins V and VI, which also reorganized to viral replication centers, exhibited different localization patterns, suggesting specialized roles for these nuclear myosins. Finally, we assessed the role of actin in adenovirus infection and found both cytoplasmic and nuclear actin likely play roles in adenovirus infection and replication. Together our data suggest the involvement of actin and multiple myosins in the nuclear replication and late viral gene expression of adenovirus. PMID:26226218

  20. human adenoviruses role in ophthalmic pterygium formation

    PubMed Central

    Kelishadi, Mishar; Kelishadi, Mandana; Moradi, Abdolvahab; Javid, Naeme; Bazouri, Masoud; Tabarraei, Alijan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ophthalmic pterygium is a common benign lesion of unknown origin and the pathogenesis might be vision-threatening. This problem is often associated with exposure to solar light. Recent evidence suggests that potentially oncogenic viruses such as human papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus may be involved in the pathogenesis of pterygia. Expression of specific adenovirus genes such as E1A and E1B, which potentially have many functions, may contribute to their oncogenic activity as well as relevance to cellular immortalization. Objectives: For the first time, we aimed to investigate involvement of adenoviruses in pterygium formation. Patients and Methods: Fifty tissue specimens of pterygium from patients undergoing pterygium surgery (as cases), 50 conjunctival swab samples from the same patients and 10 conjunctival biopsy specimens from individuals without pterygium such as patients undergoing cataract surgery (as controls) were analyzed for evidence of adenovirus infection with polymerase chain reaction using specific primers chosen from the moderately conserved region of the hexon gene. Furthermore, β-globin primers were used to access the quality of extracted DNA. Data was analyzed using SPSS (version 16) software. Results: Of 50 patients, 20 were men and 30 women with mean age of 61.1 ± 16.9 years ranged between 22 and 85 years. All samples of pterygia had positive results for adenoviruses DNA with polymerase chain reaction, but none of the negative control groups displayed adenoviruses. The pterygium group and the control groups were β-globin positive. Direct sequencing of PCR products confirmed Adenovirus infection. Conclusions: Adenoviruses might act as a possible cause of pterygium formation and other factors could play a synergistic role in the development. However, further larger studies are required to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:26034543

  1. Characterisation of the Equine adenovirus 2 genome.

    PubMed

    Giles, Carla; Vanniasinkam, Thiru; Barton, Mary; Mahony, Timothy J

    2015-09-30

    Equine adenovirus 2 (EAdV-2) is one of two serotypes of adenoviruses known to infect equines. Initial studies did not associate EAdV-2 infections with any specific clinical syndromes, although more recent evidence suggests that EAdV-2 may be associated with clinical and subclinical gastrointestinal infections of foals and adults respectively. In contrast, Equine adenovirus 1 is well recognised as a pathogen associated with upper respiratory tract infections of horses. In this study the complete genome sequence of EAdV-2 is reported. As expected, genes common to the adenoviruses were identified. Phylogenetic reconstructions using selected EAdV-2 genes confirmed the classification of this virus within the Mastadenovirus genus, and supported the hypothesis that EAdV-2 and EAdV-1 have evolved from separate lineages within the adenoviruses. One spliced open reading frame was identified that encoded for a polypeptide with high similarity to the pIX and E1b_55K adenovirus homologues and was designated pIX_E1b_55K. In addition to this fused version of E1b_55K, a separate E1b_55K encoding gene was also identified. These polypeptides do not appear to have evolved from a gene duplication event as the fused and unfused E1b_55K were most similar to E1b_55K homologues from the Atadenovirus and Mastadenovirus genera respectively. The results of this study suggest that EAdV-2 has an unusual evolutionary history that warrants further investigation. PMID:26220513

  2. Characteristics of Noncultivable Adenoviruses Associated with Diarrhea in Infants: A New Subgroup of Human Adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Gary, G. William; Hierholzer, John C.; Black, Robert E.

    1979-01-01

    Virus particles morphologically resembling adenovirus were found in fecal specimens from infants and were examined for cultivability with standard cell culture techniques and for characteristics of human adenoviruses. Specimens from 13 of 15 infants could not be cultivated in cell cultures. The two adenoviruses that were cultivated, types 1 and 31, reacted in the expected manner in all tests. Counterimmunoelectrophoresis with group-specific anti-hexon serum confirmed that the observed particles in the 15 specimens were human adenoviruses. The buoyant density in sucrose of five of the noncultivable adenoviruses in original stool suspensions averaged 1.335 g/cm3 and that of the two cultivable ones averaged 1.332 g/cm3; both groups had typical adenovirus morphology by electron microscopy. Treatment of the specimens and of a variety of tissue culture cells with proteolytic and other enzymes did not improve cultivability. Examination of partially purified virus by immunoelectron microscopy did not reveal evidence of immunoglobulin A, G, or M coating on the particles, an indication that coproantibody inhibition was not the cause of noncultivability. Fluorescent-antibody studies with an antihexon conjugate and counterimmunoelectrophoresis studies of serially passaged noncultivable viruses indicated that the viruses are infecting cells but are not undergoing effective replication. Antisera to three of the noncultivable viruses demonstrated homologous reactions in counterimmunoelectrophoresis with the respective immunizing antigens but showed only low levels of hemagglutination-inhibiting and neutralizing activity to a few of the known human adenoviruses. We concluded that the noncultivable viruses in these infant diarrhea cases were indeed human adenoviruses, were not defective particles, were not bound to coproantibody, were infectious but incapable of effective relication in conventional cell cultures, were serologically related to types 11, 17, 32, and 33, and should be

  3. Structure and Uncoating of Immature Adenovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Berna, A.J.; Mangel, W.; Marabini, R.; Scheres, S. H. W., Menendez-Conejero, R.; Dmitriev, I. P.; Curiel, D. T.; Flint, S. J.; San Martin, C.

    2009-09-18

    Maturation via proteolytic processing is a common trait in the viral world and is often accompanied by large conformational changes and rearrangements in the capsid. The adenovirus protease has been shown to play a dual role in the viral infectious cycle: (a) in maturation, as viral assembly starts with precursors to several of the structural proteins but ends with proteolytically processed versions in the mature virion, and (b) in entry, because protease-impaired viruses have difficulties in endosome escape and uncoating. Indeed, viruses that have not undergone proteolytic processing are not infectious. We studied the three-dimensional structure of immature adenovirus particles as represented by the adenovirus type 2 thermosensitive mutant ts1 grown under non-permissive conditions and compared it with the mature capsid. Our three-dimensional electron microscopy maps at subnanometer resolution indicate that adenovirus maturation does not involve large-scale conformational changes in the capsid. Difference maps reveal the locations of unprocessed peptides pIIIa and pVI and help define their role in capsid assembly and maturation. An intriguing difference appears in the core, indicating a more compact organization and increased stability of the immature cores. We have further investigated these properties by in vitro disassembly assays. Fluorescence and electron microscopy experiments reveal differences in the stability and uncoating of immature viruses, both at the capsid and core levels, as well as disassembly intermediates not previously imaged.

  4. Rapid generation of fowl adenovirus 9 vectors.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yanlong; Griffin, Bryan; de Jong, Jondavid; Krell, Peter J; Nagy, Éva

    2015-10-01

    Fowl adenoviruses (FAdV) have the largest genomes of any fully sequenced adenovirus genome, and are widely considered as excellent platforms for vaccine development and gene therapy. As such, there is a strong need for stream-lined protocols/strategies for the generation of recombinant adenovirus genomes. Current genome engineering strategies rely upon plasmid based homologous recombination in Escherichia coli BJ5183. This process is time-consuming, involves multiple cloning steps, and low efficiency recombination. This report describes a novel system for the more rapid generation of recombinant fowl adenovirus genomes using the lambda Red recombinase system in E. coli DH10B. In this strategy, PCR based amplicons with around 50 nt long homologous arms, a unique SwaI site and a chloramphenicol resistance gene fragment (CAT cassette), are introduced into the FAdV-9 genome in a highly efficient and site-specific manner. To demonstrate the efficacy of this system we generated FAdV-9 ORF2, and FAdV-9 ORF11 deleted, CAT marked and unmarked FAdV-9 infectious clones (FAdmids), and replaced either ORF2 or ORF11, with an EGFP expression cassette or replaced ORF2 with an EGFP coding sequence via the unique SwaI sites, in approximately one month. All recombinant FAdmids expressed EGFP and were fully infectious in CH-SAH cells. PMID:26238923

  5. Fluorescent antibody responses to adenoviruses in humans.

    PubMed

    Ariyawansa, J P; Tobin, J O

    1976-05-01

    Specific IgG, IgA, and IgM immunoglobulin antibody responses to adenovirus infections were studied by the indirect immunofluorescent technique in six pairs of human sera obtained during acute and convalescent phases of the illness. In addition, 70 single specimens of sera showing adenovirus IgG antibody from different age groups from birth to the 60th year of life were titrated for the same antibody to adenovirus types 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7, and 170 serum specimens from the same age groups were screened for specific immunoglobulin antibodies against types 1 and 5. Specific immunoglobulin antibodies lacked type specificity and in acute infections measured heterologous antibody response as well. On the other hand, IgG antibodies detected in single specimens of sera by immunofluorescence correlate with surveys of the isolation of virus from patients and neutralizing antibody studies by other workers. Fluorescent antibodies appeared in all three fractions of the immunoglobulins in acute adenovirus infections. Although this technique may be used in the diagnosis of adenovirus infections there is no advantage compared to complement-fixation testing. However, the use of sera absorbed with group antigen may have a more useful place in serological epidemiology than in diagnostic work. In five pairs of sera obtained during acute and convalescent phases of adenoviral illness and in 70 random single specimens from different age groups, "T" antibodies were detected only in the IgG fraction. The paired sera did not show a significant rise to indicate the usefulness of "T" antibody study in diagnosis. PMID:180061

  6. Fluorescent antibody responses to adenoviruses in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Ariyawansa, J P; Tobin, J O

    1976-01-01

    Specific IgG, IgA, and IgM immunoglobulin antibody responses to adenovirus infections were studied by the indirect immunofluorescent technique in six pairs of human sera obtained during acute and convalescent phases of the illness. In addition, 70 single specimens of sera showing adenovirus IgG antibody from different age groups from birth to the 60th year of life were titrated for the same antibody to adenovirus types 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7, and 170 serum specimens from the same age groups were screened for specific immunoglobulin antibodies against types 1 and 5. Specific immunoglobulin antibodies lacked type specificity and in acute infections measured heterologous antibody response as well. On the other hand, IgG antibodies detected in single specimens of sera by immunofluorescence correlate with surveys of the isolation of virus from patients and neutralizing antibody studies by other workers. Fluorescent antibodies appeared in all three fractions of the immunoglobulins in acute adenovirus infections. Although this technique may be used in the diagnosis of adenovirus infections there is no advantage compared to complement-fixation testing. However, the use of sera absorbed with group antigen may have a more useful place in serological epidemiology than in diagnostic work. In five pairs of sera obtained during acute and convalescent phases of adenoviral illness and in 70 random single specimens from different age groups, "T" antibodies were detected only in the IgG fraction. The paired sera did not show a significant rise to indicate the usefulness of "T" antibody study in diagnosis. PMID:180061

  7. Labeling of Adenovirus Particles with PARACEST Agents

    PubMed Central

    Vasalatiy, Olga; Gerard, Robert D; Zhao, Piyu; Sun, Xiankai; Sherry, A. Dean

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant adenovirus type 5 particles (AdCMVLuc) were labeled with two different bifunctional ligands capable of forming stable complexes with paramagnetic lanthanide ions. The number of covalently attached ligands varied between 630 and 1960 per adenovirus particle depending upon the chemical reactivity of the bifunctional ligand (NHS ester versus isothiocyanide), the amount of excess ligand added, and the reaction time. The bioactivity of each labeled adenovirus derivative, as measured by the ability of the virus to infect cells and express luciferase, was shown to be highly dependent upon the number of covalently attached ligands. This indicates that certain amino groups, likely on the surface of the adenovirus fiber protein where cell binding is known to occur, are critical for viral attachment and infection. Addition of 177Lu3+ to chemically modified versus control viruses demonstrated a significant amount of nonspecific binding of 177Lu3+ to the virus particles that could not be sequestered by addition of excess DTPA. Thus, it became necessary to implement a prelabeling strategy for conjugation of preformed lanthanide ligand chelates to adenovirus particles. Using preformed Tm3+-L2, a large number of chelates having chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) properties were attached to the surface residues of AdCMVLuc without nonspecific binding of metal ions elsewhere on the virus particle. The potential of such conjugates to act as PARACEST imaging agents was tested using an on-resonance WALTZ sequence for CEST activation. A 12% decrease in bulk water signal intensity was observed relative to controls. This demonstrates that viral particles labeled with PARACEST-type imaging agents can potentially serve as targeted agents for molecular imaging. PMID:18254605

  8. Adenovirus serotype 5 hexon mediates liver gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Waddington, Simon N; McVey, John H; Bhella, David; Parker, Alan L; Barker, Kristeen; Atoda, Hideko; Pink, Rebecca; Buckley, Suzanne M K; Greig, Jenny A; Denby, Laura; Custers, Jerome; Morita, Takashi; Francischetti, Ivo M B; Monteiro, Robson Q; Barouch, Dan H; van Rooijen, Nico; Napoli, Claudio; Havenga, Menzo J E; Nicklin, Stuart A; Baker, Andrew H

    2008-02-01

    Adenoviruses are used extensively as gene transfer agents, both experimentally and clinically. However, targeting of liver cells by adenoviruses compromises their potential efficacy. In cell culture, the adenovirus serotype 5 fiber protein engages the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) to bind cells. Paradoxically, following intravascular delivery, CAR is not used for liver transduction, implicating alternate pathways. Recently, we demonstrated that coagulation factor (F)X directly binds adenovirus leading to liver infection. Here, we show that FX binds to the Ad5 hexon, not fiber, via an interaction between the FX Gla domain and hypervariable regions of the hexon surface. Binding occurs in multiple human adenovirus serotypes. Liver infection by the FX-Ad5 complex is mediated through a heparin-binding exosite in the FX serine protease domain. This study reveals an unanticipated function for hexon in mediating liver gene transfer in vivo. PMID:18267072

  9. Verapamil Enhances the Antitumoral Efficacy of Oncolytic Adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Gros, Alena; Puig, Cristina; Guedan, Sonia; Rojas, Juan José; Alemany, Ramon; Cascallo, Manel

    2010-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of oncolytic adenoviruses is limited by the rate of adenovirus release. Based on the observation that several viruses induce cell death and progeny release by disrupting intracellular calcium homeostasis, we hypothesized that the alteration in intracellular calcium concentration induced by verapamil could improve the rate of virus release and spread, eventually enhancing the antitumoral activity of oncolytic adenoviruses. Our results indicate that verapamil substantially enhanced the release of adenovirus from a variety of cell types resulting in an improved cell-to-cell spread and cytotoxicity. Furthermore, the combination of the systemic administration of an oncolytic adenovirus (ICOVIR-5) with verapamil in vivo greatly improved its antitumoral activity in two different tumor xenograft models without affecting the selectivity of this virus. Overall, our findings indicate that verapamil provides a new, safe, and versatile way to improve the antitumoral potency of oncolytic adenoviruses in the clinical setting. PMID:20179683

  10. [Inhibition of adenovirus reproduction in cell culture by specific antibodies].

    PubMed

    Povnytsia, O Iu; Nosach, L M; Zhovnovata, V L; Zahorodnia, S D; Vantsak, N P; Tokarchuk, L V; Polishchuk, O M; Diachenko, N S

    2009-01-01

    The capacity of specific antibodies to inhibit the reproduction of homo- and heterologous adenoviruses in Hela cell added to culture medium after virus adsorption was studied. The inhibiting effect of polyclonal antivirus and monospecific antihexone antibodies to homo- and heterologous adenoviruses was shown. The effect was more expressed when using antibodies to homologous antibodies. The intensity of inhibition depended on antibodies concentration in the medium and infecting dose of the virus. Essential reduction of the quantity of infected cells and a decrease of the titer of adenovirus synthesized in the presence of homo- and heterologous antibodies was shown but adenovirus reproduction was not inhibited completely. PMID:19663330

  11. SPRi-based adenovirus detection using a surrogate antibody method.

    PubMed

    Abadian, Pegah N; Yildirim, Nimet; Gu, April Z; Goluch, Edgar D

    2015-12-15

    Adenovirus infection, which is a waterborne viral disease, is one of the most prevelant causes of human morbidity in the world. Thus, methods for rapid detection of this infectious virus in the environment are urgently needed for public health protection. In this study, we developed a rapid, real-time, sensitive, and label-free SPRi-based biosensor for rapid, sensitive and highly selective detection of adenoviruses. The sensing protocol consists of mixing the sample containing adenovirus with a predetermined concentration of adenovirus antibody. The mixture was filtered to remove the free antibodies from the sample. A secondary antibody, which was specific to the adenovirus antibody, was immobilized onto the SPRi chip surface covalently and the filtrate was flowed over the sensor surface. When the free adenovirus antibodies bound to the surface-immobilized secondary antibodies, we observed this binding via changes in reflectivity. In this approach, a higher amount of adenoviruses resulted in fewer free adenovirus antibodies and thus smaller reflectivity changes. A dose-response curve was generated, and the linear detection range was determined to be from 10 PFU/mL to 5000 PFU/mL with an R(2) value greater than 0.9. The results also showed that the developed biosensing system had a high specificity towards adenovirus (less than 20% signal change when tested in a sample matrix containing rotavirus and lentivirus). PMID:26232675

  12. Aerosol stability of bovine adenovirus type 3.

    PubMed Central

    Elazhary, M A; Derbyshire, J B

    1979-01-01

    The WBR-1 strain of bovine adenovirus type 3 was suspended in Eagle's medium or bovine nasal secretion and atomized into a rotating drum at temperatures of 6 degrees C or 32 degrees C and relative humidities of 30% or 90%. Impinger samples of the aerosols were collected seven minutes, one, two and three hours postgeneration, and titrated for infectivity in embryonic bovine kidney cell cultures. Under certain conditions of temperature and relative humidity, the virus was more stable in aerosols of Eagle's medium than in nasal secretion. The bovine adenovirus was usually inactivated more rapidly at 30% relative humidity than at 90% relative humidity and during aging of the aerosols the virus was inactivated more rapidly at 32 degrees C than at 6 degrees C. PMID:226247

  13. Structure, Function and Dynamics in Adenovirus Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Mangel, Walter F.; San Martín, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Here we review the current knowledge on maturation of adenovirus, a non-enveloped icosahedral eukaryotic virus. The adenovirus dsDNA genome fills the capsid in complex with a large amount of histone-like viral proteins, forming the core. Maturation involves proteolytic cleavage of several capsid and core precursor proteins by the viral protease (AVP). AVP uses a peptide cleaved from one of its targets as a “molecular sled” to slide on the viral genome and reach its substrates, in a remarkable example of one-dimensional chemistry. Immature adenovirus containing the precursor proteins lacks infectivity because of its inability to uncoat. The immature core is more compact and stable than the mature one, due to the condensing action of unprocessed core polypeptides; shell precursors underpin the vertex region and the connections between capsid and core. Maturation makes the virion metastable, priming it for stepwise uncoating by facilitating vertex release and loosening the condensed genome and its attachment to the icosahedral shell. The packaging scaffold protein L1 52/55k is also a substrate for AVP. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other virion components, providing a mechanism for its removal during maturation. Finally, possible roles for maturation of the terminal protein are discussed. PMID:25421887

  14. Structure, function and dynamics in adenovirus maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Mangel, Walter F.; San Martín, Carmen

    2014-11-21

    Here we review the current knowledge on maturation of adenovirus, a non-enveloped icosahedral eukaryotic virus. The adenovirus dsDNA genome fills the capsid in complex with a large amount of histone-like viral proteins, forming the core. Maturation involves proteolytic cleavage of several capsid and core precursor proteins by the viral protease (AVP). AVP uses a peptide cleaved from one of its targets as a “molecular sled” to slide on the viral genome and reach its substrates, in a remarkable example of one-dimensional chemistry. Immature adenovirus containing the precursor proteins lacks infectivity because of its inability to uncoat. The immature core is more compact and stable than the mature one, due to the condensing action of unprocessed core polypeptides; shell precursors underpin the vertex region and the connections between capsid and core. Maturation makes the virion metastable, priming it for stepwise uncoating by facilitating vertex release and loosening the condensed genome and its attachment to the icosahedral shell. The packaging scaffold protein L1 52/55k is also a substrate for AVP. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other virion components, providing a mechanism for its removal during maturation. In conclusion, possible roles for maturation of the terminal protein are discussed.

  15. Structure, function and dynamics in adenovirus maturation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mangel, Walter F.; San Martín, Carmen

    2014-11-21

    Here we review the current knowledge on maturation of adenovirus, a non-enveloped icosahedral eukaryotic virus. The adenovirus dsDNA genome fills the capsid in complex with a large amount of histone-like viral proteins, forming the core. Maturation involves proteolytic cleavage of several capsid and core precursor proteins by the viral protease (AVP). AVP uses a peptide cleaved from one of its targets as a “molecular sled” to slide on the viral genome and reach its substrates, in a remarkable example of one-dimensional chemistry. Immature adenovirus containing the precursor proteins lacks infectivity because of its inability to uncoat. The immature core ismore » more compact and stable than the mature one, due to the condensing action of unprocessed core polypeptides; shell precursors underpin the vertex region and the connections between capsid and core. Maturation makes the virion metastable, priming it for stepwise uncoating by facilitating vertex release and loosening the condensed genome and its attachment to the icosahedral shell. The packaging scaffold protein L1 52/55k is also a substrate for AVP. Proteolytic processing of L1 52/55k disrupts its interactions with other virion components, providing a mechanism for its removal during maturation. In conclusion, possible roles for maturation of the terminal protein are discussed.« less

  16. ADENOVIRUS INTERACTION WITH ITS CELLULAR RECEPTOR CAR.

    SciTech Connect

    HOWITT,J.; ANDERSON,C.W.; FREIMUTH,P.

    2001-08-01

    The mechanism of adenovirus attachment to the host cell plasma membrane has been revealed in detail by research over the past 10 years. It has long been known that receptor binding activity is associated with the viral fibers, trimeric spike proteins that protrude radially from the vertices of the icosahedral capsid (Philipson et al. 1968). In some adenovirus serotypes, fiber and other virus structural proteins are synthesized in excess and accumulate in the cell nucleus during late stages of infection. Fiber protein can be readily purified from lysates of cells infected with subgroup C viruses, for example Ad2 and Ad5 (Boulanger and Puvion 1973). Addition of purified fiber protein to virus suspensions during adsorption strongly inhibits infection, indicating that fiber and intact virus particles compete for binding sites on host cells (Philipson et al. 1968; Hautala et al. 1998). Cell binding studies using purified radiolabeled fiber demonstrated that fiber binds specifically and with high affinity to the cell plasma membrane, and that cell lines typically used for laboratory propagation of adenovirus have approximately 10{sup 4} high-affinity receptor sites per cell (Persson et al. 1985; Freimuth 1996). Similar numbers of high-affinity binding sites for radiolabeled intact virus particles also were observed (Seth et al. 1994).

  17. Capturing and concentrating adenovirus using magnetic anionic nanobeads.

    PubMed

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Baba, Koichi; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    We recently demonstrated how various enveloped viruses can be efficiently concentrated using magnetic beads coated with an anionic polymer, poly(methyl vinyl ether-maleic anhydrate). However, the exact mechanism of interaction between the virus particles and anionic beads remains unclear. To further investigate whether these magnetic anionic beads specifically bind to the viral envelope, we examined their potential interaction with a nonenveloped virus (adenovirus). The beads were incubated with either adenovirus-infected cell culture medium or nasal aspirates from adenovirus-infected individuals and then separated from the supernatant by applying a magnetic field. After thoroughly washing the beads, adsorption of adenovirus was confirmed by a variety of techniques, including immunochromatography, polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and cell culture infection assays. These detection methods positively identified the hexon and penton capsid proteins of adenovirus along with the viral genome on the magnetic beads. Furthermore, various types of adenovirus including Types 5, 6, 11, 19, and 41 were captured using the magnetic bead procedure. Our bead capture method was also found to increase the sensitivity of viral detection. Adenovirus below the detectable limit for immunochromatography was efficiently concentrated using the magnetic bead procedure, allowing the virus to be successfully detected using this methodology. Moreover, these findings clearly demonstrate that a viral envelope is not required for binding to the anionic magnetic beads. Taken together, our results show that this capture procedure increases the sensitivity of detection of adenovirus and would, therefore, be a valuable tool for analyzing both clinical and experimental samples. PMID:27274228

  18. Capturing and concentrating adenovirus using magnetic anionic nanobeads

    PubMed Central

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Baba, Koichi; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    We recently demonstrated how various enveloped viruses can be efficiently concentrated using magnetic beads coated with an anionic polymer, poly(methyl vinyl ether-maleic anhydrate). However, the exact mechanism of interaction between the virus particles and anionic beads remains unclear. To further investigate whether these magnetic anionic beads specifically bind to the viral envelope, we examined their potential interaction with a nonenveloped virus (adenovirus). The beads were incubated with either adenovirus-infected cell culture medium or nasal aspirates from adenovirus-infected individuals and then separated from the supernatant by applying a magnetic field. After thoroughly washing the beads, adsorption of adenovirus was confirmed by a variety of techniques, including immunochromatography, polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and cell culture infection assays. These detection methods positively identified the hexon and penton capsid proteins of adenovirus along with the viral genome on the magnetic beads. Furthermore, various types of adenovirus including Types 5, 6, 11, 19, and 41 were captured using the magnetic bead procedure. Our bead capture method was also found to increase the sensitivity of viral detection. Adenovirus below the detectable limit for immunochromatography was efficiently concentrated using the magnetic bead procedure, allowing the virus to be successfully detected using this methodology. Moreover, these findings clearly demonstrate that a viral envelope is not required for binding to the anionic magnetic beads. Taken together, our results show that this capture procedure increases the sensitivity of detection of adenovirus and would, therefore, be a valuable tool for analyzing both clinical and experimental samples. PMID:27274228

  19. Enhanced inactivation of adenovirus under polychromatic UV lamps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adenovirus is recognized as the most UV-resistant waterborne pathogen of concern to public health microbiologists. The US EPA has stipulated that a UV fluence (dose) of 186 mJ cm-2 is required for 4-log inactivation credit in water treatment. However, all adenovirus inactivation data to date publi...

  20. PEGylated Adenoviruses: From Mice to Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Wonganan, Piyanuch; Croyle, Maria A.

    2010-01-01

    Covalent modification with polyethylene glycol (PEG), a non-toxic polymer used in food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical preparations for over 60 years, can profoundly influence the pharmacokinetic, pharmacologic and toxciologic profile of protein and peptide-based therapeutics. This review summarizes the history of PEGylation and PEG chemistry and highlights the value of this technology in the context of the design and development of recombinant viruses for gene transfer, vaccination and diagnostic purposes. Specific emphasis is placed on the application of this technology to the adenovirus, the most potent viral vector with the most highly characterized toxicity profile to date, in several animal models. PMID:21994645

  1. Violencia de Pareja en Mujeres Hispanas: Implicaciones para la Investigación y la Práctica

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Guarda, Rosa Maria; Becerra, Maria Mercedes

    2012-01-01

    Las investigaciones sobre la violencia entre parejas sugieren que las mujeres hispanas están siendo afectadas desproporcionadamente por la ocurrencia y consecuencias de este problema de salud pública. El objetivo del presente artículo es dar a conocer el estado del arte en relación a la epidemiologia, consecuencias y factores de riesgo para VP entre mujeres Hispanas, discutiendo las implicaciones para la investigación y la práctica. Investigaciones han demostrado una fuerte asociación del status socioeconómico, abuso de droga y el alcohol, la salud mental, aculturación, inmigración, comportamientos sexuales riesgosos e historia de abuso con la violencia entre parejas. Sin embargo, más estudios se deben llevar a cabo para identificar otros factores de riesgos y de protección a poblaciones hispanas no clínicas. Mientras que el conocimiento sobre la etiología de la VP entre mujeres Hispanas se expanda, enfermeras y otros profesionales de la salud deben desarrollar, implementar y evaluar estrategias culturalmente adecuadas para la prevención primaria y secundaria de la violencia entre pareja. PMID:26166938

  2. Structure of adenovirus bound to cellular receptor car

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2004-05-18

    Disclosed is a mutant adenovirus which has a genome comprising one or more mutations in sequences which encode the fiber protein knob domain wherein the mutation causes the encoded viral particle to have significantly weakened binding affinity for CARD1 relative to wild-type adenovirus. Such mutations may be in sequences which encode either the AB loop, or the HI loop of the fiber protein knob domain. Specific residues and mutations are described. Also disclosed is a method for generating a mutant adenovirus which is characterized by a receptor binding affinity or specificity which differs substantially from wild type. In the method, residues of the adenovirus fiber protein knob domain which are predicted to alter D1 binding when mutated, are identified from the crystal structure coordinates of the AD12knob:CAR-D1 complex. A mutation which alters one or more of the identified residues is introduced into the genome of the adenovirus to generate a mutant adenovirus. Whether or not the mutant produced exhibits altered adenovirus-CAR binding properties is then determined.

  3. La problematica de la demarcacion entre ciencia y pseudociencia y sus implicaciones en la educacion cientifica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez Tolentino, Dinorah

    2011-12-01

    En la sociedad prevalece una tendencia generalizada hacia la inclusion de creencias y practicas pseudocientificas. Esta investigacion responde a la necesidad de analizar como la proliferacion de las pseudociencias afecta la vision que tienen los estudiantes universitarios sobre las ciencias naturales. A tales efectos, la investigadora describe las concepciones epistemologicas que tienen los estudiantes sobre las ciencias y las pseudociencias e identifica los criterios de demarcacion, entre un area y otra, que se derivan de estas concepciones. De igual modo, esta identifica las creencias y practicas pseudocientificas de mayor arraigo entre los estudiantes, destacando, a su vez, la razon de ser de las mismas. Por ultimo, la investigadora analiza las implicaciones educativas de la problematica de la demarcacion entre ciencia y pseudociencia. La investigacion es de naturaleza mixta, enmarcada en los paradigmas empirico- analitico y cualitativo. El proceso investigativo se llevo a cabo mediante la administracion del cuestionario Criterios para la demarcacion entre ciencia y pseudociencia. La parte cualitativa estuvo enmarcada en el diseno de estudio de caso, recopilando informacion mediante entrevistas semiestructuradas en dos grupos focales. La poblacion de estudio estuvo constituida por estudiantes universitarios del nivel subgraduado de la Universidad Central de Bayamon. Los resultados del estudio reflejaron las concepciones erroneas de los estudiantes sobre la naturaleza de las ciencias y las pseudociencias. Con respecto a la demarcacion entre ciencia y pseudociencia, el criterio imperante entre los universitarios es el de la verificabilidad, considerando la aplicacion del metodo cientifico como el metodo para demostrar la veracidad de las teorias cientificas. Las creencias y practicas pseudocientificas no son muy frecuentes entre los universitarios. Estos atribuyen las mismas a la prevalencia de elementos supersticiosos y al engano a que es sometida la poblacion

  4. Isolation and Epidemiology of Falcon Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Oaks, J. Lindsay; Schrenzel, Mark; Rideout, Bruce; Sandfort, Cal

    2005-01-01

    An adenovirus was detected by electron microscopy in tissues from falcons that died during an outbreak of inclusion body hepatitis and enteritis that affected neonatal Northern aplomado (Falco femoralis septentrionalis) and peregrine (Falco peregrinus anatum) falcons. Molecular characterization has identified the falcon virus as a new member of the aviadenovirus group (M. Schrenzel, J. L. Oaks, D. Rotstein, G. Maalouf, E. Snook, C. Sandfort, and B. Rideout, J. Clin. Microbiol. 43:3402-3413, 2005). In this study, the virus was successfully isolated and propagated in peregrine falcon embryo fibroblasts, in which it caused visible and reproducible cytopathology. Testing for serum neutralizing antibodies found that infection with this virus was limited almost exclusively to falcons. Serology also found that wild and captive peregrine falcons had high seropositivity rates of 80% and 100%, respectively, although clinical disease was rarely reported in this species. These data implicate peregrine falcons as the natural host and primary reservoir for the virus. Other species of North American falcons, including aplomado falcons, had lower seropositivity rates of 43 to 57%. Falcon species of tropical and/or island origin were uniformly seronegative, although deaths among adults of these species have been described, suggesting they are highly susceptible. Chickens and quail were uniformly seronegative and not susceptible to infection, indicating that fowl were not the source of infection. Based on the information from this study, the primary control of falcon adenovirus infections should be based on segregation of carrier and susceptible falcon species. PMID:16000467

  5. Structure of adenovirus bound to cellular receptor car

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2007-01-02

    Disclosed is a mutant CAR-DI-binding adenovirus which has a genome comprising one or more mutations in sequences which encode the fiber protein knob domain wherein the mutation causes the encoded viral particle to have a significantly weakened binding affinity for CAR-DI relative to wild-type adenovirus. Such mutations may be in sequences which encode either the AB loop, or the HI loop of the fiber protein knob domain. Specific residues and mutations are described. Also disclosed is a method for generating a mutant adenovirus which is characterized by a receptor binding affinity or specificity which differs substantially from wild type.

  6. New human adenovirus isolated from a renal transplant recipient: description and characterization of candiate adenovirus type 34.

    PubMed Central

    Hierholzer, J C; Atuk, N O; Gwaltney, J M

    1975-01-01

    An antigenically distinct adenovirus is described which was isolated in March 1972 from the urine of a 17-year-old Caucasian male who was experiencing fever after receiving a kidney transplant from a cadaver in February. The adenovirus could not be isolated in April from a pharyngeal swab which yielded cytomegalovirus. Complement-fixation, hemagglutination-inhibition, and/or serum-neutralization tests on sequential serum specimens from the patient confirmed that the adenovirus infection occurred during March and showed that infections with cytomegalovirus and respiratory syncytial virus also occurred during late March and April. The patient's persistent fever, for which other causes could not be found, may have been associated with one or more of these infections. Upper respiratory symptoms and lung involvement were not found during this period. Mild liver dysfunction during this time could not be clearly related to adenovirus infection because of the presence of multiple other causes. The adenovirus may have been latent in the donor kidney and become active in the new host as a consequence of immunological impairment. The adenovirus, purified by terminal dilution and plaque procedures, has antigenic, morphological, biophysical, host susceptibility, and hemagglutinating properties characteristic of adenovirus group IA. Buoyant densities in CsCl are 1.340 g/ml for the virion, 1.304 g/ml for the group CF antigen (hexon), 1.295 g/ml for the major soluble complete hemagglutinin (dodecon), and 1.206 g/ml for the minor soluble complete hemagglutinin (tentatively, fiber dimer). The virus does not cross-react in reciprocal hemagglutination-inhibition and serum-neutralization tests with antisera to adenovirus types 1 to 33. We propose this virus as candidate adenovirus type 34 (Compton). Images PMID:170313

  7. The Intracellular Domain of the Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor Differentially Influences Adenovirus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Loustalot, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is a cell adhesion molecule used as a docking molecule by some adenoviruses (AdVs) and group B coxsackieviruses. We previously proposed that the preferential transduction of neurons by canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2) is due to CAR-mediated internalization. Our proposed pathway of CAV-2 entry is in contrast to that of human AdV type 5 (HAdV-C5) in nonneuronal cells, where internalization is mediated by auxiliary receptors such as integrins. We therefore asked if in fibroblast-like cells the intracellular domain (ICD) of CAR plays a role in the internalization of the CAV-2 fiber knob (FKCAV), CAV-2, or HAdV-C5 when the capsid cannot engage integrins. Here, we show that in fibroblast-like cells, the CAR ICD is needed for FKCAV entry and efficient CAV-2 transduction but dispensable for HAdV-C5 and an HAdV-C5 capsid lacking the RGD sequence (an integrin-interacting motif) in the penton. Moreover, the deletion of the CAR ICD further impacts CAV-2 intracellular trafficking, highlighting the crucial role of CAR in CAV-2 intracellular dynamics. These data demonstrate that the CAR ICD contains sequences important for the recruitment of the endocytic machinery that differentially influences AdV cell entry. IMPORTANCE Understanding how viruses interact with the host cell surface and reach the intracellular space is of crucial importance for applied and fundamental virology. Here, we compare the role of a cell adhesion molecule (CAR) in the internalization of adenoviruses that naturally infect humans and Canidae. We show that the intracellular domain of CAR differentially regulates AdV entry and trafficking. Our study highlights the mechanistic differences that a receptor can have for two viruses from the same family. PMID:26136571

  8. Transient acute adrenal insufficiency associated with adenovirus serotype 40 infection

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Birendra; Ali, Muhammad; Kumar, Varun; Krebit, Ibraheem

    2014-01-01

    We present an instance of a 6-year-old boy who was admitted with adenovirus infection and developed transient acute adrenal insufficiency, which required supplementation with glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids for 8 weeks. Adenovirus has got adrenotropic potential and can cause adrenal insufficiency. We could not find any similar reported case in medical literature. We hope our case would add to the existing knowledge of adenoviral complications in paediatric patients. PMID:24928932

  9. Acute Hepatitis and Pancytopenia in Healthy Infant with Adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Matoq, Amr; Salahuddin, Asma

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses are a common cause of respiratory infection, pharyngitis, and conjunctivitis in infants and young children. They are known to cause hepatitis and liver failure in immunocompromised patients; they are a rare cause of hepatitis in immunocompetent patients and have been known to cause fulminant hepatic failure. We present a 23-month-old immunocompetent infant who presented with acute noncholestatic hepatitis, hypoalbuminemia, generalized anasarca, and pancytopenia secondary to adenovirus infection. PMID:27340581

  10. Acute Hepatitis and Pancytopenia in Healthy Infant with Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Salahuddin, Asma

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses are a common cause of respiratory infection, pharyngitis, and conjunctivitis in infants and young children. They are known to cause hepatitis and liver failure in immunocompromised patients; they are a rare cause of hepatitis in immunocompetent patients and have been known to cause fulminant hepatic failure. We present a 23-month-old immunocompetent infant who presented with acute noncholestatic hepatitis, hypoalbuminemia, generalized anasarca, and pancytopenia secondary to adenovirus infection. PMID:27340581

  11. Polymeric oncolytic adenovirus for cancer gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joung-Woo; Lee, Young Sook; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kim, Sung Wan

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic adenovirus (Ad) vectors present a promising modality to treat cancer. Many clinical trials have been done with either naked oncolytic Ad or combination with chemotherapies. However, the systemic injection of oncolytic Ad in clinical applications is restricted due to significant liver toxicity and immunogenicity. To overcome these issues, Ad has been engineered physically or chemically with numerous polymers for shielding the Ad surface, accomplishing extended blood circulation time and reduced immunogenicity as well as hepatotoxicity. In this review, we describe and classify the characteristics of polymer modified oncolytic Ad following each strategy for cancer treatment. Furthermore, this review concludes with the highlights of various polymer-coated Ads and their prospects, and directions for future research. PMID:26453806

  12. Vaccine Design: Replication-Defective Adenovirus Vectors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiangyang; Xiang, Zhiquan; Ertl, Hildegund C J

    2016-01-01

    Replication-defective adenovirus (Ad) vectors were initially developed for gene transfer for correction of genetic diseases. Although Ad vectors achieved high levels of transgene product expression in a variety of target cells, expression of therapeutic proteins was found to be transient as vigorous T cell responses directed to components of the vector as well as the transgene product rapidly eliminate Ad vector-transduced cells. This opened the use of Ad vectors as vaccine carriers and by now a multitude of preclinical as well as clinical studies has shown that Ad vectors induce very potent and sustained transgene product-specific T and B cell responses. This chapter provides guidance on developing E1-deleted Ad vectors based on available viral molecular clones. Specifically, it describes methods for cloning, viral rescue and purification as well as quality control studies. PMID:27076309

  13. Adenovirus infection of the large bowel in HIV positive patients.

    PubMed Central

    Maddox, A.; Francis, N.; Moss, J.; Blanshard, C.; Gazzard, B.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To describe the microscopic appearance of adenovirus infection in the large bowel of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive patients with diarrhoea. METHODS: Large bowel biopsy specimens from 10 HIV positive patients, eight of whom were also infected with other gastrointestinal pathogens, with diarrhoea were examined, together with six small bowel biopsy specimens from the same group of patients. Eight of the patients had AIDS. The biopsy specimens were examined by light microscopy performed on haematoxylin and eosin stained and immunoperoxidase preparations, the latter using a commercially available antibody (Serotec MCA 489). Confirmation was obtained with electron microscopy. RESULTS: The morphological appearance of cells infected with adenovirus showed characteristic nuclear and cellular changes, although the inflammatory reaction was non-specific. Immunoperoxidase staining for adenovirus was sensitive and specific, and the presence of viral inclusions consistent with adenovirus was confirmed by electron microscopy. CONCLUSIONS: The light microscopic features of adenovirus infection are distinctive and immunocytochemistry with a commercially available antibody is a sensitive and specific means of confirming the diagnosis. Further studies of the role of adenovirus in causing diarrhoea in these patients are indicated. Images PMID:1401177

  14. Canine adenovirus type 1 and Pasteurella pneumotropica co‑infection in a puppy.

    PubMed

    Pintore, Maria Domenica; Corbellini, Debora; Chieppa, Maria Novella; Vallino Costassa, Elena; Florio, Caterina Lucia; Varello, Katia; Bozzetta, Elena; Adriano, Daniela; Decaro, Nicola; Casalone, Cristina; Iulini, Barbara

    2016-03-31

    In 2008, a 2 months-old male German shepherd was presented with fever, depression, and evident organic wasting. The puppy died within 48 hours after the onset of clinical signs. A complete necropsy was performed. Bacteriological examination of samples from the brain, lung, liver, spleen, and bone marrow tested positive for Pasteurella pneumotropica. Histopathology demonstrated in ammatory and vascular lesions in the central nervous system and internal organs. Canine adenovirus type 1 nucleic acid was detected by polymerase chain reaction in the frozen brain but not in the formalin- xed, para n-embedded liver and lung samples. The positive PCR was subsequently con rmed by indirect uorescent antibody testing of the para n-embedded brain and liver sections. Although the liver is the primary site of viral damage, these laboratory ndings suggest that Canine adenovirus type 1 infection should be included in the di erential diagnosis of neuropathological diseases in dogs and that adenoviral infections could promote septicaemia caused by opportunistic pathogens. PMID:27033531

  15. Human Adenovirus 52 Uses Sialic Acid-containing Glycoproteins and the Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor for Binding to Target Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lenman, Annasara; Liaci, A. Manuel; Liu, Yan; Årdahl, Carin; Rajan, Anandi; Nilsson, Emma; Bradford, Will; Kaeshammer, Lisa; Jones, Morris S.; Frängsmyr, Lars; Feizi, Ten; Stehle, Thilo; Arnberg, Niklas

    2015-01-01

    Most adenoviruses attach to host cells by means of the protruding fiber protein that binds to host cells via the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) protein. Human adenovirus type 52 (HAdV-52) is one of only three gastroenteritis-causing HAdVs that are equipped with two different fiber proteins, one long and one short. Here we show, by means of virion-cell binding and infection experiments, that HAdV-52 can also attach to host cells via CAR, but most of the binding depends on sialylated glycoproteins. Glycan microarray, flow cytometry, surface plasmon resonance and ELISA analyses reveal that the terminal knob domain of the long fiber (52LFK) binds to CAR, and the knob domain of the short fiber (52SFK) binds to sialylated glycoproteins. X-ray crystallographic analysis of 52SFK in complex with 2-O-methylated sialic acid combined with functional studies of knob mutants revealed a new sialic acid binding site compared to other, known adenovirus:glycan interactions. Our findings shed light on adenovirus biology and may help to improve targeting of adenovirus-based vectors for gene therapy. PMID:25674795

  16. Rejection of adenovirus infection is independent of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor expression in cisplatin-resistant human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nian-Hua; Peng, Rui-Qing; Ding, Ya; Zhang, Xiao-Shi

    2016-08-01

    The adenovirus vector-based cancer gene therapy is controversial. Low transduction efficacy is believed to be one of the main barriers for the decreased expression of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) on tumor cells. However, the expression of CAR on primary tumor tissue and tumor tissue survived from treatment has still been not extensively studied. The present study analyzed the adenovirus infection rates and CAR expression in human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 and its cisplatin-resistant subline A549/DDP. The results showed that although the CAR expression in A549 and A549/DDP was not different, compared with the A549, A549/DDP appeared obviously to reject adenovirus infection. Moreover, we modified CAR expression in the two cell lines with proteasome inhibitor MG-132 and histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA), and analyzed the adenovirus infection rates after modifying agent treatments. Both TSA and MG-132 pretreatments could increase the CAR expression in the two cell lines, but the drug pretreatments could only make A549 cells more susceptible to adenovirus infectivity. PMID:27373420

  17. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... dilution in a varying serum-constant virus neutralization test using 50 to 300 TCID50 of canine adenovirus... virus neutralization test using 50 to 300 TCID50 of canine adenovirus. (i) A geometric mean titer of...

  18. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... dilution in a varying serum-constant virus neutralization test using 50 to 300 TCID50 of canine adenovirus... virus neutralization test using 50 to 300 TCID50 of canine adenovirus. (i) A geometric mean titer of...

  19. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... dilution in a varying serum-constant virus neutralization test using 50 to 300 TCID50 of canine adenovirus... virus neutralization test using 50 to 300 TCID50 of canine adenovirus. (i) A geometric mean titer of...

  20. SCREENING STUDIES TO DETRMINE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF CHLORINE TO INACTIVATE ADENOVIRUS (RM.C.M.4)

    EPA Science Inventory

    To evaluate the susceptibility of adenovirus (CCL organism) to inactivation by chemical disinfectants, including chlorine and chloramine. Bench scale disinfection studies will be conducted on adenovirus and selected bacteriophages suspended in oxidant demand free buffered water: ...

  1. Functional dissection of adenovirus VAI RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Furtado, M R; Subramanian, S; Bhat, R A; Fowlkes, D M; Safer, B; Thimmappaya, B

    1989-01-01

    During the course of adenovirus infection, the VAI RNA protects the translation apparatus of host cells by preventing the activation of host double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase, which phosphorylates and thereby inactivates the protein synthesis initiation factor eIF-2. In the absence of VAI RNA, protein synthesis is drastically inhibited at late times in infected cells. The experimentally derived secondary structure of VAI RNA consists of two extended base-paired regions, stems I and III, which are joined by a short base-paired region, stem II, at the center. Stems I and II are joined by a small loop, A, and stem III contains a hairpin loop, B. At the center of the molecule and at the 3' side, stems II and III are connected by a short stem-loop (stem IV and hairpin loop C). A fourth, minor loop, D, exists between stems II and IV. To determine sequences and domains critical for function within this VAI RNA structure, we have constructed adenovirus mutants with linker-scan substitution mutations in defined regions of the molecule. Cells infected with these mutants were analyzed for polypeptide synthesis, virus yield, and eIF-2 alpha kinase activity. Our results showed that disruption of base-paired regions in the distal parts of the longest stems, I and III, did not affect function, whereas mutations causing structural perturbations in the central part of the molecule containing stem II, the proximal part of stem III, and the central short stem-loop led to loss of function. Surprisingly, one substitution mutant, sub742, although dramatically perturbing the integrity of the structure of this central portion, showed a wild-type phenotype, suggesting that an RNA with an alternate secondary structure is functional. On the basis of sensitivity to single-strand-specific RNases, we can derive a novel secondary structure for the mutant RNA in which a portion of the sequences may fold to form a structure that resembles the central part of the wild-type molecule

  2. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.305 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing...

  3. 9 CFR 113.202 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus...; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.202 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus. Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed...

  4. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.305 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing...

  5. 9 CFR 113.202 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus...; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.202 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed Virus. Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine, Killed...

  6. ANTIGEN DETECTION WITH MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES FOR THE DIAGNOSIS OF ADENOVIRUS GASTROENTERITIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The authors have developed a monoclonal antibody-based enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for direct detection of enteric adenoviruses in stool specimens from patients with gastroenteritis. Tests specific for each of the enteric adenoviruses, adenovirus type 40 (Ad40) and type 41 (Ad41) we...

  7. Bovine adenovirus-3 as a vaccine delivery vehicle.

    PubMed

    Ayalew, Lisanework E; Kumar, Pankaj; Gaba, Amit; Makadiya, Niraj; Tikoo, Suresh K

    2015-01-15

    The use of vaccines is an effective and relatively inexpensive means of controlling infectious diseases, which cause heavy economic losses to the livestock industry through animal loss, decreased productivity, treatment expenses and decreased carcass quality. However, some vaccines produced by conventional means are imperfect in many respects including virulence, safety and efficacy. Moreover, there are no vaccines for some animal diseases. Although genetic engineering has provided new ways of producing effective vaccines, the cost of production for veterinary use is a critical criterion for selecting the method of production and delivery of vaccines. The cost effective production and intrinsic ability to enter cells has made adenovirus vectors a highly efficient tool for delivery of vaccine antigens. Moreover, adenoviruses induce both humoral and cellular immune responses to expressed vaccine antigens. Since nonhuman adenoviruses are species specific, the development of animal specific adenoviruses as vaccine delivery vectors is being evaluated. This review summarizes the work related to the development of bovine adenovirus-3 as a vaccine delivery vehicle in animals, particularly cattle. PMID:25498212

  8. [Adenovirus-delivered BMI-1 shRNA].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen-Ping; Chen, Xiao-Li; Zhen, Jie

    2009-10-01

    Recently, some plasmid vectors that direct transcription of small hairpin RNAs have been developed, which are processed into functional siRNAs by cellular enzymes. Although these vectors possess certain advantages over synthesized siRNA, many disadvantages exist, including low and variable transfection efficiency. This study was aimed to establish an adenoviral siRNA delivery system without above-mentioned disadvantages on the basis of commercially available vectors. A vector was designed to target the human polycomb gene BMI-1. The pAd-BMI-1shRNA-CMV-GFP vector was produced by cloning a 300 bp U6-BMI-1 cassette from the pGE1BMI-1shRNA plasmid and a CMV-GFP cassette from pAdTrack CMV in pShutter vector. The adenovirus was produced from the 293A packaging cell line and then infected K562 cells. The mRNA and protein levels of Bmi-1 were detected by real time-PCR and Western blot respectively. The results showed that the adenovirus carrying the BMI-1shRNA was successfully produced. After being transfected with the adenovirus, the K562 cells dramatically down-regulated BMI-1 expression, whereas the adenoviruses carrying control shRNA had no effect on BMI-1 expression. It is concluded that the adenoviruses are efficient vectors for delivery of siRNA into mammalian cells and may become a candidate vector carrying siRNA drugs for gene therapy. PMID:19840467

  9. Physical organization of subgroup B human adenovirus genomes.

    PubMed Central

    Tibbetts, C

    1977-01-01

    Cleavage sites of nine bacterial restriction endonucleases were mapped in the DNA of adenovirus type 3 (Ad3) and Ad7, representative serotypes of the "weakly oncogenic" subgroup B human adenoviruses. Of 94 sites mapped, 82 were common to both serotypes, in accord with the high overall sequence homology of DNA among members of the same subgroups. Of the sites in Ad3 and Ad7 DNA, fewer than 20% corresponded to mapped restriction sites in the DNA of Ad2 or Ad5. The latter serotypes represent the "nononcogenic" subgroup C, having only 10 to 20% overall sequence homology with the DNA of subgroup B adenoviruses. Hybridization mapping of viral mRNA from Ad7-infected cells resulted in a complex physical map that was nearly identical to the map of early and late gene clusters in Ad2 DNA. Thus the DNA sequences of human adenoviruses of subgroups B and C have significantly diverged in the course of viral evolution, but the complex organization of the adenovirus genome has been rigidly conserved. Images PMID:916027

  10. Human adenovirus: Viral pathogen with increasing importance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to describe the biology of human adenovirus (HAdV), the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of adenoviral epidemic keratoconjunctivitis and to present a practical update on its diagnosis, treatment, and prophylaxis. There are two well-defined adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis clinical syndromes: epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC) and pharyngoconjunctival fever (PCF), which are caused by different HAdV serotypes. The exact incidence of adenoviral conjunctivitis is still poorly known. However, cases are more frequent during warmer months. The virus is endemic in the general population, and frequently causes severe disease in immunocompromised patients, especially the pediatric patients. Contagion is possible through direct contact or fomites, and the virus is extremely resistant to different physical and chemical agents. The clinical signs or symptoms of conjunctival infection are similar to any other conjunctivitis, with a higher incidence of pseudomembranes. In the cornea, adenoviral infection may lead to keratitis nummularis. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, but its etiology can be confirmed using cell cultures, antigen detection, polymerase chain reaction or immunochromatography. Multiple treatments have been tried for this disease, but none of them seem to be completely effective. Prevention is the most reliable and recommended strategy to control this contagious infection. PMID:24678403

  11. Adenovirus 36 and Obesity: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Ponterio, Eleonora; Gnessi, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    There is an epidemic of obesity starting about 1980 in both developed and undeveloped countries definitely associated with multiple etiologies. About 670 million people worldwide are obese. The incidence of obesity has increased in all age groups, including children. Obesity causes numerous diseases and the interaction between genetic, metabolic, social, cultural and environmental factors are possible cofactors for the development of obesity. Evidence emerging over the last 20 years supports the hypothesis that viral infections may be associated with obesity in animals and humans. The most widely studied infectious agent possibly linked to obesity is adenovirus 36 (Adv36). Adv36 causes obesity in animals. In humans, Adv36 associates with obesity both in adults and children and the prevalence of Adv36 increases in relation to the body mass index. In vivo and in vitro studies have shown that the viral E4orf1 protein (early region 4 open reading frame 1, Adv) mediates the Adv36 effect including its adipogenic potential. The Adv36 infection should therefore be considered as a possible risk factor for obesity and could be a potential new therapeutic target in addition to an original way to understand the worldwide rise of the epidemic of obesity. Here, the data indicating a possible link between viral infection and obesity with a particular emphasis to the Adv36 will be reviewed. PMID:26184280

  12. Enhanced expression of adenovirus transforming proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Gaynor, R B; Tsukamoto, A; Montell, C; Berk, A J

    1982-01-01

    Proteins encoded in regions EIA and EIB of human adenoviruses cause transformation of rodent cells. One protein from EIA also stimulates transcription of other early regions at early times in a productive infection. In the past, direct analysis of these proteins synthesized in vivo has been difficult because of the low levels produced in both transformed cells and productively infected cells. We present a simple method which leads to expression of EIA and EIB mRNAs and proteins at 30-fold greater levels than those observed during the early phase of a standard productive infection. Under these conditions, these proteins are among the most prominent translation products of infected cells. This allowed direct visualization of EIA and EIB proteins on two-dimensional gels of pulse-labeled total cell protein. Experiments with EIA and EIB mutants confirm that the identified proteins are indeed encoded in these regions. Two EIA proteins are observed, one translated from each of the major early EIA mRNAs. Both of these EIA proteins are phosphorylated. Images PMID:7143568

  13. Adenovirus hexon modifications influence in vitro properties of pseudotyped human adenovirus type 5 vectors.

    PubMed

    Solanki, Manish; Zhang, Wenli; Jing, Liu; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Commonly used human adenovirus (HAdV)-5-based vectors are restricted by their tropism and pre-existing immunity. Here, we characterized novel HAdV-5 vectors pseudotyped with hypervariable regions (HVRs) and surface domains (SDs) of other HAdV types. Hexon-modified HAdV-5 vectors (HV-HVR5, HV-HVR12, HV-SD12 and HV-SD4) could be reconstituted and amplified in human embryonic kidney cells. After infection of various cell lines, we measured transgene expression levels by performing luciferase reporter assays or coagulation factor IX (FIX) ELISA. Dose-dependent studies revealed that luciferase expression levels were comparable for HV-HVR5, HV-SD12 and HV-SD4, whereas HV-HVR12 expression levels were significantly lower. Vector genome copy numbers (VCNs) from genomic DNA and nuclear extracts were then determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Surprisingly, determination of cell- and nuclear fraction-associated VCNs revealed increased VCNs for HV-HVR12 compared with HV-SD12 and HV-HVR5. Increased nuclear fraction-associated HV-HVR12 DNA molecules and decreased transgene expression levels were independent of the cell line used, and we observed the same effect for a hexon-modified high-capacity adenoviral vector encoding canine FIX. In conclusion, studying hexon-modified adenoviruses in vitro demonstrated that HVRs but also flanking hexon regions influence uptake and transgene expression of adenoviral vectors. PMID:26519158

  14. Capsid-like Arrays in Crystals of Chimpanzee Adenovirus Hexon

    SciTech Connect

    Xue,F.; Burnett, R.

    2006-01-01

    The major coat protein, hexon, from a chimpanzee adenovirus (AdC68) is of interest as a target for vaccine vector modification. AdC68 hexon has been crystallized in the orthorhombic space group C222 with unit cell dimensions of a = 90.8 Angstroms, b = 433.0 Angstroms, c = 159.3 Angstroms, and one trimer (3 x 104,942 Da) in the asymmetric unit. The crystals diffract to 2.1 Angstroms resolution. Initial studies reveal that the molecular arrangement is quite unlike that in hexon crystals for human adenovirus. In the AdC68 crystals, hexon trimers are parallel and pack closely in two-dimensional continuous arrays similar to those formed on electron microscope grids. The AdC68 crystals are the first in which adenovirus hexon has molecular interactions that mimic those used in constructing the viral capsid.

  15. Species-Specific Identification of Human Adenoviruses in Sewage.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Magdalena; Krzysztoszek, Arleta; Witek, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Human adenovirus (HAdV) diversity in sewage was assessed by species-specific molecular methods. Samples of raw sewage were collected in 14 sewage disposal systems from January to December 2011, in Poland. HAdVs were detected in 92.1% of the analysed sewage samples and was significantly higher at cities of over 100 000 inhabitants. HAdV DNA was detected in sewage during all seasons. The most abundant species identified were HAdV-F (average 89.6%) and -A (average 19.6%), which are associated with intestine infections. Adenoviruses from B species were not detected. The result of the present study demonstrate that human adenoviruses are consistently present in sewage in Poland, demonstrating the importance of an adequate treatment before the disposal in the environment. Multiple HAdV species identified in raw sewage provide new information about HAdV circulation in the Polish population. PMID:26094312

  16. Adenovirus Vectors for Gene Therapy, Vaccination and Cancer Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wold, William S.M.; Toth, Karoly

    2015-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are the most commonly employed vector for cancer gene therapy. They are also used for gene therapy and as vaccines to express foreign antigens. Adenovirus vectors can be replication-defective; certain essential viral genes are deleted and replaced by a cassette that expresses a foreign therapeutic gene. Such vectors are used for gene therapy, as vaccines, and for cancer therapy. Replication-competent (oncolytic) vectors are employed for cancer gene therapy. Oncolytic vectors are engineered to replicate preferentially in cancer cells and to destroy cancer cells through the natural process of lytic virus replication. Many clinical trials indicate that replication-defective and replication-competent adenovirus vectors are safe and have therapeutic activity. PMID:24279313

  17. Disseminated adenovirus infection in an immunocompromised host. Pitfalls in diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Landry, M L; Fong, C K; Neddermann, K; Solomon, L; Hsiung, G D

    1987-09-01

    In this report, a bone marrow transplant recipient with rapidly fatal gastroenteritis is presented. The presence of intranuclear inclusions on postmortem light microscopic examination of liver, lung, and small bowel tissue was considered diagnostic of cytomegalovirus infection. However, electron microscopic examination of liver tissue demonstrated adenovirus infection. This was confirmed by isolation of an adenovirus type 2 with unusual laboratory features from liver, lung, colon contents, serum, esophageal swab, and oral ulcerations. Results of a complement fixation test for antibodies to adenovirus performed on postmortem serum samples were negative, and a titer of 1:4 was noted for antibody against cytomegalovirus. This case illustrates the diagnostic pitfalls that may be encountered in establishing a specific viral diagnosis in severely ill patients. PMID:2821806

  18. Crystal Structure of Enteric Adenovirus Serotype 41 Short Fiber Head

    PubMed Central

    Seiradake, Elena; Cusack, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Human enteric adenoviruses of species F contain two fibers in the same virion, a long fiber which binds to coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) and a short fiber of unknown function. We have determined the high-resolution crystal structure of the short fiber head of human adenovirus serotype 41 (Ad41). The short fiber head has the characteristic fold of other known fiber heads but has three unusual features. First, it has much shorter loops between the beta-strands. Second, one of the usually well-ordered beta-strands on the distal face of the fiber head is highly disordered and this same region is sensitive to digestion with pepsin, an enzyme occurring naturally in the intestinal tract, the physiological environment of Ad41. Third, the AB loop has a deletion giving it a distinct conformation incompatible with CAR binding. PMID:16254343

  19. Characterization of a novel adenovirus isolated from a skunk.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Robert A; Ackford, James G; Slaine, Patrick; Li, Aimin; Carman, Susy; Campbell, Doug; Welch, M Katherine; Kropinski, Andrew M; Nagy, Éva

    2015-11-01

    Adenoviruses are a ubiquitous group of viruses that have been found in a wide range of hosts. A novel adenovirus from a skunk suffering from acute hepatitis was isolated and its DNA genome sequenced. The analysis revealed this virus to be a new member of the genus Mastadenovirus, with a genome of 31,848 bp in length containing 30 genes predicted to encode proteins, and with a G+C content of 49.0%. Global genomic organization indicated SkAdV-1 was similar in organization to bat and canine adenoviruses, and phylogenetic comparison suggested these viruses shared a common ancestor. SkAdV-1 demonstrated an ability to replicate in several mammalian liver cell lines suggesting a potential tropism for this virus. PMID:26189043

  20. The Prevalence of Rotavirus and Adenovirus in the Childhood Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Ozsari, Tamer; Bora, Gulhan; Kaya, Bulent; Yakut, Kahraman

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute gastroenteritis stemming from viral causes is very common during the childhood period. Rotavirus and enteric adenovirus are the most common factors of acute gastroenteritis encountered in infants and children. However, the epidemiology of rotavirus and enteric adenovirus gastroenteritis in the east Anatolia region is not well-known. Objectives We aimed to evaluate the relationship between the distribution of antigen positivity in rotavirus and enteric adenovirus antigen tests required cases and demographic data retrospectively in pediatric patients admitted to our hospital. Patients and Methods The records of stool sample analyses for 1154 patients admitted to our hospital from June 2011 to December 2011 with complaints of diarrhea were retrospectively examined. The presence of rotavirus and enteric adenovirus antigens in stool specimens was investigated by means of an immunochromatographic test. Results Viral antigens were detected in 327 (28.3%) stool specimens out of 1154. Among the positive results, the frequency was 73.7% for rotavirus and 26.2% for adenovirus. While the detected rotavirus antigen rate was high for all age groups, it was highest for children under the age of 2, with a rate of 57.1%. Moreover, the rotavirus infections were observed at a rate of 44.3% in winter and of 24.6% in autumn. Conclusions The most important factor in childhood acute gastroenteritis in east Anatolia is the rotavirus. Rotavirus and adenovirus antigens should be routinely investigated as a factor in fresh stool samples for the accurate diagnosis and treatment of gastroenteritis in children in the winter and autumn months.

  1. Neural stem cell-mediated delivery of oncolytic adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Julius W; Kane, J Robert; Young, Jacob S; Chang, Alan L; Kanojia, Deepak; Qian, Shuo; Spencer, Drew A; Ahmed, Atique U; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2015-01-01

    The use of stem cells (SCs) as carriers for therapeutic agents has now progressed to early clinical trials. These clinical trials exploring SC-mediated delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses will commence in the near future, hopefully yielding meritorious results that can provoke further scientific inquiry. Preclinical animal studies have demonstrated that SCs can be successfully loaded with conditionally-replicative adenoviruses and delivered to the tumor, whereupon they may evoke pronounced therapeutic efficacy. In this protocol, we describe the maintenance of SCs, provide an analysis of optimal adenoviral titers for SC loading, and evaluate the optimized viral loading on SCs. PMID:25827347

  2. Functional prediction of hypothetical proteins in human adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Dorden, Shane; Mahadevan, Padmanabhan

    2015-01-01

    Assigning functional information to hypothetical proteins in virus genomes is crucial for gaining insight into their proteomes. Human adenoviruses are medium sized viruses that cause a range of diseases. Their genomes possess proteins with uncharacterized function known as hypothetical proteins. Using a wide range of protein function prediction servers, functional information was obtained about these hypothetical proteins. A comparison of functional information obtained from these servers revealed that some of them produced functional information, while others provided little functional information about these human adenovirus hypothetical proteins. The PFP, ESG, PSIPRED, 3d2GO, and ProtFun servers produced the most functional information regarding these hypothetical proteins. PMID:26664031

  3. Human Adenovirus Type 2 but Not Adenovirus Type 12 Is Mutagenic at the Hypoxanthine Phosphoribosyltransferase Locus of Cloned Rat Liver Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paraskeva, Christos; Roberts, Carl; Biggs, Paul; Gallimore, Phillip H.

    1983-01-01

    Using resistance to the base analog 8-azaguanine as a genetic marker, we showed that adenovirus type 2, but not adenovirus type 12, is mutagenic at the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase locus of cloned diploid rat liver epithelial cells. Adenovirus type 2 increased the frequency of 8-azaguanine-resistant colonies by up to ninefold over the spontaneous frequency, depending on expression time and virus dose. PMID:6572280

  4. Identification and characterization of a novel adenovirus in the cloacal bursa of gulls

    SciTech Connect

    Bodewes, R.; Bildt, M.W.G. van de; Schapendonk, C.M.E.; Leeuwen, M. van; Boheemen, S. van; Jong, A.A.W. de; Osterhaus, A.D.M.E.; Smits, S.L.; Kuiken, T.

    2013-05-25

    Several viruses of the family of Adenoviridae are associated with disease in birds. Here we report the detection of a novel adenovirus in the cloacal bursa of herring gulls (Larus argentatus) and lesser black-backed gulls (Larus fuscus) that were found dead in the Netherlands in 2001. Histopathological analysis of the cloacal bursa revealed cytomegaly and karyomegaly with basophilic intranuclear inclusions typical for adenovirus infection. The presence of an adenovirus was confirmed by electron microscopy. By random PCR in combination with deep sequencing, sequences were detected that had the best hit with known adenoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis of complete coding sequences of the hexon, penton and polymerase genes indicates that this novel virus, tentatively named Gull adenovirus, belongs to the genus Aviadenovirus. The present study demonstrates that birds of the Laridae family are infected by family-specific adenoviruses that differ from known adenoviruses in other bird species. - Highlights: ► Lesions typical for adenovirus infection detected in cloacal bursa of dead gulls. ► Confirmation of adenovirus infection by electron microscopy and deep sequencing. ► Sequence analysis indicates that it is a novel adenovirus in the genus Aviadenovirus. ► The novel (Gull) adenovirus was detected in multiple organs of two species of gulls.

  5. Phylogenetic and pathogenic characterization of novel adenoviruses isolated from long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis).

    PubMed

    Counihan, Katrina L; Skerratt, Lee F; Franson, J Christian; Hollmén, Tuula E

    2015-11-01

    Novel adenoviruses were isolated from a long-tailed duck (Clangula hyemalis) mortality event near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska in 2000. The long-tailed duck adenovirus genome was approximately 27 kb. A 907 bp hexon gene segment was used to design primers specific for the long-tailed duck adenovirus. Nineteen isolates were phylogenetically characterized based on portions of their hexon gene and 12 were most closely related to Goose adenovirus A. The remaining 7 shared no hexon sequences with any known adenoviruses. Experimental infections of mallards with a long-tailed duck reference adenovirus caused mild lymphoid infiltration of the intestine and paint brush hemorrhages of the mucosa and dilation of the intestine. This study shows novel adenoviruses from long-tailed ducks are diverse and provides further evidence that they should be considered in cases of morbidity and mortality in sea ducks. Conserved and specific primers have been developed that will help screen sea ducks for adenoviral infections. PMID:26342465

  6. Adenovirus Dodecahedron, as a Drug Delivery Vector

    PubMed Central

    Zochowska, Monika; Paca, Agnieszka; Schoehn, Guy; Andrieu, Jean-Pierre; Chroboczek, Jadwiga; Dublet, Bernard; Szolajska, Ewa

    2009-01-01

    Background Bleomycin (BLM) is an anticancer antibiotic used in many cancer regimens. Its utility is limited by systemic toxicity and dose-dependent pneumonitis able to progress to lung fibrosis. The latter can affect up to nearly 50% of the total patient population, out of which 3% will die. We propose to improve BLM delivery by tethering it to an efficient delivery vector. Adenovirus (Ad) dodecahedron base (DB) is a particulate vector composed of 12 copies of a pentameric viral protein responsible for virus penetration. The vector efficiently penetrates the plasma membrane, is liberated in the cytoplasm and has a propensity to concentrate around the nucleus; up to 300000 particles can be observed in one cell in vitro. Principal Findings Dodecahedron (Dd) structure is preserved at up to about 50°C at pH 7–8 and during dialysis, freezing and drying in the speed-vac in the presence of 150 mM ammonium sulfate, as well as during lyophilization in the presence of cryoprotectants. The vector is also stable in human serum for 2 h at 37°C. We prepared a Dd-BLM conjugate which upon penetration induced death of transformed cells. Similarly to free bleomycin, Dd-BLM caused dsDNA breaks. Significantly, effective cytotoxic concentration of BLM delivered with Dd was 100 times lower than that of free bleomycin. Conclusions/Significance Stability studies show that Dds can be conveniently stored and transported, and can potentially be used for therapeutic purposes under various climates. Successful BLM delivery by Ad Dds demonstrates that the use of virus like particle (VLP) results in significantly improved drug bioavailability. These experiments open new vistas for delivery of non-permeant labile drugs. PMID:19440379

  7. Transport of human adenoviruses in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkinos, Petros; Syngouna, Vasiliki I.; Tselepi, Maria A.; Bellou, Maria; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.; Vantarakis, Apostolos

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater may be contaminated with infective human enteric viruses from various wastewater discharges, sanitary landfills, septic tanks, agricultural practices, and artificial groundwater recharge. Coliphages have been widely used as surrogates of enteric viruses, because they share many fundamental properties and features. Although a large number of studies focusing on various factors (i.e. pore water solution chemistry, fluid velocity, moisture content, temperature, and grain size) that affect biocolloid (bacteria, viruses) transport have been published over the past two decades, little attention has been given toward human adenoviruses (hAdVs). The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of pore water velocity on hAdV transport in water saturated laboratory-scale columns packed with glass beads. The effects of pore water velocity on virus transport and retention in porous media was examined at three pore water velocities (0.39, 0.75, and 1.22 cm/min). The results indicated that all estimated average mass recovery values for hAdV were lower than those of coliphages, which were previously reported in the literature by others for experiments conducted under similar experimental conditions. However, no obvious relationship between hAdV mass recovery and water velocity could be established from the experimental results. The collision efficiencies were quantified using the classical colloid filtration theory. Average collision efficiency, α, values decreased with decreasing flow rate, Q, and pore water velocity, U, but no significant effect of U on α was observed. Furthermore, the surface properties of viruses and glass beads were used to construct classical DLVO potential energy profiles. The results revealed that the experimental conditions of this study were unfavorable to deposition and that no aggregation between virus particles is expected to occur. A thorough understanding of the key processes governing virus transport is pivotal for public

  8. Low seroprevalent species D adenovirus vectors as influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Eric A; Barry, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal and pandemic influenza remains a constant threat. While standard influenza vaccines have great utility, the need for improved vaccine technologies have been brought to light by the 2009 swine flu pandemic, highly pathogenic avian influenza infections, and the most recent early and widespread influenza activity. Species C adenoviruses based on serotype 5 (AD5) are potent vehicles for gene-based vaccination. While potent, most humans are already immune to this virus. In this study, low seroprevalent species D adenoviruses Ad26, 28, and 48 were cloned and modified to express the influenza virus A/PR/8/34 hemagglutinin gene for vaccine studies. When studied in vivo, these species D Ad vectors performed quite differently as compared to species C Ad vectors depending on the route of immunization. By intramuscular injection, species D vaccines were markedly weaker than species C vaccines. In contrast, the species D vaccines were equally efficient as species C when delivered mucosally by the intranasal route. Intranasal adenovirus vaccine doses as low as 10(8) virus particles per mouse induced complete protection against a stringent lethal challenge dose of influenza. These data support translation of species D adenoviruses as mucosal vaccines and highlight the fundamental effects of differences in virus tropism on vaccine applications. PMID:23991187

  9. Bioaccumulation of animal adenoviruses in the pink shrimp.

    PubMed

    Luz, Roger B; Staggemeier, Rodrigo; Fabres, Rafael B; Soliman, Mayra C; Souza, Fernanda G; Gonçalves, Raoni; Fausto, Ivone V; Rigotto, Caroline; Heinzelmann, Larissa S; Henzel, Andréia; Fleck, Juliane D; Spilki, Fernando R

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses are among the most promising viral markers of fecal contamination. They are frequently found in the water, sediment and soil of regions impacted by human activity. Studies of the bioaccumulation of enteric viruses in shrimp are scarce. The cities located in the northern coast of the lake systems in Southern Brazil have high urbanization and intensive farming rates, and poor sewage collection and treatment. One hundred (n = 100) Farfantepenaeus paulensis pink-shrimp specimens and 48 water samples were collected from coastal lagoons between June 2012 and May 2013. Water samples were concentrated and the shrimp, mashed. After DNA extraction, samples were analyzed by real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in order to detect and quantify viral genomes. Thirty-five percent of shrimp samples were positive for contamination, predominantly by avian adenoviruses. A total of 91.7% of water samples contained adenoviruses DNA, with the human form being the most frequent. Our results provided evidence of significant bioaccumulation of adenoviruses in shrimp, showing the extent of the impact of fecal pollution on aquatic ecosystems. PMID:26413052

  10. Bioaccumulation of animal adenoviruses in the pink shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Roger B.; Staggemeier, Rodrigo; Fabres, Rafael B.; Soliman, Mayra C.; Souza, Fernanda G.; Gonçalves, Raoni; Fausto, Ivone V.; Rigotto, Caroline; Heinzelmann, Larissa S.; Henzel, Andréia; Fleck, Juliane D.; Spilki, Fernando R.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses are among the most promising viral markers of fecal contamination. They are frequently found in the water, sediment and soil of regions impacted by human activity. Studies of the bioaccumulation of enteric viruses in shrimp are scarce. The cities located in the northern coast of the lake systems in Southern Brazil have high urbanization and intensive farming rates, and poor sewage collection and treatment. One hundred (n = 100) Farfantepenaeus paulensis pink-shrimp specimens and 48 water samples were collected from coastal lagoons between June 2012 and May 2013. Water samples were concentrated and the shrimp, mashed. After DNA extraction, samples were analyzed by real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in order to detect and quantify viral genomes. Thirty-five percent of shrimp samples were positive for contamination, predominantly by avian adenoviruses. A total of 91.7% of water samples contained adenoviruses DNA, with the human form being the most frequent. Our results provided evidence of significant bioaccumulation of adenoviruses in shrimp, showing the extent of the impact of fecal pollution on aquatic ecosystems. PMID:26413052

  11. Serologic and hexon phylogenetic analysis of ruminant adenoviruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were to determine the antigenic relationship among ruminant adenoviruses and determine their phylogenetic relationship based on the deduced hexon gene amino acid sequence. Results of reciprocal cross-neutralization tests demonstrated antigenic relationships in either on...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section 866.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section 866.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section 866.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section 866.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3020 - Adenovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adenovirus serological reagents. 866.3020 Section 866.3020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3020...

  17. Chimpanzee Adenovirus Vector Ebola Vaccine - Preliminary Report.

    PubMed

    Ledgerwood, Julie E; DeZure, Adam D; Stanley, Daphne A; Novik, Laura; Enama, Mary E; Berkowitz, Nina M; Hu, Zonghui; Joshi, Gyan; Ploquin, Aurélie; Sitar, Sandra; Gordon, Ingelise J; Plummer, Sarah A; Holman, LaSonji A; Hendel, Cynthia S; Yamshchikov, Galina; Roman, Francois; Nicosia, Alfredo; Colloca, Stefano; Cortese, Riccardo; Bailer, Robert T; Schwartz, Richard M; Roederer, Mario; Mascola, John R; Koup, Richard A; Sullivan, Nancy J; Graham, Barney S

    2014-11-26

    Background The unprecedented 2014 epidemic of Ebola virus disease (EVD) has prompted an international response to accelerate the availability of a preventive vaccine. A replication-defective recombinant chimpanzee adenovirus type 3-vectored ebolavirus vaccine (cAd3-EBO), encoding the glycoprotein from Zaire and Sudan species that offers protection in the nonhuman primate model, was rapidly advanced into phase 1 clinical evaluation. Methods We conducted a phase 1, dose-escalation, open-label trial of cAd3-EBO. Twenty healthy adults, in sequentially enrolled groups of 10 each, received vaccination intramuscularly in doses of 2×10(10) particle units or 2×10(11) particle units. Primary and secondary end points related to safety and immunogenicity were assessed throughout the first 4 weeks after vaccination. Results In this small study, no safety concerns were identified; however, transient fever developed within 1 day after vaccination in two participants who had received the 2×10(11) particle-unit dose. Glycoprotein-specific antibodies were induced in all 20 participants; the titers were of greater magnitude in the group that received the 2×10(11) particle-unit dose than in the group that received the 2×10(10) particle-unit dose (geometric mean titer against the Zaire antigen, 2037 vs. 331; P=0.001). Glycoprotein-specific T-cell responses were more frequent among those who received the 2x10(11) particle-unit dose than among those who received the 2×10(10) particle-unit dose, with a CD4 response in 10 of 10 participants versus 3 of 10 participants (P=0.004) and a CD8 response in 7 of 10 participants versus 2 of 10 participants (P=0.07). Conclusions Reactogenicity and immune responses to cAd3-EBO vaccine were dose-dependent. At the 2×10(11) particle-unit dose, glycoprotein Zaire-specific antibody responses were in the range reported to be associated with vaccine-induced protective immunity in challenge studies involving nonhuman primates. Clinical trials

  18. [Preparation of Recombinant Human Adenoviruses Labeled with miniSOG].

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaohui; Xiao, Rong; Guo, Xiaojuan; Qu, Jianguo; Lu, Zhuozhuang; Hong, Tao

    2016-01-01

    We wished to study the intracellular transport of adenoviruses. We constructed a novel recombinant adenovirus in which the structural protein IX was labeled with a mini-singlet oxygen generator (miniSOG). The miniSOG gene was synthesized by overlapping extension polymerase chain reaction (PCR), cloned to the pcDNA3 vector, and expressed in 293 cells. Activation of miniSOG generated sufficient numbers of singlet oxygen molecules to catalyze polymerization of diaminobenzidine into an osmiophilic reaction product resolvable by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). To construct miniSOG-labelled recombinant adenoviruses, the miniSOG gene was subcloned downstream of the IX gene in a pShuttle plasmid. Adenoviral plasmid pAd5-IXSOG was generated by homologous recombination of the modified shuttle plasmid (pShuttle-IXSOG) with the backbone plasmid (pAdeasy-1) in the BJ5183 strain of Eschericia coli. Adenovirus HAdV-5-IXSOG was rescued by transfection of 293 cells with the linearized pAd5-IXSOG. After propagation, virions were purified using the CsC1 ultracentrifugation method. Finally, HAdV-5-IXSOG in 2.0 mL with a particle titer of 6 x 1011 vp/mL was obtained. Morphology of HAdV-5-IXSOG was verified by TEM. Fusion of IX with the miniSOG gene was confirmed by PCR. In conclusion, miniSOG-labeled recombinant adenoviruses were constructed, which could be valuable tools for virus tracking by TEM. PMID:27295881

  19. Conserved Sequences at the Origin of Adenovirus DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Stillman, Bruce W.; Topp, William C.; Engler, Jeffrey A.

    1982-01-01

    The origin of adenovirus DNA replication lies within an inverted sequence repetition at either end of the linear, double-stranded viral DNA. Initiation of DNA replication is primed by a deoxynucleoside that is covalently linked to a protein, which remains bound to the newly synthesized DNA. We demonstrate that virion-derived DNA-protein complexes from five human adenovirus serological subgroups (A to E) can act as a template for both the initiation and the elongation of DNA replication in vitro, using nuclear extracts from adenovirus type 2 (Ad2)-infected HeLa cells. The heterologous template DNA-protein complexes were not as active as the homologous Ad2 DNA, most probably due to inefficient initiation by Ad2 replication factors. In an attempt to identify common features which may permit this replication, we have also sequenced the inverted terminal repeated DNA from human adenovirus serotypes Ad4 (group E), Ad9 and Ad10 (group D), and Ad31 (group A), and we have compared these to previously determined sequences from Ad2 and Ad5 (group C), Ad7 (group B), and Ad12 and Ad18 (group A) DNA. In all cases, the sequence around the origin of DNA replication can be divided into two structural domains: a proximal A · T-rich region which is partially conserved among these serotypes, and a distal G · C-rich region which is less well conserved. The G · C-rich region contains sequences similar to sequences present in papovavirus replication origins. The two domains may reflect a dual mechanism for initiation of DNA replication: adenovirus-specific protein priming of replication, and subsequent utilization of this primer by host replication factors for completion of DNA synthesis. Images PMID:7143575

  20. Functional Heterogeneity of Virions in Human Adenovirus Types 2 and 12

    PubMed Central

    Rainbow, Andrew J.; Mak, Stanley

    1970-01-01

    Purified preparations of adenovirus types 2 and 12 were used to infect KB cells at different input multiplicities. The resulting infected cultures were scored for inclusion body formation, production of infectious centers, and cloning efficiency. Both preparations were found to contain some defective particles capable of preventing a cell from cloning but unable to induce inclusion bodies or form plaques. The proportion of such defective particles in adenovirus 12 was about 10 times that in adenovirus 2. At high input multiplicities, the percentage of cells displaying an inclusion body was less than that predicted by the Poisson distribution and reached a maximum of 40 to 60% for adenovirus 2 and 12 to 15% for adenovirus 12. This reduction may be due to interference by large numbers of non-plaque-producing particles infecting each cell. The per cent of cells forming infectious centers was substantially greater for adenovirus 2 than for adenovirus 12 when compared at the same input plaque-forming units, reaching a maximum of 35 to 73% for adenovirus 2 and 5 to 10% for adenovirus 12. The low value for adenovirus 12 may be a result of the same interference phenomenon. Images PMID:4194167

  1. Adenovirus Type 2-Simian Virus 40 Hybrid Population: Evidence for a Hybrid Deoxyribonucleic Acid Molecule and the Absence of Adenovirus-Encapsidated Circular Simian Virus 40 Deoxyribonucleic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Crumpacker, Clyde S.; Levin, Myron J.; Wiese, William H.; Lewis, Andrew M.; Rowe, Wallace P.

    1970-01-01

    The deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) from the adenovirus-encapsidated particles of the adenovirus type 2 (Ad2)-simian virus 40 (SV40) hybrid population plaque variant (Ad2++ HEY), known to yield SV40 virus with high efficiency, was studied by equilibrium density centrifugation followed by ribonucleic acid-DNA hybridization employing virus-specific complementary ribonucleic acids synthesized in vitro. These techniques establish linkage between the Ad2 and SV40 components in the adenovirus-encapsidated particles of this population. The linkage is alkali-resistant and presumably covalent; thus, the Ad2 DNA and SV40 DNA are present in a hybrid molecule. Velocity centrifugation studies in alkaline sucrose gradients eliminated the possibility that supercoiled circular SV40 DNA is present in the adenovirus capsids. The DNA obtained from the adenovirus-encapsidated particles of the Ad2++ HEY population appears to consist of nonhybrid Ad2 DNA and Ad2-SV40 hybrid DNA molecules. PMID:4322081

  2. [Characteristics of intranuclear inclusions formed during the reproduction of bovine adenoviruses].

    PubMed

    Nosach, L N; Belousova, R V; Diachenko, N S; Kolenkova, L M

    1986-01-01

    A cytomorphological method was used to study the reproduction of bovine adenoviruses: Ad bos 1 - Ad bos 3, belonging to the serological subgroup I, and Ad bos 4, Ad bos 5, Ad bos 7, Ad bos 8, belonging to the serological subgroup II, and those isolated from animal adenoviruses N18 and N3056. Cytomorphological method is supposed to be used not only for revealing bovine adenoviruses but also for determining preliminarily their subgroup belonging. PMID:3754069

  3. Identification of Adenoviruses in Specimens from High-Risk Pediatric Stem Cell Transplant Recipients and Controls▿

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaotian; Lu, Xiaoyan; Erdman, Dean D.; Anderson, Evan J.; Guzman-Cottrill, Judith A.; Kletzel, Morris; Katz, Ben Z.

    2008-01-01

    Adenovirus infection is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in stem cell transplant recipients. We report species and type-specific analysis from a prospective study of high-risk adenovirus infections following hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation prior to, during, and after treatment with cidofovir, as well as species analysis of contemporaneously collected samples from control patients. Nine different adenovirus types representing all six recognized species were identified, and mixed infections were commonly found in this group of patients. PMID:17989198

  4. Group D Adenoviruses Infect Primary Central Nervous System Cells More Efficiently than Those from Group C

    PubMed Central

    Chillon, Miguel; Bosch, Assumpció; Zabner, Joseph; Law, Lane; Armentano, Donna; Welsh, Michael J.; Davidson, Beverly L.

    1999-01-01

    Group C adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to central nervous system cells is inefficient. We found that wild-type group D viruses, or recombinant adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) (group C) modified to contain Ad17 (group D) fiber, were more efficient in infecting primary cultures of neurons. Together with studies on primary vascular endothelial cells and tissue culture cell lines, our results indicate that there is not a universally applicable adenovirus serotype for use as a gene transfer vector. PMID:9971839

  5. First detection of adenovirus in the vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lima, Francisco Esmaile de Sales; Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Elesbao, Felipe; Carnieli Junior, Pedro; Batista, Helena Beatriz de Carvalho Ruthner; Roehe, Paulo Michel; Franco, Ana Cláudia

    2013-10-01

    This paper describes the first detection of adenovirus in a Brazilian Desmodus rotundus bat, the common vampire bat. As part of a continuous rabies surveillance program, three bat specimens were captured in Southern Brazil. Total DNA was extracted from pooled organs and submitted to a nested PCR designed to amplify a 280 bp long portion of the DNA polymerase gene of adenoviruses. One positive sample was subjected to nucleotide sequencing, confirming that this DNA fragment belongs to a member of the genus Mastadenovirus. This sequence is approximately 25 % divergent at the nucleotide level from equine adenovirus 1 and two other recently characterized bat adenoviruses. PMID:23828618

  6. Phylogenetic Analyses of Novel Squamate Adenovirus Sequences in Wild-Caught Anolis Lizards

    PubMed Central

    Ascher, Jill M.; Geneva, Anthony J.; Ng, Julienne; Wyatt, Jeffrey D.; Glor, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus infection has emerged as a serious threat to the health of captive snakes and lizards (i.e., squamates), but we know relatively little about this virus' range of possible hosts, pathogenicity, modes of transmission, and sources from nature. We report the first case of adenovirus infection in the Iguanidae, a diverse family of lizards that is widely-studied and popular in captivity. We report adenovirus infections from two closely-related species of Anolis lizards (anoles) that were recently imported from wild populations in the Dominican Republic to a laboratory colony in the United States. We investigate the evolution of adenoviruses in anoles and other squamates using phylogenetic analyses of adenovirus polymerase gene sequences sampled from Anolis and a range of other vertebrate taxa. These phylogenetic analyses reveal that (1) the sequences detected from each species of Anolis are novel, and (2) adenoviruses are not necessarily host-specific and do not always follow a co-speciation model under which host and virus phylogenies are perfectly concordant. Together with the fact that the Anolis adenovirus sequences reported in our study were detected in animals that became ill and subsequently died shortly after importation while exhibiting clinical signs consistent with acute adenovirus infection, our discoveries suggest the need for renewed attention to biosecurity measures intended to prevent the spread of adenovirus both within and among species of snakes and lizards housed in captivity. PMID:23593364

  7. Neural stem cell-mediated delivery of oncolytic adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Julius W.; Kane, J. Robert; Young, Jacob S.; Chang, Alan L.; Kanojia, Deepak; Qian, Shuo; Spencer, Drew A.; Ahmed, Atique U.; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2015-01-01

    The use of stem cells (SCs) as carriers for therapeutic agents has by now progressed to early clinical trials. These clinical trials exploring SC-mediated delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses will commence in the near future, hopefully yielding meritorious results that could provoke further scientific inquiry. Preclinical animal studies have demonstrated that SCs can be successfully loaded with conditionally-replicative adenoviruses and, then, delivered to the tumor, upon which they may evoke pronounced therapeutic efficacy in the animal (Ahmed et al., 2011; Ahmed et al., 2012; Thaci et al., 2012; Tobias et al., 2013). Here in this protocol, we describe the maintenance of SCs, provide an analysis of optimal adenoviral titers for SC loading, and evaluate the optimized viral loading on SCs. PMID:25827347

  8. Dielectrophoresis and dielectrophoretic impedance detection of adenovirus and rotavirus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Michihiko; Ding, Zhenhao; Suehiro, Junya

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is the electrical detection of pathogenic viruses, namely, adenovirus and rotavirus, using dielectrophoretic impedance measurement (DEPIM). DEPIM consists of two simultaneous processes: dielectrophoretic trapping of the target and measurement of the impedance change and increase in conductance with the number of trapped targets. This is the first study of applying DEPIM, which was originally developed to detect bacteria suspended in aqueous solutions, to virus detection. The dielectric properties of the viruses were also investigated in terms of their dielectrophoretic behavior. Although their estimated dielectric properties were different from those of bacteria, the trapped viruses increased the conductance of the microelectrode in a manner similar to that in bacteria detection. We demonstrated the electrical detection of viruses within 60 s at concentrations as low as 70 ng/ml for adenovirus and 50 ng/ml for rotavirus.

  9. Novel bat adenoviruses with an extremely large E3 gene.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bing; Yang, Xing-Lou; Ge, Xing-Yi; Peng, Cheng; Zhang, Yun-Zhi; Zhang, Li-Biao; Shi, Zheng-Li

    2016-07-01

    Bats carry diverse RNA viruses, some of which are responsible for human diseases. Compared to bat-borne RNA viruses, relatively little information is known regarding bat-borne DNA viruses. In this study, we isolated and characterized three novel bat adenoviruses (BtAdV WIV9-11) from Rhinolophus sinicus. Their genomes, which are highly similar to each other but distinct from those of previously sequenced adenoviruses (AdVs), are 37 545, 37 566 and 38 073 bp in size, respectively. An unusually large E3 gene was identified in their genomes. Phylogenetic and taxonomic analyses suggested that these isolates represent a distinct species of the genus Mastadenovirus. Cell susceptibility assays revealed a broad cell tropism for these isolates, indicating that they have a potentially wide host range. Our results expand the understanding of genetic diversity of bat AdVs. PMID:27032099

  10. Adenovirus type 3 pneumonia causing lung damage in childhood.

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, F. A.; Wilkinson, D.; Burchak, E.; Morgante, O.

    1977-01-01

    An outbreak of adenovirus type 3 infection occurred in a hospital in 19 North American Indian infants and young children who were being treated for unrelated problems. Pneumonia occurred in 14 and was usually severe, with persistent signs of airway obstruction. Eleven of the 14 were followed periodically and complete medical reviews were conducted 8 to 10 years later. Ten had abnormal chest radiographs, and bronchography revealed bronchiectasis and minor airways changes in seven. In three cases there was clear evidence that these changes were directly related to the adenovirus type 3 infection. Pulmonary function studies showed a combination of restrictive and obstructive changes with minimal hypoxemia in most. Despite the presence of a persistent productive cough all were able to carry on a relatively normal life. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:189889

  11. Effect of Relative Humidity on Dynamic Aerosols of Adenovirus 12

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Gary W.; Griesemer, Richard A.; Shadduck, John A.; Farrell, Robert L.

    1971-01-01

    Dynamic aerosols of adenovirus 12 were generated in the same Henderson apparatus under conditions of high, medium, and low relative humidity. High relative humidities resulted in more recovery of adenovirus 12 from aerosols and lungs of newborn Syrian hamsters. At 89, 51, and 32% relative humidity, the total infectious virus recovered from a 20-min aerosol was 106.7, 106.0, and 104.3 TCD50, respectively. Hamsters exposed to these 20-min aerosols retained measured lung doses of 103.0, 102.4, and 101.0 TCD50, respectively. The measured retained lung doses were compared to calculated inhaled lung doses based on both total virus aerosolized and total virus recovery from the aerosols. PMID:4930277

  12. Oncolytic adenovirus-mediated therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Katrina; Halldén, Gunnel

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death and morbidity in men in the Western world. Tumor progression is dependent on functioning androgen receptor signaling, and initial administration of antiandrogens and hormone therapy (androgen-deprivation therapy) prevent growth and spread. Tumors frequently develop escape mechanisms to androgen-deprivation therapy and progress to castration-resistant late-stage metastatic disease that, in turn, inevitably leads to resistance to all current therapeutics, including chemotherapy. In spite of the recent development of more effective inhibitors of androgen-androgen receptor signaling such as enzalutamide and abiraterone, patient survival benefits are still limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have proven efficacy in prostate cancer cells and cause regression of tumors in preclinical models of numerous drug-resistant cancers. Data from clinical trials demonstrate that adenoviral mutants have limited toxicity to normal tissues and are safe when administered to patients with various solid cancers, including prostate cancer. While efficacy in response to adenovirus administration alone is marginal, findings from early-phase trials targeting local-ized and metastatic prostate cancer suggest improved efficacy in combination with cytotoxic drugs and radiation therapy. Here, we review recent progress in the development of multimodal oncolytic adenoviruses as biological therapeutics to improve on tumor elimination in prostate cancer patients. These optimized mutants target cancer cells by several mechanisms including viral lysis and by expression of cytotoxic transgenes and immune-stimulatory factors that activate the host immune system to destroy both infected and noninfected prostate cancer cells. Additional modifications of the viral capsid proteins may support future systemic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses. PMID:27579296

  13. Oncolytic adenovirus-mediated therapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Katrina; Halldén, Gunnel

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death and morbidity in men in the Western world. Tumor progression is dependent on functioning androgen receptor signaling, and initial administration of antiandrogens and hormone therapy (androgen-deprivation therapy) prevent growth and spread. Tumors frequently develop escape mechanisms to androgen-deprivation therapy and progress to castration-resistant late-stage metastatic disease that, in turn, inevitably leads to resistance to all current therapeutics, including chemotherapy. In spite of the recent development of more effective inhibitors of androgen–androgen receptor signaling such as enzalutamide and abiraterone, patient survival benefits are still limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have proven efficacy in prostate cancer cells and cause regression of tumors in preclinical models of numerous drug-resistant cancers. Data from clinical trials demonstrate that adenoviral mutants have limited toxicity to normal tissues and are safe when administered to patients with various solid cancers, including prostate cancer. While efficacy in response to adenovirus administration alone is marginal, findings from early-phase trials targeting local-ized and metastatic prostate cancer suggest improved efficacy in combination with cytotoxic drugs and radiation therapy. Here, we review recent progress in the development of multimodal oncolytic adenoviruses as biological therapeutics to improve on tumor elimination in prostate cancer patients. These optimized mutants target cancer cells by several mechanisms including viral lysis and by expression of cytotoxic transgenes and immune-stimulatory factors that activate the host immune system to destroy both infected and noninfected prostate cancer cells. Additional modifications of the viral capsid proteins may support future systemic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses. PMID:27579296

  14. The Challenge for Gene Therapy: Innate Immune Response to Adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Thaci, Bart; Ulasov, Ilya V.; Wainwright, Derek A.; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2011-01-01

    Adenoviruses are the most commonly used vectors for gene therapy. Despite the promising safety profile demonstrated in clinical trials, the efficacy of using adenoviruses for gene therapy is poor. A major hurdle to adenoviral-mediated gene therapy is the innate immune system. Cell-mediated recognition of viruses via capsid components or nucleic acids has received significant attention, principally thought to be regulated by the toll-like receptors (TLRs). Antiviral innate immune responses are initiated by the infected cell, which activates the interferon (IFN) response to block viral replication, while simultaneously releasing chemokines to attract neutrophils, mononuclear- and natural killer-cells. While the IFN and cellular recruitment pathways are activated and regulated independently of each other, both are required to overcome immune escape mechanisms by adenoviruses. Recent work has shown that the generation of adenoviral vectors lacking specific transcriptionally-active regions decreases immune system activation and increases the chance for immune escape. In this review, we elucidate how adenoviral vector modifications alter the IFN and innate inflammatory pathway response and propose future targets with clinically-translational relevance. PMID:21399236

  15. An outbreak of lethal adenovirus infection among different otariid species.

    PubMed

    Inoshima, Yasuo; Murakami, Tomoaki; Ishiguro, Naotaka; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Kasamatsu, Masahiko

    2013-08-30

    An outbreak of fatal fulminant hepatitis at a Japanese aquarium involved 3 otariids: a California sea lion (Zalophus californianus), a South African fur seal (Arctocephalus pusillus) and a South American sea lion (Otaria flavescens). In a span of about a week in February 2012, 3 otariids showed diarrhea and were acutely low-spirited; subsequently, all three animals died within a period of 3 days. Markedly increased aspartate amino transferase and alanine amino transferase activities were observed. Necrotic hepatitis and eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies in liver hepatocytes and intestinal epithelial cells were observed in the South American sea lion on histological examination. Otarine adenovirus DNA was detected from the livers of all three animals by polymerase chain reaction and determination of the sequences showed that all were identical. These results suggest that a single otarine adenovirus strain may have been the etiological agent of this outbreak of fatal fulminant hepatitis among the different otariid species, and it may be a lethal threat to wild and captive otariids. This is the first evidence of an outbreak of lethal adenovirus infection among different otariid species. PMID:23643878

  16. Progress on adenovirus-vectored universal influenza vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Kui; Ying, Guan; Yan, Zhou; Shanshan, Yan; Lei, Zhang; Hongjun, Li; Maosheng, Sun

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection causes serious health problems and heavy financial burdens each year worldwide. The classical inactivated influenza virus vaccine (IIVV) and live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) must be updated regularly to match the new strains that evolve due to antigenic drift and antigenic shift. However, with the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize conserved antigens, and the CD8+ T cell responses targeting viral internal proteins nucleoprotein (NP), matrix protein 1 (M1) and polymerase basic 1 (PB1), it is possible to develop a universal influenza vaccine based on the conserved hemagglutinin (HA) stem, NP, and matrix proteins. Recombinant adenovirus (rAd) is an ideal influenza vaccine vector because it has an ideal stability and safety profile, induces balanced humoral and cell-mediated immune responses due to activation of innate immunity, provides ‘self-adjuvanting’ activity, can mimic natural IFV infection, and confers seamless protection against mucosal pathogens. Moreover, this vector can be developed as a low-cost, rapid-response vaccine that can be quickly manufactured. Therefore, an adenovirus vector encoding conserved influenza antigens holds promise in the development of a universal influenza vaccine. This review will summarize the progress in adenovirus-vectored universal flu vaccines and discuss future novel approaches. PMID:25876176

  17. Progress on adenovirus-vectored universal influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Kui; Ying, Guan; Yan, Zhou; Shanshan, Yan; Lei, Zhang; Hongjun, Li; Maosheng, Sun

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection causes serious health problems and heavy financial burdens each year worldwide. The classical inactivated influenza virus vaccine (IIVV) and live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) must be updated regularly to match the new strains that evolve due to antigenic drift and antigenic shift. However, with the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize conserved antigens, and the CD8(+) T cell responses targeting viral internal proteins nucleoprotein (NP), matrix protein 1 (M1) and polymerase basic 1 (PB1), it is possible to develop a universal influenza vaccine based on the conserved hemagglutinin (HA) stem, NP, and matrix proteins. Recombinant adenovirus (rAd) is an ideal influenza vaccine vector because it has an ideal stability and safety profile, induces balanced humoral and cell-mediated immune responses due to activation of innate immunity, provides 'self-adjuvanting' activity, can mimic natural IFV infection, and confers seamless protection against mucosal pathogens. Moreover, this vector can be developed as a low-cost, rapid-response vaccine that can be quickly manufactured. Therefore, an adenovirus vector encoding conserved influenza antigens holds promise in the development of a universal influenza vaccine. This review will summarize the progress in adenovirus-vectored universal flu vaccines and discuss future novel approaches. PMID:25876176

  18. History of the restoration of adenovirus type 4 and type 7 vaccine, live oral (Adenovirus Vaccine) in the context of the Department of Defense acquisition system.

    PubMed

    Hoke, Charles H; Snyder, Clifford E

    2013-03-15

    Respiratory pathogens cause morbidity and mortality in US military basic trainees. Following the influenza pandemic of 1918, and stimulated by WWII, the need to protect military personnel against epidemic respiratory disease was evident. Over several decades, the US military elucidated etiologies of acute respiratory diseases and invented and deployed vaccines to prevent disease caused by influenza, meningococcus, and adenoviruses. In 1994, the Adenovirus Vaccine manufacturer stopped its production. By 1999, supplies were exhausted and adenovirus-associated disease, especially serotype 4-associated febrile respiratory illness, returned to basic training installations. Advisory bodies persuaded Department of Defense leaders to initiate restoration of Adenovirus Vaccine. In 2011, after 10 years of effort by government and contractor personnel and at a cost of about $100 million, the Adenovirus Vaccine was restored to use at all military basic training installations. Disease and adenovirus serotype 4 isolation rates have fallen dramatically since vaccinations resumed in October 2011 and remain very low. Mindful of the adage that "The more successful a vaccine is, the more quickly the need for it will be forgotten.", sustainment of the supply of the Adenovirus Vaccine may be a challenge, and careful management will be required for such sustainment. PMID:23291475

  19. The Evaluation of Polyhexamethylene Biguanide (PHMB) as a Disinfectant for Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Romanowski, Eric G.; Yates, Kathleen A.; O’Connor, Katherine E.; Mah, Francis S.; Shanks, Robert M. Q.; Kowalski, Regis P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Swimming pools can be a vector for transmission of adenovirus ocular infections. Polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) is a disinfectant used in swimming pools and hot tubs. The current study determined whether PHMB is an effective disinfectant against ocular adenovirus serotypes at a concentration used to disinfect swimming pools and hot tubs. Methods The direct disinfecting activity of PHMB was determined in triplicate assays by incubating nine human adenovirus types (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7a, 8, 19, and 37) with 50 and 0 PPM (µg/ml) of PHMB for 24 hours at room temperature, to simulate swimming pool temperatures, or 40°C, to simulate hot tub temperatures. Plaque assays determined adenovirus titers after incubation. Titers were Log10 converted and mean ± standard deviation Log10 reductions from controls were calculated. Virucidal (greater than 99.9%) decreases in mean adenovirus titers after PHMB treatment were determined for each adenovirus type and temperature tested. Results At room temperature, 50 PPM of PHMB produced mean reductions in titers less than 1 Log10 for all adenovirus types tested. At 40°C, 50 PPM of PHMB produced mean reductions in titers less than 1 Log10 for two adenovirus types and greater than 1 Log10, but less than 3 Log10, for seven of nine adenovirus types. Conclusions 50 PPM of PHMB was not virucidal against adenovirus at temperatures consistent with swimming pools or hot tubs. Clinical Relevance Recreational water maintained and sanitized with PHMB has the potential to serve as a vector for the transmission of ocular adenovirus infections. PMID:23450376

  20. Avian influenza vaccination in chickens and pigs with replication-competent adenovirus-free human recombinant adenovirus 5.

    PubMed

    Toro, Haroldo; van Ginkel, Frederik W; Tang, De-Chu C; Schemera, Bettina; Rodning, Soren; Newton, Joseph

    2010-03-01

    Protective immunity to avian influenza (AI) virus can be elicited in chickens by in ovo or intramuscular vaccination with replication-competent adenovirus (RCA)-free human recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) encoding AI virus H5 (AdTW68.H5) or H7 (AdCN94.H7) hemagglutinins. We evaluated bivalent in ovo vaccination with AdTW68.H5 and AdCN94.H7 and determined that vaccinated chickens developed robust hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody levels to both H5 and H7 AI strains. Additionally, we evaluated immune responses of 1-day-old chickens vaccinated via spray with AdCN94.H7. These birds showed increased immunoglobulin A responses in lachrymal fluids and increased interleukin-6 expression in Harderian gland-derived lymphocytes. However, specific HI antibodies were not detected in the sera of these birds. Because pigs might play a role as a "mixing vessel" for the generation of pandemic influenza viruses we explored the use of RCA-free adenovirus technology to immunize pigs against AI virus. Weanling piglets vaccinated intramuscularly with a single dose of RCA-free AdTW68.H5 developed strong systemic antibody responses 3 wk postvaccination. Intranasal application of AdTW68.H5 in piglets resulted in reduced vaccine coverage, i.e., 33% of pigs (2/6) developed an antibody response, but serum antibody levels in those successfully immunized animals were similar to intramuscularly vaccinated animals. PMID:20521636

  1. Adenovirus type 2 terminal protein: purification and comparison of tryptic peptides with known adenovirus-coded proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Harter, M L; Lewis, J B; Anderson, C W

    1979-01-01

    The protein covalently bound to the 5' termini of adenovirus type 2 DNA has been purified from virus labeled with [35S]methionine, using exclusion chromatography of disrupted virions to isolate the DNA-protein complex, which is then digested with DNase. The terminal protein isolated from mature virus is most effectively labeled if the cells are exposed to [35S]methionine during the "intermediate" period of 13 to 21 h postinfection, suggesting that the protein is synthesized during this interval. The tryptic peptides of the terminal protein were compared with those of several known adenovirus-coded proteins and found to be unrelated. In particular, the terminal protein is not related to the 38-50K early proteins encoded by the leftmost 4.4% of the adenovirus genome, one region essential for the transforming activity of the virus. Neither is it related to the 72K single-strand-specific DNA binding protein, the minor virion component IVa2, or the major capsid component hexon. Images PMID:513195

  2. Inhibition of proteolytic processing of adenoviral proteins by epsilon-aminocaproic acid and ambenum in adenovirus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Nosach, Lidiya; Dyachenko, Nataliya; Zhovnovataya, Valentina; Lozinskiy, Miron; Lozitsky, Victor

    2002-01-01

    Maturation of adenovirus particles is markedly affected by proteolytic processing. The possibility for blocking the conversion of precursor structural core protein (preVII) into mature structure protein VII by officinal drugs epsilon-aminocaproic acid and ambenum has been demonstrated in Hep-2 cells infected with adenovirus. Proteolytic processing may be regarded as one of the targets for inhibiting adenovirus reproduction. PMID:12545207

  3. Protective avian influenza in ovo vaccination with non-replicating human adenovirus vector

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protective immunity against avian influenza (AI) virus was elicited in chickens by single dose in ovo vaccination with a replication competent adenovirus (RCA) -free human adenovirus vector (Ad5) encoding an avian AI virus H5 hemagglutinin. Vaccinated chickens were protected against both H5N1 and H5...

  4. Subgenomic viral DNA species synthesized in simian cells by human and simian adenoviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Daniell, E

    1981-01-01

    DNA synthesized after infection of simian tissue culture cells (BSC-1 or CV-1) with human adenovirus type 2 or 5 or with simian adenovirus 7 was characterized. It was demonstrated that as much as 40% of the virus-specific DNA in nuclei of infected monkey cells consists of subgenomic pieces. No subgenomic viral DNA species were detected in the nuclei of human (HeLa) cells infected with these adenovirus types. Restriction analysis showed that these short viral DNA molecules contain normal amounts of the sequences from the ends of the viral genome, whereas internal regions are underrepresented. The production of subgenomic DNAs is not correlated with semipermissive infection. Although adenovirus types 2 and 5 are restricted in monkey cells, these cells are fully permissive for simian adenovirus 7. HR404, an adenovirus type 5 mutant which is not restricted in monkey cells, produced the same percentage of subgenomic DNAs as did its wild type (restricted) parent, and coinfection of monkey cells with adenovirus type 5 DNAs. The array of predominant size classes among the heterogeneously sized short DNAs is serotype specific. Extensive plaque purification and comparison of wild-type adenovirus type 5 with several viral mutants indicated that the distribution of aberrant sizes of DNA is characteristic of the virus and not a result of random replicative errors and then enrichment of particular species. Images PMID:6261009

  5. Adenovirus Type 7 Pneumonia in Children Who Died from Measles-Associated Pneumonia, Hanoi, Vietnam, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Hai, Le Thanh; Thach, Hoang Ngoc; Tuan, Ta Anh; Nam, Dao Huu; Dien, Tran Minh; Sato, Yuko; Kumasaka, Toshio; Suzuki, Tadaki; Hanaoka, Nozomu; Fujimoto, Tsuguto; Katano, Harutaka; Hasegawa, Hideki; Kawachi, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    During a 2014 measles outbreak in Vietnam, postmortem pathologic examination of hospitalized children who died showed that adenovirus type 7 pneumonia was a contributory cause of death in children with measles-associated immune suppression. Adenovirus type 7 pneumonia should be recognized as a major cause of secondary infection after measles. PMID:26926035

  6. Adenovirus-based vaccines against avian-origin H5N1 influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    He, Biao; Zheng, Bo-jian; Wang, Qian; Du, Lanying; Jiang, Shibo; Lu, Lu

    2015-02-01

    Since 1997, human infection with avian H5N1, having about 60% mortality, has posed a threat to public health. In this review, we describe the epidemiology of H5N1 transmission, advantages and disadvantages of different influenza vaccine types, and characteristics of adenovirus, finally summarizing advances in adenovirus-based H5N1 systemic and mucosal vaccines. PMID:25479556

  7. PREPARATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES TO ENTERIC ADENOVIRUS TYPES 40 AND 41

    EPA Science Inventory

    The authors have prepared monoclonal antibodies to each of the enteric adenoviruses types 40 and 41. Three different hybridoma cell lines were selected which produced antibody found to react by radioimmunoprecipitation with adenovirus (Ad) hexon antigens. One was specific for Ad4...

  8. Avian influenza mucosal vaccination in chickens with replication-defective recombinant adenovirus vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated protection conferred by mucosal vaccination with replication competent adenovirus (RCA)-free recombinant adenovirus expressing a codon-optimized avian influenza (AI) H5 gene (AdTW68.H5ck). Commercial layer-type chicken groups were singly vaccinated ocularly at 5 days of age, or singly v...

  9. Protection of chickens against avian influenza with non-replicating adenovirus-vectored vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protective immunity against avian influenza (AI) virus was elicited in chickens by single-dose vaccination with a replication competent adenovirus (RCA) -free human adenovirus (Ad) vector encoding a H7 hemagglutinin gene from a low pathogenic North American isolate (AdChNY94.H7). Chickens vaccinate...

  10. Immunocompetent syngeneic cotton rat tumor models for the assessment of replication-competent oncolytic adenovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Steel, Jason C.; Morrison, Brian J.; Mannan, Poonam; Abu-Asab, Mones S.; Wildner, Oliver; Miles, Brian K.; Yim, Kevin C.; Ramanan, Vijay; Prince, Gregory A.; Morris, John C.

    2007-12-05

    Oncolytic adenoviruses as a treatment for cancer have demonstrated limited clinical activity. Contributing to this may be the relevance of preclinical animal models used to study these agents. Syngeneic mouse tumor models are generally non-permissive for adenoviral replication, whereas human tumor xenograft models exhibit attenuated immune responses to the vector. The cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) is susceptible to human adenovirus infection, permissive for viral replication and exhibits similar inflammatory pathology to humans with adenovirus replicating in the lungs, respiratory passages and cornea. We evaluated three transplantable tumorigenic cotton rat cell lines, CCRT, LCRT and VCRT as models for the study of oncolytic adenoviruses. All three cells lines were readily infected with adenovirus type-5-based vectors and exhibited high levels of transgene expression. The cell lines supported viral replication demonstrated by the induction of cytopathogenic effect (CPE) in tissue culture, increase in virus particle numbers and assembly of virions seen on transmission electron microscopy. In vivo, LCRT and VCRT tumors demonstrated delayed growth after injection with replicating adenovirus. No in vivo antitumor activity was seen in CCRT tumors despite in vitro oncolysis. Adenovirus was also rapidly cleared from the CCRT tumors compared to LCRT and VCRT tumors. The effect observed with the different cotton rat tumor cell lines mimics the variable results of human clinical trials highlighting the potential relevance of this model for assessing the activity and toxicity of oncolytic adenoviruses.

  11. Construction and characterization of a recombinant human adenovirus vector expressing bone morphogenetic protein 2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheng; Wang, Guoxian; Li, Chen; Liu, Danping

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to construct and characterize a novel recombinant human adenovirus vector expressing bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and green fluorescent protein (GFP). The BMP2 gene in the plasmid pcDNA3-BMP2 was sequenced and the restriction enzyme recognition sites were analyzed. Following mutagenesis using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the gene sequence after the translation termination codon was removed and new restriction sites were added. The mutated BMP2 gene (BMP2(+) gene) was cloned into an adenovirus shuttle vector to obtain pShuttle cytomegalovirus (CMV)-BMP2(+)-internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-hrGFP-1. The adenovirus plasmid pAd CMV-BMP2(+)-IRES-hrGFP-1 was constructed by homologous recombination and was transfected into HEK293A cells, followed by adenovirus packaging. pAd CMV-BMP2 was used as the control. The two types of adenovirus were transfected into marrow stromal cells (MSCs). The expression of BMP2 and GFP, as well as the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of expressed BMP2 were detected. Following mutagenesis, the BMP2 gene sequence and recombinant adenovirus vector were as predicted. The novel adenovirus vector expressed both BMP2 and GFP, indicating that a novel recombinant human adenovirus vector expressing BMP2 had been successfully constructed. PMID:24137184

  12. Modeling adenovirus latency in human lymphocyte cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yange; Huang, Wen; Ornelles, David A; Gooding, Linda R

    2010-09-01

    Species C adenovirus establishes a latent infection in lymphocytes of the tonsils and adenoids. To understand how this lytic virus is maintained in these cells, four human lymphocytic cell lines that support the entire virus life cycle were examined. The T-cell line Jurkat ceased proliferation and died shortly after virus infection. BJAB, Ramos (B cells), and KE37 (T cells) continued to divide at nearly normal rates while replicating the virus genome. Viral genome numbers peaked and then declined in BJAB cells below one genome per cell at 130 to 150 days postinfection. Ramos and KE37 cells maintained the virus genome at over 100 copies per cell over a comparable period of time. BJAB cells maintained the viral DNA as a monomeric episome. All three persistently infected cells lost expression of the cell surface coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) within 24 h postinfection, and CAR expression remained low for at least 340 days postinfection. CAR loss proceeded via a two-stage process. First, an initial loss of cell surface staining for CAR required virus late gene expression and a CAR-binding fiber protein even while CAR protein and mRNA levels remained high. Second, CAR mRNA disappeared at around 30 days postinfection and remained low even after virus DNA was lost from the cells. At late times postinfection (day 180), BJAB cells could not be reinfected with adenovirus, even when CAR was reintroduced to the cells via retroviral transduction, suggesting that the expression of multiple genes had been stably altered in these cells following infection. PMID:20573817

  13. [Quality control of recombinant oncolytic adenovirus/p53].

    PubMed

    Gao, Kai; Bi, Hua; Ding, You-Xue; Li, Yong-Hong; Han, Chun-Mei; Guo, Ying; Rao, Chun-Ming

    2011-12-01

    To establish a detection method of oncolytic adenovirus/p53 and standard of quality control, human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter, CMV fusion promoter containing hypoxia reaction element (HRE) and p53 gene were identified by vector DNA restriction enzyme digestion and PCR analysis. The result conformed that all modified regions were in consistent with theoretical ones. Particle number was 2.0 x 10(11) mL(-1) determined by UV (A260). Infectious titer was 5.0 x 10(10) IU mL(-1) analyzed by TCID50. In vitro p53 gene expression in human lung cancer cell H1299 was determined by ELISA, and A450 ratio of nucleoprotein in virus infection group to control group was 5.2. Antitumor potency was evaluated by cytotoxicity assay using human lung cancer cell A549, and the MOI(IC50) of this gene therapy preparation was 1.0. The tumor cells targeted replication ability of recombinant virus was determined by TCID50 titer ratio of filial generation virus between human lung cancer cell A549 and human diploid epidermal fibrolast BJ cells after infected by virus with same MOI. TCID50 titer ratio of tumor cell infection group to normal cell infection control group was 398. The IE-HPLC purity of virus was 99.5%. There was less than 1 copy of wild type adenovirus within 1 x 10(7) VP recombinant virus. Other quality control items were complied with corresponding requirements in the guidance for human somatic cell therapy and gene therapy and Chinese pharmacopeia volume III. The detection method of oncolytic adenovirus/p53 was successfully established for quality control standard. The study also provided reference for quality control of other oncolytic viral vector products. PMID:22375422

  14. Proteins encoded near the adenovirus late messenger RNA leader segments

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, J.B.; Anderson, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    Small fragments of adenovirus 2 DNA cloned into the single-strand phage M13 were used to select adenoviral messenger RNAs transcribed from the R-strand between map positions 16 and 30. Cell-free translation of these mRNAs produced proteins of 13.5K, 13.6K, and 11.5K, respectively encoded between the first and second segments of the tripartite major late leader, within the ''i''-leader segment, and immediately preceding the third leader segment. Partial sequence analysis of the 13.6K protein is consistent with the hypothesis that it is encoded within the i-leader segment.

  15. Canine adenovirus type 1 in a fennec fox (Vulpes zerda).

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong-Won; Lee, Hyun-Kyoung; Kim, Seong-Hee; Kim, Yeon-Hee; Lee, Kyoung-Ki; Lee, Myoung-Heon; Oem, Jae-Ku

    2014-12-01

    A 10-mo-old female fennec fox (Vulpes zerda) with drooling suddenly died and was examined postmortem. Histologic examination of different tissue samples was performed. Vacuolar degeneration and diffuse fatty change were observed in the liver. Several diagnostic methods were used to screen for canine parvovirus, canine distemper virus, canine influenza virus, canine coronavirus, canine parainfluenza virus, and canine adenovirus (CAdV). Only CAdV type 1 (CAdV-1) was detected in several organs (liver, lung, brain, kidney, spleen, and heart), and other viruses were not found. CAdV-1 was confirmed by virus isolation and nucleotide sequencing. PMID:25632689

  16. Adenovirus vaccine vectors expressing hepatitis B surface antigen: importance of regulatory elements in the adenovirus major late intron.

    PubMed

    Mason, B B; Davis, A R; Bhat, B M; Chengalvala, M; Lubeck, M D; Zandle, G; Kostek, B; Cholodofsky, S; Dheer, S; Molnar-Kimber, K

    1990-08-01

    Adenovirus types 4 and 7 are currently used as live oral vaccines for prevention of acute respiratory disease caused by these adenovirus serotypes. To investigate the concept of producing live recombinant vaccines using these serotypes, adenovirus types 4 (Ad4) and 7 (Ad7) were constructed that produce HBsAg upon infection of cell cultures. Ad4 recombinants were constructed that express HBsAg from a cassette inserted 135 bp from the right-hand terminus of the viral genome. The cassette contained the Ad4 major late promoter followed by leader 1 of the tripartite leader, the first intervening sequence between leaders 1 and 2, leaders 2 and 3, the HBsAg gene, and tandem polyadenylation signals from the Ad4 E3B and hexon genes. Using this same cassette, a series of Ad4 recombinants expressing HBsAg were constructed with deletions in the intervening sequence between leaders 1 and 2 to evaluate the contribution of the downstream control elements more precisely. Inclusion of regions located between +82 and +148 as well as +148 and +232 resulted in increases in expression levels of HBsAg in A549-infected cells by 22-fold and 44-fold, respectively, over the levels attained by an adenovirus recombinant retaining only sequences from +1 to +82, showing the importance of these elements in the activation of the major late promoter during the course of a natural Ad4 viral infection. Parallel increases were also observed in steady-state levels of cytoplasmic HBsAg-specific mRNA. When similar Ad7 recombinant viruses were constructed, these viruses also expressed 20-fold more HBsAg due to the presence of the intron. All Ad4 and Ad7 recombinants produced HBsAg particles containing gp27 and p24 which were secreted in the medium. When dogs were immunized intratracheally with one of these Ad7 recombinants, they seroconverted to both Ad7 and HBsAg to a high level. PMID:2371766

  17. Neonatal Infection with Species C Adenoviruses Confirmed in Viable Cord Blood Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ornelles, David A.; Gooding, Linda R.; Garnett-Benson, C.

    2015-01-01

    Credible but conflicting reports address the frequency of prenatal infection by species C adenovirus. This question is important because these viruses persist in lymphoid cells and suppress double-stranded DNA-break repair. Consequently, prenatal adenovirus infections may generate the aberrant clones of lymphocytes that precede development of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The present study was designed to overcome technical limitations of prior work by processing cord blood lymphocytes within a day of collection, and by analyzing sufficient numbers of lymphocytes to detect adenovirus-containing cells at the lower limits determined by our previous studies of tonsil lymphocytes. By this approach, adenoviral DNA was identified in 19 of 517 (3.7%) samples, providing definitive evidence for the occurrence of prenatal infection with species C adenoviruses in a significant fraction of neonates predominantly of African American and Hispanic ancestry. Cord blood samples were also tested for the presence of the ETV6-RUNX1 translocation, the most common genetic abnormality in childhood ALL. Using a nested PCR assay, the ETV6-RUNX1 transcript was detected in four of 196 adenovirus-negative samples and one of 14 adenovirus-positive cord blood samples. These findings indicate that this method will be suitable for determining concordance between adenovirus infection and the leukemia-associated translocations in newborns. PMID:25764068

  18. Neonatal infection with species C adenoviruses confirmed in viable cord blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ornelles, David A; Gooding, Linda R; Garnett-Benson, C

    2015-01-01

    Credible but conflicting reports address the frequency of prenatal infection by species C adenovirus. This question is important because these viruses persist in lymphoid cells and suppress double-stranded DNA-break repair. Consequently, prenatal adenovirus infections may generate the aberrant clones of lymphocytes that precede development of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The present study was designed to overcome technical limitations of prior work by processing cord blood lymphocytes within a day of collection, and by analyzing sufficient numbers of lymphocytes to detect adenovirus-containing cells at the lower limits determined by our previous studies of tonsil lymphocytes. By this approach, adenoviral DNA was identified in 19 of 517 (3.7%) samples, providing definitive evidence for the occurrence of prenatal infection with species C adenoviruses in a significant fraction of neonates predominantly of African American and Hispanic ancestry. Cord blood samples were also tested for the presence of the ETV6-RUNX1 translocation, the most common genetic abnormality in childhood ALL. Using a nested PCR assay, the ETV6-RUNX1 transcript was detected in four of 196 adenovirus-negative samples and one of 14 adenovirus-positive cord blood samples. These findings indicate that this method will be suitable for determining concordance between adenovirus infection and the leukemia-associated translocations in newborns. PMID:25764068

  19. EGFR-Targeted Adenovirus Dendrimer Coating for Improved Systemic Delivery of the Theranostic NIS Gene

    PubMed Central

    Grünwald, Geoffrey K; Vetter, Alexandra; Klutz, Kathrin; Willhauck, Michael J; Schwenk, Nathalie; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, Reingard; Schwaiger, Markus; Zach, Christian; Wagner, Ernst; Göke, Burkhard; Holm, Per S; Ogris, Manfred; Spitzweg, Christine

    2013-01-01

    We recently demonstrated tumor-selective iodide uptake and therapeutic efficacy of combined radiovirotherapy after systemic delivery of the theranostic sodium iodide symporter (NIS) gene using a dendrimer-coated adenovirus. To further improve shielding and targeting we physically coated replication-selective adenoviruses carrying the hNIS gene with a conjugate consisting of cationic poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer linked to the peptidic, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-specific ligand GE11. In vitro experiments demonstrated coxsackie-adenovirus receptor-independent but EGFR-specific transduction efficiency. Systemic injection of the uncoated adenovirus in a liver cancer xenograft mouse model led to high levels of NIS expression in the liver due to hepatic sequestration, which were significantly reduced after coating as demonstrated by 123I-scintigraphy. Reduction of adenovirus liver pooling resulted in decreased hepatotoxicity and increased transduction efficiency in peripheral xenograft tumors. 124I-PET-imaging confirmed EGFR-specificity by significantly lower tumoral radioiodine accumulation after pretreatment with the EGFR-specific antibody cetuximab. A significantly enhanced oncolytic effect was observed following systemic application of dendrimer-coated adenovirus that was further increased by additional treatment with a therapeutic dose of 131I. These results demonstrate restricted virus tropism and tumor-selective retargeting after systemic application of coated, EGFR-targeted adenoviruses therefore representing a promising strategy for improved systemic adenoviral NIS gene therapy. PMID:24193032

  20. Phylogenetic and pathogenic characterization of novel adenoviruses from long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Counihan, Katrina; Skerratt, Lee; Franson, J. Christian; Hollmen, Tuula E.

    2015-01-01

    Novel adenoviruses were isolated from a long-tailed duck (Clangula hyemalis) mortality event near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska in 2000. The long-tailed duck adenovirus genome was approximately 27 kb. A 907 bp hexon gene segment was used to design primers specific for the long-tailed duck adenovirus. Nineteen isolates were phylogenetically characterized based on portions of their hexon gene and 12 were most closely related to Goose adenovirus A. The remaining 7 shared no hexon sequences with any known adenoviruses. Experimental infections of mallards with a long-tailed duck reference adenovirus caused mild lymphoid infiltration of the intestine and paint brush hemorrhages of the mucosa and dilation of the intestine. This study shows novel adenoviruses from long-tailed ducks are diverse and provides further evidence that they should be considered in cases of morbidity and mortality in sea ducks. Conserved and specific primers have been developed that will help screen sea ducks for adenoviral infections.

  1. Mechanism by which calcium phosphate coprecipitation enhances adenovirus-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Walters, R; Welsh, M

    1999-11-01

    Delivery of a normal copy of CFTR cDNA to airway epithelia may provide a novel treatment for cystic fibrosis lung disease. Unfortunately, current vectors are inefficient because of limited binding to the apical surface of airway epithelia. We recently reported that incorporation of adenovirus in a calcium phosphate coprecipitate (Ad:CaPi) improves adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to airway epithelia in vitro and in vivo. To understand better how coprecipitation improves gene transfer, we tested the hypothesis that incorporation in a CaPi coprecipitate increases the binding of adenovirus to the apical surface of differentiated human airway epithelia. When a Cy3-labelled adenovirus was delivered in a coprecipitate, binding increased 54-fold as compared with adenovirus alone. Moreover, infection by Ad:CaPi was independent of fiber knob-CAR and penton base-integrin interactions. After binding to the cell surface, the virus must enter the cell in order to infect. We hypothesized that Ad:CaPi may stimulate fluid phase endocytosis, thereby facilitating entry. However, we found that neither adenovirus nor Ad:CaPi coprecipitates altered fluid phase endocytosis. Nevertheless, Ad:CaPi preferentially infected cells showing endocytosis. Thus, CaPi coprecipitation improves adenovirus-mediated gene transfer by coating the epithelial surface with a layer of virus which enters cells during the normal process of endocytosis. PMID:10602380

  2. Construction and characterization of recombinant adenovirus carrying a mouse TIGIT-GFP gene.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J M; Cui, J L; He, W T; Yu, D W; Gao, Y; Wang, L; Chen, Z K; Zhou, H M

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant adenovirus vector systems have been used extensively in protein research and gene therapy. However, the construction and characterization of recombinant adenovirus is a tedious and time-consuming process. TIGIT is a recently discovered immunosuppressive molecule that plays an important role in maintaining immunological balance. The construction of recombinant adenovirus mediating TIGIT expression must be simplified to facilitate its use in the study of TIGIT. In this study, the TIGIT gene was combined with green fluorescent protein (GFP); the TIGIT-GFP gene was inserted into a gateway plasmid to construct a TIGIT-GFP adenovirus. HEK 293A cells were infected with the adenovirus, which was then purified and subjected to virus titering. TIGIT-GFP adenovirus was characterized by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence, and its expression in mouse liver was detected by infection through caudal vein injection. The results showed the successful construction of the TIGIT-GFP adenovirus (5 x 10(10) PFU/mL). Co-expression of TIGIT and GFP was identified in 293A and liver cells; synthesis and positioning of TIGIT-GFP was viewed under a fluorescence microscope. TIGIT-GFP was highly expressed on liver cells 1 day (25.53%) after infection and faded 3 days (11.36%) after injection. In conclusion, the fusion of TIGIT with GFP allows easy, rapid, and uncomplicated detection of TIGIT translation. The construction of a TIGIT-GFP adenovirus, mediating TIGIT expression in vitro and in vivo, lays the foundation for further research into TIGIT function and gene therapy. Moreover, the TIGIT-GFP adenovirus is a helpful tool for studying other proteins (which could replace the TIGIT gene). PMID:26782515

  3. Application of the polymerase chain reaction to detect fowl adenoviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, P; Ojkic, D; Tuboly, T; Huber, P; Nagy, E

    1999-01-01

    The possibility of using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of fowl adenoviruses (FAdV) was tested. The optimal reaction parameters were evaluated and defined for purified genomic DNA of type 8 fowl adenovirus (FAdV-8), and then the same conditions were applied for nucleic acid extracted from infected cells. One hundred picograms of purified viral DNA, or 250 FAdV-8-infected cells, were detected by ethidium bromide staining of the PCR products in agarose gels. The sensitivity was increased to 10 pg purified viral DNA, or 25 infected cells, when the PCR products were hybridized with a specific labeled probe. Several field isolates of FAdV and the CELO virus (FAdV serotype 1) could be amplified by the same primers and conditions, but the size of the amplicons was smaller than that for the FAdV-8 PCR product. Other avian viruses and uninfected cell cultures tested negative. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. PMID:10369570

  4. Purification of a native membrane-associated adenovirus tumor antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Persson, H; Katze, M G; Philipson, L

    1982-01-01

    A 15,000-dalton protein was purified from HeLa cells infected with adenovirus type 2. Proteins solubilized from a membrane fraction of lytically infected cells was used as the starting material for purification. Subsequent purification steps involved lentil-lectin, phosphocellulose, hydroxyapatite, DEAE-cellulose, and aminohexyl-Sepharose chromatographies. A monospecific antiserum, raised against the purified protein, immunoprecipitated a 15,000-dalton protein encoded in early-region E1B (E1B/15K protein) of the adenovirus type 2 DNA. Tryptic finger print analysis revealed that the purified protein was identical to the E1B/15K protein encoded in the transforming part of the viral genome. The antiserum immunoprecipitated the E1B/15K protein from a variety of viral transformed cell lines isolated from humans, rats, or hamsters. The E1B/15K protein was associated with the membrane fraction of both lytically and virus-transformed cell lines and could only be released by detergent treatment. Furthermore, a 11,000- to 12,000-dalton protein that could be precipitated with the anti-E1B/15K serum was recovered from membranes treated with trypsin or proteinase K, suggesting that a major part of the E1B/15K protein is protected in membrane vesicles. Translation of early viral mRNA in a cell-free system, supplemented with rough microsomes, showed that this protein was associated with the membrane fraction also in vitro. Images PMID:7097863

  5. Chimpanzee Adenovirus Vaccine Provides Multispecies Protection against Rift Valley Fever

    PubMed Central

    Warimwe, George M.; Gesharisha, Joseph; Carr, B. Veronica; Otieno, Simeon; Otingah, Kennedy; Wright, Danny; Charleston, Bryan; Okoth, Edward; Elena, Lopez-Gil; Lorenzo, Gema; Ayman, El-Behiry; Alharbi, Naif K.; Al-dubaib, Musaad A.; Brun, Alejandro; Gilbert, Sarah C.; Nene, Vishvanath; Hill, Adrian V. S.

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV) causes recurrent outbreaks of acute life-threatening human and livestock illness in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. No licensed vaccines are currently available for humans and those widely used in livestock have major safety concerns. A ‘One Health’ vaccine development approach, in which the same vaccine is co-developed for multiple susceptible species, is an attractive strategy for RVFV. Here, we utilized a replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine platform with an established human and livestock safety profile, ChAdOx1, to develop a vaccine for use against RVFV in both livestock and humans. We show that single-dose immunization with ChAdOx1-GnGc vaccine, encoding RVFV envelope glycoproteins, elicits high-titre RVFV-neutralizing antibody and provides solid protection against RVFV challenge in the most susceptible natural target species of the virus-sheep, goats and cattle. In addition we demonstrate induction of RVFV-neutralizing antibody by ChAdOx1-GnGc vaccination in dromedary camels, further illustrating the potency of replication-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine platforms. Thus, ChAdOx1-GnGc warrants evaluation in human clinical trials and could potentially address the unmet human and livestock vaccine needs. PMID:26847478

  6. Mucosal vaccination by adenoviruses displaying reovirus sigma 1

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Eric A.; Camacho, Zenaido T.; Hillestad, Matthew L.; Crosby, Catherine M.; Turner, Mallory A.; Guenzel, Adam J.; Fadel, Hind J.; Mercier, George T.; Barry, Michael A.

    2015-08-15

    We developed adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors displaying the sigma 1 protein from reovirus as mucosal vaccines. Ad5-sigma retargets to JAM-1 and sialic acid, but has 40-fold reduced gene delivery when compared to Ad5. While weaker at transduction, Ad5-sigma generates stronger T cell responses than Ad5 when used for mucosal immunization. In this work, new Ad5-fiber-sigma vectors were generated by varying the number of fiber β-spiral shaft repeats (R) between the fiber tail and sigma. Increasing chimera length led to decreasing insertion of these proteinsAd5 virions. Ad-R3 and R14 vectors effectively targeted JAM-1 in vitro while R20 did not. When wereused to immunize mice by the intranasal route, Ad5-R3-sigma produced higher serum and vaginal antibody responses than Ad5. These data suggest optimized Ad-sigma vectors may be useful vectors for mucosal vaccination. - Highlights: • Constructed adenoviruses (Ads) displaying different reovirus sigma 1 fusion proteins. • Progressively longer chimeras were more poorly encapsidated onto Ad virions. • Ad5-R3-sigma mediated better systemic and mucosal immune responses than Ad5.

  7. Molecular characterization of adenovirus circulating in Central and South America during the 2006–2008 period

    PubMed Central

    García, Josefina; Sovero, Merly; Laguna‐Torres, Victor Alberto; Gomez, Jorge; Chicaiza, Wilson; Barrantes, Melvin; Sanchez, Felix; Jimenez, Mirna; Comach, Guillermo; De Rivera, Ivette L.; Agudo, Roberto; Arango, Ana E.; Barboza, Alma; Aguayo, Nicolas; Kochel, Tadeusz J.

    2009-01-01

    Background  Human Adenoviruses are recognized pathogens, causing a broad spectrum of diseases. Serotype identification is critical for epidemiological surveillance, detection of new strains and understanding of HAdvs pathogenesis. Little data is available about HAdvs subtypes in Latin America. Methods  In this study, we have molecularly characterized 213 adenoviruses collected from ILI presenting patients, during 2006‐08, in Central and South America. Results  Our results indicate that 161(76%) adenoviruses belong to subgroup C, 45 (21%) to subgroup B and 7 (3%) to subtype E4. PMID:19903214

  8. Molecular detection of two adenoviruses associated with disease in Australian lizards.

    PubMed

    Hyndman, T; Shilton, C M

    2011-06-01

    We give the first published description of the pathology and molecular findings associated with adenovirus infection in lizards in Australia. A central netted dragon (Ctenophorus nuchalis) exhibited severe necrotising hepatitis with abundant intranuclear inclusion bodies within hepatocytes and rarely within intestinal epithelial cells. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using pooled tissues yielded an amplicon that shared strong nucleotide identity with an agamid adenovirus (EU914203). PCR on the liver of a bearded dragon (Pogona minor minor) with illthrift, coccidiosis, nematodiasis and hepatic lipidosis yielded an amplicon with strong nucleotide identity to a helodermatid adenovirus (EU914207). PMID:21595645

  9. Specific binding of the adenovirus terminal protein precursor-DNA polymerase complex to the origin of DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Rijnders, A W; van Bergen, B G; van der Vliet, P C; Sussenbach, J S

    1983-01-01

    Initiation of adenovirus DNA replication is dependent on a complex of the precursor of the terminal protein and the adenovirus-coded DNA polymerase (pTP-pol complex). This complex catalyzes the formation of a covalent linkage between dCMP and pTP in the presence of a functional origin of DNA replication residing in the terminal nucleotide sequence of adenovirus DNA. We have purified the pTP-pol complex of adenovirus type 5 and studied its binding to double-stranded DNA. Using DNA-cellulose chromatography it could be shown that the pTP-pol complex has a higher affinity for adenovirus DNA than for calf thymus or pBR322 DNA. From the differential binding of the pTP-pol complex to plasmids containing adenovirus terminal sequences with different deletions, it has been concluded that a sequence of 14 nucleotide pairs at positions 9-22 plays a crucial role in the binding of pTP-pol to adenovirus DNA. This region is conserved in the DNA's of all human adenovirus serotypes and is obviously an important structural element of the adenovirus origin of DNA replication. Comparative binding studies with adenovirus DNA polymerase and pTP-pol indicated that pTP is responsible for the binding. The nature of the binding of pTP-pol to the conserved sequence will be discussed. Images PMID:6672772

  10. Molecular Characterization of a Lizard Adenovirus Reveals the First Atadenovirus with Two Fiber Genes and the First Adenovirus with Either One Short or Three Long Fibers per Penton

    PubMed Central

    Pénzes, Judit J.; Menéndez-Conejero, Rosa; Condezo, Gabriela N.; Ball, Inna; Papp, Tibor; Doszpoly, Andor; Paradela, Alberto; Pérez-Berná, Ana J.; López-Sanz, María; Nguyen, Thanh H.; van Raaij, Mark J.; Marschang, Rachel E.; Harrach, Balázs; Benkő, Mária

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although adenoviruses (AdVs) have been found in a wide variety of reptiles, including numerous squamate species, turtles, and crocodiles, the number of reptilian adenovirus isolates is still scarce. The only fully sequenced reptilian adenovirus, snake adenovirus 1 (SnAdV-1), belongs to the Atadenovirus genus. Recently, two new atadenoviruses were isolated from a captive Gila monster (Heloderma suspectum) and Mexican beaded lizards (Heloderma horridum). Here we report the full genomic and proteomic characterization of the latter, designated lizard adenovirus 2 (LAdV-2). The double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genome of LAdV-2 is 32,965 bp long, with an average G+C content of 44.16%. The overall arrangement and gene content of the LAdV-2 genome were largely concordant with those in other atadenoviruses, except for four novel open reading frames (ORFs) at the right end of the genome. Phylogeny reconstructions and plesiomorphic traits shared with SnAdV-1 further supported the assignment of LAdV-2 to the Atadenovirus genus. Surprisingly, two fiber genes were found for the first time in an atadenovirus. After optimizing the production of LAdV-2 in cell culture, we determined the protein compositions of the virions. The two fiber genes produce two fiber proteins of different sizes that are incorporated into the viral particles. Interestingly, the two different fiber proteins assemble as either one short or three long fiber projections per vertex. Stoichiometry estimations indicate that the long fiber triplet is present at only one or two vertices per virion. Neither triple fibers nor a mixed number of fibers per vertex had previously been reported for adenoviruses or any other virus. IMPORTANCE Here we show that a lizard adenovirus, LAdV-2, has a penton architecture never observed before. LAdV-2 expresses two fiber proteins—one short and one long. In the virion, most vertices have one short fiber, but a few of them have three long fibers attached to the same penton

  11. SUPPRESSION OF VIRAL REPLICATION BY GUANIDINE: A COMPARISON OF HUMAN ADENOVIRUSES AND ENTEROVIRUSES (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comparison was made of the relative sensitivities of laboratory strain human adenoviruses and enteroviruses, and recently isolated human enteroviruses, to the presence of guanidine hydrochloride in cell culture media. The concentration of guanidine hydrochloride used was 100 mi...

  12. Molecular detection of adenoviruses, rhabdoviruses, and paramyxoviruses in bats from Kenya.

    PubMed

    Conrardy, Christina; Tao, Ying; Kuzmin, Ivan V; Niezgoda, Michael; Agwanda, Bernard; Breiman, Robert F; Anderson, Larry J; Rupprecht, Charles E; Tong, Suxiang

    2014-08-01

    We screened 217 bats of at least 20 species from 17 locations in Kenya during July and August of 2006 for the presence of adenovirus, rhabdovirus, and paramyxovirus nucleic acids using generic reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and PCR assays. Of 217 bat fecal swabs examined, 4 bats were adenovirus DNA-positive, 11 bats were paramyxovirus RNA-positive, and 2 bats were rhabdovirus RNA-positive. Three bats were coinfected by two different viruses. By sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis, the Kenya bat paramyxoviruses and rhabdoviruses from this study may represent novel viral lineages within their respective families; the Kenya bat adenoviruses could not be confirmed as novel, because the same region sequences from other known bat adenovirus genomes for comparison were lacking. Our study adds to previous evidence that bats carry diverse, potentially zoonotic viruses and may be coinfected with more than one virus. PMID:24865685

  13. Adenovirus type 2 expresses fiber in monkey-human hybrids and reconstructed cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zorn, G.A.; Anderson, C.W.

    1981-02-01

    Adenovirus type 2 protein expression was measured by indirect immunofluorescence in monkey-human hybrids and in cells reconstructed from monkey and human cell karyoplasts and cytoplasts. Monkey-human hybrid clones infected with adenovirus type 2 expressed fiber protein, whereas infected monkey cells alone did not. Hybrids constructed after the parental monkey cells were infected with adenovirus type 2 demonstrated that fiber synthesis in these cells could be rescued by fusion to uninfected human cells. Thus, human cells contain a dominant factor that acts in trans and overcomes the inability of monkey cells to synthesize fiber. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the block to adenovirus replication in monkey cells involves a nuclear event that prevents the formation of functional mRNA for some late viral proteins including fiber polypeptide.

  14. Interactions of minute virus of mice and adenovirus with host nucleoli.

    PubMed Central

    Walton, T H; Moen, P T; Fox, E; Bodnar, J W

    1989-01-01

    Biochemical evidence is presented that both minute virus of mice (MVM) and adenovirus interact with the nucleolus during lytic growth and that MVM can also target specific changes involving nucleolar components in adenovirus-infected cells. These virus-nucleolus interactions were studied by analysis of intranuclear compartmentalization of both viral DNAs and host nucleolar proteins: (i) MVM in mouse cells (its normal host) replicates its DNA in the host nucleoli; (ii) specific nucleolar proteins as well as small nuclear ribonucleoprotein antigens are recompartmentalized to multiple intranuclear foci in adenovirus-infected HeLa cells; and (iii) when adenovirus helps MVM DNA replication in a nonpermissive human cell (HeLa), the MVM DNA is also recompartmentalized for synthesis. The data suggest mechanisms for disruption of nucleolar function common to oncogenic or oncolytic virus lytic growth and cell transformation. Images PMID:2760977

  15. Molecular Detection of Adenoviruses, Rhabdoviruses, and Paramyxoviruses in Bats from Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Conrardy, Christina; Tao, Ying; Kuzmin, Ivan V.; Niezgoda, Michael; Agwanda, Bernard; Breiman, Robert F.; Anderson, Larry J.; Rupprecht, Charles E.; Tong, Suxiang

    2014-01-01

    We screened 217 bats of at least 20 species from 17 locations in Kenya during July and August of 2006 for the presence of adenovirus, rhabdovirus, and paramyxovirus nucleic acids using generic reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and PCR assays. Of 217 bat fecal swabs examined, 4 bats were adenovirus DNA-positive, 11 bats were paramyxovirus RNA-positive, and 2 bats were rhabdovirus RNA-positive. Three bats were coinfected by two different viruses. By sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis, the Kenya bat paramyxoviruses and rhabdoviruses from this study may represent novel viral lineages within their respective families; the Kenya bat adenoviruses could not be confirmed as novel, because the same region sequences from other known bat adenovirus genomes for comparison were lacking. Our study adds to previous evidence that bats carry diverse, potentially zoonotic viruses and may be coinfected with more than one virus. PMID:24865685

  16. Use of Oligonucleotide Microarrays for Rapid Detection and Serotyping of Acute Respiratory Disease-Associated Adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Baochuan; Vora, Gary J.; Thach, Dzung; Walter, Elizabeth; Metzgar, David; Tibbetts, Clark; Stenger, David A.

    2004-01-01

    The cessation of the adenovirus vaccination program for military trainees has resulted in several recent acute respiratory disease (ARD) outbreaks. In the absence of vaccination, rapid detection methods are necessary for the timely implementation of measures to prevent adenovirus transmission within military training facilities. To this end, we have combined a fluorogenic real-time multiplex PCR assay with four sets of degenerate PCR primers that target the E1A, fiber, and hexon genes with a long oligonucleotide microarray capable of identifying the most common adenovirus serotypes associated with adult respiratory tract infections (serotypes 3, 4, 7, 16, and 21) and a representative member of adenovirus subgroup C (serotype 6) that is a common cause of childhood ARD and that often persists into adulthood. Analyses with prototype strains demonstrated unique hybridization patterns for representative members of adenovirus subgroups B1, B2, C, and E, thus allowing serotype determination. Microarray-based sensitivity assessments revealed lower detection limits (between 1 and 100 genomic copies) for adenovirus serotype 4 (Ad4) and Ad7 cell culture lysates, clinical nasal washes, and throat swabs and purified DNA from clinical samples. When adenovirus was detected from coded clinical samples, the results obtained by this approach demonstrated an excellent concordance with those obtained by the more established method of adenovirus identification as well as by cell culture with fluorescent-antibody staining. Finally, the utility of this method was further supported by its ability to detect adenoviral coinfections, contamination, and, potentially, recombination events. Taken together, the results demonstrate the usefulness of the simple and rapid diagnostic method developed for the unequivocal identification of ARD-associated adenoviral serotypes from laboratory or clinical samples that can be completed in 1.5 to 4.0 h. PMID:15243087

  17. Host cell autophagy modulates early stages of adenovirus infections in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xuehuo; Carlin, Cathleen R

    2013-02-01

    Human adenoviruses typically cause mild infections in the upper or lower respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract, or ocular epithelium. However, adenoviruses may be life-threatening in patients with impaired immunity and some serotypes cause epidemic outbreaks. Attachment to host cell receptors activates cell signaling and virus uptake by endocytosis. At present, it is unclear how vital cellular homeostatic mechanisms affect these early steps in the adenovirus life cycle. Autophagy is a lysosomal degradation pathway for recycling intracellular components that is upregulated during periods of cell stress. Autophagic cargo is sequestered in double-membrane structures called autophagosomes that fuse with endosomes to form amphisomes which then deliver their content to lysosomes. Autophagy is an important adaptive response in airway epithelial cells targeted by many common adenovirus serotypes. Using two established tissue culture models, we demonstrate here that adaptive autophagy enhances expression of the early region 1 adenovirus protein, induction of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, and production of new viral progeny in airway epithelial cells infected with adenovirus type 2. We have also discovered that adenovirus infections are tightly regulated by endosome maturation, a process characterized by abrupt exchange of Rab5 and Rab7 GTPases, associated with early and late endosomes, respectively. Moreover, endosome maturation appears to control a pool of early endosomes capable of fusing with autophagosomes which enhance adenovirus infection. Many viruses have evolved mechanisms to induce autophagy in order to aid their own replication. Our studies reveal a novel role for host cell autophagy that could have a significant impact on the outcome of respiratory infections. PMID:23236070

  18. Intermediates in the Synthesis of Type 2 Adenovirus Deoxyribonucleic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Horwitz, Marshall S.

    1971-01-01

    Intermediates in the synthesis of adenovirus type 2 deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) were studied in HeLa cells. Pieces of DNA smaller than the viral genome were demonstrated after labeling with 3H-thymidine for 10 to 240 sec. Intermediates as small as the Okazaki fragments (8 to 10S) do not predominate at any of the above times. No detectable addition of nucleotides to parental genome could be shown, nor was there any breakdown of recently synthesized viral DNA. The DNA intermediates were of viral origin for they hybridized to viral DNA and were made at a stage of the cell cycle (G2) when host DNA is not synthesized. PMID:5132696

  19. Oncolytic adenoviruses: A thorny path to glioma cure

    PubMed Central

    Ulasov, I.V.; Borovjagin, A.V.; Schroeder, B.A.; Baryshnikov, A.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is a rapidly progressing brain tumor. Despite the relatively low percentage of cancer patients with glioma diagnoses, recent statistics indicate that the number of glioma patients may have increased over the past decade. Current therapeutic options for glioma patients include tumor resection, chemotherapy, and concomitant radiation therapy with an average survival of approximately 16 months. The rapid progression of gliomas has spurred the development of novel treatment options, such as cancer gene therapy and oncolytic virotherapy. Preclinical testing of oncolytic adenoviruses using glioma models revealed both positive and negative sides of the virotherapy approach. Here we present a detailed overview of the glioma virotherapy field and discuss auxiliary therapeutic strategies with the potential for augmenting clinical efficacy of GBM virotherapy treatment. PMID:25685829

  20. Mesangial Localization of Immune Complexes in Experimental Canine Adenovirus Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Wright, N. G.; Morrison, W. I.; Thompson, H.; Cornwell, H. J. C.

    1974-01-01

    Each of a group of 14 dogs was infected experimentally by an intravenous dose of canine adenovirus calculated to allow survival until the initial stages of antibody production; the kidneys of infected dogs were examined during the period of 4-14 days after administration of virus. Proliferative glomerulonephritis with localization of IgG, C3 and viral antigen in mesangial regions was demonstrated. With the electron microscope, electron dense deposits were found scattered throughout the mesangium. There was proliferation of mesangial cells, infiltration into the glomerular tuft of polymorphonuclear leucocytes and, in some cases, focal glomerular necrosis with intracapsular and tubular haemorrhage. By means of an indirect immunofluorescence test, anti-viral antibody was detected in kidney eluates; anti-kidney antibody was not present. ImagesFigs. 5-8Figs. 9-10Figs. 1-4 PMID:4375485

  1. Purification of adenovirus hexon by high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Siegel, S A; Hutchins, J E; Witt, D J

    1987-09-01

    Hexon is the major structural protein of adenovirus, and has significance in studies of virus structure and function, vaccine development, and immunodiagnosis. We describe a simple, single-step, anion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for the high yield purification of hexon. Purity of the isolated hexon was assessed by SDS-PAGE and HPLC methods. The isolated hexon was immunologically reactive with anti-hexon monoclonal antibody in a dot-blot assay. It also retained immunogenicity, as polyclonal antisera from rabbits immunized with hexon showed the desired antigen specificity. The enhanced speed of this purification method allows for the efficient isolation of hexon from various serotypes, and thus may facilitate comparative studies of hexon immunobiology. PMID:3680460

  2. Adenovirus receptors and their implications in gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anurag; Li, Xiaoxin; Bangari, Dinesh S.; Mittal, Suresh K.

    2010-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ads) have gained popularity as gene delivery vectors for therapeutic and prophylactic applications. Ad entry into host cells involves specific interactions between cell surface receptors and viral capsid proteins. Several cell surface molecules have been identified as receptors for Ad attachment and entry. Tissue tropism of Ad vectors is greatly influenced by their receptor usage. A variety of strategies have been investigated to modify Ad vector tropism by manipulating the receptor-interacting moieties. Many such strategies are aimed at targeting and/or detargeting of Ad vectors. In this review, we discuss the various cell surface molecules that are implicated as receptors for virus attachment and internalization. Special emphasis is given to Ad types that are utilized as gene delivery vectors. Various strategies to modify Ad tropism using the knowledge of Ad receptors are also discussed. PMID:19647886

  3. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Cascalló, Manel; Alemany, Ramon

    2004-01-01

    Cell transduction in vitro is only the first step toward proving that a genetherapy vector can be useful to treat tumors. However, tumor targeting in vivo is now the milestone for gene therapy to succeed against disseminated cancer. Therefore, most valuable information is obtained from studies of vector biodistribution. Owing to the hepatotropism of adenoviral vectors, a particularly important parameter is the tumor/liver ratio. This ratio can be given at the level of gene expression if the amount of transgene expression is measured. To optimize the targeting, however, the levels of viral particles that reach the tumor compared to other organs must be studied. Most of this chapter deals with methods to quantify the virus fate in tumor-bearing animals. We present a radioactive labeling method that can be used to study biodistribution. After a small section dealing with tumor models, we describe methods to quantify different parameters related to adenovirus-mediated tumor targeting. PMID:14970588

  4. Going viral: a review of replication-selective oncolytic adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Christopher; Oronsky, Bryan; Scicinski, Jan; Fanger, Gary R.; Stirn, Meaghan; Oronsky, Arnold; Reid, Tony R.

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses have had a tumultuous course, from the initial anecdotal reports of patients having antineoplastic effects after natural viral infections a century ago to the development of current cutting-edge therapies in clinical trials. Adenoviruses have long been the workhorse of virotherapy, and we review both the scientific and the not-so-scientific forces that have shaped the development of these therapeutics from wild-type viral pathogens, turning an old foe into a new friend. After a brief review of the mechanics of viral replication and how it has been modified to engineer tumor selectivity, we give particular attention to ONYX-015, the forerunner of virotherapy with extensive clinical testing that pioneered the field. The findings from those as well as other oncolytic trials have shaped how we now view these viruses, which our immune system has evolved to vigorously attack, as promising immunotherapy agents. PMID:26280277

  5. Partial characterization of new adenoviruses found in lizards.

    PubMed

    Ball, Inna; Behncke, Helge; Schmidt, Volker; Geflügel, F T A; Papp, Tibor; Stöhr, Anke C; Marschang, Rachel E

    2014-06-01

    In the years 2011-2012, a consensus nested polymerase chain reaction was used for the detection of adenovirus (AdV) infection in reptiles. During this screening, three new AdVs were detected. One of these viruses was detected in three lizards from a group of green striped tree dragons (Japalura splendida). Another was detected in a green anole (Anolis carolinensis). A third virus was detected in a Jackson's chameleon (Chamaeleo jacksonii). Analysis of a portion of the DNA-dependent DNA polymerase genes of each of these viruses revealed that they all were different from one another and from all previously described reptilian AdVs. Phylogenetic analysis of the partial DNA polymerase gene sequence showed that all newly detected viruses clustered within the genus Atadenovirus. This is the first description of AdVs in these lizard species. PMID:25000689

  6. [Anti-adenovirus activity of a substance and medical form of ribamydil in cell culture].

    PubMed

    Nosach, L N; Diachenko, N S; Zhovnovataia, V L

    2009-01-01

    The inhibiting effect of ribamydil on adenovirus reproduction was studied under the determination of the number of cells with virus- induced DNA-containing intranucleus inclusion bodies and hexone antigen, the synthesis of adenovirus proteins and the infection virus by t he investigation. EC50 of ribamydil substance is 4-8 microg/ml, but complete suppression of adenovirus genome expression was found when adding ribamydil after the virus adsorption, in concentrations of 125-500 microg/ml. The original effect of ribamydil on the expression of adenovirus genome was found under its effect in concentration of 31 microg/ml. Intranucleus virus-induced inclusion bodies of the early type only were found under these conditions. Synthesis of the structural virus polypeptides, including hexone polypeptide (II) and non-structural polypeptide 100K, taking part in hexone trimerization, proceed intensively but without formation of immunologically active hexone. The inhibiting effect of officinal form of ribamydil was less expressed as compared with the substance (EC50: 62 microg/ml). The work results prove that the therapeutic effect of ribamydil (ribavirin) under treatment of adenovirus infections may be achieved in case when it is used in a dose excluding the expression of the adenovirus genome. PMID:20458939

  7. A novel Golgi protein (GOLPH2)-regulated oncolytic adenovirus exhibits potent antitumor efficacy in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yigang; Zhao, Hongfang; Zhang, Rong; Ma, Buyun; Chen, Kan; Huang, Fang; Zhou, Xiumei; Cui, Caixia; Liu, Xinyuan

    2015-01-01

    Golgi apparatus is the organelle mainly functioning as protein processing and secretion. GOLPH2 is a resident Golgi glycoprotein, usually called GP73. Recent data displayed that GOLPH2 is a superb hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) marker candidate, and even its specificity is better than liver cancer marker AFP. Oncolytic adenoviruses are broadly used for targeting cancer therapy due to their selective tumor-killing effect. However, it was reported that traditionally oncolytic adenovirus lack the HCC specificity. In this study, a novel dual-regulated oncolytic adenovirus GD55 targeting HCC was first constructed based on our cancer targeted gene-viral therapeutic strategy. To verify the targeting and effectiveness of GOLPH2-regulated oncolytic adenovirus GD55 in HCC, the anticancer capacity was investigated in HCC cell lines and animal model. The results proved that the novel GOLPH2-regulated GD55 conferred higher adenovirus replication and infectivity for liver cancer cells than oncolytic adenovirus ZD55. The GOLPH2-regulated GD55 exerted a significant grow-suppressing effect on HCC cells in vitro but little damage to normal liver cells. In animal experiment, antitumor effect of GD55 was more effective in HCC xenograft of nude mice than that of ZD55. Thus GOLPH2-regulated GD55 may be a promising oncolytic virus agent for future liver cancer treatment. PMID:25980438

  8. Translation of adenovirus 2 late mRNAs microinjected into cultured African green monkey kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, W.D.; Anderson, C.W.

    1984-08-01

    Adenovirus 2-infected monkey cells fail to synthesize fiber, a 62,000 M/sub r/ virion polypeptide expressed at late times in productively infected cells. Yet these cells contain fiber mRNA that, after isolation, can be translated in vitro. The reason for the failure of monkey cells to translate fiber mRNA has been approached by microinjecting adenovirus mRNA into the cytoplasm of cultured monkey cells. Late adenovirus 2 mRNA, isolated from infected HeLa cells, was efficiently expressed when microinjected into the African green monkey kidney cell line CV-C. Expressed viral proteins identified by immunoprecipitation included the adenovirus fiber polypeptide. This result demonstrates that the monkey cell translational apparatus is capable of recognizing and expressing functional adenovirus mRNA. Microinjection of late virus mRNA into cells previously infected with wild-type adenovirus 2 failed to increase significantly the yield of infectious virus. 26 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  9. Structure of the C-terminal head domain of the fowl adenovirus type 1 short fibre

    SciTech Connect

    El Bakkouri, Majida; Seiradake, Elena; Cusack, Stephen; Ruigrok, Rob W.H. Schoehn, Guy

    2008-08-15

    There are more than 100 known adenovirus serotypes, including 50 human serotypes. They can infect all 5 major vertebrate classes but only Aviadenovirus infecting birds and Mastadenovirus infecting mammals have been well studied. CELO (chicken embryo lethal orphan) adenovirus is responsible for mild respiratory pathologies in birds. Most studies on CELO virus have focussed on its genome sequence and organisation whereas the structural work on CELO proteins has only recently started. Contrary to most adenoviruses, the vertices of CELO virus reveal pentons with two fibres of different lengths. The distal parts (or head) of those fibres are involved in cellular receptor binding. Here we have determined the atomic structure of the short-fibre head of CELO (amino acids 201-410) at 2.0 A resolution. Despite low sequence identity, this structure is conserved compared to the other adenovirus fibre heads. We have used the existing CELO long-fibre head structure and the one we show here for a structure-based alignment of 11 known adenovirus fibre heads which was subsequently used for the construction of an evolutionary tree. Both the fibre head sequence and structural alignments suggest that enteric human group F adenovirus 41 (short fibre) is closer to the CELO fibre heads than the canine CAdV-2 fibre head, that lies closer to the human virus fibre heads.

  10. Adenovirus-Mediated Efficient Gene Transfer into Cultured Three-Dimensional Organoids

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Zhang, Hongyu; Zhang, Bing-Qiang; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Zhonglin; Qiao, Min; Zhang, Hongmei; Deng, Fang; Wu, Ningning; Chen, Xian; Wen, Sheng; Zhang, Junhui; Liao, Zhan; Zhang, Qian; Yan, Zhengjian; Yin, Liangjun; Ye, Jixing; Deng, Youlin; Luu, Hue H.; Haydon, Rex C.; Liang, Houjie; He, Tong-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional organoids have been recently established from various tissue-specific progenitors (such as intestinal stem cells), induced pluripotent stem cells, or embryonic stem cells. These cultured self-sustaining stem cell–based organoids may become valuable systems to study the roles of tissue-specific stem cells in tissue genesis and disease development. It is thus conceivable that effective genetic manipulations in such organoids may allow us to reconstruct disease processes and/or develop novel therapeutics. Recombinant adenoviruses are one of the most commonly used viral vectors for in vitro and in vivo gene deliveries. In this study, we investigate if adenoviruses can be used to effectively deliver transgenes into the cultured “mini-gut” organoids derived from intestinal stem cells. Using adenoviral vectors that express fluorescent proteins, we demonstrate that adenoviruses can effectively deliver transgenes into the cultured 3-D “mini-gut” organoids. The transgene expression can last at least 10 days in the cultured organoids. As a proof-of-principle experiment, we demonstrate that adenovirus-mediated noggin expression effectively support the survival and self-renewal of mini-gut organoids, while adenovirus-mediated expression of BMP4 inhibits the self-sustainability and proliferation of the organoids. Thus, our results strongly suggest that adenovirus vectors can be explored as effective gene delivery vehicles to introduce genetic manipulations in 3-D organoids. PMID:24695466

  11. Adenovirus-mediated efficient gene transfer into cultured three-dimensional organoids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Zhang, Hongyu; Zhang, Bing-Qiang; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Zhonglin; Qiao, Min; Zhang, Hongmei; Deng, Fang; Wu, Ningning; Chen, Xian; Wen, Sheng; Zhang, Junhui; Liao, Zhan; Zhang, Qian; Yan, Zhengjian; Yin, Liangjun; Ye, Jixing; Deng, Youlin; Luu, Hue H; Haydon, Rex C; Liang, Houjie; He, Tong-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional organoids have been recently established from various tissue-specific progenitors (such as intestinal stem cells), induced pluripotent stem cells, or embryonic stem cells. These cultured self-sustaining stem cell-based organoids may become valuable systems to study the roles of tissue-specific stem cells in tissue genesis and disease development. It is thus conceivable that effective genetic manipulations in such organoids may allow us to reconstruct disease processes and/or develop novel therapeutics. Recombinant adenoviruses are one of the most commonly used viral vectors for in vitro and in vivo gene deliveries. In this study, we investigate if adenoviruses can be used to effectively deliver transgenes into the cultured "mini-gut" organoids derived from intestinal stem cells. Using adenoviral vectors that express fluorescent proteins, we demonstrate that adenoviruses can effectively deliver transgenes into the cultured 3-D "mini-gut" organoids. The transgene expression can last at least 10 days in the cultured organoids. As a proof-of-principle experiment, we demonstrate that adenovirus-mediated noggin expression effectively support the survival and self-renewal of mini-gut organoids, while adenovirus-mediated expression of BMP4 inhibits the self-sustainability and proliferation of the organoids. Thus, our results strongly suggest that adenovirus vectors can be explored as effective gene delivery vehicles to introduce genetic manipulations in 3-D organoids. PMID:24695466

  12. Basolateral localization of fiber receptors limits adenovirus infection from the apical surface of airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Walters, R W; Grunst, T; Bergelson, J M; Finberg, R W; Welsh, M J; Zabner, J

    1999-04-01

    Recent identification of two receptors for the adenovirus fiber protein, coxsackie B and adenovirus type 2 and 5 receptor (CAR), and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class I alpha-2 domain allows the molecular basis of adenoviral infection to be investigated. Earlier work has shown that human airway epithelia are resistant to infection by adenovirus. Therefore, we examined the expression and localization of CAR and MHC Class I in an in vitro model of well differentiated, ciliated human airway epithelia. We found that airway epithelia express CAR and MHC Class I. However, neither receptor was present in the apical membrane; instead, both were polarized to the basolateral membrane. These findings explain the relative resistance to adenovirus infection from the apical surface. In contrast, when the virus was applied to the basolateral surface, gene transfer was much more efficient because of an interaction of adenovirus fiber with its receptors. In addition, when the integrity of the tight junctions was transiently disrupted, apically applied adenovirus gained access to the basolateral surface and enhanced gene transfer. These data suggest that the receptors required for efficient infection are not available on the apical surface, and interventions that allow access to the basolateral space where fiber receptors are located increase gene transfer efficiency. PMID:10187807

  13. Adenovirus type 5 interactions with human blood cells may compromise systemic delivery.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Mark; Onion, David; Green, Nicky K; Aslan, Kriss; Rajaratnam, Ratna; Bazan-Peregrino, Miriam; Phipps, Sue; Hale, Sarah; Mautner, Vivien; Seymour, Leonard W; Fisher, Kerry D

    2006-07-01

    Intravenous delivery of adenovirus vectors requires that the virus is not inactivated in the bloodstream. Serum neutralizing activity is well documented, but we show here that type 5 adenovirus also interacts with human blood cells. Over 90% of a typical virus dose binds to human (but not murine) erythrocytes ex vivo, and samples from a patient administered adenovirus in a clinical trial showed that over 98% of viral DNA in the blood was cell associated. In contrast, nearly all viral genomes in the murine bloodstream are free in the plasma. Adenovirus bound to human blood cells fails to infect A549 lung carcinoma cells, although dilution to below 1.7 x 10(7) blood cells/ml relieves this inhibition. Addition of blood cells can prevent infection by adenovirus that has been prebound to A549 cells. Adenovirus also associates with human neutrophils and monocytes ex vivo, particularly in the presence of autologous plasma, giving dose-dependent transgene expression in CD14-positive monocytes. Finally, although plasma with a high neutralizing titer (defined on A549 cells) inhibits monocyte infection, weakly neutralizing plasma can actually enhance monocyte transduction. This may increase antigen presentation following intravenous injection, while blood cell binding may both decrease access of the virus to extravascular targets and inhibit infection of cells to which the virus does gain access. PMID:16580883

  14. Adenovirus vectors targeting distinct cell types in the retina.

    PubMed

    Sweigard, J Harry; Cashman, Siobhan M; Kumar-Singh, Rajendra

    2010-04-01

    Purpose. Gene therapy for a number of retinal diseases necessitates efficient transduction of photoreceptor cells. Whereas adenovirus (Ad) serotype 5 (Ad5) does not transduce photoreceptors efficiently, previous studies have demonstrated improved photoreceptor transduction by Ad5 pseudotyped with Ad35 (Ad5/F35) or Ad37 (Ad5/F37) fiber or by the deletion of the RGD domain in the Ad5 penton base (Ad5DeltaRGD). However, each of these constructs contained a different transgene cassette, preventing the evaluation of the relative performance of these vectors, an important consideration before the use of these vectors in the clinic. The aim of this study was to evaluate these vectors in the retina and to attempt photoreceptor-specific transgene expression. Methods. Three Ad5-based vectors containing the same expression cassette were generated and injected into the subretinal space of adult mice. Eyes were analyzed for green fluorescence protein expression in flat-mounts, cross-sections, quantitative RT-PCR, and a modified stereological technique. A 257-bp fragment derived from the mouse opsin promoter was analyzed in the context of photoreceptor-specific transgene expression. Results. Each virus tested efficiently transduced the retinal pigment epithelium. The authors found no evidence that Ad5/F35 or Ad5/F37 transduced photoreceptors. Instead, they found that Ad5/F37 transduced Müller cells. Robust photoreceptor transduction by Ad5DeltaRGD was detected. Photoreceptor-specific transgene expression from the 257-bp mouse opsin promoter in the context of Ad5DeltaRGD vectors was found. Conclusions. Adenovirus vectors may be designed with tropism to distinct cell populations. Robust photoreceptor-specific transgene expression can be achieved in the context of Ad5DeltaRGD vectors. PMID:19892875

  15. Use of cidofovir in pediatric patients with adenovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathi, Lakshmi; Arnold, Alana; Jones, Sarah; Patterson, Al; Graham, Dionne; Harper, Marvin; Levy, Ofer

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adenoviruses contribute to morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised pediatric patients including stem cell and solid organ transplant recipients. Cidofovir (CDV), an antiviral compound approved by the FDA in 1996, is used for treatment of adenoviral (ADV) infections in immunocompromised patients despite concern of potential nephrotoxicity.   Methods: We conducted a retrospective 5-year review at Boston Children’s Hospital of 16 patients (mean age = 6.5 years) receiving 19 courses of CDV. During therapy all pertinent data elements were reviewed to characterize potential response to therapy and incidence of renal dysfunction.   Results: Of the 19 CDV courses prescribed, 16 courses (84%) were in patients who had a positive blood ADV Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) alone or in combination with positive ADV PCR/ Direct Immunofluorescence Assay (DFA) at another site. Respiratory symptoms with or without pneumonia were the most common presentation (10/19, 53%). In the majority of blood positive courses (10/16, 63%), viral clearance was also accompanied by clinical response. This was not the case in four courses where patients expired despite viral clearance, including one in which death was directly attributable to adenovirus. There was reversible renal dysfunction observed during the use of CDV. Conclusions:  CDV appeared safe and reasonably tolerated for treatment of ADV in this pediatric population and was associated with viral response and clinical improvement in the majority of patients but reversible renal dysfunction was a side effect. Further studies of the efficacy of CDV for immunocompromised children with ADV infection are warranted. PMID:27239277

  16. Human adenovirus type 8 epidemic keratoconjunctivitis with large corneal epithelial full-layer detachment: an endemic outbreak with uncommon manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yueh-Chang; Chen, Nancy; Huang, I-Tsong; Yang, Hui-Hua; Huang, Chin-Te; Chen, Li-Kuang; Sheu, Min-Muh

    2015-01-01

    Epidemic viral conjunctivitis is a highly contagious disease that is encountered year-round. The causative agents are mainly adenoviruses and enteroviruses. It occurs most commonly upon infection with subgroup D adenoviruses of types 8, 19, or 37. For common corneal involvement of human adenovirus type 8 epidemic keratoconjunctivitis, full-layer epithelial detachment is rarely seen. Herein, we report three cases of epidemic keratoconjunctivitis during an outbreak which manifested as large corneal epithelial full-layer detachment within a few days. The lesions healed without severe sequelae under proper treatment. The unique manifestation of this outbreak may indicate the evolution of human adenovirus type 8. PMID:26060391

  17. Retargeted oncolytic adenovirus displaying a single variable domain of camelid heavy-chain-only antibody in a fiber protein

    PubMed Central

    van Erp, Elisabeth A; Kaliberova, Lyudmila N; Kaliberov, Sergey A; Curiel, David T

    2015-01-01

    Conditionally replicative adenoviruses are promising agents for oncolytic virotherapy. Various approaches have been attempted to retarget adenoviruses to tumor-specific antigens to circumvent deficiency of receptor for adenoviral binding and to provide an additional level of tumor specificity. Functional incorporation of highly specific targeting molecules into the viral capsid can potentially retarget adenoviral infection. However, conventional antibodies are not compatible with the cytoplasmic adenovirus capsid synthesis. The goal of this study was to evaluate the utility of single variable domains derived from heavy chain camelid antibodies for retargeting of adenovirus infection. We have combined transcriptional targeting using a tumor-specific promoter with transductional targeting through viral capsid incorporation of antihuman carcinoembryonic antigen single variable domains. Obtained data demonstrated that employment of a single variable domain genetically incorporated into an adenovirus fiber increased specificity of infection and efficacy of replication of single variable domain-targeted oncolytic adenovirus. The double targeting, both transcriptional through the C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 promoter and transductional using the single variable domain, is a promising means to improve the therapeutic index for these advanced generation conditionally replicative adenoviruses. A successful strategy to transductional retargeting of oncolytic adenovirus infection has not been shown before and therefore we believe this is the first employment of transductional targeting using single variable domains derived from heavy chain camelid antibodies to enhance specificity of conditionally replicative adenoviruses. PMID:27119101

  18. Vaccines within vaccines: the use of adenovirus types 4 and 7 as influenza vaccine vectors.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Eric A

    2014-01-01

    Adenovirus Types 4 and 7 (Ad4 and Ad7) are associated with acute respiratory distress (ARD). In order to prevent widespread Ad-associated ARD (Ad-ARD) the United States military immunizes new recruits using a safe and effective lyophilized wildtype Ad4 and Ad7 delivered orally in an enteric-coated capsule. We cloned Ad4 and Ad7 and modified them to express either a GFP-Luciferase (GFPLuc) fusion gene or a centralized influenza H1 hemagglutinin (HA1-con). BALB/c mice were injected with GFPLuc expressing viruses intramuscularly (i.m.) and intranasally (i.n.). Ad4 induced significantly higher luciferase expression levels as compared with Ad7 by both routes. Ad7 transduction was restored using a human CD46+ transgenic mouse model. Mice immunized with serial dilutions of viruses expressing the HA1-con influenza vaccine gene were challenged with 100 MLD 50 of influenza virus. Ad4 protected BALB/c mice at a lower dose by i.m. immunization as compared with Ad7. Unexpectedly, there was no difference in protection by i.n. immunization. Although Ad7 i.m. transduction was restored in CD46+ transgenic mice, protection against influenza challenge required even higher doses as compared with the BALB/c mice. However, Ad7 i.n. immunized CD46+ transgenic mice were better protected as compared with Ad4. Interestingly, the restoration of Ad7 transduction in CD46+ mice did not increase vaccine efficacy and indicates that Ad7 may transduce a different subset of cells through alternative receptors in the absence of CD46. These data indicate that both Ad4 and Ad7 can effectively induce anti-H1N1 immunity against a heterologous challenge using a centralized H1 gene. Future studies in non-human primates or human clinical trials will determine the overall effectiveness of Ad4 and Ad7 as vaccines for influenza. PMID:24280656

  19. Simultaneous detection of astrovirus, rotavirus, reovirus and adenovirus type I in broiler chicken flocks.

    PubMed

    Roussan, D A; Shaheen, I A; Khawaldeh, G Y; Totanji, W S; Al-Rifai, R H

    2012-01-01

    Enteric diseases cause substantial economic losses to the poultry industry. Astroviruses, rotaviruses, reoviruses, and adenovirus type 1 have been reported as a significant cause of intestinal symptoms in poultry. In the present study, intestinal samples from 70 commercial broiler chicken flocks were examined for the presence of astroviruses, rotavirus, and reovirus by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and for the presence of group I adenovirus by polymerase chain reaction. Astroviruses were identified in 38.6% of samples tested. Both avian nephritis virus and chicken astrovirus were identified in the astrovirus positive flocks, where 74.1% of these flocks were positive for only one type of astrovirus, whereas, 25.9% of these flocks were positive for both types of astrovirus. Reoviruses, rotaviruses, and adenoviruses were identified in 21.4, 18.6, and 14.3% of these flocks, respectively. Concomitant infection with two or more viruses in the same flock were also prominent, where 5.7, 5.7, 2.9, 2.9, 1.4, and 1.4% of these flocks were positive with both astrovirus and rotavirus; astrovirus and adenovirus; astrovirus and reovirus; rotavirus and adenovirus; rotavirus and reovirus; and reovirus and adenovirus respectively. Moreover, 4.3 and 2.7% of these flocks were positive for astrovirus, reovirus, and adenovirus; and astrovirus, reovirus, and rotavirus, respectively. Further studies will focus on identifying specific viral factors or subtypes/subgroups associated with disease through pathogenesis studies, economic losses caused by infections and co-infections of these pathogens, and the costs and benefits of countermeasures. PMID:22844713

  20. An adenovirus linked to mortality and disease in long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis) in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hollmén, Tuula E.; Franson, J.C.; Flint, P.L.; Grand, J.B.; Lanctot, Richard B.; Docherty, D.E.; Wilson, H.M.

    2003-01-01

    An adenovirus was isolated from intestinal samples of two long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis) collected during a die-off in the Beaufort Sea off the north coast of Alaska in 2000. The virus was not neutralized by reference antiserum against known group I, II, or III avian adenoviruses and may represent a new serotype. The prevalence of the virus was determined in live-trapped long-tailed ducks at the mortality site and at a reference site 100 km away where no mortality was observed. Prevalence of adenovirus antibodies in serum samples at the mortality site was 86% compared to 10% at the reference site. Furthermore, 50% of cloacal swabs collected at the mortality site and only 7% of swabs from the reference site were positive for adenoviruses. In 2001, no mortality was observed at either of the study areas, and virus prevalence in both serum and cloacal samples was low, providing further evidence that the adenovirus was linked to the mortality event in 2000. The virus was used to infect long-tailed ducks under experimental conditions and resulted in lesions previously described for avian adenovirus infections and similar to those observed in long-tailed duck carcasses from the Beaufort Sea. The status of long-tailed ducks has recently become a concern in Alaska due to precipitous declines in breeding populations there since the mid-1970s. Our findings suggest that the newly isolated adenovirus is a disease agent and source of mortality in long-tailed ducks, and thus could be a contributing factor in population declines.

  1. Adenovirus type 7 associated with severe and fatal acute lower respiratory infections in Argentine children

    PubMed Central

    Carballal, Guadalupe; Videla, Cristina; Misirlian, Alicia; Requeijo, Paula V; Aguilar, María del Carmen

    2002-01-01

    Background Adenoviruses are the second most prevalent cause of acute lower respiratory infection of viral origin in children under four years of age in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical features and outcome of acute lower respiratory infection associated with different adenovirus genotypes in children. Methods Twenty-four cases of acute lower respiratory infection and adenovirus diagnosis reported in a pediatric unit during a two-year period were retrospectively reviewed. Adenovirus was detected by antigen detection and isolation in HEp-2 cells. Adenovirus DNA from 17 isolates was studied by restriction enzyme analysis with Bam HI and Sma I. Results Subgenus b was found in 82.3% of the cases, and subgenus c in 17.7%. Within subgenus b, only genotype 7 was detected, with genomic variant 7h in 85.7% (12/14) and genomic variant 7i in 14.3% (2/14). Mean age was 8.8 ±; 6 months, and male to female ratio was 3.8: 1. At admission, pneumonia was observed in 71% of the cases and bronchiolitis in 29%. Malnutrition occurred in 37% of the cases; tachypnea in 79%; chest indrawing in 66%; wheezing in 58%; apneas in 16%; and conjunctivitis in 29%. Blood cultures for bacteria and antigen detection of other respiratory viruses were negative. During hospitalization, fatality rate was 16.7% (4 /24). Of the patients who died, three had Ad 7h and one Ad 7i. Thus, fatality rate for adenovirus type 7 reached 28.6% (4/14). Conclusions These results show the predominance of adenovirus 7 and high lethality associated with the genomic variants 7h and 7i in children hospitalized with acute lower respiratory infection. PMID:12184818

  2. A Replicating Adenovirus Capsid Display Recombinant Elicits Antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum Sporozoites in Aotus nancymaae Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Karen, Kasey A.; Deal, Cailin; Adams, Robert J.; Nielsen, Carolyn; Ward, Cameron; Espinosa, Diego A.; Xie, Jane; Zavala, Fidel

    2014-01-01

    Decades of success with live adenovirus vaccines suggest that replication-competent recombinant adenoviruses (rAds) could serve as effective vectors for immunization against other pathogens. To explore the potential of a live rAd vaccine against malaria, we prepared a viable adenovirus 5 (Ad5) recombinant that displays a B-cell epitope from the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of Plasmodium falciparum on the virion surface. The recombinant induced P. falciparum sporozoite-neutralizing antibodies in mice. Human adenoviruses do not replicate in mice. Therefore, to examine immunogenicity in a system in which, as in humans, the recombinant replicates, we constructed a similar recombinant in an adenovirus mutant that replicates in monkey cells and immunized four Aotus nancymaae monkeys. The recombinant replicated in the monkeys after intratracheal instillation, the first demonstration of replication of human adenoviruses in New World monkeys. Immunization elicited antibodies both to the Plasmodium epitope and the Ad5 vector. Antibodies from all four monkeys recognized CSP on intact parasites, and plasma from one monkey neutralized sporozoites in vitro and conferred partial protection against P. falciparum sporozoite infection after passive transfer to mice. Prior enteric inoculation of two animals with antigenically wild-type adenovirus primed a response to the subsequent intratracheal inoculation, suggesting a route to optimizing performance. A vaccine is not yet available against P. falciparum, which induces the deadliest form of malaria and kills approximately one million children each year. The live capsid display recombinant described here may constitute an early step in a critically needed novel approach to malaria immunization. PMID:25368113

  3. A CD46-binding chimpanzee adenovirus vector as a vaccine carrier.

    PubMed

    Tatsis, Nia; Blejer, Ariella; Lasaro, Marcio O; Hensley, Scott E; Cun, Ann; Tesema, Lello; Li, Yan; Gao, Guang-Ping; Xiang, Zhi Q; Zhou, Dongming; Wilson, James M; Ertl, Hildegund C J

    2007-03-01

    A replication-defective chimeric vector based on the chimpanzee adenovirus serotype C1 was developed and tested as a vaccine carrier in mice. The AdC1 virus is closely related to human adenoviruses of subgroup B2 and uses CD46 for cell attachment. To overcome poor growth of E1-deleted AdC1 vectors on cell lines that provide the E1 of adenovirus of the human serotype 5 (AdHu5) virus in trans, the inverted terminal repeats and some of the early genes of AdC1 were replaced with those from AdC5, a chimpanzee origin adenovirus of subfamily E. The chimeric AdC1/C5 vector efficiently transduces CD46-expressing mouse dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro and initiates their maturation. Transduction of DCs in vivo is inefficient in CD46 transgenic mice. The AdC1/C5 vector induces transgene product-specific B- and CD8(+) T-cell responses in mice. Responses are slightly higher in wild-type mice than in CD46 transgenic mice. Transgene product-specific T-cell responses elicited by the AdC1/C5 vector can be increased by priming or boosting with a heterologous adenovirus vector. Pre-existing immunity to adenovirus of the common human serotype 5 does not affect induction of cell-mediated immune responses by the AdC1/C5 vector. This vector provides an additional tool in a repertoire of adenovirus-based vaccine vectors. PMID:17228314

  4. Genetic and Molecular Epidemiological Characterization of a Novel Adenovirus in Antarctic Penguins Collected between 2008 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Seo, Tae-Kun; No, Jin Sun; Kim, Hankyeom; Kim, Won-keun; Choi, Han-Gu; Kang, Sung-Ho; Song, Jin-Won

    2016-01-01

    Antarctica is considered a relatively uncontaminated region with regard to the infectious diseases because of its extreme environment, and isolated geography. For the genetic characterization and molecular epidemiology of the newly found penguin adenovirus in Antarctica, entire genome sequencing and annual survey of penguin adenovirus were conducted. The entire genome sequences of penguin adenoviruses were completed for two Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica) and two Gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua). The whole genome lengths and G+C content of penguin adenoviruses were found to be 24,630–24,662 bp and 35.5–35.6%, respectively. Notably, the presence of putative sialidase gene was not identified in penguin adenoviruses by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE-PCR) as well as consensus specific PCR. The penguin adenoviruses were demonstrated to be a new species within the genus Siadenovirus, with a distance of 29.9–39.3% (amino acid, 32.1–47.9%) in DNA polymerase gene, and showed the closest relationship with turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3) in phylogenetic analysis. During the 2008–2013 study period, the penguin adenoviruses were annually detected in 22 of 78 penguins (28.2%), and the molecular epidemiological study of the penguin adenovirus indicates a predominant infection in Chinstrap penguin population (12/30, 40%). Interestingly, the genome of penguin adenovirus could be detected in several internal samples, except the lymph node and brain. In conclusion, an analysis of the entire adenoviral genomes from Antarctic penguins was conducted, and the penguin adenoviruses, containing unique genetic character, were identified as a new species within the genus Siadenovirus. Moreover, it was annually detected in Antarctic penguins, suggesting its circulation within the penguin population. PMID:27309961

  5. Genetic and Molecular Epidemiological Characterization of a Novel Adenovirus in Antarctic Penguins Collected between 2008 and 2013.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Seo, Tae-Kun; No, Jin Sun; Kim, Hankyeom; Kim, Won-Keun; Choi, Han-Gu; Kang, Sung-Ho; Song, Jin-Won

    2016-01-01

    Antarctica is considered a relatively uncontaminated region with regard to the infectious diseases because of its extreme environment, and isolated geography. For the genetic characterization and molecular epidemiology of the newly found penguin adenovirus in Antarctica, entire genome sequencing and annual survey of penguin adenovirus were conducted. The entire genome sequences of penguin adenoviruses were completed for two Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica) and two Gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua). The whole genome lengths and G+C content of penguin adenoviruses were found to be 24,630-24,662 bp and 35.5-35.6%, respectively. Notably, the presence of putative sialidase gene was not identified in penguin adenoviruses by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE-PCR) as well as consensus specific PCR. The penguin adenoviruses were demonstrated to be a new species within the genus Siadenovirus, with a distance of 29.9-39.3% (amino acid, 32.1-47.9%) in DNA polymerase gene, and showed the closest relationship with turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3) in phylogenetic analysis. During the 2008-2013 study period, the penguin adenoviruses were annually detected in 22 of 78 penguins (28.2%), and the molecular epidemiological study of the penguin adenovirus indicates a predominant infection in Chinstrap penguin population (12/30, 40%). Interestingly, the genome of penguin adenovirus could be detected in several internal samples, except the lymph node and brain. In conclusion, an analysis of the entire adenoviral genomes from Antarctic penguins was conducted, and the penguin adenoviruses, containing unique genetic character, were identified as a new species within the genus Siadenovirus. Moreover, it was annually detected in Antarctic penguins, suggesting its circulation within the penguin population. PMID:27309961

  6. Impact of preexisting adenovirus vector immunity on immunogenicity and protection conferred with an adenovirus-based H5N1 influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Aseem; Singh, Neetu; Vemula, Sai V; Couëtil, Laurent; Katz, Jacqueline M; Donis, Ruben; Sambhara, Suryaprakash; Mittal, Suresh K

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of preexisting immunity to adenoviruses in the majority of the human population might adversely impact the development of adaptive immune responses against adenovirus vector-based vaccines. To address this issue, we primed BALB/c mice either intranasally (i.n.) or intramuscularly (i.m.) with varying doses of wild type (WT) human adenovirus subtype 5 (HAd5). Following the development of immunity against HAd5, we immunized animals via the i.n. or i.m. route of inoculation with a HAd vector (HAd-HA-NP) expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) and nucleoprotein (NP) of A/Vietnam/1203/04 (H5N1) influenza virus. The immunogenicity and protection results suggest that low levels of vector immunity (<520 virus-neutralization titer) induced by priming mice with up to 10(7) plaque forming units (p.f.u.) of HAd-WT did not adversely impact the protective efficacy of the vaccine. Furthermore, high levels of vector immunity (approximately 1500 virus-neutralization titer) induced by priming mice with 10(8) p.f.u. of HAd-WT were overcome by either increasing the vaccine dose or using alternate routes of vaccination. A further increase in the priming dose to 10(9) p.f.u. allowed only partial protection. These results suggest possible strategies to overcome the variable levels of human immunity against adenoviruses, leading to better utilization of HAd vector-based vaccines. PMID:22432020

  7. Development of replication-competent adenovirus for bladder cancer by controlling adenovirus E1a and E4 gene expression with the survivin promoter

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Ho Kyung; Seo, Jeong Bin; Nam, Jae-Kook; Jeong, Kyung-Chae; Shin, Seung-Pil; Kim, In-Hoo; Lee, Sang Don; Lee, Sang-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Survivin is a member of the inhibitors of apoptosis protein family. Here, we examined survivin expression and confirmed abundant survivin expression in bladder cancer cells. This expression pattern indicated that the transcriptional regulatory elements that control survivin expression could be utilized to discriminate cancer from normal cells. We therefore generated a novel adenovirus termed Ad5/35E1apsurvivinE4 with the following characteristics: 1) E1A and E4 protein expression was dependent on survivin promoter activity; 2) the green fluorescence protein gene was inserted into the genome under the control of the CMV promoter; 3) most of the E3 sequences were deleted, but the construct was still capable of expressing the adenovirus death protein with potent cytotoxic effects; and 4) the fiber knob was from serotype 35 adenovirus. As expected from the abundant survivin expression observed in bladder cancer cells, Ad5/35E1apsurvivinE4 replicated better in cancer cells than in normal cells by a factor of 106 to 102. Likewise, Ad5/35E1apsurvivinE4 exerted greater cytotoxic effects on all bladder cancer cell lines tested. Importantly, Ad5/35E1apsurvivinE4 inhibited the growth of Ku7-Luc orthotopic xenografts in nude mice. Taken together, Ad5/35E1apsurvivinE4 indicates that the survivin promoter may be utilized for the development of a replication-competent adenovirus to target bladder cancers. PMID:25015402

  8. The Dual Nature of Nek9 in Adenovirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Richard; Radko, Sandi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT To successfully replicate in an infected host cell, a virus must overcome sophisticated host defense mechanisms. Viruses, therefore, have evolved a multitude of devices designed to circumvent cellular defenses that would lead to abortive infection. Previous studies have identified Nek9, a cellular kinase, as a binding partner of adenovirus E1A, but the biology behind this association remains a mystery. Here we show that Nek9 is a transcriptional repressor that functions together with E1A to silence the expression of p53-inducible GADD45A gene in the infected cell. Depletion of Nek9 in infected cells reduces virus growth but unexpectedly enhances viral gene expression from the E2 transcription unit, whereas the opposite occurs when Nek9 is overexpressed. Nek9 localizes with viral replication centers, and its depletion reduces viral genome replication, while overexpression enhances viral genome numbers in infected cells. Additionally, Nek9 was found to colocalize with the viral E4 orf3 protein, a repressor of cellular stress response. Significantly, Nek9 was also shown to associate with viral and cellular promoters and appears to function as a transcriptional repressor, representing the first instance of Nek9 playing a role in gene regulation. Overall, these results highlight the complexity of virus-host interactions and identify a new role for the cellular protein Nek9 during infection, suggesting a role for Nek9 in regulating p53 target gene expression. IMPORTANCE In the arms race that exists between a pathogen and its host, each has continually evolved mechanisms to either promote or prevent infection. In order to successfully replicate and spread, a virus must overcome every mechanism that a cell can assemble to block infection. On the other hand, to counter viral spread, cells must have multiple mechanisms to stifle viral replication. In the present study, we add to our understanding of how the human adenovirus is able to circumvent cellular roadblocks

  9. [Generation and preliminary immunological efficacy of a recombinant human adenovirus-rabies virus glycoprotein].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Shou-Feng; Liu, Ye; Zhang, Fei; Zhang, Jin-Xia; Hu, Rong-Liang

    2011-09-01

    To construct a recombinant human adenovirus type 5 expressing glycoprotein (GP) of attenuated rabies virus SRV9 and testing immunological efficacy on the immunized mice. Open reading frame of rabies virus GP gene of SRV9 strain was cloned into the shuttle vector of adenovirus expression system in multiple cloning sites to construct the recombinant shuttle plasmid pacAd5 CMV-Gs9, cotransfection was performed into 293AD cells mediated by FuGENE Transfection Reagent with linearized backbone plasmid and recombinant shuttle plasmid, cell cultures were collected after CPE appearance and were identified by PCR and electronmicroscopy, virus titer was measured in 293AD cells. Kunming mice were intraperitoneally injected with 10(6) TCID50 adenovirus, blood for serum preparation was collected through caudal vein pre-immune and post-immune and tested for VNA appearance by fluorescent antibody virus neutralization test (FAVN) detection. Recombinant shuttle plasmid pacAd5 CMV-Gs9 was constructed correctly. A recombinant human adenovirus type 5 was obtained expressing GP protein of rabies virus SRV9. The virus titer reached 10(6) CFU/mL at the least. All mice developed a certain amount of the anti-rabies neutralizing antibody 14 days after intraperitoneal inoculation, while the effective protection rates were 90%. In conclusion, Recombinant adenovirus expressing the rabies virus GP was constructed successfully and a certain amount of neutralizing antibodies were induced in mice, which laid the material foundation for further development of new rabies vaccine. PMID:21998956

  10. Adenovirus and mycoplasma infection in an ornate box turtle (Terrapene ornata ornata) in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Szilvia L; Gál, János

    2009-07-01

    A female, adult ornate box turtle (Terrapene ornata ornata) with fatty liver was submitted for virologic examination in Hungary. Signs of an adenovirus infection including degeneration of the liver cells, enlarged nuclei and intranuclear inclusion bodies were detected by light microscopic examination. The presence of an adenovirus was later confirmed by obtaining partial sequence data from the adenoviral DNA-dependent DNA-polymerase. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that this novel chelonian adenovirus was distinct from previously described reptilian adenoviruses, not belonging to any of the recognized genera of the family Adenoviridae. As a part of the routine diagnostic procedure for chelonians the detection of herpes-, rana- and iridoviruses together with Mycoplasma spp. was attempted. Amplicons were generated by a general mycoplasma polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the 16S/23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) intergenic spacer region, as well as, a specific Mycoplasma agassizii PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene. Based on the analyses of partial sequences of the 16S rRNA gene, the Mycoplasma sp. of the ornate box turtle seemed to be identical with the recently described eastern box turtle (Terrapene carolina carolina) Mycoplasma sp. This is the first report of a novel chelonian adenovirus and a mycoplasma infection in an ornate box turtle (T. ornata ornata) in Europe. PMID:19375875

  11. Heterologous Immunity between Adenoviruses and Hepatitis C Virus: A New Paradigm in HCV Immunity and Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shakti; Vedi, Satish; Samrat, Subodh Kumar; Li, Wen; Kumar, Rakesh; Agrawal, Babita

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ad) are commonly used as vectors for gene therapy and/or vaccine delivery. Recombinant Ad vectors are being tested as vaccines for many pathogens. We have made a surprising observation that peptides derived from various hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigens contain extensive regions of homology with multiple adenovirus proteins, and conclusively demonstrate that adenovirus vector can induce robust, heterologous cellular and humoral immune responses against multiple HCV antigens. Intriguingly, the induction of this cross-reactive immunity leads to significant reduction of viral loads in a recombinant vaccinia-HCV virus infected mouse model, supporting their role in antiviral immunity against HCV. Healthy human subjects with Ad-specific pre-existing immunity demonstrated cross-reactive cellular and humoral immune responses against multiple HCV antigens. These findings reveal the potential of a previously uncharacterized property of natural human adenovirus infection to dictate, modulate and/or alter the course of HCV infection upon exposure. This intrinsic property of adenovirus vectors to cross-prime HCV immunity can also be exploited to develop a prophylactic and/or therapeutic vaccine against HCV. PMID:26751211

  12. Identification and Application of Neutralizing Epitopes of Human Adenovirus Type 55 Hexon Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xingui; Ma, Qiang; Jiang, Zaixue; Huang, Junfeng; Liu, Qian; Lu, Xiaomei; Luo, Qingming; Zhou, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Human adenovirus type 55 (HAdV55) is a newly identified re-emergent acute respiratory disease (ARD) pathogen with a proposed recombination of hexon gene between HAdV11 and HAdV14 strains. The identification of the neutralizing epitopes is important for the surveillance and vaccine development against HAdV55 infection. In this study, four type-specific epitope peptides of HAdV55 hexon protein, A55R1 (residues 138 to 152), A55R2 (residues 179 to 187), A55R4 (residues 247 to 259) and A55R7 (residues 429 to 443), were predicted by multiple sequence alignment and homology modeling methods, and then confirmed with synthetic peptides by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and neutralization tests (NT). Finally, the A55R2 was incorporated into human adenoviruses 3 (HAdV3) and a chimeric adenovirus rAd3A55R2 was successfully obtained. The chimeric rAd3A55R2 could induce neutralizing antibodies against both HAdV3 and HAdV55. This current study will contribute to the development of novel adenovirus vaccine candidate and adenovirus structural analysis. PMID:26516903

  13. Albumin-binding adenoviruses circumvent pre-existing neutralizing antibodies upon systemic delivery.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Luis Alfonso; Condezo, Gabriela N; Moreno, Rafael; Fajardo, Carlos Alberto; Arias-Badia, Marcel; San Martín, Carmen; Alemany, Ramon

    2016-09-10

    Recombinant adenoviruses are used as vaccines, gene therapy vectors, and oncolytic viruses. However, the efficacy of such therapies is limited by pre-existing neutralizing antibodies (NAbs), especially when the virus is administered systemically for a wider biodistribution or to reach multiple metastases. To protect adenovirus against NAbs we inserted an albumin-binding domain (ABD) in the main adenovirus capsid protein, the hexon. This domain binds serum albumin to shield the virus upon systemic administration. The ABD-modified adenoviruses bind human and mouse albumin and maintain the infectivity and replication capacity in presence of NAbs. In pre-immunized mice non-modified viruses are completely neutralized, whereas ABD-modified viruses preserve the ability to transduce target organs, induce oncolysis, or generate immune responses to expressed proteins. Our results indicate that albumin coating of the virus capsid represents an effective approach to evade pre-existing NAbs. This strategy has translational relevance in the use of adenovirus for gene therapy, cancer virotherapy, and vaccination. PMID:27388756

  14. Nitrogen Gas Plasma Generated by a Static Induction Thyristor as a Pulsed Power Supply Inactivates Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Toyokawa, Yoichi; Imanishi, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    Adenovirus is one of the most important causative agents of iatrogenic infections derived from contaminated medical devices or finger contact. In this study, we investigated whether nitrogen gas plasma, generated by applying a short high-voltage pulse to nitrogen using a static induction thyristor power supply (1.5 kilo pulse per second), exhibited a virucidal effect against adenoviruses. Viral titer was reduced by one log within 0.94 min. Results from detection of viral capsid proteins, hexon and penton, by Western blotting and immunochromatography were unaffected by the plasma treatment. In contrast, analysis using the polymerase chain reaction suggested that plasma treatment damages the viral genomic DNA. Reactive chemical products (hydrogen peroxide, nitrate, and nitrite), ultraviolet light (UV-A) and slight temperature elevations were observed during the operation of the gas plasma device. Viral titer versus intensity of each potential virucidal factor were used to identify the primary mechanism of disinfection of adenovirus. Although exposure to equivalent levels of UV-A or heat treatment did not inactivate adenovirus, treatment with a relatively low concentration of hydrogen peroxide efficiently inactivated the virus. Our results suggest the nitrogen gas plasma generates reactive chemical products that inactivate adenovirus by damaging the viral genomic DNA. PMID:27322066

  15. A Novel Vaccine Approach for Chagas Disease Using Rare Adenovirus Serotype 48 Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Farrow, Anitra L.; Peng, Binghao J.; Gu, Linlin; Krendelchtchikov, Alexandre; Matthews, Qiana L.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the increasing amount of people afflicted worldwide with Chagas disease and an increasing prevalence in the United States, there is a greater need to develop a safe and effective vaccine for this neglected disease. Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) is the most common adenovirus vector used for gene therapy and vaccine approaches, but its efficacy is limited by preexisting vector immunity in humans resulting from natural infections. Therefore, we have employed rare serotype adenovirus 48 (Ad48) as an alternative choice for adenovirus/Chagas vaccine therapy. In this study, we modified Ad5 and Ad48 vectors to contain T. cruzi’s amastigote surface protein 2 (ASP-2) in the adenoviral early gene. We also modified Ad5 and Ad48 vectors to utilize the “Antigen Capsid-Incorporation” strategy by adding T. cruzi epitopes to protein IX (pIX). Mice that were immunized with the modified vectors were able to elicit T. cruzi-specific humoral and cellular responses. This study indicates that Ad48-modified vectors function comparable to or even premium to Ad5-modified vectors. This study provides novel data demonstrating that Ad48 can be used as a potential adenovirus vaccine vector against Chagas disease. PMID:26978385

  16. Delivery of oncolytic adenovirus into the nucleus of tumorigenic cells by tumor microparticles for virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ran, Li; Tan, Xiaohua; Li, Yanchun; Zhang, Huafeng; Ma, Ruihua; Ji, Tiantian; Dong, Wenqian; Tong, Tong; Liu, Yuying; Chen, Degao; Yin, Xiaonan; Liang, Xiaoyu; Tang, Ke; Ma, Jingwei; Zhang, Yi; Cao, Xuetao; Hu, Zhuowei; Qin, Xiaofeng; Huang, Bo

    2016-05-01

    Oncolytic viruses have been utilized for the treatment of various cancers. However, delivery of the viral particles to tumor cells remains a major challenge. Microparticles (MP) are vesicle forms of plasma membrane fragments of 0.1-1 μm in size that are shed by cells. We have previously shown the delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs using tumor cell-derived MPs (T-MP). Here we report that T-MPs can be utilized as a unique carrier system to deliver oncolytic adenoviruses to human tumors, leading to highly efficient cytolysis of tumor cells needed for in vivo treatment efficacy. This T-MP-mediated oncolytic virotherapy approach holds multiple advantages, including: 1) delivery of oncolytic adenovirus by T-MPs is able to avoid the antiviral effect of host antibodies; 2) delivery of oncolytic adenovirus by T-MPs is not limited by virus-specific receptor that mediates the entry of virus into tumor cells; 3) T-MPs are apt at delivering oncolytic adenoviruses to the nucleus of tumor cells as well as to stem-like tumor-repopulating cells for the desired purpose of killing them. These findings highlight a novel oncolytic adenovirus delivery system with highly promising clinical applications. PMID:26950165

  17. Recombinant adenovirus of human p66Shc inhibits MCF-7 cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoshan; Xu, Rong; Lin, Yajun; Zhen, Yongzhan; Wei, Jie; Hu, Gang; Sun, Hongfan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to construct a human recombinant p66Shc adenovirus and to investigate the inhibition of recombinant p66Shc adenovirus on MCF-7 cells. The recombinant adenovirus expression vector was constructed using the Adeno-X Adenoviral System 3. Inhibition of MCF-7 cell proliferation was determined by MTT. Intracellular ROS was measured by DCFH-DA fluorescent probes, and 8-OHdG was detected by ELISA. Cell apoptosis and the cell cycle were assayed by flow cytometry. Western blot were used to observe protein expression. p66Shc expression was upregulated in 4 cell lines after infection. The inhibitory effect of p66Shc recombinant adenovirus on MCF-7 cells was accompanied by enhanced ROS and 8-OHdG. However, no significant differences were observed in the cell apoptosis rate. The ratio of the cell cycle G2/M phase showed a significant increase. Follow-up experiments demonstrated that the expressions of p53, p-p53, cyclin B1 and CDK1 were upregulated with the overexpression of p66Shc. The Adeno-X Adenoviral System 3 can be used to efficiently construct recombinant adenovirus containing p66Shc gene, and the Adeno-X can inhibit the proliferation of MCF-7 cells by inducing cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. These results suggested that p66Shc may be a key target for clinical cancer therapy. PMID:27530145

  18. Optimization and evaluation of a method to detect adenoviruses in river water.

    PubMed

    McMinn, Brian R; Korajkic, Asja; Grimm, Ann C

    2016-05-01

    Adenoviruses are often implicated in recreational water disease outbreaks but existing methods for their detection perform poorly within these matrices. In this study, small volume (100mL) concentration was used to identify processes that promoted recovery of adenovirus from river water. Several alternative secondary concentration techniques were investigated and compared to the baseline method consisting of primary concentration via filtration, followed by celite mediated secondary concentration. The alternative secondary concentrations included multiple filter elutions, soaking the filter for 15min prior to elution and concentration using pre-treated celite (river water, 1.5% and 3% milk) instead of a filter. Modifications of the viral nucleic acid extraction technique were also evaluated. Concentration using pre-treated celite and a modified extraction technique (10min boil and a 1h ProK incubation at 37°C) recovered significantly higher levels of adenovirus (P=0.001) than other methods tested. This optimized method increased recovery of spiked adenovirus (57±27%) compared to baseline method performance (4±3%) indicating that use of pre-treated celite as opposed to filtration significantly improves recovery. Application of the optimized concentration method to larger volume (1L) of river water resulted in similar recoveries (42±19%) underlying the utility of this method to detect adenovirus from environmental samples. PMID:26874286

  19. Technical aspects of using human adenovirus as a viral water quality indicator.

    PubMed

    Rames, Emily; Roiko, Anne; Stratton, Helen; Macdonald, Joanne

    2016-06-01

    Despite dramatic improvements in water treatment technologies in developed countries, waterborne viruses are still associated with many of cases of illness each year. These illnesses include gastroenteritis, meningitis, encephalitis, and respiratory infections. Importantly, outbreaks of viral disease from waters deemed compliant from bacterial indicator testing still occur, which highlights the need to monitor the virological quality of water. Human adenoviruses are often used as a viral indicator of water quality (faecal contamination), as this pathogen has high UV-resistance and is prevalent in untreated domestic wastewater all year round, unlike enteroviruses and noroviruses that are often only detected in certain seasons. Standard methods for recovering and measuring adenovirus numbers in water are lacking, and there are many variations in published methods. Since viral numbers are likely under-estimated when optimal methods are not used, a comprehensive review of these methods is both timely and important. This review critically evaluates how estimates of adenovirus numbers in water are impacted by technical manipulations, such as during adenovirus concentration and detection (including culturing and polymerase-chain reaction). An understanding of the implications of these issues is fundamental to obtaining reliable estimation of adenovirus numbers in water. Reliable estimation of HAdV numbers is critical to enable improved monitoring of the efficacy of water treatment processes, accurate quantitative microbial risk assessment, and to ensure microbiological safety of water. PMID:27065054

  20. Occurrence of thermotolerant Campylobacter spp. and adenoviruses in Finnish bathing waters and purified sewage effluents.

    PubMed

    Hokajärvi, Anna-Maria; Pitkänen, Tarja; Siljanen, Henri M P; Nakari, Ulla-Maija; Torvinen, Eila; Siitonen, Anja; Miettinen, Ilkka T

    2013-03-01

    A total of 50 Finnish bathing water samples and 34 sewage effluent samples originating from 17 locations were studied in the summers of 2006 and 2007. Campylobacter were present in 58% and adenoviruses in 12% of all bathing water samples; 53% of all sewage effluent samples were positive for Campylobacter spp. and 59% for adenoviruses. C. jejuni was the most common Campylobacter species found and human adenovirus serotype 41 was the most common identified adenovirus type. Bathing water temperature displayed a significant negative relationship with the occurrence of Campylobacter. One location had identical pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns of C. coli isolates in the bathing water and in sewage effluent, suggesting that sewage effluent was the source of C. coli at this bathing site. The counts of faecal indicator bacteria were not able to predict the presence of Campylobacter spp. or adenoviruses in the bathing waters. Thus the observed common presence of these pathogens in Finnish sewage effluents and bathing waters may represent a public health risk. The low water temperature in Finland may enhance the prevalence of Campylobacter in bathing waters. More attention needs to be paid to minimizing the concentrations of intestinal pathogens in bathing waters. PMID:23428555

  1. Inactivation of human adenovirus by sequential disinfection with an alternative UV technology and free chlorine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Keun; Shin, Gwy-Am

    2011-03-01

    There has been growing concern over human exposure to adenoviruses through drinking water due to the extreme resistance of human adenoviruses to the traditional UV technology (low-pressure (LP) UV). As an effort to develop an effective treatment strategy against human adenoviruses in drinking water, we determined the effectiveness of sequential disinfection with an alternative UV technology (medium-pressure (MP) UV) and free chlorine. Human adenovirus 2 (Ad2) was irradiated with a low dose of MP UV irradiation (10 mJ/cm(2)) through UV collimated apparatus and then exposed to a low dose of free chlorine (0.17 mg/L) at pH 8 and 5°C using a bench-scale chemical disinfection system. A significant inactivation (e.g. 4 log(10)) of Ad2 was achieved with the low doses of MP UV and free chlorine within a very short contact time (∼1.5 min) although there was no apparent synergistic effect on Ad2 between MP UV and free chlorine. Overall, it is likely that the sequential disinfection with UV irradiation and free chlorine should control the contamination of drinking water by human adenoviruses within practical doses of UV and free chlorine typically used in drinking water treatment processes. PMID:21301114

  2. Hyperplastic stomatitis and esophagitis in a tortoise (Testudo graeca) associated with an adenovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Morante, Beatriz; Pénzes, Judit J; Costa, Taiana; Martorell, Jaime; Martínez, Jorge

    2016-09-01

    A 2-year-old female, spur-thighed tortoise (Testudo graeca) was presented with poor body condition (1/5) and weakness. Fecal analysis revealed large numbers of oxyurid-like eggs, and radiographs were compatible with gastrointestinal obstruction. Despite supportive medical treatment, the animal died. At gross examination, an intestinal obstruction was confirmed. Histopathology revealed severe hyperplastic esophagitis and stomatitis with marked epithelial cytomegaly and enormous basophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies. Electron microscopy examination revealed a large number of 60-80 nm, nonenveloped, icosahedral virions arranged in crystalline arrays within nuclear inclusions of esophageal epithelial cells, morphologically compatible with adenovirus-like particles. PCR for virus identification was performed with DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. A nested, consensus pan-adenovirus PCR and sequencing analysis showed a novel adenovirus. According to phylogenetic calculations, it clustered to genus Atadenovirus in contrast with all other chelonian adenoviruses described to date. The present report details the pathologic findings associated with an adenovirus infection restricted to the upper digestive tract. PMID:27486139

  3. Hyaluronidase Expression by an Oncolytic Adenovirus Enhances Its Intratumoral Spread and Suppresses Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Guedan, Sonia; Rojas, Juan José; Gros, Alena; Mercade, Elena; Cascallo, Manel; Alemany, Ramon

    2010-01-01

    Successful virotherapy requires efficient virus spread within tumors. We tested whether the expression of hyaluronidase, an enzyme which dissociates the extracellular matrix (ECM), could enhance the intratumoral distribution of an oncolytic adenovirus and improve its therapeutic activity. As a proof of concept, we demonstrated that intratumoral coadministration of hyaluronidase in mice-bearing tumor xenografts improves the antitumor activity of an oncolytic adenovirus. Next, we constructed a replication-competent adenovirus expressing a soluble form of the human sperm hyaluronidase (PH20) under the control of the major late promoter (MLP) (AdwtRGD-PH20). Intratumoral treatment of human melanoma xenografts with AdwtRGD-PH20 resulted in degradation of hyaluronan (HA), enhanced viral distribution, and induced tumor regression in all treated tumors. Finally, the PH20 cDNA was inserted in an oncolytic adenovirus that selectively kills pRb pathway-defective tumor cells. The antitumoral activity of the novel oncolytic adenovirus expressing PH20 (ICOVIR17) was compared to that of the parental virus ICOVIR15. ICOVIR17 showed more antitumor efficacy following intratumoral and systemic administration in mice with prestablished tumors, along with an improved spread of the virus within the tumor. Importantly, a single intravenous dose of ICOVIR17 induced tumor regression in 60% of treated tumors. These results indicate that ICOVIR17 is a promising candidate for clinical testing. PMID:20442708

  4. Characterization of the knob domain of the adenovirus type 5 fiber protein expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Henry, L J; Xia, D; Wilke, M E; Deisenhofer, J; Gerard, R D

    1994-01-01

    The adenovirus fiber protein is used for attachment of the virus to a specific receptor on the cell surface. Structurally, the protein consists of a long, thin shaft that protrudes from the vertex of the virus capsid and terminates in a globular domain termed the knob. To verify that the knob is the domain which interacts with the cellular receptor, we have cloned and expressed the knob from adenovirus type 5 together with a single repeat of the shaft in Escherichia coli. The protein was purified by conventional chromatography and functionally characterized for its interaction with the adenovirus receptor. The recombinant knob domain bound about 4,700 sites per HeLa cell with an affinity of 3 x 10(9) M-1 and blocked adenovirus infection of human cells. Antibodies raised against the knob also blocked virus infection. By gel filtration and X-ray diffraction analysis of protein crystals, the knob was shown to consist of a homotrimer of 21-kDa subunits. The results confirm that the trimeric knob is the ligand for attachment to the adenovirus receptor. Images PMID:8035520

  5. Nitrogen Gas Plasma Generated by a Static Induction Thyristor as a Pulsed Power Supply Inactivates Adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Toyokawa, Yoichi; Imanishi, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    Adenovirus is one of the most important causative agents of iatrogenic infections derived from contaminated medical devices or finger contact. In this study, we investigated whether nitrogen gas plasma, generated by applying a short high-voltage pulse to nitrogen using a static induction thyristor power supply (1.5 kilo pulse per second), exhibited a virucidal effect against adenoviruses. Viral titer was reduced by one log within 0.94 min. Results from detection of viral capsid proteins, hexon and penton, by Western blotting and immunochromatography were unaffected by the plasma treatment. In contrast, analysis using the polymerase chain reaction suggested that plasma treatment damages the viral genomic DNA. Reactive chemical products (hydrogen peroxide, nitrate, and nitrite), ultraviolet light (UV-A) and slight temperature elevations were observed during the operation of the gas plasma device. Viral titer versus intensity of each potential virucidal factor were used to identify the primary mechanism of disinfection of adenovirus. Although exposure to equivalent levels of UV-A or heat treatment did not inactivate adenovirus, treatment with a relatively low concentration of hydrogen peroxide efficiently inactivated the virus. Our results suggest the nitrogen gas plasma generates reactive chemical products that inactivate adenovirus by damaging the viral genomic DNA. PMID:27322066

  6. Recombinant adenovirus of human p66Shc inhibits MCF-7 cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoshan; Xu, Rong; Lin, Yajun; Zhen, Yongzhan; Wei, Jie; Hu, Gang; Sun, Hongfan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to construct a human recombinant p66Shc adenovirus and to investigate the inhibition of recombinant p66Shc adenovirus on MCF-7 cells. The recombinant adenovirus expression vector was constructed using the Adeno-X Adenoviral System 3. Inhibition of MCF-7 cell proliferation was determined by MTT. Intracellular ROS was measured by DCFH-DA fluorescent probes, and 8-OHdG was detected by ELISA. Cell apoptosis and the cell cycle were assayed by flow cytometry. Western blot were used to observe protein expression. p66Shc expression was upregulated in 4 cell lines after infection. The inhibitory effect of p66Shc recombinant adenovirus on MCF-7 cells was accompanied by enhanced ROS and 8-OHdG. However, no significant differences were observed in the cell apoptosis rate. The ratio of the cell cycle G2/M phase showed a significant increase. Follow-up experiments demonstrated that the expressions of p53, p-p53, cyclin B1 and CDK1 were upregulated with the overexpression of p66Shc. The Adeno-X Adenoviral System 3 can be used to efficiently construct recombinant adenovirus containing p66Shc gene, and the Adeno-X can inhibit the proliferation of MCF-7 cells by inducing cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. These results suggested that p66Shc may be a key target for clinical cancer therapy. PMID:27530145

  7. Adenovirus as a carrier for the development of influenza virus-free avian influenza vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Tang, De-chu C; Zhang, Jianfeng; Toro, Haroldo; Shi, Zhongkai; Van Kampen, Kent R

    2009-01-01

    A long-sought goal during the battle against avian influenza is to develop a new generation of vaccines capable of mass immunizing humans as well as poultry (the major source of avian influenza for human infections) in a timely manner. Although administration of the currently licensed influenza vaccine is effective in eliciting protective immunity against seasonal influenza, this approach is associated with a number of insurmountable problems for preventing an avian influenza pandemic. Many of the hurdles may be eliminated by developing new avian influenza vaccines that do not require the propagation of an influenza virus during vaccine production. Replication-competent adenovirus-free adenovirus vectors hold promise as a carrier for influenza virus-free avian influenza vaccines owing to their safety profile and rapid manufacture using cultured suspension cells in a serum-free medium. Simple and efficient mass-immunization protocols, including nasal spray for people and automated in ovo vaccination for poultry, convey another advantage for this class of vaccines. In contrast to parenteral injection of adenovirus vector, the potency of adenovirus-vectored nasal vaccine is not appreciably interfered by pre-existing immunity to adenovirus. PMID:19348562

  8. A Novel Vaccine Approach for Chagas Disease Using Rare Adenovirus Serotype 48 Vectors.

    PubMed

    Farrow, Anitra L; Peng, Binghao J; Gu, Linlin; Krendelchtchikov, Alexandre; Matthews, Qiana L

    2016-03-01

    Due to the increasing amount of people afflicted worldwide with Chagas disease and an increasing prevalence in the United States, there is a greater need to develop a safe and effective vaccine for this neglected disease. Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) is the most common adenovirus vector used for gene therapy and vaccine approaches, but its efficacy is limited by preexisting vector immunity in humans resulting from natural infections. Therefore, we have employed rare serotype adenovirus 48 (Ad48) as an alternative choice for adenovirus/Chagas vaccine therapy. In this study, we modified Ad5 and Ad48 vectors to contain T. cruzi's amastigote surface protein 2 (ASP-2) in the adenoviral early gene. We also modified Ad5 and Ad48 vectors to utilize the "Antigen Capsid-Incorporation" strategy by adding T. cruzi epitopes to protein IX (pIX). Mice that were immunized with the modified vectors were able to elicit T. cruzi-specific humoral and cellular responses. This study indicates that Ad48-modified vectors function comparable to or even premium to Ad5-modified vectors. This study provides novel data demonstrating that Ad48 can be used as a potential adenovirus vaccine vector against Chagas disease. PMID:26978385

  9. Replication of type 5 adenovirus promotes middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae in the chinchilla model of otitis media.

    PubMed

    Murrah, Kyle A; Turner, Roberta L; Pang, Bing; Perez, Antonia C; Reimche, Jennifer L; King, Lauren B; Wren, John; Gandhi, Uma; Swords, W Edward; Ornelles, David A

    2015-03-01

    Adenoviral infection is a major risk factor for otitis media. We hypothesized that adenovirus promotes bacterial ascension into the middle ear through the disruption of normal function in the Eustachian tubes due to inflammation-induced changes. An intranasal infection model of the chinchilla was used to test the ability of type 5 adenovirus to promote middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae. The hyperinflammatory adenovirus mutant dl327 and the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP were used to test the role of inflammation and viral replication, respectively, in promotion of pneumococcal middle ear infection. Precedent infection with adenovirus resulted in a significantly greater incidence of middle ear disease by S. pneumoniae as compared to nonadenovirus infected animals. Infection with the adenovirus mutant dl327 induced a comparable degree of bacterial ascension into the middle ear as did infection with the wild-type virus. By contrast, infection with the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP resulted in less extensive middle ear infection compared to the wild-type adenovirus. We conclude that viral replication is necessary for adenoviral-induced pneumococcal middle ear disease. PMID:25251686

  10. Avian influenza in ovo vaccination with replication defective recombinant adenovirus in chickens: Vaccine potency, antibody persistence, and maternal antibody transfer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protective immunity against avian influenza (AI) can be elicited in chickens in a single-dose regimen by in ovo vaccination with a replication-competent adenovirus (RCA)-free human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad)-vector encoding the AI virus (AIV) hemagglutinin (HA). We evaluated vaccine potency, antibo...

  11. Persistence and reactivation of human adenoviruses in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Kosulin, K; Geiger, E; Vécsei, A; Huber, W-D; Rauch, M; Brenner, E; Wrba, F; Hammer, K; Innerhofer, A; Pötschger, U; Lawitschka, A; Matthes-Leodolter, S; Fritsch, G; Lion, T

    2016-04-01

    Reactivation of persistent human adenoviruses (HAdVs) is associated with high morbidity and mortality in paediatric haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. Although invasive HAdV infections mainly arise from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, the specific sites of HAdV persistence are not well characterised. We prospectively screened biopsies from 143 non-HSCT paediatric patients undergoing GI endoscopy and monitored serial stool specimens from 148 paediatric HSCT recipients for the presence of HAdV by real-time PCR. Persistence of HAdV in the GI tract was identified in 31% of children, with the highest prevalence in the terminal ileum. In situ hybridisation and immunohistochemistry identified HAdV persistence in lymphoid cells of the lamina propria, whereas biopsies from five transplant recipients revealed high numbers of replicating HAdV in intestinal epithelial cells. The prevalence of HAdV species, the frequencies of persistence in the GI tract and reactivations post transplant indicated a correlation of intestinal HAdV shedding pre-transplant with high risk of invasive infection. HAdV persistence in the GI tract is a likely origin of infectious complications in immunocompromised children. Intestinal lymphocytes represent a reservoir for HAdV persistence and reactivation, whereas the intestinal epithelium is the main site of viral proliferation preceding dissemination. The findings have important implications for assessing the risk of life-threatening invasive HAdV infections. PMID:26711435

  12. Modification of Antigen Impacts on Memory Quality after Adenovirus Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Colston, Julia M; Bolinger, Beatrice; Cottingham, Matthew G; Gilbert, Sarah; Klenerman, Paul

    2016-04-15

    The establishment of robust T cell memory is critical for the development of novel vaccines for infections and cancers. Classical memory generated by CD8(+)T cells is characterized by contracted populations homing to lymphoid organs. T cell memory inflation, as seen for example after CMV infection, is the maintenance of expanded, functional, tissue-associated effector memory cell pools. Such memory pools may also be induced after adenovirus vaccination, and we recently defined common transcriptional and phenotypic features of these populations in mice and humans. However, the rules that govern which epitopes drive memory inflation compared with classical memory are not fully defined, and thus it is not currently possible to direct this process. We used our adenoviral model of memory inflation to first investigate the role of the promoter and then the role of the epitope context in determining memory formation. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that conventional memory could be converted to inflationary memory by simple presentation of the Ag in the form of minigene vectors. When epitopes from LacZ and murine CMV that normally induce classical memory responses were presented as minigenes, they induced clear memory inflation. These data demonstrate that, regardless of the transgene promoter, the polypeptide context of a CD8(+)T cell epitope may determine whether classical or inflating memory responses are induced. The ability to direct this process by the use of minigenes is relevant to the design of vaccines and understanding of immune responses to pathogens. PMID:26944930

  13. Oncolytic Replication of E1b-Deleted Adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Pei-Hsin; Wechman, Stephen L.; McMasters, Kelly M.; Zhou, Heshan Sam

    2015-01-01

    Various viruses have been studied and developed for oncolytic virotherapies. In virotherapy, a relatively small amount of viruses used in an intratumoral injection preferentially replicate in and lyse cancer cells, leading to the release of amplified viral particles that spread the infection to the surrounding tumor cells and reduce the tumor mass. Adenoviruses (Ads) are most commonly used for oncolytic virotherapy due to their infection efficacy, high titer production, safety, easy genetic modification, and well-studied replication characteristics. Ads with deletion of E1b55K preferentially replicate in and destroy cancer cells and have been used in multiple clinical trials. H101, one of the E1b55K-deleted Ads, has been used for the treatment of late-stage cancers as the first approved virotherapy agent. However, the mechanism of selective replication of E1b-deleted Ads in cancer cells is still not well characterized. This review will focus on three potential molecular mechanisms of oncolytic replication of E1b55K-deleted Ads. These mechanisms are based upon the functions of the viral E1B55K protein that are associated with p53 inhibition, late viral mRNA export, and cell cycle disruption. PMID:26561828

  14. Oncolytic Replication of E1b-Deleted Adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Pei-Hsin; Wechman, Stephen L; McMasters, Kelly M; Zhou, Heshan Sam

    2015-11-01

    Various viruses have been studied and developed for oncolytic virotherapies. In virotherapy, a relatively small amount of viruses used in an intratumoral injection preferentially replicate in and lyse cancer cells, leading to the release of amplified viral particles that spread the infection to the surrounding tumor cells and reduce the tumor mass. Adenoviruses (Ads) are most commonly used for oncolytic virotherapy due to their infection efficacy, high titer production, safety, easy genetic modification, and well-studied replication characteristics. Ads with deletion of E1b55K preferentially replicate in and destroy cancer cells and have been used in multiple clinical trials. H101, one of the E1b55K-deleted Ads, has been used for the treatment of late-stage cancers as the first approved virotherapy agent. However, the mechanism of selective replication of E1b-deleted Ads in cancer cells is still not well characterized. This review will focus on three potential molecular mechanisms of oncolytic replication of E1b55K-deleted Ads. These mechanisms are based upon the functions of the viral E1B55K protein that are associated with p53 inhibition, late viralmRNAexport, and cell cycle disruption. PMID:26561828

  15. Magnesium-Dependent Interaction of PKR with Adenovirus VAI

    SciTech Connect

    K Launer -Felty; C Wong; A Wahid; G Conn; J Cole

    2011-12-31

    Protein kinase R (PKR) is an interferon-induced kinase that plays a pivotal role in the innate immunity pathway for defense against viral infection. PKR is activated to undergo autophosphorylation upon binding to RNAs that contain duplex regions. Activated PKR phosphorylates the {alpha}-subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2, thereby inhibiting protein synthesis in virus-infected cells. Viruses have evolved diverse PKR-inhibitory strategies to evade the antiviral response. Adenovirus encodes virus-associated RNA I (VAI), a highly structured RNA inhibitor that binds PKR but fails to activate. We have characterized the stoichiometry and affinity of PKR binding to define the mechanism of PKR inhibition by VAI. Sedimentation velocity and isothermal titration calorimetry measurements indicate that PKR interactions with VAI are modulated by Mg{sup 2+}. Two PKR monomers bind in the absence of Mg{sup 2+}, but a single monomer binds in the presence of divalent ion. Known RNA activators of PKR are capable of binding multiple PKR monomers to allow the kinase domains to come into close proximity and thus enhance dimerization. We propose that VAI acts as an inhibitor of PKR because it binds and sequesters a single PKR in the presence of divalent cation.

  16. Non-classical export of an adenovirus structural protein.

    PubMed

    Trotman, Lloyd C; Achermann, Dominik P; Keller, Stephan; Straub, Monika; Greber, Urs F

    2003-06-01

    The icosahedral capsids of Adenoviruses (Ads) consist of the hexon and stabilizing proteins building the facettes, and of the vertex protein penton base (Pb) anchoring the protruding fibers. The fibers bind to the Coxsackie virus B Ad cell surface receptor (CAR) and Pb to integrins. Here we describe a novel property of the Ad2 Pb. Pb was found to leave the infected cell and, upon exit, it attached to the surrounding noninfected cells forming a radial gradient with highest Pb levels on cells adjacent to the infected cell. The producer cells remained intact until at least 30 h post infection. At this point, Pb was not recovered from the extracellular medium, suggesting that its cell-cell spread might not involve free Pb. When viral particles were released at late stages of infection, soluble Pb was found in the extracellular medium and it randomly bound to noninfected cells. Nonlytic export of Pb occurred upon transient transfection with plasmid DNA, but plasmid-encoded fiber was not exported, indicating that cell-cell spread of Pb is autonomous of infection. Pb export was not affected by Brefeldin A-induced disruption of the Golgi apparatus, suggesting that it occurred via a nonclassical mechanism. Interestingly, the coexpression of Pb and fiber leads to both Pb and fiber export, termed 'protein abduction'. We suggest that fiber abduction might support viral dissemination in infected tissues by interfering with tissue integrity. PMID:12753648

  17. Phylogenomic evidence for recombination of adenoviruses in wild gorillas.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Eileen; Pauly, Maude; Robbins, Martha; Gray, Maryke; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Nishuli, Radar; Boji Mungu-Akonkwa, Dieu-Donné; Leendertz, Fabian H; Ehlers, Bernhard

    2015-10-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) of species Human mastadenovirus B (HAdV-B) are genetically highly diverse and comprise several pathogenic types. AdVs closely related to members of HAdV-B infect African great apes and the evolutionary origin of HAdV-B has recently been determined in ancient gorillas. Genetic evidence for intra- and inter-species recombination has been obtained for AdVs of humans and captive great apes, but evidence from wild great apes is lacking. In this study, potential HAdV-B members of wild Eastern gorillas were analysed for evidence of recombination. One near-complete genome was amplified from primary sample material and sequenced, and from another six individuals genome fragments were obtained. In phylogenomic analysis, their penton base, pVII-pVI, hexon and fiber genes were compared with those of all publicly available HAdV-B full-genome sequences of humans and captive great apes. Evidence for intra-species recombination between different HAdV-B members of wild gorillas as well as between HAdV-B members of chimpanzees and gorillas was obtained. Since zoonotic AdVs have been reported to cause respiratory outbreaks in both humans and monkeys, and humans in West and Central Africa frequently hunt and butcher primates thereby increasing the chance of zoonotic transmission, such HAdV-B recombinants might widen the pool of potential human pathogens. PMID:26219820

  18. Phylogenomic characterization of California sea lion adenovirus-1.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Hinojosa, Galaxia; Gulland, Frances M D; Goldstein, Tracey; Venn-Watson, Stephanie; Rivera, Rebecca; Waltzek, Thomas B; Salemi, Marco; Wellehan, James F X

    2015-04-01

    Significant adenoviral diversity has been found in humans, but in domestic and wild animals the number of identified viruses is lower. Here we present the complete genome of a recently discovered mastadenovirus, California sea lion adenovirus 1 (CSLAdV-1) isolated from California sea lions (Zalophus californianus), an important pathogen associated with hepatitis in pinnipeds. The genome of this virus has the typical mastadenoviral structure with some notable differences at the carboxy-terminal end, including a dUTPase that does not cluster with other mastadenoviral dUTPases, and a fiber that shows similarity to a trans-sialidase of Trypanosoma cruzi and choline-binding protein A (CbpA) of Streptococcus pneumoniae. The GC content is low (36%), and phylogenetic analyses placed the virus near the root of the clade infecting laurasiatherian hosts in the genus Mastadenovirus. These findings support the hypothesis that CSLAdV-1 in California sea lions represents a host jump from an unknown mammalian host in which it is endemic. PMID:25660039

  19. Prevalence of neutralising antibodies against adenoviruses in lizards and snakes.

    PubMed

    Ball, Inna; Ofner, Sabine; Funk, Richard S; Griffin, Chris; Riedel, Ulf; Möhring, Jens; Marschang, Rachel E

    2014-10-01

    Adenoviruses (AdVs) are relatively common in lizards and snakes, and several genetically distinct AdVs have been isolated in cell culture. The aims of this study were to examine serological relationships among lizard and snake AdVs and to determine the frequency of AdV infections in these species. Isolates from a boa constrictor (Boa constrictor), a corn snake (Pantherophis gutattus) and a central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps), and two isolates from helodermatid lizards (Heloderma horridum and H. suspectum) were used in neutralisation tests for the detection of antibodies in plasma from 263 lizards from seven families (including 12 species) and from 141 snakes from four families (including 28 species) from the USA and Europe. Most lizard and snake samples had antibodies against a range of AdV isolates, indicating that AdV infection is common among these squamates. Neutralisation tests with polyclonal antibodies raised in rabbits demonstrated serological cross-reactivity between both helodermatid lizard isolates. However, squamate plasma showed different reactions to each of these lizard isolates in neutralisation tests. PMID:25163614

  20. Adenovirus type 2 encoded early 11 kDa protein

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, S.V.K.N.; Kapoor, Q.S.

    1986-05-01

    Several adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) encoded early proteins have been identified in viral infected human KB cells. These proteins are of great interest as they play key roles in cell transformation, viral DNA synthesis and gene expression. They have partially purified an AD2 encoded early polypeptide of an apparent molecular weight of 11 kilodaltons from the nuclei of viral infected cells labelled with /sup 35/S-methionine. After DNA removal from the nuclear extracts, the polypeptide was isolated using DEAE-Sephacel anion exchange and Biogel P-10 gel filtration columns. This simple two step procedure yielded several fold purification of the polypeptide. Antisera raised in mice against an Ad2 transformed rat cell line 8617 was found to immunoprecipitate the 11 kDa polypeptide from the nuclear extract of Ad2 infected KB cells. After relating this protein to an open reading frame of an Ad2 early gene block by matching the amino acid sequences to the nucleotide sequences of early genes, they plan to functionally characterize this protein by using monoclonal antibodies in in vivo and in vitro experiments.

  1. [Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis following adenovirus and respiratory syncytial virus infection].

    PubMed

    de Suremain, A; Somrani, R; Bourdat-Michel, G; Pinel, N; Morel-Baccard, C; Payen, V

    2015-05-01

    Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) is responsible for nearly 10% of acute renal failure (ARF) cases in children. It is mostly drug-induced, but in a few cases viruses are involved, probably by an indirect mechanism. An immune-competent 13-month-old boy was admitted to the intensive care unit for severe ARF with anuria in a context of fever, cough, and rhinorrhea lasting 1 week. The kidney biopsy performed early brought out tubulointerstitial damage with mild infiltrate of lymphocytes, without any signs of necrosis. There were no virus inclusion bodies, no interstitial hemorrhage, and no glomerular or vascular damage. Other causes of TIN were excluded: there was no biological argument for an immunological, immune, or drug-induced cause. Adenovirus (ADV) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) were positive in respiratory multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in nasal aspirate but not in blood, urine, and renal tissue. The patient underwent dialysis for 10 days but the response to corticosteroid therapy was quickly observed within 48 h. The mechanism of TIN associated with virus infection is unknown. However, it may be immune-mediated to be able to link severe renal dysfunction and ADV and/or RSV invasion of the respiratory tract. PMID:25842199

  2. mRNAs from human adenovirus 2 early region 4.

    PubMed Central

    Virtanen, A; Gilardi, P; Näslund, A; LeMoullec, J M; Pettersson, U; Perricaudet, M

    1984-01-01

    The molecular structure of the mRNAs from early region 4 of human adenovirus 2 has been studied by Northern blot analysis, S1 nuclease analysis, and sequence analysis of cDNA clones. The results make it possible to identify four different splice donor sites and six different splice acceptor sites. The structure of 12 different mRNAs can be deduced from the analysis. The mRNAs have identical 5' and 3' ends and are thus likely to be processed from a common mRNA precursor by differential splicing. The different mRNA species are formed by the removal of one to three introns, and they all carry a short 5' leader segment. The introns appear to serve two functions; they either place a 5' leader segment in juxtaposition with an open reading frame or fuse two open translational reading frames. The early region 4 mRNAs can encode at least seven unique polypeptides. Images PMID:6088804

  3. Falcon adenovirus infection in breeding Taita falcons (Falco fasciinucha).

    PubMed

    Dean, Jason; Latimer, Kenneth S; Oaks, J Lindsay; Schrenzel, Mark; Redig, Patrick T; Wünschmann, Arno

    2006-05-01

    Four female and 3 male Taita falcons (Falco fasciinucha) out of a breeding colony of 14 Taita falcons (7 pairs) died during the breeding season after showing lethargy and anorexia for 1 to 2 days. All animals were submitted for necropsy. Gross lesions in the female falcons were characterized by anemia secondary to marked hemorrhage into the ovary and oviduct, serofibrinous effusion into the cardioabdominal cavity and serosal petechiae. In addition, marked necrotizing splenitis and pulmonary hemorrhage were present. Histologically, the female falcons had mild necrotizing hepatitis with numerous intranuclear inclusion bodies and necrotizing splenitis with rare inclusion bodies. There were no gross lesions in the male falcons, and the histological lesions were characterized by urate deposition and rare intranuclear inclusion bodies in the renal tubular epithelial cells. Adenoviral particles were found by electron microscopy in the cloacal contents of the female Taita falcons but not in the male falcons. DNA in situ hybridization revealed widespread aviadenoviral nucleic acid within the nuclei of hepatocytes, renal tubular epithelial cells, and adrenal cells in the female falcons but no aviadenoviral nucleic acid in 1 male falcon and only a low quantity of adenoviral nucleic acid in the liver and kidney of another male Taita falcon. PCR amplified aviadenoviral DNA in the liver and intestine of all Taita falcons. The amplicons were sequenced, and the virus was identified as falcon adenovirus. The deaths of the female and male birds were attributed to the aviadenovirus infection. PMID:16789719

  4. An adenovirus associated with intestinal impaction and mortality of male eiders (Somateria mollissima) in the Baltic Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hollmén, Tuula E.; Franson, J.C.; Kilpi, Mikael; Docherty, D.E.; Myllys, V.

    2003-01-01

    We examined 10 common eider (Somateria mollissima) males found dead in 1998 during a die-off in the northern Baltic Sea off the southwestern coast of Finland. We diagnosed impaction of the posterior small intestine with mucosal necrosis as the cause of death in all 10 and isolated adenoviruses from cloacal samples of six birds. The adenovirus isolates were not neutralized by reference antisera to group I, II, or III avian adenoviruses. Cloacal swabs from 22 apparently healthy eider females nesting at the mortality area were negative for viruses. An adenovirus isolated from one of the eiders caused clinical signs of illness and gastrointestinal pathology in experimentally infected mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings. These findings suggest that the adenovirus contributed to the mortality of common eider males in the Finnish archipelago.

  5. Permissive growth of human adenovirus type 4 vaccine strain-based vector in porcine cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dong-Sheng; Li, Xiao-Jing; Wan, Wen-Yan; Li, Hong-Jie; Wang, Xiao-Xue; Yang, Xia; Li, Yong-Tao; Chang, Hong-Tao; Chen, Lu; Wang, Chuan-Qing; Zhao, Jun

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, there has been considerable interest in using adenoviruses as live vectors to develop recombinant vaccines. Previous studies have demonstrated the safety and effectiveness of HIV/SIV and influenza vaccine candidates based on human adenovirus type 4 (Ad4) replication-competent vectors in rhesus macaque and human model. To explore the possibility of human Ad4 vaccine strain used as a vector in developing porcine vaccines, the growth properties of replication-competent human Ad4 vaccine strain recombinant encoding EGFP in different porcine cell lines were investigated. All tested cell lines are permissive for Ad4 vaccine strain vector with varied replication efficiency. Thus, human Ad4 based vectors would be promising supplement to adenovirus vectors as a delivery vehicle for recombinant vaccines in swine industry. PMID:26850542

  6. Protective avian influenza in ovo vaccination with non-replicating human adenovirus vector.

    PubMed

    Toro, Haroldo; Tang, De-chu C; Suarez, David L; Sylte, Matt J; Pfeiffer, Jennifer; Van Kampen, Kent R

    2007-04-12

    Protective immunity against avian influenza virus was elicited in chickens by single-dose in ovo vaccination with a non-replicating human adenovirus vector encoding an H5N9 avian influenza virus hemagglutinin. Vaccinated chickens were protected against both H5N1 (89% hemagglutinin homology; 68% protection) and H5N2 (94% hemagglutinin homology; 100% protection) highly pathogenic avian influenza virus challenges. This vaccine can be mass-administered using available robotic in ovo injectors which provide a major advantage over current vaccination regimens. In addition, this class of adenovirus-vectored vaccines can be produced rapidly with improved safety since they do not contain any replication-competent adenoviruses. Furthermore, this mode of vaccination is compatible with epidemiological surveys of natural avian influenza virus infections. PMID:17055126

  7. Reference equine antisera to 33 human adenovirus types: homologous and heterologous titers.

    PubMed Central

    Hierholzer, J C; Gamble, W C; Dowdle, W R

    1975-01-01

    Equine antisera to human adenovirus types 1 to 33 were prepared and evaluated by hemagglutination-inhibition and serum neutralization tests. Detailed data on the potency and purity of the immunizing antigens were tabulated as one means of evaluating the antisera. Most of the 52 hemagglutination-inhibition and 25 serum neutralization major or minor heterotypic responses among the equine antisera were observed at similar levels in previous studies with rabbit antisera and appeared to represent genuine antigenic relationships among the human adenoviruses. Equine antisera to human adenoviruses 1 to 33 and a similarly packaged normal horse serum served as lots of fully tested sera for definitive typing of isolates and as reference standards for evaluating other antisera. PMID:1236869

  8. Protection of non-human primates against rabies with an adenovirus recombinant vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Z.Q.; Greenberg, L.; Ertl, H.C.; Rupprecht, C.E.

    2014-02-15

    Rabies remains a major neglected global zoonosis. New vaccine strategies are needed for human rabies prophylaxis. A single intramuscular immunization with a moderate dose of an experimental chimpanzee adenovirus (Ad) vector serotype SAd-V24, also termed AdC68, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, resulted in sustained titers of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and protection against a lethal rabies virus challenge infection in a non-human primate model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the recombinant Ad-rabies vector for further consideration in human clinical trials. - Highlights: • Pre-exposure vaccination with vaccine based on a chimpanzee derived adenovirus protects against rabies. • Protection is sustained. • Protection is achieved with single low-dose of vaccine given intramuscularly. • Protection is not affected by pre-existing antibodies to common human serotypes of adenovirus.

  9. Attachment and Detachment Behaviour of Adenovirus and Surrogates in Fine Granular Limestone Aquifer Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Margaret; Blaschke, Alfred Paul; Kirschner, Alexander; Farnleitner, Andreas; Sommer, Regina; Sidhu, Jatinder

    2015-04-01

    Comparison of transport of virus surrogates to the pathogenic virus is necessary to understand the differences between the virus and surrogate. Since experiments using pathogenic viruses cannot be done in the field, laboratory tests using flow through soil columns are used. Adenovirus, nanoparticles, PRD1 and MS2 bacteriophages were tested in fine granular limestone aquifer material taken from a borehole at a managed aquifer recharge site in Adelaide, Southern Australia. Results show that PRD1 is the most appropriate surrogate for adenovirus in an aquifer dominated by calcite material, although PRD1 did not mimic the detachment behaviour of adenovirus successfully under high pH conditions. It was also found that the charge of the colloid is not a dominant removal mechanism in this system. Implications from this study could influence how field tests using bacteriophages and nanoparticles are interpreted.

  10. Gene Delivery by Subconjunctival Injection of Adenovirus in Rats: A Study of Local Distribution, Transgene Duration and Safety

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jia Hui; Tsai, Pei-Jhen; Tsai, Han-En; Sheu, Shwu-Jiuan; Lin, Hsiu-Chen; Dusting, Gregory J.; Tai, Ming-Hong; Bee, Youn-Shen

    2015-01-01

    Subconjunctival injection is a minimally invasive route for gene delivery to ocular tissues, but has traditionally been limited to use in the cornea. The accurate ocular distribution of virus has not, however, been previously investigated. Adenovirus is an attractive gene vector as it can deliver large genes and allow for short-term gene expression, but how safe it is when delivered via subconjunctival injection remains to be established. We have characterized the bio-distribution and safety of subconjunctivally administered adenovirus in Brown Norway rats. The bio-distribution and transgene duration of adenovirus carrying luciferase gene (Ad-Luci) at various time intervals were evaluated via bioluminescence imaging after subconjunctival injection. Adenovirus carrying a reporter gene, β-galactosidase (Ad-LacZ) or hrGFP (Ad-hrGFP) was administered subconjunctivally and the viral distribution in various ocular tissues was assessed by histological analysis and quantitative PCR (qPCR). Hepatic damage was assessed by biochemical and immunohistological analysis with TUNEL stain. Systemic immunogenicity was assessed by measuring serum level of TNF-α via ELISA, 2 hours and 14 days after administration of adenovirus. Retinal function was examined by electroretinography. Subconjunctival injection of Ad-Luci induced luciferase expression in the injected eyes within 24 hours, for at least 64 days. Histological analysis showed adenovirus distributed across anterior and posterior ocular tissues. qPCR demonstrated different amounts of adenovirus in different ocular tissues, with the highest amounts closest to the injection site Unlike the intravenous route, subconjunctivally delivered adenovirus did not elicit any detectable hepatic injury or systemic immunogenicity. Retinal function was unaffected by adenovirus irrespective of administration route. In conclusion, an adenoviral vector administered subconjunctivally can infiltrate into different ocular tissues and lead to short

  11. Dicer functions as an antiviral system against human adenoviruses via cleavage of adenovirus-encoded noncoding RNA

    PubMed Central

    Machitani, Mitsuhiro; Sakurai, Fuminori; Wakabayashi, Keisaku; Tomita, Kyoko; Tachibana, Masashi; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    In various organisms, including nematodes and plants, RNA interference (RNAi) is a defense system against virus infection; however, it is unclear whether RNAi functions as an antivirus system in mammalian cells. Rather, a number of DNA viruses, including herpesviruses, utilize post-transcriptional silencing systems for their survival. Here we show that Dicer efficiently suppresses the replication of adenovirus (Ad) via cleavage of Ad-encoding small RNAs (VA-RNAs), which efficiently promote Ad replication via the inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation, to viral microRNAs (mivaRNAs). The Dicer knockdown significantly increases the copy numbers of VA-RNAs, leading to the efficient inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation and the subsequent promotion of Ad replication. Conversely, overexpression of Dicer significantly inhibits Ad replication. Transfection with mivaRNA does not affect eIF2α phosphorylation or Ad replication. These results indicate that Dicer-mediated processing of VA-RNAs leads to loss of activity of VA-RNAs for enhancement of Ad replication and that Dicer functions as a defence system against Ad in mammalian cells. PMID:27273616

  12. Expression of an engineered soluble coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor by a dimeric AAV9 vector inhibits adenovirus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Röger, C; Pozzuto, T; Klopfleisch, R; Kurreck, J; Pinkert, S; Fechner, H

    2015-06-01

    Immunosuppressed (IS) patients, such as recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, occasionally develop severe and fatal adenovirus (Ad) infections. Here, we analyzed the potential of a virus receptor trap based on a soluble coxsackievirus and Ad receptor (sCAR) for inhibition of Ad infection. In vitro, a dimeric fusion protein, sCAR-Fc, consisting of the extracellular domain of CAR and the Fc portion of human IgG1 and a monomeric sCAR lacking the Fc domain, were expressed in cell culture. More sCAR was secreted into the cell culture supernatant than sCAR-Fc, but it had lower Ad neutralization activity than sCAR-Fc. Further investigations showed that sCAR-Fc reduced the Ad infection by a 100-fold and Ad-induced cytotoxicity by ~20-fold. Not only was Ad infection inhibited by sCAR-Fc applied prior to infection, it also inhibited infection when used to treat ongoing Ad infection. In vivo, sCAR-Fc was delivered to IS mice by an AAV9 vector, resulting in persistent and high (>40 μg ml(-1)) sCAR-Fc serum levels. The sCAR-Fc serum concentration was sufficient to significantly inhibit hepatic and cardiac wild-type Ad5 infection. Treatment with sCAR-Fc did not induce side effects. Thus, sCAR-Fc virus receptor trap may be a promising novel therapeutic for treatment of Ad infections. PMID:25786873

  13. NF-κB promotes leaky expression of adenovirus genes in a replication-incompetent adenovirus vector

    PubMed Central

    Machitani, M.; Sakurai, F.; Wakabayashi, K.; Nakatani, K.; Shimizu, K.; Tachibana, M.; Mizuguchi, H.

    2016-01-01

    The replication-incompetent adenovirus (Ad) vector is one of the most promising vectors for gene therapy; however, systemic administration of Ad vectors results in severe hepatotoxicities, partly due to the leaky expression of Ad genes in the liver. Here we show that nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) mediates the leaky expression of Ad genes from the Ad vector genome, and that the inhibition of NF-κB leads to the suppression of Ad gene expression and hepatotoxicities following transduction with Ad vectors. Activation of NF-κB by recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α significantly enhanced the leaky expression of Ad genes. More than 50% suppression of the Ad gene expression was found by inhibitors of NF-κB signaling and siRNA-mediated knockdown of NF-κB. Similar results were found when cells were infected with wild-type Ad. Compared with a conventional Ad vector, an Ad vector expressing a dominant-negative IκBα (Adv-CADNIκBα), which is a negative regulator of NF-κB, mediated approximately 70% suppression of the leaky expression of Ad genes in the liver. Adv-CADNIκBα did not induce apparent hepatotoxicities. These results indicate that inhibition of NF-κB leads to suppression of Ad vector-mediated tissue damages via not only suppression of inflammatory responses but also reduction in the leaky expression of Ad genes. PMID:26814140

  14. Detection and analysis of six lizard adenoviruses by consensus primer PCR provides further evidence of a reptilian origin for the atadenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Wellehan, James F X; Johnson, April J; Harrach, Balázs; Benkö, Mária; Pessier, Allan P; Johnson, Calvin M; Garner, Michael M; Childress, April; Jacobson, Elliott R

    2004-12-01

    A consensus nested-PCR method was designed for investigation of the DNA polymerase gene of adenoviruses. Gene fragments were amplified and sequenced from six novel adenoviruses from seven lizard species, including four species from which adenoviruses had not previously been reported. Host species included Gila monster, leopard gecko, fat-tail gecko, blue-tongued skink, Tokay gecko, bearded dragon, and mountain chameleon. This is the first sequence information from lizard adenoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that these viruses belong to the genus Atadenovirus, supporting the reptilian origin of atadenoviruses. This PCR method may be useful for obtaining templates for initial sequencing of novel adenoviruses. PMID:15542689

  15. Detection and Analysis of Six Lizard Adenoviruses by Consensus Primer PCR Provides Further Evidence of a Reptilian Origin for the Atadenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Wellehan, James F. X.; Johnson, April J.; Harrach, Balázs; Benkö, Mária; Pessier, Allan P.; Johnson, Calvin M.; Garner, Michael M.; Childress, April; Jacobson, Elliott R.

    2004-01-01

    A consensus nested-PCR method was designed for investigation of the DNA polymerase gene of adenoviruses. Gene fragments were amplified and sequenced from six novel adenoviruses from seven lizard species, including four species from which adenoviruses had not previously been reported. Host species included Gila monster, leopard gecko, fat-tail gecko, blue-tongued skink, Tokay gecko, bearded dragon, and mountain chameleon. This is the first sequence information from lizard adenoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that these viruses belong to the genus Atadenovirus, supporting the reptilian origin of atadenoviruses. This PCR method may be useful for obtaining templates for initial sequencing of novel adenoviruses. PMID:15542689

  16. Efficient construction of recombinant adenovirus expression vector of the Qinchuan cattle LYRM1 gene.

    PubMed

    Li, Y K; Fu, C Z; Zhang, Y R; Zan, L S

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we cloned the coding DNA sequence (CDS) region of Qinchuan cattle LYR motif-containing 1 (LYRM1) and constructed a recombinant adenovirus expression vector to examine the function of LYRM1 on the cellular level. Total RNA was extracted from the adipose tissue of Qinchuan cattle, cDNA was obtained by reverse transcription, and polymerase chain reaction was used to amplify the CDS region of the LYRM1 gene. The CDS-containing fragment was inserted into the shuttle vector pAdTrack-CMV to construct pAdTrack-CMV-LYRM1 vector. After linearization of pAdTrack-CMV-LYRM1 and the negative control vector pAdTrack-CMV by restriction endonuclease PmeI, the vectors were transformed into Escherichia coli BJ5183 containing pAdEasy-1 to obtain the recombinant adenovirus vector pAd-LYRM1 and pAd-CMV through homologous recombination. pAd-LYRM1 and pAd-CMV were then digested by PacI and transfected into the 293A cell line. The recombinant adenovirus Ad-LYRM1 and Ad-CMV was obtained at a concentration of 7 x 108 and 1.3 x 109 green fluorescent units/mL, respectively. Preadipocytes derived from Qinchuan cattle were separately infected with Ad-LYRM1 and Ad- CMV. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that the expression of LYRM1 was increased by approximate 28,000-folds after the infection with recombinant adenovirus for 48 h. In conclusion, we successfully cloned the CDS region of the Qinchuan cattle LYRM1 gene, constructed the recombinant adenovirus expression vector, and obtained the adenovirus with high titer, providing valuable materials for studying the function of LYRM1 at the cellular level. PMID:26345880

  17. Safety evaluation of adenovirus type 4 and type 7 vaccine live, oral in military recruits.

    PubMed

    Choudhry, Azhar; Mathena, Julie; Albano, Jessica D; Yacovone, Margaret; Collins, Limone

    2016-08-31

    Before the widespread adoption of vaccination, adenovirus type 4 and type 7 were long associated with respiratory illnesses among military recruits. When supplies were depleted and vaccination was suspended in 1999 for approximately a decade, respiratory illnesses due to adenovirus infections resurged. In March 2011, a new live, oral adenovirus vaccine was licensed by the US Food and Drug Administration and was first universally administered to military recruits in October 2011, leading to rapid, dramatic elimination of the disease within a few months. As part of licensure, a postmarketing study (Sentinel Surveillance Plan) was performed to detect potential safety signals within 42days after immunization of military recruits. This study retrospectively evaluated possible adverse events related to vaccination using data from the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch Defense Medical Surveillance System (DMSS) database. Among 100,000 recruits who received the adenovirus vaccine, no statistically significant greater risk of prespecified medical events was observed within 42days after vaccination when compared with a historical cohort of 100,000 unvaccinated recruits. In an initial statistical analysis of International Classification of Disease, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification codes, a statistically significant higher risk for 19 other (not prespecified) medical events occurring in 5 or more recruits was observed among vaccinated compared with unvaccinated groups. After case record data abstraction for attribution and validation, two events (psoriasis [21 vs 7 cases] and serum reactions [12 vs 4 cases]) occurred more frequently in the vaccinated cohort. A causal relation of these rare events with adenovirus vaccination could not be established given confounding factors in the DMSS, such as coadministration of other vaccines and incomplete or inaccurate medical information, for some recruits. Prospective surveillance assessing these uncommon, but potentially

  18. Intraductal Delivery of Adenoviruses Targets Pancreatic Tumors in Transgenic Ela-myc Mice and Orthotopic Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    José, Anabel; Sobrevals, Luciano; Camacho-Sánchez, Juan Miguel; Huch, Meritxell; Andreu, Núria; Ayuso, Eduard; Navarro, Pilar; Alemany, Ramon; Fillat, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Gene-based anticancer therapies delivered by adenoviruses are limited by the poor viral distribution into the tumor. In the current work we have explored the feasibility of targeting pancreatic tumors through a loco-regional route. We have taken advantage of the ductal network in the pancreas to retrogradelly inject adenoviruses through the common bile duct in two different mouse models of pancreatic carcinogenesis: The transgenic Ela-myc mice that develop mixed neoplasms displaying both acinar-like and duct-like neoplastic cells affecting the whole pancreas; and mice bearing PANC-1 and BxPC-3 orthotopic xenografts that constitute a model of localized human neoplastic tumors. We studied tumor targeting and the anticancer effects of newly thymidine kinase-engineered adenoviruses both in vitro and in vivo, and conducted comparative studies between intraductal or intravenous administration. Our data indicate that the intraductal delivery of adenovirus efficiently targets pancreatic tumors in the two mouse models. The in vivo application of AduPARTKT plus ganciclovir (GCV) treatment induced tumor regression in Ela-myc mice. Moreover, the intraductal injection of ICOVIR15-TKT oncolytic adenoviruses significantly improved mean survival of mice bearing PANC-1 and BxPC-3 pancreatic xenografts from 30 to 52 days and from 20 to 68 days respectively (p<0.0001) when combined with GCV. Of notice, both AduPARTKT and ICOVIR15-TKT antitumoral responses were stronger by ductal viral application than intravenously, in line with the 38-fold increase in pancreas transduction observed upon ductal administration. In summary our data show that cytotoxic adenoviruses retrogradelly injected to the pancreas can be a feasible approach to treat localized pancreatic tumors. PMID:23328228

  19. Human adenovirus-host cell interactions: comparative study with members of subgroups B and C.

    PubMed Central

    Defer, C; Belin, M T; Caillet-Boudin, M L; Boulanger, P

    1990-01-01

    Host cell interactions of human adenovirus serotypes belonging to subgroups B (adenovirus type 3 [Ad3] and Ad7) and C (Ad2 and Ad5) were comparatively analyzed at three levels: (i) binding of virus particles with host cell receptors; (ii) cointernalization of macromolecules with adenovirions; and (iii) adenovirus-induced cytoskeletal alterations. The association constants with human cell receptors were found to be similar for Ad2 and Ad3 (8 x 10(9) to 9 x 10(9) M-1), and the number of receptor sites per cell ranged from 5,000 (Ad2) to 7,000 (Ad3). Affinity blottings, competition experiments, and immunofluorescence stainings suggested that the receptor sites for adenovirus were distinct for members of subgroups B and C. Adenovirions increased the permeability of cells to macromolecules. We showed that this global effect could be divided into two distinct events: (i) cointernalization of macromolecules and virions into endocytotic vesicles, a phenomenon that occurred in a serotype-independent way, and (ii) release of macromolecules into the cytoplasm upon adenovirus-induced lysis of endosomal membranes. The latter process was found to be type specific and to require unaltered and infectious virus particles of serotype 2 or 5. Perinuclear condensation of the vimentin filament network was observed at early stages of infection with Ad2 or Ad5 but not with Ad3, Ad7, and noninfectious particles of Ad2 or Ad5, obtained by heat inactivation of wild-type virions or with the H2 ts1 mutant. This phenomenon appeared to be a cytological marker for cytoplasmic transit of infectious virions within adenovirus-infected cells. It could be experimentally dissociated from vimentin proteolysis, which was found to be serotype dependent, occurring only with members of subgroup C, regardless of the infectivity of the input virus. Images PMID:2196380

  20. A Novel Cardiotropic Murine Adenovirus Representing a Distinct Species of Mastadenoviruses▿

    PubMed Central

    Klempa, Boris; Krüger, Detlev H.; Auste, Brita; Stanko, Michal; Krawczyk, Adalbert; Nickel, Katrin F.; Überla, Klaus; Stang, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    During cell culture isolation experiments to recover Dobrava hantavirus from a suspension of liver from a striped field mouse (Apodemus agrarius), an unknown virus was coisolated. Atypically for hantaviruses, it had extensive cytopathic effects. Using a random PCR approach, it was identified as a novel murine adenovirus, MAdV-3 (for MAdV type 3). A plaque-purified virus clone was prepared and further characterized. The complete genome sequence of MAdV-3 was determined to be 30,570 bp in length. Sequence comparisons to other adenovirus species revealed highest similarity to MAdV-1, the representative of the murine adenovirus A species. However, substantial differences were found in the E1, E3, and E4 genomic regions. The phylogenetic distance of MAdV-3 amino acid sequences for pVIII, protease, polymerase, and hexon from MAdV-1 is markedly higher than 0.1 exchange per position, and, based on our cross-neutralization experiments, MAdV-3 and MAdV-1 can be regarded as different serotypes. Therefore, we propose to classify MAdV-3 as the first isolate of a novel adenovirus species, designated murine adenovirus C (MAdV-C). The novel MAdV-3 virus is not only genetically and serologically distinct from MAdV-1 but also shows a unique organ tropism in infected mice. In contrast to MAdV-1, the virus was not detectable in brain but predominantly infected heart tissue. Thus, infection of mice with cardiotropic MAdV-3 might be an interesting animal model of adenovirus-induced myocarditis. PMID:19297486

  1. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to ciliated airway epithelia requires prolonged incubation time.

    PubMed Central

    Zabner, J; Zeiher, B G; Friedman, E; Welsh, M J

    1996-01-01

    The efficiency of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to airway epithelia will be an important factor in determining whether recombinant adenoviruses can be developed as vectors for transferring cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) cDNA to patients with cystic fibrosis. Current understanding of the biology of CF lung disease suggests that vectors should express transgene in mature, ciliated airway epithelia. We evaluated the efficiency of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to primary cultures of normal and CF human airway epithelia. Our studies showed that the airway cells developed from an undifferentiated epithelium with markers characteristic of basal cells and a surface covered by short microvilli 3 days after seeding to a mature epithelium whose apical surface was covered with cilia by 10 to 14 days. The ability of adenovirus vectors to express a reporter gene and to correct defective cyclic AMP-stimulated Cl- transport in CF epithelia was correlated inversely with the state of differentiation. However, the inefficiency of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer could be partially corrected when the contact time between vector and epithelium was prolonged. After prolonged contact, we observed complete correction of the CF Cl- transport defect in differentiated CF airway epithelia in culture and of the Cl- transport defect in the nasal epithelia of mice homozygous for the deltaF508 mutation. The fact that gene transfer to airway epithelia required prolonged incubation with vector contrasts with the rapid infection observed in cell models such as 293 and HeLa cells, which are commonly used to study adenovirus infection. Gene transfer observed after prolonged incubation may result from mechanisms different from those that mediate infection of 293 cells. These observations suggest that interventions that either increase the contact time or alter the epithelium or the vector may be required to facilitate gene transfer to ciliated respiratory epithelia

  2. CCL21/IL21-armed oncolytic adenovirus enhances antitumor activity against TERT-positive tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Li, Yi-Fei; Si, Chong-Zhan; Zhu, Yu-Hui; Jin, Yan; Zhu, Tong-Tong; Liu, Ming-Yuan; Liu, Guang-Yao

    2016-07-15

    Multigene-armed oncolytic adenoviruses are capable of efficiently generating a productive antitumor immune response. The chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 21 (CCL21) binds to CCR7 on naïve T cells and dendritic cells (DCs) to promote their chemoattraction to the tumor and resultant antitumor activity. Interleukin 21 (IL21) promotes survival of naïve T cells while maintaining their CCR7 surface expression, which increases their capacity to transmigrate in response to CCL21 chemoattraction. IL21 is also involved in NK cell differentiation and B cell activation and proliferation. The generation of effective antitumor immune responses is a complex process dependent upon coordinated interactions of various subsets of effector cells. Using the AdEasy system, we aimed to construct an oncolytic adenovirus co-expressing CCL21 and IL21 that could selectively replicate in TERTp-positive tumor cells (Ad-CCL21-IL21 virus). The E1A promoter of these oncolytic adenoviruses was replaced by telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter (TERTp). Ad-CCL21-IL21 was constructed from three plasmids, pGTE-IL21, pShuttle-CMV-CCL21 and AdEasy-1 and was homologously recombined and propagated in the Escherichia coli strain BJ5183 and the packaging cell line HEK-293, respectively. Our results showed that our targeted and armed oncolytic adenoviruses Ad-CCL21-IL21 can induce apoptosis in TERTp-positive tumor cells to give rise to viral propagation, in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, we confirm that these modified oncolytic adenoviruses do not replicate efficiently in normal cells even under high viral loads. Additionally, we investigate the role of Ad-CCL21-IL21 in inducing antitumor activity and tumor specific cytotoxicity of CTLs in vitro. This study suggests that Ad-CCL21-IL21 is a promising targeted tumor-specific oncolytic adenovirus. PMID:27157859

  3. Homologous Recombination in E3 Genes of Human Adenovirus Species D

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gurdeep; Robinson, Christopher M.; Dehghan, Shoaleh; Jones, Morris S.; Dyer, David W.; Seto, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Genes within the E3 transcription unit of human adenoviruses modulate host immune responses to infection. A comprehensive genomics and bioinformatics analysis of the E3 transcription unit for 38 viruses within human adenovirus species D (HAdV-D) revealed distinct and surprising patterns of homologous recombination. Homologous recombination was identified in open reading frames for E3 CR1α, CR1β, and CR1γ, similar to that previously observed with genes encoding the three major structural capsid proteins, the penton base, hexon, and fiber. PMID:24027303

  4. [Mutagenic effect of human adenovirus type I on the somatic and sex cells of male mice].

    PubMed

    Podol'skaia, S V

    1986-01-01

    Human adenovirus 1 was studied for its effect on the chromosomal apparatus both in bone marrow cells and male sex cells of mice. Chromosome aberrations were most early detected in spermatocytes of the 1st order mice infected with human adenovirus 1. In bone marrow cells of mice the highest level of chromosome aberrations was observed 30, 60, 90 days after the inoculation, which corresponds to a more frequent detection of the adenoviral antigen. The UV-irradiated-virus caused chromosome aberrations in the later periods after the inoculation which might be induced by the virus reactivation in a cell. PMID:3705168

  5. Molecular Epidemiology and Clinical Manifestations of Adenovirus Respiratory Infections in Taiwanese Children

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Fang; Shen, Fan-Ching; Wang, Shan-Li; Kuo, Pin-Hwa; Tsai, Huey-Pin; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Wang, Jen-Ren; Chi, Chia-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are important causes of respiratory infections in children. They usually cause mild upper respiratory symptoms, but they can also produce severe pneumonia and other complications. The aims of this retrospective study were to better define the molecular epidemiology of respiratory adenoviruses circulating in Taiwanese children during 2002 and 2013, detect reinfections and co-infections, and characterize the clinical features and laboratory findings according to the causative genotypes. We collected a representative sample of 182 isolates of adenoviruses from 175 children during the 12-year study period. The most prevalent species was HAdV-B genotype 3 (HAdV-3) (92/182, 50.5%) followed by HAdV-C (HAdV-2) (38/182, 20.9%). A single outbreak of HAdV-E (6/182, 3.3%) was noted in 2007. The mean age of children with adenovirus infections was 3.7 ± 2.0 years, with a slight predominance of males (53.1%). Children with HAdV-B tended to be older, had more lower respiratory tract infections, gastrointestinal symptoms, and a higher rate of hospitalization than those with HAdV-C (P < 0.05). Adenovirus co-infections were noted in 25/175 (14.3%) of the children. The most frequent co-infections were with species B (HAdV-3) and C (HAdV-2) (14/25, 56.0%). Additional infections were noted in 23/175 (13.1%) of the children. Of these repeated infections, the initial isolates were always genotypes of HAdV-C. The second isolates were genotypes of HAdV-B or HAdV-E. The clinical features of the first HAdV-B infection and the reinfection of HAdV-B followed the HAdV-C were similar. In conclusion, HAdV-B, C, and E were the only adenovirus species that were isolated from children who were sufficiently ill with respiratory infections to require a visit to the hospital. Human adenovirus B (HAdV-3) accounted for half of these species. HAdV-B was more likely than other species to produce severe disease. The high incidence of adenovirus co-infection and

  6. Sequence-independent autoregulation of the adenovirus type 5 E1A transcription unit.

    PubMed Central

    Hearing, P; Shenk, T

    1985-01-01

    The adenovirus E1A gene is known to be autoregulated at the level of transcription. Autoregulation was found to be mediated by products of the E1A 13S mRNA, which induced a fivefold increase in E1A transcription rate. Deletion analysis suggested that the autoregulation did not require any specific sequence in the E1A transcriptional control region. This conclusion was reinforced by the demonstration that a cellular alpha-globin gene substituted for the E1A gene on the adenovirus chromosome was also positively regulated by E1A gene products. Images PMID:2943984

  7. Biosynthesis of adenovirus type 2 i-leader protein.

    PubMed Central

    Symington, J S; Lucher, L A; Brackmann, K H; Virtanen, A; Pettersson, U; Green, M

    1986-01-01

    The i-leader is a 440-base-pair sequence located between 21.8 and 23.0 map units on the adenovirus type 2 genome and is spliced between the second and third segments of the major tripartite leader in certain viral mRNA molecules. The i-leader contains an open translational reading frame for a hypothetical protein of Mr about 16,600, and a 16,000-Mr polypeptide (16K protein) has been translated in vitro on mRNA selected with DNA containing the i-leader (A. Virtanen, P. Aleström, H. Persson, M. G. Katze, and U. Pettersson, Nucleic Acids Res. 10:2539-2548, 1982). To determine whether the i-leader protein is synthesized during productive infection and to provide an immunological reagent to study the properties and functions of the i-leader protein, we prepared antipeptide antibodies directed to a 16-amino acid synthetic peptide which is encoded near the N terminus of the hypothetical i-leader protein and contains a high acidic amino acid and proline content. Antipeptide antibodies immunoprecipitated from extracts of adenovirus type 2-infected cells a major 16K protein that comigrated with a 16K protein translated in vitro. Partial N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis by Edman degradation of radiolabeled 16K antigen showed that methionine is present at residue 1 and leucine is present at residues 8 and 10, as predicted from the DNA sequence, establishing that the 16K protein precipitated by this antibody is indeed the i-leader protein. Thus, the i-leader protein is a prominent species that is synthesized during productive infection. The i-leader protein is often seen as a doublet on polyacrylamide gels, suggesting that either two related forms of i-leader protein are synthesized in infected cells or that a posttranslational modification occurs. Time course studies using immunoprecipitation analysis with antipeptide antibodies revealed that the E1A 289R T antigen and the E1B-19K (175R) T antigen are synthesized beginning at 2 to 3 and 4 to 5 h postinfection

  8. Host range, prevalence, and genetic diversity of adenoviruses in bats.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Ge, Xingyi; Zhang, Huajun; Zhou, Peng; Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Yunzhi; Yuan, Junfa; Wang, Lin-Fa; Shi, Zhengli

    2010-04-01

    Bats are the second largest group of mammals on earth and act as reservoirs of many emerging viruses. In this study, a novel bat adenovirus (AdV) (BtAdV-TJM) was isolated from bat fecal samples by using a bat primary kidney cell line. Infection studies indicated that most animal and human cell lines are susceptible to BtAdV-TJM, suggesting a possible wide host range. Genome analysis revealed 30 putative genes encoding proteins homologous to their counterparts in most known AdVs. Phylogenetic analysis placed BtAdV-TJM within the genus Mastadenovirus, most closely related to tree shrew and canine AdVs. PCR analysis of 350 bat fecal samples, collected from 19 species in five Chinese provinces during 2007 and 2008, indicated that 28 (or 8%) samples were positive for AdVs. The samples were from five bat species, Hipposideros armiger, Myotis horsfieldii, M. ricketti, Myotis spp., and Scotophilus kuhlii. The prevalence ranged from 6.25% (H. armiger in 2007) to 40% (M. ricketti in 2007). Comparison studies based on available partial sequences of the pol gene demonstrated a great genetic diversity among bat AdVs infecting different bat species as well as those infecting the same bat species. This is the first report of a genetically diverse group of DNA viruses in bats. Our results support the notion, derived from previous studies based on RNA viruses (especially coronaviruses and astroviruses), that bats seem to have the unusual ability to harbor a large number of genetically diverse viruses within a geographic location and/or within a taxonomic group. PMID:20089640

  9. Experimental study of Human Adenoviruses interactions with clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellou, Maria; Syngouna, Vasiliki; Paparrodopoulos, Spyros; Vantarakis, Apostolos; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos

    2014-05-01

    Clays are used to establish low permeability liners in landfills, sewage lagoons, water retention ponds, golf course ponds, and hazardous waste sites. Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are waterborne viruses which have been used as viral indicators of fecal pollution. The objective of this study was to investigate the survival of HAdV in static and dynamic clay systems. The clays used as a model were crystalline aluminosilicates: kaolinite and bentonite. The adsorption and survival of HAdVs onto these clays were characterized at two different controlled temperatures (4 and 25o C) under static and dynamic batch conditions. Control tubes, in the absence of clay, were used to monitor virus inactivation due to factors other than adsorption to clays (e.g. inactivation or sorption onto the tubes walls). For both static and dynamic batch experiments, samples were collected for a maximum period of seven days. This seven day time - period was determined to be sufficient for the virus-clay systems to reach equilibrium. To infer the presence of infectious HAdV particles, all samples were treated with Dnase and the extraction of viral nucleid acid was performed using a commercial viral RNA kit. All samples were analyzed by Real - Time PCR which was used to quantify viral particles in clays. Samples were also tested for virus infectivity by A549 cell cultures. Exposure time intervals in the range of seven days (0.50-144 hours) resulted in a load reduction of 0.74 to 2.96 logs for kaolinite and a reduction of 0.89 to 2.92 for bentonite. Furthermore, virus survival was higher onto bentonite than kaolinite (p

  10. Binding of CCAAT displacement protein CDP to adenovirus packaging sequences.

    PubMed

    Erturk, Ece; Ostapchuk, Philomena; Wells, Susanne I; Yang, Jihong; Gregg, Keqin; Nepveu, Alain; Dudley, Jaquelin P; Hearing, Patrick

    2003-06-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) type 5 DNA packaging is initiated in a polar fashion from the left end of the genome. The packaging process is dependent upon the cis-acting packaging domain located between nucleotides 194 and 380. Seven A/T-rich repeats have been identified within this domain that direct packaging. A1, A2, A5, and A6 are the most important repeats functionally and share a bipartite sequence motif. Several lines of evidence suggest that there is a limiting trans-acting factor(s) that plays a role in packaging. Two cellular activities that bind to minimal packaging domains in vitro have been previously identified. These binding activities are P complex, an uncharacterized protein(s), and chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor (COUP-TF). In this work, we report that a third cellular protein, octamer-1 protein (Oct-1), binds to minimal packaging domains. In vitro binding analyses and in vivo packaging assays were used to examine the relevance of these DNA binding activities to Ad DNA packaging. The results of these experiments reveal that COUP-TF and Oct-1 binding does not play a functional role in Ad packaging, whereas P-complex binding directly correlates with packaging function. We demonstrate that P complex contains the cellular protein CCAAT displacement protein (CDP) and that full-length CDP is found in purified virus particles. In addition to cellular factors, previous evidence indicates that viral factors play a role in the initiation of viral DNA packaging. We propose that CDP, in conjunction with one or more viral proteins, binds to the packaging sequences of Ad to initiate the encapsidation process. PMID:12743282