Science.gov

Sample records for con sarcoidosis ocular

  1. [Ocular Manifestations in Sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Walscheid, K; Tappeiner, C; Heiligenhaus, A

    2016-05-01

    Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory multi-organ disease of unknown pathogenesis, characterised by non-necrotising granulomata. Sarcoidosis predominantly manifests in the lung, but any other organ may be affected. Ocular involvement is present in about 25 to 50 % of patients. The most common ocular manifestation is uveitis, especially of the anterior eye segment. If ocular sarcoidosis is suspected, interdisciplinary assessment of the patient is mandatory, including laboratory tests, chest X-ray, assessment by a specialist in internal medicine and, ideally, histological evidence of granuloma formation in a tissue specimen. Other (infectious) causes of granulomatous inflammation need to be excluded, especially tuberculosis or syphilis. For the ophthalmological assessment, detection of granulomatous lesions is of particular importance, especially by visualising chorioretinal granuloma by fluorescein and indocyanin green angiography. Cystoid macular oedema and glaucoma are the most frequent complications limiting visual acuity. Corticosteroids, which can be administered either locally or systemically, are the mainstay of therapy. Depending on the clinical course and the development of ocular complications, systemic steroid-sparing immunosuppressive medication may be indicated. PMID:27187879

  2. Vascular function and ocular involvement in sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Siasos, Gerasimos; Paraskevopoulos, Theodoros; Gialafos, Elias; Rapti, Aggeliki; Oikonomou, Evangelos; Zaromitidou, Marina; Mourouzis, Konstantinos; Siasou, Georgia; Gouliopoulos, Nikolaos; Tsalamandris, Sotiris; Vlasis, Konstantinos; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G; Tousoulis, Dimitris

    2015-07-01

    Ocular involvement occurs in sarcoidosis (Sar) patients mainly in the form of uveitis. This study was designed to determine if uveitis in Sar patients is associated with vascular impairment. We enrolled 82 Sar patients and 77, age and sex matched, control subjects (Cl). Sar patients were divided into those with ocular sarcoidosis (OS) and those without ocular sarcoidosis (WOS). Endothelial function was evaluated by flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured as an index of aortic stiffness and augmentation index (AIx) as a measure of arterial wave reflections. Although there was no significant difference in sex, age and mean arterial pressure, patients with OS compared to WOS patients and Cl subjects had impaired FMD (p<0.001), increased AIx (p=0.02) and increased PWV (p=0.001). Interestingly, impaired FMD in Sar patients was independently, from possible covariates (age, sex, smoking habits, arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia), associated with increased odds of ocular involvement (odds ratio=1.69, p=0.001). More precisely ROC curve analysis revealed that FMD had a significant diagnostic ability for the detection of OS (AUC=0.77, p<0.001) with a sensitivity of 79% and a specificity of 68% for an FMD value below 6.00%. To conclude in the present study we have shown that ocular involvement in Sar patients is associated with impaired endothelial function and increased arterial stiffness. These results strengthen the vascular theory which considers uveitis a consequence of vascular dysfunction in Sar patients and reveals a possible clinical importance of the use of endothelial function tests. PMID:25937082

  3. Sarcoidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Sarcoidosis? Español Sarcoidosis (sar-koy-DO-sis) is a ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Sarcoidosis 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  4. Sarcoidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Favorite Name: Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Sarcoidosis Share | Sarcoidosis is characterized by granulomas (a mass of red, ... kidney), and endocrine systems. Signs and symptoms of sarcoidosis are variable because of its ability to affect ...

  5. Sarcoidosis

    MedlinePlus

    Sarcoidosis is a disease that leads to inflammation, usually in your lungs, skin, or lymph nodes. It starts as tiny, grain-like lumps, called granulomas. Sarcoidosis can affect any organ in your body. No ...

  6. Sarcoidosis

    MedlinePlus

    Sarcoidosis is a disease in which inflammation occurs in the lymph nodes, lungs, liver, eyes, skin, or ... The exact cause of sarcoidosis is unknown. What is known is that when a person has the disease, tiny clumps of abnormal tissue (granulomas) form ...

  7. Sarcoidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the elbow Sarcoidosis on the nose and forehead Respiratory system References Judson MA, Morgenthau AS, Baughman RP. Sarcoidosis. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  8. Evaluation of Microincision Vitrectomy Surgery Using Wide-Viewing System for Complications With Ocular Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Kei; Tanaka, Atsushi; Shibata, Masanori; Muraoka, Tadashi; Ishikawa, Sho; Harimoto, Kouzo; Takeuchi, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We evaluate the outcomes of microincision vitrectomy surgery (MIVS) using wide-viewing system for complications with ocular sarcoidosis resistance to medical treatment. Consecutive clinical records of 24 eyes (19 patients) with complications of ocular sarcoidosis underwent MIVS between April 2010 and December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. MIVS and phacoemulsification were performed in 18 eyes and MIVS only in 6 eyes. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), inflammation scores in the anterior segment and in the posterior segment, and central retinal thickness (CRT) of eyes with cystoid macular edema (CME) before surgery and after 1 week, 1, 3, 6, and 12 months were evaluated. LogMAR (log of the minimum angle of resolution) converted from BCVA was improved in 83.3% after 12 months and 66.7% showed improvement of more than 2 lines. The mean LogMAR was significantly improved from 1.14 ± 1.18 to 0.36 ± 0.79 in all eyes and 0.83 ± 0.86 to 0.23 ± 0.41 in eyes with MIVS and phacoemulsification, although no improvement was observed in eyes with MIVS only. Significant decrease of the mean anterior inflammation score was observed after 1 month in eyes with MIVS only and after 12 months in eyes with MIVS and phacoemulsification, and the mean posterior inflammation scores decreased after 1 week in all eyes. In eyes with preoperative CME, mean CRT was significantly decreased from 1 week after surgery. There was no case in which ocular inflammation was exacerbated by surgical stress. Improvement of visual acuity and resolution of ocular inflammation could be achieved by MIVS using wide-viewing system for complications of ocular sarcoidosis. PMID:25700328

  9. [Sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Frye, B C; Schupp, J C; Köhler, T C; Voll, R E; Müller-Quernheim, J

    2016-05-01

    Sarcoidosis is a rare granulomatous disease mainly affecting lymph nodes and the lungs but joints, bones, muscles and other organs can also be affected. Sarcoidosis therefore represents an important differential diagnosis to various rheumatic diseases. For the diagnosis and differential diagnostic clarification, bronchoscopy including endobronchial ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration of mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes represent the main procedures. Because of the high spontaneous remission rate initiating a therapy requires a therapeutic goal defined by sarcoidosis-associated functional organ impairment, especially for acute sarcoidosis. Cortisone represents the most commonly administered medication whereas methotrexate and azathioprine are well-established second-line medications. Antibodies which neutralize tumor necrosis factors (TNF) are a potential third-line therapy. PMID:27146405

  10. Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Martires, Kathryn; Shvartsbeyn, Marianna; Brinster, Nooshin; Ramachandran, Sarika; Franks, Andrew G

    2015-01-01

    We present a 28-year-old man with a one-year history of cutaneous lesions in old scars and tattoos with concomitant subcutaneous nodules and myopathy. A skin biopsy specimen showed cutaneous sarcoidosis. We discuss the multiple aspects of this case, which represent unique presentations of this systemic disease as well as review isomorphic and isotopic responses. PMID:26990326

  11. Cigarette smoking and male sex are independent and age concomitant risk factors for the development of ocular sarcoidosis in a new orleans sarcoidosis population

    PubMed Central

    Janot, Adam C.; Huscher, Dörte; Walker, McCall; Grewal, Harmanjot K.; Yu, Mary; Lammi, Matthew R.; Saketkoo, Lesley Ann

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sarcoidosis is a multi-organ system granulomatous disease of unknown origin with an incidence of 1–40/100,000. Though pulmonary manifestations are predominant, ocular sarcoidosis (OS) affects 25–50% of patients with sarcoidosis and can lead to blindness. Methods A retrospective, single-center chart review of sarcoidosis cases investigated variables associated with the development of OS. Inclusion criteria were biopsy-proven sarcoidosis, disease duration greater than 1 year, documented smoking status on chart review and documentation of sarcoid-related eye disease. Multivariate analysis identified independent risk factors for OS. Results Of 269 charts reviewed, 109 patients met inclusion criteria. The OS group had a significantly higher proportion of smokers (71.4%) than without OS (42.0%, p=0.027) with no difference (p=0.61) in median number of pack years. Male sex was significantly higher in the OS group (57.1% versus 26.1%, p=0.009). Median duration of sarcoidosis was higher in the OS group (10 versus 4 years, p=0.031). Multivariate regression identified tobacco exposure (OR=5.25, p=0.007, 95% CI 1.58–17.41), male sex (OR=7.48, p=0.002, 95% CI 2.15–26.01), and age (OR=1.114, p=0.002, 95% CI 1.04–1.19) as concomitant risk factors for the development of OS. Conclusion To date, there are few dedicated investigations of risk factors for OS, especially smoking. This investigation identified male sex, age, and tobacco exposure as independent risk factors for OS. Though disease duration did not withstand regression analysis in this moderately sized group, age at chart review suggests screening for OS should not remit but rather intensify in aging patients with sarcoidosis. PMID:26278693

  12. Sarcoidosis Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Sarcoidosis Quiz Sarcoidosis is a disease of unknown cause that leads ... various organs in the body. The outcome of sarcoidosis varies. The disease leads to organ damage in ...

  13. Orbital tumor revealing a systemic sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Hannanachi Sassi, Samia; Dhouib, Rim; Kanchal, Fatma; Doghri, Raoudha; Boujelbene, Nadia; Bouguila, Hedi; Mrad, Karima

    2015-01-01

    Ocular involvement is seen in approximately 25% of patients with sarcoidosis. Uveitis is the most common ocular manifestation, but sarcoidosis may involve any part of the eye. Orbital manifestations of sarcoidosis are uncommon with few series in the literature. A 65-year-old woman presented with redness of the right eye and painless, unilateral eyelid swelling. Orbital scanning revealed mass infiltrating the soft tissue of the inferior right orbital quadrant. Biopsy results showed nodular, noncaseating granulomas consistent with sarcoidosis. The complete systemic workup revealed systemic manifestations of sarcoidosis at the time of examination with hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathies noted on CT scan. The orbital surgical treatment was followed by systemic prednisone therapy with good response. Although rare, orbital sarcoidosis must be considered in the evaluation of orbital tumors in elderly patients. A search for systemic findings should be undertaken and appropriate therapy should be instituted. PMID:25796029

  14. Cardiac Sarcoidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Cardiac Sarcoidosis? Sarcoidosis is a poorly understood disease that commonly affects the lungs. It can also involve the lymph nodes, liver, spleen, eyes, skin, bones, salivary glands and heart. ...

  15. Psoriasiform Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Miriam L.; Abrahams, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Background: Psoriasiform lesions are an established, but rare, manifestation of sarcoidosis. Only 0.9 percent of patients with cutaneous sarcoidosis develop this form of the disease. Observation: The authors present a case of a 61-year-old woman with a history of pulmonary sarcoidosis who presented to their dermatology clinic with thick plaques resembling psoriasis. Biopsy of one of the lesions revealed sarcoidal granulomas in association with psoriasiform changes. Conclusion: Psoriasiform lesions are a rare manifestation of sarcoidosis. The authors theorize that the co-expression of TNF-α in both entities is a possible explanation of the psoriasiform expression of sarcoidosis. PMID:27462388

  16. Progressive kidney failure as the sole manifestation of extrapulmonary sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Supreet; Relia, Nitin; Syal, Gaurav; Kaushik, Chhavi; Gokden, Neriman; Malik, Ahmad B

    2013-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a chronic multisystem disorder characterized by an accumulation of T lymphocytes and mononuclear phagocytes, non-caseating epitheliod granulomas and derangement of normal tissue architecture in affected organs. Sarcoidosis can affect any organ system, however approximately 90% of patients with sarcoidosis have pulmonary, lymph node, cutaneous or ocular manifestations. Renal involvement in sarcoidosis is rare and clinically significant renal dysfunction even less common. We present a case of isolated renal sarcoidosis which manifested with progressively worsening renal function and hypercalcemia. A systematic diagnostic approach with pertinent laboratory studies, imaging and renal biopsy elucidated the diagnosis of renal sarcoidosis without any evidence of systemic involvement. PMID:24079056

  17. Virulence, Speciation and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Ocular Coagualase Negative Staphylococci (CoNS)

    PubMed Central

    Priya, Ravindran; Mythili, Arumugam; Singh, Yendremban Randhir Babu; Sreekumar, Haridas; Manikandan, Palanisamy; Panneerselvam, Kanesan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Coagulase negative Staphylococci (CoNS) are common inhabitants of human skin and mucous membranes. With the emergence of these organisms as prominent pathogens in patients with ocular infections, investigation has intensified in an effort to identify important virulence factors and to inform new approaches to treatment and prevention. Aim: To isolate CoNS from ocular specimens; to study the possible virulence factors; speciation of coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS) which were isolated from ocular complications; antibiotic susceptibility testing of ocular CoNS. Materials and Methods: The specimens were collected from the target patients who attended the Microbiology Laboratory of a tertiary care eye hospital in Coimbatore, Tamilnadu state, India. The isolates were subjected to tube and slide coagulase tests for the identification of CoNS. All the isolates were subjected to screening for lipase and protease activities. Screening for other virulence factors viz., slime production on Congo red agar medium and haemagglutination assay with use of 96-well microtitre plates. These isolates were identified upto species level by performing biochemical tests such as phosphatase test, arginine test, maltose and trehalose fermentation tests and novobiocin sensitivity test. The isolates were subjected to antibiotic susceptibility studies, based on the revised standards of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institutes (CLSI). Results: During the one year of study, among the total 260 individuals who were screened, 100 isolates of CoNS were obtained. Lipolytic activity was seen in all the isolates, whereas 38 isolates showed a positive result for protease. A total of 63 isolates showed slime production. Of 100 isolates, 30 isolates were analyzed for haemagglutination, where 4 isolates showed the capacity to agglutinate the erythrocytes. The results of the biochemical analysis revealed that of the 100 isolates of CoNS, 43% were Staphylococcus epidermidis. The other

  18. Severe Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Kouranos, Vasileios; Jacob, Joe; Wells, Athol U

    2015-12-01

    In sarcoidosis, reduction in mortality and the prevention of disability due to major organ involvement are treatment goals. Thus, it is important to recognize severe disease and identify patients at higher risk of progression to severe disease. In this article, fibrotic lung disease and cardiac sarcoidosis are reviewed as the major contributors to sarcoidosis mortality and morbidity. In the absence of a standardized definition of severe pulmonary disease, a multidisciplinary approach to clinical staging is suggested, based on symptoms, pulmonary function tests, and imaging findings at presentation, integrated with the duration of disease and longitudinal disease behavior during early follow-up. PMID:26593144

  19. Cardiac sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Smedema, J.P.; Zondervan, P.E.; van Hagen, P.; ten Cate, F.J.; Bresser, P.; Doubell, A.F.; Pattynama, P.; Hoogsteden, H.C.; Balk, A.H.M.M.

    2002-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-system granulomatous disorder of unknown aetiology. Symptomatic cardiac involvement occurs in approximately 5% of patients. The prevalence of sarcoidosis in the Netherlands is unknown, but estimated to be approximately 20 per 100,000 population (3200 patients). We report on five patients who presented with different manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis, and give a brief review on the current management of this condition. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can be of great help in diagnosing this condition as well as in the follow-up of the response to therapy. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:25696121

  20. Biologic therapies in the treatment of sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Saketkoo, Lesley Ann; Baughman, Robert P

    2016-08-01

    Sarcoidosis is a disease of remarkable heterogeneity in organ manifestation, severity and natural history, characterized by the presence of non-caseating granulomas. The majority of cases are acute and self-limited or remit with short courses of glucocorticoids; however, a proportion progress to a life-threatening obliterative fibrotic type associated with significant disability related to pulmonary, cardiac, ocular or central nervous system involvement. Biologic agents have been demonstrated in the successful treatment of refractory organ-threatening sarcoidosis; and though sarcoidosis remains elusive in predictability of progression, strong evidence suggests an indisputably efficacious role for these agents in efforts to stave morbidity and mortality related to sarcoidosis. This paper provides a review of sarcoidosis mechanistic etiopathogenesis to highlight the hypothetical underpinnings of the utility and concerns of current biologic treatments in current use and the potential future applications of newer agents and those under development. PMID:27117719

  1. Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Birnie, David H; Nery, Pablo B; Ha, Andrew C; Beanlands, Rob S B

    2016-07-26

    Clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in perhaps 5% of patients with sarcoidosis. The 3 principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. An estimated 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic cardiac involvement (clinically silent disease). In 2014, the first international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS was published. In patients with clinically manifest CS, the extent of left ventricular dysfunction seems to be the most important predictor of prognosis. There is controversy in published reports as to the outcome of patients with clinically silent CS. Despite a paucity of data, immunosuppression therapy (primarily with corticosteroids) has been advocated for the treatment of clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, primarily with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, is often recommended for patients with clinically manifest disease. PMID:27443438

  2. Cutaneous Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Wanat, Karolyn A; Rosenbach, Misha

    2015-12-01

    The skin is the second most common organ affected in sarcoidosis, which can affect patients of all ages and races, with African American women having the highest rates of sarcoidosis in the United States. The cutaneous manifestations are protean and can reflect involvement of sarcoidal granulomas within the lesion or represent reactive non-specific inflammation, as seen with erythema nodosum. Systemic work-up is necessary in any patient with cutaneous involvement of sarcoidal granulomas, and treatment depends on other organ involvement and severity of clinical disease. Skin-directed therapies are first line for mild disease, and immunomodulators or immunosuppressants may be necessary. PMID:26593142

  3. How Is Sarcoidosis Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Sarcoidosis Treated? Not everyone who has sarcoidosis needs treatment. ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Sarcoidosis 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  4. What Causes Sarcoidosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Sarcoidosis? The cause of sarcoidosis isn't known. More ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Sarcoidosis 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  5. Living with Sarcoidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Sarcoidosis Sarcoidosis has no cure, but you can take ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Sarcoidosis 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  6. How Is Sarcoidosis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Sarcoidosis Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose sarcoidosis based on ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Sarcoidosis 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  7. [Multisystemic sarcoidosis. A clinical case report].

    PubMed

    Cerri, D; Carabelli, A; Vanotti, P; Candiani, F; Bertani, E; Peroni, G; Gelmetti, C

    1990-12-01

    Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disorder of unknown etiology with a multi-disciplinary interest. However, a multiple organ involvement is not always clearly presented. A case of a 62-year-old woman with cutaneous, pulmonary, ocular, cardiac, bone and articular involvement is described. PMID:2075284

  8. Childhood sarcoidosis: Louisiana experience.

    PubMed

    Gedalia, Abraham; Khan, Tahir A; Shetty, Avinash K; Dimitriades, Victoria R; Espinoza, Luis R

    2016-07-01

    A retrospective chart review was conducted to detect patients with sarcoidosis seen by pediatric rheumatology service from the period of 1992 to 2013 at Children's hospital of New Orleans. Twenty-seven patients were identified. The average duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 5 (range 1-120) months. Five patients had onset before the age of 5 years and were diagnosed with early-onset sarcoidosis. The most common manifestations at presentation were constitutional symptoms (62 %) followed by ocular (38 %). During the course of illness, 19/27 (70 %) had multiorgan involvement. Common manifestations included uveitis/iritis (77 %), fever (50 %), hilar adenopathy (42 %), arthritis (31 %), peripheral lympadenopathy (31 %), hepatosplenomegaly (31 %), parenchymal lung disease (27 %), and skin rash (19 %). Unusual manifestations included granulomatous bone marrow disease (3 cases), hypertension (2), abdominal aortic aneurysm (large vessel vasculitis; 1), granulomatous hepatitis (1), nephrocalcinosis (1), membranous nephropathy (1), refractory granulomatous interstitial nephritis with recurrence in transplanted kidney (1), CNS involvement (2), parotid gland enlargement (1), and sensorineural hearing loss (1). Biopsy specimen was obtained in 21/27 (77 %) patients, and demonstration of noncaseating granuloma associated with negative stains for mycobacteria and fungi was seen in 18 patients. Elevated angiotensin-converting enzyme level was seen in 74 % of patients. Treatment with oral prednisone was initiated in symptomatic patients with significant clinical improvement. Low-dose methotrexate (MTX) 10-15 mg/m(2)/week orally, as steroid-sparing agent, was administered in 14 patients. Other immunomodulators included cyclophosphamide (2 patients), etanercept (2), infliximab (2), mycophenolate mofetil (1), and tacrolimus (1). Childhood sarcoidosis is prevalent in Louisiana. Most of the affected children present with a multisystem disease associated with

  9. Diagnosis of sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, O.P.

    1983-07-01

    During the last decade, many biochemical and immunologic advances have been made in the treatment and understanding of sarcoidosis. These studies have helped us to understand the basic mechanisms involved in granuloma formation, and many clinicians have used the information to diagnose and assess the activity of sarcoidosis. Further studies are needed to clearly establish the role of these advances in the everyday management of patients with sarcoidosis.

  10. Rheumatologic Manifestations of Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Sweiss, Nadera J.; Patterson, Karen; Sawaqed, Ray; Jabbar, Umair; Korsten, Peter; Hogarth, Kyle; Wollman, Robert; Garcia, Joe G.N.; Niewold, Timothy B.; Baughman, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic, clinically heterogeneous disease characterized by the development of granulomas. Any organ system can be involved, and patients may present with any number of rheumatologic symptoms. There are no U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved therapies for the treatment of sarcoidosis. Diagnosing sarcoidosis becomes challenging, particularly when its complications cause patients’ symptoms to mimic other conditions, including polymyositis, Sjögren syndrome, or vasculitis. This review presents an overview of the etiology of and biomarkers associated with sarcoidosis. We then provide a detailed description of the rheumatologic manifestations of sarcoidosis and present a treatment algorithm based on current clinical evidence for patients with sarcoid arthritis. The discussion will focus on characteristic findings in patients with sarcoid arthritis, osseous involvement in sarcoidosis, and sarcoid myopathy. Arthritic conditions that sometimes coexist with sarcoidosis are described as well. We present two cases of sarcoidosis with rheumatologic manifestations. Our intent is to encourage a multidisciplinary, translational approach to meet the challenges and difficulties in understanding and treating sarcoidosis. PMID:20665396

  11. Etiologies of Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Edward S; Moller, David R

    2015-08-01

    Since sarcoidosis was first described more than a century ago, the etiologic determinants causing this disease remain uncertain. Studies suggest that genetic, host immunologic, and environmental factors interact together to cause sarcoidosis. Immunologic characteristics of sarcoidosis include non-caseating granulomas, enhanced local expression of T helper-1 (and often Th17) cytokines and chemokines, dysfunctional regulatory T-cell responses, dysregulated Toll-like receptor signaling, and oligoclonal expansion of CD4+ T cells consistent with chronic antigenic stimulation. Multiple environmental agents have been suggested to cause sarcoidosis. Studies from several groups implicate mycobacterial or propionibacterial organisms in the etiology of sarcoidosis based on tissue analyses and immunologic responses in sarcoidosis patients. Despite these studies, there is no consensus on the nature of a microbial pathogenesis of sarcoidosis. Some groups postulate sarcoidosis is caused by an active viable replicating infection while other groups contend there is no clinical, pathologic, or microbiologic evidence for such a pathogenic mechanism. The authors posit a novel hypothesis that proposes that sarcoidosis is triggered by a hyperimmune Th1 response to pathogenic microbial and tissue antigens associated with the aberrant aggregation of serum amyloid A within granulomas, which promotes progressive chronic granulomatous inflammation in the absence of ongoing infection. PMID:25771769

  12. Recent advances in sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, Adam S; Iannuzzi, Michael C

    2011-01-01

    Sarcoidosis, a systemic granulomatous disease of undetermined etiology, is characterized by a variable clinical presentation and course. During the past decade, advances have been made in the study of sarcoidosis. The multicenter ACCESS (A Case Control Etiologic Study of Sarcoidosis) trial recruited > 700 subjects with newly diagnosed sarcoidosis and matched control subjects. Investigators were unable to identify a single cause of sarcoidosis, but ACCESS paved the way for subsequent etiologic studies. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalase-peroxidase protein has been identified as a potential sarcoidosis antigen. Genetic aspects of the disease have been elucidated further. Genome-wide scans have identified candidate genes. Gene expression analyses have defined cytokine dysregulation in sarcoidosis more clearly. Although the criteria for diagnosis have not changed, sarcoidosis remains a diagnosis of exclusion best supported by a tissue biopsy specimen that demonstrates noncaseating granulomas in a patient with compatible clinical and radiologic features of the disease. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration of mediastinal lymph nodes has facilitated diagnosis, often eliminating the need for more invasive procedures, such as mediastinoscopy. PET scanning has proven valuable in locating occult sites of active disease. Currently, no reliable prognostic biomarkers have been identified. The tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, a relatively new class of agents, have been used in patients with refractory disease. It is unclear whether phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, prostaglandin analogs, or endothelin antagonists should be used for the treatment of sarcoidosis-associated pulmonary hypertension. PMID:21208877

  13. Sarcoidosis presenting with chylothorax.

    PubMed Central

    Jarman, P. R.; Whyte, M. K.; Sabroe, I.; Hughes, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    A patient in whom chylothorax was the presenting feature of sarcoidosis is reported. Mediastinal lymphadenopathy was shown by computed tomographic scanning. Obstruction of the thoracic duct by enlarged lymph nodes or fibrosis is the probable cause of chylothorax in this case. The association of chylothorax and sarcoidosis is extremely rare. Images PMID:8553312

  14. Sarcoidosis simulating syringomas.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Diego Santos; Presotto, Carolina; Bringel, Daniela Martins; Bomm, Lislaine; Balassiano, Eli; Alves, Maria de Fátima Guimarães Scotelaro

    2012-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disease of unknown etiology. The skin is commonly affected. Cutaneous manifestations can mimic other diseases and autoimmune disorders. The dermatologist plays a critical role in elucidating the clinical diagnosis and assisting other specialists in the investigation of a systemic disease. We report a patient with typical cutaneous manifestation of sarcoidosis with pulmonary involvement. PMID:22570040

  15. Pathogenesis of Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Gundy, Karl Van; Sharma, Om P.

    1987-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease of unknown etiology. The organs that are involved by sarcoidosis include the lungs in which the granuloma is seen in more than 90% of patients to the pituitary, which is only rarely affected. There are many hypotheses as to the cause of sarcoidosis. Some of them rely on the similarities seen between sarcoidosis and the other granuloma-forming diseases such as tuberculosis, berylliosis, pine pollen inhalation and acute and chronic bacterial and viral infections, while others find similarities between sarcoidosis and immune reactions observed in autoimmune disorders. Still other explanations implicate a genetic predisposition or a still-unknown agent as the underlying cause of the granuloma formation. Images PMID:3310401

  16. Musculoskeletal involvement in sarcoidosis*, **

    PubMed Central

    Nessrine, Akasbi; Zahra, Abourazzak Fatima; Taoufik, Harzy

    2014-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disorder of unknown cause. It most commonly affects the pulmonary system but can also affect the musculoskeletal system, albeit less frequently. In patients with sarcoidosis, rheumatic involvement is polymorphic. It can be the presenting symptom of the disease or can appear during its progression. Articular involvement is dominated by nonspecific arthralgia, polyarthritis, and Löfgren's syndrome, which is defined as the presence of lung adenopathy, arthralgia (or arthritis), and erythema nodosum. Skeletal manifestations, especially dactylitis, appear mainly as complications of chronic, multiorgan sarcoidosis. Muscle involvement in sarcoidosis is rare and usually asymptomatic. The diagnosis of rheumatic sarcoidosis is based on X-ray findings and magnetic resonance imaging findings, although the definitive diagnosis is made by anatomopathological study of biopsy samples. Musculoskeletal involvement in sarcoidosis is generally relieved with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or corticosteroids. In corticosteroid-resistant or -dependent forms of the disease, immunosuppressive therapy, such as treatment with methotrexate or anti-TNF-α, is employed. The aim of this review was to present an overview of the various types of osteoarticular and muscle involvement in sarcoidosis, focusing on their diagnosis and management. PMID:24831403

  17. [Cutaneous manifestations of sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Descamps, V; Bouscarat, F

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disorder of unknown aetiology. Its dermatological manifestations are extremely polymorphous. They are normally classed as either specific lesions, comprising granulomas, which are generally chronic, or non-specific lesions, principally acute erythema nodosum. These signs are seen in around 25% of sarcoidosis patients. The disease may be heralded by a skin disorder. Diagnosis of cutaneous sarcoidosis provides the clinician with three problems: screening for a visceral site of the disease, determination of the prognosis, and long-term management with regular monitoring coupled with suitable therapy in the event of cosmetic or functional impairment. PMID:26804434

  18. Sarcoidosis presenting with an unusual erythematous rash and persistent hypercalcemia.

    PubMed Central

    Barney, B. L.

    1992-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem disease that often presents with constitutional symptoms and ocular and skin manifestations. The chest roentgenogram may show no abnormalities or only diffuse interstitial disease. The serum calcium level is uncommonly persistently elevated and responds rapidly to low-dose corticosteroid therapy. The level of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D is often elevated, and the level of parathyroid hormone is almost always suppressed. Skin manifestations vary considerably and may appear in an unusual fashion. A skin biopsy may often be essential in the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. Images PMID:1595285

  19. Cardiac sarcoidosis - silent destroyer.

    PubMed

    Martusewicz-Boros, Magdalena M; Piotrowska-Kownacka, Dorota; Wiatr, Elżbieta; Roszkowski-Śliż, Kazimierz

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of histologically proven pulmonary sarcoidosis and cardiac involvement in a 53-year old woman with progression leading to the heart failure documented in cardiovascular magnetic resonsnce studies. PMID:27537722

  20. Foundation for Sarcoidosis Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trials Fail: FSR’s New Initiative to Bridge Gap between Industry Leaders, Researchers, and Patients Guest post ... 1 2 3 … 10 Next → Foundation for Sarcoidosis Research 1820 W. Webster Ave Suite 304 Chicago, Illinois ...

  1. Imaging of cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Erthal, Fernanda; Juneau, Daniel; Lim, Siok P; Dwivedi, Girish; Nery, Pablo B; Birnie, David; Beanlands, Rob S

    2016-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disease. Cardiac involvement is described in up to 50% of the cases. The disease spectrum is wide and cardiac manifestations ranges from being asymptomatic to heart failure, arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. The diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis can be challenging due to its non-specific nature and the focal involvement of the heart. In this review, we discuss the utility of a stepwise approach with multimodality cardiac imaging in the diagnosis and management of CS. PMID:27225318

  2. A clinically unsuspected nasopharyngeal sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Tuğrul, Selahattin; Göktaş, Seda Sezen; Özücer, Berke; Sönmez, Fatma Cavide; Özturan, Orhan

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-system disease which rarely involves the upper respiratory tract, leading to hoarseness, dysphagia, laryngeal paralysis, and upper airway obstruction. The Waldeyer's ring involvement in sarcoidosis is also very rare. In this article, we report a 32-year-old male case in whom a nasopharyngeal mass was detected based on the Waldeyer's ring involvement due to sarcoidosis. PMID:27107604

  3. Unilateral Eyelid Edema as Initial Sign of Orbital Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Petrarolha, Sílvia Miguéis Picado; Rodrigues, Bruna Suda; Filho, Flávio David Haddad; Dedivitis, Rogério Aparecido; Petrarolha, Samuel Brunini; Morais, Pedro Martins Tavares Scianni

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Sarcoidosis is a rare multisystemic granulomatous inflammatory disease of unknown etiology affecting the respiratory system, skin, and eyes. Sarcoidosis outside the lacrimal gland is rare. The case study concerns a patient with a final diagnosis of orbital sarcoidosis. Case Report. A 37-year-old male patient went to the ophthalmic emergency room complaining of pain in the left eye, diplopia, and decreased visual acuity. An external eye examination showed hard and cold edema of the lower eyelid, ocular motility with limitation of adduction, and discreet ipsilateral proptosis. Magnetic resonance of the orbit showed left eye proptosis and thickening and increase of soft tissues associated with heterogeneous impregnation of contrast in the infralateral region of the left eyelid. A biopsy of the lesion showed a chronic inflammatory process, with numerous compact nonnecrotizing granulomas surrounded by lamellar hyaline collagen, providing histological confirmation of sarcoidosis. Discussion. A biopsy of the orbital tumor is essential for the diagnosis of sarcoidosis, in addition to the search for systemic findings such as hilar adenopathy or parenchymal lung disease found in 90% of patients. PMID:27298746

  4. Unilateral Eyelid Edema as Initial Sign of Orbital Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Flávio David Haddad; Dedivitis, Rogério Aparecido; Petrarolha, Samuel Brunini

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Sarcoidosis is a rare multisystemic granulomatous inflammatory disease of unknown etiology affecting the respiratory system, skin, and eyes. Sarcoidosis outside the lacrimal gland is rare. The case study concerns a patient with a final diagnosis of orbital sarcoidosis. Case Report. A 37-year-old male patient went to the ophthalmic emergency room complaining of pain in the left eye, diplopia, and decreased visual acuity. An external eye examination showed hard and cold edema of the lower eyelid, ocular motility with limitation of adduction, and discreet ipsilateral proptosis. Magnetic resonance of the orbit showed left eye proptosis and thickening and increase of soft tissues associated with heterogeneous impregnation of contrast in the infralateral region of the left eyelid. A biopsy of the lesion showed a chronic inflammatory process, with numerous compact nonnecrotizing granulomas surrounded by lamellar hyaline collagen, providing histological confirmation of sarcoidosis. Discussion. A biopsy of the orbital tumor is essential for the diagnosis of sarcoidosis, in addition to the search for systemic findings such as hilar adenopathy or parenchymal lung disease found in 90% of patients. PMID:27298746

  5. [Kidney involvement in sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Kornev, B M; Potapova, A V

    1991-01-01

    Variants of renal damage in sarcoidosis demonstrate the diversity of clinical manifestations common to this systemic disease and serve distinctive reference points in the choice of the treatment policy. A well-defined relationship between hypercalciuria associated with sarcoidosis and risk of calcium nephropathy development is, one the one hand, a reliable criterion for the disease activity and, on the other one, the basis for administration of drug the therapy permitting one to control its level (corticosteroids and drugs of the 4-aminoquinoline series). Other variants of renal damage in sarcoidosis, excluding amyloidosis, form the basis for corticosteroid administration even in cases of the presence of renal failure, demonstrating that so-called "dramatic therapy" produces a remarkable beneficial effect characterized by the disappearance of the signs of renal failure. PMID:1948730

  6. Cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Leonhard, Sonja E.; Fritz, Daan; van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon but severe complication of sarcoidosis. Methods: We present 2 patients with cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis and compared findings with 38 cases reported in the literature. Results: When analyzing our patients and 38 cases reported in the literature, we found that median age of sarcoidosis patients with cryptococcal meningitis was 39 years (range 30–48); 27 of 33 reported cases (82%) had a history of sarcoidosis. Only 16 of 40 patients (40%) received immunomodulating therapy at the time of diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis. The diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis was delayed in 17 of 40 patients (43%), mainly because of the initial suspicion of neurosarcoidosis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination showed mildly elevated white blood cell count (range 23–129/mm3). Twenty-nine of 32 cases (91%) had a positive CSF culture for Cryptococcus neoformans and 25 of 27 cases (93%) had a positive CSF C neoformans antigen test. CD4 counts were low in all patients in whom counts were performed (84–228/mL). Twelve patients had an unfavorable outcome (32%), of which 7 died (19%) and 24 patients (65%) had a favorable outcome. The rate of unfavorable outcome in patients with a delayed diagnosis was 7 of 17 (41%) compared to 5 of 28 (21%) in patients in whom diagnosis was not delayed. Conclusion: Cryptococcal meningitis is a rare but life-threatening complication of sarcoidosis. Patients were often initially misdiagnosed as neurosarcoidosis, which resulted in considerable treatment delay and worse outcome. CSF cryptococcal antigen tests are advised in patients with sarcoidosis and meningitis. PMID:27583871

  7. Sarcoidosis Presenting Addison's Disease.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kentaro; Kagami, Shin-Ichiro; Kawashima, Hirotoshi; Kashiwakuma, Daisuke; Suzuki, Yoshio; Iwamoto, Itsuo

    2016-01-01

    We herein describe a second Japanese case of sarcoidosis presenting Addison's disease. A 52-year-old man was diagnosed with sarcoidosis based on clinical and laboratory findings, including bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy and elevated levels of serum angiotensin-converting enzyme and lysozyme, as well as the presence of noncaseating epithelioid granulomas. The patient also exhibited general fatigue, pigmentation, weight loss, hypotension and hyponatremia, suggestive of chronic adrenocortical insufficiency. An endocrine examination confirmed primary adrenocortical insufficiency. This case suggests the direct involvement of sarcoid granuloma in the adrenal glands. PMID:27150885

  8. Consequences of Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Drent, Marjolein; Strookappe, Bert; Hoitsma, Elske; De Vries, Jolanda

    2015-12-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem disorder of unknown cause(s). Less specific disabling symptoms, including fatigue and physical impairments, may have a major influence on the daily activities and the social and professional lives of the patients, resulting in a reduced quality of life. A multidisciplinary approach focusing on somatic and psychosocial aspects is recommended. Patients self-perceived knowledge about the importance of exercise and lifestyle should be improved. Developing the most appropriate therapeutic approach for sarcoidosis requires careful consideration of the possible impact of fatigue, small fiber neuropathy related symptoms, pain, cognitive functioning, and coping strategies. Personalized medicine and appropriate communication are beneficial. PMID:26593145

  9. Ocular Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Ocular Hypertension Sections What Is Ocular Hypertension? Ocular Hypertension Causes ... Hypertension Diagnosis Ocular Hypertension Treatment What Is Ocular Hypertension? Written by: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed by: J Kevin ...

  10. Who Is at Risk for Sarcoidosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... NHLBI on Twitter. Who Is at Risk for Sarcoidosis? Sarcoidosis affects people of all ages and races. ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Sarcoidosis 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  11. Sarcoidosis: Immunopathogenesis and Immunological Markers

    PubMed Central

    Loke, Wei Sheng Joshua; Herbert, Cristan; Thomas, Paul S.

    2013-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disorder invariably affecting the lungs. It is a disease with noteworthy variations in clinical manifestation and disease outcome and has been described as an “immune paradox” with peripheral anergy despite exaggerated inflammation at disease sites. Despite extensive research, sarcoidosis remains a disease with undetermined aetiology. Current evidence supports the notion that the immune response in sarcoidosis is driven by a putative antigen in a genetically susceptible individual. Unfortunately, there currently exists no reliable biomarker to delineate the disease severity and prognosis. As such, the diagnosis of sarcoidosis remains a vexing clinical challenge. In this review, we outline the immunological features of sarcoidosis, discuss the evidence for and against various candidate etiological agents (infective and noninfective), describe the exhaled breath condensate, a novel method of identifying immunological biomarkers, and suggest other possible immunological biomarkers to better characterise the immunopathogenesis of sarcoidosis. PMID:26464848

  12. Pulmonary hypertension complicating pulmonary sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Huitema, M P; Grutters, J C; Rensing, B J W M; Reesink, H J; Post, M C

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a severe complication of sarcoidosis, with an unknown prevalence. The aetiology is multifactorial, and the exact mechanism of PH in the individual patient is often difficult to establish. The diagnostic work-up and treatment of PH in sarcoidosis is complex, and should therefore be determined by a multidisciplinary expert team in a specialised centre. It is still a major challenge to identify sarcoidosis patients at risk for developing PH. There is no validated algorithm when to refer a patient suspected for PH, and PH analysis itself is difficult. Until present, there is no established therapy for PH in sarcoidosis. Besides optimal treatment for sarcoidosis, case series evaluating new therapeutic options involving PH-targeted therapy are arising for a subgroup of patients. This review summarises the current knowledge regarding the aetiology, diagnosis and possible treatment options for PH in sarcoidosis. PMID:27194118

  13. Extensive upper respiratory tract sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Soares, Mafalda Trindade; Sousa, Carolina; Garanito, Luísa; Freire, Filipe

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a chronic granulomatous disease of unknown aetiology. It can affect any part of the organism, although the lung is the most frequently affected organ. Upper airway involvement is rare, particularly if isolated. Sarcoidosis is a diagnosis of exclusion, established by histological evidence of non-caseating granulomas and the absence of other granulomatous diseases. The authors report a case of a man with sarcoidosis manifesting as a chronic inflammatory stenotic condition of the upper respiratory tract and trachea. PMID:27090537

  14. Parallel Gene Expression Changes in Sarcoidosis Involving the Lacrimal Gland, Orbital Tissue, or Blood

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, James T.; Choi, Dongseok; Wilson, David J.; Grossniklaus, Hans E.; Harrington, Christina A.; Sibley, Cailin H.; Dailey, Roger A.; Ng, John D.; Steele, Eric A.; Czyz, Craig N.; Foster, Jill A.; Tse, David; Alabiad, Chris; Dubovy, Sander; Parekh, Prashant; Harris, Gerald J.; Kazim, Michael; Patel, Payal; White, Valerie; Dolman, Peter; Korn, Bobby S.; Kikkawa, Don; Edward, Deepak P.; Alkatan, Hind; al-Hussain, Hailah; Yeatts, R. Patrick; Selva, Dinesh; Stauffer, Patrick; Planck, Stephen R.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Sarcoidosis is a major cause of ocular or periocular inflammation. The pathogenesis of sarcoidosis is incompletely understood and diagnosis often requires a biopsy. OBJECTIVE To determine how gene expression in either orbital adipose tissue or the lacrimal gland affected by sarcoidosis compares with gene expression in other causes of orbital disease and how gene expression in tissue affected by sarcoidosis compares with gene expression in peripheral blood samples obtained from patients with sarcoidosis. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS In a multicenter, international, observational study, gene expression profiling of formalin-fixed biopsy specimens, using GeneChipp U133 Plus 2 microarrays (Affymetrix), was conducted between October 2012 and January 2014 on tissues biopsied from January 2000 through June 2013. Participants included 12 patients with orbital sarcoidosis (7 in adipose tissue; 5 affecting the lacrimal gland) as well as comparable tissue from 6 healthy individuals serving as controls or patients with thyroid eye disease, nonspecific orbital inflammation, or granulomatosis with polyangiitis. In addition, results were compared with gene expression in peripheral blood samples obtained from 12 historical individuals with sarcoidosis. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Significantly differentially expressed transcripts defined as a minimum of a 1.5-fold increase or a comparable decrease and a false discovery rate of P < .05. RESULTS Signals from 2449 probe sets (transcripts from approximately 1522 genes) were significantly increased in the orbital adipose tissue from patients with sarcoidosis. Signals from 4050 probe sets (approximately 2619 genes) were significantly decreased. Signals from 3069 probe sets (approximately 2001 genes) were significantly higher and 3320 (approximately 2283 genes) were significantly lower in the lacrimal gland for patients with sarcoidosis. Ninety-two probe sets (approximately 69 genes) had significantly elevated signals and

  15. Cough in Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Tully, Timothy; Birring, Surinder S

    2016-02-01

    Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disorder that frequently affects the lungs. Cough is commonly reported by patients and can significantly reduce health-related quality of life. The mechanism of cough is unknown but airway inflammation, mechanical distortion from pulmonary fibrosis and disruption of the vagus nerve are possible. Recent evidence suggests cough reflex hypersensitivity may also be an important mechanism and predictor of the frequency of cough. The investigation of cough should evaluate common causes such as asthma, gastro-oesophageal reflux and rhinitis. In patients with suspected cough due to sarcoidosis, a trial of corticosteroids should be considered. The severity of cough should be evaluated with validated outcome measures such as visual analogue scales, cough severity diary, health-related quality of life questionnaires such as the Leicester Cough Questionnaire and objective cough monitors. Future studies are needed to identify targets for therapeutic development. PMID:26349475

  16. Cutaneous sarcoidosis and polycythemia vera.

    PubMed

    Pascual, J C; Belinchón, I; Albares, P; Vergara, G; Betlloch, I; Bañuls, J

    2004-11-01

    Polycythemia vera is classified with myelogenous leukaemia, agnogenic myeloid metaplasia and primary thrombocythemia as a myeloproliferative syndrome. Cutaneous symptoms have been reported with polycythemia vera, including facial plethora, aquagenic pruritus, urticaria, purpura, Sweet's syndrome and pyoderma gangrenosum. However, polycythemia vera associated with systemic sarcoidosis has been rarely reported. An unusual case of polycythemia vera associated with cutaneous sarcoidosis is described. PMID:15482300

  17. Morbidity and Mortality in Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Gerke, Alicia K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review Chronic sarcoidosis is a complex disease with numerous comorbid conditions and can be fatal in some cases. Recognizing causes of morbidity and mortality is important to effectively select treatments, manage symptoms, and improve outcomes. The purpose of this review is to examine emerging knowledge on morbidity and mortality in sarcoidosis. Recent Findings Approximately one to five percent of patients with sarcoidosis die from complications of sarcoidosis. Recent population studies indicate that mortality may be increasing over the past decade. The reasons behind these trends are unclear, but could include increasing incidence, detection rates, severity of disease, or age of the population. Morbidity of sarcoidosis is reflected by a trend of increased hospitalizations over recent years and increased use of healthcare resources. Morbidity can be caused by organ damage from granulomatous inflammation, treatment complications, and psychosocial effects of the disease. Recent studies are focused on morbidity related to cardiopulmonary complications, bone health, and aging within the sarcoidosis population. Last, sarcoidosis is associated with autoimmune diseases, pulmonary embolism, and malignancy; however, the underlying mechanisms linking diseases continue to be debated. Summary Morbidity in sarcoidosis is significant and multifactorial. Mortality is infrequent, but may be increasing over the years. PMID:25029298

  18. Granulomatous Lithiasic Cholecystitis in Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Handra-Luca, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Gallbladder granulomas are exceedingly rare, reported in association with tuberculosis or sarcoidosis. Here we report a case of gallbladder granulomatous cholecystitis occurring in the context of sarcoidosis. A 70-years old man presented with abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. The medical history revealed sarcoidosis diagnosed more than 20-years previously. 2-years previously the patient showed renal lithiasis, hypercalcemia and, increased angiotensin converting enzyme. The imaging features suggested thoraco-abdominal sarcoidosis. Prednisone was given at 1.2 mg/kg/day initially, than decreased, being at 2.5 mg/day at present. The ultrasound examination showed gallbladder lithiasis. A cholecystectomy was performed. Microscopy showed subacute and chronic cholecystitis with several epithelioid and giant cell granulomas some of them perineural. In conclusion, we report a case of granulomatous cholecystitis occurring in the course of treated sarcoidosis. The perineural location of granulomas may give further insights into the pathogenesis of gallbladder dysmotility. PMID:27162601

  19. Granuloma Formation in Pulmonary Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Broos, Caroline E.; van Nimwegen, Menno; Hoogsteden, Henk C.; Hendriks, Rudi W.; Kool, Mirjam; van den Blink, Bernt

    2013-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disorder of unknown cause, affecting multiple organs, but mainly the lungs. The exact order of immunological events remains obscure. Reviewing current literature, combined with careful clinical observations, we propose a model for granuloma formation in pulmonary sarcoidosis. A tight collaboration between macrophages, dendritic cells, and lymphocyte subsets, initiates the first steps toward granuloma formation, orchestrated by cytokines and chemokines. In a substantial part of pulmonary sarcoidosis patients, granuloma formation becomes an on-going process, leading to debilitating disease, and sometimes death. The immunological response, determining granuloma sustainment is not well understood. An impaired immunosuppressive function of regulatory T cells has been suggested to contribute to the exaggerated response. Interestingly, therapeutical agents commonly used in sarcoidosis, such as glucocorticosteroids and anti-TNF agents, interfere with granuloma integrity and restore the immune homeostasis in autoimmune disorders. Increasing insight into their mechanisms of action may contribute to the search for new therapeutical targets in pulmonary sarcoidosis. PMID:24339826

  20. [Cardiac sarcoidosis - clinical manifestation and diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Błaut-Jurkowska, Justyna; Podolec, Piotr; Olszowska, Maria

    2016-08-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disease defined histologically by the formation of noncaseating granulomas. The etiology of sarcoidosis remains unknown. Heart involvement in the course of sarcoidosis concerns about 5% of patients. The most common manifestation of cardiac sarcoidosis are conduction abnormalities, arrhythmias and heart failure. The diagnostic algorithm includes performing a clinical history, a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and an echocardiogram. If any of the initial screening investigations yields an abnormality, diagnostics should be continue using advanced imaging techniques: cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) or fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Nowadays endomyocardial biopsy is not performed routinely.The clinical picture of cardiac sarcoidosis is highly variable. Screening for cardiac sarcoidosis should be performed in all patients diagnosed with extracardiac sarcoidosis. Cardiac sarcoidosis should also be suspected in young patients without a diagnosis of sarcoidosis who present with conduction abnormalities of unknown etiology, because cardiac sarcoidosis may be the first or the only manifestation of the disease. PMID:27591449

  1. [Cardiac sarcoidosis - clinical manifestation and diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Błaut-Jurkowska, Justyna; Podolec, Piotr; Olszowska, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disease defined histologically by the formation of noncaseating granulomas. The etiology of sarcoidosis remains unknown. Heart involvement in the course of sarcoidosis concerns about 5% of patients. The most common manifestation of cardiac sarcoidosis are conduction abnormalities, arrhythmias and heart failure. The diagnostic algorithm includes performing a clinical history, a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and an echocardiogram. If any of the initial screening investigations yields an abnormality, diagnostics should be continue using advanced imaging techniques: cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) or fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Nowadays endomyocardial biopsy is not performed routinely.The clinical picture of cardiac sarcoidosis is highly variable. Screening for cardiac sarcoidosis should be performed in all patients diagnosed with extracardiac sarcoidosis. Cardiac sarcoidosis should also be suspected in young patients without a diagnosis of sarcoidosis who present with conduction abnormalities of unknown etiology, because cardiac sarcoidosis may be the first or the only manifestation of the disease. PMID:27590654

  2. Orbital Granuloma Annulare as Presentation of Systemic Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Joann J.; Aakalu, Vinay K.; Lin, Amy; Setabutr, Pete

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To report a unique case of an orbital mass with atypical histopathologic features that although overlap with other granulomatous disorders, likely represents orbital involvement of systemic sarcoidosis. Methods: Observational case report. Results: A 51-year-old woman presented with an orbital mass and was found to have mild proptosis and restriction of ocular motility. The remainder of her ophthalmic exam was unremarkable. Excisional biopsy revealed ill-defined granulomas with central necrosis, chronic inflammation and sclerotic collagen; several features consistent with granuloma annulare. Further systemic workup including laboratory and radiologic studies were compatible with a diagnosis of systemic sarcoidosis. Conclusion: Our case emphasizes the importance of a complete systemic workup with the detection of an orbital granuloma to ensure accurate diagnosis and appropriate management. PMID:23895369

  3. Atherosclerotic Vessel Changes in Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Tuleta, I; Pingel, S; Biener, L; Pizarro, C; Hammerstingl, C; Öztürk, C; Schahab, N; Grohé, C; Nickenig, G; Schaefer, C; Skowasch, D

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory vessel disease. The aim of our present study was to investigate whether sarcoidosis could be associated with increased risk of atherosclerotic vessel changes. Angiological analysis and blood tests were performed in 71 sarcoidosis patients and 12 matched controls in this prospective cross-sectional study. Specifically, angiological measurements comprised ankle brachial index (ABI), central pulse wave velocity (cPWV), pulse wave index (PWI), and duplex sonography of central and peripheral arteries. Sarcoidosis activity markers (angiotensin converting enzyme, soluble interleukin-2 receptor) and cardiovascular risk parameters such as cholesterol, lipoprotein(a), C-reactive protein, interleukin 6, fibrinogen, d-dimer, and blood count were analyzed in blood. We found no relevant differences in ABI, cPWV, and plaque burden between the sarcoidosis and control groups (1.10 ± 0.02 vs. 1.10 ± 0.02, 6.7 ± 0.5 vs. 6.1 ± 1.2, 53.7 % vs. 54.5 %, respectively). However, PWI was significantly higher in sarcoidosis patients (146.2 ± 6.8) compared with controls (104.9 ± 8.8), irrespectively of the activity of sarcoidosis and immunosuppressive medication. Except for increased lipoprotein(a) and d-dimer in sarcoidosis, the remaining cardiovascular markers were similar in both groups. We conclude that sarcoidosis is associated with increased pulse wave index, which may indicate an early stage of atherosclerosis. PMID:26820732

  4. Pulmonary Sarcoidosis: Diagnosis and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Eva M; Kalra, Sanjay; Ryu, Jay H

    2016-07-01

    Sarcoidosis is a chronic granulomatous disease of unknown cause that is seen worldwide and occurs mainly in patients between the ages of 20 and 60 years. It can be difficult to diagnose because it can mimic many other diseases including lymphoproliferative disorders and granulomatous infections and because there is no specific test for diagnosis, which depends on correlation of clinicoradiologic and histopathologic features. This review will focus on recent discoveries regarding the pathogenesis of sarcoidosis, common clinical presentations, diagnostic evaluation, and indications for treatment. This review is aimed largely at general practitioners and emphasizes the importance of differentiating pulmonary sarcoidosis from its common imitators. PMID:27378039

  5. Development of a sarcoidosis murine lung granuloma model using Mycobacterium superoxide dismutase A peptide.

    PubMed

    Swaisgood, Carmen M; Oswald-Richter, Kyra; Moeller, Stephen D; Klemenc, Jennifer M; Ruple, Lisa M; Farver, Carol F; Drake, John M; Culver, Daniel A; Drake, Wonder P

    2011-02-01

    Sarcoidosis is characterized by noncaseating granulomas containing CD4(+) T cells with a Th1 immunophenotype. Although the causative antigens remain unknown, independent studies noted molecular and immunologic evidence of mycobacterial virulence factors in sarcoidosis specimens. A major limiting factor in discovering new insights into the pathogenesis of sarcoidosis is the lack of an animal model. Using a distinct superoxide dismutase A peptide (sodA) associated with sarcoidosis granulomas, we developed a pulmonary model of sarcoidosis granulomatous inflammation. Mice were sensitized by a subcutaneous injection of sodA, incorporated in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA). Control subjects consisted of mice with no sensitization (ConNS), sensitized with IFA only (ConIFA), or with Schistosoma mansoni eggs. Fourteen days later, sensitized mice were challenged by tail-vein injection of naked beads, covalently coupled to sodA peptides or to schistosome egg antigens (SEA). Histologic analysis revealed hilar lymphadenopathy and noncaseating granulomas in the lungs of sodA-treated or SEA-treated mice. Flow cytometry of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) demonstrated CD4(+) T-cell responses against sodA peptide in the sodA-sensitized mice only. Cytometric bead analysis revealed significant differences in IL-2 and IFN-γ secretion in the BAL fluid of sodA-treated mice, compared with mice that received SEA or naked beads (P = 0.008, Wilcoxon rank sum test). ConNS and ConIFA mice demonstrated no significant formation of granuloma, and no Th1 immunophenotype. The use of microbial peptides distinct for sarcoidosis reveals a histologic and immunologic profile in the murine model that correlates well with those profiles noted in human sarcoidosis, providing the framework to investigate the molecular basis for the progression or resolution of sarcoidosis. PMID:20348207

  6. Administering the Sarcoidosis Health Questionnaire to sarcoidosis patients in Serbia

    PubMed Central

    Mihailović-Vučinić, Violeta; Gvozdenović, Branislav; Stjepanović, Mihailo; Vuković, Mira; Marković-Denić, Ljiljana; Milovanović, Aleksandar; Videnović-Ivanov, Jelica; Žugić, Vladimir; Škodrić-Trifunović, Vesna; Filipović, Snežana; Omčikus, Maja

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to use a Serbian-language version of the disease-specific, self-report Sarcoidosis Health Questionnaire (SHQ), which was designed and originally validated in the United States, to assess health status in sarcoidosis patients in Serbia, as well as validating the instrument for use in the country. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 346 patients with biopsy-confirmed sarcoidosis. To evaluate the health status of the patients, we used the SHQ, which was translated into Serbian for the purposes of this study. We compared SHQ scores by patient gender and age, as well as by disease duration and treatment. Lower SHQ scores indicate poorer health status. Results: The SHQ scores demonstrated differences in health status among subgroups of the sarcoidosis patients evaluated. Health status was found to be significantly poorer among female patients and older patients, as well as among those with chronic sarcoidosis or extrapulmonary manifestations of the disease. Monotherapy with methotrexate was found to be associated with better health status than was monotherapy with prednisone or combination therapy with prednisone and methotrexate. Conclusions: The SHQ is a reliable, disease-specific, self-report instrument. Although originally designed for use in the United States, the SHQ could be a useful tool for the assessment of health status in various non-English-speaking populations of sarcoidosis patients. PMID:27167430

  7. Radioisotope scanning in osseous sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, P.K.

    1980-01-01

    Technetium-99m (/sup 99m/Tc)-labeled pyrophosphate or diphosphonate compounds and gallium-67 citrate (/sup 67/Ga) are two radionuclide scanning agents that are in widespread use in clinical practice. Technetium-99m pyrophosphate is used extensively for bone scanning to detect metastatic bone disease, benign bone tumors, osteomyelitis, benign hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, and Paget's disease. Only two reports describe abnormal /sup 99m/Tc/ pyrophosphate bone scans in four patients with osseous sarcoidosis. Gallium-67 scans are used primarily to localize neoplastic or inflammatory lesions anywhere in the body. In recent years /sup 67/Ga scans have also been used to detect the presence of both pulmonary and extrapulmonary sarcoidosis, but there are no reports describing abnormal uptake of gallium in patients with osseous sarcoidosis. This report describes experience with radioisotope scanning in two patients with osseous sarcoidosis.

  8. Ultrasound findings in cutaneous sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Dybiec, Ewa; Pietrzak, Aldona; Kieszko, Robert; Kanitakis, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of cutaneous sarcoidosis relies mainly on the patient's history, presence of characteristic skin lesions and histological examination that shows a granulomatous, non-necrotizing dermal infiltration. The aim of the study was to assess the ultrasonographic features of cutaneous lesions of sarcoidosis before and after treatment. A 38-year-old woman with systemic sarcoidosis and specific cutaneous lesions was treated with systemic steroids followed by hydroxychloroquine. Ultrasonographic examination of the cutaneous sarcoidosis lesions was performed with a Philips iU 22 and Siemens Acuson S 2000 device, with the use of linear 15 MHz and 17 MHz transducers. Histological examination of skin lesions showed characteristic, naked, non-necrotizing granulomas in the upper dermis. Ultrasound examination revealed well-demarcated, hypoechogenic changes. Power-Doppler scan revealed increased vascularity within the lesions and the surrounding tissue. Clinical improvement of the skin lesions was confirmed by ultrasound examination, which showed a decrease in their size and normalization of dermal echogenicity and vascularity. Ultrasound examination can show cutaneous sarcoidosis lesions and their regression after appropriate treatment. PMID:25821428

  9. Cardiac Sarcoidosis Masked by Malignant Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tobita, Takashige; Hattori, Hidetoshi; Serizawa, Naoki; Suzuki, Tsuyoshi; Uto, Kenta; Momose, Mitsuru; Kameyama, Kaori; Shiga, Tsuyoshi; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa

    2016-08-01

    There is an association between sarcoidosis and lymphoma, termed "sarcoidosis-lymphoma syndrome." Sarcoidosis is generally detected before lymphoma, but it could present after or even concurrently with the diagnosis of lymphoma. We describe a patient presenting with ventricular tachycardia and lymphadenopathy. A diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma was made histologically. The patient responded to treatment, but had persistent (18)F-fluoro-deoxyglucose uptake in the lymph nodes and heart on follow-up positron emission tomography. Second biopsies of lymph node and endomyocardial both confirmed sarcoidosis. This finding suggests that we should maintain a high degree of suspicion for cardiac sarcoidosis in lymphoma patients. PMID:27094123

  10. A case of childhood sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Hunt, S J; O'toole, E; Philips, W; Hardman, C; Wakelin, S H; Walters, S

    2002-09-01

    Cutaneous sarcoidosis is rare in children. We report a case of a 5-year-old Bangladeshi girl who presented with fever, a papular eruption on the lower limbs and trunk, malaise, anorexia and weight loss. There was multisystem involvement with marked hepatosplenomegaly, generalized lymphadenopathy, parotid fullness and chronic uveitis. Pulmonary infiltrates were seen on the chest X-ray. Histology of a skin biopsy showed naked noncaseating granulomata and PCR for Mycobacterium tuberculosis was negative. A clinical diagnosis of sarcoidosis was made. The patient was treated with oral prednisolone (2 mg/kg per day). An excellent clinical response with resolution of the rash and improvement of extracutaneous signs was noted within 3 months and she remains well on low-dose prednisolone on alternate days. We discuss the presentation and management of sarcoidosis in children, and highlight the potential difficulty in differentiating this from disseminated tuberculosis. PMID:12372081

  11. Renal Failure Found during the Follow-up of Sarcoidosis: The Relevance of a Delay in the Diagnosis of Concurrent Hypercalcemia.

    PubMed

    Hishida, Erika; Masuda, Takahiro; Akimoto, Tetsu; Sato, Ryuta; Wakabayashi, Natsuko; Miki, Atsushi; Otani, Naoko; Imai, Toshimi; Sugase, Taro; Takeda, Shin-Ichi; Muto, Shigeaki; Nagata, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    We herein present a case of relapsed sarcoidosis with a deteriorated renal function accompanied by hypercalcemia, nephrolithiasis, and a ureteral stone in a woman with a history of ocular sarcoidosis. The ocular involvement appeared to be well controlled for a long period of time with a topical ophthalmic steroid; however, we believe that the absence of apparent recrudescence could have led to the delay in our diagnosis of relapse of the disease during the follow-up period. The conundrums regarding longitudinal surveillance for both evaluating the disease activity and determining the necessity of therapeutics are also discussed. PMID:27432099

  12. Ocular Complications of Chloroquine Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Lois A.; Hiltz, John W.

    1965-01-01

    Ocular complications of long-term chloroquine therapy were observed in 18 of 45 patients so treated. This therapy was used in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, lupus erythematosus, sarcoidosis, discoid lupus and other chronic “collagen disease”. Thirteen patients had reversible corneal opacifications, and seven had irreversible retinal changes, with visual loss and visual field defects. Pathological evidence of chloroquine retinopathy was obtained in one patient. Physicians are therefore warned to use this drug only after careful consideration. If it is used, repeated ocular examinations should include assessment of visual acuity, visual fields on a tangent screen and fundus examination through a dilated pupil. ImagesFig. 4Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:14275038

  13. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Sarcoidosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Sarcoidosis? Many people who have sarcoidosis have no signs ... symptom is more common in women than men. Sarcoidosis Signs and Symptoms The illustration shows the major ...

  14. [Hypercalcemia revealing sarcoidosis in a child].

    PubMed

    Kinné, M; Filleron, A; Salet, R; Saumet, L; Baron Joly, S; Tran, T A

    2016-05-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatosis disease with a classic triad of presentation: typical clinical and radiological signs, presence of tuberculoid granuloma without caseum in histopathology, and exclusion of other causes of granulomatosis, especially tuberculosis. Sarcoidosis is rare in the general population, and even more so in children. In the literature, few cases of sarcoidosis associated with hypercalcemia have been reported in children. We report here the case of a 14-year-old boy with bone marrow and lymph node sarcoidosis suspected, based on poor general condition with hypercalcemia. The patient was treated with hydration, diuretics, and bisphosphonates with good results. We also performed a literature review of published cases of hypercalcemia since 1990 with a diagnosis of sarcoidosis in children, comparing 23 cases (including ours) on clinical and epidemiological, biological, imaging, and histopathological diagnosis. When hypercalcemia is present in the initial clinical presentation, the diagnosis of sarcoidosis is usually made in younger children. Classical locations of the lesions, including lung, skin, and lymph nodes, were highly suggestive of sarcoidosis. Corticosteroids are commonly used to treat sarcoidosis lesions including hypercalcemia. In conclusion, sarcoidosis in children remains difficult to diagnose because the disease is rare and it is common to have nonspecific symptoms in the clinical picture (with diagnosis delayed between 3 months and several years). The classic triad is not always present. Sarcoidosis should be systematically considered and investigated in case of hypercalcemia of unknown cause in children. PMID:27021884

  15. Diagnosis and Management of Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Soto-Gomez, Natalia; Peters, Jay I; Nambiar, Anoop M

    2016-05-15

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease of unknown etiology characterized by the presence of noncaseating granulomas in any organ, most commonly the lungs and intrathoracic lymph nodes. A diagnosis of sarcoidosis should be suspected in any young or middle-aged adult presenting with unexplained cough, shortness of breath, or constitutional symptoms, especially among blacks or Scandinavians. Diagnosis relies on three criteria: (1) a compatible clinical and radiologic presentation, (2) pathologic evidence of noncaseating granulomas, and (3) exclusion of other diseases with similar findings, such as infections or malignancy. An early and accurate diagnosis of sarcoidosis remains challenging, because initial presentations may vary, many patients are asymptomatic, and there is no single reliable diagnostic test. Prognosis is variable and depends on epidemiologic factors, mode of onset, initial clinical course, and specific organ involvement. The optimal treatment for sarcoidosis remains unclear, but corticosteroid therapy has been the mainstay of therapy for those with significantly symptomatic or progressive pulmonary disease or serious extrapulmonary disease. Refractory or complex cases may require immunosuppressive therapy. Despite aggressive treatment, some patients may develop life-threatening pulmonary, cardiac, or neurologic complications from severe, progressive disease. End-stage disease may ultimately require lung or heart transplantation for eligible patients. PMID:27175719

  16. Cardiac sarcoidosis: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Dubrey, S W; Sharma, R; Underwood, R; Mittal, T

    2015-07-01

    Cardiac sarcoidosis is one of the most serious and unpredictable aspects of this disease state. Heart involvement frequently presents with arrhythmias or conduction disease, although myocardial infiltration resulting in congestive heart failure may also occur. The prognosis in cardiac sarcoidosis is highly variable, which relates to the heterogeneous nature of heart involvement and marked differences between racial groups. Electrocardiography and echocardiography often provide the first clue to the diagnosis, but advanced imaging studies using positron emission tomography and MRI, in combination with nuclear isotope perfusion scanning are now essential to the diagnosis and management of this condition. The identification of clinically occult cardiac sarcoidosis and the management of isolated and/or asymptomatic heart involvement remain both challenging and contentious. Corticosteroids remain the first treatment choice with the later substitution of immunosuppressive and steroid-sparing therapies. Heart transplantation is an unusual outcome, but when performed, the results are comparable or better than heart transplantation for other disease states. We review the epidemiology, developments in diagnostic techniques and the management of cardiac sarcoidosis. PMID:26130811

  17. Gallium scan in intracerebral sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Makhija, M.C.; Anayiotos, C.P.

    1981-07-01

    Sarcoidosis involving the nervous system probably occurs in about 4% of patients. The usefulness of brain scintigraphy in these cases has been suggested. In this case of cerebral sarcoid granuloma, gallium imaging demonstrated the lesion before treatment and showed disappearance of the lesion after corticosteroid treatment, which correlated with the patient's clinical improvement.

  18. Multisystemic Sarcoidosis Presenting as Pretibial Leg Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Baunacke, Anja; Hansel, Gesina

    2016-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic disease of unknown etiology. Up to 30% of patients develop cutaneous manifestations, either specific or nonspecific. Ulcerating sarcoidosis leading to leg ulcers is a rare observation that may lead to confusions with other, more common types of chronic leg ulcers. We report the case of a 45-year-old female patient with chronic multisystemic sarcoidosis presenting with pretibial leg ulcers. Other etiology could be excluded. Histology revealed nonspecific findings. Therefore, the diagnosis of nonspecific leg ulcers in sarcoidosis was confirmed. Treatment consisted of oral prednisolone and good ulcer care. Complete healing was achieved within 6 months. Sarcoidosis is a rare cause of leg ulcers and usually sarcoid granulomas can be found. Our patient illustrates that even in the absence of sarcoid granulomas, leg ulcers can be due to sarcoidosis. PMID:27272316

  19. Sarcoidosis of the upper and lower airways.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, Adam S; Teirstein, Alvin S

    2011-12-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of undetermined etiology characterized by a variable clinical presentation and disease course. Although clinical granulomatous inflammation may occur within any organ system, more than 90% of sarcoidosis patients have lung disease. Sarcoidosis is considered an interstitial lung disease that is frequently characterized by restrictive physiologic dysfunction on pulmonary function tests. However, sarcoidosis also involves the airways (large and small), causing obstructive airways disease. It is one of a few interstitial lung diseases that affects the entire length of the respiratory tract - from the nose to the terminal bronchioles - and causes a broad spectrum of airways dysfunction. This article examines airway dysfunction in sarcoidosis. The anatomical structure of the airways is the organizational framework for our discussion. We discuss sarcoidosis involving the nose, sinuses, nasal passages, larynx, trachea, bronchi and small airways. Common complications of airways disease, such as, atelectasis, fibrosis, bullous leions, bronchiectasis, cavitary lesions and mycetomas, are also reviewed. PMID:22082167

  20. Cryptococcal meningitis in a patient with sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Maeghan

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease characterized by the presence of noncaseating granulomas. Case reports have previously described an association between sarcoidosis and cryptococcal infection, but many of these patients were receiving immunosuppression at the time of diagnosis or had limited cutaneous disease. We report a case of cryptococcal meningitis in a 65-year-old man with a new presentation of sarcoidosis who was not receiving immunosuppressive medications. PMID:27034573

  1. Pulmonary sarcoidosis in a preschool patient.

    PubMed

    Shanthikumar, Shivanthan; Harrison, Jo

    2015-12-01

    Sarcoidosis is a rare disease, especially in the preschool age group where it usually presents with eye, joint, and skin involvement sparing the lungs. Multiple treatment regimes have been described with oral prednisolone being the usual first line treatment. We describe a case of a 4-year-old boy presenting with pulmonary sarcoidosis with no other organ involvement. The child was successfully managed with pulse intravenous methylprednisolone followed by oral prednisolone and has had a good outcome. This case reports a rare presentation of preschool sarcoidosis as well as the novel and successful use of pulse methylprednisolone in paediatric pulmonary sarcoidosis. PMID:26120005

  2. Musculoskeletal and cutaneous sarcoidosis: exuberant case report.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Natalie; Oliveira Filho, Jayme de; Nasser, Kassila da Rosa; Corbett, Ana Maria França; Tebet, Ana Carolina Franco; Reis, Mariana Lacerda Junqueira

    2014-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease of unknown cause. The osteoarticular involvement in sarcoidosis is rare and is often associated with cutaneous and long-standing chronic multisystem disease. More common in black women, osseous sarcoidosis is difficult to diagnose, with an incidence of 3 to 13%. The most characteristic radiological clinical picture evidences rounded, well-defined cysts, with no periosteal reaction and without peripheral sclerosis. The small bones of hands and feet are the most frequently involved sites. This report aims to demonstrate a rare case of osteoarticular sarcoidosis with characteristic clinical presentation, and highlight the importance of detecting osteoarticular involvement in this pathology. PMID:25054759

  3. Imaging of Sarcoidosis: A Contemporary Review.

    PubMed

    Guidry, Carey; Fricke, Robert Gaines; Ram, Roopa; Pandey, Tarun; Jambhekar, Kedar

    2016-05-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disorder with a variety of clinical presentations and radiological appearances. Although it primarily affects the lungs and lymphatics, sarcoidosis potentially involves essentially every organ system. On imaging, sarcoidosis can mimic different disease entities, including primary and metastatic neoplasms, vasculitis, and other granulomatous infections. Definitive diagnosis often requires a combination of clinical, radiological, and histologic information. Imaging plays a crucial role in diagnosis and evaluating response to therapy. This review covers imaging findings in sarcoidosis within each organ system, with an emphasis on the use of imaging in the diagnosis and management of this condition. PMID:27153786

  4. Systemic Sarcoidosis Unmasked by Cushing's Disease Surgical Treatment.

    PubMed

    Bongetta, Daniele; Zoia, Cesare; Lombardi, Francesco; Lovati, Elisabetta; Lucotti, Pietro; Gaetani, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Diseases responsive to glucocorticoids, like sarcoidosis, are rarely masked by Cushing's syndrome. An ACTH secreting pituitary adenoma is a possible cause of Cushing's syndrome and its resection can make a subclinical sarcoidosis clear. Only few cases of sarcoidosis following the treatment of hypercortisolism are reported in literature. We report a case of sarcoidosis after the resection of an ACTH secreting pituitary adenoma. PMID:27525010

  5. Systemic Sarcoidosis Unmasked by Cushing's Disease Surgical Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Francesco; Lovati, Elisabetta; Gaetani, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Diseases responsive to glucocorticoids, like sarcoidosis, are rarely masked by Cushing's syndrome. An ACTH secreting pituitary adenoma is a possible cause of Cushing's syndrome and its resection can make a subclinical sarcoidosis clear. Only few cases of sarcoidosis following the treatment of hypercortisolism are reported in literature. We report a case of sarcoidosis after the resection of an ACTH secreting pituitary adenoma. PMID:27525010

  6. Cutaneous sarcoidosis simulating porokeratosis of Mibelli.

    PubMed

    Elfatoiki, Fatima Zahra; Soussi, Wessal; Chiheb, Soumia; Jabri, Lamia; Benchikhi, Hakima

    2015-01-01

    We report a skin localization of systemic sarcoidosis, which presented with lesions that resemble porokeratosis of Mibelli. Skin biopsy showed non-caseating sarcoidal granuloma. Whereas cutaneous sarcoidosis is present in up to one-third of cases and may present with a wide variety of lesions, our presentation is uncommon. Partial remission was obtained with hydroxychloroquine and prednisone. PMID:26113926

  7. Cutaneous sarcoidosis simulating porokeratosis of Mibelli

    PubMed Central

    Elfatoiki, Fatima Zahra; Soussi, Wessal; Chiheb, Soumia; Jabri, Lamia; Benchikhi, Hakima

    2015-01-01

    We report a skin localization of systemic sarcoidosis, which presented with lesions that resemble porokeratosis of Mibelli. Skin biopsy showed non-caseating sarcoidal granuloma. Whereas cutaneous sarcoidosis is present in up to one-third of cases and may present with a wide variety of lesions, our presentation is uncommon. Partial remission was obtained with hydroxychloroquine and prednisone PMID:26113926

  8. Evaluation of Known or Suspected Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Blankstein, Ron; Waller, Alfonso H

    2016-03-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem disorder of unknown cause, and cardiac sarcoidosis affects at least 25% of patients and accounts for substantial mortality and morbidity from this disease. Cardiac sarcoidosis may present with heart failure, left ventricular systolic dysfunction, AV block, atrial or ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Cardiac involvement can be challenging to detect and diagnose because of the focal nature of the disease, as well as the fact that clinical criteria have limited diagnostic accuracy. Nevertheless, the diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis can be enhanced by integrating both clinical and imaging findings. This article reviews the various roles that different imaging modalities provide in the evaluation and management of patients with known or suspected cardiac sarcoidosis. PMID:26926267

  9. Pulmonary mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma associated with pulmonary sarcoidosis: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kokuho, Nariaki; Terasaki, Yasuhiro; Urushiyama, Hirokazu; Terasaki, Mika; Kunugi, Shinobu; Morimoto, Taisuke; Azuma, Arata; Usuda, Jitsuo; Gemma, Akihiko; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Shimizu, Akira

    2016-05-01

    Differentiating low-grade lymphoma from preexisting sarcoidosis is difficult because of their pathological similarity. This article describes a case of pulmonary mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma associated with pulmonary sarcoidosis. The patient, a 45-year-old Japanese man, presented with a 10-year history of pulmonary sarcoidosis and 5-year history of ocular sarcoidosis with histologic findings. Because only the right S3 lung nodule had gradually enlarged, partial resection was performed. Pathological study revealed noncaseous epithelioid granulomas with lymphoplasmacytic proliferation but also marked lymphoid cell proliferation with lymphoepithelial lesion findings that differed from findings of typical sarcoid lesions. Our lymphoepithelial lesion evaluation via immunohistochemistry and analysis of Ig heavy-chain gene rearrangements with assessment of Propionibacterium acnes-specific antibody reactions allow us to report, for the first time, this case of pulmonary mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma associated with pulmonary sarcoidosis in exactly the same location, which may be significant for differentiating these diseases and understanding their pathogenic association. PMID:27067783

  10. Clinical management of pulmonary sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Lower, Elyse E; Li, Huiping; Baughman, Robert P

    2016-05-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem disease for which diagnosis relies on the integration of clinical, radiologic, laboratory, and pathologic information. Assessment of clinical features is an important part of the disease evaluation. Computer Tomography provides information not available on routine chest roentgenogram which can assist diagnosing and establishing extent of disease. Monitoring for pulmonary and extra-pulmonary disease facilitates disease management. Patients with quality of life affecting symptoms or threatened end organ damage require systemic treatment which can be recommended in a stepwise fashion. Here, we provide guidance for the initial assessment, disease monitoring, and treatment recommendations for pulmonary and extra pulmonary disease. PMID:26959110

  11. Computed tomography in pulmonary sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, D.A.; Webb, W.R.; Gamsu, G.; Stulbarg, M.; Golden, J.

    1989-05-01

    We studied the high resolution CT (HRCT) scans of 15 patients with biopsy-proven sarcoidosis and correlated the findings with pulmonary function tests (12 patients), 67Ga scans (10 patients), bronchoalveolar lavage (five patients), recent transbronchial biopsy (six patients), and recent open lung biopsy (three patients). The HRCT features included small nodules, thickened interlobular septa, patchy focal increase in lung density, honeycombing, and central conglomeration of vessels and bronchi. Active alveolitis was present by gallium scanning criteria in 5 of 10 cases. By bronchoalveolar lavage criteria, activity was present in three of five cases. Patchy increase in density may correlate with active alveolitis as seen on /sup 67/Ga scanning. High resolution CT was better than chest X-radiography for demonstration of patchy increase in density and for distinguishing nodules from septal thickening. Both nodules and patchy density were partly reversible following therapy. Nodular densities seen on CT correlated with the presence of granulomata on histology. Resting pulmonary function tests correlated poorly with presence and extent of lung disease on HRCT. The presence on HRCT of focal fine nodules, patchy focal increase in lung density, and central crowding of bronchi and vessels should suggest the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. In some patients, HRCT can identify unsuspected parenchymal lung disease and document the reversible components of sarcoid lung disease.

  12. [Ocular syphilis].

    PubMed

    Chiquet, C; Khayi, H; Puech, C; Tonini, M; Pavese, P; Aptel, F; Romanet, J-P

    2014-04-01

    Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by Treponema pallidum. Previously known as the "great imitator", this disease can have numerous and complex manifestations. The ophthalmologist should suspect the diagnosis in patients with uveitis or optic neuropathy and high-risk sexual behavior and/or another sexually transmitted disease (such as HIV) or those presenting with posterior placoid chorioretinitis or necrotising retinitis. Ocular involvement in acquired syphilis is rare, tending to occur during the secondary and tertiary stages of the disease. Syphilis may affect all the structures of the eye, but uveitis (accounting for 1-5% of the uveitis in a tertiary referral center) is the most common ocular finding. Granulomatous or non-granulomatous iridocyclitis (71%), panuveitis, posterior uveitis (8%) and keratouveitis (8%) are often described. In the secondary stage, the meninges and the central nervous system can be affected, sometimes with no symptoms, which justifies performing lumbar puncture in patients with uveitis and/or optic neuropathy. The diagnosis of ocular syphilis requires screening with a non-treponemal serology and confirmation with a treponemal-specific test. Parenterally administered penicillin G is considered first-line therapy for all stages of ocular syphilis. Systemic corticosteroids are an appropriate adjunct treatment for posterior uveitis, scleritis and optic neuritis if ocular inflammation is severe. Prolonged follow-up is necessary because of the possibility of relapse of the disease. With proper diagnosis and prompt antibiotic treatment, the majority of cases of ocular syphilis can be cured. PMID:24655791

  13. Sarcoidosis and mechanisms of unexpected death.

    PubMed

    Byard, Roger W; Manton, Nicholas; Tsokos, Michael

    2008-03-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem disease of uncertain etiology characterized by multifocal areas of discrete and confluent granulomatous inflammation that may rarely be responsible for sudden and unexpected death. Two cases are reported to demonstrate disparate pathological features in fatal cases, one involving cardiac sarcoidosis, and the other neurosarcoidosis with hypothalamic infiltration. Sarcoidosis in individuals dying suddenly may be completely unrelated to the death, contributory or causal. Cardiovascular causes of sudden death in sarcoidosis include arrhythmias associated with cardiomyopathy and ischemia, ventricular rupture, and cor pulmonale due to pulmonary hypertension; respiratory causes include hemorrhage and upper airway obstruction; central nervous system causes include arrhythmias from infiltration of autonomic centers, epilepsy, and obstructive hydrocephalus from brainstem involvement; and gastrointestinal deaths may be due to hemorrhage from esophageal varices associated with portal hypertension. The diagnosis relies on the demonstration of typical noncaseating granulomas and the exclusion of other infective and environmental diseases with similar histopathological findings. PMID:18366580

  14. Subcutaneous sarcoidosis: a clinical analysis of nine patients.

    PubMed

    Ando, Masaru; Miyazaki, Eishi; Hatano, Yutaka; Nishio, Suehiro; Torigoe, Chihiro; Yamasue, Mari; Mukai, Yutaka; Nureki, Shin-Ichi; Kadota, Jun-Ichi

    2016-09-01

    Subcutaneous sarcoidosis is the specific subset of cutaneous sarcoidosis frequently associated with systemic disease. However, the disease activity, severity, and prognosis have not yet been elucidated due to the limited number of reported cases. The purpose of this study was to identify the clinical, laboratory, and prognostic differences between subcutaneous sarcoidosis and other type of cutaneous sarcoidosis. All patients with sarcoidosis diagnosed histopathologically from 2000 to 2012 at our institution were enrolled. The clinical, laboratory, chest X-ray, and pulmonary function test results were retrospectively evaluated in the patients with cutaneous sarcoidosis. In the 130 patients with sarcoidosis, cutaneous sarcoidosis was diagnosed in 37 patients (28.4 %), and 9 (6.9 %) of these patients had subcutaneous sarcoidosis. The serum levels of soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R) were significantly elevated in the group of patients with subcutaneous sarcoidosis in comparison to the patients with other types of cutaneous sarcoidosis, whereas there was no significant difference in the severity score between the two groups. Following a 2-year observation period, three patients were in remission, five patients demonstrated stable disease, and one patient had progressive disease. Subcutaneous sarcoidosis may be associated with the disease activity, although it was not found to be associated with the disease severity and it was not a predictive factor for the prognosis. Furthermore, the prevalence of subcutaneous sarcoidosis may be higher than that in previously reported series. PMID:27449952

  15. Sarcoidosis in Melanoma Patients: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Beutler, Bryce D.; Cohen, Philip R.

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic inflammatory disease characterized by the development of noncaseating granulomas in multiple organ systems. Many hematologic malignancies and solid tumors, including melanoma, have been associated with sarcoidosis. We describe the clinical and pathologic findings of a 54-year-old man with melanoma-associated sarcoidosis. In addition, we not only review the literature describing characteristics of other melanoma patients with sarcoidosis, but also the features of melanoma patients with antineoplastic therapy-associated sarcoidosis. Sarcoidosis has been described in 80 melanoma patients; sufficient information for analysis was provided in 39 of these individuals. In 43.6% of individuals (17 out of 39), sarcoidosis was directly associated with melanoma; in 56.4% of oncologic patients (22 out of 39), sarcoidosis was induced by antineoplastic therapy that had been administered for the treatment of their metastatic melanoma. The discovery of melanoma preceded the development of sarcoidosis in 12 of the 17 (70.5%) individuals who did not receive systemic treatment. Pulmonary and/or cutaneous manifestations of sarcoidosis were common among both groups of patients. Most patients did not require treatment for sarcoidosis. Melanoma patients—either following antineoplastic therapy or without systemic treatment—may be at an increased risk to develop sarcoidosis. In antineoplastic therapy naive melanoma patients, a common etiologic factor—such as exposure to ultraviolet light—may play a role in their developing melanoma and sarcoidosis. PMID:26083934

  16. [An original revealing mode of sarcoidosis: Sweet's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Bricha, Myriem; Sqalli, Fatimazzahra; Hammi, Sanae; Bourkadi, Jamal Eddine

    2016-01-01

    Sweet's syndrome is a neutrophilic dermatosis which usually presents as an idiopathic disorder. The combination of Sweet's syndrome and sarcoidosis is rare. We report the clinical case of a Sweet's syndrome revealing sarcoidosis. PMID:27279949

  17. Clinical manifestations of sarcoidosis among inner-city African-American dwellers.

    PubMed Central

    Mutlu, Gökhan M.; Rubinstein, Israel

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To characterize clinical, radiographic and physiological features of sarcoidosis among African Americans residing in inner-city Chicago. METHODS: This is a retrospective review of medical records of 75 African Americans with biopsy-proven sarcoidosis from internal medicine and pulmonary clinics at three inner-city, acute care hospitals in Chicago. RESULTS: The number of organs involved was 1.77 +/- 0.94 (mean +/- SD). The most common sites for tissue diagnosis were lung (49%), skin (19%) and lymph nodes (16%). Thirty-six (48%) patients had stage-2 and -3 disease on chest x-ray. Electrocardiographic changes and ocular involvement were detected in 23% and 21% of patients, respectively. Nineteen (25%) patients had obstructive defect (FEV1 1.71 +/- 0.78 L/s), 15 (20%) had a restrictive defect [TLC 4.1 +/- 1.2 L (63.9 +/- 9.2% predicted)]. Three patients had both restrictive and obstructive defect. Forced vital capacity and FEV1 declined by 0.26 L and 0.09 L/s per year, respectively, in patients with an obstructive defect. Most patients (91%) were treated with prednisone for 3.8 +/- 3.9 years (range 0-20 years). CONCLUSIONS: African Americans with sarcoidosis residing in inner-city Chicago express a high rate of chronic progressive disease necessitating corticosteroid therapy. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the reasons underlying this paradigm. PMID:16895285

  18. Management of sarcoidosis in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Jeny, Florence; Bouvry, Diane; Freynet, Olivia; Soussan, Michael; Brauner, Michel; Planes, Carole; Nunes, Hilario; Valeyre, Dominique

    2016-06-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease of unknown cause with very diverse presentation, outcome, severity and need for treatments. While some presentations may be very typical, for many patients, the presentation is nonspecific, with shared associations with other diseases at times being by far more frequent or misleading, which can be a cause of significant delay and often several consultations before a diagnosis of sarcoidosis can be confirmed. This is particularly the case when pulmonary manifestations are in the forefront. The diagnosis relies on three well-known criteria. In clinical practice, these criteria are not easily implemented, particularly by physicians without expertise in sarcoidosis, which can lead to a risk of either under- or over-diagnosis. Qualifying the presentation according to sarcoidosis diagnosis is essential. However, it is often not easy to classify the presentation as typical versus compatible or compatible versus inconsistent. Further investigations are needed before any other hypothesis is to be considered. It is important to detect events and to determine whether or not they are indicative of a flare of sarcoidosis. Eventually, treatment needs to be related to the correct indications. The evaluation of the efficacy and safety of treatments is crucial. To address such issues, we present five emblematic cases that illustrate this. PMID:27246591

  19. The Clinical Features of Sarcoidosis: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Judson, Marc A

    2015-08-01

    Sarcoidosis has innumerable clinical manifestations, as the disease may affect every body organ. Furthermore, the severity of sarcoidosis involvement may range from an asymptomatic state to a life-threatening condition. This manuscript reviews a wide variety of common and less common clinical characteristics of sarcoidosis. These manifestations are presented organ by organ, although additional sections describe systemic and multiorgan presentations of sarcoidosis. The lung is the organ most commonly involved with sarcoidosis with at least 90 % of sarcoidosis patients demonstrating lung involvement in most series. The skin, eye, liver, and peripheral lymph node are the next most commonly clinically involved organs in most series, with the frequency of involvement ranging from 10 to 30 %. The actual frequency of sarcoidosis organ involvement is probably much higher as it is frequently asymptomatic and may avoid detection. This is particularly common with lung, liver, cardiac, and bone involvement. Cardiac sarcoidosis is present in 25 % of all sarcoidosis but only causes clinical problems in 5 % of them. Nevertheless, unlike sarcoidosis involvement of most other organs, it may be suddenly fatal. Therefore, it is important to screen for cardiac sarcoidosis in all sarcoidosis patients. All sarcoidosis patients should also be screened for eye involvement as asymptomatic patients may have eye involvement that may cause permanent vision impairment. Pulmonary fibrosis from sarcoidosis is usually slowly progressive but may be life-threatening because of the development of respiratory failure, pulmonary hypertension, or hemoptysis related to a mycetoma or bronchiectasis. Some manifestations of sarcoidosis are not organ-specific and probably are the result of a release of mediators from the sarcoid granuloma. Two such manifestations include small fiber neuropathy and fatigue syndromes, and they are observed in a large percentage of patients. PMID:25274450

  20. Pleural effusion and sarcoidosis: an unusual combination.

    PubMed

    Ferreiro, Lucía; San José, Esther; González-Barcala, Francisco Javier; Suárez-Antelo, Juan; Toubes, M Elena; Valdés, Luis

    2014-12-01

    Pleural involvement in sarcoidosis is uncommon and appears in several forms. To document the incidence and characteristics of pleural effusion in sarcoidosis patients, a review of the cases diagnosed in our centre between January 2001 and December 2012 was carried out. One hundred and ninety-five patients with sarcoidosis were identified; three (two men and one woman) presented with unilateral pleural effusion (1.5%): one in the right side and two in the left. Two were in stageii and one was in stageiv. The pleural fluid of the two patients who underwent thoracocentesis was predominantly lymphocytic. One of these patients presented chylothorax and the other had high CA-125levels. In general, these effusions are lymphocyte-rich, paucicellular, serous exudates (sometimes chylothorax) and contain proportionally higher levels of protein than LDH. Most cases are treated with corticosteroids, although it may resolve spontaneously. PMID:24565689

  1. Sarcoidosis in tuberculosis-endemic regions: India

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disease of unknown etiology affecting multiple organs. Earlier reports suggested that sarcoidosis was a disease of the developed world. However, recent reports suggest that the disease is found in the developing countries as well. Clinical, radiological, and histopathological similarities with tuberculosis pose a great challenge in countries endemic for tuberculosis. Mantoux test, high resolution computed tomography, and transbronchial lymph node and lung biopsies are diagnostic modalities, which play an important role in the diagnosis of sarcoid. In this review, we look at the epidemiology of sarcoid in tuberculosis-endemic regions, the sarcoidosis-tuberculosis link, clinical profile, diagnostic modalities, dilemma in the diagnosis, and the treatment of this disease. PMID:23803558

  2. Sarcoidosis and the heart: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Ipek, Emrah; Demirelli, Selami; Ermis, Emrah; Inci, Sinan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Sarcoidosis is a chronic multisystem disorder without any defined etiology. Cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) is detected in 2–7% of patients with sarcoidosis and more than 20% of the cases of sarcoidosis are clinically silent. Cardiac involvement in systemic sarcoidosis (SS) and isolated cardiac sarcoidosis (iCS) are associated with arrhythmia and severe heart failure (HF) and have a poor prognosis. Early diagnosis of CS and prompt initiation of corticosteroid therapy with or without other immunosuppressants is crucial. Electrocardiography, Holter monitoring, and Doppler echocardiography with speckle tracking imaging can serve as the initial steps to diagnosis of CS. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging and positron emission tomography (PET) are promising techniques for both diagnosis and follow-up of CS. This review discusses the main aspects of cardiac involvement in sarcoidosis. PMID:26668777

  3. Right Heart Involvement in Patients with Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mita B; Mor-Avi, Victor; Murtagh, Gillian; Bonham, Catherine A; Laffin, Luke J; Hogarth, Douglas Kyle; Medvedofsky, Diego; Lang, Roberto M; Patel, Amit R

    2016-05-01

    The left ventricle (LV) is affected in 20-25% of patients with sarcoidosis and its involvement is associated with morbidity and mortality. However, effects of sarcoidosis on the right ventricle (RV) are not well documented. Our aims were to investigate the prevalence of RV dysfunction in patients with sarcoidosis and determine whether it is predominantly associated with direct cardiac involvement, severity of lung disease, or pulmonary hypertension (PH). We identified 50 patients with biopsy-proven extra-cardiac sarcoidosis and preserved LV function, who underwent echocardiography, pulmonary function (PF) testing, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance. RV function was quantified by free wall longitudinal strain. Tricuspid valve Doppler and estimated right atrial pressure were used to estimate systolic pulmonary artery pressure. Myocardial late gadolinium enhancement was considered diagnostic for cardiac sarcoidosis and assumed to involve both ventricles. Of the 50 patients, 28 (56%) had RV dysfunction, 4 with poorly defined PF status. Of the remaining 24 patients, 16 (67%) had lung disease, 8 (33%) had PH, and 10 (42%) had LV involvement. Ten patients had greater than one of these findings, and 4 had all 3. In contrast, in 4/24 patients (17%), RV dysfunction could not be explained by these mechanisms, despite severely reduced RV strain. In conclusion, RV dysfunction is common in patients with sarcoidosis and is usually associated with either direct LV involvement, lung disease, or PH, but may occur in the absence of these mechanisms, suggesting the possibility of isolated RV involvement and underscoring the need for imaging protocols that would include RV strain analysis. PMID:26773449

  4. Ocular onchocerciasis

    PubMed Central

    Thylefors, B.

    1978-01-01

    Well over 20 million people in the world are infected with Onchocerca volvulus and it is probable that 200 000-500 000 people are blind as a result of this infection, which is the most important cause of blindness in certain areas of Africa and Latin America. Treatment of the disease is difficult and often produces serious adverse reactions in the patient. Combined use of diethylcarbamazine citrate and suramin is still the most suitable form of treatment. Screening for the early detection of cases at high risk of ocular manifestations must be organized, and their treatment undertaken, if blindness is to be avoided. Prevention of ocular onchocerciasis is feasible, using vector control methods to reduce transmission, but the procedures are costly and may have to be maintained for many years. Research is needed to improve treatment and to find a chemoprophylactic agent or a preventive vaccine. PMID:307448

  5. Uptake of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose in sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, P.J.; Salama, A.

    1994-10-01

    Whole-body PET scanning was performed using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in two patients with hilar lymphadenopathy in whom the clinical differential diagnosis was between sarcoidosis and lymphoma. Both patients were later proven to have sarcoidosis. Uptake of {sup 18}FDG was seen in both intra- and extrathoracic lesions as well as in associated erythema nodosum. One patient underwent a repeat scan after steroid therapy where a marked decrease in hilar uptake was seen. Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake is observed in lymph nodes with sarcoid involvement. Further investigation is necessary to assess if quantitative differences exist between sarcoid and malignant lymphadenopathy. 30 refs., 3 figs.

  6. The Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis with 18F-FDG PET.

    PubMed

    Al-Faham, Zaid; Jolepalem, Prashant; Oliver Wong, Ching Yee

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac involvement in sarcoidosis is associated with poor prognosis. (18)F-FDG PET can detect the presence of cardiac sarcoidosis, assess disease activity, and serve as a means to monitor treatment response in patients with cardiac sarcoidosis. PMID:26271805

  7. Sarcoidosis of the vagina treated with methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Şahin, N; Solak, A; Karaarslan, S; Doruk, S

    2016-06-01

    We describe the first case of mediolateral episiotomic sarcoidosis of the deep vaginal tissue, without involvement of the pulmonary parenchyma or pulmonary symptoms. A 68-year-old female was admitted with a vaginal mass that had developed about 1 month prior. On bimanual examination, we found a painful solid mass approximately 4 cm in diameter on the episiotomy line of the deep vaginal tissue. The patient underwent pelvic magnetic resonance imaging on suspicion of a malignancy, and a vaginal true-cut biopsy was performed. The biopsy specimen exhibited non-caseating, granulomatous inflammation and many multinucleated giant cells, strongly suggesting sarcoidosis. We had excluded other granulomatous diseases; a final diagnosis was made of stage-1 sarcoidosis in the deep vaginal mass. A 3-month course of methotrexate (2.5 mg/week) was commenced to treat a flare-up of rheumatoid arthritis. The vaginal mass resolved. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of sarcoidosis in a deep vaginal mass without pulmonary parenchymal or other solid-organ involvement. PMID:26624970

  8. Extrapulmonary localization of gallium in sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, P.K.; Singh, R.; Vieras, F.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the spectrum of extrapulmonary localization of gallium in patients with sarcoidosis. The usefulness of Ga-67 scintiscans in detecting clinically occult lesions, in directing clinicians to accessible sites for biopsy, and in following the course of extrapulmonary sites of involvement with therapy is emphasized.

  9. Gastric sarcoidosis: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Liang, David B; Price, Jennifer Cohen; Ahmed, Haitham; Farmer, Nicole; Montgomery, Elizabeth A; Giday, Samuel A

    2010-04-01

    Sarcoidosis involving the gastrointestinal tract is extremely rare. Clinically recognizable gastrointestinal system involvement occurs in 0.1% to 0.9% of patients with sarcoidosis. We encountered a 22-year-old African American female admitted to Johns Hopkins Hospital (Baltimore, Maryland) for a 2-week history of fever, chills, eye pain, and abdominal pain. Her abdominal CT scan showed multiple subcentimeter retroperitoneal lymph nodes. An upper endoscopy was performed and discovered an antral nodule that measured about 7 mm and antral gastritis in which biopsies showed active chronic necrotizing granulomatous gastritis. Biopsies of the antral polyp showed focal intestinal metaplasia and active chronic necrotizing granulomatous pattern. Stains for Helicobacter pylori, acid fast, and fungi were negative. A small-bowel series showed no abnormality. Ophthalmologic evaluation revealed panuveitis with bilateral optic disc edema. The patient was later prescribed 60 mg of prednisone by mouth once a day and subsequently her abdominal pain and fever resolved during follow-up 2 months later. This literature review demonstrates the importance in the diagnosis, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, types of gastric sarcoidosis, major endoscopic findings, and management of gastric sarcoidosis. PMID:20437743

  10. Sarcoidosis of the liver and bile ducts.

    PubMed

    Ishak, K G

    1998-05-01

    In sarcoidosis, granulomas are frequently present in multiple organs, including the liver. Typically, epithelioid granulomas (noncaseating) are scattered throughout the liver, but confluent granulomas can be present in cases with severe hepatic involvement. The characteristic inclusions in giant cells (for example, Schaumann bodies and asteroid bodies) are not seen in all cases and are not pathognomonic. The granulomas of sarcoidosis may heal without a trace, but confluent granulomas can result in extensive, irregular scarring. Occlusion of intrahepatic portal vein branches by the granulomatous inflammation probably accounts for the development of portal hypertension in some cases. A granulomatous cholangitis leading to ductopenia seems to be the underlying pathogenetic mechanism of the chronic cholestatic syndrome of sarcoidosis. Recognition of this syndrome is important in the differential diagnosis of other chronic cholestatic diseases, such as primary biliary cirrhosis or primary sclerosing cholangitis. Other rare complications of sarcoidosis are the Budd-Chiari syndrome and obstructive jaundice attributable to hepatic hilar lymphadenopathy or strictures of the bile ducts. PMID:9581591

  11. Ocular dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Noojin, Gary D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Stolarski, David J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1999-06-01

    Spectrally resolved white-light interferometry (SRWLI) was used to measure the wavelength dependence of refractive index (i.e., dispersion) for various ocular components. The accuracy of the technique was assessed by measurement of fused silica and water, the refractive indices of which have been measured at several different wavelengths. The dispersion of bovine and rabbit aqueous and vitreous humor was measured from 400 to 1100 nm. Also, the dispersion was measured from 400 to 700 nm for aqueous and vitreous humor extracted from goat and rhesus monkey eyes. For the humors, the dispersion did not deviate significantly from water. In an additional experiment, the dispersion of aqueous and vitreous humor that had aged up to a month was compared to freshly harvested material. No difference was found between the fresh and aged media. An unsuccessful attempt was also made to use the technique for dispersion measurement of bovine cornea and lens. Future refinement may allow measurement of the dispersion of cornea and lens across the entire visible and near-infrared wavelength band. The principles of white- light interferometry including image analysis, measurement accuracy, and limitations of the technique, are discussed. In addition, alternate techniques and previous measurements of ocular dispersion are reviewed.

  12. Ocular pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Novack, Gary D; Robin, Alan L

    2016-05-01

    Ophthalmic diseases include both those analogous to systemic diseases (eg, inflammation, infection, neuronal degeneration) and not analogous (eg, cataract, myopia). Many anterior segment diseases are treated pharmacologically through eye drops, which have an implied therapeutic index of local therapy. Unlike oral dosage forms administered for systemic diseases, eyedrops require patients not only to adhere to treatment, but to be able to accurately perform-ie, instill drops correctly. Anatomical and physiological barriers make topical delivery to the anterior chamber challenging-in some cases more challenging than absorption through the skin, nasal passages, or gut. Treatment of the posterior segment (eg, vitreous, retina, choroid, and optic nerve) is more challenging due to additional barriers. Recently, intravitreal injections have become a standard of care with biologics for the treatment of macular degeneration and other diseases. Although the eye has esterases, hydroxylases, and transporters, it has relatively little CYP450 enzymes. Because it is challenging to obtain drug concentrations at the target site, ocular clinical pharmacokinetics, and thus pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic interactions, are rarely available. Ophthalmic pharmaceuticals require consideration of solubility, physiological pH, and osmolarity, as well as sterility and stability, which in turn requires optimal pharmaceutics. Although applied locally, ocular medications may be absorbed systemically, which results in morbidity and mortality (eg, systemic hypotension, bronchospasm, and bradycardia). PMID:26360129

  13. Reliability and Convergent Validity of the Cutaneous Sarcoidosis Activity and Morphology Instrument for Assessing Cutaneous Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Emily Y.; Kim, Ellen J.; Payne, Aimee S.; Takeshita, Junko; Vittorio, Carmela C.; Wanat, Karolyn A.; Werth, Victoria P.; Gelfand, Joel M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the reliability and convergent validity of two outcome instruments for assessing cutaneous sarcoidosis: Cutaneous Sarcoidosis Activity and Morphology Instrument (CSAMI) and Sarcoidosis Activity and Severity Index (SASI). Design Cross-sectional study evaluating cutaneous sarcoidosis disease severity using CSAMI, SASI, and Physician's Global Assessment (PGA) as reference. Setting Cutaneous sarcoidosis clinic. Participants 8 dermatologists evaluated 11 patients with cutaneous sarcoidosis. Main Outcome Measures Primary outcomes: Inter- and intra-rater reliability and convergent validity. Secondary outcomes: Correlation with quality of life measures and time required for completion. Results All instruments demonstrated good to excellent intra-rater reliability. Inter-rater reliability was excellent for CSAMI Activity scores (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC], 0.82; 95% CI, 0.66-0.94), and fair to poor for CSAMI Damage (0.42; 0.21-0.72), modified Facial SASI (0.40; 0.17-0.72), and PGA scores (0.40; 0.18-0.70). CSAMI Activity, Damage, and modified Facial SASI scores all demonstrated convergent validity with statistically significant correlations with PGA scores. Trends for correlations were seen between CSAMI scores and specific Skindex-29 quality of life domains. While CSAMI required longer time to complete than SASI, both were scored within adequate time for use in clinical trials. Conclusions CSAMI appears to be a reliable and valid outcome instrument to measure cutaneous sarcoidosis and may capture a wide range of body surface and cutaneous morphologies. Future research is necessary to demonstrate its sensitivity to change and to confirm its correlation with quality of life measures. PMID:23677081

  14. Venous thromboembolism and sarcoidosis: co-incidence or coexistence?

    PubMed Central

    Geremek, Marcin; Puscinska, Elzbieta; Sliwinski, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    The association between venous thromboembolism (VTE) and sarcoidosis has been reported recently, nevertheless the true incidence of co-incident sarcoidosis and VTE is unknown. Sarcoidosis as a chronic disease of immune dysregulation might be associated with an increased risk of VTE. The mechanisms responsible for VTE development are not clear and may be influenced by several factors: activity of inflammation, clinical characteristics of sarcoidosis and comorbidities. Pulmonary embolism (PE) as a potentially fatal condition should be considered in all of the patients with sarcoidosis in whom worsening of the respiratory status is diagnosed. A high plasma D-dimers (DD) level may be suggestive of VTE, nevertheless elevated plasma DD should be interpreted with caution, in the context of the active inflammatory process. If sarcoidosis appears to be one of risk factors for VTE development, further investigations are needed to define the pro-thrombotic phenotype of this disease. PMID:26862313

  15. [The "sarcoidosis-lymphoma syndrome"--a lymphocyte dysregulation?].

    PubMed

    Linnenberg, H S; Medici, T C; Rhyner, K

    1992-06-01

    Sarcoidosis and malignant lymphoma can occur in the same patient; sarcoidosis appears first, the malignant lymphoma follows later. The case histories of three patients illustrate what Brinker first coined as the "sarcoidosis-lymphoma syndrome". In two patients a pulmonary sarcoidosis stage I was diagnosed over 30 years respectively 4 years prior to the histological diagnosis of highly malignant Non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The third patient suffered from generalized sarcoidosis with splenomegaly, , granulomatous hepatitis and interstitial lung disease, in addition to which a lymphoproliferative syndrome was diagnosed. Comparing the pathogenesis of malignant lymphoma and sarcoidosis, parallels such as T-cell dysfunction, which probably facilitates malignant transformation of B-cells, become apparent. In both diseases the transforming gene could be the Ebstein-Barr virus. PMID:1495911

  16. Old-scar mass and changing surgical perspective: Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Aktimur, Recep; Aktimur, Sude Hatun; Çolak, Elif; Alıcı, Ömer; Demirağ, Mehmet Derya

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic inflammatory disease of an unknown etiology. Skin is involved in 25% of all cases, and 29% of them present as a scar sarcoidosis. Asymptomatic old-scar masses are generally regarded as a foreign body reaction by surgeons and often result in excisional biopsy. We describe a case of a patient who developed sarcoidosis in a 34-year-old appendectomy scar and adjacent inguinal lymph nodes without any local or systemic symptom and radiologic finding. Surgeons should not underestimate the importance of such lesions as a simple condition. Scar sarcoidosis may resolve spontaneously, or the treatment with some topical agents is effective. Furthermore, scar sarcoidosis may be the initial manifestation of systemic sarcoidosis. PMID:25931946

  17. Sarcoidosis Presenting as Isolated Gingival Enlargement: A Rare Case Entity

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Jaihans; Chopra, Deepak; Bagga, Sukhchain; Sethi, Kanika

    2014-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a non-caseating granulomatous disease . It is a multiorgan inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology. Conditions affecting skin or other organs frequently involve oral cavity and rarely manifest as gingival disease. Here we are reporting a rare case in which gingival hyperplasia was the initial symptom which finally led to the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. Oral mucous membrane needs to be examined carefully as it may constitute in presenting first sign of systemic sarcoidosis. PMID:25584337

  18. Venous Leg Ulcer in a Sarcoidosis Patient: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ohn, Jungyoon; Byun, Sang Young; Kim, In Su

    2015-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers, the most common form of leg ulcers, are relevant to the pathogenicity of pericapillary fibrin cuff. Sarcoidosis, a multiorgan granulomatous disease, causes fibrin deposition in tissues. We report a case of a 50-year-old man with venous leg ulcers coexisting with sarcoidosis. On the basis of the histologic findings, we propose the hypothesis that sarcoidosis patients are prone to the development of venous leg ulcers. PMID:26719645

  19. Tenth international conference on sarcoidosis and other granulomatous disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, C.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains papers divided among three sections: Basic Mechanisms of Sarcoidosis; Other Granulomatous Disorders; and Clinical Studies of Sarcoidosis. Some of the paper titles are: Radionuclides in Detecting Active Granuloma Formation: Gallium-67 Scintigraphy and Histopathology with Autoradiographic; a European Survey on the Usefulness of /sup 67/Ga Lung Scans in Assessing Sarcoidosis: Experience in 14 Research Centers in Seven Different Countries; and Reassessing the Standard Chest Radiograph for Intraparenchymal Activity.

  20. Solitary osseous sarcoidosis: a rare reason for pathologic fracture.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Wen; Wang, Ji-bo; Zhang, Feng-chun

    2012-08-01

    Sarcoidosis with osseous involvement as the initial manifestation is rare. Due to lack of other organ involvements, the diagnosis is somehow difficult to establish. We report a case with osseous sarcoidosis as the initial and major manifestation that developed spontaneous bone fracture. Our case emphasizes the importance of histological evidence and exclusion of other diseases i.e. rheumatoid arthritis, before making the diagnosis of osseous sarcoidosis. PMID:20364256

  1. Current and emerging pharmacological treatments for sarcoidosis: a review

    PubMed Central

    Beegle, Scott H; Barba, Kerry; Gobunsuy, Romel; Judson, Marc A

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of sarcoidosis is not standardized. Because sarcoidosis may never cause significant symptoms or organ dysfunction, treatment is not mandatory. When treatment is indicated, oral corticosteroids are usually recommended because they are highly likely to be effective in a relative short period of time. However, because sarcoidosis is often a chronic condition, long-term treatment with corticosteroids may cause significant toxicity. Therefore, corticosteroid sparing agents are often indicated in patients requiring chronic therapy. This review outlines the indications for treatment, corticosteroid treatment, and corticosteroid sparing treatments for sarcoidosis. PMID:23596348

  2. Sarcoidosis as unusual cause of massive pleural effusion

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Sharad; Periwal, Pallavi; Dogra, Vikas; Talwar, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease of unknown etiology. Pleural involvement is relatively rare. Development of pleural effusion in sarcoidosis needs to be evaluated for other causes, especially tuberculosis in endemic countries. Sarcoid pleural effusion responds to systemic corticosteroids. We are presenting case of 42 year old male patient of sarcoidosis who developed massive pleural effusion while on treatment with steroids, which was attributed to disease per se. Sarcoidosis as a cause of massive pleural effusion has not been mentioned before in published literature. PMID:26744683

  3. Gastrointestinal and hepatic manifestations of sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Ellen C; Kierson, Malca; Hagspiel, Klaus D

    2008-12-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem disease characterized by noncaseating granulomas in the affected organs, including skin, heart, nervous system, and joints. Diagnosis of sarcoidosis is generally based upon a compatible history, demonstration of granulomas in at least two different organs, negative staining and culture for acid fast bacilli, absence of occupational or domestic exposure to toxins, and lack of drug-induced disease. Involvement of the hollow organs is rare. Rather than being due to sarcoidosis, some reported mucosal lesions may simply have incidental granulomas. Extrinsic compression from lymphadenopathy can occur throughout the gastrointestinal tract. The stomach, particularly the antrum, is the most common extrahepatic organ to be involved, while the small bowel is the least common. Liver involvement frequently occurs and ranges from asymptomatic incidental granulomas to portal hypertension from granulomas in the portal triad, usually with relatively preserved liver function. CT scans show hepatosplenomegaly and adenopathy, followed in frequency by focal low-attenuation lesions of the liver and spleen. Ascites is usually a transudate from right heart failure (because of pulmonary hypertension) or portal hypertension (because of biliary cirrhosis). Rarely, an exudative ascites may occur from studding of the peritoneum with nodules. Pancreatic involvement presents as a mass, usually in the head or a diffusely firm, nodular organ. Corticosteroids should be instituted when organ function is threatened, usually lungs, eyes, and central nervous system. Their role in the treatment of hepatic sarcoidosis is unclear. The overall prognosis is good although most patients will have some permanent organ impairment. Cardiac and pulmonary diseases are the main causes of death. PMID:18853979

  4. Gallium-67 uptake in meningeal sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ayres, J.G.; Hicks, B.H.; Maisey, M.N.

    1986-07-01

    A case of sarcoidosis limited to the central nervous system is described in which the diagnosis was suggested by high Ga-67 uptake in the cranial and spinal meninges. The diagnosis was confirmed by meningeal biopsy. Treatment with oral corticosteroids resulted in clinical improvement and marked reduction in Ga-67 uptake in the meninges. This is the first reported case of the central nervous system sarcoid diagnosed by Ga-67 imaging.

  5. Gene-environment interactions in sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Culver, Daniel A.; Newman, Lee S.; Kavuru, Mani S.

    2007-01-01

    Susceptibility to most human diseases is polygenic, with complex interactions between functional polymorphisms of single genes governing disease incidence, phenotype, or both. In this context, the contribution of any discrete gene is generally modest for a single individual, but may confer substantial attributable risk on a population level. Environmental exposure can modify the effects of a polymorphism, either by providing a necessary substrate for development of human disease or because the effects of a given exposure modulate the effects of the gene. In several diseases, genetic polymorphisms have been shown to be context-dependent, i.e. the effects of a genetic variant are realized only in the setting of a relevant exposure. Since sarcoidosis susceptibility is dependent on both genetic and environmental modifiers, the study of gene-environment interactions may yield important pathogenetic information and will likely be crucial for uncovering the range of genetic susceptibility loci. However, the complexity of these relationships implies that investigations of gene-environment interactions will require the study of large cohorts with carefully-defined exposures and similar clinical phenotypes. A general principle is that the study of gene-environment interactions requires a sample size at least several-fold greater than for either factor alone. To date, the presence of environmental modifiers has been demonstrated for one sarcoidosis susceptibility locus, HLA-DQB1, in African-American families. This article reviews general considerations obtaining for the study of gene-environment interactions in sarcoidosis. It also describes the limited current understanding of the role of environmental influences on sarcoidosis susceptibility genes. PMID:17560304

  6. [Lung sarcoidosis: Clinical features and therapeutic issues].

    PubMed

    Uzunhan, Y; Jeny, F; Crockett, F; Piver, D; Kambouchner, M; Valeyre, D; Nunes, H

    2016-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disease of unknown cause. This proteiform disease is characterized by an almost constant and often predominant lung involvement. The natural history of disease is difficult to predict at presentation. Diagnosis is based on a compatible clinical and radiological presentation and evidence of non-caseating granulomas. Exclusion of alternative diseases is also required according to clinical presentation. Biopsy samples of superficial lesions should be considered before other sites like per-endoscopic bronchial biopsies or endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration. Therapeutic strategy for lung disease has to take into account the possible spontaneous resolution observed in newly diagnosed patients. Corticosteroids are the first choice when a treatment is decided, which concerns half of patients. Second and third line therapy are based respectively on immunosuppressive drugs and anti-TNFα drugs. Sarcoidosis mortality and morbidity are mainly linked to advanced pulmonary sarcoidosis - lung fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, bronchial stenosis and chronic pulmonary aspergillosis. "Non anti-inflammatory" treatments have to be considered as well. Clinicians have an essential role in treatment indication, end-point targets and evaluation of response to treatment during follow-up and in finding the best benefice to risk balance. Progress made on pharmacogenetics may offer more personalized treatments for the patients. PMID:26897112

  7. Extrapulmonary sites of radiogallium accumulation in sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sulavik, S.B.; Palestro, C.J.; Spencer, R.P.; Swyer, A.J.; Goldsmith, S.J.; Tierstein, A.S. )

    1990-12-01

    In an effort to detect extrapulmonary sites of radiogallium accumulation in cases of sarcoidosis, 145 separate Ga-67 citrate studies of 114 patients with biopsy-proven sarcoidosis were examined. The most characteristic extrapulmonary radiogallium uptake pattern was the panda sign in 47 patients (41%). The most common site of prominent extrapulmonary radiogallium uptake was the lacrimal glands in 101 patients (88%). Second most common was activity in one or more superficial lymph node regions such as the cervical, axillary, femoral, or inguinal in 19 patients (17%). Other extrapulmonary sites included breast uptake in 6 out of 80 women (8%), prominent splenic and nasal uptake in 9 (8%) patients, periportal accumulation in 7 (6%), and cutaneous/subcutaneous activity in 4 (4%). Because many of these individuals were receiving corticosteroids, the natural (untreated) prevalence of extrapulmonary findings may be even higher. Although the sensitivity and specificity of extrapulmonary radiogallium accumulation has still to be determined, many of the sites may be accessible to biopsy both for diagnostic purposes and to follow the effects of medications. It is therefore suggested that whole-body imaging be performed when radiogallium is administered to patients with suspected or known sarcoidosis.

  8. Sarcoidosis Occurring After Solid Cancer: A Nonfortuitous Association

    PubMed Central

    Grados, Aurélie; Ebbo, Mikael; Bernit, Emmanuelle; Veit, Véronique; Mazodier, Karin; Jean, Rodolphe; Coso, Diane; Aurran-Schleinitz, Thérèse; Broussais, Florence; Bouabdallah, Reda; Gravis, Gwenaelle; Goncalves, Anthony; Giovaninni, Marc; Sève, Pascal; Chetaille, Bruno; Gavet-Bongo, Florence; Weitten, Thierry; Pavic, Michel; Harlé, Jean-Robert; Schleinitz, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The association between cancer and sarcoidosis is controversial. Some epidemiological studies show an increase of the incidence of cancer in patients with sarcoidosis but only few cases of sarcoidosis following cancer treatment have been reported. We conducted a retrospective case study from internal medicine and oncology departments for patients presenting sarcoidosis after solid cancer treatment. We also performed a literature review to search for patients who developed sarcoidosis after solid cancer. We describe the clinical, biological, and radiological characteristics and outcome of these patients. Twelve patients were included in our study. Various cancers were observed with a predominance of breast cancer. Development of sarcoidosis appeared in the 3 years following cancer and was asymptomatic in half of the patients. The disease was frequently identified after a follow-up positron emission tomography computerized tomography evaluation. Various manifestations were observed but all patients presented lymph node involvement. Half of the patients required systemic therapy. With a median follow-up of 73 months, no patient developed cancer relapse. Review of the literature identified 61 other patients for which the characteristics of both solid cancer and sarcoidosis were similar to those observed in our series. This report demonstrates that sarcoidosis must be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with a history of malignancy who have developed lymphadenopathy or other lesions on positron emission tomography computerized tomography. Histological confirmation of cancer relapse is mandatory in order to avoid unjustified treatments. This association should be consider as a protective factor against cancer relapse. PMID:26181571

  9. Cutaneous localization of Ga-67 in systemic sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, P.K.

    1981-03-01

    /sup 67/Ga scans have been used in patients with sarcoidosis to assess noninvasively the intensity of alveolitis and to detect areas of extrathoracic involvement. To the author's knowledge, this is the first report of the localization of gallium in cutaneous lesions of a patient with sarcoidosis.

  10. Sarcoidosis: radiographic manifestations in the nails and distal phalanges.

    PubMed

    Albers, Brittany K; Sluzevich, Jason C; Garner, Hillary W

    2016-05-01

    Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disease which can affect multiple organ systems. Clinical and radiologic manifestations depend on the organ system involved and the chronicity of disease. Nail involvement in sarcoidosis is rare, but is clinically relevant as it indicates chronic systemic disease. Nail abnormalities can be identified radiographically, and when seen in patients with known or suspected sarcoidosis, should prompt careful evaluation of the underlying bone for osseous involvement. We describe a case of sarcoidosis with radiographic findings in the nails and distal phalangeal tufts, which were indicative of nail and osseous sarcoid involvement and strongly supported the presence of chronic systemic disease. Although the nail findings resolved clinically and on radiographs after treatment, the osseous findings showed only minimal improvement. To our knowledge, the radiographic findings of nail sarcoidosis have not been previously addressed in the literature. PMID:26768259

  11. Tuberculosis or sarcoidosis: Opposite ends of the same disease spectrum?

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Rupesh; Kee, Ae Ra; Ang, Leslie; Tun Hang, Yeo; Gupta, Vishali; Kon, Onn Min; Mitchell, Donald; Zierhut, Manfred; Pavesio, Carlos

    2016-05-01

    Tuberculosis and sarcoidosis are chronic systemic diseases that have similar pulmonary and extra-pulmonary manifestations. Multiple studies have found an epidemiological, molecular, and immunological link between the two. It has been suggested that mycobacterium tuberculosis could be a common pathophysiologic mechanism for tuberculosis and sarcoidosis, and that both clinical entities can trigger similar immunological response in patients. Due to this close association, together with possible coexistence in the same patient, the diagnosis of one disease from another may be difficult. In our paper, we suggest that tuberculosis and sarcoidosis are two ends of the same spectrum. Given the pathophysiological and clinical link between the two, we also propose a classification system for tuberculosis and sarcoidosis: Sarcoidosis (S); Sarcoid-Tuberculous (ST); Tuberculous Sarcoid (TS) and Tuberculosis (TB). More research and clinical trials should first be done to affirm the link between the two disease entities. PMID:27156614

  12. Recognition of distinctive patterns of gallium-67 distribution in sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sulavik, S.B.; Spencer, R.P.; Weed, D.A.; Shapiro, H.R.; Shiue, S.T.; Castriotta, R.J. )

    1990-12-01

    Assessment of gallium-67 ({sup 67}Ga) uptake in the salivary and lacrimal glands and intrathoracic lymph nodes was made in 605 consecutive patients including 65 with sarcoidosis. A distinctive intrathoracic lymph node {sup 67}Ga uptake pattern, resembling the Greek letter lambda, was observed only in sarcoidosis (72%). Symmetrical lacrimal gland and parotid gland {sup 67}Ga uptake (panda appearance) was noted in 79% of sarcoidosis patients. A simultaneous lambda and panda pattern (62%) or a panda appearance with radiographic bilateral, symmetrical, hilar lymphadenopathy (6%) was present only in sarcoidosis patients. The presence of either of these patterns was particularly prevalent in roentgen Stages I (80%) or II (74%). We conclude that simultaneous (a) lambda and panda images, or (b) a panda image with bilateral symmetrical hilar lymphadenopathy on chest X-ray represent distinctive patterns which are highly specific for sarcoidosis, and may obviate the need for invasive diagnostic procedures.

  13. Metabolomics connects aberrant bioenergetic, transmethylation, and gut microbiota in sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Geamanu, Andreea; Gupta, Smiti V.; Bauerfeld, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of unknown etiology. Granulomatous inflammation in sarcoidosis may affect multiple organs, including the lungs, skin, CNS, and the eyes, leading to severe morbidity and mortality. The underlying mechanisms for sustained inflammation in sarcoidosis are unknown. We hypothesized that metabolic changes play a critical role in perpetuation of inflammation in sarcoidosis. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based untargeted metabolomic analysis was used to identify circulating molecules in serum to discriminate sarcoidosis patients from healthy controls. Principal component analyses (PCA) were performed to identify different metabolic markers and explore the changes of associated biochemical pathways. Using Chenomx 7.6 NMR Suite software, we identified and quantified metabolites responsible for such separation in the PCA models. Quantitative analysis showed that the levels of metabolites, such as 3-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate, carnitine, cystine, homocysteine, pyruvate, and trimethylamine N-oxide were significantly increased in sarcoidosis patients. Interestingly, succinate, a major intermediate metabolite involved in the tricyclic acid cycle was significantly decreased in sarcoidosis patients. Application of integrative pathway analyses identified deregulation of butanoate, ketone bodies, citric cycle metabolisms, and transmethylation. This may be used for development of new drugs or nutritional modification. PMID:27489531

  14. A rare presentation of sarcoidosis with nasal bone involvement

    PubMed Central

    Uslu, Selen; Korkmaz, Hakan; Çetinkol, Yeliz

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous inflammatory disease that is induced by infectious or noninfectious environmental antigens in a genetically susceptible host. Tuberculosis and sarcoidosis are two diseases with similar clinical and pathologic findings. The link between these two diseases has been extensively studied. Objective: Herein we describe a case of sarcoidosis associated with tuberculosis, treated for tuberculosis, and, 1 year, later presented with a nasal dorsal lump and skin lesions on the extremities. Methods: Case report with clinical description. Results: Our patient had a history of skin and cervical lymphadenopathy symptoms 1 year earlier and was treated with antituberculosis drugs in an outer medical center. Therapy had cured cervical lymphadenopathies, with no improvement in skin lesions. On appearance of the nasal dorsal lump, she presented to our outpatient clinic. We retrieved the previous specimens of the patient, which revealed coexistence of necrotizing granulomas with non-necrotizing granulomas, which was strongly indicative of the coexistence of tuberculosis and sarcoidosis. Radiologic, histopathologic, and microbiologic investigation revealed the diagnosis of sarcoidosis with nasal, cutaneous, and pulmonary involvement. Treatment with prednisolone and hydroxychloroquine resulted in dramatic improvement of nasal bone, pulmonary, and skin lesions within 2 weeks. Conclusion: The clinical presentation of sarcoidosis can be complex, and the differential diagnosis from tuberculosis can be challenging. Atypical clinical pictures also can cause delays in diagnosis and proper management. In patients with granulomatous lesions that are unresponsive to antituberculosis therapy, physicians must be alerted to the possibility of coexistent sarcoidosis. PMID:27103561

  15. Sarcoidosis and chronic beryllium disease: similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Annyce S; Hamzeh, Nabeel; Maier, Lisa A

    2014-06-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a granulomatous lung disease that may be pathologically and clinically indistinguishable from pulmonary sarcoidosis, except through use of immunologic testing, such as the beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT). Similar to sarcoidosis, the pulmonary manifestations of CBD are variable and overlap with other respiratory diseases. Definitive diagnosis of CBD is established by evidence of immune sensitization to beryllium and diagnostic bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage and transbronchial biopsy. However, the diagnosis of CBD can also be established on a medically probable basis in beryllium-exposed patients with consistent radiographic imaging and clinical course. Beryllium workers exposed too much higher levels of beryllium in the past demonstrated a much more fulminant disease than is usually seen today. Some extrapulmonary manifestations similar to sarcoidosis were noted in these historic cohorts, although with a narrower spectrum. Extrapulmonary manifestations of CBD are rare today. Since lung-predominant sarcoidosis can very closely resemble CBD, CBD is still misdiagnosed as sarcoidosis when current or past exposure to beryllium is not recognized and no BeLPT is obtained. This article describes the similarities and differences between CBD and sarcoidosis, including clinical and diagnostic features that can help physicians consider CBD in patients with apparent lung-predominant sarcoidosis. PMID:25007084

  16. Sarcoidosis presenting as non-scarring non-scalp alopecia.

    PubMed

    Dan, Luke; Relic, John

    2016-08-01

    In this article we describe a 39-year-old man who presented with non-scarring non-scalp alopecia of his limbs as the initial presentation of sarcoidosis. Alopecia is a rare cutaneous manifestation of sarcoidosis. A literature review has found only one other example of sarcoidosis presenting as non-scarring non-scalp alopecia in an area other than the scalp in a patient who was otherwise asymptomatic. Several reported cases have described scarring alopecia of the scalp, which is the area of skin most commonly affected by sarcoidosis. There has been one documented case of sarcoidosis manifesting as total body non-scarring alopecia in a patient who had systemic symptoms of sarcoidosis. Other cases have presented rare cutaneous manifestations of sarcoidosis but in all these cases several other organ systems have been involved, and the patient has had systemic symptoms on presentation or the cutaneous presentation did not include non-scalp non-scarring alopecia. PMID:25823524

  17. Predictors of objective cough frequency in pulmonary sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Aish; Lee, Kai K; Rafferty, Gerrard F; Yousaf, Nadia; Pavord, Ian D; Galloway, James; Birring, Surinder S

    2016-05-01

    Cough is a common symptom of pulmonary sarcoidosis. This study aimed to quantify cough frequency, and investigate its relationship with cough reflex sensitivity, pulmonary function and health status.32 patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis were compared with 40 healthy controls. Cough reflex sensitivity to capsaicin, objective 24-h cough counts, cough-specific health status, cough severity and cough triggers were measured. The predictors of cough frequency in sarcoidosis were determined in a multivariate analysis.Objective cough frequency was significantly raised in patients with sarcoidosis compared with healthy controls (p<0.001) and patients with cough had an impaired health status. Patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis had a heightened cough reflex sensitivity compared with healthy controls (p<0.001). Only cough reflex sensitivity was significantly associated with objective cough frequency in multivariate analysis, explaining 42% of the variance (p<0.001). There was no association between cough frequency, lung function, number of organs involved, chest radiograph stage or serum angiotensin-converting enzyme levels.Cough is a common and significant symptom in patients with sarcoidosis. Ambulatory objective cough monitoring provides novel insights into the determinants of cough in sarcoidosis, suggesting that cough reflex sensitivity may be more important than lung function and other measures of disease severity, and this should be investigated further. PMID:26846840

  18. Budd-Chiari Syndrome: An Unusual Presentation of Multisystemic Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Bacha, Dhouha; Romdhane, Hayfa; Cheikh, Myriam; Nejma, Houda Ben; BelHadj, Najet

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease of unknown origin. All organs may be affected. Liver involvement is common but it is rarely symptomatic. Only a few cases of Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) secondary to a hepatic sarcoidosis have been described so far. We describe a case of multisystemic sarcoidosis presenting with BCS. A 42-year old female was referred to our department for chronic and anicteric cholestasis. Laboratory and imaging investigations disclosed features of chronic BCS associated with multisystemic sarcoidosis. The positive diagnosis was based on microscopic features, which showed hepatic, gastric and cutaneous non-caseating granulomas. Screening for an underlying thrombophilic disorder was negative. The diagnosis of BCS complicating hepatic sarcoidosis was the most likely. She was put on corticosteroids and anticoagulation therapy. To our knowledge, few cases of sarcoidosis-related BCS have been reported in the literature. In addition to being an uncommon presentation of sarcoidosis, this case illustrates the importance of recognizing an unusual cause of BCS and its therapeutic difficulties. PMID:26900444

  19. Sarcoidosis and chronic hepatitis C: treatment with prednisone and colchicine*

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Eduardo Guimarães; Guimarães, Tais Ferreira; Bottino, Caroline Bertolini; D’Acri, Antonio Macedo; Lima, Ricardo Barbosa; Martins, Carlos José

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a disease which still has uncertain etiology. Possible environmental causes are cited in the literature, like organic and inorganic particles and infectious agents. Recent studies have demonstrated the occurrence of sarcoidosis in patients with chronic C hepatitis; however, this association remains without statistical or causal evidence. In this report a case of sarcoidosis associated with chronic hepatitis C will be described, with subcutaneous lesions, considered rare, and good response to treatment with colchicine and prednisone. The hepatitis C virus was isolated in sarcoid tissue and the association between the two diseases will be discussed. PMID:27192527

  20. Sarcoidosis and chronic hepatitis C: treatment with prednisone and colchicine.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Eduardo Guimarães; Guimarães, Tais Ferreira; Bottino, Caroline Bertolini; D'Acri, Antonio Macedo; Lima, Ricardo Barbosa; Martins, Carlos José

    2016-04-01

    Sarcoidosis is a disease which still has uncertain etiology. Possible environmental causes are cited in the literature, like organic and inorganic particles and infectious agents. Recent studies have demonstrated the occurrence of sarcoidosis in patients with chronic C hepatitis; however, this association remains without statistical or causal evidence. In this report a case of sarcoidosis associated with chronic hepatitis C will be described, with subcutaneous lesions, considered rare, and good response to treatment with colchicine and prednisone. The hepatitis C virus was isolated in sarcoid tissue and the association between the two diseases will be discussed. PMID:27192527

  1. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: another autoimmune disease associated with sarcoidosis?

    PubMed

    Boerner, Eda Burcu; Costabel, Ulrich; Wessendorf, Thomas Ernst; Theegarten, Dirk; Hetzel, Martin; Drent, Marjolein; Bonella, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare lung disease characterized by the accumulation of surfactant phospholipids and lipoproteins within the alveoli.  Here we report on a female patient who was diagnosed with autoimmune PAP and successfully treated with whole lung lavage (WLL). 15 months after PAP diagnosis the patient developed marked fatigue. Additional tests revealed the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. We can only speculate that PAP and sarcoidosis in our patient are linked to each other based on the fact that other autoimmune disorders have also been associated with sarcoidosis. PMID:27055841

  2. CT of Hepatic Sarcoidosis: Small Nodular Lesions Simulating Metastatic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ufuk, Furkan; Herek, Duygu

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic inflammatory disease of unknown origin. The lymphoid system and the lungs are the most commonly involved organs. The frequency of signs or symptoms of hepatic involvement is very low. Case Report We present a case of symptomatic granulomatous liver disease secondary to sarcoidosis, mimicking a metastatic disease on ultrasonography and CT. Conclusions Hepatic involvement in sarcoidosis might be a perplexing diagnostic problem. The decisive CT finding with respect to the differential diagnosis was the absence of a mass effect and intact vascular architecture around the lesions. PMID:25908950

  3. [Lichenoid sarcoidosis on skin tattoos produced by traditional herbal treatments].

    PubMed

    Soyinka, F; Badejo, O; Laja, A O

    1981-01-01

    An unusual case of generalised sarcoidosis of the skin on tattoo marks done two years for "medicinal" purposes on a 56 year old woman is presented. The lesions were lichenoid and scaly in appearance with closely grouped papules. The old tattoo marks on the skin were not involved and areas of skin between the new tattoo marks were also spared. In addition, the sarcoidosis lesion were pruritic and burning. The circumstantial evidence indicated the medical agent applied on the tattoo wounds as the provocative factor for the development of sarcoidosis of the skin. PMID:7026927

  4. Diagnosis and treatment of cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Kengo F; Satomi, Kazuhiro

    2016-02-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of unknown aetiology. The frequency of cardiac involvement (cardiac sarcoidosis (CS)) varies in the different geographical regions, but it has been reported that it is an absolutely important prognostic factor in this disease. Complete atrioventricular block is the most common, and ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation the second most common arrhythmia in this disease, both of which are associated with cardiac sudden death. Diagnosing CS is sometimes difficult because of the non-specific ECG and echocardiographic findings, and CS is sometimes misdiagnosed as dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or an idiopathic ventricular aneurysm, and therefore, endomyocardial biopsy is important, but has a low sensitivity. Another problem is the recognition of isolated types of CS. Recently, MRI and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography have been demonstrated to be useful tools for the non-invasive diagnosis of CS as well as therapeutic evaluation tools, but are still unsatisfactory. Treatment of CS is usually done by corticosteroid therapy to control inflammation, prevent fibrosis and protect from any deterioration of the cardiac function, but the long-term outcome is still in debate. Despite the advancement of non-pharmacological approaches for CS (pacing, defibrillators and catheter ablation) to improve the prognosis, there are still many issues remaining to resolve diagnosing and managing CS. Here, we attempt a review of the clinical evidence, with special focus on the current understanding of this disease and showing the current strategies and remaining problems of diagnosing and managing CS. PMID:26643814

  5. Unmasking sarcoidosis following surgery for Cushing disease.

    PubMed

    Diernaes, Jon E F; Bygum, Anette; Poulsen, Per L

    2016-01-01

    We present a patient with Cushing disease apparently suppressing sarcoidosis, which was unmasked following surgical resection of a pituitary adrenocorticotropin (ACTH)-producing microadenoma. Case report and a short review of the literature published in this area. A 46-year-old Caucasian woman presented with symptoms of hypercortisolism such as progressive weight gain, Cushingoid appearance, proximal myopathy, easy bruising, and amenorrhea. Blood testing including inferior petrosal sinus sampling uncovered an ACTH-producing microadenoma in the right aspect of the anterior pituitary gland for which the patient underwent transphenoidal resection. Maintenance corticosteroid therapy was implemented, and the signs and symptoms of Cushing disease began to resolve. Three months after surgery, multiple erythematous painful nodules developed on the patient's arms. Erythema nodosum (EN) was diagnosed clinically and a suspicion of underlying sarcoidosis was substantiated by lung imaging and elevated plasma interleukin (IL)-2 receptor. One month later, the lesions spontaneously resolved without therapy other than maintenance glucocorticoid replacement. Physicians should be aware that patients undergoing successful treatment of Cushing syndrome may have a flare-up or emergence of a corticosteroid-responsive disease. PMID:27375832

  6. Optic neuropathy associated with systemic sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Ben J.; Graham, Elizabeth M.; Plant, Gordon T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify and follow a series of 52 patients with optic neuropathy related to sarcoidosis. Methods: Prospective observational cohort study. Results: The disorder was more common in women and affected a wide age range. It was proportionately more common in African and Caribbean ethnic groups. Two clinical subtypes were identified: the more common was a subacute optic neuropathy resembling optic neuritis; a more slowly progressive optic neuropathy arose in the remaining 17%. Sixteen (31%) were bilateral. Concurrent intraocular inflammation was seen in 36%. Pain arose in only 27% of cases. An optic perineuritis was seen in 2 cases, and predominate involvement of the chiasm in one. MRI findings showed optic nerve involvement in 75% of cases, with adjacent and more widespread inflammation in 31%. Treatment with corticosteroids was helpful in those with an inflammatory optic neuropathy, but not those with mass lesions. Relapse of visual signs arose in 25% of cases, necessitating an increase or escalation of treatment, but relapse was not a poor prognostic factor. Conclusions: This is a large prospective study of the clinical characteristics and outcome of treatment in optic neuropathy associated with sarcoidosis. Patients who experience an inflammatory optic neuropathy respond to treatment but may relapse. Those with infiltrative or progressive optic neuropathies improve less well even though the inflammatory disorder responds to therapy. PMID:27536707

  7. Unmasking sarcoidosis following surgery for Cushing disease

    PubMed Central

    Diernaes, Jon E.F.; Bygum, Anette; Poulsen, Per L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We present a patient with Cushing disease apparently suppressing sarcoidosis, which was unmasked following surgical resection of a pituitary adrenocorticotropin (ACTH)-producing microadenoma. Case report and a short review of the literature published in this area. A 46-year-old Caucasian woman presented with symptoms of hypercortisolism such as progressive weight gain, Cushingoid appearance, proximal myopathy, easy bruising, and amenorrhea. Blood testing including inferior petrosal sinus sampling uncovered an ACTH-producing microadenoma in the right aspect of the anterior pituitary gland for which the patient underwent transphenoidal resection. Maintenance corticosteroid therapy was implemented, and the signs and symptoms of Cushing disease began to resolve. Three months after surgery, multiple erythematous painful nodules developed on the patient's arms. Erythema nodosum (EN) was diagnosed clinically and a suspicion of underlying sarcoidosis was substantiated by lung imaging and elevated plasma interleukin (IL)-2 receptor. One month later, the lesions spontaneously resolved without therapy other than maintenance glucocorticoid replacement. Physicians should be aware that patients undergoing successful treatment of Cushing syndrome may have a flare-up or emergence of a corticosteroid-responsive disease. PMID:27375832

  8. An Isolated Mass in the Palm, Starting Manifestation of Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbanhoseini, Mohammad; Yazdi, Hamidreza; Naseh, Hossein; Hafezi, Poopak

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease that is characterized with noncaseating granulomatous nodules which present in multiple organs specially lungs (90%). Incidence of masses due to Sarcoidosis in upper extremity is low and most cases present in association with involvement of pulmonary hilary lymph nodes. In this article we present a rare case of Sarcoidosis which presented as a single soft tissue mass in hand without osseous or pulmonary hillary lymph node involvement. Incidence of involvement of musculoskeletal system is 1-5 %, mostly it occurs in small bones in hands and feet. In most cases involvement of soft tissue in extremities is accompanied with bone lesions. Those cases of soft tissue involvement are generally coincide with pulmonary lymph nodules. To the authors` knowledge, this is the first case of Sarcoidosis that presents without spreading in bones or pulmonary hilar lymph nodes. PMID:26894226

  9. Myositis and eosinophilia in a patient with sarcoidosis.

    PubMed Central

    al-Saffar, Z. S.; Kelsey, C. R.; Kennet, R. P.; Webley, M.

    1994-01-01

    We present a patient with muscle manifestations of sarcoidosis associated with raised creatine kinase levels, eosinophilia and interstitial lung disease. She had significant improvement on prednisolone 30 mg per day. PMID:7824422

  10. [Systemic sarcoidosis: a diagnostic challenge in pediatrics. Case report].

    PubMed

    Díaz Angarita, Tomás; Morales Camacho, William; Lozano Neira, Laura; Plata Ortiz, Jessica; Zárate Taborda, Linda

    2016-10-01

    Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous inflammatory disease of unknown etiology, evidenced most often in young adults, which can compromise several organs, mainly lung, lymph nodes, eyes and skin. The presence of the disease in pediatric population is rare. Denomination in pediatrics is made based on age and clinical manifestations of the patient. The aim of this report is to present a case of systemic sarcoidosis in a pediatric patient without lung involvement with severe extrapulmonary manifestations. Fifteen year old patient who debuted with nonspecific symptoms (emesis, weight loss). Radiographic studies without lung involvement but with findings suggestive of Langerhans cell histiocytosis; however, histopathological report (bone and lymph) showed the presence of chronic granulomatous nonnecrotizing disease, sarcoidosis type. Childhood sarcoidosis is a rare and difficult entity to diagnose, mainly by the lack of specific biomarkers for diagnosis. PMID:27606655

  11. Propionibacterium acnes isolated from lymph nodes of patients with sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    de Brouwer, Bart; Veltkamp, Marcel; Wauters, Carla A; Grutters, Jan C; Janssen, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes has been repeatedly suggested as a candidate causative agent of sarcoidosis. It is the only microorganism that has been isolated from sarcoid lesions by bacterial culture so far and this has been described in Japanese patients only. We report two non-Japanese patients in whom mediastinoscopy was performed in order to obtain lymph node tissue for histopathology, which was suggestive for sarcoidosis. Bacterial culture of these uncontaminated mediastinal lymph nodes revealed P. acnes in both patients. As shown in these two cases, P. acnes can be isolated from sterile biopsied sarcoid lymph nodes of non-Japanese patients and supports the belief that there is an etiologic link between P. acnes sarcoidosis. Further elucidation could provide an opening to novel strategies using antibiotics for treating sarcoidosis. PMID:26422574

  12. Sarcoidosis and Autoimmunity: From Genetic Background to Environmental Factors.

    PubMed

    Bindoli, Sara; Dagan, Amir; Torres-Ruiz, José J; Perricone, Carlo; Bizjak, Mojca; Doria, Andrea; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a chronic multisystem disease with variable course resulting from the interaction between environmental factors and the immune system of individuals genetically predisposed. The evidence linking sarcoidosis with environmental triggers such as metals is increasing. We describe the case of a 44 year old female with a history. of smoking since age 30 and previous mercury dental filling who presented at physical examination with numerous subcutaneous nodules. Laboratory data showed accelerated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and high titer of anti-U1 ribonucleoprotein antibodies (U1 RNP). Skin biopsy and chest X-ray suggested the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. In this report we illustrate the different causes involved in the onset of sarcoidosis. PMID:27228643

  13. Pulmonary sarcoidosis presenting with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Arondi, Sabrina; Valsecchi, Alberto; Borghesi, Andrea; Monti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a common disease that involve almost constantly the lung. Usually the onset is insidious, and symptoms are slowly ingravescent. Very rarely, as in the case here reported, sarcoidosis can cause an acute respiratory failure with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). A 20-year-old girl from Pakistan presented for acute fatigue, fever, and cough with a chest X-ray displayed the micronodular interstitial disease. Despite of anti-tuberculosis therapy, ARDS developed in a few days requiring continuous positive airway pressure treatment. Examinations on transbronchial specimens obtained by bronchoscopy permitted to reach the diagnosis of sarcoidosis and steroid therapy improved rapidly clinical conditions. This is the first case report reported in Europe that confirms the rare onset of sarcoidosis as ARDS. Steroid therapy allows to cure rapidly this severe complication. PMID:26933462

  14. Study of Toll-like receptor gene loci in sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Schürmann, M; Kwiatkowski, R; Albrecht, M; Fischer, A; Hampe, J; Müller-Quernheim, J; Schwinger, E; Schreiber, S

    2008-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-factorial systemic disease of granulomatous inflammation. Current concepts of the aetiology include interactions of unknown environmental triggers with an inherited susceptibility. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are main components of innate immunity and therefore TLR genes are candidate susceptibility genes in sarcoidosis. Ten members of the human TLR gene family have been identified and mapped to seven chromosomal segments. The aim of this study was to investigate all known TLR gene loci for genetic linkage with sarcoidosis and to follow positive signals with different methods. We analysed linkage of TLR gene loci to sarcoidosis by use of closely flanking microsatellite markers in 83 families with 180 affected siblings. We found significant linkage between sarcoidosis and markers of the TLR4 gene locus on chromosome 9q (non-parametric linkage score 2·63, P = 0·0043). No linkage was found for the remaining TLR gene loci. We subsequently genotyped 1203 sarcoidosis patients from 997 families, 1084 relatives and 537 control subjects for four single nucleotide polymorphisms of TLR4, including Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile. This genotype data set was studied by case–control comparisons and transmission disequilibrium tests, but showed no significant results. In summary, TLR4 − w ith significant genetic linkage results − appears to be the most promising member of the TLR gene family for further investigation in sarcoidosis. However, our results do not confirm the TLR4 polymorphisms Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile as susceptibility markers. Our results rather point to another as yet unidentified variant within or close to TLR4 that might confer susceptibility to sarcoidosis. PMID:18422738

  15. Evidence for a genetic component in familial sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rybicki, B.A.; Harrington, D.; Major, M.

    1994-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a disease with reported familial clustering, but a putative hereditary component has not been established. We analyzed 33 sarcoid index cases with a positive family history and their 596 1st and 2nd degree relatives to determine if the distribution of disease was consistent with a genetic etiology. Prevalence of sarcoidosis was twice as high in 1st degree relatives of index cases compared to 2nd degree relatives (8.5% vs. 3.9%; p=0.016). Recurrence risk ratios (defined as the risk of disease in relatives divided by the population prevalence) were calculated in 2nd degree relatives after making an ascertainment correction. A single gene model fit the observed results better than a polygenic model for a range of sarcoidosis prevalance. A greater shared environment among siblings compared to parents and offspring did not appear to increase risk of sarcoidosis based on a higher prevalance of disease in the latter (7.1% vs. 10.7%; p=0.313). However, the age of diagnosis in affected parent-offspring pairs was more consistent with a combined genetic and environmental etiology than either component alone. In summary, these results suggest a genetic component, possibly a single gene, increases disease risk in family members of sarcoidosis cases. A segregation analysis is planned to more thoroughly evaluate the evidence for both genetic and non-genetic transmission of sarcoidosis in these families.

  16. Gallium-67 activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Trauth, H.A.; Heimes, K.; Schubotz, R.; von Wichert, P.

    1986-01-01

    Roentgenograms and gallium-67 scans and gallium-67 counts of BAL fluid samples, together with differential cell counts, have proved to be useful in assessing activity and lung involvement in sarcoidosis. In active pulmonary sarcoidosis gallium-67 scans are usually positive. Quantitation of gallium-67 uptake in lung scans, however, may be difficult. Because gallium-67 uptake and cell counts in BAL fluid may be correlated, we set out to investigate gallium-67 activity in BAL fluid recovered from patient of different groups. Sixteen patients with recently diagnosed and untreated sarcoidosis, nine patients with healthy lungs, and five patients with CFA were studied. Gallium-67 uptake of the lung, gallium-67 activity in the lavage fluid, SACE and LACE levels, and alpha 1-AT activity were measured. Significantly more gallium-67 activity was found in BAL fluid from sarcoidosis patients than in that from CFA patients (alpha = .001) or patients with healthy lungs (alpha = .001). Gallium-67 activity in BAL fluid could be well correlated with the number of lymphocytes in BAL fluid, but poorly with the number of macrophages. Subjects with increased levels of SACE or serum alpha 1-AT showed higher lavage gallium-67 activity than did normals, but no correlation could be established. High gallium-67 activity in lavage fluid may be correlated with acute sarcoidosis or physiological deterioration; low activity denotes change for the better. The results show that gallium-67 counts in BAL fluid reflects the intensity of gallium-67 uptake and thus of activity of pulmonary sarcoidosis.

  17. Hepatic sarcoidosis: pathogenesis, clinical context, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Syed, Umer; Alkhawam, Hassan; Bakhit, Mena; Companioni, Rafael A Ching; Walfish, Aron

    2016-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is typically characterized as a non-caseating granulomatous disease that has the ability to affect multiple different organ systems. Although extra-thoracic sarcoidosis can occur in the presence and also without lung involvement, isolated extra-pulmonary disease is rare. The liver is the third most commonly affected organ system after the lungs and lymph nodes. When discussing hepatic sarcoidosis it is important to keep in mind that many patients in this population may not present as one would typically expect since most of the patients are asymptomatic or have mild presentations. Therefore, the diagnosis can be difficult at times since no single laboratory or imaging study can definitively diagnose this systemic disease. In the rare case of some patients where there is difficulty in discerning between different pathologies, the use of image-guided tissue biopsy may be necessary to establish a diagnosis. At the current time, there are no clear guidelines for the management of hepatic sarcoidosis and are mostly dependent on a patient's clinical status at time of presentation. The current body of research in regard to treatment suggests steroids to be the mainstay of therapy. However, there is a role for additional immunosuppressive therapy in cases where the initial treatment is refractory to steroids. In this manuscript, we discussed the pathogenesis of liver sarcoidosis and context of its presentation. In addition, the differential diagnosis and imaging evaluation in this population is discussed. Finally, treatment options are reviewed in setting of previous studies for liver sarcoidosis. PMID:27175775

  18. Thermography in ocular inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kawali, Ankush A

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate ocular inflammatory and non-inflammatory conditions using commercially available thermal camera. Materials and Methods: A non-contact thermographic camera (FLIR P 620) was used to take thermal pictures of seven cases of ocular inflammation, two cases of non-inflammatory ocular pathology, and one healthy subject with mild refractive error only. Ocular inflammatory cases included five cases of scleritis, one case of postoperative anterior uveitis, and a case of meibomian gland dysfunction with keratitis (MGD-keratitis). Non-inflammatory conditions included a case of conjunctival benign reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (BRLH) and a case of central serous chorio-retinopathy. Thermal and non-thermal photographs were taken, and using analyzing software, the ocular surface temperature was calculated. Results: Patient with fresh episode of scleritis revealed high temperature. Eyes with MGD-keratitis depicted lower temperature in clinically more affected eye. Conjunctival BRLH showed a cold lesion on thermography at the site of involvement, in contrast to cases of scleritis with similar clinical presentation. Conclusion: Ocular thermal imaging is an underutilized diagnostic tool which can be used to distinguish inflammatory ocular conditions from non-inflammatory conditions. It can also be utilized in the evaluation of tear film in dry eye syndrome. Its applications should be further explored in uveitis and other ocular disorders. Dedicated “ocular thermographic” camera is today's need of the hour. PMID:24347863

  19. Rationale and Design of the Genomic Research in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency and Sarcoidosis (GRADS) Study. Sarcoidosis Protocol.

    PubMed

    Moller, David R; Koth, Laura L; Maier, Lisa A; Morris, Alison; Drake, Wonder; Rossman, Milton; Leader, Joseph K; Collman, Ronald G; Hamzeh, Nabeel; Sweiss, Nadera J; Zhang, Yingze; O'Neal, Scott; Senior, Robert M; Becich, Michael; Hochheiser, Harry S; Kaminski, Naftali; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Gibson, Kevin F

    2015-10-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease characterized by noncaseating granulomatous inflammation with tremendous clinical heterogeneity and uncertain pathobiology and lacking in clinically useful biomarkers. The Genomic Research in Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency and Sarcoidosis (GRADS) study is an observational cohort study designed to explore the role of the lung microbiome and genome in these two diseases. This article describes the design and rationale for the GRADS study sarcoidosis protocol. The study addresses the hypothesis that distinct patterns in the lung microbiome are characteristic of sarcoidosis phenotypes and are reflected in changes in systemic inflammatory responses as measured by peripheral blood changes in gene transcription. The goal is to enroll 400 participants, with a minimum of 35 in each of 9 clinical phenotype subgroups prioritized by their clinical relevance to understanding of the pathobiology and clinical heterogeneity of sarcoidosis. Participants with a confirmed diagnosis of sarcoidosis undergo a baseline visit with self-administered questionnaires, chest computed tomography, pulmonary function tests, and blood and urine testing. A research or clinical bronchoscopy with a research bronchoalveolar lavage will be performed to obtain samples for genomic and microbiome analyses. Comparisons will be made by blood genomic analysis and with clinical phenotypic variables. A 6-month follow-up visit is planned to assess each participant's clinical course. By the use of an integrative approach to the analysis of the microbiome and genome in selected clinical phenotypes, the GRADS study is powerfully positioned to inform and direct studies on the pathobiology of sarcoidosis, identify diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers, and provide novel molecular phenotypes that could lead to improved personalized approaches to therapy for sarcoidosis. PMID:26193069

  20. "End-stage" pulmonary fibrosis in sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Teirstein, Alvin T; Morgenthau, Adam S

    2009-02-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is an unusual "end stage" in patients with sarcoidosis. Fibrosis occurs in a minority of patients, and presents with a unique physiologic combination of airways dysfunction (obstruction) superimposed on the more common restrictive dysfunction. Imagin techniques are essential to the diagnosis, assessment and treatment of pulmonary fibrosis. Standard chest radiographs and CT scans may reveal streaks, bullae, cephalad retraction of the hilar areas, deviation of the trachea and tented diaphragm. Positive gallium and PET scans indicate residual reversible granulomatous disease and are important guides to therapy decisions. Treatment, usually with corticosteroids, is effective in those patients with positive scans, but fibrosis does not improve with any treatment. With severe functional impariment and patient disability, pulmonary hypertension and right heart failure may supervene for which the patient will require treatment. Oxygen, careful diuresis, sildenafil and bosentan may be salutary. These patients are candidates for lung transplantation. PMID:19170216

  1. Single Lesion of Sarcoidosis Presenting as Cicatricial Alopecia: A Rare Report from India

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Aparajita; Sengupta, Sujata; Coondoo, Arijit; Gharami, Ramesh Chandra

    2014-01-01

    Sarcoidosis affects different systems of the body including the skin where it can affect various cutaneous sites. Among these sites, the scalp is a very unusual location for lesions of sarcoidosis. Sarcoidosis of the scalp can very rarely be accompanied by cicatricial alopecia. We report here a rare case of sarcoidosis of scalp with cicatricial alopecia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such report from India. PMID:25191039

  2. Pediatric ocular phthiriasis infestation.

    PubMed

    Kairys, D J; Webster, H J; Terry, J E

    1988-02-01

    Although pubic lice infestation of ocular regions is relatively uncommon, the optometrist needs to be aware of the diagnosis and treatment of louse-infested patients. A case report of ocular phthiriasis is presented along with a discussion of its etiology, clinical diagnosis and management. PMID:3361053

  3. Molecular Analysis of Sarcoidosis Granulomas Reveals Antimicrobial Targets.

    PubMed

    Rotsinger, Joseph E; Celada, Lindsay J; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V; Atkinson, James B; Drake, Wonder P

    2016-07-01

    Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disease of unknown cause. Prior molecular and immunologic studies have confirmed the presence of mycobacterial virulence factors, such as catalase peroxidase and superoxide dismutase A, within sarcoidosis granulomas. Molecular analysis of granulomas can identify targets of known antibiotics classes. Currently, major antibiotics are directed against DNA synthesis, protein synthesis, and cell wall formation. We conducted molecular analysis of 40 sarcoidosis diagnostic specimens and compared them with 33 disease control specimens for the presence of mycobacterial genes that encode antibiotic targets. We assessed for genes involved in DNA synthesis (DNA gyrase A [gyrA] and DNA gyrase B), protein synthesis (RNA polymerase subunit β), cell wall synthesis (embCAB operon and enoyl reductase), and catalase peroxidase. Immunohistochemical analysis was conducted to investigate the locale of mycobacterial genes such as gyrA within 12 sarcoidosis specimens and 12 disease controls. Mycobacterial DNA was detected in 33 of 39 sarcoidosis specimens by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction compared with 2 of 30 disease control specimens (P < 0.001, two-tailed Fisher's test). Twenty of 39 were positive for three or more mycobacterial genes, compared with 1 of 30 control specimens (P < 0.001, two-tailed Fisher's test). Immunohistochemistry analysis localized mycobacterial gyrA nucleic acids to sites of granuloma formation in 9 of 12 sarcoidosis specimens compared with 1 of 12 disease controls (P < 0.01). Microbial genes encoding enzymes that can be targeted by currently available antimycobacterial antibiotics are present in sarcoidosis specimens and localize to sites of granulomatous inflammation. Use of antimicrobials directed against target enzymes may be an innovative treatment alternative. PMID:26807608

  4. Delayed diagnosis of sarcoidosis is common in Brazil*

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Mauri Monteiro; Coletta, Ester Nei Aparecida Martins; Ferreira, Rimarcs Gomes; Pereira, Carlos Alberto de Castro

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of and the factors related to delayed diagnosis of sarcoidosis in Brazil. METHODS: We evaluated patients with a biopsy-proven diagnosis of sarcoidosis, using a questionnaire that addressed the following: time since symptom onset and since the first medical visit; and the number and specialty of the physicians visited. We divided the patients by the timeliness of the diagnosis-timely (< 6 months) and delayed (≥ 6 months)-comparing the two groups in terms of systemic and pulmonary symptoms; extrathoracic involvement; spirometric data; radiological staging; level of education; income; and tuberculosis (diagnosis and treatment). RESULTS: We evaluated 100 patients. The median number of physicians consulted was 3 (range, 1-14). In 11 cases, sarcoidosis was diagnosed at the first visit. In 54, the first physician seen was a general practitioner. The diagnosis of sarcoidosis was timely in 41 patients and delayed in 59. The groups did not differ in terms of gender; race; type of health insurance; level of education; income; respiratory/systemic symptoms; extrathoracic involvement; and radiological staging. In the delayed diagnosis group, FVC was lower (80.3 ± 20.4% vs. 90.5 ± 17.1%; p = 0.010), as was FEV1 (77.3 ± 19.9% vs. 86.4 ± 19.5%; p = 0.024), misdiagnosis with and treatment for tuberculosis (≥ 3 months) also being more common (24% vs. 7%, p = 0.032, and 20% vs. 0%; p = 0.002, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: The diagnosis of sarcoidosis is often delayed, even when the imaging is suggestive of sarcoidosis. Delayed diagnosis is associated with impaired lung function at the time of diagnosis. Many sarcoidosis patients are misdiagnosed with and treated for tuberculosis. PMID:24310626

  5. Tracheo-oesophageal fistula in a patient with chronic sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Darr, A; Mohamed, S; Eaton, D; Kalkat, M S

    2015-10-01

    Sarcoidosis is a common multisystem granulomatous condition of unknown aetiology, predominantly involving the respiratory system. Tracheal stenosis has been described but we believe that we present the first case of a tracheo-oesophageal fistula secondary to chronic sarcoidosis. A 57-year-old woman with sarcoidosis, a known tracheal stricture and a Polyflex(®) stent in situ presented with stridor. Bronchoscopy confirmed in-stent stenosis, by exuberant granulation tissue. The stent was removed and the granulation tissue was resected accordingly. Postoperatively, the patient was noticed to have an incessant cough and video fluoroscopy raised the suspicion of a tracheo-oesophageal fistula. A repeat bronchoscopy demonstrated marked granulation tissue, accompanied by a fistulous connection with the oesophagus at the mid-lower [middle of the lower] third of the trachea. Three Polyflex(®) stents were sited across the entire length of the trachea. Sarcoidosis presents with varying clinical manifestations and disease progression. Tracheal involvement appears to be a rare phenomenon and usually results in stenosis. To date, there has been little or no documented literature describing the formation of a tracheo-oesophageal fistula resulting from sarcoidosis. Early reports documented the presence of sarcoidosis induced weakening in the tracheal wall, a process termed tracheal dystonia. Weaknesses are more apparent in the membranous aspect of the trachea. Despite the rare nature of such pathology, this case report highlights the need to consider the presence of a tracheo-oesophageal fistula in sarcoidosis patients presenting with repeat aspiration in the absence of an alternate pathology. PMID:26274763

  6. [Radionuclide assessment of cardiac involvement in patients with sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Hiroe, M; Nagata, M; Sekiguchi, M; Ohta, Y; Kusakabe, K; Shigeta, A; Horie, T; Fujita, N; Hasumi, M; Toyosaki, T

    1990-01-01

    This study was aimed to determine whether nuclear methods were useful for examining cardiac pathology and for making a decision of corticosteroid therapy in patients with sarcoidosis. Thirty six patients were divided into two groups; GpA consisted of 19 patients with cardiac sarcoidosis and abnormal ECG findings, and GpB of 17 patients with sarcoidosis without ECG abnormalities. Cardiac uptake of 67Ga-citrate in 2 and 99mTc-PYP in one of GpA was observed and steroid therapy resulted in the disappearance of the uptake. 201Tl-CL cardiac tomograms disclosed perfusion defects in 10 of 14 patients (71%) in GpA, including defects with redistribution in 8 of the 10 pts, but only one case in GpB. Radionuclide ventriculography using 99mTc-RBC revealed abnormal response of left ventricular (LV) function to exercise and LV dysfunction in GpA. These data suggest that nuclear study is a useful tool for diagnosing cardiac sarcoidosis, evaluating therapeutic effectiveness and long-term follow-up in patients with sarcoidosis. PMID:2162435

  7. Colonic sarcoidosis: Unusual onset of a systemic disease

    PubMed Central

    Erra, Paola; Crusco, Sonia; Nugnes, Loredana; Pollio, Anna Maria; Di Pilla, Gianni; Biondi, Giuseppe; Vigliardi, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem chronic inflammatory condition of unknown etiology that has the potential to involve every tissue in the body. Sarcoidosis in the gastrointestinal system, and particularly the colon, is very rare. Here, we report the case of a 57-year-old man with no previous diagnosis of sarcoidosis who presented with new onset of abdominal pain and constipation. A colonoscopy revealed that the abdominal pain was caused by an obstructing lesion in the cecum-ascending colon and lacked a clear histologic diagnosis. Radiologic investigation revealed concentric wall thickening of the cecum-ascending colon with multiple satellite lymphadenopathies, highly suggestive of a malignancy. The patient underwent a laparotomy and a right hemicolectomy was performed. A diagnosis of colonic sarcoidosis was made after the resected specimen was examined. Additionally, a chest computed tomography scan revealed lung involvement with atypical radiologic features in the absence of respiratory symptoms. Only histologic examination of the surgical specimen can yield a diagnosis of gastrointestinal sarcoidosis due to the non-specificity of endoscopic and radiologic findings. PMID:25805948

  8. Nanocrystal for ocular drug delivery: hope or hype.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Om Prakash; Patel, Viral; Mehta, Tejal

    2016-08-01

    The complexity of the structure and nature of the eye emanates a challenge for drug delivery to formulation scientists. Lower bioavailability concern of conventional ocular formulation provokes the interest of researchers in the development of novel drug delivery system. Nanotechnology-based formulations have been extensively investigated and found propitious in improving bioavailability of drugs by overcoming ocular barriers prevailing in the eye. The advent of nanocrystals helped in combating the problem of poorly soluble drugs specifically for oral and parenteral drug delivery and led to development of various marketed products. Nanocrystal-based formulations explored for ocular drug delivery have been found successful in achieving increase in retention time, bioavailability, and permeability of drugs across the corneal and conjunctival epithelium. In this review, we have highlighted the ocular physiology and barriers in drug delivery. A comparative analysis of various nanotechnology-based ocular formulations is done with their pros and cons. Consideration is also given to various methods of preparation of nanocrystals with their patented technology. This article highlights the success achieved in conquering various challenges of ocular delivery by the use of nanocrystals while emphasizing on its advantages and application for ocular formulation. The perspectives of nanocrystals as an emerging flipside to explore the frontiers of ocular drug delivery are discussed. PMID:27165145

  9. Sarcoidosis patient with lupus pernio and infliximab-induced myositis: Response to Acthar gel

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ying; Lower, Elyse E.; Li, Huiping; Baughman, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Infliximab is an effective treatment for sarcoidosis patients with persistent disease despite glucocorticoids and immunosuppressive therapy. Patients receiving infliximab can experience side effects, inducing an autoimmune reaction. Treatment is unclear for sarcoidosis patients who develop autoimmune reactions to infliximab. We report a case of a patient with advanced sarcoidosis who developed a myositis type reaction to infliximab characterized by diffuse muscle achiness and weakness and marked elevations in serum creatinine phosphokinase (CPK) and aldolase. Manifestations of sarcoidosis and myositis improved after Acthar treatment. This is the first report of successful treatment with Acthar in a patient with advanced sarcoidosis with an autoimmune reaction to infliximab.

  10. Sarcoidosis detected due to tattoo swellings in an Indian female.

    PubMed

    Ghorpade, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    A female patient presented with asymptomatic swellings in old blue-black tattoo marks of her forearms. On careful skin examination, few raised erythematous, circular plaques were also found on the non-tattooed skin on her back, about which she was unaware. The diagnosis of cutaneous and systemic sarcoidosis was confirmed after classical histopathological findings from skin lesions from her non tattooed back and from papulonodular tattooed lesions, ruling out other causes of granulomas and supported by a negative Mantoux test, raised serum angiotensin converting enzyme level, high resolution computed tomography thorax, etc. She responded well to oral steroid therapy. The importance of a careful skin examination, easy access provided by skin lesions in suspected cases of cutaneous/systemic sarcoidosis, the value of sudden tattoo changes in the diagnosis here and the possible contribution of tattoos toward the causation of cutaneous and/or systemic sarcoidosis are highlighted. PMID:26275266

  11. Electrophysiological correlates of cardiac sarcoidosis: an appraisal of current evidence.

    PubMed

    Yadava, Mrinal; Bala, Rupa

    2015-06-01

    Cardiac sarcoidosis is an underdiagnosed condition that may be present in as many as 25% of patients with systemic sarcoidosis. It is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in affected individuals. The presentation of cardiac involvement in sarcoidosis includes sudden death in the absence of preceding symptoms, conduction disturbances, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. A scarcity of randomized data and a lack of prospective trials underlies the contention between experts on the most appropriate strategies for diagnosis and therapy. This review focuses on the electrophysiological sequelae of the disease, with an emphasis on current diagnostic guidelines, multimodality imaging for early detection, and the role of various therapeutic interventions. Multicentre collaboration is necessary to address the numerous unanswered questions pertaining to management of this disease. PMID:26142797

  12. Immunogenetics of Disease-Causing Inflammation in Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Grunewald, Johan; Spagnolo, Paolo; Wahlström, Jan; Eklund, Anders

    2015-08-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic inflammatory disorder characterised by tissue infiltration by mononuclear phagocytes and lymphocytes with associated non-caseating granuloma formation. Originally described as a disorder of the skin, sarcoidosis can involve any organ with wide-ranging clinical manifestations and disease course. Recent studies have provided new insights into the mechanisms involved in disease pathobiology, and we now know that sarcoidosis has a clear genetic basis largely involving human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes. In contrast to Mendelian-monogenic disorders--which are generally due to specific and relatively rare mutations often leading to a single amino acid change in an encoded protein--sarcoidosis results from genetic variations relatively common in the general population and involving multiple genes, each contributing an effect of varying magnitude. However, an individual may have the necessary genetic profile and yet the disease will not develop unless an environmental or infectious factor is encountered. Genetics appears also to contribute to the huge variability in clinical phenotype and disease behaviour. Moreover, it has been established that sarcoidosis granulomatous inflammation is a highly polarized T helper 1 immune response that starts with an antigenic stimulus followed by T cell activation via a classic HLA class II-mediated pathway. A complex network of lymphocytes, macrophages, and cytokines is pivotal in the orchestration and evolution of the granulomatous process. Despite these advances, the aetiology of sarcoidosis remains elusive and its pathogenesis incompletely understood. As such, there is an urgent need for a better understanding of disease pathogenesis, which hopefully will translate into the development of truly effective therapies. PMID:25791751

  13. Sarcoidosis in Black Women in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Jeffrey S.; Palmer, Julie R.; Boggs, Deborah A.; Serlin, David M.; Rosenberg, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    Background: Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disorder of unknown cause that occurs among men and women of all races. In the United States, black women are most frequently and most severely affected. There have been few epidemiologic studies of sarcoidosis focusing on black women. Methods: In this article, we present data on incidence, prevalence, and clinical characteristics of sarcoidosis among participants in the Black Women’s Health Study, a cohort study of 59,000 black women from across the United States. Data on incident disease and potential risk factors are obtained through biennial questionnaires. Follow-up has been > 80% through six completed cycles. Results: There were 685 prevalent cases of sarcoidosis at baseline in 1995 and 435 incident cases reported during 611,585 person-years of follow-up through 2007, for an average annual incidence rate of 71/100,000 and a current prevalence of 2.0%. The sarcoid diagnosis was confirmed in 96% of self-reported cases for whom medical records or physician checklists were obtained. The most frequently affected site was the lung. Most patients also had extrapulmonary involvement, with the most common sites being lymph nodes, skin, and eyes. Prednisone had the highest prevalence of use, followed by inhaled corticosteroids. Conclusions: This study confirms previous reports of high incidence and prevalence of sarcoidosis among black women, as well as the extent of extrapulmonary disease, frequent need for steroid therapy, and comorbid conditions in this population. The prospective identification of sarcoidosis cases from a defined population will enable a valid assessment of risk factors for incident disease as follow-up continues. PMID:20595459

  14. Ocular manifestation of Ichthyosis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Amry, Mohammad A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Ichthyosis is a rare dermato-ocular disease. This study evaluates the presenting ocular signs, symptoms, complications and prognosis of ichthyosis in a case series from Saudi Arabia. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed for 11 patients with ichthyosis who presented to King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, over the last 20 years. Results The most common presenting ocular diagnosis was ectropion of both the lids. Two patients developed corneal perforation with poor prognosis. Most of the patients underwent skin grafting to repair eyelid ectropion. The visual prognosis was excellent because timely surgical interventions were performed. Hence the rate of corneal complications such as perforation was low. Conclusion The most ocular presentation of ichthyosis is ectropion of both the upper and lower lids. Despite good visual prognosis, there were some devastating corneal complications such as perforation with unpredictable outcomes. PMID:26949357

  15. Diagnosis and treatment of azoospermia resulting from testicular sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Kovac, Jason R; Flood, Diane; Mullen, J Brendan; Fischer, Marc Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Genitourinary sarcoidosis is uncommon, with only rare documented cases of testicular involvement reported. We detail the case of a 37-year-old male who initially presented for azoospermia and secondary infertility. A testicular biopsy revealed nonnecrotizing granulomas and a chest x-ray identified perihilar lymphadenopathy and granulomatous lung nodules. A corticosteroid regimen was administered, and routine semen analyses were conducted. Significant improvements were noted after prednisone treatments. A successful in vivo fertilization was obtained. This is the first known case of testicular sarcoidosis diagnosed during investigations into azoospermia and secondary infertility which, after treatment with corticosteroids, resulted in natural fertilization. PMID:21546613

  16. Cutaneous Sarcoidosis: Preamble of a Paucisymptomatic Systemic Disease.

    PubMed

    Ramírez Huaranga, Marco Aurelio; Ramos Rodríguez, Claudia Carolina; de la Rocha Vedia, Iris Violeta; García Arpa, Mónica; Murillo Lázaro, Cristina; Bellón Guardia, María

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease with a wide range of clinical manifestations. Skin involvement is an early, frequent and accessible location for a histopathological study. Several risk factors have been described to determine the likelihood of systemic involvement of an apparent cutaneous condition. Early diagnosis and systemic treatment could prevent future complications. A series of three cases is presented in which the initial diagnosis was cutaneous sarcoidosis, but it was actually the first manifestation of a systemic disease. A review of this topic is also presented. PMID:25823568

  17. Radioisotope bone scanning in a case of sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cinti, D.C.; Hawkins, H.B.; Slavin, J.D. Jr.

    1985-03-01

    The application of radioisotope scanning to osseous involvement from systemic sarcoidosis has been infrequently described in the scientific literature. Most commonly, the small bones of the hands and feet are affected if sarcoidosis involves the skeleton. Nonetheless, there are also occasional manifestations of sarcoid in the skull, long bones, and vertebral bodies. This paper describes a case of sarcoid involving the lung parenchyma with multiple lesions in the skull and ribs demonstrated by bone scanning with Tc-99m MDP. Following treatment with steroids, the bone scan showed complete resolution of the rib lesions and almost complete resolution of the lesions in the calvarium.

  18. Direct quantitation of thoracic gallium-67 uptake in sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bourguet, P.; Delaval, P.; Herry, J.Y.

    1986-10-01

    A method of direct quantitation of /sup 67/Ga uptake in the lung is described. The attenuation coefficient requires calculation and is obtained simply for each patient by transmission using a planar radionuclide source. The validity of the method was tested with a phantom (error less than 10%). Forty-three patients with pulmonary and/or mediastinal sarcoidosis were classified. The different groups of patients as defined clinically and radiographically (controls, nonactive, and active sarcoidosis) were well-differentiated (p less than 0.001).

  19. Sarcoidosis and multiple myeloma: Concurrent presentation of an unusual association

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Vidya; Prajapat, Deepak; Talwar, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Literature on concurrent association of sarcoidosis with lymphoproliferative malignancies other than lymphoma e.g. multiple myeloma is meager. The rarity of the situation prompted us to report this patient who was a 51-year-old woman with a 2-years history of breathlessness, cough with expectoration, chest pain and backache. Initial evaluation revealed mild anemia, increased alkaline phosphatase with chest skiagram showing both lower zone non homogenous opacities with calcified hilar lymph nodes. CECT chest showed mediastinal with bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy, parenchymal fibrosis, traction bronchiectasis, ground glass opacities, septal and peribronchovascular thickening affecting mid and lower lung zones bilaterally. MRI Dorsolumbar spine was suggestive of marrow infiltrative disorder. EBUS FNA of intrathoracic nodes, EBB and TBLB confirmed sarcoidosis. PET CT revealed hyper metabolic activity in lung, multiple lymph nodes and lytic bone lesions. Serum protein electrophoresis and immunofixation revealed a monoclonal paraprotein, immunoglobulin IgG kappa type. Bone marrow biopsy revealed an increase in plasma cells (15%), but no granulomas. Diagnosis of Indolent or multiple myeloma with sarcoidosis was established. 12 cases of sarcoidosis and multiple myeloma have been reported in literature, and mostly preceding the onset of multiple myeloma by many years, in our case both were diagnosed concurrently. PMID:26933313

  20. An epidemiological perspective of the pathology and etiology of sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Sawahata, Michiru; Sugiyama, Yukihiko

    2016-01-01

    To update current knowledge on the pathology and etiology of sarcoidosis, here we review previous epidemiological research and discuss age-related differences and historical changes in the clinical characteristics of sarcoidosis we identified over the last four decades in Japan. Extrathoracic lymph node involvement was more common in young patients, while extrathoracic involvement of non-lymphatic organs and hypercalcemia were more common in older patients. Most patients in their 20s presented with bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy, but this was consistently less common among older patients. Over time, the distribution of age at diagnosis has shifted toward the older age group in the United States, Denmark, and Japan. In Japan, the incidence rate has been decreasing among young people, but there has consistently been a second peak among postmenopausal women. Age-related differences in the clinical presentation of sarcoidosis may reflect the pathways of causative antigens and the strengthening of immunoregulatory mechanisms with age. Internal and external environmental factors, such as exposure to diverse microorganisms, ovarian insufficiency, and active vitamin D deficiency, that may contribute to the onset of sarcoidosis must be identified in order to develop strategies for prevention and treatment. PMID:27537712

  1. Multicentric Castleman's disease developing during follow-up of sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Sawata, Tetsuro; Bando, Masashi; Nakayama, Masayuki; Mato, Naoko; Takemura, Tamiko; Sugiyama, Yukihiko

    2016-07-01

    Pulmonary sarcoidosis is reported to have complication of lymphoproliferative disease such as malignant lymphoma, but the complication of multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD) is rarely reported. In our case of a 60-year-old woman, bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy was noted in her chest X-ray. We performed a transbronchial lung biopsy. She was diagnosed as having pulmonary sarcoidosis (Stage II). The shadow on chest X-ray disappeared without treatment. However, after 8 years, swelling of the mediastinal and abdominal lymph node, thickened bronchovascular bundle, and multiple nodular shadows were identified, and a thoracoscopic lung biopsy was performed. Based on the histopathological findings and elevated serum interleukin-6 level (75.7 pg/mL), she was diagnosed with pulmonary sarcoidosis complicated by MCD. When a change in chest X-ray findings are found during monitoring of pulmonary sarcoidosis, it is important to proceed with a thoracoscopic lung biopsy, because of the possibility of the rare complication of MCD. PMID:27512568

  2. Renal confined sarcoidosis: Natural history and diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Ghafoor, Azam; Almakki, Akram

    2014-01-01

    A 69 year old male referred to nephrology clinic for uncontrolled hypertension. During his follow up over two years, he developed renal disease and hypercalcemia. He was found to have monoclonal gammopathy (MGUS). Urinalysis was negative except for Monoclonal IgG on immunoelectrophoresis. Workup for malignancy was negative including chest X-ray and bone marrow biopsy. He progressed into renal failure and ended up on dialysis. Interestingly, the renal biopsy showed non-caseating granulomas, and the patient was diagnosed with renal confined sarcoidosis which is extremely rare. PPD was negative. He was treated with Prednisone 60 mg daily. Surprisingly, his kidney disease was not responsive to steroids. Despite improvement in his calcium with treatment, his kidney function did not improve and he remained on hemodialysis but needed to stay on small dose of Prednisone to keep his calcium under control. Our case is the first in the literature that demonstrates the natural history of renal-confined sarcoidosis. In addition, the presence of MGUS created a diagnostic challenge and delayed diagnosis of sarcoidosis. Although the renal biopsy did not show direct damage from MGUS, a potential relation between renal sarcoidosis and MGUS is worth studied. PMID:24761384

  3. Systemic Sarcoidosis Mimicking a Behavioural Variant of Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    De Maindreville, Anne; Bedos, Line; Bakchine, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Among rare neurological manifestations, a progressive dementia may exceptionally be the revealing clinical feature of a sarcoidosis. Diagnosis may then be difficult, especially when systemic signs are missing or latent, with a risk of therapeutic delay. We report the first case of sarcoidosis mimicking a frontotemporal dementia. A 53-year-old man presented with a dementia clinically suggestive of frontotemporal dementia, progressing slowly for about 2 years. However, MRI revealed unusual aspects, mainly large areas of T2/FLAIR hypersignal within temporal regions and cerebellum, with nodular leptomeningeal and juxtacortical Gadolinium enhancement. The patient was finally diagnosed with a systemic sarcoidosis. We discuss the differential diagnosis based on MRI aspects and review the literature on the clinical, biological, and imaging features of sarcoidosis presenting with dementia. This case demonstrates that brain imaging remains mandatory in the exploration process of a patient with dementia. Although the patient presented with rather typical features of a behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia, the MRI aspect was the key exploration that leaded to the diagnosis. PMID:26442161

  4. Sarcoidosis and multiple myeloma: Concurrent presentation of an unusual association.

    PubMed

    Nair, Vidya; Prajapat, Deepak; Talwar, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Literature on concurrent association of sarcoidosis with lymphoproliferative malignancies other than lymphoma e.g. multiple myeloma is meager. The rarity of the situation prompted us to report this patient who was a 51-year-old woman with a 2-years history of breathlessness, cough with expectoration, chest pain and backache. Initial evaluation revealed mild anemia, increased alkaline phosphatase with chest skiagram showing both lower zone non homogenous opacities with calcified hilar lymph nodes. CECT chest showed mediastinal with bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy, parenchymal fibrosis, traction bronchiectasis, ground glass opacities, septal and peribronchovascular thickening affecting mid and lower lung zones bilaterally. MRI Dorsolumbar spine was suggestive of marrow infiltrative disorder. EBUS FNA of intrathoracic nodes, EBB and TBLB confirmed sarcoidosis. PET CT revealed hyper metabolic activity in lung, multiple lymph nodes and lytic bone lesions. Serum protein electrophoresis and immunofixation revealed a monoclonal paraprotein, immunoglobulin IgG kappa type. Bone marrow biopsy revealed an increase in plasma cells (15%), but no granulomas. Diagnosis of Indolent or multiple myeloma with sarcoidosis was established. 12 cases of sarcoidosis and multiple myeloma have been reported in literature, and mostly preceding the onset of multiple myeloma by many years, in our case both were diagnosed concurrently. PMID:26933313

  5. Redistribution on the thallium scan in myocardial sarcoidosis: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Makler, P.T.; Lavine, S.J.; Denenberg, B.S.; Bove, A.A.; Idell, S.

    1981-05-01

    Resting and redistribution thallium studies were performed in four young patients with sarcoidosis to evaluate the possibility of myocardial involvement. In each case the resting scan showed marked defects that resolved on the redistribution studies. In a different patient population, these results would have implied significant coronary artery disease.

  6. Husband and wife with sarcoidosis: possible environmental factors involved

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous multisystem disorder of unclear etiology that involves any organ, most commonly the lung and the lymph nodes. It is hypothesized that the disease derives from the interaction between single or multiple environmental factors and genetically determined host factors. Multiple potential etiologic agents for sarcoidosis have been proposed without any definitive demonstration of causality. We report the case of two patients, husband (57 years old) and wife (55 years old), both suffering from sarcoidosis. They underwent a lymph node biopsy by mediastinoscopy which showed a “granulomatous epithelioid giant cell non-necrotising chronic lymphadenitis”. They had lived up to 3 years ago in the country in a farm, in contact with organic dusts, animals such as dogs, chickens, rabbits, pigeons; now they have lived since about 3 years in an urban area where there are numerous chemical industries and stone quarries. The aim of this case report was to focus on environmental factors that might be related to the pathogenesis of the sarcoidosis. PMID:23351275

  7. Cardiac sarcoidosis-state of the art review.

    PubMed

    Hulten, Edward; Aslam, Saira; Osborne, Michael; Abbasi, Siddique; Bittencourt, Marcio Sommer; Blankstein, Ron

    2016-02-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-system inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology resulting in formation of non-caseating granulomas. Cardiac involvement-which is associated with worse prognosis-has been detected in approximately 25% of individuals based on autopsy or cardiac imaging studies. Nevertheless, the diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis is challenging due to the low yield of endomyocardial biopsy, and the limited accuracy of various clinical criteria. Thus, no gold standard diagnostic criterion exists. This review will summarize the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of cardiac sarcoidosis with a focus on advanced cardiovascular imaging, We review the evidence to support a role for cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging in the initial evaluation of selected patients with suspected cardiac sarcoidosis, with cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) as an alternative or complementary initial diagnostic test in a subgroup of patients in whom CMR may be contra-indicated or when CMR is negative with continued clinical concern for myocardial inflammation. In addition to the diagnostic value of these tests, CMR and PET are also useful in identifying patients who have higher risk of adverse events such as ventricular tachycardia or death, in whom preventive therapies such as defibrillators should be more strongly considered. Although no randomized controlled trials for treatment of cardiac sarcoidosis exist, immunosuppressive therapy is often used. We review emerging evidence regarding the use of cardiac PET to identify and quantity the amount of myocardial inflammation as well as to guide the use of immunotherapy. Future studies are needed to determine the benefit of imaging guided therapies aimed at improving patient outcomes. PMID:26885492

  8. Tuberculosis lymphadenitis in a well managed case of sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, P R; Garg, Kranti; Singhal, Niti; Aggarwal, D; Gupta, R; Khurana, A; Janmeja, A K

    2013-01-01

    Differentiation between tuberculosis (TB) and sarcoidoisis is sometimes extremely difficult. Sequential occurrence of sarcoidosis and TB in the same patient is uncommon. We present the case of a young man, with a proven diagnosis of sarcoidosis who later developed TB after completion of treatment for sarcoidosis. A 32-year-old male patient presented with low-grade fever since two months. Physical examination revealed cervical lymphadenopathy. Initial fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of the cervical lymph node was suggestive of granulomatous inflammation; the chest radiograph was normal. Repeat FNAC from the same lymph node was suggestive of reactive lymphoid hyperplasia. The patient was treated with antibiotics and followed-up. He again presented with persistence of fever and lymphadenopathy and blurring of vision. Ophthalmological examination revealed uveitis, possibly due to a granulomatous cause. His repeat Mantoux test again was non-reactive; serum angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) levels were raised. This time an excision biopsy of the lymph node was done which revealed discrete, non-caseating, reticulin rich granulomatous inflammation suggestive of sarcoidosis. The patient was treated with oral prednisolone and imporved symptomatically. Subsequently, nearly nine months after completion of corticosteroid treatment, he presented with low-grade, intermittent fever and a lymph node enlargement in the right parotid region. FNAC from this lymph node showed caseating granulomatous inflammation and the stain for acid-fast bacilli was positive. He was treated with Category I DOTS under the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme and improved significantly. The present case highlights the need for further research into the aetiology of TB and sarcoidosis. PMID:24660565

  9. Reduced Oxygen Uptake Efficiency Slope in Patients with Cardiac Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Ammenwerth, Wilhelm; Wurps, Henrik; Klemens, Mark A.; Crolow, Catharina; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Schönfeld, Nicolas; Bittner, Roland C.; Bauer, Torsten T.

    2014-01-01

    Background The non-invasive diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) is difficult. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has become a very valuable diagnostic tool in patients with suspected CS, but usually a combination of different tests is used. Oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES) is a parameter of cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET), which is used as an indicator for cardiovascular impairment. We investigated the predictive value of OUES for the diagnosis of myocardial involvement in sarcoid patients. Methods Retrospectively 37 consecutive patients (44.9±13.8 years) with histologically confirmed sarcoidosis and clinical suspicion of heart involvement underwent noninvasive diagnostic testing including CMR. CS was diagnosed according to the guidelines from the Japanese Society of Sarcoidosis and other Granulomatous Disorders with additional consideration of CMR findings. Furthermore, CPET with calculation of predicted OUES according to equations by Hollenberg et al. was carried out. Results Patients with CS (11/37; 30%) had a worse cardiovascular response to exercise. OUES was significantly lower in CS-group compared to non-CS-group (59.3±19.1 vs 88.0±15.4%pred., p<0.0001). ROC curve method identified 70%pred. as the OUES cut-off point, which maximized sensitivity and specificity for detection of CS (96% sensitivity, 82% specificity, 89% overall accuracy). OUES <70%pred. was the single best predictor of CS (Odds ratio: 100.43, 95% CI: 1.99 to 5064, p<0.001) even in multivariate analyses. Conclusion OUES assessed in CPET may be helpful in identifying patient with cardiac involvement of sarcoidosis. Patient selection for CMR may be assisted by CPET findings in patients with sarcoidosis. PMID:25029031

  10. Pediatric genetic ocular tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rouhani, Behnaz; Ramasubramanian, Aparna

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric genetic ocular tumors include malignancies like retinoblastoma and phakomatosis like neurofibromatosis, tuberous sclerosis, von Hippel-Lindau syndrome, and nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. It is important to screen for ocular tumors both for visual prognosis and also for systemic implications. The phakomatosis comprise of multitude of benign tumors that are aysmptomatic but their detection can aid in the diagnosis of the syndrome. Retinoblastoma is the most common malignant intraocular tumor in childhood and with current treatment modalities, the survival is more than 95%. It is transmitted as an autosomal dominant fashion and hence the offsprings of all patients with the germline retinoblastoma need to be screened from birth. This review discusses the various pediatric genetic ocular tumors discussing the clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatment.

  11. Glycobiology of ocular angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Markowska, Anna I; Cao, Zhiyi; Panjwani, Noorjahan

    2014-12-01

    Ocular neovascularization can affect almost all the tissues of the eye: the cornea, the iris, the retina, and the choroid. Pathological neovascularization is the underlying cause of vision loss in common ocular conditions such as diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity and age-related macular neovascularization. Glycosylation is the most common covalent posttranslational modification of proteins in mammalian cells. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that glycosylation influences the process of angiogenesis and impacts activation, proliferation, and migration of endothelial cells as well as the interaction of angiogenic endothelial cells with other cell types necessary to form blood vessels. Recent studies have provided evidence that members of the galectin class of β-galactoside-binding proteins modulate angiogenesis by novel carbohydrate-based recognition systems involving interactions between glycans of angiogenic cell surface receptors and galectins. This review discusses the significance of glycosylation and the role of galectins in the pathogenesis of ocular neovascularization. PMID:25108228

  12. Sarcoidosis during etanercept treatment for rheumatoid arthritis in women with a history of bilateral oophorectomy.

    PubMed

    Sawahata, Michiru; Sigiyama, Yukihiko; Yamasawa, Hideaki; Miki, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Hisashi; Muto, Shigeaki; Yamamoto, Hironori; Bando, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    nd in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Paradoxically, this treatment induces sarcoidosis in a small population of RA patients as a class effect. A safer anti-TNF therapeutic strategy requires understanding of the risk factors for sarcoidosis. In Japan, TNF inhibitor was introduced in 2003. We reviewed 226 consecutive patients (65 men and 161 women) who were newly diagnosed with sarcoidosis between 2003 and 2012 at Jichi Medical University Hospital, Japan. We detected 3 cases in which sarcoidosis developed during etanercept treatment for RA. All 3 cases were women who had undergone bilateral oophorectomy more than 20 years earlier. Taken together with our previous epidemiologic findings of a consistently maintained second peak after menopause in the age-specific distribution of sarcoidosis in women over four decades, long-term insidious ovarian dysfunction was a possible risk factor for sarcoidosis under certain conditions, especially during etanercept treatment. PMID:27537723

  13. Systemic sarcoidosis with hypercalcaemia, hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction and thyroid involvement.

    PubMed

    Alsahwi, Nassib; Blavo, Delali; Karanchi, Harsha

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disorder. The lungs are the principal organs affected, however, extrapulmonary involvement including disorders of the pituitary and thyroid glands has been reported but presentation with multiple endocrine manifestations is rare. We report the case of a 36-year-old African-American woman who presented with hypercalcaemia, abnormal thyroid function studies and secondary amenorrhoea. On workup including laboratory, radiological testing and biopsy she was diagnosed with sarcoidosis with multi-organ involvement. Endocrine manifestations included non-parathyroid hormone mediated hypercalcaemia related to sarcoidosis, thyroid involvement with sarcoidosis and hypothalamic-pituitary involvement with a sellar and suprasellar mass associated with secondary adrenal insufficiency, secondary hypogonadism, growth hormone deficiency and secondary hypothyroidism. We report to the best of our knowledge the first case of simultaneous multiple endocrine manifestations of sarcoidosis that included hypercalcaemia, hypopituitarism and sarcoidosis of the thyroid gland. PMID:27495178

  14. Key messages from a rare case of annular sarcoidosis of scalp

    PubMed Central

    Bhushan, Premanshu; Thatte, Sarvesh S.; Singh, Avninder

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis, a multisystem disease of obscure etiology, is characterized by the formation of noncaseating epithelioid cell granulomas in several organs or tissues. The diagnosis of sarcoidosis requires a compatible clinical picture, histologic demonstration of noncaseating granulomas, and exclusion of other diseases capable of producing similar histology or clinical features. The lung is the most commonly affected organ, but the skin is frequently involved. Sarcoidosis occurs worldwide and affects all ages and races with female predominance. Scalp involvement is decidedly rare among the myriad cutaneous manifestations of sarcoidosis. Alopecia is common in sarcoidosis and is generally scarring in nature. Annular sarcoidosis is a rare morphology and annular sarcoid of scalp is seldom reported. Herein we present a case of annular scalp sarcoid with systemic involvement and without alopecia. PMID:27294057

  15. Key messages from a rare case of annular sarcoidosis of scalp.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Premanshu; Thatte, Sarvesh S; Singh, Avninder

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis, a multisystem disease of obscure etiology, is characterized by the formation of noncaseating epithelioid cell granulomas in several organs or tissues. The diagnosis of sarcoidosis requires a compatible clinical picture, histologic demonstration of noncaseating granulomas, and exclusion of other diseases capable of producing similar histology or clinical features. The lung is the most commonly affected organ, but the skin is frequently involved. Sarcoidosis occurs worldwide and affects all ages and races with female predominance. Scalp involvement is decidedly rare among the myriad cutaneous manifestations of sarcoidosis. Alopecia is common in sarcoidosis and is generally scarring in nature. Annular sarcoidosis is a rare morphology and annular sarcoid of scalp is seldom reported. Herein we present a case of annular scalp sarcoid with systemic involvement and without alopecia. PMID:27294057

  16. Ocular toxicity of fludarabine

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaoyan; Herzlich, Alexandra A; Bishop, Rachel; Tuo, Jingsheng; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2008-01-01

    The purine analogs, fludarabine and cladribine represent an important class of chemotherapy agents used to treat a broad spectrum of lymphoid malignancies. Their toxicity profiles include dose-limiting myelosuppression, immunosuppression, opportunistic infection and severe neurotoxicity. This review summarizes the neurotoxicity of high- and standard-dose fludarabine, focusing on the clinical and pathological manifestations in the eye. The mechanisms of ocular toxicity are probably multifactorial. With increasing clinical use, an awareness of the neurological and ocular vulnerability, particularly to fludarabine, is important owing to the potential for life- and sight-threatening consequences. PMID:18461151

  17. Nail Sarcoidosis with and without Systemic Involvement: Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Noriega, Leandro; Criado, Paulo; Gabbi, Tatiana; Avancini, João; Di Chiacchio, Nilton

    2015-09-01

    The most commonly seen nail change in sarcoidosis, often associated with chronic systemic disease, is onychodystrophy. Imaging of hands, feet and chest is of paramount importance when nail sarcoidosis is suspected, for evaluation of bone cysts and pulmonary involvement, respectively. We report 2 cases of sarcoidosis that developed nail involvement - one with pulmonary disease, and the other without any evidence of systemic involvement, which is very rare. PMID:27170939

  18. Nail Sarcoidosis with and without Systemic Involvement: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Noriega, Leandro; Criado, Paulo; Gabbi, Tatiana; Avancini, João; Di Chiacchio, Nilton

    2015-01-01

    The most commonly seen nail change in sarcoidosis, often associated with chronic systemic disease, is onychodystrophy. Imaging of hands, feet and chest is of paramount importance when nail sarcoidosis is suspected, for evaluation of bone cysts and pulmonary involvement, respectively. We report 2 cases of sarcoidosis that developed nail involvement – one with pulmonary disease, and the other without any evidence of systemic involvement, which is very rare. PMID:27170939

  19. Sickle cell anemia patient with sarcoidosis-associated inguinal lymph node and lung infiltration.

    PubMed Central

    Güvenç, Birol; Unsal, Cagatay; Hanta, Ismail; Unsal, Aydan; Güvenç, Hakan

    2005-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a chronic, systemic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology, characterized by noncaseating granulomatous infiltration of any organ. Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is the homozygoid form of sickle cell disease (SCD), which includes a group of genetic disorders characterized by production of an abnormal hemoglobin S (HbS). There are a few case reports with coexistence of sarcoidosis and SCA. We reported a 47-year-old female with SCA and sarcoidosis. Images Fig. 1 PMID:16035582

  20. Hypercalcemia and renal failure in the course of sarcoidosis--case report.

    PubMed

    Kempisty, Anna; Kuś, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Disturbances of calcium metabolism such as hypercalcemia or/and hypercalciuria in the course of sarcoidosis can be a cause of renal failure in some patients. Life threatening hypercalcemia in sarcoidosis patients is not very frequent. Severe hypercalcemia leading to renal insufficiency is a very rare condition. We present a case of 53-year old man who was admitted to Department of Lung Diseases because of hypercalcemic syndrome and renal failure, and in whom diagnosis of sarcoidosis was made. He was successfully treated with systemic corticosteroids. In this article we present physiological mechanism of hypercalcemia in sarcoidosis patients, mechanism of renal damage and management of these difficult problems. PMID:23109211

  1. Sarcoid Myositis with Anti-Ku Antibody Consistent with both Sarcoidosis and Polymyositis.

    PubMed

    Awano, Nobuyasu; Fukuda, Kensuke; Sakayori, Masashi; Kondoh, Keisuke; Ono, Ryu; Moriya, Atsuko; Ando, Tsunehiro; Kumasaka, Toshio; Takemura, Tamiko; Ikushima, Soichiro

    2016-01-01

    We herein describe a case of sarcoid myositis with anti-Ku antibody positivity. Pathological findings of the muscle were compatible with sarcoidosis, but could not be completely distinguished from myositis diseases that arise from other causes. According to a physical examination, pathological findings, the detection of anti-Ku antibody and the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DPB1 allele, we strongly suspected that the patient developed both sarcoidosis and polymyositis. Sarcoidosis is often complicated by autoimmune diseases. This case suggests the possibility that sarcoidosis and other autoimmune diseases may have common causal genetic factors. PMID:27477413

  2. Influenza vaccination in patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis: efficacy and safety

    PubMed Central

    Tavana, Sasan; Argani, Hassan; Gholamin, Sharareh; Razavi, Seyed‐Mostafa; Keshtkar‐Jahromi, Marzieh; Talebian, Amir S.; Moghaddam, Keivan G.; Sepehri, Zahra; Azad, Talat M.; Keshtkar‐Jahromi, Maryam

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Tavana et al. (2011) Influenza vaccination in patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis: efficacy and safety. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses DOI: 10.1111/j.1750‐2659.2011.00290.x. Background  Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory, granulomatous disorder of unknown etiology. The role of cellular and humoral immune systems in this disease is unclear, whereas dysregulation of the immune system is suggested. Patients with sarcoidosis show diverse responses while exposed to various antigens. Although influenza vaccination is recommended in pulmonary sarcoidosis, its efficacy and safety has not been investigated. Objectives  To evaluate safety and immunogenicity of influenza vaccine in patients with sarcoidosis. Patients/Methods  Influenza vaccination was performed in 23 eligible patients with sarcoidosis (SP) and 26 healthy controls (HC). Antibody titers against H1N1, H3N2, and B influenza virus antigens were evaluated just before and 1 month after vaccination. Patients were followed for 6 months to assess vaccine safety. Results  Serological response and magnitude of changes in antibody titers against influenza vaccine antigens were comparable between SPs and HCs. Women showed a better serological response against B antigen (P = 0·034) than men. Twenty‐four‐hour urine calcium was associated with antibody response against H1N1 [correlation coefficient (CC) = 0·477, P = 0·003] and H3N2 (CC = 0·352, P = 0·028) antigens. Serum angiotensin‐converting enzyme correlated negatively with antibody response against B antigen (CC = −0·331, P = 0·040). Higher residual volume was associated with fewer rises in antibody titer against H3N2 antigen (CC = −0·377, P = 0·035). No major adverse events or disease flare‐up was observed during follow‐up. Conclusions  In this study, influenza vaccination did not cause any major adverse event in SPs, and their serological response was equal to HCs

  3. Instrument Measures Ocular Counterrolling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levitan, Barry M.; Reschke, Millard F.; Spector, Lawrence N.

    1991-01-01

    Compact, battery-powered, noninvasive unit replaces several pieces of equipment and operator. Instrument that looks like pair of goggles with small extension box measures ocular counterrotation. Called "otolith tilt-translation reinterpretation" (OTTR) goggles, used in studies of space motion sickness. Also adapted to use on Earth and determine extent of impairment in patients who have impaired otolith functions.

  4. Homocysteine in ocular diseases.

    PubMed

    Ajith, Thekkuttuparambil Ananthanarayanan; Ranimenon

    2015-10-23

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is a derived sulfur-containing and non-proteinogenic amino acid. The metabolism of Hcy occurs either through the remethylation to methionine or transsulfuration to cysteine. Studies have identified hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) as one of the possible risk factors for a multitude of diseases including vascular, neurodegenerative and ocular diseases. Association of HHcy with eye diseases such as retinopathy, pseudoexfoliative glaucoma maculopathy, cataract, optic atrophy and retinal vessel atherosclerosis is established. The molecular mechanism underlying these ocular diseases has been reported as impaired vascular endothelial function, apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells, extracellular matrix alterations, decreased lysyl oxidase activity and oxidative stress. The formed homocysteine-thiolactone in HHcy has stronger cytotoxicity and pro-inflammatory properties which can induce lens opacification and optic nerve damage. The metabolism of Hcy requires enzymes with vitamins such as folic acid, vitamins B12 and B6. Despite the mixed conclusion of various studies regarding the level of these vitamins in elder people, studies recommended the treatment with folate and B12 to reduce Hcy levels in subjects with or without any defect in the enzymes involved in its metabolism. The levels of Hcy, folate, B6 as well as B12 should be measured early in patients with visual impairment that would aid to screen patients for life-threatening disorders related with HHcy. Elder patients may supplement with these vitamins in order to attenuate the ocular damages. This article discusses the association of Hcy in ocular diseases and the possible mechanism in the pathogenesis. PMID:26343924

  5. Ocular Screening System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An ocular screening system designed for safe, convenient screening of large groups was developed at Marshall Space Flight Center, leading to the formation of Medical Sciences Corporation. The system identifies visual defects accurately and inexpensively, and includes a photorefractor telephoto lens and an electronic flash. Medical Sciences Corporation is using the device to test at schools, industrial plants, etc.

  6. Sarcoidosis following successful treatment of pemphigus vulgaris with rituximab: a rituximab-induced reaction further supporting B-cell contribution to sarcoidosis pathogenesis?

    PubMed

    Galimberti, F; Fernandez, A P

    2016-06-01

    The anti-CD20 peripheral B-cell depleting monoclonal antibody, rituximab, has been shown to be a safe and effective treatment for refractory pemphigus vulgaris (PV), a potentially fatal autoimmune blistering disease. We report a patient who developed skin nodules and arthralgias following successful treatment of refractory PV with rituximab. Clinical, serological and histological findings were consistent with a diagnosis of sarcoidosis. The nodules promptly responded to treatment with corticosteroids, and resolved without recurrence when the medication was tapered several months later. The temporal onset of sarcoidosis following treatment with rituximab and the eventual resolution, coupled with the remarkable similarities between the B-cell immunological environment expected in our patient during the post-rituximab period and the immunological environment described in patients with idiopathic sarcoidosis, strongly implicates exposure to rituximab as the trigger for sarcoidosis development in our patient. We propose that rituximab-induced sarcoidal granulomas may be a rare adverse effect of treatment with this medication, providing further support for an important role of B cells in the pathogenesis of sarcoidosis. With better understanding of the circumstances surrounding sarcoidosis development following rituximab administration, this medication could potentially be used to induce sarcoidosis in animal research models to study the immunopathogenesis of this disease. PMID:26800651

  7. Spontaneous improvement of laryngeal sarcoidosis resistant to systemic corticosteroid administration

    PubMed Central

    Tsubouchi, Kazuya; Hamada, Naoki; Ijichi, Kayo; Umezaki, Toshiro; Takayama, Koichi; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    We report herein a case of laryngeal sarcoidosis that was refractory to systemic corticosteroids, but that improved spontaneously. A 49-year-old woman complained of dysphagia and hoarseness with accompanying edematous swellings of both arytenoid regions. She was referred to our hospital after systemic corticosteroid therapy failed to achieve any improvement. Laryngoscopy showed marked edema of the epiglottis and both arytenoid regions. The flow–volume curve on spirometry showed flattening of the expiratory flows. Histopathological examination of the arytenoid region showed non-caseating epithelioid granulomas, and laryngeal sarcoidosis was diagnosed with the result of BAL study. She was observed without treatment as symptoms were mild. Although edema of the left arytenoid region seemed to be somewhat worsened after 6 months, she continued to be followed closely because of improvements in the flow–volume curve and increasing peak expiratory flow. By 1 year after onset, symptoms and epiglottal swelling had spontaneously improved. PMID:26392860

  8. Ga-67 uptake in the lung in sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.G.; Johnson, S.M.; Harris, C.C.; Piantadosi, C.A.; Blinder, R.A.; Coleman, R.E.

    1984-02-01

    Images were obtained with Ga-67 and bronchopulmonary lavage performed in 21 patients with sarcoidosis (31 studies). The Ga-67 index, a semiquantitative criterion, was compared to a quantitative computer index based on lung:liver activity ratios; accuracy in predicting active alveolitis (defined by lavage lymphocyte counts) was assessed and differences between 24- and 48-hour studies examined. Computer activity ratios correlated well with the Ga-67 index, which had a sensitivity of 64%, specificity of 71%, 82%, and 77%, respectively, for the computer scores. Scores at 24 and 48 hours were similar. These results suggest that (a) Ga-67 scanning is useful in staging activity in pulmonary sarcoidosis, (b) quantitative computer scores are accurate in predicting disease activity, and (c) scanning can be performed 24 or 48 hours after injection.

  9. Treatment of laryngeal sarcoidosis with intralesional steroid injection.

    PubMed

    Krespi, Y P; Mitrani, M; Husain, S; Meltzer, C J

    1987-01-01

    Laryngeal sarcoidosis presents with hoarseness, cough, and dysphagia. Shortness of breath due to upper airway obstruction may occur. Indirect laryngoscopy reveals mucosal edema and erythema, granulomas, and nodules. The supraglottic larynx is the most frequently affected area. Systemic corticosteroids can be used initially; however, with persistent symptoms and/or severe airway problems, intralesional steroid injections may be more effective, as in the six patients presented. PMID:3688765

  10. Steroid-Sparing effects of pentoxifylline in pulmonary sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, M.K.; Fontana, J.R.; Babaali, H.; Gilbert-McClain, L.I.; Stylianou, M.; Joo, J.; Moss, J.; Manganiello, V.C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Agents that target pro-inflammatory cytokines may be useful in pulmonary sarcoidosis. Objective To determine effectiveness of a non-selective cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor, pentoxifylline (POF). Design Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial Setting Clinical Research Center, National Institutes of Health. Patients 27 patients with biopsy-confirmed pulmonary sarcoidosis receiving prednisone. Intervention Placebo or POF (1200-2000 mg/day) for 10 months, as prednisone was tapered. Measurements Primary endpoints: sustained improvement in two or more pulmonary function parameters, or a combination of one pulmonary function parameter and dyspnea. Results Except for one patient, primary endpoints were not reached in POF-treated patients. Therefore, a post hoc analysis was performed. The observed relative risk reduction for flares associated with POF treatment was 54.9% (95% CI 0.21, 0.89) and the absolute risk reduction was 50.6% (95% CI 0.22, 0.80). Compared to placebo treatment, in the POF group, the mean prednisone dose was lower at 8 and 10 months (p = 0.007 and 0.01 respectively), and there was a trend towards less prednisone usage over the entire study period (p = 0.053), as determined by cumulative change analysis. Conclusions Although our exploratory post hoc analysis suggested that POF reduced flares and had steroid-sparing effects, given the study limitations, definitive conclusions cannot be drawn regarding the efficacy of POF in pulmonary sarcoidosis. In addition, gastrointestinal side-effects, at the doses used, would seem to limit the use of POF in treating pulmonary sarcoidosis. Overall, however, this trial may provide a basis for using more specific, better-tolerated, PDE inhibitors in future clinical trials. PMID:20560292

  11. Cardiac sarcoidosis &hypen; the value of magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Smedema, J. P.; Doubell, A. F.

    2000-08-01

    This report describes the management of a 40-year-old woman presenting with recurrent monomorphic ventricular tachycardias secondary to cardiac sarcoidosis. She was managed with a combination of steroids, azathioprine and mexiletine. Magnetic resonance imaging proved to be of great help in diagnosing this condition as well as in following up the response to therapy. A brief review on the management of this condition is presented. PMID:11447482

  12. Histopathologic aid to diagnosis of sarcoidosis: report of 8 cases.

    PubMed

    Manonukul, Jane; Wanitphakdeedecha, Rungsima; Wisuthsarewong, Wanee; Thirapote, Panitta

    2006-06-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic disease of unknown etiology. The disease is common in blacks and is very rare in Thailand. It presents as one of the most variable manifestations usually affecting the lungs and intrathoracic lymph nodes. Other organs such as liver, spleen, joints and eyes including skin are also involved The common cutaneous lesions are maculopapular, erythematous plaque, subcutaneous nodule, scar and lupus pernio. No reliable indicator is useful for diagnosis except the histopathologic change which is the only way for approaching this disease. Sarcoidosis is the disease of exclusion. Various infections producing granulomas should be excluded histologically. The ultimate diagnosis requires clinical correlation, laboratory investigations, chest X-ray as well as available tissue culture. Herein, the authors reported eight cases of sarcoidosis by retrospective study primarily diagnosed by histopathological findings at Siriraj Hospital from January, 1997 to December, 2004 with many different clinical presentations. Despite the diverse clinical pictures, interestingly, the presented patients almost had the same histopathologic findings as small, uniform, discrete naked granulomas usually without necrosis. These findings act as a hallmark for diagnosis of this disease. PMID:16850689

  13. Two Cases of Heerfordt's Syndrome: A Rare Manifestation of Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, Yasushi; Fukuda, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Heerfordt's syndrome is a rare manifestation of sarcoidosis characterized by the presence of facial nerve palsy, parotid gland enlargement, anterior uveitis, and low grade fever. Two cases of Heerfordt's syndrome and a literature review are presented. Case  1. A 53-year-old man presented with swelling of his right eyelid, right facial nerve palsy, and swelling of his right parotid gland. A biopsy specimen from the swollen eyelid indicated sarcoidosis and he was diagnosed with incomplete Heerfordt's syndrome based on the absence of uveitis. His symptoms were improved by corticosteroid therapy. Case  2. A 55-year-old woman presented with left facial nerve palsy, bilateral hearing loss, and swelling of her bilateral parotid glands. She had been previously diagnosed with uveitis and bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy. Although no histological confirmation was performed, she was diagnosed with complete Heerfordt's syndrome on the basis of her clinical symptoms. Swelling of the bilateral parotid glands and left facial nerve palsy were improved immediately by corticosteroid therapy. Sarcoidosis is a relatively uncommon disease for the otolaryngologist. However, the otolaryngologist may encounter Heerfordt's syndrome as this syndrome presents with facial nerve palsy and swelling of the parotid gland. Therefore, we otolaryngologists should diagnose and treat Heerfordt's syndrome appropriately in cooperation with pneumologists and ophthalmologists. PMID:26885424

  14. Sudden unexpected death due to severe pulmonary and cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Ginelliová, Alžbeta; Farkaš, Daniel; Farkašová Iannaccone, Silvia; Vyhnálková, Vlasta

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we report the autopsy findings of a 57 year old woman who died unexpectedly at home. She had been complaining of shortness of breath, episodes of dry coughing, and nausea. Her past medical and social history was unremarkable. She had no previous history of any viral or bacterial disease and no history of oncological disorders. Autopsy revealed multiple grayish-white nodular lesions in the pleura and epicardial fat and areas resembling fibrosis on the cut surface of the anterior and posterior wall of the left ventricle and interventricular septum. Histological examination of the lungs and heart revealed multiple well-formed noncaseating epithelioid cell granulomas with multinucleated giant cells. Death was attributed to myocardial ischemia due to vasculitis of intramural coronary artery branches associated with sarcoidosis. Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic disease of unknown etiology characterized by the formation of noncaseating epithelioid cell granulomas in the affected organs and tissues. The diagnosis of sarcoidosis in this case was established when other causes of granulomatous disease such as tuberculosis, berylliosis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and giant cell myocarditis had been reasonably excluded. PMID:27379608

  15. Assessment of gallium-67 scanning in pulmonary and extrapulmonary sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Israel, H.L.; Gushue, G.F.; Park, C.H.

    1986-01-01

    Gallium-67 scans have been widely employed in patients with sarcoidosis as a means of indicating alveolitis and the need for corticosteroid therapy. Observation of 32 patients followed 3 or more years after gallium scans showed no correlation between findings and later course: of 10 patients with pulmonary uptake, 7 recovered with minor residuals; of 18 patients with mediastinal of extrathoracic uptake, 10 had persistent or progressive disease; of 4 patients with negative initial scans, 2 had later progression. The value of gallium-67 scans as an aid to diagnosis was studied in 40 patients with extrapulmonary sarcoidosis. In 12 patients, abnormal lacrimal, nodal, or pulmonary uptake aided in selection of biopsy sites. Gallium-67 scans and serum ACE levels were compared in 97 patients as indices of clinical activity. Abnormal gallium-67 uptake was observed in 96.3% of the tests in active disease, and ACE level elevation occurred in 56.3%. In 24 patients with inactive or recovered disease, abnormal gallium-67 uptake occurred in 62.5% and ACE level elevation in 37.5%. Gallium-67 scans have a limited but valuable role in the diagnosis and management of sarcoidosis.

  16. Radioaerosol lung clearance in patients with active pulmonary sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, M.P.; Baughman, R.P.; Hughes, J.; Fernandez-Ulloa, M.

    1985-05-01

    Pulmonary radioaerosol clearance rate of /sup 99m/Tc diethylenetriamine pentacetate (DTPA) in 14 patients with untreated sarcoidosis was compared with /sup 67/Ga lung scan and increased lymphocytes in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. Nine healthy nonsmoking subjects had a mean DTPA clearance rate of 1.18%/min (range, 0.54 to 1.60%/min). Eight of 14 patients with sarcoidosis had clearance rates greater than 1.60%/min. Of those 8 patients with abnormal DTPA clearance, 4 had positive gallium scans, 4 had more than 17% lymphocytes in the BAL fluid, and 3 had both tests positive. To study the cause of abnormal DTPA clearance, 23 subjects (including 3 normal controls, all 14 patients with sarcoidosis, and 6 patients with localized disease on chest roentgenogram) underwent both DTPA clearance studies and BAL for quantitation of the amount of albumin in lung fluid. There was a positive correlation between the rate of DTPA clearance and the albumin concentration in lung fluid (r = 0.87, p less than 0.01).

  17. Pulmonary granulomatous reaction: talc pneumoconiosis or chronic sarcoidosis?

    PubMed Central

    Tukiainen, P; Nickels, J; Taskinen, E; Nyberg, M

    1984-01-01

    A chronic pulmonary granulomatous reaction was associated with an almost identical clinical picture in two patients exposed to talc. In both patients lung biopsy showed the deposition of talc particles and a heavy granulomatous reaction. At the time of diagnosis the Kveim test result was negative in both patients, urinary calcium excretion was normal, and there were no extrapulmonary manifestations and no response to steroid treatment. These findings point against sarcoidosis. The serum angiotensin-converting enzyme level, however, was raised in both patients. It was concluded that the patient who was exposed to talc in the rubber industry had a true talc pneumoconiosis. The other patient, who was exposed to cosmetic talcum powder, suffered from chronic sarcoidosis with talc deposition in the lungs, since an enlarged axillar lymph node containing granulomatous inflammation was discovered after two years' follow up. These cases show that it may be extremely difficult to differentiate between chronic sarcoidosis and talc pneumoconiosis even after careful clinical and histological analysis. Images PMID:6691939

  18. Correlation between ocular perfusion pressure and ocular pulse amplitude in glaucoma, ocular hypertension, and normal eyes

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Bruno P; Cronemberger, Sebastião; Kanadani, Fabio N

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between ocular perfusion pressure and ocular pulse amplitude in glaucoma, ocular hypertension, and normal eyes. Methods Ninety eyes from 90 patients were included. Thirty patients had been recently diagnosed with glaucoma and had no previous history of treatment for ocular hypotension, 30 had elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) without evidence of glaucoma, and 30 had normal IOP (<21 mmHg) with no detectable glaucomatous damage. Goldmann applanation tonometry (GAT), dynamic contour tonometry (DCT), blood pressure measurement, pachymetry, Humphrey visual field, and routine ophthalmic examination was performed in each patient. Ocular perfusion pressure was calculated as the difference between mean arterial pressure and IOP. The ocular pulse amplitude was given by DCT. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to compare the glaucomatous and ocular hypertensive groups, and comparisons with the normal IOP group were done using the Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient. Results Mean IOP by DCT was 22.7 ± 4.3 mmHg in the glaucoma group, 22.3 ± 2.8 mmHg in the ocular hypertension group, and 14.3 ± 1.6 mmHg in the control group. Mean IOP by GAT was 19.0 ± 5.1 mmHg for glaucoma, 22.4 ± 2.1 mmHg for ocular hypertension, and 12.9 ± 2.2 mmHg for controls. Mean ocular pulse amplitude was 3.4 ± 1.2 mmHg in the glaucoma group, 3.5 ± 1.2 mmHg in the ocular hypertension group, and 2.6 ± 0.9 mmHg in the control group. Mean ocular perfusion pressure was 46.3 ± 7.9 mmHg in the glaucoma group, 46.3 ± 7.9 mmHg in the ocular hypertension group, and 50.2 ± 7.0 mmHg in controls. No significant correlation between ocular perfusion pressure and ocular pulse amplitude was found in any of the groups (P = 0.865 and r = −0.032, P = 0.403 and r = −0.156, P = 0.082 and ρ = −0.307 for glaucoma, ocular hypertension, and normal eyes, respectively). Conclusion There is no significant correlation between

  19. Pulmonary metastases from low grade sarcoma in a patient with pulmonary sarcoidosis. Sarcoidosis or sarcoid-like reaction?

    PubMed

    Majori, Maria; Anghinolfi, Miriam; Gnetti, Letizia; Casalini, Angelo Gianni

    2016-01-01

    An asymptomatic man with previous histopatological diagnosis of pulmonary sarcoidosis in radiological follow-up (stable for about 4 years) presented massive right pleural effusion. After drainage, CT of the chest showed an increase in number and size of pulmonary nodules compared to the last check (8 months before). Surgical pulmonary biopsies were performed with the diagnosis of metastases from low grade sarcoma. The primary tumor was localized to the right buttock. Given the absence of symptoms, the extent of disease and many comorbidities the patient underwent only treatment with gemcitabine that was not tolerated and discontinued after the first few cycles 1 year ago. At the present the patientis still asymptomatic even if the CT of the chest shows a slow but continuous progression of the disease. The question is: is this an association between sarcoidosis and malignancy? or was this a sarcoid-like reaction during malignancy? PMID:27537721

  20. Ocular delivery of macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoo-Chun; Chiang, Bryce; Wu, Xianggen; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Biopharmaceuticals are making increasing impact on medicine, including treatment of indications in the eye. Macromolecular drugs are typically given by physician-administered invasive delivery methods, because non--invasive ocular delivery methods, such as eye drops, and systemic delivery, have low bioavailability and/or poor ocular targeting. There is a need to improve delivery of biopharmaceuticals to enable less-invasive delivery routes, less-frequent dosing through controlled-release drug delivery and improved drug targeting within the eye to increase efficacy and reduce side effects. This review discusses the barriers to drug delivery via various ophthalmic routes of administration in the context of macromolecule delivery and discusses efforts to develop controlled-release systems for delivery of biopharmaceuticals to the eye. The growing number of macromolecular therapies in the eye needs improved drug delivery methods that increase drug efficacy, safety and patient compliance. PMID:24998941

  1. Human ocular anatomy.

    PubMed

    Kels, Barry D; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    We review the normal anatomy of the human globe, eyelids, and lacrimal system. This contribution explores both the form and function of numerous anatomic features of the human ocular system, which are vital to a comprehensive understanding of the pathophysiology of many oculocutaneous diseases. The review concludes with a reference glossary of selective ophthalmologic terms that are relevant to a thorough understanding of many oculocutaneous disease processes. PMID:25704934

  2. Ocular sparganosis from Assam

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Reema; Gogoi, Rajendra Nath

    2015-01-01

    Sparganosis is caused by plerocercoid larvae of the Pseudophyllidea tapeworms of the genus Spirometra. Though prevalent in East Asian and south east Asian countries like China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Vietnam, Thailand; yet very few cases are reported from India. We report a case of migrating sub-conjunctival ocular sparganosis mimicking scleritis which later on developed into orbital cellulitis from Dibrugarh, Assam, North-eastern part of India. This case is reported for its rarity. PMID:25709957

  3. An ocular motility conundrum.

    PubMed

    McElnea, Elizabeth Margaret; Stephenson, Kirk; Lanigan, Bernie; Flitcroft, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Two siblings, an 11-year-old boy and a 7-year-old girl presented with bilateral symmetrical ptosis and limited eye movements. Having already been reviewed on a number of occasions by a variety of specialists in multiple hospital settings a diagnosis of their ocular motility disorder had remained elusive. We describe their cases, outline the differential diagnosis and review the investigations performed which were influential in finally making a diagnosis. PMID:25349186

  4. Ocular Proton Therapy Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacperek, Andrzej

    This chapter describes a review of proton therapy (PT) centers and the techniques used for the treatment of ocular lesions. The role of ion beam therapy (IBT) for eye treatments, principally choroidal melanomas, has become well established among the competing treatment modalities. More national centers now offer PT for these lesions, but not necessarily in a hospital environment. Significant improvements in eye treatment planning, patient positioning, and QA dosimetry have been realized, to the benefit of treatment efficiency and accuracy of dose delivery.

  5. Severe hypercalcemia unmasked by Vitamin D in a patient with sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Nayak-Rao, S

    2013-01-01

    Severe hypercalcemia is uncommon in clinical practice and is usually due to primary hperparathyroidism or malignancy. We present a patient who presented with severe hypercalcemia with renal failure; further evaluation of which revealed the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. This case is presented in view of the rarity of presentation of sarcoidosis with hypercalcemic crisis. PMID:24049278

  6. Blockade of the Programmed Death-1 Pathway Restores Sarcoidosis CD4+ T-Cell Proliferative Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Nicole A.; Celada, Lindsay J.; Herazo-Maya, Jose D.; Abraham, Susamma; Shaginurova, Guzel; Sevin, Carla M.; Grutters, Jan; Culver, Daniel A.; Dworski, Ryszard; Sheller, James; Massion, Pierre P.; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V.; Johnson, Joyce E.; Kaminski, Naftali; Wilkes, David S.; Oswald-Richter, Kyra A.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Effective therapeutic interventions for chronic, idiopathic lung diseases remain elusive. Normalized T-cell function is an important contributor to spontaneous resolution of pulmonary sarcoidosis. Up-regulation of inhibitor receptors, such as programmed death-1 (PD-1) and its ligand, PD-L1, are important inhibitors of T-cell function. Objectives: To determine the effects of PD-1 pathway blockade on sarcoidosis CD4+ T-cell proliferative capacity. Methods: Gene expression profiles of sarcoidosis and healthy control peripheral blood mononuclear cells were analyzed at baseline and follow-up. Flow cytometry was used to measure ex vivo expression of PD-1 and PD-L1 on systemic and bronchoalveolar lavage–derived cells of subjects with sarcoidosis and control subjects, as well as the effects of PD-1 pathway blockade on cellular proliferation after T-cell receptor stimulation. Immunohistochemistry analysis for PD-1/PD-L1 expression was conducted on sarcoidosis, malignant, and healthy control lung specimens. Measurements and Main Results: Microarray analysis demonstrates longitudinal increase in PDCD1 gene expression in sarcoidosis peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed increased PD-L1 expression within sarcoidosis granulomas and lung malignancy, but this was absent in healthy lungs. Increased numbers of sarcoidosis PD-1+ CD4+ T cells are present systemically, compared with healthy control subjects (P < 0.0001). Lymphocytes with reduced proliferative capacity exhibited increased proliferation with PD-1 pathway blockade. Longitudinal analysis of subjects with sarcoidosis revealed reduced PD-1+ CD4+ T cells with spontaneous clinical resolution but not with disease progression. Conclusions: Analogous to the effects in other chronic lung diseases, these findings demonstrate that the PD-1 pathway is an important contributor to sarcoidosis CD4+ T-cell proliferative capacity and clinical outcome. Blockade of the PD-1 pathway may be a

  7. FCGR3A and FCGR3B copy number variations are risk factors for sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianming; Li, Yunfang; Guan, Weihua; Viken, Kevin; Perlman, David M; Bhargava, Maneesh

    2016-07-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disorder that causes significant morbidity. Genetic factors contribute to sarcoidosis risks. In this study, we investigated whether copy number variations (CNVs) of FCGR3A (coding for FcγRIIIA) and FCGR3B (coding for FcγRIIIB) genes are associated with sarcoidosis susceptibility and whether the expressions of FcγRIIIA on NK cells and FcγRIIIB on neutrophils are altered in sarcoidosis patients. TaqMan real-time PCR assays were used to analyze the CNV of FCGR3A and FCGR3B genes. FCGR3A and FCGR3B CNV genotypes were compared between 671 biopsy-proven sarcoidosis patients and the same number of healthy controls matched with age, sex, race, and geographic area from the ACCESS (A Case Control Etiologic Study of Sarcoidosis) cohort. Flow cytometry analyses were used to determine expressions of FcγRIIIA on NK cells and FcγRIIIB on neutrophils in phenotype analyses. We found that FCGR3A CNVs were significantly associated with sarcoidosis in females (CN = 1 vs. CN = 2 logistic regression adjusted for sex and race, OR 4.0156, SE = 2.2784, P = 0.0143; CN = 3 vs. CN = 2 logistic regression adjusted for sex and race, OR 2.8044, SE = 1.1065, P = 0.0090), suggesting that FCGR3A gene abnormality influences sarcoidosis development in a gender-specific manner. Furthermore, FcγRIIIA expressions were significantly decreased on NK cells from sarcoidosis patients compared to those from healthy controls (P = 0.0007). Additionally, low FCGR3B CN was associated with sarcoidosis (CN <2 vs. CN = 2 logistic regression adjusted for sex and race, OR 1.5025, SE = 0.2682, P = 0.0226), indicating that the functions of FCGR3B gene may also contribute to the pathogenesis of sarcoidosis. We conclude that FCGR3A CNVs are a major risk factor for female sarcoidosis and FCGR3B CNVs may also affect the development of sarcoidosis. PMID:27059607

  8. Immune function in sarcoidosis. Studies on delayed hypersensitivity, B and T lymphocytes, serum immunoglobulins and serum complement components.

    PubMed Central

    Tannenbaum, H; Rocklin, R E; Schur, P H; Sheffer, A L

    1976-01-01

    An assessment of immune function was performed in twenty-four patients with recently diagnosed active sarcoidosis. Four patients manifested skin anergy to four antigens. All subjects except one were capable of generating a positive skin response to a croton oil patch test. The incorporation of [3H]thymidine by lymphocytes in vitro in response to the nonspecific mitogens--phytohaemagglutinin, pokeweed mitogen and Con A did not differ between anergic and non-anergic thymidine incorporation in vitro when stimulated by the specific antigens, streptokinase/streptodornase or Candida albicans. Lymphocytes obtained from nine of eleven patients having positive delayed hypersensitivity skin reactions demonstrated MIF production in vitro upon specific antigen challenge. Quantities of circulating B and T lymphocytes did not differ between anergic and absolute numbers of circulating B and T lymphocytes, as well as hypercomplementaemia and hypergammaglobulinaemia when compared to the control group. PMID:795577

  9. Randomised controlled trial of vitamin D supplementation in sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Bolland, Mark J; Wilsher, Margaret L; Grey, Andrew; Horne, Anne M; Fenwick, Sheryl; Gamble, Greg D; Reid, Ian R

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The role vitamin D intake/production plays in sarcoidosis-associated hypercalcaemia is uncertain. However, authoritative reviews have recommended avoiding sunlight exposure and vitamin D supplements, which might lead to adverse skeletal outcomes from vitamin D insufficiency. We investigated the effects of vitamin D supplementation on surrogate measures of skeletal health in patients with sarcoidosis and vitamin D insufficiency. Design Randomised, placebo-controlled trial. Setting Clinical research centre. Participants 27 normocalcaemic patients with sarcoidosis and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) <50 nmol/L. Intervention 50 000 IU weekly cholecalciferol for 4 weeks, then 50 000 IU monthly for 11 months or placebo. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary endpoint was the change in serum calcium over 12 months, and secondary endpoints included measurements of calcitropic hormones, bone turnover markers and bone mineral density (BMD). Results The mean age of participants was 57 years and 70% were women. The mean (SD) screening 25OHD was 35 (12) and 38 (9) nmol/L in the treatment and control groups, respectively. Vitamin D supplementation increased 25OHD to 94 nmol/L after 4 weeks, 84 nmol/L at 6 months and 78 nmol/L at 12 months, while levels remained stable in the control group. 1,25-Dihydroxy vitamin D levels were significantly different between the groups at 4 weeks, but not at 6 or 12 months. There were no between-groups differences in albumin-adjusted serum calcium, 24 h urine calcium, markers of bone turnover, parathyroid hormone or BMD over the trial. One participant developed significant hypercalcaemia after 6 weeks (total cholecalciferol dose 250 000 IU). Conclusions In patients with sarcoidosis and 25OHD <50 nmol/L, vitamin D supplements did not alter average serum calcium or urine calcium, but had no benefit on surrogate markers of skeletal health and caused one case of significant hypercalcaemia

  10. Association of inflammatory bowel disease risk loci with sarcoidosis, and its acute and chronic subphenotypes.

    PubMed

    Fischer, A; Nothnagel, M; Franke, A; Jacobs, G; Saadati, H R; Gaede, K I; Rosenstiel, P; Schürmann, M; Müller-Quernheim, J; Schreiber, S; Hofmann, S

    2011-03-01

    Sarcoidosis is a complex granulomatous inflammatory disorder that shares several clinical and pathogenic features with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Postulating a common genetic basis of inflammatory diseases, we tested 106 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are known or have been suggested to be associated with IBD for a potential association with sarcoidosis and its acute and chronic subphenotypes. We genotyped 1,996 German sarcoidosis patients, comprising 648 acutely and 1,161 chronically affected individuals, 2,622 control subjects, and 342 German trios with affected offspring using SNPlex™ technology. The nonsynonymous SNP rs11209026 (Arg381Gln) in the interleukin (IL)-23 receptor (IL23R) gene was associated with chronic sarcoidosis (OR 0.63; p = 5.58×10(-5)), which was supported by the result of a transmission disequilibrium test analysis in the independent family sample (OR 0.50; p = 0.031). Marker rs12035082 located at chromosome 1q24.3 was found to be associated with the acute subphenotype (OR 1.36; p = 6.80×10(-7)) and rs916977 (HERC2 locus; OR 1.30; p = 4.49×10(-5)) was associated with sarcoidosis. Our results highlight the potential importance of the IL-23 signalling pathway for the development of chronic sarcoidosis. The finding links sarcoidosis pathogenesis to other inflammatory conditions and may contribute to new hypotheses on disease mechanisms. PMID:20650992

  11. [Morphological, immunohistochemical and radiological manifestation of lung tissue remodeling at lung sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Kogan, E A; Kichigina, O N; Demura, S A; Osipenko, V I

    2012-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a group of diseases with chronic immune inflammation and granulomas formation in the lung, lymph nodes, and others organs. Under progress of disease remodeling of the lung tissue occurs and at 20-25% of patient with sarcoidosis lung fibrosis is developed. We studied biopsies from 50 patients with sarcoidosis and 10 biopsies of pathological intact lung tissue as a control group. Roentgenologic, morphologic and immunohistochemical methods with using of mono- and polyclonal antibody to MMP 1, 2, 9 and TIMP-1, PCNA, aSMA, apo-CAS were realized. The expression levels of growth factors, apoptosis, MMPs, TIMPs were different in various clinic-morphological courses of sarcoidosis. As a rule under sarcoidosis deep remodeling of lung tissue didn't occur in spite of granulomatous inflammation. Granulomatous process, alveolitis (bronchiolitis) and sclerotic changes resulted in alteration of the lung. Cells of sarcoidosis granulomas, produced low level of MMPs and TIMP can't induce evident fibrosis and so hypertension is absent or becomes apparent in the slight form. It apparently can be link with localization of pathologic process in lung tissue without any alterations in the bronchoalveolar zone. Alveolitis under sarcoidosis conditions is notable for low activity of inflammation and doesn't result in interstitial fibrosis developing. PMID:22937579

  12. Ocular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gaudana, Ripal; Ananthula, Hari Krishna; Parenky, Ashwin; Mitra, Ashim K

    2010-09-01

    Ocular drug delivery has been a major challenge to pharmacologists and drug delivery scientists due to its unique anatomy and physiology. Static barriers (different layers of cornea, sclera, and retina including blood aqueous and blood-retinal barriers), dynamic barriers (choroidal and conjunctival blood flow, lymphatic clearance, and tear dilution), and efflux pumps in conjunction pose a significant challenge for delivery of a drug alone or in a dosage form, especially to the posterior segment. Identification of influx transporters on various ocular tissues and designing a transporter-targeted delivery of a parent drug has gathered momentum in recent years. Parallelly, colloidal dosage forms such as nanoparticles, nanomicelles, liposomes, and microemulsions have been widely explored to overcome various static and dynamic barriers. Novel drug delivery strategies such as bioadhesive gels and fibrin sealant-based approaches were developed to sustain drug levels at the target site. Designing noninvasive sustained drug delivery systems and exploring the feasibility of topical application to deliver drugs to the posterior segment may drastically improve drug delivery in the years to come. Current developments in the field of ophthalmic drug delivery promise a significant improvement in overcoming the challenges posed by various anterior and posterior segment diseases. PMID:20437123

  13. Infranuclear ocular motor disorders.

    PubMed

    Lueck, Christian J

    2011-01-01

    This chapter covers the very large number of possible disorders that can affect the three ocular motor nerves, the neuromuscular junction, or the extraocular muscles. Conditions affecting the nerves are discussed under two major headings: those in which the site of damage can be anatomically localized (e.g., fascicular lesions and lesions occurring in the subarachnoid space, the cavernous sinus, the superior orbital fissure, or the orbit) and those in which the site of the lesion is either nonspecific or variable (e.g., vascular lesions, tumors, "ophthalmoplegic migraine," and congenital disorders). Specific comments on the diagnosis and management of disorders of each of the three nerves follow. Ocular motor synkineses (including Duane's retraction syndrome and aberrant regeneration) and disorders resulting in paroxysms of excess activity (e.g., neuromyotonia) are then covered, followed by myasthenia gravis and other disorders that affect the neuromuscular junction. A final section discusses disorders of the extraocular muscles themselves, including thyroid disease, orbital myositis, mitochondrial disease, and the muscular dystrophies. PMID:21601071

  14. Nonhuman Primate Ocular Biometry

    PubMed Central

    Augusteyn, Robert C.; Maceo Heilman, Bianca; Ho, Arthur; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine ocular growth in nonhuman primates (NHPs) from measurements on ex vivo eyes. Methods We obtained NHP eyes from animals that had been killed as part of other studies or because of health-related issues. Digital calipers were used to measure the horizontal, vertical, and anteroposterior globe diameters as well as corneal horizontal and vertical diameters of excised globes from 98 hamadryas baboons, 551 cynomolgus monkeys, and 112 rhesus monkeys, at ages ranging from 23 to 360 months. Isolated lens sagittal thickness and equatorial diameter were measured by shadowphotogrammetry. Wet and fixed dry weights were obtained for lenses. Results Nonhuman primate globe growth continues throughout life, slowing toward an asymptotic maximum. The final globe size scales with negative allometry to adult body size. Corneal growth ceases at around 20 months. Lens diameter increases but thickness decreases with increasing age. Nonhuman primate lens wet and dry weight accumulation is monophasic, continuing throughout life toward asymptotic maxima. The dry/wet weight ratio reaches a maximum of 0.33. Conclusions Nonhuman primate ocular globe and lens growth differ in several respects from those in humans. Although age-related losses of lens power and accommodative amplitude are similar, lens growth and properties are different indicating care should be taken in extrapolating NHP observations to the study of human accommodation. PMID:26780314

  15. Ocular tuberculosis: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Shakarchi, Faiz I

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization currently estimates that nearly two billion people, or one-third of the world’s population, are infected by tuberculosis, and that roughly 10% of the infected people are symptomatic. Tuberculosis affects the lungs in 80% of patients, while in the remaining 20% the disease may affect other organs, including the eye. Uveitis can be seen concurrently with tuberculosis, but a direct association is difficult to prove. Ocular tuberculosis is usually not associated with clinical evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis, as up to 60% of extrapulmonary tuberculosis patients may not have pulmonary disease. The diagnosis of tuberculous uveitis is often problematic and in nearly all reported cases, the diagnosis was only presumptive. Tuberculous uveitis is a great mimicker of various uveitis entities and it can be considered in the differential diagnosis of any type of intraocular inflammation. It is still unknown if ocular manifestations result from a direct mycobacterium infection or hypersensitivity reaction and this is reflected on the management of tuberculous uveitis. Prevalence of tuberculosis as an etiology of uveitis may reach up to 10% in endemic areas. Tuberculous uveitis is a vision-threatening disease that inevitably leads to blindness if not properly diagnosed and treated. The aim of this review is to illustrate the various clinical features and management of presumed tuberculous uveitis. The current review focuses on the diagnostic criteria, significance of tuberculin skin test, and use of systemic corticosteroids in the management of tuberculous uveitis as recommended in recent publications. PMID:26648690

  16. MRI and FDG PET/CT imaging manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yang; Sweiss, Nadera J

    2015-12-01

    A 52-year-old man had biopsy-proven sarcoidosis of mediastinal lymph nodes. Cardiac sarcoidosis was confirmed on cardiac MRI with typical imaging features as delayed gadolinium enhancement. Follow-up FDG PET/CT with a 3-day pretest diet modification showed suppression of overall myocardial uptake of FDG but with multifocal abnormal FDG uptake in the myocardium regions corresponding to the previous MRI findings. Additional noncardiac active sarcoidosis involving multiple organ and lymph nodes were also visualized on FDG PET/CT. PMID:26544904

  17. Interesting case of ovarian sarcoidosis: The value of multi disciplinary team working

    PubMed Central

    Wuntakal, Rekha; Bharathan, Rasiah; Rockall, Andrea; Jeyarajah, Arjun

    2007-01-01

    Background Sarcoidosis of the genital tract is a rare condition. Ovarian manifestation of this disease is rarer still. Case presentation The case presented here represents ovarian manifestation of sarcoidosis. At the point of referral to our hospital, based on computerised tomography (CT) ovarian carcinoma was a differential diagnosis. Further magnetic resonance imaging along with CT guided biopsy aided by laboratory study supported a diagnosis of sarcoidosis. Patient responded to medical management by a multidisciplinary team. Conclusion The case shows the importance of FNAC and biopsy in case or ovarian masses and multi disciplinary team approach to management. PMID:17391534

  18. Steroid Refractory Autoimmune Haemolytic Anaemia Secondary to Sarcoidosis Successfully Treated with Rituximab and Mycophenolate Mofetil.

    PubMed

    Green, Sarah; Partridge, Erica; Idedevbo, Edore; Borg, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is not a well-recognised complication of sarcoidosis. We describe the case of a 30-year-old female who presented with acute warm haemolytic anaemia and widespread lymphadenopathy. Sarcoidosis was diagnosed on lymph node biopsy and further investigation. The haemolytic anaemia responded only to a high dose of steroids. Evidence regarding treatment of steroid refractory autoimmune haemolysis secondary to sarcoidosis is lacking. Based on the emergent evidence that both disorders share common immunopathogenic mechanisms involving Th1 and Th17 lymphocytes, our patient was given rituximab and mycophenolate mofetil to successfully suppress the haemolysis and sarcoid activity. PMID:27563474

  19. Sarcoidosis Presenting as Bilateral Vocal Cord Paralysis due to Bilateral Vagal Nerve Involvement.

    PubMed

    Yamasue, Mari; Nureki, Shin-Ichi; Ushijima, Ryoichi; Mukai, Yutaka; Goto, Akihiko; Kadota, Jun-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a rare case of sarcoidosis presenting as bilateral vocal cord paralysis due to bilateral vagal nerve involvement. A 72-year-old woman with uveitis of the left eye complained of hoarseness and aspiration due to bilateral vocal cord paralysis. An endobronchial needle aspiration biopsy specimen of the mediastinal lymph nodes showed non-caseating epithelioid cell granuloma. Total protein and cell concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid were increased. We diagnosed her to have sarcoidosis with bilateral vagal nerve involvement. Corticosteroid therapy improved her symptoms of hoarseness and aspiration. Sarcoidosis should therefore be taken into consideration as a potential cause of bilateral vocal cord paralysis. PMID:27150886

  20. Steroid Refractory Autoimmune Haemolytic Anaemia Secondary to Sarcoidosis Successfully Treated with Rituximab and Mycophenolate Mofetil

    PubMed Central

    Idedevbo, Edore; Borg, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is not a well-recognised complication of sarcoidosis. We describe the case of a 30-year-old female who presented with acute warm haemolytic anaemia and widespread lymphadenopathy. Sarcoidosis was diagnosed on lymph node biopsy and further investigation. The haemolytic anaemia responded only to a high dose of steroids. Evidence regarding treatment of steroid refractory autoimmune haemolysis secondary to sarcoidosis is lacking. Based on the emergent evidence that both disorders share common immunopathogenic mechanisms involving Th1 and Th17 lymphocytes, our patient was given rituximab and mycophenolate mofetil to successfully suppress the haemolysis and sarcoid activity. PMID:27563474

  1. Role of a functional polymorphism in the F2R gene promoter in sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Platé, Manuela; Lawson, Phillippa J.; Hill, Michael R.; Marshall, Richard P.; Booth, Helen L.; Kumari, Meena; Laurent, Geoffrey J.; Hurst, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease of unknown aetiology characterized by increased inflammation, and results from gene–environment interactions. Proteinase‐activated receptor‐1 mediates the interplay between coagulation and inflammation. The rs2227744G > A promoter single nucleotide polymorphism has been linked to inflammation, cardiovascular disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations. Using a case‐control study (184 cases with sarcoidosis and 368 controls), we show that the rs2227744A allele significantly associates with protection from sarcoidosis (P = 0.003, OR = 0.68 (0.52–0.88)). PMID:26278396

  2. Sarcoidosis mimicking metastatic breast cancer in a patient with early-stage breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Altınkaya, Metin; Altınkaya, Naime; Hazar, Burhan

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disorder of unknown origin that affects the lungs and mediastinal lymph nodes in most patients. The coexistence of sarcoidosis and breast cancer has been reported. An unfortunate consequence of the presence of both entities in the same patient is the risk of misdiagnosis. We report the case of a 70-year-old female with T1N0 cancer of the right breast that was initially diagnosed as stage IV because of mediastinal positron-emission tomography -positive lymphadenopathy. Biopsy of a mediastinal lymph node allowed us to diagnose sarcoidosis and correctly stage her disease as stage I breast cancer. PMID:26985162

  3. [Uncommon cutaneous ulcerative and systemic sarcoidosis. Successful treatment with hydroxychloroquine and compression therapy].

    PubMed

    Meyersburg, D; Schön, M P; Bertsch, H P; Seitz, C S

    2011-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous multisystemic disease of unclear etiology, which can affect any organ. The cutaneous manifestations are variable, but ulcerative cutaneous sarcoidosis is very rare. One must rule out other granulomatous skin diseases, especially necrobiosis lipoidica. There is no standarized therapy; usually an interdisciplinary approach over years taking multiple side effects into consideration is needed. A 58-year-old woman with a long history of cutaneous, nodal and pulmonary sarcoidosis suddenly developed ulcerations within the disseminated skin lesions on her legs. The combination of systemic hydroxychloroquine and modern wound management lead to complete healing of the ulcers and a significant improvement in the remaining skin lesions. PMID:21656110

  4. Isolated Bilateral Trigeminal Neuropathy in Sarcoidosis Presenting with Neurotrophic Corneal Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, M.; Lascaratos, G.; Syrogiannis, A.; Esakowitz, L.

    2010-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease that may affect various organs. Nevertheless, involvement of the trigeminal nerve is exceedingly uncommon. This report presents a rare case of isolated bilateral trigeminal neuropathy presenting with neurotrophic corneal ulcers. The patient was treated with topical chloramphenicol and lubricants, as well as botulinum toxin injection to the upper eyelid to induce ptosis. Our case illustrates the importance of recognizing that bilateral corneal ulceration might be a manifestation of sarcoidosis. Physicians should be aware of this rare association, when treating sarcoidosis patients with eye related symptoms. PMID:23861615

  5. Annexins family: insights into their functions and potential role in pathogenesis of sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Mirsaeidi, Mehdi; Gidfar, Sanaz; Vu, Ann; Schraufnagel, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Annexins are Ca(2+)-regulated phospholipid-binding proteins that play an important role in the cell life cycle, exocytosis, and apoptosis. Annexin A11 is one of the oldest vertebrate annexins that has a crucial role in sarcoidosis pathogenesis. The mechanism of effect in sarcoidosis granuloma cells may be due to alterations in apoptosis. Immune cells with a specific mutation at protein location 230 are resistant to apoptosis and consequently have continued effects on inflammation and progression of sarcoidosis. The mechanism of action of annexin A11 may be based upon alterations in delivering calcium to two different apoptosis pathways (caspase and P53). PMID:27071553

  6. A functional proteomics approach to the comprehension of sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Landi, C; Bargagli, E; Carleo, A; Bianchi, L; Gagliardi, A; Cillis, G; Perari, M G; Refini, R M; Prasse, A; Bini, L; Rottoli, P

    2015-10-14

    Pulmonary sarcoidosis (Sar) is an idiopathic disease histologically typified by non-caseating epitheliod cell sarcoid granulomas. A cohort of 37 Sar patients with chronic persistent pulmonary disease was described in this study. BAL protein profiles from 9 of these Sar patients were compared with those from 8 smoker (SC) and 10 no-smoker controls (NSC) by proteomic approach. Principal Component Analysis was performed to clusterize the samples in the corresponding conditions highlighting a differential pattern profiles primarily in Sar than SC. Spot identification reveals thirty-four unique proteins involved in lipid, mineral, and vitamin Dmetabolism, and immuneregulation of macrophage function. Enrichment analysis has been elaborated by MetaCore, revealing 14-3-3ε, α1-antitrypsin, GSTP1, and ApoA1 as "central hubs". Process Network as well as Pathway Maps underline proteins involved in immune response and inflammation induced by complement system, innate inflammatory response and IL-6signalling. Disease Biomarker Network highlights Tuberculosis and COPD as pathologies that share biomarkers with sarcoidosis. In conclusion, Sar protein expression profile seems more similar to that of NSC than SC, conversely to other ILDs. Moreover, Disease Biomarker Network revealed several common features between Sar and TB, exhorting to orientate the future proteomics investigations also in comparative BALF analysis of Sar and TB. PMID:26342673

  7. Xanthogranuloma of the sellar region in a patient with sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Sulentić, Petra; Cupić, Hrvoje; Cerina, Vatroslav; Vrkljan, Milan

    2010-03-01

    Xanthogranuloma of the sellar region is a very rare brain tumor with favorable prognosis and without reported relapses of purely xanthogranulomatous lesion after complete resection. A case is presented of a 40-year-old male diagnosed with and treated for sarcoidosis, complaining of headache, photophobia and loss of libido. Physical examination revealed generally scarce hairiness, while laboratory investigations showed panhypopituitarism. Expansive sellar and suprasellar mass compressing the floor of the third ventricle and optical chiasm was confirmed by cranial multi-slice computerized tomography (MSCT). Complete resection of the tumor mass using trans-sphenoidal approach was performed. Histopathologic analysis revealed cholesterol clefts, sparse lymphoplasmacellular infiltrates, macrophages, siderophages and foreign body giant cells around cholesterol clefts confirming the diagnosis of xanthogranuloma of the sellar region. Since preoperative diagnosis of xanthogranuloma is very difficult, therapeutic algorithm does not differ from other expansive lesions of the sellar region, but pituitary involvement should always be considered in patient with sarcoidosis since therapeutic management is non-surgical. Follow up MSCT imaging after 6 months revealed a solid, contrast-enhanced mass at the posterior base of the sella. PMID:20635586

  8. Vertebral sarcoidosis: demonstration of bone involvement by computerized axial tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Dinerstein, S.L.; Kovarsky, J.

    1984-08-01

    A report is given of a rare case of vertebral sarcoidosis with negative conventional spinal x-ray films, yet with typical cystic lesions of the spine found incidentally during abdominal computerized axial tomography (CAT). The patient was a 28-year-old black man, who was admitted for evaluation of a 1 1/2-year history of diffuse myalgias, intermittent fever to 102 F orally, bilateral hilar adenopathy, and leukopenia. A technetium polyphosphate bone scan revealed diffuse areas of increased uptake over the sternum, entire vertebral column, and pelvis. Conventional x-ray films of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, and an AP view of the pelvis were all normal. Chest x-ray film revealed only bilateral hilar adenopathy. During the course of an extensive negative evaluation for infection, an abdominal CAT scan was done, showing multiple, small, sclerotic-rimmed cysts at multiple levels of the lower thoracic and lumbar spine. Bone marrow biopsy revealed only changes consistent with anemia of chronic disease. Mediastinal lymph node biopsy revealed noncaseating granulomas. A tentative diagnosis of sarcoidosis was made, and treatment with prednisone, isoniazid and rifampin was begun. Within two weeks of initiation of prednisone therapy, the patient was symptom-free. A repeat technetium polyphosphate bone scan revealed only a small residual area of mildly increased uptake over the upper thoracic vertebrae.

  9. Corticosteroids for ocular toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Jasper, Smitha; Vedula, Satyanarayana S; John, Sheeja S; Horo, Saban; Sepah, Yasir J; Nguyen, Quan Dong

    2014-01-01

    Background Ocular infestation with Toxoplasma gondii, a parasite, may result in inflammation in the retina, choroid, and uvea and consequently lead to complications such as glaucoma, cataract, and posterior synechiae. Objectives The objective of this systematic review was to assess the effects of adjunctive use of corticosteroids for ocular toxoplasmosis. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 9), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE, (January 1950 to October 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to October 2012), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to October 2012), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We searched the reference lists of included studies for any additional studies not identified by the electronic searches. We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 11 October 2012. Selection criteria We planned to include randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials. Eligible trials would have enrolled participants of any age who were immunocompetent and were diagnosed with active ocular toxoplasmosis. Included trials would have compared anti-parasitic therapy plus corticosteroids versus anti-parasitic therapy alone, or different doses or times of initiation of corticosteroids. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently screened titles and abstracts retrieved from the electronic searches. We retrieved full-text articles of studies categorized as ‘unsure’ or ‘include’ after review of the abstracts. Two authors independently reviewed each full-text article. Discrepancies were

  10. Ocular Screening System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Used to detect eye problems in children through analysis of retinal reflexes, the system incorporates image processing techniques. VISISCREEN's photorefractor is basically a 35 millimeter camera with a telephoto lens and an electronic flash. By making a color photograph, the system can test the human eye for refractive error and obstruction in the cornea or lens. Ocular alignment problems are detected by imaging both eyes simultaneously. Electronic flash sends light into the eyes and the light is reflected from the retina back to the camera lens. Photorefractor analyzes the retinal reflexes generated by the subject's response to the flash and produces an image of the subject's eyes in which the pupils are variously colored. The nature of a defect, where such exists, is identifiable by atrained observer's visual examination.