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  1. Prevalencia y tamizaje del Trastorno por Déficit de Atención con Hiperactividad en Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Nicholas T.; Schuler, Jovita; Monge, Silvia; McGough, James J.; Chavira, Denise; Bagnarello, Monica; Herrera, Luis Diego; Mathews, Carol A.

    2015-01-01

    Resumen La investigación tuvo como propósito estimar la prevalencia del Trastorno por Déficit de Atención con Hiperactividad (TDAH) en Costa Rica y determinar si la versión en español del cuestionario Swanson Nolan and Pelham Scale IV (SNAP-IV) es un instrumento de tamizaje útil en una población de niños y niñas escolares costarricenses. El instrumento fue entregado a padres y maestros de 425 niños entre 5 y 13 años de edad (promedio = 8.8). Todos fueron evaluados con el instrumento Swanson, Kotkin, Agler, M-Flynn and Pelham Scale (SKAMP). Su diagnóstico fue confirmado con una entrevista clínica. La sensibilidad y la especificidad del SNAP-IV fueron evaluadas como predictores de criterios de diagnóstico según el DSM-IV. La prevalencia puntual en la muestra del TDAH fue del 5%. El tamizaje más preciso lo hizo el SNAP-IV completado por el maestro en un corte de 20%, con una sensibilidad de 96% y una especificidad de un 82%. La sensibilidad de los instrumentos completados por los padres fue más baja que aquella de los maestros. El SNAP-IV completado por las maestras con un corte aislando el 20% de los mayores puntajes categorizó correctamente a un 87% de los sujetos. PMID:22432094

  2. Borderline personality disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Personality disorder - borderline ... Cause of borderline personality disorder (BPD) is unknown. Genetic, family, and social factors are thought to play roles. Risk factors for BPD include: Abandonment ...

  3. Borderline Personality

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Randy A.; Sansone, Lori A.

    2004-01-01

    BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER (BPD) IS A COMPLEX AXIS II Phenomenon that is typically described in a psychological or psychiatric context. In this article, we translate the various aspects of BPD to the primary care setting. Previous work in this area has explored specific relationships between BPD and individual medical disorders or between BPD and general somatic symptoms, but the synthesis of these findings and their augmentation with cogent psychological theory is new to the field. Specifically, we highlight the prevalence rate of BPD in the primary care setting, the effects on healthcare utilization, the themes of somatic preoccupation and somatization disorder, several medical syndromes that illustrate the dynamics of the disorder in the medical setting, and the relationship of BPD to disability. We believe that the BPD concept needs to extend beyond its traditional psychological/psychiatric borders to include the subset of BPD patients with somatic symptoms who are seen in primary care settings. PMID:21197375

  4. Borderline personality disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Personality disorder - borderline References American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders. 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. ...

  5. Borderline Space for Voice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batchelor, Denise

    2012-01-01

    Being on the borderline as a student in higher education is not always negative, to do with marginalisation, exclusion and having a voice that is vulnerable. Paradoxically, being on the edge also has positive connections with integration, inclusion and having a voice that is strong. Alternative understandings of the concept of borderline space can…

  6. Borderline Personality and Criminality

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Lori A.

    2009-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder is characteristically associated with a broad variety of psychiatric symptoms and aberrant behaviors. In this edition of The Interface, we discuss the infrequently examined association between borderline personality disorder and criminality. According to our review of the literature, in comparison with the rates of borderline personality disorder encountered in the general population, borderline personality disorder is over-represented in most studies of inmates. At the same time, there is considerable variation in the reported rates of this Axis II disorder in prison populations, which may be attributed to the methodologies of and populations in the various studies. Overall, female criminals appear to exhibit higher rates of borderline personality disorder, and it is oftentimes associated with a history of childhood sexual abuse, perpetration of impulsive and violent crimes, comorbid antisocial traits, and incarceration for domestic violence. PMID:20011575

  7. Borderline ovarian tumours.

    PubMed

    Tropé, Claes Göran; Kaern, Janne; Davidson, Ben

    2012-06-01

    Borderline ovarian tumours account for 10-20% of all epithelial ovarian cancer. Historically, standard primary surgery has included borderline ovarian tumours, omentectomy, peritoneal washing and multiple biopsies. As one-third of borderline ovarian tumours are diagnosed in women under the age of 40 years, fertility-sparing treatment has been more frequently used in the past 10 years. Fertility drugs are well tolerated in women with infertility after fertility-sparing surgery. Careful selection of candidates is necessary. Laparoscopic techniques can be used, but should be reserved for oncologic surgeons. This conservative treatment increases the rate of recurrence, albeit with no effect on survival. The pregnancy rate is nearly 50%, and most are achieved spontaneously. These women should be closely followed up. The question is whether this is acceptable from a gynaecologic oncologic point of view. For this reason, we will discuss recently published studies and gynaecologic oncologic concerns about the mode of fertility-sparing surgery and its consequences. PMID:22321906

  8. Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hackert, Thilo; Ulrich, Alexis; Büchler, Markus W

    2016-06-01

    Surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy remains the only treatment option for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) with the chance of long-term survival. If a radical tumor resection is possible, 5-year survival rates of 20-25% can be achieved. Pancreatic surgery has significantly changed during the past years and resection approaches have been extended beyond standard procedures, including vascular and multivisceral resections. Consequently, borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (BR-PDAC), which has recently been defined by the International Study Group for Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS), has become a controversial issue with regard to its management in terms of upfront resection vs. neoadjuvant treatment and sequential resection. Preoperative diagnostic accuracy to define resectability of PDAC is a keypoint in this context as well as the surgical and interdisciplinary expertise to perform advanced pancreatic surgery and manage complications. The present mini-review summarizes the current state of definition, management and outcome of BR-PDAC. Furthermore, the topic of ongoing and future studies on neoadjuvant treatment which is closely related to borderline resectability in PDAC is discussed. PMID:26970276

  9. Prescribing and borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chanen, Andrew M; Thompson, Katherine N

    2016-01-01

    Summary Accurate diagnosis is fundamental to effective management of borderline personality disorder, but many patients remain undetected. The first-line management for borderline personality disorder is psychosocial treatment, not drugs. There are major prescribing hazards including polypharmacy, overdose and misuse. Drug treatment might be warranted for patients who have a co-occurring mental disorder such as major depression. If a drug is prescribed for borderline personality disorder, it should only be as an adjunct to psychosocial treatment. There should be clear and collaborative goals that are regularly reviewed with the patient. Use single drugs prescribed in limited quantities for a limited time. Stop drugs that are ineffective. PMID:27340322

  10. Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Brüne, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The term ‘Borderline Personality Disorder’ (BPD) refers to a psychiatric syndrome that is characterized by emotion dysregulation, impulsivity, risk-taking behavior, irritability, feelings of emptiness, self-injury and fear of abandonment, as well as unstable interpersonal relationships. BPD is not only common in psychiatric populations but also more prevalent in the general community than previously thought, and thus represents an important public health issue. In contrast to most psychiatric disorders, some symptoms associated with BPD may improve over time, even without therapy, though impaired social functioning and interpersonal disturbances in close relationships often persist. Another counterintuitive and insufficiently resolved question is why depressive symptoms and risk-taking behaviors can occur simultaneously in the same individual. Moreover, there is an ongoing debate about the nosological position of BPD, which impacts on research regarding sex differences in clinical presentation and patterns of comorbidity. In this review, it is argued that many features of BPD may be conceptualized within an evolutionary framework, namely behavioral ecology. According to Life History Theory, BPD reflects a pathological extreme or distortion of a behavioral ‘strategy’ which unconsciously aims at immediate exploitation of resources, both interpersonal and material, based on predictions shaped by early developmental experiences. Such a view is consistent with standard medical conceptualizations of BPD, but goes beyond classic ‘deficit’-oriented models, which may have profound implications for therapeutic approaches. PMID:26929090

  11. Treatment histories of borderline inpatients.

    PubMed

    Zanarini, M C; Frankenburg, F R; Khera, G S; Bleichmar, J

    2001-01-01

    In this study, we describe the types and amounts of psychiatric treatment received by a well-defined sample of borderline personality disorder (BPD) inpatients, and compare these parameters with those of a group of carefully diagnosed personality-disordered controls. Finally, we assess the risk factors associated with a history of intensive, high-cost treatment, which we defined as having had two or more prior psychiatric hospitalizations. The treatment histories of 290 borderline inpatients and 72 axis II controls were assessed using a reliable semistructured interview. All nine forms of treatment studied except electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) were common among borderline patients (36% to 96%). In addition, a significantly higher percentage of borderline patients than axis II controls reported a history of individual and group therapy, day and residential treatment, psychiatric hospitalization, participating in self-help groups, and taking standing medications. They were also significantly younger when they first entered individual therapy and began to take standing medications. In addition, borderline patients spent more time than axis II controls in individual therapy and psychiatric hospitals, and were on standing medications for a significantly longer period of time. They also reported a significantly higher number of psychiatric hospitalizations, lifetime number of standing medications, and number of psychotropic medications taken at the same time. In addition, we found a highly significant multivariate predictive model for multiple prior hospitalizations. The six significant predictors were age 26 or older, a history of quasi psychotic thought, lifetime number of self-mutilative efforts and suicide attempts, a childhood history of reported sexual abuse, and an adult history of being physically and/or sexually assaulted. Taken together, these results confirm clinical impressions concerning the high rates of mental health services used by borderline patients

  12. Cirugía de los trastornos del comportamiento: el estado del arte

    PubMed Central

    Yampolsky, Claudio; Bendersky, Damián

    2014-01-01

    Introducción: La cirugía de los trastornos del comportamiento (CTC) se está convirtiendo en un tratamiento más común desde el desarrollo de la neuromodulación. Métodos: Este artículo es una revisión no sistemática de la historia, indicaciones actuales, técnicas y blancos quirúrgicos de la CTC. Dividimos su historia en 3 eras: la primera comienza en los inicios de la psicocirugía y termina con el desarrollo de las tícnicas estereotácticas, cuando comienza la segunda era. Ésta se caracteriza por la realización de lesiones estereotácticas. Nos encontramos transitando la tercera era, que comienza cuando la estimulación cerebral profunda (ECP) comienza a ser usada en CTC. Resultados: A pesar de los errores graves cometidos en el pasado, hoy en día, la CTC está renaciendo. Los trastornos psiquiátricos que se más frecuentemente se tratan con cirugía son: depresión refractaria, trastorno obsesivo-compulsivo y síndrome de Tourette. Además, algunos pacientes con agresividad fueron tratados quirúrgicamente. Hay varios blancos estereotácticos descriptos para estos trastornos. La estimulación vagal puede ser usada también para depresión. Conclusión: Los resultados de la ECP en estos trastornos parecen alentadores. Sin embargo, se necesitan más estudios randomizados para establecer la efectividad de la CTC. Debe tenerse en cuenta que una apropiada selección de pacientes nos ayudará a realizar un procedimiento más seguro así como también a lograr mejores resultados quirúrgicos, conduciendo a la CTC a ser más aceptada por psiquiatras, pacientes y sus familias. Se necesita mayor investigación en varios temas como: fisiopatología de los trastornos del comportamiento, indicaciones de CTC y nuevos blancos quirúrgicos. PMID:25165612

  13. Chronic suicidality and borderline personality.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Randy A

    2004-06-01

    Suicidal ideation is a complex clinical event. In this article, acute suicidal ideation is compared with chronic suicidal ideation, specifically their different meanings, relationships with Axis I and Axis II disorders, intrapsychic functions, approaches to assessment, and interventions. The potential risks of acute hospitalization of the chronically suicidal borderline personality disorder patient are discussed as well as a longitudinal, multidimensional treatment strategy for the chronically suicidal individual. PMID:15237042

  14. [A psychoanalytical approach of the borderline personality].

    PubMed

    Slucki, Daniel; Wikinski, Mariana

    A bibliographic review of the last year's psychoanalytic literature on borderline personality is presented. We expose diagnostic considerations, with special emphasis on those which refer to the boundaries between borderline personality, neurosis and psychosis on one hand, and those which distinguish between borderline personality and narcissistic disorders on the other. Vicissitudes of these patient's object relationships, their bond with other significant persons, their main psychic mechanisms, clinical traits and technical difficulties in the treatment are also described. PMID:15597123

  15. Borderline Clients: Practice Implications of Recent Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Harriette C.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews current research on treatment of borderline clients with medication, individual counseling, and family interventions. Notes that recent studies indicate that borderline personality is heterogeneous condition in which different underlying disorders (affective, schizotypal, and neurological) may be present. Reviews effectiveness of various…

  16. The Borderline Personality--An Adlerian Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rattner, Leo

    The person with a borderline personality is considered to be neither neurotic nor psychotic, but to exist somewhere in between these two diagnostic categories. Psychoanalytic theorists who have researched the phenomenon of the borderline personality have shifted their emphasis away from Freud's instinct psychology and toward an ego psychology…

  17. Borderline personality disorder: study in adolescence.

    PubMed

    James, A; Berelowitz, M; Vereker, M

    1996-04-01

    The study of the presentation, symptomatology and family characteristics of an exclusively adolescent sample of patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) was undertaken. Twenty-four cases of borderline personality disorder, 20 females, 4 males, identified using chart review and meeting the criteria of the Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines (DIB) and DSM III-R, were matched with psychiatric controls. Adolescents with borderline personality disorder were found to have high rates of affective symptomatology with Axis I diagnosis of major depressive disorder MDD (DSM-III-R), and high rates of interpersonal psychopathology, i.e., manipulation, devaluation, and a pervasive sense of boredom. The latter seem to be characteristic as for adults with borderline personality disorder. The families were particularly angry and volatile. PMID:9117533

  18. Borderline Personality in the Medical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Lori A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Individuals with borderline personality disorder in mental health settings tend to present with relationship difficulties, mood instability/dysphoria, and overt self-harm behavior. In contrast, it appears that individuals with borderline personality disorder in medical settings manifest physical symptoms that are medically difficult to substantiate. Through a review of the literature, we examine 2 symptom manifestations among patients with borderline personality in primary care and general medical settings—namely pain sensitivity and multiple somatic complaints. In addition to reviewing the research of others, we also highlight our own investigations into these 2 areas. Data Sources: We conducted a literature search of the PubMed database and a previous version of the PsycINFO search engine (no restrictions). Search terms included borderline personality, borderline personality disorder, personality disorders; chronic pain, pain, pain syndromes; and somatization disorder, Briquet’s syndrome, somatic preoccupation, somatic. Study Selection: Published articles related to borderline personality, pain and somatic symptoms (ie, somatization disorder, somatic preoccupation) were examined. Results: According to our review, the literature indicates higher-than-expected rates of borderline personality disorder among patients in primary care and general medical settings who present with chronic pain conditions and/or somatic preoccupation. Conclusions: Unlike patients with borderline personality disorder in mental health settings, who tend to present with relationship difficulties, mood instability/dysphoria, and overt self-harm behavior, patients with borderline personality disorder in primary care settings tend to present with unsubstantiated chronic pain of various types as well as somatic preoccupation. PMID:26644960

  19. Esquizofrenia y trastorno en el consumo de sustancias: prevalencia y characterísticas sociodemográficas en la población Latina

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Castro, Lorena; Raventós-Vorst, Henriette; Escamilla, Michael

    2012-01-01

    El interés por comprender la co-morbilidad de la esquizofrenia y el trastorno en el uso de sustancias, ha aumentado debido al incremento de este diagnóstico, a los efectos negativos observados en el sujeto y a los costos en los servicios de salud. Este trastorno dual puede tener efectos dramáticos en el curso clínico del trastorno psicótico tales como: mayores recaídas, re-hospitalizaciones, síntomas más severos, no adherencia al tratamiento antipsicótico, cambios marcados del humor, aumento en el grado de hostilidad e ideación suicida, así como alteraciones en otras áreas del funcionamiento incluyendo violencia, victimización, indigencia y problemas legales. La literatura proveniente en particular de Estados Unidos y Europa sugiere que el rango de prevalencia para este diagnóstico puede oscilar entre el 10% hasta el 70%. En este estudio, revisamos la prevalencia del diagnóstico dual de esquizofrenia y trastorno en el uso sustancias, así como sus características sociodemográficas, con base en la literatura disponible alrededor del mundo dando énfasis en la poblacion latina. A pesar de que este diagnóstico es ampliamente aceptado, se conoce poco sobre su prevalencia en la población latina, sobre los factores ambientales, demográficos, clínicos y otras características de estos individuos. Un mejor conocimiento sobre este diagnóstico permitiría mejorar los métodos para la detección y adecuada valoración del trastorno en el uso de sustancias en personas con trastornos metales severos como la esquizofrenia. PMID:21404151

  20. Aggression in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Látalová, K; Prasko, J

    2010-09-01

    This review examined aggressive behavior in Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) and its management in adults. Aggression against self or against others is a core component of BPD. Impulsiveness is a clinical hallmark (as well as a DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criterion) of BPD, and aggressive acts by BPD patients are largely of the impulsive type. BPD has high comorbidity rates with substance use disorders, Bipolar Disorder, and Antisocial Personality Disorder; these conditions further elevate the risk for violence. Treatment of BDP includes psychodynamic, cognitive behavioral, schema therapy, dialectic behavioral, group and pharmacological interventions. Recent studies indicate that many medications, particularly atypical antipsychotics and anticonvulsants, may reduce impulsivity, affective lability as well as irritability and aggressive behavior. But there is still a lack of large, double blind, placebo controlled studies in this area. PMID:20390357

  1. Phenomenology of Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    De Genna, Natacha M.; Feske, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about racial differences in borderline personality disorder (BPD) that may influence etiology, phenomenology, and treatment of women with BPD. A total of 83 women with BPD participated in this cross-sectional study: n = 41 white and n = 42 African-American women. Structured interviews were used to assess Axis I and II disorders, and a series of interviews and questionnaires captured internalizing and externalizing symptoms. The white women with BPD reported more severe internalizing symptoms, whereas the African-American women reported more severe externalizing symptoms. Except for the association between race and number of suicide attempts, the relationship between race and internalizing/externalizing symptoms was mediated by socioeconomic status. In conclusion, African-American women with BPD may present with more severe symptoms of lack of anger control and fewer suicidal behaviors than those of white women with BPD, raising the possibility that they are misdiagnosed and receive treatments that are not optimal for BPD. PMID:24284636

  2. Borderline personality disorder in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Kaess, Michael; Brunner, Romuald; Chanen, Andrew

    2014-10-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a common and severe mental disorder that is associated with severe functional impairment and a high suicide rate. BPD is usually associated with other psychiatric and personality disorders, high burden on families and carers, continuing resource utilization, and high treatment costs. BPD has been a controversial diagnosis in adolescents, but this is no longer justified. Recent evidence demonstrates that BPD is as reliable and valid among adolescents as it is in adults and that adolescents with BPD can benefit from early intervention. Consequently, adolescent BPD is now recognized in psychiatric classification systems and in national treatment guidelines. This review aims to inform practitioners in the field of adolescent health about the nature of BPD in adolescence and the benefits of early detection and intervention. BPD diagnosis and treatment should be considered part of routine practice in adolescent mental health to improve these individuals' well-being and long-term prognosis. PMID:25246626

  3. [Concepts of the borderline personality disorders].

    PubMed

    Ogłodek, Ewa; Araszkiewicz, Aleksander

    2011-08-01

    For many years, the borderline personality disorders have mainly been researched in terms of psychoanalytical theories, such as theories on relations with the object. Nowadays, there are three kinds of concepts that are distinguishable. The first ones are those which are group models, serving attempts to made characteristic sets of qualities, represented by individuals suffering from the borderline personality disorders, more precise. The remaining concepts are models of conflict and deficit, which explain complicated mechanisms of interactions of social, psychological and biological factors, and therefore, contribute to better understanding of the genesis of the symptoms of this disorder. Upon the basis of the attempts made so far in the field of describing the borderline personality disorders, one may indicate certain criteria, representative for the entire group of individuals with this diagnosis, regardless of the assumptions applicable to the genesis of the disorder and its symptoms, even though the population of the infirm suffering from the borderline personality disorders is not internally homogenous. The interest of psychologists, attempting to describe the borderline personality disorders, is focused upon certain sets of qualities, presented as the examples of descriptive models. Among the researchers, working on the issues of the borderline personality disorders in this manner, there are: Gunderson, Kernberg, Kohut, Winnicot, Guntrip, Fairbaim, Adler and Buie. PMID:21936354

  4. Neurobiología de la impulsividad y los trastornos de la conducta alimentaria*

    PubMed Central

    Orozco-Cabal, Luis Felipe; Herin, David

    2009-01-01

    Resumen Introducción La impulsividad es un rasgo de personalidad multidimensional relacionado con el control del comportamiento y las emociones. Está presente de manera diversa en los trastornos de la conducta alimentaria, particularmente, en la bulimia nerviosa (BN). Aunque la relación entre la impulsividad y BN ha sido objeto de numerosas investigaciones, en la actualidad se desconocen los sustratos neurobiológicos de esta relación. Objetivos Discutir críticamente la evidencia que sugiere que las alteraciones en los sistemas neuronales relacio-nados con las funciones ejecutivas, con la formación de preferencias y con la regulación de los estados emocionales sirven como base para el rasgo de personalidad impulsiva, así como su estado en subgrupos de pacientes con BN. Métodos Búsqueda selectiva de la literatura relevante. Resultados y conclusiones Esta discusión ilustra la complejidad de la relación entre la impulsividad y BN, donde la impulsividad actúa como un factor de vulnerabilidad que puede sensibilizar al sujeto con BN a estados emocionales negativos, durante los cuales modifica el impacto de estímulos internos y externos sobre el comportamiento y su regulación, favoreciendo así patrones de comportamiento maladaptativos e inflexibles. PMID:19838321

  5. Developmental aspects of borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Reich, D B; Zanarini, M C

    2001-01-01

    This study examined whether patients with borderline personality disorder and controls with other personality disorders remember their childhoods differently with respect to separation difficulties, evocative memory, temperamental factors such as frustration tolerance and mood reactivity, and onset of symptoms. Two hundred and ninety patients with borderline personality disorder and 72 with other personality disorders were assessed using an instrument to rate memories of separation difficulties, temperamental problems, and onset of symptoms before age 18. Patients with borderline personality disorder remembered more difficulties with separation between ages 6 and 17 years, more mood reactivity and poorer frustration tolerance between ages 6 and 17, and the onset of more symptoms (most prominently sadness, depression, anxiety, and suicidality) before age 18 than did patients with other personality disorders. The groups did not differ in reports of evocative memory before age 18. These results indicate that many of the features of adult patients with borderline personality disorder may initially appear during childhood and adolescence and that these features may be used to differentiate borderline from other personality disorders. PMID:11600488

  6. Recognizing borderline personality disorder in the family practice setting.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, J R; Saathoff, G B; Bernardo, M J; Barnett, B L

    1995-09-01

    The first step in the management of borderline personality disorder is making the correct diagnosis. A clinical example illustrates symptoms of a patient with borderline personality disorder in a family practice setting. Major characteristics of borderline personality disorder include severe mood instability, fear of abandonment, chronic boredom, self-injury, unstable interpersonal relationships, "splitting," identity instability and borderline rage. Early diagnosis may help prevent potential management problems and possible doctor-patient conflicts. PMID:7653428

  7. Fertility sparing treatment in borderline ovarian tumours

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Rosa Maria; Vazquez-Vicente, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Borderline ovarian tumours are low malignant potential tumours. They represent 10–15% of all epithelial ovarian malignancies. Patients with this type of tumour are younger at the time of diagnosis than patients with invasive ovarian cancer. Most of them are diagnosed in the early stages and have an excellent prognosis. It has been quite clearly established that the majority of borderline ovarian tumours should be managed with surgery alone. Because a high proportion of women with this malignancy are young and the prognosis is excellent, the preservation of fertility is an important issue in the management of these tumours. In this systemic review of the literature, we have evaluated in-depth oncological safety and reproductive outcomes in women with borderline ovarian tumours treated with fertility-sparing surgery, reviewing the indications, benefits, and disadvantages of each type of conservative surgery, as well as new alternative options to surgery to preserve fertility. PMID:25729420

  8. Fertility sparing treatment in borderline ovarian tumours.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Rosa Maria; Vazquez-Vicente, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Borderline ovarian tumours are low malignant potential tumours. They represent 10-15% of all epithelial ovarian malignancies. Patients with this type of tumour are younger at the time of diagnosis than patients with invasive ovarian cancer. Most of them are diagnosed in the early stages and have an excellent prognosis. It has been quite clearly established that the majority of borderline ovarian tumours should be managed with surgery alone. Because a high proportion of women with this malignancy are young and the prognosis is excellent, the preservation of fertility is an important issue in the management of these tumours. In this systemic review of the literature, we have evaluated in-depth oncological safety and reproductive outcomes in women with borderline ovarian tumours treated with fertility-sparing surgery, reviewing the indications, benefits, and disadvantages of each type of conservative surgery, as well as new alternative options to surgery to preserve fertility. PMID:25729420

  9. Management of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lal, Alysandra; Christians, Kathleen; Evans, Douglas B

    2010-04-01

    Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer is an emerging stage of disease defined by computed tomogrpahy criteria, patient (Katz type B), or disease characteristics (Katz type C). These patients are particularly well suited to a surgery-last strategy with induction therapy consisting of chemotherapy (gemcitabine alone or in combination) followed by chemoradiation. With appropriate selection and preoperative planning, many patients with borderline resectable disease derive clinical benefit from multimodality therapy. The use of a standardized system for the staging of localized pancreatic cancer avoids indecision and allows for the optimal treatment of all patients guided by the extent of their disease. In this article, 2 case reports are presented, and the term borderline resectable pancreatic cancer is discussed. The advantages of neoadjuvant therapy and surgery are also discussed. PMID:20159519

  10. An Overview of Countertransference With Borderline Patients

    PubMed Central

    GABBARD, GLEN O.

    1993-01-01

    Successful management of countertransference is critical to the psychotherapy of borderline patients. The author discusses the most common countertransference reactions encountered in such treatments. A theoretical framework is also proposed that conceptualizes countertransference as a joint creation between therapist and patient. It follows from this conceptual framework that therapists must constantly monitor their own contributions from past relationships as well as the aspects of countertransference evoked by the patient’s behavior. Countertransference in the psychotherapy of borderline patients must be viewed as a source of valuable diagnostic and therapeutic information and not simply as interference with the therapeutic process. PMID:22700123

  11. Borderline Intellectual Functioning: A Systematic Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peltopuro, Minna; Ahonen, Timo; Kaartinen, Jukka; Seppälä, Heikki; Närhi, Vesa

    2014-01-01

    The literature related to people with borderline intellectual functioning (BIF) was systematically reviewed in order to summarize the present knowledge. Database searches yielded 1,726 citations, and 49 studies were included in the review. People with BIF face a variety of hardships in life, including neurocognitive, social, and mental health…

  12. The psychotherapy of core borderline psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Adler, G

    1993-01-01

    A psychodynamic formulation of borderline psychopathology includes the understanding of the borderline patient's aloneness problems, need-fear dilemma issues, and difficulties with primitive guilt. The aloneness problems are at the core of the disorder, and involve an inability to maintain an evocative memory, and holding and soothing introjects of significant people when under stress of separation. The possible childhood origins of these difficulties are explored and related to the ways these issues emerge in psychotherapy. The psychodynamic formulation is crucial in the psychotherapeutic approach to the aloneness problems. It helps the therapist work with the aloneness difficulties and understand the options as the therapy continues. Since rapid therapeutic decisions are often necessary with borderline patients, the formulation provides the necessary framework, and helps the therapist process and utilize countertransference feelings. Projective identification is an important concept that helps explain the complex transference/countertransference experiences, and is used in defining the resolution of the aloneness problems of borderline patients. Finally, limit-setting and the use of transitional objects are explored, utilizing the psychodynamic framework that has been defined. PMID:8517469

  13. Dysphoria and aloneness in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Pazzagli, A; Monti, M R

    2000-01-01

    A close examination of dysphoria, anger and aloneness (three main characteristics of the borderline syndrome) provides a theoretical model of reference for the therapist. Dysphoria results from the cyclical emotional oscillation between hope for stability and disappointment in its inattainability; a dependent-anaclitic depression arises from the mixture of anger, aloneness and inner emptiness which is so characteristic of the borderline syndrome. The tendency to be immersed in the here-and-now, an intra-festum mentality, exacerbates the sense of isolation, causing more irritation, mute frustration and, consequently, anger. The effects and ramifications of anger, and the resultant precarious cohesion of the self, are explored in the borderline syndrome; they are especially illuminated by the application of Kernberg's pain-anger-hate-vengefulness cycle concept. Meanings of solitude, in its forms of aloneness and loneliness, are explored in their pertinence. Aloneness - the constant needy search for, but condemnation to never finding, objects to fill an inner sense of emptiness - is especially germane. Suggestions for assisting subjects with borderline personality disorder to overcome aloneness and the lack of historical progression are made. PMID:10867581

  14. Mucinous borderline ovarian tumor with ascites.

    PubMed

    Batool, Tahira; Ullah, Nasreen Rehmat

    2014-11-01

    Borderline mucinous tumors are epithelial ovarian tumors with low rate of growth and low potential to invade or metastasize and associated with significantly better prognosis and excellent disease-free survival after surgical removal than other epithelial ovarian cancers. The accepted initial treatment is surgical removal of the tumor. Fertility-sparing surgery may suffice in young patients with tumors confined to the ovary. Radical surgery is recommended in patients with advanced disease and advanced age. Long-term surveillance is recommended to document and treat late recurrences. We report a case of a 59 years old postmenopausal patient with complex ovarian mucinous tumor and gross ascites; she had received three lines of chemotherapeutic agents pre-operatively, without any favorable outcome. Then, she went for staging laparotomy and histopathology showed borderline ovarian mucinous tumor required no further treatment and is fine till date. PMID:25518783

  15. Neurobehavioral study of borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed Central

    van Reekum, R; Conway, C A; Gansler, D; White, R; Bachman, D L

    1993-01-01

    The existence of an "organic" subgroup of borderline personality disorder (BPD) has been postulated. This report is of a case-controlled, chart-review study of BPD. The control sample consisted of patients with a variety of psychiatric diagnoses. The study found that 81% of the patients with BPD and 22% of the control patients had a history of brain injury, either developmental (44%), acquired (58%) or both. Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between the summed number of developmental and acquired brain injuries and the score on the retro-Diagnostic Interview for Borderline. A pilot neuropsychological study showed that seven of nine subjects with BPD had evidence of frontal system dysfunction. These results help to support the hypothesized existence of an organic BPD subgroup. PMID:8499428

  16. Borderline personality traits in hysterical neurosis.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, T

    2001-04-01

    The objective of the present study is to demonstrate the traits of the psychopathology of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) compared with hysterical neurosis. A total of 48 subjects with BPD and 40 subjects with hysterical neurosis both defined by DSM-III-R were assessed by Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines (DIB). Statistical analysis was done by quantification of the second type, a multivariate data analysis. The total scores of DIB were BPD group, 6.13 +/- 1.52; hysterical neurosis group, 4.9 +/- 2.12 (t = 3.05, P = 0.0016). The correlation ratio (index of to what extent the two groups are discriminated) was 0.2442. Among the four parameters of: (i) affect, (ii) cognition, (iii) impulse-action pattern, (iv), and interpersonal relationships, the partial coefficient correlations of (iii) and (iv) were significantly high (0.342, 0.287, P < 0.01). The question items with high independent coefficients were manipulation (0.4416), intolerance of aloneness (0.3797), demanding nature (0.3768), self-mutilation (0.3609), visual hallucination (0.3395). Those with low score of independent coefficients were counterdependency (0.0533), identity disturbance (0.1010), depression (0.1551), loneliness (0.1752), hypomanic episode (0.1936). Both of BPD and hysterical neurosis groups were not so fairly well discriminated. However, these results suggested that impulse-action pattern and disorder of interpersonal relationships were traits of borderline personality disorder. We could admit manipulation, intolerance of aloneness as its symptoms. In addition, counterdependency, identity disturbance were comparatively common to both. There were some borderline personality traits symptomatically in hysterical neurosis. PMID:11285092

  17. Relationship management and the borderline patient.

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, D. F.

    1993-01-01

    Treating a patient with borderline personality disorder is fraught with peril. Some psychotherapies and medications seem to make matters worse, yet these very patients are some of the most persistent in demanding help. This happens because the context of treatment, the traditional physician-patient social contract, and the personal and professional impulses of the physician can actually feed and reinforce the patient's pathological behaviour. Relationship management offers a way to understand the problem and to handle it. PMID:8495141

  18. [Neurocognitive functioning in borderline personality disorder].

    PubMed

    Poletti, Michele

    2009-01-01

    Neurocognitive dysfunctions in subjects with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder (BPD) have been often reported in several recent studies, reviewed in this paper. Most marked impairments are reported for executive functions, autobiographical memory and social cognition processes. These impairments may be considered as neurocognitive correlates of some clinical symptoms of BPD: the dysexecutive impairment, particularly of those processes based on the orbitofrontal cortex, is the correlate of the increased impulsivity; the interference of negative emotions on encoding and retrieval of autobiographical memories is the correlate of the frequent dissociative symptoms; difficulties in social cognition processes (for example in emotion recognition) are the correlate of the instable interpersonal relationships. Early cognitive impairments are also detected in children and adolescents with borderline clinical symptoms, suggesting that neurocognitive functioning: (1) might be considered an indirect index of the neurobiological impact of the childhood trauma that usually BPD subjects report; (2) might be a moderator in the development of BPD. Reviewed studies suggest the utility of a neuropsychological evaluation in all those subjects, children, adolescents and adults, that present borderline clinical symptoms. PMID:20218216

  19. Estudio epidemiológico de sucesos traumáticos, trastorno de estrés post-traumático y otros trastornos psiquiátricos en una muestra representativa de Chile

    PubMed Central

    Pérez Benítez, Carlos I.; Vicente, Benjamin; Zlotnick, Caron; Kohn, Robert; Johnson, Jennifer; Valdivia, Sandra; Rioseco, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    RESUMEN Durante la década de 1990 en los Estados Unidos (EU), el conocimiento sobre el trastorno de estrés post-traumático (TEPT) evolucionó de estudios específicos en un principio, sobre veteranos de guerra y sobre víctimas de desastres, a estudios epidemiológicos más tarde, sin embargo, la epidemiología del TEPT en países en desarrollo ha sido un área poco estudiada hasta ahora. Los expertos en el área de trauma han propuesto que los sucesos traumáticos que ocurren en la niñez son más perjudiciales para la salud mental que aquellos que ocurren más tarde en la vida. Este trabajo revisa los resultados de un estudio epidemiológico llevado a cabo en Chile. Específicamente, se revisan los resultados sobre las tasas de prevalencia del TEPT, traumas asociados más frecuentemente con él, así como la comorbilidad de este trastorno con otros trastornos psiquiátricos a lo largo de la vida. Igualmente se analizaron las diferencias del TEPT en cada sexo, así como la exposición a traumas en una muestra representativa de chilenos. Además se comparó la prevalencia de trastornos psiquiátricos en personas que sufrieron su primer trauma durante la niñez, durante la edad adulta, o que no reportaron traumas durante su vida. En estos estudios epidemiológicos se usaron módulos del TEPT y trastorno de personalidad antisocial (TPA) de la entrevista diagnóstica siguiendo los criterios del DSM-III-R (DIS–III-R). Para evaluar el resto de los trastornos psiquiátricos se usó la Entrevista Diagnóstica Internacional Compuesta (CIDI). Estos instrumentos fueron administrados en tres ciudades chilenas a 2390 personas mayores de 15 años. Para estimar los errores estándares (EE) debido al diseño de la muestra y a la necesidad de ajuste se usó el método Taylor de linearización seriada. También se usó un análisis de regresión logística para examinar la relación entre el TEPT, los factores demográficos de riesgo y el tipo de trauma. Además se utilizó la

  20. Treating Obesity: Clinical Implications of Comorbid Borderline Personality Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sansone, Randy A.; Wiederman, Michael W.; Sansone, Lori A.

    1999-01-01

    Reviews possible links between obesity and borderline-personality disorder and discusses treatment approaches for those individuals demonstrating such comorbidity. Approaches include modification of current techniques for obesity treatment and incorporation of psychodynamic counseling specific to borderline-personality disorder. (Author/GCP)

  1. Positive affective and cognitive states in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Reed, Lawrence Ian; Zanarini, Mary C

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the current study was to compliment previous studies identifying negative states present in borderline personality disorder (BPD) by investigating the presence of positive affective and cognitive states. Ninety-six patients with criteria-defined borderline personality disorder and 24 axis II comparison participants completed the Positive Affect Scale, a 50-item self-report measure designed to assess positive states thought to be characteristic of and discriminating for BPD. Seventeen positive states (4 affective, 10 cognitive, and 3 mixed) were found to be significantly more common among axis II comparison participants than borderline patients. Twelve of these states were common to both borderline patients and axis II comparison participants. Furthermore, four positive states, when co-occurring together, were particularly strongly associated with borderline personality disorder (three negatively and one positively): (a) Fond of myself, (b) That things around me are real, (c) That I've forgiven others, and (d) Assertive. Finally, the overall mean score on the PAS significantly distinguished patients with borderline personality disorder from axis II comparison participants. Taken together, these results suggest that borderline patients are far less likely to report experiencing positive states of an affective, cognitive, and mixed nature than axis II comparison participants. They also suggest that being assertive is a positive state particularly discriminating for borderline personality disorder. PMID:22217230

  2. Borderline Personality Disorder: Too Complex for Cognitive Therapy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pretzer, James L.

    Historically, the literature on psychotherapy with borderline personality disorder has been based on object-relations theory or psychoanalytical approaches, rather than cognitive and behavioral approaches. In clinical assessment, the term borderline has been used to refer to patients with both neurotic and psychotic symptoms, a particular type of…

  3. Parenting Children with Borderline Intellectual Functioning: A Unique Risk Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenning, Rachel M.; Baker, Jason K.; Baker, Bruce L.; Crnic, Keith A.

    2007-01-01

    Parenting was examined among families of children with borderline intelligence in comparison to families of typically developing children and children with developmental delays. Parenting data were obtained at child age 5 via naturalistic home observation. Mothers of children with borderline intelligence exhibited less positive and less sensitive…

  4. Parenteral and enteral nutrition: borderline substances.

    PubMed

    Hopley, P J

    1981-01-01

    The application of medicinal product legislation to products which have a possible dual function as drugs and as foods or cosmetics has been described. The approach of the Family Practitioner Services under the NHS is to allow for as much professional debate as possible over the indeterminate ground between food and drugs. The role of the Advisory Committee on Borderline Substances in this context is briefly mentioned. Finally, some practical problems which arise in hospital practise have been described and for the solution the emphasis is upon the multi-disciplinary team approach. PMID:6947663

  5. Tailoring the Psychotherapy to the Borderline Patient

    PubMed Central

    HORWITZ, LEONARD; GABBARD, GLEN O.; ALLEN, JON G.; COLSON, DONALD B.; FRIESWYK, SIEBOLT; NEWSOM, GAVIN E.; COYNE, LOLAFAYE

    1996-01-01

    Views still differ as to the optimal psychodynamic treatment of borderline patients. Recommendations range from psychoanalysis and exploratory psychotherapy to an explicitly supportive treatment aimed at strengthening adaptive defenses. The authors contend that no single approach is appropriate for all patients in this wide-ranging diagnostic category, which spans a continuum from close-to-neurotic to close-to-psychotic levels of functioning. Careful differentiations based on developmental considerations, ego structures, and relationship patterns provide the basis for the optimal treatment approach. PMID:22700301

  6. Therapeutic Self-Disclosure With Borderline Patients

    PubMed Central

    WILKINSON, SALLYE M.; GABBARD, GLEN O.

    1993-01-01

    The therapeutic use of countertransference disclosure as a means of highlighting the borderline patient’s intrapsychic and interpersonal use of the therapist is discussed. Countertransference disclosure is narrowly defined as a form of clinical honesty that focuses on the therapist’s experience of the patient in the here-and-now moment of the session. The effects of disclosure on transference exploration, neutrality, and patient revelations are explored through examination of detailed process notes of therapy sessions. Technical issues such as indirect versus direct disclosure and responses to direct questions are also addressed. PMID:22700154

  7. The Lifetime Course of Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Biskin, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) has historically been seen as a lifelong, highly disabling disorder. Research during the past 2 decades has challenged this assumption. This paper reviews the course of BPD throughout life, including childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. BPD can be accurately identified in adolescence, and the course of the disorder, in adolescence and adulthood, is generally similar, with reductions in symptoms over time. Functional recovery is less consistent, and further research on factors or treatments that may improve the long-term functional outcome of patients with BPD is warranted. PMID:26175388

  8. Defining the mechanisms of borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Clarkin, John F; Posner, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the biological connections to mental processes was one of the original goals of psychoanalysis, and the development of cognitive and affective neuroscience and its methods might contribute to actualizing this goal. Personality disorders provide an opportunity to examine the complex mental structures of individuals experiencing extreme difficulties in interacting with their social environment. We provide initial information on a collaboration exploring an approach to one of the most serious personality disorders, borderline personality disorder, based upon the study of normal attention, individual differences in temperament, self definition and attachment organization, with the potential to illuminate the psychology and psychobiology of the disorder and to contribute to psychotherapeutic intervention. This developing model of borderline personality disorder can relate the symptoms to more enduring temperamental aspects of the patients. The goal is to understand the development of neural networks that underlie the abnormalities of adults, and eventually work out the interaction between temperament, genes, and experience that produce the disorder, and potentially inform intervention. PMID:15802943

  9. Evaluations of others by borderline patients.

    PubMed

    Arntz, A; Veen, G

    2001-08-01

    This study investigated evaluations of other people in specific emotional situations by patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD). BPD patients (N = 16), control patients with cluster C personality disorder (PD; N = 12) and normal controls (N = 15) saw film clips with emotional themes centering on abandonment, rejection and abuse, hypothesized to be specific for borderline pathology. Subjects wrote down their spontaneous reactions to six film personalities, divided over three clips, including what they thought to be characteristic traits of these persons. Spontaneous reactions were coded on two dimensions, based on earlier studies by Westen and colleagues: a) affect-tone of ascribed qualities and b) complexity of evaluations of people. The number of trait dimensions constituted the third scale. The overall pattern of findings suggests that the BPD group, as well as the cluster C group, show poorly differentiated evaluations with a low number of dimensions. Thus, this seems characteristic for personality disorders in general. The BPD group shows a lower affect-tone, reflecting a stronger tendency to view others negatively, compared with both control groups. PMID:11531203

  10. Borderline personality features in depressed or anxious patients.

    PubMed

    Distel, Marijn A; Smit, Johannes H; Spinhoven, Philip; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2016-07-30

    Anxiety and depression frequently co-occur with borderline personality disorder. Relatively little research examined the presence of borderline personality features and its main domains (affective instability, identity problems, negative relationships and self-harm) in individuals with remitted and current anxiety and depression. Participants with current (n=597) or remitted (n=1115) anxiety and/or depression and healthy controls (n=431) were selected from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety. Assessments included the Personality Assessment Inventory - Borderline Features Scale and several clinical characteristics of anxiety and depression. Borderline personality features were more common in depression than in anxiety. Current comorbid anxiety and depression was associated with most borderline personality features. Anxiety and depression status explained 29.7% of the variance in borderline personality features and 3.8% (self-harm) to 31% (identity problems) of the variance in the four domains. A large part of the variance was shared between anxiety and depression but both disorders also explained a significant amount of unique variance. The severity of anxiety and depression and the level of daily dysfunctioning was positively associated with borderline personality features. Individuals with a longer duration of anxiety and depression showed more affective instability and identity problems. These findings suggest that patients with anxiety and depression may benefit from an assessment of personality pathology as it may have implications for psychological and pharmacological treatment. PMID:27183108

  11. Borderline Personality and the Detection of Angry Faces

    PubMed Central

    Hepp, Johanna; Hilbig, Benjamin E.; Kieslich, Pascal J.; Herzog, Julia; Lis, Stefanie; Schmahl, Christian; Niedtfeld, Inga

    2016-01-01

    Background Many studies have assessed emotion recognition in patients with Borderline Personality Disorder and considerable evidence has been accumulated on patients’ ability to categorize emotions. In contrast, their ability to detect emotions has been investigated sparsely. The only two studies that assessed emotion detection abilities found contradictory evidence on patients’ ability to detect angry faces. Methods To clarify whether patients with Borderline Personality Disorder show enhanced detection of angry faces, we conducted three experiments: a laboratory study (n = 53) with a clinical sample and two highly powered web studies that measured Borderline features (n1 = 342, n2 = 220). Participants in all studies completed a visual search paradigm, and the reaction times for the detection of angry vs. happy faces were measured. Results Consistently, data spoke against enhanced detection of angry faces in the Borderline groups, indicated by non-significant group (Borderline vs. healthy control) × target (angry vs. happy) interactions, despite highly satisfactory statistical power to detect even small effects. Conclusions In contrast to emotion categorization, emotion detection appears to be intact in patients with Borderline Personality Disorder and individuals high in Borderline features. The importance of distinguishing between these two processes in future studies is discussed. PMID:27031611

  12. [The phenomenology and psychodynamics of affects in borderline patients].

    PubMed

    Leichsenring, Falk

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the phenomenology and psychodynamics of affects in borderline patients. The first part demonstrates that in most current conceptions of the borderline disorder affective disturbances are regarded as to be characteristic. In this context, the strong overlap between borderline disorders and affective disorders found in many empirical studies is described and different hypotheses are presented to explain this phenomenon. The second part of this review is concerned with the psychodynamics of affects in borderline patients. The role of affects in thinking, behaviour, self perception and the regulation of object relations is discussed. Borderline and other severe personality disorders are assessed from the perspective of affective disturbances. The psychodynamic functions of particularly characteristic affects such as anger, anxiety, depression and boredom are discussed. The close connection between affective and cognitive functioning in borderline patients is described and evaluated with regard to modern theories of affect and cognition. Finally, the role of affects in the treatment of borderline patients is discussed. PMID:15510348

  13. The nosologic status of borderline personality: clinical and polysomnographic study.

    PubMed

    Akiskal, H S; Yerevanian, B I; Davis, G C; King, D; Lemmi, H

    1985-02-01

    The REM latencies of 24 nonschizotypal borderline outpatients--who were not in the midst of a major depressive episode--were in the range of those of 30 patients with primary major depression but were significantly shorter than those of 16 patients with nonborderline personality disorders and 14 nonpsychiatric controls. Also, more of the borderline subjects had lifetime diagnoses of affective disorder, such as dysthymic, cyclothymic, and bipolar II disorder, and of a spectrum of anxiety and somatization disorders. The authors conclude that contemporary operational criteria for borderline disorder identify a wide net of temperamental disorders with strong affective coloring rather than a unitary nosologic entity. PMID:3970243

  14. Borderline intellectual functioning: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Peltopuro, Minna; Ahonen, Timo; Kaartinen, Jukka; Seppälä, Heikki; Närhi, Vesa

    2014-12-01

    The literature related to people with borderline intellectual functioning (BIF) was systematically reviewed in order to summarize the present knowledge. Database searches yielded 1,726 citations, and 49 studies were included in the review. People with BIF face a variety of hardships in life, including neurocognitive, social, and mental health problems. When adults with BIF were compared with the general population, they held lower-skilled jobs and earned less money. Although some risk factors (e.g., low birth weight) and preventive factors (e.g., education) were reported, they were not specific to BIF. The review finds that, despite the obvious everyday problems, BIF is almost invisible in the field of research. More research, societal discussion, and flexible support systems are needed. PMID:25409130

  15. Psychopharmacologic treatment of borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Ripoll, Luis H

    2013-06-01

    The best available evidence for psychopharmacologic treatment of borderline personality disorder (BPD) is outlined here. BPD is defined by disturbances in identity and interpersonal functioning, and patients report potential medication treatment targets such as impulsivity, aggression, transient psychotic and dissociative symptoms, and refractory affective instability Few randomized controlled trials of psychopharmacological treatments for BPD have been published recently, although multiple reviews have converged on the effectiveness of specific anticonvulsants, atypical antipsychotic agents, and omega-3 fatty acid supplementation. Stronger evidence exists for medication providing significant improvements in impulsive aggression than in affective or other interpersonal symptoms. Future research strategies will focus on the potential role of neuropeptide agents and medications with greater specificity for 2A serotonin receptors, as well as optimizing concomitant implementation of evidence-based psychotherapy and psychopharmacology, in order to improve BPD patients' overall functioning. PMID:24174895

  16. Psychopharmacologic treatment of borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ripoll, Luis H.

    2013-01-01

    The best available evidence for psychopharmacologic treatment of borderline personality disorder (BPD) is outlined here. BPD is defined by disturbances in identity and interpersonal functioning, and patients report potential medication treatment targets such as impulsivity, aggression, transient psychotic and dissociative symptoms, and refractory affective instability Few randomized controlled trials of psychopharmacological treatments for BPD have been published recently, although multiple reviews have converged on the effectiveness of specific anticonvulsants, atypical antipsychotic agents, and omega-3 fatty acid supplementation. Stronger evidence exists for medication providing significant improvements in impulsive aggression than in affective or other interpersonal symptoms. Future research strategies will focus on the potential role of neuropeptide agents and medications with greater specificity for 2A serotonin receptors, as well as optimizing concomitant implementation of evidence-based psychotherapy and psychopharmacology, in order to improve BPD patients' overall functioning. PMID:24174895

  17. Self-image and perception of mother and father in psychotic and borderline patients.

    PubMed

    Armelius, K; Granberg

    2000-02-01

    eine mangelnde Separation von ihren Müttern und eine geringe Differenzierung zwischen Autonomie und Kontrolle. Es wird außerdem diskutiert, wie die Ergebnisse auf die realen Beziehungen der Patienten zu anderen Menschen Einflus nehmen könnten. Des patients psychotiques et Borderline ont évalué leur image d'eux-mêmes et leur perception de leur mère et père à l'aide du modèle de l'Analyse Structural du Comportement Social (SASB. Les patients Borderline avaient des imagess plus négatives d'eux-mêmes et de leurs parents, surtout de leur père, que les patients psychotiques et les sujets normaux, alors que les patients psychotiques se jugeaient à peine différemment des sujets normaux. L'image de soi était en relation avec les images des deux parents pour les patients Borderline et pour les sujets normaux, alors que pour les patients psychotiques, seulement l'image de la mère jouait un rôle pour leur image. En plus, les patients psychotiques ne différenciaient pas entre les pôles de contrôle et d'autonomie dans l'image de soi introjectée. Nous en avons conclu que les patients Borderline se caractérisent par un attachement négatif, et les patients psychotiques par une faible séparation de la mère ainsi qu'une différenciation modeste entre autonomie et contrôle. L'influence de ceci sur les relations des patients avec les autrs est discutée dans cet article. Pacientes limítrofes y psicóticos evaluaron su autoimagen y la percepción que tenían de sus padres usando el modelo de Análisis estructural del comportamiento social (SASB). Los pacientes limítrofes registraron imágenes más negativas de sí mismos y de sus progenitores, especialmente de su padre, que los pacientes psicóticos y los normales, mientras que las evaluaciones de los pacientes psicóticos no difirieron mucho de las de los sujetos normales. La autoimagen tuvo relación con la imagen de ambos progenitores tanto en el caso de los pacientes limítrofes como de los sujetos normales

  18. [The practical significance of the concept of borderline disorders].

    PubMed

    Fleischer, J; Koníková, M; Majercíková, L; Strecko, A

    1989-02-01

    There is not agreement on borderline disorders. The authors support the view that borderline disorders are related to other classified mental disorders, i.e. that they are their abortive forms. There is a continuous transition between abortive and non-abortive forms of those classified mental disorders which are the basis of non-specific manifestations of borderline mental disorders. The authors feel that is of practical importance to differente a small circle of abortive forms which resemble various non-psychotic disorders where an axial disposition is assumed but where, contrary to recognized abortive forms (e.g. pseudoneurotic schizophrenia or hysteriform depression), they cannot be identified at a psychopathological level. The diagnosis of a borderline disorder corresponding to this narrow basic circle of abortive forms makes it possible to avoid inadequately founded diagnoses of psychosis or an authoritative refusal of the diagnosis of psychosis, and it makes the doctor search for symptoms of latent axial disposition. PMID:2647308

  19. Parenting Children With Borderline Intellectual Functioning: A Unique Risk Population

    PubMed Central

    Fenning, Rachel M.; Baker, Jason K.; Baker, Bruce L.; Crnic, Keith A.

    2009-01-01

    Parenting was examined among families of children with borderline intelligence in comparison to families of typically developing children and children with developmental delays. Parenting data were obtained at child age 5 via naturalistic home observation. Mothers of children with borderline intelligence exhibited less positive and less sensitive parenting behaviors than did other mothers and were least likely to display a style of positive engagement. Children with borderline intelligence were not observed to be more behaviorally problematic than other children; however, their mothers perceived more externalizing symptoms than did mothers of typically developing children. Findings suggest the importance of mothers’ explanatory models for child difficulties and highlight children with borderline intelligence as uniquely at risk for poor parenting. PMID:17295551

  20. Sex Bias in Classifying Borderline and Narcissistic Personality Disorder.

    PubMed

    Braamhorst, Wouter; Lobbestael, Jill; Emons, Wilco H M; Arntz, Arnoud; Witteman, Cilia L M; Bekker, Marrie H J

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated sex bias in the classification of borderline and narcissistic personality disorders. A sample of psychologists in training for a post-master degree (N = 180) read brief case histories (male or female version) and made DSM classification. To differentiate sex bias due to sex stereotyping or to base rate variation, we used different case histories, respectively: (1) non-ambiguous case histories with enough criteria of either borderline or narcissistic personality disorder to meet the threshold for classification, and (2) an ambiguous case with subthreshold features of both borderline and narcissistic personality disorder. Results showed significant differences due to sex of the patient in the ambiguous condition. Thus, when the diagnosis is not straightforward, as in the case of mixed subthreshold features, sex bias is present and is influenced by base-rate variation. These findings emphasize the need for caution in classifying personality disorders, especially borderline or narcissistic traits. PMID:26421970

  1. Borderline Personality Disorder and Development: Counseling University Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tryon, Georgiana Shick; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Discusses problems and methodology of diagnosis and counseling of college students with borderline personality disorder. Recommends that providing these students with structure through consistent limit setting can produce positive changes in their behavior. (Author/ABL)

  2. Parental qualities as perceived by borderline personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, R L; Mann, L S; Wise, T N; Segall, E A

    1985-01-01

    This study explores the contribution of parental qualities to the borderline personality disorder. The Parental Bonding Inventory is used to compare four parental qualities (caring mother, caring father, overprotective father, and overprotective mother) across three groups (borderline personality disorders, assorted psychiatric controls and normal controls). The major finding was that the borderline patients perceived their parents to be significantly less caring and more overprotective than both the psychiatric control or nonclinical control groups. This study was verified previous reports that patients diagnosed with an affective illness (in either the borderline group or psychiatric control group) reported no significant differences on the inventory. Pinpointing parental characteristics which antecede mental disorders may be an important first step in devising primary preventive interventions for adult disorders. PMID:4077030

  3. Borderline phylloides tumor in an 11-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Selamzade, M; Gidener, C; Koyuncuoglu, M; Mevsim, A

    1999-07-01

    Phylloides tumor is an uncommon breast tumor in children. Only a few cases have been reported in the literature. A case of borderline phylloides tumor in an 11-year-old girl is described. PMID:10415310

  4. Sonographic findings of an ovarian serous surface papillary borderline tumor.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yohan; Park, Sung Bin; Lee, Jong Beum; Park, Hyun Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Sonographic findings of a serous surface papillary borderline tumor of the ovary have rarely been reported in the English literature. Here, we describe a case of serous surface papillary borderline tumor, which was depicted on gray-scale and Doppler ultrasonography as smoothly lobulated and polypoid heterogeneous echoic bilateral adnexal masses encased or surrounded by what was presumed to be normal-appearing ovarian follicles with increased vascular flow. PMID:23938140

  5. [Complementary methods of rehabilitation in borderline mental disorders].

    PubMed

    Elfimov, M A; Kotenko, K V; Korchazhkina, N B; Filatova, E V; Portnov, V V; Chervinskaya, A V; Mikhailova, A A

    2016-01-01

    The article covers treatment results of 417 patients (186 males and 231 females) aged 18 to 71 years, with borderline mental disorders. Findings are that using specified complementary methods, more when treatment complex is applied, causes better psycho-emotional state in patients with borderline mental disorders, that is supported by results of medical diagnostic tests including psychometry tests (abridged minnesota multiphasic personality inventory, Beck depression inventory, Spielberger-Hanin, test "feeling, activity, mood"). PMID:27164743

  6. Axis I diagnostic comorbidity and borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, M; Mattia, J I

    1999-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (PD) has been the most studied PD. Research has examined the relationship between borderline PD and most axis I diagnostic classes such as eating disorders, mood disorders, and substance use disorders. However, there is little information regarding the relationship of borderline PD and overall comorbidity with all classes of axis I disorders assessed simultaneously. In the present study, 409 patients were evaluated with semistructured diagnostic interviews for axis I and axis II disorders. Patients with a diagnosis of borderline PD versus those who did not receive the diagnosis were assigned significantly more current axis I diagnoses (3.4 v 2.0). Borderline PD patients were twice as likely to receive a diagnosis of three or more current axis I disorders (69.5% v 31.1%) and nearly four times as likely to have a diagnosis of four or more disorders 147.5% v 13.7%). In comparison to nonborderline PD patients, borderline PD patients more frequently received a diagnosis of current major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar I and II disorder, panic disorder with agoraphobia, social and specific phobia, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), eating disorder NOS, and any somatoform disorder. Similar results were observed for lifetime diagnoses. Overall, borderline PD patients were more likely to have multiple axis I disorders than nonborderline PD patients, and the differences between the two groups were present across mood, anxiety, substance use, eating, and somatoform disorder categories. These findings highlight the importance of performing thorough evaluations of axis I pathology in patients with borderline PD in order not to overlook syndromes that are potentially treatment-responsive. PMID:10428182

  7. Improvement in Borderline Personality Disorder in Relationship to Age

    PubMed Central

    Shea, M. Tracie; Edelen, Maria Orlando; Pinto, Anthony; Yen, Shirley; Gunderson, John G.; Skodol, Andrew E.; Markowitz, John; Sanislow, Charles A.; Grilo, Carlos M.; Ansell, Emily; Daversa, Maria T.; Zanarini, Mary C.; McGlashan, Thomas H.; Morey, Leslie C.

    2008-01-01

    Objective It is commonly believed that some features of borderline personality disorder improve as individuals reach their late 30s and 40s. The current study examined age-related change in borderline criteria and functional impairment, testing the hypothesis that older age would be associated with relatively more improvement than younger age. Method 216 male and female participants with borderline personality disorder were followed prospectively with yearly assessments over 6 years. Results Participants showed similar rates of improvement in borderline features regardless of age. A significant age by study year interaction showed functioning in older subjects to reverse direction and begin to decline in the latter part of the follow-up, in contrast to younger subjects who maintained or continued improvement over the six years. Despite the decline, functioning for the older subjects was comparable to or slightly better at year 6 than at year 1. Conclusion Improvement in borderline features is not specific to the late 30s and 40s. There may be a reversal of improvement in functioning in some borderline patients in this older age range. PMID:18851719

  8. Social cognition in borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Roepke, Stefan; Vater, Aline; Preißler, Sandra; Heekeren, Hauke R.; Dziobek, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Many typical symptoms of borderline personality disorder (BPD) occur within interpersonal contexts, suggesting that BPD is characterized by aberrant social cognition. While research consistently shows that BPD patients have biases in mental state attribution (e.g., evaluate others as malevolent), the research focusing on accuracy in inferring mental states (i.e., cognitive empathy) is less consistent. For complex and ecologically valid tasks in particular, emerging evidence suggests that individuals with BPD have impairments in the attribution of emotions, thoughts, and intentions of others (e.g., Preißler et al., 2010). A history of childhood trauma and co-morbid PTSD seem to be strong additional predictors for cognitive empathy deficits. Together with reduced emotional empathy and aberrant sending of social signals (e.g., expression of mixed and hard-to-read emotions), the deficits in mental state attribution might contribute to behavioral problems in BPD. Given the importance of social cognition on the part of both the sender and the recipient in maintaining interpersonal relationships and therapeutic alliance, these impairments deserve more attention. PMID:23335877

  9. Executive functions in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Hagenhoff, Meike; Franzen, Nele; Koppe, Georgia; Baer, Nina; Scheibel, Niki; Sammer, Gebhard; Gallhofer, Bernd; Lis, Stefanie

    2013-11-30

    Different domains of executive function such as working memory and response inhibition were investigated together with elementary cognitive processes in borderline personality disorder (BPD). Patients with BPD (N=28) were compared to nonpatient controls (NP, N=28) on eight tasks (e.g. n-back, Go/NoGo, CPT-AX). In order to separate impairments in different cognitive domains and to assess the influence of more elementary cognitive processes on executive functioning, tasks were embedded in a reaction-time-decomposition approach. BPD patients solved tasks with accuracies comparable to those of nonpatients. The only exception was the n-back task, for which working memory is required: here, error rates were higher and increased more prominently in BPD patients depending on working memory load. In most tasks, movement times were shorter for BPD patients than for nonpatients, while the quality of task-solving was comparable. The faster processing in the BPD group was observable starting with the simplest task, i.e. a simple reaction-time task. These findings suggest that domains of executive functioning are differentially affected in BPD. In contrast to load-dependent deficits in working memory, response inhibition processes were unimpaired. Faster action-related processes could be observed in BPD patients in a variety of tasks; however, these did not influence executive functioning. PMID:23764434

  10. Interpreting Borderline BeLPT Results

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, D.C.; Mayer, A.S.; Lewin, M.D.; Mroz, M.M.; Maier, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT) identifies persons sensitized to beryllium (BeS) and thus at risk for chronic beryllium disease (CBD). BeLPT test results are abnormal (AB), borderline (BL), or normal (NL). This manuscript addresses the predictive value and interpretation of BL BeLPT results. Methods The various three-result combinations that meet or exceed a nominal referral criteria of 1 AB + 1 BL are assessed with probability modeling and compared. Results At 2% prevalence, the three-result combinations that meet or exceed this referral criteria and associated probabilities of BeS are: (a) 1 AB + 1 BL + 1 NL (72%); (b) 3 BL (91%); (c) 2 AB + 1 NL (95%); (d) 1 AB + 2 BL (99%); (e) 2 AB + 1 BL (100%); and (f) 3 AB (100%). Conclusion These results suggest that BL results are meaningful and that three BL results predict BeS across a broad range of population prevalences. An analysis of longitudinal BeLPT results and clinical findings from an actual surveillance program is warranted to confirm the model’s predictions. PMID:20957676

  11. Emotions and memory in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Winter, Dorina; Elzinga, Bernet; Schmahl, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Memory processes such as encoding, storage, and retrieval of information are influenced by emotional content. Because patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) are particularly susceptible to emotional information, it is relevant to understand whether such memory processes are altered in this patient group. This systematic literature review collects current evidence on this issue. Research suggests that emotional information interferes more strongly with information processing and learning in BPD patients than in healthy controls. In general, BPD patients do not seem to differ from healthy control subjects in their ability to memorize emotional information, but they tend to have specific difficulties forgetting negative information. Also, BPD patients seem to recall autobiographical, particularly negative events with stronger arousal than healthy controls, while BPD patients also show specific temporo-prefrontal alterations in neural correlates. No substantial evidence was found that the current affective state influences learning and memory in BPD patients any differently than in healthy control subjects. In general, a depressive mood seems to both deteriorate and negatively bias information processing and memories, while there is evidence that dissociative symptoms impair learning and memory independently of stimulus valence. This review discusses methodological challenges of studies on memory and emotions in BPD and makes suggestions for future research and clinical implications. PMID:24355827

  12. Borderline Personality Disorder: Why 'fast and furious'?

    PubMed

    Brüne, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The term 'Borderline Personality Disorder' (BPD) refers to a psychiatric syndrome that is characterized by emotion dysregulation, impulsivity, risk-taking behavior, irritability, feelings of emptiness, self-injury and fear of abandonment, as well as unstable interpersonal relationships. BPD is not only common in psychiatric populations but also more prevalent in the general community than previously thought, and thus represents an important public health issue. In contrast to most psychiatric disorders, some symptoms associated with BPD may improve over time, even without therapy, though impaired social functioning and interpersonal disturbances in close relationships often persist. Another counterintuitive and insufficiently resolved question is why depressive symptoms and risk-taking behaviors can occur simultaneously in the same individual. Moreover, there is an ongoing debate about the nosological position of BPD, which impacts on research regarding sex differences in clinical presentation and patterns of comorbidity.In this review, it is argued that many features of BPD may be conceptualized within an evolutionary framework, namely behavioral ecology. According to Life History Theory, BPD reflects a pathological extreme or distortion of a behavioral 'strategy' which unconsciously aims at immediate exploitation of resources, both interpersonal and material, based on predictions shaped by early developmental experiences. Such a view is consistent with standard medical conceptualizations of BPD, but goes beyond classic 'deficit'-oriented models, which may have profound implications for therapeutic approaches. PMID:26929090

  13. [Borderline personality disorders: diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Allilaire, Jean-François

    2012-10-01

    Borderline personality disorders are complex clinical states with highly polymorphic symptoms and signs, leading to delays in their diagnosis and treatment. All international classifications emphasize certain clinical criteria such as unstable identity and interpersonal relationships, feelings of emptiness or boredom, and pathological impulsiveness. The prevalence is about 2%, with a female-male sex ratio of 2 or 3 to 1. Both adolescents and adults may be affected There is a high risk of suicide, addictive behaviors, eating disorders, and criminality. These individuals frequently have a history of trauma in early childhood, such as separation, loss, physical or sexual abuse, or affective privation. Subjective signs and symptoms are particularly important in the diagnostic and therapeutic evaluation, and this requires an empathic and subtle approach. Standardized and semi-structured interviews may help to identify comorbidities such as thymic disorders, anxiety, addiction, eating disorders, and, in some cases, psychotic symptoms. The psychiatric bio-psycho-social model takes into account multiple pathogenic factors, such as trauma during early development, temperamental instability and other emotional disorders, as well as psychosocial, neurobiological (5HT etc.) and genetic vulnerabilities. Treatment requires optimal integration of psychotherapeutic and pharmacotherapeutic approaches. Emergency intervention must be available in case of delirious or suicidal behavior The clinical course is often lengthy and complex, but outcome may be favorable, provided the principal risk--suicide--is correctly managed, PMID:23815019

  14. A prospective investigation of the development of borderline personality symptoms.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Elizabeth A; Egeland, Byron; Sroufe, L Alan

    2009-01-01

    The antecedents and developmental course of borderline personality disorder symptoms were examined prospectively from infancy to adulthood using longitudinal data from a risk sample (N = 162). Borderline personality disorder symptom counts were derived from the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM Disorders diagnostic interview at age 28 years. Correlational analyses confirmed expected relations between borderline symptoms and contemporary adult disturbance (e.g., self-injurious behavior, dissociative symptoms, drug use, relational violence) as well as maltreatment history. Antecedent correlational and regression analyses revealed significant links between borderline symptoms in adulthood and endogenous (i.e., temperament) and environmental (e.g., attachment disorganization, parental hostility) history in early childhood and disturbance across domains of child functioning (e.g., attention, emotion, behavior, relationship, self-representation) in middle childhood/early adolescence. Process analyses revealed a significant mediating effect of self-representation on the relation between attachment disorganization on borderline symptoms. The findings are discussed within a developmental psychopathology framework in which disturbance in self-processes is constructed through successive transactions between the individual and environment. PMID:19825270

  15. [The borderline patient. Diagnosis, psychodynamics and physician-patient relation].

    PubMed

    Brühlmann, T

    1995-06-01

    'Borderline' is a popular psychiatric diagnosis. The uses of the term are variable and often unclear. It is the goal of this presentation to elaborate a borderline concept for use in daily clinical practise. First, development of the term over the preanalytical, analytical and empirical areas is summarized. Next, the term of borderline for clinical practise is developed on the basis of characteristics and the global picture. Characteristics are: intensive, instable behaviour in relations, reduced control of impulse, disturbed affection and mood, psychotic manifestations, instable social adaptation. Diagnosis is founded on exploration of characteristics and on seizing of the global picture. The combination with other psychiatric disorders and separation from other personality disorders have to be considered with respect to differential diagnosis. The descriptive diagnosis has to be complemented from a psychodynamic point of view. The borderline patient has in his psychologic development failed to segregate sufficiently from his primary reference person. This results in a structural deficit and a weak ego. This latter is characterized by deficient integration and deficient separation, by disturbed perception of reality and by a non-specific general weakness of the ego. Finally, difficulties arising in the relations between physician and borderline patient are outlined. PMID:7784774

  16. [Borderline leprosy as a rare differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Trawinski, Henning; Brüning, Jan-Hinnerk; Baum, Petra; Ziemer, Mirjana; Schubert, Stefan; Lübbert, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    History and clinical findings | A 42-year-old migrant from Brazil presented with persistent sensory disturbances, skin discolorations and local alopecia in the upper limbs. Decisive for the presentation in our Tropical Medicine Clinic were new occurrences of severe pain and redness and swelling in the area of the lesions that had already been assessed by a number of medical specialists without a clear diagnosis could be made. Investigations and diagnosis | The histological analysis of skin biopsies showed perivascular, perineural, periadnexial lymphocytic and granulomatous dermatitis. In a direct microbiological preparation individual acid fast bacilli could be detected (Ziehl-Neelsen stain). The electroneurographical examination demonstrated a sensitive peripheral-neurogenic damage with emphasis on the right median nerve and the left ulnar and radial nerves. Thermography revealed an increased heating or cooling threshold. The serological investigation by ELISA for IgM antibodies against the phenolic glycolipid (PGL-1) was positive (titer 1 : 1200). In summary, the diagnosis of borderline leprosy (infection with Mycobacterium leprae) with transition to multibacillary leprosy (according to WHO) and leprosy reaction type 1 was made. Treatment and course | We initiated an oral antimycobacterial therapy (multidrug therapy, MDT) with rifampin, clofazimine and dapsone for 12 months (WHO regimen for multibacillary leprosy). Leprosy reaction type 1 was treated with prednisolone and by increasing the dose of clofazimine. Analgesic therapy on demand was carried out with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (ibuprofen). MDT and successful management of leprosy reaction lead to a rapid improvement of symptoms. Conclusions | Leprosy is an infectious disease occurring only rarely in Germany (average incidence of 1-2 cases per year) that is diagnosed almost exclusively among migrants. Main symptoms comprise non-itchy, reddish, touch insensitive skin lesions or nerve deficits. The

  17. Borderline personality disorder, stigma, and treatment implications.

    PubMed

    Aviram, Ron B; Brodsky, Beth S; Stanley, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is often viewed in negative terms by mental health practitioners and the public. The disorder may have a stigma associated with it that goes beyond those associated with other mental illnesses. The stigma associated with BPD may affect how practitioners tolerate the actions, thoughts, and emotional reactions of these individuals. It may also lead to minimizing symptoms and overlooking strengths. In society, people tend to distance themselves from stigmatized populations, and there is evidence that some clinicians may emotionally distance themselves from individuals with BPD. This distancing may be especially problematic in treating patients with BPD; in addition to being unusually sensitive to rejection and abandonment, they may react negatively (e.g., by harming themselves or withdrawing from treatment) if they perceive such distancing and rejection. Clinicians' reactivity may be self-protective in response to actual behavior associated with the pathology. As a consequence, however, the very behaviors that make it difficult to work with these individuals contribute to the stigma of BPD. In a dialectical relationship, that stigma can influence the clinician's reactivity, thereby exacerbating those same negative behaviors. The result is a self-fulfilling prophecy and a cycle of stigmatization to which both patient and therapist contribute. The extent to which therapist distancing is influenced by stigma is an important question that highlights the possibility that the stigma associated with BPD can have an independent contribution to poor outcome with this population. A final issue concerns the available means for identifying and limiting the impact of stigmatization on the treatment of individuals with BPD. PMID:16990170

  18. Does Comorbid Substance Use Disorder Exacerbate Borderline Personality Features?: A Comparison of Borderline Personality Disorder Individuals with vs. without Current Substance Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Han-Joo; Bagge, Courtney L.; Schumacher, Julie A.; Coffey, Scott F.

    2010-01-01

    There is compelling evidence that comorbid borderline personality disorder (BPD) negatively impact the clinical courses and outcomes of substance use disorders (SUD). Conversely, there is little evidence that concurrent SUD exacerbates the clinical characteristics of BPD. Thus, this study sought to examine whether the presence of current substance dependence among BPD patients would be associated with stronger BPD-relevant personality traits and behavioral characteristics. Female BPD patients without (BOR; n = 37) or with current substance dependence (BSUD; n = 19), and female non-BPD/SUD controls (CON; n = 48) were compared with respect to impulsivity, affective lability, affective intensity, externalizing behaviors, and self-harming/suicidal tendencies, taking into consideration their comorbid mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and antisocial personality disorder. Results indicated that both BOR and BSUD groups scored higher than CON in most of the measures, but BOR and BSUD failed to reveal significant group differences especially when the influence of comorbid psychopathology was removed. The overall pattern of findings remained identical even when comparing BPD patients with vs. without the diagnosis of lifetime substance dependence. Our results do not support the notion that BPD individuals with SUD display more severe BPD features than individuals with BPD alone. PMID:21116439

  19. Informed consent for research in Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Dew, Rachel E

    2007-01-01

    Background Previous research on informed consent for research in psychiatric patients has centered on disorders that affect comprehension and appreciation of risks. Little has been written about consent to research in those subjects with Borderline Personality Disorder, a prevalent and disabling condition. Discussion Despite apparently intact cognition and comprehension of risks, a borderline subject may deliberately choose self-harm in order to fulfill abnormal psychological needs, or due to suicidality. Alternatively, such a subject may refuse enrollment due to transference or the desire to harm him or herself. Such phenomena could be precipitated or prevented by the interpersonal dynamics of the informed consent encounter. Summary Caution should be exercised in obtaining informed consent for research from subjects with Borderline Personality Disorder. A literature review and recommendations for future research are discussed. PMID:17493277

  20. Emotional hyper-reactivity in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Randy A; Sansone, Lori A

    2010-09-01

    According to clinical experience, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, and authorities in the field, patients with borderline personality disorder tend to be hyper-reactive to environmental stimuli. In addition to the preceding clinical impressions and experiences, the majority of empirical studies in this area have concluded that patients with borderline personality disorder are indeed hyper-responsive to experimental environmental stimuli, whether the stimuli are negative, positive, or even neutral or ambiguous. While two empirical studies did not find hyper-responsiveness, both were undertaken in inpatients with borderline personality disorder, and the potential for emotional blunting from psychotropic medications may have been a potential confound. These findings have several clinical implications in both mental health and primary care settings. PMID:20941347

  1. Increased Lead and Cadmium Burdens among Mentally Retarded Children and Children with Borderline Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlowe, Mike; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The relationship between subtoxic metal levels and mild mental retardation and borderline intelligence was investigated through comparison of hair metal concentrations in 135 secondary students with mild retardation or borderline intelligence. Children in the retarded/borderline group had significantly higher lead and cadmium concentrations.…

  2. Examining the Relationship between Childhood Sexual Abuse and Borderline Personality Disorder: Does Social Support Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elzy, Meredith B.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between childhood sexual abuse and borderline personality disorder is a prominent issue in the etiological research on borderline personality disorder. This study further explored the relationship between childhood sexual abuse and the development of borderline personality features while evaluating the moderating role of a primary…

  3. Art Therapy for Individuals with Borderline Personality: Using a Dialectical Behavior Therapy Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drass, Jessica Masino

    2015-01-01

    Art therapy has shown benefits for people with borderline personality disorder and borderline personality traits by alleviating interpersonal difficulties such as affect regulation, an unstable sense of self, self-injurious behaviors, and suicidal ideation. Borderline personality disorder is currently viewed as a trauma spectrum disorder, because…

  4. Autonomic mechanisms underpinning the stress response in borderline hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Šarenac, Olivera; Lozić, Maja; Drakulić, Srdja; Bajić, Dragana; Paton, Julian F; Murphy, David; Japundžić-Žigon, Nina

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) short-term variability and spontaneous baroreflex functioning in adult borderline hypertensive rats and normotensive control animals kept on normal-salt diet. Arterial pulse pressure was recorded by radio telemetry. Systolic BP, diastolic BP and HR variabilities and baroreflex were assessed by spectral analysis and the sequence method, respectively. In all experimental conditions (baseline and stress), borderline hypertensive rats exhibited higher BP, increased baroreflex sensitivity and resetting, relative to control animals. Acute shaker stress (single exposure to 200 cycles min-1 shaking platform) increased BP in both strains, while chronic shaker stress (3-day exposure to shaking platform) increased systolic BP in borderline hypertensive rats alone. Low- and high-frequency HR variability increased only in control animals in response to acute and chronic shaker (single exposure to restrainer) stress. Acute restraint stress increased BP, HR, low- and high-frequency variability of BP and HR in both strains to a greater extent than acute shaker stress. Only normotensive rats exhibited a reduced ratio of low- to high-frequency HR variability, pointing to domination of vagal cardiac control. In borderline hypertensive rats, but not in control animals, chronic restraint stress (9-day exposure to restrainer) increased low- and high-frequency BP and HR variability and their ratio, indicating a shift towards sympathetic cardiovascular control. It is concluded that maintenance of BP in borderline hypertensive rats in basal conditions and during stress is associated with enhanced baroreflex sensitivity and resetting. Imbalance in sympathovagal control was evident only during exposure of borderline hypertensive rats to stressors. PMID:21421701

  5. Interpersonal Precipitants and Suicide Attempts in Borderline Personality Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodsky, Beth S.; Groves, Shelly A.; Oquendo, Maria A.; Mann, J. John; Stanley, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is often characterized by multiple low lethality suicide attempts triggered by seemingly minor incidents, and less commonly by high lethality attempts that are attributed to impulsiveness or comorbid major depression. The relationships among life events, impulsiveness, and type of suicidal behavior has hardly…

  6. The Objective Borderline Method: A Probabilistic Method for Standard Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shulruf, Boaz; Poole, Phillippa; Jones, Philip; Wilkinson, Tim

    2015-01-01

    A new probability-based standard setting technique, the Objective Borderline Method (OBM), was introduced recently. This was based on a mathematical model of how test scores relate to student ability. The present study refined the model and tested it using 2500 simulated data-sets. The OBM was feasible to use. On average, the OBM performed well…

  7. Borderline Personality Disorder: A Dysregulation of the Endogenous Opioid System?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandelow, Borwin; Schmahl, Christian; Falkai, Peter; Wedekind, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    The neurobiology of borderline personality disorder (BPD) remains unclear. Dysfunctions of several neurobiological systems, including serotoninergic, dopaminergic, and other neurotransmitter systems, have been discussed. Here we present a theory that alterations in the sensitivity of opioid receptors or the availability of endogenous opioids…

  8. Treatment of Borderline Adolescents in Family Court Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Maurice R.

    A recent revision of the proposed DSM III description of the borderline category is presented with reference to the work of Masterson and Grinker. The contributions of Roger Shapiro and his group to a psychoanalytic formulation of the developmental and familial dynamics are summarized with reference to genetic factors and the lack of validation,…

  9. Hyperadrenergic borderline hypertension is characterized by suppressed aggression.

    PubMed

    Perini, C; Müller, F B; Rauchfleisch, U; Battegay, R; Bühler, F R

    1986-01-01

    The effect of suppressed aggression on the reactivity of the sympathetic nervous and cardiovascular systems has been investigated in two groups of 24 subjects each with either borderline hypertension or normal blood pressure and no family history of hypertension. Groups were matched for sex and age (18-24 years). Suppressed aggression was defined by the newly standardized Rosenzweig Picture-Frustration test, a projective method assessing the reaction to everyday stress. Responses of blood pressure, heart rate, and venous plasma catecholamines were measured before and during application of mental stressors, using the Stroop color-word conflict test and mental arithmetic. In an analysis of covariance for repeated measures, which eliminates the influence of anxiety, borderline hypertensive subjects with suppressed aggression had significantly higher heart rates and diastolic blood pressures and a greater noradrenaline reactivity than borderline hypertensive subjects without suppressed aggression or normotensive subjects. Suppressed aggression may lead to a hyperadrenergic form of early borderline hypertension and thereby contribute to higher blood pressure. PMID:2427886

  10. Borderline-lepromatous leprosy manifesting as granulomatous mastitis.

    PubMed

    Pandhi, Deepika; Verma, Prashant; Sharma, Sonal; Dhawan, Amit Kumar

    2012-06-01

    Leprosy is characterised by a chronic granulomatous inflammation of the skin and peripheral nerves. Dissemination of the lepra bacilli may cause involvement of other tissues as well. We describe an unusual case of the granulomatous involvement of the nipple-areola complex in a 35-year-old male consequent to borderline-lepromatous leprosy. PMID:22997696

  11. Autonomic Impairment in Borderline Personality Disorder: A Laboratory Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Anna; Klonsky, E. David; Hajcak, Greg

    2009-01-01

    Recent research suggests that emotional dysfunction in psychiatric disorders can be reflected in autonomic abnormalities. The present study examines sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic nervous system activity in individuals with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) before, during, and following a social stressor task. Data were obtained…

  12. The Borderline Personality Diagnosis in Adolescents: Gender Differences and Subtypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Rebekah; Zittel Conklin, Carolyn; Westen, Drew

    2005-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to identify personality features characterizing adolescent girls and boys with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and to see whether meaningful patterns of heterogeneity exist among adolescents diagnosed with the disorder. Methods: Two hundred and ninety-four randomly selected doctoral-level clinicians described…

  13. Diagnosis, Treatment, and Follow-Up of Borderline Ovarian Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zikan, Michal; Dundr, Pavel; Cibula, David

    2012-01-01

    Borderline ovarian tumors represent a heterogeneous group of noninvasive tumors of uncertain malignant potential with characteristic histology. They occur in younger women, are present at an early stage, and have a favorable prognosis, but symptomatic recurrence and death may be found as long as 20 years after therapy in some patients. The molecular changes in borderline ovarian tumors indicate linkage of this disease to type I ovarian tumors (low-grade ovarian carcinomas). The pathological stage of disease and subclassification of extraovarian disease into invasive and noninvasive implants, together with the presence of postoperative macroscopic residual disease, appear to be the major predictor of recurrence and survival. However, it should be emphasized that the most important negative prognostic factor for recurrence is just the use of conservative surgery, but without any impact on patient survival because most recurrent diseases are of the borderline type—easily curable and with an excellent prognosis. Borderline tumors are difficult masses to correctly preoperatively diagnose using imaging methods because their macroscopic features may overlap with invasive and benign ovarian tumors. Over the past several decades, surgical therapy has shifted from a radical approach to more conservative treatment; however, oncologic safety must always be balanced. Follow-up is essential using routine ultrasound imaging, with special attention paid to the remaining ovary in conservatively treated patients. Current literature on this topic leads to a number of controversies that will be discussed thoroughly in this article, with the aim to provide recommendations for the clinical management of these patients. PMID:23024155

  14. Is Anakin Skywalker suffering from borderline personality disorder?

    PubMed

    Bui, Eric; Rodgers, Rachel; Chabrol, Henri; Birmes, Philippe; Schmitt, Laurent

    2011-01-30

    Anakin Skywalker, one of the main characters in the "Star Wars" films, meets the criteria for borderline personality disorder (BPD). This finding is interesting for it may partly explain the commercial success of these movies among adolescents and be useful in educating the general public and medical students about BPD symptoms. PMID:20537718

  15. Development and Validation of the Minnesota Borderline Personality Disorder Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornovalova, Marina A.; Hicks, Brian M.; Patrick, Christopher J.; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt

    2011-01-01

    Although large epidemiological data sets can inform research on the etiology and development of borderline personality disorder (BPD), they rarely include BPD measures. In some cases, however, proxy measures can be constructed using instruments already in these data sets. In this study, the authors developed and validated a self-report measure of…

  16. Borderline Personality Disorder and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Time for Integration?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Shannon

    2003-01-01

    An increasing prevalence of borderline personality disorder (BPD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnoses among women illustrates problems and limitations of the medical model system. Article explores overlapping relationship between BPD and PTSD and critiques how both are viewed within the mental health community. Previous research is…

  17. Borderline Personality in Adolescence: An Overview for Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Stephen E.; Fall, Kevin A.

    1998-01-01

    Borderline-personality disorder in adolescence is thought to develop through environmental sources, and object-relations theory posits a developmental arrest in the separation-individuation phase of development. This article discusses gender and race considerations, issues related to counseling, general treatment strategies such as coping-skills…

  18. [Tattoos and piercings: motives for body modification in women suffering from borderline symptomatology].

    PubMed

    Höhner, Gesche; Teismann, Tobias; Willutzki, Ulrike

    2014-02-01

    Do women suffering from borderline symptomatology differ from women without these symptoms regarding their motives for body modifications?A sample of 289 women with body modifications were questioned about their tattoos, piercings and motives for body modifications as well as about symptoms of borderline personality disorder. Women with borderline symptomatology were compared to women without borderline symptomatology concerning the extent of and motives for body modification.The 2 groups showed no differences in regard to amount and extent of body modifications. The "borderline"-group considered individuality, coping and management of negative life-events to be more crucial reasons for body modification than the non-borderline females.The degree of a person's body modification is not a feasible indicator for psychopathological strain. Though, for people with borderline tendency body modification may serve as a coping strategy similar to self-injury. PMID:23784796

  19. Pharmacological interventions for borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Stoffers, Jutta; Völlm, Birgit A; Rücker, Gerta; Timmer, Antje; Huband, Nick; Lieb, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Background Drugs are widely used in borderline personality disorder (BPD) treatment, chosen because of properties known from other psychiatric disorders (“off-label use”), mostly targeting affective or impulsive symptom clusters. Objectives To assess the effects of drug treatment in BPD patients. Search methods We searched bibliographic databases according to the Cochrane Developmental, Psychosocial and Learning Problems Group strategy up to September 2009, reference lists of articles, and contacted researchers in the field. Selection criteria Randomised studies comparing drug versus placebo, or drug versus drug(s) in BPD patients. Outcomes included total BPD severity, distinct BPD symptom facets according to DSM-IV criteria, associated psychopathology not specific to BPD, attrition and adverse effects. Data collection and analysis Two authors selected trials, assessed quality and extracted data, independently. Main results Twenty-eight trials involving a total of 1742 trial participants were included. First-generation antipsychotics (flupenthixol decanoate, haloperidol, thiothixene); second-generation antipsychotics (aripirazole, olanzapine, ziprasidone), mood stabilisers (carbamazepine, valproate semisodium, lamotrigine, topiramate), antidepressants (amitriptyline, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, phenelzine sulfate, mianserin), and dietary supplementation (omega-3 fatty acid) were tested. First-generation antipsychotics were subject to older trials, whereas recent studies focussed on second-generation antipsychotics and mood stabilisers. Data were sparse for individual comparisons, indicating marginal effects for first-generation antipsychotics and antidepressants. The findings were suggestive in supporting the use of second-generation antipsychotics, mood stabilisers, and omega-3 fatty acids, but require replication, since most effect estimates were based on single studies. The long-term use of these drugs has not been assessed. Adverse event data were scarce

  20. Assessment of Borderline Personality Features in Population Samples: Is the Personality Assessment Inventory-Borderline Features Scale Measurement Invariant across Sex and Age?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Moor, Marleen H. M.; Distel, Marijn A.; Trull, Timothy J.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2009-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is more often diagnosed in women than in men, and symptoms tend to decline with age. Using a large community sample, the authors investigated whether sex and age differences in four main features of BPD, measured with the "Personality Assessment Inventory-Borderline Features" scale (PAI-BOR; Morey, 1991), are…

  1. A Further Validation of the Minnesota Borderline Personality Disorder Scale

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Elizabeth, E.; Cummings, Jenna, R.; Bornovalova, Marina A.; Hopwood, Christopher J.; Racine, Sarah E.; Keel, Pamela K.; Sisk, Cheryl, L.; Neale, Michael; Boker, Steven; Burt, Alexandra S.; Klump, Kelly L.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research indicates that Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is well conceptualized as a dimensional construct that can be represented using normal personality traits. A previous study successfully developed and validated a BPD measure embedded within a normal trait measure, the Minnesota Borderline Personality Disorder Scale (MBPD). The current study performed a further validation of the MBPD by examining its convergent validity, external correlates, and heritability in a sample of 429 female twins. The MBPD correlated strongly with the SCID-II screener for BPD and moderately with external correlates. Moreover, the MBPD and SCID-II screener exhibited very similar patterns of external correlations. Additionally, results indicated that the genetic and environmental influences on MBPD overlap with the genetic and environmental influences on the SCID-II screener, which suggests that these scales are measuring the same construct. This data provide further evidence for the construct validity of the MBPD. PMID:24364505

  2. A further validation of the Minnesota Borderline Personality Disorder Scale.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Elizabeth C; Cummings, Jenna R; Bornovalova, Marina A; Hopwood, Christopher J; Racine, Sarah E; Keel, Pamela K; Sisk, Cheryl L; Neale, Michael; Boker, Steven; Burt, S Alexandra; Klump, Kelly L

    2014-04-01

    Previous research indicates that borderline personality disorder (BPD) is well conceptualized as a dimensional construct that can be represented using normal personality traits. A previous study successfully developed and validated a BPD measure embedded within a normal trait measure, the Minnesota Borderline Personality Disorder Scale (MBPD). The current study performed a further validation of the MBPD by examining its convergent validity, external correlates, and heritability in a sample of 429 female twins. The MBPD correlated strongly with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II Personality Disorders (SCID-II) screener for BPD and moderately with external correlates. Moreover, the MBPD and SCID-II screener exhibited very similar patterns of external correlations. Additionally, results indicated that the genetic and environmental influences on MBPD overlap with the genetic and environmental influences on the SCID-II screener, which suggests that these scales are measuring the same construct. These data provide further evidence for the construct validity of the MBPD. PMID:24364505

  3. Construct validity of the five factor borderline inventory.

    PubMed

    DeShong, Hilary L; Lengel, Gregory J; Sauer-Zavala, Shannon E; O'Meara, Madison; Mullins-Sweatt, Stephanie N

    2015-06-01

    The Five Factor Borderline Inventory (FFBI) is a new self-report measure developed to assess traits of borderline personality disorder (BPD) from the perspective of the Five Factor Model of general personality. The current study sought to first replicate initial validity findings for the FFBI and then to further validate the FFBI with predispositional risk factors of the biosocial theory of BPD and with commonly associated features of BPD (e.g., depression, low self-esteem) utilizing two samples of young adults (N = 87; 85) who have engaged in nonsuicidal self-injury. The FFBI showed strong convergent and discriminant validity across two measures of the Five Factor Model and also correlated strongly with measures of impulsivity, emotion dysregulation, and BPD. The FFBI also related to two measures of early childhood emotional vulnerability and parental invalidation and measures of depression, anxiety, and self-esteem. Overall, the results provide support for the FFBI as a measure of BPD. PMID:25155158

  4. Promoting Good Psychiatric Management for Patients With Borderline Personality Disorder.

    PubMed

    Links, Paul S; Ross, James; Gunderson, John G

    2015-08-01

    General psychiatric management for patients with borderline personality disorder was devised to be an outpatient intervention that could be readily learned and easily delivered by independent community mental health professionals. To disseminate the approach, Drs. Gunderson and Links developed the Handbook of Good Psychiatric Management for Borderline Personality Disorder (Gunderson & Links, ) that presented the basics of the approach, videos to illustrate the appropriate clinical skills, and case examples to practice adherence to the approach. Unfortunately, the inclusion of "psychiatric" in the treatment's name may discourage psychologists and other mental health professionals from using this therapy. In this article, we review the basic principles and approaches related to general psychiatric management. With a case example, we illustrate how psychologists can use all the general psychiatric management principles for their patients with BPD, except medications and, as a result, provide and deliver this approach effectively. PMID:26197971

  5. [Repetitive thermal self-manipulation in borderline personality disorder].

    PubMed

    von Wild, T; Namdar, T; Stollwerck, P L; Mailänder, P; Siemers, F

    2011-10-01

    Self-mutilations are one of the major characteristics of patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Thermal injuries of BPD should be treated by a plastic surgeon who is faced to a challenge in the plastic-reconstructive strategy because of the most complex psychiatric disease. This means the need of a multidisciplinary strategy. Based on 3 case reports such conflict between best plastic reconstructive treatment of the burns wound and the psychiatric limit with the appropriate therapy options are presented. PMID:21863546

  6. Co-occurrence of dissociative identity disorder and borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Ross, Colin A; Ferrell, Lynn; Schroeder, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The literature indicates that, among individuals with borderline personality disorder, pathological dissociation correlates with a wide range of impairments and difficulties in psychological function. It also predicts a poorer response to dialectical behavior therapy for borderline personality disorder. We hypothesized that (a) dissociative identity disorder commonly co-occurs with borderline personality disorder and vice versa, and (b) individuals who meet criteria for both disorders have more comorbidity and trauma than individuals who meet criteria for only 1 disorder. We interviewed a sample of inpatients in a hospital trauma program using 3 measures of dissociation. The most symptomatic group was those participants who met criteria for both borderline personality disorder and dissociative identity disorder on the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule, followed by those who met criteria for dissociative identity disorder only, then those with borderline personality disorder only, and finally those with neither disorder. Greater attention should be paid to the relationship between borderline personality disorder and dissociative identity disorder. PMID:24377974

  7. [Stalemates and opportunities in the treatment of borderline personality disorder].

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Sébastien

    2010-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder is a serious mental health problem for which one of its main characteristics is significant difficulties in relationships with others. These relational problems have the unfortunate consequence of fostering negative attitudes among mental health professionals and contributing to the stigmatization of people suffering from this disorder. In this article, the author emphasizes the importance of taking into account the parameter of the therapeutic frame within which the feeling of facing a stalemate in the treatment of borderline personality disorder patients occurs. Six general strategies are presented that enable the therapist to limit or hinder the risk of stalemate in treatment. This article then presents the commonalities between treatments teams that tend to feel comfortable and efficacious in their management of borderline personality disorder patients. Finally, a case history is used to illustrate how some stalemates can in fact be seen as opportunities for growth for both the patient and the therapist. In order to avoid the vicious circle of negative interactions with patients already hypersensitive to inconsistencies and rejection, the author concludes by insisting on the necessity that more mental health professional have access to training programs and workshops specifically addressing how to better manage and treat people with BPD. PMID:21761087

  8. Psychophysiological ambulatory assessment of affective dysregulation in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Ebner-Priemer, Ulrich W; Welch, Stacy S; Grossman, Paul; Reisch, Thomas; Linehan, Marsha M; Bohus, Martin

    2007-04-15

    Many experts now believe that pervasive problems in affect regulation constitute the central area of dysfunction in borderline personality disorder (BPD). However, data is sparse and inconclusive. We hypothesized that patients with BPD, in contrast to healthy gender and nationality-matched controls, show a higher frequency and intensity of self-reported emotions, altered physiological indices of emotions, more complex emotions and greater problems in identifying specific emotions. We took a 24-hour psychophysiological ambulatory monitoring approach to investigate affect regulation during everyday life in 50 patients with BPD and in 50 healthy controls. To provide a typical and unmanipulated sample, we included only patients who were currently in treatment and did not alter their medication schedule. BPD patients reported more negative emotions, fewer positive emotions, and a greater intensity of negative emotions. A subgroup of non-medicated BPD patients manifested higher values of additional heart rate. Additional heart rate is that part of a heart rate increase that does not directly result from metabolic activity, and is used as an indicator of emotional reactivity. Borderline participants were more likely to report the concurrent presence of more than one emotion, and those patients who just started treatment in particular had greater problems in identifying specific emotions. Our findings during naturalistic ambulatory assessment support emotional dysregulation in BPD as defined by the biosocial theory of [Linehan, M.M., 1993. Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder. The Guildford Press, New York.] and suggest the potential utility for evaluating treatment outcome. PMID:17321599

  9. Interventions for the treatment of borderline ovarian tumours

    PubMed Central

    Faluyi, Olusola; Mackean, Melanie; Gourley, Charlie; Bryant, Andrew; Dickinson, Heather O

    2014-01-01

    Background The safety of conservative surgery and the benefit of additional interventions after surgery for borderline ovarian tumours are unknown. Objectives To evaluate the benefits and harm of different treatment modalities offered for borderline ovarian tumours. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register to 2009, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2008, Issue 4), MEDLINE and EMBASE to 2009. We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared different interventions in adult women diagnosed with borderline ovarian tumours of any histological variant. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Main results We identified seven RCTs that enrolled 372 women. We could not pool results of trials as the treatment comparisons differed. Six RCTs (n = 340) conducted over 15 years ago, evaluated adjuvant therapy (chemotherapy, pelvic external irradiation or intraperitoneal radioactive isotope therapy) after radical surgery; over 87% of participants had Stage I tumours. Most participants were followed up for over 10 years. Overall and recurrence-free survival were similar between both arms of these trials, except that one trial (n = 66) showed a significantly lower survival (P = 0.03) in women who received chemotherapy (thio-TEPA). Adverse effects of treatment were incompletely reported and all six trials were at high risk of bias. One further trial (n = 32) that recruited participants with bilateral serous tumours who were wishing fertility preservation, revealed a significantly increased chance of pregnancy (hazard ratio (HR) = 3.3, 95% CI 1.4 to 8.0) but non-significantly earlier disease recurrence (HR = 1.5, 95% CI 0.6 to 3.8) in the women who had ultra-conservative surgery (bilateral

  10. Women's Views on Their Diagnosis and Management for Borderline Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shanshan; Middleton, Philippa F.; Bubner, Tanya K.; Crowther, Caroline A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Little is known about women's views relating to a diagnosis of borderline gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and the subsequent management. This study aimed to explore women's experiences after being diagnosed with borderline GDM, their attitudes about treatment, and factors important to them for achieving any lifestyle changes. Methods. We conducted face-to-face, semistructured interviews with women diagnosed with borderline GDM. Results. A total of 22 women were interviewed. After a diagnosis of borderline GDM, 14 (64%) women reported not being concerned or worried. Management of borderline GDM was thought by 21 (95%) women to be very important or important. Eighteen (82%) women planned to improve their diet and/or exercise to manage their borderline GDM. The most frequently mentioned enabler for achieving intended lifestyle change was being more motivated to improve the health of their baby and/or themselves (15 women). The most frequent barrier was tiredness and/or being physically unwell (11 women). Conclusions. A diagnosis of borderline GDM caused some concern to one-third of women interviewed. The majority of women believed managing their borderline GDM was important and they planned to improve their lifestyle. Women's own and their babies' future health were powerful motivators for lifestyle change. PMID:25785278

  11. The Borderline/Schizoid Marriage: The Holding Environment as an Essential Treatment Construct.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormack, Charles C.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the borderline/schizoid marital constellation as the prominent constellation among borderline patients on a long-term inpatient unit. Contends that treatment of this marital constellation requires application of the concept of the holding environment as an essential treatment construct with the therapist as manager of the holding…

  12. Social Information Processing in Boys with Autistic Spectrum Disorder and Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Embregts, P.; van Nieuwenhuijzen, M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Children with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) and mild to borderline intellectual disability (ID) have less adaptive behaviour and more behaviour problems than children with mild to borderline ID. Social information processing appears to be an important mechanism in the explanation of the socially inadequate behaviour of children…

  13. Using Student Ability and Item Difficulty for Making Defensible Pass/Fail Decisions for Borderline Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shulruf, Boaz; Jones, Phil; Turner, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    The determination of Pass/Fail decisions over Borderline grades, (i.e., grades which do not clearly distinguish between the competent and incompetent examinees) has been an ongoing challenge for academic institutions. This study utilises the Objective Borderline Method (OBM) to determine examinee ability and item difficulty, and from that…

  14. Extremely rare borderline phyllodes tumor in the male breast: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Gyu; Kim, Shin Young; Jung, Hae Yoen; Lee, Deuk Young; Lee, Jong Eun

    2015-01-01

    Phyllodes tumor of the male breast is an extremely rare disease, and far fewer cases of borderline phyllodes tumors than benign or malignant tumors in the male breast have been reported. We report a case of borderline phyllodes tumor in the male breast with imaging findings of the tumor and pathologic correlation. PMID:26316459

  15. Emotion Regulation Training for Adolescents with Borderline Personality Disorder Traits: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuppert, H. Marieke; Timmerman, Marieke E.; Bloo, Josephine; van Gemert, Tonny G.; Wiersema, Herman M.; Minderaa, Ruud B.; Emmelkamp, Paul M. G.; Nauta, Maaike H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of Emotion Regulation Training (ERT), a 17-session weekly group training for adolescents with borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms. Method: One hundred nine adolescents with borderline traits (73% meeting the full criteria for BPD) were randomized to treatment as usual only (TAU) or ERT + TAU.…

  16. Adolescent Borderline Symptoms in the Community: Prognosis for Functioning over 20 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winograd, Greta; Cohen, Patricia; Chen, Henian

    2008-01-01

    Background: The long-term prognosis associated with adolescent symptoms of borderline personality disorder (BPD) in the general population is virtually unknown. In this study, the relationship of early borderline symptoms to subsequent psychosocial functioning and attainment was investigated based on data from the Children in the Community cohort.…

  17. Use of Dialectical Behavior Therapy in Borderline Personality Disorder: A View from Residency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Binali; Dunlop, Boadie W.; Ninan, Philip T.; Bradley, Rebekah

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the use of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) in treating borderline personality disorder during psychiatry residency, and assess the status of DBT education within psychiatry residencies in the United States. Method: The authors present a patient with borderline personality disorder treated by a resident using DBT,…

  18. Borderline viability: controversies in caring for the extremely premature infant.

    PubMed

    Leuthner, Steven R

    2014-12-01

    Controversy surrounding the decision to resuscitate at the limits or borderline of viability has been at the center of neonatal ethical debate for decades. This debate has led to numerous reports from individual institutions, councils, and advisory committees that all have remarkable consistency in the development of gestational age-based guidelines. This article reviews legal or regulatory concerns that may contradict ethical discussion and guidelines, discriminatory and scientific basis concerns with consensus guidelines, and personal controversy about how to determine best interest. Guidelines are a reasonable place to start in helping determine parental authority and autonomy. The article also addresses controversies raised in counseling and costs. PMID:25459775

  19. Mucinous Borderline Ovarian Tumor in Very Old Aged Postmenopausal Woman

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Hee; Lee, Hae-Hyeog; Lee, Arum; Kim, Yeon-Suk; Jeon, Dong-Su; Kwak, Jeong Ja; Yang, Yo-Sep

    2015-01-01

    Mucinous borderline ovarian tumors (BOTs) occur most often in women between the ages of 20 and 30. Early-stage detection of the condition has a more favorable prognosis. In this case report, the authors present an elderly 93-year old woman who visited our hospital due to severe abdominal pain after being diagnosed with a pelvic mass 2 years ago and not undergoing any treatment since the diagnosis was made. She underwent emergency left salpingo-oophorectomy and was diagnosed with mucinous BOT according to biopsy results. PMID:26793682

  20. [Impulse control disorders in borderline and antisocial personality disorder].

    PubMed

    Herpertz, S

    2007-01-18

    A borderline personality disorder is associated with highly impulsive acts that cannot be controlled by cognitive inhibition. In a psychopathic/antisocial personality disorder emotional inhibition of hostile acts is lacking. The patient has a high proclivity for risk-seeking, and is incapable of responding appropriately to punishment. In both disorders, the result is (auto)aggressive behavior. The family doctor must refer such patients to a specialist, when there is an acute danger of self-harm or when a grave functional limitation in the areas of work or interpersonal relationship has persisted over a long period of time. PMID:17619383

  1. The Family, Family Therapy, and Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    GLICK, IRA D.; DULIT, REBECCA A.; WACHTER, EILEEN; CLARKIN, JOHN F.

    1995-01-01

    The authors review recent controlled studies on the interrelationship of the family and its members with borderline disorder and propose a new model for understanding and managing this relationship. The focus of the model is on psychopathology, evaluation, and treatment of patient and family as they influence each other. In the authors’ view this illness originates in cerebral dysfunction, in the patient in combination with impaired relationships among family members. When the family is available, we believe that the treatment of choice is a multimodal approach involving family psychoeducation and family systems or dynamic intervention where possible, in combination with medications, individual psychotherapy, or both. PMID:22700254

  2. Neurocognitive deficits in borderline personality disorder: implications for treatment.

    PubMed

    Judd, Patricia A

    2012-03-01

    The cognitive dimension of Borderline Personality Disorder has received relatively little attention in the clinical literature and is poorly understood. This article illustrates how a range of cognitive problems including attention deficit disorder and learning disabilities may contribute to the cognitive disturbances identified in the disorder including dissociation, paranoia, all or nothing thinking, overvalued ideas, and denial and splitting. A review of relevant research supporting the presence of cognitive deficits is summarized along with a developmental pathway for the expression of the cognitive dimension. Clinical examples are provided. Recommendations for inclusion of assessment and treatment strategies that address cognitive deficits within a psychodynamically based psychotherapy are discussed. PMID:23006031

  3. Borderline Personality Characteristics and Treatment Outcome in Cognitive-Behavioral Treatments for PTSD in Female Rape Victims

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Stephanie B.; Rizvi, Shireen L.; Resick, Patricia A.

    2008-01-01

    Many studies report that comorbid borderline personality pathology is associated with poorer outcomes in the treatment of Axis I disorders. Given the high rates of comorbidity between borderline personality pathology and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), it is essential to determine whether borderline symptomatology affects PTSD treatment…

  4. The influence of borderline personality features on inpatient adolescent suicide risk.

    PubMed

    Yalch, Matthew M; Hopwood, Christopher J; Fehon, Dwain C; Grilo, Carlos M

    2014-01-01

    Suicide is a leading cause of death among adolescents and suicidal behavior is one of the primary risk factors for youth psychiatric hospitalizations. A number of studies indicate that depression and substance abuse are associated with suicide risk in this population, but less is known about the role of borderline personality features or their incremental influence over other known risk factors in indicating suicidal behavior among adolescents. This study examined whether borderline features were associated with suicide risk when controlling for symptoms of depression and substance abuse in a sample of adolescents hospitalized in an inpatient psychiatric facility. Self-report data from 477 adolescent psychiatric inpatients were used to test hypotheses about the association of borderline features with suicide risk after controlling for other common risk factors. Borderline features were significantly related to suicide risk even after accounting for symptoms of depression and substance abuse. These findings underscore the clinical value of routinely assessing borderline features among adolescents. PMID:24128121

  5. Distinct pattern of P3a event-related potential in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Meares, Russell; Melkonian, Dmitriy; Gordon, Evian; Williams, Leanne

    2005-02-28

    P3a and P3b event-related brain potentials to auditory stimuli were recorded for 17 unmedicated patients with borderline personality disorder, 17 matched healthy controls and 100 healthy control participants spanning five decades. Using high-resolution fragmentary decomposition for single-trial event-related potential analysis, distinctive disturbances in P3a in borderline personality disorder patients were found: abnormally enhanced amplitude, failure to habituate and a loss of temporal locking with P3b. Normative age dependencies from 100 controls suggest that natural age-related decline in P3a amplitude is reduced in borderline personality disorder patients and is likely to indicate failure of frontal maturation. On the basis of the theories of Hughlings Jackson, this conceptualization of borderline personality disorder is consistent with an aetiological model of borderline personality disorder. PMID:15706238

  6. Association between schizotypal and borderline personality disorder traits, and cannabis use in young adults.

    PubMed

    Raynal, Patrick; Chabrol, Henri

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the association of schizotypal and borderline personality traits to cannabis use. Participants were 476 college students (95 males; 381 females; mean age of males=21; mean age of females=20.7) who completed self-report questionnaires assessing cannabis use, schizotypal and borderline personality traits. Problematic cannabis use, depressive symptoms, borderline and schizotypal traits were significantly inter-correlated. A logistic regression analysis showed that only borderline traits contributed significantly to cannabis use in the total sample. A multiple regression analysis showed that only schizotypal traits were positively and uniquely associated to problematic cannabis use symptoms among users. These results may imply that schizotypal traits are not a risk factor for initiating use, but may facilitate the development of problematic use symptoms among users. This study showed the necessity of taking into account schizotypal traits when exploring the relationships between depressive symptoms, borderline traits and cannabis use. PMID:27149691

  7. Borderline Personality Features in Childhood: The Role of Subtype, Developmental Timing and Chronicity of Child Maltreatment

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Kathryn F.; Cicchetti, Dante; Rogosch, Fred A.; Crick, Nicki

    2014-01-01

    Child maltreatment has been established as a risk factor for borderline personality disorder (BPD), yet few studies consider how maltreatment influences the development of BPD features through childhood and adolescence. Subtype, developmental timing and chronicity of child maltreatment were examined as factors in the development of borderline personality features in childhood. Children (M age = 11.30, SD = 0.94), including 314 maltreated and 285 nonmaltreated children from comparable low socioeconomic backgrounds, provided self-reports of developmentally salient borderline personality traits. Maltreated children had higher overall borderline feature scores, higher scores on each individual subscale and were more likely to be identified as at high risk for development of BPD through raised scores on all 4 subscales. Chronicity of maltreatment predicted higher overall borderline feature scores and patterns of onset and recency of maltreatment significantly predicted whether a participant would meet criteria for the high-risk group. Implications of findings and recommendations for intervention are discussed. PMID:25047300

  8. Working around a contested diagnosis: borderline personality disorder in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Koehne, Kristy; Hamilton, Bridget; Sands, Natisha; Humphreys, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    This discourse analytic study sits at the intersection of everyday communications with young people in mental health settings and the enduring sociological critique of diagnoses in psychiatry. The diagnosis of borderline personality disorder (BPD) is both contested and stigmatized, in mental health and general health settings. Its legitimacy is further contested within the specialist adolescent mental health setting. In this setting, clinicians face a quandary regarding the application of adult diagnostic criteria to an adolescent population, aged less than 18 years. This article presents an analysis of interviews undertaken with Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) clinicians in two publicly funded Australian services, about their use of the BPD diagnosis. In contrast with notions of primacy of diagnosis or of transparency in communications, doctors, nurses and allied health clinicians resisted and subverted a diagnosis of BPD in their work with adolescents. We delineate specific social and discursive strategies that clinicians displayed and reflected on, including: team rules which discouraged diagnostic disclosure; the lexical strategy of hedging when using the diagnosis; the prohibition and utility of informal 'borderline talk' among clinicians; and reframing the diagnosis with young people. For clinicians, these strategies legitimated their scepticism and enabled them to work with diagnostic uncertainty, in a population identified as vulnerable. For adolescent identities, these strategies served to forestall a BPD trajectory, allowing room for troubled adolescents to move and grow. These findings illuminate how the contest surrounding this diagnosis in principle is expressed in everyday clinical practice. PMID:22674745

  9. Defining the neurocircuitry of borderline personality disorder: functional neuroimaging approaches.

    PubMed

    Brendel, Gary R; Stern, Emily; Silbersweig, David A

    2005-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging recently has been used to localize brain dysfunction in borderline personality disorder (BPD). Initial studies have examined baseline activity or emotional reactivity, and our group has investigated what we consider to be a crucial interaction between negative emotion and behavioral (dys)control. This research is beginning to identify abnormal frontolimbic circuitry likely underlying core clinical features of this condition. We review the evidence for dysfunction in specific frontolimbic regions, leading to a mechanistic model of symptom formation in BPD. In addition, we offer an integration of these neuroimaging findings with developmental perspectives on the emergence of borderline psychopathology, focusing on the ways in which early psychosocial experience may interact with developing brain systems. We also consider possible mechanisms of psychotherapeutic change at the neural systems level in BPD. Finally, we propose that future neuroimaging studies of BPD should integrate multiple levels of observation (structural, functional, neurochemical, genetic, and clinical) in a model-driven fashion to further understand the dynamic relationship between biological and psychological factors in the development and treatment of this difficult condition. PMID:16613437

  10. Etiological features of borderline personality related characteristics in a birth cohort of 12-year-old children

    PubMed Central

    BELSKY, DANIEL W.; CASPI, AVSHALOM; ARSENEAULT, LOUISE; BLEIDORN, WIEBKE; FONAGY, PETER; GOODMAN, MARIANNE; HOUTS, RENATE; MOFFITT, TERRIE E.

    2012-01-01

    It has been reported that borderline personality related characteristics can be observed in children, and that these characteristics are associated with increased risk for the development of borderline personality disorder. It is not clear whether borderline personality related characteristics in children share etiological features with adult borderline personality disorder. We investigated the etiology of borderline personality related characteristics in a longitudinal cohort study of 1,116 pairs of same-sex twins followed from birth through age 12 years. Borderline personality related characteristics measured at age 12 years were highly heritable, were more common in children who had exhibited poor cognitive function, impulsivity, and more behavioral and emotional problems at age 5 years, and co-occurred with symptoms of conduct disorder, depression, anxiety, and psychosis. Exposure to harsh treatment in the family environment through age 10 years predicted borderline personality related characteristics at age 12 years. This association showed evidence of environmental mediation and was stronger among children with a family history of psychiatric illness, consistent with diathesis–stress models of borderline etiology. Results indicate that borderline personality related characteristics in children share etiological features with borderline personality disorder in adults and suggest that inherited and environmental risk factors make independent and interactive contributions to borderline etiology. PMID:22293008

  11. Maternal empathy, family chaos, and the etiology of borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Golomb, A; Ludolph, P; Westen, D; Block, M J; Maurer, P; Wiss, F C

    1994-01-01

    Psychoanalytic writers have traced the etiology of borderline personality disorder (BPD) to be a preoedipal disturbance in the mother-child relationship. Despite the prevalence of theories focusing on the role of mothering in the development of BPD, few empirical studies have tested the hypothesis that borderlines were the recipients of unempathic mothering. The current preliminary study compared 13 mothers of borderline adolescents with 13 mothers of normal adolescents. This study found that mothers of borderlines tended to conceive of their children egocentrically, as need-gratifying objects, rather than as individuals with distinct and evolving personalities. This study also found that the mothers of borderlines reported raising their daughters in extremely chaotic families struggling to cope with multiple hardships, including divorce and financial worries. The stressful environmental circumstances reported by the mothers likely affected the borderline daughters directly as well as the mothers' ability to parent effectively and empathically. The results of this study suggest that, as predicted by psychoanalytic theory, a problematic mother-child relationship may play a significant role in the genesis of borderline pathology; however, the life circumstances that contextualize the mother-child relationship also need to be considered when accounting for the etiology of BPD. PMID:8040554

  12. DNA Cytometry and Nuclear Morphometry in Ovarian Benign, Borderline and Malignant Tumors

    PubMed Central

    el Din, Amina A. Gamal; Badawi, Manal A.; Aal, Shereen E. Abdel; Ibrahim, Nihad A.; Morsy, Fatma A.; Shaffie, Nermeen M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKDROUND: Ovarian carcinoma is a leading cause of death in gynecological malignancy. Ovarian surface epithelial serous and mucinous tumours are classified as benign, borderline, and malignant. The identification of borderline tumours most likely to act aggressively remains an important clinical issue. AIM: This work aimed to study DNA ploidy and nuclear area in ovarian serous and mucinous; benign, borderline and malignant tumours. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study included forty ovarian (23 serous and 17 mucinous) tumours. Paraffin blocks were sectioned; stained with haematoxylin and eosin for histopathologic and morphometric studies and with blue feulgen for DNA analysis. RESULTS: All four serous and six out of nine mucinous benign tumours were diploid. All eight serous and five mucinous malignant tumours were aneuploid. Nine of eleven (81.8%) serous and all three mucinous borderline tumours were aneuploid. There were highly significant differences in mean aneuploid cells percentage between serous benign (1.5%), borderline (45.6%) and malignant (74.5%) (p = 0.0001) and between mucinous benign (13.2%) and both borderline (63.7%) and malignant (68.4%) groups (p = 0.0001). There were significant differences in nuclear area between serous benign (26.191%), borderline (45.619%) and malignant (67.634 %) and a significant positive correlation between mean percentage aneuploid value and mean nuclear area in all serous and mucinous groups. CONCLUSION: We suggest that DNA ploidy and nuclear area combined, may be adjuncts to histopathology; in ovarian serous and mucinous benign, borderline and malignant neoplasms; identifying the aggressive borderline tumours. PMID:27275284

  13. Management of borderline personality disorder: a review of psychotherapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Stone, Michael H

    2006-02-01

    There are currently three major psychotherapeutic approaches to the management of borderline personality disorder (BPD): the psychodynamic, the cognitive-behavioral, and the supportive. There are special varieties within each: e.g., transference-focused psychotherapy (psychodynamic) or dialectic behavioral therapy (cognitive-behavioral). Though differing in basic conceptions and in methodology, all approaches aim at the amelioration of both the symptom-aspects that dominate the clinical picture at the outset, and the personality difficulties that remain apparent after the symptoms have been alleviated. The term "management" implies a focus on the more serious aspects of the borderline picture. These can be pictured hierarchically as to their level of seriousness, and there is universal agreement about the nature of this hierarchy. Therapists must pay attention first to suicidal and self-mutilative behaviors. Next, one deals with any threats to interrupt therapy prematurely. Third in order of seriousness: non-suicidal symptoms such as (mild to moderate) depression, substance abuse, panic and other anxiety manifestations, or dissociation. Psychopharmacological treatment will often be used adjunctively to help control any target symptoms, which usually fall into such categories as cognitive-perceptual, affect dysregulation, or impulsive/ behavioral dyscontrol. Therapists must then be alert to any signs of withholding, dishonesty, or antisocial tendencies, since these have an adverse effect on prognosis. When all these disruptive influences are (to the extent possible) dealt with, therapists will next take up milder symptoms such as social anxiety or lability of mood. Throughout this initial process, the personality-disorder attributes of BPD will become more apparent, and will usually emerge with greater clarity, once the serious symptoms have been dealt with. The management issues will gradually be supplanted with the overlapping and enduring personality issues

  14. Management of borderline personality disorder: a review of psychotherapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    STONE, MICHAEL H.

    2006-01-01

    There are currently three major psychotherapeutic approaches to the management of borderline personality disorder (BPD): the psychodynamic, the cognitive-behavioral, and the supportive. There are special varieties within each: e.g., transference-focused psychotherapy (psychodynamic) or dialectic behavioral therapy (cognitive-behavioral). Though differing in basic conceptions and in methodology, all approaches aim at the amelioration of both the symptom-aspects that dominate the clinical picture at the outset, and the personality difficulties that remain apparent after the symptoms have been alleviated. The term "management" implies a focus on the more serious aspects of the borderline picture. These can be pictured hierarchically as to their level of seriousness, and there is universal agreement about the nature of this hierarchy. Therapists must pay attention first to suicidal and self-mutilative behaviors. Next, one deals with any threats to interrupt therapy prematurely. Third in order of seriousness: non-suicidal symptoms such as (mild to moderate) depression, substance abuse, panic and other anxiety manifestations, or dissociation. Psychopharmacological treatment will often be used adjunctively to help control any target symptoms, which usually fall into such categories as cognitive-perceptual, affect dysregulation, or impulsive/ behavioral dyscontrol. Therapists must then be alert to any signs of withholding, dishonesty, or antisocial tendencies, since these have an adverse effect on prognosis. When all these disruptive influences are (to the extent possible) dealt with, therapists will next take up milder symptoms such as social anxiety or lability of mood. Throughout this initial process, the personality-disorder attributes of BPD will become more apparent, and will usually emerge with greater clarity, once the serious symptoms have been dealt with. The management issues will gradually be supplanted with the overlapping and enduring personality issues

  15. The experience of borderline phenomena through cinema: Guentin Tarantino's Reservoir dogs, true romance, and pulp fiction.

    PubMed

    Ross, Donald R; Favero, Marcus

    2002-01-01

    The experience of many patients with borderline personality is intense and kaleidoscopic. These qualities may be represented in film in ways that reflect and convey their essential features that are less readily captured in words. Quentin Tarantino has produced a trilogy of films that bring to light and to life the borderline experience. We use these movies to illustrate and discuss five key borderline themes: the fluid nature of drive derivatives, the discontinuous experience of time and space, the coniflicted search for an idealized parent, antisocial distortions of the superego, and the organizing and stabilizing function of a central romantic fantasy. PMID:12389520

  16. The Rejection-Rage Contingency in Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Berenson, Kathy R.; Downey, Geraldine; Rafaeli, Eshkol; Coifman, Karin; Leventhal, Nina

    2011-01-01

    Though longstanding clinical observation reflected in the DSM-IV suggests that the rage characteristic of borderline personality disorder (BPD) often appears in response to perceived rejection, the role of perceived rejection in triggering rage in BPD has never been empirically tested. Extending basic personality research on rejection sensitivity to a clinical sample, a priming-pronunciation experiment and a 21-day experience-sampling diary examined the contingent relationship between perceived rejection and rage in participants diagnosed with BPD compared to healthy controls. Despite the differences in these two assessment methods, the indices of rejection-contingent rage that they produced were both elevated in the BPD group, and were strongly interrelated. They provide corroborating evidence that reactions to perceived rejection significantly explain the rage seen in BPD. PMID:21500875

  17. Relationships between thought suppression and symptoms of borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Shannon E; Baer, Ruth A

    2009-02-01

    The current study examined relationships among childhood emotional vulnerability, an invalidating childhood environment, thought suppression, and symptoms of borderline personality disorder (BPD). Emotional vulnerability and an invalidating childhood environment are described by Linehan (1993) as important biosocial precursors to the development of BPD. Using a student sample selected to have a wide range of BPD symptoms, we examined whether thought suppression mediates the relationship between these biosocial precursors and symptoms of BPD. Results supported the hypothesis that thought suppression fully mediates the relationship between invalidating environment and BPD symptoms. Mixed support was found for the hypothesis that thought suppression mediates the relationship between emotional vulnerability and BPD symptoms. We also examined whether fear of emotions mediates the relationship between the biosocial precursors and thought suppression. Results supported this hypothesis, and also suggested that fear of emotion contributes independently to mediating the relationship between biosocial precursors and BPD symptoms. PMID:19267661

  18. Use of Clozapine for Borderline Personality Disorder: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Amamou, Badii; Salah, Walid Bel Hadj; Mhalla, Ahmed; Benzarti, Nejla; Elloumi, Hend; Zaafrane, Ferid; Gaha, Lotfi

    2016-01-01

    Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) show significant impairment in functioning, particularly in the interpersonal and social domains. Prior reports suggest that clozapine may be effective in the management of BPD. We present the case of a patient with BPD who experienced persistent suicidal ideation and was treated with clozapine at a state psychiatric hospital. After treatment failure with other psychotropic medications, clozapine medication was initiated; not only did suicidal ideation cease, but social and professional functioning also greatly improved to the point of no longer requiring intensive levels of observation or restrictive procedures. Clozapine appears to be efficacious in the management of suicide attempts and self-injurious behavior. Moreover, it appears to be promising as a therapeutic measure for ameliorating the global functioning of patients with severe BPD. Larger, randomized, blinded, and controlled prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings and to determine optimal dosage. PMID:27121437

  19. Schemas and Borderline Personality Disorder symptoms in incarcerated women.

    PubMed

    Specht, Matt W; Chapman, Alex; Cellucci, Tony

    2009-06-01

    There is increasing interest regarding the role of maladaptive cognition in Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). The current study examined the relationship between early maladaptive schema (EMS) domains and BPD symptoms as well as whether schema domains account for the relationship between childhood maltreatment and BPD severity. Incarcerated women (N=105) were assessed for BPD symptoms via semi-structured diagnostic interview. Disconnection/Rejection and Impaired Limits were associated with BPD pathology although these domains shared variance with depression and antisocial personality disorder pathology, respectively. In addition, the relationship between childhood abuse and BPD severity was non-significant after controlling for schema domains. Related findings and the implications for cognitive treatment of BPD are discussed. PMID:19159865

  20. Patient-reported outcomes in borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hasler, Gregor; Hopwood, Christopher J.; Jacob, Gitta A.; Brändle, Laura S.; Schulte-Vels, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) refers to measures that emphasize the subjective view of patients about their health-related conditions and behaviors. Typically, PROs include self-report questionnaires and clinical interviews. Defining PROs for borderline personality disorder (BPD) is particularly challenging given the disorder's high symptomatic heterogeneity, high comorbidity with other psychiatric conditions, highly fluctuating symptoms, weak correlations between symptoms and functional outcomes, and lack of valid and reliable experimental measures to complement self-report data. Here, we provide an overview of currently used BPD outcome measures and discuss them from clinical, psychometric, experimental, and patient perspectives. In addition, we review the most promising leads to improve BPD PROs, including the DSM-5 Section III, the Recovery Approach, Ecological Momentary Assessments, and novel experimental measures of social functioning that are associated with functional and social outcomes. PMID:25152662

  1. The role of mindfulness in borderline personality disorder features.

    PubMed

    Wupperman, Peggilee; Neumann, Craig S; Whitman, Jeannie B; Axelrod, Seth R

    2009-10-01

    This study investigated whether deficits in mindfulness (attention, awareness, and acceptance of the present moment) underlie variability in borderline personality disorder (BPD) features and related impairments in interpersonal functioning, impulsivity, and emotion regulation. A path analytic approach was used to examine the relationships of trait mindfulness with BPD features, interpersonal effectiveness, impulsive and passive emotion-regulation, and neuroticism in a psychiatric sample of adults (N = 70). As hypothesized, mindfulness was associated inversely with BPD features and core areas of dysfunction, and these associations continued when controlling for neuroticism. Furthermore, mindfulness deficits continued to predict BPD features even when interpersonal effectiveness, passive and impulsive emotion-regulation, and neuroticism were controlled. These findings suggest that mindfulness may be a unique predictor for the expression of BPD pathology. An emphasis on mindfulness may thus be crucial in enhancing the formulation and treatment of BPD. PMID:19829206

  2. Dream analysis in the psychodynamic psychotherapy of borderline patients.

    PubMed

    Stone, Michael H

    2012-06-01

    Despite Freud's dictum that dreams are the royal road to the unconscious, the use of dream analysis by therapists working with Borderline Personality Disorder and other severe psychiatric conditions has in the past two decades has fallen into a state of decline, if not outright neglect. The reasons why are not altogether clear, though some have said that the growing popularity of ego psychology and other movements in the domain of psychoanalysis have perhaps pushed dream analysis to one side. To me this marginalization seems unjustified. I hope to demonstrate in this article the enduring utility of dream analysis in working with the more severely disordered patients, with the aim of revivifying its application--and its efficacy--in our work with such patients. PMID:23006120

  3. Use of Clozapine for Borderline Personality Disorder: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Amamou, Badii; Salah, Walid Bel Hadj; Mhalla, Ahmed; Benzarti, Nejla; Elloumi, Hend; Zaafrane, Ferid; Gaha, Lotfi

    2016-05-31

    Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) show significant impairment in functioning, particularly in the interpersonal and social domains. Prior reports suggest that clozapine may be effective in the management of BPD. We present the case of a patient with BPD who experienced persistent suicidal ideation and was treated with clozapine at a state psychiatric hospital. After treatment failure with other psychotropic medications, clozapine medication was initiated; not only did suicidal ideation cease, but social and professional functioning also greatly improved to the point of no longer requiring intensive levels of observation or restrictive procedures. Clozapine appears to be efficacious in the management of suicide attempts and self-injurious behavior. Moreover, it appears to be promising as a therapeutic measure for ameliorating the global functioning of patients with severe BPD. Larger, randomized, blinded, and controlled prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings and to determine optimal dosage. PMID:27121437

  4. [Borderline personality disorder: the patients and their relatives].

    PubMed

    Apfelbaum, Sergio; Gagliesi, Pablo

    This present paper reviews the current theories about the borderline personality disorder and their relations with their families and significant others. The biosocial theory states that the relationship between emotional vulnerability and the interactions with family relations seems to explain the problems with DLP clients. This disorder is defined then as an interaction disease. Relatives and significant others usually have symptoms, beliefs, and emotions produced by this interaction. A list of general strategies for the assistance of these clients and their families is introduced: The transformation of the complaint into a problem, the psycho education, the reduction of expressed emotions, the acceptance and the training in different abilities. At the end, the experience with psycho education approach workshops is commented, as well as the use of a psycho educational manual. PMID:15597126

  5. Adult attachment in the clinical management of borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Fossati, Andrea

    2012-05-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a common psychiatric disorder associated with severe functional impairment, high rates of suicide and comorbid psychiatric illness, intensive use of treatment, and high costs to society. The etiology and pathogenesis of BPD are still uncertain, although an interaction between biological and psychosocial factors has been proposed to explain how the condition develops. Attachment disturbances represent one of the developmental risk factors that have been most consistently found to be associated with BPD, with a number of studies reporting a significant strong association between insecure attachment and BPD, notwithstanding the variety of measures and attachment types employed in these studies. In this article, the author first reviews clinical descriptions and research findings concerning the association between attachment disturbances and BPD and then discusses how attachment theory may help clinicians who work with patients with BPD better understand the psychopathology of the illness and plan treatment. PMID:22617081

  6. Suicidal risk and management in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Marianne; Roiff, Tracey; Oakes, Allison H; Paris, Joel

    2012-02-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in our understanding of suicidality in borderline personality disorder (BPD), with a focus on suicide risk assessment, guidelines for treatment, and medicolegal concerns. Relevant material on distinctions between suicide completers and suicide attempters, contributions of published American Psychiatric Association Guidelines, the controversial role of hospitalization, and management strategies regarding litigation is addressed. Despite accumulating data on suicidality in BPD, the current state of knowledge offers only partial clues to help identify the BPD patients most at risk of death by suicide, and offers a limited armamentarium of treatment targeted to suicide prevention, creating discomfort in clinicians and fears regarding litigation in the event of a successful suicide. Promising new interventions include less resource-intensive psychotherapies as well as brief crisis intervention. PMID:22113831

  7. The neurobiology of empathy in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Ripoll, Luis H; Snyder, Rebekah; Steele, Howard; Siever, Larry J

    2013-03-01

    We present a neurobiological model of empathic dysfunction in borderline personality disorder (BPD) to guide future empirical research. Empathy is a necessary component of interpersonal functioning, involving two distinct, parallel neural networks. One form of empathic processing relies on shared representations (SR) of others' mental states, while the other is associated with explicit mental state attribution (MSA). SR processing is visceral and automatic, contributing to attunement, but also emotional contagion. MSA processing contributes to deliberate, perspectival forms of empathic understanding. Empathic dysfunction in BPD may involve hyper-reactivity of SR networks and impairment of MSA networks. Nevertheless, this empathic dysfunction is subtle, but contributes to interpersonal difficulties. Interaction between genetic factors and traumatic attachment stressors may contribute to development of BPD, with painful attachment insecurity and disorganization affecting SR and MSA network functioning. Future avenues for BPD research will include developmental assessment of attachment and neurobiological functioning under varying conditions. PMID:23389774

  8. Reactivity to sensations in borderline personality disorder: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, M Zachary; Ahn, Roianne; Geiger, Paul J

    2011-10-01

    Individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD) are widely considered to have problems with emotional reactivity. However, the specific kinds of stimuli that are associated with heightened emotional reactivity in BPD have not been well characterized. Thus, it is unclear whether the emotional dysfunction in BPD occurs in response to any emotionally evocative stimuli, or to specific classes of stimuli. In this study, we used subjective measures (self-report and interview-based) to compare reactivity to sensations (auditory, gustatory, olfactory, tactile, visual) between participants with BPD (n = 30) and healthy controls (n = 50). Controlling for trait negative emotional reactivity, individuals with BPD reported being significantly more reactive across sensory stimuli. However, the difference between controls and BPD was significantly greater for reactivity to auditory stimuli compared to other sensory stimuli. Findings from this study provide preliminary data suggesting individuals with BPD may be characterized by heightened self-reported reactivity to aversive sounds. PMID:22023306

  9. Altered state and trait disgust in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Schienle, Anne; Haas-Krammer, Alexandra; Schöggl, Helmut; Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter; Ille, Rottraut

    2013-02-01

    Clinical experience suggests that the emotion disgust plays an important role in borderline personality disorder (BPD). We investigated 30 female patients with BPD and 30 healthy women who answered different measures of trait disgust, specifically disgust proneness, disgust sensitivity, and self-disgust. Moreover, all participants rated affective facial expressions as well as affective scenes according to perceived or elicited basic emotions. The patients with BPD reported elevated trait disgust, especially for the area of self-disgust. They also rated facial expressions of disgust as more intense than did the healthy women but only when the person who displayed this emotion was male. This sex-specific disgust bias was independent of depression and experienced sexual/physical abuse in the clinical group. Altogether, the patients with BPD showed a broad spectrum of altered disgust processes, which was positively correlated with disorder severity. Consequently, the assessment of disgust reactivity should be introduced as a diagnostic tool for this disorder. PMID:23364118

  10. Identifying Trajectories of Borderline Personality Features in Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Haltigan, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine trajectories of adolescent borderline personality (BP) features in a normative-risk cohort (n = 566) of Canadian children assessed at ages 13, 14, 15, and 16 and childhood predictors of trajectory group membership assessed at ages 8, 10, 11, and 12. Method: Data were drawn from the McMaster Teen Study, an on-going study examining relations among bullying, mental health, and academic achievement. Participants and their parents completed a battery of mental health and peer relations questionnaires at each wave of the study. Academic competence was assessed at age 8 (Grade 3). Latent class growth analysis, analysis of variance, and logistic regression were used to analyze the data. Results: Three distinct BP features trajectory groups were identified: elevated or rising, intermediate or stable, and low or stable. Parent- and child-reported mental health symptoms, peer relations risk factors, and intra-individual risk factors were significant predictors of elevated or rising and intermediate or stable trajectory groups. Child-reported attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and somatization symptoms uniquely predicted elevated or rising trajectory group membership, whereas parent-reported anxiety and child-reported ADHD symptoms uniquely predicted intermediate or stable trajectory group membership. Child-reported somatization symptoms was the only predictor to differentiate the intermediate or stable and elevated or rising trajectory groups (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.28). Associations between child-reported reactive temperament and elevated BP features trajectory group membership were 10.23 times higher among children who were bullied, supporting a diathesis–stress pathway in the development of BP features for these youth. Conclusions: Findings demonstrate the heterogeneous course of BP features in early adolescence and shed light on the potential prodromal course of later borderline personality disorder. PMID:27254092

  11. Borderline personality disorder: a disorder in search of advocacy.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Compared with bipolar disorder, borderline personality disorder (BPD) is as frequent (if not more frequent), as impairing (if not more impairing), and as lethal (if not more lethal). Yet, BPD has received less than one-tenth the funding from the National Institutes of Health than has bipolar disorder. More than other reviewers of the literature on the interface between bipolar disorder and BPD, Paris and Black (Paris J and Black DW (2015) Borderline Personality Disorder and Bipolar Disorder: What is the Difference and Why Does it Matter? J Nerv Ment Dis 203:3-7) emphasize the clinical importance of correctly diagnosing BPD and not overdiagnosing bipolar disorder, with a focus on the clinical feature of affective instability and how the failure to recognize the distinction between sustained and transient mood perturbations can result in misdiagnosing patients with BPD as having bipolar disorder. The review by Paris and Black, then, is more of an advocacy for BPD than other reviews in this area have been. In the present article, the author will illustrate how the bipolar disorder research community has done a superior job of advocating for and "marketing" their disorder compared with researchers of BPD. Specifically, researchers of bipolar disorder have conducted multiple studies highlighting the problem with underdiagnosis, written commentaries about the problem with underdiagnosis, developed and promoted several screening scales to improve diagnostic recognition, published numerous studies of the operating characteristics of these screening measures, attempted to broaden the definition of bipolar disorder by advancing the concept of the bipolar spectrum, and repeatedly demonstrated the economic costs and public health significance of bipolar disorder. In contrast, researchers of BPD have almost completely ignored each of these issues and thus have been less successful in highlighting the public health significance of the disorder. PMID:25536098

  12. Toward a genetically-informed model of borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Livesley, John

    2008-02-01

    This article describes a conceptual framework for describing borderline personality disorder (BPD) based on empirical studies of the phenotypic structure and genetic architecture of personality. The proposed phenotype has 2 components: (1) a description of core self and interpersonal pathology-the defining features of personality disorder-as these features are expressed in the disorder; and (2) a set of traits based on the anxious-dependent or emotional dysregulation factor of the four-factor model of PD. Four kinds of traits are described: emotional (anxiousness, emotional reactivity, emotional intensity, and pessimistic-anhedonia), interpersonal (submissiveness, insecure attachment, social apprehensiveness, and need for approval), cognitive (cognitive dysregulation), and self-harm (behaviors and ideas). Formulation of the phenotype was guided by the conceptualization of personality as a system of interrelated sub-systems. The psychopathology associated with BPD involves most components of the system. The trait structure of the disorder is assumed to reflect the genetic architecture of personality and individual traits are assumed to be based on adaptive mechanisms. It is suggested that borderline traits are organized around the trait of anxiousness and that an important feature of BPD is dysregulation of the threat management system leading to pervasive fearfulness and unstable emotions. The interpersonal traits are assumed to be heritable characteristics that evolved to deal with interpersonal threats that arose as a result of social living. The potential for unstable and conflicted interpersonal relationships that is inherent to the disorder is assumed to result from the interplay between the adaptive structure of personality and psychosocial adversity. The etiology of the disorder is discussed in terms of biological and environmental factors associated with each component of the phenotype. PMID:18312122

  13. Primary process thinking, primitive defensive operations and object relationships in borderline and neurotic patients.

    PubMed

    Leichsenring, F

    1991-01-01

    In the present paper Kernberg's hypothesis concerning the connection between primary process thinking on the one hand and primitive defense mechanisms and modes of object relationships on the other hand were tested empirically in a sample of 30 hospitalized borderline and 30 hospitalized neurotic patients. The diagnoses of the patients were given according to the 'Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines' of Gunderson and Kolb, the functions mentioned above were assessed on the basis of the Holtzman Inkblot Technique applying scoring systems of Lerner and coworkers for primitive defense mechanisms and of Urist for the scoring of object relationships to the Holtzman Inkblot Technique. According to the results the hypothesis derived from assumptions of Kernberg could be corroborated. Primary process thinking in borderline patients seems to be closely connected with high levels of anxiety and hostility, projective identification/projection, primitive denial and sadomasochistic relationships. A model for the coming about of primary process thinking in borderline patients is proposed. PMID:2023983

  14. BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER IN THE MEDICAL SETTING: Suggestive Behaviors, Syndromes, and Diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Randy A; Sansone, Lori A

    2015-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder is a personality dysfunction that is characterized by disinhibition and impulsivity, which oftentimes manifest as self-regulation difficulties. Patients with this disorder have always been present in medical settings, but have been described as "difficult patients" rather than patients with borderline personality disorder. According to empirical findings, a number of behaviors and medical syndromes/diagnoses are suggestive of borderline personality disorder. Suggestive behaviors in the medical setting may include aggressive or disruptive behaviors, the intentional sabotage of medical care, and excessive healthcare utilization. Suggestive medical syndromes and diagnoses in the medical setting may include alcohol and substance misuse (including the abuse of prescription medications), multiple somatic complaints, chronic pain, obesity, sexual impulsivity, and hair pulling. While not all-inclusive or diagnostic, these behaviors and syndromes/diagnoses may invite further clinical evaluation of the patient for borderline personality disorder. PMID:26351624

  15. BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER IN THE MEDICAL SETTING: Suggestive Behaviors, Syndromes, and Diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Lori A.

    2015-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder is a personality dysfunction that is characterized by disinhibition and impulsivity, which oftentimes manifest as self-regulation difficulties. Patients with this disorder have always been present in medical settings, but have been described as “difficult patients” rather than patients with borderline personality disorder. According to empirical findings, a number of behaviors and medical syndromes/diagnoses are suggestive of borderline personality disorder. Suggestive behaviors in the medical setting may include aggressive or disruptive behaviors, the intentional sabotage of medical care, and excessive healthcare utilization. Suggestive medical syndromes and diagnoses in the medical setting may include alcohol and substance misuse (including the abuse of prescription medications), multiple somatic complaints, chronic pain, obesity, sexual impulsivity, and hair pulling. While not all-inclusive or diagnostic, these behaviors and syndromes/diagnoses may invite further clinical evaluation of the patient for borderline personality disorder. PMID:26351624

  16. Stepped care: an alternative to routine extended treatment for patients with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Paris, Joel

    2013-10-01

    This review examined evidence supporting stepped care for borderline personality disorder as an alternative to routine extended treatment. Empirical studies have shown that patients with borderline personality disorder have a heterogeneous course, but symptomatic improvement can sometimes be relatively rapid. Currently, there is no evidence that any long-term treatment is superior to briefer interventions for borderline personality disorder. Long-term therapy may not be necessary for all patients, and its routine use leads to access problems. A stepped-care model, similar to models applied to other severe mental disorders, might provide a better use of resources. Stepped care can be used to limit the use of expensive programs and reduce waiting lists. Not all patients with borderline personality disorder can be treated briefly, but a stepped-care model allows those with less severe symptoms to be managed with fewer resources, freeing up more time and personnel for the treatment of those who need treatment the most. PMID:23945913

  17. Reasons for Change in Borderline Personality Disorder (and Other Axis II Disorders)

    PubMed Central

    Zanarini, Mary C.

    2008-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a slow moving disorder. Most patients with BPD improve over time. The reasons for this change are unclear. Both therapy as usual and the reparations that adult life offers can facilitate these changes. PMID:18638649

  18. Banff Borderline Changes Suspicious for Acute T Cell-Mediated Rejection: Where Do We Stand?

    PubMed

    Becker, J U; Chang, A; Nickeleit, V; Randhawa, P; Roufosse, C

    2016-09-01

    The definition of Banff Borderline became ambiguous when the Banff 2005 consensus modified the lower threshold from i1t1 (10-25% interstitial inflammation with mild tubulitis) to i0t1 (0-10% interstitial inflammation with mild tubulitis). We conducted a worldwide survey among members of the Renal Pathology Society about their approach to this diagnostic category. A web-based survey was sent out to all 503 current members (153 respondents). A database search yielded which threshold for Banff i was applied in the most influential manuscripts about Borderline. Among the 139 nephropathologists using the Borderline category, 67% use the Banff 1997 definition, requiring Banff i1. Thirty-seven percent admitted to sometimes exaggerating Banff i in the presence of tubulitis, to reach a diagnosis of Borderline. Forty-eight percent were dissatisfied with the definition of Borderline. The majority of the most influential manuscripts used the 1997 definition, contrary to the current one. There is considerable dissatisfaction with Borderline, and practice in Banff i thresholds is variable. Until additional studies inform a revision, we suggest leaving it to each pathologist's discretion whether to use i0 or i1 as the minimal threshold. In order to avoid future ambiguity, a web-based synopsis of all scattered current Banff definitions and rules should be created. PMID:26988137

  19. Borderline personality and emotional reactivity to theoretical media events: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Randy A; Wiederman, Michael W; Hatic, Anna; Flath, Laura

    2010-06-01

    Abstract Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine if patients with borderline personality emotionally react any differently than controls to theoretical media events of different valences. Methods. In this cross-sectional sample of convenience, we examined among 70 primary care patients the relationship between borderline personality disorder, according to two diagnostic measures (the borderline personality scale of the Personality Diagnostic Questionaire-4 and the Self-Harm Inventory), and emotional reactions to three types of theoretical media events - positive, negative, and neutral events. Results. Participants with versus without borderline personality evidenced no emotional differences to the various media events according to the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire-4. However, according to the Self-Harm Inventory, participants with borderline personality symptomatology were more likely to rate neutral events with greater emotional intensity, but not positive or negative events. Conclusions. These findings suggest that patients with borderline personality may tend to respond more dramatically to ambiguous stimuli, such as neutral environmental events. We discuss the potential implications of these findings. PMID:24922472

  20. The Effect of Attending Good Psychiatric Management (GPM) Workshops on Attitudes Toward Patients With Borderline Personality Disorder.

    PubMed

    Keuroghlian, Alex S; Palmer, Brian A; Choi-Kain, Lois W; Borba, Christina P C; Links, Paul S; Gunderson, John G

    2016-08-01

    The effect that attending a 1-day workshop on Good Psychiatric Management (GPM) had on attitudes about borderline personality disorder (BPD) was assessed among 297 clinicians. Change was recorded by comparing before and after scores on a 9-item survey previously developed to assess the effects of workshops on Systems Training for Emotional Predictability and Problem Solving (STEPPS). Participants reported decreased inclination to avoid borderline patients, dislike of borderline patients, and belief that BPD's prognosis is hopeless, as well as increased feeling of competence, belief that borderline patients have low self-esteem, feeling of being able to make a positive difference, and belief that effective psychotherapies exist. Less clinical experience was related to an increased feeling of competence and belief that borderline patients have low self-esteem. These findings were compared to those from the STEPPS workshop. This assessment demonstrates GPM's potential for training clinicians to meet population-wide needs related to borderline personality disorder. PMID:26111249

  1. Molecular subtypes of serous borderline ovarian tumor show distinct expression patterns of benign tumor and malignant tumor-associated signatures.

    PubMed

    Curry, Edward W J; Stronach, Euan A; Rama, Nona R; Wang, Yuepeng Y P; Gabra, Hani; El-Bahrawy, Mona A

    2014-03-01

    Borderline ovarian tumors show heterogeneity in clinical behavior. Most have excellent prognosis, although a small percentage show recurrence or progressive disease, usually to low-grade serous carcinoma. The aim of this study was to understand the molecular relationship between these entities and identify potential markers of tumor progression and therapeutic targets. We studied gene expression using Affymetrix HGU133plus2 GeneChip microarrays in 3 low-grade serous carcinomas, 13 serous borderline tumors and 8 serous cystadenomas. An independent data set of 18 serous borderline tumors and 3 low-grade serous carcinomas was used for validation. Unsupervised clustering revealed clear separation of benign and malignant tumors, whereas borderline tumors showed two distinct groups, one clustering with benign and the other with malignant tumors. The segregation into benign- and malignant-like borderline molecular subtypes was reproducible on applying the same analysis to an independent publicly available data set. We identified 50 genes that separate borderline tumors into their subgroups. Functional enrichment analysis of genes that separate borderline tumors to the two subgroups highlights a cell adhesion signature for the malignant-like subset, with Claudins particularly prominent. This is the first report of molecular subtypes of borderline tumors based on gene expression profiling. Our results provide the basis for identification of biomarkers for the malignant potential of borderline ovarian tumor and potential therapeutic targets for low-grade serous carcinoma. PMID:23948749

  2. Standard Setting in a Small Scale OSCE: A Comparison of the Modified Borderline-Group Method and the Borderline Regression Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Timothy J.; Humphrey-Murto, Susan M.; Norman, Geoffrey R.

    2006-01-01

    When setting standards, administrators of small-scale OSCEs often face several challenges, including a lack of resources, a lack of available expertise in statistics, and difficulty in recruiting judges. The Modified Borderline-Group Method is a standard setting procedure that compensates for these challenges by using physician examiners and is…

  3. [Electroconvulsive therapy for major depression in borderline personality disorder].

    PubMed

    Gescher, D M; Malevani, J

    2012-03-01

    Depressive disorder is a serious and frequent complication in borderline personality disorder (BPD), however, its severity tends to be neglected particularly if symptoms are short-lived or inconsistent as is common in patients with BPD. Yet the high frequency in these patients requires especially rapid and effective therapy to reduce the risks of vital endangerment, chronification and psychosocial impairment. Efficient crisis intervention is essential for continuity of the disease-specific multimodal therapy enabling lasting remission and social and vocational rehabilitation in BPD. In particular with regard to the high incidence of poor or failed pharmacological responses in patients with BPD, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is of significant relevance among antidepressant treatment options. Despite the wide consensus on its efficacy, there are only few selected trials on ECT for major depression (MD) in BPD. This review summarises the published original studies on this issue, and critically scrutinises indication, benefits and risks of ECT for MD in BPD. It contributes to a focused, discriminating view on ECT and thus enables an optimised patient-oriented, efficient indication for MD in BPD. PMID:21678232

  4. Borderline personality disorder: a dysregulation of the endogenous opioid system?

    PubMed

    Bandelow, Borwin; Schmahl, Christian; Falkai, Peter; Wedekind, Dirk

    2010-04-01

    The neurobiology of borderline personality disorder (BPD) remains unclear. Dysfunctions of several neurobiological systems, including serotoninergic, dopaminergic, and other neurotransmitter systems, have been discussed. Here we present a theory that alterations in the sensitivity of opioid receptors or the availability of endogenous opioids constitute part of the underlying pathophysiology of BPD. The alarming symptoms and self-destructive behaviors of the affected patients may be explained by uncontrollable and unconscious attempts to stimulate their endogenous opioid system (EOS) and the dopaminergic reward system, regardless of the possible harmful consequences. Neurobiological findings that support this hypothesis are reviewed: Frantic efforts to avoid abandonment, frequent and risky sexual contacts, and attention-seeking behavior may be explained by attempts to make use of the rewarding effects of human attachment mediated by the EOS. Anhedonia and feelings of emptiness may be an expression of reduced activity of the EOS. Patients with BPD tend to abuse substances that target mu-opioid receptors. Self-injury, food restriction, aggressive behavior, and sensation seeking may be interpreted as desperate attempts to artificially set the body to survival mode in order to mobilize the last reserves of the EOS. BPD-associated symptoms, such as substance abuse, anorexia, self-injury, depersonalization, and sexual overstimulation, can be treated successfully with opioid receptor antagonists. An understanding of the neurobiology of BPD may help in developing new treatments for patients with this severe disorder. PMID:20438240

  5. Exploration of microstructural abnormalities in borderline personality disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsche, Klaus H.; Brunner, Romuald; Henze, Romy; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Stieltjes, Bram

    2012-03-01

    As with other mental disorders, the causes of borderline personality disorder (BPD) are complex and not fully understood. In this study we aimed to determine whether adults with BPD exhibit microstructural abnormalities using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). 56 female right-handed individuals (age range, 14-18 years), 19 with a DSM-IV diagnosis of BPD, 18 patients with a DSM-IV defined current psychiatric disorder and 19 healthy control subjects were included. Groups were matched for age and IQ. DTI Images were analyzed using Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS). The analysis revealed significanty reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) values in the group of BPD patients compared to the normal controls. Similar FA reductions could not be found comparing BPD patients to clinical controls. Several clusters of increased radial (DR), axial (DA), and mean (MD) diffusivity were consistently identified when comparing the BPD patients to clinical as well as to healthy controls. None of the measures showed significant differences between the clinical and healthy controls. Diverse possible factors have been suggested to play a role in the disease, including environmental factors, neurobiological factors, or brain abnormalities. The presented results may play an important role in this ongoing debate.

  6. Recovery, as Experienced by Women with Borderline Personality Disorder.

    PubMed

    Larivière, Nadine; Couture, Élise; Blackburn, Catherine; Carbonneau, Manon; Lacombe, Christophe; Schinck, Shella-Ann; David, Pierre; St-Cyr-Tribble, Denise

    2015-12-01

    Studies examining recovery through the service users' perspectives have mainly included persons with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Giving voice to those with borderline personality disorder (BPD) would enrich our understanding of recovery, as their specific experiences may bring new dimensions, obstacles and facilitators. The objective of this study was to qualitatively capture the experience of recovery in women with BPD. Participants were women between 18 and 65 years old who had a diagnosis of BPD and completed at least 2 years in a program for persons with BPD. During the first meeting, they produced a picture collage, followed by an interview on their experience of recovery. The second meeting was a phone interview to discuss new thoughts. In addition, their medical records were reviewed. A thematic analysis of the interviews was conducted and organized with the Person-Environment-Occupation model. Although recovery was not the best term to name their experience, they all talked about a process towards stability and wellbeing (n = 12). Dimensions of recovery included, for example, letting go of the past (person), being involved in meaningful activities (occupation) and having healthy relationships (environment). Facilitators included social support and participation in a specialized therapy program. The main obstacle was unstable family relationships. The findings from this study showed similar dimensions to previous recovery studies, new perspectives on certain dimensions, as well as new ones. They also reinforced the importance to incorporate intervention outcomes that target the person with BPD, their social environment and meaningful occupations. PMID:25736797

  7. Borderlines between Sarcopenia and Mild Late-Onset Muscle Disease

    PubMed Central

    Palmio, Johanna; Udd, Bjarne

    2014-01-01

    Numerous natural or disease-related alterations occur in different tissues of the body with advancing age. Sarcopenia is defined as age-related decrease of muscle mass and strength beginning in mid-adulthood and accelerating in people older than 60 years. Pathophysiology of sarcopenia involves both neural and muscle dependent mechanisms and is enhanced by multiple factors. Aged muscles show loss in fiber number, fiber atrophy, and gradual increase in the number of ragged red fibers and cytochrome c oxidase-negative fibers. Generalized loss of muscle tissue and increased amount of intramuscular fat are seen on muscle imaging. However, the degree of these changes varies greatly between individuals, and the distinction between normal age-related weakening of muscle strength and clinically significant muscle disease is not always obvious. Because some of the genetic myopathies can present at a very old age and be mild in severity, the correct diagnosis is easily missed. We highlight this difficult borderline zone between sarcopenia and muscle disease by two examples: LGMD1D and myotonic dystrophy type 2. Muscle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a useful tool to help differentiate myopathies from sarcopenia and to reach the correct diagnosis also in the elderly. PMID:25324776

  8. Enhanced emotion-induced amnesia in borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    HURLEMANN, RENÉ; HAWELLEK, BARBARA; MAIER, WOLFGANG; DOLAN, RAYMOND J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Current biological concepts of borderline personality disorder (BPD) emphasize the interference of emotional hyperarousal and cognitive functions. A prototypical example is episodic memory. Pre-clinical investigations of emotion–episodic memory interactions have shown specific retrograde and anterograde episodic memory changes in response to emotional stimuli. These changes are amygdala dependent and vary as a function of emotional arousal and valence. Method To determine whether there is amygdala hyper-responsiveness to emotional stimuli as the underlying pathological substrate of cognitive dysfunction in BPD, 16 unmedicated female patients with BPD were tested on the behavioural indices of emotion-induced amnesia and hypermnesia established in 16 healthy controls. Results BPD patients displayed enhanced retrograde and anterograde amnesia in response to presentation of negative stimuli, while positive stimuli elicited no episodic memory-modulating effects. Conclusion These findings suggest that an amygdala hyper-responsiveness to negative stimuli may serve as a crucial aetiological contributor to emotion-induced cognitive dysfunction in BPD. PMID:17224096

  9. Pharmacologic management of borderline personality disorder: a case study.

    PubMed

    Links, Paul S; Cook, Michele; Quastel, Adam

    2005-01-01

    General principles of the "outcome-focused" model of psychopharmacologic management of patients with BPD are illustrated using the case of Ms. A, a patient with borderline personality disorder (BPD) experiencing impulsivity such as suicidal behavior, chronic insomnia and concurrent substance abuse. The model includes (1) measurement of specific behavioral outcomes related to functioning; (2) assessment of the role of substance use/abuse in patients with BPD; (3) consideration of interventions to clarify and strengthen the boundaries of the therapeutic relationship-including short lengths of time between prescription refills, medication contracts outlining consequences if substances are obtained outside of the relationship, and urine testing to ascertain compliance; (4) an understanding of the psychodynamic meanings attributed to medication while positive and negative medication effects are monitored with treatment response or transference issues, and; (5) use of the N-of-1 approach to test the new medication vs previous medications using patient specific outcomes that are anticipated to change with the pharmacologic management. PMID:16459755

  10. Borderline personality disorder: a comparison between children and adults.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Carla; Romero, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Recently, more empirical studies have been devoted to the investigation of borderline personality disorder (BPD) in children and adolescents. Against this background, the purpose of the current review is to compare research findings on diagnostic-related phenomena in child and adolescent samples with those in adult samples to establish the utility of the BPD construct in childhood and adolescence. A search of relevant publications reported in Pubmed and PsycInfo from 1940 (the first clinical descriptions of BPD in childhood) to 2006 was carried out. A total of 58 studies were included. The review of the adult literature was not exhaustive but relied on excellent existing and comprehensive reviews of the adult literature carried out in the past 5 years. Although significant differences seem to exist between juveniles and adults in diagnostic-related phenomena associated with BPD, these can be explained by the principle of heterotypic continuity in development. Moreover, enough overlap between juvenile and adult BPD has been observed to warrant further empirical investigation into the construct of juvenile BPD. Specific areas for future research in juvenile BPD suggested by this review include studies of comorbidity, measure development, and the use of neurobiological measures such as functional neuroimaging. PMID:17666001

  11. Borderline Personality Disorder as a Female Phenotypic Expression of Psychopathy?

    PubMed Central

    Sprague, Jenessa; Javdani, Shabnam; Sadeh, Naomi; Newman, Joseph P.; Verona, Edelyn

    2011-01-01

    Evidence suggests that the combination of the interpersonal-affective (F1) and impulsive-antisocial (F2) features of psychopathy may be associated with borderline personality disorder (BPD), specifically among women (e.g., Coid, 1993; Hicks, Vaidyana-than, & Patrick, 2010). However, empirical research explicitly examining gendered relationships between BPD and psychopathy factors is lacking. To further inform this area of research, we investigated the hypothesis that the interplay between the two psychopathy factors is associated with BPD among women across two studies. Study 1 consisted of a college sample of 318 adults (51% women), and Study 2 consisted of a large sample of 488 female prisoners. The interpersonal-affective (F1) and impulsiveantisocial psychopathy (F2) scores, measured with self-report and clinician-rated indices, respectively, were entered as explanatory variables in regression analyses to investigate their unique contributions to BPD traits. Across two independent samples, results indicated that the interaction of high F1 and F2 psychopathy scores was associated with BPD in women. This association was found to be specific to women in Study 1. These results suggest that BPD and psychopathy, at least as they are measured by current instruments, overlap in women and, accordingly, may reflect gender-differentiated phenotypic expressions of similar dispositional vulnerabilities. PMID:22452756

  12. Anger, preoccupied attachment, and domain disorganization in borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Jennifer Q.; Hill, Jonathan; Pilkonis, Paul A.; Yaggi, Kirsten; Broyden, Nichaela; Stepp, Stephanie; Reed, Lawrence Ian; Feske, Ulrike

    2010-01-01

    Emotional dysregulation and attachment insecurity have been reported in borderline personality disorder (BPD). Domain disorganization, evidenced in poor regulation of emotions and behaviors in relation to the demands of different social domains, may be a distinguishing feature of BPD. Understanding the interplay between these factors may be critical for identifying interacting processes in BPD and potential subtypes of BPD. Therefore, we examined the joint and interactive effects of anger, preoccupied attachment, and domain disorganization on BPD traits in clinical sample of 128 psychiatric patients. The results suggest that these factors contribute to BPD both independently and in interaction, even when controlling for other personality disorder traits and Axis I symptoms. In regression analyses, the interaction between anger and domain disorganization predicted BPD traits. In recursive partitioning analyses, two possible paths to BPD were identified: high anger combined with high domain disorganization and low anger combined with preoccupied attachment. These results may suggest possible subtypes of BPD or possible mechanisms by which BPD traits are established and maintained. PMID:19538080

  13. Construct Validity of the Adolescent Borderline Personality Disorder: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Bondurant, Helen; Greenfield, Brian; Tse, Sze Man

    2004-01-01

    Introduction Although the term borderline personality disorder (BPD) is used to describe adolescents in clinical settings, there is confusion as to what it comprises. To further elucidate that diagnosis, this article reviews its construct validity. Method Relevant publications appearing in PsychInfo (1872 to present) were reviewed for the purposes of this article. Results Thirty-six of the approximately sixty-five publications selected for consideration were included in this review. Conclusion The construct validity of adolescent BPD is supported by internal consistency (comparable to that of adults), group differences (ie this diagnosis segregates BPD from non-BPD adolescents), convergent validity (ie multiple measures of this disorder measure the same pathology) and concurrent validity, whereby these youth manifest functional impairment and distress. By contrast, the adolescent BPD criteria manifest less construct validity than the adult diagnosis in that its criteria did not uniformly predict the overall diagnosis, and showed more criterion overlap with other personality disorders and a broader pattern of axis II comorbidity. Further diminishing its construct validity, factor analysis suggested that adolescent BPD was not a single entity, and its low predictive validity was demonstrated by little diagnostic stability through adolescence into adulthood. PMID:19030500

  14. Sleep disturbances and circadian CLOCK genes in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Monika; Schäfer, Michael; Coogan, Andrew; Häßler, Frank; Thome, Johannes

    2012-10-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterised by a deep-reaching pattern of affective instability, incoherent identity, self-injury, suicide attempts, and disturbed interpersonal relations and lifestyle. The daily activities of BPD patients are often chaotic and disorganized, with patients often staying up late while sleeping during the day. These behavioural patterns suggest that altered circadian rhythms may be associated with BPD. Furthermore, BPD patients frequently report suffering from sleep disturbances. In this review, we overview the evidence that circadian rhythms and sleep are disturbed in BPD, and we explore the possibility that personality traits that are pertinent for BPD may be associated with circadian typology, and perhaps to circadian genotypes. With regards to sleep architecture, we review the evidence that BPD patients display altered non-REM and REM sleep. A possible cue to a deeper understanding of this temporal dysregulation might be an analysis of the circadian clock at the molecular and cellular level, as well as behavioural studies using actigraphy and we suggest avenues for further exploration of these factors. PMID:22806005

  15. Psychic skin: psychotic defences, borderline process and delusions.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Martin

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, I apply the concept of psychic skin to analytic work with people suffering from personality disorders and psychoses. When psychoses emerge, the defensive skin which protects the ego is breached and violent unconscious forces rip through the personality. Some of the patients diagnosed as schizophrenic with whom I work have identified with archetypal characters such as Christ, Satan, John Lennon and the Queen. I attempt to show how the adoption of these inflated personas can serve as secondary psychic skins. Such delusional identifications can provide a protective shield to hide the denuded self and prevent intrusion from the external world. Through clinical example, I try to demonstrate how these archetypal 'second skins' can preserve life until internal and external conditions make it possible for the self to emerge. I contrast such psychotic identifications with 'thin-skinned' and 'thick-skinned' narcissism as well as 'defences of the self' in borderline states where the psychic skin may be damaged but does not disintegrate. I also look at the ways in which Jung's own personal experience was different from this and how he managed to avert psychotic breakdown. PMID:22288539

  16. Brain structure and function in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Aisling; Frodl, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    The spotlight on borderline personality disorder (BPD) has been growing in recent years, with the number of papers discussing potential causes and triggers of the disorder rapidly on the increase. Also on the increase, though still lacking sufficient numbers to produce well-supported hypotheses, are studies employing neuroimaging techniques as investigative tools in BPD. In this review, we investigate the current state and findings of neuroimaging studies in BPD, focusing in particular, on the studies examining structural, functional, and neurometabolic abnormalities in the disorder. Some suspected trends in the data are highlighted, including reductions in the hippocampi and amygdalae of BPD patients compared to healthy controls, exaggerated amygdala activity in BPD patients when confronted with emotion-related stimulus, and negative correlations between increases in left amygdalar creatine and reductions in amygdalar volume, reductions in absolute N-acetylaspartate concentration in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of BPD patients, and increases in glutamate concentration in the anterior cingulate cortices of BPD patients. We also discuss the limitations of some of the current studies including hindrances due to sample effects and techniques used and the potential of future neuroimaging research in BPD. PMID:22252376

  17. Volume of hippocampal substructures in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Kreisel, Stefan Henner; Labudda, Kirsten; Kurlandchikov, Oleg; Beblo, Thomas; Mertens, Markus; Thomas, Christine; Rullkötter, Nina; Wingenfeld, Katja; Mensebach, Christoph; Woermann, Friedrich G; Driessen, Martin

    2015-03-30

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) may be associated with smaller hippocampi in comparison to hippocampal size in controls. However, specific pathology in hippocampal substructures (i.e., head, body and tail) has not been sufficiently investigated. To address hippocampal structure in greater detail, we studied 39 psychiatric inpatients and outpatients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of BPD and 39 healthy controls. The hippocampus and its substructures were segmented manually on magnetic resonance imaging scans. The volumes of hippocampal substructures (and total hippocampal volume) did not differ between BPD patients and controls. Exploratory analysis suggests that patients with a lifetime history of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may have a significantly smaller hippocampus - affecting both the hippocampal head and body - in comparison to BPD patients without comorbid PTSD (difference in total hippocampal volume: -10.5%, 95%CI -2.6 to -18.5, significant). Also, patients fulfilling seven or more DSM-IV BPD criteria showed a hippocampal volume reduction, limited to the hippocampal head (difference in volume of the hippocampal head: -16.5%, 95%CI -6.1 to -26.8, significant). Disease heterogeneity in respect to, for example, symptom severity and psychiatric comorbidities may limit direct comparability between studies; the results presented here may reflect hippocampal volumes in patients who are "less" affected or they may simply be a chance finding. However, there is also the possibility that global effects of BPD on the hippocampus may have previously been overestimated. PMID:25624067

  18. Borderline Personality Disorder in the Emergency Department: Good Psychiatric Management.

    PubMed

    Hong, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) are high utilizers of psychiatric emergency services and present unique challenges in that setting. Frequently advised to visit an emergency department (ED) if safety is in question, their experiences once there often do not have beneficial effects. Issues specific to patients with BPD in the ED include volatile interactions with staff, repeat visits, concerns about safety (and liability), and disposition. Emergency department staff attitudes toward these patients are frequently negative when compared to patients with other diagnoses, and can detrimentally affect outcomes and perpetuate stigma regarding BPD. These attitudes are often due to lack of education and training about how to understand, approach, and treat the patient with BPD. The limited literature regarding the treatment of BPD in the ED offers few guidelines. This article presents an approach based on Good Psychiatric Management that can reduce negative reactions by ED staff and make ED visits more effective and less harmful. Relevant principles include psychoeducation, the reinforcement of the connection between symptoms and interpersonal stressors, and employment of an active, authentic therapeutic stance. Training ED staff in these principles could lead to attitudinal changes, reduced stigma, and potentially improved outcomes. PMID:27603743

  19. Personality Profile of Women Affected with Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Nasiri, Hamid; Abedi, Ahmad; Ebrahimi, Amrollah; Ameli, Sedigheh Sadr; Samouei, Rahele

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The main objective of the present study is to review the psychological profile of female patients with borderline personality disorder in the women referring to the Centers of Counseling and Psychological Services at Isfahan city based on MMPI-2 test and comparing them with ordinary women. Method: The present study is of the type of cause-comparative and the selection of examinees was done in form of random sampling with 50 women with the BPD and 50 ordinary women and through confirmation of test recognition of MCMI-III and clinical interviews. In addition, 370 questions of MMPI-2 have also been implemented. Results: The results of this research showed a significant difference in validity of scales and the clinical scales of MMPI-2 test among women with BPD and regular women. The results of MANOVA test with the power of valuable test confirmed the existing differences. Conclusion: The obtained results shows that female patients with BPD has a specific and different psychological profile as compared with ordinary (regular) women and the obtained profile can be used in recognition and forecasting any disorder. PMID:23687463

  20. Maternal Borderline Personality Disorder Symptoms and Parenting of Adolescent Daughters

    PubMed Central

    Zalewski, Maureen; Stepp, Stephanie D.; Scott, Lori N.; Whalen, Diana J.; Beeney, Joseph F.; Hipwell, Alison E.

    2014-01-01

    Maternal borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms are associated with poorer parenting. However, most studies conducted are with young children. In the current study, the authors examined associations between maternal BPD symptoms and parenting in an urban community sample of 15- to 17-year-old girls (n = 1,598) and their biological mothers. Additionally, the authors tested the impact of adolescent temperament on these associations. Mothers reported on their own psychopathology and their daughters' temperament. Adolescent girls reported on mothers' parenting methods in terms of psychological and behavioral control. Results demonstrated that maternal BPD symptoms were associated with aspects of psychological and behavioral control, even after controlling for maternal depression and alcohol use severity. After examining specific BPD components that may account for these associations, the authors found that affective/behavioral dysregulation, but not interpersonal dysregulation or identity disturbance, uniquely accounted for parenting. Adolescent temperament did not moderate these associations. BPD symptoms, particularly affective/behavioral dysregulation, are important targets when conducting parenting interventions. PMID:24689767

  1. The diagnostic value of frozen section for borderline ovarian tumours.

    PubMed

    Bozdag, Halenur; Guzin, Kadir; Gocmen, Ahmet; Kabaca, Sedef; Usta, Akın; Akdeniz Duran, Esra

    2016-07-01

    Borderline ovarian tumours (BOTs) are characterised histologically by a low degree of cellular proliferation and nuclear atypia in the absence of infiltrative growth or stromal invasion. Surgical treatment has been a crucial component of BOT therapy. Surgical decisions are established intraoperatively via the frozen section. We evaluated the accuracy of frozen section diagnosis. The rate of correct diagnosis, underdiagnosis and overdiagnosis of BOTs with frozen sections was 78%, 17% and 5%, respectively. The sensitivity and positive predictive values for the diagnosis of BOTs with frozen sections were 82.3% and 93.3%, respectively. The positive likelihood ratio was 0.82 (95% CI: 0.85-0.96). The histological classification of BOTs had a significant effect on the accuracy of diagnosis (p = 0.001). Frozen section diagnosis is not suitable to be considered as the gold standard for a definitive diagnosis. Clinicians should be aware that using frozen sections is insufficient for the accurate staging of BOTs. PMID:26790979

  2. Social perspective coordination in youth with borderline personality pathology.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Tarni C; Hulbert, Carol A; Jackson, Henry J; Chanen, Andrew M

    2012-02-01

    This study investigated social perspective coordination (SPC) in youth (15-24-year-olds) with first-presentation borderline personality disorder (BPD). SPC is defined as the capacity to differentiate and integrate the perspective of the self with the perspectives of others (Selman, Beardslee, Schultz, Krupa, & Podorefsky, 1986). Two groups: patients with full or sub-syndromal BPD (n = 30) and patients with major depressive disorder (MDD; n = 30) completed measures of SPC derived from the interpersonal negotiation strategies (INS) model (Selman et al., 1986). Compared with the MDD group, the BPD group responded to all vignettes with significantly lower SPC scores and SPC was a significant predictor of BPD status over and above self-reported, personality factors (Neuroticism and Agreeableness), attachment disturbance and functional impairment. These findings suggest that disturbances in social cognition are an important characteristic of individuals with BPD pathology. These difficulties extended beyond attachment contexts and were not limited to situations involving BPD-related themes of abandonment, deprivations or mistrust/abuse. PMID:22369170

  3. Aggression in borderline personality disorder: A multidimensional model.

    PubMed

    Mancke, Falk; Herpertz, Sabine C; Bertsch, Katja

    2015-07-01

    This article proposes a multidimensional model of aggression in borderline personality disorder (BPD) from the perspective of the biobehavioral dimensions of affective dysregulation, impulsivity, threat hypersensitivity, and empathic functioning. It summarizes data from studies that investigated these biobehavioral dimensions using self-reports, behavioral tasks, neuroimaging, neurochemistry as well as psychophysiology, and identifies the following alterations: (a) affective dysregulation associated with prefrontal-limbic imbalance, enhanced heart rate reactivity, skin conductance, and startle response; (b) impulsivity also associated with prefrontal-limbic imbalance, central serotonergic dysfunction, more electroencephalographic slow wave activity, and reduced P300 amplitude in a 2-tone discrimination task; (c) threat hypersensitivity associated with enhanced perception of anger in ambiguous facial expressions, greater speed and number of reflexive eye movements to angry eyes (shown to be compensated by exogenous oxytocin), enhanced P100 amplitude in response to blends of happy versus angry facial expressions, and prefrontal-limbic imbalance; (d) reduced cognitive empathy associated with reduced activity in the superior temporal sulcus/gyrus and preliminary findings of lower oxytocinergic and higher vasopressinergic activity; and (e) reduced self-other differentiation associated with greater emotional simulation and hyperactivation of the somatosensory cortex. These biobehavioral dimensions can be nicely linked to conceptual terms of the alternative Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5) model of BPD, and thus to a multidimensional rather than a traditional categorical approach. PMID:26191822

  4. Facial expression of emotions in borderline personality disorder and depression.

    PubMed

    Renneberg, Babette; Heyn, Katrin; Gebhard, Rita; Bachmann, Silke

    2005-09-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by marked problems in interpersonal relationships and emotion regulation. The assumption of emotional hyper-reactivity in BPD is tested regarding the facial expression of emotions, an aspect highly relevant for communication processes and a central feature of emotion regulation. Facial expressions of emotions are examined in a group of 30 female inpatients with BPD, 27 women with major depression and 30 non-patient female controls. Participants were videotaped while watching two short movie sequences, inducing either positive or negative emotions. Frequency of emotional facial expressions and intensity of happiness expressions were examined, using the Emotional Facial Action Coding System (EMFACS-7, Friesen & Ekman, EMFACS-7: Emotional Facial Action Coding System, Version 7. Unpublished manual, 1984). Group differences were analyzed for the negative and the positive mood-induction procedure separately. Results indicate that BPD patients reacted similar to depressed patients with reduced facial expressiveness to both films. The highest emotional facial activity to both films and most intense happiness expressions were displayed by the non-clinical control group. Current findings contradict the assumption of a general hyper-reactivity to emotional stimuli in patients with BPD. PMID:15950175

  5. Comorbid antisocial and borderline personality disorders: mentalization-based treatment.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Anthony; Fonagy, Peter

    2008-02-01

    Mentalization is the process by which we implicitly and explicitly interpret the actions of ourselves and others as meaningful based on intentional mental states (e.g., desires, needs, feelings, beliefs, and reasons). This process is disrupted in individuals with comorbid antisocial (ASPD) and borderline personality disorder (BPD), who tend to misinterpret others' motives. Antisocial characteristics stabilize mentalizing by rigidifying relationships within prementalistic ways of functioning. However, loss of flexibility makes the person vulnerable to sudden collapse when the schematic representation is challenged. This exposes feelings of humiliation, which can only be avoided by violence and control of the other person. The common path to violence is via a momentary inhibition of the capacity for mentalization. In this article, the authors outline their current understanding of mentalizing and its relation to antisocial characteristics and violence. This is illustrated by a clinical account of mentalization-based treatment adapted for antisocial personality disorder. Treatment combines group and individual therapy. The focus is on helping patients maintain mentalizing about their own mental states when their personal integrity is challenged. A patient with ASPD does not have mental pain associated with another's state of mind; thus, to generate conflict in ASPD by thinking about the victim will typically be ineffective in inducing behavior change. PMID:18186112

  6. [Comorbid antisocial and borderline personality disorders: mentalization-based treatment].

    PubMed

    Bateman, Anthony; Fonagy, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Mentalization is the process by which we implicitly and explicitly interpret the actions of ourselves and others as meaningful based on intentional mental states (e.g., desires, needs, feelings, beliefs, and reasons). This process is disrupted in individuals with comorbid antisocial (ASPD) and borderline personality disorder (BPD), who tend to misinterpret others' motives. Antisocial characteristics stabilize mentalizing by rigidifying relationships within prementalistic ways of functioning. However, loss of flexibility makes the person vulnerable to sudden collapse when the schematic representation is challenged. This exposes feelings of humiliation, which can only be avoided by violence and control of the other person. The common path to violence is via a momentary inhibition of the capacity for mentalization. In this article, the authors outline their current understanding of mentalizing and its relation to antisocial characteristics and violence. This is illustrated by a clinical account of mentalization-based treatment adapted for antisocial personality disorder. Treatment combines group and individual therapy. The focus is on helping patients maintain mentalizing about their own mental states when their personal integrity is challenged. A patient with ASPD does not have mental pain associated with another's state of mind; thus, to generate conflict in ASPD by thinking about the victim will typically be ineffective in inducing behavior change. PMID:20795523

  7. Functional Connectivity of Pain-Mediated Affect Regulation in Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Niedtfeld, Inga; Kirsch, Peter; Schulze, Lars; Herpertz, Sabine C.; Bohus, Martin; Schmahl, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Affective instability and self-injurious behavior are important features of Borderline Personality Disorder. Whereas affective instability may be caused by a pattern of limbic hyperreactivity paired with dysfunctional prefrontal regulation mechanisms, painful stimulation was found to reduce affective arousal at the neural level, possibly underlying the soothing effect of pain in BPD. We used psychophysiological interactions to analyze functional connectivity of (para-) limbic brain structures (i.e. amygdala, insula, anterior cingulate cortex) in Borderline Personality Disorder in response to painful stimulation. Therefore, we re-analyzed a dataset from 20 patients with Borderline Personality Disorder and 23 healthy controls who took part in an fMRI-task inducing negative (versus neutral) affect and subsequently applying heat pain (versus warmth perception). Results suggest an enhanced negative coupling between limbic as well as paralimbic regions and prefrontal regions, specifically with the medial and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, when patients experienced pain in addition to emotional arousing pictures. When neutral pictures were combined with painful heat sensation, we found positive connectivity in Borderline Personality Disorder between (para-)limbic brain areas and parts of the basal ganglia (lentiform nucleus, putamen), as well areas involved in self-referential processing (precuneus and posterior cingulate). We found further evidence for alterations in the emotion regulation process in Borderline Personality Disorder, in the way that pain improves the inhibition of limbic activity by prefrontal areas. This study provides new insights in pain processing in BPD, including enhanced coupling of limbic structures and basal ganglia. PMID:22428013

  8. Frequency of mutations and polymorphisms in borderline ovarian tumors of known cancer genes.

    PubMed

    Stemke-Hale, Katherine; Shipman, Kristy; Kitsou-Mylona, Isidora; de Castro, David G; Hird, Vicky; Brown, Robert; Flanagan, James; Gabra, Hani; Mills, Gordon B; Agarwal, Roshan; El-Bahrawy, Mona

    2013-04-01

    Borderline ovarian tumors represent an understudied subset of ovarian tumors. Most studies investigating aberrations in borderline tumors have focused on KRAS/BRAF mutations. In this study, we conducted an extensive analysis of mutations and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in borderline ovarian tumors. Using the Sequenom MassArray platform, we investigated 160 mutations/polymorphisms in 33 genes involved in cell signaling, apoptosis, angiogenesis, cell cycle regulation and cellular senescence. Of 52 tumors analyzed, 33 were serous, 18 mucinous and 1 endometrioid. KRAS c.35G>A p.Gly12Asp mutations were detected in eight tumors (six serous and two mucinous), BRAF V600E mutations in two serous tumors, and PIK3CA H1047Y and PIK3CA E542K mutations in a serous and an endometrioid BOT, respectively. CTNNB1 mutation was detected in a serous tumor. Potentially functional polymorphisms were found in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), ABCB1, FGFR2 and PHLPP2. VEGF polymorphisms were the most common and detected at four loci. PHLPP2 polymorphisms were more frequent in mucinous as compared with serous tumors (P=0.04), with allelic imbalance in one case. This study represents the largest and most comprehensive analysis of mutations and functional SNPs in borderline ovarian tumors to date. At least 25% of borderline ovarian tumors harbor somatic mutations associated with potential response to targeted therapeutics. PMID:23174937

  9. Frequency of mutations and polymorphisms in borderline ovarian tumors of known cancer genes

    PubMed Central

    Stemke-Hale, Katherine; Shipman, Kristy; Kitsou-Mylona, Isidora; de Castro, David Gonzalez; Hird, Vicky; Brown, Robert; Flanagan, James; Hani Gabra, H; Mills, Gordon B.; Agarwal, R; El-Bahrawy, Mona

    2013-01-01

    Borderline ovarian tumors represent an understudied subset of ovarian tumors. Most studies investigating aberrations in borderline tumors have focused on KRAS/BRAF mutations. In this study we conducted an extensive analysis of mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms in borderline ovarian tumors. Using the Sequenom MassARRAY platform we investigated 160 mutations/polymorphisms in 33 genes involved in cell signalling, apoptosis, angiogenesis, cell cycle regulation, and cellular senescence. Of 52 tumors analysed, 33 were serous, 18 mucinous and 1 endometrioid. KRAS c.35G>A p.Gly12Asp mutations were detected in 8 tumors (6 serous and 2 mucinous), BRAF V600E mutations in 2 serous tumors, and PIK3CA H1047Y and PIK3CA E542K mutations in a serous and an endometrioid BOT respectively. CTNNB1 mutation was detected in a serous tumor. Potentially functional polymorphisms were found in VEGF, ABCB1, FGFR2 and PHLPP2. VEGF polymorphisms were the most common and detected at 4 loci. PHLPP2 polymorphisms were more frequent in mucinous as compared to serous tumors (p=0.04), with allelic imbalance in one case. This study represents the largest and most comprehensive analysis of mutations and functional single nucleotide polymorphisms in borderline ovarian tumors to date. At least 25% of borderline ovarian tumors harbour somatic mutations associated with potential response to targeted therapeutics. PMID:23174937

  10. Extending Extant Models of the Pathogenesis of Borderline Personality Disorder to Childhood Borderline Personality Symptoms: The Roles of Affective Dysfunction, Disinhibition, and Self-and Emotion-Regulation Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Gratz, Kim L.; Tull, Matthew T.; Reynolds, Elizabeth K.; Bagge, Courtney L.; Latzman, Robert D.; Daughters, Stacey B.; Lejuez, C. W.

    2010-01-01

    Although research has been conducted on the course, consequences, and correlates of borderline personality disorder (BPD), little is known about its emergence in childhood, and no studies have examined the extent to which theoretical models of the pathogenesis of BPD in adults are applicable to the correlates of borderline personality symptoms in children. The goal of this study was to examine the interrelationships between two BPD-relevant personality traits (affective dysfunction and disinhibition), self- and emotion regulation deficits, and childhood borderline personality symptoms among 263 children aged 9 to 13. We predicted that affective dysfunction, disinhibition, and their interaction would be associated with childhood borderline personality symptoms, and that self- and emotion-regulation deficits would mediate these relationships. Results provided support for the roles of both affective dysfunction and disinhibition (in the form of sensation seeking) in childhood borderline personality symptoms, as well as their hypothesized interaction. Further, both self- and emotion-regulation deficits partially mediated the relationship between affective dysfunction and childhood borderline personality symptoms. Finally, results provided evidence of different gender-based pathways to childhood borderline personality symptoms, suggesting that models of BPD among adults are more relevant to understanding the factors associated with borderline personality symptoms among girls than boys. PMID:19825268

  11. [Skills Training for Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder].

    PubMed

    Armbrust, Michael; Ehrig, Christian

    2016-07-01

    The emotionally instable personality disorder, mostly called borderline disorder, shows central abnormalities in impulse control as well as instability of mood and identity. It is composed of behaviour problems in creating relationships and in self-management, first of all by high psychophysiological tension. The prevalence of this disorder is 10 % in outpatients and 20 % in inpatients and has therefore high relevance for the medical-psychotherapeutic care system. The treatment is deemed to be complex and interminable. Regarding all evaluated techniques of treatment the best examined is the Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT). This specific therapy, developed in the eighties by Marsha M. Linehan, can be used for inpatient and outpatient treatment and combines single and group sessions. It is essential in mental health care of this disorder, but not available everywhere. Essential part of DBT is the skill training, a specific technique for the acquirement and for exercising skills for mindfulness, modulation of tension, regulation of emotions, structuring of social competence and developing self value. The central goal of DBT is to ensure the survival of the patients, to reduce self- and external aggressive behaviour and to provide inpatient crisis interventions. For sustained crisis management skills for reality acceptance are best fitting. But before, fast available sensory and active body-related skills should be used. Radical acceptance is the most important, since most effective, skill. The skills training, although in use for only twenty years, is permanently expanding in practice and is meanwhile also used for other disorders such as, for example, PTSD or ADHD. Since 2010, there also exists an elaborated DBT-version for adolescents. For medical care politics and health-economic reasons a supply with skills training for in- and outpatients all over the country is desirable. PMID:27388871

  12. Emotional lability and affective synchrony in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Schoenleber, Michelle; Berghoff, Christopher R; Tull, Matthew T; DiLillo, David; Messman-Moore, Terri; Gratz, Kim L

    2016-07-01

    Extant research on emotional lability in borderline personality disorder (BPD) has focused almost exclusively on lability of individual emotions or emotion types, with limited research considering how different types of emotions shift together over time. Thus, this study examined the temporal dynamics of emotion in BPD at the level of both individual emotions (i.e., self-conscious emotions [SCE], anger, and anxiety) and mixed emotions (i.e., synchrony between emotions). One hundred forty-four women from the community completed a diagnostic interview and laboratory study involving 5 emotion induction tasks (each of which was preceded and followed by a 5-min resting period or neutral task). State ratings of SCE, anger, and anxiety were provided at 14 time points (before and after each laboratory task and resting period). Hierarchical linear modeling results indicate that women with BPD reported greater mean levels of SCE and Anxiety (but not Anger), and greater lability of Anxiety. Women with BPD also exhibited greater variability in lability of all 3 emotions (suggestive of within-group differences in the relevance of lability to BPD). Results also revealed synchrony (i.e., positive relations) between each possible pair of emotions, regardless of BPD status. Follow-up regression analyses suggest the importance of accounting for lability when examining the role of synchrony in BPD, as the relation of SCE-Anger synchrony to BPD symptom severity was moderated by Anger and SCE lability. Specifically, synchronous changes in SCE and Anger were associated with greater BPD symptom severity when large shifts in SCE were paired with minor shifts in Anger. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27362623

  13. Confidence in facial emotion recognition in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Thome, Janine; Liebke, Lisa; Bungert, Melanie; Schmahl, Christian; Domes, Gregor; Bohus, Martin; Lis, Stefanie

    2016-04-01

    Dysfunctions of social-cognitive processes such as the recognition of emotions have been discussed to contribute to the severe impairments of interpersonal functioning in borderline personality disorder (BPD). By investigating how patients with BPD experience the intensity of different emotions in a facial expression and how confident they are in their own judgments, the current study aimed at identifying subtle alterations of emotion processing in BPD. Female patients with BPD (N = 36) and 36 healthy controls were presented with faces that displayed low-intense anger and happiness or ambiguous expressions of anger and happiness blends. Subjects were asked to rate (a) the intensity of anger and happiness in each facial expression and (b) their confidence in their judgments. Patients with BPD rated the intensity of happiness in happy faces lower than did controls, but did not differ in regard to the assessment of angry or ambiguous facial stimuli or the rating of anger. They reported lower confidence in their judgments, which was particularly pronounced for the assessment of happy facial expressions. The reduced rating of happiness was linked to higher state anger, whereas the reduced confidence in the assessment of happy faces was related to stronger feelings of loneliness and the expectation of social rejection. Our findings suggest alterations in the processing of positive social stimuli that affect both the experience of the emotional intensity and the confidence subjects experience during their assessment. The link to loneliness and social rejection sensitivity points to the necessity to target these alterations in psychotherapeutical interventions. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26389624

  14. Familial aggregation of candidate phenotypes for borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Ruocco, Anthony C; Hudson, James I; Zanarini, Mary C; Gunderson, John G

    2015-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) and its core Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) factor-analytically derived phenotypes aggregate in families. To potentially inform future conceptualizations of BPD, this study examined the familial aggregation and co-aggregation with BPD of 3 additional candidate phenotypes for BPD psychopathology: anxiousness, aggressiveness, and cognitive dysregulation. Participants included 347 probands (126 with BPD, 128 without BPD, and 93 with major depressive disorder) and 814 parents and siblings of probands. All participants completed diagnostic assessments and scales assessing the candidate phenotypes. The familial aggregation of phenotypes (correlation of level of phenotype between family members), the familial co-aggregation of phenotypes with BPD (correlation of phenotype with BPD between family members), and the within-individual correlation of phenotypes with BPD were assessed. All 3 candidate phenotypes showed high levels of familial aggregation (rs = .14 - .53, ps < .001), the magnitudes of which were comparable with DSM-based core sectors of psychopathology. Anxiousness and cognitive dysregulation showed strong within-individual associations with BPD (rs = .55 and .46, respectively; ps < .001) and substantial familial co-aggregation with BPD (rs = .12 and .13, respectively; ps ≤ .002). In contrast, aggressiveness showed a weak within-individual association with BPD (r = .11, p = .12) and little familial co-aggregation with BPD (r = .05, p = .21). These findings suggest that anxiousness and cognitive dysregulation are promising phenotypes for BPD psychopathology that move beyond factor-analytically based conceptualizations. In contrast, aggressiveness was only weakly related to BPD, suggesting that this phenotype may not represent an essential feature of this disorder. PMID:25046574

  15. Interpretation bias in Cluster-C and borderline personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Arntz, Arnoud; Weertman, Anoek; Salet, Sjoerd

    2011-08-01

    Cognitive therapy (CT) assumes that personality disorders (PDs) are characterized by interpretational biases that maintain the disorder. Changing interpretations is therefore a major aim of CT of PDs. This study tested whether Borderline PD (BPD), Avoidant and Dependent PD (AV/DEPD), and Obsessive-Compulsive PD (OCPD) are characterized by specific interpretations. Among the 122 participants there were 55 PD patients (17 BPD, 30 AV/DEPD, 29 OCPD diagnoses), 26 axis-1 patients, and 41 nonpatients. Participants put themselves into 10 scripts of negative events and noted feelings, thoughts and behaviors that came to mind. Next, they chose between hypothesized BPD-specific, AV/DEPD-specific, and OCPD-specific interpretations of each event (forced choice). Lastly, participants rated belief in each interpretation. Regression analyses revealed that forced choices and belief ratings supported the CT-model of BPD and AV/DEP: interpretations were specific. The alleged OCPD-beliefs were however not specifically related to OCPD, with relatively high popularity in axis-1 patients and nonpatients. The open responses were classified by judges blind for diagnoses, with the following results. BPD was characterized by low levels of solution-focused and healthy-flexible/accepting responses, and higher levels of criticizing others and malevolent interpretations of others. AV/DEPD was characterized by lower levels of solution-focused responses, and higher levels of self-criticism, negative emotions, guilt and fear of judgment, as well as lower levels of other-criticism. OCPD only showed trends for lower healthy responses, and higher compulsiveness and worry. It is concluded that the assumptions of CT are supported for BPD and AV/DEPD, but not - at least not on the explicit interpretational level - for OCPD. CT of OCPD might need a slightly different approach. PMID:21621746

  16. The 'Self' and Borderline Personality Disorder: Conceptual and Clinical Considerations.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Ian B; Finlayson-Short, Laura; McCutcheon, Louise K; Beard, Hilary; Chanen, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    Some concept of self has been used by many, although not all, researchers and clinicians as an 'organising construct' for borderline personality disorder (BPD). There is considerable variation in this usage and how clearly researchers have defined the self. Given this diversity, and that 'self' is often used interchangeably with parallel concepts (e.g., psyche, brain-mind, 'person') or with features of self (e.g., self-awareness, identity), unqualified use of the term is problematic. This is further complicated by the heterogeneity and 'comorbidity' of BPD and the limitations of syndromally based psychiatric nosology. Still, BPD remains in current classification systems and can be reliably diagnosed. A considerable body of research on self and BPD has accrued, including a recent profusion and confluence of neuroscientific and sociopsychological findings. These have generated supporting evidence for a supra-ordinate, functionally constituted entity of the self ranging over multiple, interacting levels from an unconscious, 'core' self, through to a reflective, phenotypic, 'idiographic' and relational self constituted by interpersonal and sociocultural experience. Important insights have been generated regarding emotional and social-cognitive dysregulation, disorder of self-awareness, relationality, identity, and coherence and continuity of the self. Many of these are shared by various trauma-related, dissociative disorders. A construct of the self could be useful as an explanatory principle in BPD, which could be construed as a 'self-state' (and relational) disorder, as opposed to a less severe disorder of aspects of the self (e.g., mood or memory). We offer a tentative description of 'Self' in this context, noting that any such construct will require a clear definition and to be evaluable. PMID:26346462

  17. Bullied by Peers in Childhood and Borderline Personality Symptoms at 11-Years of Age: A Prospective Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolke, Dieter; Schreier, Andrea; Zanarini, Mary C.; Winsper, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Background: Abuse by adults has been reported as a potent predictor of borderline personality disorder (BPD). Unclear is whether victimisation by peers increases the risk of borderline personality symptoms. Method: The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) prospective, longitudinal observation study of 6050 mothers and their…

  18. Exploring the Association between Emotional Abuse and Childhood Borderline Personality Features: The Moderating Role of Personality Traits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gratz, Kim L.; Latzman, Robert D.; Tull, Matthew T.; Reynolds, Elizabeth K.; Lejuez, C. W.

    2011-01-01

    Most of the extant literature on borderline personality disorder has focused on the course, consequences, and correlates of this disorder among adults. However, little is known about childhood borderline personality (BP) features, or the factors associated with the emergence of BP pathology in childhood. A greater understanding of childhood BP…

  19. Diagnosing Borderline Personality Disorder: Examination of How Clinical Indicators Are Used by Professionals in the Health Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treloar, Amanda Jane Commons; Lewis, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the history of the recognition of borderline personality disorder as a clinical disorder, followed by a review of the contemporary practice of diagnosing borderline personality disorder in psychiatric settings. Many researchers have cautioned against the conflation of difficult patients with the diagnostic category of borderline…

  20. Borderline Personality Features and Implicit Shame-Prone Self-Concept in Middle Childhood and Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawes, David J.; Helyer, Rebekah; Herlianto, Eugene C.; Willing, Jonah

    2013-01-01

    This study tested if children and adolescents with high levels of borderline personality features (BPF) exhibit the same shame-prone self-concept previously found to characterize adults with borderline personality disorder (Rusch et al., 2007). Self-concept was indexed using the Implicit Association Test, in a community sample of…

  1. Borderline personality features and instability of daily negative affect and self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Tolpin, Laura Hochschild; Gunthert, Kathleen Cimbolic; Cohen, Lawrence H; O'Neill, Suzanne C

    2004-02-01

    We used a daily process design and multilevel modeling to examine the role of borderline personality features in the day-to-day stability of college students' negative affect and self-esteem and their reactivity to interpersonal stressors. At the end of each day for two weeks, students completed a checklist of daily stressors and measures of state affect and self-esteem. We predicted that high scores on a measure of borderline features would be related to more daily interpersonal stressors, greater negative affective and self-esteem reactivity to these stressors, and less day-to-day carryover of negative mood and self-esteem. The first and third hypotheses were supported, but not the second. The findings demonstrate the utility of a daily process methodology and multilevel modeling to study the day-to-day functioning of individuals with borderline features. PMID:14686886

  2. [The main directions of research on the causes conditioning the occurrence of the borderline personality disorders].

    PubMed

    Ogłodek, Ewa; Araszkiewicz, Aleksander

    2011-10-01

    Currently, there are two main directions of explaining the occurrence of the borderline personality disorders (BPD). The first of them attempts to explain them upon the constitutional basis, finding the causes in the genetic conditioning, biological and organic factors. The other one underline a role of the psychological developmental categories. A significant role is ascribed to traumatic childhood mental experiences such as: harassment and sexual abuse, as well as neglect of emotional and developmental needs of a child. About 40-71% of the infirm with the borderline personality admits to have been sexually abused. It was observed that there is a connection between the extent of sexual abuse of an individual in childhood and the intensification of the disorders proper for the borderline personality. One should, however, point out that sexual abuse, although they are regarded as a risk factor, are not seen as specific to the infirm with the borderline personality disorders. Moreover, there is a third direction referred to in the literature, seeking the causes of the occurrence of the borderline personality in a significant influence of social-cultural and environment factors. It was noticed that there is a significant correlation between the social situation and the degree of dissemination of those disorders. The borderline personality disorders are more frequent among the people of the low social status background and with relatively low level of education. More and more frequently, theorists and clinical personnel adhere to the view that the development of that disorder is caused by a combination of neurobiological and social factors, together with the pathological qualities of early-childhood development. PMID:22097186

  3. Effect of maternal autonomy and relatedness and borderline personality disorder on adolescent symptomatology.

    PubMed

    Frankel-Waldheter, Miriam; Macfie, Jenny; Strimpfel, Jennifer M; Watkins, Christopher D

    2015-04-01

    Several theories propose a relationship between deficits in autonomy and relatedness and the development of borderline personality disorder (BPD). Empirical work supports relationships between maternal BPD and adolescent symptomatology, as well as between maternal autonomy and relatedness and adolescent symptomatology. However, no study has examined how individuals with BPD differ from normative comparisons on autonomy and relatedness, or whether mothers' BPD mediates the relationship between their autonomy and relatedness and their adolescents' symptomatology. We sampled 28 mothers with BPD and their adolescents aged 14-17 years, as well as 28 normative comparisons matched on demographic variables. We assessed BPD as a categorical diagnosis and along a continuum of self-reported borderline features. In a videotaped problem-solving interaction, controlling for current major depressive disorder, mothers with BPD were less likely to promote and more likely to inhibit relatedness, and they were marginally more likely to inhibit but equally likely to promote autonomy with their adolescents. Mothers' total borderline features mediated the relationship between mothers' promotion of autonomy plus relatedness and adolescent internalizing and externalizing symptoms (anxious depression, withdrawn depression, somatic problems, rule breaking, and aggression) and adolescent borderline features (affective instability and self-harm). Mothers' total borderline features also mediated the relationship between mothers' inhibition of autonomy plus relatedness and adolescent internalizing and externalizing symptoms (anxious depression, withdrawn depression, somatic problems, and aggression but not rule breaking) and adolescent borderline features (affective instability and self-harm). We discuss findings in terms of light shed on BPD and the effect of maternal BPD on adolescent development. PMID:25867839

  4. Borderline personality characteristics and treatment outcome in cognitive-behavioral treatments for PTSD in female rape victims.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Stephanie B; Rizvi, Shireen L; Resick, Patricia A

    2008-03-01

    Many studies report that comorbid borderline personality pathology is associated with poorer outcomes in the treatment of Axis I disorders. Given the high rates of comorbidity between borderline personality pathology and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), it is essential to determine whether borderline symptomatology affects PTSD treatment outcome. This study examined the effects of borderline personality characteristics (BPC) on 131 female rape victims receiving cognitive-behavioral treatment for PTSD. Higher BPC scores were associated with greater pretreatment PTSD severity; however, individuals with higher levels of BPC were just as likely to complete treatment and also as likely to show significant treatment response on several outcome measures. There were no significant interactions between type of treatment and BPC on the outcome variables. Findings suggest that women with borderline pathology may be able to benefit significantly from cognitive-behavioral treatment for PTSD. PMID:18328872

  5. The course of marriage/sustained cohabitation and parenthood among borderline patients followed prospectively for 16 years.

    PubMed

    Zanarini, Mary C; Frankenburg, Frances R; Reich, D Bradford; Wedig, Michelle M; Conkey, Lindsey C; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of marriage/sustained cohabitation and parenthood reported by recovered and nonrecovered borderline patients, the age first undertaken, and the stability of these relationships. Borderline patients were interviewed about these topics during their index admission and eight times over 16 years of prospective follow-up. Recovered borderline patients were significantly more likely than nonrecovered borderline patients to have married/lived with an intimate partner and to have become a parent. In addition, they first married/cohabited and became a parent at a significantly older age. They were also significantly less likely to have been divorced or ended a cohabiting relationship. In addition, they were significantly less likely to have given up or lost custody of a child. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that stable functioning as a spouse/partner and as a parent are strongly associated with recovery status for borderline patients. PMID:24963829

  6. Borderline Personality Characteristics and Treatment Outcome in Cognitive-Behavioral Treatments for PTSD in Female Rape Victims

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Stephanie B.; Rizvi, Shireen L.; Resick, Patricia A.

    2010-01-01

    Many studies report that comorbid borderline personality pathology is associated with poorer outcomes in the treatment of Axis I disorders. Given the high rates of comorbidity between borderline personality pathology and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), it is essential to determine whether borderline symptomatology affects PTSD treatment outcome. This study examined the effects of borderline personality characteristics (BPC) on 131 female rape victims receiving cognitive-behavioral treatment for PTSD. Higher BPC scores were associated with greater pretreatment PTSD severity; however, individuals with higher levels of BPC were just as likely to complete treatment and also as likely to show significant treatment response on several outcome measures. There were no significant interactions between type of treatment and BPC on the outcome variables. Findings suggest that women with borderline pathology may be able to benefit significantly from cognitive-behavioral treatment for PTSD. PMID:18328872

  7. Two Paradigmatic Approaches to Borderline Patients With a History of Trauma

    PubMed Central

    LEWIS, JUDITH L.

    1996-01-01

    A significant number of patients with the diagnosis of borderline personality disorder have a history of childhood trauma. This article attempts to integrate the treatment approach of Judith Herman to traumatized patients with the psychodynamic approach of Otto Kernberg to borderline patients. To facilitate paradigm shifts between these two approaches, they are presented side by side with one set of terms translated into the other. Aspects of the therapeutic relationship and process are compared and contrasted, and a preliminary attempt is made to integrate these two treatment models. PMID:22700260

  8. Sarcoma-like mural nodule in a borderline mucinous tumor of the ovary: A rare entity.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Prithwijit; Saha, Kaushik; Bhowmik, Sourav

    2014-10-01

    Sarcoma-like mural nodule (SLMN) is a very uncommon and misleading benign entity which may be associated with benign, borderline or malignant mucinous neoplasm of the ovary. It should be distinguished from other malignant mural nodules with sarcoma, carcinosarcoma or anaplastic carcinoma for proper management. We report a rare case of SLMN in a borderline mucinous tumor of the ovary in a 30-year-old lady. In spite of having confusing histopathological features the final diagnosis was made depending on the younger age of the patient, well circumscription of the nodule, absence of vascular invasion and immunohistochemical profile. PMID:25540570

  9. Long-Term Course of Borderline Personality Disorder.

    PubMed

    Stone, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    Information concerning the longitudinal course of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) derives mainly from (a) long-term (10 to 25 year) retrospective follow-up studies, primarily those conducted during the 1980s/1990s, (b) brief (1 to 3 year) follow-up studies of recent randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of several different treatment approaches, and (c) prospective follow-up studies. The patients contacted in the retrospective studies had been treated mostly by psychoanalytically informed approaches or supportive. Though there was a significant suicide rate of 3 to 9%, about two-thirds of the BPD patients eventually achieved a global assessment score in the 60s or beyond. BPD represents a heterogeneous group of patients, whose outcome is a function of many variables, including personality traits (paranoid and narcissistic conducing to less favorable outcomes), cultural differences, socio-economic level, intelligence level, gender, and age of onset. The RCT studies focused on amelioration of the symptom components of BPD, especially tendencies to self-injury and suicide. The currently favored treatment methods showed in a large percentage of patients, a lessening of these self-destructive behaviors after a year or two of treatment. The time spans were too brief to allow assessment of improvement in key life areas (attainment of self-sufficiency in work, widening of the circle of friends, and success in forming satisfactory intimate partnerships). The prospective studies are based on reassessments at regular intervals of BPD patients and a control group with other personality disorders. Over the past 16 years the BPD patients, compared with controls, were slower to achieve remission, and more apt to show cognitive peculiarities initially-though they showed appreciable improvement over time. The "recovered" BPD patients, compared with the non-recovered patients, showed twice the likelihood of achieving a successful intimate relationship. At 16 years the Mc

  10. Labile (borderline) hypertension--new aspects of a common disorder.

    PubMed

    Kuchel, O; Cuche, J L; Hamet, P; Tolis, G; Messerli, F H; Barbeau, A; Boucher, R; Genest, J

    1975-09-01

    borderline) hypertension is regarded as characterized by a blood pressure over 140/90 mmHg, falling below these values with physical and emotional rest. This clinical entity, which affects some 20% (variously estimated between 16 and 30%) of the adult population, gives rise to uncertainties in both definition and prognosis. In some patients labile hypertension represents the precursor of a fixed hypertensive state, whereas in many others it remains labile throughout life, never progressing to the stable phase nor becoming associated with hypertensive cardiovascular disease.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:233754

  11. Responses of Female Fire-Setters with Mild and Borderline Intellectual Disabilities to a Group Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, John L.; Robertson, Alison; Thorne, Ian; Belshaw, Tracy; Watson, Angela

    2006-01-01

    Background: This report describes a cognitive behavioural group intervention for women with mild and borderline intellectual disabilities detained in a secure hospital setting because of their fire-setting behaviour. The study aimed to examine participants' motivations for setting fires, their responses to an intervention designed specifically for…

  12. Skills Practice in Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Suicidal Women Meeting Criteria for Borderline Personality Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindenboim, Noam; Comtois, Katherine Anne; Linehan, Marsha M.

    2007-01-01

    Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is an evidence-based practice for borderline personality disorder (BPD) and suicidal behavior that has been replicated with a variety of populations. Patients' practice of behavioral skills taught in the group skills training component of DBT may be partly responsible for the positive treatment outcomes according…

  13. Beyond Borderline Personality Disorder: Dialectical Behavior Therapy in a College Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panepinto, Amberly R.; Uschold, Carissa C.; Olandese, Michelle; Linn, Braden K.

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated the efficacy of a dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) program with a general college counseling center population, not limited to students diagnosed with borderline personality disorder. A review of records of 64 students found that obsessive-compulsive symptoms, interpersonal sensitivity, depression, anxiety, paranoia,…

  14. The Effects of Countertransference on the Therapist Treating Borderline Personality Disorder: A Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capodanno, Karin H.

    The purpose of this paper is to review and critique the literature on the effects of countertransference on the life of the therapist treating patients with borderline personality disorder. Countertransference has long been recognized as an integral component of the therapeutic relationship and may have far reaching effects on both the…

  15. Effectiveness and Moderators of Improvement in a Family Education Program for Borderline Personality Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neiditch, Emily R.

    2010-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) puts great stress on the family system as family members cope with difficult symptoms, accompanying stigma, and caregiver burden. However, development and research on family interventions for BPD lags behind that of other serious mental illnesses. The current study describes a sample of family members,…

  16. Markers for Aggression in Inpatient Treatment Facilities for Adults with Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenneij, Nienke H.; Didden, Robert; Stolker, Joost Jan; Koot, Hans M.

    2009-01-01

    In high care settings for persons with intellectual disability (ID) aggressive incidents often occur. Still little is known about factors that are associated with an increased risk for aggressive behavior in clients who are admitted to an inpatient treatment facility. In four inpatient facilities, 108 adults with mild and borderline ID and…

  17. (Social) Cognitive Skills and Social Information Processing in Children with Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Nieuwenhuijzen, M.; Vriens, A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the unique contributions of (social) cognitive skills such as inhibition, working memory, perspective taking, facial emotion recognition, and interpretation of situations to the variance in social information processing in children with mild to borderline intellectual disabilities. Respondents were 79…

  18. Development of Borderline Personality Disorder in Adolescence and Young Adulthood: Introduction to the Special Section

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stepp, Stephanie D.

    2012-01-01

    Recognizable symptoms and features of borderline personality disorder (BPD) appear during adolescence. However, there has been resistance to diagnose or research this disorder prior to adulthood because of clinical lore that BPD is a long-standing illness and that personality traits are not stable until adulthood. This has resulted in little…

  19. Help-Seeking Process of Parents for Psychopathology in Youth with Moderate to Borderline Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douma, Jolanda C. H.; Dekker, Marielle C.; De Ruiter, Karen P.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Koot, Hans M.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the help-seeking process of parents for emotional or behavioral problems in their child with borderline to moderate intellectual disabilities. Method: In 2003, in a special education-based sample of 522 youths (ages 10-18 years, response = 77.9%), we studied the parents' perception of their child's problems, their subsequent…

  20. Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Borderline Personality Disorder: A Meta-Analysis Using Mixed-Effects Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kliem, Soren; Kroger, Christoph; Kosfelder, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Objective: At present, the most frequently investigated psychosocial intervention for borderline personality disorder (BPD) is dialectical behavior therapy (DBT). We conducted a meta-analysis to examine the efficacy and long-term effectiveness of DBT. Method: Systematic bibliographic research was undertaken to find relevant literature from online…

  1. Early Family Environments and Traumatic Experiences Associated with Borderline Personality Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Terri L.; Clum, George A.

    1993-01-01

    Assessed childhood trauma experiences (sexual abuse, physical abuse, witnessed violence, early separation) and family environment characteristics of 17 depressed female patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and 19 without BPD. Significantly, more BPD subjects reported histories of sexual abuse, physical abuse, and witnessed violence.…

  2. Fenfluramine and Methylphenidate in Children with Mental Retardation and Borderline IQ: Clinical Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Aman, Michael G.

    1997-01-01

    A double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study of methylphenidate and different doses of fenfluramine in 30 children (ages 5-14) with mental retardation or borderline IQ and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder was conducted. Parents and teachers cited more improvement with fenfluramine; however, fenfluramine had more side effects,…

  3. Individual Characteristics, Familial Experience, and Psychopathology in Children of Mothers with Borderline Personality Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnow, Sven; Spitzer, Carsten; Grabe, Hans J.; Kessler, Christoph; Freyberger, Harald J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to examine individual characteristics, familial experience, and psychopathology of children of mothers with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Method: Children of mothers with BPD were compared to children of mothers (1) with depressive disorders, (2) with cluster C personality disorders, and (3) without…

  4. Treating borderline personality disorder as a trainee psychologist: Issues of resistance, inexperience and countertransference.

    PubMed

    Cambanis, Elizabeth Va

    2012-07-01

    Clients with borderline personality disorder are viewed as difficult to work with. They also have high drop-out rates and unpredictable treatment outcomes. The characteristics of patients with borderline personality disorder often have a negative effect on the therapeutic process and on clinicians themselves. Challenges are likely magnified for trainee psychologists, given their lack of experience in implementing treatment plans and their inadequate understanding of underlying dynamics. However, to date, no studies have focused on the particular challenges experienced by trainee psychologists. This article attempts to address the gap in literature by exploring the difficulties experienced by a trainee psychologist in treating a patient with borderline personality disorder. A case study is used to highlight the challenges experienced by a novice psychologist in using specific therapeutic modalities recommended in the treatment of borderline personality disorder (BPD), namely dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT) and mentalisation based therapy (MBT). The aim of the study was to help better identify, understand and normalise the countertransference experiences and other difficulties experienced by trainee psychologists in treating clients with BPD. The article highlights observations regarding the context of the supervisory process, the importance of personal psychotherapy, the potential for harm of pejorative views, and the complications arising from a mismatch between the treatment modality and the treatment context. PMID:25865841

  5. Motor Performance of Children with Mild Intellectual Disability and Borderline Intellectual Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vuijk, P. J.; Hartman, E.; Scherder, E.; Visscher, C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: There is a relatively small body of research on the motor performance of children with mild intellectual disabilities (MID) and borderline intellectual functioning (BIF). Adequate levels of motor skills may contribute to lifelong enjoyment of physical activity, participation in sports and healthy lifestyles. The present study compares…

  6. Cognitive biases in individuals with mild to borderline intellectual disability and alcohol use-related problems.

    PubMed

    van Duijvenbode, Neomi; Didden, Robert; Voogd, Hubert; Korzilius, Hubert P L M; Engels, Rutger C M E

    2012-01-01

    The primary aim of the present pilot study was to examine cognitive biases in individuals with mild to borderline ID and alcohol use-related problems. Participants (N=57) performed the approach avoidance task, picture rating task and visual dot probe task, which was combined with eye-tracking methodology. They were admitted to a forensic setting and were all abstinent and undergoing treatment at the time of testing. Three groups were formed based on the severity of alcohol use-related problems as measured by the AUDIT. In line with the expectations, no differences were found between participants based on the severity of their alcohol use-related problems. In addition, three groups were formed based on IQ to assess the relationship between IQ and the strength of the cognitive biases. There were also no differences between individuals with mild or borderline ID and individuals with (below) average IQ on any of the variables. It is concluded that computer tasks such as these can be used in individuals with mild to borderline ID. As the results suggest no influence of IQ on the strength of cognitive biases, this study opens up new opportunities for future research on the application of measuring cognitive biases in screening, diagnosing and treating individuals with mild to borderline ID and alcohol use-related problems. PMID:22728604

  7. Serotonin Transporter Polymorphism and Borderline/Antisocial Traits Among Low-Income Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lyons-Ruth, Karlen; Holmes, Bjarne M.; Sasvari-Szekely, Maria; Ronai, Zsolt; Nemoda, Zsofia; Pauls, David

    2007-01-01

    Objectives The short allele of the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5HTTLPR) has been associated with anxiety, major depressive disorder, and suicidality. The impulsive self- and other-damaging behaviors seen in borderline personality disorder (BPD) and antisocial personality disorder (APD) also have substantial comorbidity with depression but are associated with more severe environmental stressors. This study tested the hypothesis of an association between the short allele of the 5HTTLPR and borderline or antisocial traits in young adulthood. Methods The 5HTTLPR was genotyped among 96 young adults from low- to moderate-income families (62 without and 34 with BPD or APD features). Features of borderline and antisocial personality disorder were assessed with the Structured Clinical interview for Diagnosis (SCID)-Axis II. Results The number of short 5HTTLPR alleles was significantly related to incidence of BPD or APD traits, as well as to each set of traits independently. Male gender and quality of care in infancy were also associated with incidence of BPD and APD traits but did not account for the association with the short allele. Depressive disorders were not associated with the short allele in this sample. Conclusions Young adults of lower socioeconomic status who carry the short 5HTTLPR allele may be especially vulnerable to developing antisocial or borderline traits by young adulthood. PMID:18075474

  8. Redefining Borderline Syndromes as Posttraumatic and Rediscovering Emotional Containment as a First Stage in Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Jean M.

    2005-01-01

    This brief review traces the evolution of clinical understanding about borderline syndromes during the last three decades of the 20th century. The focus shifted from descriptive phenomenology in the 1970s to documenting linkages with childhood trauma in the 1980s. In the 1990s, effective and teachable techniques for emotional containment in these…

  9. Psychoanalytic Classification and Empiricism with Borderline Personality Disorder as a Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Theodore

    1989-01-01

    Empirical studies based on psychoanalytic model have concentrated on study of therapeutic process and diagnostic groups such as borderline personality disorder (BPD). Work in BPD provides paradigm for future approaches in study of second-order inferences removed from immediate observational field. Concept of structure may be clarified by empirical…

  10. An Educational Programming Framework for a Subset of Students with Diverse Learning Needs: Borderline Intellectual Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Steven R.

    2008-01-01

    Students with intelligence test scores between 70 and 85 frequently fall into the gap between general and special education. Students with borderline intellectual functioning are a large population at-risk for school failure. Recent educational trends (e.g., the use of response to intervention models of special education eligibility,…

  11. Working Memory and Executive Function Profiles of Individuals with Borderline Intellectual Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alloway, T. P.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study was to investigate the following issues: (1) Do students with borderline intellectual functioning have a pervasive pattern of impaired working memory skills across both verbal and visuo-spatial domains? (2) Is there evidence for impairment in executive function skills, and which tasks indicate greater…

  12. Effectiveness of a Computerised Working Memory Training in Adolescents with Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Molen, M. J.; Van Luit, J. E. H.; Van der Molen, M. W.; Klugkist, I.; Jongmans, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The goal of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a computerised working memory (WM) training on memory, response inhibition, fluid intelligence, scholastic abilities and the recall of stories in adolescents with mild to borderline intellectual disabilities attending special education. Method: A total of 95 adolescents with…

  13. Cognitive Biases in Individuals with Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disability and Alcohol Use-Related Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Duijvenbode, Neomi; Didden, Robert; Voogd, Hubert; Korzilius, Hubert P. L. M.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.

    2012-01-01

    The primary aim of the present pilot study was to examine cognitive biases in individuals with mild to borderline ID and alcohol use-related problems. Participants (N = 57) performed the approach avoidance task, picture rating task and visual dot probe task, which was combined with eye-tracking methodology. They were admitted to a forensic setting…

  14. Working Memory Structure in 10- and 15-Year Old Children with Mild to Borderline Intellectual, Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Molen, Mariet J.

    2010-01-01

    The validity of Baddeley's working memory model within the typically developing population, was tested. However, it is not clear if this model also holds in children and adolescents with mild to, borderline intellectual disabilities (ID; IQ score 55-85). The main purpose of this study was therefore, to explore the model's validity in this…

  15. Psychiatric Morbidity and Social Functioning among Adults with Borderline Intelligence Living in Private Households

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassiotis, A.; Strydom, A.; Hall, I.; Ali, A.; Lawrence-Smith, G.; Meltzer, H.; Head, J; Bebbington, P.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Approximately one-eighth of the population will have DSM-IV borderline intelligence. Various mental disorders and social disability are associated with it. Method: The paper uses data (secondary analysis) from a UK-wide cross-sectional survey of 8450 adults living in private households. Data were collected on psychiatric disorders,…

  16. Working Memory Development in Children with Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Molen, M. J.; Henry, L. A.; Van Luit, J. E. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of the current cross-sectional study was to examine the developmental progression in working memory (WM) between the ages of 9 and 16 years in a large sample of children with mild to borderline intellectual disabilities (MBID). Baddeley's influential WM model was used as a theoretical framework. Furthermore, the…

  17. Analytically oriented psychotherapy in schizotypal and borderline patients: at the border of treatability.

    PubMed Central

    Stone, M. H.

    1985-01-01

    Analytically oriented psychotherapy (AOP) has been considered the treatment of choice for borderline patients and a useful technique in the treatment of schizotypal patients. There are many exceptions, however, in addition to a number of borderline and schizotypal patients who are just barely amenable to this modality: they are at the border of treatability by AOP. Limitations relating to time, cost, and the availability of therapists trained in this discipline render it important to delineate the factors which conduce either to the success or failure of AOP. From the author's clinical impressions about borderline and schizotypal patients at the border of treatability by AOP, a number of such factors emerge. On the positive side: likeableness, autoplastic defenses, high motivation, psychological-mindedness, genuine concern, good moral sense, self-discipline, and low impulsivity. Negative factors include, beside the opposites to the aforementioned, vengefulness and parental abusiveness or exploitation. A scale for measuring the balance between these positive and negative factors is proposed. Its use may, it is hoped, improve forecast, during initial consultation, as to which borderline and schizotypal patients will respond favorably to AOP. PMID:4049910

  18. Reducing Adverse Polypharmacy in Patients With Borderline Personality Disorder: An Empirical Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Oldham, John M.; Gonzalez, Sylvia; Fowler, J. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Polypharmacy is common and especially challenging in the context of borderline personality disorder in light of impulsivity and self-harm associated with the disorder, risk of adverse drug-drug interactions, and financial burden. Reduction in polypharmacy could be conceptualized as a high priority in the treatment of borderline personality disorder. This case aims to demonstrate that potential. Method: This case report presents outcomes data for an individual with borderline personality disorder during the course of an extended psychiatric hospitalization. Symptomatic change is based on the Patient Health Questionnaire Somatic, Anxiety, and Depression Symptoms scales and World Health Organization 5-Item Well-Being Index. Change in polypharmacy is presented both in terms of absolute number and complexity of the medication regimen. Clinical outcomes data are provided at 2, 12, and 24 weeks postdischarge. Results: During a 56-day hospitalization, the patient demonstrated clinical improvement across clinical domains—all occurred within the context of reduced number (43%) and complexity (40%) of her medication regimen. Symptomatic improvement was sustained up to 6 months postdischarge. Conclusions: Despite good intentions, polypharmacy can be associated with iatrogenic harm and contribute to functional impairment, especially in the context of borderline personality disorder, in which symptomatic fluctuations are part of the illness itself. A reduction in the patient’s high-risk polypharmacy during treatment represents a noteworthy treatment outcome in and of itself. Additional measures of medication risk and liability have the potential to become markers of clinical effectiveness. PMID:26693036

  19. Validation of Measures of Biosocial Precursors to Borderline Personality Disorder: Childhood Emotional Vulnerability and Environmental Invalidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauer, Shannon E.; Baer, Ruth A.

    2010-01-01

    Linehan's biosocial theory suggests that borderline personality disorder (BPD) results from a transaction of two childhood precursors: emotional vulnerability and an invalidating environment. Until recently, few empirical studies have explored relationships between these theoretical precursors and symptoms of the disorder. Psychometrically sound…

  20. Childhood Sexual Abuse and Borderline Personality Disorder in the Eating Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Glenn

    1994-01-01

    Examination of 115 women with eating disorders revealed a secondary diagnosis of borderline personality disorder associated with a history of childhood sexual abuse. A model involving background features, precipitants, and immediate and long-term psychological consequences is suggested to explain the link to childhood abuse, and implications for…

  1. Outcomes with FOLFIRINOX for Borderline Resectable and Locally Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Brian A.; Steve, Jennifer; Krasinskas, Alyssa M.; Zureikat, Amer H.; Lembersky, Barry C.; Gibson, Michael K.; Stoller, Ronald; Zeh, Herbert J.; Bahary, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Background Trials examining FOLFIRINOX in metastatic pancreatic cancer demonstrate higher response rates compared to gemcitabine-based regimens. There is currently limited experience with neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX in pancreatic cancer. Methods Retrospective review of outcomes of patients with borderline resectable or locally unresectable pancreatic cancer who were recommended to undergo neoadjuvant treatment with FOLFIRINOX. Results FOLFIRINOX was recommended for 25 patients with pancreatic cancer, 13 (52%) unresectable and 12 (48%) borderline resectable. Four patients (16%) refused treatment or were lost to follow up. 21 patients (84%) were treated with a median of 4.7 cycles. 6 patients (29%) required dose reductions secondary to toxicity. 2 patients (9%) were unable to tolerate treatment and 3 patients (14%) had disease progression on treatment. 7 patients (33%) underwent surgical resection following treatment with FOLFIRINOX alone, 2 (10%) of which were initially unresectable. 2 patients underwent resection following FOLFIRINOX + stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). The R0 resection rate for patients treated with FOLFIRINOX +/− SBRT was 33% (55% borderline resectable, 10% unresectable). A total of 5 patients (24%) demonstrated a significant pathologic response. Conclusions FOLFIRINOX is a biologically active regimen in borderline resectable and locally unresectable pancreatic cancer with encouraging R0 resection and pathologic response rates. PMID:23955427

  2. The Effectiveness of Biofeedback and Home Relaxation Training on Reduction of Borderline Hypertension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesko, Wayne A.; Summerfield, Liane M.

    1988-01-01

    Relaxation and biofeedback have been established as being effective in reducing high blood pressure over both the short and long term. A study found that biofeedback, progressive relaxation, and biofeedback/relaxation combined were all effective treatments for borderline hypertension. (JD)

  3. Borderline Personality Disorder and Deliberate Self-Harm: Does Experiential Avoidance Play a Role?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Alexander L.; Specht, Matthew W.; Cellucci, Tony

    2005-01-01

    The theory that borderline personality disorder (BPD) is associated with experiential avoidance, and that experiential avoidance mediates the association between BPD and deliberate, nonsuicidal self-harm was examined. Female inmate participants (N = 105) were given structured diagnostic assessments of BPD, as well as several measures of…

  4. Neuropsychological Characteristics of Adults with Comorbid ADHD and Borderline/Mild Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, E.; Bramham, J.; Young, S.; Paliokostas, E.; Xenitidis, K.

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to characterise the neuropsychological functioning of adults with comorbid attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and intellectual disability. Individuals with ADHD and mild-borderline range intelligence (N=59) and individuals with ADHD and normal intellectual functioning (N=95) were compared on attentional and response…

  5. Borderline personality disorder in adolescents: the He-who-must-not-be-named of psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Larrivée, Marie-Pier

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the possibility and pertinence of diagnosing borderline personality disorder in adolescents. The etiology and clinical manifestations of this disorder in adolescents are discussed, and its management is addressed in terms of psychotherapy, pharmacology, hospitalization issues, and family involvement considerations. PMID:24174891

  6. Intellectual Disabilities and Power Spectra Analysis during Sleep: A New Perspective on Borderline Intellectual Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esposito, M.; Carotenuto, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The role of sleep in cognitive processes has been confirmed by a growing number of reports for all ages of life. Analysing sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) spectra may be useful to study cortical organisation in individuals with Borderline Intellectual Functioning (BIF), as seen in other disturbances even if it is not considered a…

  7. Counseling a Student Presenting Borderline Personality Disorder in the Small College Context: Case Study and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Matthew R.; Faulkner, Ginger E.

    2009-01-01

    This case study examines the dynamics and challenges associated with counseling a client experiencing borderline personality disorder in the small college institutional context. The work of counseling centers at small private institutions has been relatively unexplored in the extant college counseling literature. To help fill this gap, the current…

  8. Two-Year Stability and Change of Schizotypal, Borderline, Avoidant, and Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grilo, Carlos M.; Sanislow, Charles A.; Gunderson, John G.; Pagano, Maria E.; Yen, Shirley; Zanarini, Mary C.; Shea, Tracie M.; Skodol, Andrew E.; Stout, Robert L.; Morey, Leslie C.; McGlashan, Thomas H.

    2004-01-01

    The authors examined the stability of schizotypal (STPD), borderline (BPD), avoidant (AVPD) and obsessive-compulsive (OCPD) personality disorders (PDs) over 2 years of prospective multiwave follow-up. Six hundred thirty-three participants recruited at 4 collaborating sites who met criteria for 1 or more of the 4 PDs or for major depressive…

  9. Borderline Personality Disorder and Emotion Regulation: Insights from the Polyvagal Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Marilyn A.; Riniolo, Todd C.; Porges, Stephen W.

    2007-01-01

    The current study provides the first published evidence that the parasympathetic component of the autonomic nervous system differentiates the response profiles between individuals diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and controls. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), a non-invasive marker of the influence of the myelinated vagal…

  10. Theory of Mind and Emotion Regulation Difficulties in Adolescents with Borderline Traits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Carla; Pane, Heather; Ha, Carolyn; Venta, Amanda; Patel, Amee B.; Sturek, Jennifer; Fonagy, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Dysfunctions in both emotion regulation and social cognition (understanding behavior in mental state terms, theory of mind or mentalizing) have been proposed as explanations for disturbances of interpersonal behavior in borderline personality disorder (BPD). This study aimed to examine mentalizing in adolescents with emerging BPD from a…