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Sample records for concave costs oberwolfach

  1. Log-Concavity and Strong Log-Concavity: a review

    PubMed Central

    Saumard, Adrien; Wellner, Jon A.

    2016-01-01

    We review and formulate results concerning log-concavity and strong-log-concavity in both discrete and continuous settings. We show how preservation of log-concavity and strongly log-concavity on ℝ under convolution follows from a fundamental monotonicity result of Efron (1969). We provide a new proof of Efron's theorem using the recent asymmetric Brascamp-Lieb inequality due to Otto and Menz (2013). Along the way we review connections between log-concavity and other areas of mathematics and statistics, including concentration of measure, log-Sobolev inequalities, convex geometry, MCMC algorithms, Laplace approximations, and machine learning. PMID:27134693

  2. Optimal Portfolio Selection Under Concave Price Impact

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Jin; Song Qingshuo; Xu Jing; Zhang Jianfeng

    2013-06-15

    In this paper we study an optimal portfolio selection problem under instantaneous price impact. Based on some empirical analysis in the literature, we model such impact as a concave function of the trading size when the trading size is small. The price impact can be thought of as either a liquidity cost or a transaction cost, but the concavity nature of the cost leads to some fundamental difference from those in the existing literature. We show that the problem can be reduced to an impulse control problem, but without fixed cost, and that the value function is a viscosity solution to a special type of Quasi-Variational Inequality (QVI). We also prove directly (without using the solution to the QVI) that the optimal strategy exists and more importantly, despite the absence of a fixed cost, it is still in a 'piecewise constant' form, reflecting a more practical perspective.

  3. Rotating concave eddy current probe

    DOEpatents

    Roach, Dennis P.; Walkington, Phil; Rackow, Kirk A.; Hohman, Ed

    2008-04-01

    A rotating concave eddy current probe for detecting fatigue cracks hidden from view underneath the head of a raised head fastener, such as a buttonhead-type rivet, used to join together structural skins, such as aluminum aircraft skins. The probe has a recessed concave dimple in its bottom surface that closely conforms to the shape of the raised head. The concave dimple holds the probe in good alignment on top of the rivet while the probe is rotated around the rivet's centerline. One or more magnetic coils are rigidly embedded within the probe's cylindrical body, which is made of a non-conducting material. This design overcomes the inspection impediment associated with widely varying conductivity in fastened joints.

  4. Tunable configurational anisotropy of concave triangular nanomagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanayakkara, Kasuni; Vasil'evskii, Ivan S.; Eremin, Igor S.; Kolentsova, Olga S.; Kargin, Nikolay I.; Anferov, Alexander; Kozhanov, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    Shape and dimension variation effects on the configurational anisotropy and magnetization ground states of single domain triangular nano-magnets are investigated using micromagnetic simulations and magnetic force microscopy. We show that introducing concavity or elongating vertexes stabilize the Y magnetization ground states of triangular nanomagnets. A phenomenological model relating the magnetization anisotropy and triangle geometry parameters is developed. MFM imaging reveals shape defined buckle and Y ground states that are in good agreement with numeric simulations. Concavity and vertex extrusion allow for the form-ruled magnetization ground state engineering in the shapes with higher orders of symmetry.

  5. Concave nanomagnets with widely tunable anisotropy

    DOEpatents

    Lambson, Brian; Gu, Zheng; Carlton, David; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2014-07-01

    A nanomagnet having widely tunable anisotropy is disclosed. The disclosed nanomagnet is a magnetic particle with a convex shape having a first magnetically easy axis. The convex shape is modified to include at least one concavity to urge a second magnetically easy axis to form substantially offset from the first magnetically easy axis. In at least one embodiment, the convex shape is also modified to include at least one concavity to urge a second magnetically easy axis to form with a magnetic strength substantially different from the first magnetically easy axis.

  6. Fabrication of concave refractive microlens arrays in solgel glass by a simple proximity-effect-assisted reflow technique.

    PubMed

    He, Miao; Yuan, Xiaocong; Bu, Jing; Cheong, Wai Chye

    2004-05-01

    We report a simple method for fabricating a concave refractive microlens array (MLA) in solgel glass by using a proximity-effect-assisted reflow technique. The solgel concave refractive MLA that we fabricated had excellent surface smoothness; good dimensional conformity, with an 8.23% nonuniformity of the microlens elements; and structural perfection, with a biggest deviation of 1% from a perfect concave spherical crown. The relative error between the measured and the designed values of the concave MLA's focal length was only 1.83%. Compared with the conventional fabrication techniques for concave MLAs, the proposed method has significant advantages including simplicity, low cost, good element conformity, and smooth device surface. PMID:15143656

  7. Infants' Perception of Information along Object Boundaries: Concavities versus Convexities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatt, Ramesh S.; Hayden, Angela; Reed, Andrea; Bertin, Evelin; Joseph, Jane

    2006-01-01

    Object parts are signaled by concave discontinuities in shape contours. In seven experiments, we examined whether 5- and 6 1/2-month-olds are sensitive to concavities as special aspects of contours. Infants of both ages detected discrepant concave elements amid convex distractors but failed to discriminate convex elements among concave…

  8. Sensitive visual test for concave diffraction gratings.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, E. C., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A simple visual test for the evaluation of concave diffraction gratings is described. It is twice as sensitive as the Foucault knife edge test, from which it is derived, and has the advantage that the images are straight and free of astigmatism. It is particularly useful for grating with high ruling frequency where the above image faults limit the utility of the Foucault test. The test can be interpreted quantitatively and can detect zonal grating space errors of as little as 0.1 A.

  9. Imaging Spectrometers Using Concave Holographic Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradie, J.; Wang, S.

    1993-01-01

    Imaging spectroscopy combines the spatial attributes of imaging with the compositionally diagnostic attributes of spectroscopy. For spacebased remote sensing applications, mass, size, power, data rate, and application constrain the scanning approach. For the first three approaches, substantial savings in mass and size of the spectrometer can be achieved in some cases with a concave holographic grating and careful placement of an order-sorting filter. A hologram etched on the single concave surface contains the equivalent of the collimating, dispersing, and camera optics of a conventional grating spectrometer and provides substantial wavelength dependent corrections for spherical aberrations and a flat focal field. These gratings can be blazed to improve efficiency when used over a small wavelength range or left unblazed for broadband uniform efficiency when used over a wavelength range of up to 2 orders. More than 1 order can be imaged along the dispersion axis by placing an appropriately designed step order-sorting filter in front of the one- or two-dimensional detector. This filter can be shaped for additional aberration corrections. The VIRIS imaging spectrometer based on the broadband design provides simultaneous imaging of the entrance slit from lambda = 0.9 to 2.6 microns (1.5 orders) onto a 128 x 128 HgCdTe detector (at 77 K). The VIRIS spectrometer was used for lunar mapping with the UH 24.in telescope at Mauna Kea Observatory. The design is adaptable for small, low mass, space based imaging spectrometers.

  10. Bimetallic FeNi concave nanocubes and nanocages.

    PubMed

    Moghimi, Nafiseh; Abdellah, Marwa; Thomas, Joseph Palathinkal; Mohapatra, Mamata; Leung, K T

    2013-07-31

    Concave nanostructures are rare because of their thermodynamically unfavorable shapes. We prepared bimetallic FeNi concave nanocubes with high Miller index planes through controlled triggering of the different growth kinetics of Fe and Ni. Taking advantage of the higher activity of the high-index planes, we then fabricated monodispersed concave nanocages via a material-independent electroleaching process. With the high-index facets exposed, these concave nanocubes and nanocages are 10- and 100-fold more active, respectively, toward electrodetection of 4-aminophenol than cuboctahedrons, providing a label-free sensing approach for monitoring toxins in water and pharmaceutical wastes. PMID:23837524

  11. Ion implantation into concave polymer surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakudo, N.; Shinohara, T.; Amaya, S.; Endo, H.; Okuji, S.; Ikenaga, N.

    2006-01-01

    A new technique for ion implantation into concave surface of insulating materials is proposed and experimentally studied. The principle is roughly described by referring to modifying inner surface of a PET (polyethylene terephthalate) bottle. An electrode that is supplied with positive high-voltage pulses is inserted into the bottle. Both plasma formation and ion implantation are simultaneously realized by the same high-voltage pulses. Ion sheath with a certain thickness that depends on plasma parameters is formed just on the inner surface of the bottle. Since the plasma potential is very close to that of the electrode, ions from the plasma are accelerated in the sheath and implanted perpendicularly into the bottle's inner surface. Laser Raman spectroscopy shows that the inner surface of an ion-implanted PET bottle is modified into DLC (diamond-like carbon). Gas permeation measurement shows that gas-barrier property enhances due to the modification.

  12. Automatic spin coater for concave spherical substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Fengchao; Gao, Jingsong; Feng, Xiaoguo; Zhao, Jingli; Xu, Zhijun; Hu, Jun; Xu, Fenglin; Wang, Huiqing; Liu, Xiaohan

    2007-12-01

    Coating photoresist film with uniform thickness on concave spherical substrate (CSS) is very important for microfabrication of concave spherical optical elements by lithography technique via a laser direct writer, for the uneven photoresist film will result in ununiformity of line width so as to influence the characters of optical elements. For improving the uniformity of photoresist film coating on CSS, an automatic spin coater was designed. The process and the mathematical model of spin coating for CSS were analyzed. Difficulties for realizing the spin coater consist of the control of multi-axis motion precisely and collaboratively, valves on/ff properly and real-timely. A flexible and wellbehaved spinning motion system was achieved by tmeans of principal and subordinate CPUs control. The motion program for spin coating could be created and implemented automatically while the pressure and the valves were was watched and controlled in real time. Film coating and laser direct writing experiments on a CSS with aperture equals to 100 mm and radius equals to 370 mm were performed. Photoresist film with uniform thickness on CSS was obtained by selecting proper spin coating parameters such as rotational speed, acceleration and viscosity of the photoresist. After development, the section analysis by the atomic force microscope showed that photoresist film thickness was about 517 nm in the center and about 520 nm in the edge of substrate, the film thickness error was within 1%, and the line width was about 6.0 μm with steep sides parallel each other. Experimental results indicate that uniform thickness of thin photoresist film has been coated on CSS by the spin coater, which contributes to quality improvement of laser direct writing lines on CSS.

  13. [General calculation method of diffraction efficiency of concave blazed gratings].

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Huang, Yuan-Shen; Xu, Bang-Lian; Li, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Da-Wei; Tao, Chun-Xian; Ling, Jin-Zhong; Zhuang, Song-Lin

    2013-07-01

    In order to make diffraction energy of concave gratings more concentrated in the desired order, the present paper puts forward that the concave blazed grating with variable groove angles could be fabricated on the concave substrates by mechanical ruling method, and the theoretical method of simultaneously calculating the diffraction efficiency in the main section and non-main section is deduced by using Fresnel-Kirchhoff's diffraction formula, which makes up the shortage of the diffraction efficiency calculated only in the main section. Finally, the diffraction efficiency curves varied with wavelength is simulated by Matlab software, and the variation laws of the diffraction efficiency are compared for different production methods and application parameters, which provides a valuable reference for the design and production of the concave gratings. PMID:24059218

  14. Selective characterization of proteins on nanoscale concave surfaces.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xi; Rameshbabu, Utthara; Dordick, Jonathan S; Siegel, Richard W

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale curvature plays a critical role in nanostructure-biomolecule interactions, yet the understanding of such effects in concave nanostructures is still very limited. Because concave nanostructures usually possess convex surface curvatures as well, it is challenging to selectively study the proteins on concave surfaces alone. In this work, we have developed a novel and facile method to address this issue by desorbing proteins on the external surfaces of hollow gold nanocages (AuNG), allowing the selective characterization of retained proteins immobilized on their internal concave surfaces. The selective desorption of proteins was achieved via varying the solution ionic strength, and was demonstrated by both calculation and experimental comparison with non-hollow nanoparticles. This method has created a new platform for the discrete observation of proteins adsorbed inside AuNG hollow cores, and this work suggests an expanded biomedical application space for hollow nanomaterials. PMID:26513422

  15. Determination of groove spacings for concave diffraction gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Zhongwen; Liu Zuping; Wang Qiuping

    2004-11-01

    A long trace profiler (LTP) based method has been reported to measure the groove density of a concave grating with a curvature radius 14346.8 mm. It is appropriate for gratings with a sufficiently large curvature radius. Measurements of the groove density of a concave or convex grating with a small curvature radius could be problematic. A system based on a diffraction method and developed to check the groove variation of variable line spacing (VLS) gratings was used to measure a concave grating at NSRL recently and is the subject of this paper. For a grating with a small radius of curvature, the off-axis errors become dominant factors determining the system uncertainty. The errors are evaluated, and a correction algorithm is developed. A commercially available concave grating with a curvature radius of 750 mm was measured. The maximum relative groove density error ({delta}N/N) was 3x10{sup -5}.

  16. Classroom Note: Concavity and the Second Law of Thermodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunning-Davies, J.

    2003-01-01

    The importance of the mathematical notion of concavity in relation to thermodynamics is stressed and it is shown how it can be useful in increasing the enthusiasm of physics' students for their mathematics' courses.

  17. Shape recognition: convexities, concavities and things in between.

    PubMed

    Schmidtmann, Gunnar; Jennings, Ben J; Kingdom, Frederick A A

    2015-01-01

    Visual objects are effortlessly recognized from their outlines, largely irrespective of viewpoint. Previous studies have drawn different conclusions regarding the importance to shape recognition of specific shape features such as convexities and concavities. However, most studies employed familiar objects, or shapes without curves, and did not measure shape recognition across changes in scale and position. We present a novel set of random shapes with well-defined convexities, concavities and inflections (intermediate points), segmented to isolate each feature type. Observers matched the segmented reference shapes to one of two subsequently presented whole-contour shapes (target or distractor) that were re-scaled and re-positioned. For very short segment lengths, performance was significantly higher for convexities than for concavities or intermediate points and for convexities remained constant with increasing segment length. For concavities and intermediate points, performance improved with increasing segment length, reaching convexity performance only for long segments. No significant differences between concavities and intermediates were found. These results show for the first time that closed curvilinear shapes are encoded using the positions of convexities, rather than concavities or intermediate regions. A shape-template model with no free parameters gave an excellent account of the data. PMID:26598139

  18. Shape recognition: convexities, concavities and things in between

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtmann, Gunnar; Jennings, Ben J.; Kingdom, Frederick A. A.

    2015-01-01

    Visual objects are effortlessly recognized from their outlines, largely irrespective of viewpoint. Previous studies have drawn different conclusions regarding the importance to shape recognition of specific shape features such as convexities and concavities. However, most studies employed familiar objects, or shapes without curves, and did not measure shape recognition across changes in scale and position. We present a novel set of random shapes with well-defined convexities, concavities and inflections (intermediate points), segmented to isolate each feature type. Observers matched the segmented reference shapes to one of two subsequently presented whole-contour shapes (target or distractor) that were re-scaled and re-positioned. For very short segment lengths, performance was significantly higher for convexities than for concavities or intermediate points and for convexities remained constant with increasing segment length. For concavities and intermediate points, performance improved with increasing segment length, reaching convexity performance only for long segments. No significant differences between concavities and intermediates were found. These results show for the first time that closed curvilinear shapes are encoded using the positions of convexities, rather than concavities or intermediate regions. A shape-template model with no free parameters gave an excellent account of the data. PMID:26598139

  19. Focusing of Intense Laser via Parabolic Plasma Concave Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weimin; Gu, Yuqiu; Wu, Fengjuan; Zhang, Zhimeng; Shan, Lianqiang; Cao, Leifeng; Zhang, Baohan

    2015-12-01

    Since laser intensity plays an important role in laser plasma interactions, a method of increasing laser intensity - focusing of an intense laser via a parabolic plasma concave surface - is proposed and investigated by three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The geometric focusing via a parabolic concave surface and the temporal compression of high harmonics increased the peak intensity of the laser pulse by about two orders of magnitude. Compared with the improvement via laser optics approaches, this scheme is much more economic and appropriate for most femtosecond laser facilities. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11174259, 11175165), and the Dual Hundred Foundation of China Academy of Engineering Physics

  20. Calculation of the diffraction efficiency on concave gratings based on Fresnel-Kirchhoff's diffraction formula.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanshen; Li, Ting; Xu, Banglian; Hong, Ruijin; Tao, Chunxian; Ling, Jinzhong; Li, Baicheng; Zhang, Dawei; Ni, Zhengji; Zhuang, Songlin

    2013-02-10

    Fraunhofer diffraction formula cannot be applied to calculate the diffraction wave energy distribution of concave gratings like plane gratings because their grooves are distributed on a concave spherical surface. In this paper, a method based on the Kirchhoff diffraction theory is proposed to calculate the diffraction efficiency on concave gratings by considering the curvature of the whole concave spherical surface. According to this approach, each groove surface is divided into several limited small planes, on which the Kirchhoff diffraction field distribution is calculated, and then the diffraction field of whole concave grating can be obtained by superimposition. Formulas to calculate the diffraction efficiency of Rowland-type and flat-field concave gratings are deduced from practical applications. Experimental results showed strong agreement with theoretical computations. With the proposed method, light energy can be optimized to the expected diffraction wave range while implementing aberration-corrected design of concave gratings, particularly for the concave blazed gratings. PMID:23400074

  1. Critical Concavity of a Drainage Basin for Steady-State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Jongmin; Paik, Kyungrock

    2015-04-01

    Longitudinal profiles of natural streams are known to show concave forms. Saying A as drainage area, channel gradient S can be expressed as the power-law, S≈A-θ (Flint, 1974), which is one of the scale-invariant features of drainage basin. According to literature, θ of most natural streams falls into a narrow range (0.4 < θ < 0.7) (Tucker and Whipple, 2002). It leads to fundamental questions: 'Why does θ falls into such narrow range?' and 'How is this related with other power-law scaling relationships reported in natural drainage basins?' To answer above questions, we analytically derive θ for a steady-state drainage basin following Lane's equilibrium (Lane, 1955) throughout the corridor and named this specific case as the 'critical concavity'. In the derivation, sediment transport capacity is estimated by unit stream power model (Yang, 1976), yielding a power function of upstream area. Stability of channel at a local point occurs when incoming flux equals outgoing flux at the point. Therefore, given the drainage at steady-state where all channel beds are stable, the exponent of the power function should be zero. From this, we can determine the critical concavity. Considering ranges of variables associated in this derivation, critical concavity cannot be resolved as a single definite value, rather a range of critical concavity is suggested. This range well agrees with the widely reported range of θ (0.4 < θ < 0.7) in natural streams. In this theoretical study, inter-relationships between power-laws such as hydraulic geometry (Leopold and Maddock, 1953), dominant discharge-drainage area (Knighton et al., 1999), and concavity, are coupled into the power-law framework of stream power sediment transport model. This allows us to explore close relationships between their power-law exponents: their relative roles and sensitivity. Detailed analysis and implications will be presented. References Flint, J. J., 1974, Stream gradient as a function of order, magnitude

  2. Dish antenna having switchable beamwidth. [with truncated concave ellipsoid subreflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. F. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A switchable beamwidth antenna includes a concave parabolic main reflecting dish which has a central circular region and a surrounding coaxial annular region. A feed means selectively excites only the central region of the main dish via a truncated subreflector for wide beamwidth or substantially the entire main dish for narrow beamwidth. In one embodiment, the feed means comprises a truncated concave ellipsoid subreflector and separate feed terminations located at two foci of the ellipsoid. One feed termination directly views all of the main dish while the other feed termination, exciting the main dish via the subreflector, excites only the central region because of the subreflector truncation. In the another embodiment, the feed means comprises one feed termination and a convex hyperboloid subreflector via which the feed excites the main dish.

  3. The concave cusp as a determiner of figure-ground.

    PubMed

    Stevens, K A; Brookes, A

    1988-01-01

    The tendency to interpret as figure, relative to background, those regions that are lighter, smaller, and, especially, more convex is well known. Wherever convex opaque objects abut or partially occlude one another in an image, the points of contact between the silhouettes form concave cusps, each indicating the local assignment of figure versus ground across the contour segments. It is proposed that this local geometric feature is a preattentive determiner of figure-ground perception and that it contributes to the previously observed tendency for convexity preference. Evidence is presented that figure-ground assignment can be determined solely on the basis of the concave cusp feature, and that the salience of the cusp derives from local geometry and not from adjacent contour convexity. PMID:3205668

  4. Shock wave reflection over convex and concave wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitade, M.; Kosugi, T.; Yada, K.; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2001-04-01

    It is well known that the transition criterion nearly agrees with the detachment criterion in the case of strong shocks, two-dimensional, and pseudosteady flow. However, when the shock wave diffracts over a wedge whose angle is below the detachment criterion, that is, in the domain of Mach reflection, precursory regular reflection (PRR) appears near the leading edge and as the shock wave propagates, the PRR is swept away by the overtaking corner signal (cs) that forces the transition to Mach reflection. It is clear that viscosity and thermal conductivity influences transition and the triple point trajectory. On the other hand, the reflection over concave and convex wedges is truly unsteady flow, and the effect of viscosity and thermal conductivity on transition and triple point trajectory has not been reported. This paper describes that influence of viscosity over convex and concave corners investigated both experiments and numerical simulations.

  5. Monotonicity and Logarithmic Concavity of Two Functions Involving Exponential Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Ai-Qi; Li, Guo-Fu; Guo, Bai-Ni; Qi, Feng

    2008-01-01

    The function 1 divided by "x"[superscript 2] minus "e"[superscript"-x"] divided by (1 minus "e"[superscript"-x"])[superscript 2] for "x" greater than 0 is proved to be strictly decreasing. As an application of this monotonicity, the logarithmic concavity of the function "t" divided by "e"[superscript "at"] minus "e"[superscript"(a-1)""t"] for "a"…

  6. Entanglement criteria via concave-function uncertainty relations

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Yichen

    2010-07-15

    A general theorem as a necessary condition for the separability of quantum states in both finite and infinite dimensional systems, based on concave-function uncertainty relations, is derived. Two special cases of the general theorem are stronger than two known entanglement criteria based on the Shannon entropic uncertainty relation and the Landau-Pollak uncertainty relation, respectively; other special cases are able to detect entanglement where some famous entanglement criteria fail.

  7. Study of Unsteady Flows with Concave Wall Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Chi R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents computational fluid dynamic studies of the inlet turbulence and wall curvature effects on the flow steadiness at near wall surface locations in boundary layer flows. The time-stepping RANS numerical solver of the NASA Glenn-HT RANS code and a one-equation turbulence model, with a uniform inlet turbulence modeling level of the order of 10 percent of molecular viscosity, were used to perform the numerical computations. The approach was first calibrated for its predictabilities of friction factor, velocity, and temperature at near surface locations within a transitional boundary layer over concave wall. The approach was then used to predict the velocity and friction factor variations in a boundary layer recovering from concave curvature. As time iteration proceeded in the computations, the computed friction factors converged to their values from existing experiments. The computed friction factors, velocity, and static temperatures at near wall surface locations oscillated periodically in terms of time iteration steps and physical locations along the span-wise direction. At the upstream stations, the relationship among the normal and tangential velocities showed vortices effects on the velocity variations. Coherent vortices effect on the velocity components broke down at downstream stations. The computations also predicted the vortices effects on the velocity variations within a boundary layer flow developed along a concave wall surface with a downstream recovery flat wall surface. It was concluded that the computational approach might have the potential to analyze the flow steadiness in a turbine blade flow.

  8. Mixed convection heat transfer in concave and convex channels

    SciTech Connect

    Moukalled, F.; Doughan, A.; Acharya, S.

    1997-07-01

    Mixed convection heat transfer studies in the literature have been primarily confined to pipe and rectangular channel geometry's. In some applications, however, heat transfer in curved channels may be of interest (e.g., nozzle and diffuser shaped passages in HVAC systems, fume hoods, chimneys, bell-shaped or dome-shaped chemical reactors, etc.). A numerical investigation of laminar mixed convection heat transfer of air in concave and convex channels is presented. Six different channel aspects ratios (R/L = 1.04, 1.25, 2.5, 5, 10, and {infinity}) and five different values of Gr/Re{sup 2} (Gr/Re{sup 2} = 0, 0.1, 1, 3, 5) are considered. Results are displayed in terms of streamline and isotherm plots, velocity and temperature profiles, and local and average Nusselt number estimates. Numerical predictions reveal that compared to straight channels of equal height, concave channels of low aspect ratio have lower heat transfer at relatively low values of Gr/Re{sup 2} and higher heat transfer at high values of Gr/Re{sup 2}. When compared to straight channels of equal heated length, concave channels are always found to have lower heat transfer and for all values of Gr/Re{sup 2}. On the other hand, predictions for convex channels revealed enhancement in heat transfer compared to straight channels of equal height and/or equal heated length for all values of Gr/Re{sup 2}.

  9. A concavity property for the reciprocal of Fisher information and its consequences on Costa's EPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toscani, Giuseppe

    2015-08-01

    We prove that the reciprocal of Fisher information of a log-concave probability density X in Rn is concave in t with respect to the addition of a Gaussian noise Zt = N(0 , tIn) . As a byproduct of this result we show that the third derivative of the entropy power of a log-concave probability density X in Rn is nonnegative in t with respect to the addition of a Gaussian noise Zt. For log-concave densities this improves the well-known Costa's concavity property of the entropy power (Costa, 1985).

  10. Development of the tongue coating analyzer based on concave grating monochrometer and virtual instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhong; Liu, Guodong; Zeng, Lvming; Huang, Zhen; Zeng, Wenping

    2010-10-01

    The tongue coating diagnosis is an important part in tongue diagnosis of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM).The change of the thickness and color of the tongue coating can reflect the pathological state for the patient. By observing the tongue coating, a Chinese doctor can determine the nature or severity of disease. Because some limitations existed in the tongue diagnosis method of TCM and the method based on the digital image processing, a novel tongue coating analyzer(TCA) based on the concave grating monochrometer and virtual instrument is developed in this paper. This analyzer consists of the light source system, check cavity, optical fiber probe, concave grating monochrometer, spectrum detector system based on CCD and data acquisition (DAQ) card, signal processing circuit system, computer and data analysis software based on LabVIEW, etc. Experimental results show that the novel TCA's spectral range can reach 300-1000 nm, its wavelength resolution can reach 1nm, and this TCA uses the back-split-light technology and multi-channel parallel analysis. Compared with the TCA based on the image processing technology, this TCA has many advantages, such as, compact volume, simpler algorithm, faster processing speed, higher accuracy, cheaper cost and real-time handle data and display the result, etc. Therefore, it has the greatly potential values in the fields of the tongue coating diagnosis for TCM.

  11. Quantum reflection: Focusing of hydrogen atoms with a concave mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Berkhout, J.J.; Luiten, O.J.; Setija, I.D.; Hijmans, T.W.; Mizusaki, T.; Walraven, J.T.M. Van der Waals Laboratorium, Universiteit van Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65/67, 1018 XE Amsterdam, The Netherlands )

    1989-10-16

    We use a concave spherical mirror to focus at 18-mm-diam beam of H atoms down to 0.5 mm. The mirror consists of a fused-quartz substrate polished to optical precision and coated with a liquid-{sup 4}He film to obtain high reflectivity. The temperature dependence of the focused beam intensity enables us to study the influence of the dynamic surface roughness on the reflection of the H atoms. Both zero-point fluctuations and thermal excitations turn out to be of importance. A monolayer of {sup 3}He does not significantly affect the results.

  12. Scaling relationships and concavity of small valley networks on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penido, Julita C.; Fassett, Caleb I.; Som, Sanjoy M.

    2013-01-01

    Valley networks are widely interpreted as the preserved erosional record of water flowing across the martian surface. The manner in which valley morphometric properties scale with drainage area has been widely examined on Earth. Earlier studies assessing these properties on Mars have suggested that martian valleys are morphometrically distinct from those on Earth. However, these earlier measurements were generally made on large valley systems because of the limited topographic data available. In this study, we determine the scaling properties of valley networks at smaller scales than have been previously assessed, using digital elevation models from the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC). We find a Hack's law exponent of 0.74, larger than on Earth, and our measurements also reveal that individual small valleys have concave up, concave down, and quasi-linear longitudinal profiles, consistent with earlier studies of dissected terrain on Mars. However, for many valleys, widths are observed to increase downstream similarly to how they scale in terrestrial channels. The similarities and differences between valley networks on Mars and Earth are consistent with the idea that valleys on Mars are comparatively immature, and precipitation was a likely mechanism for delivering water to these networks.

  13. Microtrap on a concave grating reflector for atom trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Li, Tao; Yin, Ya-Ling; Li, Xing-Jia; Xia, Yong; Yin, Jian-Ping

    2016-08-01

    We propose a novel scheme of optical confinement for atoms by using a concave grating reflector. The two-dimension grating structure with a concave surface shape exhibits strong focusing ability under radially polarized illumination. Especially, the light intensity at the focal point is about 100 times higher than that of the incident light. Such a focusing optical field reflected from the curved grating structure can provide a deep potential to trap cold atoms. We discuss the feasibility of the structure serving as an optical dipole trap. Our results are as follows. (i) Van der Waals attraction potential to the surface of the structure has a low effect on trapped atoms. (ii) The maximum trapping potential is ∼ 1.14 mK in the optical trap, which is high enough to trap cold 87Rb atoms from a standard magneto-optical trap with a temperature of 120 μK, and the maximum photon scattering rate is lower than 1/s. (iii) Such a microtrap array can also manipulate and control cold molecules, or microscopic particles. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374100, 91536218, and 11274114) and the Natural Science Foundation of Shanghai Municipality, China (Grant No. 13ZR1412800).

  14. Supersonic cavity flows over concave and convex walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, A. Ran; Das, Rajarshi; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Kim, Heuy Dong

    2016-04-01

    Supersonic cavity flows are characterized by compression and expansion waves, shear layer, and oscillations inside the cavity. For decades, investigations into cavity flows have been conducted, mostly with flows at zero pressure gradient entering the cavity in straight walls. Since cavity flows on curved walls exert centrifugal force, the features of these flows are likely to differ from those of straight wall flows. The aim of the present work is to study the flow physics of a cavity that is cut out on a curved wall. Steady and unsteady numerical simulations were carried out for supersonic flow through curved channels over the cavity with L/H = 1. A straight channel flow was also analyzed which serves as the base model. The velocity gradient along the width of the channel was observed to increase with increasing the channel curvature for both concave and convex channels. The pressure on the cavity floor increases with the increase in channel curvature for concave channels and decreases for convex channels. Moreover, unsteady flow characteristics are more dependent on channel curvature under supersonic free stream conditions.

  15. Two step process for the fabrication of diffraction limited concave microlens arrays.

    PubMed

    Ruffieux, Patrick; Scharf, Toralf; Philipoussis, Irène; Herzig, Hans Peter; Voelkel, Reinhard; Weible, Kenneth J

    2008-11-24

    A two step process has been developed for the fabrication of diffraction limited concave microlens arrays. The process is based on the photoresist filling of melted holes obtained by a preliminary photolithography step. The quality of these microlenses has been tested in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The method allows the fabrication of concave microlens arrays with diffraction limited optical performance. Concave microlenses with diameters ranging between 30 microm to 230 microm and numerical apertures up to 0.25 have been demonstrated. As an example, we present the realization of diffusers obtained with random sizes and locations of concave shapes. PMID:19030040

  16. Transversal stability of the bouncing ball on a concave surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chastaing, J.-Y.; Pillet, G.; Taberlet, N.; Géminard, J.-C.

    2015-05-01

    A ball bouncing repeatedly on a vertically vibrating surface constitutes the famous "bouncing ball" problem, a nonlinear system used in the 1980s, and still in use nowadays, to illustrate the route to chaos by period doubling. In experiments, in order to avoid the ball escape that would be inevitable with a flat surface, a concave lens is often used to limit the horizontal motion. However, we observe experimentally that the system is not stable. The ball departs from the system axis and exhibits a pendular motion in the permanent regime. We propose theoretical arguments to account for the decrease of the growth rate and of the asymptotic-size of the trajectory when the frequency of the vibration is increased. The instability is very sensitive to the physics of the contacts, which makes it a potentially interesting way to study the collisions rules, or to test the laws used in numerical studies of granular matter.

  17. Testing concave surfaces with a rotating Ronchi grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakley, Rick

    1994-10-01

    The traditional qualitative Ronchi test has undergone various manifestations with efforts to produce quantifiable results. Usual schemes call for the portage of the Ronchi grating via a carriage along machined ways aligned nearly parallel with the axis of the reflecting concave surface under test. The distance the grating is moved provides the variable in the data for making the test. A new test geometry has the grating carried in a bearing that is clamped in a gauged position, and the angle of the turned grating is read on a scale to provide the data variable. Aside from an increase in accuracy, this testing geometry allows, with the reduction mathematics, a number of entry-data options. Full-surface evaluation and the testing of astigmatic surfaces are possible. Adding an accurate vernier to the angular scale on the bearing allows finding the radius of curvature for the surface under test to a fineness unmatched by the standard mechanical spherometer.

  18. Transversal stability of the bouncing ball on a concave surface.

    PubMed

    Chastaing, J-Y; Pillet, G; Taberlet, N; Géminard, J-C

    2015-05-01

    A ball bouncing repeatedly on a vertically vibrating surface constitutes the famous "bouncing ball" problem, a nonlinear system used in the 1980s, and still in use nowadays, to illustrate the route to chaos by period doubling. In experiments, in order to avoid the ball escape that would be inevitable with a flat surface, a concave lens is often used to limit the horizontal motion. However, we observe experimentally that the system is not stable. The ball departs from the system axis and exhibits a pendular motion in the permanent regime. We propose theoretical arguments to account for the decrease of the growth rate and of the asymptotic-size of the trajectory when the frequency of the vibration is increased. The instability is very sensitive to the physics of the contacts, which makes it a potentially interesting way to study the collisions rules, or to test the laws used in numerical studies of granular matter. PMID:26066240

  19. An electrokinetically tunable optofluidic bi-concave lens.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiwang; Song, Chaolong; Luong, Trung Dung; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; Wong, Teck Neng

    2012-10-01

    This paper numerically and experimentally investigates and demonstrates the design of an optofluidic in-plane bi-concave lens to perform both light focusing and diverging using the combined effect of pressure driven flow and electro-osmosis. The concave lens is formed in a rectangular chamber with a liquid core-liquid cladding (L(2)) configuration. Under constant flow rates, the performance of the lens can be controlled by an external electric field. The lens consists of a core stream (conducting fluid), cladding streams (non-conducing fluids), and auxiliary cladding streams (conducting fluids). In the focusing mode, the auxiliary cladding stream is introduced to sandwich the biconcave lens to prevent light rays from scattering at the rough chamber wall. In the diverging mode, the auxiliary cladding liquid has a new role as the low refractive-index cladding of the lens. In the experiments, the test devices were fabricated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using the standard soft lithography technique. Ethanol, cinnamaldehyde, and a mixture of 73.5% ethylene glycol and 26.5% ethanol work as the core stream, cladding streams and auxiliary cladding streams. In the numerical simulation, the electric force acts as a body force. The governing equations are solved by a finite volume method on a Cartesian fixed staggered grid. The evolution of the interface was captured by the level set method. The results show that the focal length in the focusing mode and the divergent angle of the light beam in the diverging mode can be tuned by adjusting the external electric field at fixed flow rates. The numerical results have a reasonable agreement with the experimental results. PMID:22777136

  20. An analytical solution to river profile concavity and downstream fining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blom, A.; Chavarrias, V.

    2014-12-01

    We present an analytical solution to the steady state upward-concave bed profile, as well as downstream fining, for a river dominated by gravel and sand. The model is based on (i) the conservation equation of streamwise momentum of the flow, (ii) the conservation equation of the mass of each grain size fraction in the surface layer of the bed (the Hirano equation) yet including sediment abrasion, and (iii) the conservation equation of total sediment mass (the Exner equation). The model includes downstream fining induced by abrasion as well as by grainsize-selective transport of gravel and sand. In order to arrive at an analytical solution, the model is deliberately kept simple through assumptions such as a constant width and no tributaries. The model is then reduced to the case of steady state conditions, which means that all time derivatives in the equations are set to zero. We find a solution to the steady state streamwise profile of both the bed slope and the volume fraction of gravel in the surface layer of the bed. Like existing empirical predictors, the analytical solution is of an exponential type. The main variables that affect the solution are the total load at the upstream boundary, the gravel fraction in this upstream load, the abrasion coefficient, the grain sizes of the sediment, and the water discharge at the upstream boundary. The below image shows an example of how the gravel fraction in the upstream load affects the solution to the longitudinal profiles of, respectively, bed slope (S), the gravel fraction at the bed surface (Fg), and the mean grain size of the sediment at the bed surface (Dgs). We can see how an increase in the gravel fraction in the upstream load results in a larger overall slope and an increase in profile concavity. It also induces an increase of the gravel fraction at the bed surface.

  1. Transient river response, captured by channel steepness and its concavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanacker, Veerle; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm; Govers, Gerard; Molina, Armando; Campforts, Benjamin; Kubik, Peter W.

    2015-01-01

    Mountain rivers draining tropical regions are known to be great conveyor belts carrying efficiently more than half of the global sediment flux to the oceans. Many tropical mountain areas are located in tectonically active belts where the hillslope and stream channel morphology are rapidly evolving in response to changes in base level. Here, we report basin-wide denudation rates for an east-west transect through the tropical Andes. Hillslope and channel morphology vary systematically from east to west, reflecting the transition from high relief, strongly dissected topography in the escarpment zones into relatively low relief topography in the inter-Andean valley. The spatial pattern of differential denudation rates reflects the transient adjustment of the landscape to rapid river incision following tectonic uplift and river diversion. In the inter-Andean valley, upstream of the wave of incision, slopes and river channels display a relatively smooth, concave-up morphology and denudation rates (time scale of 104-105 a) are consistently low (3 to 200 mm/ka). In contrast, slopes and river channels of rejuvenated basins draining the eastern cordillera are steep to very steep; and the studied drainage basins show a wide range of denudation rate values (60 to 400 mm/ka) that increase systematically with increasing basin mean slope gradient, channel steepness, and channel convexity. Drainage basins that are characterised by strong convexities in their river longitudinal profiles systematically have higher denudation rates. As such, this is one of the first studies that provides field-based evidence of a correlation between channel concavity and basin mean denudation rates, consistent with process-based fluvial incision models.

  2. Holographic fabrication of large-constant concave gratings for wide-range flat-field spectrometers with the addition of a concave lens.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qian; Li, Xinghui; Ni, Kai; Tian, Rui; Pang, Jinchao

    2016-01-25

    We present a new design for the fabrication of concave gratings with large grating constants for flat-field miniature spectrometers with a wide spectral band. In this new design, one of the two optical paths for the holographic lithography of a curved grating structure with variable line spacing is modified by adding a concave lens in front of the point source. The addition of the concave lens allows the real point source, as well as the spatial filter for generating this point source, to be moved back. In this manner, the two spatial filters for generating two point sources are separated. Avoiding the physical conflict between these two spatial filters reduces the difficulty of fabricating large-constant concave gratings. Experimental results verify the feasibility of the proposed design in fabricating concave gratings with large grating constants. The resolution of a spectrometer using the fabricated concave grating is evaluated and found to be better than 1.1 nm across a spectral band ranging from 360 nm to 825 nm. PMID:26832458

  3. Reproducible Construction of Surface Tension-Mediated Honeycomb Concave Microwell Arrays for Engineering of 3D Microtissues with Minimal Cell Loss.

    PubMed

    Lee, GeonHui; Lee, JaeSeo; Oh, HyunJik; Lee, SangHoon

    2016-01-01

    The creation of engineered 3D microtissues has attracted prodigious interest because of the fact that this microtissue structure is able to mimic in vivo environments. Such microtissues can be applied extensively in the fields of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering, as well as in drug and toxicity screening. Here, we develop a novel method of fabricating a large number of dense honeycomb concave microwells via surface tension-mediated self-construction. More specifically, in order to control the curvature and shape of the concavity in a precise and reproducible manner, a custom-made jig system was designed and fabricated. By applying a pre-set force using the jig system, the shape of the honeycomb concave well was precisely and uniformly controlled, despite the fact that wells were densely packed. The thin wall between the honeycomb wells enables the minimization of cell loss during the cell-seeding process. To evaluate the performance of the honeycomb microwell array, rat hepatocytes were seeded, and spheroids were successfully formed with uniform shape and size. Liver-specific functions such as albumin secretion and cytochrome P450 were subsequently analyzed. The proposed method of fabricating honeycomb concave wells is cost-effective, simple, and reproducible. The honeycomb well array can produce multiple spheroids with minimal cell loss, and can lead to significant contributions in tissue engineering and organ regeneration. PMID:27513567

  4. Reproducible Construction of Surface Tension-Mediated Honeycomb Concave Microwell Arrays for Engineering of 3D Microtissues with Minimal Cell Loss

    PubMed Central

    Lee, GeonHui; Lee, JaeSeo; Oh, HyunJik; Lee, SangHoon

    2016-01-01

    The creation of engineered 3D microtissues has attracted prodigious interest because of the fact that this microtissue structure is able to mimic in vivo environments. Such microtissues can be applied extensively in the fields of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering, as well as in drug and toxicity screening. Here, we develop a novel method of fabricating a large number of dense honeycomb concave microwells via surface tension-mediated self-construction. More specifically, in order to control the curvature and shape of the concavity in a precise and reproducible manner, a custom-made jig system was designed and fabricated. By applying a pre-set force using the jig system, the shape of the honeycomb concave well was precisely and uniformly controlled, despite the fact that wells were densely packed. The thin wall between the honeycomb wells enables the minimization of cell loss during the cell-seeding process. To evaluate the performance of the honeycomb microwell array, rat hepatocytes were seeded, and spheroids were successfully formed with uniform shape and size. Liver-specific functions such as albumin secretion and cytochrome P450 were subsequently analyzed. The proposed method of fabricating honeycomb concave wells is cost-effective, simple, and reproducible. The honeycomb well array can produce multiple spheroids with minimal cell loss, and can lead to significant contributions in tissue engineering and organ regeneration. PMID:27513567

  5. The Role of Definition in Students' Understanding with Particular Reference to the Concavity of a Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ureyen, Mehmet

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the effect of different definitions of concavity on students' understanding was investigated. Students enrolled in the calculus-II course in the science and engineering faculties in Anadolu University, Turkey were divided into two groups and each group was given a different definition of concavity. At the end of the study, both…

  6. Measurement of the configuration of a concave surface by the interference of reflected light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumazawa, T.; Sakamoto, T.; Shida, S.

    1985-01-01

    A method whereby a concave surface is irradiated with coherent light and the resulting interference fringes yield information on the concave surface is described. This method can be applied to a surface which satisfies the following conditions: (1) the concave face has a mirror surface; (2) the profile of the face is expressed by a mathematical function with a point of inflection. In this interferometry, multilight waves reflected from the concave surface interfere and make fringes wherever the reflected light propagates. Interference fringe orders. Photographs of the fringe patterns for a uniformly loaded thin silicon plate clamped at the edge are shown experimentally. The experimental and the theoretical values of the maximum optical path difference show good agreement. This simple method can be applied to obtain accurate information on concave surfaces.

  7. Discrete-hole film cooling characteristics over concave and convex surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Shao-Yen; Yao, Yong-Qing; Xia, Bin; Tsou, Fu-Kang

    The local film-cooling effectiveness and local pressure distribution for single-row discrete holes were measured over the whole areas of concave and convex surfaces, using a plexiglass test section with curvature radii of 140 mm and 70 mm for the concave and the convex surfaces and film-cooling holes (34 on the convex surface and 22 on the concave surface) 8 mm in diameter. The results indicate that the concave surface has the widest film-cooling coverage area in the z-direction (perpendicular to the x-flow direction), while the highest film-cooling effectiveness of the convex surface is near the ejection hole. High blowing ratios at holes have an adverse effect on film cooling. The weakest cooling region is near the center line between holes; such a poorly cooled region is larger on convex surfaces than on the concave ones. Optimal design characteristics for turbine blades surfaces are discussed.

  8. High Speed Flexible Optical Disk with Cylindrically Concaved Stabilizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aman, Yasutomo; Onagi, Nobuaki; Murata, Shozo; Sugimoto, Yasunori; Koide, Daiichi; Tokumaru, Haruki

    2007-06-01

    We developed a brand-new stabilizer with a cylindrically concaved active surface for a flexible optical disk system. The unique design enabled extremely stable driving of the flexible disk at rotational speeds over 10,000 rpm. We actually demonstrated the driving at rotational speeds of up to 15,000 rpm, the spindle motor limit of our optical disk tester. This highest rotational speed promises a maximum data transfer rate of more than 600 Mbps for the recording density of a Blu-ray Disc. This stable state was achieved using a simple control that just adjusts the relative axial position of the stabilizer against the flexible disk. Once the adjustment was made, high stability was maintained over a wide rotational speed, ranging from 4,000 to 15,000 rpm. In this stable state, the axial runout on the pickup scanning line was suppressed to less than 10 μm at all rotational speeds. By achieving this high performance with simplified stabilizer control, we have come close to putting our system into practical use.

  9. A new concave electrostatic lens with periodic electrode configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Shuhei

    1993-06-01

    To obtain a large aperture lens with outstanding focal length homogeneity, a concave electrostatic quadrupole lens with a periodic configuration of the electrodes was developed and its performance was numerically studied. By adjusting the azimuthal angle (θc) of the electrode to an adequate periodic function along the lens axis, the integration of the field gradient along the axis, for a period (∫φdz/∫dz), becomes equal to an ideal quadrupole field distribution. To verify the usefulness of the lens, the beam spot distortion of the paraxial beam, which had an initial beam diameter of 90% of the lens radius, was calculated. The results revealed that the error of the focal length inside 90% of the lens radius was only 0.012% when the lens has nine period per unit length. Also, by considering the characteristics of the modified Bessel function, a simple formula for the uniformity of the focal length was obtained, and this expression agreed well with the simulation results.

  10. Faceted Gold Nanorods: Nanocuboids, Convex Nanocuboids, and Concave Nanocuboids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingfeng; Zhou, Yadong; Villarreal, Esteban; Lin, Ye; Zou, Shengli; Wang, Hui

    2015-06-10

    Au nanorods are optically tunable anisotropic nanoparticles with built-in catalytic activities. The state-of-the-art seed-mediated nanorod synthesis offers excellent control over the aspect ratios of cylindrical Au nanorods, which enables fine-tuning of plasmon resonances over a broad spectral range. However, facet control of Au nanorods with atomic-level precision remains significantly more challenging. The coexistence of various types of low-index and high-index facets on the highly curved nanorod surfaces makes it extremely challenging to quantitatively elucidate the atomic-level structure-property relationships that underpin the catalytic competence of Au nanorods. Here we demonstrate that cylindrical Au nanorods undergo controlled facet evolution during their overgrowth in the presence of Cu(2+) and cationic surfactants, resulting in the formation of anisotropic nanostructures enclosed by well-defined facets, such as low-index faceting nanocuboids and high-index faceting convex nanocuboids and concave nanocuboids. These faceted Au nanorods exhibit enriched optical extinction spectral features, broader plasmonic tuning range, and enhanced catalytic tunability in comparison to the conventional cylindrical Au nanorods. The capabilities to both fine-tailor the facets and fine-tune the plasmon resonances of anisotropic Au nanoparticles open up unique opportunities for us to study, in great detail, the facet-dependent interfacial molecular transformations on Au nanocatalysts using surface-enhanced Raman scattering as a time-resolved spectroscopic tool. PMID:25927399

  11. Manipulating the concavity of rhodium nanocubes enclosed by high-index facets via site-selective etching.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yumin; Chen, Qing-Song; Peng, Si-Yan; Wang, Zhi-Qiao; Lu, Gang; Guo, Guo-Cong

    2014-02-18

    Manipulating the degrees of concavity or Miller indices of high-index facets is significant for metal nanocrystals to further tailor their properties; however, generating a concave surface with negative curvature is still in the early development stage and tuning the degree of concavity remains a challenge. Herein, we have developed a simple and effective site-selective etching strategy to manipulate the concavity of rhodium (Rh) nanocrystals with high-index facets. PMID:24336637

  12. Hydrogen adsorption-mediated synthesis of concave Pt nanocubes and their enhanced electrocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bang-An; Du, Jia-Huan; Sheng, Tian; Tian, Na; Xiao, Jing; Liu, Li; Xu, Bin-Bin; Zhou, Zhi-You; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2016-06-01

    Concave nanocubes are enclosed by high-index facets and have negative curvature; they are expected to have enhanced reactivity, as compared to nanocubes with flat surfaces. Herein, we propose and demonstrate a new strategy for the synthesis of concave Pt nanocubes with {hk0} high-index facets, by using a hydrogen adsorption-mediated electrochemical square-wave potential method. It was found that Pt atoms prefer to deposit on edge sites rather than terrace sites on Pt surfaces with intensive hydrogen adsorption, resulting in the formation of concave structures. The as-prepared concave Pt nanocubes exhibit enhanced catalytic activity and stability towards oxidation of ethanol and formic acid in acidic solutions, compared to commercial Pt/C catalysts.Concave nanocubes are enclosed by high-index facets and have negative curvature; they are expected to have enhanced reactivity, as compared to nanocubes with flat surfaces. Herein, we propose and demonstrate a new strategy for the synthesis of concave Pt nanocubes with {hk0} high-index facets, by using a hydrogen adsorption-mediated electrochemical square-wave potential method. It was found that Pt atoms prefer to deposit on edge sites rather than terrace sites on Pt surfaces with intensive hydrogen adsorption, resulting in the formation of concave structures. The as-prepared concave Pt nanocubes exhibit enhanced catalytic activity and stability towards oxidation of ethanol and formic acid in acidic solutions, compared to commercial Pt/C catalysts. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of DFT calculation, SEM images of concave Pt nanocubes, mass activity and stability characterization of the catalysts. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02349e

  13. The morphology of graphene on a non-developable concave substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuli; Ma, Yong; Wang, Shengtao; Zhou, Yanguang; Liu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The performances of graphene sheet in micro- and nano-electronics and devices are significantly affected by its morphology, which depends on the surface features of the supporting substrate. The substrates with non-developable concave surface are widely used with graphene sheet in applications but rarely studied. Therefore, a theoretical model is established based on the energy analysis to explain the adhesion mechanisms and predict the morphology of the graphene sheet on a non-developable concave surface. Four different morphologies of the graphene sheet are revealed, and the critical conditions are established to predict which morphology the graphene/substrate system belongs to. For the monolayer graphene sheets much larger than the concave of substrate, the final equilibrium morphology is dominated by the half cone angle of the concave. The graphene sheet conforms completely to the SiO2 substrate if the half cone angle is less than 27.5 ° and spans over the concave if the angel is larger than 27.5 ° . For graphene sheets smaller than the concave, they fall into the concave and the final morphology depends only on the ratio of graphene radius to concave radius. The monolayer graphene sheet conforms to the concave if the radius ratio is less than 0.51 and wrinkles if the ratio is larger than 0.51. The theoretical results are verified by a series of molecular dynamics simulations on various graphene/substrate systems. This work can provide guidelines to design high quality graphene-coated functional materials and devices, and can offer criterion for graphene-derived nano-electronics and nano-sensors.

  14. Research on adaptive temperature control in sound field induced by self-focused concave spherical transducer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiwen; Qian, Shengyou; Ding, Yajun

    2010-05-01

    Temperature control of hyperthermia treatments is generally implemented with multipoint feedback system comprised of phased-array transducer, which is complicated and high cost. Our simulations to the acoustic field induced by a self-focused concave spherical transducer (0.5MHz, 9cm aperture width, 8.0cm focal length) show that the distribution of temperature can keep the same "cigar shape" in the focal region during ultrasound insonation. Based on the characteristic of the temperature change, a two-dimensional model of a "cigar shape" tumor is designed and tested through numerical simulation. One single-point on the border of the "cigar shape" tumor is selected as the control target and is controlled at the temperature of 43 degrees C by using a self-tuning regulator (STR). Considering the nonlinear effects of biological medium, an accurate state-space model obtained via the finite Fourier integral transformation to the bioheat equation is presented and used for calculating temperature. Computer simulations were performed with the perfusion rates of 2.0kg/(m(3)s) and 4.5kg/(m(3)s) to the different targets, it was found that the temperatures on the border of the "cigar shape" tumor can achieve the desired temperature of 43 degrees C by control of one single-point. A larger perfusion rate requires a higher power output to obtain the same temperature elevation under the same insonation time and needs a higher cost for compensating the energy loss carried away by blood flow after steady state. The power output increases with the controlled region while achieving the same temperature at the same time. Especially, there is no overshoot during temperature elevation and no oscillation after steady state. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed approach may offers a way for obtaining a single-point, low-cost hyperthermia system. PMID:20156630

  15. Design and fabrication of concave-convex lens for head mounted virtual reality 3D glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zhaoyang; Cheng, Dewen; Hu, Yuan; Huang, Yifan; Wang, Yongtian

    2015-08-01

    As a kind of light-weighted and convenient tool to achieve stereoscopic vision, virtual reality glasses are gaining more popularity nowadays. For these glasses, molded plastic lenses are often adopted to handle both the imaging property and the cost of massive production. However, the as-built performance of the glass depends on both the optical design and the injection molding process, and maintaining the profile of the lens during injection molding process presents particular challenges. In this paper, optical design is combined with processing simulation analysis to obtain a design result suitable for injection molding. Based on the design and analysis results, different experiments are done using high-quality equipment to optimize the process parameters of injection molding. Finally, a single concave-convex lens is designed with a field-of-view of 90° for the virtual reality 3D glasses. The as-built profile error of the glass lens is controlled within 5μm, which indicates that the designed shape of the lens is fairly realized and the designed optical performance can thus be achieved.

  16. Concave nanomagnets: investigation of anisotropy properties and applications to nanomagnetic logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambson, Brian; Gu, Zheng; Monroe, Morgan; Dhuey, Scott; Scholl, Andreas; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2013-05-01

    Emerging applications for nanomagnets demand increasingly precise control of magnetic anisotropy. To date, many of the available mechanisms for controlling anisotropy have placed restrictions on a nanomagnet's material, size, or thickness, particularly when more than one easy axis is required. This gives rise to practical and fundamental challenges to designing nanomagnet-based devices. Here, we review an experimental investigation of configurational anisotropy in concave nanomagnets, motivated by the finding that, in concave geometries, small adjustments to a nanomagnet's shape result in large, predictable changes in its anisotropy profile. We first employ magnetooptical techniques to characterize nanomagnets with concave shapes. We then design and test a nanomagnetic logic architecture using concave nanomagnets that exhibits improved reliability relative to existing designs.

  17. Hydrogen adsorption-mediated synthesis of concave Pt nanocubes and their enhanced electrocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bang-An; Du, Jia-Huan; Sheng, Tian; Tian, Na; Xiao, Jing; Liu, Li; Xu, Bin-Bin; Zhou, Zhi-You; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2016-06-01

    Concave nanocubes are enclosed by high-index facets and have negative curvature; they are expected to have enhanced reactivity, as compared to nanocubes with flat surfaces. Herein, we propose and demonstrate a new strategy for the synthesis of concave Pt nanocubes with {hk0} high-index facets, by using a hydrogen adsorption-mediated electrochemical square-wave potential method. It was found that Pt atoms prefer to deposit on edge sites rather than terrace sites on Pt surfaces with intensive hydrogen adsorption, resulting in the formation of concave structures. The as-prepared concave Pt nanocubes exhibit enhanced catalytic activity and stability towards oxidation of ethanol and formic acid in acidic solutions, compared to commercial Pt/C catalysts. PMID:27211517

  18. High voltage photo-switch package module having encapsulation with profiled metallized concavities

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, James S; Sanders, David M; Hawkins, Steven A; Sampayan, Stephen A

    2015-05-05

    A photo-conductive switch package module having a photo-conductive substrate or wafer with opposing electrode-interface surfaces metalized with first metallic layers formed thereon, and encapsulated with a dielectric encapsulation material such as for example epoxy. The first metallic layers are exposed through the encapsulation via encapsulation concavities which have a known contour profile, such as a Rogowski edge profile. Second metallic layers are then formed to line the concavities and come in contact with the first metal layer, to form profiled and metalized encapsulation concavities which mitigate enhancement points at the edges of electrodes matingly seated in the concavities. One or more optical waveguides may also be bonded to the substrate for coupling light into the photo-conductive wafer, with the encapsulation also encapsulating the waveguides.

  19. Elementary Properties of Positive Concave Mappings With Applications to Network Planning and Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcante, Renato L. G.; Shen, Yuxiang; Stanczak, Slawomir

    2016-04-01

    This study presents novel methods for computing fixed points of positive concave mappings and for characterizing the existence of fixed points. These methods are particularly important in planning and optimization tasks in wireless networks. For example, previous studies have shown that the feasibility of a network design can be quickly evaluated by computing the fixed point of a concave mapping that is constructed based on many environmental and network control parameters such as the position of base stations, channel conditions, and antenna tilts. To address this and more general problems, given a positive concave mapping, we show two alternative but equivalent ways to construct a matrix that is guaranteed to have spectral radius strictly smaller than one if the mapping has a fixed point. This matrix is then used to build a new mapping that preserves the fixed point of the original positive concave mapping. We show that the standard fixed point iterations using the new mapping converges faster than the standard iterations applied to the original concave mapping. As exemplary applications of the proposed methods, we consider the problems of power and load planning in networks based on the orthogonal frequency division multiple access (OFDMA) technology.

  20. Concavity of the collective excitation branch of a Fermi gas in the BEC-BCS crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurkjian, H.; Castin, Y.; Sinatra, A.

    2016-01-01

    We study the concavity of the dispersion relation q ↦ωq of the bosonic excitations of a three-dimensional spin-1/2 unpolarized Fermi gas in the random-phase approximation. In the limit of small wave numbers q , we obtain analytically the spectrum up to order 5 in q . In the neighborhood of q =0 , a change in concavity between the convex Bose-Einstein condensation limit and the concave BCS limit takes place at Δ /μ ≃0.869 (1 /kFa ≃-0.144 ), where a is the scattering length between opposite spin fermions, kF is the Fermi wave number and Δ the gap according to BCS theory, and μ is the chemical potential. At that point the branch is concave due to a negative fifth-order term. Our results are supplemented by a numerical study that shows the border between the zone of the (q ,Δ ) plane where q ↦ωq is concave and the zone where it is convex.

  1. Concave Rhombic Dodecahedral Au Nanocatalyst with Multiple High-Index Facets for CO2 Reduction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Eun; Yang, Ki Dong; Yoon, Sang Moon; Ahn, Hyo-Yong; Lee, Yoon Young; Chang, Hyejin; Jeong, Dae Hong; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Kim, Mi Young; Nam, Ki Tae

    2015-08-25

    A concave rhombic dodecahedron (RD) gold nanoparticle was synthesized by adding 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) during growth from seeds. This shape is enclosed by stabilized facets of various high-indexes, such as (331), (221), and (553). Because it is driven thermodynamically and stabilized by 4-ATP ligands, the concave RD maintains its structure over a few months, even after rigorous electrochemical reactions. We discussed the mechanism of the shape evolution controlled by 4-ATP and found that both the binding energy of Au-S and the aromatic geometry of 4-ATP are major determinants of Au atom deposition during growth. As a possible application, we demonstrated that the concave RD exhibits superior electrocatalytic performance for the selective conversion of CO2 to CO in aqueous solution. PMID:26173084

  2. Pt3Co concave nanocubes: synthesis, formation understanding, and enhanced catalytic activity toward hydrogenation of styrene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenyu; Lin, Cuikun; Zhang, Lihua; Quan, Zewei; Sun, Kai; Zhao, Bo; Wang, Feng; Porter, Nathan; Wang, Yuxuan; Fang, Jiye

    2014-02-01

    We report a facile synthesis route to prepare high-quality Pt3Co nanocubes with a concave structure, and further demonstrate that these concave Pt3Co nanocubes are terminated with high-index crystal facets. The success of this preparation is highly dependent on an appropriate nucleation process with a successively anisotropic overgrowth and a preservation of the resultant high-index planes by control binding of oleyl-amine/oleic acid with a fine-tuned composition. Using a hydrogenation of styrene as a model reaction, these Pt3Co concave nanocubes as a new class of nanocatalysts with more open structure and active atomic sites located on their high-index crystallographic planes exhibit an enhanced catalytic activity in comparison with low-indexed surface terminated Pt3Co nanocubes in similar size. PMID:24382713

  3. Rapid fabrication of a microdevice with concave microwells and its application in embryoid body formation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Youchun; Xie, Fengbo; Qiu, Tian; Xie, Lan; Xing, Wanli; Cheng, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Here, we report a novel method for the fabrication of polydimethylsiloxane microdevices with complicated 3-D structures, such as concave and crater shapes, using an easily machined polymethyl methacrylate mold combined with a one-step molding process. The procedure presented here enables rapid preparation of complex 3-D microstructures varying in shape and dimensions. To regulate embryoid body (EB) formation, we fabricated a microfluidic device with an array of concave microwells and found that EBs growing in microwells maintained their shape, viability, and a high degree of homogeneity. We believe that this novel method provides an alternative for rapid prototyping, especially in fabricating devices with curved 3-D microstructures. PMID:22662100

  4. An acoustical analysis of a room with a concave dome ceiling element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utami, Sentagi S.

    2001-05-01

    Concave surfaces are often considered detrimental in room acoustics, especially because of the impact they have on the distribution of sound energy. This paper explores certain acoustical characteristics and anomalies found in spaces below concave dome ceiling elements. The architectural design of the Darusshollah mosque in East Java, Indonesia is used as a case study with specific spatial and functional concerns. Investigations of the mosque have been conducted through both a 1:12 scale model and a computer model that utilizes ray tracing and image source methods. Analysis techniques are discussed. Results are presented and compared to provide useful insights into the acoustics of such distinctive environments.

  5. Nanoscale aluminum concaves for light-trapping in organic thin-films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goszczak, Arkadiusz Jarosław; Adam, Jost; Cielecki, Paweł Piotr; Fiutowski, Jacek; Rubahn, Horst-Günter; Madsen, Morten

    2016-07-01

    Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates, fabricated from oxalic acid and phosphoric acid, lead to non-periodic nanoscale concave structures in their underlying aluminum layer, which are investigated for their field-enhancement properties by applying a thin-film polymer coating based laser ablation technique. Local ablation spots, corresponding to field enhancement on the ridge edges of the aluminum concave nanostructures, are observed in surface-covering polymer films, and confirmed with FDTD studies. The field enhancement leads to improved light absorption in the applied polymer layers, which may be used as an efficient method for enhancing the power conversion efficiency of organic solar cells.

  6. Heat transfer and forces on concave surfaces in free molecule flow.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, C.

    1971-01-01

    A Monte Carlo modeling technique is described for mathematically simulating free molecular flows over a concave spherical surface and a concave cylindrical surface of finite length. The half-angle of the surfaces may vary from 0 to 90 degrees, and the incident flow may have an arbitrary speed ratio and an arbitrary angle of attack. Partial diffuse reflection and imperfect energy accommodation for molecules colliding with the surfaces are also considered. Results of heat transfer, drag and lift coefficients are presented for a variety of flow conditions. The present Monte Carlo results are shown to be in very good agreement with certain available theoretical solutions.

  7. Au@Pd core-shell nanobricks with concave structures and their catalysis of ethanol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjin; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Shengchun; Ding, Bingjun; Song, Xiaoping

    2013-10-01

    Au@Pd core-shell nanobricks (CNBs) with concave surfaces and Pd shells with a thickness of approximately 5 nm were synthesized by co-reduction of HAuCl4 and H2 PdCl4 in the presence of Au seeds and Ag ions. These as-synthesized concave CNBs exhibit significantly enhanced catalytic activity for the electrooxidation of ethanol in alkaline media compared to the commercially-used Pd black. The improved performance of the Au@Pd CNBs can be attributed to the exposed stepped surfaces, high-index facets, and the synergistic effects of the core and shell metals. PMID:23929810

  8. Hematite concave nanocubes and their superior catalytic activity for low temperature CO oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Hanfeng; Jiang, Xinde; Qi, Zhengbing; Chen, Wei; Wu, Zhengtao; Xu, Binbin; Wang, Zhoucheng; Mi, Jinxiao; Li, Qingbiao

    2014-06-01

    Hematite (α-Fe2O3) concave nanocubes bound by high-index {134&cmb.macr;4} and {123&cmb.macr;8} facets were synthesized and their catalytic activity for CO oxidation were also investigated.Hematite (α-Fe2O3) concave nanocubes bound by high-index {134&cmb.macr;4} and {123&cmb.macr;8} facets were synthesized and their catalytic activity for CO oxidation were also investigated. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00552j

  9. The Scallop's Eye--A Concave Mirror in the Context of Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colicchia, Giuseppe; Waltner, Christine; Hopf, Martin; Wiesner, Hartmut

    2009-01-01

    Teaching physics in the context of medicine or biology is a way to generate students' interest in physics. A more uncommon type of eye, the scallop's eye (an eye with a spherical concave mirror, which is similar to a Newtonian or Schmidt telescope) and the image-forming mechanism in this eye are described. Also, a simple eye model, which can…

  10. Stable anisotropic plasma confinement in magnetic configurations with convex-concave field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsventoukh, M. M.

    2014-02-01

    It is shown that a combination of the convex and the concave part of a field line provides a strong stabilizing action against convective (flute-interchange) plasma instability (Tsventoukh 2011 Nucl. Fusion 51 112002). This results in internal peaking of the stable plasma pressure profile that is calculated from the collisionless kinetic stability criterion for any magnetic confinement system with combination of mirrors and cusps. Connection of the convex and concave field line parts results in a reduction of the space charge that drives the unstable E × B motion, as there is an opposite direction of the particle drift in a non-uniform field at convex and concave field lines. The pressure peaking arises at the minimum of the second adiabatic invariant J that takes place at the ‘middle’ of a tandem mirror-cusp transverse cross-section. The position of the minimum in J varies with the particle pitch angle that results in a shift of the peaking position depending on plasma anisotropy. This allows one to improve a stable peaked pressure profile at a convex-concave field by changing the plasma anisotropy over the trap cross-section. Examples of such anisotropic distribution functions are found that give an additional substantial enhancement in the maximal central pressure. Furthermore, the shape of new calculated stable profiles has a wide central plasma layer instead of a narrow peak.

  11. Synthesis of concave gold nanocuboids with high-index facets and their enhanced catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Lidong; Peng, Yi; Yue, Yonghai; Hu, Ye; Liang, Xiu; Yin, Penggang; Guo, Lin

    2015-07-25

    Novel concave gold nanocuboids bounded by 24 high-index {611} facets are synthesized using the seed-mediated growth method via an overgrowth mechanism. The as-synthesized products demonstrated greatly enhanced catalytic activity for the electro-oxidation of glucose and the reduction of 4-nitrothiophenol (4-NTP) under a laser. PMID:26097908

  12. A method to search for large-scale concavities in asteroid shape models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devogèle, M.; Rivet, J. P.; Tanga, P.; Bendjoya, Ph.; Surdej, J.; Bartczak, P.; Hanus, J.

    2015-11-01

    Photometric light-curve inversion of minor planets has proven to produce a unique model solution only under the hypothesis that the asteroid is convex. However, it was suggested that the resulting shape model, for the case of non-convex asteroids, is the convex-hull of the true asteroid non-convex shape. While a convex shape is already useful to provide the overall aspect of the target, much information about real shapes is missed, as we know that asteroids are very irregular. It is a commonly accepted evidence that large flat areas sometimes appearing on shapes derived from light curves correspond to concave areas, but this information has not been further explored and exploited so far. We present in this paper a method that allows to predict the presence of concavities from such flat regions. This method analyses the distribution of the local normals to the facets composing shape models to predict the presence of abnormally large flat surfaces. In order to test our approach, we consider here its application to a large family of synthetic asteroid shapes, and to real asteroids with large-scale concavities, whose detailed shape is known by other kinds of observations (radar and spacecraft encounters). The method that we propose has proven to be reliable and capable of providing a qualitative indication of the relevance of concavities on well-constrained asteroid shapes derived from purely photometric data sets.

  13. Energetic protons from an ultraintense laser interacting with a symmetric parabolic concave target

    SciTech Connect

    Ali Bake, Muhammad; Xie Baisong; Shan Zhang; Wang Hongyu

    2013-03-15

    A scheme of a symmetric parabolic concave target irradiated by an ultraintense laser for efficient proton acceleration is proposed and involved problem is studied by using two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. Results indicate that on one hand, the laser field is focused by the front parabolic concave surface of target and, on the other hand, more energetic hot electrons will traverse to the rear surface of target due to concave shape. The space-charge-separation field, induced by those hot electrons escaping form parabolic concave rear surface of target, can accelerate protons to relatively high energy with narrow energy spread. The dependence of the efficiency of proton acceleration on the target parameters is examined, and the optimal target parameters are obtained. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the proton peak energy and energy spread are greatly enhanced when the target parameters are chosen optimal, for example, a proton bunch with the maximum energy {approx}27.5 MeV and energy spread {approx}7% can be generated. Some implications of our results to experiments and comparisons with the other works are also discussed briefly.

  14. Bicuspid aortic valve hemodynamics does not promote remodeling in porcine aortic wall concavity

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Samantha K; Moore, Alison N; Sucosky, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of type-I left-right bicuspid aortic valve (LR-BAV) hemodynamic stresses in the remodeling of the thoracic ascending aorta (AA) concavity, in the absence of underlying genetic or structural defects. METHODS: Transient wall shear stress (WSS) profiles in the concavity of tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) and LR-BAV AAs were obtained computationally. Tissue specimens excised from the concavity of normal (non-dilated) porcine AAs were subjected for 48 h to those stress environments using a shear stress bioreactor. Tissue remodeling was characterized in terms of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and activity via immunostaining and gelatin zymography. RESULTS: Immunostaining semi-quantification results indicated no significant difference in MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression between the tissue groups exposed to TAV and LR-BAV AA WSS (P = 0.80 and P = 0.19, respectively). Zymography densitometry revealed no difference in MMP-2 activity (total activity, active form and latent form) between the groups subjected to TAV AA and LR-BAV AA WSS (P = 0.08, P = 0.15 and P = 0.59, respectively). CONCLUSION: The hemodynamic stress environment present in the concavity of type-I LR-BAV AA does not cause any significant change in proteolytic enzyme expression and activity as compared to that present in the TAV AA. PMID:26839660

  15. Exceptional methanol electro-oxidation activity by bimetallic concave and dendritic Pt-Cu nanocrystals catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying-Xia; Zhou, Hui-Jing; Sun, Ping-Chuan; Chen, Tie-Hong

    2014-01-01

    PtCux (x = 1, 2 and 3) bimetallic nanocrystals with concave surface and dendritic morphology were prepared and used as electrocatalysts in methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. The bimetallic nanocrystals were synthesized via one-pot co-reduction of H2PtCl6 and Cu(acac)2 by oleylamine and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) in an autoclave at 180 °C. The concave dendritic bimetallic nanostructure consisted of a core rich in Cu and nanodendrites rich in Pt, which was formed via galvanic replacement of Cu by Pt. It was found that PVP played an important role in initiating, facilitating, and directing the replacement reaction. The electrochemical properties of the PtCux were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (CA). The concave dendritic PtCu2/C nanocrystals exhibited exceptionally high activity and strong poisoning resistance in MOR. At 0.75 V (vs. reversible hydrogen electrode, RHE) the mass activity and specific activity of PtCu2/C were 3.3 and 4.1 times higher than those of the commercial Pt/C catalysts, respectively. The enhanced catalytic activity could be attributed to the unique concave dendritic morphology of the bimetallic nanocrystals.

  16. Slow approach to steady motion of a concave body in a free-molecular gas.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Tetsuro; Arai, Junichi; Kawano, Satoyuki

    2015-07-01

    A body in a free-molecular gas accelerated by a constant external force is considered on the basis of kinetic theory. The body is an infinitely long rectangular hollow column with one face removed, and thus it has a squarish U-shaped cross section. The concave part of the body points toward the direction of motion, and thus the gas molecules may be trapped in the concavity. Gas molecules undergo diffuse reflection on a base part, whereas specular reflection on two lateral parts. It is numerically shown that the velocity of the body approaches a terminal velocity, for which a drag force exerted by the gas counterbalances the external force, in such a way that their difference decreases in proportion to the inverse square of time for a large time. This rate of approach is slower than the known rate proportional to the inverse cube of time in the case of a body without concavity [Aoki et al., Phys. Rev. E 80, 016309 (2009)]. Based on the detailed investigation on the velocity distribution function of gas molecules impinging on the body, it is clarified that the concavity prevents some molecules from escaping to infinity. This trapping enhances the effect of recollision between the body and the gas molecules, which is the cause of the inverse power laws, and thus leads to the slower approach. PMID:26274147

  17. Splitting of overlapping nuclei guided by robust combinations of concavity points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plissiti, Marina E.; Louka, Eleni; Nikou, Christophoros

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we propose a novel and robust method for the accurate separation of elliptical overlapped nuclei in microscopic images. The method is based on both the information provided by the global boundary of the nuclei cluster and the detection of concavity points along this boundary. The number of the nuclei and the area of each nucleus included in the cluster are estimated automatically by exploiting the different parts of the cluster boundary demarcated by the concavity points. More specifically, based on the set of concavity points detected in the image of the clustered nuclei, all the possible configurations of candidate ellipses that fit to them are estimated by least squares fitting. For each configuration, an index measuring the fitting residual is computed and the configuration providing the minimum error is selected. The method may successfully separate multiple (more than two) clustered nuclei as the fitting residual is a robust indicator of the number of overlapping elliptical structures even if many erroneous concavity points are present due to noise. Moreover, the algorithm has been evaluated on cytological images of conventional Pap smears and compares favorably with state of the art methods both in terms of accuracy and execution time.

  18. Advanced micromachining of concave microwells for long term on-chip culture of multicellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianqing; Chien, Chia-Chi; Parkinson, Luke; Thierry, Benjamin

    2014-06-11

    A novel approach based on advanced micromachining is demonstrated to fabricate concave microwell arrays for the formation of high quality multicellular tumor spheroids. Microfabricated molds were prepared using a state-of-the-art CNC machining center, containing arrays of 3D convex micropillars with size ranging from 150 μm to 600 μm. Microscopic imaging of the micropillars machined on the mold showed smooth, curved microfeatures of a dramatic 3D shape. Agarose microwells could be easily replicated from the metallic molds. EMT-6 tumor cells seeded in the primary macrowell sedimented efficiently to the bottom of the concave microwells and formed multicellular spheroids within 48 h. Dense and homogeneous multicellular spheroids were obtained after 10 days of culture, confirming the suitability of the proposed approach. To facilitate long term spheroid culture and reliable on-chip drug assay, polydimethylsiloxane microwells were also replicated from the metallic molds. A solvent swelling method was adapted and optimized to Pluronic F127 towards physically entrapping the block copolymer molecules within the polydimethylsiloxane network and in turn to improve long term cell-binding resistance. Homogeneous multicellular spheroids were efficiently formed in the concave microwells and on-chip drug assays could be reliably carried out using curcumin as a model anti-cancer drug. Advanced micromachining provides an excellent technological solution to the fabrication of high quality concave microwells. PMID:24773458

  19. Slow approach to steady motion of a concave body in a free-molecular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Tetsuro; Arai, Junichi; Kawano, Satoyuki

    2015-07-01

    A body in a free-molecular gas accelerated by a constant external force is considered on the basis of kinetic theory. The body is an infinitely long rectangular hollow column with one face removed, and thus it has a squarish U -shaped cross section. The concave part of the body points toward the direction of motion, and thus the gas molecules may be trapped in the concavity. Gas molecules undergo diffuse reflection on a base part, whereas specular reflection on two lateral parts. It is numerically shown that the velocity of the body approaches a terminal velocity, for which a drag force exerted by the gas counterbalances the external force, in such a way that their difference decreases in proportion to the inverse square of time for a large time. This rate of approach is slower than the known rate proportional to the inverse cube of time in the case of a body without concavity [Aoki et al., Phys. Rev. E 80, 016309 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevE.80.016309]. Based on the detailed investigation on the velocity distribution function of gas molecules impinging on the body, it is clarified that the concavity prevents some molecules from escaping to infinity. This trapping enhances the effect of recollision between the body and the gas molecules, which is the cause of the inverse power laws, and thus leads to the slower approach.

  20. Highly concave platinum nanoframes with high-index facets and enhanced electrocatalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Xia, Bao Yu; Wu, Hao Bin; Wang, Xin; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2013-11-18

    Deeply excavated: Platinum nanoframes with highly concave {740} facets are synthesized directly by a facile oleylamine-assisted solvothermal method. Because of the unique structure and exposed high-index facets, the as-prepared Pt nanoframes exhibit very high electrocatalytic activity and remarkable stability for the oxygen reduction reaction and the oxidation of methanol and formic acid. PMID:24115319

  1. A study of the depth and size of concave cube Au nanoparticles as highly sensitive SERS probes.

    PubMed

    Romo-Herrera, J M; González, A L; Guerrini, L; Castiello, F R; Alonso-Nuñez, G; Contreras, O E; Alvarez-Puebla, R A

    2016-04-01

    High and uniform near fields are localized at the eight similar sharp corners of cubic gold nanoparticles. Moreover, by introducing concavity in the particle lateral planes, such field intensities can be further increased and tuned in the near infrared region without altering the overall size of the nanoparticles. Herein, we perform a thorough investigation of the morphological, crystallographic and plasmonic properties of concave gold nanocubes (GNCs) in the sub-70 nm size range, for their potential application as highly efficient SERS substrates in size-limiting cases. Theoretical calculations indicate that the highest increment of the near-field is located at the eight sharp tips and, interestingly, a medium near-field increment is also activated over the volume next to the concave surface. Remarkably, the plasmonic response of the concave cubic morphology showed great sensitivity to the concavity degree. Experimental SERS analysis nicely matches the outcome of the theoretical model, confirming that medium-sized concave GNCs (35 nm side length) possess the highest SERS activity upon excitation with a 633 nm laser, whereas larger 61 nm side concave GNCs dominate the optical response at 785 nm. Due to their size-intensity trade off, we envision that such small concave gold nanocubes can provide a highly active and efficient SERS platform for size-limiting applications, especially when near infrared excitations are required. PMID:26979125

  2. Maximally dense packings of two-dimensional convex and concave noncircular particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, Steven; Jiao, Yang; Torquato, Salvatore

    2012-09-01

    Dense packings of hard particles have important applications in many fields, including condensed matter physics, discrete geometry, and cell biology. In this paper, we employ a stochastic search implementation of the Torquato-Jiao adaptive-shrinking-cell (ASC) optimization scheme [Nature (London)NATUAS0028-083610.1038/nature08239 460, 876 (2009)] to find maximally dense particle packings in d-dimensional Euclidean space Rd. While the original implementation was designed to study spheres and convex polyhedra in d≥3, our implementation focuses on d=2 and extends the algorithm to include both concave polygons and certain complex convex or concave nonpolygonal particle shapes. We verify the robustness of this packing protocol by successfully reproducing the known putative optimal packings of congruent copies of regular pentagons and octagons, then employ it to suggest dense packing arrangements of congruent copies of certain families of concave crosses, convex and concave curved triangles (incorporating shapes resembling the Mercedes-Benz logo), and “moonlike” shapes. Analytical constructions are determined subsequently to obtain the densest known packings of these particle shapes. For the examples considered, we find that the densest packings of both convex and concave particles with central symmetry are achieved by their corresponding optimal Bravais lattice packings; for particles lacking central symmetry, the densest packings obtained are nonlattice periodic packings, which are consistent with recently-proposed general organizing principles for hard particles. Moreover, we find that the densest known packings of certain curved triangles are periodic with a four-particle basis, and we find that the densest known periodic packings of certain moonlike shapes possess no inherent symmetries. Our work adds to the growing evidence that particle shape can be used as a tuning parameter to achieve a diversity of packing structures.

  3. Maximally dense packings of two-dimensional convex and concave noncircular particles.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Steven; Jiao, Yang; Torquato, Salvatore

    2012-09-01

    Dense packings of hard particles have important applications in many fields, including condensed matter physics, discrete geometry, and cell biology. In this paper, we employ a stochastic search implementation of the Torquato-Jiao adaptive-shrinking-cell (ASC) optimization scheme [Nature (London) 460, 876 (2009)] to find maximally dense particle packings in d-dimensional Euclidean space R(d). While the original implementation was designed to study spheres and convex polyhedra in d≥3, our implementation focuses on d=2 and extends the algorithm to include both concave polygons and certain complex convex or concave nonpolygonal particle shapes. We verify the robustness of this packing protocol by successfully reproducing the known putative optimal packings of congruent copies of regular pentagons and octagons, then employ it to suggest dense packing arrangements of congruent copies of certain families of concave crosses, convex and concave curved triangles (incorporating shapes resembling the Mercedes-Benz logo), and "moonlike" shapes. Analytical constructions are determined subsequently to obtain the densest known packings of these particle shapes. For the examples considered, we find that the densest packings of both convex and concave particles with central symmetry are achieved by their corresponding optimal Bravais lattice packings; for particles lacking central symmetry, the densest packings obtained are nonlattice periodic packings, which are consistent with recently-proposed general organizing principles for hard particles. Moreover, we find that the densest known packings of certain curved triangles are periodic with a four-particle basis, and we find that the densest known periodic packings of certain moonlike shapes possess no inherent symmetries. Our work adds to the growing evidence that particle shape can be used as a tuning parameter to achieve a diversity of packing structures. PMID:23030907

  4. Navier-Stokes Computations With One-Equation Turbulence Model for Flows Along Concave Wall Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Chi R.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the use of a time-marching three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equation numerical solver with a one-equation turbulence model to simulate the flow fields developed along concave wall surfaces without and with a downstream extension flat wall surface. The 3-D Navier- Stokes numerical solver came from the NASA Glenn-HT code. The one-equation turbulence model was derived from the Spalart and Allmaras model. The computational approach was first calibrated with the computations of the velocity and Reynolds shear stress profiles of a steady flat plate boundary layer flow. The computational approach was then used to simulate developing boundary layer flows along concave wall surfaces without and with a downstream extension wall. The author investigated the computational results of surface friction factors, near surface velocity components, near wall temperatures, and a turbulent shear stress component in terms of turbulence modeling, computational mesh configurations, inlet turbulence level, and time iteration step. The computational results were compared with existing measurements of skin friction factors, velocity components, and shear stresses of the developing boundary layer flows. With a fine computational mesh and a one-equation model, the computational approach could predict accurately the skin friction factors, near surface velocity and temperature, and shear stress within the flows. The computed velocity components and shear stresses also showed the vortices effect on the velocity variations over a concave wall. The computed eddy viscosities at the near wall locations were also compared with the results from a two equation turbulence modeling technique. The inlet turbulence length scale was found to have little effect on the eddy viscosities at locations near the concave wall surface. The eddy viscosities, from the one-equation and two-equation modeling, were comparable at most stream-wise stations. The present one

  5. Rapid prototyping of concave microwells for the formation of 3D multicellular cancer aggregates for drug screening

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Ting-Yuan; Wang, Zhe; Bai, Jing; Sun, Wei; Peng, Weng Kung; Huang, Ruby Yun-Ju; Thiery, Jean-Paul; Kamm, Roger D.

    2014-01-01

    Microwell technology has revolutionized many aspects of in vitro cellular studies from 2-dimensional (2D) traditional cultures to 3-dimensional (3D) in vivo-like functional assays. However, existing lithography-based approaches are often costly and time-consuming. This study presents a rapid, low-cost prototyping method of CO2 laser ablation of a conventional untreated culture dish to create concave microwells used for generating multicellular aggregates, which can be readily available for general laboratories. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and polystyrene (PS) microwells were investigated, and each produced distinctive microwell features. Among these three materials, PS cell culture dishes produced the optimal surface smoothness and roundness. A549 lung cancer cells were grown to form cancer aggregates of controllable size from ~40 to ~80 μm in PS microwells. Functional assays of spheroids were performed to study migration on 2D substrates and in 3D hydrogel conditions as a step towards recapitulating the dissemination of cancer cells. Preclinical anti-cancer drug screening was investigated and revealed considerable differences between 2D and 3D conditions, indicating the importance of assay type as well as the utility of the present approach. PMID:23983140

  6. Rapid prototyping of concave microwells for the formation of 3D multicellular cancer aggregates for drug screening.

    PubMed

    Tu, Ting-Yuan; Wang, Zhe; Bai, Jing; Sun, Wei; Peng, Weng Kung; Huang, Ruby Yun-Ju; Thiery, Jean-Paul; Kamm, Roger D

    2014-04-01

    Microwell technology has revolutionized many aspects of in vitro cellular studies from 2D traditional cultures to 3D in vivo-like functional assays. However, existing lithography-based approaches are often costly and time-consuming. This study presents a rapid, low-cost prototyping method of CO2 laser ablation of a conventional untreated culture dish to create concave microwells used for generating multicellular aggregates, which can be readily available for general laboratories. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and polystyrene (PS) microwells are investigated, and each produces distinctive microwell features. Among these three materials, PS cell culture dishes produce the optimal surface smoothness and roundness. A549 lung cancer cells are grown to form cancer aggregates of controllable size from ≈40 to ≈80 μm in PS microwells. Functional assays of spheroids are performed to study migration on 2D substrates and in 3D hydrogel conditions as a step towards recapitulating the dissemination of cancer cells. Preclinical anti-cancer drug screening is investigated and reveals considerable differences between 2D and 3D conditions, indicating the importance of assay type as well as the utility of the present approach. PMID:23983140

  7. Understanding the formation of CuS concave superstructures with peroxidase-like activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Weiwei; Jia, Huimin; Li, Xiaoxiao; Lei, Yan; Li, Jing; Zhao, Hongxiao; Mi, Liwei; Zhang, Lizhi; Zheng, Zhi

    2012-05-01

    Copper sulfide (CuS) concave polyhedral superstructures (CPSs) have been successfully prepared in an ethanolic solution by a simple solvothermal reaction without the use of surfactants or templates. Two typical well defined, high symmetry CuS concave polyhedrons, forming a concave truncated cuboctahedron and icosahedron were prepared. The effect of the reaction time, temperature and different Cu ion and sulfur sources on the formation of CuS CPSs were investigated and a possible formation mechanism was proposed and discussed based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. More importantly, we found, for the first time, that the CuS CPSs exhibit intrinsic peroxidase-like activity, as they can quickly catalyze the oxidation of typical horseradish peroxidase (HRP) substrates, 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and o-phenylenediamine (OPD), in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. In addition to the recent discoveries regarding peroxidase mimetics on Fe3O4 NPs and carbon nanostructures, our findings suggest a new kind of candidate for peroxidase mimics. This may open up a new application field of CuS micro-nano structures in biodetection, biocatalysis and environmental monitoring.Copper sulfide (CuS) concave polyhedral superstructures (CPSs) have been successfully prepared in an ethanolic solution by a simple solvothermal reaction without the use of surfactants or templates. Two typical well defined, high symmetry CuS concave polyhedrons, forming a concave truncated cuboctahedron and icosahedron were prepared. The effect of the reaction time, temperature and different Cu ion and sulfur sources on the formation of CuS CPSs were investigated and a possible formation mechanism was proposed and discussed based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. More importantly, we found, for the first time, that the CuS CPSs exhibit intrinsic peroxidase-like activity, as they can quickly catalyze the oxidation of typical horseradish peroxidase (HRP) substrates, 3

  8. A study of the depth and size of concave cube Au nanoparticles as highly sensitive SERS probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romo-Herrera, J. M.; González, A. L.; Guerrini, L.; Castiello, F. R.; Alonso-Nuñez, G.; Contreras, O. E.; Alvarez-Puebla, R. A.

    2016-03-01

    High and uniform near fields are localized at the eight similar sharp corners of cubic gold nanoparticles. Moreover, by introducing concavity in the particle lateral planes, such field intensities can be further increased and tuned in the near infrared region without altering the overall size of the nanoparticles. Herein, we perform a thorough investigation of the morphological, crystallographic and plasmonic properties of concave gold nanocubes (GNCs) in the sub-70 nm size range, for their potential application as highly efficient SERS substrates in size-limiting cases. Theoretical calculations indicate that the highest increment of the near-field is located at the eight sharp tips and, interestingly, a medium near-field increment is also activated over the volume next to the concave surface. Remarkably, the plasmonic response of the concave cubic morphology showed great sensitivity to the concavity degree. Experimental SERS analysis nicely matches the outcome of the theoretical model, confirming that medium-sized concave GNCs (35 nm side length) possess the highest SERS activity upon excitation with a 633 nm laser, whereas larger 61 nm side concave GNCs dominate the optical response at 785 nm. Due to their size-intensity trade off, we envision that such small concave gold nanocubes can provide a highly active and efficient SERS platform for size-limiting applications, especially when near infrared excitations are required.High and uniform near fields are localized at the eight similar sharp corners of cubic gold nanoparticles. Moreover, by introducing concavity in the particle lateral planes, such field intensities can be further increased and tuned in the near infrared region without altering the overall size of the nanoparticles. Herein, we perform a thorough investigation of the morphological, crystallographic and plasmonic properties of concave gold nanocubes (GNCs) in the sub-70 nm size range, for their potential application as highly efficient SERS

  9. Experimental study of the laminar-turbulent transition of a concave wall in a parallel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bippes, H.

    1978-01-01

    The instability of the laminar boundary layer flow along a concave wall was studied. Observations of these three-dimensional boundary layer phenomena were made using the hydrogen-bubble visualization technique. With the application of stereo-photogrammetric methods in the air-water system it was possible to investigate the flow processes qualitatively and quantitatively. In the case of a concave wall of sufficient curvature, a primary instability occurs first in the form of Goertler vortices with wave lengths depending upon the boundary layer thickness and the wall curvature. At the onset the amplification rate is in agreement with the linear theory. Later, during the non-linear amplification stage, periodic spanwise vorticity concentrations develop in the low velocity region between the longitudinal vortices. Then a meandering motion of the longitudinal vortex streets subsequently ensues, leading to turbulence.

  10. Diffraction of a two-shock configuration by a concave cylindrical surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezkina, M. K.; Krasovskaya, I. V.; Ofengeĭm, D. Kh.

    2007-10-01

    Diffraction of a two-shock configuration by a concave cylindrical surface with a continuously varying angle of diffraction in a perfect (inviscid and non-heat-conducting) gas is numerically investigated. Peculiarities of flow formation in the perturbed region due to a large initial angle of diffraction are revealed. The reasons for the appearance of the reverse flow over the cylindrical surface, which causes a vortex, are found. The influence of the vortex on the behavior of the loose end of the TU layer (slipstream) is studied. It is shown that the structure of the loose end of the TU layer is determined by vortex-related mixing in the gas. The nonstationary interaction of the diffracting shock wave and a sublayer shock with a concave cylindrical wall and the symmetry plane, which is accompanied by a change in the type of reflection, is examined.

  11. Heat transfer and flow characteristics of jets impinging on a concave hemispherical plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrycak, P.

    1982-01-01

    The present study is concerned with an experimental investigation of the flow characteristics and heat transfer from turbulent air jets impinging normally on a concave hemispherical plate (CHP). It is found that the incompressible, turbulent jets impinging on a CHP are in many respects similar to the jets impinging on a flat plate. The observed differences are due to effects of curvature and to a slightly higher turbulence level inside of the CHP. Attention is given to the experimental apparatus, aspects of inner boundary layer development, the maximum velocity decay in a wall jet, the derivation of a maximum velocity decay formula, the influence of curvature on stagnation point heat transfer, and heat transfer calculations for a concave hemispherical plate.

  12. Precursor salt assisted syntheses of high-index faceted concave hexagon and nanorod-like polyoxometalates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Jaya; Ganguly, Mainak; Mondal, Chanchal; Negishi, Yuichi; Pal, Tarasankar

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes an effective method for a precursor salt assisted fabrication and reshaping of two different polyoxometalates [(NH4)2Cu(MoO4)2 (ACM) and Cu3(MoO4)2(OH)2 (CMOH)] into five distinctive shapes through straightforward and indirect routes. Explicit regulation of the structural arrangements of ACM and CMOH has been studied in detail with altered precursor salt concentration employing our laboratory developed modified hydrothermal (MHT) method. Morphologically different ACM 3D architectures are evolved with higher molybdate concentration, whereas 1D growth of CMOH is observed with increased copper concentration. Interesting morphological transformation of the products has been accomplished employing one precursor salt at a time without using any other foreign reagent. It has been proven that large ACMs become labile in the presence of incoming Cu(ii) and NH4+ ions of the precursor salts. A new strategy for the conversion of faceted ACMs (hexagonal plate, circular plate and hollow flower) to exclusive CMOH nanorods through a Cu(ii) assisted reaction has been adopted. According to thermodynamic consideration, the synthesis of rare concave nanostructures with high index facet is still challenging due to their higher reactivity. In this study, concave hexagonal ACM with high index facet {hkl} has been successfully prepared for the first time from hexagonal ACM through simple etching with ammonium heptamolybdate (AHM), which is another precursor salt. Hexagonal ACM corrugates to a concave hexagon because of the higher reactivity of the {001} crystal plane than that of the {010} plane. It has been shown that high index facet exposed concave hexagonal ACM serves as a better catalyst for the photodegradation of dye than the other microstructures enclosed by low index facets.This paper describes an effective method for a precursor salt assisted fabrication and reshaping of two different polyoxometalates [(NH4)2Cu(MoO4)2 (ACM) and Cu3(MoO4)2(OH)2 (CMOH)] into

  13. Effects of free-stream turbulence intensity on a boundary layer recovering from concave curvature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kestoras, M. D.; Simon, T. W.

    1995-04-01

    In an attempt to characterize the turbulence characteristics of the high free-stream turbulence (TI approximately 8%) flow, several experiments are conducted on a flat recovery wall downstream of sustained concave curvature in the presence of such flow. A turbulent boundary layer that grows from the leading edge of a concave wall, then passes onto a downstream flat wall is considered. The results indicate that turbulence intensities increase profoundly in the outer region of the boundary layer over the recovery wall. The recovery wall is found to be lifted off by near-wall turbulent eddies while a 'stabilized' region forms near the wall. Contrary to the low-free-stream turbulence intensity flow, turbulent eddies penetrate the outer parts of the 'stabilized' region. The behavior of the Stanton numbers as well as the velocity distribution on the core of the flow are also accounted for.

  14. Reproducible and recyclable SERS substrates: Flower-like Ag structures with concave surfaces formed by electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Juncao; Shu, Shiwei; Li, Jianfu; Huang, Chao; Li, Yang Yang; Zhang, Rui-Qin

    2015-04-01

    Direct synthesis of three-dimensional Ag structures on solid substrates for the purposes of producing reproducible and recyclable surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) applications remains challenging. In this work, flower-like Ag structures with concave surfaces (FACS) were successfully electrodeposited onto ITO glass using the double-potentiostatic method. The FACS, with an enhancement factor of the order of 108, exhibited a SERS signal intensity 3.3 times stronger than that measured from Ag nanostructures without concave surfaces. A cleaning procedure involving lengthy immersion of the sample in ethanol and KNO3 was proposed to recycle the substrate and confirmed by using rhodamine 6G, adenine, and 4-aminothiophenol as target molecules. The findings can help to advance the practical applications of Ag nanostructure-based SERS substrates.

  15. Controlled growth of concave gold nanobars with high surface-enhanced Raman-scattering and excellent catalytic activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin-fei; Zhang, Chun-yang

    2013-07-01

    Highly monodispersed concave gold nanobars with 24 high-index {730} facets are synthesized through a seed-mediated growth in aqueous solution. The transformation from the truncated rectangular nanobars to rectangular nanobars, then transitional products, and final concave rectangular nanobars is observed with the fine control of silver nitrate in the growth solution, and their corresponding transverse surface plasmons can be well tuned, too. These concave gold nanobars exhibit good optical property, excellent catalytic activity, and high surface-enhanced Raman-scattering (SERS) response. PMID:23689955

  16. Effects of free-stream turbulence intensity on a boundary layer recovering from concave curvature effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kestoras, M.D.; Simon, T.W.

    1995-04-01

    Experiments are conducted on a flat recovery wall downstream of sustained concave curvature in the presence of high free-stream turbulence (TI {approximately} 8%). This flow simulates some of the features of the flow on the latter parts of the pressure surface of a gas turbine airfoil. The combined effects of concave curvature and TI, both present in the flow over a turbine airfoil, have so far been little studied. Computation of such flows with standard turbulence closure models has not been particularly successful. This experiment attempts to characterize the turbulence characteristics of this flow. In the present study, a turbulent boundary layer grows from the leading edge of a concave wall, then passes onto a downstream flat wall. Results show that turbulence intensities increase profoundly in the outer region of the boundary layer over the recovery wall. Near-wall turbulent eddies appear to lift off the recovery wall and a stabilized region forms near the wall. In contrast to a low-free-stream turbulence intensity flow, turbulent eddies penetrate the outer parts of the stabilized region where sharp velocity and temperature gradients exist. These eddies can more readily transfer momentum and heat. As a result, skin friction coefficients and Stanton numbers on the recovery wall are 20 and 10%, respectively, above their values in the low-free-stream turbulence intensity case. Stanton numbers do not undershoot flat-wall expectations at the same Re{sub {Delta}2} values as seen in the low-TI case. Remarkably, the velocity distribution in the core of the flow over the recovery wall exhibits a negative gradient normal to the wall under high-free-stream turbulence intensity conditions. This velocity distribution appears to be the result of two effects: (1) cross transport of kinetic energy by boundary work in the upstream curved flow and (2) readjustment of static pressure profiles in response to the removal of concave curvature.

  17. A METHOD OF TREATING UNSTRUCTURED CONCAVE CELLS IN STAGGERED-GRID LAGRANGIAN HYDRODYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    C. ROUSCULP; D. BURTON

    2000-12-01

    A method is proposed for the treatment of concave cells in staggered-grid Lagrangian hydrodynamics. The method is general enough to be applied to two- and three-dimensional unstructured cells. Instead of defining a cell-point as the geometric average of its nodes (a cell-center), the cell-point is that which equalizes the triangular/tetrahedral area/volume in two/three dimensions. Examples are given.

  18. Precursor salt assisted syntheses of high-index faceted concave hexagon and nanorod-like polyoxometalates.

    PubMed

    Pal, Jaya; Ganguly, Mainak; Mondal, Chanchal; Negishi, Yuichi; Pal, Tarasankar

    2015-01-14

    This paper describes an effective method for a precursor salt assisted fabrication and reshaping of two different polyoxometalates [(NH4)2Cu(MoO4)2 (ACM) and Cu3(MoO4)2(OH)2 (CMOH)] into five distinctive shapes through straightforward and indirect routes. Explicit regulation of the structural arrangements of ACM and CMOH has been studied in detail with altered precursor salt concentration employing our laboratory developed modified hydrothermal (MHT) method. Morphologically different ACM 3D architectures are evolved with higher molybdate concentration, whereas 1D growth of CMOH is observed with increased copper concentration. Interesting morphological transformation of the products has been accomplished employing one precursor salt at a time without using any other foreign reagent. It has been proven that large ACMs become labile in the presence of incoming Cu(II) and NH4(+) ions of the precursor salts. A new strategy for the conversion of faceted ACMs (hexagonal plate, circular plate and hollow flower) to exclusive CMOH nanorods through a Cu(II) assisted reaction has been adopted. According to thermodynamic consideration, the synthesis of rare concave nanostructures with high index facet is still challenging due to their higher reactivity. In this study, concave hexagonal ACM with high index facet {hkl} has been successfully prepared for the first time from hexagonal ACM through simple etching with ammonium heptamolybdate (AHM), which is another precursor salt. Hexagonal ACM corrugates to a concave hexagon because of the higher reactivity of the {001} crystal plane than that of the {010} plane. It has been shown that high index facet exposed concave hexagonal ACM serves as a better catalyst for the photodegradation of dye than the other microstructures enclosed by low index facets. PMID:25500856

  19. Simple proof of the concavity of the entropy power with respect to Gaussian noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dembo, Amir

    1989-01-01

    A very simple proof of M. H. Costa's result that the entropy power of Xt = X + N (O, tI) is concave in t, is derived as an immediate consequence of an inequality concerning Fisher information. This relationship between Fisher information and entropy is found to be useful for proving the central limit theorem. Thus, one who seeks new entropy inequalities should try first to find new inequalities about Fisher information, or at least to exploit the existing ones in new ways.

  20. Fabrication and characterization of linear diffusers based on concave micro lens arrays.

    PubMed

    Bitterli, Roland; Scharf, Toralf; Herzig, Hans-Peter; Noell, Wilfried; de Rooij, Nico; Bich, Andreas; Roth, Sylvain; Weible, Kenneth J; Voelkel, Reinhard; Zimmermann, Maik; Schmidt, Michael

    2010-06-21

    We present a new approach of beam homogenizing elements based on a statistical array of concave cylindrical microlens arrays. Those elements are used to diffuse light in only one direction and can be employed together with fly's eye condensers to generate a uniform flat top line for high power coherent light sources. Conception, fabrication and characterization for such 1D diffusers are presented in this paper. PMID:20588560

  1. An extended magnetostatic Born-Infeld model with a concave lower order term

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jun; Pan, Xing-Bin

    2013-11-15

    This paper concerns an extended Born-Infeld model with a concave lower order term for the magnetostatic case. Three types of boundary value problems are considered: the boundary condition prescribing the tangential component of A, the natural boundary condition, and the boundary condition prescribing the tangential component of curl A. In each case we obtain existence and regularity of solutions for small boundary data.

  2. Understanding the formation of CuS concave superstructures with peroxidase-like activity.

    PubMed

    He, Weiwei; Jia, Huimin; Li, Xiaoxiao; Lei, Yan; Li, Jing; Zhao, Hongxiao; Mi, Liwei; Zhang, Lizhi; Zheng, Zhi

    2012-06-01

    Copper sulfide (CuS) concave polyhedral superstructures (CPSs) have been successfully prepared in an ethanolic solution by a simple solvothermal reaction without the use of surfactants or templates. Two typical well defined, high symmetry CuS concave polyhedrons, forming a concave truncated cuboctahedron and icosahedron were prepared. The effect of the reaction time, temperature and different Cu ion and sulfur sources on the formation of CuS CPSs were investigated and a possible formation mechanism was proposed and discussed based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. More importantly, we found, for the first time, that the CuS CPSs exhibit intrinsic peroxidase-like activity, as they can quickly catalyze the oxidation of typical horseradish peroxidase (HRP) substrates, 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and o-phenylenediamine (OPD), in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. In addition to the recent discoveries regarding peroxidase mimetics on Fe(3)O(4) NPs and carbon nanostructures, our findings suggest a new kind of candidate for peroxidase mimics. This may open up a new application field of CuS micro-nano structures in biodetection, biocatalysis and environmental monitoring. PMID:22552534

  3. Numerical modeling of a wall jet in a concave rough bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, J.; Bombardelli, F.; Loh, K.

    2013-12-01

    We present numerical results of the mean flow and turbulence characteristics in the near field of a turbulent wall jet issuing from a sluice gate onto a concave rough wall which had been experimentally investigated by Albayrak et al. (J. Fluid Mech., 606, 27, 2008) at the Reynolds number of 33,500 and the Froude number of 1.014, based on the jet velocity and the sluice gate opening height. Turbulent flow is simulated using unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and the scale-adaptive-simulation approaches based on the k-ω shear-stress transport model. The instantaneous jet velocity profile is numerically reproduced based on the difference of upstream and downstream water levels computed by the volume of fluid method. The flow is dominated by the adverse pressure gradient due to the concave wall and mostly by the development of the large-scale Görtler vortices. Our numerical solutions numerically reproduce the development of the distinct large-scale coherent vortical structures which interacts with the concave wall.

  4. Assessment of CHF enhancement mechanisms in a curved, rectangular channel subjected to concave heating

    SciTech Connect

    Sturgis, J.C.; Mudawar, I.

    1999-05-01

    An experimental study was undertaken to examine the enhancement in critical heat flux (CHF) provided by streamwise curvature. Curved and straight rectangular flow channels were fabricated with identical 5.0 x 2.5 mm cross sections and heated lengths of 101.6 mm in which the heat was applied to only one wall--the concave wall (32.3 mm radius) in the curved channel and a side wall in the straight. Tests were conducted using FC-72 liquid with mean inlet velocity and outlet subcooling of 0.25 to 10 m s{sup {minus}1} and 3 to 29 C, respectively. Centripetal acceleration for curved flow reached 315 times earth`s gravitational acceleration. Critical heat flux was enhanced due to flow curvature at all conditions but the enhancement decreased with increasing subcooling. For near-saturated conditions, the enhancement was approximately 60% while for highly subcooled flow it was only 20%. The causes for the enhancement were identified as (1) increased pressure on the liquid-vapor interface at wetting fronts, (2) buoyancy forces and (3) increased subcooling at the concave wall. Flow visualization tests were conducted in transparent channels to explore the role of buoyancy forces in enhancing the critical heat flux. These forces were observed to remove vapor from the concave wall and distribute it throughout the cross section. Vapor removal was only effective at near-saturated conditions, yielding the observed substantial enhancement in CHF relative to the straight channel.

  5. High-Speed Unsteady Flows around Concave Axisymmetric Bodies: Flow Instabilities and their Suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panaras, A.; Drikakis, D.

    2009-01-01

    The axisymmetric concave body, i.e. a body in which the normals to its surface intersect, is a typical configuration about which shock/shock interactions appear. Various shapes of axisymmetric concave bodies are used in a variety of applications in aeronautics. For exampe: axisymmetric jet inlets with conical centerbody, ballistic missiles drag reduction by spike, plasma or hot gas injection, parachutes for pilot-ejection capsules. However, it is well known that two distinct modes of instability appear around a concave body in the high-speed flow regime, for a certain range of geometric parameters. These instabilities can cause undesirable effects such as severe vibration of the structure, heating and pressure loads. According to the experimental evidence, the unsteady flow is characterized by periodic radial inflation and collapse of the conical separation bubble formed around the forebody (pulsation). Various explanations have been given for the driving mechanism of the instabilities. They are based on interpretation of experimental results or on numerical simulation of the related flows. A merging of the leading explanations is done, and basic rules for the passive suppression of the instabilities are applied, in order to enforce the proposed driving mechanism of the instabilities. Most of the analysis is based on numerical simulations.

  6. Imaging with Concave Large-Aperture Therapeutic Ultrasound Arrays Using Conventional Synthetic-Aperture Beamforming

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Yayun; Ebbini, Emad S.

    2009-01-01

    Several dual-mode ultrasound array (DMUA) systems are being investigated for potential use in image-guided surgery. In therapeutic mode, DMUAs generate pulsed or continuous-wave (CW) high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) beams capable of generating localized therapeutic effects within the focal volume. In imaging mode, pulse-echo data can be collected from the DMUA elements to obtain B-mode images or other forms of feedback on the state of the target tissue before, during, and after the application of the therapeutic HIFU beam. Therapeutic and technological constraints give rise to special characteristics of therapeutic arrays. Specifically, DMUAs have concave apertures with low f-number values and are typically coarsely sampled using directive elements. These characteristics necessitate pre- and post-beamforming signal processing of echo data to improve the spatial and contrast resolution and maximize the image uniformity within the imaging field of view (IxFOV). We have recently developed and experimentally validated beamforming algorithms for concave large-aperture DMUAs with directive elements. Experimental validation was performed using a 1 MHz, 64-element, concave spherical aperture with 100 mm radius of curvature. The aperture was sampled in the lateral direction using elongated elements 1−λ×33.3‒ with 1.333‒−λ center-to-center spacing (λ is the wavelength). This resulted in f-number values of 0.8 and 2 in the azimuth and elevation directions, respectively. In this paper, we present a new DMUA design approach based on different sampling of the shared concave aperture to improve image quality while maintaining therapeutic performance. A pulse-wave (PW) simulation model using a modified version of the Field II program is used in this study. The model is used in generating pulse-echo data for synthetic-aperture (SA) beamforming for forming images of a variety of targets, e.g., wire arrays and speckle-generating cyst phantoms. To provide

  7. Fabrication of a roller type PDMS stamp using SU-8 concave molds and its application for roll contact printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jongho; Kim, Beomjoon

    2016-03-01

    Continuous fabrication of micropatterns at low-cost is attracting attention in various applications within industrial fields. To meet such demands, we have demonstrated a roll contact printing technique, using roller type polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamps with roll-to-flat and roll-to-roll stages. Roller type PDMS stamps for roll contact printing were fabricated using a custom-made metal support and SU-8 microstructures fabricated on concave substrates as a mold. The molding/casting method which we developed here provided faster and easier fabrication than conventional methods for roller type stamps. Next, roll contact printing was performed using fabricated roller type PDMS stamps with roll-to-flat and roll-to-roll stages. Patterns with minimum widths of 3 μm and 2.1 μm were continuously fabricated for each stage, respectively. In addition, the relationship between applied pressures and dimensional changes of roll contact printed patterns was investigated. Finally, we confirmed that roll contact printing and the new fabrication method for roller stamps presented in this study demonstrated the feasibility for industrial applications.

  8. Semiconductor light-emitting devices having concave microstructures providing improved light extraction efficiency and method for producing same

    DOEpatents

    Tansu, Nelson; Gilchrist, James F; Ee, Yik-Khoon; Kumnorkaew, Pisist

    2013-11-19

    A conventional semiconductor LED is modified to include a microlens layer over its light-emitting surface. The LED may have an active layer including at least one quantum well layer of InGaN and GaN. The microlens layer includes a plurality of concave microstructures that cause light rays emanating from the LED to diffuse outwardly, leading to an increase in the light extraction efficiency of the LED. The concave microstructures may be arranged in a substantially uniform array, such as a close-packed hexagonal array. The microlens layer is preferably constructed of curable material, such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and is formed by soft-lithography imprinting by contacting fluid material of the microlens layer with a template bearing a monolayer of homogeneous microsphere crystals, to cause concave impressions, and then curing the material to fix the concave microstructures in the microlens layer and provide relatively uniform surface roughness.

  9. Kinetically controlled synthesis of Pt-Cu alloy concave nanocubes with high-index facets for methanol electro-oxidation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yue; Bian, Ting; Choi, Sang-Il; Jiang, Yingying; Jin, Chuanhong; Fu, Maoshen; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Deren

    2014-01-18

    Pt-Cu alloy concave nanocubes enclosed by high-index {511} facets were synthesized in high yields and exhibited substantially enhanced electrocatalytic properties for methanol oxidation relative to commercial Pt/C. PMID:24271020

  10. Efficient proton acceleration and focusing by an ultraintense laser interacting with a parabolic double concave target with an extended rear

    SciTech Connect

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Xie, Bai-Song; Aimidula, Aimierding; Wang, Hong-Yu

    2013-07-15

    A new scheme for acceleration and focusing of protons via an improved parabolic double concave target irradiated by an ultraintense laser pulse is proposed. When an intense laser pulse illuminates a concave target, the hot electrons are concentrated on the focal region of the rear cavity and they form a strong space-charge-separation field, which accelerates the protons. For a simple concave target, the proton energy spectrum becomes very broad outside the rear cavity because of transverse divergence of the electromagnetic fields. However, particle-in-cell simulations show that, when the concave target has an extended rear, the hot electrons along the wall surface induce a transverse focusing sheath field, resulting in a clear enhancement of proton focusing, which makes the lower proton energy spread, while, leads to a little reduction of the proton bunch peak energy.

  11. Efficient proton acceleration and focusing by an ultraintense laser interacting with a parabolic double concave target with an extended rear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Xie, Bai-Song; Aimidula, Aimierding; Wang, Hong-Yu

    2013-07-01

    A new scheme for acceleration and focusing of protons via an improved parabolic double concave target irradiated by an ultraintense laser pulse is proposed. When an intense laser pulse illuminates a concave target, the hot electrons are concentrated on the focal region of the rear cavity and they form a strong space-charge-separation field, which accelerates the protons. For a simple concave target, the proton energy spectrum becomes very broad outside the rear cavity because of transverse divergence of the electromagnetic fields. However, particle-in-cell simulations show that, when the concave target has an extended rear, the hot electrons along the wall surface induce a transverse focusing sheath field, resulting in a clear enhancement of proton focusing, which makes the lower proton energy spread, while, leads to a little reduction of the proton bunch peak energy.

  12. Controlled synthesis of concave tetrahedral palladium nanocrystals by reducing Pd(acac){sub 2} with carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Hai; Chi, Quan; Zhao, Yanxi; Li, Chunya; Tang, Heqing; Li, Jinlin; Huang, Tao; Liu, Hanfan

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: By using CO as a reducing agent, uniform and well-defined concave tetrahedral Pd nanocrystals were successfully synthesized. CO flow rate was the most essential for the formation of the concave tetrahedral nanostructures. The morphologies and sizes of the final products can be well controlled by adjusting the flow rate of CO. Highlights: ► By using CO as a reducing agent, concave tetrahedral Pd nanocrystals were obtained. ► CO flow rate is critical to the formation of concave tetrahedral Pd nanocrystals. ► The selective adsorption of CO on (1 1 0) facets is essential to concave Pd tetrahedra. -- Abstract: CO reducing strategy to control the morphologies of palladium nanocrystals was investigated. By using CO as a reducing agent, uniform and well-defined concave tetrahedral Pd nanocrystals with a mean size of about 55 ± 2 nm were readily synthesized with Pd(acac){sub 2} as a precursor and PVP as a stabilizer. The structures of the as-prepared Pd nanocrystals were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) absorption spectroscopy and electrochemical measurements. The results demonstrated that CO was the most essential for the formation of the concave tetrahedral Pd nanostructures. The morphologies and sizes of the final products can be well controlled by adjusting the flow rate of CO. The most appropriate CO flow rate, temperature and time for the formation of the ideal concave tetrahedral Pd nanocrystals was 0.033 mL s{sup −1}, 100 °C and 3 h, respectively.

  13. Pd-Cu(2)O and Ag-Cu(2)O hybrid concave nanomaterials for an effective synergistic catalyst.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingling; Chen, Xiaobin; Wu, Yuen; Wang, Dingsheng; Peng, Qing; Zhou, Gang; Li, Yadong

    2013-10-11

    Palladium and silver salts were combined with Cu2 O octadecahedra in concave heterostructures. The formation of concave faces involved selective oxidative etching of Cu2 O on the {100} faces and in situ growth of Pd/Ag on different sites. The structures showed superior catalytic activities to both single domains and their mixtures in a model Sonogashira-type organic reaction. PMID:24038721

  14. Structure sensitive chemical reactivity by palladium concave nanocubes and nanoflowers synthesised by a seed mediated procedure in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Sreedhala, S; Sudheeshkumar, V; Vinod, C P

    2014-07-01

    Palladium nanocubes and their transformation to concave nanocubes and nanoflowers are realised by a seed mediated procedure in aqueous medium and at room temperature using cationic surfactants. The concave nanocubes and nanoflowers were found to be enclosed by high index facets. The under co-ordinated atoms present on the high index facets make these nanostructures chemically more active towards Suzuki coupling and Heck coupling reactions compared to the conventional nanocubes and spherical nanoparticles of similar size. PMID:24882223

  15. Effect of a concave grid mesh in a carbon nanotube-based field emission X-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun Suk; Castro, Edward Joseph D.; Lee, Choong Hun

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Successful design using a concave grid mesh for the focusing electron. • Much better X-ray image due to the concave grid mesh. • Higher anode current efficiency using the concave grid mesh versus a flat grid mesh. - Abstract: This study introduces a simple approach to improve the X-ray image quality produced by the carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitter X-ray source by altering the geometrical shape of the grid mesh from the conventional flat shape to a concave one in a typical triode structure. The concave shape of the grid electrode increases the effective number of the grid cells in the mesh, which exerted an electric field in the direction of the emitted electrons, thereby increasing the emission current reaching the anode. Furthermore, the curved mesh (concave grid mesh), which was responsible for the extraction of electrons from the field emitter, exhibited a focusing effect on the electron beam trajectory thereby, reducing the focal spot size impinging on the anode and resulted in a better spatial resolution of the X-ray images produced.

  16. Controlled growth of concave gold nanobars with high surface-enhanced Raman-scattering and excellent catalytic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin-Fei; Zhang, Chun-Yang

    2013-06-01

    Highly monodispersed concave gold nanobars with 24 high-index {730} facets are synthesized through a seed-mediated growth in aqueous solution. The transformation from the truncated rectangular nanobars to rectangular nanobars, then transitional products, and final concave rectangular nanobars is observed with the fine control of silver nitrate in the growth solution, and their corresponding transverse surface plasmons can be well tuned, too. These concave gold nanobars exhibit good optical property, excellent catalytic activity, and high surface-enhanced Raman-scattering (SERS) response.Highly monodispersed concave gold nanobars with 24 high-index {730} facets are synthesized through a seed-mediated growth in aqueous solution. The transformation from the truncated rectangular nanobars to rectangular nanobars, then transitional products, and final concave rectangular nanobars is observed with the fine control of silver nitrate in the growth solution, and their corresponding transverse surface plasmons can be well tuned, too. These concave gold nanobars exhibit good optical property, excellent catalytic activity, and high surface-enhanced Raman-scattering (SERS) response. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fig. S1-S19, Tables S1-S3 and relevant theoretical calculations. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr01363d

  17. Triangle and concave pentagon electrodes for an improved broadband frequency response of stripline beam position monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shobuda, Yoshihiro; Chin, Yong Ho; Takata, Koji; Toyama, Takeshi; Nakamura, Keigo

    2016-02-01

    The frequency domain performance of a stripline beam position monitor depends largely on the longitudinal shape of its electrode. Some shapes other than a conventional rectangle have been proposed and tested. To attain a good impedance matching along the electrode, they need to be precisely bent down toward their downstream in proportion to their width. This is a considerable task, and a failure to comply with it will result in a large distortion of the frequency-domain transfer function from the ideal one due to unwanted signal reflections. In this report, we first propose a triangle electrode for easy fabrication and setup: it only requires that a triangularly cut flat electrode will be placed in a chamber while being obliquely inclined toward the downstream port. Theoretical and simulation results show that the simple triangle electrode has a remarkably flatter frequency response than the rectangle one. The frequency response, in particular at high frequencies, can be further improved by attaching an "apron" plate, perpendicular to the upstream edge of the electrode. The overshooting of the frequency response at low frequency can be eliminated by replacing the straight sidelines of the triangle by three-point polylines (with a result that the triangle is transformed to a concave pentagon). The concave pentagon electrode needs to be bent only once at the middle point of the polylines for a good impedance matching and thus its fabrication and setup remain to be easy. Rf measurements for the various electrode shapes have been carried out. We found that the concave pentagon electrode achieves a wide and flat frequency response up to about 4 GHz for the J-PARC Main Ring (MR).

  18. Free-stream turbulence and concave curvature effects on heated, transitional boundary layers, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, J.; Simon, T. W.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the transition process on flat-plate and concave curved-wall boundary layers for various free-streem turbulence levels was performed. Where possible, sampling according to the intermittency function was made. Such sampling allowed segregation of the signal into two types of behavior: laminar-like and turbulent-like. The results from the investigation are discussed. Documentation is presented in two volumes. Volume one contains the text of the report including figures and supporting appendices. Volume two contains data reduction program listings and tabulated data.

  19. A Study of Laminar Separation Bubble in the Concave Region of an Airfoil Using Laser Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangalam, Sivaramakrishnan; Meyers, James F.; Dagenhart, John R.; Harvey, William D.

    1985-01-01

    Laser velocimetry (LV) was used to study the nature of laminar separation bubbles in the concave region of a 1.83-meter airfoil model which was tested in the NASA Langley Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel. Three component, coincident data from LV measurements including histograms of particle velocity, mean velocity profiles, turbulence intensity, and Reynolds stresses within the shear layer were used to determine the locations of laminar separation, transition, and turbulent reattachment. Boundary-layer parameters determined from velocity profiles were used to compare the results with existing empirical relations for describing the laminar separation bubble.

  20. Hollow and Concave Nanoparticles via Preferential Oxidation of the Core in Colloidal Core/Shell Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hollow and concave nanocrystals find applications in many fields, and their fabrication can follow different possible mechanisms. We report a new route to these nanostructures that exploits the oxidation of Cu2–xSe/Cu2–xS core/shell nanocrystals with various etchants. Even though the Cu2–xSe core is encased in a thick Cu2–xS shell, the initial effect of oxidation is the creation of a void in the core. This is rationalized in terms of diffusion of Cu+ ions and electrons from the core to the shell (and from there to the solution). Differently from the classical Kirkendall effect, which entails an imbalance between in-diffusion and out-diffusion of two different species across an interface, the present mechanism can be considered as a limiting case of such effect and is triggered by the stronger tendency of Cu2–xSe over Cu2–xS toward oxidation and by fast Cu+ diffusion in copper chalcogenides. As the oxidation progresses, expansion of the inner void erodes the entire Cu2–xSe core, accompanied by etching and partial collapse of the shell, yielding Cu2–xSySe1–y concave particles. PMID:24866716

  1. Hollow and concave nanoparticles via preferential oxidation of the core in colloidal core/shell nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Miszta, Karol; Brescia, Rosaria; Prato, Mirko; Bertoni, Giovanni; Marras, Sergio; Xie, Yi; Ghosh, Sandeep; Kim, Mee Rahn; Manna, Liberato

    2014-06-25

    Hollow and concave nanocrystals find applications in many fields, and their fabrication can follow different possible mechanisms. We report a new route to these nanostructures that exploits the oxidation of Cu(2-x)Se/Cu(2-x)S core/shell nanocrystals with various etchants. Even though the Cu(2-x)Se core is encased in a thick Cu(2-x)S shell, the initial effect of oxidation is the creation of a void in the core. This is rationalized in terms of diffusion of Cu(+) ions and electrons from the core to the shell (and from there to the solution). Differently from the classical Kirkendall effect, which entails an imbalance between in-diffusion and out-diffusion of two different species across an interface, the present mechanism can be considered as a limiting case of such effect and is triggered by the stronger tendency of Cu(2-x)Se over Cu(2-x)S toward oxidation and by fast Cu(+) diffusion in copper chalcogenides. As the oxidation progresses, expansion of the inner void erodes the entire Cu(2-x)Se core, accompanied by etching and partial collapse of the shell, yielding Cu(2-x)S(y)Se(1-y) concave particles. PMID:24866716

  2. Concave microwell based size-controllable hepatosphere as a three-dimensional liver tissue model.

    PubMed

    Wong, Sau Fung; No, Da Yoon; Choi, Yoon Young; Kim, Dong Sik; Chung, Bong Geun; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2011-11-01

    We have developed a size-controllable spheroidal hepatosphere and heterosphere model by mono-culturing of primary hepatocytes and by co-culturing primary hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). We demonstrated that uniform-sized heterospheres, which self-aggregated from primary hepatocytes and HSCs, formed within concave microwell arrays in a rapid and homogeneous manner. The effect of HSCs was quantitatively and qualitatively investigated during spheroid formation, and HSC played an important role in controlling the organization of the spheroidal aggregates and formation of tight cell-cell contacts. An analysis of the metabolic function showed that heterospheres secreted 30% more albumin than hepatospheres on day 8. In contrast, the urea secretion from heterospheres was similar to that of hepatospheres. A quantitative cytochrome P450 assay showed that the enzymatic activity of heterospheres cultured for 9 days was higher as compared with primary hepatospheres. These size-controllable heterospheres could be mass-produced using concave plate and be useful for creating artificial three-dimensional hepatic tissue constructs and regeneration of failed liver. PMID:21813175

  3. CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Surface Micromachined Adjustable Micro-Concave Mirror for Bio-Detection Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Ju-Nan; Chen, Wei-Lun; Jywe, Wen-Yuh

    2009-08-01

    We present a bio-detection system integrated with an adjustable micro-concave mirror. The bio-detection system consists of an adjustable micro-concave mirror, micro flow cytometer chip and optical detection module. The adjustable micro-concave mirror can be fabricated with ease using commercially available MEMS foundry services (such as multiuser MEMS processes, MUMPs) and its curvature can be controlled utilizing thermal or electrical effects. Experimental results show that focal lengths of the micro-concave mirror ranging from 313.5 to 2275.0 μm are achieved. The adjustable micro-concave mirror can be used to increase the efficiency of optical detection and provide a high signal-to-noise ratio. The developed micro-concave mirror is integrated with a micro flow cytometer for cell counting applications. Successful counting of fluorescent-labeled beads is demonstrated using the developed method.

  4. Large-scale synthesis of palladium concave nanocubes with high-index facets for sustainable enhanced catalytic performance.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaobin; Gao, Guanhui; Pan, Zhengyin; Wang, Tingjun; Meng, Xiaoqing; Cai, Lintao

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic activity of palladium (Pd) nanostructures highly relies on their size and morphology, especially enclosed with high-index facets, which provide more active sites so as to enhance their catalytic performance comparing with their low-index facet counterparts. Herein, Pd concave nanocubes enclosed with {730} facets by a one-pot scalable liquid method, with various high-index facets are synthesized via tuning reduction kinetics. Due to their high-index facets, the Pd concave nanocubes exhibit much higher electrocatalytic activity and stability for methanol oxidation than the Pd nanocubes enclosed by {100} facets and commercial Pd/C. Furthermore, we scale up synthesis of Pd concave nanocubes by expanding the volume of all species to fifty times with high-yield production. PMID:25686863

  5. Large-Scale Synthesis of Palladium Concave Nanocubes with High-Index Facets for Sustainable Enhanced Catalytic Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiaobin; Gao, Guanhui; Pan, Zhengyin; Wang, Tingjun; Meng, Xiaoqing; Cai, Lintao

    2015-02-01

    The catalytic activity of palladium (Pd) nanostructures highly relies on their size and morphology, especially enclosed with high-index facets, which provide more active sites so as to enhance their catalytic performance comparing with their low-index facet counterparts. Herein, Pd concave nanocubes enclosed with {730} facets by a one-pot scalable liquid method, with various high-index facets are synthesized via tuning reduction kinetics. Due to their high-index facets, the Pd concave nanocubes exhibit much higher electrocatalytic activity and stability for methanol oxidation than the Pd nanocubes enclosed by {100} facets and commercial Pd/C. Furthermore, we scale up synthesis of Pd concave nanocubes by expanding the volume of all species to fifty times with high-yield production.

  6. Double-concave deformity of the polyethylene tibial post in posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Niki, Yasuo; Matsumoto, Hideo; Yoshimine, Fumihiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Suda, Yasunori; Banks, Scott A

    2010-04-01

    This report describes a unique case of bilateral total knee arthroplasty necessitating revision of the polyethylene insert, which showed prominent marks on the tibial post resulting from repeated seiza-style sitting. The patient presented 7 years postoperatively with knee pain and flexion disturbance due to continuous joint effusion persisting for more than 4 months. Proliferating synovia throughout the joint revealed reactive synovitis to polyethylene particles. The retrieved polyethylene inserts displayed double-concave deformity of the tibial post with burnishing and creep in tibiofemoral articulation. The damage pattern of retrieved polyethylene inserts reflected the data from tibiofemoral contact location obtained using a shape-matching technique in the early postoperative phase. This case provides an example of damage to the polyethylene tibial post caused by a floor-sitting lifestyle and the potential clinical sequelae. PMID:19261434

  7. Design of a Gas-Liquid Unbaffled Stirred Tank with a Concave Blade Impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, T. T.; Kumar, Bimlesh

    2015-01-01

    Experimental investigation of unbaffled multiphase (gas-liquid) stirred tanks is conducted with the use of a concave blade impeller to analyze mass transfer, gassed power, and gas holdup. The experiments are carried out with various impeller diameter to tank diameter ratios and impeller clearances. The design criterion for the mass transfer rate is proposed, and its prediction capability is found to be satisfactory. The results show that the gassed power is dependent on the impeller diameter to tank diameter ratio and impeller clearance. The design criteria for gassed power to ungassed power ratio and gas holdup are also introduced. Multiphase modeling is done by employing the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques to observe the characteristic flow pattern transition and to carry out a qualitative analysis of the mass transfer rate.

  8. Calculation of Isodose Curves for Cca and Ccb Concave Eye Applicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mowlavi, Ali Asghar; Yazdani, Majed

    BEBIG Ruthenium-106 ophthalmic plaques have been used for treatment of uveal melanoma, retinoblastoma, melanoma of the iris and other special applications for more than 30 years. The plaques consist of a thin film of Ru-106, a beta emitter encapsulated in pure silver. Simulations of small concave applicators CCA and CCB, manufactured by Bebig, were performed using Monte Carlo MCNP4C code which allows for description of the applicator (geometry and materials) in detail. Electrons are emitted from the 106Ru nuclei isotropically with initial energy randomly sampled from the corresponding Fermi spectra and with initial positions uniformly distributed on the radioactive layer. In this work, relative doses were calculated in soft tissue phantom near the active layer. Isodose curves for CCA and CCB eye applicators were determined. Our calculated data agrees well with the measured phantom data reported in literature.

  9. Enhancement of heat removal using concave liquid metal targets for high-power accelerators.

    SciTech Connect

    Konkashbaev, I.; Fischer, P.; Hassanein, A.; Mokhov, N. V.; Mathematics and Computer Science; FNAL

    2007-01-01

    The need is increasing for development of high-power targets and beam dump areas for the production of intense beams of secondary particles. The severe constraints arising from a megawatt beam deposited on targets and absorbers call for nontrivial procedures to dilute the beam. This study describes the development of targets and absorbers and the advantages of using flowing liquid metal in concave channels first proposed by IFMIF to raise the liquid metal boiling point by increasing the pressure in liquid supported by a centrifugal force. Such flow with a back-wall is subject to Taylor-Couette instability. The instability can play a positive role of increasing the heat transfer from the hottest region in the target/absorber to the back-wall cooled by water. Results of theoretical analysis and numerical modeling of both targets and dump areas for the IFMIF, ILC, and RIA facilities are presented.

  10. Non-concave fundamental diagrams and phase transitions in a stochastic traffic cellular automaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maerivoet, S.; de Moor, B.

    2004-11-01

    Within the class of stochastic cellular automata models of traffic flows, we look at the velocity dependent randomization variant (VDR-TCA) whose parameters take on a specific set of extreme values. These initial conditions lead us to the discovery of the emergence of four distinct phases. Studying the transitions between these phases, allows us to establish a rigorous classification based on their tempo-spatial behavioral characteristics. As a result from the system’s complex dynamics, its flow-density relation exhibits a non-concave region in which forward propagating density waves are encountered. All four phases furthermore share the common property that moving vehicles can never increase their speed once the system has settled into an equilibrium.

  11. On the Numerical Convergence to Steady State of Hypersonic Flows Over Bodies with Concavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2002-01-01

    Two recent numerical studies of hypersonic flows over bodies with concavities revealed problems with convergence to a steady state with an oft-used application of local-time-stepping. Both simulated flows showed a time-like, periodic shedding of vortices in a subsonic domain bounded by supersonic external flow although the simulations, using local-time-stepping, were not time accurate. Simple modifications to the numerical algorithm were implemented to enable implicit, first-order accurate in time simulations. Subsequent time-accurate simulations of the two test problems converged to a steady state. The baseline algorithm and modifications for temporal accuracy are described. The requirement for sub-iterations to achieve convergence is demonstrated. Failure to achieve convergence without time accuracy is conjectured to arise from temporal errors being continuously refocused into a subsonic domain.

  12. Stability and control of compressible flows over a surface with concave-conves curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Bayliss, A.; Parikh, P.; Turkel, E.

    1986-01-01

    The active control of spatially unstable disturbances in a laminar, two-dimensional, compressible boundary layer over a curved surface is numerically simulated. The control is effected by localized time-periodic surface heating. We consider two similar surfaces of different heights with concave-convex curvature. In one, the height is sufficiently large so that the favorable pressure gradient is sufficient to stabilize a particular disturbance. In the other case the pressure gradient induced by the curvature is destabilizing. It is shown that by using active control that the disturbance can be stabilized. The results demonstrate that the curvature induced mean pressure gradient significantly enhances the receptivity of the flow localized time-periodic surface heating and that this is a potentially viable mechanism in air.

  13. Stereo and shading contribute independently to shape convexity-concavity discrimination.

    PubMed

    Aubin, Mercédès; Arguin, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined the joint contribution of shading and stereopsis to the perception of shape convexity-concavity. The stimuli were the images of a synthetic convex 3-D shape seen from viewpoints leading to ambiguity as to its convexity. Illumination came from either above or below, and from either the right or the left, and stimuli were presented dichoptically with normal binocular disparity, reversed disparity, or no disparity. Participants responded "convex" more often when the lighting came from above than from below. Also, participants responded that the shape was convex more often with normal than with zero disparity, and more often with zero disparity than with reversed stereopsis. The effects of lighting direction and display mode were additive--that is, they did not interact. This indicates that shading and stereopsis contribute independently to shape perception. PMID:25109021

  14. Tailoring thermal radiative properties with film-coupled concave grating metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Liping

    2015-06-01

    This work numerically investigates the radiative properties of film-coupled metamaterials made of a two-dimensional metallic concave grating on a continuous metal film separated by an ultrathin dielectric spacer. Spectrally-selective absorption is demonstrated in the visible and near-infrared regime, and underlying mechanisms are elucidated to be either localized magnetic polaritons (MPs) or surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). The unique behaviors of MPs and SPPs are explained with the help of electromagnetic field distributions at respective resonance frequencies. An inductor-capacitor model is utilized to further confirm the excitation of MP, while dispersion relation is used to understand the behaviors of different SPP modes. Geometric effects of ridge width and grating period on the resonance absorption peaks are discussed. Moreover, directional responses at oblique incidences for different polarization states are studied. Fundamental understanding gained here will facilitate the design of novel metamaterials in energy harvesting and sensing applications.

  15. Free-stream turbulence and concave curvature effects on heated, transitional boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, J.; Simon, T. W.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the transition process on flat-plate and concave curved-wall boundary layers for various free-stream turbulence levels was performed. Results show that for transition of a flat-plate, the two forms of boundary layer behavior, identified as laminar-like and turbulent-like, cannot be thought of as separate Blasius and fully-turbulent profiles, respectively. Thus, simple transition models in which the desired quantity is assumed to be an average, weighted on intermittency, of the theoretical laminar and fully turbulent values is not expected to be successful. Deviation of the flow identified as laminar-like from theoretical laminar behavior is shown to be due to recovery after the passage of a turbulent spot, while deviation of the flow identified as turbulent-like from the full-turbulent values is thought to be due to incomplete establishment of the fully-turbulent power spectral distribution. Turbulent Prandtl numbers for the transitional flow, computed from measured shear stress, turbulent heat flux and mean velocity and temperature profiles, were less than unity. For the curved-wall case with low free-stream turbulence intensity, the existence of Gortler vortices on the concave wall within both laminar and turbulent flows was established using liquid crystal visualization and spanwise velocity and temperature traverses. Transition was found to occur via a vortex breakdown mode. The vortex wavelength was quite irregular in both the laminar and turbulent flows, but the vortices were stable in time and space. The upwash was found to be more unstable, with higher levels of u' and u'v', and lower skin friction coefficients and shape factors. Turbulent Prandtl numbers, measured using a triple-wire probe, were found to be near unity for all post-transitional profiles, indicating no gross violation of Reynolds analogy. No evidence of streamwise vortices was seen in the high turbulence intensity case.

  16. Adsorption of Poly(methyl methacrylate) on Concave Al2O3 Surfaces in Nanoporous Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Nunnery, Grady; Hershkovits, Eli; Tannenbaum, Allen; Tannenbaum, Rina

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the influence of polymer molecular weight and surface curvature on the adsorption of polymers onto concave surfaces. Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) of various molecular weights was adsorbed onto porous aluminum oxide membranes having various pore sizes, ranging from 32 to 220 nm. The surface coverage, expressed as repeat units per unit surface area, was observed to vary linearly with molecular weight for molecular weights below ~120 000 g/mol. The coverage was independent of molecular weight above this critical molar mass, as was previously reported for the adsorption of PMMA on convex surfaces. Furthermore, the coverage varied linearly with pore size. A theoretical model was developed to describe curvature-dependent adsorption by considering the density gradient that exists between the surface and the edge of the adsorption layer. According to this model, the density gradient of the adsorbed polymer segments scales inversely with particle size, while the total coverage scales linearly with particle size, in good agreement with experiment. These results show that the details of the adsorption of polymers onto concave surfaces with cylindrical geometries can be used to calculate molecular weight (below a critical molecular weight) if pore size is known. Conversely, pore size can also be determined with similar adsorption experiments. Most significantly, for polymers above a critical molecular weight, the precise molecular weight need not be known in order to determine pore size. Moreover, the adsorption developed and validated in this work can be used to predict coverage also onto surfaces with different geometries. PMID:19415910

  17. Use of concave mirrors and a single camera to acquire full surface information of randomly oriented apples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using machine vision to fully inspect fruit for contamination requires imaging as much of the surface of each fruit as is possible. For apples, the concave nature of the stem and calyx regions present a particular problem. These regions are more likely to harbor contamination and full visualization ...

  18. Experimental investigation of the flow-induced vibration of a curved cylinder in convex and concave configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assi, Gustavo R. S.; Srinil, Narakorn; Freire, Cesar M.; Korkischko, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted to investigate the two-degree-of-freedom vortex-induced vibration (VIV) response of a rigid section of a curved circular cylinder with low mass-damping ratio. Two curved configurations, a concave and a convex, were tested regarding the direction of the flow, in addition to a straight cylinder that served as reference. Amplitude and frequency responses are presented versus reduced velocity for a Reynolds number range between 750 and 15 000. Results for the curved cylinders with concave and convex configurations revealed significantly lower vibration amplitudes when compared to the typical VIV response of a straight cylinder. However, the concave cylinder showed relatively higher amplitudes than the convex cylinder which were sustained beyond the typical synchronisation region. We believe this distinct behaviour between the convex and the concave configurations is related to the wake interference taking place in the lower half of the curvature due to perturbations generated in the horizontal section when it is positioned upstream. Particle-image velocimetry (PIV) measurements of the separated flow along the cylinder highlight the effect of curvature on vortex formation and excitation revealing a complex fluid-structure interaction mechanism.

  19. Structure sensitive chemical reactivity by palladium concave nanocubes and nanoflowers synthesised by a seed mediated procedure in aqueous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreedhala, S.; Sudheeshkumar, V.; Vinod, C. P.

    2014-06-01

    Palladium nanocubes and their transformation to concave nanocubes and nanoflowers are realised by a seed mediated procedure in aqueous medium and at room temperature using cationic surfactants. The concave nanocubes and nanoflowers were found to be enclosed by high index facets. The under co-ordinated atoms present on the high index facets make these nanostructures chemically more active towards Suzuki coupling and Heck coupling reactions compared to the conventional nanocubes and spherical nanoparticles of similar size.Palladium nanocubes and their transformation to concave nanocubes and nanoflowers are realised by a seed mediated procedure in aqueous medium and at room temperature using cationic surfactants. The concave nanocubes and nanoflowers were found to be enclosed by high index facets. The under co-ordinated atoms present on the high index facets make these nanostructures chemically more active towards Suzuki coupling and Heck coupling reactions compared to the conventional nanocubes and spherical nanoparticles of similar size. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional HRTEM images, UV-Vis spectra and details of TOF calculation. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01283f

  20. Experiments on straintronic nanomagnetic logic with two-state elliptical and four-state diamond and concave magnetostrictive nanomagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Souza, Noel; Salehi Fashami, Mohammad; Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo; Atulasimha, Jayasimha

    2014-03-01

    Experimental work on strain-induced magnetization switching of single-domain magnetostrictive nanomagnets grown on a bulk <001>PMN-PT substrate is demonstrated through Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM) studies. Low-moment MFM probes are used in order to minimize tip-induced magnetization switching of the nanomagnets. Voltages are applied along the length of the PMN-PT substrate (d33 mode) to generate the required strain in the magnetostrictive nanomagnet. Domain switching is then investigated in uniaxial (two-state) i) isolated, ii) dipole-coupled, and iii) an array of nanomagnets to implement NAND logic. Subsequent theoretical studies focus on four-state magnetostrictive nanomagnets (diamond- and concave-shaped). The magnetization characteristics of these shapes, particularly the switching coherence, are examined for various criteria (size, concavity depth, thickness, etc.) with the conclusion that concave nanomagnets are the ideal shape for coherent and reliable magnetization switching in future magnetoelectric devices. Experimental results of magnetic field- and stress-induced switching in these concave nanomagnets on a bulk PMN-PT substrate are also presented. We acknowledge support of the National Science Foundation (NSF) under NSF CAREER grant CCF-1253370, the NEB2020 Grant ECCS-1124714 and SHF grant CCF-1216614 as well as the Semiconductor Research Company (SRC) under NRI task 2203.001.

  1. Universal tectonic dichotomy of small celestial bodies expressed in their common convexo-concave shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2008-09-01

    The wave planetology [1, 2, 3 & others] declares in its first theorem that all celestial bodies are dichotomous. This is a result of a warping action of the fundamental wave (wave 1 long 2πR where R is a body radius) that appears in any body due to its movement in non-round (elliptical, parabolic) keplerian orbits with periodically changing accelerations. Having a standing character and four crossing directions in rotating bodies (but all bodies rotate!) these waves inevitably press in one hemisphere and bulge out the opposite one tending to impose on a body convexo-concave shape. This shape is leveled out in larger bodies due to enhanced gravity but is clearly observed in smaller ones with diminished gravity. Still, in the larger bodies as, for an example, in Earth the tectonic dichotomy is expressed as an opposition of the subsided western Pacific hemisphere and the uplifted eastern continental hemisphere. At Mars even sharper dichotomy is in the north-south direction. Small bodies (normally less than 400-500 km across) notwithstanding their type (asteroids, comets, satellites), size and composition (stones, metals, ices) are flattened and bended by the fundamental wave. That is why all asteroids in the main asteroid belt have an oblong shape what was established rather long ago but never was properly explained. Now a number of small satellites is observed by Cassini spacecraft in the saturnian system that makes together with jovian and martian small satellites a representative group for comparisons. In the figures below are shown asteroids, satellites and a comet arranged in a row of increasing sizes. They all are flattened except the largest in the row Enceladus (505 km) and bended tending to acquire a convexo-concave shape. Asteroids: Itokawa (0.5 km long), Eros (33 km, PIA03111). Satellites: Calypso (22 km, PIA07633), Atlas (32 km, PIA08233), Prometheus (102 km, PIA08192), Hyperion (350 km, PIA06645), Enceladus (505 km, PIA08258, comet-like behaviour). Comet

  2. Controllable synthesis of concave cubic gold core-shell nanoparticles for plasmon-enhanced photon harvesting.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yang; Butburee, Teera; Yu, Hua; Li, Zhen; Amal, Rose; Lu, G Q Max; Wang, Lianzhou

    2015-07-01

    Well-defined core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) containing concave cubic Au cores and TiO2 shells (CA@T) were synthesized in colloidal suspension. These CA@T NPs exhibit Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR) absorption in the NIR region, which provides a unique property for utilizing the low energy range of the solar spectrum. In order to evaluate the plasmonic enhancement effect, a variety of CA@T NPs were incorporated into working electrodes of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). By adjusting the shell thickness of CA@T NPs, the plasmonic property can be tuned to achieve maximum photovoltaic improvement. Furthermore, the DSSC cells fabricated with the CA@T NPs exhibit a remarkably plasmonic assisted conversion efficiency enhancement (23.3%), compared to that (14.8%) of the reference cells assembled with spherical Au@TiO2 core-shell (SA@T) NPs under similar conditions. Various characterizations reveal that this performance improvement is attributed to the much stronger electromagnetic field generated at the hot spots of CA@T NPs, resulting in significantly higher light harvesting and more efficient charge separation. This study also provides new insights into maximizing the plasmonic enhancement, offering great potential in other applications including light-matter interaction, photocatalytic energy conversion and new-generation solar cells. PMID:25498878

  3. Plasma confinement by magnetic field with convex-concave field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsventoukh, Mikhail M.; Krashevskaya, Galina V.; Prishvitsyn, Alexander S.

    2015-06-01

    It has been found that plasma confinement by the magnetic field of alternating-sign curvature with convex-concave field lines results in a strong stabilizing action against convective (flute-interchange) perturbations. For simple combinations of axisymmetric mirrors and cusps the calculations according to the kinetic stability criterion give strongly, centrally peaked stable plasma pressure profiles instead of shallow ones. For the experimental research of this effect, a compact magnetic confinement device has been modified by adding of the external current coil to fulfil the field-line curvature requirements. The critical convectively-stable plasma pressure profiles calculation in this experimental geometry and the probe measurements of the spatial plasma distribution in the new magnetic configuration of alternating-sign curvature have been performed. The experimental results give some support for a conclusion that there is an increase in the ion saturation current at the region near the minimum of the specific volume min ∫dl/B. This region corresponds to the average minimum in the second adiabatic invariant, and the kinetic description predicts the stable pressure profile peaking here due to reduction of charge separation by particle drift in alternating-sign curvature.

  4. Micro-concave waveguide antenna for high photon extraction from nitrogen vacancy centers in nanodiamond

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekharan, Ranjith; Kewes, Günter; Djalalian-Assl, Amir; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Tomljenovic-Hanic, Snjezana; McCallum, Jeffrey C.; Roberts, Ann; Benson, Oliver; Prawer, Steven

    2015-01-01

    The negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy colour center (NV− center) in nanodiamond is an excellent single photon source due to its stable photon generation in ambient conditions, optically addressable nuclear spin state, high quantum yield and its availability in nanometer sized crystals. In order to make practical devices using nanodiamond, highly efficient and directional emission of single photons in well-defined modes, either collimated into free space or waveguides are essential. This is a Herculean task as the photoluminescence of the NV centers is associated with two orthogonal dipoles arranged in a plane perpendicular to the NV defect symmetry axis. Here, we report on a micro-concave waveguide antenna design, which can effectively direct single photons from any emitter into either free space or into waveguides in a narrow cone angle with more than 80% collection efficiency irrespective of the dipole orientation. The device also enhances the spontaneous emission rate which further increases the number of photons available for collection. The waveguide antenna has potential applications in quantum cryptography, quantum computation, spectroscopy and metrology. PMID:26169682

  5. Self-aligning concave relativistic plasma mirror with ultrafast adjustable focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hai-En; Arefiev, Alexey; Shaw, Joseph; Stark, David; Wang, Xiaoming; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Downer, Michael; Univ of Texas, Austin Team; InstituteFusion Studies, Univ of Texas, Austin Team

    2015-11-01

    Plasma mirrors (PMs) excited at sub-relativistic intensity (<1018W/cm2) are widely used to improve the temporal contrast of ultrashort laser pulses that are subsequently focused to ultra-relativistic intensity. However, new applications demand PMs that reflects efficiently with high beam quality when excited directly at relativistic intensity. We report a quantitative laboratory study of space-/time-integrated and space-/time- resolved reflectivity of PMs excited by high-contrast, 30 fs, 800 nm relativistically intense laser pulses. We observe high reflectivity (>0.8) for intensities up to 5x1018W/cm2, provided laser contrast exceeds 104 at 1 ps and angle of incidence is less than 5°. Particle-in-cell simulations suggest that sharp drops observed outside these limits are caused by refocusing of reflected light outside the collection optics due to depression of the reflecting surface by light pressure (deformation, usually a concave curvature) and self-induced relativistic transparency. Furthermore, the reflected relativistic intensity can be enhanced multiple times and the second focus position can be adjusted in the range of few tens of micron away from PM surface by controlling the contrast at 1 ps.

  6. A theoretical model for flow boiling CHF from short concave heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, J.E.; Mudawar, I.

    1995-08-01

    Experiments were performed to enable the development of a new theoretical mode for the enhancement in CHF commonly observed with flow boiling on concave heater as compared to straight heaters. High-speed video imaging and photomicrography were employed to capture the trigger mechanism for CHF each type heater. A wavy vapor layer was observed to engulf the heater surface in each case, permitting liquid access to the surface only in regions where depressions (troughs) in the liquid vapor interface made contact with the surface. CHF in each case occurred when the pressure force exerted upon the wavy vapor-liquid inter ace in the contact region could no longer overcome the momentum of the vapor produced in these regional. Shorter interfacial wavelengths with greater curvature were measured on the curve, heater than on the straight heater, promoting a greater pressure force on the wave interface and a corresponding increase in CHF for the curved heater. A theoretics. CHF model is developed from these observations, based upon a new theory for hydrodynamic instability, along a curved interface. CHF data are predicted with good accuracy for both heaters. 23 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Micro-concave waveguide antenna for high photon extraction from nitrogen vacancy centers in nanodiamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajasekharan, Ranjith; Kewes, Günter; Djalalian-Assl, Amir; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Tomljenovic-Hanic, Snjezana; McCallum, Jeffrey C.; Roberts, Ann; Benson, Oliver; Prawer, Steven

    2015-07-01

    The negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy colour center (NV- center) in nanodiamond is an excellent single photon source due to its stable photon generation in ambient conditions, optically addressable nuclear spin state, high quantum yield and its availability in nanometer sized crystals. In order to make practical devices using nanodiamond, highly efficient and directional emission of single photons in well-defined modes, either collimated into free space or waveguides are essential. This is a Herculean task as the photoluminescence of the NV centers is associated with two orthogonal dipoles arranged in a plane perpendicular to the NV defect symmetry axis. Here, we report on a micro-concave waveguide antenna design, which can effectively direct single photons from any emitter into either free space or into waveguides in a narrow cone angle with more than 80% collection efficiency irrespective of the dipole orientation. The device also enhances the spontaneous emission rate which further increases the number of photons available for collection. The waveguide antenna has potential applications in quantum cryptography, quantum computation, spectroscopy and metrology.

  8. Reliable Single Chip Genotyping with Semi-Parametric Log-Concave Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Rippe, Ralph C. A.; Meulman, Jacqueline J.; Eilers, Paul H. C.

    2012-01-01

    The common approach to SNP genotyping is to use (model-based) clustering per individual SNP, on a set of arrays. Genotyping all SNPs on a single array is much more attractive, in terms of flexibility, stability and applicability, when developing new chips. A new semi-parametric method, named SCALA, is proposed. It is based on a mixture model using semi-parametric log-concave densities. Instead of using the raw data, the mixture is fitted on a two-dimensional histogram, thereby making computation time almost independent of the number of SNPs. Furthermore, the algorithm is effective in low-MAF situations. Comparisons between SCALA and CRLMM on HapMap genotypes show very reliable calling of single arrays. Some heterozygous genotypes from HapMap are called homozygous by SCALA and to lesser extent by CRLMM too. Furthermore, HapMap's NoCalls (NN) could be genotyped by SCALA, mostly with high probability. The software is available as R scripts from the website www.math.leidenuniv.nl/~rrippe. PMID:23077503

  9. LiCoO2 Concaved Cuboctahedrons from Symmetry-Controlled Topological Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Wu, L.; Zhang, L.; Zhu, Y.; Grey, C.P.

    2011-01-19

    Morphology control of functional materials is generally performed by controlling the growth rates on selected orientations or faces. Here, we control particle morphology by 'crystal templating': by choosing appropriate precursor crystals and reaction conditions, we demonstrate that a material with rhombohedral symmetry - namely the layered, positive electrode material, LiCoO{sub 2} - can grow to form a quadruple-twinned crystal with overall cubic symmetry. The twinned crystals show an unusual, concaved-cuboctahedron morphology, with uniform particle sizes of 0.5-2 {micro}m. On the basis of a range of synthetic and analytical experiments, including solid-state NMR, X-ray powder diffraction analysis and HRTEM, we propose that these twinned crystals form via selective dissolution and an ion-exchange reaction accompanied by oxidation of a parent crystal of CoO, a material with cubic symmetry. This template crystal serves to nucleate the growth of four LiCoO{sub 2} twin crystals and to convert a highly anisotropic, layered material into a pseudo-3-dimensional, isotropic material.

  10. Design of a novel spectrophotometer for water quality monitor based on holography concave grating and CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhong; Liu, Guodong; Zeng, Lvming; Huang, Zhen

    2011-11-01

    With the rapid development of the society and living standard, the water resources have been polluted more and more seriously, which is threatening the health of people and producing of the industry and agriculture. To protect the sustainable water resource, the monitoring of the water quality became an urgent task. There are some methods used to monitor the water quality, including the liquid chromatograph(LC), electrolysis method, electrochemical method, colorimetry method, atomic absorption spectrometric method, etc. But some drawbacks are existed in these methods. So, a fluorescence spectrophotometry method is adopted into this paper. And a novel water quality monitor(WQM) is designed. Meanwhile, in order to improve the spectral resolution and prevision, an improved spectrophotometer(SPM) based on holography concave (HC)grating is designed. In addition, the linear CCD with combined data acquisition (DAQ) card is used as the spectral detection system and virtual instrument(VI) technology based on LabVIEW is used to control the spectral acquisition and analysis. Experimental results show that the performances of the novel SPM for WQM are improved, its resolution can reach 2nm, the stray-light is less and the checking prevision of this WQM is higher than others. Therefore, the novel SPM for WQM has the potential value in the water quality monitoring and biochemical application.

  11. Design of a novel spectrophotometer for water quality monitor based on holography concave grating and CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhong; Liu, Guodong; Zeng, Lvming; Huang, Zhen

    2012-01-01

    With the rapid development of the society and living standard, the water resources have been polluted more and more seriously, which is threatening the health of people and producing of the industry and agriculture. To protect the sustainable water resource, the monitoring of the water quality became an urgent task. There are some methods used to monitor the water quality, including the liquid chromatograph(LC), electrolysis method, electrochemical method, colorimetry method, atomic absorption spectrometric method, etc. But some drawbacks are existed in these methods. So, a fluorescence spectrophotometry method is adopted into this paper. And a novel water quality monitor(WQM) is designed. Meanwhile, in order to improve the spectral resolution and prevision, an improved spectrophotometer(SPM) based on holography concave (HC)grating is designed. In addition, the linear CCD with combined data acquisition (DAQ) card is used as the spectral detection system and virtual instrument(VI) technology based on LabVIEW is used to control the spectral acquisition and analysis. Experimental results show that the performances of the novel SPM for WQM are improved, its resolution can reach 2nm, the stray-light is less and the checking prevision of this WQM is higher than others. Therefore, the novel SPM for WQM has the potential value in the water quality monitoring and biochemical application.

  12. Micro-concave waveguide antenna for high photon extraction from nitrogen vacancy centers in nanodiamond.

    PubMed

    Rajasekharan, Ranjith; Kewes, Günter; Djalalian-Assl, Amir; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Tomljenovic-Hanic, Snjezana; McCallum, Jeffrey C; Roberts, Ann; Benson, Oliver; Prawer, Steven

    2015-01-01

    The negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy colour center (NV(-) center) in nanodiamond is an excellent single photon source due to its stable photon generation in ambient conditions, optically addressable nuclear spin state, high quantum yield and its availability in nanometer sized crystals. In order to make practical devices using nanodiamond, highly efficient and directional emission of single photons in well-defined modes, either collimated into free space or waveguides are essential. This is a Herculean task as the photoluminescence of the NV centers is associated with two orthogonal dipoles arranged in a plane perpendicular to the NV defect symmetry axis. Here, we report on a micro-concave waveguide antenna design, which can effectively direct single photons from any emitter into either free space or into waveguides in a narrow cone angle with more than 80% collection efficiency irrespective of the dipole orientation. The device also enhances the spontaneous emission rate which further increases the number of photons available for collection. The waveguide antenna has potential applications in quantum cryptography, quantum computation, spectroscopy and metrology. PMID:26169682

  13. Graphene nanosheet-tailored PtPd concave nanocubes with enhanced electrocatalytic activity and durability for methanol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yizhong; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Chen, Wei

    2014-02-01

    Here, we demonstrate that graphene oxide (GO) can act as a structure-directing agent for the formation of PtPd alloy concave nanocubes enclosed by high index facets. In the presence of GO, PtPd alloy concave nanocubes could be easily tailored by a simple hydrothermal reaction. In sharp contrast, only cubic PtPd alloy nanocrystals were obtained in the absence of GO. Moreover, compared to the unsupported PtPd nanocubes, the composition ratio of Pt to Pd changed significantly from 1 : 1 to 3 : 1. Due to the exposed high-index facets and the strong interaction between catalysts and graphene support, the as-synthesized PtPd concave nanocubes exhibited enhanced electrocatalytic activity and high durability toward methanol oxidation. The present work highlights the unique role of GO in the formation of metal nanocrystals as not only a catalyst support but also a structure- and/or morphology-directing agent, due to the presence of various functional groups on GO sheets. The present GO-assisted approach provides a new avenue to the synthesis of nanocrystals with high-index facets and initiates new opportunities for the exploration of high-performance graphene-based nanocatalysts.Here, we demonstrate that graphene oxide (GO) can act as a structure-directing agent for the formation of PtPd alloy concave nanocubes enclosed by high index facets. In the presence of GO, PtPd alloy concave nanocubes could be easily tailored by a simple hydrothermal reaction. In sharp contrast, only cubic PtPd alloy nanocrystals were obtained in the absence of GO. Moreover, compared to the unsupported PtPd nanocubes, the composition ratio of Pt to Pd changed significantly from 1 : 1 to 3 : 1. Due to the exposed high-index facets and the strong interaction between catalysts and graphene support, the as-synthesized PtPd concave nanocubes exhibited enhanced electrocatalytic activity and high durability toward methanol oxidation. The present work highlights the unique role of GO in the formation of

  14. Formation of size-controllable spheroids using gingiva-derived stem cells and concave microwells: Morphology and viability tests

    PubMed Central

    LEE, SUNG-IL; YEO, SEONG-IL; KIM, BO-BAE; KO, YOUNGKYUNG; PARK, JUN-BEOM

    2016-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells have previously been isolated and characterized from the gingiva, and gingiva-derived stem cells have been applied for tissue engineering purposes. The present study was performed to generate size-controllable stem cell spheroids using concave microwells. Gingiva-derived stem cells were isolated, and the stem cells of 1×105 (group A) or 2×105 (group B) cells were seeded in polydimethylsiloxane-based, concave micromolds with 600 µm diameters. The morphology of the microspheres was viewed under an inverted microscope, and the changes in the diameter and cell viability were analyzed. The gingiva-derived stem cells formed spheroids in the concave microwells. The diameters of the spheroids were larger in group A compared to group B. No significant changes in shape or diameter were noted with increases in incubation time. Cell viability was higher in group B at each time point when compared with group A. Within the limits of the study, the size-controllable stem cell spheroids could be generated from gingival cells using microwells. The shape of the spheroids and their viability were clearly maintained during the experimental periods. PMID:26870343

  15. Graphene nanosheet-tailored PtPd concave nanocubes with enhanced electrocatalytic activity and durability for methanol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yizhong; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Chen, Wei

    2014-03-21

    Here, we demonstrate that graphene oxide (GO) can act as a structure-directing agent for the formation of PtPd alloy concave nanocubes enclosed by high index facets. In the presence of GO, PtPd alloy concave nanocubes could be easily tailored by a simple hydrothermal reaction. In sharp contrast, only cubic PtPd alloy nanocrystals were obtained in the absence of GO. Moreover, compared to the unsupported PtPd nanocubes, the composition ratio of Pt to Pd changed significantly from 1 : 1 to 3 : 1. Due to the exposed high-index facets and the strong interaction between catalysts and graphene support, the as-synthesized PtPd concave nanocubes exhibited enhanced electrocatalytic activity and high durability toward methanol oxidation. The present work highlights the unique role of GO in the formation of metal nanocrystals as not only a catalyst support but also a structure- and/or morphology-directing agent, due to the presence of various functional groups on GO sheets. The present GO-assisted approach provides a new avenue to the synthesis of nanocrystals with high-index facets and initiates new opportunities for the exploration of high-performance graphene-based nanocatalysts. PMID:24519683

  16. Cost-efficient and flexible fabrication of rectangular-shaped microlens arrays with controllable aspect ratio and spherical morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yang; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Bian, Hao; Deng, Zefang; Du, Guangqing; Si, Jinhai; Yun, Feng; Hou, Xun

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a cost-efficient and flexible approach to the development of controllable-shape concave and convex microlens arrays by using femtosecond laser wet etch and replication techniques. Periodic concave rectangular-shaped microlens arrays with different length-width ratios were achieved by firstly introducing periodic microcraters on silica glass using an 800 nm femtosecond laser, and subsequently enlarging the craters into microlens with smooth curved surfaces in hydrofluoric (HF) acid solution. The concave microlens can serve as molds of replication to obtain convex microlenses on polymers. Over 10,000 rectangular-shaped concave and convex microlens with controllable aspect ratio, high fill factor and spherical morphology can be fabricated in 5 h. A simulation result and a projection experiment result verify the optical performance of these rectangular-shaped spherical microlens arrays (MLAs).

  17. Hybrid optoacoustic tomography and pulse-echo ultrasonography using concave arrays.

    PubMed

    Merčep, Elena; Jeng, Gency; Morscher, Stefan; Li, Pai-Chi; Razansky, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    Implementation of hybrid imaging using optoacoustic tomography (OAT) and ultrasound (US) brings together the important advantages and complementary features of both methods. However, the fundamentally different physical contrast mechanisms of the two modalities may impose significant difficulties in the optimal tomographic data acquisition and image formation strategies. We investigate the applicability of the commonly applied imaging geometries for acquisition and reconstruction of hybrid optoacoustic tomography and pulse-echo ultrasound (OPUS) images. Optimization of the ultrasound image formation strategy using concave array geometry was implemented using a synthetic aperture method combined with spatial compounding. Experimental validation was performed using a custom-made multiplexer unit executing switching between the two modalities employing the same transducer array. A variety of array probes with different angular coverages were subsequently tested, including arrays for clinical hand-held imaging as well as stationary arrays for tomographic small animal imaging. The results demonstrate that acquisition of OAT data by mere addition of an illumination source to the common US linear array geometry may result in significant limited-view artifacts and overall loss of image quality. On the other hand, unsatisfactory US image quality is achieved with tomographic arrays solely optimized for OAT image acquisition without considering the optimal transmit-receive beamforming parameters. Optimal selection of the array pitch size, tomographic coverage and spatial compounding parameters has achieved here an accurate hybrid imaging performance, which was experimentally showcased in tissuemimicking phantoms, post-mortem mice, and hand-held imaging of a healthy volunteer. The efficient combination of the two modalities in a single imaging device reveals the true power of functional and molecular imaging capacities of OAT in addition to the morphological and functional

  18. Experimental and numerical investigations on slot air jet impingement cooling of a heated cylindrical concave surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri-Bidgoli, H.; Ashjaee, M.; Yousefi, T.

    2014-04-01

    Experimental and numerical studies have been carried out for slot air jet impingement on a heated concave surface of a partially opened-top horizontal cylinder of length L = 20 cm. The slot jet is situated at the symmetry line of the partially opened-top cylinder along the gravity vector and impinges to the bottom of the cylinder which is designated as θ = 0°. The width of the opening at the top of the horizontal cylinder is W = 3 cm which corresponds to a circumferential angle Δθ = 50.8°. The experiments are performed by a Mach-Zehnder interferometer which enables to measure the local convection heat transfer coefficient. Also, a finite volume method based on the SIMPLE algorithm and non-orthogonal grid discretization scheme is used to solve the continuity, momentum, and energy equations. The Poisson equations are solved for (x, y) to find the grid points which are distributed in a non-uniform manner with higher concentration close to the solid regions. The effects of jet Reynolds number ( Re j) in the range from 190 to 1,600 and the ratio of spacing between nozzle and cylinder surface to the jet width from H = 1.5 to H = 10.7 on the local and average Nusselt numbers are examined. It is observed that maximum Nusselt number occurs at the stagnation point at (θ = 0°) and the local heat transfer coefficient decreases on the circumferential surface of the cylinder with increase of θ as a result of thermal boundary layer thickness growth. Also results show that the local and average heat transfer coefficients are raised by increasing the jet Reynolds number and by decreasing the nozzle-to-surface spacing.

  19. Fabrication and testing of a high-precision concave spherical mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Jan; Green, Katie; Stuart, Wayne; Puhanic, Edita; Leistner, Achim; Oreb, Bob

    2008-08-01

    CSIRO's Australian Centre for Precision Optics has recently finished the production of a high-precision concave spherical mirror. The specifications were very ambitious: numerical aperture 0.75; asphericity below 5.5 nm rms and 27.3 nm P-V. The available reference transmission sphere had to be calibrated to enable adequate accuracy. Due to the high numerical aperture of the mirror, sub-aperture measurements had to be stitched together to form a complete surface map of the mirror. Phase-shifting interferometry at high numerical aperture suffers from phase-step non-uniformity because of the large off-axis angles. We present what we believe to be a new interpretation of this phenomenon as a focus error, which clarifies where in the interferometer the phase-shift error occurs. We discuss the ball-averaging method for calibrating the reference transmission sphere and present results from the averaging process to ensure an uncertainty commensurate with the certification requirement. For carrying out the sub-aperture measurements, we constructed a two-axis gimbal mount to swivel the mirror around the focus of the test wavefront. If the centers of curvature of the transmission sphere and the mirror coincide, the mirror can be tilted without losing the interferogram. We present a simple and effective alignment method, which can be generally applied to optical tests where the wavefront comes to a focus. The mirror was coated with protected aluminum and tested in its mount. No effect on the sphericity error from the coating was found, and the specifications were exceeded by approximately 30%. We discuss subtleties of the stitching process on curved surfaces and report final results.

  20. Profile measurement of concave spherical mirror and a flat mirror using a high-speed nanoprofiler.

    PubMed

    Usuki, Koji; Kitayama, Takao; Matsumura, Hiroki; Kojima, Takuya; Uchikoshi, Junichi; Higashi, Yasuo; Endo, Katsuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Ultraprecise aspheric mirrors that offer nanofocusing and high coherence are indispensable for developing third-generation synchrotron radiation and X-ray free-electron laser sources. In industry, the extreme ultraviolet (wavelength: 13.5 nm) lithography used for high-accuracy aspheric mirrors is a promising technology for fabricating semiconductor devices. In addition, ultraprecise mirrors with a radius of curvature of less than 10 mm are needed in many digital video instruments. We developed a new type of nanoprofiler that traces the normal vector of a mirror's surface. The principle of our measuring method is that the normal vector at each point on the surface is determined by making the incident light beam on the mirror surface and the reflected beam at that point coincide, using two sets of two pairs of goniometers and one linear stage. From the acquired normal vectors and their coordinates, the three-dimensional shape is calculated by a reconstruction algorithm. The characteristics of the measuring method are as follows: the profiler uses the straightness of laser light without using a reference surface. Surfaces of any shape can be measured, and there is no limit on the aperture size. We calibrated this nanoprofiler by considering the system error resulting from the assembly error and encoder scale error, and evaluated the performance at the nanometer scale. We suppressed the effect of random errors by maintaining the temperature in a constant-temperature room within ±0.01°C. We measured a concave spherical mirror with a radius of curvature of 400 mm and a flat mirror and compared the results with those obtained using a Fizeau interferometer. The profiles of the mirrors were consistent within the range of system errors. PMID:23680514

  1. Anisotropy of X-Ray Bursts from Neutron Stars with Concave Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, C.-C.; Keek, L.

    2016-03-01

    Emission from neutron stars and accretion disks in low-mass X-ray binaries is anisotropic. The non-spherical shape of the disk as well as blocking of the neutron star by the disk make the observed flux dependent on the inclination angle of the disk with respect to the line of sight. This is of importance for the interpretation of thermonuclear X-ray bursts from neutron stars. Because part of the X-ray burst is reflected off the disk, the observed burst flux depends on the anisotropies for both direct emission from the neutron star and reflection off the disk. This influences measurements of source distance, mass accretion rate, and constraints on the neutron star’s equation of state. Previous predictions of the anisotropy factors assumed a geometrically flat disk. Detailed observations of two so-called superbursts allowed for the direct and the reflected burst fluxes to each be measured separately. The reflection fraction was much higher than what the anisotropies of a flat disk can account for. We create numerical models to calculate the anisotropy factors for different disk shapes, including concave disks. We present the anisotropy factors of the direct and reflected burst fluxes separately, as well as the anisotropy of the persistent flux. Reflection fractions substantially larger than unity are produced in the case where the inner accretion disk increases steeply in height, such that part of the star is blocked from view. Such a geometry could possibly be induced by the X-ray burst if X-ray heating causes the inner disk to puff up.

  2. A simpler method for total scalp irradiation: the multijaw-size concave arc technique.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Minoru; Konno, Masahiro; Ogawa, Hirofumi; Harada, Hideyuki; Asakura, Hirofumi; Fuji, Hiroshi; Murayama, Shigeyuki; Nishimura, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    The lateral electron-photon technique (LEPT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) are commonly used for total scalp irradiation. However, the treatment planning and irradiation are laborious and time-consuming. We herein present the multijaw-size concave arc technique (MCAT) as a total scalp irradiation method that overcomes these problems. CT datasets for eight patients previously treated for angiosarcoma of the scalp were replanned using MCAT, LEPT, and IMRT. The MCAT was designed with a dynamic conformal arc for the total scalp, with a multileaf collimator to shield the brain. Two additional conformal arcs with a decreased upper-jaw position of the first dynamic conformal arc were used to reduce the cranial hotspots. The prescribed dose was 40 Gy (2 Gy/fraction) to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV, defined as the total scalp plus a 4 mm margin). MCAT was compared with LEPT and IMRT with respect to the PTV dose homogeneity (D5%-95%), underdosage (V < 90%), overdosage (V > 110%), doses to the brain, and the delivery time and monitor units (MUs) for single irradiation. We were able to formulate treatment plans for all three techniques that could deliver the prescription dose in all patients. MCAT was significantly superior to LEPT with respect to PTV dose homogeneity, overdosage, and underdosage, although MCAT was inferior to IMRT with respect to dose homogeneity and overdosage. The mean brain dose and high-dosage volume of all three techniques were low, but IMRT provided larger volume to the brain than did the other two techniques in the low dosage region. In MCAT, the mean delivery time could be reduced by approximately half or more, and the mean MUs could be reduced by at least 100 compared to the other two techniques. MCAT can achieve total scalp irradiation with substantially fewer MUs and a shorter delivery time than LEPT and IMRT. PMID:25207405

  3. L2CXCV: A Fortran 77 package for least squares convex/concave data smoothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demetriou, I. C.

    2006-04-01

    Fortran 77 software is given for least squares smoothing to data values contaminated by random errors subject to one sign change in the second divided differences of the smoothed values, where the location of the sign change is also unknown of the optimization problem. A highly useful description of the constraints is that they follow from the assumption of initially increasing and subsequently decreasing rates of change, or vice versa, of the process considered. The underlying algorithm partitions the data into two disjoint sets of adjacent data and calculates the required fit by solving a strictly convex quadratic programming problem for each set. The piecewise linear interpolant to the fit is convex on the first set and concave on the other one. The partition into suitable sets is achieved by a finite iterative algorithm, which is made quite efficient because of the interactions of the quadratic programming problems on consecutive data. The algorithm obtains the solution by employing no more quadratic programming calculations over subranges of data than twice the number of the divided differences constraints. The quadratic programming technique makes use of active sets and takes advantage of a B-spline representation of the smoothed values that allows some efficient updating procedures. The entire code required to implement the method is 2920 Fortran lines. The package has been tested on a variety of data sets and it has performed very efficiently, terminating in an overall number of active set changes over subranges of data that is only proportional to the number of data. The results suggest that the package can be used for very large numbers of data values. Some examples with output are provided to help new users and exhibit certain features of the software. Important applications of the smoothing technique may be found in calculating a sigmoid approximation, which is a common topic in various contexts in applications in disciplines like physics, economics

  4. Elastomeric inverse moulding and vacuum casting process characterization for the fabrication of arrays of concave refractive microlenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmet, L.; Van Overmeire, S.; Van Erps, J.; Ottevaere, H.; Debaes, C.; Thienpont, H.

    2007-01-01

    We present a complete and precise quantitative characterization of the different process steps used in an elastomeric inverse moulding and vacuum casting technique. We use the latter replication technique to fabricate concave replicas from an array of convex thermal reflow microlenses. During the inverse elastomeric moulding we obtain a secondary silicone mould of the original silicone mould in which the master component is embedded. Using vacuum casting, we are then able to cast out of the second mould several optical transparent poly-urethane arrays of concave refractive microlenses. We select ten particular representative microlenses on the original, the silicone moulds and replica sample and quantitatively characterize and statistically compare them during the various fabrication steps. For this purpose, we use several state-of-the-art and ultra-precise characterization tools such as a stereo microscope, a stylus surface profilometer, a non-contact optical profilometer, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, a Twyman-Green interferometer and an atomic force microscope to compare various microlens parameters such as the lens height, the diameter, the paraxial focal length, the radius of curvature, the Strehl ratio, the peak-to-valley and the root-mean-square wave aberrations and the surface roughness. When appropriate, the microlens parameter under test is measured with several different measuring tools to check for consistency in the measurement data. Although none of the lens samples shows diffraction-limited performance, we prove that the obtained replicated arrays of concave microlenses exhibit sufficiently low surface roughness and sufficiently high lens quality for various imaging applications.

  5. Adaptive compensation of lower order thermal aberrations in concave-convex power oscillators under variable pump conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackel, Steven M.; Moshe, Inon

    2000-09-01

    A Nd:Cr:GSGG concave-convex power oscillator was developed that utilized both an adaptive mirror comprised of spherical and cylindrical optical elements together with a Faraday rotator to dynamically eliminate lower order aberrations (thermal focusing, astigmatism, and bipolar focusing). An adaptively controlled collimating lens corrected for shifts in the mode-waist position. The addition of a polarizer and a reentrant mirror totally eliminated thermal birefringence losses. The techniques developed are attractive in any solid state laser that must work under changing pump power conditions.

  6. Characterisation of a large aperture steep concave parabolic mirror using SASI based on auto-collimation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bingcai; Li, Bing; Tian, Ailing; Yang, Haoyu; Gao, Fen; Chen, Lei

    2015-01-01

    To characterise a large aperture steep concave parabolic mirror, a new sub-aperture stitching interferometry measurement technology (SASI) based on auto-collimation is proposed. The principle of the stitching process is analysed, and the sub-aperture partitioning for a full aperture of a paraboloid is discussed. Next, the overlapped sampled points between sub-apertures are rectified through sampled points realigned in mesh grids. Finally, two experiments, the SASI based on auto-collimation and the full aperture test, were implemented for a parabolic mirror. The stitching result exhibits good agreement with the full-aperture result.

  7. Nonlinear 3D projection printing of concave hydrogel microstructures for long-term multicellular spheroid and embryoid body culture.

    PubMed

    Hribar, K C; Finlay, D; Ma, X; Qu, X; Ondeck, M G; Chung, P H; Zanella, F; Engler, A J; Sheikh, F; Vuori, K; Chen, S C

    2015-06-01

    Long-term culture and monitoring of individual multicellular spheroids and embryoid bodies (EBs) remains a challenge for in vitro cell propagation. Here, we used a continuous 3D projection printing approach - with an important modification of nonlinear exposure - to generate concave hydrogel microstructures that permit spheroid growth and long-term maintenance, without the need for spheroid transfer. Breast cancer spheroids grown to 10 d in the concave structures showed hypoxic cores and signs of necrosis using immunofluorescent and histochemical staining, key features of the tumor microenvironment in vivo. EBs consisting of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) grown on the hydrogels demonstrated narrow size distribution and undifferentiated markers at 3 d, followed by signs of differentiation by the presence of cavities and staining of the three germ layers at 10 d. These findings demonstrate a new method for long-term (e.g. beyond spheroid formation at day 2, and with media exchange) 3D cell culture that should be able to assist in cancer spheroid studies as well as embryogenesis and patient-derived disease modeling with iPSC EBs. PMID:25900329

  8. Fast response Fabry-Perot interferometer microfluidic refractive index fiber sensor based on concave-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jiajun; Lu, Zejin; Quan, Mingran; Jiao, Yuzhu; Yao, Yong

    2016-09-01

    We report a fast response microfluidic Fabry-Perot (FP) interferometer refractive index (RI) fiber sensor based on a concave-core photonic crystal fiber (CPCF), which is formed by directly splicing a section CPCF with a section of single mode fiber. The CPCF is made by cleaving a section of multimode photonic crystal fiber with an axial tension. The shallow concave-core of CPCF naturally forms the FP cavity with a very short cavity length. The inherent large air holes in the cladding of CPCF are used as the open channels to let liquid sample come in and out of FP cavity. In order to shorten the liquid channel length and eliminate the harmful reflection from the outside end face of the CPCF, the CPCF is cleaved with a tilted tensile force. Due to the very small cavity capacity, the short length and the large sectional area of the microfluidic channels, the proposed sensor provides an easy-in and easy-out structure for liquids, leading to great decrement of the measuring time. The proposed sensor exhibits fast measuring speed, the measuring time is less than 359 and 23 ms for distilled water and pure ethanol, respectively. We also experimentally study and demonstrate the superior performances of the sensor in terms of high RI sensitivity, good linear response, low temperature cross-sensitivity and easy fabrication. PMID:27607621

  9. Morphological evolution of 2D Rh nanoplates to 3D Rh concave nanotents, hierarchically stacked nanoframes, and hierarchical dendrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ki Woong; Park, Jongsik; Lee, Hyunkyung; Yoon, Donghwan; Baik, Hionsuck; Haam, Seungjoo; Sohn, Jeong-Hun; Lee, Kwangyeol

    2015-02-01

    Impurity doping has yielded a number of useful optical and catalytic alloy nanoparticles, by providing synthetic routes to unprecedented nanostructures. However, Zn is difficult to use as a dopant in alloy nanoparticles due to the difficulty in reduction, and therefore little has been reported on Zn-doped alloy nanoparticles and their potential applications. Herein we report an unusual role of the dopant Zn as a crystal growth modifying agent to cause the formation of novel concave Rh nanostructures, namely nanotents. We could further prepare unprecedented hierarchically stacked Rh nanoframes and dendritic nanostructures derived from them by understanding the role of various surface-stabilizing moieties. We also report the usage of new Rh nanostructures in selective hydrogenation of phthalimides.Impurity doping has yielded a number of useful optical and catalytic alloy nanoparticles, by providing synthetic routes to unprecedented nanostructures. However, Zn is difficult to use as a dopant in alloy nanoparticles due to the difficulty in reduction, and therefore little has been reported on Zn-doped alloy nanoparticles and their potential applications. Herein we report an unusual role of the dopant Zn as a crystal growth modifying agent to cause the formation of novel concave Rh nanostructures, namely nanotents. We could further prepare unprecedented hierarchically stacked Rh nanoframes and dendritic nanostructures derived from them by understanding the role of various surface-stabilizing moieties. We also report the usage of new Rh nanostructures in selective hydrogenation of phthalimides. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr05986g

  10. Nonlinear 3D Projection Printing of Concave Hydrogel Microstructures for Long-Term Multicellular Spheroid and Embryoid Body Culture

    PubMed Central

    Hribar, K.C; Finlay, D.; Ma, X.; Qu, X.; Ondeck, M. G.; Chung, P. H.; Zanella, F.; Engler, A. J.; Sheikh, F.; Vuori, K.; Chen, S.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term culture and monitoring of individual multicellular spheroids and embryoid bodies (EBs) remains a challenge for in vitro cell propogation. Here, we used a continuous 3D projection printing approach – with an important modification of nonlinear exposure — to generate concave hydrogel microstructures that permit spheroid growth and long-term maintenance, without the need for spheroid transfer. Breast cancer spheroids grown to 10 d in the concave structures showed hypoxic cores and signs of necrosis using immunofluorescent and histochemical staining, key features of the tumor microenvironment in vivo. EBs consisting of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) grown on the hydrogels demonstrated narrow size distribution and undifferentiated markers at 3 d, followed by signs of differentiation by the presence of cavities and staining of the three germ layers at 10 d. These findings demonstrate a new method for long-term (e.g. beyond spheroid formation at day 2, and with media exchange) 3D cell culture that should be able to assist in cancer spheroid studies as well as embryogenesis and patient-derived disease modeling with iPSC EBs. PMID:25900329

  11. Aberration-corrected concave grating for the mid-infrared spectrometer aboard the Infrared Telescope in Space.

    PubMed

    Onaka, T

    1995-02-01

    A mechanically ruled aberration-corrected concave grating was developed for use in the low-resolution mid-infrared spectrometer aboard the cryogenically cooled Infrared Telescope in Space. The design and the performance testing of the grating are reported. The spectrometer requires a wide spectral range (4.5-11.7 µm) and a wide field of view (8 × 8 arcmin) with a low wavelength resolution (Δλ ≤ 0.3 µm). The aberration-corrected concave grating provides a flat focal plane with a small aberration in the spatial direction compared with those caused by the finite size of the entrance slit. It also permits a simple design for the spectrometer, which is advantageous for applications in space cryogenic instruments. The measurements of the wavelength resolution and the spatial resolution are shown to be in good agreement with the predicted performance. The diffraction efficiency of the grating is more than 80% at the blaze wavelength (6 µm) and fairly high (>30%) over the entire wavelength range in question. The grating produces polarization of less than 10% for λ < 6.4 µm and of 10-20% for 6.7 µm <λ 9.7 µm. These results indicate the potential applicability of this type of grating to the wide-field IR spectroscopic observations. PMID:20963166

  12. SU-E-T-379: Concave Approximations of Target Volume Dose Metrics for Intensity- Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Y; Chen, Y; Wickerhauser, M; Deasy, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The widely used treatment plan metric Dx (mimimum dose to the hottest x% by volume of the target volume) is simple to interpret and use, but is computationally poorly behaved (non-convex), this impedes its use in computationally efficient intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment planning algorithms. We therefore searched for surrogate metrics that are concave, computationally efficient, and accurately correlated to Dx values in IMRT treatment plans. Methods: To find concave surrogates of D95—and more generally, Dx values with variable x values—we tested equations containing one or two generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) functions. Fits were obtained by varying gEUD ‘a’ parameter values, as well as the linear equation coefficients. Fitting was performed using a dataset of dose-volume histograms from 498 de-identified head and neck IMRT treatment plans. Fit characteristics were tested using a crossvalidation process. Reported root-mean-square error values were averaged over the cross-validation shuffles. Results: As expected, the two-gEUD formula provided a superior fit, compared to the single-gEUD formula. The best approximation uses two gEUD terms: 16.25 x gEUD[a=0.45] – 15.30 x gEUD[a=1.75] – 0.69. The average root-mean-square error on repeated (70/30) cross validation was 0.94 Gy. In addition, a formula was found that reasonably approximates Dx for x between 80% and 96%. Conclusion: A simple concave function using two gEUD terms was found that correlates well with PTV D95s for these head and neck treatment plans. More generally, a formula was found that represents well the Dx for x values from 80% to 96%, thus providing a computationally efficient formula for use in treatment planning optimization. The formula may need to be adjusted for other institutions with different treatment planning protocols. We conclude that the strategy of replacing Dx values with gEUD-based formulas is promising.

  13. Steepness and Concavity Controls on the Expression of Reach-Scale Channel Morphology, Debris Flow Deposition, and the Spatial Distribution of Salmonids in the Pacific Northwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, C. L.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2004-12-01

    Steepness and concavity indexes derived from the power function relationship between drainage area and channel slope provide a first-order control on (1) the expression of reach-scale channel morphology, (2) runout potential of debris flows, and (3) the spatial distribution of anadromous fish in the Pacific Northwest. Channels steeper than about 10% are typically dominated by the effects of periodic debris flow scour and subsequent accumulation of coarse sediment. Downstream of this area, channels with slopes between 3 to 10% represent a transition from debris flow to fluvial process dominance. In this transitional region of the network, debris flow deposits often form fill deposits that are subsequently incised by fluvial re-working that leads to the formation of step-pool sequences. Such reaches have restricted salmonid access, generally being most favorable to steelhead and cutthroat trout. The stronger the concavity of a channel profile, the shorter the length of this transitional reach. In the Oregon Coast Range, steepness and concavity values are high and the spatial extent of transitional channels is greatly restricted (typically only occurring in reaches with draining areas between 0.5 and 1.5 km2). The abrupt change in slope from steep debris flow prone channels to low-gradient pool-riffle and bedrock channels promotes debris flow deposition and fan formation at tributary junctions. In these highly concave basins, a relatively large proportion of the fluvial channel network have gradients below 3% and are accessible to salmonids, resulting in a broad spatial distribution. This broad distribution allows for a spreading of risk that may enhance a population's ability to persist during severe disturbance. In contrast, many catchments in the Klamath Mountains of northern California have high steepness values but low concavity. In this region, the portion of the network occupied by transitional reaches is greatly expanded. Step-pool channels dominate the

  14. Glycine-mediated syntheses of Pt concave nanocubes with high-index {hk0} facets and their enhanced electrocatalytic activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-cheng; Hui, Jun-feng; Liu, Zhi-Chang; Zhang, Xin; Zhuang, Jing; Wang, Xun

    2012-10-23

    Metal nanocrystals with high-index facets (HIFs) have drawn significant attention for their superior catalysis activity compared to that of low-index faces. However, because of the high surface energy of HIFs, it is still challenging to preserve HIFs during the growth of nanocrystals. In this study, highly selective Pt concave nanocubes (CNCs) with high-index {hk0} facets have been successfully prepared in a simple aqueous solution. The vital role of glycine as the surface controller in the formation of CNCs was demonstrated. These Pt CNCs exhibited enhanced specific activities toward the electro-oxidation of methanol and formic acid in comparison to commercial Pt black and Pt/C catalysts. PMID:23046108

  15. Self-assembly of metallosupramolecular rhombi from chiral concave 9,9’-spirobifluorene-derived bis(pyridine) ligands

    PubMed Central

    Hovorka, Rainer; Hytteballe, Sophie; Piehler, Torsten; Meyer-Eppler, Georg; Topić, Filip; Rissanen, Kari; Engeser, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Summary Two new 9,9’-spirobifluorene-based bis(4-pyridines) were synthesised in enantiopure and one also in racemic form. These ligands act as concave templates and form metallosupramolecular [(dppp)2M2L2] rhombi with cis-protected [(dppp)Pd]2+ and [(dppp)Pt]2+ ions. The self-assembly process of the racemic ligand preferably occurs in a narcissistic self-recognising manner. Hence, a mixture of all three possible stereoisomers [(dppp)2M2{(R)-L}2](OTf)4, [(dppp)2M2{(S)-L}2](OTf)4, and [(dppp)2M2{(R)-L}{(S)-L}](OTf)4 was obtained in an approximate 1.5:1.5:1 ratio which corresponds to an amplification of the homochiral assemblies by a factor of approximately three as evidenced by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The racemic homochiral assemblies could also be characterised by single crystal X-ray diffraction. PMID:24605163

  16. Unsteady aerodynamic flow field analysis of the space shuttle configuration. Part 3: Unsteady aerodynamics of bodies with concave nose geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson, L. E.; Reding, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis of the unsteady aerodynamics of bodies with concave nose geometries was performed. The results show that the experimentally observed pulsating flow on spiked bodies and in forward facing cavities can be described by the developed simple mathematical model of the phenomenon. Static experimental data is used as a basis for determination of the oscillatory frequency of spike-induced flow pulsations. The agreement between predicted and measured reduced frequencies is generally very good. The spiked-body mathematical model is extended to describe the pulsations observed in forward facing cavities and it is shown that not only the frequency but also the pressure time history can be described with the accuracy needed to predict the experimentally observed time average effects. This implies that it should be possible to determine analytically the impact of the flow pulsation on the structural integrity of the nozzles for the jettisoned empty SRM-shells.

  17. Sub-wavelength focusing of cylindrical vector beams by a 1D metallic photonic crystal plano-concave lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yi; Wang, Jin; Xu, Ji

    2014-10-01

    The fine manipulations of cylindrical vector beams (CVBs) based on metallic microstructures, such as sub-wavelength focusing, have entered many interdisciplinary areas, and the important applications have been found in many fields including optical micromanipulation, super-resolution imaging, micro-machining and so on. But so far, the sub-wavelength focusing of azimuthally polarized beams is encountered, since the manipulation mechanisms rely heavily on the excitation of surface plasmon polaritons, which brings the polarization limitation. We theoretically investigated the focusing behavior of CVBs in 1D metallic photonic crystals (MPCs). The simulation results show that a 1D MPC plano-concave lens can focus cylindrical vector beams into scale of sub-wavelength. The negative refraction at the interface between the air and the 1D MPC is analyzed at the frequencies corresponding to the second photonic band, which makes the 1D MPC has the ability to focus higher Fourier components of light beams. The cylindrical plano-concave structure is constructed to focus the radially and azimuthally polarized beams simultaneously. The behavior is demonstrated by Finite Element Method (FEM). The shape of focusing field can be tailored, by changing the polarization ratio of the incident beams. In addition, the effective sub-wavelength focusing phenomenon can also be realized in variety of wave ranges, by choosing the proper materials and adjusting the parameters. We believe that it's the first time to realize the simultaneous sub-wavelength focusing of radially and azimuthally polarized beams, the application of which is quite promising in broad prospects.

  18. Magnetic force-assisted self-locking metallic bead array for fabrication of diverse concave microwell geometries.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gi-Hun; Park, Ye Eun; Cho, Minhaeng; Park, Hansoo; Park, Joong Yull

    2016-09-21

    Spheroid cell culture is very useful for further understanding cellular behavior including motility and biochemical reaction since it mimics three-dimensional (3D) in vivo organ tissue. Among previously proposed various methods for spheroid production, such as hanging drop and spinner flask, microwell is a recently developed method harnessing microtechnology to produce uniform-sized spheroids. Although soft-lithography has been popular for creating microwell arrays, a 3D spherical geometry has been regarded as difficult to fabricate using conventional methods, or often requires complex fabrication processes and expensive equipment. Here, we propose a new method for fabricating concave microwells for cell spheroid production and culture. To demonstrate this method, we fabricated a 30 × 30 microwell array in 3 × 3 cm plates, utilizing metal beads, a through-hole array, and an assembly of small magnets. The spherical metal beads were used as a mold for the microwell, naturally creating the desired 3D concave microwell geometry. One of the key ideas was to place and hold each metal bead in the designated through-hole using the small magnet array. We also performed computational simulation of the magnetostatic force to design and observe the magnetic force field in detail. In addition, to provide a practical demonstration of the proposed system in cell biology, we created and cultured adipose-derived stem cell spheroids for 14 days for chondrogenic differentiation. This method allows further variations in microwell geometry that will enhance the method's applicability as a helpful tool for various studies in cell biology, cancer research, and tissue engineering. PMID:27509885

  19. MOF-templated synthesis of porous Co(3)O(4) concave nanocubes with high specific surface area and their gas sensing properties.

    PubMed

    Lü, Yinyun; Zhan, Wenwen; He, Yue; Wang, Yiting; Kong, Xiangjian; Kuang, Qin; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Zheng, Lansun

    2014-03-26

    Porous metal oxides nanomaterials with controlled morphology have received great attention because of their promising applications in catalysis, energy storage and conversion, gas sensing, etc. In this paper, porous Co3O4 concave nanocubes with extremely high specific surface area (120.9 m(2)·g(-1)) were synthesized simply by calcining Co-based metal-organic framework (Co-MOF, ZIF-67) templates at the optimized temperature (300 °C), and the formation mechanism of such highly porous structures as well as the influence of the calcination temperature are well explained by taking into account thermal behavior and intrinsic structural features of the Co-MOF precursors. The gas-sensing properties of the as-synthesized porous Co3O4 concave nanocubes were systematically tested towards volatile organic compounds including ethanol, acetone, toluene, and benzene. Experimental results reveal that the porous Co3O4 concave nanocubes present the highest sensitivity to ethanol with fast response/recovery time (< 10 s) and a low detection limit (at least 10 ppm). Such outstanding gas sensing performance of the porous Co3O4 concave nanocubes benefits from their high porosity, large specific surface area, and remarkable capabilities of surface-adsorbed oxygen. PMID:24559195

  20. Improving the spectral resolution of flat-field concave grating miniature spectrometers by dividing a wide spectral band into two narrow ones.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qian; Pang, Jinchao; Li, Xinghui; Ni, Kai; Tian, Rui

    2015-11-10

    In this study, a new flat-field concave grating miniature spectrometer is proposed with improved resolution across a wide spectral band. A mirror is added to a conventional concave grating spectrometer and placed near the existing detector array, allowing a wide spectral band to be divided into two adjacent subspectral bands. One of these bands is directly detected by the detector, and the other is indirectly analyzed by the same detector after being reflected by the mirror. These two subspectral bands share the same entrance slit, concave grating, and detector, which allows for a compact size, while maintaining an improved spectral resolution across the entire spectral band. The positions of the mirror and other parameters of the spectrometer are designed by a computer procedure and the optical design software ZEMAX. Simulation results show that the resolution of this kind of flat-field concave grating miniature spectrometer is better than 1.6 nm across a spectral band of 700 nm. Experiments based on three laser sources reveal that the measured resolutions are comparable to the simulated ones, with a maximum relative error between them of less than 19%. PMID:26560772

  1. Ag@Au concave cuboctahedra: A unique probe for monitoring Au-catalyzed reduction and oxidation reactions by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Jiawei; Winget, Sarah A.; Wu, Yiren; Su, Dong; Sun, Xiaojun; Xie, Zhao -Xiong; Qin, Dong

    2016-01-26

    In this paper, we report a facile synthesis of Ag@Au concave cuboctahedra by titrating aqueous HAuCl4 into a suspension of Ag cuboctahedra in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA), NaOH, and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) at room temperature. Initially, the Au atoms derived from the reduction of Au3+ by AA are conformally deposited on the entire surface of a Ag cuboctahedron. Upon the formation of a complete Au shell, however, the subsequently formed Au atoms are preferentially deposited onto the Au{100} facets, resulting in the formation of a Ag@Au cuboctahedron with concave structures at the sites of {111} facets. The concave cuboctahedramore » embrace excellent SERS activity that is more than 70-fold stronger than that of the original Ag cuboctahedra at an excitation wavelength of 785 nm. The concave cuboctahedra also exhibit remarkable stability in the presence of an oxidant such as H2O2 because of the protection by a complete Au shell. These two unique attributes enable in-situ SERS monitoring of the reduction of 4-nitrothiophenol (4-NTP) to 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) by NaBH4 through a 4,4'-dimercaptoazobenzene (trans-DMAB) intermediate and the subsequent oxidation of 4-ATP back to trans-DMAB upon the introduction of H2O2.« less

  2. Synthesis of Au@Pt bimetallic nanoparticles with concave Au nanocuboids as seeds and their enhanced electrocatalytic properties in the ethanol oxidation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Lingyu; Li, Lidong; Peng, Yi; Guo, Lin

    2015-12-01

    Herein, a new type of uniform and well-structured Au@Pt bimetallic nanoparticles (BNPs) with highly active concave Au nanocuboids (NCs) as seeds was successfully synthesized by using the classic seed-mediated method. Electrochemical measurements were conducted to demonstrate their greatly enhanced catalytic performance in the ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR). It was found that the electrochemical performance for Au@Pt BNPs with the concave Au NCs as seeds, which were enclosed by {611} high-index facets, could be seven times higher than that of the Au@Pt bimetallic nanoparticles with regular spherical Au NPs as seeds. Furthermore, our findings show that the morphology and electrocatalytic activity of the Au@Pt BNPs can be tuned simply by changing the compositional ratios of the growth solution. The lower the amount of H2PtCl6 used in the growth solution, the thinner the Pt shell grew, and the more high-index facets of concave Au NCs seeds were exposed in Au@Pt BNPs, leading to higher electrochemical activity. These as-prepared concave Au@Pt BNPs will open up new strategies for improving catalytic efficiency and reducing the use of the expensive and scarce resource of platinum in the ethanol oxidation reaction, and are potentially applicable as electrochemical catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells.

  3. Synthesis of Au@Pt bimetallic nanoparticles with concave Au nanocuboids as seeds and their enhanced electrocatalytic properties in the ethanol oxidation reaction.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lingyu; Li, Lidong; Peng, Yi; Guo, Lin

    2015-12-18

    Herein, a new type of uniform and well-structured Au@Pt bimetallic nanoparticles (BNPs) with highly active concave Au nanocuboids (NCs) as seeds was successfully synthesized by using the classic seed-mediated method. Electrochemical measurements were conducted to demonstrate their greatly enhanced catalytic performance in the ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR). It was found that the electrochemical performance for Au@Pt BNPs with the concave Au NCs as seeds, which were enclosed by {611} high-index facets, could be seven times higher than that of the Au@Pt bimetallic nanoparticles with regular spherical Au NPs as seeds. Furthermore, our findings show that the morphology and electrocatalytic activity of the Au@Pt BNPs can be tuned simply by changing the compositional ratios of the growth solution. The lower the amount of H2PtCl6 used in the growth solution, the thinner the Pt shell grew, and the more high-index facets of concave Au NCs seeds were exposed in Au@Pt BNPs, leading to higher electrochemical activity. These as-prepared concave Au@Pt BNPs will open up new strategies for improving catalytic efficiency and reducing the use of the expensive and scarce resource of platinum in the ethanol oxidation reaction, and are potentially applicable as electrochemical catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells. PMID:26585310

  4. Pd@Pt core-shell concave decahedra: A class of catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction with enhanced activity and durability

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Xue; Vera, Madeline; Chi, Miaofang; Xia, Younan; Luo, Ming; Huang, Hongwen; Ruditskiy, Aleksey; Park, Jinho; Bao, Shixiong; Liu, Jingyue; et al

    2015-11-13

    Here, we report a facile synthesis of multiply twinned Pd@Pt core shell concave decahedra by controlling the deposition of Pt on preformed Pd decahedral seeds. The Pt atoms are initially deposited on the vertices of a decahedral seed, followed by surface diffusion to other regions along the edges/ridges and then across the faces. Different from the coating of a Pd icosahedral seed, the Pt atoms prefer to stay at the vertices and edges/ridges of a decahedral seed even when the deposition is conducted at 200 degrees C, naturally generating a core shell structure covered by concave facets. The nonuniformity inmore » the Pt coating can be attributed to the presence of twin boundaries at the vertices, as well as the {100} facets and twin defects along the edges/ridges of a decahedron, effectively trapping the Pt adatoms at these high-energy sites. As compared to a commercial Pt/C catalyst, the Pd@Pt concave decahedra show substantial enhancement in both catalytic activity and durability toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). For the concave decahedra with 29.6% Pt by weight, their specific (1.66 mA/cm2pt) and mass (1.60 A/mg/2pt) ORR activities are enhanced by 4.4 and 6.6 times relative to those of the Pt/C catalyst (0.36 mA/cm2pt and 0.32 A/mgpt, respectively). After 10 000 cycles of accelerated durability test, the concave decahedra still exhibit a mass activity of 0.69 A/mgpt, more than twice that of the pristine Pt/C catalyst.« less

  5. Pd@Pt core-shell concave decahedra: A class of catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction with enhanced activity and durability

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xue; Vera, Madeline; Chi, Miaofang; Xia, Younan; Luo, Ming; Huang, Hongwen; Ruditskiy, Aleksey; Park, Jinho; Bao, Shixiong; Liu, Jingyue; Howe, Jane; Xie, Zhaoxiong

    2015-11-13

    Here, we report a facile synthesis of multiply twinned Pd@Pt core shell concave decahedra by controlling the deposition of Pt on preformed Pd decahedral seeds. The Pt atoms are initially deposited on the vertices of a decahedral seed, followed by surface diffusion to other regions along the edges/ridges and then across the faces. Different from the coating of a Pd icosahedral seed, the Pt atoms prefer to stay at the vertices and edges/ridges of a decahedral seed even when the deposition is conducted at 200 degrees C, naturally generating a core shell structure covered by concave facets. The nonuniformity in the Pt coating can be attributed to the presence of twin boundaries at the vertices, as well as the {100} facets and twin defects along the edges/ridges of a decahedron, effectively trapping the Pt adatoms at these high-energy sites. As compared to a commercial Pt/C catalyst, the Pd@Pt concave decahedra show substantial enhancement in both catalytic activity and durability toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). For the concave decahedra with 29.6% Pt by weight, their specific (1.66 mA/cm2pt) and mass (1.60 A/mg/2pt) ORR activities are enhanced by 4.4 and 6.6 times relative to those of the Pt/C catalyst (0.36 mA/cm2pt and 0.32 A/mgpt, respectively). After 10 000 cycles of accelerated durability test, the concave decahedra still exhibit a mass activity of 0.69 A/mgpt, more than twice that of the pristine Pt/C catalyst.

  6. Concave gold nanocube assemblies as nanotraps for surface-enhanced Raman scattering-based detection of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteini, Paolo; de Angelis, Marella; Ulivi, Lorenzo; Centi, Sonia; Pini, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    SERS detection of proteins is typically performed by using labeling agents with stable and high Raman scattering cross sections. This is a valuable approach for trace detection and quantification of a target protein but is unsuitable for inspecting its inherent structural and functional properties. On the other hand, direct SERS of proteins has been mainly devoted to the study of short peptides and aminoacid sequences or of prosthetic groups with intense Raman signals, which is of scarce interest for a thorough characterization of most proteins. Here we try to overcome these limitations by setting-up an effective platform for the structural SERS analysis of proteins. The platform consists of an extended bidimensional array of gold concave nanocubes (CNCs) supported on a PDMS film. CNCs are closely-packed through face-face and face-corner interactions generating a monolayered arrangement featuring well distributed nanoholes. Here the protein homogeneously experiences an E-field enhancement outward from the metal surfaces surrounding it, which causes a large number of vibrations to be contemporarily amplified. The proposed platform provides stable and detailed SERS spectra and confers rapidity and reproducibility to the analysis.SERS detection of proteins is typically performed by using labeling agents with stable and high Raman scattering cross sections. This is a valuable approach for trace detection and quantification of a target protein but is unsuitable for inspecting its inherent structural and functional properties. On the other hand, direct SERS of proteins has been mainly devoted to the study of short peptides and aminoacid sequences or of prosthetic groups with intense Raman signals, which is of scarce interest for a thorough characterization of most proteins. Here we try to overcome these limitations by setting-up an effective platform for the structural SERS analysis of proteins. The platform consists of an extended bidimensional array of gold concave

  7. Flat-ramp vs. convex-concave thrust geometries in a deformable hanging wall: new insights from analogue modeling experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Pedro; Tomas, Ricardo; Rosas, Filipe; Duarte, Joao; Terrinha, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    Different modes of strain accommodation affecting a deformable hanging-wall in a flat-ramp-flat thrust system were previously addressed through several (sandbox) analog modeling studies, focusing on the influence of different variables, such as: a) thrust ramp dip angle and friction (Bonini et al, 2000); b) prescribed thickness of the hanging-wall (Koy and Maillot, 2007); and c) sin-thrust erosion (compensating for topographic thrust edification, e.g. Persson and Sokoutis, 2002). In the present work we reproduce the same experimental procedure to investigate the influence of two different parameters on hanging-wall deformation: 1) the geometry of the thrusting surface; and 2) the absence of a velocity discontinuity (VD) that is always present in previous similar analogue modeling studies. Considering the first variable we use two end member ramp geometries, flat-ramp-flat and convex-concave, to understand the control exerted by the abrupt ramp edges in the hanging-wall stress-strain distribution, comparing the obtain results with the situation in which such edge singularities are absent (convex-concave thrust ramp). Considering the second investigated parameter, our motivation was the recognition that the VD found in the different analogue modeling settings simply does not exist in nature, despite the fact that it has a major influence on strain accommodation in the deformable hanging-wall. We thus eliminate such apparatus artifact from our models and compare the obtained results with the previous ones. Our preliminary results suggest that both investigated variables play a non-negligible role on the structural style characterizing the hanging-wall deformation of convergent tectonic settings were such thrust-ramp systems were recognized. Acknowledgments This work was sponsored by the Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia (FCT) through project MODELINK EXPL/GEO-GEO/0714/2013. Pedro Almeida wants to thank to FCT for the Ph.D. grant (SFRH/BD/52556/2014) under the

  8. Establishment and experimental verification of the photoresist model considering interface slip between photoresist and concave spherical substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S.; Bayanheshig, Zhao, X. L.; Xing, S.; Jiang, Y. X.; Wu, N.; Jiao, Q. B.; Li, W. H.; Tan, X.

    2015-07-01

    A thickness distribution model of photoresist spin-coating on concave spherical substrate (CSS) has been developed via both theoretical studies and experimental verification. The stress of photoresist on rotating CSS is analyzed and the boundary conditions of hydrodynamic equation are presented under the non-lubricating condition. Moreover, a multivariable polynomial equation of photoresist-layer thickness distribution is derived by analyzing and deducing the flow equation where the evaporation rate, substrate topography, interface slip between liquid and CSS, and the variation of rotational speed and photoresist parameters are considered in detail. Importantly, the photoresist-layer thickness at various CSS rotational speeds and liquid concentrations can be obtained according to the theoretical equation. The required photoresist viscosity and concentration parameters of different photoresist coating thickness under a certain coating speeds can be also solved through this equation. It is noted that the calculated theoretical values are well consistent with the experimental results which were measured with various CSS rotational speeds and liquid concentrations at steady state. Therefore, both our experimental results and theoretical analysis provide the guidance for photoresist dilution and pave the way for potential improvements and microfabrication applications in the future.

  9. Establishment and experimental verification of the photoresist model considering interface slip between photoresist and concave spherical substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S. E-mail: guozhongupenn@gmail.com; Zhao, X. L.; Jiang, Y. X.; Bayanheshig, E-mail: guozhongupenn@gmail.com; Wu, N.; Jiao, Q. B.; Li, W. H.; Tan, X.; Xing, S. E-mail: guozhongupenn@gmail.com

    2015-07-15

    A thickness distribution model of photoresist spin-coating on concave spherical substrate (CSS) has been developed via both theoretical studies and experimental verification. The stress of photoresist on rotating CSS is analyzed and the boundary conditions of hydrodynamic equation are presented under the non-lubricating condition. Moreover, a multivariable polynomial equation of photoresist-layer thickness distribution is derived by analyzing and deducing the flow equation where the evaporation rate, substrate topography, interface slip between liquid and CSS, and the variation of rotational speed and photoresist parameters are considered in detail. Importantly, the photoresist-layer thickness at various CSS rotational speeds and liquid concentrations can be obtained according to the theoretical equation. The required photoresist viscosity and concentration parameters of different photoresist coating thickness under a certain coating speeds can be also solved through this equation. It is noted that the calculated theoretical values are well consistent with the experimental results which were measured with various CSS rotational speeds and liquid concentrations at steady state. Therefore, both our experimental results and theoretical analysis provide the guidance for photoresist dilution and pave the way for potential improvements and microfabrication applications in the future.

  10. Concave gold nanocube assemblies as nanotraps for surface-enhanced Raman scattering-based detection of proteins.

    PubMed

    Matteini, Paolo; de Angelis, Marella; Ulivi, Lorenzo; Centi, Sonia; Pini, Roberto

    2015-02-28

    SERS detection of proteins is typically performed by using labeling agents with stable and high Raman scattering cross sections. This is a valuable approach for trace detection and quantification of a target protein but is unsuitable for inspecting its inherent structural and functional properties. On the other hand, direct SERS of proteins has been mainly devoted to the study of short peptides and aminoacid sequences or of prosthetic groups with intense Raman signals, which is of scarce interest for a thorough characterization of most proteins. Here we try to overcome these limitations by setting-up an effective platform for the structural SERS analysis of proteins. The platform consists of an extended bidimensional array of gold concave nanocubes (CNCs) supported on a PDMS film. CNCs are closely-packed through face-face and face-corner interactions generating a monolayered arrangement featuring well distributed nanoholes. Here the protein homogeneously experiences an E-field enhancement outward from the metal surfaces surrounding it, which causes a large number of vibrations to be contemporarily amplified. The proposed platform provides stable and detailed SERS spectra and confers rapidity and reproducibility to the analysis. PMID:25563172

  11. A Linear Programming Approach to Routing Control in Networks of Constrained Nonlinear Positive Systems with Concave Flow Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arneson, Heather M.; Dousse, Nicholas; Langbort, Cedric

    2014-01-01

    We consider control design for positive compartmental systems in which each compartment's outflow rate is described by a concave function of the amount of material in the compartment.We address the problem of determining the routing of material between compartments to satisfy time-varying state constraints while ensuring that material reaches its intended destination over a finite time horizon. We give sufficient conditions for the existence of a time-varying state-dependent routing strategy which ensures that the closed-loop system satisfies basic network properties of positivity, conservation and interconnection while ensuring that capacity constraints are satisfied, when possible, or adjusted if a solution cannot be found. These conditions are formulated as a linear programming problem. Instances of this linear programming problem can be solved iteratively to generate a solution to the finite horizon routing problem. Results are given for the application of this control design method to an example problem. Key words: linear programming; control of networks; positive systems; controller constraints and structure.

  12. Numerical investigation of oscillatory thermocapillary flows under zero gravity in a circular liquid film with concave free surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Takagi, Y.; Okano, Y.; Dost, S.

    2016-03-01

    NASA astronaut Pettit has conducted thermocapillary flow experiments in water films suspended in a solid ring onboard the International Space Station (ISS) in 2003 and 2011. In one of these experiments, an oscillatory thermocapillary flow was observed. The developed flow broke its symmetry along the centerline of the film. To the best of our knowledge, there are no studies on such oscillatory thermocapillary flows in thin films, and the flow-mechanism giving rise to such oscillatory flows is also not well understood. In order to shed light on the subject, we have carried out a numerical simulation study. The simulation results have shown that the water film geometry (film surface shape; being concave) is an important parameter and give rise to three oscillatory flow structures in the film, namely, a hydrothermal wave developing near the heated section, a symmetric oscillatory flow due to temperature variations, and a symmetry breaking flow due to the hydrodynamic instability along the free boundary layer (mixing layer) and the development of the hydrothermal waves. Simulation results show that the symmetry-breaking phenomenon observed in the thin film experiment on the ISS can be explained by the hydrodynamic instability and the development of hydrothermal waves.

  13. Experiments in Transitional Boundary Layers With Emphasis on High Free-Stream Disturbance Level, Surface Concave Curvature and Strong Favorable Streamwise Pressure Gradient Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, T. W.; Volino, R. J.

    2007-01-01

    Experiments on boundary layer transition with flat, concave and convex walls and various levels of free-stream disturbance and with zero and strong streamwise acceleration have been conducted. Measurements of both fluid mechanics and heat transfer processes were taken. Examples are profiles of mean velocity and temperature; Reynolds normal and shear stresses; turbulent streamwise and cross-stream heat fluxed; turbulent Prandtl number; and streamwise variations of wall skin friction and heat transfer coefficient values. Free-stream turbulence levels were varied over the range from about 0.3 percent to about 8 percent. The effects of curvature on the onset of transition under low disturbance conditions are clear; concave curvature leads to an earlier and more rapid transition and the opposite is true for convex curvature This was previously known but little documentation of the transport processes in the flow was available

  14. Development of concave-face boudin in Chhotanagpur Granite Gneiss Complex of Jasidih-Deoghar area, eastern India: Insight from finite element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Susanta Kumar; Deb, Indrasish

    2014-05-01

    With the help of 2D-finite element modeling the present study analyses the role of syntectonic migmatisation on the development of concave-face boudins within amphibolite dykes in Chhotanagpur Granite Gneiss Complex of Jasidih-Deoghar area, eastern India. Amphibolitic bands embedded in quartzofeldspathic gneiss show concave-face boudins with varied face geometries, resulted due to rheological changes during syntectonic migmatisation. Detailed study reveals that due to couple effect of H2O infiltration and potassium (K+)-metasomatism associated with the invasion of pegmatitic fluid, pyroxene converted to amphibole and later to biotite at the marginal part of the amphibolitic bands and especially, near the separation zone of boudin. In this study, three types of models are prepared to simulate three different patterns of syntectonic rheological changes that can best explain the features observed in the field. Type I is a symmetric rim model representing equal amount of rheological changes in all directions of a rectangular boudin object. Other two are asymmetric rim models (Type II and Type III) with different amount of rheological changes along length and width of the boudin block. The analysis also takes into account the effects of rate of syntectonic rheological changes (D). The study reveals that the pattern and rate of rheological changes have strong influences on the development of concave-face boudin. Type I model produces barrel-shaped fish-mouth boudin with extremely sharp corners, whereas Type III model produces more lensoid shape with relatively tighter fish mouth. For all types of model, U-shaped concave-face boudin develops at lower rate of rheological changes and the face geometry gradually transforms to V-shape with increasing the rate. The progressive change of face curvature (FC), exterior curvature (EC) and aspect ratio (AR) depends on the timing of rheological inversion during progressive deformation.

  15. One-pot synthesis of high-index faceted AgCl nanocrystals with trapezohedral, concave hexoctahedral structures and their photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haibin; Lu, Yonggang; Liu, Hong; Fang, Jingzhong

    2015-07-01

    AgCl semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) with trapezohedral (TPH) and concave hexoctahedral (HOH) structures have been successfully synthesized for the first time in high yield by a direct one-pot solvothermal method. The as-prepared TPH, concave HOH AgCl NCs with unconventional polyhedral shapes and smooth surfaces were enclosed by 24 high-index {311} facets and 48 high-index {15 5 2} facets, respectively. A specific ionic liquid poly(diallyldimethylammonium) chloride (PDDA) acted as both a Cl- ion precursor and a morphology-controlled stabilizer, which was indispensable for the formation of these high-index faceted AgCl polyhedra and the derived uniform octahedral AgCl in an appropriate concentration of hot AgNO3 and ethylene glycol (EG) solution. With high-index facets exposed, both TPH and concave HOH AgCl NCs exhibit much higher photocatalytic activity than octahedral AgCl NCs that have mainly {111} faces exposed, with lower surface areas and surface energies, for the degradation of organics under sunlight. It is expected that the use of polyhedral AgCl NCs with high-index facets is an effective approach for the design of alternative semiconductor photocatalysts with a high performance, which may find potential applications such as in photochromics and environmental management.

  16. 2D numerical simulation of impinging jet onto the concave surface by k - w - overline{{v2 }} - f turbulence model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifi, Zeinab; Nazari, Mohammad Reza; Khalaji, Erfan

    2016-03-01

    In the present article, the characteristics of turbulent jet impinging onto a concave surface is studied using k - w - overline{{v2 }} - f turbulence model. Dependent parameters such as inlet Reynolds number (2960 < Re < 12,000), nozzle-plate distance (4 < H/B < 10), concavity (D/B = 30, 60) of confined and unconfined impinging jet are scrutinized to find out whether this approach would bring any privileges compared to other investigations or not. The obtained results indicate better performance in low nozzle-plate distance in comparison with those mentioned in other literatures. Furthermore, the average Nusselt number of confined impinging jet overtakes unconfined one (similar circumstances) while this trend will decline as relative concavity increases. Moreover, local heat transfer of stagnation area and wall jet goes up and down through nozzle-plate distance enhancement respectively. Finally, the effects of sinusoidal pulsed inlet profile on heat transfer of unconfined impinging jet indicate direct affiliation of amplitude and neutral impact of frequency on Nusselt number distribution.

  17. In-cylinder flows of a motored four-stroke engine with flat-crown and slightly concave-crown pistons

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, R.F.; Yang, H.S.; Yeh, C.-N.

    2008-04-15

    The temporal and spatial evolution processes of the in-cylinder flow structures and turbulence intensities in the symmetry and offset planes of a motored four-valve, four-stroke engine during the intake and compression strokes are diagnosed by using a particle image velocimeter. Two pistons of different crown shapes (flat-crown and slightly concave-crown pistons) are studied. The inception, establishment, and evolution of the tumbling vortical flow structures during the intake and compression strokes are clearly depicted. Quantitative strengths of the rotating vortical flow motions are presented by a dimensionless parameter, the tumble ratio, which can represent the mean angular velocity of the vortices in the target plane. The turbulence intensity of the in-cylinder flow is also calculated by using the measured time-varying velocity data. The results show that the flat-crown piston induces higher bulk-averaged tumble ratio and turbulence intensity than the slightly concave-crown piston does because the tumble ratio and turbulence generated by the flat-crown piston in the offset planes during the compression stroke are particularly large. The engine with the flat-crown piston also presents larger torque and power outputs and lower hydrocarbon emission than that with the slightly concave-crown piston. This might be caused by the enhanced combustion in the engine cylinder due to the stronger tumble ratio and turbulence intensity. (author)

  18. A new signal restoration method based on deconvolution of the Point Spread Function (PSF) for the Flat-Field Holographic Concave Grating UV spectrometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Honglin; Luo, Yongdao

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, with the development of the Flat-Field Holographic Concave Grating, they are adopted by all kinds of UV spectrometers. By means of single optical surface, the Flat-Field Holographic Concave Grating can implement dispersion and imaging that make the UV spectrometer system design quite compact. However, the calibration of the Flat-Field Holographic Concave Grating is very difficult. Various factors make its imaging quality difficult to be guaranteed. So we have to process the spectrum signal with signal restoration before using it. Guiding by the theory of signals and systems, and after a series of experiments, we found that our UV spectrometer system is a Linear Space- Variant System. It means that we have to measure PSF of every pixel of the system which contains thousands of pixels. Obviously, that's a large amount of calculation .For dealing with this problem, we proposes a novel signal restoration method. This method divides the system into several Linear Space-Invariant subsystems and then makes signal restoration with PSFs. Our experiments turn out that this method is effective and inexpensive.

  19. One-pot synthesis of high-index faceted AgCl nanocrystals with trapezohedral, concave hexoctahedral structures and their photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haibin; Lu, Yonggang; Liu, Hong; Fang, Jingzhong

    2015-07-21

    AgCl semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) with trapezohedral (TPH) and concave hexoctahedral (HOH) structures have been successfully synthesized for the first time in high yield by a direct one-pot solvothermal method. The as-prepared TPH, concave HOH AgCl NCs with unconventional polyhedral shapes and smooth surfaces were enclosed by 24 high-index {311} facets and 48 high-index {15 5 2} facets, respectively. A specific ionic liquid poly(diallyldimethylammonium) chloride (PDDA) acted as both a Cl(-) ion precursor and a morphology-controlled stabilizer, which was indispensable for the formation of these high-index faceted AgCl polyhedra and the derived uniform octahedral AgCl in an appropriate concentration of hot AgNO3 and ethylene glycol (EG) solution. With high-index facets exposed, both TPH and concave HOH AgCl NCs exhibit much higher photocatalytic activity than octahedral AgCl NCs that have mainly {111} faces exposed, with lower surface areas and surface energies, for the degradation of organics under sunlight. It is expected that the use of polyhedral AgCl NCs with high-index facets is an effective approach for the design of alternative semiconductor photocatalysts with a high performance, which may find potential applications such as in photochromics and environmental management. PMID:26088365

  20. Ribosomal protein L5 has a highly twisted concave surface and flexible arms responsible for rRNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, T; Yao, M; Kawamura, S; Iwasaki, K; Kimura, M; Tanaka, I

    2001-01-01

    Ribosomal protein L5 is a 5S rRNA binding protein in the large subunit and plays an essential role in the promotion of a particular conformation of 5S rRNA. The crystal structure of the ribosomal protein L5 from Bacillus stearothermophilus has been determined at 1.8 A resolution. The molecule consists of a five-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet and four alpha-helices, which fold in a way that is topologically similar to the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) domain. The molecular shape and electrostatic representation suggest that the concave surface and loop regions are involved in 5S rRNA binding. To identify amino acid residues responsible for 5S rRNA binding, we made use of Ala-scanning mutagenesis of evolutionarily conserved amino acids occurring in the beta-strands and loop regions. The mutations of Asn37 at the beta1-strand and Gln63 at the loop between helix 2 and beta3-strand as well as that of Phe77 at the tip of the loop structure between the beta2- and beta3-strands caused a significant reduction in 5S rRNA binding. In addition, the mutations of Thr90 on the beta3-strand and Ile141 and Asp144 at the loop between beta4- and beta5-strands moderately reduced the 5S rRNA-binding affinity. Comparison of these results with the more recently analyzed structure of the 50S subunit from Haloarcula marismortui suggests that there are significant differences in the structure at N- and C-terminal regions and probably in the 5S rRNA binding. PMID:11350033

  1. Effect of a multi-sided concave liner barrel design on thickness and roughness of teat-end hyperkeratosis.

    PubMed

    Haeussermann, Angelika; Britten, Justine; Britten, Allan; Pahl, Christian; Älveby, Nils; Hartung, Eberhard

    2016-05-01

    In a round liner barrel, the force of the closing liner is transferred by the two opposite sides of the liner wall to the teat apex. Liners with a multi-sided barrel shape close at three or more planes and distribute their force to a larger area of the teat apex. The objective of the study was to investigate effects of a liner with a multi-sided concave barrel design on the degree of teat-end hyperkeratosis, thickness and roughness, and on the time delay until thickness or roughness of teat-end hyperkeratosis responded to the experimental liner. The investigations were done on two dairy farms, one in USA and one in Germany. A split-udder arrangement of liners was used, and control treatment was a liner with round barrel shape. The test period comprised 14 weeks in the first study and 16 weeks in the second study. Thickness of teat-end hyperkeratosis was influenced by farm and test week. Roughness was influenced by farm, test week and treatment. In the first study, the incidence of rough teat-end hyperkeratosis was about 28 and 42% lower in teats milked with the experimental liner than in teats milked with the control liner by test weeks 11 and 14, respectively. In the second study, incidence of rough teat-end hyperkeratosis was rare in general, and in addition hardly occurred in teats milked with the experimental liner. The results indicate that the barrel design of the experimental liner causes similar effects on different farms but magnitude of the effect depends on initial incidence of teat end hyperkeratosis in the herd. PMID:27210492

  2. Educational Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Robert

    Problems in educational cost accounting and a new cost accounting approach are described in this paper. The limitations of the individualized cost (student units) approach and the comparative cost approach (in the form of fund-function-object) are illustrated. A new strategy, an activity-based system of accounting, is advocated. Borrowed from…

  3. Formation of palladium concave nanocrystals via auto-catalytic tip overgrowth by interplay of reduction kinetics, concentration gradient and surface diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Na; Chen, Xueying; Yue, Bin; He, Heyong

    2016-04-01

    A clear understanding of the growth mechanism involved in the shape-controlled synthesis of noble-metal nanocrystals with concave surfaces can provide useful information for the rational design of novel anisotropic nanostructures with controllable properties. In this paper, we conducted a systematic study of the detailed growth mechanism of the Pd arrow-headed tripods and revealed how the formation of the concave Pd nanocrystals was collectively controlled by the reduction kinetics, concentration gradient of Pd precursors, and surface diffusion of atoms. The formation of the arrow-headed tripods can be attributed to an auto-catalytic tip overgrowth process, where the Pd triangular nanoplate seeds formed under a suitably slow reduction rate can auto-catalyze the dehydrogenation of benzyl alcohol to generate hydrogen atoms [H]. The presence of [H] further dramatically accelerates the reduction of Pd(acac)2, which introduces a concentration gradient of Pd precursors in our non-stirring synthesis system and facilitates the kinetically-controlled tip overgrowth under a concentration gradient to form tripods with troughs on the arms. The final shapes of the concave nanocrystals depend on the relative rate of atom deposition and surface diffusion of atoms, which can be tuned by manipulating the reaction conditions such as the reaction temperature and the stirring conditions. This study presents a new possibility for the rational synthesis of various Pd nanostructures by manipulating the auto-catalytic process and tuning the relative rate of atom deposition and surface diffusion of atoms, which provides useful information for understanding the growth mechanism and the design of other anisotropic noble-metal nanostructures.

  4. Selective hydrothermal synthesis of BiOBr microflowers and Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} shuttles with concave surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Peipei; Zhu Lingling; Zhu Yongchun; Qian Yitai

    2011-06-15

    Through controlling the amount of NaOH added, BiOBr and Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} with different shapes were hydrothermally synthesized in the reaction system of Bi(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}-hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB)-NaOH. As 8 mmol of NaOH was added, BiOBr microflowers constructed of nanoflakes were synthesized. The thickness of these single-crystal nanoflakes was about 20 nm. In the similar condition, when the amount of NaOH added was 28 mmol, Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} shuttles with concave surfaces were obtained. The length of these shuttles was 100 {mu}m and the diameter at the middle of these shuttles was 50 {mu}m. The photocatalytic activity of as-prepared BiOBr microflowers was evaluated by the degradation of methyl orange (MO) under visible-light irradiation ({lambda}>420 nm), which was up to 96% within 90 min. - Graphical abstract: Through controlling the amount of NaOH added, BiOBr microflowers and Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} shuttles with concave surfaces were hydrothermally synthesized in the reaction system of Bi(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}-hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB)-NaOH. Highlights: > BiOBr microflowers constructed of nanoflakes were synthesized hydrothermally. > Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} shuttles with concave surfaces were also synthesized. > Their formation mechanisms were studied based on the experimental results. > The photocatalytic activity of BiOBr microflowers was evaluated under visible-light irradiation.

  5. Cost goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoag, J.

    1981-01-01

    Cost goal activities for the point focusing parabolic dish program are reported. Cost goals involve three tasks: (1) determination of the value of the dish systems to potential users; (2) the cost targets of the dish system are set out; (3) the value side and cost side are integrated to provide information concerning the potential size of the market for parabolic dishes. The latter two activities are emphasized.

  6. Tracking Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Paul W.

    2010-01-01

    Even though there's been a slight reprieve in energy costs, the reality is that the cost of non-renewable energy is increasing, and state education budgets are shrinking. One way to keep energy and operations costs from overshadowing education budgets is to develop a 10-year energy audit plan to eliminate waste. First, facility managers should…

  7. The improvement of GaN-based LED grown on concave nano-pattern sapphire substrate with SiO2 blocking layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jyun-Hao; Huang, Shyh-Jer; Su, Yan-Kuin; Huang, Kai-Wen

    2015-11-01

    In contrast to convex nano-pattern sapphire substrates (NPSS), which are frequently used to fabricate high-quality nitride-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs), concave NPSS have been paid relatively less attention. In this study, a concave NPSS was fabricated, and its nitride epitaxial growth process was evaluated in a step by step manner. A SiO2 layer was used to avoid nucleation over the sidewall and bottom of the nano-patterns to reduce dislocation reformation. Traditional LED structures were grown on the NPSS layer to determine its influence on device performance. X-ray diffraction, etched pit density, inverse leakage current, and internal quantum efficiency (IQE) results showed that dislocations and non-radiative recombination centers are reduced by the NPSS constructed with a SiO2 blocking layer. An IQE twice that on a planar substrate was also achieved; such a high IQE significantly enhanced the external quantum efficiency of the resultant device. Taken together, the results demonstrate that the SiO2 blocking layer proposed in this work can enhance the performance of LEDs.

  8. Effects of Periodic Unsteady Wake Flow and Pressure Gradient on Boundary Layer Transition Along the Concave Surface of a Curved Plate. Part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schobeiri, M. T.; Radke, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    Boundary layer transition and development on a turbomachinery blade is subjected to highly periodic unsteady turbulent flow, pressure gradient in longitudinal as well as lateral direction, and surface curvature. To study the effects of periodic unsteady wakes on the concave surface of a turbine blade, a curved plate was utilized. On the concave surface of this plate, detailed experimental investigations were carried out under zero and negative pressure gradient. The measurements were performed in an unsteady flow research facility using a rotating cascade of rods positioned upstream of the curved plate. Boundary layer measurements using a hot-wire probe were analyzed by the ensemble-averaging technique. The results presented in the temporal-spatial domain display the transition and further development of the boundary layer, specifically the ensemble-averaged velocity and turbulence intensity. As the results show, the turbulent patches generated by the wakes have different leading and trailing edge velocities and merge with the boundary layer resulting in a strong deformation and generation of a high turbulence intensity core. After the turbulent patch has totally penetrated into the boundary layer, pronounced becalmed regions were formed behind the turbulent patch and were extended far beyond the point they would occur in the corresponding undisturbed steady boundary layer.

  9. Preparation of superparamagnetic Mn(x)Fe(1-x)O nanoparticles from low-index-facet cubes to high-index-facet concave structures and their catalytic performance in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pei-Ying; Teng, His-Sheng; Yeh, Chen-Sheng

    2013-08-21

    We report the synthesis of concave magnetic Mn(x)Fe(1-x)O nanoparticles with high-index facet structures by a thermal decomposition approach. The particle morphology varies from cubic shape under pure Ar, to star-like shapes with exposure to air during the reaction. The oxidative etching in the presence of air (O2) strongly affects the exposed facets on the surface. These concave nanoparticles are transferred from the organic phase to aqueous solution and show distinct catalytic activity toward the degradation of xylenol orange in aqueous solution. PMID:23836257

  10. Troubleshooting Costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornacki, Jeffrey L.

    Seventy-six million cases of foodborne disease occur each year in the United States alone. Medical and lost productivity costs of the most common pathogens are estimated to be 5.6-9.4 billion. Product recalls, whether from foodborne illness or spoilage, result in added costs to manufacturers in a variety of ways. These may include expenses associated with lawsuits from real or allegedly stricken individuals and lawsuits from shorted customers. Other costs include those associated with efforts involved in finding the source of the contamination and eliminating it and include time when lines are shut down and therefore non-productive, additional non-routine testing, consultant fees, time and personnel required to overhaul the entire food safety system, lost market share to competitors, and the cost associated with redesign of the factory and redesign or acquisition of more hygienic equipment. The cost associated with an effective quality assurance plan is well worth the effort to prevent the situations described.

  11. 3D modelling of interaction of strongly nonlinear internal seiches with a concave lake topography and a phenomenon of the "lake monsters".

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terletska, Kateryna; Maderich, Vladimir; Brovchenko, Igor; Jung, Kyung Tae

    2013-04-01

    In the freshwater lakes in moderate latitudes stratification occurs as a result of the seasonal warming of the surface water layer. Than the intense wind surges (usually in autumn) tilt the surface and generate long basin-scale low-frequency standing internal waves (seiches). Depending on the initial interface tilt and stratification wide spectra of possible flow regimes can be observed [1]-[2].They varied from small amplitude symmetric seiches to large amplitude nonlinear waves.Nonlinearity leads to an asymmetry of internal waves and appearance of the surge or bore and further disintegration of it on a sequence of solitary waves. In present study degeneration of the strongly nonlinear internal seiches in elongated lakes with a concave "spoon-like" topography is investigated.Two different three-dimensional non-hydrostatic free-surface numerical models are used to investigate degeneration of large internal waves and its subsequent interaction with the concave lake slope. One of this model is non-hydrostatic model [3] and the other is a well-known MIT model. At first we consider idealized elongated elliptic-shape lake with the dimension of 5 km X 1 km with the maximal depth 30 m. The stratification in lake is assumed to be given in a form of the tangent function with a density difference between upper and lower layers 2 kgm-3 . It is assumed that motion in such lake is initiated by inclination of thermocline on a certain angle. Than lake adjusts to return to its original state producing internal seiches which begin interacting with a bottom topography. The process of degeneration of internal seiches in the lake with concave ends consist of chain of elementary processes: 1) steeping of long basin scale large amplitude wave, that evolve into internal surge, 2) surge interact with concave lake ends that leads the concentration of the flow and formation of down slope bottom jet along the lake axis, 3) due to cumulative effect local velocity in the jet accelerates up to

  12. An Automated Three-Dimensional Detection and Segmentation Method for Touching Cells by Integrating Concave Points Clustering and Random Walker Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Hui; Chen, Shangbin; Zhang, Bin; Ding, Wenxiang; Luo, Qingming; Li, Anan

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing cytoarchitecture is crucial for understanding brain functions and neural diseases. In neuroanatomy, it is an important task to accurately extract cell populations' centroids and contours. Recent advances have permitted imaging at single cell resolution for an entire mouse brain using the Nissl staining method. However, it is difficult to precisely segment numerous cells, especially those cells touching each other. As presented herein, we have developed an automated three-dimensional detection and segmentation method applied to the Nissl staining data, with the following two key steps: 1) concave points clustering to determine the seed points of touching cells; and 2) random walker segmentation to obtain cell contours. Also, we have evaluated the performance of our proposed method with several mouse brain datasets, which were captured with the micro-optical sectioning tomography imaging system, and the datasets include closely touching cells. Comparing with traditional detection and segmentation methods, our approach shows promising detection accuracy and high robustness. PMID:25111442

  13. Preparation of superparamagnetic MnxFe1-xO nanoparticles from low-index-facet cubes to high-index-facet concave structures and their catalytic performance in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Pei-Ying; Teng, His-Sheng; Yeh, Chen-Sheng

    2013-07-01

    We report the synthesis of concave magnetic MnxFe1-xO nanoparticles with high-index facet structures by a thermal decomposition approach. The particle morphology varies from cubic shape under pure Ar, to star-like shapes with exposure to air during the reaction. The oxidative etching in the presence of air (O2) strongly affects the exposed facets on the surface. These concave nanoparticles are transferred from the organic phase to aqueous solution and show distinct catalytic activity toward the degradation of xylenol orange in aqueous solution.We report the synthesis of concave magnetic MnxFe1-xO nanoparticles with high-index facet structures by a thermal decomposition approach. The particle morphology varies from cubic shape under pure Ar, to star-like shapes with exposure to air during the reaction. The oxidative etching in the presence of air (O2) strongly affects the exposed facets on the surface. These concave nanoparticles are transferred from the organic phase to aqueous solution and show distinct catalytic activity toward the degradation of xylenol orange in aqueous solution. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr01865b

  14. Changes of concave and convex rib-vertebral angle, angle difference and angle ratio in patients with right thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Canavese, Federico; Turcot, Katia; Holveck, Jerôme; Farhoumand, Agnés Dahl; Kaelin, André

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the radiological changes in rib-vertebral angles (RVAs), rib-vertebral angle differences (RVADs), and rib-vertebral angle ratios (RVARas) in patients with untreated right thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and to compare with the normal subjects. The concave and convex RVA from T1 to T12, the RVADs and the RVARas were measured on AP digital radiographs of 44 female patients with right convex idiopathic scoliosis and 14 normal females. Patients were divided into three groups: normal subjects (group 1), scoliotic patients with Cobb's angle equal or <30° (group 2) and scoliotic patients with Cobb's angle over 30° (group 3). Overall values (mean ± SD) of the RVAs on the concave side were 90.5° ± 17° in group 1, 90.3° ± 15.8° in group 2 and 88.8° ± 15.4° in group 3. On the convex side, values were 90.0° ± 17.3° in group 1, 86.3° ± 13.7° in group 2 and 80.7° ± 14.4° in group 3. Overall values (mean ± SD) of the RVADs at all levels were 0.5° ± 0.7° in group 1, 4.0° ± 4.8° in group 2 and 8.0° ± 4.0° in group 3. The RVARa values (mean ± SD) at all levels was 1.008° ± 0.012° in group 1, 1.041° ± 0.061° in group 2 and 1.102° ± 0.151° in group 3. RVAD and RVARa values in the scoliotic segment were greater in patients with untreated scoliosis over 30° than in patients with an untreated deformity of <30° or normal subjects. A significant effect between groups was observed for the RVA, RVAD and RVARa variables. Measurement of RVA, RVAD and RVARa should not only be performed at and around the apex of a thoracic spinal deformity, but also extended to the whole thoracic spine. PMID:20811755

  15. Reliability of geomagnetic paleointensity data: the effects of the NRM fraction and concave-up behavior on paleointensity determinations by the Thellier method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvin, Annick; Roperch, Pierrick; Levi, Shaul

    2005-06-01

    To test the reliability of the Thellier method for paleointensity determinations, we studied six historic lavas from Hawaii and two Gauss-age lava flows from Raiatea Island (French Polynesia). Our aim is to investigate the effects of the NRM fraction and concave-up behavior of NRM-thermal remanent magnetization (TRM) diagrams on paleointensity determinations. For the Hawaiian samples, the paleointensity results were investigated at both sample and site levels. For consistency and confidence in the paleointensity results, it is important to measure multiple samples from each cooling unit. The results from the Raiatea Island samples confirm that reliable paleointensities can be obtained from NRM-TRM diagrams with concave-up curvature, provided the data are accompanied by successful partial TRM (pTRM) checks and no significant chemical remanent magnetization (CRM) production. We conclude that reliable determinations of the paleofield strength require analyses of linear segments representing at least 40-50% of the total NRM. This new criterion has to be considered for future studies and for evaluating published paleointensities for calculating average geomagnetic field models. Using this condition together with other commonly employed selection criteria, the observed mean site paleointensities are typically within 10% of the Definitive Geomagnetic Reference Field (DGRF). Our new results for the Hawaii 1960 lava flow are in excellent agreement with the expected value, in contrast to significant discrepancies observed in some earlier studies. Overestimates of paleointensity determinations can arise from cooling-rate dependence of TRM acquisition, viscous remanent magnetization (VRM) at elevated temperatures, and TRM properties of multidomain (MD) particles. These outcomes are exaggerated at lower temperature ranges. Therefore, we suggest that, provided the pTRM checks are successful and there is no significant CRM production, it is better to increase the NRM fraction

  16. Cost Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreman, Phillip

    2009-01-01

    Education administrators involved in construction initiatives unanimously agree that when it comes to change orders, less is more. Change orders have a negative rippling effect of driving up building costs and producing expensive project delays that often interfere with school operations and schedules. Some change orders are initiated by schools…

  17. Grazing-incidence efficiencies in the 28{endash}42-{Angstrom} wavelength region of replicas of the Skylab 3600-line/mm concave grating with multilayer and gold coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, W.R.,; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Seely, J.F.; Kowalski, M.P.; Rife, J.C.,

    1997-09-01

    The efficiencies of replicas of the Skylab 3600-line/mm concave grating with multilayer and gold coatings were measured by using synchrotron radiation at an angle of incidence of 79{degree} and in the 28{endash}42-{Angstrom} wavelength range. The blaze angle of the grating facets that faced the incident radiation was 3.1{degree}, and the average angle of the opposite facets was 6{degree}. For the gold grating, the {minus}1 outside order had the highest efficiency of any diffracted order (excluding the zero order) over the entire wavelength range. Calculations of the grating efficiency indicated that the high efficiency in the {minus}1 order resulted from the rather small angle (6{degree}) of the facets opposite the incident radiation. For the multilayer grating, the efficiency in the on-blaze +2 inside order was enhanced in the 30{endash}34-{Angstrom} wavelength region as a result of the high reflectance of the multilayer coating. The maximum efficiency in the +2 order occurred at the wavelength (32 {Angstrom}) corresponding to the peak of the reflectance of the multilayer coating on the facets facing the incident radiation. These results further demonstrate that a multilayer coating can be used to enhance the efficiency, in a selected wavelength range and in the on-blaze order, of a grating operating at a small grazing angle (11{degree}). {copyright} 1997 Optical Society of America

  18. The Economics of NASA Mission Cost Reserves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitley, Sally; Shinn, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Increases in NASA mission costs are well-noted but not well-understood, and there is little evidence that they are decreasing in frequency or amount over time. The need to control spending has led to analysis of the causes and magnitude of historical mission overruns, and many program control efforts are being implemented to attempt to prevent or mitigate the problem (NPR 7120). However, cost overruns have not abated, and while some direct causes of increased spending may be obvious (requirements creep, launch delays, directed changes, etc.), the underlying impetus to spend past the original budget may be more subtle. Gaining better insight into the causes of cost overruns will help NASA and its contracting organizations to avoid .them. This paper hypothesizes that one cause of NASA mission cost overruns is that the availability of reserves gives project team members an incentive to make decisions and behave in ways that increase costs. We theorize that the presence of reserves is a contributing factor to cost overruns because it causes organizations to use their funds less efficiently or to control spending less effectively. We draw a comparison to the insurance industry concept of moral hazard, the phenomenon that the presence of insurance causes insureds to have more frequent and higher insurance losses, and we attempt to apply actuarial techniques to quantifY the increase in the expected cost of a mission due to the availability of reserves. We create a theoretical model of reserve spending motivation by defining a variable ReserveSpending as a function of total reserves. This function has a positive slope; for every dollar of reserves available, there is a positive probability of spending it. Finally, the function should be concave down; the probability of spending each incremental dollar of reserves decreases progressively. We test the model against available NASA CADRe data by examining missions with reserve dollars initially available and testing whether

  19. Formation of a Cu@RhRu core-shell concave nanooctahedron via Ru-assisted extraction of Rh from the Cu matrix and its excellent electrocatalytic activity toward the oxygen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Suhyun; Yoon, Donghwan; Bang, Sulgi; Kim, Jongchan; Baik, Hionsuck; Yang, Haesik; Lee, Kwangyeol

    2015-09-01

    A facile one step route has been developed for the synthesis of trimetallic Cu@RhRu core-shell concave nanooctahedra by co-decomposition of Ru, Rh and Cu precursors. A mechanistic study reveals that nanoparticles with a CuRh alloy core and a Ru shell are initially formed and a subsequent migration of Rh to the shell results in the Cu@RhRu core-shell concave nanooctahedron. The shell exhibits atomically mixed Ru and Rh phases with an fcc atomic structure, although the hcp atomic structure is commonly found for the bulk Ru. We also report an unusually high catalytic activity of the Cu@RhRu octahedral nanocrystals toward the oxygen evolution reaction in alkaline solution.A facile one step route has been developed for the synthesis of trimetallic Cu@RhRu core-shell concave nanooctahedra by co-decomposition of Ru, Rh and Cu precursors. A mechanistic study reveals that nanoparticles with a CuRh alloy core and a Ru shell are initially formed and a subsequent migration of Rh to the shell results in the Cu@RhRu core-shell concave nanooctahedron. The shell exhibits atomically mixed Ru and Rh phases with an fcc atomic structure, although the hcp atomic structure is commonly found for the bulk Ru. We also report an unusually high catalytic activity of the Cu@RhRu octahedral nanocrystals toward the oxygen evolution reaction in alkaline solution. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03942h

  20. Photoinduced electron transfer in a charge-transfer complex formed between corannulene and Li+@C60 by concave-convex π-π interactions.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Mihoko; Ohkubo, Kei; Shionoya, Mitsuhiko; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2014-09-24

    A charge-transfer (CT) complex was formed between corannulene (C20H10) and lithium ion-encapsulated [60]fullerene (Li(+)@C60) with the binding constant KG = 1.9 × 10 M(-1) by concave-convex π-π CT interactions in benzonitrile at 298 K, exhibiting a broad CT absorption extended to the NIR region. Femotosecond laser excitation of the C20H10/Li(+)@C60 CT complex resulted in the singlet charge-separated (CS) state, (1)(C20H10(•+)/Li(+)@C60(•-)), which decayed with the lifetime of 1.4 ns. Nanosecond laser excitation of Li(+)@C60 resulted in intermolecular electron transfer (ET) from C20H10 to the triplet excited state of Li(+)@C60 [(3)(Li(+)@C60)*] to produce the triplet CS state (3)(C20H10(•+)/Li(+)@C60(•-)). The distance between two electron spins in the triplet CS state was estimated to be 10 Å from the zero-field splitting pattern observed by EPR measurements at 4 K. The triplet CS state decayed to the ground state via intramolecular back electron transfer (BET). The CS lifetime was determined to be 240 μs in benzonitrile at 298 K. The temperature dependence of the rate constant of BET afforded the reorganization energy (λ = 1.04 eV) and the electronic coupling term (V = 0.0080 cm(-1)). The long lifetime of triplet CS state results from the spin-forbidden BET process and a small V value. PMID:25166343

  1. Parametric Cost Deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Edwin B.

    1995-01-01

    Parametric cost analysis is a mathematical approach to estimating cost. Parametric cost analysis uses non-cost parameters, such as quality characteristics, to estimate the cost to bring forth, sustain, and retire a product. This paper reviews parametric cost analysis and shows how it can be used within the cost deployment process.

  2. A concave-patterned TiN/PECVD-Si3N4 /TiN diaphragm MEMS acoustic sensor based on a polyimide sacrificial layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaewoo; Jeon, J. H.; Je, C. H.; Kim, Y.-G.; Lee, S. Q.; Yang, W. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S.-G.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present a concave-patterned TiN/PECVD-Si3N4 /TiN diaphragm micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) acoustic sensor based on a polyimide sacrificial layer. The use of the spin-coated polyimide eliminates the additional Al pad process of conventional device fabrication due to simple O2 ashing to release the sacrificial layer, simplifying the photolithography process. Also, to adjust the acoustic sensor for a bottom-ported package, its diaphragm was implemented to be placed over the back-plate. The TiN/PECVD-Si3N4/TiN multi-layer diaphragm was formed with the stress controllability of PECVD-Si3N4 from  -162 MPa to  +109 MPa. Furthermore, a parallel-plate capacitance model on the basis of an approximately linearized electric field method (ALEM) is proposed to evaluate the capacitance of two plates. The modelled capacitance showed less than 3.7% error in FEM simulation, demonstrating the validity of the proposed model. At a zero-bias voltage, the effective intrinsic and parasitic capacitances in the active area were 1.656 pF and 0.388 pF, respectively. Moreover, with a pull-in analytical model by using ALEM, the effective tensile stress for the diaphragm was extracted to  +31.5 MPa, where the pull-in voltage was 10.7 V. In succession, the dynamic response for the open-circuit sensitivity was modelled with an equivalent circuit model based on lumped parameters. The measured open-circuit sensitivity of  -45.1 dBV Pa-1 at 1 kHz with a bias of 9.6 V was only slightly different from the modelled sensitivity of  -45.0 dBV Pa-1. Thus, these results demonstrate that the proposed sensor is suitable for a front-end voice capture module.

  3. Unraveling Higher Education's Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Gus; Charles, Maria

    1998-01-01

    The activity-based costing (ABC) method of analyzing institutional costs in higher education involves four procedures: determining the various discrete activities of the organization; calculating the cost of each; determining the cost drivers; tracing cost to the cost objective or consumer of each activity. Few American institutions have used the…

  4. Managing costs. [Resource recovery facility costs

    SciTech Connect

    Paret, M.P. ); Strouse, R.K. )

    1992-03-01

    This article examines the costs associated with a resource recovery facility in Indianapolis and how keeping these costs low provides flexibility for enacting economic incentives and new funding mechanisms that are generally needed today to encourage cost-effective recycling. The topics discussed in the article include project development, program finances, cogeneration, and the future outlook.

  5. KSC Construction Cost Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center cost Index aids in conceptual design cost estimates. Report discusses development of KSC Cost Index since January 1974. Index since January 1974. Index provides management, design engineers, and estimators an up-to-data reference for local labor and material process. Also provides mount and rate of change in these costs used to predict future construction costs.

  6. Attribution of Library Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Miriam A.

    1977-01-01

    Universities conduct a variety of cost-allocation studies that require the collection and analysis of the library cost-data. Cost accounting methods are used in most studies; however, costs are attributed to library user groups in a variety of ways. Cost accounting studies are reviewed and allocation methods are discussed. (Author)

  7. Price and cost estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Price and Cost Estimating Program (PACE II) was developed to prepare man-hour and material cost estimates. Versatile and flexible tool significantly reduces computation time and errors and reduces typing and reproduction time involved in preparation of cost estimates.

  8. Life Cycle Costing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCraley, Thomas L.

    1985-01-01

    Life cycle costing establishes a realistic comparison of the cost of owning and operating products. The formula of initial cost plus maintenance plus operation divided by useful life identifies the best price over the lifetime of the product purchased. (MLF)

  9. Cost of hypertension treatment.

    PubMed

    Odell, T W; Gregory, M C

    1995-12-01

    A retrospective analysis was conducted of the cost of hypertension care at one internal medicine clinic, looking at the cost of office visits, laboratory tests, and medications. Cost of hypertension care was $947 the first year of treatment, $575 the second year, and $420 per year thereafter. Drug costs were the major determinant of cost of care, comprising 80% of the total cost of treatment after the first year of therapy. PMID:8770721

  10. The cost of doing a cost estimate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, Donald S.; Buchanan, Harry R.

    1993-01-01

    A model for estimating the cost required to do a cost estimate for Deep Space Network (DSN) projects that range from $0.1 to $100 million is presented. The cost of the cost estimate in thousands of dollars, C(sub E), is found to be approximately given by C(sub E) = K(/C(sub p)/(sup 0.35)) where C(sub p) is the cost of the project being estimated in millions of dollars and K is a constant depending on the accuracy of the estimate. For an order-of-magnitude estimate, K = 24; for a budget estimate, K = 60; and for a definitive estimate, K = 115. That is, for a specific project, the cost of doing a budget estimate is about 2.5 times as much as that for an order-of-magnitude estimate, and a definitive estimate costs about twice as much as a budget estimate. Use of this model should help provide the level of resources required for doing cost estimates and, as a result, provide insights towards more accurate estimates with less potential for cost overruns.

  11. ESTIMATING IRRIGATION COSTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Having accurate estimates of the cost of irrigation is important when making irrigation decisions. Estimates of fixed costs are critical for investment decisions. Operating cost estimates can assist in decisions regarding additional irrigations. This fact sheet examines the costs associated with ...

  12. GME: at what cost?

    PubMed

    Young, David W

    2003-11-01

    Current computing methods impede determining the real cost of graduate medical education. However, a more accurate estimate could be obtained if policy makers would allow for the application of basic cost-accounting principles, including consideration of department-level costs, unbundling of joint costs, and other factors. PMID:14626704

  13. Design-to-cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, F. E.

    1974-01-01

    Attempts made to design to costs equipment, vehicles and subsystems for various space projects are discussed. A systematic approach, based on mission requirement analysis, definition of a mission baseline design, benefit and cost analysis, and a benefit-cost analysis was proposed for implementing the cost control program.

  14. Estimating airline operating costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, D. V.

    1978-01-01

    A review was made of the factors affecting commercial aircraft operating and delay costs. From this work, an airline operating cost model was developed which includes a method for estimating the labor and material costs of individual airframe maintenance systems. The model, similar in some respects to the standard Air Transport Association of America (ATA) Direct Operating Cost Model, permits estimates of aircraft-related costs not now included in the standard ATA model (e.g., aircraft service, landing fees, flight attendants, and control fees). A study of the cost of aircraft delay was also made and a method for estimating the cost of certain types of airline delay is described.

  15. SPS cost considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodcock, G. R.

    1978-01-01

    Recent solar power satellite (SPS) system definition studies have emphasized cost estimation for the operational phase of an SPS program, in order to assess economic practicality of SPS. A cost analysis approach is described. Cost results for a silicon photovoltaic SPS are reported, showing SPS costs from $1700 to $2700 per kilowatt and busbar power costs from 3 cents to 7 cents per kilowatt-hour. Rationales behind the estimates are discussed.

  16. Estimating Airline Operating Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, D. V.

    1978-01-01

    The factors affecting commercial aircraft operating and delay costs were used to develop an airline operating cost model which includes a method for estimating the labor and material costs of individual airframe maintenance systems. The model permits estimates of aircraft related costs, i.e., aircraft service, landing fees, flight attendants, and control fees. A method for estimating the costs of certain types of airline delay is also described.

  17. OOTW COST TOOLS

    SciTech Connect

    HARTLEY, D.S.III; PACKARD, S.L.

    1998-09-01

    This document reports the results of a study of cost tools to support the analysis of Operations Other Than War (OOTW). It recommends the continued development of the Department of Defense (DoD) Contingency Operational Support Tool (COST) as the basic cost analysis tool for 00TWS. It also recommends modifications to be included in future versions of COST and the development of an 00TW mission planning tool to supply valid input for costing.

  18. Total Cost Management: Analyzing Operational Support Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenny, Hans J.

    1996-01-01

    Total cost management, an innovation useful in higher education, is best implemented in the institution's support services. Total cost management is the practice of analyzing and improving an institution's financial and qualitative performance when producing a particular product or service, paying attention to the complete work process and all…

  19. Net Shape Spin Formed Cryogenic Aluminum Lithium Cryogenic Tank Domes for Lower Cost Higher Performance Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, Peter A.; Hoffman, Eric; Domack, Marcia; Brewster, Jeb; Russell, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    With the goal of lower cost (simplified manufacturing and lower part count) and higher performance (higher strength to weight alloys) the NASA Technical Maturation Program in 2006 funded a proposal to investigate spin forming of space launch vehicle cryogenic tank domes. The project funding continued under the NASA Exploration Technology Development Program through completion in FY12. The first phase of the project involved spin forming of eight, 1 meter diameter "path finder" domes. Half of these were processed using a concave spin form process (MT Aerospace, Augsburg Germany) and the other half using a convex process (Spincraft, Boston MA). The convex process has been used to produce the Ares Common Bulkhead and the concave process has been used to produce dome caps for the Space Shuttle light weight external tank and domes for the NASDA H2. Aluminum Lithium material was chosen because of its higher strength to weight ratio than the Aluminum 2219 baseline. Aluminum lithium, in order to obtain the desired temper (T8), requires a cold stretch after the solution heat treatment and quench. This requirement favors the concave spin form process which was selected for scale up. This paper describes the results of processing four, 5.5 meter diameter (upper stage scale) net shaped spin formed Aluminum Lithium domes. In order to allow scalability beyond the limits of foundry and rolling mills (about 12 foot width) the circular blank contained one friction stir weld (heavy lifter scales require a flat blank containing two welds). Mechanical properties data (tensile, fracture toughness, stress corrosion, and simulated service testing) for the parent metal and weld will also be discussed.

  20. Nuclear fuel cycle costs

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, W.D.; Haire, M.J.; Rainey, R.H.

    1982-02-01

    The costs for the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, which were developed as part of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP), are presented. Total fuel cycle costs are given for the pressurized water reactor once-through and fuel recycle systems, and for the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor system. These calculations show that fuel cycle costs are a small part of the total power costs. For breeder reactors, fuel cycle costs are about half that of the present once-through system. The total power cost of the breeder reactor system is greater than that of light-water reactor at today's prices for uranium and enrichment.

  1. Flash xenon CPV simulator with low-cost elastic bent-trough mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Noboru; Okamoto, Kazuya; Ijiro, Toshikazu; Kiryu, Mitsugu; Yoshida, Takanori

    2013-09-01

    In the research and development of concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) systems, a highly collimated artificial sunlight source with a wide irradiated area is very helpful in the reliable evaluation of module efficiency and optical performance. To collimate the light, a conventional flash xenon CPV simulator uses an expensive large concave mirror. This paper introduces a new flash xenon CPV simulator that consists of two low-cost elastic bent-trough mirrors. The prototype simulator achieved an irradiance deviation of less than 10%, collimation of 0.228° - 0.330°, and good spectral matching at an irradiated area of 700 mm × 500 mm. The major drawback of the present concept is that the flash lamp must provide higher emissive power than the conventional method because of the light attenuation caused by the two reflections from the mirrors.

  2. Managing Information On Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taulbee, Zoe A.

    1990-01-01

    Cost Management Model, CMM, software tool for planning, tracking, and reporting costs and information related to costs. Capable of estimating costs, comparing estimated to actual costs, performing "what-if" analyses on estimates of costs, and providing mechanism to maintain data on costs in format oriented to management. Number of supportive cost methods built in: escalation rates, production-learning curves, activity/event schedules, unit production schedules, set of spread distributions, tables of rates and factors defined by user, and full arithmetic capability. Import/export capability possible with 20/20 Spreadsheet available on Data General equipment. Program requires AOS/VS operating system available on Data General MV series computers. Written mainly in FORTRAN 77 but uses SGU (Screen Generation Utility).

  3. Cost-Estimation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Brian

    1995-01-01

    COSTIT computer program estimates cost of electronic design by reading item-list file and file containing cost for each item. Accuracy of cost estimate based on accuracy of cost-list file. Written by use of AWK utility for Sun4-series computers running SunOS 4.x and IBM PC-series and compatible computers running MS-DOS. The Sun version (NPO-19587). PC version (NPO-19157).

  4. Opportunity Cost: A Reexamination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Is opportunity cost an ambiguous and arbitrary concept or a simple, straightforward, and fruitful one? This reexamination of opportunity cost addresses this question, and shows that opportunity cost is an ambiguous concept because "two" definitions are in widespread use. One of the definitions is indeed simple, fruitful, and one that…

  5. Conceptual Cost Estimating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center data aid in efficient construction-cost managment. Report discusses development and use of NASA TR-1508, Kennedy Space Center Aerospace Construction price book for preparing conceptual budget, funding cost estimating, and preliminary cost engineering reports. Report based on actual bid prices and Government estimates.

  6. Plagiarism and Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liebler, Robert

    2009-01-01

    It is costly for faculty to deal with cheating. Keith-Spiegel et al. (1998) identified several of these costs and argued that they can be grouped into four categories: emotionality, difficult, fear, and denial. I argue that the emotional and fear costs for faculty make it unlikely that the common approaches to dealing with plagiarism will be…

  7. COST OF MTBE REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Widespread contamination of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in ground water has raised concerns about the increased cost of remediation of MTBE releases compared to BTEX-only sites. To evaluate these cost, cost information for 311 sites was furnished by U.S. EPA Office of Undergr...

  8. Power Plant Cycling Costs

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

    2012-07-01

    This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

  9. Ion propulsion cost effectivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zafran, S.; Biess, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    Ion propulsion modules employing 8-cm thrusters and 30-cm thrusters were studied for Multimission Modular Spacecraft (MMS) applications. Recurring and nonrecurring cost elements were generated for these modules. As a result, ion propulsion cost drivers were identified to be Shuttle charges, solar array, power processing, and thruster costs. Cost effective design approaches included short length module configurations, array power sharing, operation at reduced thruster input power, simplified power processing units, and power processor output switching. The MMS mission model employed indicated that nonrecurring costs have to be shared with other programs unless the mission model grows. Extended performance missions exhibited the greatest benefits when compared with monopropellant hydrazine propulsion.

  10. Costs of groundwater contamination

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neil, W.B.; Raucher, R.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Two factors determine the cost of groundwater contamination: (1) the ways in which water was being used or was expected to be used in the future and (2) the physical characteristics of the setting that constrain the responses available to regain lost uses or to prevent related damages to human health and the environment. Most contamination incidents can be managed at a low enough cost that uses will not be foreclosed. It is important to take into account the following when considering costs: (1) natural cleansing through recharge and dilution can take many years; (2) it is difficult and costly to identify the exact area and expected path of a contamination plume; and (3) treatment or replacement of contaminated water often may represent the cost-effective strategy for managing the event. The costs of contamination include adverse health effects, containment and remediation, treatment and replacement costs. In comparing the costs and benefits of prevention programs with those of remediation, replacement or treatment, it is essential to adjust the cost/benefit numbers by the probability of their actual occurrence. Better forecasts of water demand are needed to predict more accurately the scarcity of new supply and the associated cost of replacement. This research should include estimates of the price elasticity of water demand and the possible effect on demand of more rational cost-based pricing structures. Research and development of techniques for in situ remediation should be encouraged.

  11. Cost characteristics of hospitals.

    PubMed

    Smet, Mike

    2002-09-01

    Modern hospitals are complex multi-product organisations. The analysis of a hospital's production and/or cost structure should therefore use the appropriate techniques. Flexible functional forms based on the neo-classical theory of the firm seem to be most suitable. Using neo-classical cost functions implicitly assumes minimisation of (variable) costs given that input prices and outputs are exogenous. Local and global properties of flexible functional forms and short-run versus long-run equilibrium are further issues that require thorough investigation. In order to put the results based on econometric estimations of cost functions in the right perspective, it is important to keep these considerations in mind when using flexible functional forms. The more recent studies seem to agree that hospitals generally do not operate in their long-run equilibrium (they tend to over-invest in capital (capacity and equipment)) and that it is therefore appropriate to estimate a short-run variable cost function. However, few studies explicitly take into account the implicit assumptions and restrictions embedded in the models they use. An alternative method to explain differences in costs uses management accounting techniques to identify the cost drivers of overhead costs. Related issues such as cost-shifting and cost-adjusting behaviour of hospitals and the influence of market structure on competition, prices and costs are also discussed shortly. PMID:12220092

  12. Concepts of Cost and Cost Analysis for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinkman, Paul T.; Allen, Richard H.

    1986-01-01

    Concepts of costs and cost analysis in higher education are examined, along with how to prepare for a cost study. Specific cost analysis techniques are identified, along with types of data generated and potential problems. In preparing for cost studies, it is important to consider: purpose, types of cost analysis, types of cost, common…

  13. Low cost MCFC anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, D.S.

    1996-12-31

    This paper outlines a project, funded under a DOE SBIR grant, which tested a potentially lower cost method of manufacturing MCFC stack anodes and evaluated the feasibility of using the technology in the existing M-C Power Corp. manufacturing facility. The procedure involves adding activator salts to the anode tape casting slurry with the Ni and Cr or Al powders. Two different processes occur during heat treatment in a reducing environment: sintering of the base Ni structure, and alloying or cementation of the Cr or Al powders. To determine whether it was cost-effective to implement the cementation alloying manufacturing process, the M-C Power manufacturing cost model was used to determine the impact of different material costs and processing parameters on total anode cost. Cost analysis included equipment expenditures and facility modifications required by the cementation alloying process.

  14. Heliostat cost optimization study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Reeken, Finn; Weinrebe, Gerhard; Keck, Thomas; Balz, Markus

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a methodology for a heliostat cost optimization study. First different variants of small, medium sized and large heliostats are designed. Then the respective costs, tracking and optical quality are determined. For the calculation of optical quality a structural model of the heliostat is programmed and analyzed using finite element software. The costs are determined based on inquiries and from experience with similar structures. Eventually the levelised electricity costs for a reference power tower plant are calculated. Before each annual simulation run the heliostat field is optimized. Calculated LCOEs are then used to identify the most suitable option(s). Finally, the conclusions and findings of this extensive cost study are used to define the concept of a new cost-efficient heliostat called `Stellio'.

  15. Electric propulsion cost estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    A parametric cost model for mercury ion propulsion modules is presented. A detailed work breakdown structure is included. Cost estimating relationships were developed for the individual subsystems and the nonhardware items (systems engineering, software, etc.). Solar array and power processor unit (PPU) costs are the significant cost drivers. Simplification of both of these subsystems through applications of advanced technology (lightweight solar arrays and high-efficiency, self-radiating PPUs) can reduce costs. Comparison of the performance and cost of several chemical propulsion systems with the Hg ion module are also presented. For outer-planet missions, advanced solar electric propulsion (ASEP) trip times and O2/H2 propulsion trip times are comparable. A three-year trip time savings over the baselined NTO/MMH propulsion system is possible with ASEP.

  16. NASA's attack on costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, George M.

    1994-01-01

    This article's concern is regarding the high costs of space travel and the need to minimize or reduce these costs in order to effectively provide the continuation of the space programs and space exploration needs of the future. Discussed is the possibility and need to optimize payloads in order to lower the costs associated with them. Design phase principles and implementation phase points are discussed.

  17. Engine costs for reusability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schindler, Carla M.; Lansaw, John

    1990-01-01

    The advanced Launch System (ALS) program goals demand an order-of-magnitude reduction in costs over existing launch vehicle propulsion systems. Studies suggest that reusable engines provide cost advantages over expendable propulsion systems. Early studies are quantifying operations costs, and cost sensitivities to engine production and operations variables. ALS production and operations philosophies enhance the potential of an affordable, operationally flexible launch vehicle propulsion system. The assumptions made and criteria set during the initial planning for the operations phase of the ALS highlight the changes for implementing such a system.

  18. Avoidable waste management costs

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, K.; Burns, M.; Priebe, S.; Robinson, P.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the activity based costing method used to acquire variable (volume dependent or avoidable) waste management cost data for routine operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Waste volumes from environmental restoration, facility stabilization activities, and legacy waste were specifically excluded from this effort. A core team consisting of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, and Oak Ridge Reservation developed and piloted the methodology, which can be used to determine avoidable waste management costs. The method developed to gather information was based on activity based costing, which is a common industrial engineering technique. Sites submitted separate flow diagrams that showed the progression of work from activity to activity for each waste type or treatability group. Each activity on a flow diagram was described in a narrative, which detailed the scope of the activity. Labor and material costs based on a unit quantity of waste being processed were then summed to generate a total cost for that flow diagram. Cross-complex values were calculated by determining a weighted average for each waste type or treatability group based on the volume generated. This study will provide DOE and contractors with a better understanding of waste management processes and their associated costs. Other potential benefits include providing cost data for sites to perform consistent cost/benefit analysis of waste minimization and pollution prevention (WMIN/PP) options identified during pollution prevention opportunity assessments and providing a means for prioritizing and allocating limited resources for WMIN/PP.

  19. Designers' unified cost model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, W.; Ilcewicz, L.; Swanson, G.; Gutowski, T.

    1992-01-01

    The Structures Technology Program Office (STPO) at NASA LaRC has initiated development of a conceptual and preliminary designers' cost prediction model. The model will provide a technically sound method for evaluating the relative cost of different composite structural designs, fabrication processes, and assembly methods that can be compared to equivalent metallic parts or assemblies. The feasibility of developing cost prediction software in a modular form for interfacing with state-of-the-art preliminary design tools and computer aided design programs is being evaluated. The goal of this task is to establish theoretical cost functions that relate geometric design features to summed material cost and labor content in terms of process mechanics and physics. The output of the designers' present analytical tools will be input for the designers' cost prediction model to provide the designer with a database and deterministic cost methodology that allows one to trade and synthesize designs with both cost and weight as objective functions for optimization. This paper presents the team members, approach, goals, plans, and progress to date for development of COSTADE (Cost Optimization Software for Transport Aircraft Design Evaluation).

  20. Updated Conceptual Cost Estimating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    16-page report discusses development and use of NASA TR-1508, the Kennedy Space Center Aerospace Construction Price Book for preparing conceptual, budget, funding, cost-estimating, and preliminary cost-engineering reports. Updated annually from 1974 through 1985 with actual bid prices and government estimates. Includes labor and material quantities and prices with contractor and subcontractor markups for buildings, facilities, and systems at Kennedy Space Center. While data pertains to aerospace facilities, format and cost-estimating techniques guide estimation of costs in other construction applications.

  1. Cost model for biobanks.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Sanchez, M Beatriz; Lopez-Valeiras, Ernesto; Morente, Manuel M; Fernández Lago, Orlando

    2013-10-01

    Current economic conditions and budget constraints in publicly funded biomedical research have brought about a renewed interest in analyzing the cost and economic viability of research infrastructures. However, there are no proposals for specific cost accounting models for these types of organizations in the international scientific literature. The aim of this paper is to present the basis of a cost analysis model useful for any biobank regardless of the human biological samples that it stores for biomedical research. The development of a unique cost model for biobanks can be a complicated task due to the diversity of the biological samples they store. Different types of samples (DNA, tumor tissues, blood, serum, etc.) require different production processes. Nonetheless, the common basic steps of the production process can be identified. Thus, the costs incurred in each step can be analyzed in detail to provide cost information. Six stages and four cost objects were obtained by taking the production processes of biobanks belonging to the Spanish National Biobank Network as a starting point. Templates and examples are provided to help managers to identify and classify the costs involved in their own biobanks to implement the model. The application of this methodology will provide accurate information on cost objects, along with useful information to give an economic value to the stored samples, to analyze the efficiency of the production process and to evaluate the viability of some sample collections. PMID:24835258

  2. Cost Containment in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Culyer, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    Health care cost containment is not in itself a sensible policy objective, because any assessment of the appropriateness of health care expenditure in aggregate, as of that on specific programs, requires a balancing of costs and benefits at the margin. International data on expenditures can, however, provide indications of the likely impact on costs and expenditures of structural features of health care systems. Data from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development for both European countries and a wider set are reviewed, and some current policies in Europe that are directed at controlling health care costs are outlined. PMID:10313433

  3. Designer's unified cost model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, William T.; Ilcewicz, L. B.; Swanson, G. D.; Gutowski, T.

    1992-01-01

    A conceptual and preliminary designers' cost prediction model has been initiated. The model will provide a technically sound method for evaluating the relative cost of different composite structural designs, fabrication processes, and assembly methods that can be compared to equivalent metallic parts or assemblies. The feasibility of developing cost prediction software in a modular form for interfacing with state of the art preliminary design tools and computer aided design programs is being evaluated. The goal of this task is to establish theoretical cost functions that relate geometric design features to summed material cost and labor content in terms of process mechanics and physics. The output of the designers' present analytical tools will be input for the designers' cost prediction model to provide the designer with a data base and deterministic cost methodology that allows one to trade and synthesize designs with both cost and weight as objective functions for optimization. The approach, goals, plans, and progress is presented for development of COSTADE (Cost Optimization Software for Transport Aircraft Design Evaluation).

  4. ''When Cost Measures Contradict''

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, W. D.; Smith, A. E.; Biggar, S. L.; Bernstein, P. M.

    2003-05-09

    When regulators put forward new economic or regulatory policies, there is a need to compare the costs and benefits of these new policies to existing policies and other alternatives to determine which policy is most cost-effective. For command and control policies, it is quite difficult to compute costs, but for more market-based policies, economists have had a great deal of success employing general equilibrium models to assess a policy's costs. Not all cost measures, however, arrive at the same ranking. Furthermore, cost measures can produce contradictory results for a specific policy. These problems make it difficult for a policy-maker to determine the best policy. For a cost measures to be of value, one would like to be confident of two things. First one wants to be sure whether the policy is a winner or loser. Second, one wants to be confident that a measure produces the correct policy ranking. That is, one wants to have confidence in a policy measure's ability to correctly rank policies from most beneficial to most harmful. This paper analyzes empirically these two properties of different costs measures as they pertain to assessing the costs of the carbon abatement policies, especially the Kyoto Protocol, under alternative assumptions about implementation.

  5. COST DIGEST: COST SUMMARIES OF SELECTED ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes cost data on over 20 environmental control technologies. The cost parameters presented include total capital investment, net annual operating expenses, and unit annualized costs. These cost estimates are given over an appropriate range of system capacities f...

  6. Inventory-driven costs.

    PubMed

    Callioni, Gianpaolo; de Montgros, Xavier; Slagmulder, Regine; Van Wassenhove, Luk N; Wright, Linda

    2005-03-01

    In the 199os, Hewlett-Packard's PC business was struggling to turn a dollar, despite the company's success in winning market share. By 1997, margins on its PCs were as thin as a silicon wafer, and some product lines hadn't turned a profit since 1993. The problem had everything to do with the PC industry's notoriously short product cycles and brutal product and component price deflation. A common rule of thumb was that the value of a fully assembled PC decreased 1% a week. In such an environment, inventory costs become critical. But not just the inventory costs companies traditionally track, HP found, after a thorough review of the problem. The standard "holding cost of inventory"--the capital and physical costs of inventory--accounted for only about 10% of HP's inventory costs. The greater risks, it turned out, resided in four other, essentially hidden costs, which stemmed from mismatches between demand and supply: Component devaluation costs for components still held in production; Price protection costs incurred when product prices drop on the goods distributors still have on their shelves; Product return costs that have to be absorbed when distributors return and receive refunds on overstock items, and; Obsolescence costs for products still unsold when new models are introduced. By developing metrics to track those costs in a consistent way throughout the PC division, HP has found it can manage its supply chains with much more sophistication. Gone are the days of across-the-board measures such as,"Everyone must cut inventories by 20% by the end of the year," which usually resulted in a flurry of cookie-cutter lean production and just-in-time initiatives. Now, each product group is free to choose the supply chain configuration that best suits its needs. Other companies can follow HP's example. PMID:15768682

  7. What Does it Really Cost? Allocating Indirect Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Herbert; Davenport, Elisabeth

    1997-01-01

    Better managerial control in terms of decision making and understanding the costs of a system/service result from allocating indirect costs. Allocation requires a three-step process: selecting cost objectives, pooling related overhead costs, and selecting costs bases to connect the objectives to the pooled costs. Argues that activity-based costing…

  8. Improving hospital cost accounting with activity-based costing.

    PubMed

    Chan, Y C

    1993-01-01

    In this article, activity-based costing, an approach that has proved to be an improvement over the conventional costing system in product costing, is introduced. By combining activity-based costing with standard costing, health care administrators can better plan and control the costs of health services provided while ensuring that the organization's bottom line is healthy. PMID:8444618

  9. Controlling Health Care Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessoff, Alan

    2009-01-01

    This article examines issues on health care costs and describes measures taken by public districts to reduce spending. As in most companies in America, health plan designs in public districts are being changed to reflect higher out-of-pocket costs, such as higher deductibles on visits to providers, hospital stays, and prescription drugs. District…

  10. Analyzing Bilingual Education Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernal, Joe J.

    This paper examines the particular problems involved in analyzing the costs of bilingual education and suggests that cost analysis of bilingual education requires a fundamentally different approach than that followed in other recent school finance studies. Focus of the discussion is the Intercultural Development Research Association's (IDRA)…

  11. An Eye on Cost.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agron, Joe

    2000-01-01

    Presents the 11th annual residence hall construction report showing larger sized residence halls are costing less to construct. Statistics are presented of cost ranges for residence hall construction, the amenities being added to today's residence halls, and classroom- and science-building construction. (GR)

  12. Curriculum Costs: Vocational Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cumming, C. E.

    To establish a definition of costs in education, a "concept map" is established to which inevitable questions of inclusion and exclusion can be addressed. A specific case, namely the costs of practical/vocational subjects, is then presented. It also includes a profile of benefits, since with regard to vocational education, much more than with…

  13. Cost versus Enrollment Bubbles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vedder, Richard K.; Gillen, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The defining characteristic of a bubble is unsustainable growth that eventually reverses. Bubbles typically arise when uncertainty leads to unsustainable trends, and the authors argue that there are two areas in which higher education has experienced what appear to be unsustainable trends, namely, college costs (the costs to students, parents, and…

  14. Analyzing Costs of Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, James O.; Black, Talbot

    A simplified method to gather and analyze cost data is presented for administrators of Handicapped Children's Early Education Programs, and specifically for members of the Technical Assistance Development System, North Carolina. After identifying benefits and liabilities associated with analyzing program costs, attention is focused on the internal…

  15. Designing for Cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Edwin B.; Unal, Resit

    1991-01-01

    Designing for cost is a state of mind. Of course, a lot of technical knowledge is required and the use of appropriate tools will improve the process. Unfortunately, the extensive use of weight based cost estimating relationships has generated a perception in the aerospace community that the primary way to reduce cost is to reduce weight. Wrong! Based upon an approximation of an industry accepted formula, the PRICE H (tm) production-production equation, Dean demonstrated theoretically that the optimal trajectory for cost reduction is predominantly in the direction of system complexity reduction, not system weight reduction. Thus the phrase "keep it simple" is a primary state of mind required for reducing cost throughout the design process.

  16. The costs of asthma.

    PubMed

    Barnes, P J; Jonsson, B; Klim, J B

    1996-04-01

    At present, asthma represents a substantial burden on health care resources in all countries so far studied. The costs of asthma are largely due to uncontrolled disease, and are likely to rise as its prevalence and severity increase. Costs could be significantly reduced if disease control is improved. A large proportion of the total cost of illness is derived from treating the consequences of poor asthma control-direct costs, such as emergency room use and hospitalizations. Indirect costs, which include time off work or school and early retirement, are incurred when the disease is not fully controlled and becomes severe enough to have an effect on daily life. In addition, quality of life assessments show that asthma has a significant socioeconomic impact, not only on the patients themselves, but on the whole family. Underuse of prescribed therapy, which includes poor compliance, significantly contributes towards the poor control of asthma. The consequences of poor compliance in asthma include increased morbidity and sometimes mortality, and increased health care expenditure. To improve asthma management, international guidelines have been introduced which recommend an increase in the use of prophylactic therapy. The resulting improvements in the control of asthma will reduce the number of hospitalizations associated with asthma, and may ultimately produce a shift within direct costs, with subsequent reductions in indirect costs. In addition, costs may be reduced by improving therapeutic interventions and through effective patient education programmes. This paper reviews current literature on the costs of asthma to assess how effectively money is spent and, by estimating the proportion of the cost attributable to uncontrolled disease, will identify where financial savings might be made. PMID:8726924

  17. Costing imaging procedures.

    PubMed

    Bretland, P M

    1988-01-01

    The existing National Health Service financial system makes comprehensive costing of any service very difficult. A method of costing using modern commercial methods has been devised, classifying costs into variable, semi-variable and fixed and using the principle of overhead absorption for expenditure not readily allocated to individual procedures. It proved possible to establish a cost spectrum over the financial year 1984-85. The cheapest examinations were plain radiographs outside normal working hours, followed by plain radiographs, ultrasound, special procedures, fluoroscopy, nuclear medicine, angiography and angiographic interventional procedures in normal working hours. This differs from some published figures, particularly those in the Körner report. There was some overlap between fluoroscopic interventional and the cheaper nuclear medicine procedures, and between some of the more expensive nuclear medicine procedures and the cheaper angiographic ones. Only angiographic and the few more expensive nuclear medicine procedures exceed the cost of the inpatient day. The total cost of the imaging service to the district was about 4% of total hospital expenditure. It is shown that where more procedures are undertaken, the semi-variable and fixed (including capital) elements of the cost decrease (and vice versa) so that careful study is required to assess the value of proposed economies. The method is initially time-consuming and requires a computer system with 512 Kb of memory, but once the basic costing system is established in a department, detailed financial monitoring should become practicable. The necessity for a standard comprehensive costing procedure of this nature, based on sound cost accounting principles, appears inescapable, particularly in view of its potential application to management budgeting. PMID:3349241

  18. Cassini tour cost reductions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duxbury, J. H.

    1996-01-01

    The original design of the Cassini tour violated the cost constraint for the mission operations and data analysis by more than 30 percent. This challenge was addressed by performing tradeoffs in order to establish a modified risk and performance posture for the operations organization. This new posture accepted more data acquisition risk with minimal impact to the mission objectives, and brought the operation costs to within the program's constraints. The methodology employed within the Cassini program in order to address the tour cost, risk and performance parameters is presented.

  19. Cost Modeling for low-cost planetary missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwan, Eric; Habib-Agahi, Hamid; Rosenberg, Leigh

    2005-01-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of the JPL parametric cost models used to estimate flight science spacecrafts and instruments. This material will emphasize the cost model approaches to estimate low-cost flight hardware, sensors, and instrumentation, and to perform cost-risk assessments. This presentation will also discuss JPL approaches to perform cost modeling and the methodologies and analyses used to capture low-cost vs. key cost drivers.

  20. Planning for Cost Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlaebitz, William D.

    1984-01-01

    A heat pump life-cycle cost analysis is used to explain the technique. Items suggested for the life-cycle analysis approach include lighting, longer-life batteries, site maintenance, and retaining experts to inspect specific building components. (MLF)

  1. Cost of Computer Searching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenery, Peter J.

    1973-01-01

    The program described has the primary objective of making Federally generated technology and research information available to public and private agencies. Cost analysis, data banks, and search strategies are explained. (Author/DH)

  2. System Cost Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1996-03-27

    SCM is used for estimation of the life-cycle impacts (costs, health and safety risks) of waste management facilities for mixed low-level, low-level, and transuranic waste. SCM uses parametric cost functions to estimate life-cycle costs for various treatment, storage, and disposal modules which reflect planned and existing waste management facilities at Department of Energy (DOE) installations. SCM also provides transportation costs for intersite transfer of DOE wastes. SCM covers the entire DOE waste management complex tomore » allow system sensitivity analysis including: treatment, storage, and disposal configuration options; treatment technology selection; scheduling options; transportation options; waste stream and volume changes; and site specific conditions.« less

  3. Capital cost estimate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The capital cost estimate for the nuclear process heat source (NPHS) plant was made by: (1) using costs from the current commercial HTGR for electricity production as a base for items that are essentially the same and (2) development of new estimates for modified or new equipment that is specifically for the process heat application. Results are given in tabular form and cover the total investment required for each process temperature studied.

  4. Operational cost drivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, Arthur L.; Dickinson, William J.

    1988-01-01

    To be economically viable, the operations cost of launch vehicles must be reduced by an order of magnitude as compared to the Space Transportation System (STS). A summary of propulsion-related operations cost drivers derived from a two-year study of Shuttle ground operations is presented. Examples are given of the inordinate time and cost of launch operations caused by propulsion systems designs that did not adequately consider impacts on prelaunching processing. Typical of these cost drivers are those caused by central hydraulic systems, storable propellants, gimballed engines, multiple propellants, He and N2 systems and purges, hard starts, high maintenance turbopumps, accessibility problems, and most significantly, the use of multiple, nonintegrated RCS, OMS, and main propulsion systems. Recovery and refurbishment of SRBs have resulted in expensive crash and salvage operations. Vehicle system designers are encouraged to be acutely aware of these cost drivers and to incorporate solutions (beginning with the design concepts) to avoid business as usual and costs as usual.

  5. 20 CFR 627.435 - Cost principles and allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... OMB Circulars identified in DOL's regulations at 29 CFR 97.22(b). (c) Costs allocable to another... unforeseen events; (7) Costs prohibited by 29 CFR part 93 (Lobbying Restrictions) or costs of any salaries or... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cost principles and allowable costs....

  6. 20 CFR 627.435 - Cost principles and allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... OMB Circulars identified in DOL's regulations at 29 CFR 97.22(b). (c) Costs allocable to another... unforeseen events; (7) Costs prohibited by 29 CFR part 93 (Lobbying Restrictions) or costs of any salaries or... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cost principles and allowable costs....

  7. Estimations of the maximum tangential velocity V θm in the vortex core region and also the mean rotational velocity V oi near the concave wall surface in the returned flow type cyclone dust collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Akira

    2010-12-01

    There are many types of cyclone dust collectors for separating the fine solid and dust particles from gases in the various industries and also in the home used purposes. For estimating the power loss and the collection efficiency, one of the most important factors is the maximum tangential velocity V θm in the vortex core region in the cyclone body. In order to determine V θm by the simple method, it is useful to apply the mechanical balance of the angular momentum fluxes under the assumption of Ogawa combined vortex model which is composed of the quasi-forced vortex in the vortex core region and also the quasi-free vortex surrounded the vortex core region and also under the assumption of the introduction of equivalent length Heq corresponding to the cone spaces of the cyclone body and the dust bunker. On the other hand, the mean rotational velocity V oi near the concave wall surface is also estimated by the mechanical balance of angular momentum fluxes with the moment of viscous friction force. For confirming the general applications of the obtained equations, the returned flow types cyclones changed the throat diameter D3 are designed. The material of the cyclone is the transparent acrylic resin. Therefore the inner surface of the cyclone body can be regarded as smooth surface. The comparisons of the measured velocities V θm and V oi by a cylindrical Pitot tube are shown in good agreement with those of the proposed equations. The above stated results are described in detail.

  8. How much does curation cost?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    NIH administrators have recently expressed concerns about the cost of curation for biological databases. However, they did not articulate the exact costs of curation. Here we calculate the cost of biocuration of articles for the EcoCyc database as $219 per article over a 5-year period. That cost is 6–15% of the cost of open-access publication fees for publishing biomedical articles, and we estimate that cost is 0.088% of the cost of the overall research project that generated the experimental results. Thus, curation costs are small in an absolute sense, and represent a miniscule fraction of the cost of the research. PMID:27504008

  9. Costing the satellite power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazelrigg, G. A., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The paper presents a methodology for satellite power system costing, places approximate limits on the accuracy possible in cost estimates made at this time, and outlines the use of probabilistic cost information in support of the decision-making process. Reasons for using probabilistic costing or risk analysis procedures instead of standard deterministic costing procedures are considered. Components of cost, costing estimating relationships, grass roots costing, and risk analysis are discussed. Risk analysis using a Monte Carlo simulation model is used to estimate future costs.

  10. Reducing Life-Cycle Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roodvoets, David L.

    2003-01-01

    Presents factors to consider when determining roofing life-cycle costs, explaining that costs do not tell the whole story; discussing components that should go into the decision (cost, maintenance, energy use, and environmental costs); and concluding that important elements in reducing life-cycle costs include energy savings through increased…

  11. New Federal Cost Accounting Regulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolff, George J.; Handzo, Joseph J.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses a new set of indirect cost accounting procedures which must be followed by school districts wishing to recover any indirect costs of administering federal grants and contracts. Also discusses the amount of indirect costs that may be recovered, computing indirect costs, classifying project costs, and restricted grants. (Author/DN)

  12. Using DRGs and standard costs to control nursing labor costs.

    PubMed

    Meeting, D T; Saunders, G; Curcio, R F

    1988-09-01

    Nursing care is a very significant part of a healthcare organization's costs. However, until recently, methods of controlling nursing costs were largely ineffective. With the implementation of the prospective payment system and the use of diagnosis related groups, budgeting and controlling nursing costs are now possible with the use of standard costing. In this article, methods and procedures are discussed and explained for controlling inpatient nursing costs with the use of DRGs and standard costs. PMID:10312677

  13. Factory Cost Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1996-12-17

    The Factory Cost Model (FCM) is an economic analysis tool intended to provide flat panel display (FPD) and other similar discrete component manufacturers with the ability to make first-order estimates of the cost of unit production. This software has several intended uses. Primary among these is the ability to provide first-order economic analysis for future factories. Consequently, the model requires a minimal level of input detail, and accomodates situations where actual production data are notmore » available. This software is designed to be activity based such that most of the calculated direct costs are associated with the steps of a manufacturibg process. The FCM architecture has the ability to accomodate the analysis of existing manufacturing facilities. The FCM can provide assistance with strategic economic decisions surrounding production related matters. For instance, the program can project the effect on costs and resources of a new product''s introduction, or it can assess the potential cost reduction produced by step yield improvements in the manufacturing process.« less

  14. Containing Health Care Costs

    PubMed Central

    Derzon, Robert A.

    1980-01-01

    As the federal government shifted from its traditional roles in health to the payment for personal health care, the relationship between public and private sectors has deteriorated. Today federal and state revenue funds and trusts are the largest purchasers of services from a predominantly private health system. This financing or “gap-filling” role is essential; so too is the purchaser's concern for the costs and prices it must meet. The cost per person for personal health care in 1980 is expected to average $950, triple for the aged. Hospital costs vary considerably and inexplicably among states; California residents, for example, spend 50 percent more per year for hospital care than do state of Washington residents. The failure of each sector to understand the other is potentially damaging to the parties and to patients. First, and most important, differences can and must be moderated through definite changes in the attitudes of the protagonists. PMID:6770551

  15. General methodology: Costing, budgeting, and techniques for benefit-cost and cost-effectiveness analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stretchberry, D. M.; Hein, G. F.

    1972-01-01

    The general concepts of costing, budgeting, and benefit-cost ratio and cost-effectiveness analysis are discussed. The three common methods of costing are presented. Budgeting distributions are discussed. The use of discounting procedures is outlined. The benefit-cost ratio and cost-effectiveness analysis is defined and their current application to NASA planning is pointed out. Specific practices and techniques are discussed, and actual costing and budgeting procedures are outlined. The recommended method of calculating benefit-cost ratios is described. A standardized method of cost-effectiveness analysis and long-range planning are also discussed.

  16. Underestimation of Project Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry W.

    2015-01-01

    Large projects almost always exceed their budgets. Estimating cost is difficult and estimated costs are usually too low. Three different reasons are suggested: bad luck, overoptimism, and deliberate underestimation. Project management can usually point to project difficulty and complexity, technical uncertainty, stakeholder conflicts, scope changes, unforeseen events, and other not really unpredictable bad luck. Project planning is usually over-optimistic, so the likelihood and impact of bad luck is systematically underestimated. Project plans reflect optimism and hope for success in a supposedly unique new effort rather than rational expectations based on historical data. Past project problems are claimed to be irrelevant because "This time it's different." Some bad luck is inevitable and reasonable optimism is understandable, but deliberate deception must be condemned. In a competitive environment, project planners and advocates often deliberately underestimate costs to help gain project approval and funding. Project benefits, cost savings, and probability of success are exaggerated and key risks ignored. Project advocates have incentives to distort information and conceal difficulties from project approvers. One naively suggested cure is more openness, honesty, and group adherence to shared overall goals. A more realistic alternative is threatening overrun projects with cancellation. Neither approach seems to solve the problem. A better method to avoid the delusions of over-optimism and the deceptions of biased advocacy is to base the project cost estimate on the actual costs of a large group of similar projects. Over optimism and deception can continue beyond the planning phase and into project execution. Hard milestones based on verified tests and demonstrations can provide a reality check.

  17. COSTS OF URBAN STORMWATER CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents information on the cost of stormwater pollution control facilities in urban areas, including collection, control, and treatment systems. Information on prior cost studies of control technologies and cost estimating models used in these studies was collected, r...

  18. Cost efficient command management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, Theresa; Murphy, C. W.; Kuntz, Jon; Barlett, Tom

    1996-01-01

    The design and implementation of a command management system (CMS) for a NASA control center, is described. The technology innovations implemented in the CMS provide the infrastructure required for operations cost reduction and future development cost reduction through increased operational efficiency and reuse in future missions. The command management design facilitates error-free operations which enables the automation of the routine control center functions and allows for the distribution of scheduling responsibility to the instrument teams. The reusable system was developed using object oriented methodologies.

  19. Drilling cost-cutting

    SciTech Connect

    Capuano, L.E. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    This presentation by Louis E. Capuano, Jr., President, ThermaSource, Inc., discusses cost-cutting in the drilling phase of geothermal energy exploration and production. All aspects of a geothermal project including the drilling must be streamlined to make it viable and commercial. If production could be maximized from each well, there would be a reduction in drilling costs. This could be achieved in several ways, including big hole and multi-hole completion, directional drilling, better knowledge of the resource and where to penetrate, etc.

  20. Low Cost, Durable Seal

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, George; Parsons, Jason; Friedman, Jake

    2010-12-17

    Seal durability is critical to achieving the 2010 DOE operational life goals for both stationary and transportation PEM fuel cell stacks. The seal material must be chemically and mechanically stable in an environment consisting of aggressive operating temperatures, humidified gases, and acidic membranes. The seal must also be producible at low cost. Currentlyused seal materials do not meet all these requirements. This project developed and demonstrated a high consistency hydrocarbon rubber seal material that was able to meet the DOE technical and cost targets. Significant emphasis was placed on characterization of the material and full scale molding demonstrations.

  1. Cost Validation Using PRICE H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jack, John; Kwan, Eric; Wood, Milana

    2011-01-01

    PRICE H was introduced into the JPL cost estimation tool set circa 2003. It became more available at JPL when IPAO funded the NASA-wide site license for all NASA centers. PRICE H was mainly used as one of the cost tools to validate proposal grassroots cost estimates. Program offices at JPL view PRICE H as an additional crosscheck to Team X (JPL Concurrent Engineering Design Center) estimates. PRICE H became widely accepted ca, 2007 at JPL when the program offices moved away from grassroots cost estimation for Step 1 proposals. PRICE H is now one of the key cost tools used for cost validation, cost trades, and independent cost estimates.

  2. Honest signalling with costly gambles

    PubMed Central

    Meacham, Frazer; Perlmutter, Aaron; Bergstrom, Carl T.

    2013-01-01

    Costly signalling theory is commonly invoked as an explanation for how honest communication can be stable when interests conflict. However, the signal costs predicted by costly signalling models often turn out to be unrealistically high. These models generally assume that signal cost is determinate. Here, we consider the case where signal cost is instead stochastic. We examine both discrete and continuous signalling games and show that, under reasonable assumptions, stochasticity in signal costs can decrease the average cost at equilibrium for all individuals. This effect of stochasticity for decreasing signal costs is a fundamental mechanism that probably acts in a wide variety of circumstances. PMID:23904587

  3. Alignment-Insensitive Lower-Cost Telescope Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Hagopian, John; Dean, Bruce; Howard, Joe

    2008-01-01

    This architecture features an active wavefront sensing and control scheme along with methods for measuring the relative positions of the primary to aft optics, such as the secondary mirror, and should enable larger and cheaper telescope architectures needed for future applications. A wavefront source/sensor is placed at the center of curvature of the primary mirror. The system provides continuous light onto a primary mirror that is retro-reflected onto itself. This allows the wavefront controller to constantly update the positions of the primary mirror segments (or deformable mirror actuators). Another function of this innovation involves using a concave mirror on the back of the secondary mirror (or other aft optic) that has the same center-of-curvature location (in defocus) as the primary mirror. The two return beams can be aligned next to each other on a detector, or radially on top of each other. This provides a means with which to measure the relative position of the primary to the secondary (or other aft optics), thus allowing for the removal of misalignment of the center-of-curvature source/sensor (meaning it doesn't need precision placement) and also provides a means with which to monitor the relative alignment over time. This innovation does not require extremely good thermal stability on the primary mirror and can thus be used in any thermal environment and with cheaper materials. In addition to this, the architecture lets one phase (or align) the primary mirror independent of whether a star or scene is in the field. The segmented, spherical primary allows for cost-effective three-meter class (e.g. Midex and Discovery) missions as well as enabling 30-meter telescope solutions that can be manufactured in a reasonable amount of time. The continuous wavefront sensing and control architecture enables missions for low-Earth-orbit.

  4. Cost Recovery Through Depreciation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrester, Robert T.; Wesolowski, Leonard V.

    1983-01-01

    The approach of adopting depreciation rather than use allowance in order to recover more accurately the cost of college buildings and equipment used on federal projects is considered. It is suggested that depreciation will offer most colleges and universities a higher annual recovery rate, and an opportunity for better facilities planning. For…

  5. Innovations Without Added Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cereghino, Edward

    1974-01-01

    There is no question that we are in a tight money market, and schools are among the first institutions to feel the squeeze. Therefore, when a plan is offered that provides for innovations without added costs, its something worth noting. (Editor)

  6. Opportunity Cost: A Reply

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The author's objective for this reply in reexamining opportunity cost was to draw attention to two conflicting definitions of the concept in current use and to argue the case for dropping one of them. The comments of Daniel Arce, Rod O'Donnell, and Daniel Stone might be read as demonstration that the author has failed on both counts. Such a…

  7. Strategy Reduces Construction Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Jim; Petters, Walt

    2000-01-01

    Reveals how a Florida school district had success when switching from a design-bid-build approach for school construction to a construction management (CM) at risk. The CM at risk process involving project delivery options, maximum price guarantees, and the school district's benefits in cost savings accrued are addressed. (GR)

  8. Textbooks: Costs and Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mize, Rita

    2004-01-01

    As community colleges seek to be as accessible as possible to students and attempt to retain low enrollment fees, manageable parking fees, and waiver of fees for those with financial needs, an additional and significant cost ? for textbooks and supplies ? has not been addressed systematically. While fees for a full-time student are $390 per…

  9. Heliostat cost reduction study.

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Scott A.; Lumia, Ronald. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Davenport, Roger (Science Applications International Corporation, San Diego, CA); Thomas, Robert C. (Advanced Thermal Systems, Centennial, CO); Gorman, David; Kolb, Gregory J.; Donnelly, Matthew W.

    2007-06-01

    Power towers are capable of producing solar-generated electricity and hydrogen on a large scale. Heliostats are the most important cost element of a solar power tower plant. Since they constitute {approx} 50% of the capital cost of the plant it is important to reduce heliostat cost as much as possible to improve the economic performance of power towers. In this study we evaluate current heliostat technology and estimate a price of $126/m{sup 2} given year-2006 materials and labor costs for a deployment of {approx}600 MW of power towers per year. This 2006 price yields electricity at $0.067/kWh and hydrogen at $3.20/kg. We propose research and development that should ultimately lead to a price as low as $90/m{sup 2}, which equates to $0.056/kWh and $2.75/kg H{sup 2}. Approximately 30 heliostat and manufacturing experts from the United States, Europe, and Australia contributed to the content of this report during two separate workshops conducted at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility.

  10. Student Housing Cost Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Berkeley. Univ. Residential Building System.

    Target costs for the University Residential Building System (URBS) Project of the University of California are presented. Findings depict the effectiveness of building design and material applications and should be useful in guiding future student housing design work, whether the design utilizes the URBS system or not. Ten recently constructed…

  11. Cost Is Not Everything.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clement, Russell T.

    1985-01-01

    Reports results of survey of 21 smaller to medium-sized (50,000-200,000 volumes) libraries which was conducted to determine factors used to make selection decisions in purchase of automated turnkey systems from established vendors. Factors examined include costs, software, hardware, and vendors for parts A (actual experience) and B (hypothetical…

  12. Costing climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reay, David S.

    2002-12-01

    Debate over how, when, and even whether man-made greenhouse-gas emissions should be controlled has grown in intensity even faster than the levels of greenhouse gas in our atmosphere. Many argue that the costs involved in reducing emissions outweigh the potential economic damage of human-induced climate change. Here, existing cost-benefit analyses of greenhouse-gas reduction policies are examined, with a view to establishing whether any such global reductions are currently worthwhile. Potential for, and cost of, cutting our own individual greenhouse-gas emissions is then assessed. I find that many abatement strategies are able to deliver significant emission reductions at little or no net cost. Additionally, I find that there is huge potential for individuals to simultaneously cut their own greenhouse-gas emissions and save money. I conclude that cuts in global greenhouse-gas emissions, such as those of the Kyoto Protocol, cannot be justifiably dismissed as posing too large an economic burden.

  13. Costs and benefits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Two models of cost benefit analysis are illustrated and the application of these models to assessing the economic scope of space applications programs was discussed. Four major areas cited as improvable through space derived information - food supply and distribution, energy sources, mineral reserves, and communication and navigation were - discussed. Specific illustrations are given for agriculture and maritime traffic.

  14. Collaborating To Cut Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strosnider, Kim

    1998-01-01

    Private colleges across the country are collaborating to cut costs, streamline services, and increase efficiency. An ambitious Ohio project, involving 35 colleges, to redesign business operations hopes to save $20-25 million. Other efforts include joint classes using interactive television, shared library resources, cross-registration, jointly…

  15. Understanding Higher Education Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middaugh, Michael F.

    2005-01-01

    Public discussion of higher education costs frequently confuses price with expenditure. This article examines factors associated with increases in the sticker price of a college education and the expenditures incurred by institutions in delivering that education. The discussion suggests that while growth in college tuition is real, access to…

  16. Cost Effective Prototyping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickman, Jerry L.; Kundu, Nikhil K.

    1996-01-01

    This laboratory exercise seeks to develop a cost effective prototype development. The exercise has the potential of linking part design, CAD, mold development, quality control, metrology, mold flow, materials testing, fixture design, automation, limited parts production and other issues as related to plastics manufacturing.

  17. Cutting Transportation Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Barbara

    1982-01-01

    Beginning on the front cover, this article tells how school districts are reducing their transportation costs. Particularly effective measures include the use of computers for bus maintenance and scheduling, school board ownership of buses, and the conversion of gasoline-powered buses to alternative fuels. (Author/MLF)

  18. Curbing Workers' Comp Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeb, William S.

    1998-01-01

    An actuarial study revealed that Pasadena Schools had an unfunded worker's compensation liability of over $10 million and 400 open claims. Advised to implement strong cost-containment measures (an early return-to-work program) and equally strong accountability measures (strict performance guides and safe work practices), the district achieved…

  19. Rising College Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    USA Today, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Focuses on ways in which parents of school-age children can offset the rising costs of college, including encouraging students to get summer and part-time jobs, putting savings toward students' education in accounts in students' names to save taxes, investigating cooperative work/education plans, and investing in mutual funds. (DB)

  20. 45 CFR 149.115 - Cost threshold and cost limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ....115 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE EARLY RETIREE REINSURANCE PROGRAM Reinsurance Amounts § 149.115 Cost threshold and cost limit. The following cost threshold and cost limits apply individually, to each early retiree as...

  1. 45 CFR 149.115 - Cost threshold and cost limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ....115 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE EARLY RETIREE REINSURANCE PROGRAM Reinsurance Amounts § 149.115 Cost threshold and cost limit. The following cost threshold and cost limits apply individually, to each early retiree as...

  2. 45 CFR 149.115 - Cost threshold and cost limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....115 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE EARLY RETIREE REINSURANCE PROGRAM Reinsurance Amounts § 149.115 Cost threshold and cost limit. The following cost threshold and cost limits apply individually, to each early retiree as...

  3. 45 CFR 149.115 - Cost threshold and cost limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ....115 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE EARLY RETIREE REINSURANCE PROGRAM Reinsurance Amounts § 149.115 Cost threshold and cost limit. The following cost threshold and cost limits apply individually, to each early retiree as...

  4. 45 CFR 149.115 - Cost threshold and cost limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ....115 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE EARLY RETIREE REINSURANCE PROGRAM Reinsurance Amounts § 149.115 Cost threshold and cost limit. The following cost threshold and cost limits apply individually, to each early retiree as...

  5. Reducing coal transportation costs

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, R.D. )

    1990-10-11

    Ten years ago, the Staggers Rail Act of 1980 became law. This act significantly altered the landscape against which the freight rates paid by electric utilities and other shippers for transporting coal and other goods by rail are determined. Among the most significant changes was the creation of the Rail Cost Adjustment Factor (RCAF), a special mechanism to enable railroads to recoup increases in their costs through expedited rate increases. The RCAF has generated much controversy between shippers and railroads, especially over the treatment of changes in rail productivity, that is, whether the RCAF should track only changes in the prices paid by railroads for raw inputs or should instead measure changes in the actual cost of rail production by reflecting increases in the amount of output achieved per unit of input. Shippers last year won a major battle when the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) added a productivity adjustment to the RCAF, although that decision is still subject to judicial review and possible modification by the ICC. The railroads have responded to the productivity adjustment by pursuing other means of raising their rates, thus creating new issues and choices for utilities. This article reviews the role and significance of the RCAF, explains the nature and impact of the new productivity adjustment, and analyzes the implications of the productivity adjustment for the pricing of rail transportation services in the future. These matters are of major importance for coal-burning utilities and their ratepayers, especially as the cost of coal transportation in many areas exceeds the cost of the coal itself.

  6. Manned Mars mission cost estimate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamaker, Joseph; Smith, Keith

    1986-01-01

    The potential costs of several options of a manned Mars mission are examined. A cost estimating methodology based primarily on existing Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) parametric cost models is summarized. These models include the MSFC Space Station Cost Model and the MSFC Launch Vehicle Cost Model as well as other modes and techniques. The ground rules and assumptions of the cost estimating methodology are discussed and cost estimates presented for six potential mission options which were studied. The estimated manned Mars mission costs are compared to the cost of the somewhat analogous Apollo Program cost after normalizing the Apollo cost to the environment and ground rules of the manned Mars missions. It is concluded that a manned Mars mission, as currently defined, could be accomplished for under $30 billion in 1985 dollars excluding launch vehicle development and mission operations.

  7. Fixed and Sunk Costs Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, X. Henry; Yang, Bill Z.

    2001-01-01

    Attempts to clarify the concepts of, and the link between, fixed costs and sunk costs. Argues that the root of confusion is the inconsistency in defining the term fixed costs. Consistently defines fixed and sunk costs, and describes how instructors must teach under these definitions. (RLH)

  8. Average Cost of Common Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Fred; Tweeten, Luther

    The paper shows costs of elementary and secondary schools applicable to Oklahoma rural areas, including the long-run average cost curve which indicates the minimum per student cost for educating various numbers of students and the application of the cost curves determining the optimum school district size. In a stratified sample, the school…

  9. Cost Accounting for Decision Makers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaneklides, Ann L.

    1985-01-01

    Underscores the importance of informed decision making through accurate anticipation of cost incurrence in light of changing economic and environmental conditions. Explains the concepts of cost accounting, full allocation of costs, the selection of an allocation base, the allocation of indirect costs, depreciation, and implications for community…

  10. Production cost methods and data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffe, R. E.; Fujita, T.

    1975-01-01

    The general gas cost equation for utility financing is presented. Modifications and assumptions made in order to apply the cost equation to hydrogen production are described. Cost data are given for various methods of hydrogen production. The cost matrix procedure is briefly discussed.

  11. Space station: Cost and benefits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Costs for developing, producing, operating, and supporting the initial space station, a 4 to 8 man space station, and a 4 to 24 man space station are estimated and compared. These costs include contractor hardware; space station assembly and logistics flight costs; and payload support elements. Transportation system options examined include orbiter modules; standard and extended duration STS fights; reusable spacebased perigee kick motor OTV; and upper stages. Space station service charges assessed include crew hours; energy requirements; payload support module storage; pressurized port usage; and OTV service facility. Graphs show costs for science missions, space processing research, small communication satellites; large GEO transportation; OVT launch costs; DOD payload costs, and user costs.

  12. Elements of Designing for Cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Edwin B.; Unal, Resit

    1992-01-01

    During recent history in the United States, government systems development has been performance driven. As a result, systems within a class have experienced exponentially increasing cost over time in fixed year dollars. Moreover, little emphasis has been placed on reducing cost. This paper defines designing for cost and presents several tools which, if used in the engineering process, offer the promise of reducing cost. Although other potential tools exist for designing for cost, this paper focuses on rules of thumb, quality function deployment, Taguchi methods, concurrent engineering, and activity based costing. Each of these tools has been demonstrated to reduce cost if used within the engineering process.

  13. Elements of designing for cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Edwin B.; Unal, Resit

    1992-01-01

    During recent history in the United States, government systems development has been performance driven. As a result, systems within a class have experienced exponentially increasing cost over time in fixed year dollars. Moreover, little emphasis has been placed on reducing cost. This paper defines designing for cost and presents several tools which, if used in the engineering process, offer the promise of reducing cost. Although other potential tools exist for designing for cost, this paper focuses on rules of thumb, quality function deployment, Taguchi methods, concurrent engineering, and activity-based costing. Each of these tools has been demonstrated to reduce cost if used within the engineering process.

  14. Through Life Costing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newnes, Linda; Mileham, A. R.; Cheung, W. M.; Goh, Y. M.

    When an innovation is launched in such a market, reliable information about the life cost of the novel product is naturally lacking. This has proven to be a key obstacle to venture capital funded cleantech companies with innovations that are conceptually proven and that deliver significant improvements to conventional alternatives, but that lack enough reference installations to provide reliable data on life costs. One way out of this dilemma that is increasingly discussed among practitioners is servitization, i.e., the notion that the owner of the innovation should be an agency that is specialised in using and maintaining the product, letting the end customer become a buyer of the product's service (such as heat) rather than the product itself.

  15. Costs of climate impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, W O

    1980-03-01

    The surest prospect for future world climate patterns is that they will differ from present ones. What is uncertain is how much, and exactly in what way in different geographical regions. The anthropogenic CO/sub 2/ increase will probably exceed the unknown forcing functions of natural climate change within 30 to 60 years. It is not unlikely that by AD 2040 the world's climate, driven by the CO/sub 2/ increase, will enter a domain warmer than any within the past few million years. The costs of averting this climate change or of absorbing its impact are likely to be huge, even though today imponderable. Not least among these are intangible and unquantifiable costs associated with changes in human values and the quality of everyday life for future generations.

  16. Costs in inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Witczak, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Variables influencing total direct medical costs in inflammatory bowel diseases include country, diagnosis (generally, patients with Crohn's disease generated higher costs compared with patients with ulcerative colitis), and year since diagnosis. In all studies the mean costs were higher than the median costs, which indicates that a relatively small group of the most severely ill patients significantly affect the total cost of treatment of these diseases. A major component of direct medical costs was attributed to hospitalisation, ranging from 49% to 80% of the total. The costs of surgery constituted 40–61% of inpatient costs. Indirect costs in inflammatory bowel diseases, unappreciated and often underestimated (considered by few authors and as a loss of work), are in fact important and may even exceed direct medical costs. PMID:27110304

  17. Levelized Power Generation Cost Codes

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1996-04-30

    LPGC is a set of nine microcomputer programs for estimating power generation costs for large steam-electric power plants. These programs permit rapid evaluation using various sets of economic and technical ground rules. The levelized power generation costs calculated may be used to compare the relative economics of nuclear and coal-fired plants based on life-cycle costs. Cost calculations include capital investment cost, operation and maintenance cost, fuel cycle cost, decommissioning cost, and total levelized power generationmore » cost. These programs can be used for quick analyses of power generation costs using alternative economic parameters, such as interest rate, escalation rate, inflation rate, plant lead times, capacity factor, fuel prices, etc. The two major types of electric generating plants considered are pressurized water reactor (PWR) and pulverized coal-fired plants. Data are also provided for the Large Scale Prototype Breeder (LSPB) type liquid metal reactor.« less

  18. Geothermal probabilistic cost study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orren, L. H.; Ziman, G. M.; Jones, S. C.; Lee, T. K.; Noll, R.; Wilde, L.; Sadanand, V.

    1981-01-01

    A tool is presented to quantify the risks of geothermal projects, the Geothermal Probabilistic Cost Model (GPCM). The GPCM model was used to evaluate a geothermal reservoir for a binary-cycle electric plant at Heber, California. Three institutional aspects of the geothermal risk which can shift the risk among different agents was analyzed. The leasing of geothermal land, contracting between the producer and the user of the geothermal heat, and insurance against faulty performance were examined.

  19. Exploration cost-cutting

    SciTech Connect

    Huttrer, J.

    1996-12-31

    This presentation by Jerry Huttrer, President, Geothermal Management Company, discusses the general state of exploration in the geothermal industry today, and mentions some ways to economize and perhaps save costs of geothermal exploration in the future. He suggests an increased use of satellite imagery in the mapping of geothermal resources and the identification of hot spots. Also, coordinating with oil and gas exploration efforts, the efficiency of the exploration task could be optimized.

  20. Geothermal probabilistic cost study

    SciTech Connect

    Orren, L.H.; Ziman, G.M.; Jones, S.C.; Lee, T.K.; Noll, R.; Wilde, L.; Sadanand, V.

    1981-08-01

    A tool is presented to quantify the risks of geothermal projects, the Geothermal Probabilistic Cost Model (GPCM). The GPCM model is used to evaluate a geothermal reservoir for a binary-cycle electric plant at Heber, California. Three institutional aspects of the geothermal risk which can shift the risk among different agents are analyzed. The leasing of geothermal land, contracting between the producer and the user of the geothermal heat, and insurance against faulty performance are examined. (MHR)

  1. Geothermal probabilistic cost study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orren, L. H.; Ziman, G. M.; Jones, S. C.; Lee, T. K.; Noll, R.; Wilde, L.; Sadanand, V.

    1981-08-01

    A tool is presented to quantify the risks of geothermal projects, the Geothermal Probabilistic Cost Model (GPCM). The GPCM model was used to evaluate a geothermal reservoir for a binary-cycle electric plant at Heber, California. Three institutional aspects of the geothermal risk which can shift the risk among different agents was analyzed. The leasing of geothermal land, contracting between the producer and the user of the geothermal heat, and insurance against faulty performance were examined.

  2. Is empathy cost efficient?

    PubMed

    Book, H E

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to constrain rising health-care costs, third-party payers are currently encouraging psychiatrists and other physicians to focus on the financial aspects of their treatment approaches. This paper has attempted to address the impact of this cost-efficient attitude on our empathy and by tracking the evolution of our health-care-delivery system since the turn of the century. I have described three overlapping phases: the humanist, the scientific, and the current corporate phase, and emphasized the importance or trivialization of an empathic practice-style associated with each stage. I have warned how the corporate delivery system, with its focus on cost constraints, may inhibit our capacity to be empathic by stimulating self-serving concerns about the corporation's monetary welfare and our own financial well-being. This unempathic stance may result in treatment being driven by financial factors that override clinically driven needs of the patient. At its extreme, this approach may render psychiatrists vulnerable for viewing patients as bad objects that deprive financially, and for countertransferentially retaliating against them through "warehousing" and abandonment. PMID:1902067

  3. The costs of rape.

    PubMed

    Perilloux, Carin; Duntley, Joshua D; Buss, David M

    2012-10-01

    The current study examined costs experienced by victims of completed rape (n=49) and attempted sexual assault (n=91) using quantitative analyses of 13 domains: health, self-esteem, self-perceived attractiveness, self-perceived mate value, family relationships,work life, social life, social reputation, sexual reputation, desire to have sex, frequency of sex, enjoyment of sex, and long-term, committed relationships. Women also provided descriptive accounts of their experiences, and we used these to illustrate the costs in the victims' own words.Compared to victims of an attempted sexual assault, victims of a completed rape reported significantly more negative outcomes in 11 of the 13 domains. The most negatively affected domains were self-esteem, sexual reputation, frequency of sex, desire to have sex, and self-perceived mate value. Although victims of rape experienced more negative effects than victims of attempted sexual assault,both groups of victims reported negative effects in every domain.Discussion focuses on the implications of the differing degrees and patterns of the costs of attempted and completed sexual victimization. PMID:21975924

  4. Proposed reliability cost model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delionback, L. M.

    1973-01-01

    The research investigations which were involved in the study include: cost analysis/allocation, reliability and product assurance, forecasting methodology, systems analysis, and model-building. This is a classic example of an interdisciplinary problem, since the model-building requirements include the need for understanding and communication between technical disciplines on one hand, and the financial/accounting skill categories on the other. The systems approach is utilized within this context to establish a clearer and more objective relationship between reliability assurance and the subcategories (or subelements) that provide, or reenforce, the reliability assurance for a system. Subcategories are further subdivided as illustrated by a tree diagram. The reliability assurance elements can be seen to be potential alternative strategies, or approaches, depending on the specific goals/objectives of the trade studies. The scope was limited to the establishment of a proposed reliability cost-model format. The model format/approach is dependent upon the use of a series of subsystem-oriented CER's and sometimes possible CTR's, in devising a suitable cost-effective policy.

  5. Assessing the Costs and Cost-Effectiveness of Genomic Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Kurt D.; Dukhovny, Dmitry; Siebert, Uwe; Green, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Despite dramatic drops in DNA sequencing costs, concerns are great that the integration of genomic sequencing into clinical settings will drastically increase health care expenditures. This commentary presents an overview of what is known about the costs and cost-effectiveness of genomic sequencing. We discuss the cost of germline genomic sequencing, addressing factors that have facilitated the decrease in sequencing costs to date and anticipating the factors that will drive sequencing costs in the future. We then address the cost-effectiveness of diagnostic and pharmacogenomic applications of genomic sequencing, with an emphasis on the implications for secondary findings disclosure and the integration of genomic sequencing into general patient care. Throughout, we ground the discussion by describing efforts in the MedSeq Project, an ongoing randomized controlled clinical trial, to understand the costs and cost-effectiveness of integrating whole genome sequencing into cardiology and primary care settings. PMID:26690481

  6. The Yale Cost Model and cost centres: servant or master?

    PubMed

    Rigby, E

    1993-01-01

    Cost accounting describes that aspect of accounting which collects, allocates and controls the cost of producing a service. Costing information is primarily reported to management to enable control of costs and to ensure the financial viability of units, departments and divisions. As costing studies continue to produce estimates of Diagnosis Related Group (DRG) costs in New South Wales hospitals, as well as in other states, costs for different hospitals are being externally compared, using a tool which is usually related to internal management and reporting. Comparability of costs is assumed even though accounting systems differ. This paper examines the cost centre structures at five major teaching hospitals in Sydney. It describes the similarities and differences in how the cost centres were constituted, and then details the line items of expenditure that are charged to each cost centre. The results of a comparative study of a medical specialty are included as evidence of different costing methodologies in the hospitals. The picture that emerged from the study is that the hospitals are constituting their cost centres to meet their internal management needs, that is, to know the cost of running a ward or nursing unit, a medical specialty, department and so on. The rationale for the particular cost centre construction was that cost centre managers could manage and control costs and assign responsibility. There are variations in procedures for assigning costs to cost centres, and the question is asked 'Do these variations in procedures make a material difference to our ability to compare costs per Diagnosis Related Group at the various hospitals?' It is contended that the accounting information, which is produced as a result of different practices, is primarily for internal management, not external comparison. It would be better for hospitals to compare their estimated costs per Diagnosis Related Group to an internal standard cost rather than the costs from other

  7. Low cost space.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, A. O.

    1973-01-01

    It is pointed out that a contradiction between boundless space and limited resources has put the space program in the distressing position of cutting good and worthy projects from its activities during this decade. One approach to ameliorate the situation is to increase the productivity of space activities by greater utilization of the equipment developed for its projects. The Space Shuttle constitutes the first big step in that direction. The reusable character of the Shuttle orbiter will cut operational costs by permitting recovery and reuse of payload equipment through routine round-trip operations to space.

  8. ALS - The cost cutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, Frank

    1987-10-01

    The Advanced Launch System (ALS) development program will avail itself of existing technologies in the short term in order to produce an interim 'core' vehicle that may be operational by 1993; the full, booster-incorporating system objective will then be achieved in 1998. This programmatic 'decoupling' of booster and core vehicle development efforts will separate their funding peaks. The ALS program will cut costs by colocating manufacturing and launch facilities, using Al-Li alloys in booster primary structures, and aggressively applying 'paperless' CIM. The ALS launch vehicle configuration will be primarily determined by both payload requirements and flight frequency.

  9. LIFE Cost of Electricity, Capital and Operating Costs

    SciTech Connect

    Anklam, T

    2011-04-14

    Successful commercialization of fusion energy requires economic viability as well as technical and scientific feasibility. To assess economic viability, we have conducted a pre-conceptual level evaluation of LIFE economics. Unit costs are estimated from a combination of bottom-up costs estimates, working with representative vendors, and scaled results from previous studies of fission and fusion plants. An integrated process model of a LIFE power plant was developed to integrate and optimize unit costs and calculate top level metrics such as cost of electricity and power plant capital cost. The scope of this activity was the entire power plant site. Separately, a development program to deliver the required specialized equipment has been assembled. Results show that LIFE power plant cost of electricity and plant capital cost compare favorably to estimates for new-build LWR's, coal and gas - particularly if indicative costs of carbon capture and sequestration are accounted for.

  10. The cost of IT security.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Mac

    2015-04-01

    Breaches in data security have become commonplace in health care, making IT security a necessary cost for healthcare organizations. Organizations that do not invest proactively in IT security face a significant risk of incurring much greater costs from incidents involving compromised data security. Direct costs of security breaches include the costs of discovery, response, investigation, and notification and also can include state or federal penalties and costs of compliance with corrective action plans and resolution agreements. Hidden costs can include damage to brand, loss of consumer confidence, reduced HCAHPS scores, and--by extension--reduced value-based purchasing payments. PMID:26665523

  11. Estimating the Cost to do a Cost Estimate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, D. S.; Buchanan, H. R.

    1998-01-01

    This article provides a model for estimating the cost required to do a cost estimate. Overruns may lead to concellation of a project. In 1991, we completed a study on the cost of doing cost estimates for the class of projects normally encountered in the development and implementation of equipment at the network of tracking stations operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for NASA.

  12. Cost Benefit Model Development. Cost Benefit Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marson, Arthur A.; And Others

    Through an analysis of the economic costs and benefits of five vocational-technical programs, it was shown that the benefits of a vocational-technical education outweigh the costs. Four programs showing greater benefits than costs were auto body (courses at two technical institutes), materials management, and electronic servicing. Clothing…

  13. Cost Estimates for Federal Student Loans: The Market Cost Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delisle, Jason

    2008-01-01

    In an ongoing debate about the relative costs of the federal government's direct and guaranteed student loan programs, some budget experts and private lenders have argued for the use of "market cost" estimates. They assert that official government cost estimates for federal student loans differ from what private entities would likely charge…

  14. 20 CFR 627.435 - Cost principles and allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... OMB Circulars identified in DOL's regulations at 29 CFR 97.22(b). (c) Costs allocable to another... unforeseen events; (7) Costs prohibited by 29 CFR part 93 (Lobbying Restrictions) or costs of any salaries or expenses related to any activity designed to influence legislation or appropriations pending before...

  15. Activity-Based Costing: A Cost Management Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turk, Frederick J.

    1993-01-01

    In college and university administration, overhead costs are often charged to programs indiscriminately, whereas the support activities that underlie those costs remain unanalyzed. It is time for institutions to decrease ineffective use of resources. Activity-based management attributes costs more accurately and can improve efficiency. (MSE)

  16. Cost Differential Analysis: Providing Data for Added Cost Funding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nystrom, Dennis C.; Hennessy, James V.

    1975-01-01

    A 1972-73 statewide study conducted in Illinois to develop a cost accounting system which facilitates cost differential ratios for secondary vocational education courses indicated that vocational programs are approximately twice as expensive as nonvocational. Specific cost elements identified in the study provided essential information regarding…

  17. Beyond managed costs.

    PubMed

    Savage, G T; Campbell, K S; Patman, T; Nunnelley, L L

    2000-01-01

    Managed care organizations (MCOs) face an uncertain future. While consolidation and price competition have expanded their market share, health care expenditures are expected to rise in the near future, and the cost containment premise--and promise--of MCOs is being threatened by mixed blessing and nonsupportive stakeholders. To shed light on MCOs' situation, we discuss four drivers for change in health management in the U.S.: technology, regulation, consumerism, and demographics. Using those four drivers, we then assess the various stakeholders in the industry through a competitive analysis and a stakeholder analysis. These analyses suggest that the munificence of the MCO business environment has significantly declined, especially among supplier and buyer stakeholders. Hence, MCOs cannot continue to manage health care costs alone as this will no longer generate sufficient support among buyer and supplier stakeholders. Instead, MCOs must tackle five critical health care issues by working closely with other stakeholders and also by learning what they can from innovative health care initiatives both inside and outside the United States. PMID:10710733

  18. Lifetime costs of cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Marie; Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Madsen, Mette; Uldall, Peter

    2009-08-01

    This study quantified the lifetime costs of cerebral palsy (CP) in a register-based setting. It was the first study outside the US to assess the lifetime costs of CP. The lifetime costs attributable to CP were divided into three categories: health care costs, productivity costs, and social costs. The population analysed was retrieved from the Danish Cerebral Palsy Register, which covers the eastern part of the country and has registered about half of the Danish population of individuals with CP since 1950. For this study we analysed 2367 individuals with CP, who were born in 1930 to 2000 and were alive in 2000. The prevalence of CP in eastern Denmark was approximately 1.7 per 1000. Information on productivity and the use of health care was retrieved from registers. The lifetime cost of CP was about 860,000 euro for men and about 800,000 euro for women. The largest component was social care costs, particularly during childhood. A sensitivity analysis found that alterations in social care costs had a small effect, whereas lowering the discount rate from 5 to 3 per cent markedly increased total lifetime costs. Discounting decreases the value of costs in the future compared with the present. The high social care costs and productivity costs associated with CP point to a potential gain from labour market interventions that benefit individuals with CP. PMID:19416329

  19. National Variation in Urethroplasty Cost and Predictors of Extreme Cost: A Cost Analysis with Policy Implications

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Catherine R.; Osterberg, E. Charles; Sanford, Thomas; Alwaal, Amjad; Gaither, Thomas W.; McAninch, Jack W.; McCulloch, Charles E.; Breyer, Benjamin N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine which factors are associated with higher urethroplasty procedural costs and whether they have been increasing or decreasing over time. Identification of determinants of extreme costs may help reduce cost while maintaining quality. Materials and Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis using the 2001–2010 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project - Nationwide Inpatient Sample (HCUP-NIS). The HCUP-NIS captures hospital charges which we converted to cost using the HCUP Cost-to-Charge Ratio. Log cost linear regression with sensitivity analysis was used to determine variables associated with increased costs. Extreme cost was defined as the top 20th percentile of expenditure, analyzed with logistic regression and expressed as Odds Ratios (OR). Results A total of 2298 urethroplasties were recorded in NIS over the study period. The median (interquartile range) calculated costs was $7321 ($5677–$10000). Patients with multiple comorbid conditions were associated with extreme costs (OR 1.56 95% CI 1.19–2.04, p=0.02) compared to patients with no comorbid disease. Inpatient complications raised the odds of extreme costs OR 3.2 CI 2.14–4.75, p<0.001). Graft urethroplasties were associated with extreme costs (OR 1.78 95% CI 1.2–2.64, p=0.005). Variation in patient age, race, hospital region, bed size, teaching status, payer type, and volume of urethroplasty cases were not associated with extremes of cost. Conclusion Cost variation for perioperative inpatient urethroplasty procedures is dependent on preoperative patient comorbidities, postoperative complications and surgical complexity related to graft usage. Procedural cost and cost variation are critical for understanding which aspects of care have the greatest impact on cost. PMID:27107626

  20. Understanding your health care costs

    MedlinePlus

    ... This is the payment you make for certain health care provider visits and prescriptions. It is a set ... about lower-cost facilities and medicines. Understanding your health care costs can help you save money when managing ...

  1. REMEDIAL ACTION COSTING PROCEDURES MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The manual provides specific procedures for the cost estimating and economic analysis steps required for preparing engineering cost estimates for selecting remedial action alternatives in response to the requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and ...

  2. Aerobraking cost/risk decisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, David A.; Tolson, Robert

    2005-01-01

    this paper provides a brief history of past and future aerobraking missions, describes the aerobraking technique, summarizes the costs associated with aerobraking, and concludes with a suggested methodology for evaluating the cost/risk trade when selecting the aerobraking approach.

  3. Cost Weight Compression: Impact of Cost Data Precision and Completeness

    PubMed Central

    Botz, Charles K.; Sutherland, Jason; Lawrenson, Jolyn

    2006-01-01

    This study was designed to quantitatively assess the impact of deficiencies in completeness and precision of hospital case cost data on cost weight compression. For the nursing per diem model versus the nursing workload model the average compression was 19.6 percent (for the 25.9 percent of cases that changed cost weight by at least 5 percent). We concluded that the compression of case mix cost weights based on nursing per diem cost or per diem charge models, such as for U.S. diagnosis-related groups (DRGs), may be pervasive and material. PMID:17290652

  4. Wind Integration Cost and Cost-Causation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; Holttinen, H.; Kiviluoma, J.; Estanqueiro, A.; Martin-Martinez, S.; Gomez-Lazaro, E.; Peneda, I.; Smith, C.

    2013-10-01

    The question of wind integration cost has received much attention in the past several years. The methodological challenges to calculating integration costs are discussed in this paper. There are other sources of integration cost unrelated to wind energy. A performance-based approach would be technology neutral, and would provide price signals for all technology types. However, it is difficult to correctly formulate such an approach. Determining what is and is not an integration cost is challenging. Another problem is the allocation of system costs to one source. Because of significant nonlinearities, this can prove to be impossible to determine in an accurate and objective way.

  5. Heliostat cost-analysis tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, L. D.; Chang, R. E.

    1981-10-01

    A heliostat cost analysis tool (HELCAT) that processes manufacturing transportation, and installation cost data was developed which provides a consistent structure for cost analyses. The HELCAT calculates a representation product price based on direct input data and various economic, financial, and accounting assumptions. The characteristics of this tool and its initial application in the evaluation of second generation heliostat cost estimates are discussed. A set of nominal economic and financial parameters is also suggested.

  6. Cost analysis for procedure comparisons.

    PubMed

    Trowers, E A; Batra, S C; Buessler, J; Anderson, L K

    1995-01-01

    Using the methodology of activity-based costing as a conceptual framework, the authors present the potential cost reduction of a new office routine and a medical procedure. The costs of a new instrument for colorectal cancer screening and a new surveying and follow-up of at-risk patients show that time and relevant costs in the G.I Clinic and G.I Endoscopy Lab were significantly reduced. PMID:10153384

  7. The Costs of Knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prusak, Laurence

    2008-01-01

    Acquiring knowledge-genuinely learning something new-requires the consent and commitment of the person you're trying to learn from. In contrast to information, which can usually be effectively transmitted in a document or diagram, knowledge comes from explaining, clarifying, questioning, and sometimes actually working together. Getting this kind of attention and commitment often involves some form of negotiation, since even the most generous person's time and energy are limited. Few experts sit around waiting to share their knowledge with strangers or casual acquaintances. In reasonably collaborative enterprises- I think NASA is one-this sort of negotiation isn't too onerous. People want to help each other and share what they know, so the "cost" of acquiring knowledge is relatively low. In many organizations (and many communities and countries), however, there are considerable costs associated with this activity, and many situations in which negotiations fail. The greatest knowledge cost is in and adopting knowledge to one's own use. Sometimes this means formally organizing what one learns in writing. Sometimes it means just taking time to reflect on someone else's thoughts and experiences-thinking about knowledge that is not exactly what you need but can lead you to develop ideas that will be useful. A long, discursive conversation, with all the back-and-forth that defines conversation, can be a mechanism of knowledge exchange. I have seen many participants at NASA APPEL Masters Forums talking, reflecting, and thinking-adapting what they are hearing to their own needs. Knowledge transfer is not a simple proposition. An enormous amount of information flows through the world every day, but knowledge is local, contextual, and "stickyn-that is, it takes real effort to move it from one place to another. There is no way around this. To really learn a subject, you have to work at it, you have to pay your "knowledge dues." So while, thanks to advances in technology

  8. Attrition Cost Model Instruction Manual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yanagiura, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    This instruction manual explains in detail how to use the Attrition Cost Model program, which estimates the cost of student attrition for a state's higher education system. Programmed with SAS, this model allows users to instantly calculate the cost of attrition and the cumulative attrition rate that is based on the most recent retention and…

  9. An introduction to cost analysis.

    PubMed

    Camponovo, Ernest

    2015-04-01

    This article describes the basics of cost accounting for healthcare providers and how these concepts relate to decision making in medical practice. By understanding cost accounting and cost analysis, providers can be better prepared to compete and survive in a changing healthcare environment. PMID:25802940

  10. Hidden Costs of School Construction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Thomas E.

    1999-01-01

    Costs that may increase the original school construction estimates include school-design inefficiency, architect fees, and costs for land, site development, technology, demolition, consultants, and security. A quality-review team can plan to avoid hidden costs and ensure that the new facility will meet instructional needs at the least possible…

  11. The Cost of Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartle, Terry W.

    1998-01-01

    A discussion of the current cost and financing of higher education looks at how higher education has been treated in federal policy in recent years, its status in public policy in the near future, including some salient uncertainties, and college cost and student debt. Emphasis is given to trends in the cost of professional education. (MSE)

  12. Hydropower Baseline Cost Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, Patrick W.; Zhang, Qin Fen; DeNeale, Scott T.; Chalise, Dol Raj; Centurion, Emma E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent resource assessments conducted by the United States Department of Energy have identified significant opportunities for expanding hydropower generation through the addition of power to non-powered dams and on undeveloped stream-reaches. Additional interest exists in the powering of existing water resource infrastructure such as conduits and canals, upgrading and expanding existing hydropower facilities, and the construction new pumped storage hydropower. Understanding the potential future role of these hydropower resources in the nation’s energy system requires an assessment of the environmental and techno-economic issues associated with expanding hydropower generation. To facilitate these assessments, this report seeks to fill the current gaps in publically available hydropower cost-estimating tools that can support the national-scale evaluation of hydropower resources.

  13. Managing clinical grant costs.

    PubMed

    Glass, Harold E; Hollander, Karen

    2009-05-01

    The rapidly increasing cost of pharmaceutical R&D presents a major challenge for the industry. This paper examines one aspect of that spending, clinical grants, and presents ways that pharmaceutical companies can best manage those expenditures. The first part of the paper examines the role of clinical grant payments as a motivation for clinical trial participation. The second part outlines a number of current management practices for controlling clinical grant costs. Financial compensation is an important matter for many physicians conducting clinical trials, especially those in office-based practices and those conducting phase 4 clinical trials. Since financial considerations are important to most types of investigators, and there is no compelling evidence that paying at high rates insures timely performance or quality data, companies engaging clinical investigators must manage their clinical grant funds as effectively as possible. Sound financial management requires that clinical development professionals appreciate the complex relationship between the pharmaceutical company and the physicians who serve as clinical investigators on that company's clinical trials. Sensible financial management of clinical grants also demands that sponsor companies get the most value for their clinical grant spending. Ultimately, good clinical grant management requires an attitude that combines good business sense with an understanding that pharmaceutical R&D strives to bring to market new drugs that can help patient populations around the world. Investigators are medical contractors in clinical trials, and while they are engaged in their vital research, they are a part of the research process that must be carefully budgeted and managed. Society, pharmaceutical companies, clinical investigators, and patients will reap the benefits of adequately budgeted, and well managed clinical grants. PMID:19470309

  14. Variable cost of ICU care, a micro-costing analysis.

    PubMed

    Karabatsou, Dimitra; Tsironi, Maria; Tsigou, Evdoxia; Boutzouka, Eleni; Katsoulas, Theodoros; Baltopoulos, George

    2016-08-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU) costs account for a great part of a hospital's expenses. The objective of the present study was to measure the patient-specific cost of ICU treatment, to identify the most important cost drivers in ICU and to examine the role of various contributing factors in cost configuration. A retrospective cost analysis of all ICU patients who were admitted during 2011 in a Greek General, seven-bed ICU and stayed for at least 24hours was performed, by applying bottom-up analysis. Data collected included demographics and the exact cost of every single material used for patients' care. Prices were yielded from the hospital's purchasing costs and from the national price list of the imaging and laboratory tests, which was provided by the Ministry of Health. A total of 138 patients were included. Variable cost per ICU day was €573.18. A substantial cost variation was found in the total costs obtained for individual patients (median: €3443, range: €243.70-€116,355). Medicines were responsible for more than half of the cost and antibiotics accounted for the largest part of it, followed by blood products and cardiovascular drugs. Medical cause of admission, severe illness and increased length of stay, mechanical ventilation and dialysis were the factors associated with cost escalation. ICU variable cost is patient-specific, varies according to each patient's needs and is influenced by several factors. The exact estimation of variable cost is a pre-requisite in order to control ICU expenses. PMID:27080569

  15. Selected Tether Applications Cost Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keeley, Michael G.

    1988-01-01

    Diverse cost-estimating techniques and data combined into single program. Selected Tether Applications Cost Model (STACOM 1.0) is interactive accounting software tool providing means for combining several independent cost-estimating programs into fully-integrated mathematical model capable of assessing costs, analyzing benefits, providing file-handling utilities, and putting out information in text and graphical forms to screen, printer, or plotter. Program based on Lotus 1-2-3, version 2.0. Developed to provide clear, concise traceability and visibility into methodology and rationale for estimating costs and benefits of operations of Space Station tether deployer system.

  16. Solar power satellite cost estimate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harron, R. J.; Wadle, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    The solar power configuration costed is the 5 GW silicon solar cell reference system. The subsystems identified by work breakdown structure elements to the lowest level for which cost information was generated. This breakdown divides into five sections: the satellite, construction, transportation, the ground receiving station and maintenance. For each work breakdown structure element, a definition, design description and cost estimate were included. An effort was made to include for each element a reference that more thoroughly describes the element and the method of costing used. All costs are in 1977 dollars.

  17. Estimation of immunization providers' activities cost, medication cost, and immunization dose errors cost in Iraq.

    PubMed

    Al-lela, Omer Qutaiba B; Bahari, Mohd Baidi; Al-abbassi, Mustafa G; Salih, Muhannad R M; Basher, Amena Y

    2012-06-01

    The immunization status of children is improved by interventions that increase community demand for compulsory and non-compulsory vaccines, one of the most important interventions related to immunization providers. The aim of this study is to evaluate the activities of immunization providers in terms of activities time and cost, to calculate the immunization doses cost, and to determine the immunization dose errors cost. Time-motion and cost analysis study design was used. Five public health clinics in Mosul-Iraq participated in the study. Fifty (50) vaccine doses were required to estimate activities time and cost. Micro-costing method was used; time and cost data were collected for each immunization-related activity performed by the clinic staff. A stopwatch was used to measure the duration of activity interactions between the parents and clinic staff. The immunization service cost was calculated by multiplying the average salary/min by activity time per minute. 528 immunization cards of Iraqi children were scanned to determine the number and the cost of immunization doses errors (extraimmunization doses and invalid doses). The average time for child registration was 6.7 min per each immunization dose, and the physician spent more than 10 min per dose. Nurses needed more than 5 min to complete child vaccination. The total cost of immunization activities was 1.67 US$ per each immunization dose. Measles vaccine (fifth dose) has a lower price (0.42 US$) than all other immunization doses. The cost of a total of 288 invalid doses was 744.55 US$ and the cost of a total of 195 extra immunization doses was 503.85 US$. The time spent on physicians' activities was longer than that spent on registrars' and nurses' activities. Physician total cost was higher than registrar cost and nurse cost. The total immunization cost will increase by about 13.3% owing to dose errors. PMID:22521848

  18. Costing blood products and services.

    PubMed

    Wallace, E L

    1991-05-01

    At present, blood centers and transfusion services have limited alternatives for offsetting the ever-rising costs of health care inputs. In the face of current revenue constraints, cost reduction or cost containment through efficiency improvements or service reduction is the principal available means. Such methods ought to be pursued vigorously by blood bankers with the aid of well-designed costing and other physical measurements systems. Experience indicates, however, that blood bankers, in their attempts to reduce or contain costs, are likely to place undue reliance on cost accounting systems as the means of capturing sought-for benefits. Management must learn enough about methods of costing to judge directly the uses and limitations of the information produced. Such understanding begins with recognition that all costs and cost comparisons should be specific to the purpose for which they are developed. No costing procedure is capable of producing measures generally applicable to all management decisions. A measure relevant to a planning decision is unlikely to be appropriate for performance evaluation. Useful comparisons among sets of organizations of costs, or of measures of physical inputs and outputs, require assurance that the methods of measurement employed are the same and that the sets of organizations from which the measures are drawn are reasonably comparable. PMID:2020991

  19. Realistic costs of carbon capture

    SciTech Connect

    Al Juaied, Mohammed . Belfer Center for Science and International Affiaris); Whitmore, Adam )

    2009-07-01

    There is a growing interest in carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a means of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However there are substantial uncertainties about the costs of CCS. Costs for pre-combustion capture with compression (i.e. excluding costs of transport and storage and any revenue from EOR associated with storage) are examined in this discussion paper for First-of-a-Kind (FOAK) plant and for more mature technologies, or Nth-of-a-Kind plant (NOAK). For FOAK plant using solid fuels the levelised cost of electricity on a 2008 basis is approximately 10 cents/kWh higher with capture than for conventional plants (with a range of 8-12 cents/kWh). Costs of abatement are found typically to be approximately US$150/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$120-180/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants the additional cost of electricity with capture is approximately 2-5 cents/kWh, with costs of the range of US$35-70/tCO2 avoided. Costs of abatement with carbon capture for other fuels and technologies are also estimated for NOAK plants. The costs of abatement are calculated with reference to conventional SCPC plant for both emissions and costs of electricity. Estimates for both FOAK and NOAK are mainly based on cost data from 2008, which was at the end of a period of sustained escalation in the costs of power generation plant and other large capital projects. There are now indications of costs falling from these levels. This may reduce the costs of abatement and costs presented here may be 'peak of the market' estimates. If general cost levels return, for example, to those prevailing in 2005 to 2006 (by which time significant cost escalation had already occurred from previous levels), then costs of capture and compression for FOAK plants are expected to be US$110/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$90-135/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants costs are expected to be US$25-50/tCO2. Based on these considerations a likely representative range of costs of abatement from CCS excluding

  20. Treatment program operations and costs.

    PubMed

    Broome, Kirk M; Knight, Danica K; Joe, George W; Flynn, Patrick M

    2012-03-01

    This study investigates how average costs for an episode of care in outpatient drug-free (ODF) treatment relate to clinical intensity (length of stay and weekly counseling hours) and program structure (e.g., size, staffing), controlling for prices paid and selected clientele measures. Based on cost assessments from a naturalistic sample of 67 programs located across the United States (using the Treatment Cost Analysis Tool), robust regression techniques showed that programs having 10% longer treatment stays had episode costs 7% higher; those having 10% more weekly counseling hours per client had 4% higher episode costs. Other important factors included wages, amount of counselors' time conducting sessions, and serving more clients referred from the criminal justice system. The study provides valuable information on treatment program features that relate to costs. Most importantly, cost differences associated with longer stays or more intensive counseling protocols appear modest and may be justified by improved client outcomes. PMID:22154033

  1. Low cost sensing of vegetation volume and structure with a Microsoft Kinect sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzari, G.; Goulden, M.

    2011-12-01

    The market for videogames and digital entertainment has decreased the cost of advanced technology to affordable levels. The Microsoft Kinect sensor for Xbox 360 is an infrared time of flight camera designed to track body position and movement at a single-articulation level. Using open source drivers and libraries, we acquired point clouds of vegetation directly from the Kinect sensor. The data were filtered for outliers, co-registered, and cropped to isolate the plant of interest from the surroundings and soil. The volume of single plants was then estimated with several techniques, including fitting with solid shapes (cylinders, spheres, boxes), voxel counts, and 3D convex/concave hulls. Preliminary results are presented here. The volume of a series of wild artichoke plants was measured from nadir using a Kinect on a 3m-tall tower. The calculated volumes were compared with harvested biomass; comparisons and derived allometric relations will be presented, along with examples of the acquired point clouds. This Kinect sensor shows promise for ground-based, automated, biomass measurement systems, and possibly for comparison/validation of remotely sensed LIDAR.

  2. Laboratory cost and utilization containment.

    PubMed

    Steiner, J W; Root, J M; White, D C

    1991-01-01

    The authors analyzed laboratory costs and utilization in 3,771 cases of Medicare inpatients admitted to a New England academic medical center ("the Hospital") from October 1, 1989 to September 30, 1990. The data were derived from the Hospital's Decision Resource System comprehensive data base. The authors established a historical reference point for laboratory costs as a percentage of total inpatient costs using 1981-82 Medicare claims data and cost report information. Inpatient laboratory costs were estimated at 9.5% of total inpatient costs for pre-Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) Medicare discharges. Using this reference point and adjusting for the Hospital's 1990 case mix, the "expected" laboratory cost was 9.3% of total cost. In fact, the cost averaged 11.5% (i.e., 24% above the expected cost level), and costs represented an even greater percentage of DRG reimbursement at 12.9%. If we regard the reimbursement as a total cost target (to eliminate losses from Medicare), then that 12.9% is 39% above the "expected" laboratory proportion of 9.3%. The Hospital lost an average of $1,091 on each DRG inpatient. The laboratory contributed 29% to this loss per case. Compared to other large hospitals, the Hospital was slightly (3%) above the mean direct cost per on-site test and significantly (58%) above the mean number of inpatient tests per inpatient day compared to large teaching hospitals. The findings suggest that careful laboratory cost analyses will become increasingly important as the proportion of patients reimbursed in a fixed manner grows. The future may hold a prospective zero-based laboratory budgeting process based on predictable patterns of DRG admissions or other fixed-reimbursement admission and laboratory utilization patterns. PMID:10113716

  3. Cost containment: Europe. Italy.

    PubMed

    Apolone, G; Melotti, R; Repetto, F; Iapichino, G

    1994-08-01

    Through prepaid compulsory insurance managed by the central government, Italy's National Health Service (NHS) provides full coverage, free accessibility, and no or limited copayment by individuals when receiving health services. Although Italy spends less than other countries on health care (< 8% of the country's gross national product), the present NHS faces considerable difficulties, and its performance regarding quality, outcome, and spending has come under question. ICUs account for < 2% of total hospital beds, and the proportion of ICU patients is < 2.5% of all hospital patients (2.5% of all Italian hospital patients receive ICU care at some time during their hospital stay). Information from administrative databases and epidemiologic studies gives an interesting national picture of the situation in Italy regarding admission criteria case mix, and outcomes when compared with data from other countries. Important changes in the financial and institutional framework of the NHS are underway, yielding an unpredictable scenario for the future. Innovations focus mostly on cost containment and quality initiatives. These innovations will likely produce a new health service in which regions will have a more important role than in the past. Actions planned in a large Italian region by the local government are used as an example to explain the potential impact of this new trend on critical care medicine. PMID:8087596

  4. Activity-based costing saves on supply distribution costs.

    PubMed

    1997-10-01

    Activity-based costing is coming, but is your organization ready? A few pioneering hospitals are already reaping the operational and economic benefits of activity-based costing in their materials management, and now the VHA purchasing alliance is offering this costing option to its 1,200 hospital members. The concept is simple, so why aren't there more takers? Here are the details on this pragmatic pricing approach that could save your facility plenty. PMID:10178010

  5. Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis

    SciTech Connect

    D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert; E. Schneider

    2008-03-01

    This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 25 cost modules—23 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, transuranic, and high-level waste.

  6. Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis

    SciTech Connect

    D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert

    2007-04-01

    This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 26 cost modules—24 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, and high-level waste.

  7. Solid rocket motor cost model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harney, A. G.; Raphael, L.; Warren, S.; Yakura, J. K.

    1972-01-01

    A systematic and standardized procedure for estimating life cycle costs of solid rocket motor booster configurations. The model consists of clearly defined cost categories and appropriate cost equations in which cost is related to program and hardware parameters. Cost estimating relationships are generally based on analogous experience. In this model the experience drawn on is from estimates prepared by the study contractors. Contractors' estimates are derived by means of engineering estimates for some predetermined level of detail of the SRM hardware and program functions of the system life cycle. This method is frequently referred to as bottom-up. A parametric cost analysis is a useful technique when rapid estimates are required. This is particularly true during the planning stages of a system when hardware designs and program definition are conceptual and constantly changing as the selection process, which includes cost comparisons or trade-offs, is performed. The use of cost estimating relationships also facilitates the performance of cost sensitivity studies in which relative and comparable cost comparisons are significant.

  8. [The cost of quality assurance].

    PubMed

    Materson, B J; Quintana, O

    1993-01-01

    This paper views quality assurance costs as appraisal costs. We used cost accounting techniques to estimate the cost of quality assurance activities in a large university affiliated Veteran Administration Medical Center. In addition to the personnel employed full-time for quality assurance activities, all other employees in or directly in support of clinical services were interviewed in order to determine the per cent of their work time devoted to specific quality assurance activities. The per cent time committed was multiplied by the salary and benefits package for each employee and the total computed for the facility. In addition, non-salary overhead expenses were estimated by multiplying the salary and fringe benefit costs to the ratio of total medical center non-personnel costs to total medical center costs. We found that 3.39 per cent of the total budget or $4,884,775 was devoted to quality assurance activities. The highest costs aside from the designated quality assurance personnel were for pharmacy, Laboratory, extended care (including nursing home), psychiatry, and nursing services. We did not attempt a formal benefit analysis. We concluded that quality assurance activities in a major medical center are not free. Careful cost accounting studies should be performed both to determine the cost of quality assurance and to identify its specific benefits. PMID:8322107

  9. Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis

    SciTech Connect

    D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert; E. Schneider

    2009-12-01

    This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 25 cost modules—23 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, transuranic, and high-level waste.

  10. A model for the cost of doing a cost estimate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, D. S.; Buchanan, H. R.

    1992-01-01

    A model for estimating the cost required to do a cost estimate for Deep Space Network (DSN) projects that range from $0.1 to $100 million is presented. The cost of the cost estimate in thousands of dollars, C(sub E), is found to be approximately given by C(sub E) = K((C(sub p))(sup 0.35)) where C(sub p) is the cost of the project being estimated in millions of dollars and K is a constant depending on the accuracy of the estimate. For an order-of-magnitude estimate, K = 24; for a budget estimate, K = 60; and for a definitive estimate, K = 115. That is, for a specific project, the cost of doing a budget estimate is about 2.5 times as much as that for an order-of-magnitude estimate, and a definitive estimate costs about twice as much as a budget estimate. Use of this model should help provide the level of resources required for doing cost estimates and, as a result, provide insights towards more accurate estimates with less potential for cost overruns.

  11. Equivalence of cost generators for minimum cost flow phase unwrapping.

    PubMed

    Hubig, Michael; Suchandt, Steffen; Adam, Nico

    2002-01-01

    Phase unwrapping represents a crucial step in processing phase data obtained with techniques such as synthetic aperture radar interferometry, speckle interferometry, and magnetic resonance imaging. The so-called branch-cut approaches form an important class of phase unwrapping algorithms. In 1996, Costantini proposed to transform the problem of correctly placing branch cuts into a minimum cost flow problem [Proceedings of the Fringe '96 Workshop (European Space Agency, Munich, 1996), pp. 261-272]. The critical point of this new approach is to generate cost functions that have to represent all the a priori knowledge necessary for phase unwrapping. Any function transforming a priori knowledge into a cost function is called a cost generator. Several types of algorithms ranging from heuristic approaches to generators based on probability-theory interpretations were suggested. A problem arising from the growing diversity of algorithms is to find a criterion for the equivalence of different cost generators. Two cost generators are equivalent if they produce cost functions with the same minimal flow for every residue configuration on every image with all possible a priori knowledge. Comparing the results of different cost generators on test scenes can show only their non-equivalence. We solve this problem by proving the following mathematical classification theorem: Two cost generators are equivalent if and only if one can be transformed into the other by multiplication by a fixed constant. PMID:11778734

  12. 42 CFR 417.540 - Enrollment costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Enrollment costs. 417.540 Section 417.540 Public... PLANS Medicare Payment: Cost Basis § 417.540 Enrollment costs. (a) Principle. Enrollment costs are... of costs included. Enrollment costs include, but are not limited to, reasonable costs incurred...

  13. 48 CFR 31.203 - Indirect costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... cost of that or any other final cost objective. (c) The contractor shall accumulate indirect costs by... for allocating indirect costs is the cost accounting period during which such costs are incurred and... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Indirect costs....

  14. 48 CFR 31.203 - Indirect costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... cost of that or any other final cost objective. (c) The contractor shall accumulate indirect costs by... for allocating indirect costs is the cost accounting period during which such costs are incurred and... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Indirect costs....

  15. 50 CFR 37.46 - Cost reimbursement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... actual costs incurred, including, but not limited to, its direct costs and indirect costs as established... costs shall include, but are not limited to, those direct costs and indirect costs, as established by the indirect costs rate of the charging bureau or office, incurred in reviewing and acting...

  16. 42 CFR 417.540 - Enrollment costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Enrollment costs. 417.540 Section 417.540 Public... PREPAYMENT PLANS Medicare Payment: Cost Basis § 417.540 Enrollment costs. (a) Principle. Enrollment costs are... of costs included. Enrollment costs include, but are not limited to, reasonable costs incurred...

  17. Cracking down on cost outliers.

    PubMed

    Sackman, Jill E; Citrin, Levi

    2014-03-01

    A systematic approach targeting both the patients and physicians whose costs are above the norm is a sustainable way to effectively reduce costs of care. Finance leaders should build teams of specialists who can provide data on outliers in real time, make changes as problems are identified, and track improvements. Using a care map analytic framework hospitals can identify problem areas while establishing mechanisms to better control and manage costs in the long term. PMID:24701845

  18. Forage Harvest and Transport Costs

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.; Downing, M.; Turhollow, A.

    1998-12-01

    An engineering-economic approach is used to calculate harvest, in-field transport, and over-the-road transport costs for hay as bales and modules, silage, and crop residues as bales and modules. Costs included are equipment depreciation interest; fuel, lube, and oil; repairs; insurance, housing, and taxes; and labor. Field preparation, pest control, fertilizer, land, and overhead are excluded from the costs calculated Equipment is constrained by power available, throughput or carrying capacity, and field speed.

  19. Cost Modeling for Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2011-01-01

    Parametric cost models are an important tool for planning missions, compare concepts and justify technology investments. This paper presents on-going efforts to develop single variable and multi-variable cost models for space telescope optical telescope assembly (OTA). These models are based on data collected from historical space telescope missions. Standard statistical methods are used to derive CERs for OTA cost versus aperture diameter and mass. The results are compared with previously published models.

  20. HTGR Cost Model Users' Manual

    SciTech Connect

    A.M. Gandrik

    2012-01-01

    The High Temperature Gas-Cooler Reactor (HTGR) Cost Model was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. The HTGR Cost Model calculates an estimate of the capital costs, annual operating and maintenance costs, and decommissioning costs for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. The user can generate these costs for multiple reactor outlet temperatures; with and without power cycles, including either a Brayton or Rankine cycle; for the demonstration plant, first of a kind, or nth of a kind project phases; for a single or four-pack configuration; and for a reactor size of 350 or 600 MWt. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for the HTGR Cost Model. Instructions, screenshots, and examples are provided to guide the user through the HTGR Cost Model. This model was design for users who are familiar with the HTGR design and Excel. Modification of the HTGR Cost Model should only be performed by users familiar with Excel and Visual Basic.

  1. Video distribution system cost model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gershkoff, I.; Haspert, J. K.; Morgenstern, B.

    1980-01-01

    A cost model that can be used to systematically identify the costs of procuring and operating satellite linked communications systems is described. The user defines a network configuration by specifying the location of each participating site, the interconnection requirements, and the transmission paths available for the uplink (studio to satellite), downlink (satellite to audience), and voice talkback (between audience and studio) segments of the network. The model uses this information to calculate the least expensive signal distribution path for each participating site. Cost estimates are broken downy by capital, installation, lease, operations and maintenance. The design of the model permits flexibility in specifying network and cost structure.

  2. Spacecraft platform cost estimating relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruhl, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    The three main cost areas of unmanned satellite development are discussed. The areas are identified as: (1) the spacecraft platform (SCP), (2) the payload or experiments, and (3) the postlaunch ground equipment and operations. The SCP normally accounts for over half of the total project cost and accurate estimates of SCP costs are required early in project planning as a basis for determining total project budget requirements. The development of single formula SCP cost estimating relationships (CER) from readily available data by statistical linear regression analysis is described. The advantages of single formula CER are presented.

  3. Estimating the Cost of Doing a Cost Estimate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, D. S.; Buchanan, H. R.

    1996-01-01

    This article provides a model for estimating the cost required to do a cost estimate...Our earlier work provided data for high technology projects. This article adds data from the construction industry which validates the model over a wider range of technology.

  4. Cost-shifting under cost reimbursement and prospective payment.

    PubMed

    Foster, R W

    1985-09-01

    Cost-shifting is seen as a three-way phenomenon involving hospital interests as well as those of government and private patients. Without economies of scale, private patients are indifferent to government policies unless underpayment leads to hospital bankruptcy. In the presence of economies of scale, private patients benefit from reductions in government payment under either cost reimbursement or prospective payment. Their interest in a shift to prospective payment depends upon the hospital's location on its cost curve. Hospitals benefit from increases in payment rates in all cases, but benefit from a shift to prospective payment only if operating in a region of declining average costs. The conventional view of cost-shifting is inconsistent with profit maximization and may be inappropriate for many voluntary hospitals as well. PMID:10300555

  5. Cost trajectories for cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Wodchis, W.P.; Arthurs, E.; Khan, A.I.; Gandhi, S.; MacKinnon, M.; Sussman, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Health care spending is known to be highly skewed, with a small subset of the population consuming a disproportionate amount of health care resources. Patients with cancer are high-cost users because of high incremental health care costs for treatment and the growing prevalence of cancer. The objectives of the present study included characterizing cancer-patient trajectories by cost, and identifying the patient and health system characteristics associated with high health system costs after cancer treatment. Methods This retrospective cohort study identified Ontario adults newly diagnosed with cancer between 1 April 2009 and 30 September 2010. Costs of health care use before, during, and after cancer episodes were used to develop trajectories of care. Descriptive analyses examined differences between the trajectories in terms of clinical and health system characteristics, and a logistic regression approach identified predictors of being a high-cost user after a cancer episode. Results Ten trajectories were developed based on whether patients were high- or low-cost users before and after their cancer episode. The most common trajectory represented patients who were low-cost in the year before cancer, survived treatment, and continued to be low-cost in the year after cancer (31.4%); stage ii cancer of the male genital system was the most common diagnosis within that trajectory. Regression analyses identified increases in age and in multimorbidity and low continuity of care as the strongest predictors of high-cost status after cancer. Conclusions Findings highlight an opportunity to proactively identify patients who might transition to high-cost status after cancer treatment and to remediate that transition. PMID:26985150

  6. Uncovering your hidden occupancy costs.

    PubMed

    Apgar, M

    1993-01-01

    Senior managers at large companies may not believe that they can have much impact on the "bricks and mortar" of their cost structure. They may even think that occupancy costs are too insignificant to worry about, too technical to analyze, and too fixed to control. But as real estate consultant Mahlon Apgar argues, occupancy costs can hurt a company's earnings, share value, and overall performance. On the other hand, every dollar saved drops straight to the bottom line. Shearson Lehman Brothers, for example, has found that it can save as much as $20 million annually by reducing occupancy costs in its branch offices and headquarters. Managing occupancy costs isn't easy. But it is timely. As companies strive to improve productivity by consolidating functions and downsizing staff, they are saddled with excess office space. Expansions abroad present completely different market conditions that put a premium on reducing occupancy costs. At the same time, the changing nature of work is challenging deeply held beliefs about the workplace, and, consequently, traditional expectations of office space are giving way to innovations that are less costly and more productive. To manage occupancy costs, managers must be able to identify their components, measure their impact, understand what drives them, and develop options to change them. Four basic tools help diagnose problems: a cost history, a loss analysis, a component analysis, and a lease aging profile. Understanding cost drivers like leasing, location, and layout can give executives the insights they need to reduce occupancy costs while improving the effectiveness of facilities to support day-to-day operations. PMID:10126151

  7. Renewable Energy Cost Optimization Spreadsheet

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-12-31

    The Software allow users to determine the optimum combination of renewable energy technologies to minimize life cycle cost for a facility by employing various algorithms which calculate initial and operating cost, energy delivery, and other attributes associated with each technology as a function of size.

  8. Student Cost Study, Fall 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, David F.

    Indirect student costs at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington were studied: semester expenses for food, shelter, clothing, books and supplies, personal items, health care, transportation, and child care. Selected cost data were also compared to student characteristics including: whether they had ever received financial aid from the…

  9. Human Costs of Nuclear Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagan, L. A.

    1972-01-01

    Discusses the human costs of producing and using nuclear fuel to generate electricity and...whether these costs are equitably compensated for and represented in the price of the electricity.'' Analysis considers estimates of the value of human life, lost productivity, and potential effects of radiation. (Author/AL)

  10. Replacement Cost of Domestic Crude

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-12-01

    The DEEPWATER model forecasts the replacement cost of domestic crude oil for 13 offshore regions in the lower 48 states. The replacement cost of domestic crude oil is the constant or levelized selling price that will recover the full expense of exploration, development, and productions with a reasonable return on capital.

  11. Lessons for Teaching Cost Containment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPhee, Stephen J.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    An educational program for medical and surgical house staffs and for medical students designed to reduce unneeded orders for low cost, high volume ancillary and nursing services is discussed. The program components include lectures, medical record audits and reviews, and group feedback in the form of cost summaries. (Author/MLW)

  12. Gauging Technology Costs and Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaestner, Rich

    2007-01-01

    Regardless of the role technology plays in a school district, district personnel should know the costs associated with technology, understand the consequences of technology purchases, and be able to measure the benefits of technology, so they can make more informed decisions. However, determining costs and benefits of current technology or…

  13. The Total Cost of Ownership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, C. William

    2000-01-01

    Examines what Total Cost of Ownership is regarding the purchase of technological resources for schools and the major expenses that are likely to occur after technological hardware and software have been installed. A list of best practices that can reduce costs approximately 15 percent and a checklist for technology budgeting are provided. (GR)

  14. The True Cost of Ownership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, Jamie

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of technology planning in schools focuses on the total cost of ownership, a model from business that can be helpful in determining the real costs of educational technology. Highlights include learning resources; organizational impacts and management; computer network resources, including software; research and development; and spirit…

  15. Cost Benefit Studies. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, Arthur; Marson, Arthur A.

    This document applies Dr. Mehar Aurora's method for conducting cost benefit studies to the Food Manufacturing Technology-Dairy and the Food Manufacturing Technology-Canning and Freezing programs offered by the Moraine Park Technical Institute. Costs to individual students enrolled in the programs include tuition, fees, housing, travel, books,…

  16. Progress Toward Automated Cost Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Joseph A.

    1992-01-01

    Report discusses efforts to develop standard system of automated cost estimation (ACE) and computer-aided design (CAD). Advantage of system is time saved and accuracy enhanced by automating extraction of quantities from design drawings, consultation of price lists, and application of cost and markup formulas.

  17. Electric power substation capital costs

    SciTech Connect

    Dagle, J.E.; Brown, D.R.

    1997-12-01

    The displacement or deferral of substation equipment is a key benefit associated with several technologies that are being developed with the support of the US Department of Energy`s Office of Utility Technologies. This could occur, for example, as a result of installing a distributed generating resource within an electricity distribution system. The objective of this study was to develop a model for preparing preliminary estimates of substation capital costs based on rudimentary conceptual design information. The model is intended to be used by energy systems analysts who need ``ballpark`` substation cost estimates to help establish the value of advanced utility technologies that result in the deferral or displacement of substation equipment. This cost-estimating model requires only minimal inputs. More detailed cost-estimating approaches are recommended when more detailed design information is available. The model was developed by collecting and evaluating approximately 20 sets of substation design and cost data from about 10 US sources, including federal power marketing agencies and private and public electric utilities. The model is principally based on data provided by one of these sources. Estimates prepared with the model were compared with estimated and actual costs for the data sets received from the other utilities. In general, good agreement (for conceptual level estimating) was found between estimates prepared with the cost-estimating model and those prepared by the individual utilities. Thus, the model was judged to be adequate for making preliminary estimates of typical substation costs for US utilities.

  18. Library Automation: Guidelines to Costing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Geoffrey

    As with all new programs, the costs associated with library automation must be carefully considered before implementation. This document suggests guidelines to be followed and areas to be considered in the costing of library procedures. An existing system model has been suggested as a standard (Appendix A) and a classification of library tasks…

  19. Using Technology to Control Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Simon; Schoenberg, Doug; Richards, Dan; Morath, Michael

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors examines the use of technology to control costs in the child care industry. One of these technology solutions is Software-as-a-Service (SaaS). SaaS solutions can help child care providers save money in many aspects of center management. In addition to cost savings, SaaS solutions are also particularly appealing to…

  20. University Research Costing Changes Urged.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Based primarily on an examination of grants made in 1981 and 1982 by the National Institutes of Health, the General Accounting Office (GAO) has issued a report that recommends, among other things, a fixed allowance for indirect costs at large universities. GAO findings and issues related to indirect costs are discussed. (JN)

  1. The High Cost of Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasicot, Julie

    1996-01-01

    Describes how school districts, faced with shrinking resources, have cut costs for student transportation. To combat rising transportation costs, districts have charged fees for student transportation, entered into private contracts, cut transportation services, used alternative fuels, and streamlined bus routes and schedules. (LMI)

  2. Program Tracks Cost Of Travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauldin, Lemuel E., III

    1993-01-01

    Travel Forecaster is menu-driven, easy-to-use computer program that plans, forecasts cost, and tracks actual vs. planned cost of business-related travel of division or branch of organization and compiles information into data base to aid travel planner. Ability of program to handle multiple trip entries makes it valuable time-saving device.

  3. Asymmetrical Switch Costs in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellefson, Michelle R.; Shapiron, Laura R.; Chater, Nick

    2006-01-01

    Switching between tasks produces decreases in performance as compared to repeating the same task. Asymmetrical switch costs occur when switching between two tasks of unequal difficulty. This asymmetry occurs because the cost is greater when switching to the less difficult task than when switching to the more difficult task. Various theories about…

  4. Escalating costs for cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nyman, J V; Dorr, R T; Hall, G R

    1981-08-01

    The annual costs of chemotherapeutic agents from 1975 to 1980 were determined, and the impact on a hospital's budget of new chemotherapeutic agents marketed during this period was evaluated. Pharmacy purchasing records for the antineoplastics were reviewed retrospectively to determine fiscal year (FY) costs. Statistics from the Consumer Price Index report and hospital patient load were used to project an adjusted annual cost for cancer chemotherapy. The annual expenditures for seven agents marketed in the past five years were expressed as a percentage of the pharmacy's budget. In addition, the oncology clinic records for the past four years were reviewed to assess trends in the number of visits and quantity of drugs prescribed. Analysis indicated that the costs of antineoplastic drugs have risen from $10,156 for FY 1973-1974 to $296,914 for FY 1979-1980. Antineoplastic drug costs have risen from 5.74 to 16.74% of the total drug budget during the same period. Only a portion of the increase in costs could be attributed to increased patient load and inflation. The percentage of patients receiving chemotherapy has reached a plateau, and the quantity of agents being prescribed was not found to be increasing. It was concluded that the rise in cost tends to follow the recent commercial availability of several new antineoplastics, especially doxorubicin. Cancer drug costs will continue to represent a large portion of the total hospital budget in the future and budgets must be planned accordingly. PMID:7270558

  5. Cost goals for biofuels technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, L.L.; Flaim, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    Federally funded energy research seeks to demonstrate that alternative fuels can be produced and then to induce private sector involvement by showing that they can be produced profitably. Prices for fossil fuels may be used as cost goals for biofuels to determine when profitability may be achieved. Achieving equality with fossil fuel prices drives out the highest-cost sources of supply and enables initial market penetration; as costs decrease, biofuels can potentially gain a greater market share. However, achieving competitive costs is not a sufficient condition for success unless prices of conventional substitutes are expected to rise. Cost goals are used for research planning purposes, as a common denominator to allow comparisons among many biofuels options. Application of standard investment criteria to biofuels R and D would require that benefits from their use pay back research costs. These benefits must be discounted because they are realized in the future. Furthermore, realization of future savings is uncertain, so risks must be accounted for. Research may be justified if the expected value of the discounted benefits is greater than the discounted cost of the research. Cost goals satisfying this condition might be substantially lower than projected fuel prices. This paper examines recent fossil fuel price projections and discusses the challenges biofuels research faces just to produce competitive products. In light of the difficult goals, researchers should adopt a strategy targeting major technological breakthroughs rather than incremental improvements. Production of ethanol from wood is used as an example of this strategy. 35 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Cost Determinants in Canadian Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickson, Vaughan

    1994-01-01

    A study investigated the relationship between costs per student (overall, instruction, library, computing, administration, physical plant) and enrollment in 61 Canadian universities. Also examined was the influence on cost of student mix, faculty-student ratio, faculty wages, program and discipline enrollment rates, and research intensity. (MSE)

  7. Ultimate Cost of Building Walls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimm, Clayford T.; Gross, James G.

    The need for economic analysis of building walls is discussed, and the factors influencing the ultimate cost of exterior walls are studied. The present worth method is used to analyze three types of exterior non-loadbearing panel or curtain walls. Anticipated costs are expressed in terms of their present value per square foot of wall area. The…

  8. 34 CFR 642.40 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Transportation costs for participants and training staff. (g) Lodging and subsistence costs for participants and training staff. (h) Transportation costs, lodging and subsistence costs and fees for consultants, if...

  9. Cancer Treatment: The Cost Factor.

    PubMed

    Smith, S

    2014-12-01

    Countries in the Caribbean region have expressed concern at the rising incidence of chronic non-communicable diseases. Cancer is one of these and the cost of treating patients with this has escalated in the recent past. In this paper, the author examines colon cancer and the cost of caring for patients with this. A viewpoint with regard to the reasons for the increased cost of care of patients with cancer is advanced. The factors contributing to the increasing costs are explored. Research epistemology and the role of the pharmaceutical industry are also explored. The need for consensus decision-making with regard to choice of agent/regime is emphasized, as is the need for a deliberate cost-benefit approach. PMID:25867563

  10. [Therapy costs at the hospital].

    PubMed

    Schwarz, R

    1990-02-01

    The inflation in hospital financing has fallen off. The new regulations brought in with the health reform law (Gesundheitsreformgesetz) could help to cut hospital running costs and lead to a more economical form of medical treatment. At present a prognosis of these cost reductions is not possible. The new list of charges for medical treatment (Bundespflegesatzverordnung) brought in by the government in 1986 also has helped in reducing expenditures. Especially the requirement for self-budgeting and performance-costing has lead to a reduced inflation rate in medical treatment costs. An effective control of medical treatment costs demands more management not only in administrative but also in medical areas as well. Improving hospital economy must not automatically lead to a reduction in the quality of the service provided. PMID:2316103

  11. Sequential Construction of Costly Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Gutfraind, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Natural disasters or attacks often disrupt infrastructure networks requiring a costly recovery. This motivates an optimization problem where the objecitve is to construct the nodes of a graph G(V;E), and the cost of each node is dependent on the number of its neighbors previously constructed, or more generally, any properties of the previously-completed subgraph. In this optimization problem the objective is to find a permutation of the nodes which results in the least construction cost. We prove that in the case where the cost of nodes is a convex function in the number of neighbors, the optimal construction sequence is to start at a single node and move outwards. We also introduce algorithms and heuristics for solving various instances of the problem. Those methods can be applied to help reduce the cost of recovering from disasters as well as to plan the deployment of new network infrastructure.

  12. Electronic health records lifecycle cost.

    PubMed

    Eastaugh, Steven R

    2013-01-01

    We have overestimated the ability of electronic health records (EHR) systems to enhance efficiency by eliminating transcription and the need to physically pull charts. Hospital managers typically underestimate the costs of upgrade fees and support. To avoid this problem, hospitals must develop a full total cost of ownership (TCO) analysis to independently forecast total lifecycle costs for EHR information technology. Vendor information must be checked for validity and a milestone payment schedule must be devised to pay for results (outcomes) not promises. Vendors vary widely in their capacity to set up a fully functional inpatient-outpatient EHR system. Documentation programming will help to control hospital costs while enhancing service quality and staff morale. This study presents cost analysis from 62 hospitals in 16 cities during the period 2012-2013. PMID:24003760

  13. Cancer Treatment: The Cost Factor

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Countries in the Caribbean region have expressed concern at the rising incidence of chronic non-communicable diseases. Cancer is one of these and the cost of treating patients with this has escalated in the recent past. In this paper, the author examines colon cancer and the cost of caring for patients with this. A viewpoint with regard to the reasons for the increased cost of care of patients with cancer is advanced. The factors contributing to the increasing costs are explored. Research epistemology and the role of the pharmaceutical industry are also explored. The need for consensus decision-making with regard to choice of agent/regime is emphasized, as is the need for a deliberate cost-benefit approach. PMID:25867563

  14. Cost Estimation and Control for Flight Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Walter E.; Vanhook, Michael E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Good program management practices, cost analysis, cost estimation, and cost control for aerospace flight systems are interrelated and depend upon each other. The best cost control process cannot overcome poor design or poor systems trades that lead to the wrong approach. The project needs robust Technical, Schedule, Cost, Risk, and Cost Risk practices before it can incorporate adequate Cost Control. Cost analysis both precedes and follows cost estimation -- the two are closely coupled with each other and with Risk analysis. Parametric cost estimating relationships and computerized models are most often used. NASA has learned some valuable lessons in controlling cost problems, and recommends use of a summary Project Manager's checklist as shown here.

  15. The Psychology of Cost Estimating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Cost estimation for large (and even not so large) government programs is a challenge. The number and magnitude of cost overruns associated with large Department of Defense (DoD) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) programs highlight the difficulties in developing and promulgating accurate cost estimates. These overruns can be the result of inadequate technology readiness or requirements definition, the whims of politicians or government bureaucrats, or even as failures of the cost estimating profession itself. However, there may be another reason for cost overruns that is right in front of us, but only recently have we begun to grasp it: the fact that cost estimators and their customers are human. The last 70+ years of research into human psychology and behavioral economics have yielded amazing findings into how we humans process and use information to make judgments and decisions. What these scientists have uncovered is surprising: humans are often irrational and illogical beings, making decisions based on factors such as emotion and perception, rather than facts and data. These built-in biases to our thinking directly affect how we develop our cost estimates and how those cost estimates are used. We cost estimators can use this knowledge of biases to improve our cost estimates and also to improve how we communicate and work with our customers. By understanding how our customers think, and more importantly, why they think the way they do, we can have more productive relationships and greater influence. By using psychology to our advantage, we can more effectively help the decision maker and our organizations make fact-based decisions.

  16. 48 CFR 31.202 - Direct costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Direct costs. 31.202... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 31.202 Direct costs. (a) No final cost objective shall have allocated to it as a direct cost any cost, if other...

  17. 42 CFR 417.534 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 417.534 Section 417.534 Public... PLANS Medicare Payment: Cost Basis § 417.534 Allowable costs. (a) Definition—Allowable costs means the direct and indirect costs, including normal standby costs incurred by the HMO or CMP, that are proper...

  18. 7 CFR 246.14 - Program costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... services and administration costs are: (i) Direct costs. Those direct costs that are allowable under 7 CFR part 3016. (ii) Indirect costs. Those indirect costs that are allowable under 7 CFR part 3016. When.... In accordance with the provisions of 7 CFR part 3016, a claim for indirect costs shall be...

  19. A Guide To Measuring College Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winston, Gordon C.

    2000-01-01

    Argues that full-cost models in higher education fail to account correctly for capital and financial aid expenditures. Urges full accounting of all cost drivers that impact on higher education expenditures, e.g., operating costs, maintenance costs, physical capital costs, the current replacement value of capital stock, and the opportunity cost of…

  20. 48 CFR 31.202 - Direct costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Direct costs. 31.202... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 31.202 Direct costs. (a) No final cost objective shall have allocated to it as a direct cost any cost, if other...

  1. 48 CFR 31.202 - Direct costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Direct costs. 31.202... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 31.202 Direct costs. (a) No final cost objective shall have allocated to it as a direct cost any cost, if other...

  2. 48 CFR 31.202 - Direct costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Direct costs. 31.202... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 31.202 Direct costs. (a) No final cost objective shall have allocated to it as a direct cost any cost, if other...

  3. 42 CFR 417.534 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Allowable costs. 417.534 Section 417.534 Public... PREPAYMENT PLANS Medicare Payment: Cost Basis § 417.534 Allowable costs. (a) Definition—Allowable costs means the direct and indirect costs, including normal standby costs incurred by the HMO or CMP, that...

  4. 7 CFR 246.14 - Program costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... services and administration costs are: (i) Direct costs. Those direct costs that are allowable under 7 CFR part 3016. (ii) Indirect costs. Those indirect costs that are allowable under 7 CFR part 3016. When.... In accordance with the provisions of 7 CFR part 3016, a claim for indirect costs shall be...

  5. 7 CFR 246.14 - Program costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... services and administration costs are: (i) Direct costs. Those direct costs that are allowable under 7 CFR part 3016. (ii) Indirect costs. Those indirect costs that are allowable under 7 CFR part 3016. When.... In accordance with the provisions of 7 CFR part 3016, a claim for indirect costs shall be...

  6. 7 CFR 246.14 - Program costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... services and administration costs are: (i) Direct costs. Those direct costs that are allowable under 7 CFR part 3016. (ii) Indirect costs. Those indirect costs that are allowable under 7 CFR part 3016. When.... In accordance with the provisions of 7 CFR part 3016, a claim for indirect costs shall be...

  7. 7 CFR 246.14 - Program costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... services and administration costs are: (i) Direct costs. Those direct costs that are allowable under 7 CFR part 3016. (ii) Indirect costs. Those indirect costs that are allowable under 7 CFR part 3016. When.... In accordance with the provisions of 7 CFR part 3016, a claim for indirect costs shall be...

  8. 77 FR 43542 - Cost Accounting Standards: Cost Accounting Standards 412 and 413-Cost Accounting Standards...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... Harmonization Rule. The final rule was published at 76 FR 81296 on December 27, 2011. Generally, the technical... Standard (CAS) 412, ``Composition and Measurement of Pension Cost,'' and CAS 413, ``Adjustment and... the final rule that revised Cost Accounting Standard (CAS) 412, ``Composition and Measurement...

  9. Geothermal Exploration Cost and Time

    DOE Data Explorer

    Jenne, Scott

    2013-02-13

    The Department of Energy’s Geothermal Technology Office (GTO) provides RD&D funding for geothermal exploration technologies with the goal of lowering the risks and costs of geothermal development and exploration. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) was tasked with developing a metric in 2012 to measure the impacts of this RD&D funding on the cost and time required for exploration activities. The development of this cost and time metric included collecting cost and time data for exploration techniques, creating a baseline suite of exploration techniques to which future exploration cost and time improvements can be compared, and developing an online tool for graphically showing potential project impacts (all available at http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway: Geothermal). This paper describes the methodology used to define the baseline exploration suite of techniques (baseline), as well as the approach that was used to create the cost and time data set that populates the baseline. The resulting product, an online tool for measuring impact, and the aggregated cost and time data are available on the Open Energy Information website (OpenEI, http://en.openei.org) for public access. - Published 01/01/2013 by US National Renewable Energy Laboratory NREL.

  10. Launch systems operations cost modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Mark K.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the launch systems operations modeling portion of a larger model development effort, NASA's Space Operations Cost Model (SOCM), led by NASA HQ. The SOCM study team, which includes cost and technical experts from each NASA Field Center and various contractors, has been tasked to model operations costs for all future NASA mission concepts including planetary and Earth orbiting science missions, space facilities, and launch systems. The launch systems operations modeling effort has near term significance for assessing affordability of our next generation launch vehicles and directing technology investments, although it provides only a part of the necessary inputs to assess life cycle costs for all elements that determine affordability for a launch system. Presented here is a methodology to estimate requirements associated with a launch facility infrastructure, or Spaceport, from start-up/initialization into steady-state operation. Included are descriptions of the reference data used, the unique estimating methodology that combines cost lookup tables, parametric relationships, and constructively-developed correlations of cost driver input values to collected reference data, and the output categories that can be used by economic and market models. Also, future plans to improve integration of launch vehicle development cost models, reliability and maintainability models, economic and market models, and this operations model to facilitate overall launch system life cycle performance simulations will be presented.

  11. Cost analysis of emergency department.

    PubMed

    Cremonesi, P; Di Bella, E; Montefiori, M

    2010-12-01

    This paper is intended to examine both clinical and economic data concerning the activity of an emergency department of an Italian primary Hospital. Real data referring to arrivals, waiting times, service times, severity (according to triage classification) of patients' condition collected along the whole 2009 are matched up with the relevant accounting and economic information concerning the costs faced. A new methodological approach is implemented in order to identify a "standard production cost" and its variability. We believe that this kind of analysis well fits the federalizing process that Italy is experiencing. In fact the federal reform is driving our Country toward a decentralized provision and funding of local public services. The health care services are "fundamental" under the provisions of the law that in turn implies that a standard cost has to be defined for its funding. The standard cost (as it is defined by the law) relies on the concepts of appropriateness and efficiency in the production of the health care service, assuming a standard quality level as target. The identification and measurement of health care costs is therefore a crucial task propaedeutic to health services economic evaluation. Various guidelines with different amount of details have been set up for costing methods which, however, are defined in simplified frameworks and using fictious data. This study is a first attempt to proceed in the direction of a precise definition of the costs inherent to the emergency department activity. PMID:21553561

  12. Low cost solar cell arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iles, P. A.; Mclennan, H.

    1975-01-01

    Limitations in both space and terrestial markets for solar cells are described. Based on knowledge of the state-of-the-art, six cell options are discussed; as a result of this discussion, the three most promising options (involving high, medium and low efficiency cells respectively) were selected and analyzed for their probable costs. The results showed that all three cell options gave promise of costs below $10 per watt in the near future. Before further cost reductions can be achieved, more R and D work is required; suggestions for suitable programs are given.

  13. Costs of pain in rheumatology.

    PubMed

    Marsico, A; Atzeni, F; Piroddi, A; Cazzola, M; Stisi, S; Sarzi-Puttini, P

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain has been identified as an important issue related to various rheumatic diseases. At the time of a major government spending review, it is appropriate to discuss the pain characterising rheumatic diseases and its related costs. It is clearly essential for healthcare authorities to rationalise their policies on the basis of the increasing expectations of the users of healthcare services while simultaneously balancing their books. There are few published studies concerning the costs of pain of any kind, and the same is true of the costs of the chronic pain associated with diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and fibromyalgia. PMID:24938203

  14. HMO contracting: know your costs.

    PubMed

    Astle, S; Roth, R

    1987-07-01

    HMO contracting requires a detailed knowledge of patient costs. We addressed the need for sophisticated cost accounting and patient information systems as it pertains to HMO contracting. Agencies cannot afford to overlook the global applications of such systems. The ability of an agency to make informed and competitive financial decisions in any price-based payment environment is critical. A system that can accurately identify and assist with forecasting costs will be a valuable asset for an agency as it moves toward the price-based payment environment of the future. PMID:10301849

  15. Nurses cut health care costs.

    PubMed

    Dunham-Taylor, J; Oldaker, J; DeCapua, T; Manley, N K; Oprian, B; Wrestler, J

    1993-12-01

    Nurses are a value-added and cost-savings component of health care, yet others frequently impede nurse efforts. Nurses, coupled with business, can contribute to cutting health care costs by (a) increasing dialogue with business leaders on effective cost-cutting measures across health care, (b) supporting nurse leaders who are capable of administering key community positions, (c) involving whole communities in wellness/health promotion and/or disease prevention programs, (d) encouraging more home health care alternatives; and (e) supporting nurse-related entrepreneurial efforts. PMID:8228142

  16. Reductive Degradation: Versatile, Low Cost.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Water and Sewage Works, 1979

    1979-01-01

    This article discusses the use of reductive degradation as an economical and effective treatment of chlorinated hydrocarbons. Comparisons with activated carbon treatment show lower capital equipment and treatment costs. (CS)

  17. Yearly Energy Costs for Buildings

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1991-03-20

    COSTSAFR3.0 generates a set of compliance forms which will be attached to housing Requests for Proposals (RFPs) issued by Departments or Agencies of the Federal Government. The compliance forms provide a uniform method for estimating the total yearly energy cost for each proposal. COSTSAFR3.0 analyzes specific housing projects at a given site, using alternative fuel types, and considering alternative housing types. The program is designed around the concept of minimizing overall costs through energy conservationmore » design, including first cost and future utility costs, and estabilishes a standard design to which proposed housing designs are compared. It provides a point table for each housing type that can be used to determine whether a proposed design meets the standard and how a design can be modified to meet the standard.« less

  18. Cost containment: the Pacific. Japan.

    PubMed

    Tajimi, K; Shimada, Y; Nishimura, S; Sirio, C A

    1994-08-01

    The Japanese healthcare system is structured to provide universal healthcare access to the entire Japanese population via a constitutional guarantee. Increasing costs within the Japanese healthcare system are largely attributable to the country's rapidly aging population. Intensive care services are provided primarily in large tertiary care hospitals by a relatively small cadre of dedicated critical care physicians. Triage pressure is high in many Japanese hospitals due to a relatively small proportion of ICU beds. As a result, few patients are admitted to the ICU at low risk of adverse outcome or monitoring. Costs associated with providing critical care are poorly understood because of current hospital cost accounting systems. Critical care costs have only recently become an area of concern. Nevertheless, critical care physicians are taking steps to more fully understand severity of illness, clinical outcome, and utilization of resources in order to effectively guide healthcare policy and resource allocation decisions impacting Japanese critical care. PMID:8087603

  19. The Cost of Technological Dependence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Surendra J.

    1973-01-01

    Technological transfer often exacts a definite price, with the developing countries in an obvious situation of dependency. But today it is possible to appraise the economic and social cost of transference. (BL)

  20. Metabolic cost of extravehicular activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waligora, J. M.; Horrigan, D. J., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The Skylab zero-g extravehicular activity data is of particular interest when it is considered in combination with the Apollo and Gemini data. The energy cost of extravehicular activity from Gemini through Skylab is discussed.

  1. The cost of waste: Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, S.

    1996-06-01

    Some of the greatest opportunities for tapping into hidden profit potential at industrial coatings manufacturing plants may be in their waste or, rather, in their ability to eliminate the root causes of waste generation. This occurs because the total cost of waste (TCOW) does not appear only in a plant`s cost to dispose or recycle its waste. TCOW has four principal components, each of which are shown in different lines in the monthly financial accounting report. An additional potential component--the production plant capacity and personnel that are utilized producing controllable waste instead of product for sale and profit--fails to show up at all. Expanding the focus of waste reduction from merely reducing an individual component`s costs to eliminating the root causes of controllable waste generation provides significant additional profits and frees plant production equipment and people to: make more product for sale and profit, and reduce per-unit manufacturing costs.

  2. Opportunity Cost of Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turkoglu, Recep

    2004-01-01

    In this study, opportunity cost (OC) of distance education (DE) has been examined. In addition, factors which affect OC of DE have been investigated. (Contains 1 table.) [Abstract modified to meet ERIC guidelines.

  3. Gang Up on Lighting Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1983

    1983-01-01

    A new lighting system at a Wisconsin elementary school involved replacing all the incandescent fixtures with either fluorescent, mercury vapor, or high-output fixtures. Group lamp replacement procedures instead of spot relamping are expected to save labor costs. (MLF)

  4. Analysis of Costs and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duchesne, Roderick M.

    1973-01-01

    This article outlines a library management information system concerned with total library costs and performance. The system is essentially an adaptation of well-proven industrial and commercial management accounting techniques to the library context. (24 references) (Author)

  5. Reservoir management cost-cutting

    SciTech Connect

    Gulati, M.S.

    1996-12-31

    This article by Mohinder S. Gulati, Chief Engineer, Unocal Geothermal Operations, discusses cost cutting in geothermal reservoir management. The reservoir engineer or geoscientist can make a big difference in the economical outcome of a project by improving well performance and thus making geothermal energy more competitive in the energy marketplace. Bringing plants online in less time and proving resources to reduce the cycle time are some of the ways to reduce reservoir management costs discussed in this article.

  6. Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2003-04-25

    The Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GENSIM) is a user-friendly, high-level dynamic simulation model that calculates electricity production costs for variety of electricity generation technologies, including: pulverized coal, gas combustion turbine, gas combined cycle, nuclear, solar (PV and thermal), and wind. The model allows the user to quickly conduct sensitivity analysis on key variables, including: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; and capacity factors. The model also includes consideration ofmore » a wide range of externality costs and pollution control options for carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and mercury. Two different data sets are included in the model; one from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the other from Platt's Research Group. Likely users of this model include executives and staff in the Congress, the Administration and private industry (power plant builders, industrial electricity users and electric utilities). The model seeks to improve understanding of the economic viability of various generating technologies and their emission trade-offs. The base case results using the DOE data, indicate that in the absence of externality costs, or renewable tax credits, pulverized coal and gas combined cycle plants are the least cost alternatives at 3.7 and 3.5 cents/kwhr, respectively. A complete sensitivity analysis on fuel, capital, and construction time shows that these results coal and gas are much more sensitive to assumption about fuel prices than they are to capital costs or construction times. The results also show that making nuclear competitive with coal or gas requires significant reductions in capital costs, to the $1000/kW level, if no other changes are made. For renewables, the results indicate that wind is now competitive with the nuclear option and is only competitive with coal and gas for grid connected applications if one includes the federal production tax

  7. Integrating services involves cost issues.

    PubMed

    Blaney, C L

    1998-01-01

    This article discusses the integration of sexually transmitted disease (STD) care within family planning (FP) programs and the cost effectiveness of integrated services in development countries. Examples are taken from experiences in Colombia, India, the US, and Kenya. The 1994 International Conference on Population and Development urged the integration of reproductive health care within FP. The more than 330 million annual new STD cases increase HIV transmission and cause pain and infertility. Women are biologically more susceptible to STDs, are more likely to be asymptomatic, and face harsher consequences, including death. Women with STDs should avoid the IUD and use barrier methods. Maintaining laboratories, training staff, and supplying drugs can overburden strained health budgets, but may lower long-term medical costs, increase productivity in employment, and decrease pain and suffering. STDs are viewed by some US health professionals as a "best buy" for being one of the least expensive of the reproductive health options. A Kenyan study found that treating STDs and providing oral contraceptives saved money by collapsing treatment into one instead of two visits. The savings were in overhead and staff costs. Evaluations of cost effectiveness should consider local STD prevalence, cultural setting, client needs, and available resources. In some cases, referral of cases to STD clinics may be the most cost-effective. A US study found that chlamydia screening for all FP clients was more cost-effective than screening selectively. Another US study found that universal screening for chlamydia would provide long-term medical savings even if prevalence was only 2%. Developing countries have the lower-cost option of offering syndromic management of STDs for symptomatic women rather than lab tests. A program in India cut costs by educating and encouraging barrier methods. PMID:12293237

  8. Cost containment and child health.

    PubMed

    Fox, V L

    1987-08-01

    Children, as consumers of health resources, have special developmental, psychological, and medical needs different from those of adults. Thus, cost containment efforts can affect children differently. Data related to insurance benefits changes, intensified market forces, and reductions in federal funding are cited. Their analysis focuses on the importance of accountability in applying cost constraints to services that can have a significant effect upon the health and well-being of one quarter of the next generation. PMID:2980911

  9. The path to cost transformation.

    PubMed

    Hill-Mischel, Jody; Morrissey, Walter W; Neese, Kimberly; Shoger, Timothy R

    2016-06-01

    A healthcare organization's efforts to strategically transform its cost structure in preparation for value-based payment invariably must begin with a systemwide assessment of cost and quality. Such an assessment should focus on three categories of performance improvement activities: margin improvement, business restructuring, and clinical transformation. A work-team approach is recommended, where teams with multidisciplinary representation assume responsibility for assessing specific areas (e.g., acute care enterprise, physician enterprise, business restructuring). PMID:27451567

  10. Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model

    SciTech Connect

    2003-04-25

    The Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GENSIM) is a user-friendly, high-level dynamic simulation model that calculates electricity production costs for variety of electricity generation technologies, including: pulverized coal, gas combustion turbine, gas combined cycle, nuclear, solar (PV and thermal), and wind. The model allows the user to quickly conduct sensitivity analysis on key variables, including: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; and capacity factors. The model also includes consideration of a wide range of externality costs and pollution control options for carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and mercury. Two different data sets are included in the model; one from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the other from Platt's Research Group. Likely users of this model include executives and staff in the Congress, the Administration and private industry (power plant builders, industrial electricity users and electric utilities). The model seeks to improve understanding of the economic viability of various generating technologies and their emission trade-offs. The base case results using the DOE data, indicate that in the absence of externality costs, or renewable tax credits, pulverized coal and gas combined cycle plants are the least cost alternatives at 3.7 and 3.5 cents/kwhr, respectively. A complete sensitivity analysis on fuel, capital, and construction time shows that these results coal and gas are much more sensitive to assumption about fuel prices than they are to capital costs or construction times. The results also show that making nuclear competitive with coal or gas requires significant reductions in capital costs, to the $1000/kW level, if no other changes are made. For renewables, the results indicate that wind is now competitive with the nuclear option and is only competitive with coal and gas for grid connected applications if one includes the federal production tax credit

  11. Load Leveling Battery System Costs

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-10-12

    SYSPLAN evaluates capital investment in customer side of the meter load leveling battery systems. Such systems reduce the customer's monthly electrical demand charge by reducing the maximum power load supplied by the utility during the customer's peak demand. System equipment consists of a large array of batteries, a current converter, and balance of plant equipment and facilities required to support the battery and converter system. The system is installed on the customer's side of themore » meter and controlled and operated by the customer. Its economic feasibility depends largely on the customer's load profile. Load shape requirements, utility rate structures, and battery equipment cost and performance data serve as bases for determining whether a load leveling battery system is economically feasible for a particular installation. Life-cycle costs for system hardware include all costs associated with the purchase, installation, and operation of battery, converter, and balance of plant facilities and equipment. The SYSPLAN spreadsheet software is specifically designed to evaluate these costs and the reduced demand charge benefits; it completes a 20 year period life cycle cost analysis based on the battery system description and cost data. A built-in sensitivity analysis routine is also included for key battery cost parameters. The life cycle cost analysis spreadsheet is augmented by a system sizing routine to help users identify load leveling system size requirements for their facilities. The optional XSIZE system sizing spreadsheet which is included can be used to identify a range of battery system sizes that might be economically attractive. XSIZE output consisting of system operating requirements can then be passed by the temporary file SIZE to the main SYSPLAN spreadsheet.« less

  12. Ambulatory purchasing: harnessing supply costs.

    PubMed

    Jager, P A

    1997-04-01

    The healthcare system remains in a dynamic state of flux. We have all heard the story: the changing healthcare market brings reduced reimbursement for services, increased competition, and steadily increasing supply, maintenance, and equipment costs. Ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) must keep in sync with this change or fail to survive the current market forces. However, because they represent a small contract to various vendors, many ASCs pay premium prices for inventory while receiving less from Managed Care Plans (MCPs) and Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs). This dilemma makes control of supply costs a top priority for ASCs. In reality, purchasing is becoming more strategically connected to the ASC balance sheet than ever before. Apart from personnel costs, supply and pharmaceutical purchasing represents the greatest expense category on our financial statement. Harnessing these costs directly relates to bottom line profitability. In addition, while performing cost savings magic, ASCs must maintain patient and surgeon satisfaction with the superior outcomes and state-of-the-art technology their reputations are based upon. Sound impossible? This article details how Surgery Center Plus, Inc. (SCP) implemented a cost containment project. PMID:10167012

  13. 48 CFR 1852.216-73 - Estimated cost and cost sharing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Estimated cost and cost... and Clauses 1852.216-73 Estimated cost and cost sharing. As prescribed in 1816.307-70(a), insert the following clause: Estimated Cost and Cost Sharing (DEC 1991) (a) It is estimated that the total cost...

  14. 48 CFR 1552.216-76 - Estimated cost and cost-sharing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Estimated cost and cost... 1552.216-76 Estimated cost and cost-sharing. As prescribed in 1516.307(c), insert the following clause: Estimated Cost and Cost-Sharing (APR 1996) (a) The total estimated cost of performing the work under...

  15. 48 CFR 1852.216-73 - Estimated cost and cost sharing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Estimated cost and cost... and Clauses 1852.216-73 Estimated cost and cost sharing. As prescribed in 1816.307-70(a), insert the following clause: Estimated Cost and Cost Sharing (DEC 1991) (a) It is estimated that the total cost...

  16. 48 CFR 1552.216-76 - Estimated cost and cost-sharing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Estimated cost and cost... 1552.216-76 Estimated cost and cost-sharing. As prescribed in 1516.307(c), insert the following clause: Estimated Cost and Cost-Sharing (APR 1996) (a) The total estimated cost of performing the work under...

  17. NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEM COST MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Francesco Ganda; Brent Dixon

    2012-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program is preparing to perform an evaluation of the full range of possible Nuclear Energy Systems (NES) in 2013. These include all practical combinations of fuels and transmuters (reactors and sub-critical systems) in single and multi-tier combinations of burners and breeders with no, partial, and full recycle. As part of this evaluation, Levelized Cost of Electricity at Equilibrium (LCAE) ranges for each representative system will be calculated. To facilitate the cost analyses, the 2009 Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis Report is being amended to provide up-to-date cost data for each step in the fuel cycle, and a new analysis tool, NE-COST, has been developed. This paper explains the innovative “Island” approach used by NE-COST to streamline and simplify the economic analysis effort and provides examples of LCAE costs generated. The Island approach treats each transmuter (or target burner) and the associated fuel cycle facilities as a separate analysis module, allowing reuse of modules that appear frequently in the NES options list. For example, a number of options to be screened will include a once-through uranium oxide (UOX) fueled light water reactor (LWR). The UOX LWR may be standalone, or may be the first stage in a multi-stage system. Using the Island approach, the UOX LWR only needs to be modeled once and the module can then be reused on subsequent fuel cycles. NE-COST models the unit operations and life cycle costs associated with each step of the fuel cycle on each island. This includes three front-end options for supplying feedstock to fuel fabrication (mining/enrichment, reprocessing of used fuel from another island, and/or reprocessing of this island’s used fuel), along with the transmuter and back-end storage/disposal. Results of each island are combined based on the fractional energy generated by each islands in an equilibrium system. The cost analyses use the probability

  18. 16 CFR 1105.13 - Noncompensable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the participant's actual cost; and (c) Costs determined not to be allowable under generally accepted accounting principles and practices or part 1-15, Federal Procurement Regulations (41 CFR part 1-15). ... Noncompensable costs. The items of cost toward which the Commission will not contribute include: (a) Costs...

  19. 14 CFR 1273.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CFR part 31, Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply...) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in the form of payments to fixed-price contractors; and (2) Reasonable fees or profit to...

  20. 28 CFR 66.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... than a hospital and an organization named in OBM Circular A-122 as not subject to that circular 48 CFR part 31. Contract Cost Principles and Procedures, or uniform cost accounting standards that comply with... allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in...

  1. Cost analysis of atmosphere monitoring systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakut, M. M.

    1973-01-01

    The cost analyses of two leading atmospheric monitoring systems, namely the mass spectrometer and the gas chromatograph, are reported. A summary of the approach used in developing the cost estimating techinques is presented; included are the cost estimating techniques, the development of cost estimating relationships and the atmospheric monitoring system cost estimates.

  2. 50 CFR 37.46 - Cost reimbursement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cost reimbursement. 37.46 Section 37.46... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE, ALASKA General Administration § 37.46 Cost reimbursement. (a) Each applicant for... actual costs incurred, including, but not limited to, its direct costs and indirect costs as...

  3. 48 CFR 16.302 - Cost contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cost contracts. 16.302... AND CONTRACT TYPES TYPES OF CONTRACTS Cost-Reimbursement Contracts 16.302 Cost contracts. (a) Description. A cost contract is a cost-reimbursement contract in which the contractor receives no fee....

  4. 34 CFR 300.16 - Excess costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Excess costs. 300.16 Section 300.16 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.16 Excess costs. Excess costs means those costs that... for an example of how excess costs must be calculated.) (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1401(8))...

  5. 29 CFR 4221.10 - Costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Costs. 4221.10 Section 4221.10 Labor Regulations Relating... PLANS ARBITRATION OF DISPUTES IN MULTIEMPLOYER PLANS § 4221.10 Costs. The costs of arbitration under... the costs of its own witnesses. (b) Other costs of arbitration. Except as provided in § 4221.6(d)...

  6. 49 CFR 266.11 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 266.11 Section 266.11... TRANSPORTATION ACT § 266.11 Allowable costs. Allowable costs include only the following costs which are properly allocable to the work performed: Planning and program operation costs which are allowed under...

  7. 29 CFR 102.171 - Cost shifting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cost shifting. 102.171 Section 102.171 Labor Regulations... By Federal Income Tax Refund Offset § 102.171 Cost shifting. Costs incurred by the Agency in... amount of the offset. Such costs may include administrative costs and attorneys fees....

  8. 40 CFR 791.50 - Costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Costs. 791.50 Section 791.50 Protection...) DATA REIMBURSEMENT Basis for Proposed Order § 791.50 Costs. (a) All costs reasonable and necessary to... tests, are eligible for reimbursement. Necessary costs include: (1) Direct and indirect costs...

  9. 29 CFR 102.165 - Cost shifting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cost shifting. 102.165 Section 102.165 Labor Regulations... by Administrative Offset § 102.165 Cost shifting. Costs incurred by the Agency in connection with... offset. Such costs may include administrative costs and attorneys fees....

  10. 48 CFR 31.203 - Indirect costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... coverage, the contractor shall follow the criteria and guidance in 48 CFR 9904.406 for selecting the cost... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 31.203 Indirect... final cost objectives. No final cost objective shall have allocated to it as an indirect cost any...

  11. Cost Finding: Why It Is Important.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mielke, Linda

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the importance of cost finding for public libraries and the relationship of cost finding to output measures. A cost finding study conducted on the cost of gift books is described; several worksheets from the study are included. Suggestions are offered for beginning a cost-finding project. (three references) (MES)

  12. A Departmental Cost-Effectiveness Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holleman, Thomas, Jr.

    In establishing a departmental cost-effectiveness model, the traditional cost-effectiveness model was discussed and equipped with a distant and deflation equation for both benefits and costs. Next, the economics of costing was examined and program costing procedures developed. Then, the model construct was described as it was structured around the…

  13. 7 CFR 3430.54 - Indirect costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...-GENERAL AWARD ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS Post-Award and Closeout § 3430.54 Indirect costs. Indirect cost... assistance regulations and cost principles, unless superseded by another authority. Use of indirect costs as... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Indirect costs. 3430.54 Section 3430.54...

  14. What does an MRI scan cost?

    PubMed

    Young, David W

    2015-11-01

    Historically, hospital departments have computed the costs of individual tests or procedures using the ratio of cost to charges (RCC) method, which can produce inaccurate results. To determine a more accurate cost of a test or procedure, the activity-based costing (ABC) method must be used. Accurate cost calculations will ensure reliable information about the profitability of a hospital's DRGs. PMID:26685437

  15. 29 CFR 102.165 - Cost shifting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cost shifting. 102.165 Section 102.165 Labor Regulations... by Administrative Offset § 102.165 Cost shifting. Costs incurred by the Agency in connection with... offset. Such costs may include administrative costs and attorneys fees....

  16. 29 CFR 102.165 - Cost shifting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cost shifting. 102.165 Section 102.165 Labor Regulations... by Administrative Offset § 102.165 Cost shifting. Costs incurred by the Agency in connection with... offset. Such costs may include administrative costs and attorneys fees....

  17. 29 CFR 4221.10 - Costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Costs. 4221.10 Section 4221.10 Labor Regulations Relating... PLANS ARBITRATION OF DISPUTES IN MULTIEMPLOYER PLANS § 4221.10 Costs. The costs of arbitration under... the costs of its own witnesses. (b) Other costs of arbitration. Except as provided in § 4221.6(d)...

  18. 34 CFR 300.16 - Excess costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Excess costs. 300.16 Section 300.16 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.16 Excess costs. Excess costs means those costs that... for an example of how excess costs must be calculated.) (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1401(8))...

  19. 29 CFR 4221.10 - Costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Costs. 4221.10 Section 4221.10 Labor Regulations Relating... PLANS ARBITRATION OF DISPUTES IN MULTIEMPLOYER PLANS § 4221.10 Costs. The costs of arbitration under... the costs of its own witnesses. (b) Other costs of arbitration. Except as provided in § 4221.6(d)...

  20. 34 CFR 300.16 - Excess costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Excess costs. 300.16 Section 300.16 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.16 Excess costs. Excess costs means those costs that... for an example of how excess costs must be calculated.) (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1401(8))...