Science.gov

Sample records for concentration boundary layers

  1. Dense gas boundary layer experiments: Visualization, pressure measurements, concentration evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, H.; Neuwald, P.; Kuhl, A.L.

    1992-11-01

    This technical report describes methods that were applied to investigate turbulent boundary layers generated by inviscid, baroclinic effects. The Cranz-Schardin 24-sparks camera was used to visualize the interactions of a planar shock wave with a Freon R12-layer. The shock propagates more slowly in the Freon layer than in air because of its smaller sound speed. This causes the shock front to be curved and to be reflected between the wall and the layer interface. As a consequence of the reflection process, a series of compression and expansion waves radiate from the layer. Large fluctuations in the streamwise velocity and in pressure develop for about 1 ms. These waves strongly perturb the interface shear layer, which rapidly transitions to a turbulent boundary flow. Pressure measurements showed that the fluctuations in the Freon layer reach a peak pressure 4 times higher than in the turbulent boundary flow. To characterize the preshock Freon boundary layer, concentration measurements were performed with a differential interferometry technique. The refraction index of Freon R12 is so high that Mach-Zehnder interferometry was not successful in these experiments. The evaluation of the concentration profile is described here in detail. Method and results of corresponding LDV measurements under the same conditions are presented in a different report, EMI Report T 9/92. The authors plan to continue the dense gas layer investigations with the gas combination helium/Freon.

  2. Vertical distribution of HOx concentrations driven by boundary layer dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomm, Sebastian; Broch, Sebastian; Fuchs, Hendrik; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Holland, Frank; Bohn, Birger; Häseler, Rolf; Jäger, Julia; Kaiser, Jennifer; Keutsch, Frank; Li, Xin; Lu, Keding; Lohse, Insa; Rohrer, Franz; Tillmann, Ralf; Wegener, Robert; Wolfe, Glenn; Mentel, Thomas F.; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Wahner, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) and hydroperoxy (HO2) radicals are key compounds for the degradation of pollutants in the atmosphere. Therefore, accurate and precise measurements of HOx radicals (= OH + HO2) at different altitudes and in different regions are necessary to test our understanding of atmospheric chemical processes. The planetary boundary layer (PBL) is of special interest as it is chemically the most active part of the atmosphere. Until today, there is a general lack of measurements investigating the distribution of radicals, trace gases, and aerosols in the PBL with high spatial resolution. Here, we present results of measurements performed in June/July 2012 in the Po valley region in Italy as part of the Pan-European Gas-AeroSOls-climate interaction Study (PEGASOS). A Zeppelin NT was used as an airborne platform for measurements of HOx radical concentrations and total OH reactivity (kOH) applying a remotely controlled Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) instrument. In addition a comprehensive set of other trace gases (O3, CO, NO, NO2, HCHO, HONO, VOCs), photolysis frequencies, particle number concentration, and meteorological parameters were measured. During the morning hours, a layered atmospheric structure with vertical gradients in trace gas concentrations was observed. In altitudes larger than 600 m above ground, air masses with low trace gas concentrations (NOx < 500 ppt, kOH < 3 s-1) were probed, whereas air masses in altitudes below 100 m above ground were influenced by ground emissions resulting in higher trace gas concentrations (NOx > 6 ppb, kOH > 6 s-1). The airship Zeppelin NT was used to perform localized height profiles between 75 and 900 m above ground in order to investigate the influence of these trace gas gradients on HOx radical concentrations. Due to changing chemical conditions, the measured OH concentration shows a variability with height up to a factor of 2.5 and for the measured HO2 concentration up to a factor of 5. Additionally, we present

  3. Footprint characteristics of scalar concentration in the convective boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaofeng; Cai, Xuhui

    2005-11-01

    Footprint characteristics for passive scalar concentration in the convective boundary layer (CBL) are investigated. A backward Lagrangian stochastic (LS) dispersion model and a large eddy simulation (LES) model are used in the investigation. Typical characteristics of the CBL and their responses to the surface heterogeneity are resolved from the LES. Then the turbulence fields are used to drive the backward LS dispersion. To remedy the spoiled description of the turbulence near the surface, Monin-Obukhov similarity is applied to the lowest LES level and the surface for the modeling of the backward LS dispersion. Simulation results show that the footprint within approximately 1 km upwind predominates in the total contribution. But influence from farther distances also exists and is even slightly greater than that from closer locations. Surface heterogeneity may change the footprint pattern to a certain degree. A comparison to three analytical models provides a validation of the footprint simulations, which shows the possible influence of along-wind turbulence and the large eddies in the CBL, as well as the surface heterogeneity.

  4. Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loitsianskii. L. G.

    1956-01-01

    The fundamental, practically the most important branch of the modern mechanics of a viscous fluid or a gas, is that branch which concerns itself with the study of the boundary layer. The presence of a boundary layer accounts for the origin of the resistance and lift force, the breakdown of the smooth flow about bodies, and other phenomena that are associated with the motion of a body in a real fluid. The concept of boundary layer was clearly formulated by the founder of aerodynamics, N. E. Joukowsky, in his well-known work "On the Form of Ships" published as early as 1890. In his book "Theoretical Foundations of Air Navigation," Joukowsky gave an account of the most important properties of the boundary layer and pointed out the part played by it in the production of the resistance of bodies to motion. The fundamental differential equations of the motion of a fluid in a laminar boundary layer were given by Prandtl in 1904; the first solutions of these equations date from 1907 to 1910. As regards the turbulent boundary layer, there does not exist even to this day any rigorous formulation of this problem because there is no closed system of equations for the turbulent motion of a fluid. Soviet scientists have done much toward developing a general theory of the boundary layer, and in that branch of the theory which is of greatest practical importance at the present time, namely the study of the boundary layer at large velocities of the body in a compressed gas, the efforts of the scientists of our country have borne fruit in the creation of a new theory which leaves far behind all that has been done previously in this direction. We shall herein enumerate the most important results by Soviet scientists in the development of the theory of the boundary layer.

  5. Particle concentrations and number size distributions in the planetary boundary layer derived from airship based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, Ralf; Zhao, Defeng; Ehn, Mikael; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Holland, Frank; Rohrer, Franz; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Wahner, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric particles play a key role for regional and global climate due to their direct and indirect radiative forcing effects. The concentration and size of the particles are important variables to these effects. Within the continental planetary boundary layer (PBL) the particle number size distribution is influenced by meteorological parameters, local sinks and sources resulting in variable spatial distributions. However, measurements of particle number size distributions over a broad vertical range of the PBL are rare. The airship ZEPPELIN NT is an ideal platform to measure atmospheric aerosols on a regional scale within an altitude range up to 1000 m. For campaigns in the Netherlands, Northern Italy and South Finland in 2012 and 2013 the airship was deployed with a wide range of instruments, including measurements of different trace gases, short lived radicals, solar radiation, aerosols and meteorological parameters. Flights were carried out at different times of the day to investigate the influence of the diurnal evolution of the PBL on atmospheric trace gases and aerosols. During night and early morning hours the concentration and size distribution of atmospheric particles were found to be strongly influenced by the layered structure of the PBL, i.e. the nocturnal boundary layer and the residual layer. Within the residual layer particle concentrations stay relatively constant as this layer is decoupled from ground sources. The particles persist in the accumulation mode as expected for an aged aerosol. In the nocturnal boundary layer particle concentrations and size are more dynamic with higher concentrations than in the residual layer. A few hours after sunrise, the layered structure of the PBL intermixes. During daytime the PBL is well mixed and a negative concentration gradient with increasing height is observed. Several height profiles at different times of the day and at different locations in Europe were measured. The aerosol measurements will be

  6. Observations of high droplet number concentrations in Southern Ocean boundary layer clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubb, T.; Huang, Y.; Jensen, J.; Campos, T.; Siems, S.; Manton, M.

    2015-09-01

    Data from the standard cloud physics payload during the NSF/NCAR High-performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) campaigns provide a snapshot of unusual wintertime microphysical conditions in the boundary layer over the Southern Ocean. On 29 June 2011, the HIAPER sampled the boundary layer in a region of pre-frontal warm air advection between 58 and 48° S to the south of Tasmania. Cloud droplet number concentrations were consistent with climatological values in the northernmost profiles but were exceptionally high for wintertime in the Southern Ocean at 100-200 cm-3 in the southernmost profiles. Sub-micron (0.06concentrations for the southern profiles were up to 400 cm-3. Analysis of back trajectories and atmospheric chemistry observations revealed that while conditions in the troposphere were more typical of a clean remote ocean airmass, there was some evidence of continental or anthropogenic influence. However, the hypothesis of long range transport of continental aerosol fails to explain the magnitude of the aerosol and cloud droplet concentration in the boundary layer. Instead, the gale force surface winds in this case (wind speed at 167 m above sea level was >25 m s-1) were most likely responsible for production of sea spray aerosol which influenced the microphysical properties of the boundary layer clouds. The smaller size and higher number concentration of cloud droplets is inferred to increase the albedo of these clouds, and these conditions occur regularly, and are expected to increase in frequency, over windy parts of the Southern Ocean.

  7. Short term variations of 7Be, 10Be concentrations in atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagata, Takeyasu; Sugihara, Sinji; Morinaga, Ichiro; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Nagai, Hisao

    2010-04-01

    To compare meteorological conditions, short term variations of atmospheric concentrations of 7Be ( T1/2 = 53.3 days) and 10Be ( T1/2 = 1.5 × 10 6 years) were investigated at Tokyo and Fukuoka, Japan, and Pacific Ocean nearby Japan. Atmospheric concentrations of 7Be and 10Be at anticyclone condition were higher than that at cyclone condition to a factor of 2-10. Because of being influenced by re-suspended components from soil ( 10Be/ 7Be > 1000), temporal variability of 10Be/ 7Be was high in daytime and low in nighttime. But when corrected for re-suspended component using Al concentration as an indicator of soil the 10Be/ 7Be ratio was constant. Comparing 7Be and 10Be concentrations with 212Pb concentration as soil-generated component, we make a conclusion that high 7Be and 10Be concentration air mass is brought into boundary layer by high convection at daytime. Those diurnal variations were not observed in marine boundary layer. When cyclone passed through Fukuoka to Tokyo, which is 12 h behind, 7Be and 10Be concentrations also decreased with 12 h lag between Fukuoka and Tokyo. The 10Be/ 7Be ratio was constant during anticyclone to cyclone condition, and between Tokyo and Fukuoka. We conclude that after stratospheric aerosols enter into the upper troposphere they reside there for a certain period and mix uniformly in horizontal strata; later they are transported down to lower troposphere by anticyclone and penetrate into ground level air at daytime by convective strong mixing of boundary layer.

  8. Analysis of modified MYJ and YSU boundary layer schemes in WRF-Chem with respect to simulated boundary layer heights and pollutant concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forkel, Renate; Foreman, Richard; Emeis, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    To improve the performance of boundary layer schemes currently applied within WRF-Chem (Grell et al., 2005), the Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) model (Mellor and Yamada 1982) and the Yonsei University (YSU) PBL scheme (Hong et al. 2006) have been updated using data from a 100 m high offshore measurement tower called FINO1. The turbulence intensity in the Mellor-Yamada-Janjic model has been enhanced as described in Foreman and Emeis (2012). An alternative to the exchange coefficient for stable stratification in the YSU scheme is described in Foreman et al. (2014). These modifications to the two schemes have been applied and are compared with the existing schemes. For example, the updated MYJ scheme results in an improved representation of the turbulent kinetic energy throughout the boundary layer as compared with the measurements at FINO1. The modified MYJ and YSU schemes, which have been originally developed for wind energy applications, have been implemented into version 3.5 of the WRF model. Simulations with WRF-Chem were carried out for Europe and the region of Augsburg in order to evaluate the effect of the modified PBL schemes on simulated PBL heights, gas phase pollutant and aerosol concentrations. Foreman, R.J. and S. Emeis, 2012. A method for increasing the turbulent kinetic energy in the Mellor-Yamada-Janjic boundary layer parametrization. Boundary Layer Meteorology 145:329-349. Foreman, R.J. S. Emeis and B. Canadillas, 2014. Stable boundary layer parametrization without eddy viscosity or turbulent kinetic energy equation approaches. Submitted to Boundary Layer Meteorology 2014. Grell, G. A., Peckham, S. E., Schmitz, R., McKeen, S. A., Frost, G., Skamarock,W. C., and Eder, B., 2005. Fully Coupled Online Chemistry within the WRF Model. Atmospheric Environment 39, 6957-6975. Hong S, Noh Y, Dudhia J 2006. Nonlocal boundary layer vertical diffusion in a medium-range forecast model. Mon Wea Rev 124:2322-2339. Mellor GL, Yamada T 1982. Development of a turbulence

  9. Methane and nonmethane hydrocarbon concentrations in the North and South Atlantic marine boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cofer, W. R., III

    1982-01-01

    Methane and nonmethane hydrocarbon (NMHC) data were collected in the Atlantic marine boundary layer from 40 N to 32 S latitude during October and November 1980. Average volume mixing ratios for CH4 of 1.69 + or - 0.02 ppmv were obtained north of the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) and 1.60 + or - 0.02 ppmv south of the ITCZ. The hemispheric CH4 gradient was very sharp, decreasing rapidly between 14 N and 10 N latitude. Gaseous NMHC concentrations (based on response as CH4) were measured simultaneously and found to lie consistently within the standard error for the individual measurements + or - 0.02 ppmv) after correction for water vapor interference. The correction for water vapor response was large, frequently as much as 80% of the raw NMHC signal. Application of the student's t distribution test to the NMHC data set established that the mean northern and southern hemispheric NMHC mixing ratios measured, 0.016 and 0.010 ppmv, respectively, were statistically different at the 95% confidence level. These results indicate volatile NMHC mixing ratios average less than 0.02 ppmv over the Atlantic and represent the first set of semicontinuous NMHC measurements spanning the North and South Atlantic marine boundary layer.

  10. Influence of a high aerosol concentration on the thermal structure of the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaikin, M. N.; Kuznetsova, I. N.; Kadygrov, E. N.

    2006-12-01

    The influence of increased concentrations of submicron aerosol produced by forest fires on thermal characteristics of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) in Moscow and its remote vicinity (the town of Zvenigorod) are analyzed on the basis of regular remote measurements of the ABL temperature profile with the use of MTP-5 profilers. In the air basin of a large city, additional aerosol and accompanying pollutants in early morning hours (at small heights of the Sun) most frequently did not cause substantial changes in the ABL thermal structure. In the locality remote from the megalopolis (Zvenigorod), the atmospheric pollution by aerosol led to noticeable changes in the ABL thermal characteristics. Especially strong changes were observed in the daytime, during the maximum supply of solar radiation. In morning hours, the heating rate of the lower 100-m layer of the polluted air exceeded the heating rate of a relatively pure air by more than one degree. In higher layers, the differences between the rates of temperature changes in a relatively clean atmosphere and in an atmosphere polluted by aerosol (in the suburb) were insignificant.

  11. The Influence of High Aerosol Concentration on Atmospheric Boundary Layer Temperature Stratification

    SciTech Connect

    Khaykin, M.N.; Kadygrove, E.N.; Golitsyn, G.S.

    2005-03-18

    Investigations of the changing in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) radiation balance as cased by natural and anthropogenic reasons is an important topic of the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. The influence of aerosol on temperature stratification of ABL while its concentration was extremely high within a long period of time was studied experimentally. The case was observed in Moscow region (Russia) with the transport of combustion products from peat-bog and forest fires in July-September, 2002. At this time the visibility was some times at about 100-300 m. Aerosol concentration measured by Moscow University Observatory and A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics field station in Zvenigorod (55.7 N; 36.6 E) for several days was in 50-100 times more than background one (Gorchakov at al 2003). The high aerosol concentration can change the radiation balance at ABL, and so to change thermal stratification in ABL above the mega lopolis. For the analysis the data were used of synchronous measurements by MTP-5 (Microwave Temperature Profiler operating at wavelength 5 mm) in two locations, namely: downtown Moscow and country-side which is 50 km apart to the West (Zvenigorod station). (Kadygrov and Pick 1998; Westwater at al 1999; Kadygrov at al 2002). Zvenigorod station is located in strongly continental climate zone which is in between of the climates of ARM sites (NSANorth Slope of Alaska and SGP-Southern Great Plains). The town of Zvenigorod has little industry, small traffic volume and topography conductive to a good air ventilation of the town. For these reasons Zvenigorod can be considered as an undisturbed rural site. For the analysis some days were chosen with close meteorological parameters (average temperature, humidity, wind, pressure and cloud form) but strongly differing in aerosol concentration level.

  12. ESTIMATING SURFACE CONCENTRATIONS FROM AN ELEVATED, BUOYANT PLUME IN A LIMITED-MIXED CONVECTIVE BOUNDARY LAYER

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the past decade, recent advances have suggested that convective scaling can be used to parameterize diffusion from a plume in the convective boundary layer (CBL). New methods such as convective scaling need to be explored because the traditionally used Gaussian plume model doe...

  13. Black carbon concentrations and sources in the marine boundary layer of the tropical Atlantic Ocean using four methodologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Combustion-derived aerosols in the marine boundary layer have been poorly studied, especially in remote environments such as the open Atlantic Ocean. The tropical Atlantic has the potential to contain a high concentration of aerosols, such as black carbon, due to the African emis...

  14. Implications of a concentration-dependent growth rate on the boundary layer crystal-melt model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasaga, Antonio C.

    1981-12-01

    The influence of a melt boundary layer on crystal growth is analyzed. The treatment extends the results of Burton, Prim and Slichter (1953) and incorporates composition-dependent growth rates. It is shown that in these general cases the growth rate cannot be arbitrarily fixed but must satisfy a self-consistent equation. Self-consistency problems arise because the growth rate determines the composition profile in the melt and, in turn, the composition profile determines the growth rate. The self-consistent growth rate is shown to vary markedly with the ratio δ/D, where δ is the thickness of the boundary layer and D is the appropriate diffusion coefficient in the melt. This self-consistency can be very important in the analysis of both field and laboratory growth rates as well as in trace element partition kinetic models.

  15. Differences in the concentrations of atmospheric trace gases in and above the tropical boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, R. A.; Khalil, M. A. K.

    1981-01-01

    Weekly air samples were collected at Cape Kumakahi (0 km) and at nearby Mauna Loa Observatory (3.4 km) which is above the boundary layer. EC/GC and GC/FID techniques were used to measure CH3I, CHCl3, CO and CH4 which are largely natural in origin, and C2Cl4, CCl4, CH3CCl3, (F-11), CCl2F2, (F-12), CHClF, (F-22) and C2F3Cl3 (F-113), which are due to anthropogenic (CCl3F) etc. activities. It was found that all these gases are significantly (alpha is equal to or less than 0.05) more abundant in the boundary layer than above it.

  16. Boundary Layer and Synoptic Effects on NO Concentrations at the South Pole: A Multiyear Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, William; Davis, Douglas

    2015-04-01

    A series of experiments have explored the behavior of NO concentrations at the South Pole as part of the ISCAT (1998, 2000) and ANTCI (2003, 2005, 2006-7) field programs [Davis et al., 2008]. The relationship between NO and boundary layer depth (BLD) proposed by [Davis et al., 2004] was verified by [Neff et al., 2008] using direct sodar measurements of BLD during the period November-December 2003. A longer time series of NOx was generated in the ANTCI program from sunrise in 2006 into summer 2007. However, no direct BLD measurements were available. To address this deficiency, we used multiple linear regression on data from 2003 where both directly observed BLD and meteorological variables were recorded. This analysis showed that the three most important variables were wind speed (r2=0.56), Delta T2-22m (r2=0.32), and wind direction (r2=0.10). The strong dependence on wind speed is consistent with the results of [Neff et al., 2008] showing the dependence of BLD on surface stress (representing turbulent mixing of momentum to the surface). The dependence on wind direction may be unique to the South Pole because of the constancy of surface winds from the northeast that are weakly perturbed by synoptic weather systems: winds from grid east tend to be light, colder, and with shallower BLD whereas those from grid north are stronger, warmer, and have greater BLD. To further test these regression results, we used lower resolution sodar data from the austral spring of 1993(e.g., October/ November). From these data we found that applying the 2003 regression analysis results to 1993 data, ~32% of the variance could be accounted for, despite the coarseness of the 1993 observations. The latter result provided the justification for applying the 2003 BLD regression analysis to our estimating BLDs on the 2006-7 NOx data set. As found in the 2003 data set, the general trend in the 2006-7 data showed that predicted shallow BLDs consistently correlated with higher concentrations of

  17. Analysis of the electrolyte convection inside the concentration boundary layer during structured electrodeposition of copper in high magnetic gradient fields.

    PubMed

    König, Jörg; Tschulik, Kristina; Büttner, Lars; Uhlemann, Margitta; Czarske, Jürgen

    2013-03-19

    To experimentally reveal the correlation between electrodeposited structure and electrolyte convection induced inside the concentration boundary layer, a highly inhomogeneous magnetic field, generated by a magnetized Fe-wire, has been applied to an electrochemical system. The influence of Lorentz and magnetic field gradient force to the local transport phenomena of copper ions has been studied using a novel two-component laser Doppler velocity profile sensor. With this sensor, the electrolyte convection within 500 μm of a horizontally aligned cathode is presented. The electrode-normal two-component velocity profiles below the electrodeposited structure show that electrolyte convection is induced and directed toward the rim of the Fe-wire. The measured deposited structure directly correlates to the observed boundary layer flow. As the local concentration of Cu(2+) ions is enhanced due to the induced convection, maximum deposit thicknesses can be found at the rim of the Fe-wire. Furthermore, a complex boundary layer flow structure was determined, indicating that electrolyte convection of second order is induced. Moreover, the Lorentz force-driven convection rapidly vanishes, while the electrolyte convection induced by the magnetic field gradient force is preserved much longer. The progress for research is the first direct experimental proof of the electrolyte convection inside the concentration boundary layer that correlates to the deposited structure and reveals that the magnetic field gradient force is responsible for the observed structuring effect. PMID:23432054

  18. Black carbon concentrations across the tropical Atlantic boundary layer using three methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, K.; Lohmann, R.; Cantwell, M.; Herckes, P.

    2012-12-01

    . The detected EC comprised between 1-22% of the OC pool (with one possible outlier detecting >50% of the OC pool) where the highest EC/OC ratios occurred near the US coast. The PFL method complements the other two approaches by measuring the entire proposed BC continuum (soot, charcoal, char, and partially charred biomass) rather than being biased to soot, such as in the CTO-375 method. BC values ranged between 0.07-2.49μg/m3 where the highest values were found within the African plume and off the coast of the Caribbean islands. BC/TOC values were between 4.2%-74% and agreed most closely to the CTO-375 values suggesting that soot is the main form of BC. The Sunset Method predicted the lowest concentration of EC in all samples, with the highest concentration of 0.32μg/m3. This method was the only technique to not detect EC in every sample, suggesting that our samples may require a longer sampling time. Although CTO-375 and PFL methods resulted in comparable results, the PFL-based results suggested elevated BC concentrations in the African plume as we had expected. Since BC/EC is an operational definition, multiple methods offer the greatest opportunity to evaluate true concentrations which are required for proper model verification. In conclusion, BC is present in high concentration in the remote Eq-Atlantic Ocean boundary layer, suggesting a strong climate forcing capability in this study area.

  19. The Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennekes, Hendrik

    1974-01-01

    Discusses some important parameters of the boundary layer and effects of turbulence on the circulation and energy dissipation of the atmosphere. Indicates that boundary-layer research plays an important role in long-term forecasting and the study of air-pollution meteorology. (CC)

  20. Sudden changes in aerosol and gas concentrations in the central Arctic marine boundary layer: Causes and consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigg, E. Keith; Leck, Caroline; Nilsson, E. Douglas

    2001-12-01

    Measurements of aerosol number size distributions and concentrations of the precursor gases dimethyl sulfide, sulfur dioxide and ammonia were made within the pack ice region of the central Arctic Ocean during July and August 1996 from the icebreaker Oden. Changes in concentration, sometimes exceeding the entire seasonal variation, often occurred within an hour and attempts to find the reasons for them are described. Vertical profiles of aerosol concentration in Aitken and accumulation mode particles obtained on helicopter flights revealed intense concentration gradients in the lowest 1000 m. Those below 100 m were common. Concentrations of accumulation mode particles were usually greater near the surface than at 100 m. Four representative case studies for which vertical aerosol profiles were obtained are presented. Observations of rapid large changes in near-surface concentration of aerosols in different size ranges are compared with the vertical profiles, meteorological information, and acoustic or optical remote sensing to infer processes causing the changes. Comparison of simultaneous variations in aerosols and precursor gas concentrations are used to define the vertical profiles of the gases. It was found that dimethyl sulfide and ammonia concentrations usually must have been strongly depleted near the surface relative to concentrations at about 100 m. Sulfur dioxide profiles appeared to be more complex. Turbulence or vertical air motions initiated by atmospheric wave motions trapped within the stable boundary layer appeared to be directly responsible for many of the sudden concentration changes, through interaction with concentration gradients close to the surface. The presence of low-level jets also had direct or indirect influences on mixing in the lowest few hundred meters. The extent to which aerosols measured near the surface can determine the microphysics of central Arctic marine boundary layer clouds is examined.

  1. Black carbon concentrations and sources in the marine boundary layer of the tropical Atlantic Ocean using four methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, K.; Cantwell, M.; Herckes, P.; Lohmann, R.

    2014-07-01

    Combustion-derived aerosols in the marine boundary layer have been poorly studied, especially in remote environments such as the open Atlantic Ocean. The tropical Atlantic has the potential to contain a high concentration of aerosols, such as black carbon, due to the African emission plume of biomass and agricultural burning products. Atmospheric particulate matter samples across the tropical Atlantic boundary layer were collected in the summer of 2010 during the southern hemispheric dry season when open fire events were frequent in Africa and South America. The highest black carbon concentrations were detected in the Caribbean Sea and within the African plume, with a regional average of 0.6 μg m-3 for both. The lowest average concentrations were measured off the coast of South America at 0.2 to 0.3 μg m-3. Samples were quantified for black carbon using multiple methods to provide insights into the form and stability of the carbonaceous aerosols (i.e., thermally unstable organic carbon, soot like, and charcoal like). Soot-like aerosols composed up to 45% of the carbonaceous aerosols in the Caribbean Sea to as little as 4% within the African plume. Charcoal-like aerosols composed up to 29% of the carbonaceous aerosols over the oligotrophic Sargasso Sea, suggesting that non-soot-like particles could be present in significant concentrations in remote environments. To better apportion concentrations and forms of black carbon, multiple detection methods should be used, particularly in regions impacted by biomass burning emissions.

  2. Boundary-Layer & health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costigliola, V.

    2010-09-01

    It has long been known that specific atmospheric processes, such as weather and longer-term climatic fluctuations, affect human health. The biometeorological literature refers to this relationship as meteorotropism, defined as a change in an organism that is correlated with a change in atmospheric conditions. Plenty of (patho)physiological functions are affected by those conditions - like the respiratory diseases - and currently it is difficult to put any limits for pathologies developed in reply. Nowadays the importance of atmospheric boundary layer and health is increasingly recognised. A number of epidemiologic studies have reported associations between ambient concentrations of air pollution, specifically particulate pollution, and adverse health effects, even at the relatively low concentrations of pollution found. Since 1995 there have been over twenty-one studies from four continents that have explicitly examined the association between ambient air pollutant mixes and daily mortality. Statistically significant and positive associations have been reported in data from various locations around the world, all with varying air pollutant concentrations, weather conditions, population characteristics and public health policies. Particular role has been given to atmospheric boundary layer processes, the impact of which for specific patient-cohort is, however, not well understood till now. Assessing and monitoring air quality are thus fundamental to improve Europe's welfare. One of current projects run by the "European Medical Association" - PASODOBLE will develop and demonstrate user-driven downstream information services for the regional and local air quality sectors by combining space-based and in-situ data with models in 4 thematic service lines: - Health community support for hospitals, pharmacies, doctors and people at risk - Public information for regions, cities, tourist industry and sporting event organizers - Compliance monitoring support on particulate

  3. Mixed-layer models and large-eddy simulations of stratocumulus-topped marine boundary layers: Their nonlinear dynamics and sensitivity to cloud droplet concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Junya

    Due to their high albedo and weak greenhouse effects, low stratiform clouds have a strong tendency to cool the earth and are an important factor in predicting global climate. However, they are difficult to accurately simulate in global climate models, leading to large disparities between the responses of leading global climate models to increased greenhouse gases and aerosols. Marine subtropical stratocumulus-topped boundary layers that persist over cool ocean waters such as off the coast of California or Chile are particularly challenging due to a strong and sharp capping inversion that is difficult for the grids of numerical models to resolve, as well as the clouds themselves being thin, radiatively active, and sometimes drizzling. We use a simple model problem to look at effects of aerosols on the properties of stratocumulus cloud-topped boundary layer, which can help us better understand the effect of human-generated aerosols on climate. We compare simulations with two models, a simple Mixed-Layer Model (MLM) and a much more complex and computationally intensive Large-Eddy Simulations (LES). Our model problem is idealized from an observed case, Research Flight 1 of the Second Dynamics and Chemistry of Marine Stratocumulus Experiment (DYCOMS-II) 300 km southwest of San Diego. Simulations with different values of cloud droplet condensations are run to steady state and compared to each other. The MLM is a 3-variable autonomous system of ordinary differential equations which we study using phase plane analysis. This leads to the idea of a one-dimensional slow manifold and multiple long-term evolutions depending on the initial boundary layer depth, which prove to be very helpful in understanding the LES as well as the MLM. For high droplet concentrations, the LES displays two slow manifolds leading into two stable steady states, a well-mixed stratocumulus layer and a decoupled boundary layer with thin, broken cloud. This is the first time that an LES of boundary

  4. Boundary layer simulator improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praharaj, Sarat C.; Schmitz, Craig P.; Nouri, Joseph A.

    1989-01-01

    Boundary Layer Integral Matrix Procedure (BLIMPJ) has been identified by the propulsion community as the rigorous boundary layer program in connection with the existing JANNAF reference programs. The improvements made to BLIMPJ and described herein have potential applications in the design of the future Orbit Transfer Vehicle engines. The turbulence model is validated to include the effects of wall roughness and a way is devised to treat multiple smooth-rough surfaces. A prediction of relaminarization regions is examined as is the combined effects of wall cooling and surface roughness on relaminarization. A turbulence model to represent the effects of constant condensed phase loading is given. A procedure is described for thrust decrement calculation in thick boundary layers by coupling the T-D Kinetics Program and BLIMPJ and a way is provided for thrust loss optimization. Potential experimental studies in rocket nozzles are identified along with the required instrumentation to provide accurate measurements in support of the presented new analytical models.

  5. The atmospheric boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Garratt, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    This book is aimed at researchers in the atmospheric and associated sciences who require a moderately advanced text on the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) in which the many links between turbulence, air-surface transfer, boundary-layer structure and dynamics, and numerical modeling are discussed and elaborated upon. Chapter 1 serves as an introduction, with Chapters 2 and 3 dealing with the development of mean and turbulence equations, and the many scaling laws and theories that are the cornerstone of any serious ABL treatment. Modelling of the ABL is crucially dependent for its realism on the surface boundary conditions, and Chapters 4 and 5 deal with aerodynamic and energy considerations, with attention to both dry and wet land surfaces and the sea. The structure of the clear-sky, thermally stratified ABL is treated in Chapter 6, including the convective and stable cases over homogeneous land, the marine ABL and the internal boundary layer at the coastline. Chapter 7 then extends the discussion to the cloudy ABL. This is seen as particularly relevant since the extensive stratocumulus regions over the sub-tropical oceans and stratus regions over the Arctic are now identified as key players in the climate system. Finally, Chapters 8 and 9 bring much of the book's material together in a discussion of appropriate ABL and surface parameterization schemes for the general circulation models of the atmosphere that are being used for climate simulation.

  6. Profiling the PM2.5 mass concentration vertical distribution in the boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Z.; Wang, Z.; Yang, S.; Shan, H.; Ma, X.; Zhang, H.; Zhao, S.; Liu, D.; Xie, C.; Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Fine particle (PM2.5) affects human life and activities directly; the detection of PM2.5 mass concentration profile is very essential due to its practical and scientific meanings (such as, quantifying of air quality and its variability, and improving air quality forecast and assessment). But so far, it is difficult to detect PM2.5 mass concentration profile. The proposed methodology to study the relationship between aerosol extinction coefficient and PM2.5 mass concentration is described, which indicates that the PM2.5 mass concentration profile could be retrieved by combining a charge-coupled device (CCD) side-scatter lidar and a PM2.5 sampling detector. When the relative humidity is less than 70 %, PM2.5 mass concentration is proportional to aerosol extinction coefficient, and then the specific coefficient can be calculated. Using this specific coefficient, aerosol extinction profile is converted to PM2.5 mass concentration profile. Three cases of clean night (on 21 September 2014), pollutant night (on 17 March 2014), and heavy pollutant night (on 13 February 2015) are studied. The characteristic of PM2.5 mass concentration profile in near-ground during these three nights' cases in the western suburb of Hefei city was discussed. The PM2.5 air pollutant concentration is comparatively large in close surface varying with time and altitude. The experiment results show that the CCD side-scatter lidar combined with a PM2.5 detector is an effective and new method to explore pollutant mass concentration profile in near-ground.

  7. Profiling the PM2.5 mass concentration vertical distribution in the boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zongming; Wang, Zhenzhu; Yang, Shijun; Shan, Huihui; Ma, Xiaomin; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Sugui; Liu, Dong; Xie, Chenbo; Wang, Yingjian

    2016-04-01

    Fine particles (PM2.5) affect human life and activities directly; the detection of PM2.5 mass concentration profile is very essential due to its practical and scientific significance (such as the quantification of air quality and its variability as well as the assessment of improving air quality forecast). But so far, it has been difficult to detect PM2.5 mass concentration profile. The proposed methodology to study the relationship between aerosol extinction coefficient and PM2.5 mass concentration is described, which indicates that the PM2.5 mass concentration profile could be retrieved by combining a charge-coupled device (CCD) side-scatter lidar with a PM2.5 sampling detector. When the relative humidity is less than 70 %, PM2.5, mass concentration is proportional to the aerosol extinction coefficient, and then the specific coefficient can be calculated. Through this specific coefficient, aerosol extinction profile is converted to PM2.5 mass concentration profile. Three cases of clean night (on 21 September 2014), pollutant night (on 17 March 2014), and heavy pollutant night (on 13 February 2015) are studied. The characteristics of PM2.5 mass concentration profile at the near-ground level during the cases of these 3 nights in the western suburb of Hefei city were discussed. The PM2.5 air pollutant concentration is comparatively large close to the surface and varies with time and altitude. The experiment results show that the CCD side-scatter lidar combined with a PM2.5 detector is an effective and new method to explore pollutant mass concentration profile at the near-ground level.

  8. Boundary layer simulator improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praharaj, S. C.; Schmitz, C.; Frost, C.; Engel, C. D.; Fuller, C. E.; Bender, R. L.; Pond, J.

    1984-01-01

    High chamber pressure expander cycles proposed for orbit transfer vehicles depend primarily on the heat energy transmitted from the combustion products through the thrust wall chamber wall. The heat transfer to the nozzle wall is affected by such variables as wall roughness, relamarization, and the presence of particles in the flow. Motor performance loss for these nozzles with thick boundary layers is inaccurate using the existing procedure coded BLIMPJ. Modifications and innovations to the code are examined. Updated routines are listed.

  9. Measured and modelled concentrations and vertical profiles of airborne particulate matter within the boundary layer of a street canyon.

    PubMed

    Colls, J J; Micallef, A

    1999-09-01

    Concentrations and vertical profiles of various fractions of airborne particulate matter (suspended particulate matter (SPM), PM10 and PM2.5) have been measured over the first three metres from ground in a street canyon. Measurements were carried out using automated near real-time apparatus called the Kinetic Sequential Sampling (KSS) system. KSS system is essentially an electronically-controlled lift carrying a real-time particle monitor for sampling air sequentially, at different heights within the breathing zone, which includes all heights within the surface layer of a street canyon at which people may breathe. Data is automatically logged at the different receptor levels, for the determination of the average vertical concentration profile of airborne particulate matter. For measuring the airborne particle concentration, a Grimm Dust Monitor 1.104/5 was used. The recorded data also allows for time series analysis of airborne particulate matter concentration at different heights. Time series data and hourly-average vertical concentration profiles in the boundary layer of the confines of a street are thought to be mainly determined by traffic emissions and traffic associated processes. Hence the measured data were compared with results of a street canyon emission-dispersion model in time and space. This Street Level Air Quality (SLAQ) model employs the plume-box technique and includes modules for simulating vehicle-generated effects such as thermally- and mechanically-generated turbulence and resuspension of road dust. Environmental processes, such as turbulence resulting from surface sensible heat and the formation of sulphate aerosol from sulphur dioxide exhaust emissions, are taken into account. The paper presents an outline description of the measuring technique and model used, and a comparison of the measured and modelled data. PMID:10535122

  10. Boundary Layer Model for Air Pollutant Concentrations Due to Highway Traffic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragland, Kenneth W.; Peirce, J. Jeffrey

    1975-01-01

    A numerical solution of the three-dimensional steady-state diffusion equation for a finite width line source is presented. The wind speed and eddy diffusivity as a function of height above the roadway are obtained. Normalized ground level and elevated concentrations near a highway are obtained for winds perpendicular, parallel, and at 45 degrees.…

  11. Seasonal Trends in Boundary Layer Concentrations of Halocarbons at Coastal and Forest Sites in Borneo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Andrew; Harris, Neil; Gostlow, Bryan; O'Brien, Louise; Hawkes, Jeff; Ashfold, Matt; Yang, Xin; Warwick, Nicola; Pyle, John; Nadzir, Shahrul

    2010-05-01

    Halogen compounds are increasingly recognised as being important in atmospheric chemistry processes in the stratosphere and the troposphere. The sources of the halogens include natural (marine and terrestrial) and anthropogenic emissions of organic species. Long term measurements of halocarbons are currently made from various sites globally (e.g. by the AGAGE network and by NOAA-ESRL), however these sites are generally in background locations and have sparse coverage of the maritime continent which is anyway an understudied region. From April 2008 until present we have been making measurements in Borneo from inland (forest) and coastal sites using two µDirac instruments. One instrument is based at the Bukit Atur Research Station, Danum Valley (5.0°N, 117.8°E) and the other is based at a coastal site in Borneo (Tawau, 4.2°N, 118.0°E). The instruments are gas chromatographs with electron capture detector (GC-ECD) and are capable of operating quasi-autonomously with a low level of local support. They were initially deployed as part of the OP3 project and thereafter through another NERC funded project. Here we present the results from the first two years of measurements of certain short-lived halocarbons (including CHCl3, CH2Br2/CHCl2Br, C2Cl4 and CHBr3). High concentrations of some halocarbons have been observed at the coastal site. For 2-3 weeks in September 2008 the lowest observed values of CHBr3 were around 4 pptv, though there was no well defined background level and there were also significantly higher values (peaking at 50-150 pptv). Since then, lower background values (1-2 pptv) have been measured, with transient peaks present in all seasons except northern winter when the air comes predominantly from the northern hemisphere. The observed background concentrations at the inland site (about 85 km away) are around 1-2 pptv with relatively few of the transient peaks observed at the coast (occasional excursions to 5 pptv). These peaks are thus attributed to

  12. Boundary layer transition studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watmuff, Jonathan H.

    1995-01-01

    A small-scale wind tunnel previously used for turbulent boundary layer experiments was modified for two sets of boundary layer transition studies. The first study concerns a laminar separation/turbulent reattachment. The pressure gradient and unit Reynolds number are the same as the fully turbulent flow of Spalart and Watmuff. Without the trip wire, a laminar layer asymptotes to a Falkner & Skan similarity solution in the FPG. Application of the APG causes the layer to separate and a highly turbulent and approximately 2D mean flow reattachment occurs downstream. In an effort to gain some physical insight into the flow processes a small impulsive disturbance was introduced at the C(sub p) minimum. The facility is totally automated and phase-averaged data are measured on a point-by-point basis using unprecedently large grids. The evolution of the disturbance has been tracked all the way into the reattachment region and beyond into the fully turbulent boundary layer. At first, the amplitude decays exponentially with streamwise distance in the APG region, where the layer remains attached, i.e. the layer is viscously stable. After separation, the rate of decay slows, and a point of minimum amplitude is reached where the contours of the wave packet exhibit dispersive characteristics. From this point, exponential growth of the amplitude of the disturbance is observed in the detached shear layer, i.e. the dominant instability mechanism is inviscid. A group of large-scale 3D vortex loops emerges in the vicinity of the reattachment. Remarkably, the second loop retains its identify far downstream in the turbulent boundary layer. The results provide a level of detail usually associated with CFD. Substantial modifications were made to the facility for the second study concerning disturbances generated by Suction Holes for laminar flow Control (LFC). The test section incorporates suction through interchangeable porous test surfaces. Detailed studies have been made using isolated

  13. Mathematical model describing thickness changes of concentration boundary layers controlled by polymeric membrane parameters and concentration Rayleigh number.

    PubMed

    Slezak, Andrzej; Slezak, Izabella; Bryll, Arkadiusz; Jasik-Slezak, Jolanta; Młynarski, Jacek

    2006-01-01

    In the paper, by applicating the classic definition of concentration Rayleigh number and the second Kedem-Katchalsky equation, there was deriven the equation of the fourth degree, which makes thicknesses (deltah and deltal) dependent on the concentration difference (Ch-Cl), concentration Rayleigh number (Rc), membrane permeability parameters (omega, xi s) and solutions (Dl, Dh), physico-chemical parameters of solutions (v(l), v(h), rho l, rho h, delta rho/deltaC), temperature (T) and gravitational acceleration (g). On the basis of the obtained formula for isothermal conditions (T = const) and constant gravitational field (g = const), there were calculated non-linear dependencies delta h = f(Ch-Cl)(Rc, zeta s), delta h = f (Rc)((Ch-Cl),zeta s) and delta h = f(delta s)((Ch-Cl),Rc). PMID:16869546

  14. Interactions in boundary-layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Frank T.

    1989-01-01

    Certain theoretical studies of boundary-layer transition are described, based on high Reynolds numbers and with attention drawn to the various nonlinear interactions and scales present. The article concentrates in particular on theories for which the mean-flow profile is completely altered from its original state. Two- and three-dimensional flow theory and conjectures on turbulent-boundary-layer structures are included. Specific recent findings noted, and in qualitative agreement with experiments, are: nonlinear finite-time break-ups in unsteady interactive boundary layers; strong vortex/wave interactions; and prediction of turbulent boundary-layer displacement- and stress sublayer-thicknesses.

  15. Modeling the urban boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A summary and evaluation is given of the Workshop on Modeling the Urban Boundary Layer; held in Las Vegas on May 5, 1975. Edited summaries from each of the session chairpersons are also given. The sessions were: (1) formulation and solution techniques, (2) K-theory versus higher order closure, (3) surface heat and moisture balance, (4) initialization and boundary problems, (5) nocturnal boundary layer, and (6) verification of models.

  16. Ellipsometry characterization of polycrystalline ZnO layers with the modeling of carrier concentration gradient: Effects of grain boundary, humidity, and surface texture

    SciTech Connect

    Sago, Keisuke; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki; Kuramochi, Hideto; Iigusa, Hitoshi; Utsumi, Kentaro

    2014-04-07

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) has been applied to study the effects of grain boundary, humidity, and surface texture on the carrier transport properties of Al-doped ZnO layers fabricated by dc and rf magnetron sputtering. In the SE analysis, the variation in the free carrier absorption toward the growth direction, induced by the ZnO grain growth on foreign substrates, has been modeled explicitly by adopting a multilayer model in which the optical carrier concentration (N{sub opt}) varies continuously with a constant optical mobility (μ{sub opt}). The effect of the grain boundary has been studied by comparing μ{sub opt} with Hall mobility (μ{sub Hall}). The change in μ{sub Hall}/μ{sub opt} indicates a sharp structural transition of the ZnO polycrystalline layer at a thickness of d ∼ 500 nm, which correlates very well with the structure confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. In particular, below the transition thickness, the formation of the high density grain boundary leads to the reduction in the μ{sub Hall}/μ{sub opt} ratio as well as N{sub opt}. As a result, we find that the thickness dependence of the carrier transport properties is almost completely governed by the grain boundary formation. On the other hand, when the ZnO layer is exposed to wet air at 85 °C, μ{sub Hall} reduces drastically with a minor variation of μ{sub opt} due to the enhanced grain boundary scattering. We have also characterized textured ZnO:Al layers prepared by HCl wet etching by SE. The analysis revealed that the near-surface carrier concentration increases slightly after the etching. We demonstrate that the SE technique can be applied to distinguish various rough textured structures (size ∼ 1 μm) of the ZnO layers prepared by the HCl etching.

  17. Boundary-layer stability and airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viken, Jeffrey K.

    1986-01-01

    Several different natural laminar flow (NLF) airfoils have been analyzed for stability of the laminar boundary layer using linear stability codes. The NLF airfoils analyzed come from three different design conditions: incompressible; compressible with no sweep; and compressible with sweep. Some of the design problems are discussed, concentrating on those problems associated with keeping the boundary layer laminar. Also, there is a discussion on how a linear stability analysis was effectively used to improve the design for some of the airfoils.

  18. Seasonal variation in concentration, size, and settling velocity of muddy marine flocs in the benthic boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fettweis, Michael; Baeye, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM) concentration profiles of the lowest 2 m of the water column and particle size distribution at 2 m above the bed were measured in a coastal turbidity maximum area (southern North Sea) during more than 700 days between 2006 and 2013. The long-term data series of SPM concentration, floc size, and settling velocity have been ensemble averaged according to tidal range, alongshore residual flow direction, and season, in order to investigate the seasonal SPM dynamics and its relation with physical and biological processes. The data show that the SPM is more concentrated in the near-bed layer in summer, whereas in winter, the SPM is better mixed throughout the water column. The decrease of the SPM concentration in the water column during summer is compensated by a higher near-bed concentration indicating that a significant part of the SPM remains in the area during summer rather than being advected out of it. The opposite seasonality between near-bed layer and water column has to our knowledge not yet been presented in literature. Physical effects such as wave heights, wind climate, or storms have a weak correlation with the observed seasonality. The argument to favor microbial activity as main driver of the seasonality lies in the observed variations in floc size and settling velocity. On average, the flocs are larger and thus settling velocities higher in summer than winter.

  19. Boundary Layer Control on Airfoils.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhab, George; Eastlake, Charles

    1991-01-01

    A phenomena, boundary layer control (BLC), produced when visualizing the fluidlike flow of air is described. The use of BLC in modifying aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils, race cars, and boats is discussed. (KR)

  20. Removing Boundary Layer by Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackeret, J

    1927-01-01

    Through the utilization of the "Magnus effect" on the Flettner rotor ship, the attention of the public has been directed to the underlying physical principle. It has been found that the Prandtl boundary-layer theory furnishes a satisfactory explanation of the observed phenomena. The present article deals with the prevention of this separation or detachment of the flow by drawing the boundary layer into the inside of a body through a slot or slots in its surface.

  1. Airship measurements of aerosol size distributions, cloud droplet spectra, and trace gas concentrations in the marine boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    Frick, G.M.; Hoppel, W.A. )

    1993-11-01

    The use of an airship as a platform to conduct atmospheric chemistry, aerosol, and cloud microphysical research is described, and results from demonstration flights made off the Oregon coast are presented. The slow speed of the airship makes it an ideal platform to do high-spatial resolution profiling both vertically and horizontally, and to measure large aerosol and cloud droplet distributions without the difficulties caused by high-speed aircraft sampling. A unique set of data obtained during the demonstration flights show the effect that processing marine boundary layer aerosol through stratus clouds has on the aerosol size distribution. Evidence of new particle formation (nucleation of particles) was also observed on about half the days on which flights were made. 11 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Concentrations of PM 10, PM 2.5, and PM 1 influenced by atmospheric circulation and atmospheric boundary layer in the Korean mountainous coast during a duststorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyo; Choi, Doo Sun

    2008-09-01

    Particle size concentrations of 100 ng m - 3 to 203" in the main text were changed to "100 ng m- 3". Please check if appropriate.--> μg m - 3 were measured at two sampling points over the eastern coastal region of Korea by two GRIMM aerosol samplers from March 7-17, 2004. One sampling point was located on the western upwind side of the mountains, and the other sampling point was located in the city of Kangnung in the coastal basin downwind and adjacent to the East Sea. Concentrations of PM 10, PM 2.5, and PM 1 were measured near the ground in Kangnung on March 8, 2004, until 1200 LST before the passage of a duststorm. Values of about 40, 35, and 30 μg m - 3 , respectively, were detected indicating little variation among sample concentrations. Before the duststorm, maximum concentrations for PM 10 occurred around 0800 and 1700 LST due to increased fuel combustion from road vehicles. From the afternoon of March 10-16 when the largest amount of dust from China had passed over Kangnung under the influence of a westerly wind, PM 10 concentration reached 340 μg m - 3 , and PM 2.5 and PM 1 concentrations reached 105 μg m - 3 and 60 μg m - 3 , respectively, indicating double the PM 10 concentration as compared to PM 2.5. Most of the dust transported from China consisted of particle sizes larger than PM 2.5 and PM 1. Dust transported from the western, upwind side of the mountains combined with the particulates emitted from road vehicles and industrial and residential boilers in the city after sunrise under the influence of westerly winds resulted in a high particulate concentration at 0900 LST. However, a low concentration of particulates in the city was detected near 1200 LST due to changes in the structure of the atmospheric boundary layer, while a high concentration over the mountains occurred due to a stable layer. High-particulate concentrations in the city occurred again after 1700 LST owing to increased fuel combustion from road vehicles and residential boilers

  3. Boundary layer halogens in coastal Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso; Mahajan, Anoop S; Salmon, Rhian A; Bauguitte, Stephane J-B; Jones, Anna E; Roscoe, Howard K; Plane, John M C

    2007-07-20

    Halogens influence the oxidizing capacity of Earth's troposphere, and iodine oxides form ultrafine aerosols, which may have an impact on climate. We report year-round measurements of boundary layer iodine oxide and bromine oxide at the near-coastal site of Halley Station, Antarctica. Surprisingly, both species are present throughout the sunlit period and exhibit similar seasonal cycles and concentrations. The springtime peak of iodine oxide (20 parts per trillion) is the highest concentration recorded anywhere in the atmosphere. These levels of halogens cause substantial ozone depletion, as well as the rapid oxidation of dimethyl sulfide and mercury in the Antarctic boundary layer. PMID:17641195

  4. Physics of magnetospheric boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    1995-01-01

    This final report was concerned with the ideas that: (1) magnetospheric boundary layers link disparate regions of the magnetosphere-solar wind system together; and (2) global behavior of the magnetosphere can be understood only by understanding its internal linking mechanisms and those with the solar wind. The research project involved simultaneous research on the global-, meso-, and micro-scale physics of the magnetosphere and its boundary layers, which included the bow shock, the magnetosheath, the plasma sheet boundary layer, and the ionosphere. Analytic, numerical, and simulation projects were performed on these subjects, as well as comparisons of theoretical results with observational data. Other related activity included in the research included: (1) prediction of geomagnetic activity; (2) global MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) simulations; (3) Alfven resonance heating; and (4) Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) effect. In the appendixes are list of personnel involved, list of papers published; and reprints or photocopies of papers produced for this report.

  5. Unsteady turbulent boundary layer analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singleton, R. E.; Nash, J. F.; Carl, L. W.; Patel, V. C.

    1973-01-01

    The governing equations for an unsteady turbulent boundary layer on a swept infinite cylinder, composed of a continuity equation, a pair of momentum equations and a pair of turbulent energy equations which include upstream history efforts, are solved numerically. An explicit finite difference analog to the partial differential equations is formulated and developed into a computer program. Calculations were made for a variety of unsteady flows in both two and three dimensions but primarily for two dimensional flow fields in order to first understand some of the fundamental physical aspects of unsteady turbulent boundary layers. Oscillating free stream flows without pressure gradient, oscillating retarded free stream flows and monotonically time-varying flows have all been studied for a wide frequency range. It was found that to the lowest frequency considered, the lower frequency bound being determined by economic considerations (machine time), there were significant unsteady effects on the turbulent boundary layer.

  6. Boundary layer control for airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pake, F. A.; Pipitone, S. J.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation is summarized of the aerodynamic principle of boundary layer control for nonrigid LTA craft. The project included a wind tunnel test on a BLC body of revolution at zero angle of attack. Theoretical analysis is shown to be in excellent agreement with the test data. Methods are evolved for predicting the boundary layer development on a body of revolution and the suction pumping and propulsive power requirements. These methods are used to predict the performance characteristics of a full-scale airship. The analysis indicates that propulsive power reductions of 15 to 25 percent and endurance improvements of 20 to 40 percent may be realized in employing boundary-layer control to nonrigid airships.

  7. Nonparallel stability of boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, Ali H.

    1987-01-01

    The asymptotic formulations of the nonparallel linear stability of incompressible growing boundary layers are critically reviewed. These formulations can be divided into two approaches. The first approach combines a numerical method with either the method of multiple scales, or the method of averaging, of the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation; all these methods yield the same result. The second approach combined a multi-structure theory with the method of multiple scales. The first approach yields results that are in excellent agreement with all available experimental data, including the growth rates as well as the neutral stability curve. The derivation of the linear stability of the incompressible growing boundary layers is explained.

  8. The concentration variation of NOy and T.NO3 during the transport in the remote marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadanaga, Y.; Yuba, A.; Takami, A.; Hatakeyama, S.; Masui, Y.; Ohara, T.; Yokouchi, Y.; Yonemura, S.; Kato, S.; Kajii, Y. J.; Takenaka, N.; Bandow, H.

    2012-12-01

    The recent studies reported that the emission of nitrogen oxides from the East Asia has been increasing recently. NOx (= NO + NO2) are chemically transformed into other nitrogen oxides species such as NO3, N2O5, peroxyacylnitrate (PANs), gaseous nitric acid (HNO3), particulate nitrate (NO3-(p)) and so on. Especially, HNO3 and NO3-(p) have a relatively longer lifetime in the atmosphere so that these species can be transported and removed by the dry/wet deposition. Deposited N-containing species have an impact on the atmospheric and aquatic environment such as changing biological activities, acidification and eutrophication in the remote marine boundary layer. The removal rate of N-containing species is important for the estimation of the impact on the remote atmospheric and aquatic environment. We conducted the continuous measurements of total odd nitrogen species (NOy) and T.NO3 (= HNO3 + NO3-(p)) at Cape Hedo, Okinawa and Fukue Island, Nagasaki, Japan. We analyzed the transport event defined as the case that the same air mass transported from the Asian Continent through Fukue to Hedo. The variations of NOy and T.NO3 are mainly due to the deposition and dilution process during the transport. According to the comparison of NOy /CO ratio measured in Fukue and Hedo during the transport event, NOy mainly decreased due to the dry deposition. The removal rate constant and lifetime of NOy was calculated as (1.16 ± 0.36) × 10-5 s-1 and 18 - 35 hour, respectively. We will discuss the chemical transformation of T.NO3 during the transport in the meeting.

  9. Physics of magnetospheric boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, I. H.

    1993-01-01

    The central ideas of this grant are that the magnetospheric boundary layers link disparate regions of the magnetosphere together, and the global behavior of the magnetosphere can be understood only by understanding the linking mechanisms. Accordingly the present grant includes simultaneous research on the global, meso-, and micro-scale physics of the magnetosphere and its boundary layers. These boundary layers include the bow shock, magnetosheath, the plasma sheet boundary layer, and the ionosphere. Analytic, numerical and simulation projects have been performed on these subjects, as well as comparison of theoretical results with observational data. Very good progress has been made, with four papers published or in press and two additional papers submitted for publication during the six month period 1 June - 30 November 1993. At least two projects are currently being written up. In addition, members of the group have given papers at scientific meetings. The further structure of this report is as follows: section two contains brief accounts of research completed during the last six months, while section three describes the research projects intended for the grant's final period.

  10. Turbulent boundary layers over nonstationary plane boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roper, A. T.

    1976-01-01

    Methods of predicting integral parameters and skin-friction coefficients of turbulent boundary layers developing over moving-ground-planes are evaluated using test information from three different wind tunnel facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center. These data include test information from the VSTOL tunnel which is presented for the first time. The three methods evaluated were: (1) relative integral parameter method, (2) relative power law method, and (3) modified law of the wall method. Methods (1) and (2) can be used to predict moving-ground-plane shape factors with an expected accuracy of + or - 10%. They may also be used to predict moving-ground-plane displacement and momentum thicknesses with lower expected accuracy. This decrease in accuracy can be traced to the failure of approximations upon which these methods are based to prove universal when compared with VSTOL tunnel test results.

  11. Measurements to understand the role of the sub Arctic environment on boundary layer ozone, gaseous mercury and bromine oxide concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netcheva, S.; Bottenheim, J.; Staebler, R.; Steffen, A.; Bobrowski, N.; Moores, J.

    2009-04-01

    Marine Boundary Layer spring time ozone (O3) and Gaseous Elemental Mercury (GEM) depletion episodes in Polar Regions and the role played by reactive halogen species have been studied for several years. Understanding of the photochemistry involved has improved significantly in the last few years, but many questions remain. The key in filling many gaps of information is in conducting systematic measurements over freezing and thawing surfaces of big water basins in Polar Regions where depletion episodes are thought to originate. Regardless of extensive research in the field, data sets collected over the ice are limited due to logistics and engineering challenges. The fast changing Arctic environment with its potential implications for climate change and human and ecosystem health demand urgent development of a predictive capability that could only be achieved by complete quantitative understanding of these phenomena. The Out On The Ice (OOTI) mini atmospheric chemistry laboratory was developed in 2004 specifically to permit collecting data at remote locations in an autonomous way. The system is battery powered, easily transported by snowmobile and quickly deployed at a target location. The equipment has undergone multiple engineering and instrumentation improvements. In its current version, it conducts fully automated measurements of O3, GEM and carbon dioxide (CO2) simultaneously at two levels: right above a surface of interest and at 2.5 meters. This is accomplished by utilizing two identical sets of instruments (2B for O3 and Gardis for GEM), or by continuous valve switching (CO2). A vertical profile of bromine oxide is determined by scanning the collecting optics of a Differential Optical Absorption Spectrometer through different elevation angles. Furthermore a full set of meteorological data is acquired in parallel with the chemical measurements in order to evaluate environmental and air mass transport contributions. We will present results from data collected

  12. Boundary Layers, Transitions and Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Effects of roughness in boundary layers have to be addressed. Until adverse pressure gradient effects are understood, roughness will not significantly drive design. Mechanisms responsible for separation not understood. Effects on Zero Pressure Gradient boundary layers (shear stress). Effects on separation in pressure gradient (prediction of separation). Effect on scalar transport (heat transfer) not understood. Model for skin friction needed in simulations - first grid point likely to be in buffer layer. Definition of roughness important for useful experiments. A lot of validation experiments will be needed. How to get to ks for roughness of engineering interest? - depends on wavelength height, etc. for engineering interest? Re-discovering the wheel should be avoided: existing knowledge (theoretical and experimental) should find its way into the engineering models. It is a task of the industry to filter out the existing information in the literature for results relevant to its application, being external or internal.

  13. Fluid flow enhances the effectiveness of toxin export by aquatic microorganisms: A first-passage perspective on microvilli and the concentration boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licata, Nicholas A.; Clark, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    A central challenge for organisms during development is determining a means to efficiently export toxic molecules from inside the developing embryo. For aquatic microorganisms, the strategies employed should be robust with respect to the variable ocean environment and limit the chances that exported toxins are reabsorbed. As a result, the problem of toxin export is closely related to the physics of mass transport in a fluid. In this paper, we consider a model first-passage problem for the uptake of exported toxins by a spherical embryo. By considering how macroscale fluid turbulence manifests itself on the microscale of the embryo, we determine that fluid flow enhances the effectiveness of toxin export as compared to the case of diffusion-limited transport. In the regime of a large Péclet number, a perturbative solution of the advection-diffusion equation reveals that a concentration boundary layer forms at the surface of the embryo. The model results suggest a functional role for cell surface roughness in the export process, with the thickness of the concentration boundary layer setting the length scale for cell membrane protrusions known as microvilli. We highlight connections between the model results and experiments on the development of sea urchin embryos.

  14. Impact of atmospheric boundary layer depth variability and wind reversal on the diurnal variability of aerosol concentration at a valley site.

    PubMed

    Pal, S; Lee, T R; Phelps, S; De Wekker, S F J

    2014-10-15

    The development of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) plays a key role in affecting the variability of atmospheric constituents such as aerosols, greenhouse gases, water vapor, and ozone. In general, the concentration of any tracers within the ABL varies due to the changes in the mixing volume (i.e. ABL depth). In this study, we investigate the impact on the near-surface aerosol concentration in a valley site of 1) the boundary layer dilution due to vertical mixing and 2) changes in the wind patterns. We use a data set obtained during a 10-day field campaign in which a number of remote sensing and in-situ instruments were deployed, including a ground-based aerosol lidar system for monitoring of the ABL top height (zi), a particle counter to determine the number concentration of aerosol particles at eight different size ranges, and tower-based standard meteorological instruments. Results show a clearly visible decreasing trend of the mean daytime zi from 2900 m AGL (above ground level) to 2200 m AGL during a three-day period which resulted in increased near-surface pollutant concentrations. An inverse relationship exists between the zi and the fine fraction (0.3-0.7 μm) accumulation mode particles (AMP) on some days due to the dilution effect in a well-mixed ABL. These days are characterized by the absence of daytime upvalley winds and the presence of northwesterly synoptic-driven winds. In contrast, on the days with an onset of an upvalley wind circulation after the morning transition, the wind-driven local transport mechanism outweighs the ABL-dilution effect in determining the variability of AMP concentration. The interplay between the ABL depth evolution and the onset of the upvalley wind during the morning transition period significantly governs the air quality in a valley and could be an important component in the studies of mountain meteorology and air quality. PMID:25105753

  15. Stability of compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, Ali H.

    1989-01-01

    The stability of compressible 2-D and 3-D boundary layers is reviewed. The stability of 2-D compressible flows differs from that of incompressible flows in two important features: There is more than one mode of instability contributing to the growth of disturbances in supersonic laminar boundary layers and the most unstable first mode wave is 3-D. Whereas viscosity has a destabilizing effect on incompressible flows, it is stabilizing for high supersonic Mach numbers. Whereas cooling stabilizes first mode waves, it destabilizes second mode waves. However, second order waves can be stabilized by suction and favorable pressure gradients. The influence of the nonparallelism on the spatial growth rate of disturbances is evaluated. The growth rate depends on the flow variable as well as the distance from the body. Floquet theory is used to investigate the subharmonic secondary instability.

  16. Jupiter's deep magnetotail boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaou, G.; McComas, D. J.; Bagenal, F.; Elliott, H. A.; Ebert, R. W.

    2015-06-01

    In 2007 the New Horizons (NH) spacecraft flew by Jupiter for a gravity assist en route to Pluto. After closest approach on day of year (DOY) 58, 2007, NH followed a tailward trajectory that provided a unique opportunity to explore the deep jovian magnetotail and the surrounding magnetosheath. After DOY 132, 16 magnetopause crossings were observed between 1654 and 2429 Jupiter radii (Rj) along the dusk flank tailward of the planet. In some cases the crossings were identified as rapid transitions from the magnetotail to the magnetosheath and vice versa. In other cases a boundary layer was observed just inside the magnetopause. Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) is an instrument on board NH that obtained spectra of low energy ions during the flyby period. We use a forward model including the SWAP instrument response to derive plasma parameters (density, temperature and velocity) which best reproduce the observations. We also vary the plasma parameters in our model in order to fit the observations more accurately on occasions where the measurements exhibit significant variability. We compare the properties of the plasma in the boundary layer with those of the magnetosheath plasma derived in our earlier work. We attempt to estimate the magnetic field in the boundary layer assuming pressure balance between it and the magnetosheath. Finally, we investigate several possible scenarios to assess if magnetopause movement and structure could cause the variations seen in the data.

  17. Boundary layer receptivity and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, D. C.

    1993-01-01

    Receptivity processes initiate natural instabilities in a boundary layer. The instabilities grow and eventually break down to turbulence. Consequently, receptivity questions are a critical element of the analysis of the transition process. Success in modeling the physics of receptivity processes thus has a direct bearing on technological issues of drag reduction. The means by which transitional flows can be controlled is also a major concern: questions of control are tied inevitably to those of receptivity. Adjoint systems provide a highly effective mathematical method for approaching many of the questions associated with both receptivity and control. The long term objective is to develop adjoint methods to handle increasingly complex receptivity questions, and to find systematic procedures for deducing effective control strategies. The most elementary receptivity problem is that in which a parallel boundary layer is forced by time-harmonic sources of various types. The characteristics of the response to such forcing form the building blocks for more complex receptivity mechanisms. The first objective of this year's research effort was to investigate how a parallel Blasius boundary layer responds to general direct forcing. Acoustic disturbances in the freestream can be scattered by flow non-uniformities to produce Tollmien-Schlichting waves. For example, scattering by surface roughness is known to provide an efficient receptivity path. The present effort is directed towards finding a solution by a simple adjoint analysis, because adjoint methods can be extended to more complex problems. In practice, flows are non-parallel and often three-dimensional. Compressibility may also be significant in some cases. Recent developments in the use of Parabolized Stability Equations (PSE) offer a promising possibility. By formulating and solving a set of adjoint parabolized equations, a method for mapping the efficiency with which external forcing excites the three

  18. The entraining moist boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    A unified theory of entrainment into the planetary boundary layer is presented. It is assumed that the rates of buoyant and shear production of turbulence kinetic energy can be determined in terms of the entrainment mass flux. An expression is derived from the conservation law for turbulence kinetic energy, which, with the introduction of an empirical parameter, can be used together with a second relation between turbulence kinetic energy and the turbulence velocity scale to obtain the mass entrainment flux. The theory provides descriptions of storage-limited entrainment, buoyancy-limited entrainment into a clear mixed layer, and shallowing. It has been incorporated into a simulation of Day 33 of the Wangara experiment using a simple mixed layer model.

  19. Dispersion of a Passive Scalar Fluctuating Plume in a Turbulent Boundary Layer. Part I: Velocity and Concentration Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nironi, Chiara; Salizzoni, Pietro; Marro, Massimo; Mejean, Patrick; Grosjean, Nathalie; Soulhac, Lionel

    2015-09-01

    The prediction of the probability density function (PDF) of a pollutant concentration within atmospheric flows is of primary importance in estimating the hazard related to accidental releases of toxic or flammable substances and their effects on human health. This need motivates studies devoted to the characterization of concentration statistics of pollutants dispersion in the lower atmosphere, and their dependence on the parameters controlling their emissions. As is known from previous experimental results, concentration fluctuations are significantly influenced by the diameter of the source and its elevation. In this study, we aim to further investigate the dependence of the dispersion process on the source configuration, including source size, elevation and emission velocity. To that end we study experimentally the influence of these parameters on the statistics of the concentration of a passive scalar, measured at several distances downwind of the source. We analyze the spatial distribution of the first four moments of the concentration PDFs, with a focus on the variance, its dissipation and production and its spectral density. The information provided by the dataset, completed by estimates of the intermittency factors, allow us to discuss the role of the main mechanisms controlling the scalar dispersion and their link to the form of the PDF. The latter is shown to be very well approximated by a Gamma distribution, irrespective of the emission conditions and the distance from the source. Concentration measurements are complemented by a detailed description of the velocity statistics, including direct estimates of the Eulerian integral length scales from two-point correlations, a measurement that has been rarely presented to date.

  20. Turbulent boundary layer of an airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fediaevsky, K

    1937-01-01

    A need has arisen for a new determination of the velocity profiles in the boundary layer. Assuming that the character of the velocity distribution depends to a large extent on the character of the shear distribution across the boundary layer, we shall consider the nature of the shear distribution for a boundary layer with a pressure gradient.

  1. Planetary Boundary Layer from AERI and MPL

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Virginia

    2014-02-13

    The distribution and transport of aerosol emitted to the lower troposphere is governed by the height of the planetary boundary layer (PBL), which limits the dilution of pollutants and influences boundary-layer convection. Because radiative heating and cooling of the surface strongly affect the PBL top height, it follows diurnal and seasonal cycles and may vary by hundreds of meters over a 24-hour period. The cap the PBL imposes on low-level aerosol transport makes aerosol concentration an effective proxy for PBL height: the top of the PBL is marked by a rapid transition from polluted, well-mixed boundary-layer air to the cleaner, more stratified free troposphere. Micropulse lidar (MPL) can provide much higher temporal resolution than radiosonde and better vertical resolution than infrared spectrometer (AERI), but PBL heights from all three instruments at the ARM SGP site are compared to one another for validation. If there is agreement among them, the higher-resolution remote sensing-derived PBL heights can accurately fill in the gaps left by the low frequency of radiosonde launches, and thus improve model parameterizations and our understanding of boundary-layer processes.

  2. Relationships of coastal nocturnal boundary layer winds and turbulence to Houston ozone concentrations during TexAQS 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Sara C.; Banta, Robert M.; Langford, Andrew O.; Senff, Christoph J.; Brewer, W. Alan; Williams, Eric J.; Lerner, Brian M.; Osthoff, Hans D.; Hardesty, R. Michael

    2010-05-01

    Measurements made with a ship-based Doppler wind lidar during the summertime 2006 Texas Air Quality Study are used to study the relationship between lower-tropospheric vertical structure and winds and ozone (O3) concentrations in Houston, Texas, under two different flow regimes. We observed that strong southerly flow regimes, dominated by the subtropical anticyclone (Bermuda high) off the Atlantic coast of the United States, resulted in strong (i.e., high wind speed) onshore nocturnal low-level jets (LLJ) and low O3 and oxidant Ox (where Ox = O3 + NO2) concentrations at night and the following afternoon. In contrast, periods dominated by northerly or easterly flow resulted in relatively weak (low wind speed), but still onshore, nocturnal LLJs associated with higher concurrent and next-day concentrations of O3 and Ox. We present lidar data from 24 h example periods for each of these conditions and demonstrate how each type of flow regime is related to in situ ship-based ozone measurements. We expanded the study to include all days during the study when the ship was near Houston, to demonstrate how the strength of the meridional winds aloft show a better relationship to concurrent ship-measured Ox concentrations than the winds near the surface do. We found a strong relationship between a parameterization of the observed nocturnal jets, which reflect the synoptic conditions, to peak hourly O3 measured the next day at the ship and averaged throughout the Houston/Galveston/Brazoria continuous ambient monitoring stations monitoring network, indicating potential applications for planning air quality.

  3. Boundary Layer Heights from CALIOP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, R.; Ackerman, S. A.; Holz, R.; Roubert, L.

    2012-12-01

    This work is focused on the development of a planetary boundary layer (PBL) height retrieval algorithm for CALIOP and validation studies. Our current approach uses a wavelet covariance transform analysis technique to find the top of the boundary layer. We use the methodology similar to that found in Davis et. al. 2000, ours has been developed to work with the lower SNR data provided by CALIOP, and is intended to work autonomously. Concurrently developed with the CALIOP algorithm we will show results from a PBL height retrieval algorithm from profiles of potential temperature, these are derived from Aircraft Meteorological DAta Relay (AMDAR) observations. Results from 5 years of collocated AMDAR - CALIOP retrievals near O'Hare airport demonstrate good agreement between the CALIOP - AMDAR retrievals. In addition, because we are able to make daily retrievals from the AMDAR measurements, we are able to observe the seasonal and annual variation in the PBL height at airports that have sufficient instrumented-aircraft traffic. Also, a comparison has been done between the CALIOP retrievals and the NASA Langley airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) PBL height retrievals acquired during the GoMACCS experiment. Results of this comparison, like the AMDAR comparison are favorable. Our current work also involves the analysis and verification of the CALIOP PBL height retrieval from the 6 year CALIOP global data set. Results from this analysis will also be presented.

  4. Modelling the transitional boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narasimha, R.

    1990-01-01

    Recent developments in the modelling of the transition zone in the boundary layer are reviewed (the zone being defined as extending from the station where intermittency begins to depart from zero to that where it is nearly unity). The value of using a new non-dimensional spot formation rate parameter, and the importance of allowing for so-called subtransitions within the transition zone, are both stressed. Models do reasonably well in constant pressure 2-dimensional flows, but in the presence of strong pressure gradients further improvements are needed. The linear combination approach works surprisingly well in most cases, but would not be so successful in situations where a purely laminar boundary layer would separate but a transitional one would not. Intermittency-weighted eddy viscosity methods do not predict peak surface parameters well without the introduction of an overshooting transition function whose connection with the spot theory of transition is obscure. Suggestions are made for further work that now appears necessary for developing improved models of the transition zone.

  5. Nonequilibrium chemistry boundary layer integral matrix procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, H.; Buckingham, A. C.; Morse, H. L.

    1973-01-01

    The development of an analytic procedure for the calculation of nonequilibrium boundary layer flows over surfaces of arbitrary catalycities is described. An existing equilibrium boundary layer integral matrix code was extended to include nonequilibrium chemistry while retaining all of the general boundary condition features built into the original code. For particular application to the pitch-plane of shuttle type vehicles, an approximate procedure was developed to estimate the nonequilibrium and nonisentropic state at the edge of the boundary layer.

  6. Outer layer effects in wind-farm boundary layers: Coriolis forces and boundary layer height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaerts, Dries; Meyers, Johan

    2015-11-01

    In LES studies of wind-farm boundary layers, scale separation between the inner and outer region of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is frequently assumed, i.e., wind turbines are presumed to fall within the inner layer and are not affected by outer layer effects. However, modern wind turbine and wind farm design tends towards larger rotor diameters and farm sizes, which means that outer layer effects will become more important. In a prior study, it was already shown for fully-developed wind farms that the ABL height influences the power performance. In this study, we use the in-house LES code SP-Wind to investigate the importance of outer layer effects on wind-farm boundary layers. In a suite of LES cases, the ABL height is varied by imposing a capping inversion with varying inversion strengths. Results indicate the growth of an internal boundary layer (IBL), which is limited in cases with low inversion layers. We further find that flow deceleration combined with Coriolis effects causes a change in wind direction throughout the farm. This effect increases with decreasing boundary layer height, and can result in considerable turbine wake deflection near the end of the farm. The authors are supported by the ERC (ActiveWindFarms, grant no: 306471). Computations were performed on VSC infrastructiure (Flemish Supercomputer Center), funded by the Hercules Foundation and the Flemish Government-department EWI.

  7. Microgravity Effects on Plant Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutte, Gary; Monje, Oscar

    2005-01-01

    The goal of these series of experiment was to determine the effects of microgravity conditions on the developmental boundary layers in roots and leaves and to determine the effects of air flow on boundary layer development. It is hypothesized that microgravity induces larger boundary layers around plant organs because of the absence of buoyancy-driven convection. These larger boundary layers may affect normal metabolic function because they may reduce the fluxes of heat and metabolically active gases (e.g., oxygen, water vapor, and carbon dioxide. These experiments are to test whether there is a change in boundary layer associated with microgravity, quantify the change if it exists, and determine influence of air velocity on boundary layer thickness under different gravity conditions.

  8. Convective boundary layer and modeling of dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Nizam Uddin

    Looping, bifurcation, and meandering of a plume are generally observed in a convective field. The blobby or puffy concentration patterns associated with these plumes are marked deviations from what is expected from either conventional K-theory or Gaussian distribution formulae. A numerical model was developed for material dispersion in a convective boundary layer from both elevated and ground sources. Mechanistic formulation, rather than parameterization, or statistical behavior of planetary boundary layer (PBL) phenomena, was used as a basis. The dispersion mechanism is considered to be due to mixing between the updraft and the downdraft. This model uses two universal constants, (turbulent entrainment constant, a, and decay constant A) and a mixing scheme directly supported by observations. Researchers examined the dispersion pattern from the elevated and ground sources. For elevated sources, the maximum concentration descends first to the ground level at some distance downwind, and then rises, depending on the inversion height, the mean wind and height at which material is released. The updrafts have a higher velocity than the downdrafts and consequently the downdrafts occupy a larger horizontal area. In some cases the updrafts and downdrafts are comparable and materials are caught equally in the updrafts and downdrafts. The concentration of materials is split into two parts, one moving downward and the other upward. It is shown using the same mechanistic principles, that different convective situations cause different concentration patterns (for example, looping, bifurcating of a plume, and ascending of center line).

  9. Goertler instability of compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Hady, N. M.; Verma, A. K.

    1984-01-01

    The instability of the laminar compressible boundary-layer flows along concave surfaces is investigated. The linearized disturbance equations for the three-dimensional, counter-rotating, longitudinal-type vortices in two-dimensional boundary layers are presented in an orthogonal curvilinear system of coordinates. The basic approximation of the disturbance equations, which includes the effect of the growth of the boundary layer, is considered and solved numerically.

  10. Three-dimensional boundary layers approaching separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. C., III

    1976-01-01

    The theory of semi-similar solutions of the laminar boundary layer equations is applied to several flows in which the boundary layer approaches a three-dimensional separation line. The solutions obtained are used to deduce the nature of three-dimensional separation. It is shown that in these cases separation is of the "ordinary" type. A solution is also presented for a case in which a vortex is embedded within the three-dimensional boundary layer.

  11. Turbulent boundary layers with secondary flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grushwitz, E.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental analysis of the boundary layer on a plane wall, along which the flow occurs, whose potential flow lines are curved in plane parallel to the wall is discussed. According to the equation frequently applied to boundary layers in a plane flow, which is usually obtained by using the pulse law, a generalization is derived which is valid for boundary layers with spatial flow. The wall shear stresses were calculated with this equation.

  12. Structure of the low latitude boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sckopke, N.; Paschmann, G.; Haerendel, G.; Sonnerup, B. U. O.; Bame, S. J.; Forbes, T. G.; Hones, E. W., Jr.; Russell, C. T.

    1980-01-01

    Observations at high temporal resolution of the frontside magnetopause and plasma boundary layer, made with the LASL/MPE fast plasma analyzer onboard the ISEE 1 and 2 spacecraft, revealed a complex quasiperiodic structure of some of the observed boundary layers. A cool tailward streaming boundary layer plasma was seen intermittently, with intervening periods of hot tenuous plasma which has properties similar to the magnetospheric population. While individual encounters with the boundary layer plasma last only a few minutes, the total observation time may extend over one hour or more.

  13. Nonlinear breakdowns in boundary layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Frank T.

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical studies of boundary-layer transition are described, based on high Reynolds numbers and with attention drawn to nonlinear interactions, breakdowns and scales. The article notes in particular truly nonlinear theories for which the mean-flow profile is completely altered from its original state. Two- and three-dimensional flow theory and conjectures on turbulent boundary-layer structures are included. Specific recent findings noted, and in qualitative agreement with experiments, are: nonlinear finite-time break-ups in unsteady interactive boundary layers; strong vortex/wave interactions; and prediction of turbulent boundary-layer displacement- and stress sublayer-thicknesses.

  14. Development of perturbations in the boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dovgal, A. V.; Kachanov, Y. S.; Kozlov, V. V.; Levchenko, V. Y.; Maksimov, V. P.

    1986-01-01

    The transition of laminar flows into turbulent flows in a boundary layer is discussed. The individual aspects of the transition process, observed under controllable model conditions are examined. The aspect of this problem, namely the development or excitation of the natural oscillations in the boundary layer, the so-called Tollmin-Schlichting waves is covered. Three types of excitation of these waves are considered: (1) distributed generation throughout the boundary layer; (2) generation in the vicinity of the forward edge of a model, having either a sharp edge or an edge with a large radius or curvature, and (3) generation in a developed boundary layer by means of a focused effect.

  15. Boundary layers of the earth's outer magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, T. E.; Frank, L. A.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetospheric boundary layer and the plasma-sheet boundary layer are the primary boundary layers of the earth's outer magnetosphere. Recent satellite observations indicate that they provide for more than 50 percent of the plasma and energy transport in the outer magnetosphere although they constitute less than 5 percent by volume. Relative to the energy density in the source regions, plasma in the magnetospheric boundary layer is predominantly deenergized whereas plasma in the plasma-sheet boundary layer has been accelerated. The reconnection hypothesis continues to provide a useful framework for comparing data sampled in the highly dynamic magnetospheric environment. Observations of 'flux transfer events' and other detailed features near the boundaries have been recently interpreted in terms of nonsteady-state reconnection. Alternative hypotheses are also being investigated. More work needs to be done, both in theory and observation, to determine whether reconnection actually occurs in the magnetosphere and, if so, whether it is important for overall magnetospheric dynamics.

  16. Halogen chemistry in the trosopheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plane, John M. C.; Mahajan, Anoop; Oetjen, Hilke

    Iodine and bromine chemistry can affect the lower troposphere in several important ways: (1), change the oxidizing capacity by destroying ozone and affecting the hydroxyl radical concentration; (2), react efficiently with dimethyl sulphide (in the marine boundary layer) and mercury (in the polar regions); and (3), form ultra-fine particles (iodine oxides are highly condensable), which may contribute to cloud condensation nuclei and hence affect climate. This paper will report measurements of IO, BrO, OIO and I2 , made by the technique of differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), in several contrasting environments: equatorial clean mid-ocean (Cape Verde); mid-latitude clean coastal (Mace Head, Ireland); polluted coastal (Roscoff, France); and the polar boundary layer (Halley Bay, Antarctica and Hudson Bay, Canada). Both IO and BrO are observed in all these locations at concentrations (> 1 pptv), and so have a major impact on (1) and (2) above. The concentrations of IO in coastal Antarctica, and coastlines rich in certain species of macro-algae, are large enough (> 10 pptv) to promote ultra-fine particle formation. Recently, the first satellite measurements of IO, using the SCIAMACHY instrument on ENVISAT, have been reported by two groups; their results will be compared with the ground-based measurements.

  17. Convective boundary layer evolution from lidar backscatter and its relationship with surface aerosol concentration at a location of a central China megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Wei; Yi, Fan

    2015-08-01

    Based on the 1 min backscatter ratio R profiles from the all-day lidar measurements in Wuhan, China (30.5°N, 114.4°E), hourly convective boundary layer (CBL) height was calculated with the variance method. The calculated CBL height sequence displays the regular diurnal cycle of the CBL top. The prevalent mixing process within the CBL is also revealed. During the CBL growth period, the backscatter ratio R falls visibly with increasing altitude and has large variance within the CBL, suggesting that more abundant aerosol particles from lower altitudes are being transported upward and being mixed with the local background or advected aerosol layers. During the CBL quasistationary period, R tends to be vertically uniform, and its variance reaches a daytime minimum within the CBL, indicating that the vertical homogenization of aerosol particles produced by the convectively driven mixing reaches its maximum. During the afternoon and early evening transition period, the vertical uniformity of R weakens and the variance enlarges again, implying that the reduced convectively driven mixing fails to maintain a high vertical homogeneity. When the 1 min R profiles were plotted together in terms of each 1 h interval, the fluctuating R curves at heights around the CBL top looked like a "node", representing the structure of the entrainment zone between the CBL and the free troposphere. The moving node depicts the evolution of the entrainment zone. The diurnal variation of the CBL height shows an obvious seasonal dependence which coincides with the annual variation of the local surface temperature. The surface fine particle concentration generally has a more complex diurnal cycle than that expected from the CBL-dilution/CBL-accumulation effect. But, it shows a strong annual variation which is out of phase with respect to that of the monthly mean maximum CBL height. This tends to suggest that the seasonal behavior of the surface fine particle concentration mainly depends on the

  18. Cyclone separator having boundary layer turbulence control

    DOEpatents

    Krishna, Coimbatore R.; Milau, Julius S.

    1985-01-01

    A cyclone separator including boundary layer turbulence control that is operable to prevent undue build-up of particulate material at selected critical areas on the separator walls, by selectively varying the fluid pressure at those areas to maintain the momentum of the vortex, thereby preventing particulate material from inducing turbulence in the boundary layer of the vortical fluid flow through the separator.

  19. The boundary layer growth in an urban area.

    PubMed

    Pino, D; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J; Comerón, A; Rocadenbosch, F

    2004-12-01

    The development and maintenance of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) plays a key role in the distribution of atmospheric constituents, especially in a polluted urban area. In particular, the ABL has a direct impact on the concentration and transformation of pollutants. In this work, in order to analyze the different mechanisms which control the boundary layer growth, we have simulated by means of the non-hydrostatic model MM5 several boundary layer observed in the city of Barcelona (Spain). Sensitivity analysis of the modelled ABL is carried out by using various descriptions of the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Direct and continuous measurements of the boundary layer depth taken by a lidar are used to evaluate the results obtained by the model. PMID:15504507

  20. Boundary Layers of Air Adjacent to Cylinders

    PubMed Central

    Nobel, Park S.

    1974-01-01

    Using existing heat transfer data, a relatively simple expression was developed for estimating the effective thickness of the boundary layer of air surrounding cylinders. For wind velocities from 10 to 1000 cm/second, the calculated boundary-layer thickness agreed with that determined for water vapor diffusion from a moistened cylindrical surface 2 cm in diameter. It correctly predicted the resistance for water vapor movement across the boundary layers adjacent to the (cylindrical) inflorescence stems of Xanthorrhoea australis R. Br. and Scirpus validus Vahl and the leaves of Allium cepa L. The boundary-layer thickness decreased as the turbulence intensity increased. For a turbulence intensity representative of field conditions (0.5) and for νwindd between 200 and 30,000 cm2/second (where νwind is the mean wind velocity and d is the cylinder diameter), the effective boundary-layer thickness in centimeters was equal to [Formula: see text]. PMID:16658855

  1. Structure of relaminarizing turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, O.; Patwardhan, Saurabh

    2014-11-01

    Relaminarization of a turbulent boundary layer in a strongly accelerated flow has received a great attention in recent times. It has been found that such relaminarization is a general and regularly occurring phenomenon in the leading-edge region of a swept wing of an airplane (van Dam et al., 1993). In this work, we investigate the effect of initial Reynolds number on the process of relaminarization in turbulent boundary layers. The experimental and numerical investigation of relaminarizing turbulent boundary layers undergoing same history reveals that the boundary layer with higher initial Reynolds number relaminarizes at a lower pressure gradient value compared to the one with lower Reynolds number. This effect can be explained on the inviscid theory proposed earlier in the literature. Further, various parameter criteria proposed to predict relaminarization, are assessed and the structure of relaminarizing boundary layers is investigated. A mechanism for stabilization of near-wall low speed streaks is proposed.

  2. Estimation of Hg 0 exchange between ecosystems and the atmosphere using 222Rn and Hg 0 concentration changes in the stable nocturnal boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrist, Daniel; Conen, Franz; Vogt, Roland; Siegwolf, Rolf; Alewell, Christine

    The goal of this study was to test a 222Rn/Hg 0 method to measure exchange fluxes of Hg 0 between ecosystems and the atmosphere complementing gradient-based micrometeorological methods which are difficult to apply when exchange fluxes are very low, during calm nights, and over heterogeneous surfaces. The method is based on absolute concentration changes of Hg 0 and of the trace gas 222Rn over several hours in the stable nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) when absolute gas concentrations change according to the source or sink strength of the underlying landscape. 222Rn accumulations were observed in 28 of 66 measured nights in an urban area and in 14 of the 40 nights at a subalpine grassland. Concurrent and significant increases in atmospheric Hg 0 concentrations were observed 22 times in the urban area and calculated Hg 0 emissions—for the first time measured over a city area—averaged 6.4±0.9 ng m -2 h -1. Concurrent changes in Hg 0 in the stable NBLs at the subalpine site were very small and significant only nine times with calculated Hg 0 fluxes averaging -0.2±0.3 ng m -2 h -1, indicating that the flux of Hg 0 in the grassland was a very small net deposition of atmospheric Hg 0 to the ecosystem. At the subalpine grassland the 222Rn/Hg 0 method compared reasonably well to a modified Bowen ratio (MBR) method applied during turbulent conditions (-1.9±0.2 ng m -2 h -1 [or -1.7±0.4 ng m -2 h -1 during nights only]). The MBR, however, was not applicable in the urban area due to high surface roughness. We conclude that the 222Rn/Hg 0 method—although limited to nighttime periods in our study—can complement gradient-based methods during stable NBL periods and can be used over heterogeneous surfaces when conventional micrometeorological approaches are not applicable.

  3. LDV measurements of turbulent baroclinic boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    Neuwald, P.; Reichenbach, H.; Kuhl, A.L.

    1993-07-01

    Described here are shock tube experiments of nonsteady, turbulent boundary layers with large density variations. A dense-gas layer was created by injecting Freon through the porous floor of the shock tube. As the shock front propagated along the layer, vorticity was created at the air-Freon interface by an inviscid, baroclinic mechanism. Shadow-schlieren photography was used to visualize the turbulent mixing in this baroclinic boundary layer. Laser-Doppler-Velocimetry (LDV) was used to measure the streamwise velocity histories at 14 heights. After transition, the boundary layer profiles may be approximated by a power-law function u {approximately} u{sup {alpha}} where {alpha} {approx_equal} 3/8. This value lies between the clean flat plate value ({alpha} = 1/7) and the dusty boundary layer value ({alpha} {approx_equal} 0.7), and is controlled by the gas density near the wall.

  4. Open-path TDL-Spectrometry for a Tomographic Reconstruction of 2D H2O-Concentration Fields in the Soil-Air-Boundary-Layer of Permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Anne; Wagner, Steven; Dreizler, Andreas; Ebert, Volker

    2013-04-01

    The melting of permafrost soils in arctic regions is one of the effects of climate change. It is recognized that climatically relevant gases are emitted during the thawing process, and that they may lead to a positive atmospheric feedback [1]. For a better understanding of these developments, a quantification of the gases emitted from the soil would be required. Extractive sensors with local point-wise gas sampling are currently used for this task, but are hampered due to the complex spatial structure of the soil surface, which complicates the situation due to the essential need for finding a representative gas sampling point. For this situation it would be much preferred if a sensor for detecting 2D-concentration fields of e.g. water vapor, (and in the mid-term also for methane or carbon dioxide) directly in the soil-atmosphere-boundary layer of permafrost soils would be available. However, it also has to be kept in mind that field measurements over long time periods in such a harsh environment require very sturdy instrumentation preferably without the need for sensor calibration. Therefore we are currently developing a new, robust TDLAS (tuneable diode laser absorption spectroscopy)-spectrometer based on cheap reflective foils [2]. The spectrometer is easily transportable, requires hardly any alignment and consists of industrially available, very stable components (e.g. diode lasers and glass fibers). Our measurement technique, open path TDLAS, allows for calibration-free measurements of absolute H2O concentrations. The static instrument for sampling open-path H2O concentrations consists of a joint sending and receiving optics at one side of the measurement path and a reflective element at the other side. The latter is very easy to align, since it is a foil usually applied for traffic purposes that retro-reflects the light to its origin even for large angles of misalignment (up to 60°). With this instrument, we achieved normalized detection limits of up to 0

  5. Chemistry of a polluted cloudy boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, Daniel J.; Gottlieb, Elaine W.; Prather, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    A one-dimensional photochemical model for cloud-topped boundary layers has been developed to include descriptions of gas- and aqueous-phase chemistry and the radiation field in and below the cloud. The model is applied to the accumulation of pollutants during a wintertime episode with low stratus over Bakersfield, CA. The mechanisms of sulfate production and the balance between the concentrations of acids and bases are examined. It is shown that most of the sulfate production may be explained by the Fe(III)-catalyzed autoxidation of S(IV). Another source of sulfate is the oxidation of SO2 by OH in both the gas and the aqueous phase. It is shown that the sulfate production in the model is controlled by the availability of NH3. It is suggested that this explains the balance observed between total concentration of acids and bases.

  6. Longitudinal vortices imbedded in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, R. D.; Shabaka, I. M. M.; Shibl, A.; Bradshaw, P.

    1983-01-01

    The attenuation of skew-induced longitudinal vortices by turbulent or viscous stresses is studied for the case of pure, artificially-generated longitudinal vortices entrained into initially two-dimensional boundary layers in nominally zero pressure gradients. Three types of vortex-boundary interactions are studied in detail: (1) an isolated vortex in a two-dimensional boundary layer; (2) a vortex pair in a turbulent boundary layer with the common flow between the vortices moving away from the surface; (3) a vortex pair in a boundary layer with the common flow moving towards the surface. Detailed mean flow and turbulence measurements are made, showing that the eddy viscosities defined for the different shear-stress components behave in different and complicated ways. Terms in the Reynolds stress transport equations, notably the triple products that effect turbulent diffusion of Reynolds stress, also fail to obey simple rules.

  7. An Evaluation of Boundary Conditions for Modeling Urban Boundary Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Calhoun, R.J.; Chan, S.T.; Lee, R.L.

    2000-05-18

    Numerical modeling of the urban boundary layer is complicated by the need to describe airflow patterns outside of the computational domain. These patterns have an impact on how successfully the simulation is able to model the turbulence associated with the urban boundary layer. This talk presents experiments with the model boundary conditions for simulations that were done to support two Department of Energy observational programs involving the Salt Lake City basin. The Chemical/Biological Non-proliferation Program (CBNP) is concerned with the effects of buildings on influencing dispersion patterns in urban environments. The Vertical Transport and Mixing Program (VTMX) investigating mixing mechanisms in the stable boundary layer and how they are influenced by the channeling caused by drainage flows or by obstacles such as building complexes. Both of these programs are investigating the turbulent mixing caused by building complexes and other urban obstacles.

  8. Planetary Boundary Layer Simulation Using TASS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schowalter, David G.; DeCroix, David S.; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Arya, S. Pal; Kaplan, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Boundary conditions to an existing large-eddy simulation model have been changed in order to simulate turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer. Several options are now available, including the use of a surface energy balance. In addition, we compare convective boundary layer simulations with the Wangara and Minnesota field experiments as well as with other model results. We find excellent agreement of modelled mean profiles of wind and temperature with observations and good agreement for velocity variances. Neutral boundary simulation results are compared with theory and with previously used models. Agreement with theory is reasonable, while agreement with previous models is excellent.

  9. Boundary-layer linear stability theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, L. M.

    1984-01-01

    Most fluid flows are turbulent rather than laminar and the reason for this was studied. One of the earliest explanations was that laminar flow is unstable, and the linear instability theory was first developed to explore this possibility. A series of early papers by Rayleigh produced many notable results concerning the instability of inviscid flows, such as the discovery of inflectional instability. Viscosity was commonly thought to act only to stabilize the flow, and flows with convex velocity profiles appeared to be stable. The investigations that led to a viscous theory of boundary layer instability was reported. The earliest application of linear stability theory to transition prediction calculated the amplitude ratio of the most amplified frequency as a function of Reynolds number for a Blasius boundary layer, and found that this quantity had values between five and nine at the observed Ret. The experiment of Schubauer and Skramstad (1947) completely reversed the prevailing option and fully vindicated the Gottingen proponents of the theory. This experiment demonstrated the existence of instability waves in a boundary layer, their connection with transition, and the quantitative description of their behavior by the theory of Tollmien and Schlichting. It is generally accepted that flow parameters such as pressure gradient, suction and heat transfer qualitatively affect transition in the manner predicted by the linear theory, and in particular that a flow predicted to be stable by the theory should remain laminar. The linear theory, in the form of the e9, or N-factor is today in routine use in engineering studies of laminar flow. The stability theory to boundary layers with pressure gradients and suction was applied. The only large body of numerical results for exact boundary layer solutions before the advent of the computer age by calculating the stability characteristics of the Falkner-Skan family of velocity profiles are given. When the digital computer

  10. Boundary-layer linear stability theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, L. M.

    1984-06-01

    Most fluid flows are turbulent rather than laminar and the reason for this was studied. One of the earliest explanations was that laminar flow is unstable, and the linear instability theory was first developed to explore this possibility. A series of early papers by Rayleigh produced many notable results concerning the instability of inviscid flows, such as the discovery of inflectional instability. Viscosity was commonly thought to act only to stabilize the flow, and flows with convex velocity profiles appeared to be stable. The investigations that led to a viscous theory of boundary layer instability was reported. The earliest application of linear stability theory to transition prediction calculated the amplitude ratio of the most amplified frequency as a function of Reynolds number for a Blasius boundary layer, and found that this quantity had values between five and nine at the observed Ret. The experiment of Schubauer and Skramstad (1947) completely reversed the prevailing option and fully vindicated the Gottingen proponents of the theory. This experiment demonstrated the existence of instability waves in a boundary layer, their connection with transition, and the quantitative description of their behavior by the theory of Tollmien and Schlichting. It is generally accepted that flow parameters such as pressure gradient, suction and heat transfer qualitatively affect transition in the manner predicted by the linear theory, and in particular that a flow predicted to be stable by the theory should remain laminar. The linear theory, in the form of the e9, or N-factor is today in routine use in engineering studies of laminar flow. The stability theory to boundary layers with pressure gradients and suction was applied. The only large body of numerical results for exact boundary layer solutions before the advent of the computer age by calculating the stability characteristics of the Falkner-Skan family of velocity profiles are given. When the digital computer

  11. Calculation methods for compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Cary, A. M., Jr.; Harris, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Calculation procedures for non-reacting compressible two- and three-dimensional turbulent boundary layers were reviewed. Integral, transformation and correlation methods, as well as finite difference solutions of the complete boundary layer equations summarized. Alternative numerical solution procedures were examined, and both mean field and mean turbulence field closure models were considered. Physics and related calculation problems peculiar to compressible turbulent boundary layers are described. A catalog of available solution procedures of the finite difference, finite element, and method of weighted residuals genre is included. Influence of compressibility, low Reynolds number, wall blowing, and pressure gradient upon mean field closure constants are reported.

  12. Soot profiles in boundary-layer flames

    SciTech Connect

    Beier, R.A.; Pagni, P.J.

    1981-12-01

    Carbon particulate volume fractions and approximate particle size distributions are measured in a free laminar combusting boundary layer for liquid hydrocarbon fuels (n-heptane, iso-octane, cyclohexane, cyclohexene, toluene) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). A multiwavelength laser transmission technique determines a most probable radius and the total particle concentration, which are two parameters in an assumed form for the size distribution. In the combusting boundary layer, a sooting region exists between the pyrolyzing fuel surface and the flame zone. The liquid fuel soot volume fractions, f/sub v/, range from f/sub v/ approx. 10/sup -7/ for n-heptane, a paraffin, to f/sub v approx. 10/sup -5/ for toluene, an aromatic. The PMMA volume fractions, f/sub v/ approx. 5 X 10/sup -7/, are approximately the same as the values previously reported for pool fires. The soot volume fractions increase with height; convection of carbon particles downstream widens the soot region with height. For all fuels tested, the most probable radius is between 20 nm and 50 nm, and it changes only slightly with height and distance from the fuel surface.

  13. Boundary-layer control for drag reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, William D.

    1988-01-01

    Although the number of possible applications of boundary-layer control is large, a discussion is given only of those that have received the most attention recently at NASA Langley Research Center to improve airfoil drag characteristics. This research concerns stabilizing the laminar boundary layer through geometric shaping (natural laminar flow, NLF) and active control involving the removal of a portion of the laminar boundary layer (laminar flow control, LFC) either through discrete slots or a perforated surface. At low Reynolds numbers, a combination of shaping and forced transition has been used to achieve the desired run of laminar flow and control of laminar separation. In the design of both natural laminar flow and laminar flow control airfoils and wings, boundary layer stability codes play an important role. A discussion of some recent stability calculations using both incompressible and compressible codes is given.

  14. Boundary layer flow visualization for flight testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obara, Clifford J.

    1986-01-01

    Flow visualization is used extensively in flight testing to determine aerodynamic characteristics such as surface flow direction and boundary layer state. Several visualization techniques are available to the aerodynamicist. Two of the most popular are oil flows and sublimating chemicals. Oil is used to visualize boundary layer transition, shock wave location, regions of separated flow, and surface flow direction. Boundary layer transition can also be visualized with sublimating chemicals. A summary of these two techniques is discussed, and the use of sublimating chemicals is examined in some detail. The different modes of boundary layer transition are characterized by different patterns in the sublimating chemical coating. The discussion includes interpretation of these chemical patterns and the temperature and velocity operating limitations of the chemical substances. Information for selection of appropriate chemicals for a desired set of flight conditions is provided.

  15. Dynamic Acoustic Detection of Boundary Layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grohs, Jonathan R.

    1995-01-01

    The wind tunnel investigation into the acoustic nature of boundary layer transition using miniature microphones. This research is the groundwork for entry into the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). Due to the extreme environmental conditions of NTF testing, low temperatures and high pressures, traditional boundary layer detection methods are not available. The emphasis of this project and further studies is acoustical sampling of a typical boundary layer and environmental durability of the miniature microphones. The research was conducted with the 14 by 22 Foot Subsonic Tunnel, concurrent with another wind tunnel test. Using the resources of LaRC, a full inquiry into the feasibility of using Knowles Electronics, Inc. EM-3086 microphones to detect the surface boundary layer, under differing conditions, was completed. This report shall discuss the difficulties encountered, product performance and observations, and future research adaptability of this method.

  16. Halogen chemistry in the marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plane, J. M. C.; Gomez Martin, J. C.; Kumar, R.; Mahajan, A. S.; Oetjen, H.; Saunders, R. W.

    2009-04-01

    Important atmospheric sources of iodine include the air-sea exchange of biogenic iodocarbons, and the emission of I2 from macro-algae. The major source of bromine is the release of bromide ions from sea-salt aerosol. The subsequent atmospheric chemistry of these halogens (1), changes the oxidizing capacity of the marine boundary layer by destroying ozone and changing the hydroxyl radical concentration; (2), reacts efficiently with dimethyl sulphide and mercury (in the polar regions); and (3), leads to the formation of ultra-fine particles which may contribute to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and hence affect climate. This paper will report observations of IO, BrO, OIO and I2 made by the technique of differential optical absorption spectroscopy, in several contrasting marine environments: the equatorial mid-Atlantic (Cape Verde); mid-latitude clean coastal (Mace Head, Ireland); polluted coastal (Roscoff, France); and the polar marine boundary layer (Hudson Bay, Canada). Both IO and BrO are observed in all these locations at significant concentrations (> 1 pptv), and so have a major impact on (1) and (2) above. To complement the field campaigns we have also carried out wide-ranging laboratory investigation. A new study of OIO photochemistry shows that absorption in the visible bands between 490 and 630 nm leads to I atom production with a quantum yield of unity, which now means that iodine is a particularly powerful ozone-depleting agent. We have also studied the formation and growth kinetics of iodine oxide nano-particles, and their uptake of water, sulphuric acid and di-carboxylic organic acids, in order to model their growth to a size where they can act as CCN. Their ice-nucleating properties will also be reported.

  17. Dependence of Boundary Layer Mixing On Lateral Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, D.

    Ocean circulation models often show strong mixing in association with lateral bound- ary layers. Such mixing is generally considered to be artifactual rather than real. Fur- thermore, the severity of the problem is boundary condition dependent. For example, an inconsistency between geostrophy and insulating boundary conditions on tempera- ture and salinity cause many modelers to opt for the no slip, rather than slip boundary condtion on the tangential component of momentum. As modellers increasingly move into the eddy revealing regime, biharmonic, rather than harmonic dissipative operators are likely to become more common. Biharmonic operators, however, require specifi- cation of additional boundary conditions. For example, there are several `natural ex- tensions' to each of the slip and no slip conditions. Here, these various possiblities are considered in the context of a simple model. Particular attention is payed to how mixing (and the associated overturning cell) is affected by the choice of boundary condition.

  18. Modeling the summertime Arctic cloudy boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, J.A.; Pinto, J.O.; McInnes, K.L.

    1996-04-01

    Global climate models have particular difficulty in simulating the low-level clouds during the Arctic summer. Model problems are exacerbated in the polar regions by the complicated vertical structure of the Arctic boundary layer. The presence of multiple cloud layers, a humidity inversion above cloud top, and vertical fluxes in the cloud that are decoupled from the surface fluxes, identified in Curry et al. (1988), suggest that models containing sophisticated physical parameterizations would be required to accurately model this region. Accurate modeling of the vertical structure of multiple cloud layers in climate models is important for determination of the surface radiative fluxes. This study focuses on the problem of modeling the layered structure of the Arctic summertime boundary-layer clouds and in particular, the representation of the more complex boundary layer type consisting of a stable foggy surface layer surmounted by a cloud-topped mixed layer. A hierarchical modeling/diagnosis approach is used. A case study from the summertime Arctic Stratus Experiment is examined. A high-resolution, one-dimensional model of turbulence and radiation is tested against the observations and is then used in sensitivity studies to infer the optimal conditions for maintaining two separate layers in the Arctic summertime boundary layer. A three-dimensional mesoscale atmospheric model is then used to simulate the interaction of this cloud deck with the large-scale atmospheric dynamics. An assessment of the improvements needed to the parameterizations of the boundary layer, cloud microphysics, and radiation in the 3-D model is made.

  19. Boundary layer loss sensitivity study using a modified ICRPG turbulent boundary layer computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omori, S.; Krebsbach, A.; Gross, K. W.

    1972-01-01

    Modifications of the turbulent boundary layer (TBL) computer program refer to a more accurate representation of boundary layer edge conditions, internal calculation of the Prandtl number, a changed friction coefficient relationship, and computation of the performance degradation. Important input parameters of the modified TBL program such as wall temperature distribution, Prandtl number, Stanton number, and velocity profile exponent were changed and the individual effects on significant boundary layer parameters, heat transfer, and performance degradation are described.

  20. Lear jet boundary layer/shear layer laser propagation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, K.

    1980-01-01

    Optical degradations of aircraft turbulent boundary layers with shear layers generated by aerodynamic fences are analyzed. A collimated 2.5 cm diameter helium-neon laser (0.63 microns) traversed the approximate 5 cm thick natural aircraft boundary layer in double pass via a reflective airfoil. In addition, several flights examined shear layer-induced optical degradation. Flight altitudes ranged from 1.5 to 12 km, while Mach numbers were varied from 0.3 to 0.8. Average line spread function (LSF) and Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) data were obtained by averaging a large number of tilt-removed curves. Fourier transforming the resulting average MTF yields an LSF, thus affording a direct comparison of the two optical measurements. Agreement was good for the aerodynamic fence arrangement, but only fair in the case of a turbulent boundary layer. Values of phase variance inferred from the LSF instrument for a single pass through the random flow and corrected for a large aperture ranged from 0.08 to 0.11 waves (lambda = .63 microns) for the boundary layer. Corresponding values for the fence vary from 0.08 to 0.16 waves. Extrapolation of these values to 10.6 microns suggests negligible degradation for a CO2 laser transmitted through a 5 cm thick, subsonic turbulent boundary layer.

  1. Soot and radiation in combusting boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    Beier, R.A.

    1981-12-01

    In most fires thermal radiation is the dominant mode of heat transfer. Carbon particles within the fire are responsible for most of this emitted radiation and hence warrant quantification. As a first step toward understanding thermal radiation in full scale fires, an experimental and theoretical study is presented for a laminar combusting boundary layer. Carbon particulate volume fraction profiles and approximate particle size distributions are experimentally determined in both free and forced flow for several hydrocarbon fuels and PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate). A multiwavelength laser transmission technique determines a most probable radius and a total particle concentration which are two unknown parameters in an assumed Gauss size distribution. A sooting region is observed on the fuel rich side of the main reaction zone. For free flow, all the flames are in air, but the free stream ambient oxygen mass fraction is a variable in forced flow. To study the effects of radiation heat transfer, a model is developed for a laminar combusting boundary layer over a pyrolyzing fuel surface. An optically thin approximation simplifies the calculation of the radiant energy flux at the fuel surface. For the free flames in air, the liquid fuel soot volume fractions, f/sub v/, range from f/sub v/ approx. 10/sup -7/ for n-heptane, a paraffin, to f/sub v/ approx. 10/sup -7/ for toluene, an aromatic. The PMMA soot volume fractions, f/sub v/ approx. 5 x 10/sup -7/, are approximately the same as the values previously reported for pool fires. Soot volume fraction increases monotonically with ambient oxygen mass fraction in the forced flow flames. For all fuels tested, a most probable radius between 20 nm and 80 nm is obtained which varies only slightly with oxygen mass fraction, streamwise position, or distance normal to the fuel surface. The theoretical analysis yields nine dimensionless parameters, which control the mass flux rate at the pyrolyzing fuel surface.

  2. Boundary Layer Cloudiness Parameterizations Using ARM Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Albrecht

    2004-09-15

    This study used DOE ARM data and facilities to: (1) study macroscopic properties of continental stratus clouds at SGP and the factors controlling these properties, (2) develop a scientific basis for understanding the processes responsible for the formation of boundary layer clouds using ARM observations in conjunction with simple parametric models and LES, and (3) evaluate cumulus cloud characteristics retrieved from the MMCR operating at TWP-Nauru. In addition we have used high resolution 94 GHz observations of boundary layer clouds and precipitation to: (1) develop techniques for using high temporal resolution Doppler velocities to study large-eddy circulations and turbulence in boundary layer clouds and estimate the limitations of using current and past MMCR data for boundary layer cloud studies, (2) evaluate the capability and limitations of the current MMCR data for estimating reflectivity, vertical velocities, and spectral under low- signal-to-noise conditions associated with weak no n-precipitating clouds, (3) develop possible sampling modes for the new MMCR processors to allow for adequate sampling of boundary layer clouds, and (4) retrieve updraft and downdraft structures under precipitating conditions.

  3. The Kinematics of Turbulent Boundary Layer Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Stephen Kern

    1991-01-01

    The long history of research into the internal structure of turbulent boundary layers has not provided a unified picture of the physics responsible for turbulence production and dissipation. The goals of the present research are to: (1) define the current state of boundary layer structure knowledge; and (2) utilize direct numerical simulation results to help close the unresolved issues identified in part A and to unify the fragmented knowledge of various coherent motions into a consistent kinematic model of boundary layer structure. The results of the current study show that all classes of coherent motion in the low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer may be related to vortical structures, but that no single form of vortex is representative of the wide variety of vortical structures observed. In particular, ejection and sweep motions, as well as entrainment from the free-streem are shown to have strong spatial and temporal relationships with vortical structures. Disturbances of vortex size, location, and intensity show that quasi-streamwise vortices dominate the buffer region, while transverse vortices and vortical arches dominate the wake region. Both types of vortical structure are common in the log region. The interrelationships between the various structures and the population distributions of vortices are combined into a conceptual kinematic model for the boundary layer. Aspects of vortical structure dynamics are also postulated, based on time-sequence animations of the numerically simulated flow.

  4. High enthalpy hypersonic boundary layer flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yanow, G.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of an ionizing laminar boundary layer formed by a very high enthalpy flow (in excess of 12 eV per atom or 7000 cal/gm) with allowance for the presence of helium driver gas is described. The theoretical investigation has shown that the use of variable transport properties and their respective derivatives is very important in the solution of equilibrium boundary layer equations of high enthalpy flow. The effect of low level helium contamination on the surface heat transfer rate is minimal. The variation of ionization is much smaller in a chemically frozen boundary layer solution than in an equilibrium boundary layer calculation and consequently, the variation of the transport properties in the case of the former was not essential in the integration. The experiments have been conducted in a free piston shock tunnel, and a detailed study of its nozzle operation, including the effects of low levels of helium driver gas contamination has been made. Neither the extreme solutions of an equilibrium nor of a frozen boundary layer will adequately predict surface heat transfer rate in very high enthalpy flows.

  5. Boundary-Layer-Ingesting Inlet Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Lewis R.; Allan, Brian G.; Gorton, Susan A.

    2008-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to provide the first demonstration of an active flow control system for a flush-mounted inlet with significant boundary-layer-ingestion in transonic flow conditions. The effectiveness of the flow control in reducing the circumferential distortion at the engine fan-face location was assessed using a 2.5%-scale model of a boundary-layer-ingesting offset diffusing inlet. The inlet was flush mounted to the tunnel wall and ingested a large boundary layer with a boundary-layer-to-inlet height ratio of 35%. Different jet distribution patterns and jet mass flow rates were used in the inlet to control distortion. A vane configuration was also tested. Finally a hybrid vane/jet configuration was tested leveraging strengths of both types of devices. Measurements were made of the onset boundary layer, the duct surface static pressures, and the mass flow rates through the duct and the flow control actuators. The distortion and pressure recovery were measured at the aerodynamic interface plane. The data show that control jets and vanes reduce circumferential distortion to acceptable levels. The point-design vane configuration produced higher distortion levels at off-design settings. The hybrid vane/jet flow control configuration reduced the off-design distortion levels to acceptable ones and used less than 0.5% of the inlet mass flow to supply the jets.

  6. Numerical simulation of supersonic boundary layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Y.; Adams, N. A.; Sandham, N. D.; Kleiser, L.

    1994-01-01

    The present contribution reviews some of the recent progress obtained at our group in the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of compressible boundary layer transition. Elements of the different simulation approaches and numerical techniques employed are surveyed. Temporal and spatial simulations, as well as comparisons with results obtained from Parabolized Stability Equations, are discussed. DNS results are given for flat plate boundary layers in the Mach number range 1.6 to 4.5. A temporal DNS at Mach 4.5 has been continued through breakdown all the way to the turbulent stage. In addition results obtained with a recently developed extended temporal DNS approach are presented, which takes into account some nonparallel effects of a growing boundary layer. Results from this approach are quite close to those of spatial DNS, while preserving the efficiency of the temporal DNS.

  7. Mechanics of Boundary Layer Transition. Part 5: Boundary Layer Stability theory in incompressible and compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, L. M.

    1967-01-01

    The fundamentals of stability theory, its chief results, and the physical mechanisms at work are presented. The stability theory of the laminar boundary determines whether a small disturbance introduced into the boundary layer will amplify or damp. If the disturbance damps, the boundary layer remains laminar. If the disturbance amplifies, and by a sufficient amount, then transition to turbulence eventually takes place. The stability theory establishes those states of the boundary layer which are most likely to lead to transition, identifys those frequencies which are the most dangerous, and indicates how the external parameters can best be changed to avoid transition.

  8. Aerosol buffering of marine boundary layer cloudiness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazil, J.; Feingold, G.; Wang, H.

    2010-12-01

    The role of aerosol particles in maintaining a cloudy boundary layer in the remote marine environment is explored. It has previously been shown that precipitation can result in the transition from a closed- to open-cellular state but that the boundary layer cannot maintain this open-cell state without a resupply of particles. Potential sources include wind-driven production of sea salt particles from the ocean, nucleation from the gas phase, and entrainment from the free troposphere. Here we investigate with model simulations how the interplay of cloud properties, aerosol production, and boundary layer dynamics results in aerosol sources acting as a buffer against processes that destabilize cloudiness and the dynamic state of the marine boundary layer. For example, at nighttime, cloud liquid water increases in the absence of solar heating, resulting in increased precipitation, stronger cloud top cooling, accelerated boundary layer turbulence, and faster surface wind speeds. Faster surface wind speeds drive an enhanced flux of sea salt aerosol, at a time when aerosol particles are scavenged more readily by enhanced precipitation. In contrast, absorption of solar radiation during daytime reduces cloud water, decelerates boundary layer turbulence, reduces surface wind speeds, and therefore slows surface emissions. This is compensated by nucleation of small aerosol particles from the gas phase in response to the nigh complete removal of cloud condensation nuclei in precipitating open cell walls. These newly formed particles need to grow to larger sizes before they can serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), but will likely contribute to the CCN population during the nighttime and, together with ocean emissions, buffer the system against precipitation removal.

  9. Hairpin vortices in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eitel-Amor, G.; Örlü, R.; Schlatter, P.; Flores, O.

    2015-02-01

    The present work presents a number of parallel and spatially developing simulations of boundary layers to address the question of whether hairpin vortices are a dominant feature of near-wall turbulence, and which role they play during transition. In the first part, the parent-offspring regeneration mechanism is investigated in parallel (temporal) simulations of a single hairpin vortex introduced in a mean shear flow corresponding to either turbulent channels or boundary layers (Reτ ≲ 590). The effect of a turbulent background superimposed on the mean flow is considered by using an eddy viscosity computed from resolved simulations. Tracking the vortical structure downstream, it is found that secondary hairpins are only created shortly after initialization, with all rotational structures decaying for later times. For hairpins in a clean (laminar) environment, the decay is relatively slow, while hairpins in weak turbulent environments (10% of νt) dissipate after a couple of eddy turnover times. In the second part, the role of hairpin vortices in laminar-turbulent transition is studied using simulations of spatial boundary layers tripped by hairpin vortices. These vortices are generated by means of specific volumetric forces representing an ejection event, creating a synthetic turbulent boundary layer initially dominated by hairpin-like vortices. These hairpins are advected towards the wake region of the boundary layer, while a sinusoidal instability of the streaks near the wall results in rapid development of a turbulent boundary layer. For Reθ > 400, the boundary layer is fully developed, with no evidence of hairpin vortices reaching into the wall region. The results from both the parallel and spatial simulations strongly suggest that the regeneration process is rather short-lived and may not sustain once a turbulent background is developed. From the transitional flow simulations, it is conjectured that the forest of hairpins reported in former direct numerical

  10. Stability of an oscillating boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levchenko, V. Y.; Solovyev, A. S.

    1985-01-01

    Levchenko and Solov'ev (1972, 1974) have developed a stability theory for space periodic flows, assuming that the Floquet theory is applicable to partial differential equations. In the present paper, this approach is extended to unsteady periodic flows. A complete unsteady formulation of the stability problem is obtained, and the stability characteristics over an oscillating period are determined from the solution of the problem. Calculations carried out for an oscillating incompressible boundary layer on a plate showed that the boundary layer flow may be regarded as a locally parallel flow.

  11. Stability of an oscillating boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levchenko, V. Y.; Solovyev, A. S.

    1985-03-01

    Levchenko and Solov'ev (1972, 1974) have developed a stability theory for space periodic flows, assuming that the Floquet theory is applicable to partial differential equations. In the present paper, this approach is extended to unsteady periodic flows. A complete unsteady formulation of the stability problem is obtained, and the stability characteristics over an oscillating period are determined from the solution of the problem. Calculations carried out for an oscillating incompressible boundary layer on a plate showed that the boundary layer flow may be regarded as a locally parallel flow.

  12. Boundary-Layer Code For Supersonic Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinckney, S. Z.; Walton, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    HUD is integral computer code based on Spaulding-Chi method for predicting development of boundary layers in laminar, transitional, and turbulent regions of flows on two-dimensional or axisymmetric bodies. Approximates nonequilibrium velocity profiles as well as local surface friction in presence of pressure gradient. Predicts transfer of heat in turbulent boundary layer in presence of high axial presure gradient. Provides for pressure gradients both normal and lateral to surfaces. Also used to estimate requirements for cooling scramjet engines. Because of this capability, HUD program incorporated into several scramjet-cycle-performance-analysis codes, including SCRAM (ARC-12338) and SRGULL (LEW-15093). Written in FORTRAN 77.

  13. Boundary-layer theory for blast waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. B.; Berger, S. A.; Kamel, M. M.; Korobeinikov, V. P.; Oppenheim, A. K.

    1975-01-01

    It is profitable to consider the blast wave as a flow field consisting of two regions: the outer, which retains the properties of the inviscid solution, and the inner, which is governed by flow equations including terms expressing the effects of heat transfer and, concomitantly, viscosity. The latter region thus plays the role of a boundary layer. Reported here is an analytical method developed for the study of such layers, based on the matched asymptotic expansion technique combined with patched solutions.

  14. Calculation methods for compressible turbulent boundary layers, 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Cary, A. M., Jr.; Harris, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Equations and closure methods for compressible turbulent boundary layers are discussed. Flow phenomena peculiar to calculation of these boundary layers were considered, along with calculations of three dimensional compressible turbulent boundary layers. Procedures for ascertaining nonsimilar two and three dimensional compressible turbulent boundary layers were appended, including finite difference, finite element, and mass-weighted residual methods.

  15. Boundary Layer Transition on X-43A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Wurster, Kathryn; Bittner, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The successful Mach 7 and 10 flights of the first fully integrated scramjet propulsion systems by the Hyper-X (X-43A) program have provided the means with which to verify the original design methodologies and assumptions. As part of Hyper-X s propulsion-airframe integration, the forebody was designed to include a spanwise array of vortex generators to promote boundary layer transition ahead of the engine. Turbulence at the inlet is thought to provide the most reliable engine design and allows direct scaling of flight results to groundbased data. Pre-flight estimations of boundary layer transition, for both Mach 7 and 10 flight conditions, suggested that forebody boundary layer trips were required to ensure fully turbulent conditions upstream of the inlet. This paper presents the results of an analysis of the thermocouple measurements used to infer the dynamics of the transition process during the trajectories for both flights, on both the lower surface (to assess trip performance) and the upper surface (to assess natural transition). The approach used in the analysis of the thermocouple data is outlined, along with a discussion of the calculated local flow properties that correspond to the transition events as identified in the flight data. The present analysis has confirmed that the boundary layer trips performed as expected for both flights, providing turbulent flow ahead of the inlet during critical portions of the trajectory, while the upper surface was laminar as predicted by the pre-flight analysis.

  16. Nonlinear Transient Growth and Boundary Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paredes, Pedro; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Parabolized stability equations (PSE) are used in a variational approach to study the optimal, non-modal disturbance growth in a Mach 3 at plate boundary layer and a Mach 6 circular cone boundary layer. As noted in previous works, the optimal initial disturbances correspond to steady counter-rotating streamwise vortices, which subsequently lead to the formation of streamwise-elongated structures, i.e., streaks, via a lift-up effect. The nonlinear evolution of the linearly optimal stationary perturbations is computed using the nonlinear plane-marching PSE for stationary perturbations. A fully implicit marching technique is used to facilitate the computation of nonlinear streaks with large amplitudes. To assess the effect of the finite-amplitude streaks on transition, the linear form of plane- marching PSE is used to investigate the instability of the boundary layer flow modified by spanwise periodic streaks. The onset of bypass transition is estimated by using an N- factor criterion based on the amplification of the streak instabilities. Results show that, for both flow configurations of interest, streaks of sufficiently large amplitude can lead to significantly earlier onset of transition than that in an unperturbed boundary layer without any streaks.

  17. Flow unsteadiness effects on boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Sreedhara V.

    1989-01-01

    The development of boundary layers at high subsonic speeds in the presence of either mass flux fluctuations or acoustic disturbances (the two most important parameters in the unsteadiness environment affecting the aerodynamics of a flight vehicle) was investigated. A high quality database for generating detailed information concerning free-stream flow unsteadiness effects on boundary layer growth and transition in high subsonic and transonic speeds is described. The database will be generated with a two-pronged approach: (1) from a detailed review of existing literature on research and wind tunnel calibration database, and (2) from detailed tests in the Boundary Layer Apparatus for Subsonic and Transonic flow Affected by Noise Environment (BLASTANE). Special instrumentation, including hot wire anemometry, the buried wire gage technique, and laser velocimetry were used to obtain skin friction and turbulent shear stress data along the entire boundary layer for various free stream noise levels, turbulence content, and pressure gradients. This database will be useful for improving the correction methodology of applying wind tunnel test data to flight predictions and will be helpful for making improvements in turbulence modeling laws.

  18. Boundary layer control device for duct silencers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, Fredric H. (Inventor); Soderman, Paul T. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A boundary layer control device includes a porous cover plate, an acoustic absorber disposed under the porous cover plate, and a porous flow resistive membrane interposed between the porous cover plate and the acoustic absorber. The porous flow resistive membrane has a flow resistance low enough to permit sound to enter the acoustic absorber and high enough to damp unsteady flow oscillations.

  19. Orbiter Boundary Layer Transition Prediction Tool Enhancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; King, Rudolph A.; Kegerise, Michael A.; Wood, William A.; McGinley, Catherine B.; Berger, Karen T.; Anderson, Brian P.

    2010-01-01

    Updates to an analytic tool developed for Shuttle support to predict the onset of boundary layer transition resulting from thermal protection system damage or repair are presented. The boundary layer transition tool is part of a suite of tools that analyze the local aerothermodynamic environment to enable informed disposition of damage for making recommendations to fly as is or to repair. Using mission specific trajectory information and details of each d agmea site or repair, the expected time (and thus Mach number) of transition onset is predicted to help define proper environments for use in subsequent thermal and stress analysis of the thermal protection system and structure. The boundary layer transition criteria utilized within the tool were updated based on new local boundary layer properties obtained from high fidelity computational solutions. Also, new ground-based measurements were obtained to allow for a wider parametric variation with both protuberances and cavities and then the resulting correlations were calibrated against updated flight data. The end result is to provide correlations that allow increased confidence with the resulting transition predictions. Recently, a new approach was adopted to remove conservatism in terms of sustained turbulence along the wing leading edge. Finally, some of the newer flight data are also discussed in terms of how these results reflect back on the updated correlations.

  20. Astrophysical Boundary Layers: A New Picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Mikhail; Rafikov, Roman R.; Mclellan Stone, James

    2016-04-01

    Accretion is a ubiquitous process in astrophysics. In cases when the magnetic field is not too strong and a disk is formed, accretion can proceed through the mid plane all the way to the surface of the central compact object. Unless that compact object is a black hole, a boundary layer will be formed where the accretion disk touches its surfaces. The boundary layer is both dynamically and observationally significant as up to half of the accretion energy is dissipated there.Using a combination of analytical theory and computer simulations we show that angular momentum transport and accretion in the boundary layer is mediated by waves. This breaks with the standard astrophysical paradigm of an anomalous turbulent viscosity that drives accretion. However, wave-mediated angular momentum transport is a natural consequence of "sonic instability." The sonic instability, which we describe analytically and observe in our simulations, is a close cousin of the Papaloizou-Pringle instability. However, it is very vigorous in the boundary layer due to the immense radial velocity shear present at the equator.Our results are applicable to accreting neutron stars, white dwarfs, protostars, and protoplanets.

  1. INDIVIDUAL TURBULENT CELL INTERACTION: BASIS FOR BOUNDARY LAYER ESTABLISHMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Boundary layers are important in determining the forces on objects in flowing fluids, mixing characteristics, and other phenomena. For example, benthic boundary layers are frequently active resuspension layers that determine bottom turbidity and transniissivity. Traditionally, bo...

  2. Accretion disk boundary layers in cataclysmic variables. 1: Optically thick boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popham, Robert; Narayan, Ramesh

    1995-01-01

    We develop numerical models of accretions disks in cataclysmic variables (CVs), including and emphasizing the boundary layer region where the accretion disk meets the accreting white dwarf. We confine ourselves to solutions where the boundary layer region is vertically optically thick, and find that these solutions share several common features. The angular and radial velocities of the accreting material drop rapidly in a dynamical boundary layer, which has a radial width approximately 1%-3% of the white dwarf radius. The energy dissipated in this region diffuses through the inner part of the disk and is radiated from the disk surface in a thermal boundary layer, which has a radial width comparable to the disk thickness, approximately 5%-15% of the white dwarf radius. We examine the dependence of the boundary layer structure on the mass accretion rate, the white dwarf mass and rotation rate, and the viscosity parameter alpha. We delineate the boundary between optically thick and optically thin boundary layer solutions as a function of these parameters and suggest that by means of a careful comparison with observations it may be possible to estimate alpha in CVs. We derive an expression for the total boundary layer luminosities as a function of the parameters and show that it agrees well with the luminosites of our numerical solutions. Finally, we calcuate simple blackbody continuum spectra of the boundary layer and disk emission for our solutions and compare these to soft X-ray, EUV, and He II emission-line observations of CVs. We show that, through such comparisons, it may be possible to determine the rotation rates of the accreting stars in CVs, and perhaps also the white dwarf masses and the accretion rates. The spectra are quite insensitive to alpha, so the uncertainty in this parameter does not affect such comparisons.

  3. The influence of surface forces on the formation of structural peculiarities in the boundary layers of liquids and boundary phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derjaguin, B. V.

    1992-05-01

    This article, mentioning the influence of surface forces on the formation and the properties of diffuse adsorption layers on the boundary of solution-substrate, is mainly about the influence of surface forces on the structure and properties of boundary layers of the liquid. It deals with the phenomena of formation of homogeneous liquid crystalline layers of nonmesogenic liquids, boundary phases and the properties of boundary nonhomogeneous layers of water and alcohols. In the conclusion the data on surface forces are given with the radius of action up to 100 μm, which are generated by leucocytes of blood plasma with the addition of a concentrated salt solution.

  4. Localized travelling waves in the asymptotic suction boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreilos, Tobias; Gibson, John F.; Schneider, Tobias M.

    2016-05-01

    We present two spanwise-localized travelling wave solutions in the asymptotic suction boundary layer, obtained by continuation of solutions of plane Couette flow. One of the solutions has the vortical structures located close to the wall, similar to spanwise-localized edge states previously found for this system. The vortical structures of the second solution are located in the free stream far above the laminar boundary layer and are supported by a secondary shear gradient that is created by a large-scale low-speed streak. The dynamically relevant eigenmodes of this solution are concentrated in the free stream, and the departure into turbulence from this solution evolves in the free stream towards the walls. For invariant solutions in free-stream turbulence, this solution thus shows that that the source of energy of the vortical structures can be a dynamical structure of the solution itself, instead of the laminar boundary layer.

  5. Bursting frequency prediction in turbulent boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    LIOU,WILLIAM W.; FANG,YICHUNG

    2000-02-01

    The frequencies of the bursting events associated with the streamwise coherent structures of spatially developing incompressible turbulent boundary layers were predicted using global numerical solution of the Orr-Sommerfeld and the vertical vorticity equations of hydrodynamic stability problems. The structures were modeled as wavelike disturbances associated with the turbulent mean flow. The global method developed here involves the use of second and fourth order accurate finite difference formula for the differential equations as well as the boundary conditions. An automated prediction tool, BURFIT, was developed. The predicted resonance frequencies were found to agree very well with previous results using a local shooting technique and measured data.

  6. Particulate plumes in boundary layers with obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosyan, Arakel; Karelsky, Kirill

    2013-04-01

    This presentation is aimed at creating and realization of new physical model of impurity transfer (solid particles and heavy gases) in areas with non-flat and/or nonstationary boundaries. The main idea of suggested method is to use non-viscous equations for solid particles transport modeling in the vicinity of complex boundary. In viscous atmosphere with as small as one likes coefficient of molecular viscosity, the non-slip boundary condition on solid surface must be observed. This postulates the reduction of velocity to zero at a solid surface. It is unconditionally in this case Prandtle hypothesis must be observed: for rather wide range of conditions in the surface neighboring layers energy dissipation of atmosphere flows is comparable by magnitude with manifestation of inertia forces. That is why according to Prandtle hypothesis in atmosphere movement characterizing by a high Reynolds number the boundary layer is forming near a planet surface, within which the required transition from zero velocities at the surface to magnitudes at the external boundary of the layer that are quite close to ones in ideal atmosphere flow. In that layer fast velocity gradients cause viscous effects to be comparable in magnitude with inertia forces influence. For conditions considered essential changes of hydrodynamic fields near solid boundary caused not only by non-slip condition but also by a various relief of surface: mountains, street canyons, individual buildings. Transport of solid particles, their ascent and precipitation also result in dramatic changes of meteorological fields. As dynamic processes of solid particles transfer accompanying the flow past of complex relief surface by wind flows is of our main interest we are to use equations of non-viscous hydrodynamic. We should put up with on the one hand idea of big wind gradients in the boundary layer and on the other hand disregard of molecular viscosity in two-phase atmosphere equations.We deal with describing big field

  7. Hairpin vortices in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eitel-Amor, G.; Flores, O.; Schlatter, P.

    2014-04-01

    The present work addresses the question whether hairpin vortices are a dominant feature of near-wall turbulence and which role they play during transition. First, the parent-offspring mechanism is investigated in temporal simulations of a single hairpin vortex introduced in a mean shear flow corresponding to turbulent channels and boundary layers up to Reτ = 590. Using an eddy viscosity computed from resolved simulations, the effect of a turbulent background is also considered. Tracking the vortical structure downstream, it is found that secondary hairpins are created shortly after initialization. Thereafter, all rotational structures decay, whereas this effect is enforced in the presence of an eddy viscosity. In a second approach, a laminar boundary layer is tripped to transition by insertion of a regular pattern of hairpins by means of defined volumetric forces representing an ejection event. The idea is to create a synthetic turbulent boundary layer dominated by hairpin-like vortices. The flow for Reτ < 250 is analysed with respect to the lifetime of individual hairpin-like vortices. Both the temporal and spatial simulations demonstrate that the regeneration process is rather short-lived and may not sustain once a turbulent background has formed. From the transitional flow simulations, it is conjectured that the forest of hairpins reported in former DNS studies is an outer layer phenomenon not being connected to the onset of near-wall turbulence.

  8. Large eddy simulation of plume dispersion in a convective boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Fosberry, L.P.; Tsang, T.T.H.

    1996-12-31

    Plume dispersion in a convective boundary layer is dependent on release height. When a neutrally buoyant contaminant is released from an elevated point in the convective boundary layer at z {approximately} 0.5h, where h is the height of the boundary layer, the plume descends and a concentration maximum is observed at ground level. Alternately, when the contaminant is released from a surface source at z < {approximately} 0.2h, the plume lifts off and a maximum concentration is observed near the inversion layer. Neutrally buoyant plume dispersion in the convective atmospheric boundary layer were simulated by a mixed pseudospectral finite difference Large Eddy Simulation (LES).

  9. Toward parameterization of the stable boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetzel, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    Wangara data is used to examine the depth of the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) and the height to which surface-linked turbulence extends. It is noted that a linearity of virtual temperature profiles has been found to extend up to a significant portion of the NBL, and then diverge where the wind shear rides over the surface-induced turbulence. A series of Richardson numbers are examined for varying degrees of turbulence and the significant cooling region is observed to have greater depth than the depth of the linear relationship layer. A three-layer parameterization of the thermodynamic structure of the NBL is developed so that a system of five equations must be solved when the wind velocity profile and the temperature at the surface are known. A correlation between the bulk Richardson number and the depth of the linear layer was found to be 0.89.

  10. Boundary Layer Theory. Part 1; Laminar Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlichting, H.

    1949-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to give you a survey of a field of aerodynamics which has for a number of years been attracting an ever growing interest. The subject is the theory of flows with friction, and, within that field, particularly the theory of friction layers, or boundary layers. As you know, a great many considerations of aerodynamics are based on the so-called ideal fluid, that is, the frictionless incompressible fluid. By neglect of compressibility and friction the extensive mathematical theory of the ideal fluid (potential theory) has been made possible.

  11. Turbulent shear stresses in compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laderman, A. J.; Demetriades, A.

    1979-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometer measurements of turbulent shear stresses in a Mach 3 compressible boundary layer were performed in order to investigate the effects of heat transfer on turbulence. Measurements were obtained by an x-probe in a flat plate, zero pressure gradient, two dimensional boundary layer in a wind tunnel with wall to freestream temperature ratios of 0.94 and 0.71. The measured shear stress distributions are found to be in good agreement with previous results, supporting the contention that the shear stress distribution is essentially independent of Mach number and heat transfer for Mach numbers from incompressible to hypersonic and wall to freestream temperature ratios of 0.4 to 1.0. It is also found that corrections for frequency response limitations of the electronic equipment are necessary to determine the correct shear stress distribution, particularly at the walls.

  12. Boundary layer transition detection by luminescence imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclachlan, B. G.; Bell, J. H.; Gallery, J.; Gouterman, M.; Callis, J.

    1993-01-01

    In recent experiments we have demonstrated the feasibility of a new approach to boundary layer transition detection. This new approach employs the temperature dependence of certain photoluminescent materials in the form of a surface coating or 'paint' to detect the change in heat transfer characteristics that accompany boundary layer transition. The feasibility experiments were conducted for low subsonic to transonic Mach numbers on two-dimensional airfoil and flat plate configurations. Paint derived transition locations were determined and compared to those obtained from Preston pressure probe measurements. Artificial heating of the models was used to obtain transition temperature signatures suitable for the instrumentation available to us. Initial estimates show, however, that passive kinetic heating at high Mach numbers is a promising alternative.

  13. Numerical simulation of boundary-layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalart, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    The transition to turbulence in boundary layers was investigated by direct numerical solution of the nonlinear, three-dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in the half-infinite domain over a flat plate. Periodicity was imposed in the streamwise and spanwise directions. A body force was applied to approximate the effect of a nonparallel mean flow. The numerical method was spectra, based on Fourier series and Jacobi polynomials, and used divergence-free basis functions. Extremely rapid convergence was obtained when solving the linear Orr-Sommerfeld equation. The early nonlinear and three-dimensional stages of transition, in a boundary layer disturbed by a vibrating ribbon, were successfully simulated. Excellent qualitative agreement was observed with either experiments or weakly nonlinear theories. In particular, the breakdown pattern was staggered or nonstaggered depending on the disturbance amplitude.

  14. BOREAS AFM-6 Boundary Layer Height Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) site. This data set provides boundary layer height information over the site. The data were collected from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994 and are stored in tabular ASCII files. The boundary layer height data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  15. Burst vortex/boundary layer interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, P.; Naaseri, M.

    1988-01-01

    Several configurations of delta wing vortex generator and boundary layer test plate were tested, and two final ones selected. Sample measurements and flow visualizations in the candidate configurations, together with more detailed measurements in one of the two final arrangements, which were selected so that a pure vortex bursts repeatably and then interacts, in as simple fashion as possible, with a simple turbulent boundary layer, are included. It is concluded that different intensities of bursting or breakdown, like different strengths of shock wave or hydraulic jump, can be produced by minor changes of configuration. The weaker breakdowns do not produce flow reversal. The initial measurements were done with a fairly weak, but repeatable, breakdown. Basic measurements on the second final arrangement, with a stronger breakdown, are in progress.

  16. Shock-boundary-layer interaction in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertelrud, Arild

    1989-01-01

    A brief survey is given on the study of transonic shock/boundary layer effects in flight. Then the possibility of alleviating the adverse shock effects through passive shock control is discussed. A Swedish flight experiment on a swept wing attack aircraft is used to demonstrate how it is possible to reduce the extent of separated flow and increase the drag-rise Mach number significantly using a moderate amount of perforation of the surface.

  17. The boundary layer on compressor cascade blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, S.

    1981-01-01

    Some redesign of the cascade facility was necessary in order to incoporate the requirements of the LDA system into the design. Of particular importance was the intended use of a combination of suction upstream of the blade pack with diverging pack walls, as opposed to blade pack suction alone, for spanwise dimensionality control. An ARL blade was used to redo some tests using this arrangement. Preliminary testing and boundary layer measurements began on the double circular arc blades.

  18. Clidar Mountain Boundary Layer Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Nimmi C. P.; Barnes, John E.

    2016-06-01

    A CCD Camera Lidar system called the CLidar system images a vertically pointing laser from the side with a spatially separated CCD camera and wide angle optics. The system has been used to investigate case studies of aerosols in mountain boundary layers in in the times following sunset. The aerosols detected by the system demonstrate the wide variation of near ground aerosol structure and capabilities of the CLidar system.

  19. Boundary Layer Control for Hypersonic Airbreathing Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Nowak, Robert J.; Horvath, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    Active and passive methods for tripping hypersonic boundary layers have been examined in NASA Langley Research Center wind tunnels using a Hyper-X model. This investigation assessed several concepts for forcing transition, including passive discrete roughness elements and active mass addition (or blowing), in the 20-Inch Mach 6 Air and the 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnels. Heat transfer distributions obtained via phosphor thermography, shock system details, and surface streamline patterns were measured on a 0.333-scale model of the Hyper-X forebody. The comparisons between the active and passive methods for boundary layer control were conducted at test conditions that nearly match the Hyper-X nominal Mach 7 flight test-point of an angle-of-attack of 2-deg and length Reynolds number of 5.6 million. For passive roughness, the primary parametric variation was a range of trip heights within the calculated boundary layer thickness for several trip concepts. The passive roughness study resulted in a swept ramp configuration, scaled to be roughly 0.6 of the calculated boundary layer thickness, being selected for the Mach 7 flight vehicle. For the active blowing study, the manifold pressure was systematically varied (while monitoring the mass flow) for each configuration to determine the jet penetration height, with schlieren, and transition movement, with the phosphor system, for comparison to the passive results. All the blowing concepts tested, which included various rows of sonic orifices (holes), two- and three-dimensional slots, and random porosity, provided transition onset near the trip location with manifold stagnation pressures on the order of 40 times the model surface static pressure, which is adequate to ensure sonic jets. The present results indicate that the jet penetration height for blowing was roughly half the height required with passive roughness elements for an equivalent amount of transition movement.

  20. Pressure gradient influence in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuther, Nico; Kaehler, Christian J.

    2015-11-01

    Understanding wall-bounded turbulence is still an ongoing process. Although remarkable progress has been made in the last decades, many challenges still remain. Mean flow statistics are well understood in case of zero pressure gradient flows. However, almost all turbulent boundary layers in technical applications, such as aircrafts, are subjected to a streamwise pressure gradient. When subjecting turbulent boundary layers to adverse pressure gradients, significant changes in the statistical behavior of the near-wall flow have been observed in experimental studies conducted however the details dynamics and characteristics of these flows has not been fully resolved. The sensitivity to Reynolds number and the dependency on several parameters, including the dependence on the pressure gradient parameter, is still under debate and very little information exists about statistically averaged quantities such as the mean velocity profile or Reynolds stresses. In order to improve the understanding of wall-bounded turbulence, this work experimentally investigates turbulent boundary layer subjected to favorable and adverse pressure gradients by means of Particle Image Velocimetry over a wide range of Reynolds numbers, 4200

  1. Shock-wave boundary layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delery, J.; Marvin, J. G.; Reshotko, E.

    1986-01-01

    Presented is a comprehensive, up-to-date review of the shock-wave boundary-layer interaction problem. A detailed physical description of the phenomena for transonic and supersonic speed regimes is given based on experimental observations, correlations, and theoretical concepts. Approaches for solving the problem are then reviewed in depth. Specifically, these include: global methods developed to predict sudden changes in boundary-layer properties; integral or finite-difference methods developed to predict the continuous evolution of a boundary-layer encountering a pressure field induced by a shock wave; coupling methods to predict entire flow fields; analytical methods such as multi-deck techniques; and finite-difference methods for solving the time-dependent Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations used to predict the development of entire flow fields. Examples are presented to illustrate the status of the various methods and some discussion is devoted to delineating their advantages and shortcomings. Reference citations for the wide variety of subject material are provided for readers interested in further study.

  2. Coupled wake boundary layer model of windfarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Richard; Gayme, Dennice; Meneveau, Charles

    2014-11-01

    We present a coupled wake boundary layer (CWBL) model that describes the distribution of the power output in a windfarm. The model couples the traditional, industry-standard wake expansion/superposition approach with a top-down model for the overall windfarm boundary layer structure. Wake models capture the effect of turbine positioning, while the top-down approach represents the interaction between the windturbine wakes and the atmospheric boundary layer. Each portion of the CWBL model requires specification of a parameter that is unknown a-priori. The wake model requires the wake expansion rate, whereas the top-down model requires the effective spanwise turbine spacing within which the model's momentum balance is relevant. The wake expansion rate is obtained by matching the mean velocity at the turbine from both approaches, while the effective spanwise turbine spacing is determined from the wake model. Coupling of the constitutive components of the CWBL model is achieved by iterating these parameters until convergence is reached. We show that the CWBL model predictions compare more favorably with large eddy simulation results than those made with either the wake or top-down model in isolation and that the model can be applied successfully to the Horns Rev and Nysted windfarms. The `Fellowships for Young Energy Scientists' (YES!) of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter supported by NWO, and NSF Grant #1243482.

  3. Unsteadiness of Shock Wave / Boundary Layer Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, Noel

    2009-11-01

    Shock wave / boundary layer interactions are an important feature of high-speed flows that occur in a wide range of practical configurations including aircraft control surfaces, inlets, missile base flows, nozzles, and rotating machinery. These interactions are often associated with severe boundary layer separation, which is highly unsteady, and exhibits high fluctuating pressure and heat loads. The unsteady motions are characterized by a wide range of frequencies, including low-frequency motions that are about two orders of magnitude lower than those that characterize the upstream boundary layer. It is these low-frequency motions that are of most interest because they have been the most difficult to explain and model. Despite significant work over the past few decades, the source of the low-frequency motions remains a topic of intense debate. Owing to a flurry of activity over the past decade on this single topic we are close to developing a comprehensive understanding of the low-frequency unsteadiness. For example, recent work in our laboratory and others suggests that the driving mechanism is related to low-frequency fluctuations in the upstream boundary layer. However, several recent studies suggest the dominant mechanism is an intrinsic instability of the separated flow. Here we attempt to reconcile these views by arguing that the low-frequency unsteadiness is driven by both upstream and downstream processes, but the relative importance of each mechanism depends on the strength (or length-scale) of separation. In cases where the separation bubble is relatively small, then the flow is intermittently separated, and there exists a strong correlation between upstream velocity fluctuations and the separation bubble dynamics. It appears that superstructures in the upstream boundary layer can play an important role in driving the unsteadiness for this case. It is not clear, however, if the upstream fluctuations directly move the separation point or indirectly couple

  4. The Saharan atmospheric boundary layer: Turbulence, stratification and mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Carreras, Luis; Parker, Douglas J.; Marsham, John H.; Rosenberg, Philip D.; Marenco, Franco; Mcquaid, James B.

    2013-04-01

    concentrations, demonstrating the potential for variability in, for example, dust concentrations independent of external forcings. The residual layer, where long-range transport can take place, is analyzed in particular detail. Various processes which can lead to transport into and mixing within the residual layer are explored, including shear-driven turbulence at the residual layer top and the potential for detrainment from the convective boundary layer top due to the combination of a weak lid and a neutral layer above.

  5. The role of nonlinear critical layers in boundary layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M.E.

    1995-01-01

    Asymptotic methods are used to describe the nonlinear self-interaction between pairs of oblique instability modes that eventually develops when initially linear spatially growing instability waves evolve downstream in nominally two-dimensional laminar boundary layers. The first nonlinear reaction takes place locally within a so-called 'critical layer', with the flow outside this layer consisting of a locally parallel mean flow plus a pair of oblique instability waves - which may or may not be accompanied by an associated plane wave. The amplitudes of these waves, which are completely determined by nonlinear effects within the critical layer, satisfy either a single integro-differential equation or a pair of integro-differential equations with quadratic to quartic-type nonlinearities. The physical implications of these equations are discussed.

  6. Scaling the heterogeneously heated convective boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Heerwaarden, C.; Mellado, J.; De Lozar, A.

    2013-12-01

    We have studied the heterogeneously heated convective boundary layer (CBL) by means of large-eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS). What makes our study different from previous studies on this subject are our very long simulations in which the system travels through multiple states and that from there we have derived scaling laws. In our setup, a stratified atmosphere is heated from below by square patches with a high surface buoyancy flux, surrounded by regions with no or little flux. By letting a boundary layer grow in time we let the system evolve from the so-called meso-scale to the micro-scale regime. In the former the heterogeneity is large and strong circulations can develop, while in the latter the heterogeneity is small and does no longer influence the boundary layer structure. Within each simulation we can now observe the formation of a peak in kinetic energy, which represents the 'optimal' heterogeneity size in the meso-scale, and the subsequent decay of the peak and the development towards the transition to the micro-scale. We have created a non-dimensional parameter space that describes all properties of this system. By studying the previously described evolution for different combinations of parameters, we have derived three important conclusions. First, there exists a horizontal length scale of the heterogeneity (L) that is a function of the boundary layer height (h) and the Richardson (Ri) number of the inversion at the top of the boundary layer. This relationship has the form L = h Ri^(3/8). Second, this horizontal length scale L allows for expressing the time evolution, and thus the state of the system, as a ratio of this length scale and the distance between two patches Xp. This ratio thus describes to which extent the circulation fills up the space that exists between two patch centers. The timings of the transition from the meso- to the micro-scale collapse under this scaling for all simulations sharing the same flux

  7. Acoustic radar investigations of boundary layer phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marks, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    A comparison is made between acoustic radar echoes and conventional meteorological data obtained from the WKY tower, for the purpose of better understanding the relationships between acoustic radar echoes and boundary layer processes. Two thunderstorm outflow cases are presented and compared to both acoustic radar data and Charba's gust front model. The acoustic radar echoes reveal the boundary between warm and cold air and other areas of mixing and strong thermal gradient quite well. The thunderstorm outflow of 27 June 1972 is found to compare with in most respects to Charba's gust front model. The major difference is the complete separation of the head from the main body of cold air, probably caused by erosion of the area behind the head by mixing with the ambient air. Two cases of nocturnal inversions caused by advection of warmer air aloft are presented. It is found that areas of turbulent mixing or strong thermal gradient can be identified quite easily in the acoustic radar record.

  8. Boundary-Layer-Ingesting Inlet Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Lewis R.; Allan, Brian G.; Gorton, Susan A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of a research study conducted in support of the small-scale demonstration of an active flow control system for a boundary-layer-ingesting (BLI) inlet. The effectiveness of active flow control in reducing engine inlet circumferential distortion was assessed using a 2.5% scale model of a 35% boundary-layer-ingesting flush-mounted, offset, diffusing inlet. This experiment was conducted in the NASA Langley 0.3-meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel at flight Mach numbers with a model inlet specifically designed for this type of testing. High mass flow actuators controlled the flow through distributed control jets providing the active flow control. A vortex generator point design configuration was also tested for comparison purposes and to provide a means to examine a hybrid vortex generator and control jets configuration. Measurements were made of the onset boundary layer, the duct surface static pressures, and the mass flow through the duct and the actuators. The distortion and pressure recovery were determined by 40 total pressure measurements on 8 rake arms each separated by 45 degrees and were located at the aerodynamic interface plane. The test matrix was limited to a maximum free-stream Mach number of 0.85 with scaled mass flows through the inlet for that condition. The data show that the flow control jets alone can reduce circumferential distortion (DPCP(sub avg)) from 0.055 to about 0.015 using about 2.5% of inlet mass flow. The vortex generators also reduced the circumferential distortion from 0.055 to 0.010 near the inlet mass flow design point. Lower inlet mass flow settings with the vortex generator configuration produced higher distortion levels that were reduced to acceptable levels using a hybrid vortex generator/control jets configuration that required less than 1% of the inlet mass flow.

  9. Boundary-Layer-Ingesting Inlet Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Lewis R.; Allan, Brian G.; Gorton, Susan A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of a research study conducted in support of the small-scale demonstration of an active flow control system for a boundary-layer-ingesting (BLI) inlet. The effectiveness of active flow control in reducing engine inlet circumferential distortion was assessed using a 2.5% scale model of a 35% boundary-layer-ingesting flush-mounted, offset, diffusing inlet. This experiment was conducted in the NASA Langley 0.3-meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel at flight Mach numbers with a model inlet specifically designed for this type of testing. High mass flow actuators controlled the flow through distributed control jets providing the active flow control. A vortex generator point design configuration was also tested for comparison purposes and to provide a means to examine a hybrid vortex generator and control jets configuration. Measurements were made of the onset boundary layer, the duct surface static pressures, and the mass flow through the duct and the actuators. The distortion and pressure recovery were determined by 40 total pressure measurements on 8 rake arms each separated by 45 degrees and were located at the aerodynamic interface plane. The test matrix was limited to a maximum free-stream Mach number of 0.85 with scaled mass flows through the inlet for that condition. The data show that the flow control jets alone can reduce circumferential distortion (DPCPavg) from 0.055 to about 0.015 using about 2.5% of inlet mass flow. The vortex generators also reduced the circumferential distortion from 0.055 to 0.010 near the inlet mass flow design point. Lower inlet mass flow settings with the vortex generator configuration produced higher distortion levels that were reduced to acceptable levels using a hybrid vortex generator/control jets configuration that required less than 1% of the inlet mass flow.

  10. Boundary-layer Transition at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, George M

    1956-01-01

    Recent results of the effects of Mach number, stream turbulence, leading-edge geometry, leading-edge sweep, surface temperature, surface finish, pressure gradient, and angle of attack on boundary-layer transition are summarized. Factors that delay transition are nose blunting, surface cooling, and favorable pressure gradient. Leading-edge sweep and excessive surface roughness tend to promote early transition. The effects of leading-edge blunting on two-dimensional surfaces and surface cooling can be predicted adequately by existing theories, at least in the moderate Mach number range.

  11. Coherent motions in the turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Stephen K.

    1991-01-01

    The role of coherent structures in the production and dissipation of turbulence in a boundary layer is characterized, summarizing the results of recent investigations. Coherent motion is defined as a three-dimensional region of flow where at least one fundamental variable exhibits significant correlation with itself or with another variable over a space or time range significantly larger than the smallest local scales of the flow. Sections are then devoted to flow-visualization experiments, statistical analyses, numerical simulation techniques, the history of coherent-structure studies, vortices and vortical structures, conceptual models, and predictive models. Diagrams and graphs are provided.

  12. The minisodar and planetary boundary layer studies

    SciTech Connect

    Coulter, R.L.

    1996-06-01

    The minisodar, in addition to being smaller than conventional sodar, operates at higher frequencies, obtains usable signal returns closer to the surface, and can use smaller range gates. Because the max range is generally limited to the lower 200 m above the surface, the minisodar is not able to interrogate the entire daytime atmospheric Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL); however it can be a very useful tool for understanding the PBL. In concert with other instruments, the minisodar can add significant new insights to our understanding of the PBL. This paper gives examples of past and potential uses of minisodars in such situations.

  13. Sound radiation due to boundary layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Meng

    1993-01-01

    This report describes progress made to date towards calculations of noise produced by the laminar-turbulence transition process in a low Mach number boundary layer formed on a rigid wall. The primary objectives of the study are to elucidate the physical mechanisms by which acoustic waves are generated, to clarify the roles of the fluctuating Reynolds stress and the viscous stress in the presence of a solid surface, and to determine the relative efficiency as a noise source of the various transition stages. In particular, we will examine the acoustic characteristics and directivity associated with three-dimensional instability waves, the detached high-shear layer, and turbulent spots following a laminar breakdown. Additionally, attention will be paid to the unsteady surface pressures during the transition, which provide a source of flow noise as well as a forcing function for wall vibration in both aeronautical and marine applications.

  14. Autumnal Mixed-Phase Cloudy Boundary Layers in the Arctic.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, James O.

    1998-06-01

    Two mixed-phase cloudy boundary layer events observed over the Arctic ice pack in autumn are extensively analyzed. The local dynamic and thermodynamic structure of the boundary layers is determined from aircraft measurements including analysis of turbulence, longwave radiative transfer, and cloud microphysics. The large-scale forcing is determined from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction reanalysis fields while mesoscale forcing is estimated from 40-km aircraft box patterns. The two cases differed somewhat in their local static stability, surface characteristics, and large-scale forcing. One case was characterized by a stably stratified cloudy boundary layer over a heterogeneous surface containing numerous open leads. The other case occurred over a fairly homogenous surface of multiyear ice and consisted of a surface-based stable layer surmounted by a low-level jet and a cloud-topped mixed layer. An important large-scale factor in the development of low clouds appears to have been water vapor advection. Low clouds formed irrespective of the sign of the large-scale vertical velocity. Observed flux profiles indicate that both cloudy boundary layers are cooled through turbulent eddies except at cloud top where entrainment of warm moist air aloft occurs. Maximum turbulent kinetic energy occurs near cloud top where turbulent motions are driven by strong radiative cooling (>70 K day1) and in the vicinity of the low-level jet where turbulence is shear induced. The presence of both liquid and ice in the cloud layers appears to be a nearly steady-state feature at temperatures between 13° and 20°C. Results of a simple condensed water budget indicate that these colloidally unstable mixed-phase clouds may be maintained through strong cloud-top radiative cooling. The isobaric cooling rate required to maintain the presence of both liquid and ice in a stratiform cloud is quite sensitive to variations in the highly uncertain concentration of ice-forming nuclei.

  15. Turbulent Plasmaspheric Boundary Layer: Observables and Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, Evgeny

    2014-10-01

    In situ satellite observations reveal strong lower hybrid/fast magnetosonic turbulence and broadband hiss-like VLF waves in the substorm subauroral geospace at and earthward of the electron plasmasheet boundary. These coincide with subauroral ion drifts/polarization streams (SAID/SAPS) in the plasmasphere and topside ionosphere. SAID/SAPS appear in ~10 min after the substorm onset consistent with the fast propagation of substorm injection fronts. The SAID channel follows the dispersionless cutoff of the energetic electron flux at the plasmapause. This indicates that the cold plasma maintains charge neutrality within the channel, thereby short-circuiting the injected plasma jet (injection fronts over the plasmasphere. Plasma turbulence leads to the circuit resistivity and magnetic diffusion as well as significant electron heating and acceleration. As a result, a turbulent boundary layer forms between the inner edge of the electron plasmasheet and plasmasphere. The SAID/SAPS-related VLF emissions appear to constitute a distinctive subset of substorm/storm-related VLF activity in the region co-located with freshly injected energetic ions inside the plasmasphere. Significant pitch-angle diffusion coefficients suggest that substorm SAID/SAPS-related VLF waves could be responsible for the alteration of the outer radiation belt boundary during (sub)storms. Supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  16. Sound Radiation from a Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufer, J.

    1961-01-01

    If the restriction of incompressibility in the turbulence problem is relaxed, the phenomenon of energy radiation in the form of sound from the turbulent zone arises. In order to calculate this radiated energy, it is shown that new statistical quantities, such as time-space correlation tensors, have to be known within the turbulent zone in addition to the conventional quantities. For the particular case of the turbulent boundary layer, indications are that the intensity of radiation becomes significant only in supersonic flows. Under these conditions, the recent work of Phillips is examined together with some experimental findings of the author. It is shown that the qualitative features of the radiation field (intensity, directionality) as predicted by the theory are consistent with the measurements; however, even for the highest Mach number flow, some of the assumptions of the asymptotic theory are not yet satisfied in the experiments. Finally, the question of turbulence damping due to radiation is discussed, with the result that in the Mach number range covered by the experiments, the energy lost from the boundary layer due to radiation is a small percentage of the work done by the wall shearing stresses.

  17. Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Karen T.; Anderson, Brian P.; Campbell, Charles H.; Garske, Michael T.; Saucedo, Luis A.; Kinder, Gerald R.; Micklos, Ann M.

    2011-01-01

    In support of the Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment (BLT FE) Project, a manufactured protuberance tile was installed on the port wing of Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery for STS-119, STS-128, STS-131 and STS-133 as well as Space Shuttle Endeavour for STS-134. Additional instrumentation was installed in order to obtain more spatially resolved measurements downstream of the protuberance. This paper provides an overview of the BLT FE Project with emphasis on the STS-131 and STS-133 results. A high-level overview of the in-situ flight data is presented, along with a summary of the comparisons between pre- and post-flight analysis predictions and flight data. Comparisons show that empirically correlated predictions for boundary layer transition onset time closely match the flight data, while predicted surface temperatures were significantly higher than observed flight temperatures. A thermocouple anomaly observed on a number of the missions is discussed as are a number of the mitigation actions that will be taken on the final flight, STS-134, including potential alterations of the flight trajectory and changes to the flight instrumentation.

  18. X-33 Hypersonic Boundary Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Hollis, Brian R.; Thompson, Richard A.; Hamilton, H. Harris, II

    1999-01-01

    Boundary layer and aeroheating characteristics of several X-33 configurations have been experimentally examined in the Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel. Global surface heat transfer distributions, surface streamline patterns, and shock shapes were measured on 0.013-scale models at Mach 6 in air. Parametric variations include angles-of-attack of 20-deg, 30-deg, and 40-deg; Reynolds numbers based on model length of 0.9 to 6.6 million; and body-flap deflections of 0, 10 and 20-deg. The effects of discrete and distributed roughness elements on boundary layer transition, which included trip height, size, location, and distribution, both on and off the windward centerline, were investigated. The discrete roughness results on centerline were used to provide a transition correlation for the X-33 flight vehicle that was applicable across the range of reentry angles of attack. The attachment line discrete roughness results were shown to be consistent with the centerline results, as no increased sensitivity to roughness along the attachment line was identified. The effect of bowed panels was qualitatively shown to be less effective than the discrete trips; however, the distributed nature of the bowed panels affected a larger percent of the aft-body windward surface than a single discrete trip.

  19. Performance and boundary-layer evaluation of a sonic inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, J. F.; Ruggeri, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the boundary layer characteristics and aerodynamic performance of a radial vane sonic inlet with a length/diameter ratio of 1 for several vane configurations. The sonic inlet was designed with a slight wavy wall type of diffuser geometry, which permits operation at high inlet Mach numbers (sufficiently high for good noise suppression) without boundary layer flow separation and with good total pressure recovery. A new method for evaluating the turbulent boundary layer was developed to separate the boundary layer from the inviscid core flow, which is characterized by a total pressure variation from hub to tip, and to determine the experimental boundary layer parameters.

  20. Meteorological and trace gas factors affecting the number concentration of atmospheric Aitken (Dp = 50 nm) particles in the continental boundary layer: parameterization using a multivariate mixed effects model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkonen, S.; Korhonen, H.; Romakkaniemi, S.; Smith, J. N.; Joutsensaari, J.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Hamed, A.; Breider, T. J.; Birmili, W.; Spindler, G.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Facchini, M. C.; Laaksonen, A.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of aerosol size distribution and different gas and meteorological parameters, made in three polluted sites in Central and Southern Europe: Po Valley, Italy, Melpitz and Hohenpeissenberg in Germany, were analysed for this study to examine which of the meteorological and trace gas variables affect the number concentration of Aitken (Dp= 50 nm) particles. The aim of our study was to predict the number concentration of 50 nm particles by a combination of in-situ meteorological and gas phase parameters. The statistical model needs to describe, amongst others, the factors affecting the growth of newly formed aerosol particles (below 10 nm) to 50 nm size, but also sources of direct particle emissions in that size range. As the analysis method we used multivariate nonlinear mixed effects model. Hourly averages of gas and meteorological parameters measured at the stations were used as predictor variables; the best predictive model was attained with a combination of relative humidity, new particle formation event probability, temperature, condensation sink and concentrations of SO2, NO2 and ozone. The seasonal variation was also taken into account in the mixed model structure. Model simulations with the Global Model of Aerosol Processes (GLOMAP) indicate that the parameterization can be used as a part of a larger atmospheric model to predict the concentration of climatically active particles. As an additional benefit, the introduced model framework is, in theory, applicable for any kind of measured aerosol parameter.

  1. Meteorological and trace gas factors affecting the number concentration of atmospheric Aitken (Dp=50 nm) particles in the continental boundary layer: parameterization using a multivariate mixed effects model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkonen, S.; Korhonen, H.; Romakkaniemi, S.; Smith, J. N.; Joutsensaari, J.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Hamed, A.; Breider, T. J.; Birmili, W.; Spindler, G.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Facchini, M. C.; Laaksonen, A.

    2010-08-01

    Measurements of aerosol size-distribution and different gas and meteorological parameters, made in three polluted sites in Central- and Southern Europe: Po Valley, Italy, Melpitz and Hohenpeissenberg in Germany, were analysed for this study to examine which of the meteorological and trace gas variables affect the number concentration of Aitken (Dp=50 nm) particles. The aim of our study was to predict the number concentration of 50 nm particles by a combination of in-situ meteorological and gas phase parameters. The statistical model needs to describe, amongst others, the factors affecting the growth of newly formed aerosol particles (below 10 nm) to 50 nm size, but also sources of direct particle emissions in that size range. As the analysis method we used multivariate nonlinear mixed effects model. Hourly averages of gas and meteorological parameters measured at the stations were used as predictor variables; the best predictive model was attained with a combination of relative humidity, new particle formation event probability, temperature, condensation sink and concentrations of SO2, NO2 and ozone. The seasonal variation was also taken into account in the mixed model structure. Model simulations with the Global Model of Aerosol Processes (GLOMAP) indicate that the parameterization can be used as a part of a larger atmospheric model to predict the concentration of climatically active particles. As an additional benefit, the introduced model framework is, in theory, applicable for any kind of measured aerosol parameter.

  2. Mercury in the marine boundary layer and seawater of the South China Sea: Concentrations, sea/air flux, and implication for land outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xuewu; Feng, Xinbin; Zhang, Gan; Xu, Weihai; Li, Xiangdong; Yao, Hen; Liang, Peng; Li, Jun; Sommar, Jonas; Yin, Runsheng; Liu, Na

    2010-03-01

    Using R/V Shiyan 3 as a sampling platform, measurements of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), surface seawater total mercury (THg), methyl mercury (MeHg), and dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) were carried out above and in the South China Sea (SCS). Measurements were collected for 2 weeks (10 to 28 August 2007) during an oceanographic expedition, which circumnavigated the northern SCS from Guangzhou (Canton), Hainan Inland, the Philippines, and back to Guangzhou. GEM concentrations over the northern SCS ranged from 1.04 to 6.75 ng m-3 (mean: 2.62 ng m-3, median: 2.24 ng m-3). The spatial distribution of GEM was characterized by elevated concentrations near the coastal sites adjacent to mainland China and lower concentrations at stations in the open sea. Trajectory analysis revealed that high concentrations of GEM were generally related to air masses from south China and the Indochina peninsula, while lower concentrations of GEM were related to air masses from the open sea area, reflecting great Hg emissions from south China and Indochina peninsula. The mean concentrations of THg, MeHg, and DGM in surface seawater were 1.2 ± 0.3 ng L-1, 0.12 ± 0.05 ng L-1, and 36.5 ± 14.9 pg L-1, respectively. In general, THg and MeHg levels in the northern SCS were higher compared to results reported from most other oceans/seas. Elevated THg levels in the study area were likely attributed to significant Hg delivery from surrounding areas of the SCS primarily via atmospheric deposition and riverine input, whereas other sources like in situ production by various biotic and abiotic processes may be important for MeHg. Average sea/air flux of Hg in the study area was estimated using a gas exchange method (4.5 ± 3.4 ng m-2 h-1). This value was comparable to those from other coastal areas and generally higher than those from open sea environments, which may be attributed to the reemission of Hg previously transported to this area.

  3. SUPERSONIC SHEAR INSTABILITIES IN ASTROPHYSICAL BOUNDARY LAYERS

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Rafikov, Roman R.

    2012-06-20

    Disk accretion onto weakly magnetized astrophysical objects often proceeds via a boundary layer (BL) that forms near the object's surface, in which the rotation speed of the accreted gas changes rapidly. Here, we study the initial stages of formation for such a BL around a white dwarf or a young star by examining the hydrodynamical shear instabilities that may initiate mixing and momentum transport between the two fluids of different densities moving supersonically with respect to each other. We find that an initially laminar BL is unstable to two different kinds of instabilities. One is an instability of a supersonic vortex sheet (implying a discontinuous initial profile of the angular speed of the gas) in the presence of gravity, which we find to have a growth rate of order (but less than) the orbital frequency. The other is a sonic instability of a finite width, supersonic shear layer, which is similar to the Papaloizou-Pringle instability. It has a growth rate proportional to the shear inside the transition layer, which is of order the orbital frequency times the ratio of stellar radius to the BL thickness. For a BL that is thin compared to the radius of the star, the shear rate is much larger than the orbital frequency. Thus, we conclude that sonic instabilities play a dominant role in the initial stages of nonmagnetic BL formation and give rise to very fast mixing between disk gas and stellar fluid in the supersonic regime.

  4. Boundary layer roll circulations during FIRE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirer, Hampton N.; Haack, Tracy

    1990-01-01

    The probable mechanism underlying the development of boundary layer roll circulations are studied using wind and temperature profiles measured by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Electra during the stratocumulus phase of the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE). The expected, or preferred, roll orientations, horizontal wavelengths, and propagation periods are determined by finding the minimum values of the dynamic and thermodynamic forcing parameters, which here are the eddy Reynolds number (Re) and moist Rayleigh number (Ra sub m). These minimum values depend on the height z sub T of the capping temperature inversion and on the values of the Fourier coefficients of the background height-dependent vector wind profile. As input to our nonlinear spectral model, descent and ascent runs by the Electra provide for initial estimates of the inversion height and the wind profiles. In the first phase of the investigation presented here, a mechanism is said to be a probable contributor to the development of roll circulations within the stratocumulus-topped boundary layer if the modeled roll orientation and wavelengths agree with their observed values. Preliminary results using the 14-coefficient model of Haack-Hirschberg (1988) are discussed for the 7 July 1987 Electra Mission 188-A (Flight 5). This mission was flown across a sharp cloud boundary that was within a LANDSAT/SPOT scene. The stratocumulus deck was relatively solid in the eastern part of the scene, while there was a rapid decrease in cloud cover to scattered cumulus clouds aligned in streets to the west. These cloud streets were oriented nearly parallel to the mean wind direction in the layer, which was approximately 340 degrees. The hypothesis that roll circulations occurred in both the relatively clear and the cloudy regions is investigated using as model input a descent profile obtained in the relatively clear air and an ascent profile obtained in the cloudy air. Initial results for the

  5. Persistent Structures in the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Dan; Chabalko, Chris

    2005-01-01

    Persistent structures in the turbulent boundary layer are located and analyzed. The data are taken from flight experiments on large commercial aircraft. An interval correlation technique is introduced which is able to locate the structures. The Morlet continuous wavelet is shown to not only locates persistent structures but has the added benefit that the pressure data are decomposed in time and frequency. To better understand how power is apportioned among these structures, a discrete Coiflet wavelet is used to decompose the pressure data into orthogonal frequency bands. Results indicate that some structures persist a great deal longer in the TBL than would be expected. These structure contain significant power and may be a primary source of vibration energy in the airframe.

  6. Atmospheric boundary layer over steep surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Sergeev, Daniil A.; Druzhinin, Oleg; Kandaurov, Alexander A.; Ermakova, Olga S.; Ezhova, Ekaterina V.; Esau, Igor; Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2014-08-01

    Turbulent air-sea interactions coupled with the surface wave dynamics remain a challenging problem. The needs to include this kind of interaction into the coupled environmental, weather and climate models motivate the development of a simplified approximation of the complex and strongly nonlinear interaction processes. This study proposes a quasi-linear model of wind-wave coupling. It formulates the approach and derives the model equations. The model is verified through a set of laboratory (direct measurements of an airflow by the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique) and numerical (a direct numerical simulation (DNS) technique) experiments. The experiments support the central model assumption that the flow velocity field averaged over an ensemble of turbulent fluctuations is smooth and does not demonstrate flow separation from the crests of the waves. The proposed quasi-linear model correctly recovers the measured characteristics of the turbulent boundary layer over the waved water surface.

  7. Supersonic boundary-layer flow turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Chi-Rong

    1993-01-01

    Baldwin-Lomax and kappa-epsilon turbulence models were modified for use in Navier-Stokes numerical computations of Mach 2.9 supersonic turbulent boundary layer flows along compression ramps. The computational results of Reynolds shear stress profiles were compared with experimental data. The Baldwin-Lomax model was modified to account for the Reynolds shear stress amplification within the flow field. A hybrid kappa-epsilon model with viscous sublayer turbulence treatment was constructed to predict the Reynolds shear stress profiles within the entire flow field. These modified turbulence models were effective for the computations of the surface pressure and the skin friction factor variations along an 8 deg ramp surface. The hybrid kappa-epsilon model could improve the predictions of the Reynolds shear stress profile and the skin friction factor near the corner of a 16 deg ramp.

  8. Modelling of the Evolving Stable Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorbjan, Zbigniew

    2014-06-01

    A single-column model of the evolving stable boundary layer (SBL) is tested for self-similar properties of the flow and effects of ambient forcing. The turbulence closure of the model is diagnostic, based on the K-theory approach, with a semi-empirical form of the mixing length, and empirical stability functions of the Richardson number. The model results, expressed in terms of local similarity scales, are universal functions, satisfied in the entire SBL. Based on similarity expression, a realizability condition is derived for the minimum allowable turbulent heat flux in the SBL. Numerical experiments show that the development of "horse-shoe" shaped, fixed-elevation hodographs in the interior of the SBL around sunrise is controlled by effects imposed by surface thermal forcing.

  9. Geometric invariance of compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Wei-Tao; Wu, Bin; She, Zhen-Su; Hussain, Fazle

    2015-11-01

    A symmetry based approach is applied to analyze the mean velocity and temperature fields of compressible, flat plate turbulent boundary layers (CTBL). A Reynolds stress length scale and a turbulent heat flux length scale are identified to possess the same defect scaling law in the CTBL bulk, which is solely owing to the constraint of the wall to the geometry of the wall-attached eddies, but invariant to compressibility and wall heat transfer. This invariance is called the geometric invariance of CTBL eddies and is likely the origin of the Mach number invariance of Morkovin's hypothesis, as well as the similarity of energy and momentum transports. A closure for the turbulent transport by using the invariant lengths is attainted to predict the mean velocity and temperature profiles in the CTBL bulk- superior to the van Driest transformation and the Reynolds analogy based relations for its sound physics and higher accuracy. Additionally, our approach offers a new understanding of turbulent Prandtl number.

  10. Acoustics of laminar boundary layers breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Meng

    1994-01-01

    Boundary layer flow transition has long been suggested as a potential noise source in both marine (sonar-dome self noise) and aeronautical (aircraft cabin noise) applications, owing to the highly transient nature of process. The design of effective noise control strategies relies upon a clear understanding of the source mechanisms associated with the unsteady flow dynamics during transition. Due to formidable mathematical difficulties, theoretical predictions either are limited to early linear and weakly nonlinear stages of transition, or employ acoustic analogy theories based on approximate source field data, often in the form of empirical correlation. In the present work, an approach which combines direct numerical simulation of the source field with the Lighthill acoustic analogy is utilized. This approach takes advantage of the recent advancement in computational capabilities to obtain detailed information about the flow-induced acoustic sources. The transitional boundary layer flow is computed by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations without model assumptions, thus allowing a direct evaluation of the pseudosound as well as source functions, including the Lighthill stress tensor and the wall shear stress. The latter are used for calculating the radiated pressure field based on the Curle-Powell solution of the Lighthill equation. This procedure allows a quantitative assessment of noise source mechanisms and the associated radiation characteristics during transition from primary instability up to the laminar breakdown stage. In particular, one is interested in comparing the roles played by the fluctuating volume Reynolds stress and the wall-shear-stresses, and in identifying specific flow processes and structures that are effective noise generators.

  11. Simulations of Boundary-Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbert, Thorwald

    2007-01-01

    For incompressible benchmark flows, we have demonstrated the capability of the parabolized stability equations (PSE) to simulate the transition process in excellent agreement with microscopic experiments and direct Navier-Stokes simulations at modest computational cost. Encouraged by these results, we have developed the PSE methodology of three-dimensional boundary-layers in general curvilinear coordinates for the range from low to hypersonic speeds, and for both linear and nonlinear problems. For given initial and boundary conditions, the approach permits simulations from receptivity through linear and secondary instabilities into the late stages of transition where significant changes in skin friction and heat transfer coefficients occur. We have performed transition simulations for a variety of two- and three-dimensional similarity solutions and for realistic flows over swept wings at subsonic and supersonic speeds, the pressure ans suction side of turbine blades at low and medium turbulence levels, and over a blunt cone at Mach number Ma = 8. We present selected results for different transition mechanisms with emphasis on the late stage of transition and the evolution of wall-shear stress and heat transfer.

  12. A Turbulent Boundary Layer over Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyunwook; Kim, John

    2015-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer (TBL) developing over superhydrophobic surfaces (SHS) were performed in order to investigate the underlying physics of turbulent flow over SHS. SHS were modeled through the shear-free boundary condition, assuming that the gas-liquid interfaces remained as non-deformable. Pattern-averaged turbulence statistics were examined in order to determine the effects of SHS on turbulence in no-slip and slip regions separately. Near-wall turbulence over the slip region was significantly affected by SHS due to insufficient mean shear required to sustain near-wall turbulence. SHS also indirectly affected near-wall turbulence over the no-slip region. In addition to the effects of the spanwise width of SHS on skin-friction drag reduction reported previously, spatial effects in the streamwise direction were examined. A guideline for optimal design of SHS geometry will be discussed. This research was supported by the ONR (Grant No. N000141410291).

  13. Large Eddy Simulation of Transitional Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayadi, Taraneh; Moin, Parviz

    2009-11-01

    A sixth order compact finite difference code is employed to investigate compressible Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of subharmonic transition of a spatially developing zero pressure gradient boundary layer, at Ma = 0.2. The computational domain extends from Rex= 10^5, where laminar blowing and suction excites the most unstable fundamental and sub-harmonic modes, to fully turbulent stage at Rex= 10.1x10^5. Numerical sponges are used in the neighborhood of external boundaries to provide non-reflective conditions. Our interest lies in the performance of the dynamic subgrid scale (SGS) model [1] in the transition process. It is observed that in early stages of transition the eddy viscosity is much smaller than the physical viscosity. As a result the amplitudes of selected harmonics are in very good agreement with the experimental data [2]. The model's contribution gradually increases during the last stages of transition process and the dynamic eddy viscosity becomes fully active and dominant in the turbulent region. Consistent with this trend the skin friction coefficient versus Rex diverges from its laminar profile and converges to the turbulent profile after an overshoot. 1. Moin P. et. al. Phys Fluids A, 3(11), 2746-2757, 1991. 2. Kachanov Yu. S. et. al. JFM, 138, 209-247, 1983.

  14. Planetary Boundary Layer Dynamics over Reno, Nevada in Summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liming, A.; Sumlin, B.; Loria Salazar, S. M.; Holmes, H.; Arnott, W. P.

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying the height of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) is important to understand the transport behavior, mixing, and surface concentrations of air pollutants. In Reno, NV, located in complex, mountainous terrain with high desert climate, the daytime boundary layer can rise to an estimated 3km or more on a summer day due to surface heating and convection. The nocturnal boundary layer, conversely, tends to be much lower and highly stable due to radiative cooling from the surface at night and downslope flow of cool air from nearby mountains. With limited availability of radiosonde data, current estimates of the PBL height at any given time or location are potentially over or underestimated. To better quantify the height and characterize the PBL physics, we developed portable, lightweight sensors that measure CO2 concentrations, temperature, pressure, and humidity every 5 seconds. Four of these sensors are used on a tethered balloon system to monitor CO2 concentrations from the surface up to 300m. We will combine this data with Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) data that measures vertical profiles of wind speed, temperature, and humidity from 40m to 400m. This experiment will characterize the diurnal evolution of CO2 concentrations at multiple heights in the PBL, provide insight into PBL physics during stability transition periods at sunrise and sunset, and estimate the nighttime PBL depth during August in Reno. Further, we expect to gain a better understanding of the impact of mixing volume changes (i.e., PBL height) on air quality and pollution concentrations in Reno. The custom portable sensor design will also be presented. It is expected that these instruments can be used for indoor or outdoor air quality studies, where lightness, small size, and battery operation can be of benefit.

  15. Boundary layer aerosol size distribution, mass concentration and mineralogical composition in Morocco and at Cape Verde Islands during SAMUM I-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandler, K.; Lieke, K.

    2009-04-01

    The Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment (SAMUM) is dedicated to the understanding of the radiative effects of mineral dust. Two major field experiments were performed: A first joint field campaign took place at Ouarzazate and near Zagora, southern Morocco, from May 13 to June 7, 2006. Aircraft and ground based measurements of aerosol physical and chemical properties were carried out to collect a data set of surface and atmospheric columnar information within a major dust source. This data set combined with satellite data provides the base of the first thorough columnar radiative closure tests in Saharan dust. A second field experiment was conducted during January-February 2008, in the Cape Verde Islands region, where about 300 Tg of mineral dust are transported annually from Western Africa across the Atlantic towards the Caribbean Sea and the Amazon basin. Along its transport path, the mineral dust is expected to influence significantly the radiation budget - by direct and indirect effects - of the subtropical North Atlantic. We are lacking a radiative closure in the Saharan air plume. One focus of the investigation within the trade wind region is the spatial distribution of mixed dust/biomass/sea salt aerosol and their physical and chemical properties, especially with regard to radiative effects. We report on measurements of size distributions, mass concentrations and mineralogical composition conducted at the Zagora (Morocco) and Praia (Cape Verde islands) ground stations. The aerosol size distribution was measured from 20 nm to 500

  16. Improved Boundary Layer Depth Retrievals from MPLNET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Jasper R.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Molod, Andrea M.; Joseph, Everette

    2013-01-01

    Continuous lidar observations of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) depth have been made at the Micropulse Lidar Network (MPLNET) site in Greenbelt, MD since April 2001. However, because of issues with the operational PBL depth algorithm, the data is not reliable for determining seasonal and diurnal trends. Therefore, an improved PBL depth algorithm has been developed which uses a combination of the wavelet technique and image processing. The new algorithm is less susceptible to contamination by clouds and residual layers, and in general, produces lower PBL depths. A 2010 comparison shows the operational algorithm overestimates the daily mean PBL depth when compared to the improved algorithm (1.85 and 1.07 km, respectively). The improved MPLNET PBL depths are validated using radiosonde comparisons which suggests the algorithm performs well to determine the depth of a fully developed PBL. A comparison with the Goddard Earth Observing System-version 5 (GEOS-5) model suggests that the model may underestimate the maximum daytime PBL depth by 410 m during the spring and summer. The best agreement between MPLNET and GEOS-5 occurred during the fall and they diered the most in the winter.

  17. Acoustic sounding in the planetary boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, E. H.

    1974-01-01

    Three case studies are presented involving data from an acoustic radar. The first two cases examine data collected during the passage of a mesoscale cold-air intrusion, probably thunderstorm outflow, and a synoptic-scale cold front. In these studies the radar data are compared to conventional meteorological data obtained from the WKY tower facility for the purpose of radar data interpretation. It is shown that the acoustic radar echoes reveal the boundary between warm and cold air and other areas of turbulent mixing, regions of strong vertical temperature gradients, and areas of weak or no wind shear. The third case study examines the relationship between the nocturnal radiation inversion and the low-level wind maximum or jet in the light of conclusions presented by Blackadar (1957). The low-level jet is seen forming well above the top of the inversion. Sudden rapid growth of the inversion occurs which brings the top of the inversion to a height equal that of the jet. Coincident with the rapid growth of the inversion is a sudden decrease in the intensity of the acoustic radar echoes in the inversion layer. It is suggested that the decrease in echo intensity reveals a decrease in turbulent mixing in the inversion layer as predicted by Blackadar. It is concluded that the acoustic radar can be a valuable tool for study in the lower atmosphere.

  18. Intercomparison of planetary boundary layer parameterization and its impacts on surface ozone concentration in the WRF/Chem model for a case study in Houston/Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuchiara, G. C.; Li, X.; Carvalho, J.; Rappenglück, B.

    2014-10-01

    With over 6 million inhabitants the Houston metropolitan area is the fourth-largest in the United States. Ozone concentration in this southeast Texas region frequently exceeds the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS). For this reason our study employed the Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF/Chem) to quantify meteorological prediction differences produced by four widely used PBL schemes and analyzed its impact on ozone predictions. The model results were compared to observational data in order to identify one superior PBL scheme better suited for the area. The four PBL schemes include two first-order closure schemes, the Yonsei University (YSU) and the Asymmetric Convective Model version 2 (ACM2); as well as two turbulent kinetic energy closure schemes, the Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) and Quasi-Normal Scale Elimination (QNSE). Four 24 h forecasts were performed, one for each PBL scheme. Simulated vertical profiles for temperature, potential temperature, relative humidity, water vapor mixing ratio, and the u-v components of the wind were compared to measurements collected during the Second Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS-II) Radical and Aerosol Measurements Project (TRAMP) experiment in summer 2006. Simulated ozone was compared against TRAMP data, and air quality stations from Continuous Monitoring Station (CAMS). Also, the evolutions of the PBL height and vertical mixing properties within the PBL for the four simulations were explored. Although the results yielded high correlation coefficients and small biases in almost all meteorological variables, the overall results did not indicate any preferred PBL scheme for the Houston case. However, for ozone prediction the YSU scheme showed greatest agreements with observed values.

  19. Intercomparison of Planetary Boundary Layer Parameterization and its Impacts on Surface Ozone Concentration in the WRF/Chem Model for a Case Study in Houston/Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuchiara, Gustavo C.; Li, Xiangshang; Carvalho, Jonas; Rappenglück, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    With over 6 million inhabitants the Houston metropolitan area is the fourth-largest in the United States. Ozone concentration in this southeast Texas region frequently exceeds the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS). For this reason our study employed the Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF/Chem) to quantify meteorological prediction differences produced by four widely used PBL schemes and analyzed its impact on ozone predictions. The model results were compared to observational data in order to identify one superior PBL scheme better suited for the area. The four PBL schemes include two first-order closure schemes, the Yonsei University (YSU) and the Asymmetric Convective Model version 2 (ACM2); as well as two turbulent kinetic energy closure schemes, the Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) and Quasi-Normal Scale Elimination (QNSE). Four 24 h forecasts were performed, one for each PBL scheme. Simulated vertical profiles for temperature, potential temperature, relative humidity, water vapor mixing ratio, and the u-v components of the wind were compared to measurements collected during the Second Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS-II) Radical and Aerosol Measurements Project (TRAMP) experiment in summer 2006. Simulated ozone was compared against TRAMP data, and air quality stations from Continuous Monitoring Station (CAMS). Also, the evolutions of the PBL height and vertical mixing properties within the PBL for the four simulations were explored. Although the results yielded high correlation coefficients and small biases in almost all meteorological variables, the overall results did not indicate any preferred PBL scheme for the Houston case. However, for ozone prediction the YSU scheme showed greatest agreements with observed values.

  20. Diverging boundary layers with zero streamwise pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauley, Wayne R.; Eaton, John K.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of spanwise divergence on the boundary layer forming between a pair of embedded streamwise vortices with the common flow between them directed toward the wall was studied. Measurements indicate that divergence controls the rate of development of the boundary layer and that large divergence significantly retards boundary layer growth and enhances skin friction. For strongly diverging boundary layers, divergence accounts for nearly all of the local skin friction. Even with divergence, however, the local similarity relationships for two-dimensional boundary layers are satisfactory. Although divergence modifies the mean development of the boundary layer, it does not significantly modify the turbulence structure. In the present experiments with a zero streamwise pressure gradient, it was found that spanwise divergence dit not significantly affect the Reynolds stress and the turbulent triple product distributions.

  1. Simulating supercell thunderstorms in a convective boundary layer: Effects on storm and boundary layer properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowotarski, Christopher J.

    Nearly all previous numerical simulations of supercell thunderstorms have neglected surface uxes of heat, moisture, and momentum as well as horizontal inhomogeneities in the near-storm environment from resulting dry boundary layer convection. This investigation uses coupled radiation and land-surface schemes within an idealized cloud model to identify the effects of organized boundary layer convection in the form of horizontal convective rolls (HCRs) on the strength, structure, and evolution of simulated supercell thunderstorms. The in uence of HCRs and the importance of their orientation relative to storm motion is tested by comparing simulations with a convective boundary layer (CBL) against those with a horizontally homogeneous base state having the same mean environment. The impact of anvil shading on the CBL is tested by comparing simulations with and without the effects of clouds in the radiative transfer scheme. The results of these simulations indicate that HCRs provide a potentially important source of environmental vertical vorticity in the sheared, near-storm boundary layer. These vorticity perturbations are amplified both beneath the main supercell updraft and along the trailing out ow boundary, leading to the formation of occasionally intense misovortices. HCRs perpendicular to storm motion are found to have a detrimental effect on the strength and persistence of the lowlevel mesocyclone, particularly during its initial development. Though the mean environment is less supportive of low-level rotation with a wind profile conducive to HCRs oriented parallel to storm motion, such HCRs are found to often enhance the low-level mesocyclone circulation. When anvil shading is included, stabilization results in generally weaker low-level mesocyclone circulation, regardless of HCR orientation. Moreover, HCRs diminish in the near-storm environment such that the effects of HCRs on the supercell are mitigated. HCRs are also shown to be a necessary condition for the

  2. Computation of three-dimensional mixed convective boundary layer flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gadepalli, Prashandt; Rahman, Muhammad M.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents the numerical solution of heat and mass transfer during cross-flow (orthogonal) mixed convection. In this class of flow, a buoyancy-driven transport in the vertical direction and a forced convective flow in the horizontal direction results in a three-dimensional boundary layer structure adjacent to the plate. The rates of heat and mass transfer are determined by a combined influence of the two transport processes. The equations for the conservation of mass, momentum, energy, and species concentration were solved along with appropriate boundary conditions to determine the distributions of velocity components, temperature, and concentration across the thickness of the boundary layer at different locations on the plate. Results were expressed in dimensionless form using Reynolds number, Richardson number for heat transfer, Richardson number for mass transfer, Prandtl number, and Schmidt number as parameters. It was found that the transport is dominated by buoyancy at smaller vertical locations and at larger distances away from the forced convection leading edge. Effects of forced convection appeared to be very strong at smaller horizontal distances from the leading edge. The cross stream forced convection enhanced the rate of heat and mass transfer by a very significant amount.

  3. Methods and results of boundary layer measurements on a glider

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nes, W. V.

    1978-01-01

    Boundary layer measurements were carried out on a glider under natural conditions. Two effects are investigated: the effect of inconstancy of the development of static pressure within the boundary layer and the effect of the negative pressure difference in a sublaminar boundary layer. The results obtained by means of an ion probe in parallel connection confirm those results obtained by means of a pressure probe. Additional effects which have occurred during these measurements are briefly dealt with.

  4. Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment Implementation on OV-103

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanos, Theodoros A.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the boundary layer transition experiment flown on Discovery. The purpose of the boundary layer transition flight experiment was to obtain hypersonic aero-thermodynamic data for the purpose of better understanding the flow transition from a laminar to turbulent boundary layer using a known height protuberance. The preparation of the shuttle is described, with the various groups responsibilities outlined. Views of the shuttle in flight with the experimental results are shown.

  5. Mixing length in low Reynolds number compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Cary, A. M., Jr.; Holley, B. B.

    1975-01-01

    The paper studies the effect of low Reynolds number in high-speed turbulent boundary layers on variations of mixing length. Boundary layers downstream of natural transition on plates, cones and cylinders, and boundary layers on nozzle walls without laminarization-retransition are considered. The problem of whether low Reynolds number amplification of shear stress is a result of transitional flow structure is considered. It is concluded that a knowledge of low Reynolds number boundary layer transition may be relevant to the design of high-speed vehicles.

  6. Incorporation of the planetary boundary layer in atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeng, Chin-Hoh; Wyngaard, John; Pielke, Roger; Krueger, Steve

    1993-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: perspectives on planetary boundary layer (PBL) measurements; current problems of PBL parameterization in mesoscale models; and convective cloud-PBL interactions.

  7. The boundary layer on compressor cascade blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, S.; Zierke, W. C.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of NASA Research Grant NSG-3264 is to characterize the flowfield about an airfoil in a cascade at chord Reynolds number(R sub C)near 5 x 10 to the 5th power. The program is experimental and combines laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) measurements with flow visualization techniques in order to obtain detailed flow data, e.g., boundary layer profiles, points of separation and the transition zone, on a cascade of highly-loaded compressor blades. The information provided by this study is to serve as benchmark data for the evaluation of current and future compressor cascade predictive models, in this way aiding in the compressor design process. Summarized is the research activity for the period 1 December 1985 through 1 June 1986. Progress made from 1 June 1979 through 1 December 1985 is presented. Detailed measurements have been completed at the initial cascade angle of 53 deg. (incidence angle 5 degrees). A three part study, based on that data, has been accepted as part of the 1986 Gas Turbine Conference and will be submitted for subsequent journal publication. Also presented are data for a second cascade angle of 45 deg (an incidence angle of 3 degrees).

  8. A boundary layer model for magnetospheric substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostoker, Gordon; Eastman, Tim

    1987-01-01

    An alternative framework for understanding magnetospheric substorm activity is presented. It is argued that observations of magnetic field and plasma flow variations in the magnetotail can be explained in terms of the passage of the plasma sheet boundary layer over the satellite detecting the tail signatures. It is shown that field-aligned currents and particle acceleration processes on magnetic field lines threading the ionospheric Harang discontinuity lead to the distinctive particle and field signatures observed in the magnetotail during substorms. It is demonstrated that edge effects of field-aligned currents associated with the westward traveling surge can lead to the negative B(z) perturbations observed in the tail that are presently attributed to observations made on the anti-earthward side of a near-earth neutral line. Finally, it is shown that the model can provide a physical explanation of both the driven system and the loading-unloading system whose combined effects provide the observed substorm perturbation pattern in the magnetosphere and ionosphere.

  9. Effect of sound on boundary layer stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saric, William S.; Spencer, Shelly Anne

    1993-06-01

    Experiments are conducted in the Arizona State University Unsteady Wind Tunnel with a zero-pressure-gradient flat-plate model that has a 67:1 elliptical leading edge. Boundary-layer measurements are made of the streamwise fluctuating-velocity component in order to identify the amplified T-S waves that are forced by downstream-traveling sound waves. Measurements are taken with circular 3-D roughness elements placed at the Branch 1 neutral stability point for the frequency under consideration, and then with the roughness element downstream of Branch 1. These roughness elements have a principal chord dimension equal to 2 lambda(sub TS)/pi of the T-S waves under study and are 'stacked' in order to resemble a Gaussian height distribution. Measurements taken just downstream of the roughness (with leading-edge T-S waves, surface roughness T-S waves, instrumentation sting vibrations, and the Stokes wave subtracted) show the generation of 3-D T-S waves, but not in the characteristic heart-shaped disturbance field predicted by 3-D asymptotic theory. Maximum disturbance amplitudes are found on the roughness centerline. However, some near-field characteristics predicted by numerical modeling are observed.

  10. Effect of sound on boundary layer stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saric, William S. (Principal Investigator); Spencer, Shelly Anne

    1993-01-01

    Experiments are conducted in the Arizona State University Unsteady Wind Tunnel with a zero-pressure-gradient flat-plate model that has a 67:1 elliptical leading edge. Boundary-layer measurements are made of the streamwise fluctuating-velocity component in order to identify the amplified T-S waves that are forced by downstream-travelling, sound waves. Measurements are taken with circular 3-D roughness elements placed at the Branch 1 neutral stability point for the frequency under consideration, and then with the roughness element downstream of Branch 1. These roughness elements have a principal chord dimension equal to 2(lambda)(sub TS)/pi, of the T-S waves under study and are 'stacked' in order to resemble a Gaussian height distribution. Measurements taken just downstream of the roughness (with leading-edge T-S waves, surface roughness T-S waves, instrumentation sting vibrations and the Stokes wave subtracted) show the generation of 3-D-T-S waves, but not in the characteristic heart-shaped disturbance field predicted by 3-D asymptotic theory. Maximum disturbance amplitudes are found on the roughness centerline. However, some near-field characteristics predicted by numerical modelling are observed.

  11. Effect of sound on boundary layer stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saric, William S.; Spencer, Shelly Anne

    1993-01-01

    Experiments are conducted in the Arizona State University Unsteady Wind Tunnel with a zero-pressure-gradient flat-plate model that has a 67:1 elliptical leading edge. Boundary-layer measurements are made of the streamwise fluctuating-velocity component in order to identify the amplified T-S waves that are forced by downstream-traveling sound waves. Measurements are taken with circular 3-D roughness elements placed at the Branch 1 neutral stability point for the frequency under consideration, and then with the roughness element downstream of Branch 1. These roughness elements have a principal chord dimension equal to 2 lambda(sub TS)/pi of the T-S waves under study and are 'stacked' in order to resemble a Gaussian height distribution. Measurements taken just downstream of the roughness (with leading-edge T-S waves, surface roughness T-S waves, instrumentation sting vibrations, and the Stokes wave subtracted) show the generation of 3-D T-S waves, but not in the characteristic heart-shaped disturbance field predicted by 3-D asymptotic theory. Maximum disturbance amplitudes are found on the roughness centerline. However, some near-field characteristics predicted by numerical modeling are observed.

  12. Green House Gases Flux Model in Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurgaliev, Ildus

    Analytical dynamic model of the turbulent flux in the three-layer boundary system is presented. Turbulence is described as a presence of the non-zero vorticity. The generalized advection-diffusion-reaction equation is derived for an arbitrary number of components in the flux. The fluxes in the layers are objects for matching requirements on the boundaries between the layers. Different types of transport mechanisms are dominant on the different levels of the layers.

  13. Fullerenes in the cretaceous-tertiary boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Heymann, D.; Chibante, L.P.F.; Smalley, R.E. ); Brooks, R.R. ); Wolbach, W.S. )

    1994-07-29

    High-pressure liquid chromatography with ultraviolet-visible spectral analysis of toluene extracts of samples from two Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary sites in New Zealand has revealed the presence of C[sub 60] at concentrations of 0.1 to 0.2 parts per million of the associated soot. This technique verified also that fullerenes are produced in similar amounts in the soots of common flames under ambient atmospheric conditions. Therefore, the C[sub 60] in the K-T boundary layer may have originated in the extensive wildfires that were associated with the cataclysmic impact event that terminated the Mezozoic era about 65 million years ago.

  14. Modelling the low-latitude boundary layer with reconnection entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, P.; Holzer, T. E.; Russell, C. T.; Wang, Z.

    1994-01-01

    We develop a one-dimensional Low Latitude Boundary Layer (LLBL) model for northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The boundary layer in this model is uniform in the direction normal to the magnetopause, a 'plateau-type' boundary layer. The boundary layer motion is decoupled from the magnetosheath motion and driven by the plasma pressure associated with the incoming solar wind plasma near local noon, which has become entrained on closed field lines as a result of reconnection in the cusp region. Dissipation in the ionosphere at the feet of the boundary layer field lines opposes this motion. There are two physical solutions for the model. In one, the boundary layer reaches a terminal velocity in the tail as the boundary layer plasma effectively joins the solar wind flow. In the other solution, the flow is nearly stopped in the far tail. In combination with other mechanisms, this latter solution may correspond to the case in which the boundary layer plasma participates in magnetospheric convection and returns sunward. The density, velocity, and thickness as functions of distance from local noon are studied, assuming that the magnetopause hasa elliptical shape and the magnetospheric field is dipolar.

  15. A study of methods to investigate nozzle boundary layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauley, Laura L.

    1991-01-01

    To further investigate nozzle flow, numerical computations are employed. The computations produce complete flow velocity and temperature fields within the nozzle. As a check, these results can be compared with experimental data at the wall. Once an accurate numerical scheme has been validated, it can be used as a design tool to predict the performance of other nozzle designs without the cost of experimental testing. Typically, the numerical analysis assumes either a laminar boundary layer or a fully turbulent boundary layer which is steady and two-dimensional. Boundary layer transition is not considered. Computing both the completely laminar boundary layer and the completely turbulent boundary layer conditions gives the minimum and maximum wall heat flux possible for a specified geometry. When the experimental heat flux measurements lie between these two values, the nature of the boundary layer is unknown. The boundary layer may have transitioned from laminar to turbulent; three-dimensional structures may be present in the boundary layer, or the inlet flow conditions may not be correctly specified in the computation.

  16. Symmetries in Turbulent Boundary Layer Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberlack, M.

    1996-01-01

    The objective is the development of a new theory which enables the algorithmic computation of all self-similar mean velocity profiles. The theory is based on Liegroup analysis and unifies a large set of self-similar solutions for the mean velocity of stationary parallel turbulent shear flows. The results include the logarithmic law of the wall, an algebraic law, the viscous sublayer, the linear region in the middle of a Couette flow and in the middle of a rotating channel flow, and a new exponential mean velocity profile not previously reported. Experimental results taken in the outer parts of a high Reynolds number flat-plate boundary layer, strongly support the exponential profile. From experimental as well as from DNS data of a turbulent channel flow the algebraic scaling law could be confirmed in both the center region and in the near wall region. In the case of the logarithmic law of the wall, the scaling with the wall distance arises as a result of the analysis and has not been assumed in the derivation. The crucial part of the derivation of all the different mean velocity profiles is to consider the invariance of the equation for the velocity fluctuations at the same time as the invariance of the equation for the velocity product equations. The latter is the dyad product of the velocity fluctuations with the equation for the velocity fluctuations. It has been proven that all the invariant solutions are also consistent with similarity of all velocity moment equations up to any arbitrary order.

  17. A top specified boundary layer (TSBL) approximation approach for the simulation of groundwater contamination processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubin, H.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents improvements in the 'classical boundary layer' (CBL) approximation method to obtain simple but robust initial characterization of aquifer contamination processes. Contaminants are considered to penetrate into the groundwater through the free surface of the aquifer. The improved method developed in this study is termed the 'top specified boundary layer' (TSBL) approach. It involves the specification of the contaminant concentration at the top of the contaminated 'region of interest' (ROI), which is simulated as a boundary layer. the TSBL modification significantly improves the ability of the boundary layer method to predict the development of concentration profiles over both space and time. The TSBL method can be useful for the simulation of cases in which the contaminant concentration is prescribed at the aquifer's free surface as well as for cases in which the contaminant mass flux is prescribed at the surface.

  18. Dynamic behavior of an unsteady trubulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, P. G.; Reynolds, W. C.; Jayaramen, R.; Carr, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments on an unsteady turbulent boundary layer are reported in which the upstream portion of the flow is steady (in the mean) and in the downstream region, the boundary layer sees a linearly decreasing free stream velocity. This velocity gradient oscillates in time, at frequencies ranging from zero to approximately the bursting frequency. For the small amplitude, the mean velocity and mean turbulence intensity profiles are unaffected by the oscillations. The amplitude of the periodic velocity component, although as much as 70% greater than that in the free stream for very low frequencies, becomes equal to that in the free stream at higher frequencies. At high frequencies, both the boundary layer thickness and the Reynolds stress distribution across the boundary layer become frozen. The behavior at higher amplitude is quite similar. At sufficiently high frequencies, the boundary layer thickness remains frozen at the mean value over the oscillation cycle, even though flow reverses near the wall during a part of the cycle.

  19. Dusty boundary layer in a surface-burst explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A.L.; Ferguson, R.E.; Chien, K.Y.; Collins, J.P.

    1993-08-01

    Dusty boundary layers are an inherent feature of explosions over ground surfaces. Detailed knowledge of dusty boundary layer characteristics is needed in explosion safety analysis (e.g., to calculate the drag loads on structures). Also, to predicct the amount of dust in the rising fireball of an explsion, one must know the dusty boundary layer swept up during the positive and negative phases of the blast wave and how much of this boundary layer dust is entrained into the stem of the dust cloud. This paper describes the results of numerical simulations of the dusty boundary layer created by a surface burst explosion. The evolution of the flow was calculated by a high-order Godunov code that solves the nonsteady conservation laws.

  20. Destiny of earthward streaming plasma in the plasmasheet boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.; Horwitz, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    The dynamics of the earth's magnetotail have been investigated, and it has become clear that the plasmasheet boundary layer field lines map into the Region I Field-Aligned Currents (FAC) of the auroral zone. It is pointed out that the role of earthward streaming ions in the plasmasheet boundary layer may be of fundamental importance in the understanding of magnetotail dynamics, auroral zone physics, and especially for ionospheric-magnetospheric interactions. The present paper has the objective to evaluate propagation characteristics for the earthward streaming ions observed in the plasmasheet boundary layer. An investigation is conducted of the propagation characteristics of protons in the plasmasheet boundary layer using independent single particle dynamics, and conclusions are discussed. The density of earthward streaming ions found in the plasmasheet boundary layer should include the ring current as well as the auroral zone precipitaiton and inner plasmasheet regions of the magnetosphere.

  1. An Equation for the Mean Velocity Distribution of Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandborn, V. A.

    1959-01-01

    A general relation, empirical in origin, for the mean velocity distribution of both laminar and turbulent boundary layers is proposed. The equation, in general, accurately describes the profiles in both laminar and turbulent flows. The calculation of profiles is based on a prior knowledge of momentum, displacement, and boundary-layer thickness together with free-stream conditions. The form for turbulent layers agrees with the present concepts of similarity of the outer layer. For the inner region or turbulent boundary layers the present relation agrees very closely with experimental measurements even in cases where the logarithmic law of the wall is inadequate. A unique relation between profile form factors and the ratio of displacement thickness to boundary-layer thickness is obtained for turbulent separation. A similar criterion is also obtained for laminar separation. These relations are demonstrated to serve as an accurate criterion for identifying separation in known profiles.

  2. Evaporation, Heat Transfer, and Velocity Distribution in Two-Dimensional and Rotationally Symmetrical Laminar Boundary-Layer Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froessling, Nils

    1958-01-01

    The fundamental boundary layer equations for the flow, temperature and concentration fields are presented. Two dimensional symmetrical and unsymmetrical and rotationally symmetrical steady boundary layer flows are treated as well as the transfer boundary layer. Approximation methods for the calculation of the transfer layer are discussed and a brief survey of an investigation into the validity of the law that the Nusselt number is proportional to the cube root of the Prandtl number is presented.

  3. Boundary Layer Rolls Observed Above and Below a Jet in a Marine Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, R. C.; Emmitt, G. D.; Godwin, K.; Greco, S.

    2013-12-01

    We have flown a coherent Doppler wind lidar (DWL) on the Cirpas Twin Otter off the California coast near Monterey since 2003. One scientific purpose of these flights is to understand the relationship between the turbulent fluxes measured on the aircraft or on other platforms and the observed structure of the marine boundary layer (MBL). Two common features are found in the MBL flow: (1) a strong jet at approximately 200 m above the sea surface; and (2) organized large eddies (OLE) in the form of roll vortices that are approximately aligned along the mean wind direction. On two flights (April 13, 2007 and September 30, 2012), the DWL data indicated that roll OLE existed simultaneously both above and below the jet. The DWL winds suggest that the OLE in these layers are sometimes independent and sometimes connected. Standard flux data are obtained on the Twin Otter at flight level, which is nominally 300 m. The 10 Hz wind and temperature data exhibit variability at spatial scales corresponding to the OLE wavelength. We have constructed a nonlinear theoretical model that includes triad wave-wave interactions to test the hypothesis that rolls could form both above and below the jet. This model shows that this is possible and that the rolls in the two layers could have unique characteristics compared to standard boundary layer rolls. The model further shows that the rolls above and below the jet are due to separate instabilities that interact. This is consistent with the observations of both connected and independent OLE above and below the jet. Contrast-enhanced DWL line-of-sight winds. Jet maximum 200 m below aircraft. Typical resonant triad solution for rolls above and below a PBL jet.

  4. A Lagrangian Study of Southeast Pacific Boundary Layer Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, Gallia

    concentration which extend far offshore into regions of normally very clean cloud. We use Lagrangian trajectories to investigate the source of the high droplet concentrations of the mesoscale "hooks", and evaluate whether boundary layer transport of coastal pollutants alone can account for their extent. We find that boundary layer trajectories past 85 W do not pass sufficiently close to the coastline to explain high aerosol concentrations offshore.

  5. The wave-induced boundary layer under long internal waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuncheng; Redekopp, Larry G.

    2011-08-01

    The boundary layer formed under the footprint of an internal solitary wave is studied by numerical simulation for waves of depression in a two-layer model of the density stratification. The inviscid outer flow, in the perspective of boundary-layer theory, is based on an exact solution for the long wave-phase speed, yielding a family of fully nonlinear solitary wave solutions of the extended Korteweg-de Vries equation. The wave-induced boundary layer corresponding to this outer flow is then studied by means of simulation employing the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) formulation coupled with a turbulence closure model validated for wall-bounded flows. Boundary-layer characteristics are computed for an extensive range of environmental conditions and wave amplitudes. Boundary-layer transition, identified by monitoring the eddy viscosity, is correlated in terms of a boundary-layer Reynolds number. The frictional drag is evaluated for laminar, transitional, and turbulent cases, and correlations are presented for the friction coefficient plus relevant measures of the boundary-layer thickness.

  6. On Reflection of Shock Waves from Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liepmann, H W; Roshko, A; Dhawan, S

    1952-01-01

    Measurements are presented at Mach numbers from about 1.3 to 1.5 of reflection characteristics and the relative upstream influence of shock waves impinging on a flat surface with both laminar and turbulent boundary layers. The difference between impulse and step waves is discussed and their interaction with the boundary layer is compared. General considerations on the experimental production of shock waves from wedges and cones and examples of reflection of shock waves from supersonic shear layers are also presented.

  7. Slow Manifolds and Multiple Equilibria in Stratocumulus-Capped Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretherton, Christopher S.; Uchida, Junya; Blossey, Peter N.

    2010-04-01

    In marine stratocumulus-capped boundary layers under strong inversions, the timescale for thermodynamic adjustment is roughly a day, much shorter than the multiday timescale for inversion height adjustment. Slow-manifold analysis is introduced to exploit this timescale separation when boundary layer air columns experience only slow changes in their boundary conditions. Its essence is that the thermodynamic structure of the boundary layer remains approximately slaved to its inversion height and the instantaneous boundary conditions; this slaved structure determines the entrainment rate and hence the slow evolution of the inversion height and can be regarded as a one-dimensional slow manifold. Slow-manifold analysis is applied to mixed-layer model and large-eddy simulations of an idealized nocturnal stratocumulus-capped boundary layer. Both models are found to have multiple equilibria; depending on the initial inversion height, the simulations slowly evolve toward a shallow thin-cloud boundary layer or a deep, well-mixed thick cloud boundary layer. In the mixed-layer model, this can be described using a single slow manifold bifurcated by an unstable equilibrium inversion height which separates a branch that evolves toward a deep steady state from a branch which shallows indefinitely. In the large-eddy simulations, there are two separate slow manifolds (one of which becomes unstable if cloud droplet concentration is reduced). On one, the boundary layer is well-mixed and deepens to a thick-cloud steady state. On the other, the boundary layer is decoupled and shallows to a thin-cloud steady state. If the initial inversion height supports an optically thick but nearly nondrizzling cloud, it evolves onto the well-mixed manifold; if the initial cloud layer is either too thin to efficiently radiatively cool, or thick enough to heavily drizzle, it evolves onto the decoupled manifold. Applications to analysis of stratocumulus observations and to pockets of open cells and ship

  8. Spherical bubble motion in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felton, Keith; Loth, Eric

    2001-09-01

    Monodisperse dilute suspensions of spherical air bubbles in a tap-water turbulent vertical boundary layer were experimentally studied to note their motion and distribution. Bubbles with diameters of 0.37-1.2 mm were injected at various transverse wall-positions for free-stream velocities between 0.4 and 0.9 m/s. The bubbles were released from a single injector at very low frequencies such that two-way coupling and bubble-bubble interaction were negligible. The experimental diagnostics included ensemble-averaged planar laser intensity profiles for bubble concentration distribution, as well as Cinematic Particle Image Velocimetry with bubble tracking for bubble hydrodynamic forces. A variety of void distributions within the boundary layer were found. For example, there was a tendency for bubbles to collect along the wall for higher Stokes number conditions, while the lower Stokes number conditions produced Gaussian-type profiles throughout the boundary layer. In addition, three types of bubble trajectories were observed—sliding bubbles, bouncing bubbles, and free-dispersion bubbles. Instantaneous liquid forces acting on individual bubbles in the turbulent flow were also obtained to provide the drag and lift coefficients (with notable experimental uncertainty). These results indicate that drag coefficient decreases with increasing Reynolds number as is conventionally expected but variations were observed. In general, the instantaneous drag coefficient (for constant bubble Reynolds number) tended to be reduced as the turbulence intensity increased. The averaged lift coefficient is higher than that given by inviscid theory (and sometimes even that of creeping flow theory) and tends to decrease with increasing bubble Reynolds number.

  9. Crosshatch roughness distortions on a hypersonic turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltier, S. J.; Humble, R. A.; Bowersox, R. D. W.

    2016-04-01

    The effects of periodic crosshatch roughness (k+ = 160) on a Mach 4.9 turbulent boundary layer (Reθ = 63 000) are examined using particle image velocimetry. The roughness elements generate a series of alternating shock and expansion waves, which span the entire boundary layer, causing significant (up to +50% and -30%) variations in the Reynolds shear stress field. Evidence of the hairpin vortex organization of incompressible flows is found in the comparative smooth-wall boundary layer case (Reθ = 47 000), and can be used to explain several observations regarding the rough-wall vortex organization. In general, the rough-wall boundary layer near-wall vortices no longer appear to be well-organized into streamwise-aligned packets that straddle relatively low-speed regions like their smooth-wall counterpart; instead, they lean farther away from the wall, become more spatially compact, and their populations become altered. In the lower half of the boundary layer, the net vortex swirling strength and outer-scaled Reynolds stresses increase relative to the smooth-wall case, and actually decrease in the outer half of the boundary layer, as ejection and entrainment processes are strengthened and weakened in these two regions, respectively. A spectral analysis of the data suggests a relative homogenizing of the most energetic scales near Λ = ˜ 0.5δ across the rough-wall boundary layer.

  10. Spatial Linear Instability of Confluent Wake/Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, William W.; Liu, Feng-Jun; Rumsey, C. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The spatial linear instability of incompressible confluent wake/boundary layers is analyzed. The flow model adopted is a superposition of the Blasius boundary layer and a wake located above the boundary layer. The Orr-Sommerfeld equation is solved using a global numerical method for the resulting eigenvalue problem. The numerical procedure is validated by comparing the present solutions for the instability of the Blasius boundary layer and for the instability of a wake with published results. For the confluent wake/boundary layers, modes associated with the boundary layer and the wake, respectively, are identified. The boundary layer mode is found amplified as the wake approaches the wall. On the other hand, the modes associated with the wake, including a symmetric mode and an antisymmetric mode, are stabilized by the reduced distance between the wall and the wake. An unstable mode switching at low frequency is observed where the antisymmetric mode becomes more unstable than the symmetric mode when the wake velocity defect is high.

  11. Boundary-layer receptivity and laminar-flow airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerschen, Edward J.

    1987-01-01

    Boundary-layer receptivity examines the way in which external disturbances generate instability waves in boundary layers. Receptivity theory is complementary to stability theory, which studies the evolution of disturbances that are already present in the boundary layer. A transition prediction method which combines receptivity with linear stability theory would directly account for the influence of free-stream disturbances and also consider the characteristics of the boundary layer upstream of the neutral stability point. The current e sup N transition prediction methods require empirical correlations for the influence of environmental disturbances, and totally ignore the boundary layer characteristics upstream of the neutral stability point. The regions where boundary-layer receptivity occurs can be separated into two classes, one near the leading edges and the other at the downstream points where the boundary layer undergoes rapid streamwise adjustments. Analyses were developed for both types of regions, and parametric studies which examine the relative importance of different mechanisms were carried out. The work presented here has focused on the low Mach number case. Extensions to high subsonic and supersonic conditions are presently underway.

  12. On the theory of laminar boundary layers involving separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Karman, TH; Millikan, C

    1934-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical discussion of the laminar boundary layer, which was developed with a view of facilitating the investigation of those boundary layers in particular for which the phenomenon of separation occurs. The treatment starts with a slight modification of the form of the boundary layer equation first published by Von Mises. Two approximate solutions of this equation are found, one of which is exact at the outer edge of the boundary layer while the other is exact at the wall. The final solution is obtained by joining these two solutions at the inflection points of the velocity profiles. The final solution is given in terms of a series of universal functions for a fairly broad class of potential velocity distributions outside of the boundary layer. Detailed calculations of the boundary layer characteristics are worked out for the case in which the potential velocity is a linear function of the distance from the upstream stagnation point. Finally, the complete separation point characteristics are determined for the boundary layer associated with a potential velocity distribution made up of two linear functions of the distance from the stagnation point. It appears that extensions of the detailed calculations to more complex potential flows can be fairly easily carried out by using the explicit formulae given in the paper. (author)

  13. Boundary-Layer Origin for Jets, and Non-Existence of the Boundary Layer in Young Jet-Producing Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Peter T.

    2016-01-01

    Twenty-five years ago, Pringle suggested a boundary-layer origin for jets from YSOs. The jets were driven by a toroidal magnetic field generated by strong shear in the accretion boundary layer. Such a mechanism is clearly non-magnetocentrifugal in nature.Nearly fifteen years ago, we suggested a cartoon of the jet-launching mechanism in protostars in which shear, acting upon MHD turbulence generated by the magnetorotational instability (MRI), generated a tangled, toroidal magnetic field capable of driving a jet. This picture, which is also manifestly non-magnetocentrifugal in nature, relied upon a novel model for MRI-driven MHD turbulence based on a viscoelastic, rather than a viscous, prescription for the turbulent stress. Our hypothesis has some clear similarities to Pringle's mechanism, but it relied upon a large envelope surrounding the central star.An accretion boundary layer has long been recognized as a promising source for protostellar jets in good part because in a standard thin disk, matter loses circa half of all its accretion energy in this layer, but it is problematic to drive a well-collimated outflow from a boundary layer in a thin disk. In this presentation, we argue paradoxically that the "boundary layer" can drive jets when a true boundary layer, like the thin disk, does not exist. This changes the inner boundary condition for viscous angular momentum flux in the disk.The standard argument for a thin boundary layer is, we argue, circular. In high accretion-rate systems, or when the gas cannot cool efficiently, there is no reason to suspect the turbulent viscosity in this boundary layer to be small, and therefore neither is the boundary layer. When the boundary layer becomes larger than the central accretor itself, it is arguably no longer a boundary layer, but rather an envelope. It is still, however, a substantial source of power and toroidal MRI-driven magnetic fields.It is, again, only in relatively hot or high-accretion rate systems in which

  14. Seasonality of mercury in the Atlantic marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soerensen, Anne L.; Sunderland, Elsie; Skov, Henrik; Holmes, Christopher; Jacob, Daniel J.

    2010-05-01

    Around one third of the mercury emissions today are from primary anthropogenic sources, with the remaining two-thirds from secondary reemissions of earlier deposition and natural sources (AMAP/UNEP 2008). Mercury exchange at the air-sea interface is important for the global distribution of atmospheric mercury as parts of deposited mercury will reenter the atmosphere through evasion. The exchange at the air-sea interface also affects the amount of inorganic mercury in the ocean and thereby the conversion to the neuro-toxic methylmercury. Here we combine new cruise measurements in the atmospheric marine boundary layer (MBL) of the Atlantic Ocean (Northern Hemisphere) from the fall of 2006 and the spring of 2007 with existing data from cruises in the Atlantic Ocean since 1978. We observe from these data a seasonal cycle in Hg(0) concentrations in the Atlantic marine boundary later (MBL) that exhibits minimum concentrations during summer and high concentrations during fall to spring. These observations suggest a local, seasonally dependent Hg(0) source in the MBL that causes variability in concentrations above the open ocean. To further investigate controls on Hg(0) concentrations in the MBL, we developed an improved representation of oceanic air-sea exchange processes within the GEOS-Chem global 3-D biogeochemical mercury model. Specifically, we used new data on mercury redox reactions in the surface ocean as a function of biological and photochemical processes, and implemented new algorithms for mercury dynamics associated with suspended particles. Our coupled atmospheric-oceanic modeling results support the premise that oceanic evasion is a main driver controlling Hg(0) concentrations in the MBL. We also use the model to investigate what drivers the evasion across the air-sea interface on shorter timescales. This is done by tracking evasion rates and other model components on an hourly basis for chosen locations in the Atlantic Ocean.

  15. Some effects of suspended sediment stratification on an oceanic bottom boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, C.E. Jr.; Weatherly, G.L.

    1981-05-20

    A suspended-sediment-induced, stably stratified oceanic bottom boundary layer is examined with the Mellor-Yamada level II turbulence closure model. The boundary layer equations are coupled through the eddy diffusion coefficients for momentum and mass. The bottom boundary layer of the Florida Current is modeled using flow and sediment properties as input parameters. Model results indicate that the boundary layer response to a suspended sediment concentration gradient is to reduce appreciably the level of turbulence. Turbulent kinetic energy and eddy conductivity are reduced by about 40% and 25%, respectively, and bottom stress is reduced by approximately 45%. Increases of veering angle of approx. =5/sup 0/, together with enhancement of the Ekman-like nature of the current spiral with sediment-induced stability, are noted. The boundary layer adjusts to the reduced turbulence level by a decrease in the slope of the velocity profile and by diminution of the thicknesses of the boundary layer and contained logarithmic layer by as much as 50%. The predictions are consistent with findings from studies of stably stratified atmospheric boundary layers, and sediment-carrying channel flows. The results suggest that u/sub asterisk/ values inferred from logartihmic speed profiles in sediment-laden flows may be significant overestimates of the actual u/sub asterisk/.

  16. Size distributions of boundary-layer clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Stull, R.; Berg, L.; Modzelewski, H.

    1996-04-01

    Scattered fair-weather clouds are triggered by thermals rising from the surface layer. Not all surface layer air is buoyant enough to rise. Also, each thermal has different humidities and temperatures, resulting in interthermal variability of their lifting condensation levels (LCL). For each air parcel in the surface layer, it`s virtual potential temperature and it`s LCL height can be computed.

  17. Further Improvements to Nozzle Boundary Layer Calculations in BLIMPJ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praharaj, S. C.; Gross, Klaus W.

    1989-01-01

    Further improvements made to advance the current Boundary Layer Integral Matrix Procedure - Version J (BLIMPJ) containing previously modeled simplified calculation methods by accounting for condensed phase, thick boundary layer and free stream turbulence effects are discussed. The condensed phase effects were included through species composition effect considered via input to the code and through particle damping effect considered via a turbulence model. The thrust loss calculation procedure for thick boundary layer effects was improved and the optimization of net thrust with respect to nozzle length was performed. The effects of free stream turbulence were approximately modeled in the turbulence model.

  18. Numerical experiments on the stability of controlled boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, Thomas A.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1988-01-01

    Nonlinear simulations are presented for instability and transition in parallel water boundary layers subjected to pressure gradient, suction, or heating control. In the nonlinear regime, finite amplitude, 2-D Tollmein-Schlichting waves grow faster than is predicted by linear theory. Moreover, this discrepancy is greatest in the case of heating control. Likewise, heating control is found to be the least effective in delaying secondary instabilities of both the fundamental and subharmonic type. Flow field details (including temperature profiles) are presented for both the uncontrolled boundary layer and the heated boundary layer.

  19. Formation of pre-sheath boundary layers in electronegative plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Vitello, P., LLNL

    1998-05-01

    In electronegative plasmas Coulomb scattering between positive and negative ions can lead to the formation of a pre-sheath boundary layer containing the bulk of the negative ions. The negative ion boundary layer forms when momentum transfer from positive to negative ions dominates the negative ion acceleration from the electric field. This condition is met in Inductively Coupled Plasma reactors that operate at low pressure and high plasma density. Simulations of the GEC reactor for Chlorine and Oxygen chemistries using the INDUCT95 2D model are presented showing the pre-sheath boundary layer structure as a function of applied power and neutral pressure.

  20. Structure of turbulence in three-dimensional boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanian, Chelakara S.

    1993-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the three dimensional turbulent boundary layer concepts and of the currently available experimental information for their turbulence modeling. It is found that more reliable turbulence data, especially of the Reynolds stress transport terms, is needed to improve the existing modeling capabilities. An experiment is proposed to study the three dimensional boundary layer formed by a 'sink flow' in a fully developed two dimensional turbulent boundary layer. Also, the mean and turbulence field measurement procedure using a three component laser Doppler velocimeter is described.

  1. Control of turbulent boundary layer flows by sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Whipkey, R. R.; Jones, G. S.

    1983-04-01

    The effects of acoustic excitation on the turbulent boundary-layer characteristics over an airfoil were examined as a function of excitation frequency and level and also flow velocity. The measured data primarily consisted of: (1) lift coefficients, (2) mean velocities and turbulence intensities as measured by a laser velocimeter, and (3) flow visualization. The experiments successfully demonstrated that separation of turbulent boundary layer flows can be controlled by sound in both pre- and post-stall regions. In addition, it was shown that, with high-frequency acoustic excitation, the turbulence levels in the boundary layer at a fixed measurement point can be reduced considerably.

  2. The biogeochemical sulfur cycle in the marine boundary layer over the Northeast Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, T. S.; Johnson, J. E.; Quinn, P. K.; Goldan, P. D.; Kuster, W. C.

    1990-01-01

    The major components of the marine boundary layer biogeochemical sulfur cycle were measured simultaneously onshore and off the coast of Washington State, U.S.A. during May 1987. Seawater dimethysulfide (DMS) concentrations on the continental shelf were strongly influenced by coastal upwelling. Concentration further offshore were typical of summer values (2.2 nmol/l) at this latitude. Although seawater DMS concentrations were high on the biologically productive continental shelf (2-12 nmol/l), this region had no measurable effect on atmospheric DMS concentrations. Atmospheric DMS concentrations (0.1-12 nmol/l), however, were extremely dependent upon wind speed and boundary layer height. Although there appeared to be an appreciable input of nonsea-salt sulfate to the marine boundary layer from the free troposphere, the local flux of DMS from the ocean to the atmosphere was sufficient to balance the remainder of the sulfur budget.

  3. Bottom boundary layer in south San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, Ralph T.; Gartner, Jeffrey W.; Smith, Richard E.

    1997-01-01

    Detailed velocity distributions within the benthic turbulent boundary layer were measured by a Broad Band Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (BB-ADCP) in South San Francisco Bay, California. In "mode 5", the BB-ADCP was able to measure velocity in 5 cm increments. The validation of these measurements was achieved by comparing the BB-ADCP measurements with the velocities measured by a Narrow Band Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (NB-ADCP) in close proximity. There were thirty-three (33) velocity time-series measured by the BB-ADCP beginning at 7 cm above bed and extending to 175 cm in water column for about two weeks. The velocities from locations at 7 cm and 12 cm above the bed were determined to be of lower accuracy, and they were not used in estimates of friction velocity, u.. The values of u. at 95% confidence level were determined with relative error less than 20%. The time-series of u. varied with velocity outside of the boundary layer, and responded to spring-neap tidal variations. Attempts to use acoustic backscatterance echo intensity to measure suspended sediment concentration showed prom ise, and merit consideration in future studies.

  4. Carbon transport in the bottom boundary layer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lohrenz, S.E.; Asper, V.L.

    1997-09-01

    The authors objective was to characterize distributions of chloropigment fluorescence in relation to physical processes in the benthic boundary layer in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) Ocean Margins Program`s (OMP) goal of quantifying carbon transport across the continental shelf. Their approach involved participation in the Ocean Margins Program (OMP) field experiment on the continental shelf off Cape Hatteras by conducting multi-sensor fluorescence measurements of photosynthetic pigments. Specific tasks included (1) pre- and post-deployment calibration of multiple fluorescence sensors in conjunction with Woods Hole personnel; (2) collection and analysis of photosynthetic pigment concentrations and total particulate carbon in water column samples to aid in interpretation of the fluorescence time-series during the field experiment; (3) collaboration in the analysis and interpretation of 1994 and 1996 time-series data in support of efforts to quantify pigment and particulate organic carbon transport on the continental shelf off Cape Hatteras. This third component included analysis of data obtained with a multi-sensor fiber-optic fluorometer in the benthic boundary layer of the inner shelf off Cape Hatteras during summer 1994.

  5. Vertical transport of water in the Martian boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zent, Aaron P.; Haberle, R. M.; Houben, Howard C.

    1993-01-01

    We are continuing our examination of the transport of H2O through the martian boundary layer, and we have written a one-dimensional numerical model of the exchange of H2O between the atmosphere and subsurface of Mars through the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Our goal is to explore the mechanisms of H2O exchange, and to elucidate the role played by the regolith in the local H2O budget. The atmospheric model includes effects of Coriolis, pressure gradient, and frictional forces for momentum, as well as radiation, sensible heat flux, and advection for heat. The model differs from Flasar and Goody by use of appropriate Viking-based physical constants and inclusion of the radiative effects of atmospheric dust. We specify the pressure gradient force or compute it from a simple slope model. The subsurface model accounts for conduction of heat and diffusion of H2O through a porous adsorbing medium in response to diurnal forcing. The model is initialized with depth-independent H2O concentrations (2 kg M(exp -3)) in the regolith, and a dry atmosphere. The model terminates when the atmospheric H2O column abundance stabilizes at 0.1 percent per sol.

  6. Shipboard measurements of the cloud-capped marine boundary layer during FIRE/ASTEX

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    Results are reported on measurements of the cloud-capped marine boundary layer during FIRE/ASTEX. A method was developed from the ASTEX dataset for measuring profiles of liquid water content, droplet size and concentration from cloud radar/microwave radiometer data in marine boundary layer clouds. Profiles were also determined from the first three moments of the Doppler spectrum measured in drizzle with the ETL cloud radar during ASTEX.

  7. Energy dissipating structures in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farge, Marie; Nguyen van Yen, Romain; Schneider, Kai

    2011-11-01

    We present numerical experiments of a dipole crashing into a wall, a generic event in two-dimensional incompressible flows with solid boundaries. The Reynolds number Re is varied from 985 to 7880, and no-slip boundary conditions are approximated by Navier boundary conditions with a slip length proportional to Re-1 . Energy dissipation is shown to first set up within a vorticity sheet of thickness proportional to Re-1 in the neighborhood of the wall, and to continue as this sheet rolls up into a spiral and detaches from the wall. The energy dissipation rate integrated over these regions appears to converge towards Rey -independent values, indicating the existence of energy dissipating structures that persist in the vanishing viscosity limit. Details can be found in Nguyen van yen, Farge and Schneider, PRL, 106, 184502 (2011).

  8. Observations of the magnetopause current layer: Cases with no boundary layer and tests of recent models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, Timothy E.

    1995-01-01

    Evidence for the probable existence of magnetospheric boundary layers was first presented by Hones, et al. (1972), based on VELA satellite plasma observations (no magnetic field measurements were obtained). This magnetotail boundary layer is now known to be the tailward extension of the high-latitude boundary layer or plasma mantle (first uniquely identified using HEOS 2 plasma and field observations by Rosenbauer et al., 1975) and the low-latitude boundary layer (first uniquely identified using IMP 6 plasma and field observations by Eastman et al., 1976). The magnetospheric boundary layer is the region of magnetosheath-like plasma located Earthward of, but generally contiguous with the magnetopause. This boundary layer is typically identified by comparing low-energy (less than 10 keV) ion spectra across the magnetopause. Low-energy electron measurements are also useful for identifying the boundary layer because the shocked solar wind or magnetosheath has a characteristic spectral signature for electrons as well. However, there are magnetopause crossings where low-energy electrons might suggest a depletion layer outside the magnetopause even though the traditional field-rotation signature indicates that this same region is a boundary layer Earthward of the current layer. Our analyses avoided crossings which exhibit such ambiguities. Pristine magnetopause crossings are magnetopause crossings for which the current layer is well defined and for which there is no adjoining magnetospheric boundary layer as defined above. Although most magnetopause models to date apply to such crossings, few comparisons between such theory and observations of pristine magnetopause crossings have been made because most crossings have an associated magnetospheric boundary layer which significantly affects the applicable boundary conditions for the magnetopause current layer. Furthermore, almost no observational studies of magnetopause microstructure have been done even though key

  9. Influences on the Height of the Stable Boundary Layer as seen in LES

    SciTech Connect

    Kosovic, B; Lundquist, J

    2004-06-15

    Climate models, numerical weather prediction (NWP) models, and atmospheric dispersion models often rely on parameterizations of planetary boundary layer height. In the case of a stable boundary layer, errors in boundary layer height estimation can result in gross errors in boundary-layer evolution and in prediction of turbulent mixing within the boundary layer.

  10. Enriched boundary layers for heterogeneous reaction in stirred microfluidic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirtland, Joseph; Stroock, Abraham

    2008-11-01

    The rate of transport of a scalar from a fluid stream to a reactive surface depends on both the character of the flow and the scalar concentration profile incident on the surface. Uniaxial flows tend to form thick regions of low concentration near the reactive surface, leading to decreased rates of scalar transport. For irreversible reactions, this effect can be mitigated through efficient mixing of the bulk. This ensures that the average concentration is incident on the reactive surface, and that concentration boundary layers are kept thin. Coupled reversible reactions, such as those occurring at the electrodes of an electrochemical cell, can complicate the analysis of such a system. In a stirred microfluidic electrochemical cell, depletion of the reactant of the forward reaction implies enrichment of the reactant of the reverse reaction. This enriched fluid can bypass the well mixed bulk, leading to increased scaling of the overall transport process with the Péclet number Pe, even in cases of efficient bulk mixing. We present numerical and experimental results in several such flows and discuss situations where this enrichment can be beneficial (amplification in sensors) or detrimental (quantitative concentration measurement). J. Kirtland, G. McGraw, A. Stroock. Physics of Fluids 18, 073602 (2006).

  11. Toward evaluation of heat fluxes in the convective boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Sorbjan, Z.

    1995-05-01

    This article demonstrates that vertical profiles of the heat flux in the convective boundary layer can be diagnosed through an integration over height of the time change rates of observed potential temperature profiles. Moreover, the basic characteristics of the convective boundary layer, such as the mixed-layer height z{sub t}, the depth of the interfacial (entrainment) layer, and the heat flux zero-crossing height h{sub 0} can be uniquely evaluated based on a time evolution of potential temperature profiles in the lower atmosphere. 12 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  12. The current structure of stratified tidal planetary boundary layer flow

    SciTech Connect

    Myrhaug, D.; Slaattelid, O.H.

    1995-12-31

    The paper presents the bottom shear stress and velocity profiles in stratified tidal planetary boundary layer flow by using similarity theory. For a given seabed roughness length, free stream current velocity components, frequency of tidal oscillation, Coriolis parameter and stratification parameter the maximum bottom shear stress is determined for flow conditions in the rough, smooth and transitional smooth-to-rough turbulent regime. Further, the direction of the bottom shear stress and the velocity profiles are given. Comparison is made with data from field measurements of time-independent as well as tidal planetary boundary layer flow for neutral conditions, and the agreement between the predictions and the data is generally good. Further, an example of application for stable stratification is given, and qualitatively the predictions show, as expected, that the bottom shear stress and the thickness of the boundary layer become smaller for stable than for neutral stratification. Other features of the tidal planetary boundary layer flow are also discussed.

  13. Viscous boundary layers in rotating fluids driven by periodic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W.; Cogley, A. C.

    1976-01-01

    The paper analyzes the boundary layers formed in a rotating fluid by an oscillating flow over an infinite half plate, with particular attention paid to the effects of unsteadiness, the critical latitude effect and the structure of the solution to the boundary layer equations at resonance. The Navier-Stokes boundary layer equations are obtained through an asymptotic expansion with the incorporation of the Rossby and Ekman numbers and are analyzed as the sum of a nonlinear steady solution and a linearized unsteady solution. The solution is predominantly composed of two inertial wave vector components, one circularly polarized to the left and the other circularly polarized to the right. The problem considered here has relevance in oceanography and meteorology, with special reference to the unsteady atmospheric boundary layer.

  14. Further studies of unsteady boundary layers with flow reversal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    One set of calculations was performed using the first order, time dependent turbulent boundary layer equations, and extended earlier work by Nash and Patel to a wider range of flows. Another set of calculations was performed for laminar flow using the time dependent Navier-Stokes equations. The results of the calculations confirm previous conclusions concerning the existence of a regime of unseparated flow, containing an embedded region of reversal, which is accessible to first order boundary layer theory. However, certain doubts are cast on the precise nature of the events which accompany the eventual breakdown of the theory due to singularity onset. The earlier view that the singularity appears as the final event in a sequence involving rapid thickening of the boundary layer and the formation of a localized region of steep gradients is called into question by the present results. It appears that singularity onset is not necessarily preceded by rapid boundary layer thickening, or even necessarily produces immediate thickening.

  15. Interacting turbulent boundary layer over a wavy wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polak, A.; Werle, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    The two dimensional supersonic flow of a thick turbulent boundary layer over a train of relatively small wave-like protuberances is considered. The flow conditions and the geometry are such that there exists a strong interaction between the viscous and inviscid flow. The problem cannot be solved without inclusion of interaction effects due to the occurrence of the separation singularity in classical boundary layer methods. The interacting boundary layer equations are solved numerically using a time-like relaxation method with turbulence effects represented by the inclusion of the eddy viscosity model. Results are presented for flow over a train of up to six waves for Mach numbers of 10 and 32 million/meter, and wall temperature rations (T sub w/T sub 0) of 0.4 and 0.8. Limited comparisons with independent experimental and analytical results are also given. Detailed results on the influence of small protuberances on surface heating by boundary layers are presented.

  16. Boundary-layer transition effects on airplane stability and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dam, C. P.; Holmes, B. J.

    1986-01-01

    Surface contamination of laminar-flow airfoils can significantly modify the location of transition from laminar-to-turbulent boundary-layer flow. The contamination can be the result of insect debris, environmental effects such as ice crystals and moisture due to mist or rain, surface damage, or other contamination adhering to the surface. Location and mode of transition have a dominant effect on the lift-and-drag characteristics of a lifting surface. The influences of laminar boundary-layer flow behavior on airplane stability and control are examined through theoretical results and experimental (wind-tunnel and free-flight) data. For certain airfoils with a relatively steep pressure recovery it is shown that loss of laminar flow near the leading edge can result in premature separation of the turbulent boundary layer and, consequently, in loss of lift and control effectiveness. Aerodynamic modifications which minimize boundary-layer transition effects on airplane stability and control are also discussed.

  17. Experimental measurements of unsteady turbulent boundary layers near separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Investigations conducted to document the behavior of turbulent boundary layers on flat surfaces that separate due to adverse pressure gradients are reported. Laser and hot wire anemometers measured turbulence and flow structure of a steady free stream separating turbulent boundary layer produced on the flow of a wind tunnel section. The effects of sinusoidal and unsteadiness of the free stream velocity on this separating turbulent boundary layer at a reduced frequency were determined. A friction gage and a thermal tuft were developed and used to measure the surface skin friction and the near wall fraction of time the flow moves downstream for several cases. Abstracts are provided of several articles which discuss the effects of the periodic free stream unsteadiness on the structure or separating turbulent boundary layers.

  18. Stability of the laminar boundary layer in a streamwise corner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakin, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    The stability of viscous, incompressible flow along a streamwise corner, often called the corner boundary layer problem is examined. The semi-infinite boundary value problem satisfied by small amplitude disturbances in the "bending boundary layer' region is obtained. The mean secondary flow induced by the corner exhibits a flow reversal in this region. Uniformly valid "first approximations' to solutions of the governing differential equations are derived. Uniformity at infinity is achieved by a suitable choice of the large parameter and use of an approximate Langer variable. Approximations to solutions of balanced type have a phase shift across the critical layer which is associated with instabilities in the case of two dimensional boundary layer profiles.

  19. A compressible boundary layer algorithm for use with SINDA '85

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakowski, Barbara; Darling, Douglas; Vandewall, Allan

    1992-01-01

    It is useful to interface a high-speed-flow solution and SINDA to analyze the thermal behavior of systems that include both conduction and high speed flows. When interfacing a high-speed-flow solution to SINDA, it may be necessary to include the viscous effects in the energy equations. Boundary layer effects of interest include heat transfer coefficients (including convection and viscous dissipation) and friction coefficients. To meet this need, a fast, uncoupled, compressible, two-dimensional, boundary layer algorithm was developed that can model flows with and without separation. This algorithm was used as a subroutine with SINDA. Given the core flow properties and the wall heat flux from SINDA, the boundary layer algorithm returns a wall temperature to SINDA and boundary layer algorithm are iterated until they predict the same wall temperature.

  20. The structure and evolution of boundary layers in stratified convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, Evan H.; Brown, Benjamin; Brandenburg, Axel; Rast, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Solar convection is highly stratified, and the density in the Sun increases by many orders of magnitude from the photosphere to the base of the convection zone. The photosphere is an important boundary layer, and interactions between the surface convection and deep convection may lie at the root of the solar convection conundrum, where observed large-scale velocities are much lower than predicted by full numerical simulations. Here, we study the structure and time evolution of boundary layers in numerical stratified convection. We study fully compressible convection within plane-parallel layers using the Dedalus pseudospectral framework. Within the context of polytropic stratification, we study flows from low (1e-3) to moderately high (0.1) Mach number, and at moderate to high Rayleigh number to study both laminar and turbulent convective transport. We aim to characterize the thickness and time variation of velocity and thermal (entropy) boundary layers at the top and bottom boundaries of the domain.

  1. Tropical boundary layer equilibrium in the last ice age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, Alan K.; Ridgway, W.

    1992-01-01

    A radiative-convective boundary layer model is used to assess the effect of changing sea surface temperature, pressure, wind speed, and the energy export from the tropics on the boundary layer equilibrium equivalent potential temperature. It remains difficult to reconcile the observations that during the last glacial maximum (18,000 yr BP) the snowline on the tropical mountains fell 950 m, while the tropical sea surface temperatures fell only 1-2 K.

  2. Wave phenomena in a high Reynolds number compressible boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayliss, A.; Maestrello, L.; Parikh, P.; Turkel, E.

    1985-01-01

    Growth of unstable disturbances in a high Reynolds number compressible boundary layer is numerically simulated. Localized periodic surface heating and cooling as a means of active control of these disturbances is studied. It is shown that compressibility in itself stabilizes the flow but at a lower Mach number, significant nonlinear distortions are produced. Phase cancellation is shown to be an effective mechanism for active boundary layer control.

  3. Classification of structures in the stable boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belusic, Danijel

    2015-04-01

    Ubiquitous but generally unknown flow structures populate the stable boundary layer at scales larger than turbulence. They introduce nonstationarity, affect the generation of turbulence and induce fluxes. Classification of the structures into clusters based on a similarity measure could reduce their apparent complexity and lead to better understanding of their characteristics and mechanisms. Here we explore different approaches to detect and classify structures, the usefulness of those approaches, and their potential to provide better understanding of the stable boundary layer.

  4. Approximation theory for boundary layer suction through individual slits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walz, A.

    1979-01-01

    The basic concepts of influencing boundary layers are summarized, especially the prevention of flow detachment and the reduction of frictional resistance. A mathematical analysis of suction through a slit is presented with two parameters, for thickness and for shape of the boundary layer, being introduced to specify the flow's velocity profile behind the slit. An approximation of the shape parameter produces a useful formula, which can be used to determine the most favorable position of the slit. An aerodynamic example is given.

  5. MPLNET V3 Cloud and Planetary Boundary Layer Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Jasper R.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Campbell, James R.; Haftings, Phillip C.

    2016-06-01

    The NASA Micropulse Lidar Network Version 3 algorithms for planetary boundary layer and cloud detection are described and differences relative to the previous Version 2 algorithms are highlighted. A year of data from the Goddard Space Flight Center site in Greenbelt, MD consisting of diurnal and seasonal trends is used to demonstrate the results. Both the planetary boundary layer and cloud algorithms show significant improvement of the previous version.

  6. Wall pressure spectra calculations for equilibrium boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panton, R. L.; Linebarger, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    Calculation of the flow direction wave-number spectrum of pressure fluctuations on the wall under a turbulent boundary layer. Particular attention is paid to finding the spectral density of the wall pressure fluctuations as a function of the streamwise wave number. For this purpose a five-dimensional integration is employed in which the equilibrium boundary layers are assumed to have velocity profiles given by the law of the wall plus Cole's wake function.

  7. Large eddy simulation of boundary layer flow under cnoidal waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yin-Jun; Chen, Jiang-Bo; Zhou, Ji-Fu; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Water waves in coastal areas are generally nonlinear, exhibiting asymmetric velocity profiles with different amplitudes of crest and trough. The behaviors of the boundary layer under asymmetric waves are of great significance for sediment transport in natural circumstances. While previous studies have mainly focused on linear or symmetric waves, asymmetric wave-induced flows remain unclear, particularly in the flow regime with high Reynolds numbers. Taking cnoidal wave as a typical example of asymmetric waves, we propose to use an infinite immersed plate oscillating cnoidally in its own plane in quiescent water to simulate asymmetric wave boundary layer. A large eddy simulation approach with Smagorinsky subgrid model is adopted to investigate the flow characteristics of the boundary layer. It is verified that the model well reproduces experimental and theoretical results. Then a series of numerical experiments are carried out to study the boundary layer beneath cnoidal waves from laminar to fully developed turbulent regimes at high Reynolds numbers, larger than ever studied before. Results of velocity profile, wall shear stress, friction coefficient, phase lead between velocity and wall shear stress, and the boundary layer thickness are obtained. The dependencies of these boundary layer properties on the asymmetric degree and Reynolds number are discussed in detail.

  8. Turbulent Boundary Layer in High Rayleigh Number Convection in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    du Puits, Ronald; Li, Ling; Resagk, Christian; Thess, André; Willert, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Flow visualizations and particle image velocimetry measurements in the boundary layer of a Rayleigh-Bénard experiment are presented for the Rayleigh number Ra =1.4×1010. Our visualizations indicate that the appearance of the flow structures is similar to ordinary (isothermal) turbulent boundary layers. Our particle image velocimetry measurements show that vorticity with both positive and negative sign is generated and that the smallest flow structures are 1 order of magnitude smaller than the boundary layer thickness. Additional local measurements using laser Doppler velocimetry yield turbulence intensities up to I=0.4 as in turbulent atmospheric boundary layers. From our observations, we conclude that the convective boundary layer becomes turbulent locally and temporarily although its Reynolds number Re ≈200 is considerably smaller than the value 420 underlying existing phenomenological theories. We think that, in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection, the transition of the boundary layer towards turbulence depends on subtle details of the flow field and is therefore not universal.

  9. Orbiter Boundary Layer Transition Stability Modeling at Flight Entry Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartkowicz, Matt; Johnson, Heath; Candler, Graham; Campbell, Charles H.

    2009-01-01

    State of the art boundary layer stability modeling capabilities are increasingly seeing application to entry flight vehicles. With the advent of user friendly and robust implementations of two-dimensional chemical nonequilibrium stability modeling with the STABL/PSE-CHEM software, the need for flight data to calibrate such analyses capabilities becomes more critical. Recent efforts to perform entry flight testing with the Orbiter geometry related to entry aerothermodynamics and boundary layer transition is allowing for a heightened focus on the Orbiter configuration. A significant advancement in the state of the art can likely be achieved by establishing a basis of understanding for the occurrence of boundary layer transition on the Orbiter due to discrete protruding gap fillers and the nominal distributed roughness of the actual thermal protection system. Recent success in demonstrating centerline two-dimensional stability modeling on the centerline of the Orbiter at flight entry conditions provides a starting point for additional investigations. The more detailed paper will include smooth Orbiter configuration boundary layer stability results for several typical orbiter entry conditions. In addition, the numerical modeling approach for establishing the mean laminar flow will be reviewed and the method for determining boundary layer disturbance growth will be overviewed. In addition, if actual Orbiter TPS surface data obtained via digital surface scans become available, it may be possible to investigate the effects of an as-flown flight configuration on boundary layer transition compared to a smooth CAD reference.

  10. Structure and Growth of the Marine Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccumber, M.

    1984-01-01

    LANDSAT visible imagery and a one-dimensional Lagrangian boundary layer model were used to hypothesize the nature and the development of the marine boundary layer during a winter episode of strong seaward cold air advection. Over-water heating and moistening of the cold, dry continental air is estimable from linear relations involving horizontal gradients of the near-surface air temperature and humidity. A line of enhanced convection paralleling the Atlantic U.S. coast from south of New York Bay to the vicinity of Virginia Beach, VA was attributed to stronger convergence at low levels. This feature was characterized as a mesoscale front. With the assistance of a three-dimensional mesoscale boundary layer model, initialized with data obtained from the MASEX, the marine boundary layer can be mapped over the entire Atlantic coastal domain and the evolution of the boundary layer can be studied as a function of different characteristics of important surface level forcings. The effects on boundary layer growth due to the magnitude and pattern of sea surface temperature, to the shape of the coastline, and to atmospheric conditions, such as the orientation of the prevailing wind are examined.